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Sample records for calcium 53

  1. Intravital imaging reveals p53-dependent cancer cell death induced by phototherapy via calcium signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Missiroli, Sonia; Poletti, Federica; Ramirez, Fabian Galindo; Morciano, Giampaolo; Morganti, Claudia; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Mammano, Fabio; Pinton, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    One challenge in biology is signal transduction monitoring in a physiological context. Intravital imaging techniques are revolutionizing our understanding of tumor and host cell behaviors in the tumor environment. However, these deep tissue imaging techniques have not yet been adopted to investigate the second messenger calcium (Ca2+). In the present study, we established conditions that allow the in vivo detection of Ca2+ signaling in three-dimensional tumor masses in mouse models. By combining intravital imaging and a skinfold chamber technique, we determined the ability of photodynamic cancer therapy to induce an increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentrations and, consequently, an increase in cell death in a p53-dependent pathway. PMID:25544762

  2. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Turn to calcium-fortified (or "calcium-set") tofu, soy milk, tempeh, soy yogurt, and cooked soybeans (edamame). Calcium-fortified foods. Look for calcium-fortified orange juice, soy or rice milk, breads, and cereal. Beans. You can get decent ...

  3. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and blood vessels contract and expand, to secrete hormones and enzymes and to send messages through the nervous system. It is important to get plenty of calcium in the foods you eat. Foods rich in calcium include Dairy products such as milk, cheese, and yogurt Leafy, green vegetables Fish with ...

  4. MCUR1-mediated mitochondrial calcium signaling facilitates cell survival of hepatocellular carcinoma via ROS-dependent P53 degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jinliang; Ren, Tingting; Wang, Jiaojiao; Zhang, Hui; Yuan, Peng; Zhu, Jianjun; Wu, Yousheng; Huang, Qichao; Guo, Xu; Zhang, Jing; Ji, Lele; Li, Jibin; Zhang, Hongxin; Yang, Hushan

    2017-09-22

    Levels of the Mitochondrial Calcium uniporter regulator 1 (MCUR1) increases during development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, mechanistic understanding of how mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis is remodeled and its functional roles remains limited in cancers, especially in HCC. MCUR1 was frequently upregulated in HCC cells to enhance the Ca2+ uptake into mitochondria in a MCU-dependent manner, which significantly facilitated cell survival by promoting cell proliferation and inhibiting mitochondria-dependent intrinsic apoptosis, and thus contributed to poor prognosis of HCC patients. In vivo assay confirmed these results, indicating that forced expression of MCUR1 significantly increased the fraction of Ki67-positive cells and reduced the positive TUNEL staining in xenograft tumors, while decreased MCUR1 expression was associated with impaired growth capacity of HCC cells in nude mice. The survival advantage conferred by MCUR1-mediated mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake was majorly caused by elevated mitochondrial ROS production and subsequent AKT/MDM2- mediated P53 degradation, which regulated the expression of apoptosis-related molecules BAX and BCL-2 and cell cycle-related molecules P21, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin E. Treatment with mitochondrial Ca2+-buffering protein parvalbumin significantly suppressed the growth of HCC cells. Conclusions & Innovation: Our study provides evidence supporting a possible tumor-promoting role for MCUR1-mediated mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake and uncovers a mechanism that links remodeling of mitochondrial Ca2+ homeostasis to cancer cell survival, which suggests a potential novel therapeutic target for HCC.

  5. Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from dietary supplements are linked to a greater risk of kidney stones, especially among older adults. But calcium from foods does not appear to cause kidney stones. For most people, other factors (such as not drinking enough fluids) probably have ...

  6. The calcium binding protein ALG-2 binds and stabilizes Scotin, a p53-inducible gene product localized at the endoplasmic reticulum membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draeby, Ingrid; Woods, Yvonne L; la Cour, Jonas Marstrand

    2007-01-01

    ALG-2 (apoptosis linked gene 2 product) is a calcium binding protein for which no clear cellular function has been established. In this study we identified Scotin as a novel ALG-2 target protein containing 6 PXY and 4 PYP repeats, earlier identified in the ALG-2 binding regions of AIP1/ALIX and TSG...

  7. Calcium - urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urinary Ca+2; Kidney stones - calcium in urine; Renal calculi - calcium in your urine; Parathyroid - calcium in urine ... Urine calcium level can help your provider: Decide on the best treatment for the most common type of kidney ...

  8. Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium carbonate is a dietary supplement used when the amount of calcium taken in the diet is not ... for healthy bones, muscles, nervous system, and heart. Calcium carbonate also is used as an antacid to relieve ...

  9. Calcium supplements

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007477.htm Calcium supplements To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. WHO SHOULD TAKE CALCIUM SUPPLEMENTS? Calcium is an important mineral for the ...

