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Sample records for calcium additions

  1. Calcium addition in straw gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risnes, H.; Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk;

    2003-01-01

    The present work focuses on the influence of calcium addition in gasification. The inorganic¿organic element interaction as well as the detailed inorganic¿inorganic elements interaction has been studied. The effect of calcium addition as calcium sugar/molasses solutions to straw significantly...... affected the ash chemistry and the ash sintering tendency but much less the char reactivity. Thermo balance test are made and high-temperature X-ray diffraction measurements are performed, the experimental results indicate that with calcium addition major inorganic¿inorganic reactions take place very late...... calcium binds silicon primarily as calcium silicates and less as potassium calcium silicates....

  2. Calcium addition in straw gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risnes, H.; Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk; Moilanen, A.; Norby, P.; Papadakis, K.; Posselt, D.; Sørensen, L. H.

    2003-01-01

    The present work focuses on the influence of calcium addition in gasification. The inorganic¿organic element interaction as well as the detailed inorganic¿inorganic elements interaction has been studied. The effect of calcium addition as calcium sugar/molasses solutions to straw significantly...... affected the ash chemistry and the ash sintering tendency but much less the char reactivity. Thermo balance test are made and high-temperature X-ray diffraction measurements are performed, the experimental results indicate that with calcium addition major inorganic¿inorganic reactions take place very late...

  3. Calcium phosphate cements properties with polymers addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPC) have attracted great interest to use in orthopedics and dentistry as replacements for damaged parts of the skeletal system, showing good biocompatibility and osseointegration, allowing its use as bone graft. Several studies have shown that the addition of polymer additives have a strong influence on the cement properties. The low mechanical strength is the main obstacle to greater use of CPC as an implant material. The objective of this study was to evaluate properties of a cement based on α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP), added polymers. PVA (10%, 8%, 6%), sodium alginate (2%) and polyacrylate ammonia (3%), all in weight, were added to the synthesized α-TCP powder. The samples were molded and evaluated for density, porosity in vitro test (Simulated Body Fluid), crystalline phases and mechanical strength. The results show increased the mechanical properties of the cement when added these polymers

  4. INFLUENCE OF POLYMERIC ADDITIVES ON CRYSTALLIZATION OF CALCIUM SULPHATE DIHYDRATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ustinova Yulia Valer’evna

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Currently, functional additives are widely spread in the production of inorganic dry mixtures. However, their impact on the microstructure of products, generated in the process of hardening of inorganic binders, is understudied. In this context, the goal of the work is the study of calcium sulfate dihydrate (CaSO •2H O crystallization. Super plasticizer based on sulfonated melamine-formaldehyde resin, methylcellulose and vinyl acetate, ethylene and vinyl chloride copolymer powder were selected for studies. First, pure calcium sulfate dihydrate crystals were synthesized. Then, synthesized calcium sulfate dihydrate crystals were exposed to the X-ray analysis to determine the nature of influence of polymer additives on the shape and dimensions of crystals. Possible combinations of simple forms of CaSO •2H O were identified by the X-ray analysis and the special software. Electronic microscopy analysis was performed to validate models of calcium sulfate dihydrate crystals. All plasticizers influence the crystallization of calcium sulfate dihydrate. The influence of additives on the shape and dimensions of crystals of calcium sulfate dihydrate can be explained by the fact that molecules of sulfonated melamine-formaldehyde resins, methylcellulose, and copolymers of vinyl acetate, ethylene and vinyl chloride are absorbed by crystal faces. It is proven that the method of X-ray analysis can be used to predict the shape and habitus of crystals.

  5. Hydration of Portland cement with additions of calcium sulfoaluminates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Saout, Gwenn, E-mail: gwenn.le-saout@mines-ales.fr [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Lothenbach, Barbara [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland); Hori, Akihiro [DENKA Chemicals GmbH, Wehrhahn-Center, Cantadorstr. 3, D-40211 Duesseldorf (Germany); Higuchi, Takayuki [Denki Kagaku Kogyo Kabushiki Kaisha (DENKA), Omi, Itoigawa, Niigata, 949-0393 (Japan); Winnefeld, Frank [Empa, Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology, Concrete and Construction Chemistry Laboratory, Ueberlandstrasse 129, CH-8600 Duebendorf (Switzerland)

    2013-01-15

    The effect of mineral additions based on calcium aluminates on the hydration mechanism of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) was investigated using isothermal calorimetry, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance and pore solution analysis. Results show that the addition of a calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSA) to the OPC does not affect the hydration mechanism of alite but controls the aluminate dissolution. In the second blend investigated, a rapid setting cement, the amorphous calcium aluminate reacts very fast to ettringite. The release of aluminum ions strongly retards the hydration of alite but the C-S-H has a similar composition as in OPC with no additional Al to Si substitution. As in CSA-OPC, the aluminate hydration is controlled by the availability of sulfates. The coupling of thermodynamic modeling with the kinetic equations predicts the amount of hydrates and pore solution compositions as a function of time and validates the model in these systems.

  6. Hydration of Portland cement with additions of calcium sulfoaluminates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of mineral additions based on calcium aluminates on the hydration mechanism of ordinary Portland cement (OPC) was investigated using isothermal calorimetry, thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance and pore solution analysis. Results show that the addition of a calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSA) to the OPC does not affect the hydration mechanism of alite but controls the aluminate dissolution. In the second blend investigated, a rapid setting cement, the amorphous calcium aluminate reacts very fast to ettringite. The release of aluminum ions strongly retards the hydration of alite but the C–S–H has a similar composition as in OPC with no additional Al to Si substitution. As in CSA–OPC, the aluminate hydration is controlled by the availability of sulfates. The coupling of thermodynamic modeling with the kinetic equations predicts the amount of hydrates and pore solution compositions as a function of time and validates the model in these systems.

  7. Investigating calcium polyphosphate addition to a conventional calcium phosphate cement for bone-interfacing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krausher, Jennifer Lynn

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) are of great interest in bone regeneration applications because of their biocompatibility and osteoconductivity, and as delivery vehicles for therapeutics; however, delivery applications have been limited by adverse interactions between therapeutics and the cement setting reaction. Amorphous calcium polyphosphate (CPP) yields a biodegradable material with a demonstrated drug delivery capacity following appropriate processing. The incorporation of drug-loaded CPP into a CPC is under consideration as a method of minimizing adverse interactions and extending drug release. This thesis represents the first investigation into the effects of CPP addition on the properties, setting and antibiotic release profile of a conventional apatitic calcium phosphate cement. As-made, gelled and vancomycin-loaded CPP particulate were added to the powder component of a conventional dicalcium phosphate/tetracalcium phosphate CPC. The setting behaviour, set properties and microstructure of the resulting CPP-CPCs were evaluated with setting time testing (Gilmore needle method), pH testing, mechanical testing, SEM imaging, XRD and FTIR analysis. In vitro degradation and elution behaviour were evaluated by monitoring calcium release (atomic absorbance spectroscopy), mechanical strength and vancomycin release (UV-visual spectrophotometry). CPP addition was found to increase the setting time, reduce the mechanical strength and inhibit the conversion of the CPC starting powders to the set apatitic phase. The most likely mechanism for the observed effect of CPP addition was the adsorption of polyphosphate chains on the particle surfaces, which would inhibit the dissolution of the starting powders and the conversion of apatite precursor phases to apatite, leading to reduced mechanical properties. The detrimental effects of CPP were reduced by limiting the CPP fraction to less than a few weight per cent and increasing the size of the CPP particulate. CPP

  8. Effect of Calcium Additive on the Crystallization of Struvite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perwitasari Dyah Suci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Crystallization of struvite [MgNH4PO4.6H2O] may lead to the deposition of scale which may create significant problems in the process pipes, pumps and other industrial equipment. However, struvite precipitation can be benefited for phosphate recovery for use of fertilizer. The aim at the present work was to investigate calcium additive on struvite precipitation. The experiment was carried out in a batch mode using a 1-liter Pyrex glass vessel mechanically agitated for 200 rpm. The scale-forming solution was prepared for mixing solutions to MgCl2 and NH4H2PO4 with Mg+2 , NH4+ and PO4-3 in a molar ratio of 1: 1:1. The crystallization temperature of 30 and 40 °C was selected. Ca was added into the crystallizing solution to chloride dihydrate 0.4M (CaCl2•2H2O. Then each solution was pH adjusted to 9 by addition of KOH. The crystals obtained were characterized using SEM for morphology, EDS for elemental analysis as well as XRPD Rietveld analysis for crystaline phases. The induction periods varied from 10 to 90 min, which means that the struvite crystals began forming 10 to 90 min after mixing of the solution. It was observed that the Ca additive may inhibit the struvite crystallization. SEM analysis revealed that the struvite crystals obtained were predominantly of irregular prismatic morphology. Furthermore, the EDS pattern revealed that the elemental composition of the crystals consisted of Ca, Cl, S Mg, N, and P, providing that many crystalline phase found in the crystals such as Gypsum, CaCl2, struvite, struvite-(K and sylvite. It was observed that the Ca additive appeared to inhibit the struvite crystallization.

  9. Effects of calcium hydroxide addition on the physical and chemical properties of a calcium silicate-based sealer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Carlos KUGA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently, various calcium silicate-based sealers have been introduced for use in root canal filling. The MTA Fillapex is one of these sealers, but some of its physicochemical properties are not in accordance with the ISO requirements. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the flowability, pH level and calcium release of pure MTA Fillapex (MTAF or containing 5% (MTAF5 or 10% (MTAF10 calcium hydroxide (CH, in weight, in comparison with AH Plus sealer. Material and Methods: The flowability test was performed according to the ISO 6876:2001 requirements. For the pH level and calcium ion release analyses, the sealers were placed individually (n=10 in plastic tubes and immersed in deionized water. After 24 hours, 7 and 14 days, the water in which each specimen had been immersed was evaluated to determine the pH level changes and calcium released. Flowability, pH level and calcium release data were analyzed statistically by the ANOVA test (α=5%. Results: In relation to flowability: MTAF>AH Plus>MTAF5>MTAF10. In relation to the pH level, for 24 h: MTAF5=MTAF10=MTAF>AH Plus; for 7 and 14 days: MTAF5=MTAF10>MTAF>AH Plus. For the calcium release, for all periods: MTAF>MTAF5=MTAF10>AH Plus. Conclusions: The addition of 5% CH to the MTA Fillapex (in weight is an alternative to reduce the high flowability presented by the sealer, without interfering in its alkalization potential.

  10. Polyelectrolyte addition effect on the properties of setting hydraulic cements based on calcium phosphate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work the effects of the addition of some poly electrolytes (sodium alginate and poly acrylic acid) on the solubility, crystalline phases, pH and mechanical strength under compression of three calcium phosphate cements were studied. (author)

  11. Effect of extracellular calcium on the additive effect of theophylline on the cardiac response to catecholamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamkuwar Prashant

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available At different extracellular calcium concentrations, the positive inotropic effect of isoproterenol and isoproterenol in combination with theophylline, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor have been evaluated in the isolated frog heart and the isolated guinea pig left atria to investigate whether extracellular calcium produces any effect on the additive effect of the theophylline on the cardiac response to catecholamine. Cumulative dose response study of isoproterenol and isoproterenol in presence of theophylline at different extracellular calcium concentration was performed. The study revealed an increase in additive effect of theophylline on the cardiac response to catecholamine with increase in extracellular calcium concentration, but increase in extracellular calcium concentration decreased the myocardial responsiveness to additive effect of theophylline and isoproterenol combination. The mechanism of positive inotropic effect of isoproterenol and in combination with theophylline involves increase in intracellular cAMP by different pathways and extracellular calcium produces positive inotropic effect by initiating the interaction between the contractile proteins actin and myosin. The study revealed that an increase in the concentration of extracellular calcium increased the additive effect of theophylline and isoproterenol combination, but a decrease in the myocardial responsiveness was observed.

  12. An investigation on physical properties of polyethylene composite with bentonite, kaolin and calcium carbonate additives

    OpenAIRE

    Karabeyoğlu, Sencer S.; , Nurşen Öntürk

    2014-01-01

    Bentonite, Kaolin, Calcium carbonate easily obtained in nature as mineral products are widely used in plastics industry for additive materials. In this study, Bentonite, Kaolin, and Calcium carbonate minerals were compounded with polyethylene matrix used in specific rates. Prepared compounds melted in sheet metal molds and cooled down under appropriate conditions. Thus, production of composite material was achieved. Hardness, water absorption, and physical properties of manufactured composite...

  13. Alleviation of Al Toxicity in Barley by Addition of Calcium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Tian-rong; CHEN Ying; ZHANG Yan-hua; JIN Ye-fei

    2006-01-01

    The potential mechanism by which Ca alleviates Al toxicity was investigated in barley seedlings. It was found that 100 μM Al-alone treatment inhibited barley plant growth and thereby reduced shoot height and root length, and dry weights of root, shoot and leaf; promoted Al accumulation but inhibited Ca absorption in plant tissues; and induced an increase in the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POD) and in the level of lipid peroxidation (MDA content) in leaves. Except for the increase in Ca concentration in plant tissues, treatment with 0.5 mM Ca in the absence of Al had less effect on the above-mentioned parameters, compared with the control. Addition of Ca efficiently reduced Al toxicity, which is reflected by the promotion of plant growth, reduction in Al concentration and MDA content,increase in Ca concentration and in SOD, POD, and CAT activities compared with the Al-alone-treatment; with increase in Ca level (3.0 mM), the ameliorative effect became more dominant. This indicated that the alleviation of aluminum toxicity in barley seedlings with Ca supplementation could be associated with less absorption of Al and the enhancement of the protective ability of the cell because of increased activity of the antioxidative enzyme.

  14. Effect of calcium chloride addition on ice cream structure and quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, F F; Resende, J V; Abreu, L R; Goff, H D

    2008-06-01

    The influence of calcium fortification by the addition of calcium chloride on quality parameters of ice cream based on physical properties was investigated, as was the effect of kappa-carrageenan at modifying the effects of this calcium fortification. Four ice cream mixes of conventional composition, with added kappa-carrageenan (0 or 0.025%) and added calcium chloride (0 or 4.4 g L(-1) = 40 mM of added Ca(2+)), were prepared. Modulated temperature-differential scanning calorimetry was used to investigate the effect of calcium chloride on the nucleation temperature, enthalpy of melting, and freezing point depression. The protein composition of 15.4% (wt/wt) reconstituted skim milk powder solutions with or without 4.4 g L(-1) added CaCl(2) and in the supernatant after ultracentrifugation was determined. Fat particle size distributions in ice cream were characterized by light scattering. Ice crystal sizes before and after temperature cycling were determined by cold-stage light microscopy. The results demonstrated that the addition of calcium chloride led to a substantial increase in ice crystal sizes and in fat partial coalescence, which were exacerbated by the addition of kappa-carrageenan. These results can be explained by the interaction between Ca(2+) ions and casein micelles, rather than any effects on freezing point depression. The calcium ions led to a more compact micelle, less serum beta-casein, and high fat destabilization, all of which would be expected to reduce macromolecular structure and volume occupancy in the unfrozen phase, which led to increased rates of ice recrystallization. PMID:18487638

  15. Evaluation of calcium superphosphate as an additive to reduce gas emissions from rabbit manure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Estellés Barber

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Techniques to reduce the emission of air pollutants from livestock production are demanded. In this study, the effect of an additive (calcium superphosphate on gas emissions from rabbit manure was investigated and compared with a control where no additive was used. Calcium superphosphate was applied at a rate of 100 g/m2 per week in a manure pit during 2 cycles of growing rabbits. Manure samples were collected weekly and then chemically and microbiologically analysed. Gas emissions (ammonia, carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide were determined in 2 open flux chambers. No differences were observed in gas emissions between the treated and control samples except for ammonia emissions, which were reduced by 33% when the additive was applied (P<0.05. No statistical differences were obtained in the microbial content between control and treatment, as results showed a high variability. Dry matter content and pH were the most influential parameters on the emission of gases from manure. According to these results, the application of calcium superphosphate may be considered as an effective technique to reduce ammonia emission from rabbit manure. The additive may also be potentially effective in other species, but additional research is necessary to investigate its performance.

  16. Effect of Calcium Oxide Additive on the Performance of Iron Oxide Sorbent for High-Temperature Coal Gas Desulfurization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiling Fan; Kechang Xie; Ju Shangguan; Fang Shen; Chunhu Li

    2007-01-01

    The effect of calcium oxide additive in iron oxide sorbent for hot gas desulfurization was investigated by XRD and TPR techniques. XRD characterization showed that CaO was highly dispersed after the calcination of sorbents. Calcium sulfate formed in the desulfurization was decomposed and regenerated to CaO by reacting with CO before the next sulfidation process. Calcium participated in every sulfidation/regeneration cycle and contributed to the enhancement of sulfur capacity. The TPR results showed that the reduction temperature of the sorbent increased with the increase of the content of calcium. Calcium played a role of retarding reduction. Therefore, the addition of calcium oxide additive will benefit the utilization of iron oxide sorbent in strongly reducing atmospheres.

  17. EFFECT OF CALCIUM ADDITION ON THE DEFLUORIDATION CAPACITY OF BONE CHAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, P.; Dahi, Elian

    1997-01-01

    Dosage of small amounts of calcium chloride to fluoride water prior to contact with bone char which has already been saturated with fluoride is shown to provide an additional fluoride removal capacity. The additionally obtained removal capacity increases with slower filtration velocities and...... capable of reducing the fluoride concentration form 10 to about 0.5 mgF/L. The additionally saturated column is shown to be regenerated by simple adjustment of the pH of the water to 11 and allowing to flow for a few bed volumes. The useful regeneration capacity, where the fluoride concentration is...

  18. Effects of temperature and sodium carboxylate additives on mineralization of calcium oxalate in silica gel systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OUYANG; Jianming; DENG; Suiping; LI; Xiangping; TAN; Yanh

    2004-01-01

    [1]Ouyang, J. M., Yao, X. Q., Su, Z. X. et al., Simulation of calcium oxalate stone in Vitro, Science in China, Ser. B, 2003, 46(3):234-242.[2]Xu, S. H., Chen, J. Q., Zhou, H., Nepidemiological study of renal calculus in Shenshen region, Chin. J. Urol. (in Chinese), 1999,20(11): 655-657.[3]Bretherton, T., Rodgers, A., Crystallization of calcium oxalate in minimally diluted urine, J. Crystal Growth, 1998, 192: 448-455.[4]Grover, P. K., Ryall, R. L., Effect of seed crystals of uric acid and monosodium urate on the crystallization of CaOxa in undiluted human urine in vitro, Clin. Sci., 1997, 92: 205-213.[5]Laube, N., Mohr, B., Hesse, A., Laser-probe-based investigation of the evolution of particle size distributions of calcium oxalate particles formed in artificial urines, J. Crystal Growth, 2001, 233:367-374.[6]Tunik, L., Fueredi-Milhofer, H., Garti, N., Adsorption of sodium diisooctyl sulfosuccinate onto calcium oxalate crystals, Langmuir,1998, 14: 3351-3355.[7]Cody, A. M., Cody, R. D., Calcium oxalate trihydrate phase control by structurally-specific carboxylic acids, J. Cryst. Growth,1994, 135: 234-245.[8]Ouyang, J. M., Duan, L., Tieke, B., Effects of carboxylic acids on the crystal growth of calcium oxalate nanoparticles in lecithin-water liposome systems, Langmuir, 2003, 19: 8980-8985.[9]Guo, S., Ward, M. D., Wesson, J. A., Direct visualization of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystallization and dissolution with atomic force microscopy and the role of polymeric additives,Langmuir, 2002, 18:4284-4291.[10]Yasui, T., Sato, M., Fujita, K., Effects of citrate on renal stone formation and osteopontin expression in a rat urolithiasis model,Urol. Res., 2001,29: 50-56.[11]Ouyang, J. M., Deng, S. P., Controlled and uncontrolled crystallization of calcium oxalate monohydrate in the presence of citric acid, Dalton Transactions, 2003, (14): 2846-2851.[12]Khan, S. R., Whalen, P. O., Glenton, P. A., Heterogeneous nucleation of

  19. Effects of calcium hydroxide addition on the physical and chemical properties of a calcium silicate-based sealer

    OpenAIRE

    KUGA, Milton Carlos; DUARTE Marco Antonio Hungaro; SANT'ANNA-JÚNIOR, Arnaldo; KEINE, Kátia Cristina; FARIA, Gisele; Andrea Abi Rached DANTAS; GUIOTTI, Flávia Angélica

    2014-01-01

    Recently, various calcium silicate-based sealers have been introduced for use in root canal filling. The MTA Fillapex is one of these sealers, but some of its physicochemical properties are not in accordance with the ISO requirements. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the flowability, pH level and calcium release of pure MTA Fillapex (MTAF) or containing 5% (MTAF5) or 10% (MTAF10) calcium hydroxide (CH), in weight, in comparison with AH Plus sealer. Material and Methods: The...

  20. The influence calcium hydroxide addition on the immobilization of resin waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigation of the influence calcium hydroxide addition on the immobilization of resin wastes which was coming from Reactor Kartini used cement portland type I mark Nusantara was done. The experiment was conducted by mixing cement water, resin wastes and Ca(OH)2 with in container, followed by stirring the mixture up to homogeneous phase of paste was obtained. The homogeneous phase of paste was then put into polyethylene tube with the size of 3 cm in diameter and 4 cm in height and was cured for 28 days, so that the monolith block was formed. The monolith block was then heated at the ambient temperature, 200oC, 400oC used Furnace and was continued by compressively tested and leach tested. The variation resin wastes that experimented were 0%, 3%, 6%, 9%, 12%, 15%, 18%, 21% and 24% from total weight. The ratio water to cements that experimented were 0.28; 0.35; 0.4. The number of Ca(OH)2 that added were 0% and 0.5% from total weight. The result showed that sample without additives Ca(OH)2 had compressive strength higher than sample with additive Ca(OH)2 but the sample with additives easier cracking than sample without additives on heat tested and leach tested. Additives Ca(OH)2 0.5% with ratio water to cements 0.4 have good result to immobilization resin wastes up to 24%. (author)

  1. Autotrophic nitrogen removal from black water: calcium addition as a requirement for settleability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Graaff, M S; Temmink, H; Zeeman, G; van Loosdrecht, M C M; Buisman, C J N

    2011-01-01

    Black (toilet) water contains half of the organic load in the domestic wastewater, as well as the major fraction of the nutrients nitrogen and phosphorus. When collected with vacuum toilets, the black water is 25 times more concentrated than the total domestic wastewater stream, i.e. including grey water produced by laundry, showers etc. A two-stage nitritation-anammox process was successfully employed and removed 85%-89% of total nitrogen in anaerobically treated black water. The (free) calcium concentration in black water was too low (42 mg/L) to obtain sufficient granulation of anammox biomass. The granulation and retention of the biomass was improved considerably by the addition of 39 mg/L of extra calcium. This resulted in a volumetric nitrogen removal rate of 0.5 gN/L/d, irrespective of the two temperatures of 35 °C and 25 °C at which the anammox reactors were operated. Nitrous oxide, a very strong global warming gas, was produced in situations of an incomplete anammox conversion accompanied by elevated levels of nitrite. PMID:20822793

  2. Effects of Monocarboxylic Acid Addition on Crystallization of Calcium Phosphate in a Hydrogel Matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In biomineralization, it is thought that water-soluble organic substances control crystal growth of minerals in hard tissues. The roles of organic substances are not well understood, because the biomineralization process is established by complicated parameters. Crystal growth in hydrogel matrixes can be regarded as simplified model system of biomineralization. In the present study, we investigated the effects of propionic acid (Pro) on crystalline phases and crystal morphologies of calcium phosphate formed in polymeric hydrogel matrixes as the model system of biomineralization. Crystalline phase of the precipitates was octacalcium phosphate (OCP) with spherical shape regardless of Pro concentrations. The fibrous crystals formed under the condition without addition of Pro. The crystal morphologies composing spherical crystals were changed from fibrous to plate-like shape with increasing Pro concentrations. Generally, OCP crystal has plate-like shape exposing (100) face, which calcium ions exist on. Therefore, crystal growth rate of [100] direction of OCP was decreased by Pro adsorbed on (100) face. As a result, crystal morphology composing spherulite became plate-like shape with increasing Pro concentrations.

  3. Hydrothermal Formation Of Hemi-hydrate Calcium Sulfate Whiskers In The Presence Of Additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of addictives on the hydrothermal formation of hemi-hydrate calcium sulfate (CaSO4·0.5H2O) whiskers were discussed in this paper, using CaCl2 and Na2SO4 as the reactants. The presence of NaCl, CaCl2 or Na2SO4 increased the concentrations of Ca2+ and SO42-, leading to the formation of CaSO4·0.5H2O whiskers with aspect ratio lower than 50. The one dimensional growth of CaSO4·0.5H2O whiskers was enhanced in water with no additives owing to the low super-saturation, leading to the formation of uniform whiskers with a length of 200-2000 μm and an aspect ratio higher than 100.

  4. Biomimetic calcium phosphate coating of additively manufactured porous CoCr implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Carl; Xia, Wei; Engqvist, Håkan; Snis, Anders; Lausmaa, Jukka; Palmquist, Anders

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this work was to study the feasibility to use a biomimetic method to prepare biomimetic hydroxyapatite (HA) coatings on CoCr substrates with short soaking times and to characterize the properties of such coatings. A second objective was to investigate if the coatings could be applied to porous CoCr implants manufactured by electron beam melting (EBM). The coating was prepared by immersing the pretreated CoCr substrates and EBM implants into the phosphate-buffered solution with Ca2+ in sealed plastic bottles, kept at 60 °C for 3 days. The formed coating was partially crystalline, slightly calcium deficient and composed of plate-like crystallites forming roundish flowers in the size range of 300-500 nm. Cross-section imaging showed a thickness of 300-500 nm. In addition, dissolution tests in Tris-HCl up to 28 days showed that a substantial amount of the coating had dissolved, however, undergoing only minor morphological changes. A uniform coating was formed within the porous network of the additive manufactured implants having similar thickness and morphology as for the flat samples. In conclusion, the present coating procedure allows coatings to be formed on CoCr and could be used for complex shaped, porous implants made by additive manufacturing.

  5. Calcium Addition Affects Germination and Early Seedling Growth of Sweet Sorghum under Saline Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] This study aimed to determine the interactive effects of supple- mental Ca amendment and salinity on germination of sweet sorghum seeds in saline solution culture medium, and investigate the effects of different combinations of Na/Ca ratio in saline soils on the early growth of sweet sorghum plants. [Method] A germi- nation test and a greenhouse pot experiment were conducted to assess the interac- tive effects of calcium addition to culture medium on the germination and seedling growth of sweet sorghum (Sorghum saccharatum Moench) in saline soils with a range of NaYCa ratios. In the germination test, seeds were treated with different combinations of five calcium levels [0, 5, 10, 15, and 20 mmol/L Ca(NO3)2] and five salinity levels (0, 50, 100, 150, and 200 mmol/L NaCI). In the greenhouse experi- ment, seeds were sown in potting soils containing 3 salinity levels (2.3, 4.7 and 7.0 dS/m) and three Na:Ca ratios (10:0, 10:1, and 5:1). [Result] In the germination test, Ca addition at 5 mmol/L promoted germination by 5.5%, 9.9%, and 17.0% at the 3.4, 6.7 and 10.1 dS/m salinity levels. The higher Ca level (10 mmol/L) also in- creased germination by 9.1% and 7.8% at the 3.4 and 6.7 dS/m salinity levels. Then even higher Ca addition at 15 and 20 mmol/L appeared to promote germina- tion when culture media had high salinity (10.1 and 13.4 dS/m). In the greenhouse pot experiment, saline soil amended with supplemental Ca at the 2.3 and 4.7 dS/m salinity levels significantly promoted early seedling growth, with an increase of 6.8% to 28.2% in plant height and 14.3% to 67.9% in whole plant weight. From 28 to 42 d after seeding, the relative growth of seedling was increased by Ca addition, with a reduction of 49.5% to 66.0% in plant height and 4.8% to 61.9% in whole plant weight. From 42 to 56 d after seeding, however, the relative growth of seedling was significantly inhibited by Ca amendment. [Conclusion] Results of this study indicate that appropriate supplemental

  6. Effect of in-office bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide with and without addition of calcium on the enamel surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moraes, Izadora Quintela Souza; Silva, Lucas Nunes de Brito; Porto, Isabel Cristina Celerino de Moraes; de Lima Neto, Cantídio Francisco; Dos Santos, Natanael Barbosa; Fragoso, Larissa Silveira de Mendonça

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate effectiveness and effects of bleaching with 35% hydrogen peroxide with and without calcium on color, micromorphology, and the replacement of calcium and phosphate on the enamel surface. Thirty bovine enamel blocks (5.0 × 5.0 mm) were placed into the following groups: G1: artificial saliva (control); G2: 35% hydrogen peroxide gel without calcium (Whiteness HP Maxx-FGM); and G3: 35% hydrogen peroxide gel with calcium (Whiteness HP Blue-FGM). Three color measurements were performed with a spectrophotometer: untreated (baseline), after performing staining, and after application of bleaching agents. Calcium deposition on the enamel was evaluated before and after the application of bleaching agents using energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry. The enamel surface micromorphology was observed under scanning electron microscopy. The pH of each product was measured. The data were subjected to one-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA), and any differences were analyzed using Tukey's test (P < 0.05). G3 showed greater variation in total color after the experiment than G2 and G1; there was no significant difference in calcium or phosphorus concentration before and after the experimental procedures; morphological changes were observed only in G2 and G3; and the pH values of the Whiteness HP Maxx and Whiteness HP Blue bleaching agents were 5.77 and 7.79, respectively. The 35% hydrogen peroxide with calcium showed greater bleaching potential, but the addition of calcium had no effect in terms of reducing morphological changes or increasing the calcium concentration on the enamel surface. PMID:26279091

  7. Partial and full stabilization of zirconia by calcium chloride and bromide additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Partial and full stabilization of zirconia was attempted by using stabilizers like calcium chloride and bromide (10, 15 and 20 mol per cent). The green mixture was heated in powder form in the temperature range of 300deg to 1300degC. The stabilization was studied through thermal analysis and powder X-ray diffraction techniques. The green mixture showed crystallinity only above 300degC. Crystal size increased with increase in calcination temperature. Calcined samples showed the presence of cubic/tetragonal phase along with a certain amount of monoclinic phase at room temperature. The intensity of the compound peak (30.2deg 2θ), where 10 mol per cent CaCl2 was used as stabilizer, in creased rapidly with temperature up to 550degC, while in case of CaBr2 stabilizer it increased rapidly up to 750degC. Above these temperatures, marginal increase in intensity was observed in both the cases. A comparative study shows that below 800degC firing temperature, CaCl2 was more effective than CaBr2. However, above this temperature the reverse was observed. In case of 15 and 20 mol per cent CaCl2 addition, formation of the cubic phase took place at 1550deg and 1300degC respectively. However, 20 mol per cent CaBr2 addition resulted in cubic and CaZrO3 phase formation. (author). 14 refs., 7 figs

  8. The Flame Spectrometric Determination of Calcium in Fruit Juice by Standard Addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohl, Arthur N.

    1985-01-01

    Provides procedures to measure the calcium concentration in fruit juice by atomic absorption. Fruit juice is used because: (1) it is an important consumer product; (2) large samples are available; and (3) calcium exists in fruit juice at concentrations that do not require excessive dilution or preconcentration prior to measurement. (JN)

  9. Prevention of postmenopausal bone loss - effects of alternative administration forms of estrogens, alternative gestagens and calcium addition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium metabolism was examined in 133 healthy postmenopausal women every three months during two years of treatment with oral or percutaneous 17β-estradiol combined with different doses of calcium supplementation and/or different gestagens. Bone mineral content measured in the forearm (single photon absorptiometry), in the spine and in the total skeleton (dual photon absorptiometry) was unchanged in all estrogen-treated groups during the two years of treatment, and the responses in the groups with and without calcium supplementation and with different gestagens were not significantly different. Furthermore, the responses were independent of route of administration of the estrogen. Biochemical indices of bone turnover (serum alkaline phosphatase and fasting urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine) decreased highly significantly during estrogen treatment (p<0.001) independent of route of administration of the estrogen, of calcium supplementation, and of gestagen agent. We conclude that estrogen treatment independently of route of administration, prevents postmenopausal bone loss. The gestagen agents used here do not affect calcium metabolism, and calcium supplementation has no additive effect to estrogen therapy. (orig.)

  10. Prevention of postmenopausal bone loss - effects of alternative administration forms of estrogens, alternative gestagens and calcium addition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riis, B.J.; Christiansen, C.

    1987-02-01

    Calcium metabolism was examined in 133 healthy postmenopausal women every three months during two years of treatment with oral or percutaneous 17..beta..-estradiol combined with different doses of calcium supplementation and/or different gestagens. Bone mineral content measured in the forearm (single photon absorptiometry), in the spine and in the total skeleton (dual photon absorptiometry) was unchanged in all estrogen-treated groups during the two years of treatment, and the responses in the groups with and without calcium supplementation and with different gestagens were not significantly different. Furthermore, the responses were independent of route of administration of the estrogen. Biochemical indices of bone turnover (serum alkaline phosphatase and fasting urinary hydroxyproline/creatinine) decreased highly significantly during estrogen treatment (p<0.001) independent of route of administration of the estrogen, of calcium supplementation, and of gestagen agent. We conclude that estrogen treatment independently of route of administration, prevents postmenopausal bone loss. The gestagen agents used here do not affect calcium metabolism, and calcium supplementation has no additive effect to estrogen therapy.

  11. The influence of polyaspartate additive on the growth and morphology of calcium carbonate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gower, Laurie Anne

    The addition of low levels of polyaspartate to a supersaturated calcium carbonate (CaCOsb3) solution leads to unusual morphologies in the inorganic phase. Spherulitic vaterite aggregates with helical protrusions, and distorted calcite crystals that contain spiral pits, have been produced. The helical particles are coated with an inorganic membrane that appears to be responsible for the helical twist. The polymer also causes deposition of thin CaCOsb3 tablets and films on the glass substrate. Two distinct types of films are deposited; the first is a mosaic of calcite crystals, and the second is spherulitic vaterite. In situ observations of the crystallization reaction have determined that the thin-film morphology is a result of the phase separation of a hydrated CaCOsb3/polymer liquid-precursor, whereby accumulation of isotropic droplets creates a coating on the substrate, and subsequent dehydration and crystallization yields birefringent CaCOsb3 films. During the amorphous to crystalline transition, incremental growth steps lead to "transition bars" and sectored calcite tablets. This in vitro system was originally modeled after certain aspects of CaCOsb3 biomineralization, in which the soluble proteins extracted from biominerals tend to have high levels of aspartic acid residues. Based on the similarities between features exhibited by the products of this system and those in biominerals, an argument has been presented to suggest that this polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process is involved in the morphogenesis of CaCOsb3 biominerals. These features include the following: thin CaCOsb3 tablets that grow laterally; tablets that express unstable crystallographic faces; non-faceted single crystals with curved surfaces; spatially-delineated single crystals; sectored calcite tablets; hollow-shell spheres; calcium carbonate cements; and magnesium-bearing calcites. This work has demonstrated that a means of morphological control can be accomplished through non

  12. TENSILE STRENGTH AND CREEP RESISTANCE OF Mg-9Al-1ZnBASED ALLOYS WITH CALCIUM ADDITION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.S. Sun; W.M. Zhang; X.G. Min

    2001-01-01

    Small amount of calcium addition to the Mg-9Al-0. 8Zn-0.2Mn(AZ91) alloy resulted in the obvious influence on mechanical properties. The yield strength of the alloys increased with the increase of Ca addition and maximum strength was obtained from the alloy containing 0.15% of Ca. The creep resistance at the temperatures between 150-200°C was also significantly increased with Ca addition. The creep rate (at 200°C,50MPa) of the alloy with 0. 15% of Ca addition was one order of magnitude lower than that of the base alloy (AZ91). Microstructural observations revealed that the addition of calcium refined the microstructure and enhanced the thermal stability of the β precipitates, which accounted for the improvement of creep resistance at high temperatures.``

  13. Gallium(III)- and calcium(II)-catalyzed Meyer-Schuster rearrangements followed by intramolecular aldol condensation or endo-Michael addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Presset, M; Michelet, B; Guillot, R; Bour, C; Bezzenine-Lafollée, S; Gandon, V

    2015-03-28

    The first gallium- and calcium-catalyzed Meyer-Schuster rearrangements are described. Under substrate control, the incipient conjugated ketones can be trapped intramolecularly by β-keto esters or amides to yield cyclic products after aldol condensation or endo-Michael addition. An interesting additive effect that promotes the latter tandem process with calcium has been found. PMID:25503868

  14. Calcium phosphate holmium-166 ceramic to addition in bone cement: synthesis and characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spine metastases are a common and painful complication of cancer. The treatment often consists of bone cement injection (vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty) within vertebral body for vertebrae stabilization, followed by external beam radiation therapy. Recently, researchers introduced the concept of radioactive bone cement for spine tumors therapy. Then, investigations about bioactive and radioactive materials became interesting. In this study, we present the synthesis of calcium phosphate incorporated holmium (CaP-Ho) via sol-gel technique, and its characterization by XRD, FT-IR, NA and SEM. Results showed a multiphasic bioceramic composed mainly of hydroxyapatite, β-tricalcium phosphate, holmium phosphate and traces of calcium pyrophosphate. Furthermore, the nuclide Ho-166 was the major radioisotope produced. Despite that, the radioactive bioceramic CaP-166Ho must be investigated in clinical trials to assure its efficacy and safety on spine tumors treatment (author)

  15. Calcium phosphate holmium-166 ceramic to addition in bone cement: synthesis and characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donanzam, Blanda A.; Campos, Tarcisio P.R., E-mail: campos@nuclear.ufmg.b [Universidade do Federal de Minas Gerais (DEN/UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Dept. de Engenharia Nuclear; Dalmazio, Ilza; Valente, Eduardo S., E-mail: id@cdtn.b, E-mail: valente@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Spine metastases are a common and painful complication of cancer. The treatment often consists of bone cement injection (vertebroplasty or kyphoplasty) within vertebral body for vertebrae stabilization, followed by external beam radiation therapy. Recently, researchers introduced the concept of radioactive bone cement for spine tumors therapy. Then, investigations about bioactive and radioactive materials became interesting. In this study, we present the synthesis of calcium phosphate incorporated holmium (CaP-Ho) via sol-gel technique, and its characterization by XRD, FT-IR, NA and SEM. Results showed a multiphasic bioceramic composed mainly of hydroxyapatite, {beta}-tricalcium phosphate, holmium phosphate and traces of calcium pyrophosphate. Furthermore, the nuclide Ho-166 was the major radioisotope produced. Despite that, the radioactive bioceramic CaP-{sup 166}Ho must be investigated in clinical trials to assure its efficacy and safety on spine tumors treatment (author)

  16. Optimizing and Evaluating the Biocompatibility of Fiber Composites with Calcium Phosphate Additives

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Suchý, Tomáš; Balík, Karel; Sucharda, Zbyněk; Sochor, M.; Lapčíková, Monika; Sedláček, R.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 161, 19/20 (2011), s. 493-502. ISSN 0043-5341 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/10/1457; GA ČR(CZ) GA106/06/1576 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519; CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : biocomposites * calcium phosphate * polyamide fibers Subject RIV: JI - Composite Materials http://www.springerlink.com/content/047q753g04h4l836/

  17. Effect of silica fume additions on the hydration behaviour of calcium aluminates

    OpenAIRE

    Fumo, Daniel A.; Segadães, Ana M.

    1997-01-01

    In the recent refractory castables technology, the calcium aluminate cement is being replaced in increasing proportion by very fine matrix components, such as silica fume and colloidal alumina. More efficient particle packing and the resulting lower water requirements have been the proposed explanation for the improved green density and strength, without sacrificing the castable workability. However, the aluminates are still responsible for the hydraulic setting of the castable. The hydration...

  18. Formation of interconnected macropores in apatitic calcium phosphate bone cement with the use of an effervescent additive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesaraki, S; Moztarzadeh, F; Sharifi, D

    2007-10-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) can be considered as good candidate for bone tissue engineering because they can be resorbed and take part in the bone remodeling process. Several efforts have been made into improve the resorption rate of the calcium phosphate cement by introducing macropores to the cement matrix. In this investigation a simple and effective method has been presented based on the addition of various amounts of an effervescent agent to the calcium phosphate cement components. The effervescent agent was a mixture of sodium hydrogen carbonate, NaHCO(3) (that was added to the powder phase), and citric acid monohydrate, C(6)H(8)O(7).H(2)O (that was dissolved in the liquid phase). The obtained macroporous samples were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometer, X-ray diffraction, and scanning electron microscopy techniques at 4 h after setting and 3 days after soaking in a special simulated body fluid solution named Hank's balanced salt solution. Mercury intrusion porosimetry was also employed for characterizing the pore volume and pore size distribution in the cement structure. Results showed that the rate of conversion of staring reactant to the apatite phase and the apatite chemistry were significantly changed by using the additive in the cement components. Also both the pore volume and pore size were changed by varying both the amount of effervescent additive and the powder to liquid ratio. PMID:17380498

  19. Immobilization of antimony in waste-to-energy bottom ash by addition of calcium and iron containing additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Caneghem, Jo; Verbinnen, Bram; Cornelis, Geert; de Wijs, Joost; Mulder, Rob; Billen, Pieter; Vandecasteele, Carlo

    2016-08-01

    The leaching of Sb from waste-to-energy (WtE) bottom ash (BA) often exceeds the Dutch limit value of 0.32mgkg(-1) for recycling of BA in open construction applications. From the immobilization mechanisms described in the literature, it could be concluded that both Ca and Fe play an important role in the immobilization of Sb in WtE BA. Therefore, Ca and Fe containing compounds were added to the samples of the sand fraction of WtE BA, which in contrast to the granulate fraction is not recyclable to date, and the effect on the Sb leaching was studied by means of batch leaching tests. Results showed that addition of 0.5 and 2.5% CaO, 5% CaCl2, 2.5% Fe2(SO4)3 and 1% FeCl3 decreased the Sb leaching from 0.62±0.02mgkgDM(-1) to 0.20±0.02, 0.083±0.044, 0.25±0.01, 0.27±0.002 and 0.29±0.02mgkgDM(-1), respectively. Due to the increase in pH from 11.41 to 12.53 when 2.5% CaO was added, Pb and Zn leaching increased and exceeded the respective leaching limits. Addition of 5% CaCO3 had almost no effect on the Sb leaching, as evidenced by the resulting 0.53mgkgDM(-1) leaching concentration. This paper shows a complementary enhancement of the effect of Ca and Fe, by comparing the aforementioned Sb leaching results with those of WtE BA with combined addition of 2.5% CaO or 5% CaCl2 with 2.5% Fe2(SO4)3 or 1% FeCl3. These lab scale results suggest that formation of romeites with a high Ca content and formation of iron antimonate (tripuhyite) with a very low solubility are the main immobilization mechanisms of Sb in WtE BA. Besides the pure compounds and their mixtures, also addition of 10% of two Ca and Fe containing residues of the steel industry, hereafter referred to as R1 and R2, was effective in decreasing the Sb leaching from WtE BA below the Dutch limit value for reuse in open construction applications. To evaluate the long term effect of the additives, pilot plots of WtE BA with 10% of R1 and 5% and 10% of R2 were built and samples were submitted to leaching tests at

  20. Modifications on the properties of a calcium phosphate cement by additions of sodium alginate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coelho, W.T.; Fernandes, J.M.; Vieira, R.S.; Thurmer, M.B.; Santos, L.A., E-mail: trajano@ufrgs.br, E-mail: julianafernandes2@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: rsvieira.eng@gmail.com, E-mail: monicathurmer@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: luis.santos@ufrgs.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (PPG/LABIOMAT/UFRGS), RS (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    The Calcium Phosphate Cement (CPC) are bone substitutes with great potential for use in orthopedics, traumatology and dentistry due to its biocompatibility, bioactivity and osteoconductivity, and form a paste that can be easily shaped and placed into the surgical site. However, CPCs have low mechanical strength, which equals the maximum mechanical strength of trabecular bone. In order to assess the strength and time to handle a CPC composed primarily of alpha phase, were added sodium alginate (1%, 2% and 3% wt) and an accelerator in an aqueous solution. The cement powder was mixed with liquid of setting, shaped into specimens and evaluated for apparent density and porosity by Archimedes method, X-ray diffraction and compressive strength. A significant increase in compressive strength by adding sodium alginate was verified. (author)

  1. Modifications on the properties of a calcium phosphate cement by additions of sodium alginate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Calcium Phosphate Cement (CPC) are bone substitutes with great potential for use in orthopedics, traumatology and dentistry due to its biocompatibility, bioactivity and osteoconductivity, and form a paste that can be easily shaped and placed into the surgical site. However, CPCs have low mechanical strength, which equals the maximum mechanical strength of trabecular bone. In order to assess the strength and time to handle a CPC composed primarily of alpha phase, were added sodium alginate (1%, 2% and 3% wt) and an accelerator in an aqueous solution. The cement powder was mixed with liquid of setting, shaped into specimens and evaluated for apparent density and porosity by Archimedes method, X-ray diffraction and compressive strength. A significant increase in compressive strength by adding sodium alginate was verified. (author)

  2. 76 FR 48751 - Lanxess Corp.; Filing of Food Additive Petition (Animal Use); Calcium Formate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... regulations in part 573 Food Additives Permitted in Feed and Drinking Water of Animals (21 CFR part 573) to... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 573 Lanxess Corp.; Filing of Food Additive... petition proposing that the food additive regulations be amended to provide for the safe use of...

  3. A novel approach for stabilizing fresh urine by calcium hydroxide addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Dyllon G; Krähenbühl, Manuel; Köpping, Isabell; Larsen, Tove A; Udert, Kai M

    2016-05-15

    In this study, we investigated the prevention of enzymatic urea hydrolysis in fresh urine by increasing the pH with calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) powder. The amount of Ca(OH)2 dissolving in fresh urine depends significantly on the composition of the urine. The different urine compositions used in our simulations showed that between 4.3 and 5.8 g Ca(OH)2 dissolved in 1 L of urine at 25 °C. At this temperature, the pH at saturation is 12.5 and is far above the pH of 11, which we identified as the upper limit for enzymatic urea hydrolysis. However, temperature has a strong effect on the saturation pH, with higher values being achieved at lower temperatures. Based on our results, we recommend a dosage of 10 g Ca(OH)2 L(-1) of fresh urine to ensure solid Ca(OH)2 always remains in the urine reactor which ensures sufficiently high pH values. Besides providing sufficient Ca(OH)2, the temperature has to be kept in a certain range to prevent chemical urea hydrolysis. At temperatures below 14 °C, the saturation pH is higher than 13, which favors chemical urea hydrolysis. We chose a precautionary upper temperature of 40 °C because the rate of chemical urea hydrolysis increases at higher temperatures but this should be confirmed with kinetic studies. By considering the boundaries for pH and temperature developed in this study, urine can be stabilized effectively with Ca(OH)2 thereby simplifying later treatment processes or making direct use easier. PMID:27055084

  4. A novel approach for stabilizing fresh urine by calcium hydroxide addition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Dyllon G.; Krähenbühl, Manuel; Köpping, Isabell; Larsen, Tove A.; Udert, Kai M.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the prevention of enzymatic urea hydrolysis in fresh urine by increasing the pH with calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) powder. The amount of Ca(OH)2 dissolving in fresh urine depends significantly on the composition of the urine. The different urine compositions used in our simulations showed that between 4.3 and 5.8 g Ca(OH)2 dissolved in 1 L of urine at 25 °C. At this temperature, the pH at saturation is 12.5 and is far above the pH of 11, which we identified as the upper limit for enzymatic urea hydrolysis. However, temperature has a strong effect on the saturation pH, with higher values being achieved at lower temperatures. Based on our results, we recommend a dosage of 10 g Ca(OH)2 L−1 of fresh urine to ensure solid Ca(OH)2 always remains in the urine reactor which ensures sufficiently high pH values. Besides providing sufficient Ca(OH)2, the temperature has to be kept in a certain range to prevent chemical urea hydrolysis. At temperatures below 14 °C, the saturation pH is higher than 13, which favors chemical urea hydrolysis. We chose a precautionary upper temperature of 40 °C because the rate of chemical urea hydrolysis increases at higher temperatures but this should be confirmed with kinetic studies. By considering the boundaries for pH and temperature developed in this study, urine can be stabilized effectively with Ca(OH)2 thereby simplifying later treatment processes or making direct use easier. PMID:27055084

  5. STUDY OF CRYSTALLIZATION OF CALCIUM SULFATE DIHYDRATE THAT HAS POLYMER ADDITIVES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ustinova Yuliya Valer'evna

    2012-10-01

    A. It is identified that additives based on polymers of different origin affect processes of crystallization, the size and shape of crystals. B. The X-ray diffraction analysis has proven that molecules of polymer additives do not penetrate into the gypsum structure and the chemical composition of the product does not change. C. Methods of thermal analysis have proven that the introduction of polymer additives does not produce any adverse impact on the stability of gypsum crystals, if exposed to temperature fluctuations. D. The major impact produced onto crystallization is the one of the super plasticizer based on the sulfonated melamine-formaldehyde resin.

  6. Calcium phosphate cements properties with polymers addition; Propriedades do cimento de fosfato de calcio com adicao de polimeros

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, J.M.; Trajano, W.T.; Escobar, C.F.; Santos, L.A., E-mail: julianafernandes2@yahoo.com.br [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), RS (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPC) have attracted great interest to use in orthopedics and dentistry as replacements for damaged parts of the skeletal system, showing good biocompatibility and osseointegration, allowing its use as bone graft. Several studies have shown that the addition of polymer additives have a strong influence on the cement properties. The low mechanical strength is the main obstacle to greater use of CPC as an implant material. The objective of this study was to evaluate properties of a cement based on α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP), added polymers. PVA (10%, 8%, 6%), sodium alginate (2%) and polyacrylate ammonia (3%), all in weight, were added to the synthesized α-TCP powder. The samples were molded and evaluated for density, porosity in vitro test (Simulated Body Fluid), crystalline phases and mechanical strength. The results show increased the mechanical properties of the cement when added these polymers.

  7. Modification of oxide inclusions present in aluminum-killed low carbon steel by addition of calcium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Carlos S. Pires

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available A crescente demanda por aços de alta qualidade com elevada limpeza interna tem levado a uma contínua melhoria nas práticas de produção do aço, em especial na etapa de refino secundário. O interesse especial é no controle das inclusões não-metálicas, devido ao seu efeito prejudicial nas etapas subseqüentes (lingotamento e conformação plástica e devido às sua grande influência nas propriedades do produto final. Através do controle do tamanho, da quantidade e da composição química das inclusões, é possível obter um produto final de alta qualidade. O controle da formação das inclusões não-metálicas e a identificação de suas fases constituintes são de suma importância para a obtenção de aços limpos. Nesse trabalho, amostras de aço de baixo teor de carbono, desoxidado ao silício, coletadas em uma indústria siderúrgica, são analisadas e é demonstrado que, pela comparação do teor total de cálcio e de oxigênio no aço, é possível prever os tipos de inclusões presentes no aço.The increasing demand in recent years for high-quality steel products has led to the continuous improvement of steelmaking practices. There is a special interest in the control of non-metallic inclusions due to their harmful effect on the subsequent stages and their great influence on the properties of the final product. Through the control of the amount, size and chemical composition of the inclusions it is possible to obtain a final product of good quality. The control of the formation of non-metallic inclusions and the identification of their constituent phases are of extreme importance for the obtaining of clean steels. In this work, samples collected in a steelmaking process are analyzed and it is demonstrated that by comparing the total calcium and oxygen contents in the steel, it is possible to have an overview of the types of oxide inclusions present.

  8. Mechanism of unusual polymorph transformations in calcium carbonate: Dissolution-recrystallization vs additive-mediated nucleation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Arpita Sarkar; Samiran Mahapatra

    2012-11-01

    Unusual transformation of one CaCO3 phase to another has been reported by the process of dissolution-recrystallization and under the influence of additive. In one case, while metastable vaterite transforms to another metastable phase aragonite by simple refluxing in distilled water, it instead transforms thermodynamically stable phase calcite upon refluxing in its `mother-liquor’. This is explained by the process of dissolution-recrystallization. In another case, aragonite is preferentially synthesized over calcite in the presence of molten lauric acid as an additive.

  9. CHARACTERISTICS OF FLUORIDE EMISSION FROM FIVE CLAY MINERALS AS AFFECTED BY TEMPERATURE,HEATING TIME AND ADDITION OF CALCIUM COMPOUNDS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Characteristics of fluoride emission from five clay minerals (montmorillonite, kaolinite, vermiculite, geothite, and allophane) as affected by temperature, heating time and addition of calcium compounds were studied. Marked increase of the fluoride emission rate was noticed with increase of temperature. The fluoride release, began at 500 ℃-600 ℃, and the main bulk of the fluoride emission occurred at the temperature of about 800 ℃. The loss of crystalline water was primarily responsible for the increase of fluoride emission. When minerals were heated at 800 ℃, The fluoride emission rate from the clay minerals reached the highest after heating for 1 hour. The samples treated by CaO, CaCO3, Ca(OH)2, Ca3(PO4)2, and CaSO4 had 55.45%, 59.58%, 46.45%, 54.31%, 31.25% reduction in the fluoride emission from montmorillonite at the temperature of 800 ℃, respectively. CaCO3 had the highest fluoride fixing capacity compared to other calcium compounds.

  10. Microstructure and mechanical properties of the Al-Ti alloy with calcium addition

    OpenAIRE

    L.A. Dobrzański; K. Labisz; Olsen, A

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: In this paper there are presented the investigation results of mechanical properties and microstructure with intermetallic phases of the aluminium – titanium alloy with a defined content of Ca addition. The purpose of this work was also to determine the heat treatment conditions for solution heat treatment of the investigation alloys.Design/methodology/approach: The reason of this work was to determine the heat treatment influence, particularly solution heat treatment time to the cha...

  11. Effect of Additives on the Morphology of the Hydrated Product and Physical Properties of a Calcium Phosphate Cement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiupeng WANG; Jiandong YE; Yingjun WANG

    2008-01-01

    The morphology of a hydrated calcium phosphate cement (CPC) doped with several normally used additives was investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the compressive strength of the cement was determined in this study. The hydrated products of CPC without additives was rod-like hydroxyapatite (HA) grains with around 2-5 μm in length and 100 nm in width. The addition of Sr obviously decreased the crystal size of the rod-like grains. CPCs containing carbonate, collagen and gelatin showed flake-like crystal morphology. Crylic acid-containing CPC presented flocculus-like structure. And malic acid-containing CPC exhibited oriented flake-like structure. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis showed that the additives used in this study did not alter the hydration products of the cement. The compressive strength tests indicated that the compressive strength of the cement with rod-like morphology HA crystals was much higher than that of the cement with flake-like morphology HA crystals, and the cement with oriented flake-like morphology HA crystals .exhibited the poorest compressive strength.

  12. Effect of the addition of calcium hydroxide on the hydrothermal-mechanochemical treatment of Eucalyptus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Maki; Endo, Takashi

    2015-02-01

    The effect of Ca(OH)2 addition on optimization of hydrothermal-mechanochemical pretreatment, which combines hydrothermal and milling treatments, was examined. The highest glucose yield of 90% was achieved in the ball-milled specimen previously treated at 170°C in the presence of 20% Ca(OH)2 per substrate weight. The specific surface area of the substrate was closely correlated with glucose yield, and a larger specific surface area was obtained when treating the specimen at 170°C in the presence of Ca(OH)2 compared to treatment at 170°C without Ca(OH)2. Although the Ca(OH)2-treated specimen was relatively unaffected by delignification, the cleavage of the ester bonds between lignin and hemicellulose was confirmed by FT-IR. This suggests that Ca(OH)2 weakens the substrate structure by loosening the bonds between lignin and hemicellulose as the mechanism to increase the specific surface area regardless of the high lignin content, facilitating the fibrillation of fibers with mechanical milling. PMID:25496951

  13. Influence of addition of calcium oxide on physicochemical properties of Portland cement with zirconium or niobium oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Tanomaru-Filho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: Calcium oxide (CaO may be added to mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA or Portland cement (PC to improve physicochemical and biological properties. Aims: To evaluate the physicochemical properties of PC associated with radiopacifiers and CaO. Materials and Methods: MTA Angelus, PC + 30% zirconium oxide (Zr, or 30% niobium oxide (Nb associated with 10 or 20% of CaO were evaluated. Gilmore needles were used to evaluate initial and final setting time. Compressive strength was evaluated after the periods of 24 hours and 21 days. pH was analyzed after 3, 12, 24 hours, 7, 14, 21 days. Solubility and flow tests were performed based on the ISO 6876. The data obtained were submitted to analysis of variance and Tukey tests (P ≤ 0.05. Results: The associations with 10% CaO showed greater strength that the associations with 20% CaO. The shortest initial setting time was observed for the association PC + Zr + 20% CaO and MTA. All the cements presented alkaline pH. The flow of all cements was similar. The highest solubility was found in the associations with 20% CaO. Conclusion: The addition of CaO to PC favored the alkaline property and the PC + Zr + 20% CaO presented setting time similar to MTA.