  10. Elemental calcium intake associated with calcium acetate/calcium carbonate in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Rosamund J; Copley, J Brian

    2017-01-01

    Calcium-based and non-calcium-based phosphate binders have similar efficacy in the treatment of hyperphosphatemia; however, calcium-based binders may be associated with hypercalcemia, vascular calcification, and adynamic bone disease. A post hoc analysis was carried out of data from a 16-week, Phase IV study of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) who switched to lanthanum carbonate monotherapy from baseline calcium acetate/calcium carbonate monotherapy. Of the intent-to-treat population (N=2520), 752 patients with recorded dose data for calcium acetate (n=551)/calcium carbonate (n=201) at baseline and lanthanum carbonate at week 16 were studied. Elemental calcium intake, serum phosphate, corrected serum calcium, and serum intact parathyroid hormone levels were analyzed. Of the 551 patients with calcium acetate dose data, 271 (49.2%) had an elemental calcium intake of at least 1.5 g/day at baseline, and 142 (25.8%) had an intake of at least 2.0 g/day. Mean (95% confidence interval [CI]) serum phosphate levels were 6.1 (5.89, 6.21) mg/dL at baseline and 6.2 (6.04, 6.38) mg/dL at 16 weeks; mean (95% CI) corrected serum calcium levels were 9.3 (9.16, 9.44) mg/dL and 9.2 (9.06, 9.34) mg/dL, respectively. Of the 201 patients with calcium carbonate dose data, 117 (58.2%) had an elemental calcium intake of at least 1.5 g/day, and 76 (37.8%) had an intake of at least 2.0 g/day. Mean (95% CI) serum phosphate levels were 5.8 (5.52, 6.06) mg/dL at baseline and 5.8 (5.53, 6.05) mg/dL at week 16; mean (95% CI) corrected serum calcium levels were 9.7 (9.15, 10.25) mg/dL and 9.2 (9.06, 9.34) mg/dL, respectively. Calcium acetate/calcium carbonate phosphate binders, taken to control serum phosphate levels, may result in high levels of elemental calcium intake. This may lead to complications related to calcium balance.

  11. Calcium Electroporation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gibot, Laure; Madi, Moinecha

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcium electroporation describes the use of high voltage electric pulses to introduce supraphysiological calcium concentrations into cells. This promising method is currently in clinical trial as an anti-cancer treatment. One very important issue is the relation between tumor cell kill...... efficacy-and normal cell sensitivity. METHODS: Using a 3D spheroid cell culture model we have tested the effect of calcium electroporation and electrochemotherapy using bleomycin on three different human cancer cell lines: a colorectal adenocarcinoma (HT29), a bladder transitional cell carcinoma (SW780......), and a breast adenocarcinoma (MDA-MB231), as well as on primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (HDF-n). RESULTS: The results showed a clear reduction in spheroid size in all three cancer cell spheroids three days after treatment with respectively calcium electroporation (p

  12. Inhibition of p53-induced apoptosis without affecting expression of p53-regulated genes

    OpenAIRE

    Lotem, Joseph; Gal, Hilah; Kama, Rachel; Amariglio, Ninette; Rechavi, Gideon; Domany, Eytan; Sachs, Leo; Givol, David

    2003-01-01

    Using DNA microarray and clustering of expressed genes we have analyzed the mechanism of inhibition of wild-type p53-induced apoptosis by the cytokine interleukin 6 (IL-6) and the calcium mobilizer thapsigargin (TG). Clustering analysis of 1,786 genes, the expression level of which changed after activation of wild-type p53 in the absence or presence of IL-6 or TG, showed that these compounds did not cause a general inhibition of the ability of p53 to up-regulate or down-regulate gene ex...

  13. p53 Isoforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoury, Marie P.; Bourdon, Jean-Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Normal function of the p53 pathway is ubiquitously lost in cancers either through mutation or inactivating interaction with viral or cellular proteins. However, it is difficult in clinical studies to link p53 mutation status to cancer treatment and clinical outcome, suggesting that the p53 pathway is not fully understood. We have recently reported that the human p53 gene expresses not only 1 but 12 different p53 proteins (isoforms) due to alternative splicing, alternative initiation of translation, and alternative promoter usage. p53 isoform proteins thus contain distinct protein domains. They are expressed in normal human tissues but are abnormally expressed in a wide range of cancer types. We have recently reported that p53 isoform expression is associated with breast cancer prognosis, suggesting that they play a role in carcinogenesis. Indeed, the cellular response to damages can be switched from cell cycle arrest to apoptosis by only manipulating p53 isoform expression. This may provide an explanation to the hitherto inconsistent relationship between p53 mutation, treatment response, and outcome in breast cancer. However, the molecular mechanism is still unknown. Recent reports suggest that it involves modulation of gene expression in a p53-dependent and -independent manner. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge about the biological activities of p53 isoforms and propose a molecular mechanism conciliating our current knowledge on p53 and integrating p63 and p73 isoforms in the p53 pathway. PMID:21779513

  14. Get Enough Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Calcium Print This Topic En español Get Enough Calcium Browse Sections The Basics Overview Foods and Vitamins ... women, don't get enough calcium. How much calcium do I need every day? Women: If you ...

  15. Calcium carbonate overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tums overdose; Calcium overdose ... Calcium carbonate can be dangerous in large amounts. ... Some products that contain calcium carbonate are certain: ... and mineral supplements Other products may also contain calcium ...

  16. Calcium paradox and calcium entry blockers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Slade, A.M.; Nayler, W.G.; Meijler, F.L.

    1984-01-01

    Reperfusion of isolated hearts with calcium-containing solution after a short period of calcium-free perfusion results in irreversible cell damage (calcium paradox). This phenomenon is characterized by an excessive influx of calcium into the cells, the rapid onset of myocardial contracture,

  17. S100A4 interacts with p53 in the nucleus and promotes p53 degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orre, L M; Panizza, E; Kaminskyy, V O; Vernet, E; Gräslund, T; Zhivotovsky, B; Lehtiö, J

    2013-12-05

    S100A4 is a small calcium-binding protein that is commonly overexpressed in a range of different tumor types, and it is widely accepted that S100A4 has an important role in the process of cancer metastasis. In vitro binding assays has shown that S100A4 interacts with the tumor suppressor protein p53, indicating that S100A4 may have additional roles in tumor development. In the present study, we show that endogenous S100A4 and p53 interact in complex samples, and that the interaction increases after inhibition of MDM2-dependent p53 degradation using Nutlin-3A. Further, using proximity ligation assay, we show that the interaction takes place in the cell nucleus. S100A4 knockdown experiments in two p53 wild-type cell lines, A549 and HeLa, resulted in stabilization of p53 protein, indicating that S100A4 is promoting p53 degradation. Finally, we demonstrate that S100A4 knockdown leads to p53-dependent cell cycle arrest and increased cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Thus, our data add a new layer to the oncogenic properties of S100A4 through its inhibition of p53-dependent processes.

  18. Coronary Calcium Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / Coronary Calcium Scan Coronary Calcium Scan Also known as Calcium Scan Test A coronary calcium scan is a CT scan of your heart that detects and measures the amount of calcium in the walls of your coronary arteries. Overview ...

  19. Calcium source (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getting enough calcium to keep bones from thinning throughout a person's life may be made more difficult if that person has ... as a tendency toward kidney stones, for avoiding calcium-rich food sources. Calcium deficiency also effects the ...

  20. Calcium and bones (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium is one of the most important minerals for the growth, maintenance, and reproduction of the human ... body, are continually being re-formed and incorporate calcium into their structure. Calcium is essential for the ...

  1. Calcium hydroxide poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hydrate - calcium; Lime milk; Slaked lime ... Calcium hydroxide ... These products contain calcium hydroxide: Cement Limewater Many industrial solvents and cleaners (hundreds to thousands of construction products, flooring strippers, brick cleaners, cement ...

  2. Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Patient / Caregiver Diseases & Conditions Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) Calcium Pyrophosphate Deposition (CPPD) Fast Facts The risk of ... young people, too. Proper diagnosis depends on detecting calcium pyrophosphate crystals in the fluid of an affected ...

  3. Calcium blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003477.htm Calcium blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The calcium blood test measures the level of calcium in the blood. ...

  4. Substitutions in Calcium Aluminates and Calcium Aluminoferrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALUMINUM COMPOUNDS, *CEMENTS, * CALCIUM COMPOUNDS, * FERRITES , *SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH, INFRARED SPECTROSCOPY, X RAY DIFFRACTION, CHEMICAL COMPOSITION, SUBSTITUTES, CHEMICAL ANALYSIS, ALKALI METAL COMPOUNDS.

  5. Expression of TP53 isoforms p53β or p53γ enhances chemosensitivity in TP53(null cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth Silden

    Full Text Available The carboxy-terminal truncated p53 alternative spliced isoforms, p53β and p53γ, are expressed at disparate levels in cancer and are suggested to influence treatment response and therapy outcome. However, their functional role in cancer remains to be elucidated. We investigated their individual functionality in the p53(null background of cell lines H1299 and SAOS-2 by stable retroviral transduction or transient transfection. Expression status of p53β and p53γ protein was found to correlate with increased response to camptothecin and doxorubicin chemotherapy. Decreased DNA synthesis and clonogenicity in p53β and p53γ congenic H1299 was accompanied by increased p21((CIP1/WAF1, Bax and Mdm2 proteins. Chemotherapy induced p53 isoform degradation, most prominent for p53γ. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib substantially increased basal p53γ protein level, while the level of p53β protein was unaffected. Treatment with dicoumarol, a putative blocker of the proteasome-related NAD(PH quinone oxidoreductase NQO1, effectively attenuated basal p53γ protein level in spite of bortezomib treatment. Although in vitro proliferation and clonogenicity assays indicated a weak suppressive effect by p53β and p53γ expression, studies of in vivo subcutaneous H1299 tumor growth demonstrated a significantly increased growth by expression of either p53 isoforms. This study suggests that p53β and p53γ share functionality in chemosensitizing and tumor growth enhancement but comprise distinct regulation at the protein level.

  6. OTUD5 regulates p53 stability by deubiquitinating p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judong Luo

    Full Text Available The p53 tumour suppressor protein is a transcription factor that prevents oncogenic progression by activating the expression of apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest genes in stressed cells. The stability of p53 is tightly regulated by ubiquitin-dependent degradation, driven mainly by its negative regulators ubiquitin ligase MDM2.In this study, we have identified OTUD5 as a DUB that interacts with and deubiquitinates p53. OTUD5 forms a direct complex with p53 and controls level of ubiquitination. The function of OTUD5 is required to allow the rapid activation of p53-dependent transcription and a p53-dependent apoptosis in response to DNA damage stress.As a novel deubiquitinating enzyme for p53, OTUD5 is required for the stabilization and the activation of a p53 response.