  14. Effect of addition of nano-hydroxyapatite on physico-chemical and antibiofilm properties of calcium silicate cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    GUERREIRO-TANOMARU, Juliane Maria; VÁZQUEZ-GARCÍA, Fernando Antonio; BOSSO-MARTELO, Roberta; BERNARDI, Maria Inês Basso; FARIA, Gisele; TANOMARU, Mario

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) is a calcium silicate cement composed of Portland cement (PC) and bismuth oxide. Hydroxyapatite has been incorporated to enhance mechanical and biological properties of dental materials. This study evaluated physicochemical and mechanical properties and antibiofilm activity of MTA and PC associated with zirconium oxide (ZrO2) and hydroxyapatite nanoparticles (HAn). Material and Methods White MTA (Angelus, Brazil); PC (70%)+ZrO2 (30%); PC (60%)+ZrO2 (30%)+HAn (10%); PC (50%)+ZrO2 (30%)+HAn (20%) were evaluated. The pH was assessed by a digital pH-meter and solubility by mass loss. Setting time was evaluated by using Gilmore needles. Compressive strength was analyzed by mechanical test. Samples were radiographed alongside an aluminum step wedge to evaluate radiopacity. For the antibiofilm evaluation, materials were placed in direct contact with E. faecalis biofilm induced on dentine blocks. The number of colony-forming units (CFU mL-1) in the remaining biolfilm was evaluated. The results were submitted to ANOVA and the Tukey test, with 5% significance. Results There was no difference in pH levels of PC+ZrO2, PC+ZrO2+HAn (10%) and PC+ZrO2+HAn (20%) (p>0.05) and these cements presented higher pH levels than MTA (p<0.05). The highest solubility was observed in PC+ZrO2+HAn (10%) and PC+ZrO2+HAn (20%) (p<0.05). MTA had the shortest initial setting time (p<0.05). All the materials showed radiopacity higher than 3 mmAl. PC+ZrO2 and MTA had the highest compressive strength (p<0.05). Materials did not completely neutralize the bacterial biofilm, but the association with HAn provided greater bacterial reduction than MTA and PC+ZrO2 (p<0.05) after the post-manipulation period of 2 days. Conclusions The addition of HAn to PC associated with ZrO2 harmed the compressive strength and solubility. On the other hand, HAn did not change the pH and the initial setting time, but improved the radiopacity (HAn 10%), the final setting time

  15. Magnesium chloride as a leaching and aragonite-promoting self-regenerative additive for the mineral carbonation of calcium-rich materials

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Rafael; Bodor, Marius; Dragomir, Paul; Vraciu, Andreea; Vlad, Maria; Van Gerven, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Two approaches for the intensification of the mineral carbonation reaction are combined and studied in this work, namely: (i) the calcium leaching and aragonite promoting effects of magnesium chloride (MgCl2), and (ii) the passivating layer abrasion effect of sonication. The alkaline materials subjected to leaching and carbonation tests included lime, wollastonite, steel slags, and air pollution control (APC) residue. Batch leaching tests were conducted with varying concentrations of additive...

  16. Scientific Opinion on the re-evaluation of sodium stearoyl-2-lactylate (E 481) and calcium stearoyl-2-lactylate (E 482) as food additives

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to food (ANS)

    2013-01-01

    Following a request by the European Commission, the Panel of Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS) was asked to deliver a scientific opinion on the safety of sodium stearoyl-2-lactylate (E 481, SSL) and calcium stearoyl-2-lactylate (E 482, CSL) when used as food additives. SSL and CSL are used as emulsifiers and stabilizers. An Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI) of 20 mg/kg bw/day for SSL and CSL (either singly or in combination) was established in 1974 by the Joint FAO/WHO Exper...

  17. Evaluation of colloidal silica suspension as efficient additive for improving physicochemical and in vitro biological properties of calcium sulfate-based nanocomposite bone cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borhan, Shokoufeh; Hesaraki, Saeed; Ahmadzadeh-Asl, Shaghayegh

    2010-12-01

    In the present study new calcium sulfate-based nanocomposite bone cement with improved physicochemical and biological properties was developed. The powder component of the cement consists of 60 wt% α-calcium sulfate hemihydrate and 40 wt% biomimetically synthesized apatite, while the liquid component consists of an aqueous colloidal silica suspension (20 wt%). In this study, the above mentioned powder phase was mixed with distilled water to prepare a calcium sulfate/nanoapatite composite without any additive. Structural properties, setting time, compressive strength, in vitro bioactivity and cellular properties of the cements were investigated by appropriate techniques. From X-ray diffractometer analysis, except gypsum and apatite, no further phases were found in both silica-containing and silica-free cements. The results showed that both setting time and compressive strength of the calcium sulfate/nanoapatite cement improved by using colloidal silica suspension as cement liquid. Meanwhile, the condensed phase produced from the polymerization process of colloidal silica filled the micropores of the microstructure and covered rodlike gypsum crystals and thus controlled cement disintegration in simulated body fluid. Additionally, formation of apatite layer was favored on the surfaces of the new cement while no apatite precipitation was observed for the cement prepared by distilled water. In this study, it was also revealed that the number of viable osteosarcoma cells cultured with extracts of both cements were comparable, while silica-containing cement increased alkaline phosphatase activity of the cells. These results suggest that the developed cement may be a suitable bone filling material after well passing of the corresponding in vivo tests. PMID:20972610

  18. Crystallization of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) in a flowing system: Influence of Cu2+ additives on induction time and crystalline phase transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usmany, Y.; Putranto, W. A.; Bayuseno, A. P.; Muryanto, S.

    2016-04-01

    Scaling of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) is commonly found in piping systems in oil, gas, desalination and other chemical processes. The scale may create technical problems, leading to the reduction of heat transfer, increase of energy consumption and unscheduled equipment shutdown. This paper presents crystallization scaling experiments and evaluation of the effect of Cu2+ additives on the induction time and calcium carbonate transformation. The crystals precursors were prepared using equimolar of CaCl2 and Na2CO3 resulted in concentrations of 3000 ppm Ca2+ in the solution. The Cu2+ in amounts of 0, 1 and 10 ppm was separately added in the solution. The flow rates (20, 35, and 60 mL/min) and elevated temperatures (27, 35 and 45°C) were selected in the study. The induction time for crystallization of CaCO3 was observed by measuring the solution conductivity over time, while the phase transformation of calcium carbonate was examined by XRD method and SEM/EDX. It was found that the conductivity remained steady for a certain period reflecting to the induction time of crystal formation, and then decreased sharply afterwards,. The induction time was increased from 34 and 48 minutes in the presence of Cu additives (1 and 10 ppm), depending on the flow rates and temperature observed. In all the experiments, the Cu2+ addition leads to the reduction of mass of crystals. Apparently, the presence of Cu2+ could inhibit the CaCO3 crystallization. In the absence of Cu2+ and at elevated temperature, the crystals obtained were a mixture of vaterite and calcite. In the presence of Cu2+ and at elevated temperature, the crystals formed were aragonite and calcite. Here, the presence of Cu2+ additives might have controlled the crystal transformation of CaCO3.

  19. Synthesis of calcium sulfonates on the base of sulfomethylated bis-alkylphenols and research of them as multifunctional additives to lubricating oils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of researches on the synthesis of alkaline sulfonates of calcium on the base of products of formaldehyde condensation of nonyl and technical alkyl phenols are given in this article. In suggested method of preparation of sulfonate additives instead of traditionally used reaction of sulfonation of raw material by aggressive sulfonated agents was used from the point of ecology the reaction of sulfomethylation by formaldehyde and bisulfite of sodium. In this case the formation of acid tar and air pollution by toxic gases (SO3, SO2). On the base of the prepared oxyalkylbenzylsulfonates of sodium by reaction of exchangeable decomposition and carbonation were synthesized medium alkaline and high alkaline sulfonates of calcium. It was shown that the developed alkaline sulphonates by physicochemical and functional properties essentially surpass additives of analogous purpose. Different from the above mentioned additives they at the same time with detergent-dispersant properties improve also anticorrosive and antioxidative properties of lubricating oils, that is they are additives of multifunctional action

  20. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of malic acid and a mixture of sodium and calcium malate when used as technological additives for all animal species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available An application has been made for the re-authorisation of malic acid as a preservative in feed and an acidity regulator in feed for cats and dogs and for the authorisation of a mixture of sodium and calcium salts of malic acid to be used as an acidity regulator in feed for all animal species. Evidence from feeding studies with dogs, poultry, piglets, veal calves and ruminants showed that the highest typical use level of 1 600 mg malic acid/kg complete feedingstuffs (supplied as acid or salts is safe for all animal species. Setting a maximum content was not considered as necessary. Malic acid and its sodium and calcium salts are permitted food additives without limit in the EU. The use of malic acid and its sodium and calcium salts in animal nutrition is safe for the consumer. Malic acid and its salts are considered as strongly irritant to the skin and mucosa and as a particular risk to the eyes. Exposure via inhalation for those handling the additives is also considered to present a risk. Malates are components of the diet of humans and animals and are rapidly and completely metabolised to CO2. Consequently, their use in animal production would not pose a risk to the environment. Malic acid is used in food as a preservative. It is reasonable to expect that the effect seen in food will be observed in feed when it is used at comparable concentrations and under similar conditions. However, the FEEDAP Panel has reservations about the effectiveness of malic acid as a preservative in complete feedingstuffs with a moisture content of ≤ 12 %. The ability of malic acid and its salts to act as acidity regulators in feed has not been demonstrated.

  1. Further improvement in ganoderic acid production in static liquid culture of Ganoderma lucidum by integrating nitrogen limitation and calcium ion addition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan-Jun; Zhang, De-Huai; Han, Li-Liang; Yu, Xuya; Zhao, Peng; Li, Tao; Zhong, Jian-Jiang; Xu, Jun-Wei

    2016-01-01

    To further improve the ganoderic acid (GA) production, a novel integrated strategy by combining nitrogen limitation and calcium ion addition was developed. The effects of the integrated combination on the content of GA-T (one powerful anticancer compound), their intermediates (squalene and lanosterol) and on the transcription levels of GA biosynthetic genes in G. lucidum fermentation were investigated. The maximum GA-T content with the integrated strategy were 1.87 mg/ 100 mg dry cell weight, which was 2.1-4.2 fold higher than that obtained with either calcium ion addition or nitrogen limitation alone, and it is also the highest record as ever reported in submerged fermentation of G. lucidum. The squalene content was increased by 3.9- and 2.2-fold in this case compared with either individual strategy alone. Moreover, the transcription levels of the GA biosynthetic genes encoding 3-hydroxy-3-methyglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and lanosterol synthase were also up-regulated by 3.3-7.5 and 1.3-2.3 fold, respectively. PMID:26508324

  2. Calcium addition at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest increases sugar storage, antioxidant activity and cold tolerance in native red spruce (Picea rubens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halman, Joshua M; Schaberg, Paul G; Hawley, Gary J; Eagar, Christopher

    2008-06-01

    In fall (November 2005) and winter (February 2006), we collected current-year foliage of native red spruce (Picea rubens Sarg.) growing in a reference watershed and in a watershed treated in 1999 with wollastonite (CaSiO(3), a slow-release calcium source) to simulate preindustrial soil calcium concentrations (Ca-addition watershed) at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (Thornton, NH). We analyzed nutrition, soluble sugar concentrations, ascorbate peroxidase (APX) activity and cold tolerance, to evaluate the basis of recent (2003) differences between watersheds in red spruce foliar winter injury. Foliar Ca and total sugar concentrations were significantly higher in trees in the Ca-addition watershed than in trees in the reference watershed during both fall (P=0.037 and 0.035, respectively) and winter (P=0.055 and 0.036, respectively). The Ca-addition treatment significantly increased foliar fructose and glucose concentrations in November (P=0.013 and 0.007, respectively) and foliar sucrose concentrations in winter (P=0.040). Foliar APX activity was similar in trees in both watersheds during fall (P=0.28), but higher in trees in the Ca-addition watershed during winter (P=0.063). Cold tolerance of foliage was significantly greater in trees in the Ca-addition watershed than in trees in the reference watershed (Pcold tolerance in trees in the reference watershed contributed to their high vulnerability to winter injury in 2003. Because the reference watershed reflects forest conditions in the region, the consequences of impaired physiological function caused by soil Ca depletion may have widespread implications for forest health. PMID:18381266

  3. The effects of CeO2 addition on crystallization behavior and pore size in microporous calcium titanium phosphate glass ceramics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We prepare a phosphate glass ceramic in the system of CaO–TiO2–P2O5 and add 2 to 6 mol% CeO2 to it. We determine the optimum percentage of CeO2 addition. ► We study phase separation, suitable time and temperature for crystallization in the microporous Calcium Titanium Phosphate Glass Ceramics utilizing DTA, SEM and XRD. ► We investigate on pore size utilizing BET and SEM techniques before and after CeO2 addition. ► CeO2 increases the pore size in the Calcium Titanium Phosphate Glass Ceramics. -- Abstract: In this research the effect of the addition of CeO2 to microporous Calcium Titanium Phosphate glass ceramics was studied. Different molar percentages of CeO2 were added to three samples of a base glass whose composition was P2O5 30, CaO 45, TiO2 25 (mol%). The first sample had 2 mol% CeO2, the second sample had 4 mol% CeO2, and the third sample had 6 mol% CeO2. The fourth sample did not contain any CeO2. The glass samples were melted and crystallized to bulk glass ceramics by a conventional method. Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA) was utilized to determine the appropriate nucleation and crystallization temperatures. Among the samples, the DTA curve of the sample which had 2 mol% CeO2 had the sharpest crystallization peak. Therefore, this sample was chosen to prepare the glass ceramics. Using X-ray Diffraction (XRD) it was found that in all samples β-Ca3(PO4)2 and CaTi4(PO4)6 were the major phases. The β-Ca3(PO4)2 phase was dissolved away by soaking the glass ceramics in HCl, leaving a porous skeleton of CaTi4(PO4)6. CeO2 addition increased the glass transition temperature and decreased the crystallization time and temperature. It was shown that CeO2 addition resulted in an increase in the mean pore diameter while the specific surface area decreased. The median pore diameter and specific surface area were determined as 27 nm and 14 m2/g, respectively, for the sample containing 2 mol% CeO2.

  4. A facile pollutant-free approach toward a series of nutritionally effective calcium phosphate nanomaterials for food and drink additives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micronutrient malnutrition is widespread and constitutes one of the main nutritional problems worldwide. Vitamins, amino acids, carbohydrates and Ca-phosphate (CaP) minerals are important to human health and disease prevention. Herein we developed a simple wet-chemical method to prepare multinary nutrients-containing CaP nanomaterials in diluted apple, orange, and grape juices. The scanning electron microscopy observation shows that these nanomaterials are short plate-like CaP nanocrystals of ∼500 nm in length. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, nitrogen adsorption, thermogravimetric analyses confirm the different specific surface area and organic nutrient contents. The Fourier transform infrared and X-ray diffraction analyses indicate there exist similar organic groups (i.e., COO−, HN-CO) but different CaP species in the precipitates. The dissolution test in vitro simulated stomach juice pH condition indicates that these inorganic–organic nanohybrid materials are multidoped by micronutrients (such as Zn, Sr, Mg, K, vitamin c) and can be readily dissolved in the weak acidic aqueous solutions. This highly efficient utilization of fruit juice to produce CaP-based micronutrient composites may minimize the adverse side effect, so that the nanomaterials are promising as functional food/drink additives. Thus, this novel approach is environmentally and biologically friendly to produce edible nutrients while production cost is attained.

  5. Addition of Phenylboronic Acid to Malus domestica Pollen Tubes Alters Calcium Dynamics, Disrupts Actin Filaments and Affects Cell Wall Architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Kefeng; Gao, Sai; Zhang, Weiwei; Xing, Yu; Cao, Qingqin; Qin, Ling

    2016-01-01

    A key role of boron in plants is to cross-link the cell wall pectic polysaccharide rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II) through borate diester linkages. Phenylboronic acid (PBA) can form the same reversible ester bonds but cannot cross-link two molecules, so can be used as an antagonist to study the function of boron. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of PBA on apple (Malus domestica) pollen tube growth and the underlying regulatory mechanism. We observed that PBA caused an inhibition of pollen germination, tube growth and led to pollen tube morphological abnormalities. Fluorescent labeling, coupled with a scanning ion-selective electrode technique, revealed that PBA induced an increase in extracellular Ca2+ influx, thereby elevating the cytosolic Ca2+ concentration [Ca2+]c and disrupting the [Ca2+]c gradient, which is critical for pollen tube growth. Moreover the organization of actin filaments was severely perturbed by the PBA treatment. Immunolocalization studies and fluorescent labeling, together with Fourier-transform infrared analysis (FTIR) suggested that PBA caused an increase in the abundance of callose, de-esterified pectins and arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) at the tip. However, it had no effect on the deposition of the wall polymers cellulose. These effects are similar to those of boron deficiency in roots and other organs, indicating that PBA can induce boron deficiency symptoms. The results provide new insights into the roles of boron in pollen tube development, which likely include regulating [Ca2+]c and the formation of the actin cytoskeleton, in addition to the synthesis and assembly of cell wall components. PMID:26886907

  6. Thermodynamics and Kinetics of Boron Removal from Metallurgical Grade Silicon by Addition of High Basic Potassium Carbonate to Calcium Silicate Slag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jijun; Wang, Fanmao; Ma, Wenhui; Lei, Yun; Yang, Bin

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we investigated the thermodynamics and kinetics of boron removal from metallurgical grade silicon (MG-Si) using a calcium silicate slag containing a high basic potassium carbonate. The distribution of boron between slag and silicon was theoretically derived and the distribution coefficients ( L B) of boron with different compositions of CaO, SiO2, and K2CO3 in slag reagents were determined. The maximal value of L B reached 2.08 with a high basicity slag of 40 pctCaO-40 pctSiO2-20 pctK2CO3 (Λ = 0.73). The boron removal rates from MG-Si using CaO-SiO2 and CaO-SiO2-K2CO3 slags at 1823 K (1550 °C) were investigated in an electromagnetic induction furnace. The results showed that the boron concentration in MG-Si can be reduced from 22 to 1.8 ppmw at 1823 K (1550 °C) with 20 pct K2CO3 addition to calcium silicate slag, where the removal efficiency of boron reached 91.8 pct. The mass transfer coefficient ( β S) of boron in binary 50 pctCaO-50 pctSiO2 slag was 3.16 × 10-6 m s-1 at 1823 K (1550 °C) and was 2.43 × 10-5 m s-1 in ternary 40 pctCaO-40 pctSiO2-20 pctK2CO3 slag.

  7. Scientific Opinion on the re-evaluation of sodium stearoyl-2-lactylate (E 481 and calcium stearoyl-2-lactylate (E 482 as food additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Following a request by the European Commission, the Panel of Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to Food (ANS was asked to deliver a scientific opinion on the safety of sodium stearoyl-2-lactylate (E 481, SSL and calcium stearoyl-2-lactylate (E 482, CSL when used as food additives. SSL and CSL are used as emulsifiers and stabilizers. An Acceptable Daily Intake (ADI of 20 mg/kg bw/day for SSL and CSL (either singly or in combination was established in 1974 by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives (JECFA. The Scientific Committee on Food (SCF endorsed this ADI of 20 mg/kg bw/day in 1978. The biological fate of CSL is comparable in rodent and non-rodent species. The acute oral toxicity in rats is low. Subacute and subchronic oral toxicity studies with SSL and CSL in rats and dogs revealed a NOAEL of 5 % in the diet. Neither SSL and CSL nor their breakdown products stearic and lactic acid raise concern for genotoxicity. The NOAEL in a one-year oral toxicity study with SSL in rats was 2214 mg/kg bw/day for males and 2641 mg/kg bw/day for females. No data on reproductive toxicity and carcinogenicity were available. However, no reproductive or carcinogenic effects are expected since the products of hydrolysis, stearic and lactic acid are constituents of natural food and part of endogenous metabolism in mammals. The Panel concluded that based on the NOAEL of 2200 mg/kg bw/day derived from the one-year toxicity study in rats and an uncertainty factor of 100, an ADI of 22 mg/kg bw/day for sodium stearoyl-2-lactylate (E 481 and calcium stearoyl-2-lactylate (E 482 either singly or in combination can be established. The estimated exposure to SSL and CSL occurs mainly via the consumption of flavoured fermented milk products including heat treated products, bread and rolls and fine bakery wares and is below the ADI of 22 mg/kg bw/day for all the adult population including the elderly, but exceeds the ADI for other groups of the population

  8. Scientific Opinion on the re-evaluation of propionic acid (E 280, sodium propionate (E 281, calcium propionate (E 282 and potassium propionate (E 283 as food additives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Food Additives and Nutrient Sources added to food (ANS

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The EFSA ANS Panel provides a scientific opinion re-evaluating the safety of propionic acid (E 280, sodium propionate (E 281, calcium propionate (E 282 and potassium propionate (E 283 which are authorised as food additives in the EU and have been previously evaluated by the SCF and JECFA. JECFA allocated an ADI “not limited”. The SCF concluded that potassium propionate could be added to the list of preservatives and established an ADI ”not specified”. Propionates are naturally occurring substances in the normal diet. The Panel considered that forestomach hyperplasia reported in long-term studies in rodents is not a relevant endpoint for humans because humans lack this organ. Based on the reported presence of reversible diffuse epithelial hyperplasia in the oesophagus the LOAEL for a 90-day study in dogs was considered by the Panel to be 1 % propionic acid in the diet and the NOAEL to be 0.3 % propionic acid in the diet. The Panel considered that there is no concern with respect to genotoxicity and carcinogenicity. The Panel concluded that the present database did not allow allocation of an ADI for propionic acid - propionates. The overall mean and 95th percentile exposures to propionic acid - propionates resulting from their use as food additives (major contributor to exposure ranged from 0.7-21.1 and 3.6-40.8 mg/kg bw/day, respectively. The Panel noted that the concentration provoking site of contact effect in the 90-day study in dogs (1 % propionic acid in the diet is a factor of three higher than the concentration of propionic acid - propionates in food at the highest permitted level and concluded that for food as consumed, there would not be a safety concern from the maximum concentrations of propionic acid and its salts at their currently authorised uses and use levels as food additives.

  9. 21 CFR 573.240 - Calcium periodate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... with calcium hydroxide or calcium oxide to form a substance consisting of not less than 60 percent by... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium periodate. 573.240 Section 573.240 Food... Additive Listing § 573.240 Calcium periodate. The food additive calcium periodate may be safely used...

  10. Polyelectrolyte addition effect on the properties of setting hydraulic cements based on calcium phosphate; Efeito da adicao de polieletrolitos sobre as propriedades de cimentos de fosfato de calcio de pega hidraulica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Luis A. dos; Oliveira, Luci C. de; Rigo, Eliana C.S.; Boschi, Anselmo Ortega [Sao Carlos Univ., SP (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais; Carrodeguas, Raul Gracia [Universidad de La Habana, Habana, (Cuba). Centro de Biomateriales

    1997-12-31

    In the present work the effects of the addition of some poly electrolytes (sodium alginate and poly acrylic acid) on the solubility, crystalline phases, pH and mechanical strength under compression of three calcium phosphate cements were studied. (author) 10 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Calcium - urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003603.htm Calcium - urine To use the sharing features on this ... enable JavaScript. This test measures the amount of calcium in urine. All cells need calcium in order ...

  12. Calcium supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007477.htm Calcium supplements To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. WHO SHOULD TAKE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS? Calcium is an important mineral for the ...

  13. Photosynthetic and growth response of sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) mature trees and seedlings to calcium, magnesium, and nitrogen additions in the Catskill Mountains, NY, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momen, Bahram; Behling, Shawna J; Lawrence, Gregory B.; Sullivan, Joseph H

    2015-01-01

    Decline of sugar maple in North American forests has been attributed to changes in soil calcium (Ca) and nitrogen (N) by acidic precipitation. Although N is an essential and usually a limiting factor in forests, atmospheric N deposition may cause N-saturation leading to loss of soil Ca. Such changes can affect carbon gain and growth of sugar maple trees and seedlings. We applied a 22 factorial arrangement of N and dolomitic limestone containing Ca and Magnesium (Mg) to 12 forest plots in the Catskill Mountain region of NY, USA. To quantify the short-term effects, we measured photosynthetic-light responses of sugar maple mature trees and seedlings two or three times during two summers. We estimated maximum net photosynthesis (An-max) and its related light intensity (PAR at An-max), apparent quantum efficiency (Aqe), and light compensation point (LCP). To quantify the long-term effects, we measured basal area of living mature trees before and 4 and 8 years after treatment applications. Soil and foliar chemistry variables were also measured. Dolomitic limestone increased Ca, Mg, and pH in the soil Oe horizon. Mg was increased in the B horizon when comparing the plots receiving N with those receiving CaMg. In mature trees, foliar Ca and Mg concentrations were higher in the CaMg and N+CaMg plots than in the reference or N plots; foliar Ca concentration was higher in the N+CaMg plots compared with the CaMg plots, foliar Mg was higher in the CaMg plots than the N+CaMg plots; An-max was maximized due to N+CaMg treatment; Aqe decreased by N addition; and PAR at An-max increased by N or CaMg treatments alone, but the increase was maximized by their combination. No treatment effect was detected on basal areas of living mature trees four or eight years after treatment applications. In seedlings, An-max was increased by N+CaMg addition. The reference plots had an open herbaceous layer, but the plots receiving N had a dense monoculture of common woodfern in the

  14. Photosynthetic and Growth Response of Sugar Maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) Mature Trees and Seedlings to Calcium, Magnesium, and Nitrogen Additions in the Catskill Mountains, NY, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momen, Bahram; Behling, Shawna J; Lawrence, Greg B; Sullivan, Joseph H

    2015-01-01

    Decline of sugar maple in North American forests has been attributed to changes in soil calcium (Ca) and nitrogen (N) by acidic precipitation. Although N is an essential and usually a limiting factor in forests, atmospheric N deposition may cause N-saturation leading to loss of soil Ca. Such changes can affect carbon gain and growth of sugar maple trees and seedlings. We applied a 22 factorial arrangement of N and dolomitic limestone containing Ca and Magnesium (Mg) to 12 forest plots in the Catskill Mountain region of NY, USA. To quantify the short-term effects, we measured photosynthetic-light responses of sugar maple mature trees and seedlings two or three times during two summers. We estimated maximum net photosynthesis (An-max) and its related light intensity (PAR at An-max), apparent quantum efficiency (Aqe), and light compensation point (LCP). To quantify the long-term effects, we measured basal area of living mature trees before and 4 and 8 years after treatment applications. Soil and foliar chemistry variables were also measured. Dolomitic limestone increased Ca, Mg, and pH in the soil Oe horizon. Mg was increased in the B horizon when comparing the plots receiving N with those receiving CaMg. In mature trees, foliar Ca and Mg concentrations were higher in the CaMg and N+CaMg plots than in the reference or N plots; foliar Ca concentration was higher in the N+CaMg plots compared with the CaMg plots, foliar Mg was higher in the CaMg plots than the N+CaMg plots; An-max was maximized due to N+CaMg treatment; Aqe decreased by N addition; and PAR at An-max increased by N or CaMg treatments alone, but the increase was maximized by their combination. No treatment effect was detected on basal areas of living mature trees four or eight years after treatment applications. In seedlings, An-max was increased by N+CaMg addition. The reference plots had an open herbaceous layer, but the plots receiving N had a dense monoculture of common woodfern in the forest floor

  15. Calcium Oscillations

    OpenAIRE

    Dupont, Geneviève; Combettes, Laurent; Bird, Gary S.; Putney, James W.

    2011-01-01

    Calcium signaling results from a complex interplay between activation and inactivation of intracellular and extracellular calcium permeable channels. This complexity is obvious from the pattern of calcium signals observed with modest, physiological concentrations of calcium-mobilizing agonists, which typically present as sequential regenerative discharges of stored calcium, a process referred to as calcium oscillations. In this review, we discuss recent advances in understanding the underlyin...

  16. The influence of various doses of phosphorus and of the addition of calcium or potassium fertilization upon the yield of tomatoes in Wrocław hydroponic culture using two intensities of light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Gumicka

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Two experiments were carried out with phosphate fertilization of tomatoes in hydroponic culture. It has been proved that an additional dose of phosphorus given during the second cluster bloom, caused an yield increase. The optimal dose is 12 g of superphosphate (16% P2O5 per plant. The "green back" symptoms did not appear in these conditions. The parallel additional applying of calcium or potassium gave a decrease of the yield. When the light intensity was lowered to about 50%, the yield has decreased by half. In these conditions an additional applying of calcium (0,4 g CaCO3 and phosphorus (1g superphosphate annulated the negative influence of the low light intensity.

  17. Stochastic Simulation of Cardiac Ventricular Myocyte Calcium Dynamics and Waves

    OpenAIRE

    Tuan, Hoang-Trong Minh; Williams, George S.B.; Chikando, Aristide C.; Sobie, Eric A.; Lederer, W. Jonathan; Jafri, M. Saleet

    2011-01-01

    A three dimensional model of calcium dynamics in the rat ventricular myocyte was developed to study the mechanism of calcium homeostasis and pathological calcium dynamics during calcium overload. The model contains 20,000 calcium release units (CRUs) each containing 49 ryanodine receptors. The model simulates calcium sparks with a realistic spontaneous calcium spark rate. It suggests that in addition to the calcium spark-based leak, there is an invisible calcium leak caused by the stochastic ...

  18. The Effect of Modified Atmosphere Packaging and Addition of Rosemary Extract, Sodium Acetate and Calcium Lactate Mixture on the Quality of Pre-cooked Hamburger Patties during Refrigerated Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Muhlisin,; Kang, Sun Moon; Choi, Won Hee; Lee, Keun Taik; Cheong, Sung Hee; Lee, Sung Ki

    2013-01-01

    The effect of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP; 30% CO2+70% N2 or 100% N2) and an additive mixture (500 ppm rosemary extract, 3,000 ppm sodium acetate and 1,500 ppm calcium lactate) on the quality of pre-cooked hamburger patties during storage at 5°C for 14 d was evaluated. The addition of the additive mixture reduced aerobic and anaerobic bacteria counts in both 30% CO2-MAP (30% CO2+70% N2) and 100% N2-MAP (p

  19. Gene delivery using calcium phosphate nanoparticles: Optimization of the transfection process and the effects of citrate and poly(l-lysine) as additives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammed A; Wu, Victoria M; Ghosh, Shreya; Uskoković, Vuk

    2016-06-01

    Despite the long history of nanoparticulate calcium phosphate (CaP) as a non-viral transfection agent, there has been limited success in attempts to optimize its properties for transfection comparable in efficiency to that of viral vectors. Here we focus on the optimization of: (a) CaP nanoparticle precipitation conditions, predominantly supersaturation and Ca/P molar ratios; (b) transfection conditions, mainly the concentrations of the carrier and plasmid DNA; (c) the presence of surface additives, including citrate anion and cationic poly(l-lysine) (PLL). CaP nanoparticles significantly improved transfection with plasmid DNA encoding enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells compared to a commercial non-viral carrier. At the same time they elicited significantly lesser cytotoxicity than the commercial carrier. Plasmid DNA acted as a nucleation promoter, decreasing the nucleation lag time of metastable CaP solutions and leading to a higher rate of nucleation and a lower size of the precipitated particles. The degree of supersaturation (DS) of 15 was found to be more optimal for transfection than that of 12.5 or 17.5 and higher. Because CaP particles precipitated at DS 15 were spherical, while DS 17.5 and 21 yielded acicular particles, it was concluded that spherical particle morphologies were more conducive to transfection than the anisotropic ones. Even though the yield at DS 15 was 10 and 100 times lower than that at DS 17.5 and 21, respectively, transfection rates were higher using CaP nanoparticle colloids prepared at DS 15 than using those made at higher or lower DS, indicating that the right particle morphology can outweigh the difference in the amount of the carrier, even when this difference is close to 100×. In contrast to the commercial carrier, the concentration of CaP-pDNA delivered to the cells was directly proportional to the transfection rate. Osteosarcoma K7M2 cells were four times more easily transfectable with

  20. Effects of dietary addition of vitamins C and D3 on growth and calcium and phosphorus content of pond-cultured channel catfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Launer, C.A.; Tiemeier, O.W.; Deyoe, C.W.

    1978-01-01

    Fingerling channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, were fed one of three diets: one deficient in vitamin C (ascorbic acid), one deficient in vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol), or one containing both vitamins. Semimonthly from May to September and monthly from September to February, calcium and phosphorus were determined in eviscerated bodies and fat-free skeletons by neutron activation analysis. Body weight gains, survival rate, and feed conversion rates were determined for the May to September period. Fish on the three diet regimens showed no significant difference in weight gain, feed conversion, or survival. Interactions between sampling date and diet indicated no correlation between vitamin C or D3 and the calcium and phosphorus in eviscerated bodies and fat-free skeletons of the fish.

  1. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of vitamin C (ascorbic acid, sodium ascorbate, calcium ascorbate, ascorbyl palmitate, sodium calcium ascorbyl phosphate and sodium ascorbyl phosphate as a feed additive for all animal species based on a dossier submitted by DSM Nutritional Products Ltd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin C is essential for primates, guinea pigs and fish. Vitamin C, in the form of ascorbic acid and its calcium and sodium salts, ascorbyl palmitate, sodium calcium ascorbyl phosphate and sodium ascorbyl phosphate, is safe for all animal species. Setting a maximum content in feed and water for drinking is not considered necessary. Data on the vitamin C consumption of consumers are based on the levels of vitamin C in foodstuffs, including food of animal origin, produced in accordance with current EU legislation on the supplementation of feed with vitamin C. The exposure is far below the guidance level. Any potential contribution of the use of vitamin C in feed is therefore already considered in the above data. Consequently, the use of vitamin C in animal nutrition is not of concern for consumer safety. In the absence of inhalation toxicity studies it would be prudent to assume that inhalation of dust from the additives presents a health hazard to workers. Sodium calcium ascorbyl phosphate is not an irritant to skin and eyes and is unlikely to be a skin sensitiser. This conclusion is extrapolated to sodium ascorbyl phosphate. In the absence of data, ascorbic acid, sodium ascorbate, calcium ascorbate and ascorbyl palmitate should be considered as irritant to skin and eyes and as dermal sensitisers. The supplementation of feed with vitamin C does not pose a risk to the environment. Ascorbic acid, sodium calcium ascorbyl phosphate and sodium ascorbyl phosphate are regarded as effective sources of vitamin C when added to feed or water for drinking. Since ascorbic acid, sodium ascorbate, calcium ascorbate and ascorbyl palmitate are authorised for use as antioxidants in food and their function in feed is essentially the same as that in food, no further demonstration of efficacy is considered necessary.

  2. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of vitamin C (ascorbic acid and sodium calcium ascorbyl phosphate as a feed additive for all animal species based on a dossier submitted by VITAC EEIG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin C (formerly known as antiscorbutic vitamin is essential for primates, guinea pigs and fish. Vitamin C, in the form of ascorbic acid and sodium calcium ascorbyl phosphate, is safe for all animal species. Setting a maximum content in feed and water for drinking is not considered necessary. Data on the vitamin C consumption of consumers are based on the levels of vitamin C in foodstuffs, including food of animal origin, produced in accordance with current EU legislation on the supplementation of feed with vitamin C. The exposure is far below the guidance level. Any potential contribution of the use of vitamin C in feed is therefore already considered in the above data. Consequently, the use of vitamin C in animal nutrition is not of concern for consumer safety. In the absence of inhalation toxicity studies it would be prudent to assume that inhalation of dust from the additives presents a health hazard to workers and measures should be taken to minimise inhalation exposure. In the absence of data, ascorbic acid and sodium calcium ascorbyl phosphate should be considered as irritant to skin and eyes and as dermal sensitisers. The supplementation of feed with vitamin C does not pose a risk to the environment. Ascorbic acid and sodium calcium ascorbyl phosphate are regarded as effective sources of vitamin C when added to feed or water for drinking.

  3. The Effect of Modified Atmosphere Packaging and Addition of Rosemary Extract, Sodium Acetate and Calcium Lactate Mixture on the Quality of Pre-cooked Hamburger Patties during Refrigerated Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhlisin; Kang, Sun Moon; Choi, Won Hee; Lee, Keun Taik; Cheong, Sung Hee; Lee, Sung Ki

    2013-01-01

    The effect of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP; 30% CO2+70% N2 or 100% N2) and an additive mixture (500 ppm rosemary extract, 3,000 ppm sodium acetate and 1,500 ppm calcium lactate) on the quality of pre-cooked hamburger patties during storage at 5°C for 14 d was evaluated. The addition of the additive mixture reduced aerobic and anaerobic bacteria counts in both 30% CO2-MAP (30% CO2+70% N2) and 100% N2-MAP (p<0.05). The 30% CO2-MAP was more effective to suppress the microbial growth than 100% N2-MAP, moreover the 30% CO2-MAP combined with additive mixture resulted in the lowest bacterial counts. The hamburger patties with additive mixture showed lower CIE L* and CIE a*, and higher CIE b* than those with no additive mixture. The 30% CO2-MAP tended to decrease the TBARS during storage regardless of the addition of additives. The use of 30% CO2-MAP in combination with additives mixture was effective for maintaining the quality and extending the shelf-life of pre-cooked hamburger patties. PMID:25049716

  4. A study of the effect of addition of calcium, boron, cobalt and the combination of the three ions on biogas production from cow dung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The individual and combined effects of calcium (Ca2+ ; 51.16) mg/cm3), boron (B3+; 0.07 mg/cm3) and cobalt (Co2+; 2.97 mg/cm3) ions on biogas production from cow dung was investigated. The gas yield was recorded at 24 hours interval for 63 days under an average room temperature of 28.19 Celsius. It was found that the digesters containing Ca2+, B3+, Co2+ and a combination of the three ions produced 3101 cm3, 3229 cm3 and 2481 cm3 of gas respectively, while the control digester produced 3290 cm3 of gas. Analysis of variance conducted on the gas yield data at the significance level of α = 0.05 and critical region of F(4,∞)≥ 2.37 lead to the acceptance of the null hypothesis that the mean biogas yield of the five digesters are equal. The least significant difference (LSD) between the means is 17.61 cm3. Thus, these ions have no significant effect on the quantity of biogas produced from the cow dung investigated, at the concentration level tested

  5. Lactation curves and economic results of Saanen goats fed increasing dietary energy levels obtained by the addition of calcium salts of fatty acids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo de Souza

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of calcium salts of fatty acids (CSFA to increase the dietary energy levels for Saanen goats and their effects on the lactation curve, dry matter intake, body weight, and economic results of the goats. Twenty multiparous goats, weighing an average of 63.5±10.3 kg, were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups, each receiving one of the following dietary energy levels: a control diet consisting of 2.6 Mcal of metabolizable energy per kg of dry matter (Mcal ME/kg DM or a test diet supplemented with CSFA (Lactoplus® to obtain 2.7, 2.8, or 2.9 Mcal ME/kg DM. Goats were housed in individual stalls and were fed and milked twice daily. The animals were evaluated until 180 days in milk by measuring dry matter intake and milk yield. These measurements were used to calculate feed efficiencies and the cost-benefit ratio of diet and lactation curves using Wood's nonlinear model. Increasing dietary energy levels showed no effect on body weight. Supplementation with CSFA did not limit dry matter intake; however, it changed the shape of the lactation curve by promoting a late peak lactation with a longer duration. Milk yields at 180 days in milk had a quadratic increase with a maximum energy level at 2.85 Mcal ME/kg DM. Increasing the dietary energy level for Saanen goats using CSFA changes their lactation curves, with the best milk production achieved with a 2.85 Mcal ME/kg DM diet; however, the greatest economic results were obtained with a 2.7 Mcal ME/kg DM diet.

  6. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of Iodine compounds (E2 as feed additives for all species: calcium iodate anhydrous (coated granulated preparation, based on a dossier submitted by Doxal Italia S.p.A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Calcium iodate anhydrous is considered a safe source of iodine for all animal species/categories when used up to the currently authorised maximum content of total iodine in feed, with the exception of horses and dogs, for which maximum tolerated levels are 3 and 4 mg I/kg complete feed, respectively. The limited data available on iodine tolerance in cats support a provisional tolerated level of 5 mg I/kg complete feed. Consumers exposure was calculated in two scenarios applying the currently authorised maximum iodine contents in feed and reduced contents. The iodine content of food of animal origin, if produced taking account of the currently authorised maximum iodine content in feed, would represent a substantial risk to high consumers. The risk would originate primarily from milk consumption and to a minor extent from eggs. The UL for adults (600 µg/day and for toddlers (200 µg/day would be exceeded by a factor of 2 and 4, respectively. If the authorised maximum iodine concentrations for dairy cows and laying hens were reduced to 2 and 3 mg I/kg feed, respectively, the exposure of adult consumers would be below the UL. However, iodine intake in high-consuming toddlers would remain above the UL (1.6-fold. The formulated additive could pose a risk by inhalation to users. The preparation is non irritant to skin and eyes but may be a dermal sensitiser; coating may prevent the contact of the active substance to skin and eyes. The use of calcium iodate in animal nutrition is not expected to pose a risk to the environment. Calcium iodate is efficacious to meet iodine requirements. The FEEDAP Panel recommends the maximum iodine contents in complete feed be reduced: dairy cows/minor dairy ruminants, 2 mg I/kg; laying hens, 3 mg I/kg; horses, 3 mg I/kg; dogs, 4 mg I/kg; cats, 5 mg I/kg.

  7. 21 CFR 73.1070 - Calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 73.1070 Section 73.1070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL LISTING OF COLOR ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1070 Calcium carbonate. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive calcium carbonate is a fine,...

  8. Reduction of Saltiness and Acrylamide Levels in Palm Sugar-Like Flavouring through Buffer Modification and the Addition of Calcium Chloride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Aida Wan Mustapha

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Palm sugar-like flavouring (PSLF is a type of flavour product that is formed by heating amino acids and sugar under specific heating conditions. Unfortunately, PSLF has a salty taste and contains high amounts of acrylamide. Hence, the objective of this research was to reduce saltiness and acrylamide without negatively affecting the aroma properties of PSLF. A decrease in the sodium phosphate (NaHPO4 buffer concentration from 0.20 to 0.02 M was found to reduce sodium to approximately 15% of the level found in original PSLF. A further decrease (~25% in the sodium content was achieved by removing monobasic sodium phosphate (NaH2PO4 from the buffer system. Meanwhile, the addition of CaCl2 at 20–40 mg/L reduced the acrylamide content in PSLF by as much as 58%. A CaCl2 concentration of 20 mg/mL was most favourable as it most efficiently suppressed acrylamide formation while providing an acceptably high flavour yield in PSLF. In view of the high acrylamide content in PSLF, additional work is necessary to further reduce the amount of acrylamide by controlling the asparagine concentration in the precursor mixture.

  9. Additive effects of cilnidipine, an L-/N-type calcium channel blocker, and an angiotensin II receptor blocker on reducing cardiorenal damage in Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mori Y

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Yutaka Mori,1,2 Shizuka Aritomi,3 Kazumi Niinuma,3 Tarou Nakamura,3 Kenichi Matsuura,1 Junichi Yokoyama,1 Kazunori Utsunomiya1 1Division of Diabetes and Endocrinology, Department of Internal Medicine, The Jikei University School of Medicine, Minato-ku, Japan; 2Department of Clinical Research, National Hospital Organization, Utsunomiya National Hospital, Utsunomiya, Japan; 3Research Center, Ajinomoto Pharmaceuticals Co, Ltd, Kanagawa, Japan Abstract: Cilnidipine (Cil, which is an L-/N-type calcium channel blocker (CCB, has been known to provide renal protection by decreasing the activity of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS and the renin–angiotensin system. In this study, we compared the effects of the combination of Cil and amlodipine (Aml, which is an L-type CCB, with an angiotensin (Ang II receptor blocker on diabetic cardiorenal damage in spontaneously type 2 diabetic rats. Seventeen-week-old Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty rats were randomly assigned to receive Cil, Aml, valsartan (Val, Cil + Val, Aml + Val, or a vehicle (eight rats per group for 22 weeks. Antihypertensive potencies were nearly equal among the CCB monotherapy groups and the combination therapy groups. The lowering of blood pressure by either treatment did not significantly affect the glycemic variables. However, exacerbations of renal and heart failure were significantly suppressed in rats administered Cil or Val, and additional suppression was observed in those administered Cil + Val. Although Val increased the renin–Ang system, Aml + Val treatment resulted in additional increases in these parameters, while Cil + Val did not show such effects. Furthermore, Cil increased the ratio of Ang-(1–7 to Ang-I, despite the fact that Val and Aml + Val decreased the Ang-(1–7 levels. These actions of Cil + Val might be due to their synergistic inhibitory effect on the activity of the SNS, and on aldosterone secretion through N-type calcium channel antagonism and Ang II

  10. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... before being swallowed; do not swallow them whole. Drink a full glass of water after taking either the regular or chewable tablets or capsules. Some liquid forms of calcium carbonate must be shaken well before use.Do not ...

  11. Calcium Electroporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gibot, Laure; Madi, Moinecha;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill...... efficacy-and normal cell sensitivity. METHODS: Using a 3D spheroid cell culture model we have tested the effect of calcium electroporation and electrochemotherapy using bleomycin on three different human cancer cell lines: a colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT29), a bladder transitional cell carcinoma (SW780......), and a breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB231), as well as on primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF-n). RESULTS: The results showed a clear reduction in spheroid size in all three cancer cell spheroids three days after treatment with respectively calcium electroporation (p<0.0001) or...

  12. Calcium Calculator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Latvia - Lebanon - Libya - Lithuania - Luxembourg - Macedonia, Republic of - Malaysia - Malta - Mexico - Moldova - Morocco - Netherlands - New Zealand - Nigeria - ... and Statistics Popular content Calcium content of common foods What is Osteoporosis? The Board Introduction to Bone ...

  13. LOW-TEMPERATURE SINTERED (ZnMg2SiO4 MICROWAVE CERAMICS WITH TiO2 ADDITION AND CALCIUM BOROSILICATE GLASS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BO LI

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The low-temperature sintered (ZnMg2SiO–TiO2 microwave ceramic using CaO–B2O3–SiO2 (CBS as a sintering aid has been developed. Microwave properties of (Zn1-xMgx2SiO4 base materials via sol-gel method were highly dependent on the Mg-substituted content. Further, effects of CBS and TiO2 additives on the crystal phases, microstructures and microwave characteristics of (ZnMg2SiO4 (ZMS ceramics were investigated. The results indicated that CBS glass could lower the firing temperature of ZMS dielectrics effectively from 1170 to 950°C due to the liquid-phase effect, and significantly improve the sintering behavior and microwave properties of ZMS ceramics. Moreover, ZMS–TiO2 ceramics showed the biphasic structure and the abnormal grain growth was suppressed by the pinning effect of second phase TiO2. Proper amount of TiO2 could tune the large negative temperature coefficient of resonant frequency (tf of ZMS system to a near zero value. (Zn0.8Mg0.22SiO4 codoped with 10 wt.% TiO2 and 3 wt.% CBS sintered at 950°C exhibits the dense microstructure and excellent microwave properties: εr = 9.5, Q·f = 16 600 GHz and tf = −9.6 ppm/°C.

  14. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  15. 21 CFR 582.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.1191 Section 582.1191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  16. 21 CFR 582.1205 - Calcium hydroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium hydroxide. 582.1205 Section 582.1205 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1205 Calcium hydroxide. (a) Product. Calcium hydroxide. (b) Conditions of use....

  17. Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease; CPPD disease; Acute CPPD arthritis; Pseudogout ... Calcium pyrophosphate arthritis is caused by the collection of salt called calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD). The buildup ...

  18. Calcium channel blockers and Alzheimer's disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi Tan; Yulin Deng; Hong Qing

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by two pathological hallmarks: amyloid plaques and neurofi-brillary tangles. In addition, calcium homeostasis is disrupted in the course of human aging. Recent research shows that dense plaques can cause functional alteration of calcium signals in mice with Alzheimer's disease. Calcium channel blockers are effective therapeutics for treating Alzheimer's disease. This review provides an overview of the current research of calcium channel blockers in-volved in Alzheimer's disease therapy.

  19. Calcium channel blockers and Alzheimer's disease★

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Yi; Deng, Yulin; Qing, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is characterized by two pathological hallmarks: amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. In addition, calcium homeostasis is disrupted in the course of human aging. Recent research shows that dense plaques can cause functional alteration of calcium signals in mice with Alzheimer's disease. Calcium channel blockers are effective therapeutics for treating Alzheimer's disease. This review provides an overview of the current research of calcium channel blockers involved in...

  20. Calcium and bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone strength and calcium ... calcium (as well as phosphorus) to make healthy bones. Bones are the main storage site of calcium in ... your body does not absorb enough calcium, your bones can get weak or will not grow properly. ...

  1. Get Enough Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Calcium Print This Topic En español Get Enough Calcium Browse Sections The Basics Overview Foods and Vitamins ... 2 of 4 sections Take Action! Take Action: Calcium Sources Protect your bones – get plenty of calcium ...

  2. Calcium carbonate overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Some products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: ... and mineral supplements Other products may also contain calcium ...

  3. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of iodine compounds (E2 as feed additives for all species: calcium iodate anhydrous and potassium iodide, based on a dossier submitted by HELM AG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Calcium iodate anhydrous and potassium iodide are considered safe sources of iodine for all animal species/categories when used up to the currently authorised maximum content of total iodine in complete feed, with the exception of horses and dogs, for which maximum tolerated levels are 3 and 4 mg I/kg complete feed, respectively. The limited data available on iodine tolerance in cats support a provisional tolerated level of 5 mg I/kg complete feed. Exposure of consumers was calculated in two scenarios applying the currently authorised maximum iodine contents in feed and reduced contents. The iodine content of food of animal origin, if produced taking account of the currently authorised maximum content of iodine in feed, would represent a substantial risk to high consumers. The risk would originate primarily from the consumption of milk and to a minor extent from eggs. The UL for adults (600 µg/day and for toddlers (200 µg/day would be exceeded by a factor of 2 and  4, respectively. If the authorised maximum iodine in feed for dairy cows and laying hens were reduced to 2 and 3 mg I/kg feed, respectively, the exposure of adult consumers would be below the UL. However, iodine intake in high-consuming toddlers would remain above the UL (1.6-fold. The additives are considered as irritant to the eyes, skin and respiratory tract, and as dermal sensitisers. Exposure by inhalation should be avoided. The use of the additives in animal nutrition is not expected to pose a risk to the environment. The additives are efficacious to meet animal iodine requirements. The FEEDAP Panel recommends that the maximum iodine contents in complete feed be reduced as follows: dairy cows and minor dairy ruminants, 2 mg I/kg; laying hens, 3 mg I/kg; horses, 3 mg I/kg; dogs, 4 mg I/kg; cats, 5 mg I/kg.

  4. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of iodine compounds (E2 as feed additives for all animal species: calcium iodate anhydrous and potassium iodide, based on a dossier submitted by Ajay Europe SARL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Calcium iodate anhydrous and potassium iodide are considered safe sources of iodine for all animal species/categories when used up to the currently authorised maximum content of total iodine in complete feed, with the exception of horses and dogs, for which maximum tolerated levels are 3 and 4 mg I/kg complete feed, respectively. The limited data available on iodine tolerance in cats support a provisional tolerated level of 5 mg I/kg complete feed. Exposure of consumers was calculated in two scenarios applying the currently authorised maximum iodine contents in feed and reduced contents. The iodine content of food of animal origin, if produced taking account of the currently authorised maximum content of iodine in feed, would represent a substantial risk to high consumers. The risk would originate primarily from the consumption of milk and to a minor extent from eggs. The UL for adults (600 µg/day and for toddlers (200 µg/day would be exceeded by a factor of 2 and 4, respectively. If the authorised maximum iodine in feed for dairy cows and laying hens were reduced to 2 and 3 mg I/kg feed, respectively, the exposure of adult consumers would be below the UL. However, iodine intake in high-consuming toddlers would remain above the UL (1.6-fold. The additives are considered as irritant to the eyes, skin and respiratory tract, and as dermal sensitisers. Exposure by inhalation should be avoided. The use of the additives in animal nutrition is not expected to pose a risk to the environment. The additives are efficacious to meet animal iodine requirements. The FEEDAP Panel recommends that the maximum iodine contents in complete feed be reduced as follows: dairy cows and minor dairy ruminants, 2 mg I/kg; laying hens, 3 mg I/kg; horses, 3 mg I/kg; dogs, 4 mg I/kg; cats, 5 mg I/kg.

  5. 21 CFR 172.120 - Calcium disodium EDTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium disodium EDTA. 172.120 Section 172.120 Food... Food Preservatives § 172.120 Calcium disodium EDTA. The food additive calcium disodium EDTA (calcium... 100 Promote color retention. 1 By weight of egg yolk portion. (2) With disodium EDTA...

  6. Calcium paradox and calcium entry blockers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Slade, A.M.; Nayler, W.G.; Meijler, F.L.

    1984-01-01

    Reperfusion of isolated hearts with calcium-containing solution after a short period of calcium-free perfusion results in irreversible cell damage (calcium paradox). This phenomenon is characterized by an excessive influx of calcium into the cells, the rapid onset of myocardial contracture, exhausti

  7. Calcium Absorption from Fortified Ice Cream Formulations Compared with Calcium Absorption from Milk

    OpenAIRE

    van der Hee, Regine M.; Miret, Silvia; Slettenaar, Marieke; Duchateau, Guus S.M.J.E.; Rietveld, Anton G.; Wilkinson, Joy E.; Quail, Patricia J.; Berry, Mark J.; Dainty, Jack R.; Teucher, Birgit; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2009-01-01

    Objective Optimal bone mass in early adulthood is achieved through appropriate diet and lifestyle, thereby protecting against osteoporosis and risk of bone fracture in later life. Calcium and vitamin D are essential to build adequate bones, but calcium intakes of many population groups do not meet dietary reference values. In addition, changes in dietary patterns are exacerbating the problem, thereby emphasizing the important role of calcium-rich food products. We have designed a calcium-fort...

  8. 21 CFR 172.410 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 172.410 Section 172.410 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED FOR DIRECT ADDITION TO FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Anticaking Agents § 172.410 Calcium...

  9. Calcium is required for swimming by the nonflagellated cyanobacterium Synechococcus strain WH8113.

    OpenAIRE

    Pitta, T P; Sherwood, E E; Kobel, A M; Berg, H C

    1997-01-01

    The marine cyanobacterium Synechococcus strain WH8113 swims in the absence of any recognizable organelles of locomotion. We have found that calcium is required for this motility. Cells deprived of calcium stopped swimming, while addition of calcium completely restored motility. No other divalent ions tested could replace calcium. Terbium, a lanthanide ion, blocked motility even when calcium was present at 10(5)-fold-higher concentrations, presumably by occupying calcium binding sites. Calcium...

  10. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of vitamin C (ascorbic acid, sodium ascorbate, calcium ascorbate, ascorbyl palmitate, sodium calcium ascorbyl phosphate and sodium ascorbyl phosphate) as a feed additive for all animal species based on a dossier submitted by DSM Nutritional Products Ltd

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP)

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin C is essential for primates, guinea pigs and fish. Vitamin C, in the form of ascorbic acid and its calcium and sodium salts, ascorbyl palmitate, sodium calcium ascorbyl phosphate and sodium ascorbyl phosphate, is safe for all animal species. Setting a maximum content in feed and water for drinking is not considered necessary. Data on the vitamin C consumption of consumers are based on the levels of vitamin C in foodstuffs, including food of animal origin, produced in accordance with c...

  11. Calcium and bones (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human ... body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their structure. Calcium is essential for the ...

  12. Coronary Calcium Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Coronary Calcium Scan? A coronary calcium scan is a test ... you have calcifications in your coronary arteries. Coronary Calcium Scan Figure A shows the position of the ...

  13. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... Calcium hydroxide ... These products contain calcium hydroxide: Cement Limewater Many industrial solvents and cleaners (hundreds to thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement ...

  14. Calcium source (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getting enough calcium to keep bones from thinning throughout a person's life may be made more difficult if that person has ... as a tendency toward kidney stones, for avoiding calcium-rich food sources. Calcium deficiency also effects the ...

  15. Calcium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - calcium ... Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the human body. It helps form and maintain healthy teeth and bones. A proper level of calcium in the body over a lifetime can help ...

  16. Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) Fast Facts The risk of ... young people, too. Proper diagnosis depends on detecting calcium pyrophosphate crystals in the fluid of an affected ...