  7. Calcium channel blocker overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002580.htm Calcium-channel blocker overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Calcium-channel blockers are a type of medicine used to ...

  8. Fenoprofen calcium overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002649.htm Fenoprofen calcium overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Fenoprofen calcium is a type of medicine called a nonsteroidal ...

  9. Calcium and Mitosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, P.

    1983-01-01

    Although the mechanism of calcium regulation is not understood, there is evidence that calcium plays a role in mitosis. Experiments conducted show that: (1) the spindle apparatus contains a highly developed membrane system that has many characteristics of sarcoplasmic reticulum of muscle; (2) this membrane system contains calcium; and (3) there are ionic fluxes occurring during mitosis which can be seen by a variety of fluorescence probes. Whether the process of mitosis can be modulated by experimentally modulating calcium is discussed.

  10. Calcium en cardioplegie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruigrok, T.J.C.; Meijler, F.L.

    1985-01-01

    Coronary perfusion with a calcium-free solution, followed by reperfusion with a calcium containing solution, may result in acute myocardial cell death and in irreversible loss of the e1ectrical and mechanical activity of the heart. This phenomenon is known as the calcium paradox. A number of

  11. p53-based Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, David P.; Cheok, Chit Fang; Lain, Sonia

    2010-01-01

    Inactivation of p53 functions is an almost universal feature of human cancer cells. This has spurred a tremendous effort to develop p53 based cancer therapies. Gene therapy using wild-type p53, delivered by adenovirus vectors, is now in widespread use in China. Other biologic approaches include the development of oncolytic viruses designed to replicate and kill only p53 defective cells and also the development of siRNA and antisense RNA's that activate p53 by inhibiting the function of the negative regulators Mdm2, MdmX, and HPV E6. The altered processing of p53 that occurs in tumor cells can elicit T-cell and B-cell responses to p53 that could be effective in eliminating cancer cells and p53 based vaccines are now in clinical trial. A number of small molecules that directly or indirectly activate the p53 response have also reached the clinic, of which the most advanced are the p53 mdm2 interaction inhibitors. Increased understanding of the p53 response is also allowing the development of powerful drug combinations that may increase the selectivity and safety of chemotherapy, by selective protection of normal cells and tissues. PMID:20463003

  12. Calcium channel blocker poisoning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miran Brvar

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calcium channel blockers act at L-type calcium channels in cardiac and vascular smooth muscles by preventing calcium influx into cells with resultant decrease in vascular tone and cardiac inotropy, chronotropy and dromotropy. Poisoning with calcium channel blockers results in reduced cardiac output, bradycardia, atrioventricular block, hypotension and shock. The findings of hypotension and bradycardia should suggest poisoning with calcium channel blockers.Conclusions: Treatment includes immediate gastric lavage and whole-bowel irrigation in case of ingestion of sustainedrelease products. All patients should receive an activated charcoal orally. Specific treatment includes calcium, glucagone and insulin, which proved especially useful in shocked patients. Supportive care including the use of catecholamines is not always effective. In the setting of failure of pharmacological therapy transvenous pacing, balloon pump and cardiopulmonary by-pass may be necessary.

  13. 48 CFR 6101.53 - Accelerated procedure [Rule 53].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accelerated procedure . 6101.53 Section 6101.53 Federal Acquisition Regulations System CIVILIAN BOARD OF CONTRACT APPEALS... monetary amount in dispute and that amount is $100,000 or less. Such election shall be made no later than...

  14. Pseudogout and Calcium Pyrophosphate Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Williamson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 53-year-old male presented with worsening right knee pain and swelling over the past 48 hours. He denied recent trauma to the knee, history of IV drug use, and recent illness. He had no history of diabetes, immunodeficiency, chronic steroids, rheumatologic disease, or knee replacement. He described the pain as sharp, non-radiating, and worse with movement. He was unable to walk due to pain. Significant findings: Radiographs of the knee showed multiple radio-dense lines paralleling the articular surface (see red arrows consistent with calcium pyrophosphate crystal deposition within the joint often seen in calcium pyrophosphate disease (CPPD also known as pseudogout. Discussion: Patients commonly present to the emergency department with non-traumatic joint pain. Arthrocentesis is an important diagnostic tool to evaluate for septic arthritis, gout, or pseudogout. Arthrocentesis can demonstrate crystals or abnormal cell count, gram stain, and culture.[1] In the evaluation of joint pain, plain films are usually obtained to evaluate for fracture, dislocation, effusion, or secondary signs of infection. In this case the classic x-ray supported the diagnosis of CPPD.2 The patient was found to have positively birefringent rhomboid shaped crystals consistent with pseudogout on arthrocentesis. Gram stain and culture were both negative. The patient was discharged with NSAIDs and had significant improvement in symptoms upon follow up with primary care physician in 3 days.

  15. CH-53K Heavy Lift Replacement Helicopter (CH-53K)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Selected Acquisition Report (SAR) RCS: DD-A&T(Q&A)823-390 CH-53K Heavy Lift Replacement Helicopter (CH-53K) As of FY 2017 President’s Budget...December 2015 SAR March 4, 2016 10:04:18 UNCLASSIFIED 4 Col Henry Vanderborght PMA-261 Heavy Lift Helicopters Program Executive Office - Air, Anti...757-5780 Fax: 301-757-5109 DSN Phone: 757-5780 DSN Fax: 757-5109 Date Assigned: May 29, 2014 Program Information Program Name CH-53K Heavy Lift

  16. Acidosis and Urinary Calcium Excretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, R Todd; Cordat, Emmanuelle; Chambrey, Régine

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic acidosis is associated with increased urinary calcium excretion and related sequelae, including nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis. The increased urinary calcium excretion induced by metabolic acidosis predominantly results from increased mobilization of calcium out of bone and inhibi...

  17. Calcium and bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eat in their diet. Vitamin D is the hormone that helps the gut absorb more calcium. Many older adults have common risks that make bone health worse. Calcium intake in the diet (milk, cheese, yogurt) is low. Vitamin D levels are ...

  18. Calcium D-saccharate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garcia, André Castilho; Hedegaard, Martina Vavrusova; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt

    2016-01-01

    Molar conductivity of saturated aqueous solutions of calcium d-saccharate, used as a stabilizer of beverages fortified with calcium d-gluconate, increases strongly upon dilution, indicating complex formation between calcium and d-saccharate ions, for which, at 25 °C, Kassoc = 1032 ± 80, ΔHassoc......° = -34 ± 6 kJ mol-1, and ΔSassoc° = -55 ± 9 J mol-1 K-1, were determined electrochemically. Calcium d-saccharate is sparingly soluble, with a solubility product, Ksp, of (6.17 ± 0.32) × 10-7 at 25 °C, only moderately increasing with the temperature: ΔHsol° = 48 ± 2 kJ mol-1, and ΔSassoc° = 42 ± 7 J mol-1...... K-1. Equilibria in supersaturated solutions of calcium d-saccharate seem only to adjust slowly, as seen from calcium activity measurements in calcium d-saccharate solutions made supersaturated by cooling. Solutions formed by isothermal dissolution of calcium d-gluconate in aqueous potassium d...

  19. Extracellular Calcium and Magnesium

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. The cause of preeclampsia remains unknown and calcium and magnesium supplement are being suggested as means of prevention. The objective of this study was to assess magnesium and calcium in the plasma and cerebrospinal fluid of Nigerian women with preedamp sia and eclampsia. Setting was ...

  20. HYPERTHERMIA, INTRACELLULAR FREE CALCIUM AND CALCIUM IONOPHORES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    STEGE, GJJ; WIERENGA, PK; KAMPINGA, HH; KONINGS, AWT

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that heat-induced increase of intracellular calcium does not correlate with hyperthermic cell killing. Six different cell lines were investigated; in four (EAT, HeLa S3, L5178Y-R and L5178Y-S) heat treatments killing 90% of the cells did not affect the levels of intracellular free

  1. Proteomic analysis of a rare urinary stone composed of calcium carbonate and calcium oxalate dihydrate: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Kiyoko; Matsuta, Yosuke; Moriyama, Manabu; Yasuda, Makoto; Chishima, Noriharu; Yamaoka, Noriko; Fukuuchi, Tomoko; Miyazawa, Katsuhito; Suzuki, Koji

    2014-03-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the matrix protein of a rare urinary stone that contained calcium carbonate. A urinary stone was extracted from a 34-year-old male patient with metabolic alkalosis. After X-ray diffractometry and infrared analysis of the stone, proteomic analysis was carried out. The resulting mass spectra were evaluated with protein search software, and matrix proteins were identified. X-ray diffraction and infrared analysis confirmed that the stone contained calcium carbonate and calcium oxalate dihydrate. Of the identified 53 proteins, 24 have not been previously reported from calcium oxalate- or calcium phosphate-containing stones. The protease inhibitors and several proteins related to cell adhesion or the cytoskeleton were identified for the first time. We analyzed in detail a rare urinary stone composed of calcium carbonate and calcium oxalate dihydrate. Considering the formation of a calcium carbonate stone, the new identified proteins should play an important role on the urolithiasis process in alkaline condition. © 2013 The Japanese Urological Association.

  2. Calcium sensing in exocytosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Wu, Bingbing; Han, Weiping

    2012-01-01

    Neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones are released through regulated exocytosis of synaptic vesicles and large dense core vesicles. This complex and highly regulated process is orchestrated by SNAREs and their associated proteins. The triggering signal for regulated exocytosis is usually...... an increase in intracellular calcium levels. Besides the triggering role, calcium signaling modulates the precise amount and kinetics of vesicle release. Thus, it is a central question to understand the molecular machineries responsible for calcium sensing in exocytosis. Here we provide an overview of our...