  17. 添加含钙化合物对茶园土壤pH及有效氟的影响%Influence of Addition of Calcium compounds on pH and Available Fluoride Content in Tea Garden Soil

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张永利; 廖万有; 王烨军; 苏有健; 孙力

    2013-01-01

    鉴于长期饮用高氟茶可引起饮茶型氟中毒,拟通过探明茶园土壤有效氟的调控机制,为治理土壤氟污染并降低茶叶中氟含量提供理论依据.以湖南某茶园0~20 cm和20~40 cm土壤为对象,通过室内模拟培养,研究不同形态和添加量的钙离子对土壤pH和有效氟含量的影响.结果表明,添加200~400 mg/kg Ca2+[Ca(NO3)2]和100~1000 mg/kg Ca2+[CaCl2]后2层土壤pH由4.0降至3.5~3.7,土壤水溶态氟含量明显增加;添加60~1400 mg/kg Ca2+[Ca(OH)2]时,随Ca(OH)2添加量的增加,2层土壤pH分别升至5.13、5.23,土壤水溶态氟含量呈现先增加再降低最后增加的趋势;添加3种形态含钙化合物均降低土壤交换态氟含量.当土壤pH在3.5~6.0间变化时,以pH 5.0为拐点,土壤pH降低或升高水溶态氟含量均增加,土壤酸化时尤甚.因此,可在酸性土壤上施用白云石粉、Ca(OH)2,在偏碱性土壤上施用Ca(NO3)2、CaCl2,调整土壤pH至5.0左右,以有效降低茶园土壤有效氟含量.%Long-term consumption of high-fluoride tea probably causes drinking tea fluorosis. This article ascertained the regulation mechanism of available fluoride content in tea garden soil, to provide theory of controlling soil fluoride pollution and reducing fluoride content of tea leaves. Laboratory incubation tests were conducted, using 0-20 cm and 20-40 cm layers soils from two tea gardens of Hunan Province as experiment materials, to study the influence of different forms and addition amount of calcium ion on soil pH and available fluoride content. The results showed that soil pH value fell to 3.5 from 4.0-3.7 and soil water soluble fluoride content increased obviously when the addition amount of Ca(NO3)2 and CaCl2 was increased. With the increase of addition amount of Ca(OH)2, the soil pH value change ranged from 4.0 to 5.2, soil water soluble fluorine content was decreased obviously at first, then increased. Soil exchangeable fluoride content was

  18. Effects of additive calcium hydride on the pyrolysis characteristics of alkali lignin%添加剂氢化钙对碱木质素热裂解特性的影响

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    耿晶; 王文亮; 任学勇; 常建民

    2015-01-01

    The calcium hydride (CaH2 )was employed as additive in alkali lignin for resolving the complicated products and low content of single component of the lignin pyrolysis.The effect of the pyrolysis vapor from alkali lignin with different proportions of CaH2 was investigated by pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS).The results indicate that the addi-tion of CaH2 reduces the components of alkali lignin pyrolysis from 51 kinds to 20 kinds,which achieves the enrichment of the key components.The addition of CaH2 further improves the content of guaiacol and methanol,which is raised by more than 70% and 100%,respectively.CaH2 has double roles of hydrogenation and catalytic convertion in the lignin pyrolysis.CaH2 promotes the reduction and transformation of the intermediate products such as ketones,acids,aldehydes and other unsaturated functional groups.Carboxyl and carbonyl groups are reduced to phenolic hydroxyl and alcoholic hydroxyl groups.The increase of phenolic hydroxyl group improves the reactivity of alkali lignin pyrolysis product,and the increase of alcoholic hydroxyl group improves the stability of the pyrolysis product.Therefore,CaH2 has a significant influence on improving the composition distribution, quality and stability of alkali lignin pyrolysis products.%针对碱木质素热裂解产物种类分布复杂、单一组分含量偏低等问题,以还原性强的氢化钙作为添加剂,利用热裂解气质联用分析法考察了添加不同质量分数氢化钙对碱木质素热裂解产物组分构成、转化及分布的影响。结果表明:氢化钙的加入使得碱木质素热裂解组分种类从51种减少到20种,促进了组分的富集;氢化钙的加入大幅度促进了碱木质素热裂解主产物愈创木酚和甲醇的生成,分别提高了70%和100%以上;氢化钙在碱木质素热裂解过程中起到加氢还原和催化转化双重作用,促进了热裂解中间产物酮类、酸类、醛类等

  19. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of iodine compounds (E2 as feed additives for all animal species: calcium iodate anhydrous, based on a dossier submitted by Calibre Europe SPRL/BVBA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Calcium iodate anhydrous is considered a safe source of iodine for all animal species/categories when used up to the currently authorised maximum content of total iodine in complete feed, with the exception of horses and dogs, for which maximum tolerated levels are 3 and 4 mg I/kg complete feed, respectively. The limited data available on iodine tolerance in cats support a provisional tolerated level of 5 mg I/kg complete feed. Exposure of consumers was calculated in two scenarios applying the currently authorised maximum iodine contents in feed and reduced contents. The iodine content of food of animal origin, if produced taking account of the currently authorised maximum content of iodine in feed, would represent a substantial risk to high consumers. The risk would originate primarily from the consumption of milk and to a minor extent from eggs. The UL for adults (600 µg/day and for toddlers (200 µg/day would be exceeded by a factor of 2 and 4, respectively. If the authorised maximum iodine concentrations in feed for dairy cows and laying hens were reduced to 2 and 3 mg I/kg feed, respectively, the exposure of adult consumers would be below the UL. However, iodine intake in high-consuming toddlers would remain above the UL (1.6-fold. Calcium iodate is considered as irritant to the eye, skin and respiratory tract, and a dermal sensitiser. The exposure by inhalation should be avoided. The use of calcium iodate in animal nutrition is not expected to pose a risk to the environment. Calcium iodate is efficacious to meet animal iodine requirements. The FEEDAP Panel recommends that the maximum iodine contents in complete feed be reduced as follows: dairy cows and minor dairy ruminants, 2 mg I/kg; laying hens, 3 mg I/kg; horses, 3 mg I/kg; dogs, 4 mg I/kg; cats, 5 mg I/kg.

  20. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of vitamin C (ascorbic acid and sodium calcium ascorbyl phosphate) as a feed additive for all animal species based on a dossier submitted by VITAC EEIG

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP)

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin C (formerly known as antiscorbutic vitamin) is essential for primates, guinea pigs and fish. Vitamin C, in the form of ascorbic acid and sodium calcium ascorbyl phosphate, is safe for all animal species. Setting a maximum content in feed and water for drinking is not considered necessary. Data on the vitamin C consumption of consumers are based on the levels of vitamin C in foodstuffs, including food of animal origin, produced in accordance with current EU legislation on the supplemen...

  1. Calcium and Vitamin D

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home › Patients › Treatment › Calcium/Vitamin D Calcium/Vitamin D Getting enough calcium and vitamin D is essential ... counter medications and calcium supplements. What is Vitamin D and What Does it Do? Vitamin D plays ...

  2. Rapid screening assay for calcium bioavailability studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium bioavailability has been studied by numerous techniques. The authors report here the use of the gamma emitting isotope of calcium (47Ca) in a whole body retention assay system. In this system, calcium sources are administered by oral gavage and subsequent counts are determined and corrected for isotopic decay. Unlike iron and zinc retention curves, which exhibit a 2-3 day equilibration period, calcium reaches equilibration after 24 hours. Autoradiographic analysis of the femurs indicate that the newly absorbed calcium is rapidly distributed to the skeletal system. Moreover, the isotope is distributed along the entire bone. Comparisons of calcium bioavailability were made using intrinsic/extrinsic labeled milk from two species i.e. rat and goat as well as CaCO3. In addition, extrinsic labeled cow milk was examined. In the rat, the extrinsic labeled calcium from milk was better absorbed than the intrinsic calcium. This was not the case in goat milk or the calcium carbonate which exhibited no significant differences. Chromatographic analysis of the labeled milk indicates a difference in distribution of the 47Ca. From these data, the authors recommend the use of this assay system in calcium bioavailability studies. The labeling studies and comparisons indicate caution should be used, however, in labeling techniques and species milk comparison

  3. How calcium makes endocytic receptors attractive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Christian B F; Moestrup, Søren K

    2014-01-01

    receptor. Endosomal acidification and calcium efflux lead to the essential ligand-receptor affinity switch and separation. Recent data, including crystal structures of receptor-ligand complexes, now reveal how calcium, in different types of domain scaffolds, functions in a common way as a removable...... 'lynchpin' that stabilizes favorable positioning of ligand-attractive receptor residues. In addition to explaining how calcium depletion can cause ligand-receptor dissociation, the new data add further insight into how acidification contributes to dissociation through structural changes that affect the...... receptor calcium sites....

  4. Importance of Calcium

    OpenAIRE

    TANDOĞAN, Berivan; ULUSU, N. Nuray

    2005-01-01

    Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body. Calcium regulates many cellular processes and has important structural roles in living organisms. Skeletal muscle structure and function, polymerisation of fibrin and the conduction of impulses in the nervous system are regulated by calcium. Calcium is an important intracellular messenger in protozoa, plants, and animals. Calcium-transporting systems which are located in the plasma membrane and in the organelles, regulate the ionic concentrati...

  5. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION Special Dietary and Nutritional Additives § 172.330 Calcium pantothenate... (racemic) form. (b) To assure safe use of the additive, the label and labeling of the food...

  6. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of iodine compounds (E2) as feed additives for all animal species: calcium iodate anhydrous, based on a dossier submitted by Calibre Europe SPRL/BVBA

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP)

    2013-01-01

    Calcium iodate anhydrous is considered a safe source of iodine for all animal species/categories when used up to the currently authorised maximum content of total iodine in complete feed, with the exception of horses and dogs, for which maximum tolerated levels are 3 and 4 mg I/kg complete feed, respectively. The limited data available on iodine tolerance in cats support a provisional tolerated level of 5 mg I/kg complete feed. Exposure of consumers was calculated in two scenarios applying th...

  7. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of Iodine compounds (E2) as feed additives for all species: calcium iodate anhydrous (coated granulated preparation), based on a dossier submitted by Doxal Italia S.p.A.

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP)

    2013-01-01

    Calcium iodate anhydrous is considered a safe source of iodine for all animal species/categories when used up to the currently authorised maximum content of total iodine in feed, with the exception of horses and dogs, for which maximum tolerated levels are 3 and 4 mg I/kg complete feed, respectively. The limited data available on iodine tolerance in cats support a provisional tolerated level of 5 mg I/kg complete feed. Consumers exposure was calculated in two scenarios applying the currently ...

  8. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of iodine compounds (E2) as feed additives for all animal species: calcium iodate anhydrous and potassium iodide, based on a dossier submitted by Ajay Europe SARL

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP)

    2013-01-01

    Calcium iodate anhydrous and potassium iodide are considered safe sources of iodine for all animal species/categories when used up to the currently authorised maximum content of total iodine in complete feed, with the exception of horses and dogs, for which maximum tolerated levels are 3 and 4 mg I/kg complete feed, respectively. The limited data available on iodine tolerance in cats support a provisional tolerated level of 5 mg I/kg complete feed. Exposure of consumers was calculated in two ...

  9. Scientific Opinion on the safety and efficacy of iodine compounds (E2) as feed additives for all species: calcium iodate anhydrous and potassium iodide, based on a dossier submitted by HELM AG

    OpenAIRE

    EFSA Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (FEEDAP)

    2013-01-01

    Calcium iodate anhydrous and potassium iodide are considered safe sources of iodine for all animal species/categories when used up to the currently authorised maximum content of total iodine in complete feed, with the exception of horses and dogs, for which maximum tolerated levels are 3 and 4 mg I/kg complete feed, respectively. The limited data available on iodine tolerance in cats support a provisional tolerated level of 5 mg I/kg complete feed. Exposure of consumers was calculated in two ...

  10. Calcium in diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... best source. Milk and dairy products such as yogurt, cheeses, and buttermilk contain a form of calcium ... the amount of calcium in a dairy product. Yogurt, most cheeses, and buttermilk are excellent sources of ...

  11. Fenoprofen calcium overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenoprofen calcium is a type of medicine called a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. It is a prescription pain medicine used to relieve symptoms of arthritis . Fenoprofen calcium overdose occurs when someone takes more than the ...

  12. Calcium channel blocker overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002580.htm Calcium channel blocker overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Calcium channel blockers are a type of medicine used ...

  13. Fenoprofen calcium overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002649.htm Fenoprofen calcium overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Fenoprofen calcium is a type of medicine called a nonsteroidal ...

  14. Calcium and magnesium disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Jesse P

    2014-07-01

    Hypocalcemia is a clinical disorder that can be life threatening to the cow (milk fever) and predisposes the animal to various other metabolic and infectious disorders. Calcium homeostasis is mediated primarily by parathyroid hormone, which stimulates bone calcium resorption and renal calcium reabsorption. Parathyroid hormone stimulates the production of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D to enhance diet calcium absorption. High dietary cation-anion difference interferes with tissue sensitivity to parathyroid hormone. Hypomagnesemia reduces tissue response to parathyroid hormone. PMID:24980727

  15. Calcium and Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  16. Relating a calcium indicator signal to the unperturbed calcium concentration time-course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abarbanel Henry DI

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Optical indicators of cytosolic calcium levels have become important experimental tools in systems and cellular neuroscience. Indicators are known to interfere with intracellular calcium levels by acting as additional buffers, and this may strongly alter the time-course of various dynamical variables to be measured. Results By investigating the underlying reaction kinetics, we show that in some ranges of kinetic parameters one can explicitly link the time dependent indicator signal to the time-course of the calcium influx, and thus, to the unperturbed calcium level had there been no indicator in the cell.

  17. Calcium en cardioplegie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Meijler, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Coronary perfusion with a calcium-free solution, followed by reperfusion with a calcium containing solution, may result in acute myocardial cell death and in irreversible loss of the e1ectrical and mechanical activity of the heart. This phenomenon is known as the calcium paradox. A number of cardiop

  18. Calcium absorption from corn tortilla is relatively high and is dependent upon calcium content and liming in Mexican women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosado, Jorge L; Díaz, Margarita; Rosas, Angélica; Griffit, Ian; García, Olga P

    2005-11-01

    Corn tortillas are the staple food of Mexico. During their preparation, calcium is added to the tortillas; therefore, tortillas are the main source of calcium for a large proportion of the population. The bioavailability of calcium from lime-treated tortillas in humans is not known. The objectives of the present study were to determine calcium absorption from corn tortilla, to determine the effect of lime treatment on calcium absorption from corn tortilla, and to compare calcium absorption from tortilla prepared with a commercial corn flour and tortillas prepared with the traditional lime treatment at home. Nonpregnant, nonlactating women (n = 9) were administered 3 different treatments: 1) 180 g of corn tortilla prepared from corn flour with no lime treatment (CF), 2) 180 g of corn tortilla prepared from lime-treated commercial corn flour (LTCCF), or 3) 180 g of corn tortillas prepared from lime-treated home-prepared corn flour (LTHCF). Calcium absorption was measured using an established dual-tracer stable isotope technique. Calcium absorption of CF, LTCCF, and LTHCF was (mean +/- SD): 44 +/- 3.2, 32 +/- 4.4, and 30 +/- 2.4%, respectively; the fractional calcium absorption from CF differed from that of either LTCCF or LTHCF (P tortillas is high and dependent on calcium concentration. The addition of calcium during lime treatment increases calcium concentration and total calcium absorption. PMID:16251614

  19. Effect of calcium addition and pH on yield and texture of Minas cured cheese Efeito da adição de cálcio e do pH sobre o rendimento e a textura de queijo-de-Minas curado

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.N.C. Santos

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Milk calcium concentration is a factor related to cheese texture, an important rheological property of cheese quality as perceived by consumers. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different pH conditions (5.8 and 6.6 and calcium addition (0, 150, 300 ppm of CaCl2, on yield and nutrient retention of the clots obtained and on the texture of Minascured cheese. Clots were analyzed for wet and dry yield, percentage content and retention of protein, fat and calcium. The texture of the cheese was evaluated by instrumental and sensorial tests. No differences were observed on the wet and dry yields, or on the protein content, fat and calcium retention of clots produced in the different experimental conditions. The instrumental evaluation showed that calcium addition significantly influenced the texture of cheeses, regardless of the pH of milk clotting. The sensory panel did not find a difference in the hardness ofcheeses produced at the same pH of milk clotting in function of CaCl2 addition. There was no difference in the texture of Minascured cheese due to the calcium addition to milk for dairy product consumers, which brings a new perspective on manufacture for cheese markers.Avaliou-se o efeito de diferentes condições de pH ­5,8 e 6,6 ­e da adição de cálcio ­0, 150, 300ppm de CaCl2 - sobre o rendimento, a retenção de nutrientes nos coágulos produzidos e a textura de queijo-de-Minas curado. Foram analisados nos coágulos os rendimentos úmido e seco, o percentual e a retenção de proteína, de gordura e de cálcio. A textura dos queijos foi avaliada por testes instrumental e sensorial. Não foram observadas diferenças nos rendimentos úmido e seco, no conteúdo percentual e na retenção de proteína, gordura e cálcio nos coágulos produzidos em diferentes condições experimentais. A análise instrumental mostrou que a adição ou não de cálcio influenciou a textura dos queijos, independentemente do pH de coagulação do leite

  20. Effect of dietary calcium and phosphorus on intestinal calcium absorption and vitamin D metabolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To understand better dietary regulation of intestinal calcium absorption, a quantitative assessment of the metabolites in plasma and duodenum of rats given daily doses of radioactive vitamin D3 and diets differing in calcium and phosphorus content was made. All known vitamin D metabolites were ultimately identified by high-pressure liquid chromatography. In addition to the known metabolites (25-hydroxyvitamin D3, 24,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, 25,26-dihydroxyvitamin D3, and 1,24,25-trihydroxyvitamin D3), several new and unidentified metabolites were found. In addition to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 and 1,24,25-trihydroxyvitamin D3, the levels of some of the unknown metabolites could be correlated with intestinal calcium transport. However, whether or not any of these metabolites plays a role in the stimulation of intestinal calcium absorption by low dietary calcium or low dietary phosphorus remains unknown

  1. Additives for the Axe

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    On May 1,China will begin to ban the production and use of two food additives commonly used to "bleach" flour,benzoyl peroxide and calcium peroxide.The decision was made after 10 years of wrangling between the policy makers,manufacturers,scientists and consumers.The Ministry of Health said in a statement it was applying the ban in response to consumers’ concerns about chemical substances in food,and technical improvements that had made the two additives unnecessary in flour processing.Minister of Health Chen Zhu has also said

  2. Calcium absorption and achlorhydria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Defective absorption of calcium has been thought to exist in patients with achlorhydria. The author compared absorption of calcium in its carbonate form with that in a pH-adjusted citrate form in a group of 11 fasting patients with achlorhydria and in 9 fasting normal subjects. Fractional calcium absorption was measured by a modified double-isotope procedure with 0.25 g of calcium used as the carrier. Mean calcium absorption (+/- S.D.) in the patients with achlorhydria was 0.452 +/- 0.125 for citrate and 0.042 +/- 0.021 for carbonate (P less than 0.0001). Fractional calcium absorption in the normal subjects was 0.243 +/- 0.049 for citrate and 0.225 +/- 0.108 for carbonate (not significant). Absorption of calcium from carbonate in patients with achlorhydria was significantly lower than in the normal subjects and was lower than absorption from citrate in either group; absorption from citrate in those with achlorhydria was significantly higher than in the normal subjects, as well as higher than absorption from carbonate in either group. Administration of calcium carbonate as part of a normal breakfast resulted in completely normal absorption in the achlorhydric subjects. These results indicate that calcium absorption from carbonate is impaired in achlorhydria under fasting conditions. Since achlorhydria is common in older persons, calcium carbonate may not be the ideal dietary supplement

  3. EXERCISE ENHANCING CALCIUM ABSORPTION MECHANISM

    OpenAIRE

    Muliani

    2013-01-01

    Calcium has important role in many biological processes therefore calcium homeostasis should be maintained. Imbalance in calcium homeostasis would affects the bone metabolism, neuromuscular function, blood coagulation, cell proliferation and signal transduction. Homeostasis of calcium is maintained by three major organs: gastrointestinal tract, bone and kidney. Intestinal calcium absorption is the sole mechanism to supply calcium to the body. Calcium absorption controlled by calcitropic hormo...

  4. 氟化钙参与石煤提钒过程的浸出行为研究%Acid-Leaching of Vanadium from Stone Coal with Calcium Fluoride Addition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王非; 张一敏; 黄晶; 刘涛; 赵杰; 张国斌

    2013-01-01

    The behavior of leaching vanadium from stone coal with calcium fluoride was researched under the conditions of 95 ℃,4 h,1 ml·g-1,15% (volume fraction) H2SO4 and 5% (mass fraction) calcium fluoride.The leaching rate of vanadium could reach 92.39%.Through the analyses of inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES),valence state vanadium and X-ray diffractometry (XRD) for the raw ore of stone coal,ICP-AES,X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and 19F liquid nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) for the leachate,and XRD and scanning electron microscope (SEM) for the leaching residue,the whole leaching process could be summarized that calcium fluoride reacted with sulfuric acid to generate hydrofluoric acid and the hydrofluoric acid solution (HF) could enhance the leaching process owing to its strong destructiveness to vanadium-bearing minerals; calcite consumed part of acid to generate CaSO4 and CO2 ; chlorite and vanadium-bearing phlogopite were thoroughly broken down and released V,Al,K,Mg,Si etc.[AlF5] 2-and [SiF6] 2-were generated and left in the leachate after F-reacted with other elements in the vanadium leaching.In the process of intense stir,the released Ⅴ(Ⅲ) was oxidized into VO2+ by O2 from air to exist in leachate.Part of the released Al existed in leachate as Al3 + and others combined with F to generate [AlF5] 2-.Part of the released Si existed in residue as SiO2,and the rest combined with F to generate [SiF6] 2-.It was because the bond energies of Al-F and Si-F were bigger than that of Al-O and Si-O,and the generation of [AlF5] 2-and [SiF6] 2-made the leaching system more stable and facilitated leaching vanadium.%研究了氟化钙参与石煤提钒过程的浸出行为,浸出条件为95℃,4h,1ml·g-1,15%(体积分数)硫酸和5%(质量分数)氟化钙.在此条件下钒的浸出率可达到92.39%.通过对石煤原矿进行电感耦合等离子体原子发射光谱分析(ICP-AES)、钒价态分析和X射线衍射(XRD

  5. Dengue and Calcium

    OpenAIRE

    Shivanthan, Mitrakrishnan C; Rajapakse, Senaka

    2014-01-01

    Dengue is potentially fatal unless managed appropriately. No specific treatment is available and the mainstay of treatment is fluid management with careful monitoring, organ support, and correction of metabolic derangement. Evidence with regards to the role of calcium homeostasis in dengue is limited. Low blood calcium levels have been demonstrated in dengue infection and hypocalcemia maybe more pronounced in more severe forms. The cause of hypocalcemia is likely to be multifactorial. Calcium...

  6. Measurements of intracellular calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) has been measured in cultured cells by using Fura-2 load cells and a computer-controlled Perkin Elmer LS-5B spectrofluorometer. Increased [Ca2+]i in cells exposed to extracellular bilirubin was observed both with and without extracellular calcium. However, the increase was considerable larger with extracellular calcium. The enhancement of [Ca2+]i became smaller with decreasing bilirubin/BSA (bovine serum albumine) ratio. 5 refs., 5 figs

  7. Propriedades mecânicas e estrutura celular de melão desidratado osmoticamente em soluções de sacarose ou maltose, com adição de lactato de cálcio Mechanical properties and cellular structure of osmodehydrated melon in sucrose or maltose solutions with calcium lactate addition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristhiane Caroline Ferrari

    2011-08-01

    rupture and structure by light microscopy. Maltose treatments in combination with the salt action promoted higher water loss and lower solids gain rates. The calcium lactate addition in the sucrose or maltose solution resulted in higher stress at rupture values. This increase was more pronounced for sucrose treatments, due to the higher calcium uptake observed in these experiments. Calcium lactate was efficient in the maintenance of melon cellular structure when used at concentrations up to 1,0%. Maltose showed a higher protector effect in cellular membrane functionality, while the treatment performed only with sucrose solution as well as both treatments with salt concentration at 1,5%caused an intense cytoplasm plasmolysis and cell wall damages.

  8. Calcium D-saccharate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, André Castilho; Hedegaard, Martina Vavrusova; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2016-01-01

    Molar conductivity of saturated aqueous solutions of calcium d-saccharate, used as a stabilizer of beverages fortified with calcium d-gluconate, increases strongly upon dilution, indicating complex formation between calcium and d-saccharate ions, for which, at 25 °C, Kassoc = 1032 ± 80, ΔHassoc......° = -34 ± 6 kJ mol-1, and ΔSassoc° = -55 ± 9 J mol-1 K-1, were determined electrochemically. Calcium d-saccharate is sparingly soluble, with a solubility product, Ksp, of (6.17 ± 0.32) × 10-7 at 25 °C, only moderately increasing with the temperature: ΔHsol° = 48 ± 2 kJ mol-1, and ΔSassoc° = 42 ± 7 J mol-1...... K-1. Equilibria in supersaturated solutions of calcium d-saccharate seem only to adjust slowly, as seen from calcium activity measurements in calcium d-saccharate solutions made supersaturated by cooling. Solutions formed by isothermal dissolution of calcium d-gluconate in aqueous potassium d...

  9. Calcium-Mediated Abiotic Stress Signaling in Roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Katie A; Matthus, Elsa; Swarbreck, Stéphanie M; Davies, Julia M

    2016-01-01

    Roots are subjected to a range of abiotic stresses as they forage for water and nutrients. Cytosolic free calcium is a common second messenger in the signaling of abiotic stress. In addition, roots take up calcium both as a nutrient and to stimulate exocytosis in growth. For calcium to fulfill its multiple roles must require strict spatio-temporal regulation of its uptake and efflux across the plasma membrane, its buffering in the cytosol and its sequestration or release from internal stores. This prompts the question of how specificity of signaling output can be achieved against the background of calcium's other uses. Threats to agriculture such as salinity, water availability and hypoxia are signaled through calcium. Nutrient deficiency is also emerging as a stress that is signaled through cytosolic free calcium, with progress in potassium, nitrate and boron deficiency signaling now being made. Heavy metals have the capacity to trigger or modulate root calcium signaling depending on their dose and their capacity to catalyze production of hydroxyl radicals. Mechanical stress and cold stress can both trigger an increase in root cytosolic free calcium, with the possibility of membrane deformation playing a part in initiating the calcium signal. This review addresses progress in identifying the calcium transporting proteins (particularly channels such as annexins and cyclic nucleotide-gated channels) that effect stress-induced calcium increases in roots and explores links to reactive oxygen species, lipid signaling, and the unfolded protein response. PMID:27621742

  10. Consumption of calcium-fortified cereal bars to improve dietary calcium intake of healthy women: randomized controlled feasibility study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer T Lee

    Full Text Available Calcium is an important structural component of the skeletal system. Although an adequate intake of calcium helps to maintain bone health and reduce the risk of osteoporosis, many women do not meet recommended daily intakes of calcium. Previous interventions studies designed to increase dietary intake of women have utilized primarily dairy sources of calcium or supplements. However, lactose intolerance, milk protein allergies, or food preferences may lead many women to exclude important dairy sources of dietary calcium. Therefore, we undertook a 9 week randomized crossover design trial to examine the potential benefit of including a non-dairy source of calcium in the diet of women. Following a 3 week run-in baseline period, 35 healthy women > 18 years were randomized by crossover design into either Group I or Group II. Group I added 2 calcium-fortified cereal bars daily (total of 400 mg calcium/day (intervention to their usual diet and Group II continued their usual diet (control. At the end of 3 weeks, diets were switched for another 3 weeks. Intakes of calcium and energy were estimated from 3-day diet and supplemental diaries. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used for within group comparisons and Mann Whitney U tests were used for between group comparisons of calcium and energy intake. Dietary calcium was significantly higher during intervention (1071 mg/d when participants consumed 2 calcium-fortified cereal bars daily than during the baseline (720 mg/d, P <0.0001 or control diets (775 mg/d, P = 0.0001 periods. Furthermore, the addition of 2 calcium-fortified cereal bars daily for the 3 week intervention did not significantly increase total energy intake or result in weight gain. In conclusion, consumption of calcium-fortified cereal bars significantly increased calcium intake of women. Further research examining the potential ability of fortified cereal bars to help maintain and improve bone health of women is warranted.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT

  11. Serum Calcium Level in Hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Hazari, Mohammed Abdul Hannan; Arifuddin, Mehnaaz Sameera; Muzzakar, Syed; Reddy, Vontela Devender

    2012-01-01

    Background: The alterations in extracellular calcium level may influence intracellular calcium level and possibly play a role in the pathogenesis of essential hypertension. Aim: The purpose was to find out the association between serum calcium levels and hypertension; and to compare the serum calcium levels between normotensive controls, hypertensive subjects on calcium channel blockers, and hypertensive subjects on antihypertensive medication other than calcium channel blockers. Materials an...

  12. HYPERTHERMIA, INTRACELLULAR FREE CALCIUM AND CALCIUM IONOPHORES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEGE, GJJ; WIERENGA, PK; KAMPINGA, HH; KONINGS, AWT

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that heat-induced increase of intracellular calcium does not correlate with hyperthermic cell killing. Six different cell lines were investigated; in four (EAT, HeLa S3, L5178Y-R and L5178Y-S) heat treatments killing 90% of the cells did not affect the levels of intracellular free calciu

  13. Extracellular calcium sensing and extracellular calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E. M.; MacLeod, R. J.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2001-01-01

    The cloning of a G protein-coupled extracellular Ca(2+) (Ca(o)(2+))-sensing receptor (CaR) has elucidated the molecular basis for many of the previously recognized effects of Ca(o)(2+) on tissues that maintain systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, especially parathyroid chief cells and several cells in the kidney. The availability of the cloned CaR enabled the development of DNA and antibody probes for identifying the CaR's mRNA and protein, respectively, within these and other tissues. It also permitted the identification of human diseases resulting from inactivating or activating mutations of the CaR gene and the subsequent generation of mice with targeted disruption of the CaR gene. The characteristic alterations in parathyroid and renal function in these patients and in the mice with "knockout" of the CaR gene have provided valuable information on the CaR's physiological roles in these tissues participating in mineral ion homeostasis. Nevertheless, relatively little is known about how the CaR regulates other tissues involved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) homeostasis, particularly bone and intestine. Moreover, there is evidence that additional Ca(o)(2+) sensors may exist in bone cells that mediate some or even all of the known effects of Ca(o)(2+) on these cells. Even more remains to be learned about the CaR's function in the rapidly growing list of cells that express it but are uninvolved in systemic Ca(o)(2+) metabolism. Available data suggest that the receptor serves numerous roles outside of systemic mineral ion homeostasis, ranging from the regulation of hormonal secretion and the activities of various ion channels to the longer term control of gene expression, programmed cell death (apoptosis), and cellular proliferation. In some cases, the CaR on these "nonhomeostatic" cells responds to local changes in Ca(o)(2+) taking place within compartments of the extracellular fluid (ECF) that communicate with the outside environment (e.g., the gastrointestinal tract). In others

  14. Food additives

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002435.htm Food additives To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Food additives are substances that become part of a food ...

  15. Protein kinase C interaction with calcium: a phospholipid-dependent process.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bazzi, M D

    1990-08-21

    The calcium-binding properties of calcium- and phospholipid-dependent protein kinase C (PKC) were investigated by equilibrium dialysis in the presence and the absence of phospholipids. Calcium binding to PKC displayed striking and unexpected behavior; the free proteins bound virtually no calcium at intracellular calcium concentrations and bound limited calcium (about 1 mol\\/mol of PKC) at 200 microM calcium. However, in the presence of membranes containing acidic phospholipids, PKC bound at least eight calcium ions per protein. The presence of 1 microM phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu) in the dialysis buffer had little effect on these calcium-binding properties. Analysis of PKC-calcium binding by gel filtration under equilibrium conditions gave similar results; only membrane-associated PKC bound significant amounts of calcium. Consequently, PKC is a member of what may be a large group of proteins that bind calcium in a phospholipid-dependent manner. The calcium concentrations needed to induce PKC-membrane binding were similar to those needed for calcium binding (about 40 microM calcium at the midpoint). However, the calcium concentration required for PKC-membrane binding was strongly influenced by the phosphatidylserine composition of the membranes. Membranes with higher percentages of phosphatidylserine required lower concentrations of calcium. These properties suggested that the calcium sites may be generated at the interface between PKC and the membrane. Calcium may function as a bridge between PKC and phospholipids. These studies also suggested that calcium-dependent PKC-membrane binding and PKC function could be regulated by a number of factors in addition to calcium levels and diacylglycerol content of the membrane.

  16. Influence of the calcium sulfate source on the rheological behaviour of calcium sulfoaluminate cement pastes

    OpenAIRE

    Santacruz, Isabel; García-Maté, Marta; G. Aranda, Miguel Ángel; De la Torre, Ángeles G.

    2013-01-01

    Calcium sulfoaluminate (CSA) cements are receiving increasing attention since their manufacture produces much less CO2 than ordinary Portland cement (OPC) [1]. In addition, they show interesting properties such as high early-age strengths, short setting times and impermeability. The main uses of these CSA cements are for quick repairs and pre-cast products or floor concrete applications. They are prepared by mixing the clinker with different amounts of a calcium sulfate set regulator such as ...

  17. Neuronal calcium sparks and intracellular calcium “noise”

    OpenAIRE

    Melamed-Book, Naomi; Kachalsky, Sylvia G.; Kaiserman, Igor; Rahamimoff, Rami

    1999-01-01

    Intracellular calcium ions are involved in many forms of cellular function. To accommodate so many control functions, a complex spatiotemporal organization of calcium signaling has developed. In both excitable and nonexcitable cells, calcium signaling was found to fluctuate. Sudden localized increases in the intracellular calcium concentration—or calcium sparks—were found in heart, striated and smooth muscle, Xenopus Laevis oocytes, and HeLa and P12 cells. In the nervous system, intracellular...

  18. Calcium and iron absorption: mechanism of action and nutritional importance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallberg, L; Rossander-Hultén, L; Brune, M; Gleerup, A

    1992-05-01

    We investigated the inhibitory effect of calcium on iron absorption in 57 human subjects. Three studies suggested that the effect is not located in the gastrointestinal tract. The presence of phytate in a meal and formation of calcium-iron-phytate complexes is not a prerequisite for the inhibition. The relative increase in iron absorption by ascorbic acid was the same in meals with and without calcium, suggesting that calcium did not influence the balance between enhancing and inhibiting ligands in the gastrointestinal lumen. No inhibiting effect on iron absorption was seen when adding 3 mg calcium to 0.01 mg iron (molar ratio Ca/Fe = 420). Previous studies showing a marked inhibition by calcium had a lower molar ratio, but greater amounts of calcium were given. This suggests that a minimal concentration of calcium is needed to achieve an effect. The present results indirectly support our original hypothesis that the inhibitory effect of calcium on iron absorption is situated within the intestinal mucosal cells. The practical nutritional implications of the inhibitory effect of calcium are considerable since addition of milk, milkshake or cheese to common meals such as pizza or hamburger meals reduced iron absorption by 50-60%. It is recommended to reduce the intake of dairy products with the main meals providing most of the dietary iron, especially for those having the highest iron requirements i.e. children, teenagers and women at childbearing age. PMID:1600930

  19. Intracellular calcium ions as regulators of renal tubular sodium transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windhager, E; Frindt, G; Yang, J M; Lee, C O

    1986-09-15

    This review addresses the putative role of intracellular calcium ions in the regulation of sodium transport by renal tubules. Cytoplasmic calcium-ion activities in proximal tubules of Necturus are less than 10(-7) M and can be increased by lowering the electrochemical potential gradient for sodium ions across the peritubular cell membrane, or by addition of quinidine or ionomycin to peritubular fluid. Whereas lowering of the peritubular Na concentration increases cytosolic [Ca++] and [H+], ionomycin, a calcium ionophore, raises intracellular [Ca++] without decreasing pHi. The intracellular calcium-ion level is maintained by transport processes in the plasma membrane and membranes of intracellular organelles, as well as by calcium-binding proteins. Calcium ions inhibit net transport of sodium by reducing the rate of sodium entry across the luminal cell membrane. In the collecting tubule this inhibition is caused, at least in part, by an indirect reduction in the activity of the amiloride-sensitive sodium channel. PMID:2430134

  20. Phagocytosis-induced 45calcium efflux in polymorphonuclear leucocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of calcium ions in regulating the structure and function of non-muscle cells is a subject of intense study. Several lines of evidence that calcium may be essential in the function of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMNL) and an important control element in the process of phagocytosis. Direct studies of calcium distribution and fluxes have only recently been undertaken. To our knowledge, no report of calcium movements during normal phagocytosis has been published. In the context of an overall study of calcium dynamics in the PMNL, we report here initial studies on 45Ca efflux in prelabelled guinea pig PMNL. The results demonstrate the energy-dependence of resting calcium efflux and an increased efflux upon addition of phagocytic particles which is not dependent on particle internalization

  1. Effects of calcium chelators on calcium distribution and protein solubility in rennet casein dispersions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIntyre, Irene; O' Sullivan, Michael; O' Riordan, Dolores

    2016-04-15

    This study investigated the effects of calcium chelating salts on calcium-ion activity (ACa(++)), calcium distribution, and protein solubility in model CaCl2 solutions (50 mmol L(-1)) or rennet casein dispersions (15 g/100 g). Disodium phosphate and trisodium citrate at concentrations of 10 and 30 mmol L(-1) and at ratios of 1:0, 2:1, 1:1, 1:2 and 0:1 were added to both systems. The CaCl2 system, despite its simplicity, was a good indicator of chelating salt-calcium interactions in rennet casein dispersions. Adding trisodium citrate either alone or as part of a mixed chelating salt system resulted in high levels of dispersed "chelated" calcium; conversely, disodium phosphate addition resulted in lower levels, while the ACa(++) decreased with increasing concentration of both chelating salts. Neither chelating salt produced high levels of soluble protein. Thus calcium chelating salts may play a more subtle role in modulating hydration during manufacture of casein-based matrices than simply solubilising calcium or protein. PMID:26616945

  2. Characterization of Calcium Compounds in Opuntia ficus indica as a Source of Calcium for Human Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isela Rojas-Molina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of calcium compounds in cladodes, soluble dietary fiber (SDF, and insoluble dietary fiber (IDF of Opuntia ficus indica are reported. The characterization of calcium compounds was performed by using Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive Spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, and infrared spectroscopy. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and titrimetric methods were used for quantification of total calcium and calcium compounds. Whewellite (CaC2O4·H2O, weddellite (CaC2O4·(H2O2.375, and calcite (CaCO3 were identified in all samples. Significant differences (P≤0.05 in the total calcium contents were detected between samples. CaC2O4·H2O content in cladodes and IDF was significantly higher (P≤0.05 in comparison to that observed in SDF, whereas minimum concentration of CaCO3 was detected in IDF with regard to CaCO3 contents observed in cladodes and SDF. Additionally, molar ratio oxalate : Ca2+ in all samples changed in a range from 0.03 to 0.23. These results support that calcium bioavailability in O. ficus indica modifies according to calcium compounds distribution.

  3. Calcium binding by dietary fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dietary fibre from plants low in phytate bound calcium in proportion to its uronic-acid content. This binding by the non-cellulosic fraction of fibre reduces the availability of calcium for small-intestinal absorption, but the colonic microbial digestion of uronic acids liberates the calcium. Thus the ability to maintain calcium balance on high-fibre diets may depend on the adaptive capacity on the colon for calcium. (author)

  4. [Calcium suppletion for patients who use gastric acid inhibitors: calcium citrate or calcium carbonate?].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, H.J. de; Gans, R.O.; Huls, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Various calcium supplements are available for patients who have an indication for calcium suppletion. American guidelines and UpToDate recommend prescribing calcium citrate to patients who use antacids The rationale for this advice is that water-insoluble calcium carbonate needs acid for adequate ab

  5. Fractional absorption of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa) and calcium carbonate measured by a dual stable-isotope method

    Science.gov (United States)

    With the use of stable isotopes, this study aimed to compare the bioavailability of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa), obtained from oyster shell powder heated to a high temperature, with an additional heated seaweed component (Heated Algal Ingredient, HAI), with that of calcium carbonate. In ...

  6. Avian eggshell formation in calcium-rich and calcium-poor habitats: Importance of snail shells and anthropogenic calcium sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graveland, J.

    1996-01-01

    Most passerines depend on the intake of calcium-rich material in addition to their normal food for proper eggshell formation and skeletal growth. A large proportion of Great Tits (Pants major) in forests on nutrient-poor soils in the Netherlands produce eggs with defective shells as a result of calc

  7. Calcium in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Schwartau

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the review on the role of calcium in many physiological processes of plant organisms, including growth and development, protection from pathogenic influences, response to changing environmental factors, and many other aspects of plant physiology. Initial intake of calcium ions is carried out by Ca2+-channels of plasma membrane and they are further transported by the xylem owing to auxins’ attractive ability. The level of intake and selectivity of calcium transport to ove-ground parts of the plant is controlled by a symplast. Ca2+enters to the cytoplasm of endoderm cells through calcium channels on the cortical side of Kaspary bands, and is redistributed inside the stele by the symplast, with the use of Ca2+-АТPases and Ca2+/Н+-antiports. Owing to regulated expression and activity of these calcium transporters, calclum can be selectively delivered to the xylem. Important role in supporting calcium homeostasis is given to the vacuole which is the largest depo of calcium. Regulated quantity of calcium movement through the tonoplast is provided by a number of potential-, ligand-gated active transporters and channels, like Ca2+-ATPase and Ca2+/H+ exchanger. They are actively involved in the inactivation of the calcium signal by pumping Ca2+ to the depo of cells. Calcium ATPases are high affinity pumps that efficiently transfer calcium ions against the concentration gradient in their presence in the solution in nanomolar concentrations. Calcium exchangers are low affinity, high capacity Ca2+ transporters that are effectively transporting calcium after raising its concentration in the cell cytosol through the use of protons gradients. Maintaining constant concentration and participation in the response to stimuli of different types also involves EPR, plastids, mitochondria, and cell wall. Calcium binding proteins contain several conserved sequences that provide sensitivity to changes in the concentration of Ca2+ and when you

  8. Additivity dominance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Rozin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Judgments of naturalness of foods tend to be more influenced by the process history of a food, rather than its actual constituents. Two types of processing of a ``natural'' food are to add something or to remove something. We report in this study, based on a large random sample of individuals from six countries (France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, UK and USA that additives are considered defining features of what makes a food not natural, whereas ``subtractives'' are almost never mentioned. In support of this, skim milk (with major subtraction of fat is rated as more natural than whole milk with a small amount of natural vitamin D added. It is also noted that ``additives'' is a common word, with a synonym reported by a native speaker in 17 of 18 languages, whereas ``subtractive'' is lexicalized in only 1 of the 18 languages. We consider reasons for additivity dominance, relating it to omission bias, feature positive bias, and notions of purity.

  9. Role of calcium in growth inhibition induced by a novel cell surface sialoglycopeptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betz, N. A.; Westhoff, B. A.; Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1995-01-01

    Our laboratory has purified an 18 kDa cell surface sialoglycopeptide growth inhibitor (CeReS-18) from intact bovine cerebral cortex cells. Evidence presented here demonstrates that sensitivity to CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition in BALB-c 3T3 cells is influenced by calcium, such that a decrease in the calcium concentration in the growth medium results in an increase in sensitivity to CeReS-18. Calcium did not alter CeReS-18 binding to its cell surface receptor and CeReS-18 does not bind calcium directly. Addition of calcium, but not magnesium, to CeReS-18-inhibited 3T3 cells results in reentry into the cell cycle. A greater than 3-hour exposure to increased calcium is required for escape from CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition. The calcium ionophore ionomycin could partially mimic the effect of increasing extracellular calcium, but thapsigargin was ineffective in inducing escape from growth inhibition. Increasing extracellular calcium 10-fold resulted in an approximately 7-fold increase in total cell-associated 45Ca+2, while free intracellular calcium only increased approximately 30%. However, addition of CeReS-18 did not affect total cell-associated calcium or the increase in total cell-associated calcium observed with an increase in extracellular calcium. Serum addition induced mobilization of intracellular calcium and influx across the plasma membrane in 3T3 cells, and pretreatment of 3T3 cells with CeReS-18 appeared to inhibit these calcium mobilization events. These results suggest that a calcium-sensitive step exists in the recovery from CeReS-18-induced growth inhibition. CeReS-18 may inhibit cell proliferation through a novel mechanism involving altering the intracellular calcium mobilization/regulation necessary for cell cycle progression.

  10. Gravimetric Determination of Calcium as Calcium Carbonate Hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrickson, Charles H.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravimetric determination of calcium as calcium carbonate is described. This experiment is suitable for undergraduate quantitative analysis laboratories. It is less expensive than determination of chloride as silver chloride. (BB)

  11. Additivity dominance

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Rozin; Claude Fischler; Christy Shields-Argeles

    2009-01-01

    Judgments of naturalness of foods tend to be more influenced by the process history of a food, rather than its actual constituents. Two types of processing of a ``natural'' food are to add something or to remove something. We report in this study, based on a large random sample of individuals from six countries (France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, UK and USA) that additives are considered defining features of what makes a food not natural, whereas ``subtractives'' are almost never mentioned....

  12. CALCIUM SOAP LUBRICANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Alaz, Izer; Tugce, Nefise; Devrim, Balköse

    2014-01-01

    The article studies the properties of calcium stearate (CaSt2) and lubricants produced on its basis. These lubricants were prepared using sodium stearate and calcium chloride by subsidence from aqueous solutions. The CaSt2 and the light fraction of crude oil were mixed together to obtain lubricating substances. The article shows that CaSt2 had the melting temperature of 142.8 C that is higher than the melting temperature of crude oil (128 C). The compositions of obtained lubricants were stu...

  13. CALCIUM-INDUCED SUPRAMOLECULAR STRUCTURES IN THE CALCIUM CASEINATE SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The molecular details deciphering the spontaneous calcium-induced protein aggregation process in the calcium caseinate system remain obscure. Understanding this complex process could lead to potential new applications of this important food ingredient. In this work, we studied calcium-induced supra...

  14. Calcium signaling and T-type calcium channels in cancer cell cycling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James T Taylor; Xiang-Bin Zeng; Jonathan E Pottle; Kevin Lee; Alun R Wang; Stephenie G Yi; Jennifer A S Scruggs; Suresh S Sikka; Ming Li

    2008-01-01

    Regulation of intracellular calcium is an important signaling mechanism for cell proliferation in both normal and cancerous cells. In normal epithelial cells,free calcium concentration is essential for cells to enter and accomplish the S phase and the M phase of the cell cycle. In contrast, cancerous cells can pass these phases of the cell cycle with much lower cytoplasmic free calcium concentrations, indicating an alternative mechanism has developed for fulfilling the intracellular calcium requirement for an increased rate of DNA synthesis and mitosis of fast replicating cancerous cells. The detailed mechanism underlying the altered calcium loading pathway remains unclear;however, there is a growing body of evidence that suggests the T-type Ca2+ channel is abnormally expressed in cancerous cells and that blockade of these channels may reduce cell proliferation in addition to inducing apoptosis. Recent studies also show that the expression of T-type Ca2+ channels in breast cancer cells is proliferation state dependent, i.e. the channels are expressed at higher levels during the fast-replication period, and once the cells are in a non-proliferation state, expression of this channel isminimal. Therefore, selectively blocking calcium entry into cancerous cells may be a valuable approach for preventing tumor growth. Since T-type Ca2+ channels are not expressed in epithelial cells, selective T-type Ca2+ channel blockers may be useful in the treatment of certain types of cancers.

  15. A sensor for calcium uptake

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Sean; Meyer, Tobias

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondria — the cell’s power plants — increase their energy production in response to calcium signals in the cytoplasm. A regulator of the elusive mitochondrial calcium channel has now been identified.

  16. Children's Bone Health and Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Trials Resources and Publications Children's Bone Health and Calcium: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links ... straight, walk, run, and lead an active life. Calcium is one of the key dietary building blocks ...

  17. Calcium ion channel and epilepsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yudan Lü; Weihong Lin; Dihui Ma

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the relationship between calcium ion channel and epilepsy for well investigating the pathogenesis of epilepsy and probing into the new therapeutic pathway of epilepsy.DATA SOURCES: A computer-based online research Calcium ion channel and epilepsy related articles published between January 1994 and December 2006 in the CKNI and Wanfang database with the key words of "calcium influxion, epilepsy, calcium-channel blocker". The language was limited to Chinese. At the same time,related articles published between January 1993 and December 2006 in Pubmed were searched for on online with the key words of "calcium influxion, epilepsy" in English.STUDY SELECTION: The materials were selected firstly. Inclusive criteria: ① Studies related to calcium ion channel and the pat1hogenesis of epilepsy. ② Studies on the application of calcium ion channel blocker in the treatment of epilepsy. Exclusive criteria: repetitive or irrelated studies.DATA EXTRACTION: According to the criteria, 123 articles were retrieved and 93 were excluded due to repetitive or irrelated studies. Altogether 30 articles met the inclusive criteria, 11 of them were about the structure and characters of calcium ion channel, 10 about calcium ion channel and the pathogenesis of epilepsy and 9 about calcium blocker and the treatment of epilepsy.DATA SYNTHESIS: Calcium ion channels mainly consist of voltage dependent calcium channel and receptor operated calcium channel. Depolarization caused by voltage gating channel-induced influxion is the pathological basis of epileptic attack, and it is found in many studies that many anti-epileptic drugs have potential and direct effect to rivalizing voltage-dependent calcium ion channel.CONCLUSION: Calcium influxion plays an important role in the seizure of epilepsy. Some calcium antagonists seen commonly are being tried in the clinical therapy of epilepsy that is being explored, not applied in clinical practice. If there are enough evidences to

  18. Solar Imagery - Chromosphere - Calcium

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of full-disk images of the sun in Calcium (Ca) II K wavelength (393.4 nm). Ca II K imagery reveal magnetic structures of the sun from about...

  19. Impregnating Coal With Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Voecks, Gerald E.; Gavalas, George R.

    1991-01-01

    Relatively inexpensive process proposed for impregnating coal with calcium carbonate to increase rates of gasification and combustion of coal and to reduce emission of sulfur by trapping sulfur in calcium sulfide. Process involves aqueous-phase reactions between carbon dioxide (contained within pore network of coal) and calcium acetate. Coal impregnated with CO2 by exposing it to CO2 at high pressure.

  20. Acidosis and Urinary Calcium Excretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, R Todd; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Chambrey, Régine;

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is associated with increased urinary calcium excretion and related sequelae, including nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis. The increased urinary calcium excretion induced by metabolic acidosis predominantly results from increased mobilization of calcium out of bone and...... renal tubule and then discuss why not all gene defects that cause renal tubular acidosis are associated with hypercalciuria and nephrocalcinosis....

  1. Effect of CuO on the Formation Mechanism of Calcium Sulphoaluminate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Suhua; SHEN Xiaohong; HUANG Yeping; ZHONG Baiqian

    2008-01-01

    Calcium sulphoaluminate was prepared with chemical reagents in this paper.The formation mechanism of calcium sulphoaluminate and effect of CuO on the formation mechanism of calcium sulphoaluminate were investigated by the chemical analysis,X-ray diffraction(XRD),and differential scanning calorimetry(DSC).The results show that there are three ways in the formation of calcium sulphoaluminate.CuO can promote the decomposition of calcium carbonate and decrease the formation temperature of calcium sulphoaluminate(C4A3S).When the burning temperature is below 1000℃,the addition of CuO can promote the formation of calcium sulphoaluminate,while CuO can not favor the formation of calcium sulphoaluminate above 1000℃.

  2. Reduced levels of intracellular calcium releasing in spermatozoa from asthenozoospermic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    García Juan F

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Asthenozoospermia is one of the most common findings present in infertile males characterized by reduced or absent sperm motility, but its aetiology remains unknown in most cases. In addition, calcium is one of the most important ions regulating sperm motility. In this study we have investigated the progesterone-evoked intracellular calcium signal in ejaculated spermatozoa from men with normospermia or asthenozoospermia. Methods Human ejaculates were obtained from healthy volunteers and asthenospermic men by masturbation after 4–5 days of abstinence. For determination of cytosolic free calcium concentration, spermatozoa were loaded with the fluorescent ratiometric calcium indicator Fura-2. Results Treatment of spermatozoa from normospermic men with 20 micromolar progesterone plus 1 micromolar thapsigargin in a calcium free medium induced a typical transient increase in cytosolic free calcium concentration due to calcium release from internal stores. Similar results were obtained when spermatozoa were stimulated with progesterone alone. Subsequent addition of calcium to the external medium evoked a sustained elevation in cytosolic free calcium concentration indicative of capacitative calcium entry. However, when progesterone plus thapsigargin were administered to spermatozoa from patients with asthenozoospermia, calcium signal and subsequent calcium entry was much smaller compared to normospermic patients. As expected, pretreatment of normospermic spermatozoa with both the anti-progesterone receptor c262 antibody and with progesterone receptor antagonist RU-38486 decreased the calcium release induced by progesterone. Treatment of spermatozoa with cytochalasin D or jasplakinolide decreased the calcium entry evoked by depletion of internal calcium stores in normospermic patients, whereas these treatments proved to be ineffective at modifying the calcium entry in patients with asthenozoospermia. Conclusion Our results suggest

  3. Diversity of calcium speciation in leaves of Primulina species (Gesneriaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingwen Qi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Primulina is a genus containing typical “stone plants” or “cave plants” that show a high degree of edaphic specialization in the karst limestone regions of southwest China. Most species of the genus occur only on calcareous soils developed from carbonate bedrock, while a few species are found only on the red soil developed from the Danxia landform or acidic soil developed from sandshale bedrock. The aim of this study is to investigate the diversity and characteristics of calcium absorption and storage in Primulina from different soil substrates. Calcium in leaves was determined for plants sampled from 15 populations representing 11 Primulina species occurring on calcareous soil, red soil or acid soil. We analyzed the main types of calcium found in leaves, and compared the calcium content within and among species from different soil types. The results revealed a general high level of leaf calcium content in Primulina species compared with other plants from the karst regions of southwest China. However, we found a significant difference in calcium content among Primulina species from different soil types, with high average calcium content (2,285.6 mg/kg in Primulina from calcareous soil relative to low levels present in Primulina from both acid soil (1,379.3 mg/kg and Danxia red soil (1,329.1 mg/kg. The main form of calcium stored in most Primulina species (9 out of 11 was pectate calcium, which accounted for 31.6–64.2% of the total calcium in the leaves. In contrast, for two species, P. linearifolia and P. medica, which grow on soil with a pH > 8, the main calcium form was soluble calcium, which accounted for about 40% of the total calcium in plant leaves. In addition, differences in calcium amount and type were recorded within species from either the same or different soil types. These results suggest that there is variation in calcium speciation found in Primulina at both interspecific and intraspecific levels. Our findings provide a

  4. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D.; Burton, Rachel A.; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact the development, physical traits and disease susceptibility of fruit through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g., blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples). This review works toward an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved knowledge of the calcium

  5. Fruit Calcium: Transport and Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocking, Bradleigh; Tyerman, Stephen D; Burton, Rachel A; Gilliham, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Calcium has well-documented roles in plant signaling, water relations and cell wall interactions. Significant research into how calcium impacts these individual processes in various tissues has been carried out; however, the influence of calcium on fruit ripening has not been thoroughly explored. Here, we review the current state of knowledge on how calcium may impact the development, physical traits and disease susceptibility of fruit through facilitating developmental and stress response signaling, stabilizing membranes, influencing water relations and modifying cell wall properties through cross-linking of de-esterified pectins. We explore the involvement of calcium in hormone signaling integral to the physiological mechanisms behind common disorders that have been associated with fruit calcium deficiency (e.g., blossom end rot in tomatoes or bitter pit in apples). This review works toward an improved understanding of how the many roles of calcium interact to influence fruit ripening, and proposes future research directions to fill knowledge gaps. Specifically, we focus mostly on grapes and present a model that integrates existing knowledge around these various functions of calcium in fruit, which provides a basis for understanding the physiological impacts of sub-optimal calcium nutrition in grapes. Calcium accumulation and distribution in fruit is shown to be highly dependent on water delivery and cell wall interactions in the apoplasm. Localized calcium deficiencies observed in particular species or varieties can result from differences in xylem morphology, fruit water relations and pectin composition, and can cause leaky membranes, irregular cell wall softening, impaired hormonal signaling and aberrant fruit development. We propose that the role of apoplasmic calcium-pectin crosslinking, particularly in the xylem, is an understudied area that may have a key influence on fruit water relations. Furthermore, we believe that improved knowledge of the calcium

  6. Calcium and calcitonin responses to calcium infusion in type I diabetes mellitus.

    OpenAIRE

    Amado, J. A.; C. Gomez; Obaya, S.; Otero, M; Gonzalez-Macias, J

    1987-01-01

    We studied calcium and calcium and calcitonin responses to intravenous calcium infusion (3 mg of elemental calcium/kg of body weight in 10 minutes) in 21 type I diabetic males and 17 age-matched normal males. Baseline total calcium, parathyroid hormone and calcitonin levels were normal in the diabetic group, but ionized calcium was lowered. Cortical bone status and osteocalcin levels were normal, suggesting a normal osteoblastic function. Total calcium and ionized calcium responses to calcium...

  7. DISTILLATION OF CALCIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, J.

    1954-07-27

    This invention relates to an improvement in the process for the purification of caicium or magnesium containing an alkali metal as impurity, which comprises distiiling a batch of the mixture in two stages, the first stage distillation being carried out in the presence of an inert gas at an absolute pressure substantially greater than the vapor pressure of calcium or maguesium at the temperature of distillation, but less than the vaper pressure at that temperature of the alkali metal impurity so that only the alkali metal is vaporized and condensed on a condensing surface. A second stage distilso that substantially only the calcium or magnesium distills under its own vapor pressure only and condenses in solid form on a lower condensing surface.

  8. Consumption of Calcium-Fortified Cereal Bars to Improve Dietary Calcium Intake of Healthy Women: Randomized Controlled Feasibility Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jennifer T.; Moore, Carolyn E.; Radcliffe, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium is an important structural component of the skeletal system. Although an adequate intake of calcium helps to maintain bone health and reduce the risk of osteoporosis, many women do not meet recommended daily intakes of calcium. Previous interventions studies designed to increase dietary intake of women have utilized primarily dairy sources of calcium or supplements. However, lactose intolerance, milk protein allergies, or food preferences may lead many women to exclude important dairy sources of dietary calcium. Therefore, we undertook a 9 week randomized crossover design trial to examine the potential benefit of including a non-dairy source of calcium in the diet of women. Following a 3 week run-in baseline period, 35 healthy women > 18 years were randomized by crossover design into either Group I or Group II. Group I added 2 calcium-fortified cereal bars daily (total of 400 mg calcium/day) (intervention) to their usual diet and Group II continued their usual diet (control). At the end of 3 weeks, diets were switched for another 3 weeks. Intakes of calcium and energy were estimated from 3-day diet and supplemental diaries. Wilcoxon signed-rank tests were used for within group comparisons and Mann Whitney U tests were used for between group comparisons of calcium and energy intake. Dietary calcium was significantly higher during intervention (1071 mg/d) when participants consumed 2 calcium-fortified cereal bars daily than during the baseline (720 mg/d, P <0.0001) or control diets (775 mg/d, P = 0.0001) periods. Furthermore, the addition of 2 calcium-fortified cereal bars daily for the 3 week intervention did not significantly increase total energy intake or result in weight gain. In conclusion, consumption of calcium-fortified cereal bars significantly increased calcium intake of women. Further research examining the potential ability of fortified cereal bars to help maintain and improve bone health of women is warranted. Trial Registration Clinical

  9. Models of calcium signalling

    CERN Document Server

    Dupont, Geneviève; Kirk, Vivien; Sneyd, James

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the ways in which mathematical, computational, and modelling methods can be used to help understand the dynamics of intracellular calcium. The concentration of free intracellular calcium is vital for controlling a wide range of cellular processes, and is thus of great physiological importance. However, because of the complex ways in which the calcium concentration varies, it is also of great mathematical interest.This book presents the general modelling theory as well as a large number of specific case examples, to show how mathematical modelling can interact with experimental approaches, in an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to the study of an important physiological control mechanism. Geneviève Dupont is FNRS Research Director at the Unit of Theoretical Chronobiology of the Université Libre de Bruxelles;Martin Falcke is head of the Mathematical Cell Physiology group at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin;Vivien Kirk is an Associate Professor in the Depar...