  3. Bone repair in calcium-deficient rats: comparison of xylitol+calcium carbonate with calcium carbonate, calcium lactate and calcium citrate on the repletion of calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hämäläinen, M M

    1994-06-01

    The potential value of xylitol in calcium therapy was evaluated by comparing the effect of dietary xylitol (50 g/kg diet) + calcium carbonate with the effects of calcium carbonate, calcium lactate and calcium citrate on bone repair of young male rats after the rats consumed for 3 wk a calcium-deficient diet (0.2 g Ca/kg diet). After this calcium-depletion period, the rats were fed for 2 wk one of four diets, each containing 5 g Ca/kg diet as one of the four dietary calcium sources. The diet of the control animals was supplemented with CaCO3 (5 g Ca/kg diet) throughout the study. The Ca-deficient rats showed low bone mass, low serum calcium and high serum 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, parathyroid hormone (1-34 fraction) and osteocalcin concentrations. They also excreted magnesium, phosphate and hydroxyproline in the urine in high concentrations, and had high bone alkaline phosphatase and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase activities. Most of these changes were reversed by the administered of the calcium salts. The highest recoveries of femoral dry weight, calcium, magnesium and phosphate were observed in the groups receiving xylitol+CaCO3 and calcium lactate. Calcium lactate and calcium citrate caused low serum phosphate concentration compared with rats receiving CaCO3 and with the age-matched Ca-replete controls. Xylitol-treated rats excreted more calcium and magnesium in urine than did the other rats, probably due to increased absorption of these minerals from the gut. These results suggest that dietary xylitol improves the bioavailability of calcium salts.

  4. Calcium – how and why?

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Calcium is among the most commonly used ions, in a multitude of biological functions, so much so that it is impossible to imagine life without calcium. In this article I have attempted to address the question as to how calcium has achieved this status with a brief mention of the history of calcium research in biology. It appears ...

  5. Calcium and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Milk Allergy Figuring Out Food Labels What's a Vegetarian? Osteoporosis Minerals Your Bones Mineral Chart Vitamin D ... Need to Drink Milk? Lactose Intolerance Becoming a Vegetarian Soy Foods and Health Calcium Bones, Muscles, and ...

  6. Stoichiometry of Calcium Medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    The topic of calcium supplement and its effects on human lives is presented in the way of questions to the students. It enables the students to realize the relevance of chemistry outside the classroom surrounding.

  7. Magnesium, calcium and cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Anghileri, Leopoldo J

    2009-01-01

    Magnesium ion (Mg(2+)) and calcium ion (Ca(2+)) control a diverse and important range of cellular processes, such as gene transcription, cell proliferation, neoplastic transformation, immune response and therapeutic treatment...

  8. 53

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    échapper à son contrôle. 4. La participation de la société civile. La situation avant 1990 était assez simple: une société civile réduite à un clergé condescendant, un syndicat unique affilié au parti unique, une absence d'association et d'ONG .

  9. Stability of p53 homologs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Brandt

    Full Text Available Most proteins have not evolved for maximal thermal stability. Some are only marginally stable, as for example, the DNA-binding domains of p53 and its homologs, whose kinetic and thermodynamic stabilities are strongly correlated. Here, we applied high-throughput methods using a real-time PCR thermocycler to study the stability of several full-length orthologs and paralogs of the p53 family of transcription factors, which have diverse functions, ranging from tumour suppression to control of developmental processes. From isothermal denaturation fluorimetry and differential scanning fluorimetry, we found that full-length proteins showed the same correlation between kinetic and thermodynamic stability as their isolated DNA-binding domains. The stabilities of the full-length p53 orthologs were marginal and correlated with the temperature of their organism, paralleling the stability of the isolated DNA-binding domains. Additionally, the paralogs p63 and p73 were significantly more stable and long-lived than p53. The short half-life of p53 orthologs and the greater persistence of the paralogs may be biologically relevant.

  10. Modeling oscillatory control in NF-¿B, p53 and Wnt signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mengel, Benedicte; Hunziker, Alexander; Pedersen, Lykke

    2010-01-01

    Oscillations are commonly observed in cellular behavior and span a wide range of timescales, from seconds in calcium signaling to 24 hours in circadian rhythms. In between lie oscillations with time periods of 1-5 hours seen in NF-¿B, p53 and Wnt signaling, which play key roles in the immune system...

  11. [Calcium suppletion for patients who use gastric acid inhibitors: calcium citrate or calcium carbonate?].

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jonge, H.J. de; Gans, R.O.; Huls, G.A.