  10. Calcium phosphates in Ca(2+)-fortified milk: phase identification and quantification by Raman spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arifin, Martha; Swedlund, Peter J; Hemar, Yacine; McKinnon, Ian R

    2014-12-17

    Calcium phosphate nanoclusters (CPNs) are important for the structure, function, and nutrient density of many dairy products. Phosphorylated amino acids in caseins stabilize calcium phosphate as nanoclusters which are amorphous to X-ray diffraction and exist within casein micelles, and these CPNs play a key role in micelle stability. Addition of calcium to milk results in further calcium phosphate removal from the serum, and there is uncertainty about the nature of the material formed and its stability. In this work we investigate both the solution and colloidal phases in CaCl2 enriched bovine milk to identify, quantify, and determine the solubility of the calcium phosphate material formed in response to calcium addition to milk. The P-O stretching bands are quite distinct in the Raman spectra of the main synthetic calcium phosphate mineral phases, including the amorphous calcium phosphate phase. In response to adding between 5 and 40 mM CaCl2 to milk, the serum phosphate concentration decreased asymptotically from 7.5 ± 0.2 to 0.54 ± 0.05 mM. Using Raman spectroscopy with a combination of internal and external standards, it was possible to show that the calcium phosphate material formed after Ca(2+) addition to milk was the same as amorphous calcium phosphate nanoclusters present in the absence of added calcium. The use of an internal standard allowed a quantitative analysis of the spectra which demonstrated that the amorphous calcium phosphate formed accounted for all of the calcium and phosphate that was removed from solution in response to calcium addition. PMID:25414967

  11. Reverse calcium affinity purification of Fab with calcium derivatized hydroxyapatite

    OpenAIRE

    Gagnon, Pete; Cheung, Chia-wei; Yazaki, Paul J.

    2009-01-01

    This study introduces the application of calcium-derivatized hydroxyapatite for purification of Fab. Fab binds to native hydroxyapatite but fails to bind to the calcium derivatized form. IgG, Fc, and most other protein contaminants bind to the calcium form. This supports Fab purification by a simple flow-through method that achieves greater than 95% purity from papain digests and mammalian cell culture supernatants. Alternatively, Fab can be concentrated on native hydroxyapatite then eluted s...

  12. The calcium oxide influence on formation of manganese, calcium pyrovanadate solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The X-ray graphic, derivatographic, microscopic and chemical methods are used to study solid solutions of manganese, calcium pyrovanadates containing 1-10 mass% CaO and the products of interaction of reprocessing charges of vanadium-containing converter slags intended for he formation of manganese and calcium pyrovanadates with additions of calcium oxide within 10-90 mass%. It is established that in the case of 1-6 mass% CaO content in manganese pyrovanadate solid interstitial solutions appear, while at 6-20 mass% CaO - solid substitution solutions form. The results of calculating elementary cell parameters as well as melting temperatures and pyrovanadate solid solution solubility depending on CaO content are presented. The best solubility of introduction solid solutions during vanadium extraction according to the lime technology is found

  13. Use of technical biochemical in combination for the detection of proteins of union to calcium in Plasmodium falciparum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium plays a fundamental role in the development of Plasmodium falciparum, the intracellular parasite that causes malaria. With the purpose of understanding the mechanism by which calcium acts in this parasite, calcium-binding proteins were detected in this organism the combined use of the metachromatic dye Stains-all and the 45Ca overlay assay allowed the identification, in mature parasites. Of 9 calcium - binding proteins. 6 of which seem to be different from any reported calcium-binding protein. Additionally, it was determined that the combined use of these techniques can be useful for the detection and purification of calcium-binding proteins

  14. Combustión sin Llama de Mezclas Pobres Metano-Aire sobre Óxido de Magnesio Adicionado con Óxido de Calcio Flameless Combustion of Lean Methane-Air Mixtures over Magnesium Oxide with Addition of Calcium Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elías de J Gómez

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Se preparó material activo partiendo de óxido de magnesio (MgO grado industrial y grado reactivo adicionado con óxido de calcio (CaO. En un lecho fijo empacado con partículas de material activo, se investigó el efecto que tienen la cantidad de CaO adicionado, la temperatura de calcinación, la velocidad espacial, el exceso de oxígeno y la composición de mezcla reactiva sobre la actividad, medida como conversión porcentual de metano. Se obtuvo combustión completa de metano para composiciones menores al límite inferior de inflamabilidad lo que permite evitar la emisión de NOx producidos por mecanismo térmico. Las muestras preparadas con MgO grado industrial tuvieron actividad similar a las obtenidas con MgO grado reactivo adicionado con CaO. Los materiales, de fácil preparación y bajo costo, mostraron alta estabilidad térmica antes y después de someterlos a reacción. Las propiedades de los sólidos preparados los hacen promisorios para aplicaciones en sistemas de combustión de gas natural y depuración de emisiones gaseosas.Active material was prepared using industrial and reactive grade magnesium oxide (MgO with the addition of calcium oxide (CaO. In a fixed packed bed containing particles of active material, the effects of quantity of CaO added, calcination temperature, space velocity, oxygen excess and reactive mixture composition on activity, measured as percentage of methane conversion, were studied. Complete combustion was reached for compositions under the low limit of inflammability which allow avoiding the formation of thermal NOx. Samples prepared with industrial grade MgO showed similar activity to those prepared with reactive grade MgO with the addition of CaO. The materials, of low cost and easy preparation, showed high thermal stability before and after reaction tests. The properties of the prepared solids make them promising materials for natural gas combustion and gas emission treatment systems.

  15. Glycochenodeoxycholic acid inhibits calcium phosphate precipitation in vitro by preventing the transformation of amorphous calcium phosphate to calcium hydroxyapatite.

    OpenAIRE

    Qiu, S M; Wen, G.; Hirakawa, N; Soloway, R D; Hong, N K; Crowther, R S

    1991-01-01

    Calcium hydroxyapatite can be a significant component of black pigment gallstones. Diverse molecules that bind calcium phosphate inhibit hydroxyapatite precipitation. Because glycine-conjugated bile acids, but not their taurine counterparts, bind calcium phosphate, we studied whether glycochenodeoxycholic acid inhibits calcium hydroxyapatite formation. Glycochenodeoxycholic acid (2 mM) totally inhibited transformation of amorphous calcium phosphate microprecipitates to macroscopic crystalline...

  16. [Study on the Influence of Mineralizer on the Preparation of Calcium Aluminates Based on Infrared Spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wei; Wang, Liang; Zheng, Huai-li; Chen, Wei; Tang, Xiao-min; Shang, Juan-fang; Qian, Li

    2015-05-01

    In this study, effect of mineralizer on the structure and spectraproperties of calcium aluminates formation was extensively studied. Medium or low-grade bauxite and calcium carbonate were used as raw material and mineralizer CaF2 as additive. Calcium aluminates can be obtained after mixing fully, calcination and grinding. The prepared calcium aluminates can be directly used for the production of polyaluminiumchloride (PAC), polymeric aluminum sulfate, sodium aluminate and some other water treatment agents. The calcium aluminates preparation technology was optimized by investigating the mass ratio of raw materials (bauxiteand calcium carbonate) and mineralizer CaF2 dosage. The structure and spectra properties of bauxite and calcium aluminates were characterized by Fourier transform infrared(FTIR) spectroscopy analysis and the mineralization mechanism of the mineralizer was studied. FTIR spectra indicated that the addition of mineralizer promoted the decomposition and transformation of the diaspore, gibbsite and kaolinite, the decomposition of calcium carbonate, and more adequately reaction between bauxite and calcium carbonate. In addition, not only Ca in calcium carbonate and Si in bauxite were more readily reacted, but also Si-O, Si-O-Al and Al-Si bonds in the bauxite were more fractured which contributed to the release of Al in bauxite, and therefore, the dissolution rate of Al2O3 could be improved. The dissolution rate of Al2O3 can be promoted effectively when the mineralizer CaF2 was added in a mass ratio amount of 3%. And the mineralizer CaF2 cannot be fully functioned, when its dosage was in a mass percent of 1. 5%. Low-grade bauxite was easier to sinter for the preparation of calcium aluminates comparing with the highgrade one. The optimum material ratio for the preparation of calcium aluminates calcium at 1 250 °C was the mass ratio between bauxite and calcium carbonate of 1 : 0. 6 and mineralizer CaF2 mass ratio percent of 3%. PMID:26415430

  17. Calcium Binding to Amino Acids and Small Glycine Peptides in Aqueous Solution: Toward Peptide Design for Better Calcium Bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ning; Skibsted, Leif H

    2016-06-01

    Deprotonation of amino acids as occurs during transfer from stomach to intestines during food digestion was found by comparison of complex formation constants as determined electrochemically for increasing pH to increase calcium binding (i) by a factor of around 6 for the neutral amino acids, (ii) by a factor of around 4 for anions of the acidic amino acids aspartic and glutamic acid, and (iii) by a factor of around 5.5 for basic amino acids. Optimized structures of the 1:1 complexes and ΔHbinding for calcium binding as calculated by density functional theory (DFT) confirmed in all complexes a stronger calcium binding and shorter calcium-oxygen bond length in the deprotonated form. In addition, the stronger calcium binding was also accompanied by a binding site shift from carboxylate binding to chelation by α-amino group and carboxylate oxygen for leucine, aspartate, glutamate, alanine, and asparagine. For binary amino acid mixtures, the calcium-binding constant was close to the predicted geometric mean of the individual amino acid binding constants indicating separate binding of calcium to two amino acids when present together in solution. At high pH, corresponding to conditions for calcium absorption, the binding affinity increased in the order Lys < Arg < Cys < Gln < Gly ∼ Ala < Asn < His < Leu < Glu< Asp. In a series of glycine peptides, calcium-binding affinity was found to increase in the order Gly-Leu ∼ Gly-Gly < Ala-Gly < Gly-His ∼ Gly-Lys-Gly < Glu-Cys-Gly < Gly-Glu, an ordering confirmed by DFT calculations for the dipeptides and which also accounted for large synergistic effects in calcium binding for up to 6 kJ/mol when compared to the corresponding amino acid mixtures. PMID:27159329

  18. 21 CFR 573.280 - Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium stearate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium stearate... SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS FOOD ADDITIVES PERMITTED IN FEED AND DRINKING WATER OF ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.280 Feed-grade calcium stearate and sodium...

  19. Calcium – how and why?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J K Jaiswal

    2001-09-01

    Calcium is among the most commonly used ions, in a multitude of biological functions, so much so that it is impossible to imagine life without calcium. In this article I have attempted to address the question as to how calcium has achieved this status with a brief mention of the history of calcium research in biology. It appears that during the origin and early evolution of life the Ca2+ ion was given a unique opportunity to be used in several biological processes because of its unusual physical and chemical properties.

  20. Calcium Phosphate Biomaterials: An Update

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Current calcium phosphate (CaP) biomaterials for bone repair, substitution, augmentation and regeneration include hydroxyapatite ( HA ) from synthetic or biologic origin, beta-tricalcium phosphate ( β-TCP ) , biphasic calcium phosphate (BCP), and are available as granules, porous blocks, components of composites (CaP/polymer) cements, and as coatings on orthopedic and dental implants. Experimental calcium phosphate biomaterials include CO3- and F-substituted apatites, Mg-and Zn-substituted β-TCP, calcium phosphate glasses. This paper is a brief review of the different types of CaP biomaterials and their properties such as bioactivity, osteoconductivity, osteoinductivity.

  1. 21 CFR 573.260 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 573.260 Section 573.260 Food and... Listing § 573.260 Calcium silicate. Calcium silicate, including synthetic calcium silicate, may be safely used as an anticaking agent in animal feed, provided that the amount of calcium silicate does...

  2. Calcium measurement methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CarloAlberto Redi

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Rightly stressed by prof. Wolfgang Walz in the Preface to the series Neuromethods series, the “careful application of methods is probably the most important step in the process of scientific inquiry”. Thus, I strongly suggest to all those interested in calcium signaling and especially to the new-comers in the hot topic of neuroscience (which has so much space even in science-society debate for its implications in legal issues and in the judge-decision process to take profit from this so well edited book. I am saying this since prof. Verkhratsky and prof. Petersen......

  3. Compartmentalization of the submembrane calcium activity during calcium influx and its significance in transmitter release.

    OpenAIRE

    Simon, S M; Llinás, R R

    1985-01-01

    Quantitative modeling indicates that, in presynaptic terminals, the intracellular calcium concentration profile during inward calcium current is characterized by discrete peaks of calcium immediately adjacent to the calcium channels. This restriction of intracellular calcium concentration suggests a remarkably well specified intracellular architecture such that calcium, as a second messenger, may regulate particular intracellular domains with a great degree of specificity.

  4. The Role of Calcium in Microstructural Refinement of AZ91 Magnesium Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Shengfa; KANG Liugen; HAN Hui; WANG Zhongfan

    2006-01-01

    The effect of calcium addition on the microstructures of AZ91 magnesium alloy was investigated. It was found that a small amount of calcium in AZ91 alloy produced a large decrease in the a-Mg grain size and the dispersed fine β-Mg17 Al12 phases. In addition, some Al4 Ca particles were found to exist in the AZ91 alloy containing 0.5 wt% Ca. EDS analysis and water-quenched technique revealed that the grain-refining mechanism of calcium for the AZ91 alloys was mainly attributed to the role of restricting growth of calcium in the primary a-Mg crystals.

  5. Adição de cimento de aluminato de cálcio e seus efeitos na hidratação do óxido de magnésio Effects of calcium aluminate cement addition on magnesia hydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Salomão

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Cimento de aluminato de cálcio (CAC e óxido de magnésio (MgO são duas importantes matérias primas para a indústria de concretos refratários e apresentam grande tendência à hidratação. Os efeitos dessa reação em cada caso isolado são distintos e bem conhecidos: enquanto o CAC hidratado atua como ligante e garante a resistência mecânica do material antes da sinterização, a hidratação do MgO pode causar sua total desintegração em alguns casos. Devido ao interesse tecnológico nesses materiais, é importante investigar as peculiaridades desses processos e as potenciais interações entre eles. Neste trabalho, os efeitos da adição de diferentes teores de CAC na hidratação do MgO foram investigados em suspensões aquosas usando medidas de expansão volumétrica aparente, pH das suspensões e difração de raios X. Foi observado que os efeitos danosos da hidratação do MgO podem ser significativamente reduzidos com um controle adequado do teor de CAC nas formulações.Calcium aluminate cement (CAC and magnesium oxide (MgO are two of the most important raw materials for refractory castables industry and both present a high driving force for hydration. The effects of this reaction for each compound are well known: whereas the hydrated CAC behaves as a binder, hardening the castable, MgO hydration can cause the total disintegration of the material. Due to the technological interests involved, it is important to study the peculiarities in these processes and their potential interactions. In the present work, the effects of the addition of different CAC contents on MgO hydration were investigated in aqueous suspensions by means of apparent volumetric expansion, pH measurements and qualitative X-ray diffraction. It was found out that the deleterious effects of MgO hydration can be significantly reduced with a proper control of the CAC content for the formulations.

  6. In vitro calcium availability in bakery products fortified with tuna bone powder as a natural calcium source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, Mahnaz; Kamilah, Hanisah; Huda, Nurul; Ariffin, Fazilah

    2015-08-01

    Avoidance of dairy products due to lactose intolerance can lead to insufficiency of calcium (Ca) in the body. In an approach to address this problem, tuna bone powder (TBP) was formulated as a calcium supplement to fortify bakery products. In a study, TBP recovered by alkaline treatment contained 38.16 g/100 g of calcium and 23.31 g/100 g of phosphorus. The ratio of Ca:P that was close to 2:1 was hence comparable to that in human bones. The availability of calcium in TBP was 53.93%, which was significantly higher than most calcium salts, tricalcium phosphate (TCP) being the exception. In vitro availability of calcium in TBP-fortified cookies or TCP-fortified cookies were comparable at 38.9% and 39.5%, respectively. These values were higher than the readings from TBP-fortified bread (36.7%) or TCP-fortified bread (37.4%). Sensory evaluation of bakery products containing TBP or TCP elicited comparable scores for the two additives from test panels. Hence, TBP could be used in the production of high calcium bakery products that would enjoy consumer acceptance. PMID:27144766

  7. Direct Imaging of Hippocampal Epileptiform Calcium Motifs Following Kainic Acid Administration in Freely Behaving Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdyyeva, Tamara K; Frady, E Paxon; Nassi, Jonathan J; Aluisio, Leah; Cherkas, Yauheniya; Otte, Stephani; Wyatt, Ryan M; Dugovic, Christine; Ghosh, Kunal K; Schnitzer, Mark J; Lovenberg, Timothy; Bonaventure, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to abnormally high calcium concentrations is thought to be a core mechanism underlying hippocampal damage in epileptic patients; however, no prior study has characterized calcium activity during seizures in the live, intact hippocampus. We have directly investigated this possibility by combining whole-brain electroencephalographic (EEG) measurements with microendoscopic calcium imaging of pyramidal cells in the CA1 hippocampal region of freely behaving mice treated with the pro-convulsant kainic acid (KA). We observed that KA administration led to systematic patterns of epileptiform calcium activity: a series of large-scale, intensifying flashes of increased calcium fluorescence concurrent with a cluster of low-amplitude EEG waveforms. This was accompanied by a steady increase in cellular calcium levels (>5 fold increase relative to the baseline), followed by an intense spreading calcium wave characterized by a 218% increase in global mean intensity of calcium fluorescence (n = 8, range [114-349%], p wave had no consistent EEG phenotype and occurred before the onset of motor convulsions. Similar changes in calcium activity were also observed in animals treated with 2 different proconvulsant agents, N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) and pentylenetetrazol (PTZ), suggesting the measured changes in calcium dynamics are a signature of seizure activity rather than a KA-specific pathology. Additionally, despite reducing the behavioral severity of KA-induced seizures, the anticonvulsant drug valproate (VA, 300 mg/kg) did not modify the observed abnormalities in calcium dynamics. These results confirm the presence of pathological calcium activity preceding convulsive motor seizures and support calcium as a candidate signaling molecule in a pathway connecting seizures to subsequent cellular damage. Integrating in vivo calcium imaging with traditional assessment of seizures could potentially increase translatability of pharmacological intervention, leading to

  8. Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Balance › Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health March 2012 Download PDFs ... helps keep your bones strong. Why are vitamin D and calcium important to bone health? Vitamin D ...

  9. Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000490.htm Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones To use the sharing ... and maintain strong bones. How Much Calcium and Vitamin D Do I Need? Amounts of calcium are ...

  10. Effect of high dietary calcium on weight management in rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was undertaken to find out a suitable dietary regime to maintain a lower prevalence of overweight or obesity by adjusting the diet components. Therefore, male Swiss albino rats were selected according to their ages and divided into two main groups, i.e., premature and mature groups. Each rat group was divided into 4 subgroups and each subgroup was fed on a diet of varied composition. Serum levels of lipids, calcium, phosphorous and testosterone were determined in addition to body weight measurement. The results indicate non-significant decrease of percentage of body weight gain in premature rats fed on high-calcium diets while significant decrease of percentage of body weight gain in mature rats fed on the same diet composition. The levels of serum HDL-C, LDL-C, triglycerides and testosterone were significantly decreased in premature rats fed high- calcium diets. In premature rats, only rat subgroup fed on high calcium from milk, showed a significant decrease in serum cholesterol levels. Calcium and phosphorus levels exhibited non- significant change between premature rats. In mature rats, LDL-C data demonstrate nonsignificant changes while cholesterol and triglyceride levels were significantly decreased in rats fed high -calcium diet compared to control. HDL-C level revealed a significant decrease in sera of mature rats fed on high calcium from milk. Serum testosterone levels were significantly decreased in mature rats fed low- fat diets or low fat diets supplemented with high- calcium level. In general, one would suggest to consume low fat diet (4%) supplemented with high calcium from dry skimmed milk fortified with hydroxyapatite as suitable dietary program to avoid overweight or obesity.

  11. Calcium transport in turtle bladder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unidirectional 45Ca fluxes were measured in the turtle bladder under open-circuit and short-circuit conditions. In the open-circuited state net calcium flux (JnetCa) was secretory (serosa to mucosa). Ouabain reversed JnetCa to an absorptive flux. Amiloride reduced both fluxes such that JnetCa was not significantly different from zero. Removal of mucosal sodium caused net calcium absorption; removal of serosal sodium caused calcium secretion. When bladders were short circuited, JnetCa decreased to approximately one-third of control value but remained secretory. When ouabain was added under short-circuit conditions, JnetCa was similar in magnitude and direction to ouabain under open-circuited conditions (i.e., absorptive). Tissue 45Ca content was ≅30-fold lower when the isotope was placed in the mucosal bath, suggesting that the apical membrane is the resistance barrier to calcium transport. The results obtained in this study are best explained by postulating a Ca2+-ATPase on the serosa of the turtle bladder epithelium and a sodium-calcium antiporter on the mucosa. In this model, the energy for calcium movement would be supplied, in large part, by the Na+-K+-ATPase. By increasing cell sodium, ouabain would decrease the activity of the mucosal sodium-calcium exchanger (or reverse it), uncovering active calcium transport across the serosa

  12. An Improved Calcium Flame Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, Robert S.

    1985-01-01

    Indicates that the true red color of calcium can be obtained (using the procedure described by Sorm and Logowski) if the calcium ion solution is mixed with an equal volume of saturated ammonium bromide solution. Suggestions for flame tests of other elements are also noted. (JN)

  13. The effect of calcium and chitosan metabolism to the excretion of radiostrontium in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chitosan, a natural nontoxic chelator, was reported to reduce whole body retention of radiostrontium in mice. As calcium has a similar chemical properties to strontium both of which be easily bound with hydroxyapatite structure, calcium can be either a competitor or enhancer to chitosan on the removal of radiostrontium. We compared the effect of chitosan and calcium on the excretion of ingested radiostrontium (85Sr). Chitosan or calcium(CaCl2) and usual food was mixed as 1:99 by weight. The mixed food to chitosan(group 1) or calcium(group 2) were given orally for 30 days before 85Sr administration. In other groups, mixed calcium and chitosan solution (group 3), 1% calcium (group 4), or 1% chitosan solution (group 5) was given for 7 days immediately after oral administration of 85SrCl2 (0.25μCi). In control group, no chitosan or calcium were given. Either chitosan or calcium was effective on the removal of 85Sr from mouse body (Table 1). Addition of calcium on chitosan did not improve or deteriorate the effect of chitosan on the removal of 85Sr from mouse body. In conclusion, calcium was similarly effective on the removal of 85Sr from mouse body. (author)

  14. CALCIUM ENHANCES ANTIINFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF ASPIRIN

    OpenAIRE

    Choksi Krishna; Shenoy Ashoka M; A. R. Shabharaya; Lala Minaxi

    2011-01-01

    The objective of present study is to evaluate the effects of calcium carbonate and calcium gluconate on acute and subacute inflammation and to study their possible interactions with Aspirin. Calcium carbonate (10 mg/kg) and calcium gluconate (5 mg/kg) were administered individually and also co-administered along with sub therapeutic dose Aspirin (50mg/kg) to study their interaction. The inflammation was induced by carrageenan or a foreign body. Both calcium carbonate and calcium gluconate cou...

  15. Anodic Behavior of Alloy 22 in Calcium Chloride and in Calcium Chloride Plus Calcium Nitrate Brines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, K J; Day, S D; Ilevbare, G O; Whalen, M T; King, K J; Hust, G A; Wong, L L; Estill, J C; Rebak, R B

    2003-05-13

    Alloy 22 (UNS N60622) is a nickel-based alloy, which is extensively used in aggressive industrial applications, especially due to its resistance to localized corrosion and stress corrosion cracking in high chloride environments. The purpose of this work was to characterize the anodic behavior of Alloy 22 in concentrated calcium chloride (CaCl{sub 2}) brines and to evaluate the inhibitive effect of nitrate, especially to localized corrosion. Standard electrochemical tests such as polarization resistance and cyclic polarization were used. Results show that the corrosion potential of Alloy 22 was approximately -360 mV in the silver-silver chloride (SSC) scale and independent of the tested temperature. Cyclic polarization tests showed that Alloy 22 was mainly susceptible to localized attack in 5 M CaCl{sub 2} at 75 C and higher temperatures. The addition of nitrate in a molar ratio of chloride to nitrate equal to 10 increased the onset of localized corrosion to approximately 105 C. The addition of nitrate to the solution also decreased the uniform corrosion rate and the passive current of the alloy.

  16. Limestone reaction in calcium aluminate cement–calcium sulfate systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports a study of ternary blends composed of calcium aluminate cement, calcium sulfate hemihydrate and limestone. Compressive strength tests and hydration kinetics were studied as a function of limestone and calcium sulfate content. The phase evolution and the total porosity were followed and compared to thermodynamic simulation to understand the reactions involved and the effect of limestone on these binders. The reaction of limestone leads to the formation of hemicarboaluminate and monocarboaluminate. Increasing the ratio between sulfate and aluminate decreases the extent of limestone reaction

  17. Contribution of calcium oxalate to soil-exchangeable calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauer, Jenny M.; Perakis, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    Acid deposition and repeated biomass harvest have decreased soil calcium (Ca) availability in many temperate forests worldwide, yet existing methods for assessing available soil Ca do not fully characterize soil Ca forms. To account for discrepancies in ecosystem Ca budgets, it has been hypothesized that the highly insoluble biomineral Ca oxalate might represent an additional soil Ca pool that is not detected in standard measures of soil-exchangeable Ca. We asked whether several standard method extractants for soil-exchangeable Ca could also access Ca held in Ca oxalate crystals using spike recovery tests in both pure solutions and soil extractions. In solutions of the extractants ammonium chloride, ammonium acetate, and barium chloride, we observed 2% to 104% dissolution of Ca oxalate crystals, with dissolution increasing with both solution molarity and ionic potential of cation extractant. In spike recovery tests using a low-Ca soil, we estimate that 1 M ammonium acetate extraction dissolved sufficient Ca oxalate to contribute an additional 52% to standard measurements of soil-exchangeable Ca. However, in a high-Ca soil, the amount of Ca oxalate spike that would dissolve in 1 M ammonium acetate extraction was difficult to detect against the large pool of exchangeable Ca. We conclude that Ca oxalate can contribute substantially to standard estimates of soil-exchangeable Ca in acid forest soils with low soil-exchangeable Ca. Consequently, measures of exchangeable Ca are unlikely to fully resolve discrepancies in ecosystem Ca mass balance unless the contribution of Ca oxalate to exchangeable Ca is also assessed.

  18. Calcium binding protein-mediated regulation of voltage-gated calcium channels linked to human diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasrin NFJATBAKHSH; Zhong-ping FENG

    2011-01-01

    Calcium ion entry through voltage-gated calcium channels is essential for cellular signalling in a wide variety of cells and multiple physiological processes. Perturbations of voltage-gated calcium channel function can lead to pathophysiological consequences. Calcium binding proteins serve as calcium sensors and regulate the calcium channel properties via feedback mechanisms. This review highlights the current evidences of calcium binding protein-mediated channel regulation in human diseases.

  19. Functional separation of deep cytoplasmic calcium from subplasmalemmal space calcium in cultured human uterine smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Roger C; Zhang, PeiSheng

    2004-07-01

    For smooth muscle, two important functions of free intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)(i)) are modulation of plasma membrane excitability properties and modulation of the contractile apparatus. As proposed by van Breemen, Ca(2+)(i) can be divided into the subplasmalemmal space (Ca(2+)(sps)) and the deep cytosol (Ca(2+)(d)) by the superficial calcium buffer barrier. Using these distinctions, Ca(2+)(sps) activates the large conductance calcium-activated potassium channel (BK), and Ca(2+)(d) binds calcium-dependent fluorescent probes in the cytoplasm. We present here combined fluorescence-patch clamp experiments designed to simultaneously assess Ca(2+)(d) and Ca(2+)(sps) in cultured human uterine smooth muscle cells. Open probabilities (P(o)) of the BK channel were measured using the cell-attached patch clamp technique. P(o) was used to approximate changes of [Ca(2+)(sps)]. Relative concentrations of Ca(2+)(d) were approximated by observing fluorescence of Calcium green-1 (F). Under control conditions, we found similar time courses for rises of P(o) and F following 10nM oxytocin (OT) addition. In parallel experiments, but with lanthanum (La(3+)) added to the bath to block transmembrane calcium flux, P(o) was only slightly affected, but F increases were delayed and blunted. These data paradoxically indicate that following OT stimulation, the primary source of calcium for Ca(2+)(sps) is internal stores, and calcium entry from the extracellular space is required to raise Ca(2+)(d). When cells were exposed to cyclopiazonic acid (CPA) to release SR calcium stores, P(o) increased slowly, then persisted at large values. The persistence of P(o) rises suggests that removal of calcium from the subplasmalemmal space is primarily via reuptake into the SR. In the presence of La(3+), OT-induced rises of F were slightly prolonged, suggesting that transmembrane calcium flux contributes to decreasing Ca(2+)(d), but is not the primary mechanism. In summary, these data demonstrate that Ca(2

  20. Engineering crystal growth of calcium hydrogenphosphate dihydrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sikiric, M.; Babic-Ivancic, V. [Institut Rudjer Boskovic, Zagreb (Croatia); Milat, O. [Zagreb Univ. (Croatia). Inst. za Fiziku; Sarig, S.; Fueredi-Milhofer, H. [Hebrew Univ., Jerusalem (Israel). Inst. of Applied Chemistry

    2001-07-01

    The factors underlying calcium hydrogenphosphate dihydrate (CaHPO{sub 4}.2H{sub 2}O, DCPD) interactions with several structurally different additives: glutamic and aspartic acid, sodium citrate, hexaammonium tetrapolyphosphate, calcium phytate and polyaspartic acid were studied. DCPD crystals were prepared under controlled conditions by fast mixing of the anionic and cationic reactant solutions and subsequent growth without further stirring in the course of 24 hours at 37 C. The initial conditions were c(CaCl{sub 2}) = c(Na{sub 2}HPO{sub 4}) = 0.021 mol dm{sup -3}, c(NaCl) = 0.3 mol dm{sup -3}, pH{sub i} 5.5. The respective additive was added to the anionic component prior to pH adjustment. Crystals were characterized by X-ray diffraction, while their morphology was observed by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The Miller indices of the crystal faces were determined from SEM micrographs, after the orientation of the most prominent face was ascertained by the Weissenberg method. Mechanism of additive-DCPD crystals interaction depends on size and structure of additive molecule, structural fit between organic molecule and the ionic structure of particular crystal face. Small molecules (ions) specifically adsorb on lateral faces by electrostatic interactions, while macromolecules and molecules with hindered structure specifically adsorb on dominant (010) face, for which certain degree of structural fit is necessary. (orig.)

  1. Calcium carbonate and calcium sulfate in Martian meteorite EETA79001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, J. L.; Wentworth, S. J.

    1987-01-01

    Chips of glassy Lithology C of EETA79001 were studied by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to determine the mineralogy and petrogenesis of the glass that was shown by others to contain trapped Mars-like gases. Calcium carbonite was identified as massive to acicular crystals for which Ca, C, and O were the major elements. Calcium sulfate was identified as prismatic-acicular crystals with Ca and S as the major elements.

  2. Calcium titration of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii centrin and its structural changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña, Wanda; Pastrana-Ríos, Belinda

    2014-07-01

    Chlamydomonas reinhardtii centrin is a highly conserved calcium binding protein belonging to the EF-hand superfamily. Centrin, like other calcium binding proteins, changes conformation upon calcium binding. In addition, the calcium binding sites are comprised mainly of aspartates and glutamates which would serve as probes for a calcium binding event. 2D IR correlation spectroscopy has proven to be a valuable technique to determine the differences in the molecular behavior of the EF-hand domains within centrin. Moreover, the differences in affinity for calcium displayed by these domains were correlated to differences in the molecular behavior of these EF-hand domains when compared with each other and the full-length protein. We were able to confirm the nature of the two independent domains within centrin. Furthermore, we established the mechanism of aggregation was self-association due to adsorption of centrin to the ZnSe ATR crystal and estimated the extent of aggregation of the full-length protein.

  3. Estimation of presynaptic calcium currents and endogenous calcium buffers at the frog neuromuscular junction with two different calcium fluorescent dyes

    OpenAIRE

    Samigullin, Dmitry; Fatikhov, Nijaz; Khaziev, Eduard; Skorinkin, Andrey; Nikolsky, Eugeny; Bukharaeva, Ellya

    2015-01-01

    At the frog neuromuscular junction, under physiological conditions, the direct measurement of calcium currents and of the concentration of intracellular calcium buffers—which determine the kinetics of calcium concentration and neurotransmitter release from the nerve terminal—has hitherto been technically impossible. With the aim of quantifying both Ca2+ currents and the intracellular calcium buffers, we measured fluorescence signals from nerve terminals loaded with the low-affinity calcium dy...

  4. The role of uncoupling protein 3 regulating calcium ion uptake into mitochondria during sarcopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikawa, Takeshi; Choi, Inho; Haruna, Marie; Hirasaka, Katsuya; Maita Ohno, Ayako; Kondo Teshima, Shigetada

    Overloaded mitochondrial calcium concentration contributes to progression of mitochondrial dysfunction in aged muscle, leading to sarcopenia. Uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) is primarily expressed in the inner membrane of skeletal muscle mitochondria. Recently, it has been reported that UCP3 is associated with calcium uptake into mitochondria. However, the mechanisms by which UCP3 regulates mitochondrial calcium uptake are not well understood. Here we report that UCP3 interacts with HS-1 associated protein X-1 (Hax-1), an anti-apoptotic protein that is localized in mitochondria, which is involved in cellular responses to calcium ion. The hydrophilic sequences within the loop 2, matrix-localized hydrophilic domain of mouse UCP3 are necessary for binding to Hax-1 of the C-terminal domain in adjacent to mitochondrial innermembrane. Interestingly, these proteins interaction occur the calcium-dependent manner. Indeed, overexpression of UCP3 significantly enhanced calcium uptake into mitochondria on Hax-1 endogenously expressing C2C12 myoblasts. In addition, Hax-1 knock-down enhanced calcium uptake into mitochondria on both UCP3 and Hax-1 endogenously expressing C2C12 myotubes, but not myoblasts. Finally, the dissociation of UCP3 and Hax-1 enhances calcium uptake into mitochondria in aged muscle. These studies identify a novel UCP3-Hax-1 complex regulates the influx of calcium ion into mitochondria in muscle. Thus, the efficacy of UCP3-Hax-1 in mitochondrial calcium regulation may provide a novel therapeutic approach against mitochondrial dysfunction-related disease containing sarcopenia.

  5. Mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis of small calcium concentrations in minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A mass spectrometric isotope dilution analysis for the determination of small calcium contents is developed. The different steps (decomposition of the mineral including isotope dilution technique, calcium separation and mass spectrometric measurement) of the analytical procedure are described. For a 42Ca spike the optimum spike addition is calculated. The dependence of the analysis error on the mass spectrometric measurements is discussed. Using a chromatographic method with a strong acidic ion exchanger calcium can be completely separated from potassium. The calcium content in the range of 0.15-0.004% of two feldspars and of one lepidolite is determined with external relative standard deviations of 0.9-5.1%. (orig.)

  6. New dynamic model for non-Fickian diffusion of calcium spark in cardiac myocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TAN Wenchang; LIU Shiqiang; GUO Jingjing; WANG Shiqiang; CHENG Heping; T. Masuoka

    2003-01-01

    A new dynamic model for non-Fickian diffusion of calcium spark in cardiac myocytes was developed by introducing time lags on the basis of the microscale mass transport theory. Numerical simulation showed that the size of the calcium spark produced by the new dynamic model was larger than that of Fick diffusion and was in more agreement with experimental results. In addition, the time lags of the calcium spark in cardiac myocytes were about 0.1-0.8 ms. These results can be used to understand the mechanism of calcium spark diffusion in cardiac myocytes.

  7. BLENDED CALCIUM ALUMINATE-CALCIUM SULFATE CEMENT-BASED GROUT FOR P-REACTOR VESSEL IN-SITU DECOMMISSIONING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Stefanko, D.

    2011-03-10

    The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout which has a pH greater than 12.4. In addition, blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement compositions can be formulated such that the primary cementitious phase is a stable crystalline material. A less alkaline material (pH {<=} 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts [Wiersma, 2009a and b, Wiersma, 2010, and Serrato and Langton, 2010]. Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere [Griffin, 2010, Stefanko, 2009 and Wiersma, 2009 and 2010, Bobbitt, 2010, respectively]. Radiolysis calculations are also provided in a separate document [Reyes-Jimenez, 2010].

  8. Blended Calcium Aluminate-Calcium Sulfate Cement-Based Grout For P-Reactor Vessel In-Situ Decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this report is to document laboratory testing of blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate grouts for P-Reactor vessel in-situ decommissioning. Blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement-based grout was identified as candidate material for filling (physically stabilizing) the 105-P Reactor vessel (RV) because it is less alkaline than portland cement-based grout which has a pH greater than 12.4. In addition, blended calcium aluminate - calcium hemihydrate cement compositions can be formulated such that the primary cementitious phase is a stable crystalline material. A less alkaline material (pH ≤ 10.5) was desired to address a potential materials compatibility issue caused by corrosion of aluminum metal in highly alkaline environments such as that encountered in portland cement grouts (Wiersma, 2009a and b, Wiersma, 2010, and Serrato and Langton, 2010). Information concerning access points into the P-Reactor vessel and amount of aluminum metal in the vessel is provided elsewhere (Griffin, 2010, Stefanko, 2009 and Wiersma, 2009 and 2010, Bobbitt, 2010, respectively). Radiolysis calculations are also provided in a separate document (Reyes-Jimenez, 2010).

  9. Variability of calcium absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Variability in calcium absorption was estimated in three groups of normal subjects in whom Ca absorption was measured by standard isotopic-tracer methods at interstudy intervals ranging from 1 to 4 mo. Fifty absorption tests were performed in 22 subjects. Each was done in the morning after an overnight fast with an identical standard breakfast containing a Ca load of approximately 250 mg. Individual fractional absorption values were normalized to permit pooling of the data. The coefficient of variation (CVs) for absorption for the three groups ranged from 10.57 to 12.79% with the size of the CV increasing with interstudy duration. One other published study presenting replicate absorption values was analyzed in a similar fashion and was found to have a CV of absorption of 9.78%. From these data we estimate that when the standard double-isotope method is used to measure Ca absorption there is approximately 10% variability around any given absorption value within an individual human subject and that roughly two-thirds of this represents real biological variability in absorption

  10. The flame photometric determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, H.

    1957-01-01

    A flame photometric method of determining calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate locks has been developed Aluminum and phosphate interference was overcome by the addition of a large excess of magnesium. The method is rapid and suitable for routine analysis Results obtained are within ?? 2% of the calcium oxide content. ?? 1957.

  11. Regional specificity of exercise and calcium during skeletal growth in girls : A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iuliano-Burns, S; Saxon, L; Naughton, G; Gibbons, K; Bass, SL

    2003-01-01

    Combining exercise with calcium supplementation may produce additive or multiplicative effects at loaded sites; thus, we conducted a single blind, prospective, randomized controlled study in pre- and early-pubertal girls to test the following hypotheses. (1) At the loaded sites, exercise and calcium

  12. Modification of oxygen and sulphur inclusions in steel by calcium treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Lis

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In the article, the results of examinations of changes in deformability of oxygen and sulphur inclusions in structural steel processed with calcium are discussed. The results obtained imply the positive influence of the calcium additives on the changes in geometry of oxygen and sulphur inclusions related to the modification of their chemical composition.

  13. Nanostructure of Calcium Silicate Hydrates in Cements

    KAUST Repository

    Skinner, L. B.

    2010-05-11

    Calcium silicate hydrate (CSH) is the major volume phase in the matrix of Portland cement concrete. Total x-ray scattering measurements with synchrotron x rays on synthetic CSH(I) shows nanocrystalline ordering with a particle diameter of 3.5(5) nm, similar to a size-broadened 1.1 nm tobermorite crystal structure. The CSH component in hydrated tricalcium silicate is found to be similar to CSH(I). Only a slight bend and additional disorder within the CaO sheets is required to explain its nanocrystalline structure. © 2010 The American Physical Society.

  14. A novel hydrolytic product from flesh of Mactra veneriformis and its bioactivities in calcium supplement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lingchong; Chen, Shiyong; Liu, Rui; Wu, Hao

    2012-09-01

    To prepare calcium-binding peptides, the flesh residue of Mactra Veneriformis was subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis. By comparing the capability of combining calcium of the hydrolyzates, pepsin was confirmed to be the most suitable enzyme for hydrolyzing the flesh residue to release calcium-binding peptides among the seven tested proteases. The pepsin hydrolyzate (PHM) was divided into three fractions according to the molecule weight of its composition, which ranged from 0.5 to 15 kDa. The low-molecule-weight fraction named PHM-3 had the highest capability in combining calcium. The peptides existing in the PHM-3 fraction consisted of higher contents of Glu, Ala and Leu, and could produce one type of calcium-peptide complex by powerfully chelating calcium ions. PHM-3 products could effectively increase calcium absorption and retention while they decreased the calcium excretion in animal tests. Additionally, symptoms caused by low calcium bioavailability in ovariectomized rats, such as bone mineral density reduction and mechanical strength loss could be significantly ameliorated by the hydrolytic products addition in diet.

  15. A Novel Hydrolytic Product from Flesh of Mactra veneriformis and Its Bioactivities in Calcium Supplement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Lingchong; CHEN Shiyong; LIU Rui; WU Hao

    2012-01-01

    To prepare calcium-binding peptides,the flesh residue of Mactra Veneriformis was subjected to enzymatic hydrolysis.By comparing the capability of combining calcium of the hydrolyzates,pepsin was confirmed to be the most suitable enzyme for hydrolyzing the flesh residue to release calcium-binding peptides among the seven tested proteases.The pepsin hydrolyzate(PHM)was divided into three fractions according to the molecule weight of its composition,which ranged from 0.5 to 15 kDa.The low-molecule-weight fraction named PHM-3 had the highest capability in combining calcium.The peptides existing in the PHM-3fraction consisted of higher contents of Glu,Ala and Leu,and could produce one type of calcium-peptide complex by powerfully chelating calcium ions.PHM-3 products could effectively increase calcium absorption and retention while they decreased the calcium excretion in animal tests.Additionally,symptoms caused by low calcium bioavailability in ovariectomized rats,such as bone mineral density reduction and mechanical strength loss could be significantly ameliorated by the hydrolytic products addition in diet.

  16. Micro structural characteristics of minced meat products from use of protein-mineral additive

    OpenAIRE

    M. Golovko; M. Serik; T. Golovko; V. Polupan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. Infringement of balance mineral substances is widely manifested in the meat products which is much wealthier in phosphorus than calcium. List of additives that containing calcium and technology meat products with their using are limited. Purpose of the work is studying and scientific substantiation of influence proteinmineral additive (PMA) on the technological microstructural properties of minced meat products. Matherials and...

  17. Calcium-sensitive immunoaffinity chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Maiken L; Lindhardt Madsen, Kirstine; Skjoedt, Karsten;

    2014-01-01

    homogeneity may be impossible due to contamination with abundant antigens. In this study, we purified the scarce, complement-associated plasma protein complex, collectin LK (CL-LK, complex of collectin liver 1 and kidney 1), by immunoaffinity chromatography using a calcium-sensitive anti-collectin-kidney-1 m......Ab. This antibody was characterized by binding to CL-LK at hypo- and physiological calcium concentrations and dissociated from CK-LK at hyperphysiological concentrations of calcium. We purified CL-LK from plasma to a purity of 41% and a yield of 38%, resulting in a purification factor of more than 88......,000 in a single step. To evaluate the efficiency of this new purification scheme, we purified CL-LK using the same calcium-sensitive mAb in combination with acidic elution buffer and by using calcium-dependent anti-CL-K1 mAbs in combination with EDTA elution buffer. We found that calcium...

  18. Determination of (210)Po in calcium supplements and the possible related dose assessment to the consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumińska-Parulska, Dagmara I

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this pioneer study was to investigate the most popular calcium supplements as a potential additional source of polonium (210)Po in human diet. The analyzed calcium pharmaceutics contained organic or inorganic calcium compounds; some from natural sources as mussels' shells, fish extracts, or sedimentary rocks. The objectives of this research were to investigate the naturally occurring (210)Po activity concentrations in calcium supplements, find the correlations between (210)Po concentration in medicament and calcium chemical form, and calculate the effective radiation dose connected to analyzed calcium supplement consumption. As results showed, (210)Po concentrations in natural origin calcium supplements (especially sedimentary rocks) were higher than the other analyzed. Also the results of (210)Po analysis obtained for inorganic forms of calcium supplements were higher. The highest (210)Po activity concentrations were determined in mineral tablets made from sedimentary rocks: dolomite and chalk - 3.88 ± 0.22 and 3.36 ± 0.10 mBq g(-1) respectively; while the lowest in organic calcium compounds: calcium lactate and calcium gluconate - 0.07 ± 0.02 and 0.17 ± 0.01 mBq g(-1). The annual effective radiation doses from supplements intake were estimated as well. The highest annual radiation dose from (210)Po taken with 1 tablet of calcium supplement per day was connected to sample made from chalk - 2.5 ± 0.07 μSv year(-1), while the highest annual radiation dose from (210)Po taken with 1 g of pure calcium per day was connected to dolomite - 12.7 ± 0.70 μSv year(-1). PMID:26318774

  19. Calcium Carbonate Nucleation in an Alkaline Lake Surface Water, Pyramid Lake, Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M.M.; Hoch, A.

    2012-01-01

    Calcium concentration and calcite supersaturation (??) needed for calcium carbonate nucleation and crystal growth in Pyramid Lake (PL) surface water were determined during August of 1997, 2000, and 2001. PL surface water has ?? values of 10-16. Notwithstanding high ??, calcium carbonate growth did not occur on aragonite single crystals suspended PL surface water for several months. However, calcium solution addition to PL surface-water samples caused reproducible calcium carbonate mineral nucleation and crystal growth. Mean PL surface-water calcium concentration at nucleation was 2.33 mM (n = 10), a value about nine times higher than the ambient PL surface-water calcium concentration (0.26 mM); mean ?? at nucleation (109 with a standard deviation of 8) is about eight times the PL surface-water ??. Calcium concentration and ?? regulated the calcium carbonate formation in PL nucleation experiments and surface water. Unfiltered samples nucleated at lower ?? than filtered samples. Calcium concentration and ?? at nucleation for experiments in the presence of added particles were within one standard deviation of the mean for all samples. Calcium carbonate formation rates followed a simple rate expression of the form, rate (mM/min) = A (??) + B. The best fit rate equation "Rate (?? mM/?? min) = -0.0026 ?? + 0.0175 (r = 0.904, n = 10)" was statistically significant at greater than the 0.01 confidence level and gives, after rearrangement, ?? at zero rate of 6.7. Nucleation in PL surface water and morphology of calcium carbonate particles formed in PL nucleation experiments and in PL surface-water samples suggest crystal growth inhibition by multiple substances present in PL surface water mediates PL calcium carbonate formation, but there is insufficient information to determine the chemical nature of all inhibitors. ?? 2011 U.S. Government.

  20. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated calcium signaling in the nervous system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-xin SHEN; Jerrel L YAKEL

    2009-01-01

    Based on the composition of the five subunits forming functional neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), they are grouped into either heteromeric (comprising both α and β subunits) or homomeric (comprising only α subunits) recep-tors. The nAChRs are known to be differentially permeable to calcium ions, with the α7 nAChR subtype having one of the highest permeabilities to calcium. Calcium influx through nAChRs, particularly through the α-bungarotoxin-sensitive α7-containing nAChRs, is a very efficient way to raise cytoplasmic calcium levels. The activation of nAChRs can mediate three types of cytoplasmic calcium signals: (1) direct calcium influx through the nAChRs, (2) indirect calcium influx through voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) which are activated by the nAChR-mediated depolarization, and (3) calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) (triggered by the first two sources) from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through the ryanodine receptors and inositol (1,4,5)-triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs). Downstream signaling events mediated by nAChR-mediated calcium responses can be grouped into instantaneous effects (such as neurotransmitter release, which can occur in milliseconds after nAChR activation), short-term effects (such as the recovery of nAChR desensitization through cellular signaling cascades), and long-term effects (such as neuroprotection via gene expression). In addition, nAChR activity can be regulated by cytoplasmic calcium levels, suggesting a complex reciprocal relationship. Further advances in imaging techniques, animal models, and more potent and subtype-selective ligands for neuronal nAChRs would help in understand-ing the neuronal nAChR-mediated calcium signaling, and lead to the development of improved therapeutic treatments.

  1. Fabrications of zinc-releasing biocement combining zinc calcium phosphate to calcium phosphate cement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiuchi, Shinya; Hiasa, Masahiro; Yasue, Akihiro; Sekine, Kazumitsu; Hamada, Kenichi; Asaoka, Kenzo; Tanaka, Eiji

    2014-01-01

    Recently, zinc-releasing bioceramics have been the focus of much attention owing to their bone-forming ability. Thus, some types of zinc-containing calcium phosphate (e.g., zinc-doped tricalcium phosphate and zinc-substituted hydroxyapatite) are examined and their osteoblastic cell responses determined. In this investigation, we studied the effects of zinc calcium phosphate (ZCP) derived from zinc phosphate incorporated into calcium phosphate cement (CPC) in terms of its setting reaction and MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cell responses. Compositional analysis by powder X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that HAP crystals were precipitated in the CPC containing 10 or 30wt% ZCP after successfully hardening. However, the crystal growth observed by scanning electron microscopy was delayed in the presence of additional ZCP. These findings indicate that the additional zinc inhibits crystal growth and the conversion of CPC to the HAP crystals. The proliferation of the cells and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity were enhanced when 10wt% ZCP was added to CPC. Taken together, ZCP added CPC at an appropriate fraction has a potent promotional effect on bone substitute biomaterials. PMID:24090874

  2. Detection of irradiation history for health foods. Calcium salt of organic acid and its basic ingredient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium carbonate and calcium salt of organic acid are well-known food additives used for the improvement of the shelf life and eating quality of health food. Calcium carbonate is a precursor in the synthesis of calcium salts of organic acid. Certain calcium carbonates made of natural limestone mined from very old stratum have silicate minerals exposed to a low level of natural radiation over a long period of time and food additives derived from calcium carbonates contained of such silicate minerals are possible to classify as irradiated foods by PSL and TL analysis in spite of non-irradiation. The study of calcium carbonates and calcium salts of organic acid obtained from different producers were allow to provided appropriate decisions by using the information of both the TL response (Glow1 peak temperature and TL ratio) and PSL ratio. ESR measurements of radicals in such food additives caused by gamma- irradiation were effective tool for correctly determining for irradiation history of those because the measurements were not affected by silicate minerals contained in those. (author)

  3. Influence of a Calcium-Specific Chelant on Biofilm Removal

    OpenAIRE

    Turakhia, M. H.; Cooksey, K. E.; Characklis, W. G.

    1983-01-01

    This paper describes the influence of ethylene glycol-bisβ-aminoethyl ether)- N, N-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) on biofilm removal. The addition of EGTA resulted in the immediate detachment of biofilm which suggests that the chelant removed essential calcium from the biofilm, causing it to detach.

  4. "Caged calcium" in Aplysia pacemaker neurons. Characterization of calcium-activated potassium and nonspecific cation currents

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    We have studied calcium-activated potassium current, IK(Ca), and calcium-activated nonspecific cation current, INS(Ca), in Aplysia bursting pacemaker neurons, using photolysis of a calcium chelator (nitr-5 or nitr-7) to release "caged calcium" intracellularly. A computer model of nitr photolysis, multiple buffer equilibration, and active calcium extrusion was developed to predict volume-average and front-surface calcium concentration transients. Changes in arsenazo III absorbance were used to...

  5. Mercury Control with Calcium-Based Sorbents and Oxidizing Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas K. Gale

    2005-07-01

    This Final Report contains the test descriptions, results, analysis, correlations, theoretical descriptions, and model derivations produced from many different investigations performed on a project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, to investigate calcium-based sorbents and injection of oxidizing agents for the removal of mercury. Among the technologies were (a) calcium-based sorbents in general, (b) oxidant-additive sorbents developed originally at the EPA, and (c) optimized calcium/carbon synergism for mercury-removal enhancement. In addition, (d) sodium-tetrasulfide injection was found to effectively capture both forms of mercury across baghouses and ESPs, and has since been demonstrated at a slipstream treating PRB coal. It has been shown that sodium-tetrasulfide had little impact on the foam index of PRB flyash, which may indicate that sodium-tetrasulfide injection could be used at power plants without affecting flyash sales. Another technology, (e) coal blending, was shown to be an effective means of increasing mercury removal, by optimizing the concentration of calcium and carbon in the flyash. In addition to the investigation and validation of multiple mercury-control technologies (a through e above), important fundamental mechanism governing mercury kinetics in flue gas were elucidated. For example, it was shown, for the range of chlorine and unburned-carbon (UBC) concentrations in coal-fired utilities, that chlorine has much less effect on mercury oxidation and removal than UBC in the flyash. Unburned carbon enhances mercury oxidation in the flue gas by reacting with HCl to form chlorinated-carbon sites, which then react with elemental mercury to form mercuric chloride, which subsequently desorbs back into the flue gas. Calcium was found to enhance mercury removal by stabilizing the oxidized mercury formed on carbon surfaces. Finally, a model was developed to describe these mercury adsorption, desorption, oxidation, and removal mechanisms, including

  6. Effect of Preharvest Calcium Treatments on Sweet Cherry Fruit Quality

    OpenAIRE

    Deniz EROGUL

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the effects of different foliar calcium compounds on fruit cracking and quality of sweet cherry variety ‘0900 Ziraat’ were investigated. Calcium caseinate, calcium chloride, calcium hydroxide and calcium nitrate were used as foliar sprays. Calcium applications reduced the cracking index 38% to 66% compared to cherries that did not receive foliar treatment. The most efficient applications for decreasing cracking were calcium hydroxide and calcium chloride. Calcium chloride and c...

  7. Aging and calcium as an environmental factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, T

    1985-12-01

    Calcium deficiency is a constant menace to land-abiding animals, including mammals. Humans enjoying exceptional longevity on earth are especially susceptible to calcium deficiency in old age. Low calcium and vitamin D intake, short solar exposure, decreased intestinal absorption, and falling renal function with insufficient 1,25(OH)2 vitamin D biosynthesis all contribute to calcium deficiency, secondary hyperparathyroidism, bone loss and possibly calcium shift from the bone to soft tissue, and from the extracellular to the intracellular compartment, blunting the sharp concentration gap between these compartments. The consequences of calcium deficiency might thus include not only osteoporosis, but also arteriosclerosis and hypertension due to the increase of calcium in the vascular wall, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and senile dementia due to calcium deposition in the central nervous system, and a decrease in cellular function, because of blunting of the difference in extracellular-intracellular calcium, leading to diabetes mellitus, immune deficiency and others (Fig. 6). PMID:2943880

  8. Transport of Calcium Ions into Mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhaolong; Zhang, Dayong; He, Xiaolan; Huang, Yihong; Shao, Hongbo

    2016-06-01

    To uptake calcium ions of mitochondria is of significant functional connotation for cells, because calcium ions in mitochondria are involved in energy production, regulatory signals transfer, and mitochondrial permeability transition pore opening and even programmed cell death of apoptosis, further playing more roles in plant productivity and quality. Cytoplasmic calcium ions access into outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM) from voltage dependent anion-selective channel (VDAC) and were absorbed into inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM) by mitochondrial calcium uniporter (MCU), rapid mitochondrial calcium uptake (RaM) or mitochondrial ryanodine receptor (mRyR). Although both mitochondria and the mechanisms of calcium transport have been extensively studied, but there are still long-standing or even new challenges. Here we review the history and recent discoveries of the mitochondria calcium ions channel complex involved calcium assimilation, and discuss the role of calcium ions into mitochondria. PMID:27252588

  9. Optimizing calcium selective fluorimetric nanospheres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kisiel, Anna; Kłucińska, Katarzyna; Gniadek, Marianna; Maksymiuk, Krzysztof; Michalska, Agata

    2015-11-01

    Recently it was shown that optical nanosensors based on alternating polymers e.g. poly(maleic anhydride-alt-1-octadecene) were characterized by a linear dependence of emission intensity on logarithm of concentration over a few of orders of magnitude range. In this work we focus on the material used to prepare calcium selective nanosensors. It is shown that alternating polymer nanosensors offer competitive performance in the absence of calcium ionophore, due to interaction of the nanospheres building blocks with analyte ions. The emission increase corresponds to increase of calcium ions contents in the sample within the range from 10(-4) to 10(-1) M. Further improvement in sensitivity (from 10(-6) to 10(-1) M) and selectivity can be achieved by incorporating calcium ionophore in the nanospheres. The optimal results were obtained for core-shell nanospheres, where the core was prepared from poly(styrene-co-maleic anhydride) and the outer layer from poly(maleic anhydride-alt-1-octadecene). Thus obtained chemosensors were showing linear dependence of emission on logarithm of calcium ions concentration within the range from 10(-7) to 10(-1) M. PMID:26452839

  10. Isomorfic Substitutions of Calcium by Strontium in Calcium Hydroxyapatite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By means of homogeneous precipitation it has been possible to synthesize crystalline solid solutions of calcium strontium hydroxyapatite from aqueous solutions. The lattice constants for the solid solutions were measured in the range Ca9Sr(PO4)6(OH)2 - CaSr9(PO4)6(OH)2. The investigations show that the discrimination of strontium against calcium is considerably smaller than reported elsewhere (1). Strontium is preferentially built into the c-axis direction of the apatite lattice

  11. Effect of anions or foods on absolute bioavailability of calcium from calcium salts in mice by pharmacokinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Ueda, Yukari; Taira, Zenei

    2013-01-01

    We studied the absolute bioavailability of calcium from calcium L-lactate in mice using pharmacokinetics, and reviewed the absolute bioavailability of calcium from three other calcium salts in mice previously studied: calcium chloride, calcium acetate, and calcium ascorbate. The results showed that calcium metabolism is linear between intravenous administration of 15 mg/kg and 30 mg/kg, and is not affected by anions. Results after oral calcium administration of 150 mg/kg showed that the intes...

  12. Evaluation of certain food additives and contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This report represents the conclusions of a Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee convened to evaluate the safety of various food additives and contaminants, with a view to recommending Acceptable Daily Intakes (ADIs) and tolerable intakes, respectively, and to prepare specifications for the identity and purity of food additives. The first part of the report contains a general discussion of the principles governing the toxicological evaluation of food additives and contaminants (including flavouring agents), and the establishment and revision of specifications. A summary follows of the Committee's evaluations of toxicological data on various specific food additives (furfural, paprika oleoresin, caramel colour II, cochineal extract, carmines, aspartame-acesulfame salt, D-tagatose, benzoyl peroxide, nitrous oxide, stearyl tartrate and trehalose), flavouring agents and contaminants (cadmium and tin), and of intake data on calcium from calcium salts of food additives. Annexed to the report are tables summarizing the Committee's recommendations for ADIs of the food additives and tolerable intakes of the contaminants considered, changes in the status of specifications of these food additives and specific flavouring agents, and further information required or desired. PMID:11588830

  13. Markov chain models of coupled calcium channels: Kronecker representations and iterative solution methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathematical models of calcium release sites derived from Markov chain models of intracellular calcium channels exhibit collective gating reminiscent of the experimentally observed phenomenon of stochastic calcium excitability (i.e., calcium puffs and sparks). Calcium release site models are stochastic automata networks that involve many functional transitions, that is, the transition probabilities of each channel depend on the local calcium concentration and thus the state of the other channels. We present a Kronecker-structured representation for calcium release site models and perform benchmark stationary distribution calculations using both exact and approximate iterative numerical solution techniques that leverage this structure. When it is possible to obtain an exact solution, response measures such as the number of channels in a particular state converge more quickly using the iterative numerical methods than occupation measures calculated via Monte Carlo simulation. In particular, multi-level methods provide excellent convergence with modest additional memory requirements for the Kronecker representation of calcium release site models. When an exact solution is not feasible, iterative approximate methods based on the power method may be used, with performance similar to Monte Carlo estimates. This suggests approximate methods with multi-level iterative engines as a promising avenue of future research for large-scale calcium release site models

  14. Calcium release-activated calcium current in rat mast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoth, M; Penner, R

    1993-06-01

    1. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings of membrane currents and fura-2 measurements of free intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) were used to study the biophysical properties of a calcium current activated by depletion of intracellular calcium stores in rat peritoneal mast cells. 2. Calcium influx through an inward calcium release-activated calcium current (ICRAC) was induced by three independent mechanisms that result in store depletion: intracellular infusion of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3) or extracellular application of ionomycin (active depletion), and intracellular infusion of calcium chelators (ethylene glycol bis-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) or 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA)) to prevent reuptake of leaked-out calcium into the stores (passive depletion). 3. The activation of ICRAC induced by active store depletion has a short delay (4-14 s) following intracellular infusion of InsP3 or extracellular application of ionomycin. It has a monoexponential time course with a time constant of 20-30 s and, depending on the complementary Ca2+ buffer, a mean normalized amplitude (at 0 mV) of 0.6 pA pF-1 (with EGTA) and 1.1 pA pF-1 (with BAPTA). 4. After full activation of ICRAC by InsP3 in the presence of EGTA (10 mM), hyperpolarizing pulses to -100 mV induced an instantaneous inward current that decayed by 64% within 50 ms. This inactivation is probably mediated by [Ca2+]i, since the decrease of inward current in the presence of the fast Ca2+ buffer BAPTA (10 mM) was only 30%. 5. The amplitude of ICRAC was dependent on the extracellular Ca2+ concentration with an apparent dissociation constant (KD) of 3.3 mM. Inward currents were nonsaturating up to -200 mV. 6. The selectivity of ICRAC for Ca2+ was assessed by using fura-2 as the dominant intracellular buffer (at a concentration of 2 mM) and relating the absolute changes in the calcium-sensitive fluorescence (390 nm excitation) with the calcium current integral

  15. Calcium phosphate in catheter encrustation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, A J; Harries, J E; Hukins, D W; Kennedy, A P; Sutton, T M

    1987-02-01

    Encrusted catheters from nine female patients were the source of samples of deposits which were examined by X-ray diffraction, atomic absorption spectroscopy, infra-red spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. In eight samples the only crystalline phase which could be clearly distinguished by X-ray diffraction was ammonium magnesium orthophosphate hexahydrate, NH4MgPO4 X 6H2O, which occurs naturally as the mineral struvite. However, atomic absorption spectroscopy revealed an appreciable concentration of calcium in all samples. Calcium phosphates have previously been detected in catheter deposits. Infra-red and EXAFS spectra were consistent with the calcium phosphate being present as a poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite. Thus the deposits appear to consist of a mixture of crystalline struvite and a form of hydroxyapatite which is not fully crystalline. PMID:3030487

  16. Analysis of Calcium Content,Hormones,and Degrading Enzymes in Tomato Pedicel Explants During Calcium-Inhibited Abscission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Tao; LI Tian-lai; QI Ming-fang

    2009-01-01

    This study was designed to analyze the changes of phytohormone concentrations,calcium fraction,and the activities of degrading enzymes during calcium-inhibited and ethyleneglycol-bis-(β-aminoethyl ether)N,N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA)induced abscission of tomato pedicel explants.Added calcium caused an increase in the total calcium content within the abscission zone and produced a corresponding reduction (20%) in pedicel explant abscission.As expected,EGTA treatment produced the opposite effect and resulted in a decrease in the total calcium content,while accelerating abscission of pedicel explants.Hormone analysis revealed that indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) concentrations in the abscission zone first decreased and then increased before the occurrence of abscission in all treatments,with the greatest effect produced by addition of EGTA.Similarly,abscisic acid (ABA),and gibberellin (GA1+3) concentrations,and ethylene production were elevated in the abscission zone during the first 16 h before abscission when explants imbibed EGTA.With calcium treatment,the concentrations of ABA,ethylene,and GA1+3 also increased in pedicels throughout the first 16 h following exposure,but the increase was slower and less dramatic than with EGTA.Both cellulase and polygalacturonase were induced in the explants during abscission and the activities were also strengthened by treatment with EGTA.Calciumtreated explants produced lower hydrolysing enzyme activities than controls throughout abscission.Calcium played a role of mediating hormone balance and degrading enzymes activities and affected on abscission.

  17. The effect of variable calcium and very low calcium diets on human calcium metabolism. Ph.D. Thesis. Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, J.

    1971-01-01

    The effects of a very low calcium diet, with variable high and low protein intake, on the dynamics of calcium metabolism and the mechanism of calciuretics, are examined. The experiment, using male subjects, was designed to study the role of intestinal calcium absorption on urinary calcium excretion, and the rate of production of endogeneously secreted calcium in the gastrointestinal tract. The study showed an average of 70% fractional absorption rate during very low calcium intake, and that a decrease in renal tubular reabsorption of calcium is responsible for calciuretic effects of high protein intake. The study also indicates that there is a tendency to develop osteoporosis after long periods of low calcium intake, especially with a concurrent high protein intake.

  18. Assessment of food calcium radioprotection effectiveness against cesium-137, added alone and with iodine-131

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New fish product with addition of food calcium had radioprotective properties, resulted in decreased cesium-137 content in organs and tissues of animals by 40-60% and lesser changes in differential blood count and biochemical indexes of blood serum

  19. Synthesis and characterization of zirconium-doped calcium phosphate biomaterial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new synthesis route for the production of calcium phosphate biomaterial was developed by using organic di-(2-ethylhexyl) phosphoric acid (DEHPA) mixed with calcium hydroxide slurry. Unlike the conventional involving chemical precipitation process this new method involves a sol-gel process. Another advantage of this method is the starting material DEHPA can form strong bonding with many elements including zirconium and rare earths. This makes it suitable to be used as drug delivery material especially those involving bone related disease. It also improves the biomaterial strength with the presence of zirconium oxide phase. From XRD analysis, the result shows the present of HA, α-TCP and β-TCP. The addition of different rare elements on to the calcium phosphate will varies the amount of these three phases. SEM analysis was also performed to study the morphology of the calcium phosphate material. The presence of the rare earths on to the calcium phosphate was established by using the EDS technique. (Author)

  20. Tumoral calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A report of two patients in which a soft tissue mass, initially regarded as a malignant tumor, was shown to be the result of calcium pyrophosphate deposition disease. The first case, a woman aged 71 years, presented with a mass involving the right fifth finger. In the second case, also a women aged 71 years, the lesion involved the tissues adjacent to the right hip. Each lesion consisted of a mass of highly cellular tissue containing deposits of calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate crystals. The clinical, radiological, and pathological features of the two cases are compared with those of seven similar cases reported in the literature. (orig.)

  1. In vitro osteoblast-like and endothelial cells' response to calcium silicate/calcium phosphate cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to investigate the interaction between calcium silicate/calcium phosphate cement (CS/CPC) and osteogenesis, in particular the in vitro osteoblast-like and endothelial cells' response to CS/CPC. The effect of CS/CPC on cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation of murine osteoblast-like cell MC3T3-E1, as well as the influence on the cell attachment and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC), was studied in detail. Our results indicated that CS/CPC exhibited excellent biocompatibility to the osteoblast-like cells. Moreover, the morphology and cytoskeleton organization of MC3T3-E1 cultured on the CS/CPC disks suggested that CS/CPC induced better cell adhesion and cell spreading. Simultaneously, cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of MC3T3-E1 were significantly improved after 3 and 7 days of culture on CS/CPC disks in comparison with CPC disks. Additionally, on CS/CPC disks, HUVEC attached well on day 1 and cell proliferation was also greatly enhanced by day 7. Collectively, these results suggest that the introduction of calcium silicate may improve the cell response involved in the osteogenesis and thus may be beneficial to further modify CPC as a better bone repairing material.

  2. Complex formation ions calcium with macromolecules pectin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In clause the mechanism of sorption of ions of calcium by macromolecules of pectin is opened. Is shown, that the linkage of ions of calcium descends on acid bunches of pectin, and process carries cooperative character

  3. Mechanism of store-operated calcium entry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Devkanya Dutta

    2000-12-01

    Activation of receptors coupled to the phospholipase C/IP3 signalling pathway results in a rapid release of calcium from its intracellular stores, eventually leading to depletion of these stores. Calcium store depletion triggers an influx of extracellular calcium across the plasma membrane, a mechanism known as the store-operated calcium entry or capacitative calcium entry. Capacitative calcium current plays a key role in replenishing calcium stores and activating various physiological processes. Despite considerable efforts, very little is known about the molecular nature of the capacitative channel and the signalling pathway that activates it. This review summarizes our current knowledge about store operated calcium entry and suggests possible hypotheses for its mode of activation.

  4. Dairy Dilemma: Are You Getting Enough Calcium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Dairy Dilemma Dairy Dilemma Are You Getting Enough Calcium? You may be avoiding dairy products because of ... But dairy products are a major source of calcium, vitamin D and other nutrients that are important ...

  5. Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can break easily, even without an obvious injury. Vitamin D helps your body absorb calcium. Eat foods that provide the right amounts of calcium, vitamin D, and protein. This kind of diet will give ...

  6. Teaching Calcium-Induced Calcium Release in Cardiomyocytes Using a Classic Paper by Fabiato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Willmann

    2008-01-01

    This teaching paper utilizes the materials presented by Dr. Fabiato in his review article entitled "Calcium-induced release of calcium from the cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum." In the review, supporting evidence of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) is presented. Data concerning potential objections to the CICR theory are discussed as well. In…

  7. Electrophysical properties of calcium orthovanadate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron conductivity, dielectric permeability and magnetic susceptibility of calcium orthovanadate are studied. It is shown that structural transformations bring about changes in the nature of electrophysical properties of Ca3(VO4)2 and cause the charge redistribution in VO43- anion groups

  8. Iodide refining of calcium-thermal zirconium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of high zirconium of calcium - thermal zirconium KTC-HP and metallic wastes production by iodide refining is examined. The impurities behavior is studied,the refining coefficient dependence on the impurity concentration in the initial material is determined. The impurities minimum concentration in iodide zirconium are evaluated by extrapolation.It is determined that the refining efficiency decreases in the range: Ni=Mn > Cr >F>C>N>O>Fe and aluminium and silicon removal during the iodide refining of calcium thermal zirconium is problematic. By comparison of iodide metal of KTC-HP expected quality with the specifications and the iodide zirconium purity real level obtained in the adopted practice the possibility of standard metal production of KTC-HP and metal wastes is demonstrated. The principal merit of KTC - hafnium content <0,01 mass % is preserved. Alloys melting of double or triple on the base of KTC according TS 95.2185-90 with the addition of 35...50 % of iodide zirconium by the method VDP will allow to obtain the alloys KTC-110 and KTC-125 with oxygen fraction of total mass 0,06...0,10% and hafnium content, meeting the world standards

  9. 21 CFR 182.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium phosphate. 182.1217 Section 182.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  10. 21 CFR 582.5217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.5217 Section 582.5217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic)....

  11. 21 CFR 582.5191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.5191 Section 582.5191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use....

  12. 21 CFR 182.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium silicate. 182.2227 Section 182.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Anticaking Agents § 182.2227 Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate....

  13. 21 CFR 582.2227 - Calcium silicate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium silicate. 582.2227 Section 582.2227 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium silicate. (a) Product. Calcium silicate. (b) Tolerance. 2 percent and 5 percent. (c)...

  14. Calcium dynamics in vascular smooth muscle

    OpenAIRE

    Amberg, Gregory C.; Navedo, Manuel F.

    2013-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells are ultimately responsible for determining vascular luminal diameter and blood flow. Dynamic changes in intracellular calcium are a critical mechanism regulating vascular smooth muscle contractility. Processes influencing intracellular calcium are therefore important regulators of vascular function with physiological and pathophysiological consequences. In this review we discuss the major dynamic calcium signals identified and characterized in vascular smooth muscle cells....

  15. Lactulose stimulates calcium absorption in postmenopausal women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heuvel, E.G.H.M. van den; Muijs, T.; Dokkum, W. van; Schaafsma, G.

    1999-01-01

    Animal studies have indicated that calcium absorption is increased by lactulose, a synthetic disaccharide. Therefore, the influence of lactulose on calcium absorption was measured in postmenopausal women who may benefit from the possible enhancing effect of lactulose on calcium absorption. Twelve po

  16. Effect of Calcium Ions on the Disintegration of Enteric-Coated Solid Dosage Forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Gousous, Jozef; Langguth, Peter

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the effect of calcium ions on the disintegration of enteric-coated dosage forms, disintegration testing was performed on enteric-coated aspirin tablets in the presence and absence of calcium in the test media. The results show that the presence of calcium ions retards the disintegration of enteric-coated dosage forms. This finding, which has not been reported in scientific literature, sheds light on the importance of conducting well-designed detailed investigations into the potential of calcium from dietary sources, calcium supplements, antacids, and/or phosphate binders affecting the absorption of drugs formulated into enteric-coated dosage forms. Moreover, it shows the necessity to investigate the potential of the occurrence of additional nutrient-excipient interactions. PMID:26523769

  17. Sodium/Calcium Exchangers Selectively Regulate Calcium Signaling in Mouse Taste Receptor Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Szebenyi, Steven A.; Laskowski, Agnieszka I.; Medler, Kathryn F.

    2010-01-01

    Taste cells use multiple signaling mechanisms to generate appropriate cellular responses to discrete taste stimuli. Some taste stimuli activate G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) that cause calcium release from intracellular stores while other stimuli depolarize taste cells to cause calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). While the signaling mechanisms that initiate calcium signals have been described in taste cells, the calcium clearance mechanisms (CCMs) that contrib...

  18. Calcium electroporation in three cell lines; a comparison of bleomycin and calcium, calcium compounds, and pulsing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gissel, Hanne; Hojman, Pernille;

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Electroporation with calcium (calcium electroporation) can induce ATP depletion-associated cellular death. In the clinical setting, the cytotoxic drug bleomycin is currently used with electroporation (electrochemotherapy) for palliative treatment of tumors. Calcium electroporation...... offers several advantages over standard treatment options: calcium is inexpensive and may readily be applied without special precautions, as is the case with cytostatic drugs. Therefore, details on the use of calcium electroporation are essential for carrying out clinical trials comparing calcium...... electroporation and electrochemotherapy. METHODS: The effects of calcium electroporation and bleomycin electroporation (alone or in combination) were compared in three different cell lines (DC-3F, transformed Chinese hamster lung fibroblast; K-562, human leukemia; and murine Lewis Lung Carcinoma). Furthermore...

  19. Effect of anions or foods on absolute bioavailability of calcium from calcium salts in mice by pharmacokinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Zenei Taira, Zenei

    2013-01-01

    Yukari Ueda, Zenei TairaFaculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Tokushima Bunri University, Tokushima, JapanAbstract: We studied the absolute bioavailability of calcium from calcium L-lactate in mice using pharmacokinetics, and reviewed the absolute bioavailability of calcium from three other calcium salts in mice previously studied: calcium chloride, calcium acetate, and calcium ascorbate. The results showed that calcium metabolism is linear between intravenous administration of 15 mg/kg and 30 ...

  20. Calcium signals and calcium channels in osteoblastic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, R. L.; Akanbi, K. A.; Farach-Carson, M. C.

    1998-01-01

    Calcium (Ca2+) channels are present in non-excitable as well as in excitable cells. In bone cells of the osteoblast lineage, Ca2+ channels play fundamental roles in cellular responses to external stimuli including both mechanical forces and hormonal signals. They are also proposed to modulate paracrine signaling between bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts at local sites of bone remodeling. Calcium signals are characterized by transient increases in intracellular Ca2+ levels that are associated with activation of intracellular signaling pathways that control cell behavior and phenotype, including patterns of gene expression. Development of Ca2+ signals is a tightly regulated cellular process that involves the concerted actions of plasma membrane and intracellular Ca2+ channels, along with Ca2+ pumps and exchangers. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge concerning the structure, function, and role of Ca2+ channels and Ca2+ signals in bone cells, focusing on the osteoblast.

  1. Computational study of a calcium release-activated calcium channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Keka; Shantappa, Anil

    2016-05-01

    The naturally occurring proteins that form hole in membrane are commonly known as ion channels. They play multiple roles in many important biological processes. Deletion or alteration of these channels often leads to serious problems in the physiological processes as it controls the flow of ions through it. The proper maintenance of the flow of ions, in turn, is required for normal health. Here we have investigated the behavior of a calcium release-activated calcium ion channel with pdb entry 4HKR in Drosophila Melanogaster. The equilibrium energy as well as molecular dynamics simulation is performed first. The protein is subjected to molecular dynamics simulation to find their energy minimized value. Simulation of the protein in the environment of water and ions has given us important results too. The solvation energy is also found using Charmm potential.

  2. Role of Calcium Signaling in the Transcriptional Regulation of the Apicoplast Genome of Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabna Cheemadan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium is a universal second messenger that plays an important role in regulatory processes in eukaryotic cells. To understand calcium-dependent signaling in malaria parasites, we analyzed transcriptional responses of Plasmodium falciparum to two calcium ionophores (A23187 and ionomycin that cause redistribution of intracellular calcium within the cytoplasm. While ionomycin induced a specific transcriptional response defined by up- or downregulation of a narrow set of genes, A23187 caused a developmental arrest in the schizont stage. In addition, we observed a dramatic decrease of mRNA levels of the transcripts encoded by the apicoplast genome during the exposure of P. falciparum to both calcium ionophores. Neither of the ionophores caused any disruptions to the DNA replication or the overall apicoplast morphology. This suggests that the mRNA downregulation reflects direct inhibition of the apicoplast gene transcription. Next, we identify a nuclear encoded protein with a calcium binding domain (EF-hand that is localized to the apicoplast. Overexpression of this protein (termed PfACBP1 in P. falciparum cells mediates an increased resistance to the ionophores which suggests its role in calcium-dependent signaling within the apicoplast. Our data indicate that the P. falciparum apicoplast requires calcium-dependent signaling that involves a novel protein PfACBP1.

  3. Calcium regulation of EGF-induced ERK5 activation: role of Lad1-MEKK2 interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Yao

    Full Text Available The ERK5 cascade is a MAPK pathway that transmits both mitogenic and stress signals, yet its mechanism of activation is not fully understood. Using intracellular calcium modifiers, we found that ERK5 activation by EGF is inhibited both by the depletion and elevation of intracellular calcium levels. This calcium effect was found to occur upstream of MEKK2, which is the MAP3K of the ERK5 cascade. Co-immunoprecipitation revealed that EGF increases MEKK2 binding to the adaptor protein Lad1, and this interaction was reduced by the intracellular calcium modifiers, indicating that a proper calcium concentration is required for the interactions and transmission of EGF signals to ERK5. In vitro binding assays revealed that the proper calcium concentration is required for a direct binding of MEKK2 to Lad1. The binding of these proteins is not affected by c-Src-mediated phosphorylation on Lad1, but slightly affects the Tyr phosphorylation of MEKK2, suggesting that the interaction with Lad1 is necessary for full Tyr phosphorylation of MEKK2. In addition, we found that changes in calcium levels affect the EGF-induced nuclear translocation of MEKK2 and thereby its effect on the nuclear ERK5 activity. Taken together, these findings suggest that calcium is required for EGF-induced ERK5 activation, and this effect is probably mediated by securing proper interaction of MEKK2 with the upstream adaptor protein Lad1.

  4. Substitution of calcium by strontium within selected calcium phosphates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokita, E.; Hermes, C.; Nolting, H.-F.; Ryczek, J.

    1993-06-01

    Sr incorporation in the molecules of amorphous calcium phosphate, apatitic tricalcium phosphate, hydroxyapatite, octacalcium phosphate and dicalcium phosphate dihydrate was investigated. The concentration of Sr ranged from 225 to 1010 μ g / g, i.e. it overlapped with the physiological range of Sr concentrations in human bone. The leading experimental technique was extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) at the Sr K edge. Results of these studies demonstrated the following: (1) Sr incorporation in the calcium phosphates is compound-dependent, (2) the coordination of incorporated Sr atoms in the Ca-P molecules is similar to that of Ca atoms, but interatomic distances are ≈0.015 nm larger, (3) in apatitic tricalcium phosphate, hydroxyapatite and octacalcium phosphate lattices Sr atoms may occupy selected Ca sites, which was not the case for dicalcium phosphate dihydrate, (4) in the apatite lattice Sr atoms are coordinated by 6 PO 4 tetrahedrals and (5) EXAFS spectra at the K edge of the incorporated Sr may be used to distinguish the structures of amorphous calcium phosphate, dicalcium phosphate dihydrate as well as apatite and its derivatives (apatitic tricalcium phosphate, octacalcium phosphate).

  5. USING CALCIUM CARBONATE WHISKERS AS PAPERMAKING FILLER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyu Chen

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Whiskers, having large length/diameter ratio, are fiber-shaped single crystals. The technical possibility of using calcium carbonate whiskers as papermaking filler to replace conventional powder-like calcium carbonate was investigated. The results showed that it may be feasible to use calcium carbonate whisker as papermaking filler. Compared with conventional precipitated calcium carbonate, calcium carbonate whisker had higher retention efficiency. The use of calcium carbonate whisker also favorably affected the strength properties of paper sheets. A model was proposed to suggest the mechanism for paper strength improvement. The whiskers filled in paper sheets could increase the friction between fibers, thus increasing bonding strength. Moreover, the strength properties of paper were further improved because calcium carbonate whiskers were partly embedded in pulp fiber walls.

  6. CALCIUM ENHANCES ANTIINFLAMMATORY ACTIVITY OF ASPIRIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choksi Krishna

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of present study is to evaluate the effects of calcium carbonate and calcium gluconate on acute and subacute inflammation and to study their possible interactions with Aspirin. Calcium carbonate (10 mg/kg and calcium gluconate (5 mg/kg were administered individually and also co-administered along with sub therapeutic dose Aspirin (50mg/kg to study their interaction. The inflammation was induced by carrageenan or a foreign body. Both calcium carbonate and calcium gluconate could not show significant anti-inflammatory activity on their own in acute as well as subacute inflammation models. Aspirin at sub-anti-inflammatory dose (50mg/Kg when co-administered along with calcium salts produced the significant anti-inflammatory response which was comparable to anti-inflammatory response of aspirin at therapeutic dose (200mg/Kg. Also co-adminostration minimized the gastro-toxicity of aspirin.

  7. Response to an oral calcium load in nephrolithiasis patients with fluctuating parathyroid hormone and ionized calcium levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Gomes

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available the response to an oral calcium load test was assessed in 17 hypercalciuric nephrolithiasis patients who presented elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH irrespective of the ionized calcium (sCa2+ levels. Blood samples were collected at baseline (0 min and at 60 and 180 min after 1 g calcium load for serum PTH, total calcium, sCa2+, and 1.25(OH2D3 determinations. According to the sCa2+ level at baseline, patients were classified as normocalcemic (N = 9 or hypercalcemic (N = 8. Six healthy subjects were also evaluated as controls. Bone mineral density was reduced in 14/17 patients. In the normocalcemic group, mean PTH levels at 0, 60 and 180 min (95 ± 76, 56 ± 40, 57 ± 45 pg/ml, respectively did not differ from the hypercalcemic group (130 ± 75, 68 ± 35, 80 ± 33 pg/ml but were significantly higher compared to healthy subjects despite a similar elevation in sCa2+ after 60 and 180 min vs baseline in all 3 groups. Mean total calcium and 1.25(OH2D3 were similar in the 3 groups. Additionally, we observed that 5 of 9 normocalcemic patients presented a significantly higher concentration-time curve for serum PTH (AUC0',60',180' than the other 4 patients and the healthy subjects, suggesting a primary parathyroid dysfunction. These data suggest that the individual response to an oral calcium load test may be a valuable dynamic tool to disclose a subtle primary hyperparathyroidism in patients with high PTH and fluctuating sCa2+ levels, avoiding repeated measurements of both parameters.

  8. Response to an oral calcium load in nephrolithiasis patients with fluctuating parathyroid hormone and ionized calcium levels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gomes S.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available the response to an oral calcium load test was assessed in 17 hypercalciuric nephrolithiasis patients who presented elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH irrespective of the ionized calcium (sCa2+ levels. Blood samples were collected at baseline (0 min and at 60 and 180 min after 1 g calcium load for serum PTH, total calcium, sCa2+, and 1.25(OH2D3 determinations. According to the sCa2+ level at baseline, patients were classified as normocalcemic (N = 9 or hypercalcemic (N = 8. Six healthy subjects were also evaluated as controls. Bone mineral density was reduced in 14/17 patients. In the normocalcemic group, mean PTH levels at 0, 60 and 180 min (95 ± 76, 56 ± 40, 57 ± 45 pg/ml, respectively did not differ from the hypercalcemic group (130 ± 75, 68 ± 35, 80 ± 33 pg/ml but were significantly higher compared to healthy subjects despite a similar elevation in sCa2+ after 60 and 180 min vs baseline in all 3 groups. Mean total calcium and 1.25(OH2D3 were similar in the 3 groups. Additionally, we observed that 5 of 9 normocalcemic patients presented a significantly higher concentration-time curve for serum PTH (AUC0',60',180' than the other 4 patients and the healthy subjects, suggesting a primary parathyroid dysfunction. These data suggest that the individual response to an oral calcium load test may be a valuable dynamic tool to disclose a subtle primary hyperparathyroidism in patients with high PTH and fluctuating sCa2+ levels, avoiding repeated measurements of both parameters.

  9. The effect of calcium salts, ascorbic acid and peptic pH on calcium, zinc and iron bioavailabilities from fortified human milk using an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etcheverry, Paz; Wallingford, John Charles; Miller, Dennis Dean; Glahn, Raymond Philip

    2005-05-01

    The calcium, zinc, and iron bioavailabilities of human milk with commercial and noncommercial human milk fortifiers (HMFs) were evaluated under a variety of conditions: peptic digestion at pH 2 and pH 4, supplementation of ascorbic acid, and addition of three calcium salts. The noncommercial HMFs consisted of casein phosphopeptides (CPPs), alpha-lactalbumin, colostrum, and hydrolyzed whey protein concentrate (WPC). They were mixed with human milk (HM) and calcium, zinc, and iron were added. Ascorbic acid (AA) was added in certain studies. The commercial HMFs were Nestlé FM-85, Similac HMF (SHMF), and Enfamil HMF (EHMF). All HMFs were compared to S-26/SMA HMF. Results showed that the peptic pH (2 vs. 4) had no effect on mineral bioavailability. Addition of different calcium salts had no effect on calcium cell uptake and cell ferritin levels (an indicator of iron uptake), however, the addition of calcium glycerophosphate/gluconate increased zinc uptake by Caco-2 cells. Addition of AA significantly increased ferritin levels, with no effect on calcium or zinc uptake. Among the commercial HMFs, FM-85 was significantly lower in zinc uptake than S-26/SMA, and HM+EHMF was significantly higher than HM+S-26/SMA. Cell ferritin levels were significantly higher for HM+S-26/SMA than for all other commercial fortifiers. None of the commercial HMFs were different from HM+S-26/SMA in calcium uptake. PMID:16028632

  10. [Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koitschev, C; Kaiserling, E; Koitschev, A

    2003-08-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate deposition disease (CPPD) of the temporomandibular joint is rare. The disorder is characterized by the presence of crystal deposits within the affected joint. The deposition of crystals in adjacent soft tissue may lead to the formation of pseudotumors. This form of the disease is called tophaceous pseudogout and typically affects the temporomandibular joint. It is difficult to differentiate the disease, particularly from malignant tumors, on the clinical and radiographic findings alone. The diagnosis is based on histological identification of the calcium pyrophosphate crystals. We present an unusually advanced case of tophaceous pseudogout of the temporomandibular joint. The etiology, clinical and diagnostic criteria as well as treatment options are discussed on the basis of our own experience and a review of the literature. PMID:12942180

  11. Testosterone increases urinary calcium excretion and inhibits expression of renal calcium transport proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsu, Yu-Juei; Dimke, Henrik Anthony; Schoeber, Joost P H;

    2010-01-01

    Although gender differences in the renal handling of calcium have been reported, the overall contribution of androgens to these differences remains uncertain. We determined here whether testosterone affects active renal calcium reabsorption by regulating calcium transport proteins. Male mice had...... higher urinary calcium excretion than female mice and their renal calcium transporters were expressed at a lower level. We also found that orchidectomized mice excreted less calcium in their urine than sham-operated control mice and that the hypocalciuria was normalized after testosterone replacement...... calcium transport. Thus, our study shows that gender differences in renal calcium handling are, in part, mediated by the inhibitory actions of androgens on TRPV5-mediated active renal calcium transport....

  12. Influence of calcium oxalate crystal accumulation on the calcium content of seeds from Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakata, Paul A

    2012-04-01

    Crystals of calcium oxalate often form in cells adjacent to the vascular bundles in the tissues along the xylem stream. This spatial crystal pattern suggests a role for calcium oxalate formation in regulating calcium transport and partitioning to edible organs such as seeds. To investigate this potential role, microscopic and biochemical comparisons were conducted on the different tissues of Medicago truncatula wild-type and the calcium oxalate defective (cod) 5 which lacks the ability to accumulate prismatic crystals in the cells adjacent to the vascular bundles. Calcium measurements showed that cod5 seeds had more calcium and cod5 pods contained less calcium than the corresponding wild-type tissues. Roots, stems, and leaves from cod5 and wild-type had similar calcium content. Although cod5 was devoid of prismatic crystals, cod5 pods were observed to form druse crystals of calcium oxalate not found in wild-type pods. Taken together these findings suggest a functional role for calcium oxalate formation in regulating calcium transport to the seeds. Regulating calcium uptake at the roots also appeared to be another point of control in determining seed calcium content. Overall, regulating the long distance transport and partitioning of calcium to the seeds appears to be a complex process with multiple points of control. PMID:22325887

  13. Serum calcium in pulmonary tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Subhash C. Sharma

    1981-01-01

    Serum calcium was studied serially in 94 patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis. An equal number of age- and sex-matched patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were controls. Seventy patients in the study group were normocalcaemic and 10 were hypercalcaemic. These 10 were on a higher supplement of vitamin D than the 70 normocalcaemic patients. There was a positive correlation between the daily vitamin intake and the degree and duration of hypercalcaemia. None of the controls...

  14. Drying dichloromethane over calcium hydride

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Lucas Kinard, Kurtis Kasper & Antonios Mikos ### Abstract This protocol describes the drying of dichloromethane by a simple 10 step procedure. One can implement this protocol using common lab glass and lab equipment. First, dichloromethane is refluxed with calcium hydride to remove water. Then, dichloromethane is distilled to separate it from the byproducts of the reflux reaction. This procedure can be implemented in 1 day. ### Introduction In many instances i...

  15. Optimization of calcium chloride content on bioactivity and mechanical properties of white Portland cement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research investigates the optimization of calcium chloride content on the bioactivity and mechanical properties of white Portland cement. Calcium chloride was used as an addition of White Portland cement at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10% by weight. Calcium chloride was dissolved in sterile distilled water and blended with White Portland cement using a water to cement ratio of 0.5. Analysis of the bioactivity and pH of white Portland cement pastes with calcium chloride added at various amounts was carried out in simulated body fluid. Setting time, density, compressive strength and volume of permeable voids were also investigated. The characteristics of cement pastes were examined by X-ray diffractometer and scanning electron microscope linked to an energy-dispersive X-ray analyzer. The result indicated that the addition of calcium chloride could accelerate the hydration of white Portland cement, resulting in a decrease in setting time and an increase in early strength of the pastes. The compressive strength of all cement pastes with added calcium chloride was higher than that of the pure cement paste, and the addition of calcium chloride at 8 wt.% led to achieving the highest strength. Furthermore, white Portland cement pastes both with and without calcium chloride showed well-established bioactivity with respect to the formation of a hydroxyapatite layer on the material within 7 days following immersion in simulated body fluid; white Portland cement paste with added 3%CaCl2 exhibited the best bioactivity. - Highlights: ► Optimization CaCl2 content on the bioactivity and mechanical properties. ► CaCl2 was used as an addition at 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10% by weight. ► CaCl2 resulted in a decrease in setting time and an increase in early strength. ► Addition of 3%CaCl2 exhibited the optimum formation of hydroxyapatite.

  16. The determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks by flame photometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Henry

    1956-01-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of calcium in phosphate, carbonate, and silicate rocks using the Beckman flame photometer, with photomultiplier attachement. The sample is dissolved in hydrofluoric, nitric, and perchloric acids, the hydrofluoric and nitric acids are expelled, a radiation buffer consisting of aluminum, magnesium, iron, sodium, potassium, phosphoric acid, and nitric acid is added, and the solution is atomized in an oxy-hydrogen flame with an instrument setting of 554 mµ. Measurements are made by comparison against calcium standards, prepared in the same manner, in the 0 to 50 ppm range. The suppression of calcium emission by aluminum and phosphate was overcome by the addition of a large excess of magnesium. This addition almost completely restores the standard curve obtained from a solution of calcium nitrate. Interference was noted when the iron concentration in the aspirated solution (including the iron from the buffer) exceeded 100 ppm iron. Other common rock-forming elements did not interfere. The results obtained by this procedure are within ± 2 percent of the calcium oxide values obtained by other methods in the range 1 to 95 percent calcium oxide. In the 0 to 1 percent calcium oxide range the method compares favorably with standard methods.

  17. Calcium sensitizers: What have we learned over the last 25 years?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollesello, P; Papp, Z; Papp, J Gy

    2016-01-15

    The use of inotropes for correcting hemodynamic dysfunction in patients with congestive heart failure has been described over many decades. Drugs such as cardiac glycosides, cathecolamines, phosphodiestherase inhibitors, and calcium sensitizers have been in turn proposed. However, the number of new chemical entities in this therapeutic field has been surprisingly low, and the current selection of drugs is limited. One of the paradigm shifts in the discovery for new inotropes was to focus on 'calcium sensitizers' instead of 'calcium mobilizers'. This was designed to lead to the development of safer inotropes, devoid of the complications that arise due to increased intracellular calcium levels. However, only three such calcium sensitizers have been fully developed over the latest 30 years. Moreover, two of these, levosimendan and pimobendan, have multiple molecular targets and other pharmacologic effects in addition to inotropy, such as peripheral vasodilation. More recently, omecamtiv mecarbil was described, which is believed to have a pure inotropy action that is devoid of pleiotropic effects. When the clinical data of these three calcium sensitizers are compared, it appears that the less pure inotropes have the cutting edge over the purer inotrope, due to additional effects during the treatment of a complex syndrome such as acute congested heart failure. This review aims to answer the question whether calcium sensitization per se is a sufficient strategy for bringing required clinical benefits to patients with heart failure. This review is dedicated to the memory of Heimo Haikala, a true and passionate innovator in this challenging field. PMID:26580334

  18. Anode properties of alloy Zn 55 Al alloyed by calcium in the medium of NaCl

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of studies of influence of calcium additives on anode properties of zinc-aluminium alloy Zn 55 Al are given. Chemical composition and results of studies of corrosion-electrochemical properties of Zn 55 Al alloy alloyed by calcium are considered.

  19. CCN3 and calcium signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chang Long

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The CCN family of genes consists presently of six members in human (CCN1-6 also known as Cyr61 (Cystein rich 61, CTGF (Connective Tissue Growth Factor, NOV (Nephroblastoma Overexpressed gene, WISP-1, 2 and 3 (Wnt-1 Induced Secreted Proteins. Results obtained over the past decade have indicated that CCN proteins are matricellular proteins, which are involved in the regulation of various cellular functions, such as proliferation, differentiation, survival, adhesion and migration. The CCN proteins have recently emerged as regulatory factors involved in both internal and external cell signaling. CCN3 was reported to physically interact with fibulin-1C, integrins, Notch and S100A4. Considering that, the conformation and biological activity of these proteins are dependent upon calcium binding, we hypothesized that CCN3 might be involved in signaling pathways mediated by calcium ions. In this article, we review the data showing that CCN3 regulates the levels of intracellular calcium and discuss potential models that may account for the biological effects of CCN3.

  20. Measurement of calcium content of gallstones by computed tomography and the relationship between gallbladder function and calcification of gallstones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoneda, Masashi; Tamasawa, Naoki; Takebe, Kazuo (Hirosaki Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine); Makino, Isao; Sakuraba, Kiyoshi; Tamura, Toyokazu

    1990-08-01

    To evaluate the relationship between gallbladder function and calcification of gallstones, we studied gallbladder contractility by oral cholecystography, the computed tomography (CT) number of stones for 30 gallstone patients, calcium content of 13 stones operatively extirpated, and the degree of inflammatory change in 13 surgical gallbladder specimens. There was significant correlation between the calcium content and CT numbers of stones, and 1% of the calcium content of gallstone was approximately equal to 40 Hounsfield Units (HU) of the CT number. The calcium content of stones in patients with normal gallbladder contractility was extrapolated to be below 1.5%, while that with poor contractility ranged from 0% to 21%. Additionally there is a possibility that calcium content increases, related to the inflammatory change of gallbladder. Hence our results suggested that measurement of the CT number of stones is useful to evaluate the calcium content of gallstones, and that the gallbladder contractility could be one of the factors to influence calcification of stones. (author).

  1. The role of calcium in human aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beto, Judith A

    2015-01-01

    Calcium is an essential nutrient that is necessary for many functions in human health. Calcium is the most abundant mineral in the body with 99% found in teeth and bone. Only 1% is found in serum. The serum calcium level is tightly monitored to remain within normal range by a complex metabolic process. Calcium metabolism involves other nutrients including protein, vitamin D, and phosphorus. Bone formation and maintenance is a lifelong process. Early attention to strong bones in childhood and adulthood will provide more stable bone mass during the aging years. Research has shown that adequate calcium intake can reduce the risk of fractures, osteoporosis, and diabetes in some populations. The dietary requirements of calcium and other collaborative nutrients vary slightly around the world. Lactose intolerance due to lactase deficiency is a common cause of low calcium intake. Strategies will be discussed for addressing this potential barrier to adequate intake. The purpose of this narrative review is a) to examine the role of calcium in human health, b) to compare nutrient requirements for calcium across lifecycle groups and global populations, c) to review relationships between calcium intake, chronic disease risk, and fractures, and d) to discuss strategies to address diet deficiencies and lactose intolerance. PMID:25713787

  2. Sensory-Driven Enhancement of Calcium Signals in Individual Purkinje Cell Dendrites of Awake Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Najafi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Climbing fibers (CFs are thought to contribute to cerebellar plasticity and learning by triggering a large influx of dendritic calcium in the postsynaptic Purkinje cell (PC to signal the occurrence of an unexpected sensory event. However, CFs fire about once per second whether or not an event occurs, raising the question of how sensory-driven signals might be distinguished from a background of ongoing spontaneous activity. Here, we report that in PC dendrites of awake mice, CF-triggered calcium signals are enhanced when the trigger is a sensory event. In addition, we show that a large fraction of the total enhancement in each PC dendrite can be accounted for by an additional boost of calcium provided by sensory activation of a non-CF input. We suggest that sensory stimulation may modulate dendritic voltage and calcium concentration in PCs to increase the strength of plasticity signals during cerebellar learning.

  3. Influence of the surfactant nature on the calcium carbonate synthesis in water-in-oil emulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szcześ, Aleksandra

    2009-02-01

    Calcium carbonate has been precipitated from water-in-oil emulsions consisting of n-hexane/nonionic surfactant (Brij 30) and its mixture with cationic (DTAB) or anionic surfactant (SDS) to which calcium chloride and sodium carbonate were added. It was found that the surfactant kind and its amount can regulate the size, form and morphology of the precipitated particles. In case of nonionic surfactant the water/surfactant ratio is the most important parameter that allows to obtain small and regular calcium carbonate crystals. Addition of the DTAB results in different morphology of particles having the same crystal form, whereas addition of SDS changes the kind of emulsion from water-in-oil to oil-in-water. Moreover, light transmittance and backscattering light measurements have been used as a method to study the kinetics of calcium carbonate precipitation in emulsion systems.

  4. Calcium carbonate microspheres as carriers for the anticancer drug camptothecin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Neng [Division of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LT (United Kingdom); State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Department of Bio-pharmaceutical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu ,610065 (China); Yin, Huabing, E-mail: huabing.yin@glasgow.ac.uk [Division of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LT (United Kingdom); Ji, Bozhi; Klauke, Norbert; Glidle, Andrew [Division of Biomedical Engineering, School of Engineering, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, G12 8LT (United Kingdom); Zhang, Yongkui; Song, Hang [Department of Bio-pharmaceutical Engineering, School of Chemical Engineering, Sichuan University, Chengdu ,610065 (China); Cai, Lulu; Ma, Liang; Wang, Guangcheng [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Chen, Lijuan, E-mail: lijuan17@hotmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China); Wang, Wenwen [State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, West China Medical School, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2012-12-01

    Biogenic calcium carbonate has come to the attention of many researchers as a promising drug delivery system due to its safety, pH sensitivity and the large volume of information already in existence on its medical use. In this study, we employed bovine serum albumin (BSA) as an additive to synthesize a series of porous calcium carbonate microspheres (CCMS). These spheres, identified as vaterite, are stable both in aqueous solutions and organic solvents. Camptothecin, an effective anticancer agent, was loaded into the CCMS by simple diffusion and adsorption. The camptothecin loaded CCMS showed sustained cell growth inhibitory activity and a pH dependent release of camptothecin. With a few hours, the release is negligible under physiological conditions (pH = 7.4) but almost complete at pH 4 to 6 (i.e. pHs found in lysosomes and solid tumor tissue respectively). These findings suggest that porous, biogenic calcium carbonate microspheres could be promising carriers for the safe and efficient delivery of anticancer drugs of low aqueous solubility. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BSA-doped calcium carbonate microspheres with porous structure were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Camptothecin was encapsulated in the spherical microparticles with encapsulation efficiency up to 11%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The release of encapsulated camptothecin is pH dependent Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In vitro studies showed an effective anticancer activity of the camptothecin- microspheres.

  5. Mechanisms of calcium transport in small intestine. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vitamin D hormone, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, was demonstrated to be the prime hormonal agent regulating intestinal absorption of divalent cations. Production of the vitamin D hormone is, in turn, regulated by parathyroid hormone, low dietary calcium, low plasma phosphorus, and is suppressed by 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, by high plasma phosphorus, high plasma calcium, and the absence of parathyroid hormone. A variety of analogs of the vitamin D hormone were prepared. In addition, the preparation of radiolabeled vitamin D hormone was accomplished using chemical synthesis, and this highly radioactive substance was found to localize in the nuclei of the intestinal villus cells that promote intestinal absorption of calcium. A receptor for the vitamin D hormone was also located, and the general mechanism of response to the vitamin D hormone included the binding to a receptor molecule, transfer to the nucleus, transcription of specific genes followed by translation to transport proteins. Methods were developed for the discovery of the appropriate gene products that play a role in calcium transport

  6. Gelsolin mediates calcium-dependent disassembly of Listeria actin tails

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Laura; Arnaudeau, Serge; Gibson, Bruce; Li, Wei; Krause, Ryoko; Hao, Binghua; Bamburg, James R.; Lew, Daniel P.; Demaurex, Nicolas; Southwick, Frederick

    2005-01-01

    The role of intracellular Ca2+ in the regulation of actin filament assembly and disassembly has not been clearly defined. We show that reduction of intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) to <40 nM in Listeria monocytogenes-infected, EGFP–actin-transfected Madin–Darby canine kidney cells results in a 3-fold lengthening of actin filament tails. This increase in tail length is the consequence of marked slowing of the actin filament disassembly rate, without a significant change in assembly rate. The Ca2+-sensitive actin-severing protein gelsolin concentrates in the Listeria rocket tails at normal resting [Ca2+]i and disassociates from the tails when [Ca2+]i is lowered. Reduction in [Ca2+]i also blocks the severing activity of gelsolin, but not actin-depolymerizing factor (ADF)/cofilin microinjected into Listeria-infected cells. In Xenopus extracts, Listeria tail lengths are also calcium-sensitive, markedly shortening on addition of calcium. Immunodepletion of gelsolin, but not Xenopus ADF/cofilin, eliminates calcium-sensitive actin-filament shortening. Listeria tail length is also calcium-insensitive in gelsolin-null mouse embryo fibroblasts. We conclude that gelsolin is the primary Ca2+-sensitive actin filament recycling protein in the cell and is capable of enhancing Listeria actin tail disassembly at normal resting [Ca2+]i (145 nM). These experiments illustrate the unique and complementary functions of gelsolin and ADF/cofilin in the recycling of actin filaments. PMID:15671163

  7. Extracellular calcium sensing in rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extracellular calcium (Ca2+o) can act as a first messenger in many cell types through a G protein-coupled receptor, calcium-sensing receptor (CaR). It is still debated whether the CaR is expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Here, we report the expression of CaR mRNA and protein in rat aortic VSMCs and show that Ca2+o stimulates proliferation of the cells. The effects of Ca2+o were attenuated by pre-treatment with MAPK kinase 1 (MEK1) inhibitor, as well as an allosteric modulator, NPS 2390. Furthermore, stimulation of the VSMCs with Ca2+o-induced phosphorylation of ERK1/2, but surprisingly did not cause inositol phosphate accumulation. We were not able to conclusively state that the CaR mediates Ca2+o-induced cell proliferation. Rather, an additional calcium-sensing mechanism may exist. Our findings may be of importance with regard to atherosclerosis, an inflammatory disease characterized by abnormal proliferation of VSMCs and high local levels of calcium

  8. Mechanism of calcium mitigating membrane fouling in submerged membrane bioreactors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Hanmin; XIA Jie; YANG Yang; WANG Zixing; YANG Fenglin

    2009-01-01

    Two parallel membrane bioreactors (MBRs) were operated under different calcium dosages (168.5, 27 mg/L) to gain a better understanding of the mechanism of retarding membrane fouling by the addition of calcium.The results showed that the particle size of sludge flocs increased and the particle size distribution tended to be narrow at the optimum dosage (168.5 mg/L).Calcium was effective in decreasing loosely bound extracellular polymeric substances (LB-EPS) in microbial flocs and soluble microbial products (SMP) in the supernatant at the dosage of 168.5 mg/L by strengthening the neutralization and bridging of EPS with flocs.Furthermore, the amount of CODS and CODC decreased in both the mixed liquor and the fouling cake layer on the membrane surface.In order to compare the filtration characteristics of cake layers from the MBRs with the two calcium dosages, the specific cake resistance and the compressibility coefficient were measured.The specific cake resistance from the MBR with optimum dosage (168.5 mg/L) was distinctly lower than that with low dosage (27 mg/L).The compressibility coefficient of the cake layers under different dosages were respectively attained as 0.65, 0.91.Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and three-dimensional confocal scanning laser microscope analysis (CLSM) images were utilized to observe the gel layer directly.

  9. Calcium carbonate microspheres as carriers for the anticancer drug camptothecin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biogenic calcium carbonate has come to the attention of many researchers as a promising drug delivery system due to its safety, pH sensitivity and the large volume of information already in existence on its medical use. In this study, we employed bovine serum albumin (BSA) as an additive to synthesize a series of porous calcium carbonate microspheres (CCMS). These spheres, identified as vaterite, are stable both in aqueous solutions and organic solvents. Camptothecin, an effective anticancer agent, was loaded into the CCMS by simple diffusion and adsorption. The camptothecin loaded CCMS showed sustained cell growth inhibitory activity and a pH dependent release of camptothecin. With a few hours, the release is negligible under physiological conditions (pH = 7.4) but almost complete at pH 4 to 6 (i.e. pHs found in lysosomes and solid tumor tissue respectively). These findings suggest that porous, biogenic calcium carbonate microspheres could be promising carriers for the safe and efficient delivery of anticancer drugs of low aqueous solubility. - Highlights: ► BSA-doped calcium carbonate microspheres with porous structure were prepared. ► Camptothecin was encapsulated in the spherical microparticles with encapsulation efficiency up to 11%. ► The release of encapsulated camptothecin is pH dependent ► In vitro studies showed an effective anticancer activity of the camptothecin- microspheres.

  10. STIM1 is a Calcium Sensor Specialized for Digital Signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Bird, Gary S.; Hwang, Sung-Yong; Smyth, Jeremy T.; Fukushima, Miwako; Boyles, Rebecca R.; Putney, James W.

    2009-01-01

    When cells are activated by calcium-mobilizing agonists at low, physiological concentrations, the resulting calcium signals generally take the form of repetitive regenerative discharges of stored calcium, termed calcium oscillations [1]. These intracellular calcium oscillations have long fascinated biologists as representing a mode of digitized intracellular signaling. Recent work has highlighted the role of calcium influx as an essential component of calcium oscillations [2]. This influx occ...

  11. Sodium induces simultaneous changes in cytosolic calcium and pH in salt-tolerant quince protoplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Onofrio, Cladio; Lindberg, Sylvia

    2009-11-01

    Previous experiments with salt-resistant quince BA29 (Cydonia oblonga cv. Mill.) have shown that this cultivar takes up sodium transiently into the cytosol of shoot protoplasts only in the absence of calcium chloride, or at or =100mM to single protoplasts from in vitro-cultivated quince in the presence of 1.0mM calcium induced instant changes in the cytosolic concentrations of calcium and protons. These changes were investigated by use of tetra [acetoxymethyl] esters of the fluorescent stilbene chromophores Fura 2 and bis-carboxyethyl-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF), respectively. The cytosolic Ca(2+) dynamics in the protoplasts were dependent on the concentration of NaCl added. The changes in calcium differed in amplitude and final concentration and were correlated in time mainly with changes in pH. Addition of 100-400mM NaCl to the protoplasts caused an oscillating increase in the cytosolic level of calcium, and then a decrease. Addition of mannitol, of equiosmolar concentration to NaCl, did not increase the cytosolic calcium concentration. Moreover, there was no increase in cytosolic calcium when NaCl was added in the presence of calcium binding ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethylether)-N,N,N',N'-tetra acetic acid (EGTA), or lantan or verapamil, two inhibitors of plasma membrane calcium channels. Therefore, we conclude that, in salt-resistant quince, sodium induces an influx of calcium into the cytosol by plasma membrane calcium channels, and a simultaneous increase in cytosolic pH. Because these changes were obtained in the presence of 1mM calcium in the medium, they were not due to sodium uptake into the cytosol. PMID:19556023

  12. Effect of rice husk ash addition on CO2 capture behavior of calcium-based sorbent during calcium looping cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice husk ash/CaO was proposed as a CO2 sorbent which was prepared by rice husk ash and CaO hydration together. The CO2 capture behavior of rice husk ash/CaO sorbent was investigated in a twin fixed bed reactor system, and its apparent morphology, pore structure characteristics and phase variation during cyclic carbonation/calcination reactions were examined by SEM-EDX, N2 adsorption and XRD, respectively. The optimum preparation conditions for rice husk ash/CaO sorbent are hydration temperature of 75 C, hydration time of 8 h, and mole ratio of SiO2 in rice husk ash to CaO of 1.0. The cyclic carbonation performances of rice husk ash/CaO at these preparation conditions were compared with those of hydrated CaO and original CaO. The temperature at 660 C-710 C is beneficial to CO2 absorption of rice husk ash/CaO, and it exhibits higher carbonation conversions than hydrated CaO and original CaO during multiple cycles at the same reaction conditions. Rice husk ash/CaO possesses better anti-sintering behavior than the other sorbents. Rice husk ash exhibits better effect on improving cyclic carbonation conversion of CaO than pure SiO2 and diatomite. Rice husk ash/CaO maintains higher surface area and more abundant pores after calcination during the multiple cycles; however, the other sorbents show a sharp decay at the same reaction conditions. Ca2SiO4 found by XRD detection after calcination of rice husk ash/CaO is possibly a key factor in determining the cyclic CO2 capture behavior of rice husk ash/CaO. (author)

  13. Effect of calcium ionophore on unfertilized oocytes after ICSI cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Maryam Eftekhar; Farnaz Mohammadian; Fariba Yousefnejad; Parisa Khani; Abbas Aflatoonian

    2012-01-01

    Background: Fertilization failure is one of the most problems in assisted reproduction technology (ART). Objective: The aim of this study was the evaluation of oocytes activation by addition of calcium ionophore in unfertilized oocytes in ICSI cycles. Materials and Methods: This study was done on 15 ICSI cycles (stimulated with standard long protocol). Mature retrieved oocytes with normal morphology that had no evidence of fertilization 24 hours after ICSI were included in the study. The oocy...

  14. Calcium Sulfoaluminate Eco-Cement from Industrial Waste

    OpenAIRE

    Ukrainczyk, N.; Frankoviæ Mihelj, N.; Šipušić, J.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, the potential benefits offered by calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSA) production from industrial wastes or by-products already present in Republic of Croatia have been addressed. A variety of industrial wastes, namely phosphogypsum (PG), coal bottom ash (BA) and electric arc furnace slag (EAFS) were used as raw materials to provide additional environmental advantages in production of CSA. Mass fraction of Ye’elimite, the principal hydraulic mineral in the prepared CSA was de...

  15. Furcal perforation repair using calcium enriched mixture cement

    OpenAIRE

    Asgary Saeed

    2010-01-01

    This case describes a furcal perforation in a mandibular first molar accompanied by furcal lesion which has been managed after one month. Root canal treatment was performed; subsequently, the defect was repaired with calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement. The endodontically treated tooth was restored with amalgam. A 24-month recall showed no evidence of periodontal breakdown, no symptoms, in addition to completes healing of furcal lesion. According to physical and biological properties of the...