    2012-01-01

    Various calcium supplements are available for patients who have an indication for calcium suppletion. American guidelines and UpToDate recommend prescribing calcium citrate to patients who use antacids The rationale for this advice is that water-insoluble calcium carbonate needs acid for adequate

  12. Calcium in plant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Schwartau

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper gives the review on the role of calcium in many physiological processes of plant organisms, including growth and development, protection from pathogenic influences, response to changing environmental factors, and many other aspects of plant physiology. Initial intake of calcium ions is carried out by Ca2+-channels of plasma membrane and they are further transported by the xylem owing to auxins’ attractive ability. The level of intake and selectivity of calcium transport to ove-ground parts of the plant is controlled by a symplast. Ca2+enters to the cytoplasm of endoderm cells through calcium channels on the cortical side of Kaspary bands, and is redistributed inside the stele by the symplast, with the use of Ca2+-АТPases and Ca2+/Н+-antiports. Owing to regulated expression and activity of these calcium transporters, calclum can be selectively delivered to the xylem. Important role in supporting calcium homeostasis is given to the vacuole which is the largest depo of calcium. Regulated quantity of calcium movement through the tonoplast is provided by a number of potential-, ligand-gated active transporters and channels, like Ca2+-ATPase and Ca2+/H+ exchanger. They are actively involved in the inactivation of the calcium signal by pumping Ca2+ to the depo of cells. Calcium ATPases are high affinity pumps that efficiently transfer calcium ions against the concentration gradient in their presence in the solution in nanomolar concentrations. Calcium exchangers are low affinity, high capacity Ca2+ transporters that are effectively transporting calcium after raising its concentration in the cell cytosol through the use of protons gradients. Maintaining constant concentration and participation in the response to stimuli of different types also involves EPR, plastids, mitochondria, and cell wall. Calcium binding proteins contain several conserved sequences that provide sensitivity to changes in the concentration of Ca2+ and when you

  13. In vitro calcium availability in bakery products fortified with tuna bone powder as a natural calcium source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, Mahnaz; Kamilah, Hanisah; Huda, Nurul; Ariffin, Fazilah

    2015-08-01

    Avoidance of dairy products due to lactose intolerance can lead to insufficiency of calcium (Ca) in the body. In an approach to address this problem, tuna bone powder (TBP) was formulated as a calcium supplement to fortify bakery products. In a study, TBP recovered by alkaline treatment contained 38.16 g/100 g of calcium and 23.31 g/100 g of phosphorus. The ratio of Ca:P that was close to 2:1 was hence comparable to that in human bones. The availability of calcium in TBP was 53.93%, which was significantly higher than most calcium salts, tricalcium phosphate (TCP) being the exception. In vitro availability of calcium in TBP-fortified cookies or TCP-fortified cookies were comparable at 38.9% and 39.5%, respectively. These values were higher than the readings from TBP-fortified bread (36.7%) or TCP-fortified bread (37.4%). Sensory evaluation of bakery products containing TBP or TCP elicited comparable scores for the two additives from test panels. Hence, TBP could be used in the production of high calcium bakery products that would enjoy consumer acceptance.

  14. [Microbial geochemical calcium cycle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavarzin, G A

    2002-01-01

    The participation of microorganisms in the geochemical calcium cycle is the most important factor maintaining neutral conditions on the Earth. This cycle has profound influence on the fate of inorganic carbon, and, thereby, on the removal of CO2 from the atmosphere. The major part of calcium deposits was formed in the Precambrian, when prokaryotic biosphere predominated. After that, calcium recycling based on biogenic deposition by skeletal organisms became the main process. Among prokaryotes, only a few representatives, e.g., cyanobacteria, exhibit a special calcium function. The geochemical calcium cycle is made possible by the universal features of bacteria involved in biologically mediated reactions and is determined by the activities of microbial communities. In the prokaryotic system, the calcium cycle begins with the leaching of igneous rock predominantly through the action of the community of organotrophic organisms. The release of carbon dioxide to the soil air by organotrophic aerobes leads to leaching with carbonic acid and soda salinization. Under anoxic conditions, of major importance is the organic acid production by primary anaerobes (fermentative microorganisms). Calcium carbonate is precipitated by secondary anaerobes (sulfate reducers) and to a smaller degree by methanogens. The role of the cyanobacterial community in carbonate deposition is exposed by stromatolites, which are the most common organo-sedimentary Precambrian structures. Deposition of carbonates in cyanobacterial mats as a consequence of photoassimilation of CO2 does not appear to be a significant process. It is argued that carbonates were deposited at the boundary between the "soda continent", which emerged as a result of subaerial leaching with carbonic acid, and the ocean containing Ca2+. Such ecotones provided favorable conditions for the development of the benthic cyanobacterial community, which was a precursor of stromatolites.

  15. Vulture News - Vol 53 (2005)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The advantages and disadvantages of vulture restaurants versus simply leaving livestock (and game) carcasses in the veldt · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Mark D Anderson, Angus Anthony, 42-45. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/vulnew.v53i1.37635 ...

  16. Calcium orthophosphates in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V

    2013-06-01

    Dental caries, also known as tooth decay or a cavity, remains a major public health problem in the most communities even though the prevalence of disease has decreased since the introduction of fluorides for dental care. Therefore, biomaterials to fill dental defects appear to be necessary to fulfill customers' needs regarding the properties and the processing of the products. Bioceramics and glass-ceramics are widely used for these purposes, as dental inlays, onlays, veneers, crowns or bridges. Calcium orthophosphates belong to bioceramics but they have some specific advantages over other types of bioceramics due to a chemical similarity to the inorganic part of both human and mammalian bones and teeth. Therefore, calcium orthophosphates (both alone and as components of various formulations) are used in dentistry as both dental fillers and implantable scaffolds. This review provides brief information on calcium orthophosphates and describes in details current state-of-the-art on their applications in dentistry and dentistry-related fields. Among the recognized dental specialties, calcium orthophosphates are most frequently used in periodontics; however, the majority of the publications on calcium orthophosphates in dentistry are devoted to unspecified "dental" fields.