  16. Promotion of beta-glucan synthase activity in corn microsomal membranes by calcium and protein phosphorylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliyath, G.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1988-01-01

    Regulation of the activity of beta-glucan synthase was studied using microsomal preparations from corn coleoptiles. The specific activity as measured by the incorporation of glucose from uridine diphospho-D-[U-14C]glucose varied between 5 to 15 pmol (mg protein)-1 min-1. Calcium promoted beta-glucan synthase activity and the promotion was observed at free calcium concentrations as low as 1 micromole. Kinetic analysis of substrate-velocity curve showed an apparent Km of 1.92 x 10(-4) M for UDPG. Calcium increased the Vmax from 5.88 x 10(-7) mol liter-1 min-1 in the absence of calcium to 9.52 x 10(-7) mol liter-1 min-1 and 1.66 x 10(-6) mol liter-1 min-1 in the presence of 0.5 mM and 1 mM calcium, respectively. The Km values remained the same under these conditions. Addition of ATP further increased the activity above the calcium-promoted level. Sodium fluoride, a phosphoprotein phosphatase inhibitor, promoted glucan synthase activity indicating that phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are involved in the regulation of the enzyme activity. Increasing the concentration of sodium fluoride from 0.25 mM to 10 mM increased glucan synthase activity five-fold over the + calcium + ATP control. Phosphorylation of membrane proteins also showed a similar increase under these conditions. Calmodulin, in the presence of calcium and ATP stimulated glucan synthase activity substantially, indicating that calmodulin could be involved in the calcium-dependent phosphorylation and promotion of beta-glucan synthase activity. The role of calcium in mediating auxin action is discussed.

  17. Calcium Silicate-Based Cements Associated with Micro- and Nanoparticle Radiopacifiers: Physicochemical Properties and Bioactivity

    OpenAIRE

    BOSSO-MARTELO, Roberta; Juliane Maria GUERREIRO-TANOMARU; Viapiana, Raqueli; Berbert, Fábio Luis Camargo Vilella; Basso Bernardi, Maria Inês; Tanomaru-Filho, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the physicochemical properties and bioactivity of two formulations of calcium silicate-based cements containing additives (CSCM) or resin (CSCR), associated with radiopacifying agents zirconium oxide (ZrO2) and niobium oxide (Nb2O5) as micro- and nanoparticles; calcium tungstate (CaWO4); and bismuth oxide (Bi2O3). MTA Angelus was used as control. Methods. Surface features and bioactivity were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and the ch...

  18. Fortification of all-purpose wheat-flour tortillas with calcium lactate, calcium carbonate, or calcium citrate is acceptable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanchik-Cerpovicz, Joelle E; McKemie, Rebecca J

    2007-03-01

    Fortification helps provide adequate nutrients for individuals not meeting daily needs. Foods may be fortified with calcium to assist individuals with lactose intolerance and others preferring not to consume traditional forms of dairy. This study examined the quality of all-purpose wheat-flour tortillas fortified with calcium lactate, calcium carbonate, or calcium citrate. These tortillas were compared to similarly prepared nonfortified flour tortillas (control) and commercial nonfortified flour tortillas. Calcium-fortified tortillas contained 114 mg elemental calcium per standard serving (48 g tortilla), an 8.6-fold increase compared to nonfortified tortillas. Moisture contents and rollabilities of all tortillas were similar. Consumers (N=87) evaluated each tortilla in duplicate using a hedonic scale and reported liking the appearance, texture, flavor, aftertaste, and overall acceptability of all tortillas. However, the appearance of control tortillas was preferred over commercial tortillas (Ptortillas or those fortified with calcium carbonate was preferred over the control (Ptortillas, suggesting that appearance and aftertaste may not influence willingness to purchase. Overall, this study shows that fortification of flour tortillas with various forms of calcium is a feasible alternative calcium source. PMID:17324671

  19. Binding of calcium and carbonate to polyacrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribello, Gareth A; Liew, CheeChin; Parrinello, Michele

    2009-05-21

    Polyacrylate molecules can be used to slow the growth of calcium carbonate. However, little is known about the mechanism by which the molecules impede the growth rate. A recent computational study (Bulo et al. Macromolecules 2007, 40, 3437) used metadynamics to investigate the binding of calcium to polyacrylate chains and has thrown some light on the coiling and precipitation of these polymers. We extend these simulations to examine the binding of calcium and carbonate to polyacrylate chains. We show that calcium complexed with both carbonate and polyacrylate is a very stable species. The free energies of calcium-carbonate-polyacrylate complexes, with different polymer configurations, are calculated, and differences in the free energy of the binding of carbonate are shown to be due to differences in the amount of steric hindrance about the calcium, which prevents the approach of the carbonate ion. PMID:19400592

  20. Biphasic calcium phosphate in periapical surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Suneelkumar, Chinni; Datta, Krithika; Manali R Srinivasan; Kumar, Sampath T

    2008-01-01

    Calcium phosphate ceramics like hydroxyapatite and β -tricalcium phosphate (β -TCP) possess mineral composition that closely resembles that of the bone. They can be good bone substitutes due to their excellent biocompatibility. Biphasic calcium phosphate is a bone substitute which is a mixture of hydroxyapatite and β -tricalcium phosphate in fixed ratios. Studies have demonstrated the osteoconductive potential of this composition. This paper highlights the clinical use of biphasic calcium pho...

  1. Gravity, Calcium, And Bone: Update, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Morey-Holton, Emily

    1992-01-01

    Report reviews short-term flight and ground-based experiments on effects of 1 g and 0 g on skeletal adaptation, calcium metabolism, and growth processes. Results indicate two principal components of calcium metabolism-calcium endocrine system and bone - respond within days to changes in orientation of body in gravitation and to weightlessness. Effects of spaceflight or bed rest on biomechanics of bones more severe than on total body bone mass.

  2. Gravity, calcium, and bone - Update, 1989

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Morey-Holton, Emily

    1990-01-01

    Recent results obtained on skeletal adaptation, calcium metabolism, and bone browth during short-term flights and ground simulated-microgravity experiments are presented. Results demonstrate that two principal components of calcium metabolism respond within days to changes in body position and to weightlessness: the calcium endocrine system and bone characteristics. Furthermore, results of recent studies imply that bone biomechanics are more severely affected by spaceflight exposures than is the bone mass.

  3. Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia and calcium sensing receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mrgan, Monija; Nielsen, Sanne; Brixen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) is a lifelong, benign autosomal dominant disease characterized by hypercalcemia, normal to increased parathyroid hormone level, and a relatively low renal calcium excretion. Inactivation of the calcium-sensing receptor in heterozygous patients results in...... FHH, while in homozygous patients as well as in compound heterozygous or dominant negative heterozygous patients, it may result in neonatal severe hyperparathyroidism (NSHPT). Parathyroid surgery is not indicated in FHH and does not lower plasma calcium unless total parathyroidectomy is performed, in...

  4. Overbased Calcium sulfonate Detergent Technology Overview

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Qing-gao; MUIR Ronald J.

    2009-01-01

    Overbased calcium sulfonate is used widely as detergent in automotive and marine lubricants, as well as various industrial oil applications. In this paper, the process to produce overbased calcium sulfonate is overviewed. The sulfonate structure and molecular weight and its molecular weight distribution, the enclosed calcium carbonate nanoparticle size and crystalline structure, properties of the carrier oil, all influence its properties, such as stability, viscosity, and detergency of the system.

  5. Calcium hydroxide isotope effect in calcium isotope enrichment by ion exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jepson, B.E.; Shockey, G.C.

    1984-01-01

    The enrichment of calcium isotopes has been observed in ion-exchange chromatography with an aqueous phase of calcium hydroxide and a solid phase of sulfonic acid resin. The band front was exceedingly sharp as a result of the acid-base reaction occuring at the front of the band. Single-stage separation coefficients were found to be epsilon(/sup 44/Ca//sup 40/Ca) = 11 x 10 /sup -4/ and epsilon(/sup 48/Ca//sup 40/Ca) = 18 x 10/sup -4/. The maximum column separation factors achieved were 1.05 for calcium-44 and 1.09 for calcium-48 with the heavy isotopes enriching in the fluid phase. The calcium isotope effect between fully hydrated aqueous calcium ions and undissociated aqueous calcium hydroxide was estimated. For the calcium-44/40 isotope pair the separation coefficient was 13 x 10/sup -4/. 20 references, 2 figures.

  6. Glutathione-Induced Calcium Shifts in Chick Retinal Glial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Hercules R; Ferraz, Gabriel; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Ribeiro-Resende, Victor T; Chiarini, Luciana B; do Nascimento, José Luiz M; Matos Oliveira, Karen Renata H; Pereira, Tiago de Lima; Ferreira, Leonardo G B; Kubrusly, Regina C; Faria, Robson X; Herculano, Anderson Manoel; Reis, Ricardo A de Melo

    2016-01-01

    Neuroglia interactions are essential for the nervous system and in the retina Müller cells interact with most of the neurons in a symbiotic manner. Glutathione (GSH) is a low-molecular weight compound that undertakes major antioxidant roles in neurons and glia, however, whether this compound could act as a signaling molecule in neurons and/or glia is currently unknown. Here we used embryonic avian retina to obtain mixed retinal cells or purified Müller glia cells in culture to evaluate calcium shifts induced by GSH. A dose response curve (0.1-10 mM) showed that 5-10 mM GSH, induced calcium shifts exclusively in glial cells (later labeled and identified as 2M6 positive cells), while neurons responded to 50 mM KCl (labeled as βIII tubulin positive cells). BBG 100 nM, a P2X7 blocker, inhibited the effects of GSH on Müller glia. However, addition of DNQX 70 μM and MK-801 20 μM, non-NMDA and NMDA blockers, had no effect on GSH calcium induced shift. Oxidized glutathione (GSSG) at 5 mM failed to induce calcium mobilization in glia cells, indicating that the antioxidant and/or structural features of GSH are essential to promote elevations in cytoplasmic calcium levels. Indeed, a short GSH pulse (60s) protects Müller glia from oxidative damage after 30 min of incubation with 0.1% H2O2. Finally, GSH induced GABA release from chick embryonic retina, mixed neuron-glia or from Müller cell cultures, which were inhibited by BBG or in the absence of sodium. GSH also induced propidium iodide uptake in Müller cells in culture in a P2X7 receptor dependent manner. Our data suggest that GSH, in addition to antioxidant effects, could act signaling calcium shifts at the millimolar range particularly in Müller glia, and could regulate the release of GABA, with additional protective effects on retinal neuron-glial circuit. PMID:27078878

  7. Calcium carboorthovanadate - a new compound with the apa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Data on calcium carboorthovanadate, Ca10(VO4)6CO3, a new compound with an appatite structure based on calcium orthovanadate, are reported. The synthesis has been conducted in a stoichiometric mixture of finely ground calcium carbonate and calcium orthovanadate. It is found that calcium carboorthovanadate belongs to the hexagonal syngony and has an apatite structure. An analysis of the infrared spectra of initial compounds and calcium carboorthovanadate confirmed the presence of carbonate (CO3)2- and orthovanadate (VO4)3 groupings in the latter. On heating in air, beginning with 450 deg C calcium carboorthovanadate decomposes at a slow rate into calcium oxide, calcium orthovanadate, and carbon dioxide

  8. Calcium supplements: do they help or harm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manson, Joann E; Bassuk, Shari S

    2014-01-01

    Current recommendations for calcium intake call for 1,000 mg per day for women ages 19-50 and 1,200 mg per day for women over age 50 to ensure bone health. Given recent concerns that calcium supplements may raise risk for cardiovascular disease and kidney stones, women should aim to meet this recommendation primarily by eating a calcium-rich diet and taking calcium supplements only if needed to reach the RDA goal (often only approximately 500 mg per day in supplements is required). PMID:23880796

  9. Presynaptic calcium signalling in cerebellar mossy fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Jörntell, Henrik; Midtgaard, Jens

    2010-01-01

    appeared to be isolated from one another in terms of calcium signalling. CGP55845 application showed that GABA B receptors mediated presynaptic inhibition of the calcium signal over the entire firing frequency range of mossy fibres. A paired-pulse depression of the calcium signal lasting more than 1 s...... affected burst firing in mossy fibres; this paired-pulse depression was reduced by GABA B antagonists. While our results indicated that a presynaptic rosette electrophysiologically functioned as a unit, topical GABA application showed that calcium signals in the branches of complex rosettes could be...

  10. Peroxisome is a reservoir of intracellular calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raychaudhury, Bikramjit; Gupta, Shreedhara; Banerjee, Shouvik; Datta, Salil C

    2006-07-01

    We have examined fura 2-loaded purified peroxisomes under confocal microscope to prove that this mammalian organelle is a store of intracellular calcium pool. Presence of calcium channel and vanadate sensitive Ca(2+)-ATPase in the purified peroxisomal membrane has been demonstrated. We have further observed that machineries to maintain calcium pool in this mammalian organelle are impaired during infection caused by Leishmania donovani. Results reveal that peroxisomes have a merit to play a significant role in the metabolism of intracellular calcium. PMID:16713100

  11. Calcium wave of Brain Astrocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornell Bell, A. H.

    1997-03-01

    Time lapse confocal scanning laser microscopy was used to study hippocampal astrocyte cultures loaded with a calcium indicator, Fluo3-AM (4 uM). kThe neurotransmitter kainate (100uM) overwhelms the Na+-buffering capacity of astrocytes within 100 sec resulting in reversal of the Na+/Ca2+ exchanger. This results in a subcellular site where Ca2+ entering the cytoplasm contributes to a long-distance Ca2+ wave which travels at 20 um/sec without decrement. Image analysis has shown calcium waves not only at a high Kainate dose, but also at a low Kainate dose, e.g. 10uM. These are, however, shortlived and burried in an extremely noisy background and only detectable by analyzing the calcium waves images for spatio-temporal coherence. As the kainate dose increases, more large scale coherent structures with visible geometric features (spiral waves and target waves) can be observed. Multiple spiral waves are produced when the Kainate dose increases to 100 uM. These waves travel at a constant velocity across entire microscope fields for long time periods (>30 mins). Na+ channels have no effect on the Kainate wave. Voltage-gated Ca2+ channels are not involved and Ca2+ enters through reversal of the exchanger. Ca2+ release from stores does not contribute to the kainate wave. Removal of Na+ or Ca2+ from outside and the specific Na+/Ca2+ exchange inhibitor benzamil (10 uM) inhibit the kainate wave. A functional antibody to alpha6-Integrin which is localized to membrane regions between cells inhibits the spread of the kainate wave in a dose and time-dependent manner. Fluorescence Recovery after Photobleach (FRAP) techniques indicate that gap junctions remain open between cells. This would imply that Ca2+ or IP3 need not pass through the gap junction, but reversal of the exchanger would propel the Ca2+ wave at the cell surface.

  12. Calcium and magnesium silicate hydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deep geological disposals are planed to discard long-lived intermediate-level and high-level radioactive wastes. Clay-based geological barriers are expected to limit the ingress of groundwater and to reduce the mobility of radioelements. In the interaction zone between the cement and the clay based material alteration can occur. Magnesium silicate hydrates (M-S-H) have been observed due to the reaction of magnesium sulfate containing groundwater with cements or in the interaction zone between low-pH type cement and clays. M-S-H samples synthesized in the laboratory showed that M-S-H has a variable composition within 0.7 ≤ Mg/Si ≤ 1.5. TEM/EDS analyses show an homogeneous gel with no defined structure. IR and 29Si NMR data reveal a higher polymerization degree of the silica network in M-S-H compared to calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H). The presence of mainly Q3 silicate tetrahedrons in M-S-H indicates a sheet like or a triple-chain silica structure while C-S-H is characterised by single chain-structure. The clear difference in the silica structure and the larger ionic radius of Ca2+ (1.1 Angstrom) compared to Mg2+ (0.8 Angstrom) make the formation of an extended solid solution between M-S-H and C-S-H gel improbable. In fact, the analyses of synthetic samples containing both magnesium and calcium in various ratios indicate the formation of separate M-S-H and C-S-H gels with no or very little uptake of magnesium in CS-H or calcium in M-S-H

  13. Association of Urinary Calcium Excretion with Serum Calcium and Vitamin D Levels

    OpenAIRE

    A Rathod; Bonny, O; Guessous, I; Suter, P M; Conen, D; Erne, P; Binet, I; Gabutti, L; Gallino, A; Muggli, F; Hayoz, D; Pechere-Bertschi, A; Paccaud, F.; Burnier, M.; Bochud, M

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Population-based data on urinary calcium excretion are scarce. The association of serum calcium and circulating levels of vitamin D [25(OH)D2 or D3] with urinary calcium excretion in men and women from a population-based study was explored. DESIGN, SETTINGS, PARTICIPANTS, & MEASUREMENTS: Multivariable linear regression was used to explore factors associated with square root-transformed 24-hour urinary calcium excretion (milligrams per 24 hours) taken as the dep...

  14. Drosophila mushroom body Kenyon cells generate spontaneous calcium transients mediated by PLTX-sensitive calcium channels.

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Shaojuan Amy; Campusano, Jorge M.; Su, Hailing; O'Dowd, Diane K.

    2005-01-01

    Spontaneous calcium oscillations in mushroom bodies of late stage pupal and adult Drosophila brains have been implicated in memory consolidation during olfactory associative learning. This study explores the cellular mechanisms regulating calcium dynamics in Kenyon cells, principal neurons in mushroom bodies. Fura-2 imaging shows that Kenyon cells cultured from late stage Drosophila pupae generate spontaneous calcium transients in a cell autonomous fashion, at a frequency similar to calcium o...

  15. The Electronic Structure of Calcium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jan, J.-P.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    The electronic structure of calcium under pressure is re-examined by means of self-consistent energy band calculations based on the local density approximation and using the linear muffin-tin orbitals (LMTO) method with corrections to the atomic sphere approximation included. At zero pressure.......149 Ryd, respectively, relative to the s band, give the best possible agreement. Under increasing pressure the s and p electrons are found to transfer into the d band, and Ca undergoes metal-semimetal-metal electronic transitions. Calculations of the bandstructure and the electronic pressure, including...

  16. Physicochemical investigation of calcium bromtechnetate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium hexabromotechnetate is extracted for the first time and its composition corresponding to the CaTcBr6 formula is determined. Using the thermal analysis method the anhydrous salt stability boundaries are found. The X-ray phase analysis has shown the compound to be isostructural with (NH4)2TcI6 and has a rhombic b.c.c. crystal lattice with the following parameters: a=10.39+-0.01, b=7.34+-0.01 and c=7.45+-0.001A. At 380-420 deg C CaTcBr6 decomposes to Tc, CaBr2 and Br

  17. Calcium Imaging Perspectives in Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chidananda Nagamangala Kanchiswamy

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The calcium ion (Ca2+ is a versatile intracellular messenger. It provides dynamic regulation of a vast array of gene transcriptions, protein kinases, transcription factors and other complex downstream signaling cascades. For the past six decades, intracellular Ca2+ concentration has been significantly studied and still many studies are under way. Our understanding of Ca2+ signaling and the corresponding physiological phenomenon is growing exponentially. Here we focus on the improvements made in the development of probes used for Ca2+ imaging and expanding the application of Ca2+ imaging in plant science research.

  18. Barium calcium hydroxyapatite solid solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The replacement of calcium by barium in the hydroxyapatite structure by solid-state reaction at different temperatures and by precipitation from an aqueous system has been investigated by X-ray diffraction and i.r. absorption analyses. The products obtained by solid-state reaction at 1200 deg C are solid solutions over the range of barium concentration 60 to 100 atom %. The lattice dimensions and the i.r. frequencies of the solid solutions vary linearly with the atom % of barium. Only small amounts of barium can be incorporated in hydroxyapatite by precipitation from the aqueous system. (author)

  19. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for lunch; and beans, salsa, taco sauce, and cheese for dinner. Create mini-pizzas by topping whole-wheat English muffins or bagels with pizza sauce and low-fat mozzarella or soy cheese. Try whole-grain crackers with low-fat cheese ...

  20. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eliminates in urine, feces, and sweat. These include consumption of alcohol- and caffeine-containing beverages as well as intake ... and older 2,000 mg Pregnant and breastfeeding teens 3,000 mg Pregnant and breastfeeding adults 2, ...

  1. Effect of sepsis on calcium uptake and content in skeletal muscle and regulation in vitro by calcium of total and myofibrillar protein breakdown in control and septic muscle: Results from a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because high calcium concentration in vitro stimulates muscle proteolysis, calcium has been implicated in the pathogenesis of increased muscle breakdown in different catabolic conditions. Protein breakdown in skeletal muscle is increased during sepsis, but the effect of sepsis on muscle calcium uptake and content is not known. In this study the influence of sepsis, induced in rats by cecal ligation and puncture, on muscle calcium uptake and content was studied. Sixteen hours after cecal ligation and puncture or sham operation, calcium content of the extensor digitorum longus (EDL) and soleus (SOL) muscles was determined with an atomic absorption spectrometer. Calcium uptake was measured in intact SOL muscles incubated in the presence of calcium 45 (45Ca) for between 1 and 120 minutes. Total and myofibrillar protein breakdown was determined in SOL muscles, incubated in the presence of different calcium concentrations (0; 2.5; 5.0 mmol/L), and measured as release into the incubation medium of tyrosine and 3-methylhistidine (3-MH), respectively. Calcium content was increased by 51% (p less than 0.001) during sepsis in SOL and by 10% (p less than 0.05) in EDL muscle. There was no difference in 45Ca uptake between control and septic muscles during the early phase (1 to 5 minutes) of incubation. During more extended incubation (30 to 120 minutes), muscles from septic rats took up significantly more 45Ca than control muscles (p less than 0.05). Tyrosine release by incubated SOL muscles from control and septic rats was increased when calcium was added to the incubation medium, and at a calcium concentration of 2.5 mmol/L, the increase in tyrosine release was greater in septic than in control muscle. Addition of calcium to the incubation medium did not affect 3-MH release in control or septic muscle

  2. The effect of Mexidol on magnesium-calcium balance and endothelial dysfunction in operational stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baturin V.A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study: to study the effect of mexidol content of ionized calcium and magnesium in erythrocytes and the number of circulating endothelial cells in patients undergoing surgery in the maxillofacial area. Material and methods. The intracellular concentration of calcium and magnesium was measured before the operation, in one, three and five days after the surgery with the help of cytochemical method. Mexidol (100mg was administered intravenously as a single addition to the standard premedication. Results. After surgery, the intracellular calcium and magnesium content increased. After 24 hours, the magnesium level began to decline, and the calcium content in erythrocytes continued to grow. On day 5, the magnesium concentration in erythrocytes decreased below the initial level, and calcium levels remained significantly elevated. Number of endothelial cells in the blood increased immediately after surgery and magnesium-calcium balance and limits endothelial dysfunction. Mexidol continued growing, reaching a peak on day 5 after surgery. When using mexidol decreased levels of calcium and magnesium levels help prevent falls on the 5th day after surgery, decreased the number of circulating endothelial cells. Conclusion. Mexidol prevents postoperative magnesium violation.

  3. Mechanism of Calcium Fluoride Acceleration for Vacuum Carbothermic Reduction of Magnesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yun; Liu, Yu-qin; Ma, Hong-wen; Zhou, Wei-gong

    2016-04-01

    The use of a small amount of calcium fluoride as an additive greatly accelerated the reduction of magnesia during the preparation of magnesium from magnesia using the vacuum carbothermic reduction method. At 1573 K (1300 °C), the magnesia reaction rates of the samples with 1, 3, and 5 pct CaF2 were all approximately 26 pct, three times that of free CaF2, and they were arranged in order of the calcium fluoride weight percentages at 1673 K (1400 °C). The residues were analyzed using chemical analysis, XRD, SEM, EDS, and XRF. The possible acceleration mechanism was discussed. Calcium fluoride combined with magnesia and silicon dioxide to form a eutectic that melted as a channel to aid the solid-solid reaction between carbon and magnesia at approximately 1573 K (1300 °C). Calcium fluoride in the molten state offered free calcium ions and fluorine ions. Fluorine ions entered and distorted the magnesia crystal lattice. The structural strength and chemical stability of the magnesia crystal lattice decreased, which facilitated the magnesia reduction by carbon. Calcium ions were employed to generate the calcium and magnesium silicate. The easyly evaporating fluorides, including magnesium fluoride and silicon tetrafluoride, were regarded as the main reason for the loss of fluorine.

  4. Deuterium oxide normalizes blood pressure and vascular calcium uptake in Dahl salt-sensitive hypertensive rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examined the effect of 25% deuterium oxide in drinking water on systolic blood pressure, uptakes of calcium, and rubidium 86 by aortas of Dahl salt-sensitive rats on 0.4% (low) and 8% (high) sodium chloride (salt) diet. Twenty-four rats were divided into four groups. Groups I and II were on the low salt diet and groups III and IV on the high salt diet from 6 weeks of age. Additionally, at 10 weeks of age groups I and III were placed on 100% water and groups II and IV on 25% deuterium oxide. At 14 weeks, systolic blood pressure, uptakes of calcium, and rubidium 86 by aortas were significantly higher (p less than 0.01) in rats on the high salt diet as compared with those on the low salt diet. Deuterium oxide intake normalized systolic blood pressure and aortic calcium uptake but not aortic rubidium 86 uptake in hypertensive rats on the high salt diet. Deuterium oxide had no effect on blood pressure or aortic calcium uptake in rats on the low salt diet. The parallel increase in systolic blood pressure and vascular calcium uptake suggests that increased calcium uptake mechanisms are associated with hypertension in salt-sensitive Dahl rats. Furthermore, deuterium oxide appears to normalize elevated blood pressure in salt-sensitive hypertensive rats by normalizing elevated vascular (aortic) calcium uptake

  5. Association of Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CASR rs 1801725 with Colorectal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fateme Rostami

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium induces apoptosis in intestinal epithelial cells and subsequently prevents colorectal cancer through ion calcium receptor. Calcium-sensing receptor mutation reduces the expression of this receptor, and subsequently in reduces calcium transportation. Many studies have shown that Calcium-sensing receptor gene polymorphism may increase the risk of colorectal cancer. The purpose of this study is to assess the prevalence of calcium-sensing receptor polymorphisms (rs 1801725 in Iran society and to examine the role of this polymorphism in the increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC.Materials and Methods: The research was a case-control study. 105 patients with colorectal cancer and 105 controls were randomly studied using polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism. χ2 test and software 16- SPSS were used for statistical analysis.Results: In patient samples, the frequency of the genotypes TT, GT, GG in gene CASR rs 1801725 was respectively 64.8, 32.4, and 2.9 and the frequency of this polymorphism in control samples was respectively 51.2, 45.7, and 2.9. Frequency of allele G in patient samples was 0/48 and frequency of allele T was 0.25. In addition, Frequency of allele G in control samples was 0.74 and Frequency of allele T was calculated 0.19.Conclusion: The results show that calcium-sensing receptor variant (1801725 rs is not associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer.

  6. Cytoplasmic calcium levels in protoplasts from the cap and elongation zone of maize roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, H. G.; Evans, M. L.; Johnson, J. D.

    1991-01-01

    Calcium has been implicated as a key component in the signal transduction process of root gravitropism. We measured cytoplasmic free calcium in protoplasts isolated from the elongation zone and cap of primary roots of light-grown, vertically oriented seedlings of Zea mays L. Protoplasts were loaded with the penta-potassium salts of fura-2 and indo-1 by incubation in acidic solutions of these calcium indicators. Loading increased with decreasing pH but the pH dependence was stronger for indo-1 than for fura-2. In the case of fura-2, loading was enhanced only at the lowest pH (4.5) tested. Dyes loaded in this manner were distributed predominantly in the cytoplasm as indicated by fluorescence patterns. As an alternative method of loading, protoplasts were incubated with the acetoxymethylesters of fura-2 and indo-1. Protoplasts loaded by this method exhibited fluorescence both in the cytoplasm and in association with various organelles. Cytoplasmic calcium levels measured using spectrofluorometry, were found to be 160 +/- 40 nM and 257 +/- 27 nM, respectively, in populations of protoplasts from the root cap and elongation zone. Cytoplasmic free calcium did not increase upon addition of calcium to the incubation medium, indicating that the passive permeability to calcium was low.

  7. Design for Additive Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Bertran Comellas, Martí

    2012-01-01

    This Thesis, Design for Additive Manufacturing, has been mainly focused on the design process and the considerations to be taken into account when designing parts for Additive Manufacturing. It starts with an introduction to Additive Manufacturing, the different technologies and processes are described to let the readers understand their operating principle, materials used and their strengths and weaknesses. The applications of Additive manufacturing are also explained in the introductory ...

  8. Effectivenss of oil-soluble diakylphenosulfonamides as antiwear additives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sushko, E.B.; Belov, P.S.; Trofimov, V.A.

    1984-01-01

    This article investigates the antiwear efficiency of dialkylphenolsulfonamides in motor oils. The focus of the study is on N-dialkyl-2-hydroxy-3,5-dialkylbenzenesulfonamides. Derivatives of 2-hydroxy-3,5-dialkylbenzoic acids (dialkylsalicylic acids) were synthesized in order to determine the influence of the structure of the amide fragment on the properties of the compounds. Functional properties of the compounds, such as their adsorptivity on metal, polarity, and dipole moment, were examined. A PF-1 tribometer and a four-ball tester were used to determine the antiwear properties of the compounds. It is found that the dialkylphenolsulfonamides and the amine dialkylphenolsulfonate are better in antiwear efficiency than the ash-containing commercial additives PSM'Ya (calcium sulfonate), the overbased calcium sulfonate L-59, or ASK (calcium alkylsalicylate). With regard to the antiwear efficiency of the studied synthesized compounds, amine dialkylphenolsulfonate is the most efficient, followed by dialkylphenolsulfonamide and dialkylsalicylamide.

  9. Serotonin and calcium homeostasis during the transition period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, S R; Laporta, J; Moore, S A E; Hernandez, L L

    2016-07-01

    The transition from pregnancy to lactation puts significant, sudden demands on maternal energy and calcium reserves. Although most mammals are able to effectively manage these metabolic adaptations, the lactating dairy cow is acutely susceptible to transition-related disorders because of the high amounts of milk being produced. Hypocalcemia is a common metabolic disorder that occurs at the onset of lactation. Hypocalcemia is also known to result in poor animal welfare conditions. In addition, cows that develop hypocalcemia are more susceptible to a host of other negative health outcomes. Different feeding tactics, including manipulating the dietary cation-anion difference and administering low-calcium diets, are commonly used preventative strategies. Despite these interventions, the incidence of hypocalcemia in the subclinical form is still as high as 25% to 30% in the United States dairy cow population, with a 5% to 10% incidence of clinical hypocalcemia. In addition, although there are various effective treatments in place, they are administered only after the cow has become noticeably ill, at which point there is already significant metabolic damage. This emphasizes the need for developing alternative prevention strategies, with the monoamine serotonin implicated as a potential therapeutic target. Our research in rodents has shown that serotonin is critical for the induction of mammary parathyroid hormone-related protein, which is necessary for the mobilization of bone tissue and subsequent restoration of maternal calcium stores during lactation. We have shown that circulating serotonin concentrations are positively correlated with serum total calcium on the first day of lactation in dairy cattle. Administration of serotonin's immediate precursor through feeding, injection, or infusion to various mammalian species has been shown to increase circulating serotonin concentrations, with positive effects on other components of maternal metabolism. Most recently

  10. Buffering effects of calcium salts in kimchi: lowering acidity, elevating lactic acid bacterial population and dextransucrase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Seo Eun; Moon, Jin Seok; Jung, Jee Yun; Kim, Ji-Sun; Eom, Hyun-Ju; Kim, So-Young; Yoon, Hyang Sik; Han, Nam Soo

    2009-12-01

    This study investigates the buffering effects of calcium salts in kimchi on total acidity, microbial population, and dextransucrase activity. Calcium chloride or calcium carbonate was added in dongchimi-kimchi, a watery-radish kimchi, and their effects on various biochemical attributes were analyzed. The addition of 0.1% calcium chloride produced a milder decrease in the pH after 24 days of incubation, which allowed the lactic acid bacteria to survive longer than in the control. In particular, the heterofermentative Leuconostoc genus population was 10-fold higher than that in the control. When sucrose and maltose were also added along with the calcium salts, the dextransucrase activity in the kimchi was elevated and a higher concentration of isomaltooligosaccharides was synthesized when compared with the control. Calcium chloride was determined as a better activator compound of dextransucrase than calcium carbonate, probably because of its higher solubility. Therefore, the results of this study confirm the ability of the proposed approach to modulate the kimchi fermentation process and possibly enhance the quality of kimchi based on the addition of dietary calcium salts. PMID:20075632

  11. Benchmarking Spike Rate Inference in Population Calcium Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theis, Lucas; Berens, Philipp; Froudarakis, Emmanouil; Reimer, Jacob; Román Rosón, Miroslav; Baden, Tom; Euler, Thomas; Tolias, Andreas S; Bethge, Matthias

    2016-05-01

    A fundamental challenge in calcium imaging has been to infer spike rates of neurons from the measured noisy fluorescence traces. We systematically evaluate different spike inference algorithms on a large benchmark dataset (>100,000 spikes) recorded from varying neural tissue (V1 and retina) using different calcium indicators (OGB-1 and GCaMP6). In addition, we introduce a new algorithm based on supervised learning in flexible probabilistic models and find that it performs better than other published techniques. Importantly, it outperforms other algorithms even when applied to entirely new datasets for which no simultaneously recorded data is available. Future data acquired in new experimental conditions can be used to further improve the spike prediction accuracy and generalization performance of the model. Finally, we show that comparing algorithms on artificial data is not informative about performance on real data, suggesting that benchmarking different methods with real-world datasets may greatly facilitate future algorithmic developments in neuroscience. PMID:27151639

  12. Calcium biofortification and bioaccessibility in soilless "baby leaf" vegetable production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Imperio, Massimiliano; Renna, Massimiliano; Cardinali, Angela; Buttaro, Donato; Serio, Francesco; Santamaria, Pietro

    2016-12-15

    Calcium is an essential nutrient for human health, because it is a structural component and takes part in a variety of biological processes. The aim of this study was to increase Ca content of baby leaf vegetables (BLV: basil, mizuna, tatsoi and endive), as fresh-cut products. For the production of biofortified BLV, a floating system with two level of Ca (100 and 200mgL(-1)) in the nutrient solution was used. In addition, the assessment of bioaccessibility of Ca, by in vitro digestion process, was performed. In all vegetables, the Ca biofortification (200mgL(-1)) caused a significant Ca enrichment (9.5% on average) without affecting vegetables growth, oxalate contents and marketable quality. Calcium bioaccessibility ranged from 25% (basil) to 40% (endive) but the biofortified vegetables showed more bioaccessible Ca. These results underline the possibility to obtain Ca biofortified BLV by using agronomic approaches. PMID:27451166

  13. Calcium and Vitamin D: Important at Every Age

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... supported by your browser. Home Bone Basics Nutrition Calcium and Vitamin D: Important at Every Age Publication ... Osteoporosis Program For Your Information The Role of Calcium Calcium is needed for our heart, muscles, and ...

  14. Additives as corrosion inhibitors in reinforced concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work studies the behavior of two additives as inhibitors of corrosion in reinforced concrete. The presence of Microsilica, a physical inhibitor, in the mixture decreases pore size in structures and improves compression. Calcium Nitrite, a chemical inhibitor, is an oxidizing agent and allows a more homogenous film to form over the steel that becomes more resistant to attacks from aggressive ions like anion chloride and others. Three pairs of concrete test pieces were used without additives and with additives with a/c ration of 0.55. The samples were exposed to an accelerated attack of chlorides, submerging them in a 4.27 M solution of NaCl for 24 hours and then drying them at room temperature for another 24 hours, completing a cycle every 48 hours. The tests were carried out at 1 cycle and 5 cycles of partial moistening and drying. The steel corrosion was evaluated with corrosion potential measurements. Conductivity, pH, chlorides and sulfate profiles were defined depending on the depth of the concrete. The composition of the corrosion products was determined using X-ray diffraction and the morphology of the film by scanning electron microscopy. The results show that for 1 test cycle, the corrosion potential of the steel in the sample with calcium nitrite was -54mV, which was a higher value than that measured in the sample with microsilica (-217.3mV) and without an additive (-159.1mV), corroborating its inhibitory power. The content of the free chlorides in the sample with micros ice allows greater capillary suction by adding high amounts of chloride to the structure (2.6% on the outside up to 2.20% near the steel); while the test pieces with calcium nitrite and without an additive had concentrations lower than 2% in all the evaluated points. After five cycles of exposing the samples to the saline solution the behavior is inverted. The measures of conductivity agreed with the previous results. Meanwhile, the pH of the solutions obtained from the powder from the

  15. Clinical validation of dialysable calcium in relation to other methods of serum calcium measurement.

    OpenAIRE

    Prince, R. L.; Langton, S R

    1985-01-01

    Dialysable calcium (CaD) values were measured by a simple technique not interfered with by protein bound calcium and validation attempted by comparison with concentrations of ionised calcium (CaI) and clinical categorisation. CaD values were also compared with total calcium (CaT) and albumin adjusted calcium (CaA) concentrations. The normal ranges for CaD, CaT, CaA, and CaI were calculated from the results in healthy blood donors. In 50 normal subjects CaD was more highly correlated with CaI ...

  16. What determines the calcium concentration of speleothem-forming drip waters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Andy; Flemons, Ingrid; Andersen, Martin S.; Coleborn, Katie; Treble, Pauline C.

    2016-08-01

    Cave drip water calcium ion concentration is a primary determinant of speleothem deposition and growth rate. The factors that determine drip water calcium ion concentrations are the soil and vadose zone CO2 concentrations, and the hydrogeochemical evolution of the water from soil to cave. Here, we use a systematic literature review of cave drip water calcium concentrations, combined with PHREEQC equilibrium modelling, to investigate the global relationship between calcium concentration and surface climate. Our results are discussed in the context of understanding the climatic and environmental controls on drip water calcium concentration, speleothem growth rates and proxies of past climate and environmental change. We use an empirical, global soil CO2 concentration-temperature relationship to derive PHREEQC modelled cave drip water calcium concentrations. The global mean modelled drip water calcium concentration is close to that observed, but it over-predicts at high and low temperatures, and significantly under-predicts at temperate conditions. We hypothesise that closed system hydrochemical evolution due to water saturation is an important control on carbonate dissolution at colder temperatures. Under warmer conditions, for example temperate climates with a dry and hot or warm summer, seasonally-limited water availability can lead to: water-limitations on microbial and root respiration; wildfire; and prior calcite precipitation, all of which limit drip water calcium concentrations. In temperate climates with no dry season, higher CO2 concentrations than modelled from soil values are necessary to explain the observed drip water calcium values, which we propose is from an additional source of CO2 from microbial activity and root respiration in the vadose zone during open system hydrochemical evolution.

  17. Characteristics of the interaction of calcium with casein submicelles as determined by analytical affinity chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interaction of calcium with casein submicelles was investigated in CaCl2 and calcium phosphate buffers and with synthetic milk salt solutions using the technique of analytical affinity chromatography. Micelles that had been prepared by size exclusion chromatography with glycerolpropyl controlled-pore glass from fresh raw skim milk that had never been cooled, were dialyzed at room temperature against calcium-free imidazole buffer, pH 6.7. Resulting submicelles were covalently immobilized on succinamidopropyl controlled-pore glass (300-nm pore size). Using 45Ca to monitor the elution retardation, the affinity of free Ca2+ and calcium salt species was determined at temperatures of 20 to 40 degrees C and pH 6.0 to 7.5. Increasing the pH in this range or increasing the temperature strengthened the binding of calcium to submicelles, similar to previous observations with individual caseins. However, the enthalpy change obtained from the temperature dependence was considerably greater than that reported for alpha s1- and beta-caseins. Furthermore, the elution profiles for 45Ca in milk salt solutions were decidedly different from those in CaCl2 or calcium phosphate buffers and the affinities were also greater. For example, at pH 6.7 and 30 degrees C the average dissociation constant for the submicelle-calcium complex is 0.074 mM for CaCl2 and calcium phosphate buffers, vs 0.016 mM for the milk salt solution. The asymmetric frontal boundaries and higher average affinities observed with milk salts may be due to binding of calcium salts with greater affinity in addition to the binding of free Ca2+ in these solutions

  18. An Intracellular Calcium Oscillations Model Including Mitochondrial Calcium Cycling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Xiao-Min; LIU Zeng-Rong

    2005-01-01

    @@ Calcium is a ubiquitous second messenger. Mitochondria contributes significantly to intracellular Ca2+ dynamics.The experiment of Kaftan et al. [J. Biol. Chem. 275(2000) 25465] demonstrated that inhibiting mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake can reduce the frequency of cytosolic Ca2+ concentration oscillations of gonadotropes. By considering the mitochondrial Ca2+ cycling we develop a three-variable model of intracellular Ca2+ oscillations based on the models of Atri et al. [Biophys. J. 65 (1993) 1727] and Falcke et al. [Biophys. J. 77 (1999) 37]. The model reproduces the fact that mitochondrial Ca2+ cycling increases the frequency of cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations, which accords with Kaftan's results. Moreover the model predicts that when the mitochondria overload with Ca2+, the cytosolic Ca2+ oscillations vanish, which may trigger apoptosis.

  19. Inhibitory effect of calcium channel blockers on proliferation of human glioma cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of 2 specific calcium channel blockers, verapamil and nimodipine, on the proliferation of human glioma tumour cells were investigated in vitro. Tumour tissues for primary cell cultures were obtained bioptically from 3 patients with the histopathological diagnosis of glioblastoma. The [3H]-thymidine incorporation into glioma tumour cells DNA was used as a sensitive index of the cell proliferation. It was found that varapamil (104-105M) and nimodipine (104-106M) significantly inhibited the [3H]-thymidine uptake in a dose-related manner. The inhibitory effect of both calcium channel antagonists was reversed by stimultancous addition of calcium chloride (5x103M). These results indicate that verapamil and nimodipine may exert an antiproliferative effect on glioma cells growth acting through a blokade of specific voltage-dependent calcium channels. (author)

  20. Evaluation of Calcium Phosphate Cement As a Root Canal Sealer Filling Material

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Calcium phosphate cement for root end sealing was obtained by mixing α-tricalcium phosphate and additives with an aqueous solution of citric. Powder and liquid were mixed at a ratio of 1.25g/mL. The biocompatibility of this material was investigated primarily by subcutaneous implantation tests. Then calcium phosphate cement was used to fill three adult dogs' root canal, both calcium hydroxide paste and hydroxyapatite paste as control. The animals were killed at 4,12,20 weeks postoperatively respectively. The effects of different materials on the apical closure, restoration of periapical tissues and adaptability to the dentinal surface were examined by optical and electronic microscope. The observation at 20 weeks shows that the calcium phosphate cement has the potentialities of being a root canal sealer filling material available for pulpless teeth with open-apex and destructive periapical tissue.

  1. Bone Up on the Need for Calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Peggy

    1987-01-01

    Most grade-schoolers drink milk at each meal, but teens, especially girls, often switch to carbonated soda at mealtime just as they should be building up their bone bank of calcium. Why calcium is important and how to get enough of it are covered. (MT)

  2. 21 CFR 182.8217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium phosphate. 182.8217 Section 182.8217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b) Conditions of use. This...

  3. Calcium, snails, and birds: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mänd

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that wild birds breeding in acidified areas have difficulties with obtaining sufficient calcium for their eggshells, and that the cause of it is the shortage of land snails. Many birds have to search for Ca-rich snail shells on a daily basis during egg production. Molluscs depend on litter calcium, which has decreased due to acidification of the environment. Calcium limitation may be a widespread phenomenon also in non-acidified, naturally Ca-poor areas. The problem is that while in the latter areas the time for development of specific adaptations may have been sufficient, then in acidified areas, on the contrary, calcium shortage is a recent phenomenon. Therefore, since the extent of calcium limitation in non-acidified areas is hard to derive from observational data, experimental approach is needed. We provide experimental evidence that specific calcium deficit does affect reproductive traits also in the birds breeding in naturally base-poor habitats. Our study was conducted in a heterogeneous woodland area in Estonia containing deciduous forest patches as well as base-poor pine forest with low snail abundance. Ca supplementation, using snail shell and chicken eggshell fragments, was carried out for pied flycatchers and great tits. Extra calcium affected positively several reproductive traits like egg volume and eggshell thickness, start of breeding, and fledglings’ parameters. The negative relationship between calcium availability and lay-date suggests that birds adjust their breeding tactics to conditions of Ca deficiency, for example, by postponing laying.

  4. Calcium Free Asbestos for Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snitzer, B. A.

    1983-01-01

    Organic-acid salt removes unwanted calcium without weakening asbestos. Asbestos mixed with disodium ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (disodium EDTA) in water and agitated for 2 hours. After disodium EDTA solution is drained away, asbestos contains only 0.02 to 0.1 percent calcium. Fiber structure of asbestos unaffected.

  5. Stochastic models of intracellular calcium signals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cellular signaling operates in a noisy environment shaped by low molecular concentrations and cellular heterogeneity. For calcium release through intracellular channels–one of the most important cellular signaling mechanisms–feedback by liberated calcium endows fluctuations with critical functions in signal generation and formation. In this review it is first described, under which general conditions the environment makes stochasticity relevant, and which conditions allow approximating or deterministic equations. This analysis provides a framework, in which one can deduce an efficient hybrid description combining stochastic and deterministic evolution laws. Within the hybrid approach, Markov chains model gating of channels, while the concentrations of calcium and calcium binding molecules (buffers) are described by reaction–diffusion equations. The article further focuses on the spatial representation of subcellular calcium domains related to intracellular calcium channels. It presents analysis for single channels and clusters of channels and reviews the effects of buffers on the calcium release. For clustered channels, we discuss the application and validity of coarse-graining as well as approaches based on continuous gating variables (Fokker–Planck and chemical Langevin equations). Comparison with recent experiments substantiates the stochastic and spatial approach, identifies minimal requirements for a realistic modeling, and facilitates an understanding of collective channel behavior. At the end of the review, implications of stochastic and local modeling for the generation and properties of cell-wide release and the integration of calcium dynamics into cellular signaling models are discussed

  6. Stochastic Kinetics of Intracellular Calcium Oscillations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈昌胜; 曾仁端

    2003-01-01

    A stochastic model of intracellular calcium oscillations is put forward by taking into account the random opening-closing of Ca2+ channels in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane. The numerical results of the stochastic model show simple and complex calcium oscillations, which accord with the experiment results.

  7. Engineering calcium oxalate crystal formation in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many plants accumulate crystals of calcium oxalate. Just how these crystals form remains unknown. To gain insight into the mechanisms regulating calcium oxalate crystal formation, a crystal engineering approach was initiated utilizing the non-crystal accumulating plant, Arabidopsis. The success of t...

  8. Stochastic models of intracellular calcium signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rüdiger, Sten, E-mail: sten.ruediger@physik.hu-berlin.de

    2014-01-10

    Cellular signaling operates in a noisy environment shaped by low molecular concentrations and cellular heterogeneity. For calcium release through intracellular channels–one of the most important cellular signaling mechanisms–feedback by liberated calcium endows fluctuations with critical functions in signal generation and formation. In this review it is first described, under which general conditions the environment makes stochasticity relevant, and which conditions allow approximating or deterministic equations. This analysis provides a framework, in which one can deduce an efficient hybrid description combining stochastic and deterministic evolution laws. Within the hybrid approach, Markov chains model gating of channels, while the concentrations of calcium and calcium binding molecules (buffers) are described by reaction–diffusion equations. The article further focuses on the spatial representation of subcellular calcium domains related to intracellular calcium channels. It presents analysis for single channels and clusters of channels and reviews the effects of buffers on the calcium release. For clustered channels, we discuss the application and validity of coarse-graining as well as approaches based on continuous gating variables (Fokker–Planck and chemical Langevin equations). Comparison with recent experiments substantiates the stochastic and spatial approach, identifies minimal requirements for a realistic modeling, and facilitates an understanding of collective channel behavior. At the end of the review, implications of stochastic and local modeling for the generation and properties of cell-wide release and the integration of calcium dynamics into cellular signaling models are discussed.

  9. Particularities of thermal expansion of calcium vanadates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature dependence of unit cell parameters of calcium vanadates Ca(VO3)2, Ca2V2O7 and Ca3(VO4)2 is studied. It is shown that lattice parameters of meta- and pyrovanadates change monotonously. Lattice parameters of calcium orthovanadate change sharply and unmonotonously at 400-500 deg C

  10. Elements from chlorine to calcium nuclear reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kunz, Wunibald

    1968-01-01

    Nuclear Tables: Part II Nuclear Reactions, Volume 3: The Elements from Chlorine to Calcium contains tabulations of the nuclear reaction values of elements chlorine, argon, potassium, and calcium. These tabulations provide the calculated Q-values of the elements and their isotopes. This book will be of value to general chemistry researchers.

  11. ALG-2, a multifunctional calcium binding protein?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarabykina, Svetlana; Mollerup, Jens; Winding Gojkovic, P.;

    2004-01-01

    ALG-2 was originally discovered as a pro-apoptotic protein in a genetic screen. Due to its ability to bind calcium with high affinity it was postulated to provide a link between the known effect of calcium in programmed cell death and the molecular death execution machinery. This review article...

  12. Additives in yoghurt production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milna Tudor

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In yoghurt production, mainly because of sensory characteristics, different types of additives are used. Each group, and also each substance from the same group has different characteristics and properties. For that reason, for improvement of yoghurt sensory characteristics apart from addition selection, the quantity of the additive is very important. The same substance added in optimal amount improves yoghurt sensory attributes, but too small or too big addition can reduce yoghurt sensory attributes. In this paper, characteristics and properties of mostly used additives in yoghurt production are described; skimmed milk powder, whey powder, concentrated whey powder, sugars and artificial sweeteners, fruits, stabilizers, casein powder, inulin and vitamins. Also the impact of each additive on sensory and physical properties of yoghurt, syneresis and viscosity, are described, depending on used amount added in yoghurt production.

  13. Additive usage levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlais, R

    1996-01-01

    With the adoption of the European Parliament and Council Directives on sweeteners, colours and miscellaneous additives the Commission is now embarking on the project of coordinating the activities of the European Union Member States in the collection of the data that are to make up the report on food additive intake requested by the European Parliament. This presentation looks at the inventory of available sources on additive use levels and concludes that for the time being national legislation is still the best source of information considering that the directives have yet to be transposed into national legislation. Furthermore, this presentation covers the correlation of the food categories as found in the additives directives with those used by national consumption surveys and finds that in a number of instances this correlation still leaves a lot to be desired. The intake of additives via food ingestion and the intake of substances which are chemically identical to additives but which occur naturally in fruits and vegetables is found in a number of cases to be higher than the intake of additives added during the manufacture of foodstuffs. While the difficulties are recognized in contributing to the compilation of food additive intake data, industry as a whole, i.e. the food manufacturing and food additive manufacturing industries, are confident that in a concerted effort, use data on food additives by industry can be made available. Lastly, the paper points out that with the transportation of the additives directives into national legislation and the time by which the food industry will be able to make use of the new food legislative environment several years will still go by; food additives use data by the food industry will thus have to be reviewed at the beginning of the next century. PMID:8792135

  14. Vicarious Michael Addition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    C-H bond can undergo vicarious Michael addition reaction (VMA) with doubleactivated double bond in the absence of strong base and catalyst under mild conditions.Intramolecular H-bonding, electron-withdrawing inductive effect, and steric hindrance at aposition of nucleophile facilitates C-H addition over N-H addition. By using VMA, high branching multiplicity, novel branching pattern, controllable density and distribution of functional groups can be envisioned for novel dendrimer synthesis.

  15. Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Stewart W.; Martina, Filomeno; Addison, Adrian C.; Ding, Jialuo; Pardal, Goncalo; Colegrove, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Depositing large components (>10 kg) in titanium, aluminium, steel and other metals is possible using Wire + Arc Additive Manufacturing. This technology adopts arc welding tools and wire as feedstock for additive manufacturing purposes. High deposition rates, low material and equipment costs, and good structural integrity make Wire+Arc Additive Manufacturing a suitable candidate for replacing the current method of manufacturing from solid billets or large forgings, especially with regards to ...

  16. Calcium Forms,Subcelluar Distribution and Ultrastructure of Pulp Cells as Influenced by Calcium Deficiency in Apple (Malus pumila) Fruits

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Jian-hui; ZHOU Wei

    2004-01-01

    Calcium in Red Fuji and Starkrimson apples during storage were fractionated by sequent extracting. Localization and distribution of calcium and influence of calcium nutrition on cell ultrastructure were observed by transmission electron microscopy combined with in situ precipitation of calcium with an improved method of potassium pyroantimonate technique. Results indicated that spraying calcium solution on surface of young fruits increased contents of calcium in all forms. During storage, contents of soluble calcium and pectic calcium declined and thosein calcium phosphate, calcium oxalate and calcium silicate increased. Calcium contents of Red Fuji in all forms were higher than those of Starkrimson, indicating that calcium accumulating capability of Red Fuji fruits preceded that of Starkrimson. Under transmission electron microscopy, calcium antimonite precipitates (CaAP) was mainly distributed in cell wall, tonoplast, nuclear membrane and nucleoplasm,much more CaAP deposited in vacuole. Calcium deficiency during storage leads to decrease of CaAP in locations mentioned above, disappearance of compartmentation, and entrance of CaAP to cytoplasm. Transformation from soluble calcium and pectic calcium to calcium phosphate,oxalate and damages of biomembranes structuraly and functionally resulted from calcium deficiency during storage were the crucial causation of physiological disorder.

  17. Application of Calcium Phosphate Materials in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabr S. Al-Sanabani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate materials are similar to bone in composition and in having bioactive and osteoconductive properties. Calcium phosphate materials in different forms, as cements, composites, and coatings, are used in many medical and dental applications. This paper reviews the applications of these materials in dentistry. It presents a brief history, dental applications, and methods for improving their mechanical properties. Notable research is highlighted regarding (1 application of calcium phosphate into various fields in dentistry; (2 improving mechanical properties of calcium phosphate; (3 biomimetic process and functionally graded materials. This paper deals with most common types of the calcium phosphate materials such as hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate which are currently used in dental and medical fields.

  18. Influence of calcium depletion on iron-binding properties of milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, V A; Ellis, A; Ye, A; Das, S; Singh, H

    2015-04-01

    We investigated the effects of calcium depletion on the binding of iron in milk. A weakly acidic cation-exchange resin was used to remove 3 different levels (18-22, 50-55, and 68-72%) of calcium from milk. Five levels of iron (5, 10, 15, 20, and 25 mM) were added to each of these calcium-depleted milks (CDM) and the resultant milks were analyzed for particle size, microstructure, and the distribution of protein and minerals between the colloidal and soluble phases. The depletion of calcium affected the distribution of protein and minerals in normal milk. Iron added to normal milk and low-CDM (~20% calcium depletion) bound mainly to the colloidal phase (material sedimented at 100,000 × g for 1 h at 20 °C), with little effect on the integrity of the casein micelles. Depletion of ~70% of the calcium from milk resulted in almost complete disintegration of the casein micelles, as indicated by all the protein remaining in the soluble phase upon ultracentrifugation. Addition of up to ~20 mM iron to high CDM resulted in the formation of small fibrous structures that remained in the soluble phase of milk. It appeared that the iron bound to soluble (nonsedimentable) caseins in high-CDM. We observed a decrease in the aqueous phosphorus content of all milks upon iron addition, irrespective of their calcium content. We considered the interaction between aqueous phosphorus and added iron to be responsible for the high iron-binding capacity of the proteins in milk. The soluble protein-iron complexes formed in high-CDM (~70% calcium depletion) could be used as an effective iron fortificant for a range of food products because of their good solubility characteristics. PMID:25648803

  19. Diagnosis and assessment of skeletal related disease using calcium 41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillegonds, Darren J.; Vogel, John S.; Fitzgerald, Robert L.; Deftos, Leonard J.; Herold, David; Burton, Douglas W.

    2012-05-15

    A method of determining calcium metabolism in a patient comprises the steps of administering radioactive calcium isotope .sup.41Ca to the patient, allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and reaction of the radioactive calcium isotope .sup.41Ca by the patient, obtaining a sample of the radioactive calcium isotope .sup.41Ca from the patient, isolating the calcium content of the sample in a form suitable for precise measurement of isotopic calcium concentrations, and measuring the calcium content to determine parameters of calcium metabolism in the patient.

  20. The effects of apple pomace, bentonite and calcium superphosphate on swine manure aerobic composting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jishao; Huang, Yimei; Liu, Xueling; Huang, Hua

    2014-09-01

    The effects of additives such as apple pomace, bentonite and calcium superphosphate on swine manure composting were investigated in a self-built aerated static box (90 L) by assessing their influences on the transformation of nitrogen, carbon, phosphorous and compost maturity. The results showed that additives all prolonged the thermophilic stage in composting compared to control. Nitrogen losses amounted to 34-58% of the initial nitrogen, in which ammonia volatilization accounted for 0.3-4.6%. Calcium superphosphate was helpful in facilitating composting process as it significantly reduced the ammonia volatilization during thermophilic stage and increased the contents of total nitrogen and phosphorous in compost, but bentonite increased the ammonia volatilization and reduced the total nitrogen concentration. It suggested that calcium superphosphate is an effective additive for keeping nitrogen during swine manure composting. PMID:24928053

  1. Calcium: a code coupling tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Today, the calculation performances of computers allow the precise and global simulation of complex industrial processes such as the functioning of a nuclear reactor core. One can question the need for the elaboration of new global numerical models in order to make use of the overall capability of computers. Another less time consuming solution consist in the coupling of existing well validated numerical models in order to make them working together. This paper presents the basic principles of the coupling of numerical codes, the tools required, the Calcium tool for codes coupling and an example of application of this tool in the coupling of the THYC (EdF), COCCINELLE (EdF) and CATHARE (CEA-EdF-Framatome) codes for the modeling of the thermal-hydraulic and neutronic behaviour of a reactor core during accidental situation. (J.S.)

  2. Endothelin induces two types of contractions of rat uterus: phasic contractions by way of voltage-dependent calcium channels and developing contractions through a second type of calcium channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effects of endothelin on nonvascular smooth muscle have been examined using rat uterine horns and two modes of endothelin action have been revealed. Endothelin (0.3 nM) caused rhythmic contractions of isolated uterus in the presence of extracellular calcium. The rhythmic contractions were completely inhibited by calcium channel antagonists. These characteristics of endothelin-induced contractions were very similar to those induced by oxytocin. Binding assays using 125I-endothelin showed that endothelin and the calcium channel blockers did not compete for the binding sites. However, endothelin was unique in that it caused, in addition to rhythmic contractions, a slowly developing monophasic contraction that was insensitive to calcium channel blockers. This developing contraction became dominant at higher concentrations of endothelin and was also calcium dependent

  3. Endothelin induces two types of contractions of rat uterus: phasic contractions by way of voltage-dependent calcium channels and developing contractions through a second type of calcium channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozuka, M.; Ito, T.; Hirose, S.; Takahashi, K.; Hagiwara, H.

    1989-02-28

    Effects of endothelin on nonvascular smooth muscle have been examined using rat uterine horns and two modes of endothelin action have been revealed. Endothelin (0.3 nM) caused rhythmic contractions of isolated uterus in the presence of extracellular calcium. The rhythmic contractions were completely inhibited by calcium channel antagonists. These characteristics of endothelin-induced contractions were very similar to those induced by oxytocin. Binding assays using /sup 125/I-endothelin showed that endothelin and the calcium channel blockers did not compete for the binding sites. However, endothelin was unique in that it caused, in addition to rhythmic contractions, a slowly developing monophasic contraction that was insensitive to calcium channel blockers. This developing contraction became dominant at higher concentrations of endothelin and was also calcium dependent.

  4. Calcium-Dependent and Independent Mechanisms of Capsaicin Receptor (TRPV1)-Mediated Cytokine Production and Cell Death in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Reilly, Christopher A.; Johansen, Mark E.; Lanza, Diane L.; Lee, Jeewoo; Lim, Ju-Ok; Yost, Garold S.

    2005-01-01

    Activation of the capsaicin receptor (VR1 or TRPV1) in bronchial epithelial cells by capsaicinoids and other vanilloids promotes pro-inflammatory cytokine production and cell death. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of TRPV1-mediated calcium flux from extracellular sources as an initiator of these responses and to define additional cellular pathways that control cell death. TRPV1 antagonists and reduction of calcium concentrations in treatment solutions attenuated calcium ...

  5. Calcium sulphate deposition on heated metal surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accumulation of undesired matter at heat transfer surfaces (fouling) is a severe problem to industry. The growth of calcium sulphate dihydrate an heated metal surfaces has been examined and a mechanism for the effect of surface roughness on the amount of deposition has been proposed. A novel piece of equipment was designed and constructed in which the growth of crystals on heat transfer surfaces with different surface roughnesses could be observed under controlled solution conditions. The test section was a transparent rectangular channel into which three 25 mm diameter test pieces could be inserted such that the polished faces were planar with the rear face of the channel. The back faces of these test pieces were heated by contact with hot water. Using Reynolds numbers of 300 to 13,500 and calcium sulphate solutions with bulk concentrations from 20 to 50 mM Ca2+, no gross effect due to surface roughness was seen. However a limited effect, which distinguished grit-blasted surfaces from polished surfaces, was found in experiments with a bulk concentration from 28 to 33 mM Ca2+. In all of the experiments it was observed that the presence of bubbles enhanced crystal growth. It was also found that the amount of deposition formed on any surface decreased with decreasing dissolved oxygen content of the bulk solution. It is suggested that a bulk concentration of approximately 33 mM Ca2+ is a critical level of supersaturation, which corresponds with the so-called metastable limit of supersaturation. The surface roughness effect may be associated with two factors. Firstly, as the critical supersaturation is approached crystal growth is enhanced at certain sites, in particular the edges of bubbles. Secondly, very rough surfaces, such as grit-blasted surfaces, more readily support and initiate bubble formation and consequently the grit-blasted surface shows greater growth. Additional work with a different test rig, using a stagnant solution, indicated that suppression of

  6. Eco friendly green and yellow ceramic pigments based on calcium-doped Pr{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 9} obtained by addition of mineralizers and chemical coprecipitation.; Ecopigmentos ceramicos verdes y amarillos de Pr{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 9} dopados con calcio obtenidos en presencia de mineralizadores y por coprecipitacion quimica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo, R.; Garcori, C.; Llusar, M.; Garcia, A.; Badenes, J.; Monros, G.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper the synthesis of (Pr{sub 2}-xCa{sub x})Mo{sub 2}O{sub 9} solid solutions by ceramic route is presented. Crystallography and colour evolution from green to yellow described on literature have been checked. When enamelled in a lead free double firing ceramic glaze, pigments produces light yellow colours not better than b*=19. Using NH{sub 4}Cl, NaF and Na{sub 2}SiF{sub 6} as mineralizers in the (Pr{sub 2}-xCa{sub x})Mo{sub 2}O{sub 9} x=0,1 composition with the same molar addition of halogens (0.84 mols per formula weight), a structural effect of fluoride ion is observed but the yellow colour on enamelled samples do not improve. Finally, using an ammonia coprecipitation method in the x=0.6 sample, a similar crystallization to the homologous ceramic sample is detected, but x ray diffraction peaks are more intense and less wide, pointing to a more regular and higher crystal size crystallization which is checked by electronic scanning microscopy. This microstructure give more intense yellow coloured powders and improve their resistance against glaze, producing significantly best yellow colours than ceramic samples. (Author) 14 refs.

  7. The Properties and Characteristics of Concretes Containing Calcium Carbonate (CaCO3) and Synthetic Lightweight Aggregate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Matthew J.

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of precipitated calcium carbonate as a means for enhancing the mechanical and environmental favorability of concretes containing synthetic lightweight aggregates (SLA), which are comprised of recycled mixed plastic and fly ash. Compressive strength tests show that 2% calcium carbonate additions are able to mitigate strength decreases induced by SLA as well as decrease concrete density when compared to NWA concretes. SLA concretes containing 5% calcium carbonate do not show the same trend. Instead, strength decreases and density increases are observed. Furthermore, increases in aluminum trisulphate (AFt) phase mineralization are observed through scanning electron microscopy. Results suggest that calcium carbonate additions increase early hydration and stabilize AFt minerals thaumasite and ettringite throughout hydration. It is proposed that increased AFt phase mineralization causes reductions in concrete density. However, a limit to this relationship was observed as additions of greater than 2% calcium carbonate exceed the potential for increased hydration, causing a threshold effect that resulted in calcium carbonate acting as filler, which increases density. Improved mechanical properties and the ability to stabilize waste plastics, fly ash, and CO2 emissions make the use of 2% calcium carbonate in conjunction with SLA a favorable alternative to ordinary concretes.

  8. Influence of ferrite phase in alite-calcium sulfoaluminate cements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duvallet, Tristana Yvonne Francoise

    Since the energy crisis in 1970's, research on low energy cements with low CO2- emissions has been increasing. Numerous solutions have been investigated, and the goal of this original research is to create a viable hybrid cement with the components of both Ordinary Portland cement (OPC) and calcium sulfoaluminate cement (CSAC), by forming a material that contains both alite and calcium sulfoaluminate clinker phases. Furthermore, this research focuses on keeping the cost of this material reasonable by reducing aluminum requirements through its substitution with iron. The aim of this work would produce a cement that can use large amounts of red mud, which is a plentiful waste material, in place of bauxite known as an expensive raw material. Modified Bogue equations were established and tested to formulate this novel cement with different amounts of ferrite, from 5% to 45% by weight. This was followed by the production of cement from reagent chemicals, and from industrial by-products as feedstocks (fly ash, red mud and slag). Hydration processes, as well as the mechanical properties, of these clinker compositions were studied, along with the addition of gypsum and the impact of a ferric iron complexing additive triisopropanolamine (TIPA). To summarize this research, the influence of the addition of 5-45% by weight of ferrite phase, was examined with the goal of introducing as much red mud as possible in the process without negatively attenuate the cement properties. Based on this PhD dissertation, the production of high-iron alite-calcium sulfoaluminateferrite cements was proven possible from the two sources of raw materials. The hydration processes and the mechanical properties seemed negatively affected by the addition of ferrite, as this phase was not hydrated entirely, even after 6 months of curing. The usage of TIPA counteracted this decline in strength by improving the ferrite hydration and increasing the optimum amount of gypsum required in each composition

  9. Additive and polynomial representations

    CERN Document Server

    Krantz, David H; Suppes, Patrick

    1971-01-01

    Additive and Polynomial Representations deals with major representation theorems in which the qualitative structure is reflected as some polynomial function of one or more numerical functions defined on the basic entities. Examples are additive expressions of a single measure (such as the probability of disjoint events being the sum of their probabilities), and additive expressions of two measures (such as the logarithm of momentum being the sum of log mass and log velocity terms). The book describes the three basic procedures of fundamental measurement as the mathematical pivot, as the utiliz

  10. Production of precipitated calcium carbonate from calcium silicates and carbon dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibilities for reducing carbon dioxide emissions from the pulp and paper industry by calcium carbonation are presented. The current precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC) production uses mined, crushed calcium carbonate as raw materials. If calcium silicates were used instead, carbon dioxide emissions from the calcination of carbonates would be eliminated. In Finland, there could, thus, be a potential for eliminating 200 kt of carbon dioxide emissions per year, considering only the PCC used in the pulp and paper industry. A preliminary investigation of the feasibility to produce PCC from calcium silicates and the potential to replace calcium carbonate as the raw material was made. Calcium carbonate can be manufactured from calcium silicates by various methods, but only a few have been experimentally verified. The possibility and feasibility of these methods as a replacement for the current PCC production process was studied by thermodynamic equilibrium calculations using HSC software and process modelling using Aspen Plus[reg]. The results from the process modelling showed that a process that uses acetic acid for extraction of the calcium ions is a high potential option for sequestering carbon dioxide by mineral carbonation. The main obstacle seems to be the limited availability and relatively high price of wollastonite, which is a mineral with high calcium silicate content. An alternative is to use the more common, but also more complex, basalt rock instead

  11. Effect of calcium intake on urinary oxalate excretion in calcium stone-forming patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishiura J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Dietary calcium lowers the risk of nephrolithiasis due to a decreased absorption of dietary oxalate that is bound by intestinal calcium. The aim of the present study was to evaluate oxaluria in normocalciuric and hypercalciuric lithiasic patients under different calcium intake. Fifty patients (26 females and 24 males, 41 ± 10 years old, whose 4-day dietary records revealed a regular low calcium intake (<=500 mg/day, received an oral calcium load (1 g/day for 7 days. A 24-h urine was obtained before and after load and according to the calciuria under both diets, patients were considered as normocalciuric (NC, N = 15, diet-dependent hypercalciuric (DDHC, N = 9 or diet-independent hypercalciuric (DIHC, N = 26. On regular diet, mean oxaluria was 30 ± 14 mg/24 h for all patients. The 7-day calcium load induced a significant decrease in mean oxaluria compared to the regular diet in NC and DIHC (20 ± 12 vs 26 ± 7 and 27 ± 18 vs 32 ± 15 mg/24 h, respectively, P<0.05 but not in DDHC patients (22 ± 10 vs 23 ± 5 mg/24 h. The lack of an oxalate decrease among DDHC patients after the calcium load might have been due to higher calcium absorption under higher calcium supply, with a consequent lower amount of calcium left in the intestine to bind with oxalate. These data suggest that a long-lasting regular calcium consumption <500 mg was not associated with high oxaluria and that a subpopulation of hypercalciuric patients who presented a higher intestinal calcium absorption (DDHC tended to hyperabsorb oxalate as well, so that oxaluria did not change under different calcium intake.

  12. Transgenic plants with increased calcium stores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Sarah (Inventor); Tsou, Pei-Lan (Inventor); Robertson, Dominique (Inventor); Boss, Wendy (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention provides transgenic plants over-expressing a transgene encoding a calcium-binding protein or peptide (CaBP). Preferably, the CaBP is a calcium storage protein and over-expression thereof does not have undue adverse effects on calcium homeostasis or biochemical pathways that are regulated by calcium. In preferred embodiments, the CaBP is calreticulin (CRT) or calsequestrin. In more preferred embodiments, the CaBP is the C-domain of CRT, a fragment of the C-domain, or multimers of the foregoing. In other preferred embodiments, the CaBP is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum by operatively associating the transgene encoding the CaBP with an endoplasmic reticulum localization peptide. Alternatively, the CaBP is targeted to any other sub-cellular compartment that permits the calcium to be stored in a form that is biologically available to the plant. Also provided are methods of producing plants with desirable phenotypic traits by transformation of the plant with a transgene encoding a CaBP. Such phenotypic traits include increased calcium storage, enhanced resistance to calcium-limiting conditions, enhanced growth and viability, increased disease and stress resistance, enhanced flower and fruit production, reduced senescence, and a decreased need for fertilizer production. Further provided are plants with enhanced nutritional value as human food or animal feed.

  13. Food Additives and Hyperkinesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wender, Ester H.

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that food additives are causally associated with hyperkinesis and learning disabilities in children is reviewed, and available data are summarized. Available from: American Medical Association 535 North Dearborn Street Chicago, Illinois 60610. (JG)

  14. Groups – Additive Notation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coghetto Roland

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We translate the articles covering group theory already available in the Mizar Mathematical Library from multiplicative into additive notation. We adapt the works of Wojciech A. Trybulec [41, 42, 43] and Artur Korniłowicz [25].

  15. Thermoluminescence in calcium phosphate doped with samarium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium phosphate is a main constitutional substance of human bones and teeth, and it seems worthwhile to investigate the thermoluminescence (TL) characteristics after X-ray irradiation at room temperature. It has been reported that there are two crystal modifications for the corresponding compounds, one rhombohedral and the other having a monoclinic lattice (α- and β-phase, respectively), and α-Ca3(PO4)2 is produced by heating the β-phase. However, it was rather difficult to get the former phase completely 100% from the latter only by heating. With the TL glow curves used for dosimetry it is generally required that a main isolated glow peak should be located at rather high-temperature regions, in order to avoid fading during the keeping of the irradiated materials at room temperature. It is the purpose of the present work to obtain a stable TL dosimeter peak by using β-Ca3(PO4)2, the raw material of which can be obtained directly from any chemical company. According to our preliminary experiments doping various activators into the β-Ca3(PO4)2, it was found that the addition of Sm2O3 into the raw material gives rise to a satisfactory result, and in this paper we describe the case in detail. (Author)

  16. Buffer regulation of calcium puff sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puffs are localized Ca2+ signals that arise in oocytes in response to inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). They are the result of the liberation of Ca2+ from the endoplasmic reticulum through the coordinated opening of IP3 receptor/channels clustered at a functional release site. The presence of buffers that trap Ca2+ provides a mechanism that enriches the spatio–temporal dynamics of cytosolic calcium. The expression of different types of buffers along the cell's life provides a tool with which Ca2+ signals and their responses can be modulated. In this paper we extend the stochastic model of a cluster of IP3R-Ca2+ channels introduced previously to elucidate the effect of buffers on sequences of puffs at the same release site. We obtain analytically the probability laws of the interpuff time and of the number of channels that participate of the puffs. Furthermore, we show that under typical experimental conditions the effect of buffers can be accounted for in terms of a simple inhibiting function. Hence, by exploring different inhibiting functions we are able to study the effect of a variety of buffers on the puff size and interpuff time distributions. We find the somewhat counter-intuitive result that the addition of a fast Ca2+ buffer can increase the average number of channels that participate of a puff. (paper)

  17. Dental Problems in Calcium Metabolism Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Rabbani M.D.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium metabolism disorders can be acute or chronic and chronic disorders can cause different disease states such as dental problems. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study done in Children's Medical Center affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences during 2005-2009, all (93 patients with hypoparathyroidism, nutritional rickets, hypophosphatemic rickets and renal osteodysthrophy from the endocrinology and nephrology departments of the Center were referred to a dentist there for orodental examination. Subsequently, the frequency of dental problems including taurodontism, enamel hypoplasia, dental abscess, dental caries and gingivitis were recorded and analyzed. Results: Nutritional rickets was the most common disorder in this study and delay in dentition was the most frequent dental problem in the patients (61.9%. Most cases of taurdontism and enamel hypoplasia were seen in patients with hypoparathyroidism (33% and 50%, respectively. Dental abscess, dental caries and gingivitis were more common in patients with renal osteodysthrophia (50%, 90% and 20%, respectively. In addition, dental caries and delay in dentition were the most prevalent disorders in this study (69.8% and 49.5%, respectively. Conclusion: According to the above findings, it seems that effective screening, regular periodic examinations, proper diagnosis and timely treatment of dental diseases are the main principles of prevention of orodental problems. Moreover, dentists as well as pediatricians should be aware of the features of the aforesaid disorders which lead to dental problems so that early intervention could prevent subsequent serious and more invasive dental problems.

  18. Calcium Fructoborate for Bone and Cardiovascular Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogoşanu, George Dan; Biţă, Andrei; Bejenaru, Ludovic Everard; Bejenaru, Cornelia; Croitoru, Octavian; Rău, Gabriela; Rogoveanu, Otilia-Constantina; Florescu, Dan Nicolae; Neamţu, Johny; Scorei, Iulia Daria; Scorei, Romulus Ion

    2016-08-01

    Calcium fructoborate (CF), a natural sugar-borate ester found in fresh fruits and vegetables, is a source of soluble boron. CF contains three forms of borate (diester, monoester, and boric acid) and all are biologically active, both at the intracellular (as free boric acid) and extracellular level (as fructose-borate diester and monoester). At the cellular and molecular level, CF is superior to the boric acid/borate, exhibiting a complex "protective" effect against inflammatory response. CF is commercially available in the USA as a "nature-identical" complex, an active compound for dietary supplements. It provides effective and safe support against the discomfort and lack of flexibility associated with osteoarticular conditions (arthritis and joint degeneration), and improves Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis (WOMAC) and McGill indexes. In addition, orally administered CF is effective in ameliorating symptoms of physiological response to stress, including inflammation of the mucous membranes, discomfort associated with osteoarthritis disorders, and bone loss, and also for supporting cardiovascular health. Clinical studies have exhibited the ability of CF to significantly modulate molecular markers associated with inflammatory mechanisms, mainly on the elevated serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP). PMID:26686846

  19. Sparse Additive Models

    OpenAIRE

    Ravikumar, Pradeep; Lafferty, John; Liu, Han; Wasserman, Larry

    2007-01-01

    We present a new class of methods for high-dimensional nonparametric regression and classification called sparse additive models (SpAM). Our methods combine ideas from sparse linear modeling and additive nonparametric regression. We derive an algorithm for fitting the models that is practical and effective even when the number of covariates is larger than the sample size. SpAM is closely related to the COSSO model of Lin and Zhang (2006), but decouples smoothing and sparsity, enabling the use...

  20. Additively Manufactured Propulsion System

    OpenAIRE

    Dushku, Matthew; Mueller, Paul

    2012-01-01

    New high-performance, carbon-fiber reinforced polymer material allows additive manufacturing to produce pressure vessels capable of high pressures (thousands of pounds per square inch). This advancement in turn allows integral hybrid propulsion which is revolutionary for both CubeSats and additively-manufactured spacecraft. Hybrid propulsion offers simplicity as compared to bipropellant liquid propulsion, significantly better safety compared to solid or monopropellant hydrazine propulsion, an...

  1. Synthesis of hollow spherical calcium phosphate nanoparticles using polymeric nanotemplates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poly(methylmethacrylate)-block-poly(methacrylic acid) (PMMA-b-PMAA) copolymer was synthesized by an atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) technique. The block copolymer was employed as a template for the controlled precipitation of calcium phosphate from aqueous solution at different pH values. A Ca2+ ion selective electrode was used to study the interactions between Ca2+ ions and the polymer, which indicated a possible weak interaction between Ca2+ and un-ionized MAA segments at pH∼4.0 in addition to electrostatic interaction between Ca2+ and ionized MAA segments at higher pH. An interesting structure representing that of a superstructure consisting of hybrid nano-filaments was observed by the transmission electron microscope at pH∼4.0. The filaments originated from a core of similar size to primary polymer aggregates, suggesting that cooperative interactions at a local level between dissolving calcium phosphate clusters and disassembling polymer segments are responsible for the secondary growth process. A hollow spherical morphology was obtained at pH∼7.0 and 9.0. Such calcium phosphate/polymer monohybrids with complex morphologies are interesting and might be useful as novel drug delivery carriers, ceramics precursors, reinforcing fillers or biomedical implants

  2. CO2 sequestration using calcium-silicate concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examined the feasibility of sequestering carbon dioxide (CO2) using calcium silicate while developing a strong and durable concrete building product. In addition to offering a solution for a safe, environmentally sound manner to sequester carbon dioxide, the carbonation curing of concrete has the potential to provide a permanent storage for exhaust CO2. The calcium compounds in cement react with CO2 through the early-age carbonation curing, forming geologically stable calcium carbonates. In this study, both type 10 and type 30 Portland cements were used as CO2 binders in concretes with 0, 25, 50, and 75 per cent quartz aggregates and lightweight aggregates. The sequestration took place in a chamber under 0.5 MPa pressure at ambient temperature for a duration of 2 hours. The recovered CO2 from flue gas was simulated using a 100 per cent concentration of CO2. The CO2 uptake was quantified by direct mass gain and by an infrared-based carbon analyzer. The performance of the carbonated concrete was evaluated by its strength. In 2 hours, a CO2 uptake of 9 to 16 per cent by binder mass was achieved. The carbonation curing of concrete was found to provide better strength, stability, permeability and abrasion resistance in concrete products without steel reinforcement. 10 refs., 4 tabs., 10 figs

  3. Effect of calcium on adsorption capacity of powdered activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Gang; Shang, Junteng; Wang, Ying; Li, Yansheng; Gao, Hong

    2013-12-01

    We investigated the effect of calcium ion on the adsorption of humic acid (HA) (as a target pollutant) by powered activated carbon. The HA adsorption isotherms at different pH and kinetics of two different solutions including HA alone and HA doped Ca(2+), were performed. It was showed that the adsorption capacity of powdered activated carbon (PAC) for HA was markedly enhanced when Ca(2+) was doped into HA. Also, HA and Ca(2+) taken as nitrate were tested on the uptake of each other respectively and it was showed that the adsorbed amounts of both of them were significantly promoted when HA and calcium co-existed. Furthermore, the adsorbed amount of HA slightly decreased with the increasing of Ca(2+) concentration, whereas the amount of calcium increased with the increasing of HA concentration, but all above the amounts without addition. Finally, the change of pH before and after adsorption process is studied. In the two different solutions including HA alone and HA doped Ca(2+), pH had a small rise, but the extent of pH of later solution was bigger. PMID:25078809

  4. Calcium: A Nutrient Deserving a Special Issue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan J. Whiting

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Interest in calcium has continued since the 1980s when its role in promoting bone growth and retention was established in clinical trials of children and postmenopausal women. The human nutrition functions now attributed to calcium have expanded beyond bone health to include other conditions such as body weight maintenance. While most efforts have been focused on the findings that dietary intakes are low, there are emerging data on safety concerns of excess amounts. This Special Issue on calcium nutrition, spanning the lifecycle from critically ill neonates through to older adults, has been written by some of the leading researchers in this field.

  5. Sorption of UO22+ on calcium carbonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sorption of uranyl ions on calcium carbonate from aqueous solutions featuring different concentration of calcium nitrate was studied experimentally. It is shown that uranium sorption decreases with calcium concentration growth in solution, irrespective of the ratio of solid phase and solution masses. Specific sorption of uranium per unit of the sorbent surface depends linearly on the ratio of UO22+ and Ca2+ ions activities in solution with proportionality factor (sorption equilibrium constant) 1.71 ± 0.16 mol/m2 at 20 deg C

  6. Calcium signaling in physiology and pathophysiology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He-ping CHENG; Sheng WEI; Li-ping WEI; Alexei VERKHRATSKY

    2006-01-01

    Calcium ions are the most ubiquitous and pluripotent cellular signaling molecules that control a wide variety of cellular processes.The calcium signaling system is represented by a relatively limited number of highly conserved transporters and channels,which execute Ca2+ movements across biological membranes and by many thousands of Ca2+-sensitive effectors.Molecular cascades,responsible for the generation of calcium signals,are tightly controlled by Ca2+ ions themselves and by genetic factors,which tune the expression of different Ca2+-handling molecules according to adaptational requirements.Ca2+ ions determine normal physiological reactions and the development of many pathological processes.

  7. CALCIUM CARBONATE REDUCES IRON ABSORPTION FROM IRON SULFATE, BUT NOT WHEN IRON IS PRESENTED AS AN ORGANIC COMPLEX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. CONCEI�O

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available

    Experimental and epidemiological evidences have demonstrated that calcium inhibits iron absorption; calcium carbonate being one of the most effective calcium sources to reduce iron absorption from dietary origin or from iron sulfate. In the present work, the short-term effect of calcium from calcium carbonate on iron absorption was studied in rats, using different iron compounds (monosodium ferric EDTA, iron-bys-glicine, iron peptide complex with iron sulfate as a control. Eighty (80 animals were divided into groups of 10 animals each with homogeneous weight. After 18h fast, the animals received by gavage 5 mL of a dispersion containing one of the iron compounds (1mg Fe/kg body weight, concomitantly or not with calcium carbonate at a molar ratio of 150:1 (Ca/Fe. Two hours after the administration, the animals were sacrificed and blood was collected for serum iron determination (iron transfer rate from intestinal lumen to blood compartment. Additionally, the intestines were collected for soluble iron determination (available iron. The results demonstrated that calcium ion from calcium carbonate inhibits the iron absorption from iron sulfate, but not from organic iron (di- or trivalent complexes.

  8. Death-Associated Protein Kinase Activity Is Regulated by Coupled Calcium/Calmodulin Binding to Two Distinct Sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Bertrand; Huart, Anne-Sophie; Temmerman, Koen; Vahokoski, Juha; Mertens, Haydyn D T; Komadina, Dana; Hoffmann, Jan-Erik; Yumerefendi, Hayretin; Svergun, Dmitri I; Kursula, Petri; Schultz, Carsten; McCarthy, Andrew A; Hart, Darren J; Wilmanns, Matthias

    2016-06-01

    The regulation of many protein kinases by binding to calcium/calmodulin connects two principal mechanisms in signaling processes: protein phosphorylation and responses to dose- and time-dependent calcium signals. We used the calcium/calmodulin-dependent members of the death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) family to investigate the role of a basic DAPK signature loop near the kinase active site. In DAPK2, this loop comprises a novel dimerization-regulated calcium/calmodulin-binding site, in addition to a well-established calcium/calmodulin site in the C-terminal autoregulatory domain. Unexpectedly, impairment of the basic loop interaction site completely abolishes calcium/calmodulin binding and DAPK2 activity is reduced to a residual level, indicative of coupled binding to the two sites. This contrasts with the generally accepted view that kinase calcium/calmodulin interactions are autonomous of the kinase catalytic domain. Our data establish an intricate model of multi-step kinase activation and expand our understanding of how calcium binding connects with other mechanisms involved in kinase activity regulation. PMID:27133022

  9. Effect of calcium ionophore on unfertilized oocytes after ICSI cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Eftekhar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Fertilization failure is one of the most problems in assisted reproduction technology (ART. Objective: The aim of this study was the evaluation of oocytes activation by addition of calcium ionophore in unfertilized oocytes in ICSI cycles. Materials and Methods: This study was done on 15 ICSI cycles (stimulated with standard long protocol. Mature retrieved oocytes with normal morphology that had no evidence of fertilization 24 hours after ICSI were included in the study. The oocytes with fertilization and unfertilized oocytes with degeneration were excluded from the study. The unfertilized oocytes were washed with GIVF medium and were transferred to GIVF medium that contained 5 μmol of calcium ionophore and were incubated for 10 minutes. Then again oocytes were washed with GIVF medium and consequently were transferred to GIVF medium and were incubated at 37°C in 6% CO2. After 18 hours, the oocytes were examined and activated oocytes were defined with observation of at least one pronucleus or cleaved oocytes. Results: After ovarian stimulation and oocytes retrieval, 175 mature oocytes were obtained and injection of sperm was done for all of them. 114 of 175 oocytes (66% showed evidence of fertilization after 24 hours. A total of 61 oocytes (34% showed no evidence of fertilization and 10 oocytes were degenerated and were excluded from the study. Only 51 unfertilized oocytes with normal morphology were selected and were exposed to calcium ionophore. 37 (72.5% of treated oocytes were fertilized (2PN and 32 (62.7% of them showed evidence of cleavage. 6 (11.8% embryos had good quality. Conclusion: According to our results, oocytes activation with calcium ionophore had an acceptable fertilization rate, however high quality embryos remained low. We propose future studies to evaluate embryo quality.

  10. Injectable hydrogels derived from phosphorylated alginic acid calcium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphorylation of sodium alginate salt (NaAlg) was carried out using H3PO4/P2O5/Et3PO4 followed by acid–base reaction with Ca(OAc)2 to give phosphorylated alginic acid calcium complexes (CaPAlg), as a water dispersible alginic acid derivative. The modified alginate derivatives including phosphorylated alginic acid (PAlg) and CaPAlg were characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for 1H, and 31P nuclei, high resolution inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric analysis. CaPAlg hydrogels were prepared simply by mixing CaPAlg solution (2 w/v%) with NaAlg solution (2 w/v%) in various ratios (2:8, 4:6, 6:4, 8:2) of volume. No additional calcium salts such as CaSO4 or CaCl2 were added externally. The gelation was completed within about 3–40 min indicating a high potential of hydrogel delivery by injection in vivo. Their mechanical properties were tested to be ≤ 6.7 kPa for compressive strength at break and about 8.4 kPa/mm for elastic modulus. SEM analysis of the CaPAlg hydrogels showed highly porous morphology with interconnected pores of width in the range of 100–800 μm. Cell culture results showed that the injectable hydrogels exhibited comparable properties to the pure alginate hydrogel in terms of cytotoxicity and 3D encapsulation of cells for a short time period. The developed injectable hydrogels showed suitable physicochemical and mechanical properties for injection in vivo, and could therefore be beneficial for the field of soft tissue engineering. - Highlights: • Preparation of water-soluble alginic acid complexes with calcium phosphate • Self-assembly of the phosphorylated alginic acid calcium complexes with sodium alginate • Preparation of injectable hydrogels with diverse gelation times within about 3–40 min

  11. Hydration of calcium sulfoaluminate cements - Experimental findings and thermodynamic modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcium sulfoaluminate cements (CSA) are a promising low-CO2 alternative to ordinary Portland cements and are as well of interest concerning their use as binder for waste encapsulation. In this study, the hydration of two CSA cements has been investigated experimentally and by thermodynamic modelling between 1 h and 28 days at w/c ratios of 0.72 and 0.80, respectively. The main hydration product of CSA is ettringite, which precipitates together with amorphous Al(OH)3 until the calcium sulfate is consumed after around 1-2 days of hydration. Afterwards, monosulfate is formed. In the presence of belite, straetlingite occurs as an additional hydration product. The pore solution analysis reveals that straetlingite can bind a part of the potassium ions, which are released by the clinker minerals. The microstructure of both cements is quite dense even after 16 h of hydration, with not much pore space available at a sample age of 28 days. The pore solution of both cements is dominated during the first hours of hydration by potassium, sodium, calcium, aluminium and sulfate; the pH is around 10-11. When the calcium sulfate is depleted, the sulfate concentration drops by a factor of 10. This increases pH to around 12.5-12.8. Based on the experimental data, a thermodynamic hydration model for CSA cements based on cement composition, hydration kinetics of clinker phases and calculations of thermodynamic equilibria by geochemical speciation has been established. The modelled phase development with ongoing hydration agrees well with the experimental findings.

  12. Annexins V and VI: major calcium-dependent atrial secretory granule-binding proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubell, A F; Bester, A J; Thibault, G

    1991-11-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide is stored by atrial myocytes in secretory granules, known as atrial specific granules, and is released from these granules by exocytosis. We have isolated a group of atrial proteins by affinity chromatography that bind to atrial specific granules in a calcium-dependent manner. The two major proteins isolated (32.5 kd and 67 kd) are calcium-binding proteins and have been identified as annexins V and VI by immunoblotting with specific antisera. The calcium dependence of their binding to atrial specific granules has been characterized in vitro and indicates that this interaction takes place at micromolar levels of calcium. In addition, the group of proteins isolated includes another calcium-binding protein of 20 kd, as well as GTP-binding proteins of 22 to 26 kd. Membrane interactions during exocytosis are presumably mediated by the interaction of specific proteins with the granule membrane. The properties of the proteins described here, and their ability to bind to atrial specific granules in a calcium-dependent manner, make them likely candidates in the search for regulatory proteins mediating atrial natriuretic peptide secretion. PMID:1834552

  13. 5-Hydroxytryptamino-induced calcium sparks in cultured rat stomach fundus smooth muscle cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张小玲; 阎宏涛; 闫炀

    2003-01-01

    With a new fluorescence probe of Ca2+, STDIn-AM, 5-hydroxytryptamino (5-HT)-induced spontaneous calcium release events (calcium sparks) in cultured rat stomach fundus smooth muscle cells (SFSMC) are investigated by laser scanning confocal microscope. The mechanisms of initiation of Ca2+ sparks, propagating Ca2+ waves and their relation to E-C coupling are discussed. After the extracellular [Ca2+] is increased to 10 mmol/L, addition of 5-HT causes hot spots throughout the cytoplasm, which is brighter near the plasmalemma. The amplitude of the event is at least two times greater than the standard deviation of fluorescence intensity fluctuations measured in the neighboring region and the duration of the Ca2+ signal is over 100 ms. The results suggest that 5-HT acts by the way of 5-HT2 receptors on SFSMC, then through 5-HT2 receptors couples IP3/Ca2+ and DG/PKC double signal transduction pathways to cause Ca2+ release from intracellular Ca2+ stores and followed Ca2+ influx possibly through calcium release-activated calcium influx. The acceptor of activated 5-HT2 can also cause membrane depolarization, which then stimulates the L-type Ca2+ channels leading to Ca2+ influx. Thenthe local Ca2+ entry mentioned above activates ryanodine-sensitive Ca2+ releasechannels (RyR) on sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) to cause local Ca2+ release events (Ca2+ sparks) through calcium-induced calcium release (CICR).

  14. Fouling control mechanisms of demineralized water backwash: Reduction of charge screening and calcium bridging effects

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Sheng

    2011-12-01

    This paper investigates the impact of the ionic environment on the charge of colloidal natural organic matter (NOM) and ultrafiltration (UF) membranes (charge screening effect) and the calcium adsorption/bridging on new and fouled membranes (calcium bridging effect) by measuring the zeta potentials of membranes and colloidal NOM. Fouling experiments were conducted with natural water to determine whether the reduction of the charge screening effect and/or calcium bridging effect by backwashing with demineralized water can explain the observed reduction in fouling. Results show that the charge of both membranes and NOM, as measured by the zeta potential, became more negative at a lower pH and a lower concentration of electrolytes, in particular, divalent electrolytes. In addition, calcium also adsorbed onto the membranes, and consequently bridged colloidal NOM and membranes via binding with functional groups. The charge screening effect could be eliminated by flushing NOM and membranes with demineralized water, since a cation-free environment was established. However, only a limited amount of the calcium bridging connection was removed with demineralized water backwashes, so the calcium bridging effect mostly could not be eliminated. As demineralized water backwash was found to be effective in fouling control, it can be concluded that the reduction of the charge screening is the dominant mechanism for this. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Calcium phosphate granulation in anaerobic treatment of black water: a new approach to phosphorus recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervahauta, Taina; van der Weijden, Renata D; Flemming, Roberta L; Hernández Leal, Lucía; Zeeman, Grietje; Buisman, Cees J N

    2014-01-01

    Recovery of phosphorus from wastewater as calcium phosphate could diminish the need for mining of scarce phosphate rock resources. This study introduces a novel approach to phosphorus recovery by precipitation of calcium phosphate granules in anaerobic treatment of black water. The granules formed in the Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) reactor at lab- and demonstration-scale were analyzed for chemical composition and mineralogy by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES), Electron microprobe (EMP), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and micro X-ray Diffraction (XRD). The granules had a diameter of 1-2 mm, organic content of 33 wt%, and phosphorus content of 11-13 wt%. Three calcium phosphate phases were identified in the granules: hydroxyapatite, calcium phosphate hydrate and carbonated hydroxyapatite. Without any addition of chemicals, 7 gP/person/year can be recovered with the calcium phosphate granules, representing 2% of the incoming phosphorus in the UASB reactor. As the heavy metal content was lower compared to other phosphorus recovery products, phosphate rock and phosphorus fertilizer, the calcium phosphate granules could be considered as a new phosphorus product. PMID:24183558

  16. Modulation of Intracellular Calcium Levels by Calcium Lactate Affects Colon Cancer Cell Motility through Calcium-Dependent Calpain

    OpenAIRE

    Pasupathi Sundaramoorthy; Jae Jun Sim; Yeong-Su Jang; Siddhartha Kumar Mishra; Keun-Yeong Jeong; Poonam Mander; Oh Byung Chul; Won-Sik Shim; Seung Hyun Oh; Ky-Youb Nam; Hwan Mook Kim

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cell motility is a key phenomenon regulating invasion and metastasis. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays a major role in cellular adhesion and metastasis of various cancers. The relationship between dietary supplementation of calcium and colon cancer has been extensively investigated. However, the effect of calcium (Ca2+) supplementation on calpain-FAK-motility is not clearly understood. We sought to identify the mechanism of FAK cleavage through Ca2+ bound lactate (CaLa), its downstrea...

  17. Additive Manufacturing Infrared Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddy, Darrell

    2014-01-01

    Additive manufacturing is a rapid prototyping technology that allows parts to be built in a series of thin layers from plastic, ceramics, and metallics. Metallic additive manufacturing is an emerging form of rapid prototyping that allows complex structures to be built using various metallic powders. Significant time and cost savings have also been observed using the metallic additive manufacturing compared with traditional techniques. Development of the metallic additive manufacturing technology has advanced significantly over the last decade, although many of the techniques to inspect parts made from these processes have not advanced significantly or have limitations. Several external geometry inspection techniques exist such as Coordinate Measurement Machines (CMM), Laser Scanners, Structured Light Scanning Systems, or even traditional calipers and gages. All of the aforementioned techniques are limited to external geometry and contours or must use a contact probe to inspect limited internal dimensions. This presentation will document the development of a process for real-time dimensional inspection technique and digital quality record of the additive manufacturing process using Infrared camera imaging and processing techniques.

  18. Structures of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases reveal mechanism of activation by calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernimont, Amy K; Artz, Jennifer D.; Jr, Patrick Finerty; Lin, Yu-Hui; Amani, Mehrnaz; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Senisterra, Guillermo; Vedadi, Masoud; Tempel, Wolfram; Mackenzie, Farrell; Chau, Irene; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L. David; Hui, Raymond (Toronto); (WU-MED)

    2010-09-21

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have pivotal roles in the calcium-signaling pathway in plants, ciliates and apicomplexan parasites and comprise a calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK)-like kinase domain regulated by a calcium-binding domain in the C terminus. To understand this intramolecular mechanism of activation, we solved the structures of the autoinhibited (apo) and activated (calcium-bound) conformations of CDPKs from the apicomplexan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. In the apo form, the C-terminal CDPK activation domain (CAD) resembles a calmodulin protein with an unexpected long helix in the N terminus that inhibits the kinase domain in the same manner as CaMKII. Calcium binding triggers the reorganization of the CAD into a highly intricate fold, leading to its relocation around the base of the kinase domain to a site remote from the substrate binding site. This large conformational change constitutes a distinct mechanism in calcium signal-transduction pathways.

  19. In vitro osteoblast-like and endothelial cells' response to calcium silicate/calcium phosphate cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao Qinghui; Qian Jiangchao [State Key Laboratory of Bioreactor Engineering, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China); Zhou Huanjun; Yuan Yuan; Mao Yuhao; Liu Changsheng, E-mail: jiangchaoqian@ecust.edu.c, E-mail: csliu@sh163.ne [Engineering Research Center for Biomedical Materials of Ministry of Education, East China University of Science and Technology, Shanghai 200237 (China)

    2010-06-01

    This study aims to investigate the interaction between calcium silicate/calcium phosphate cement (CS/CPC) and osteogenesis, in particular the in vitro osteoblast-like and endothelial cells' response to CS/CPC. The effect of CS/CPC on cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation of murine osteoblast-like cell MC3T3-E1, as well as the influence on the cell attachment and proliferation of human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC), was studied in detail. Our results indicated that CS/CPC exhibited excellent biocompatibility to the osteoblast-like cells. Moreover, the morphology and cytoskeleton organization of MC3T3-E1 cultured on the CS/CPC disks suggested that CS/CPC induced better cell adhesion and cell spreading. Simultaneously, cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of MC3T3-E1 were significantly improved after 3 and 7 days of culture on CS/CPC disks in comparison with CPC disks. Additionally, on CS/CPC disks, HUVEC attached well on day 1 and cell proliferation was also greatly enhanced by day 7. Collectively, these results suggest that the introduction of calcium silicate may improve the cell response involved in the osteogenesis and thus may be beneficial to further modify CPC as a better bone repairing material.

  20. From additivity to synergism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ritz, Christian; Streibig, Jens Carl

    2014-01-01

    Interest in synergistic or antagonistic effects through mixture experiments has grown immensely over the past two decades, not the least within in pharmacology and toxicology. Several definitions of reference models exist; one commonly used reference model is concentration or dose addition, which...... assumes compounds, when administrated simultaneously, do not interfere with each other at the site of action. We focus on statistical modelling that allows evaluation of dose addition. We will describe several statistical approaches that are suitable for analysis mixture data where synergistic or...

  1. Calcium and caffeine interaction in increased calcium balance in ovariectomized rats

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Tavares da Silva; Neuza Maria Brunoro Costa; Frederico Souzalima Caldoncelli Franco; Antônio José Natali

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the effects of caffeine intake associated with inadequate or adequate calcium intake in laparotomized or ovariectomized rats by means of the calcium balance. Forty adults Wistar rats were ovariectomized or laparotomized. METHODS: The animals (n=40) were randomly placed in eight groups receiving the AIN-93 diet with 100% or 50% of the recommended calcium intake with or without added caffeine (6mg/kg/day). The animals were kept in individuals metabolic cages a...

  2. Technology obtaining of nitrogen fertilizer from the calcium is containing waste of production of calcium saltpetre

    OpenAIRE

    Власян, Світлана Варужанівна; Шестозуб, Анатолій Борисович; Волошин, Микола Дмитрович

    2013-01-01

    The new technology of obtaining nitrogen fertilizer from calcium-containing sludge of calcium saltpeter production is considered in the paper. The main objective of the research is the development of processing technology of sludge of calcium saltpeter production into alkaline nitrogen fertilizer, analysis of the composition of initial material and finished product, testing of fertilizer by means of vegeta­tive studies and determination of expenditure of drying agent that is exhaust gases of ...

  3. In vivo Calcium Imaging of Evoked Calcium Waves in the Embryonic Cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Yuryev, Mikhail; Pellegrino, Christophe; Jokinen, Ville; Andriichuk, Liliia; Khirug, Stanislav; Khiroug, Leonard; Rivera, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The dynamics of intracellular calcium fluxes are instrumental in the proliferation, differentiation, and migration of neuronal cells. Knowledge thus far of the relationship between these calcium changes and physiological processes in the developing brain has derived principally from ex vivo and in vitro experiments. Here, we present a new method to image intracellular calcium flux in the cerebral cortex of live rodent embryos, whilst attached to the dam through the umbilical cord. Using this ...

  4. Testing Carbon Sequestration in Soil Through the Addition of Gypsum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Y.; Tokunaga, T. K.; Wan, J.; Conrad, M. E.; Salve, R.

    2011-12-01

    In order to help control adverse effects of increased atmospheric concentrations of CO2, effective methods for fixing carbon need to be developed. Given the large C inventories and fluxes associated with soils, it is important to identify cost- and energy-effective means for increasing long-term C retention within soil profiles. This study investigates the alternative strategy of increasing carbon retention in soils through accelerating calcite (CaCO3) precipitation and promoting soil organic carbon (SOC) complexation on mineral surfaces. With the addition of calcium ion to soils with pH > 8 often found in arid and semi-arid regions, the slow process of calcite precipitation may be accelerated. Calcium also promotes SOC binding onto mineral surfaces, diminishing leaching of SOC. Addition of flue gas desulfurization gypsum (FGDG) represents an inexpensive source of calcium to natural, slightly alkaline soil surfaces which might promote the fixation of CO2 as calcite and decrease leaching losses of organic carbon. To test this hypothesis, we prepared laboratory soil columns (7.5 cm in diameter and 85 cm in height) with and without calcium sulfate-amended layers. The distribution of carbon in the columns was monitored in gaseous, aqueous and solid phases over a period of several months to test the effect of adding calcium ions. In some columns, a relatively high fraction of 13C-labeled bicarbonate was injected to differentiate the newly precipitated calcite from the initial calcite present in the soil. The potential for more distinct calcite precipitation within the soil root zone will be investigated in vegetated soil columns. Through obtaining C mass balances in soil profiles, this study is quantifying the efficiency of gypsum amendments for mitigating C losses to the atmosphere.

  5. Calcium and Cancer Prevention: Strengths and Limits of the Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... calcium carbonate has about 40 percent elemental calcium, meaning that 500 mg of calcium carbonate actually contains ... in this trial also contained vitamin D (400 international units [ IU ]). During ... and calcium in relation to prostate cancer risk among more than 142, ...

  6. Effects of Adding Chymosin to Milk on Calcium Homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ulla Kristine; Jensen, Lars Thorbjørn; Mosekilde, Leif;

    2014-01-01

    Calcium intake and absorption is important for bone health. In a randomized double-blind cross-over trial, we investigated effects of adding chymosin to milk on the intestinal calcium absorption as measured by renal calcium excretion and indices of calcium homeostasis. The primary outcome of the...

  7. Assessment of calcium content of lumbarspine by computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assessment of calcium content of lumbar spine by computed tomography was performed on 76 patients without bone disease and 15 patients with chronic renal failure. Calcium content of medulla and cortex was calculated by CT number. Relationship between calcium content of medulla, cortex and age was discussed. The necessity of midline scan of lumbar spine to obtain the accurate calcium was also stressed. (author)

  8. Radiolead (210)Pb and (210)Po/(210)Pb activity ratios in calcium supplements and the assessment of their possible dose to consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumińska-Parulska, Dagmara I

    2016-08-23

    This paper presents the results of pioneer study of the most popular calcium supplements as a potential additional source of radiolead (210)Pb in human diet. The analyzed calcium pharmaceutics contained organic or inorganic calcium compounds; some came from natural sources as mussels' shells, fish extracts, or sedimentary rocks. The idea was to investigate the naturally occurring (210)Pb activity in different calcium supplements and calculate the annual effective radiation dose from radiolead (210)Pb decay in consumed calcium supplement. The results showed (210)Pb concentrations in natural origin calcium supplements (especially sedimentary rocks) were significantly higher. The highest (210)Pb activity concentrations were determined in mineral tablets made from dolomite - 2.97 ± 0.18 mBq g(-1), while the lowest was observed in organic calcium compounds - both calcium lactate - 0.08 ± 0.01 and 0.13 ± 0.01 mBq g(-1). The highest annual radiation dose from (210)Pb taken with 1 tablet of calcium supplement per day was calculated for soluble calcium lactate sample - 1.19 ± 0.03 µSv year(-1), while the highest annual radiation dose from (210)Pb taken daily with 1 g of pure Ca for dolomite - 5.57 ± 0.34 µSv year(-1). PMID:27253716

  9. Effect of calcium on adsorptive removal of As(III) and As(V) by iron oxide-based adsorbents

    KAUST Repository

    Uwamariya, V.

    2014-06-25

    The effects of calcium on the equilibrium adsorption capacity of As(III) and As(V) onto iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS) and granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) were investigated through batch experiments, rapid small-scale column tests (RSSCT) and kinetics modelling. Batch experiments showed that at calcium concentrations≤20 mg/L, high As(III) and As(V) removal efficiencies by IOCS and GFH are achieved at pH 6. An increase of the calcium concentration to 40 and 80 mg/L reversed this trend, giving higher removal efficiencies at higher pH (8). The adsorption capacities of IOCS and GFH at an equilibrium arsenic concentration of 10 g/L were found to be between 2.0 and 3.1 mg/g for synthetic water without calcium and between 2.8 and 5.3 mg/g when 80 mg/L of calcium was present at the studied pH values. After 10 hours of filter run in RSSCT, approximately 1000 empty bed volumes, the ratios of C/Co for As(V) were 26% and 18% for calcium-free model water; and only 1% and 0.2% after addition of 80 mg/L of Ca for filter columns with IOCS and GFH, respectively. The adsorption of As(III) and As(V) onto GFH follows a second-order reaction, with and without addition of calcium. The adsorption of As(III) and As(V) onto IOCS follows a first-order reaction without calcium addition, and moves to the second-reaction-order kinetics when calcium is added. Based on the intraparticle diffusion model, the main controlling mechanism for As(III) adsorption is intraparticle diffusion, while surface diffusion contributes greatly to the adsorption of As(V).

  10. Effect of casein phosphopeptide - amorphous calcium phosphate containing chewing gum on salivary concentration of calcium and phosphorus: An in-vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B P Santhosh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Caries clinical trials of sugar-free chewing gum have shown that the gum is noncariogenic and in fact has anticariogenic effect through the stimulation of saliva. Sugar-free gums, therefore, may be an excellent delivery vehicle for safe and effective additive, capable of promoting enamel remineralization. Casein phosphopeptide - amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP nanocomplexes incorporated into sugar-free chewing gum have shown to remineralize enamel subsurface lesions in situ. So this study was conducted to evaluate the effect of CPP-ACP containing sugar-free chewing gum on salivary concentration of calcium and phosphorous. Materials and Methods : Unstimulated saliva from each 24 selected subjects was collected. Then each subject was given two pellets of chewing gum containing CPP-ACP and asked to chew for a period of 20 min, after which saliva samples were collected from each individual. Once all the samples were collected they were assessed for calcium and phosphorous concentration using affiliated reagent kits and photometer. Statistical Analysis Used: Data obtained were analyzed using student′s paired t test. Results: Significant difference was found in the calcium and phosphorus concentration of saliva before and after chewing CPP-ACP containing chewing gum. Conclusions: Chewing of CPP-ACP containing chewing gum showed a significant increase in the salivary concentration of calcium for a prolonged period of time hence it may help in the remineralization of tooth surfaces.

  11. Astrocyte calcium signaling: the third wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazargani, Narges; Attwell, David

    2016-01-27

    The discovery that transient elevations of calcium concentration occur in astrocytes, and release 'gliotransmitters' which act on neurons and vascular smooth muscle, led to the idea that astrocytes are powerful regulators of neuronal spiking, synaptic plasticity and brain blood flow. These findings were challenged by a second wave of reports that astrocyte calcium transients did not mediate functions attributed to gliotransmitters and were too slow to generate blood flow increases. Remarkably, the tide has now turned again: the most important calcium transients occur in fine astrocyte processes not resolved in earlier studies, and new mechanisms have been discovered by which astrocyte [Ca(2+)]i is raised and exerts its effects. Here we review how this third wave of discoveries has changed our understanding of astrocyte calcium signaling and its consequences for neuronal function. PMID:26814587

  12. Obtainment of calcium carbonate from mussels shell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mussels and oyster shell are discarded at environment, and this accumulation is causing negative consequences to ecosystem. Calcium carbonate is main constituent of the shell chemical composition. Aiming to reduce environmental aggression and generate income to shellfish producer, there was the possibility of using these shells as an alternative to commercial calcium carbonate. For this physics, chemicals and thermal properties were evaluated, using X-ray fluorescence, thermogravimetric analysis, size distribution, abrasiveness and scanning electronic microscopy. The results indicate that mussels shells have an initial degradation temperature higher than commercial calcium carbonate e same lost weight behavior and 95% of shell chemical composition is calcium carbonate. The sample size distribution was influenced by grinding condition and time as well as its abrasiveness. (author)

  13. Modeling and analysis of calcium bromide hydrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lottes, Steven A.; Lyczkowski, Robert W.; Panchal, Chandrakant B.; Doctor, Richard D. [Energy Systems Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2009-05-15

    The main focus of this paper is the modeling, simulation, and analysis of the calcium bromide hydrolysis reactor stage in the calcium-bromine thermochemical water-splitting cycle for nuclear hydrogen production. One reactor concept is to use a spray of calcium bromide into steam, in which the heat of fusion supplies the heat of reaction. Droplet models were built up in a series of steps incorporating various physical phenomena, including droplet flow, heat transfer, phase change, and reaction, separately. Given the large heat reservoir contained in a pool of molten calcium bromide that allows bubbles to rise easily, using a bubble column reactor for the hydrolysis appears to be a feasible and promising alternative to the spray reactor concept. The two limiting cases of bubble geometry, spherical and spherical-cap, are considered in the modeling. Results for both droplet and bubble modeling with COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS trademark are presented, with recommendations for the path forward. (author)

  14. Discrete stochastic modeling of calcium channel dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Baer, M E; Levine, H; Tsimring, L S; Baer, Markus; Falcke, Martin; Levine, Herbert; Tsimring, Lev S.

    1999-01-01

    We propose a simple discrete stochastic model for calcium dynamics in living cells. Specifically, the calcium concentration distribution is assumed to give rise to a set of probabilities for the opening/closing of channels which release calcium thereby changing those probabilities. We study this model in one dimension, analytically in the mean-field limit of large number of channels per site N, and numerically for small N. As the number of channels per site is increased, the transition from a non-propagating region of activity to a propagating one changes in nature from one described by directed percolation to that of deterministic depinning in a spatially discrete system. Also, for a small number of channels a propagating calcium wave can leave behind a novel fluctuation-driven state, in a parameter range where the limiting deterministic model exhibits only single pulse propagation.

  15. Discrete Stochastic Modeling of Calcium Channel Dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose a discrete stochastic model for calcium dynamics in living cells. A set of probabilities for the opening/closing of calcium channels is assumed to depend on the calcium concentration. We study this model in one dimension, analytically in the limit of a large number of channels per site N , and numerically for small N . As the number of channels per site is increased, the transition from a nonpropagating region of activity to a propagating one changes from one described by directed percolation to that of deterministic depinning in a spatially discrete system. Also, for a small number of channels a propagating calcium wave can leave behind a novel fluctuation-driven state. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society

  16. Synthesis of calcium hydroxyapatite from calcium carbonate and different orthophosphate sources: A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Calcium hydroxyapatite was synthesized from CaCO3 and four orthophosphates. ► Only H3PO4 led to the complete precipitation of orthophosphate species. ► H3PO4 was also the most efficient for calcium dissolution. ► Reaction pathway was dissolution-precipitation accompanied by agglomeration step. - Abstract: The synthesis of calcium hydroxyapatite (Ca-HA) starting from calcium carbonate and different orthophosphate sources, including orthophosphoric acid, potassium, sodium and ammonium dihydrogen orthophosphates, was investigated under ambient conditions. The reaction started with calcium carbonate dissolution in an acid medium, followed by rapid precipitation of calcium cations with orthophosphate species to form calcium phosphate based particles which were in the size range of 0.4–1 μm. These particles then agglomerated into much larger ones, up to 350 μm in diameter (aggregates). These aggregates possessed an unstable porous structure which was responsible for the porosity of the final products. The highest specific surface area and pore volume were obtained with potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate. On the other hand, orthophosphoric acid led to the highest dissolution of calcium carbonate and the complete precipitation of orthophosphate species. Under ambient conditions, calcium phosphate based solid products of low crystallinity were formed. Different intermediates were identified and a reaction pathway proposed.

  17. Characterization of Calcium Compounds in Opuntia ficus indica as a Source of Calcium for Human Diet

    OpenAIRE

    Isela Rojas-Molina; Elsa Gutiérrez-Cortez; Moustapha Bah; Alejandra Rojas-Molina; César Ibarra-Alvarado; Eric Rivera-Muñoz; Alicia del Real; Ma. de los Angeles Aguilera-Barreiro

    2015-01-01

    Analyses of calcium compounds in cladodes, soluble dietary fiber (SDF), and insoluble dietary fiber (IDF) of Opuntia ficus indica are reported. The characterization of calcium compounds was performed by using Scanning Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive Spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, and infrared spectroscopy. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy and titrimetric methods were used for quantification of total calcium and calcium compounds. Whewellite (CaC2O4·H2O), weddellite (CaC2O4·(H2O)2.375),...

  18. Calcium entry into guinea-pig jejunum cells after calcium stores depletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacaud, P; Bolton, T B

    1991-01-01

    1) Membrane currents were recorded under voltage-clamp from cells using patch-clamp pipettes. Cells were dialysed with potassium-free caesium solution to block any Ca-activated K-current. The pipette solution contained Indo-1 and the ratio of the emissions from this dye at 480 and 405 nm was used to estimate the free calcium concentration in the cell. 2) Carbachol applied to the cell evoked at -50 mV an initial increase in the intracellular calcium concentration (Cai) followed by a smaller sustained rise (plateau); the changes in inward cationic current (ICarb) closely followed changes in Cai. Calcium entry blockers did not affect these responses. 3) The initial peak in Cai produced by carbachol was due to calcium store release: it was present in calcium-free solution, and unchanged at +50 mV, but it was abolished by prior application of caffeine (10 mM) to the cell or by inclusion of heparin (which blocks D-myoinositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptors) in the pipette. 4) The sustained rise (plateau) in Cai produced by carbachol was due to the entry of calcium into the cell down its electrochemical gradient as it was affected by changing the cell membrane potential or the calcium concentration in the bathing solution. As the sustained rise in Cai produced by caffeine had similar properties it was suggested that depletion of calcium stores can evoke an increased calcium entry into the cell through some pathway. PMID:1665265

  19. Effect of Calcium on the Vanadium Extraction from High Calcium Type Stone Coal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BAO Shenxu; LIANG Liang; ZHANG Yimin; HAN Shihua; HU Yangjia

    2015-01-01

    The high calcium type stone coal from Hubei province was leached by water and dilute acid separately after being roasted with different dosage of NaCl. The water leaching rate of vanadium (WLRV) was low and only 26.8%of vanadium can be leached by water when 4%NaCl was added, but the acid leaching rate of vanadium (ALRV) was relatively high. Calcium in the high calcium type stone coal is greatly superfluous relative to vanadium, hence, the calcium reacts with vanadium to form Ca(VO3)2, Ca2V2O7 and Ca3(VO4)2 orderly during the stone coal roasting process and high temperature is beneficial to the reactions between calcium and vanadium, which was validated by simulated reactions between pure calcium carbonate and vanadium pentoxide. These calcium vanadates are all water insoluble but acid soluble and this causes the low WLRV and relatively high ALRV. After calcium removal by HCl, the WLRV is highly enhanced and reaches about 50%when only 2%NaCl was added. If the HCl content is too high, the stone coal is easily sintered and the formed glass structure can enwrap vanadium, which leads the WLRV to decline. Single water leaching process is not appropriate to extract vanadium from high calcium type stone coal.

  20. Effect of albumin and free calcium concentrations on calcium binding in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Besarab, A; DeGuzman, A; Swanson, J W

    1981-01-01

    In vivo equilibrium dialysis studies were performed to define further the characteristics of calcium binding to bovine albumin. The concentration range for albumin (1 to 9 g/dl) as well as ultrafilterable calcium (0.5 to 2.5 mM) studied encompassed those that might be ordinarily encountered in most clinical situations. Major differences in the regressions of total calcium on ultrafilterable calcium occurred at albumin concentrations of 1, 2, and 9 g/dl but only small differences at albumin co...

  1. Study of calcium chloride and calcium nitrate purification on inorganic sorbents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purification of calcium chloride and calcium nitrate from iron, chromium, manganese and cobalt impurities by sorption on some inorganic collectors are considered in this article. Study was conducted by means of radioactive-tracer technique at concurrent use of several γ-radioactive isotopes. As a collectors were used hydrated aluminium and zirconium oxides. Dependence of effectiveness of precipitation by collectors on ph-value of medium, quantity of collector, nature and concentration of components is studied. Optimal parameters of purification of calcium chloride and calcium nitrate are defined.

  2. Calcium citrate without aluminum antacids does not cause aluminum retention in patients with functioning kidneys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhaee, K.; Wabner, C. L.; Zerwekh, J. E.; Copley, J. B.; Pak, L.; Poindexter, J. R.; Pak, C. Y.

    1993-01-01

    It has been suggested that calcium citrate might enhance aluminum absorption from food, posing a threat of aluminum toxicity even in patients with normal renal function. We therefore measured serum and urinary aluminum before and following calcium citrate therapy in patients with moderate renal failure and in normal subjects maintained on constant metabolic diets with known aluminum content (967-1034 mumol/day, or 26.1-27.9 mg/day, in patients and either 834 or 1579 mumol/day, or 22.5 and 42.6 mg/day, in normal subjects). Seven patients with moderate renal failure (endogenous creatinine clearance of 43 ml/min) took 50 mmol (2 g) calcium/day as effervescent calcium citrate with meals for 17 days. Eight normal women received 25 mmol (1 g) calcium/day as tricalcium dicitrate tablets with meals for 7 days. In patients with moderate renal failure, serum and urinary aluminum were normal before treatment at 489 +/- 293 SD nmol/l (13.2 +/- 7.9 micrograms/l) and 767 +/- 497 nmol/day (20.7 +/- 13.4 micrograms/day), respectively. They remained within normal limits and did not change significantly during calcium citrate treatment (400 +/- 148 nmol/l and 600 +/- 441 nmol/day, respectively). Similarly, no significant change in serum and urinary aluminum was detected in normal women during calcium citrate administration (271 +/- 59 vs 293 +/- 85 nmol/l and 515 +/- 138 vs 615 +/- 170 nmol/day, respectively). In addition, skeletal bone aluminum content did not change significantly in 14 osteoporotic patients (endogenous creatinine clearance of 68.5 ml/min) treated for 24 months with calcium citrate, 10 mmol calcium twice/day separately from meals (29.3 +/- 13.9 ng/mg ash bone to 27.9 +/0- 10.4, P = 0.727). In them, histomorphometric examination did not show any evidence of mineralization defect. Thus, calcium citrate given alone without aluminum-containing drugs does not pose a risk of aluminum toxicity in subjects with normal or functioning kidneys, when it is administered on an

  3. Stroma cell-derived factor-1α signaling enhances calcium transients and beating frequency in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ielham Hadad

    Full Text Available Stroma cell-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α is a cardioprotective chemokine, acting through its G-protein coupled receptor CXCR4. In experimental acute myocardial infarction, administration of SDF-1α induces an early improvement of systolic function which is difficult to explain solely by an anti-apoptotic and angiogenic effect. We wondered whether SDF-1α signaling might have direct effects on calcium transients and beating frequency.Primary rat neonatal cardiomyocytes were culture-expanded and characterized by immunofluorescence staining. Calcium sparks were studied by fluorescence microscopy after calcium loading with the Fluo-4 acetoxymethyl ester sensor. The cardiomyocyte enriched cellular suspension expressed troponin I and CXCR4 but was vimentin negative. Addition of SDF-1α in the medium increased cytoplasmic calcium release. The calcium response was completely abolished by using a neutralizing anti-CXCR4 antibody and partially suppressed and delayed by preincubation with an inositol triphosphate receptor (IP3R blocker, but not with a ryanodine receptor (RyR antagonist. Calcium fluxes induced by caffeine, a RyR agonist, were decreased by an IP3R blocker. Treatment with forskolin or SDF-1α increased cardiomyocyte beating frequency and their effects were additive. In vivo, treatment with SDF-1α increased left ventricular dP/dtmax.These results suggest that in rat neonatal cardiomyocytes, the SDF-1α/CXCR4 signaling increases calcium transients in an IP3-gated fashion leading to a positive chronotropic and inotropic effect.

  4. Sloppy Addition and Multiplication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nannarelli, Alberto

    Sometimes reducing the precision of a numerical processor, by introducing errors, can lead to significant performance (delay, area and power dissipation) improvements without compromising the overall quality of the processing. In this work, we show how to perform the two basic operations, addition...

  5. 21 CFR 201.70 - Calcium labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... product is more than 3.2 grams: “Ask a doctor before use if you have 1 kidney stones a calcium-restricted diet”. The warnings in §§ 201.64(c), 201.70(c), 201.71(c), and 201.72(c) may be combined, if applicable, provided the ingredients are listed in alphabetical order, e.g., a calcium or sodium restricted diet. 1...

  6. Modulation of intestinal absorption of calcium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absorption of ingested calcium (2ml of a 10mM CaCl2 solution + 45Ca) by the adult rat was shown to be facilitated by the simultaneous ingestion of an active carbohydrate, L-arabinose. As the carbohydrate concentration is increased from 10 to 200mM, the absorption of calcium is maximised at a level corresponding to about twice the control absorption level. A similar doubling of calcium absorption is obtained when a 100mM concentration of any one of a number of other carbohydrates is ingested simultaneously with a 10mM CaCl2 solution. Conversely, the simultaneous ingestion of increasing doses (10 to 100mM) of phosphate (NaH2PO4) with a 10mM CaCl2 solution results in decreased 45Ca absorption and retention by the adult rat. The maximum inhibition of calcium absorption by phosphate is independent of the concentration of the ingested calcium solution (from 5 to 50mM CaCl2). The simultaneous ingestion of CaCl2 (10mM) with lactose and sodium phosphate (50 and 10mM respectively) shows that the activation effect of lactose upon 45Ca absorption may be partly dissimulated by the presence of phosphate. These various observations indicate that, within a large concentration range (2 to 50mM CaCl2) calcium absorption appears to be a precisely modulated diffusion process. Calcium absorption varies (between minimum and maximum levels) as a function of the state of saturation by the activators (carbohydrates) and inhibitors (phosphate) of the calcium transport system

  7. Oral calcium supplementation in peripartum dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oetzel, Garrett R

    2013-07-01

    Hypocalcemia in dairy cattle around parturition can be manifest as clinical milk fever or subclinical hypocalcemia. Subclinical hypocalcemia has the greatest economic effect because it affects a much higher proportion of cows. Oral calcium supplements are used to mitigate the effects of both forms of hypocalcemia. Oral calcium supplements are appropriate for cows displaying early clinical signs of hypocalcemia and prophylactically to lessen the negative impacts of hypocalcemia. PMID:23809900

  8. DETERMINATION OF CALCIUM CONTENT IN DIETARY SUPPLEMENTS

    OpenAIRE

    Marjanović-Balaban, Željka R.; Antunović, Vesna R.; Jelić, Dijana R.; Živković, Tanja M.

    2015-01-01

    Calcium is a macro element that is very important for the human body: its content and circulation in the body is large, it serves as the electrolyte, it has a building role and participates in the process of metabolism. The European Union, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the Ministry of Food and Drug (Food and Drug Administration, FDA) gave the RDA (Recommended Dietary Allowances,) for this macro element. The absorption and bioavailability of the calcium may vary depending on a number...

  9. Rickets induced by calcium or phosphate depletion.

    OpenAIRE

    Abugassa, S.; Svensson, O.

    1990-01-01

    We studied the effects of calciopenia and phosphopenia on longitudinal growth, skeletal mineralization, and development of rickets in young Sprague-Dawley rats. At an age of 21 days, two experimental groups were given diets containing 0.02% calcium or 0.02% phosphorus; otherwise the diets were nutritionally adequate. After 7, 14, and 21 days, five animals from each group were randomly chosen. The animals were anaesthetized and blood samples were drawn for analysis of calcium, phosphorus, and ...

  10. Gel time of calcium acrylate grouting material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Tong-Chun

    2004-08-01

    Calcium acrylate is a polymerized grout, and can polymerize in an aqueous solution. The polymerization reaction utilizes ammonium persulfate as a catalyst and sodium thiosulfate as the activator. Based on the theory of reaction kinetics, this study on the relation between gel time and concentration of activator and catalyst showed that gel time of calcium acrylate is inversely proportional to activator and catalyst concentration. A formula of gel time is proposed, and an example is provided to verify the proposed formula. PMID:15236477

  11. Understanding calcium dynamics experiments and theory

    CERN Document Server

    Malchow, Dieter

    2003-01-01

    Intracellular Calcium is an important messenger in living cells. Calcium dynamics display complex temporal and spatial structures created by the concentration patterns which are characteristic for a nonlinear system operating far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Written as a set of tutorial reviews on both experimental facts and theoretical modelling, this volume is intended as an introduction and modern reference in the field for graduate students and researchers in biophysics, biochemistry and applied mathematics.

  12. Furcal perforation repair using calcium enriched mixture cement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asgary Saeed

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This case describes a furcal perforation in a mandibular first molar accompanied by furcal lesion which has been managed after one month. Root canal treatment was performed; subsequently, the defect was repaired with calcium enriched mixture (CEM cement. The endodontically treated tooth was restored with amalgam. A 24-month recall showed no evidence of periodontal breakdown, no symptoms, in addition to completes healing of furcal lesion. According to physical and biological properties of the newly introduced CEM cement, this novel material may be suitable for sealing and repairing the perforations. The present case report supports this hypothesis.

  13. Model Additional Protocol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the end of the cold war a series of events has changed the circumstances and requirements of the safeguards system. The discovery of a clandestine nuclear weapons program in Iraq, the continuing difficulty in verifying the initial report of Democratic People's Republic of Korea upon entry into force of their safeguards agreement, and the decision of the South African Government to give up its nuclear weapons program and join the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons have all played a role in an ambitious effort by IAEA Member States and the Secretariat to strengthen the safeguards system. A major milestone in this effort was reached in May 1997 when the IAEA Board of Governors approved a Model Protocol Additional to Safeguards Agreements. The Model Additional Protocol was negotiated over a period of less than a year by an open-ended committee of the Board involving some 70 Member States and two regional inspectorates. The IAEA is now in the process of negotiating additional protocols, State by State, and implementing them. These additional protocols will provide the IAEA with rights of access to information about all activities related to the use of nuclear material in States with comprehensive safeguards agreements and greatly expanded physical access for IAEA inspectors to confirm or verify this information. In conjunction with this, the IAEA is working on the integration of these measures with those provided for in comprehensive safeguards agreements, with a view to maximizing the effectiveness and efficiency, within available resources, the implementation of safeguards. Details concerning the Model Additional Protocol are given. (author)

  14. A theory of Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump stimulation and activity

    CERN Document Server

    Graupner, M; Meyer-Hermann, M; Erler, Frido; Graupner, Michael; Meyer-Hermann, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The ATP-driven Plasma Membrane Calcium (PMCA) pump is characterized by a high affinity to calcium and a low transport rate compared to other transmembrane calcium transport proteins. It plays a crucial role for calcium extrusion from cells. Calmodulin is an intracellular calcium buffering protein which is capable in its Calcium-liganded form to stimulate the PMCA pump by increasing both, the affinity to calcium and the maximum calcium transport rate. We introduce a new model of this stimulation process and deduce analytical expressions for experimental observables in order to determine the model parameter on the basis of specific experiments. Furthermore a model for the pumping activity is developed. In contrast to the biological process we have to describe the pumping rate behavior by assuming a ATP:Calcium stoichiometry of 2 in order to reproduce experimental data. The conjunction of the description of calcium pumping and the stimulation model fully and correctly simulates PMCA pump function. Therewith the ...

  15. A calcium-induced calcium release mechanism mediated by calsequestrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young-Seon; Keener, James P

    2008-08-21

    Calcium (Ca(2+))-induced Ca(2+) release (CICR) is widely accepted as the principal mechanism linking electrical excitation and mechanical contraction in cardiac cells. The CICR mechanism has been understood mainly based on binding of cytosolic Ca(2+) with ryanodine receptors (RyRs) and inducing Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). However, recent experiments suggest that SR lumenal Ca(2+) may also participate in regulating RyR gating through calsequestrin (CSQ), the SR lumenal Ca(2+) buffer. We investigate how SR Ca(2+) release via RyR is regulated by Ca(2+) and calsequestrin (CSQ). First, a mathematical model of RyR kinetics is derived based on experimental evidence. We assume that the RyR has three binding sites, two cytosolic sites for Ca(2+) activation and inactivation, and one SR lumenal site for CSQ binding. The open probability (P(o)) of the RyR is found by simulation under controlled cytosolic and SR lumenal Ca(2+). Both peak and steady-state P(o) effectively increase as SR lumenal Ca(2+) increases. Second, we incorporate the RyR model into a CICR model that has both a diadic space and the junctional SR (jSR). At low jSR Ca(2+) loads, CSQs are more likely to bind with the RyR and act to inhibit jSR Ca(2+) release, while at high SR loads CSQs are more likely to detach from the RyR, thereby increasing jSR Ca(2+) release. Furthermore, this CICR model produces a nonlinear relationship between fractional jSR Ca(2+) release and jSR load. These findings agree with experimental observations in lipid bilayers and cardiac myocytes. PMID:18538346

  16. Analytical models of calcium binding in a calcium channel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The anomalous mole fraction effect of L-type calcium channels is analyzed using a Fermi like distribution with the experimental data of Almers and McCleskey [J. Physiol. 353, 585 (1984)] and the atomic resolution model of Lipkind and Fozzard [Biochemistry 40, 6786 (2001)] of the selectivity filter of the channel. Much of the analysis is algebraic, independent of differential equations. The Fermi distribution is derived from the configuration entropy of ions and water molecules with different sizes, different valences, and interstitial voids between particles. It allows us to calculate potentials and distances (between the binding ion and the oxygen ions of the glutamate side chains) directly from the experimental data using algebraic formulas. The spatial resolution of these results is comparable with those of molecular models, but of course the accuracy is no better than that implied by the experimental data. The glutamate side chains in our model are flexible enough to accommodate different types of binding ions in different bath conditions. The binding curves of Na+ and Ca2+ for [CaCl2] ranging from 10−8 to 10−2 M with a fixed 32 mM background [NaCl] are shown to agree with published Monte Carlo simulations. The Poisson-Fermi differential equation—that includes both steric and correlation effects—is then used to obtain the spatial profiles of energy, concentration, and dielectric coefficient from the solvent region to the filter. The energy profiles of ions are shown to depend sensitively on the steric energy that is not taken into account in the classical rate theory. We improve the rate theory by introducing a steric energy that lumps the effects of excluded volumes of all ions and water molecules and empty spaces between particles created by Lennard-Jones type and electrostatic forces. We show that the energy landscape varies significantly with bath concentrations. The energy landscape is not constant

  17. Membrane associated complexes in calcium dynamics modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitochondria not only govern energy production, but are also involved in crucial cellular signalling processes. They are one of the most important organelles determining the Ca2+ regulatory pathway in the cell. Several mathematical models explaining these mechanisms were constructed, but only few of them describe interplay between calcium concentrations in endoplasmic reticulum (ER), cytoplasm and mitochondria. Experiments measuring calcium concentrations in mitochondria and ER suggested the existence of cytosolic microdomains with locally elevated calcium concentration in the nearest vicinity of the outer mitochondrial membrane. These intermediate physical connections between ER and mitochondria are called MAM (mitochondria-associated ER membrane) complexes. We propose a model with a direct calcium flow from ER to mitochondria, which may be justified by the existence of MAMs, and perform detailed numerical analysis of the effect of this flow on the type and shape of calcium oscillations. The model is partially based on the Marhl et al model. We have numerically found that the stable oscillations exist for a considerable set of parameter values. However, for some parameter sets the oscillations disappear and the trajectories of the model tend to a steady state with very high calcium level in mitochondria. This can be interpreted as an early step in an apoptotic pathway. (paper)

  18. Optical and spectroscopic investigation on Calcium Borotellurite glass system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paz, E. C.; Lodi, T. A.; Gomes, B. R. A.; Melo, G. H. A.; Pedrochi, F.; Steimacher, A.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, the glass formation in Calcium Borotellurite (CBTx) system and their optical properties were studied. Six glass samples were prepared by melt-quenching technique and the samples obtained are transparent, lightly yellowish, without any visible crystallites. The results showed that TeO2 addition increases the density, the electronic polarizability and, consequently, the refractive index. The increase of electronic polarizability and optical basicity suggest that TeO2 addition increases the non-bridging oxygen (NBO) concentration. The increase of TeO2 shifts the band edge to longer wavelength owing to increase in non-bridging oxygen ions, resulting in a linear decrease of optical energy gap. The addition of TeO2 increases the temperature coefficient of the optical path length (dS/dT) in room temperature, which are comparable to phosphate and lower than Low Silica Calcium Alumino Silicate (LSCAS) glasses. The values of dS/dT present an increase as a function of temperature for all the samples measured. The results suggest that CBTx is a good candidate for rare-earth doping and several optical applications.

  19. The effect of dimethylsulfoxide on the calcium paradox.

    OpenAIRE

    Ruigrok, T. J.; Moes, D.; Slade, A.M.; Nayler, W. G.

    1981-01-01

    Reperfusion of isolated rat hearts with calcium-containing solution after a short period of calcium-free perfusion results in irreversible cell damage (calcium paradox). Experiments were undertaken to study the effect of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) on the occurrence of the calcium paradox in rat heart muscle. DMSO (1.4 mol/l) was added to the calcium-free or the reperfusion medium. Cell damage was quantitated in terms of creatine kinase (CK) release, cardiac electrogram (CEG) changes, and ultras...

  20. Factors to consider in the selection of a calcium supplement.

    OpenAIRE

    Shangraw, R F

    1989-01-01

    Calcium supplements are widely used, yet many questions remain as to the absorption of various calcium salts. Because the solubility of many calcium salts is dependent upon pH, the type of salt used, the condition of the patient, and the time of administration should be considered. Studies show that many calcium supplements on the market today do not meet standards of quality established in the "U.S. Pharmacopeia" (USP). Consumers must be discerning about the products they purchase. Calcium s...

  1. The spatial pattern of atrial cardiomyocyte calcium signalling modulates contraction

    OpenAIRE

    Mackenzie, L; Roderick, H Llewelyn; Berridge, MJ; Conway, SJ; Bootman, MD

    2004-01-01

    We examined the regulation of calcium signalling in atrial cardiomyocytes during excitation-contraction coupling, and how changes in the distribution of calcium impacts on contractility. Under control conditions, calcium transients originated in subsarcolemmal locations and showed local regeneration through activation of calcium-induced calcium release from ryanodine receptors. Despite functional ryanodine receptors being expressed at regular (~2 μm) intervals throughout atrial myocytes, the ...

  2. Increased absolute calcium binding to albumin in hypoalbuminaemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Besarab, A; Caro, J F

    1981-01-01

    The amount of calcium bound to protein was measured in 30 patients with differing diseases and varying degrees of hypoalbuminaemia. Total serum calcium increased directly with both serum albumin and ultrafilterable calcium concentrations. The estimated amount of calcium bound per gram of albumin varied inversely with the albumin concentration, decreasing from 2.1 to 1.0 mg calcium/g albumin as albumin concentration increased from 1.7 to 3.1 g/dl. Circulating parathyroid hormone (PTH) concentr...

  3. Calcium and ascorbic acid affect cellular structure and water mobility in apple tissue during osmotic dehydration in sucrose solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauro, Maria A; Dellarosa, Nicolò; Tylewicz, Urszula; Tappi, Silvia; Laghi, Luca; Rocculi, Pietro; Rosa, Marco Dalla

    2016-03-15

    The effects of the addition of calcium lactate and ascorbic acid to sucrose osmotic solutions on cell viability and microstructure of apple tissue were studied. In addition, water distribution and mobility modification of the different cellular compartments were observed. Fluorescence microscopy, light microscopy and time domain nuclear magnetic resonance (TD-NMR) were respectively used to evaluate cell viability and microstructural changes during osmotic dehydration. Tissues treated in a sucrose-calcium lactate-ascorbic acid solution did not show viability. Calcium lactate had some effects on cell walls and membranes. Sucrose solution visibly preserved the protoplast viability and slightly influenced the water distribution within the apple tissue, as highlighted by TD-NMR, which showed higher proton intensity in the vacuoles and lower intensity in cytoplasm-free spaces compared to other treatments. The presence of ascorbic acid enhanced calcium impregnation, which was associated with permeability changes of the cellular wall and membranes. PMID:26575708

  4. Linear quantum addition rules

    OpenAIRE

    Nathanson, Melvyn B.

    2006-01-01

    The quantum integer $[n]_q$ is the polynomial $1 + q + q^2 + ... + q^{n-1}.$ Two sequences of polynomials $\\mathcal{U} = \\{u_n(q)\\}_{n=1}^{\\infty}$ and $\\mathcal{V} = \\{v_n(q)\\}_{n=1}^{\\infty}$ define a {\\em linear addition rule} $\\oplus$ on a sequence $\\mathcal{F} = \\{f_n(q)\\}_{n=1}^{\\infty}$ by $f_m(q)\\oplus f_n(q) = u_n(q)f_m(q) + v_m(q)f_n(q).$ This is called a {\\em quantum addition rule} if $[m]_q \\oplus [n]_q = [m+n]_q$ for all positive integers $m$ and $n$. In this paper all linear qua...

  5. Coagulation of β-conglycinin, glycinin and isoflavones induced by calcium chloride in soymilk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yu-Hsuan; Yu, Chia-Jung; Li, Wen-Tai; Hsieh, Jung-Feng

    2015-08-01

    The coagulation of β-conglycinin (7S), glycinin (11S) and isoflavones induced by calcium chloride was investigated. Approximately 92.6% of the soymilk proteins were coagulated into the soymilk pellet fraction (SPF) after the addition of 5 mM calcium chloride. SDS-PAGE and two-dimensional electrophoresis analysis indicated that most of the 7S (α’, α and β), 11S acidic (A1a, A1b, A2, A3 and A4) and 11S basic (B1a) proteins in the SSF were coagulated into the SPF after treatment with 5 mM calcium chloride. Isoflavones, including daidzein and genistein, were also coagulated into the SPF after the addition of 5 mM calcium chloride. The amounts of daidzein and genistein in the SSF decreased to 39.4 ± 1.6 and 11.8 ± 7.0%, respectively. HPLC analysis suggested that daidzein and genistein were bound with 7S and 11S proteins and then were coprecipitated into the SPF by 5 mM calcium chloride.

  6. Modification of oxide inclusions present in aluminum-killed low carbon steel by addition of calcium

    OpenAIRE

    José Carlos S. Pires; Amauri Garcia

    2004-01-01

    A crescente demanda por aços de alta qualidade com elevada limpeza interna tem levado a uma contínua melhoria nas práticas de produção do aço, em especial na etapa de refino secundário. O interesse especial é no controle das inclusões não-metálicas, devido ao seu efeito prejudicial nas etapas subseqüentes (lingotamento e conformação plástica) e devido às sua grande influência nas propriedades do produto final. Através do controle do tamanho, da quantidade e da composição química das inclusões...

  7. Additives in swine nutrition

    OpenAIRE

    Sinovec Zlatan J.; Jokić Živan; Šefer Dragan

    2002-01-01

    To attain better feed utilization, longer preservation, easier manipultion and higher production and better quality of food of animal orgin as the final goal, besides raw materials, feed mixes contain numerous pronutrients (additives), added to perform different effects, in a narrower sense, the term pronutrient implies heterogenous substances, which have no diverse effects and have to be efficient in the manner of use. Basically, all pronutrients have to reach the goal of keeping optimal ani...

  8. Split double factorial with additional treatment and the post-harvest of Niagara grapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pórtya Piscitelli Cavalcanti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTThis study aims to discuss and explain how to deal with the analysis of experiments conducted in completely randomized design (CRD and subdivided into double factorial with additional treatment in the plot. In addition it was illustrate the discussion by analyzing data from an experiment on post-harvest of Niagara grapes. The sums of squares for each source of variation are presented, while discussing how the additional treatment affects the whole variation. Niagara grapes were treated in the pre-harvest with three preservatives (calcium chloride, calcium nitrate and calcium lactate at 0%, 0.5%, 1% and 2% and stored for 0, 10, 20 and 30 days.All the preservatives evaluated at 0% represented the control (additional treatment.

  9. Effect of combining different calcium concentration dialysate on calcium balance in peritoneal dialysis patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Hui-ping; WU Bei; LU Li-xia; QIAO Jie; WU Xiang-lan; WANG Mei

    2012-01-01

    Background Calcium and phosphorus metabolic disturbance are common in dialysis patients and associated with increased morbidity and mortality.Therefore,maintaining the balance of calcium and phosphate metabolism and suitable intact parathyroid hormone(iPTH)level has become the focus of attention.We investigated the effects of different peritoneal dialysate calcium concentrations on calcium phosphate metabolism and iPTH in continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis(CAPD)patients.Methods Forty stable CAPD patients with normal serum calcium were followed for six months of treatment with 1.25 mmol/L calcium dialysate(DCa1.25,PD4,22 patients)or a combination of 1.75 mmol/L calcium dialysate(DCa1.75,PD2)and PD4(18 patients)twice a day respectively.Total serum calcium(after albumin correction),serum phosphorus,iPTH,alkaline phosphatase(ALP)and blood pressure were recorded before and 1,3 and 6 months after treatment commenced.Results No significant difference was found in baseline serum calcium,phosphorus between the two patient groups,but the levels of iPTH were significantly different.No significant changes were found in the dosage of calcium carbonate and active vitamin D during 6 months.In the PD4 group,serum calcium level at the 1st,3rd,6th months were significantly lower than the baseline(P<0.05).There was no significant difference in serum phosphorus after 6 months treatment.iPTH was significantly higher(P<0.001)at the 1st,3rd,and 6th months compared with the baseline.No differences were seen in ALP and blood pressure.In the PD4+PD2 group,no significant changes in serum calcium,phosphorus,iPTH,ALP and BP during the 6-month follow-up period.Conclusions Treatment with 1.25 mmol/L calcium dialysate for six months can decrease serum calcium,increase iPTH,without change in serum phosphorus,ALP,and BP.The combining of PD4 and PD2 can stabilize the serum calcium and avoid fluctuations in iPTH levels.

  10. Increased calcium absorption from synthetic stable amorphous calcium carbonate: Double-blind randomized crossover clinical trial in post-menopausal women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium supplementation is a widely recognized strategy for achieving adequate calcium intake. We designed this blinded, randomized, crossover interventional trial to compare the bioavailability of a new stable synthetic amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) with that of crystalline calcium carbonate (C...

  11. The Incredible, Embryological Egg: Calcium and Strontium Isotopes Recapitulate Ontogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, G. W.; Skulan, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    that caused by osteoporosis in humans. For both mass-dependent Ca and Sr isotopes, the isotopic value of the albumen is the highest natural value yet measured. The offset between the δ88/86Sr values of the albumen and shell is 0.45%, less than half that of the δ44/42Ca offset value (1.29%), as predicted by the relative mass differences. However, the yolk is 0.35% heavier than the shell in δ44/42Ca but 0.70% lighter in δ88/86Sr. In addition, the 87Sr/86Sr value of the shell (0.70854 ±0.000012, 2σ) is statistically the same as the albumen (0.70856 ±0.000018), but slightly offset from the yolk (0.70830 ±0.000014). The apparent decoupling of Ca and Sr, and the radiogenic offset between yolk and shell, may reflect differences in the residence time of calcium and strontium in different reproductive organs, as well as the contribution of medullary bone to shell formation. In addition, it may also reflect differential discrimination against Sr versus Ca in oviduct and uterus. Further studies could extend to thinning eggshells in wild avian populations, biochemical mechanisms of bone formation, and the mechanism of strontium ranelate in the treatment of osteoporosis.

  12. Purification and characterisation of a glutamic acid-containing peptide with calcium-binding capacity from whey protein hydrolysate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shun-Li; Zhao, Li-Na; Cai, Xixi; Wang, Shao-Yun; Huang, Yi-Fan; Hong, Jing; Rao, Ping-Fan

    2015-02-01

    The bioavailability of dietary ionised calcium is affected by intestinal basic environment. Calcium-binding peptides can form complexes with calcium to improve its absorption and bioavailability. The aim of this study was focused on isolation and characterisation of a calcium-binding peptide from whey protein hydrolysates. Whey protein was hydrolysed using Flavourzyme and Protamex with substrate to enzyme ratio of 25:1 (w/w) at 49 °C for 7 h. The calcium-binding peptide was isolated by DEAE anion-exchange chromatography, Sephadex G-25 gel filtration and reversed phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). A purified peptide of molecular mass 204 Da with strong calcium binding ability was identified on chromatography/electrospray ionisation (LC/ESI) tandem mass spectrum to be Glu-Gly (EG) after analysis and alignment in database. The calcium binding capacity of EG reached 67·81 μg/mg, and the amount increased by 95% compared with whey protein hydrolysate complex. The UV and infrared spectrometer analysis demonstrated that the principal sites of calcium-binding corresponded to the carboxyl groups and carbonyl groups of glutamic acid. In addition, the amino group and peptide amino are also the related groups in the interaction between EG and calcium ion. Meanwhile, the sequestered calcium percentage experiment has proved that EG-Ca is significantly more stable than CaCl2 in human gastrointestinal tract in vitro. The findings suggest that the purified dipeptide has the potential to be used as ion-binding ingredient in dietary supplements. PMID:25592629

  13. Surface modification of porous polycaprolactone/biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds for bone regeneration in rat calvaria defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Hyun; Linh, Nguyen T B; Min, Young K; Lee, Byong-Taek

    2014-10-01

    In this study, polycaprolactone scaffolds fabricated by a salt-leaching process were loaded with biphasic calcium phosphate successfully to improve the osteoconductivity in bone regeneration. The surface of polycaprolactone/biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds was aminolyzed by 1,6-hexamethylenediamine to introduce amino groups onto the surface, which was verified qualitatively by ninhyrin staining. Collagen was further immobilized on the aminolyzed porous polycaprolactone via N-ethyl-N'-(3-dimethylaminopropy) carbodiimide hydrochloride/hydroxy-2,5-dioxopyrolidine-3-sulfonic acid sodium cross-linking. The pore size of polycaprolactone/biphasic calcium phosphate-collagen scaffolds was 200-300 µm, which was suitable for bone in-growth. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed the coupling of collagen immobilized on the surface of polycaprolactone/biphasic calcium phosphate. In vitro results demonstrated that the spreading and viability of MC3T3-E1 cells were remarkably improved in the polycaprolactone/biphasic calcium phosphate-collagen scaffolds. The in vivo study was carried out by implanting the porous polycaprolactone, polycaprolactone/biphasic calcium phosphate, and polycaprolactone/biphasic calcium phosphate-collagen to the skulls of rats. Although the addition of biphasic calcium phosphate particles in the polycaprolactone scaffolds does not have a strong effect on the new bone formation, the immobilization of collagen on the polycaprolactone/biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds significantly improved the bone regeneration even though the implantation time was short, 6 weeks. The present results provide more evidence that functionalizing polycaprolactone with biphasic calcium phosphate and collagen may be a feasible way to improve the osteoconduction in bone regeneration. PMID:24939961

  14. Update on calcium pyrophosphate deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhishek, Abhishek; Doherty, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition (CPPD) associates with ageing, osteoarthritis (OA), uncommon metabolic diseases, mutations and polymorphisms in the ankylosis human gene (ANKH). CPPD is frequently polyarticular, occurs due to a generalised articular predisposition, and the association between CPPD and OA is joint specific, for example CPPD associates with knee OA, but not with hip OA. Other recently identified associations include knee malalignment (knee CC), low cortical BMD and soft-tissue calcification. CPPD is generally asymptomatic. A recent study reported that knees with OA plus CC at the index joint, or at distant joints (in absence of index joint CC), were more likely to have attrition. CPPD can cause acute CPP crystal arthritis, chronic CPP crystal inflammatory arthritis, and is frequently present in joints with OA. Joint aspiration remains the gold standard for diagnosing CPPD, although other promising techniques are emerging. Patients with polyarticular or young onset CPPD should be screened for underlying metabolic abnormalities, however, such testing can be unrewarding. The treatment of CPPD is symptomatic. Acute CPP crystal arthritis is treated with rest, local application of ice-packs, joint aspiration, colchicine and/or intra-articular corticosteroid injection (once infection is excluded). Colchicine, low-dose corticosteroids, hydroxychloroquine and radiosynovectomy are recommended for the treatment of chronic or recurrent acute CPP crystal arthritis. Recent RCTs did not confirm any benefit from methotrexate, and although there is increasing interest in the use of anti-IL1 agents for acute or chronic CPP crystal arthritis, their efficacy has not been formally examined. Unlike gout, currently there are no treatments to eliminate CPP crystal deposits. PMID:27586801

  15. Inhibition of collagen synthesis by select calcium and sodium channel blockers can be mitigated by ascorbic acid and ascorbyl palmitate

    OpenAIRE

    Ivanov, Vadim; Ivanova, Svetlana; KALINOVSKY, TATIANA; NIEDZWIECKI, ALEKSANDRA; RATH, MATTHIAS

    2016-01-01

    Calcium, sodium and potassium channel blockers are widely prescribed medications for a variety of health problems, most frequently for cardiac arrhythmias, hypertension, angina pectoris and other disorders. However, chronic application of channel blockers is associated with numerous side effects, including worsening cardiac pathology. For example, nifedipine, a calcium-channel blocker was found to be associated with increased mortality and increased risk for myocardial infarction. In addition...

  16. Spatiotemporal dynamics of calcium-driven cardiac alternans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skardal, Per Sebastian; Karma, Alain; Restrepo, Juan G.

    2014-05-01

    We investigate the dynamics of spatially discordant alternans (SDA) driven by an instability of intracellular calcium cycling using both amplitude equations [P. S. Skardal, A. Karma, and J. G. Restrepo, Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 108103 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.108103] and ionic model simulations. We focus on the common case where the bidirectional coupling of intracellular calcium concentration and membrane voltage dynamics produces calcium and voltage alternans that are temporally in phase. We find that, close to the alternans bifurcation, SDA is manifested as a smooth wavy modulation of the amplitudes of both repolarization and calcium transient (CaT) alternans, similarly to the well-studied case of voltage-driven alternans. In contrast, further away from the bifurcation, the amplitude of CaT alternans jumps discontinuously at the nodes separating out-of-phase regions, while the amplitude of repolarization alternans remains smooth. We identify universal dynamical features of SDA pattern formation and evolution in the presence of those jumps. We show that node motion of discontinuous SDA patterns is strongly hysteretic even in homogeneous tissue due to the novel phenomenon of "unidirectional pinning": node movement can only be induced towards, but not away from, the pacing site in response to a change of pacing rate or physiological parameter. In addition, we show that the wavelength of discontinuous SDA patterns scales linearly with the conduction velocity restitution length scale, in contrast to the wavelength of smooth patterns that scales sublinearly with this length scale. Those results are also shown to be robust against cell-to-cell fluctuations due to the property that unidirectional node motion collapses multiple jumps accumulating in nodal regions into a single jump. Amplitude equation predictions are in good overall agreement with ionic model simulations. Finally, we briefly discuss physiological implications of our findings. In particular, we

  17. Physicochemical characterization of zinc-substituted calcium phosphates

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    DOROTA WALCZYK; DAGMARA MALINA; MILENA KRÓL; KLAUDIA PLUTA; AGNIESZKA SOBCZAK-KUPIEC

    2016-04-01

    Biocompatible and bioactive calcium phosphates can make chemical bonds with living bones. Improvement of their biological and physicochemical properties can be achieved by doping with various ions that are presented in natural apatites of bones. These substitutions influence lattice parameters, structure and morphology of apatites. In recent times great attention has been devoted to zinc ions that are the second most abundant trace element present in bones. Zinc embedded into calcium phosphate may enhance the bone formation and in addition exhibits antifungal and antibacterial properties. Therefore, it is rational to form structures incorporated with this ion. In this paper the incorporation of the Zn ions into natural and synthetic calcium phosphates has been reported.Natural hydroxyapatites (HAs) applied in this study were derived mainly from pork bones whereas both brushite and synthetic were formed using wet chemical methods. Ambient temperature synthesis leads to the formation ofbrushite, whereas the process performed at elevated temperature gives HA. Subsequently, attained structures were modified with Zn ions by using in situ or sorption procedures. Phase composition and morphology of obtained materials were determined by means of X-ray diffractometry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy equipped with energy-dispersive spectroscopy. Introduced XRD patterns depict changes of the crystallinity of HA with the increase in the amount of embedded zinc ions. On the contrary, no changes of the crystallinity were observed for the brushite doped with Zn ions. Morphology of attained powders, visualized using scanningelectron microscopy exemplified structural changes between calcium phosphates conjugated with zinc ions. Many authors report that the addition of small amounts of Zn ions leads to loss of crystallinity and decrease of lattice parameters. Interestingly, upon addition of Zn ions to the natural and synthetic HAp by sorption

  18. Eggshell powder, a comparable or better source of calcium than purified calcium carbonate: Piglet studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, A.; Beelen, G.M.

    1999-01-01

    Powdered chicken eggshells might be an interesting and widely available source of calcium. In two studies using piglets we determined the digestibility of calcium from different diets. The first study compared casein-based diets with CaCO3 (CasCC) or eggshell powder (CasES). The second study compare

  19. Calcium spikes and calcium plateaux evoked by differential polarization in dendrites of turtle motoneurones in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, J; Kiehn, O

    1993-01-01

    The ability of dendrites in turtle motoneurones to support calcium spikes and calcium plateaux was investigated using differential polarization by applied electric fields. 2. Electric fields were generated by passing current through transverse slices of the turtle spinal cord between two plate...

  20. Characterization of dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The structural and regulatory properties of the dihydropyridine-sensitive calcium channel were studied by isolating protein components of the channel complex from both cardiac and skeletal muscle. Hydrodynamic characterization of the (+)-(3H)PN200-110-labeled cardiac calcium channel revealed that the protein components of the complex had a total molecular mass of 370,000 daltons, a Stokes radius of 86 angstrom, and a frictional ratio of 1.3. A technique is described for the rapid incorporation of the CHAPS solubilized skeletal muscle calcium channel complex into phospholipid vesicles. 45Ca2+ uptake into phospholipid vesicles containing calcium channels was inhibited by phenylalkalamine calcium antagonists. Wheat germ lectin followed by DEAE chromatography of the CHAPS solubilized complex resulted in the dissociation of regulatory components of the complex from channel components. The DEAE preparation gave rise to 45Ca2+ uptake that was not inhibited by verapamil but was inhibited by GTPgS activated G0. The inhibition of 45Ca2+ uptake by verapamil was restored by co-reconstitution of wash fractions from wheat germ lectin chromatography. Phosphorylation of polypeptides in this fraction by polypeptide-dependent protein kinase prevented the restoration of verapamil sensitivity. The partial purification of an endogenous skeletal muscle ADP-ribosyltransferase is also described. ADP-ribosylation of the α2 subunit of the calcium channel complex is enhanced by polylysine and inhibited by GTPγS, suggesting that regulation of this enzyme is under the control of GTP binding proteins. These results suggest a complex model, involving a number of different protein components, for calcium channel regulation in skeletal muscle

  1. Process for the reduction of the radioactivity of calcium sulfate from phosphorites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioactivity of calcium sulphate prepared from phosphorites can be avoided by the addition of strong nitric or hydrochloric acid and ammonium salts, in particular ammonium nitrate or phosphate, either following or during acidic decomposition of the phosphorite. (orig./WI)

  2. Mechanism and evolution of calcium transport across the plant plasma membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium is an essential plant nutrient, thus the influx of Ca(2+) into plant cells is a critical process. In addition, the efflux of Ca(2+) out of a cell is important to prevent toxicity resulting from Ca(2+) excess, and to modulate levels of cytosolic Ca(2+) required for signaling functions. Bioc...

  3. Effect of coffee extracts on intracellular calcium level in levels in glial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Akın, Demet; Görmüş, Uzay; Yapışlar, Hande; Farah, Adriana

    2012-01-01

    Widely used antidepressant drugs such as fluoxetine exert additional blocking effects on voltage gated Ca⁺² channels. Differences in intracellular calcium levels may be involved in the release of monoamines, which play important role in the pathogenesis of depression.

  4. Additives in swine nutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinovec Zlatan J.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available To attain better feed utilization, longer preservation, easier manipultion and higher production and better quality of food of animal orgin as the final goal, besides raw materials, feed mixes contain numerous pronutrients (additives, added to perform different effects, in a narrower sense, the term pronutrient implies heterogenous substances, which have no diverse effects and have to be efficient in the manner of use. Basically, all pronutrients have to reach the goal of keeping optimal animal health status and to increase production of food of animal origin without adverse and negative effects. The development of biotechnology had a great part in the appearance of natural alternatives which are able to fulfil and satisfy the high demands of highly productive animals, as well as those of the consumer lobby and environmental protection movements. Growth promoters based upon physiological mechanisms and production potential of the animal have an unquestionable adventage, not only because of the lack of residues in food of animal origin; but also because of their ecological safety and decrease of envirnomental pollution by undigested materials. Demand continues to grow for "all natural", non-pharmaceutical feed additives with growth enhancing effects in food animals. Special attention is paid to minerals (anorganic and organic sources, growth stimulators (antibiotics, probiotics prebiotics, substances for better feed utilization (enzymes, acidifers adsorbents.

  5. Calcium ferrite formation from the thermolysis of calcium tris (maleato) ferrate(III)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    B S Randhawa; Kamaljeet Sweety

    2000-08-01

    For preparing calcium ferrite, calcium tris (maleato) ferrate(III) precursor was prepared by mixing aqueous solutions of iron(III) maleate, calcium maleate and maleic acid. Various physico-chemical techniques i.e. TG, DTG, DTA, Mössbauer, XRD, IR etc have been used to study the decomposition behaviour from ambient to 900°C and ferrite formation. Three consecutive decomposition steps leading to the formation of -Fe2O3 and calcium carbonate have been observed at various stages of thermolysis. In the final stage the ferrite, Ca2Fe2O5, is obtained as a result of solid state reaction between -Fe2O3 and calcium carbonate at 788°C, a temperature much lower than for ceramic method. The results have been compared with those of the oxalate precursor.

  6. Calcium carbonate scaling kinetics determined from radiotracer experiments with calcium-47

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deposition rate of calcium carbonate on a heat-transfer surface has been measured using a calcium-47 radiotracer and compared to the measured rate of thermal fouling. The crystalline phase of calcium carbonate that precipitates depends on the degree of supersaturation at the heat-transfer surface, with aragonite precipitating at higher supersaturations and calcite precipitating at lower supersaturations. Whereas the mass deposition rates were constant with time, the thermal fouling rates decreased throughout the course of each experiment as a result of densification of the deposit. It is proposed that the densification was driven by the temperature gradient across the deposit together with the retrograde solubility of calcium carbonate. The temperature dependence of the deposition rate yielded an activation energy of 79 ± 4 kJ/mol for the precipitation of calcium carbonate on a heat-transfer surface. (author)

  7. Skin injuries afflicting three oil workers following contact with calcium bromide and/or calcium chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, W R; Distante, S; Holmes, J D; Kolhe, P S

    1997-01-01

    Calcium bromide brine is a highly concentrated aqueous solution of calcium bromide and calcium chloride. It is used extensively in the oil industry. This solution and its components are recognized as causes of skin injury and information is available from the manufacturers on their safe use and handling. Two patients who were injured following unprotected skin exposure to this solution and one patient who was injured following exposure to calcium chloride powder are reported. All sustained skin injuries characterised by an absence of pain and a delayed clinical appearance of the full extent of the injury. Furthermore healing was complicated by graft loss or was slow. Although organic bromine compounds are recognized as a cause of skin injuries, no previous reports of such injuries to humans secondary to calcium chloride or bromide exposure were found in the medical literature. Our experience with these patients is described. PMID:9568340

  8. Sorbent preparation/modification/additives. Final report, September 1, 1992--November 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prudich, M.E.; Venkataramakrishnan, R. [Ohio Univ., Athens, OH (United States)

    1994-02-01

    Sorbent preparation techniques used today have generally been adapted from techniques traditionally used by the lime industry. Traditional dry hydration and slaking processes have been optimized to produce materials intended for use in the building industry. These preparation techniques should be examined with an eye to optimization of properties important to the SO{sub 2} capture process. The study of calcium-based sorbents for sulfur dioxide capture is complicated by two factors: (1) little is known about the chemical mechanisms by which the standard sorbent preparation and enhancement techniques work, and (2) a sorbent preparation technique that produces a calcium-based sorbent that enjoys enhanced calcium utilization in one regime of operation [flame zone (>2400 F), in-furnace (1600--2400 F), economizer (800--1100 F), after air preheater (<350 F)] may not produce a sorbent that enjoys enhanced calcium utilization in the other reaction zones. Again, an in-depth understanding of the mechanism of sorbent enhancement is necessary if a systematic approach to sorbent development is to be used. As a long-term goal, an experimental program is being carried out for the purpose of (1) defining the effects of slaking conditions on the properties of calcium-based sorbents, (2) determining how the parent limestone properties of calcium-based sorbents, and (3) elucidating the mechanism(s) relating to the activity of various dry sorbent additives. An appendix contains a one-dimensional duct injection model with modifications to handle the sodium additives.

  9. Bone calcium turnover during pregnancy and lactation in women with low calcium diets is associated with calcium intake and circulating insulin-like growth factor 1 concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    BACKGROUND: Few data exist on longitudinal changes in bone calcium turnover rates across pregnancy and lactation. OBJECTIVE: Our aim was to characterize calcium kinetic variables and predictors of these changes across pregnancy and early lactation in women with low calcium intakes. DESIGN: Stable ca...

  10. Role of mitochondria and network connectivity in intercellular calcium oscillations

    CERN Document Server

    Dokukina, I V; Grachev, E A; Gunton, J D; Dokukina, Irina V.; Gracheva, Maria E.; Grachev, Eugene A.; Gunton, James D.

    2005-01-01

    Mitochondria are large-scale regulators of cytosolic calcium under normal cellular conditions. In this paper we model the complex behavior of mitochondrial calcium during the action of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate on a single cell and find results that are in good agreement with recent experimental studies. We also study the influence of the cellular network connectivity on intercellular signalling via gap junction diffusion. We include in our model the dependence of the junctional conductivity on the cytosolic calcium concentrations in adjacent cells. We consider three different mechanisms of calcium wave propagation through gap junctions: via calcium diffusion, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate diffusion, and both calcium and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate diffusion. We show that inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate diffusion is the mechanism of calcium wave propagation and that calcium diffusion is the mechanism of synchronization of cytosolic calcium oscillations in adjacent cells. We also study the role of different to...

  11. Role of calcium in gravity perception of plant roots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Michael L.

    Calcium ions may play a key role in linking graviperception by the root cap to the asymmetric growth which occurs in the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. Application of calcium-chelating agents to the root cap inhibits gravitropic curvature without affecting growth. Asymmetric application of calcium to one side of the root cap induces curvature toward the calcium source, and gravistimulation induces polar movement of applied 45Ca2+ across the root cap toward the lower side. The action of calcium may be linked to auxin movement in roots since 1) auxin transport inhibitors interfere both with gravitropic curvature and gravi-induced polar calcium movement and 2) asymmetric application of calcium enhances auxin movement across the elongation zone of gravistimulated roots. Indirect evidence indicates that the calcium-modulated regulator protein, calmodulin, may be involved in either the transport or action of calcium in the gravitropic response mechanism of roots.

  12. Enhanced bioactivity of glass ionomer cement by incorporating calcium silicates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Song; Cai, Yixiao; Engqvist, Håkan; Xia, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Glass ionomer cements (GIC) are known as a non-bioactive dental cement. During setting the GIC have an acidic pH, driven by the acrylic acid component. It is a challenge to make GIC alkaline without disturbing its mechanical properties. One strategy was to add slowly reacting systems with an alkaline pH. The aim of the present study is to investigate the possibility of forming a bioactive dental material based on the combination of glass ionomer cement and calcium silicates. Two types of GIC were used as control. Wollastonite (CS also denoted β-CaSiO3) or Mineral Trioxide Aggregate (MTA) was incorporated into the 2 types of GIC. The material formulations' setting time, compressive strength, pH and bioactivity were compared between modified GIC and GIC control. Apatite crystals were found on the surfaces of the modified cements but not on the control GIC. The compressive strength of the cement remained with the addition of 20% calcium silicate or 20% MTA after one day immersion. In addition, the compressive strength of GIC modified with 20% MTA had been increased during the 14 d immersion (p < 0 .05). PMID:26787304

  13. Effects of calcium on intestinal mucin: implications for cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forstner, J F; Forstner, G G

    1976-06-01

    A major feature of the disease cystic fibrosis is the excessive concentration of mucus within ducts and glands of mucous-producing organs. Some mucous secretions also show an elevation in calcium concentration. Using purified rat intestinal goblet cell mucin as a model mucin, we have investigated the effect of millimolar additions (1-25 mM) of CaCl2 on the physical properties of the mucin. Isotonicity of incubation media was preserved in order to mimic in vivo conditions. CaCl2 (8-15mM) caused a 15-33% decrease in viscosity, no change in electrophoretic mobility in acrylamide gels, and a 20-30% decrease in solubility of the mucin. Solubility changes were reversed by the addition of EDTA (20 mM) to incubations. Insolubility was also produced in incubations of mucin with a mixture of soluble intestinal contents (NaCl washings). These findings strongly suggest that the mucin became smaller and more dense as calcium was added, a process most probably achieved by loss of intramolecular water. PMID:1272637

  14. Radioactivity: additional tables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following additional tables are presented to the annual report on radioactive discharges from the major establishments in the U.K.: 1) Radioactive gaseous effluent, trends in annual emissions, by site, (civil and M.O.D.) 2) Radioactive liquid effluent (radionuclides specified by authorisations), trends in annual discharges to surface and coastal waters: by site. 3) Liquid effluent (radionuclides not subject to separate limits): annual discharges to surface and coastal waters by site. 4) Isotopic composition of liquid effluent from CEGB stations, 1984. 5) Trends in the amount of radioactivity in waste dumped in the north-east Atlantic. 6) Trends in volume of waste disposed of at Drigg (by source of waste). 7) Solid waste: trends in volume disposed of and level of activity at some other disposal sites. 8) Radioactivity in samples of fish and shellfish: trends in concentrations. (UK)

  15. Additive Pattern Database Heuristics

    CERN Document Server

    Felner, A; Korf, R E; 10.1613/jair.1480

    2011-01-01

    We explore a method for computing admissible heuristic evaluation functions for search problems. It utilizes pattern databases, which are precomputed tables of the exact cost of solving various subproblems of an existing problem. Unlike standard pattern database heuristics, however, we partition our problems into disjoint subproblems, so that the costs of solving the different subproblems can be added together without overestimating the cost of solving the original problem. Previously, we showed how to statically partition the sliding-tile puzzles into disjoint groups of tiles to compute an admissible heuristic, using the same partition for each state and problem instance. Here we extend the method and show that it applies to other domains as well. We also present another method for additive heuristics which we call dynamically partitioned pattern databases. Here we partition the problem into disjoint subproblems for each state of the search dynamically. We discuss the pros and cons of each of these methods a...

  16. Perspectives on Additive Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourell, David L.

    2016-07-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has skyrocketed in visibility commercially and in the public sector. This article describes the development of this field from early layered manufacturing approaches of photosculpture, topography, and material deposition. Certain precursors to modern AM processes are also briefly described. The growth of the field over the last 30 years is presented. Included is the standard delineation of AM technologies into seven broad categories. The economics of AM part generation is considered, and the impacts of the economics on application sectors are described. On the basis of current trends, the future outlook will include a convergence of AM fabricators, mass-produced AM fabricators, enabling of topology optimization designs, and specialization in the AM legal arena. Long-term developments with huge impact are organ printing and volume-based printing.

  17. Teardrop bladder: additional considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nine cases of teardrop bladder (TDB) seen at excretory urography are presented. In some of these patients, the iliopsoas muscles were at the upper limit of normal in size, and additional evaluation of the perivesical structures with computed tomography (CT) was necessary. CT demonstrated only hypertrophied muscles with or without perivesical fat. The psoas muscles and pelvic width were measured in 8 patients and compared with the measurements of a control group of males without TDB. Patients with TDB had large iliopsoas muscles and narrow pelves compared with the control group. The psoas muscle width/pelvic width ratio was significantly greater (p < 0.0005) in patients with TDB than in the control group, with values of 1.04 + 0.05 and 0.82 + 0.09, respectively. It is concluded that TDB is not an uncommon normal variant in black males. Both iliopsoas muscle hypertrophy and a narrow pelvis are factors that predispose a patient to TDB

  18. Voltage-Gated Calcium Channels in Nociception

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, Takahiro; Adams, David J.

    Voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) are a large and functionally diverse group of membrane ion channels ubiquitously expressed throughout the central and peripheral nervous systems. VGCCs contribute to various physiological processes and transduce electrical activity into other cellular functions. This chapter provides an overview of biophysical properties of VGCCs, including regulation by auxiliary subunits, and their physiological role in neuronal functions. Subsequently, then we focus on N-type calcium (Cav2.2) channels, in particular their diversity and specific antagonists. We also discuss the role of N-type calcium channels in nociception and pain transmission through primary sensory dorsal root ganglion neurons (nociceptors). It has been shown that these channels are expressed predominantly in nerve terminals of the nociceptors and that they control neurotransmitter release. To date, important roles of N-type calcium channels in pain sensation have been elucidated genetically and pharmacologically, indicating that specific N-type calcium channel antagonists or modulators are particularly useful as therapeutic drugs targeting chronic and neuropathic pain.

  19. Vitamin D with Calcium Reduces Mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rejnmark, Lars; Avenell, Alison; Masud, Tahir;

    2012-01-01

    ,528 randomized participants (86.8% females) with a median age of 70 (interquartile range, 62-77) yr. Vitamin D with or without calcium reduced mortality by 7% [hazard ratio, 0.93; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.88-0.99]. However, vitamin D alone did not affect mortality, but risk of death was reduced if vitamin...... D was given with calcium (hazard ratio, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.84-0.98). The number needed to treat with vitamin D plus calcium for 3 yr to prevent one death was 151. Trial level meta-analysis (24 trials with 88,097 participants) showed similar results, i.e. mortality was reduced with vitamin D plus...... calcium (odds ratio, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.88-0.99), but not with vitamin D alone (odds ratio, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.91-1.06).Conclusion:Vitamin D with calcium reduces mortality in the elderly, whereas available data do not support an effect of vitamin D alone....

  20. Calcium and bone disorders in pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shriraam Mahadevan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant transplacental calcium transfer occurs during pregnancy, especially during the last trimester, to meet the demands of the rapidly mineralizing fetal skeleton. Similarly, there is an obligate loss of calcium in the breast milk during lactation. Both these result in considerable stress on the bone mineral homeostasis in the mother. The maternal adaptive mechanisms to conserve calcium are different in pregnancy and lactation. During pregnancy, increased intestinal absorption of calcium from the gut mainly due to higher generation of calcitriol (1,25 dihydroxy vitamin D helps in maintaining maternal calcium levels. On the other hand, during lactation, the main compensatory mechanism is skeletal resorption due to increased generation of parathormone related peptide (PTHrP from the breast. Previous studies suggest that in spite of considerable changes in bone mineral metabolism during pregnancy, parity and lactation are not significantly associated with future risk for osteoporosis. However, in India, the situation may not be the same as a significant proportion of pregnancies occur in the early twenties when peak bone mass is not yet achieved. Further, malnutrition, anemia and vitamin D deficiency are commonly encountered in this age group. This may have an impact on future bone health of the mother. It may also probably provide an opportunity for health care providers for prevention. Other metabolic bone diseases like hypoparathyroidism, hyperparathyroidism and pseudohypoparathyroidism are rarely encountered in pregnancy. Their clinical implications and management are also discussed.