  17. p53 isoform Δ113p53 is a p53 target gene that antagonizes p53 apoptotic activity via BclxL activation in zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Jun; Ng, Sok Meng; Chang, Changqing; Zhang, Zhenhai; Bourdon, Jean-Christophe; Lane, David P; Peng, Jinrong

    2009-01-01

    p53 is a well-known tumor suppressor and is also involved in processes of organismal aging and developmental control. A recent exciting development in the p53 field is the discovery of various p53 isoforms. One p53 isoform is human Δ133p53 and its zebrafish counterpart Δ113p53. These N-terminal-truncated p53 isoforms are initiated from an alternative p53 promoter, but their expression regulation and physiological significance at the organismal level are not well understood. We show here that ...

  18. Risk factors for calcium carbonate urolithiasis in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwaokorie, Eugene E; Osborne, Carl A; Lulich, Jody P; Fletcher, Thomas F; Ulrich, Lisa K; Koehler, Lori A; Buettner, Michelle T

    2015-08-01

    To identify demographic or signalment factors associated with calcium carbonate urolith formation in goats. Retrospective case series and case-control study. 354 goats with calcium carbonate uroliths (case animals) and 16,366 goats without urinary tract disease (control animals). Medical records of the Minnesota Urolith Center were reviewed to identify case goats for which samples were submitted between January 1, 1984, and December 31, 2012. Control goats evaluated at US veterinary teaching hospitals in the same time period were identified by searching Veterinary Medical Database records. Age, breed, sex, reproductive status, geographic location, season, and anatomic location of collected uroliths were analyzed to identify risk or protective factors associated with calcium carbonate urolithiasis. Nigerian dwarf goats had higher odds of developing calcium carbonate uroliths than did Pygmy goats (reference group). Several breeds had lower odds of this finding, compared with Pygmy goats; odds were lowest for mixed, Anglo-Nubian, and Toggenburg breeds. Breeds of African origin (Pygmy, Nigerian Dwarf, and Boer) comprised 146 of 275 (53%) case goats with data available. Goats of African descent had a higher risk of developing calcium carbonate uroliths than did goats of non-African descent (reference group). Males and neutered goats had higher odds of calcium carbonate urolithiasis, compared with females and sexually intact goats, respectively. Age category, geographic location, and season were associated with detection of calcium carbonate uroliths. Goats with calcium carbonate uroliths were typically neutered males, > 1 year of age, and of African descent. This study identified factors associated with calcium carbonate urolithiasis in goats; however, these associations do not allow conclusions regarding cause-and-effect relationships.

  19. Calcium Signalling: Fishing Out Molecules of Mitochondrial Calcium Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Hajnóczky, György; Csordás, György

    2010-01-01

    Cellular energy metabolism, survival and death are controlled by mitochondrial calcium signals originating in the cytoplasm. Now, RNAi studies link three proteins — MICU1, NCLX and LETM1 — to the previously unknown molecular mechanism of mitochondrial calcium transport.

  20. Gravimetric Determination of Calcium as Calcium Carbonate Hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrickson, Charles H.; Robinson, Paul R.

    1979-01-01

    The gravimetric determination of calcium as calcium carbonate is described. This experiment is suitable for undergraduate quantitative analysis laboratories. It is less expensive than determination of chloride as silver chloride. (BB)

  1. First Quantification of Calcium Intake from Calcium-Dense Dairy Products in Dutch Fracture Patients (The Delft Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter van den Berg

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Recommendations for daily calcium intake from dairy products are variable and based on local consensus. To investigate whether patients with a recent fracture complied with these recommendations, we quantified the daily dairy calcium intake including milk, milk drinks, pudding, yoghurt, and cheese in a Dutch cohort of fracture patients and compared outcomes with recent data of a healthy U.S. cohort (80% Caucasians. An observational study analyzed dairy calcium intakes of 1526 female and 372 male Dutch fracture patients older than 50. On average, participants reported three dairy servings per day, independently of age, gender or population density. Median calcium intake from dairy was 790 mg/day in females and males. Based on dairy products alone, 11.3% of women and 14.2% of men complied with Dutch recommendations for calcium intake (adults ≤ 70 years: 1100 mg/day and >70 years: 1200 mg/day. After including 450 mg calcium from basic nutrition, compliance raised to 60.5% and 59.1%, respectively, compared to 53.2% in the U.S. cohort. Daily dairy calcium intake is not associated with femoral neck bone mineral density (BMD T-scores or WHO Fracture Assessment Tool (FRAX risk scores for major fracture or hip fracture. However, when sub analyzing the male cohort, these associations were weakly negative. The prevalence of maternal hip fracture was a factor for current fracture risks, both in women and men. While daily dairy calcium intake of Dutch fracture patients was well below the recommended dietary intake, it was comparable to intakes in a healthy U.S. cohort. This questions recommendations for adding more additional dairy products to preserve adult skeletal health, particularly when sufficient additional calcium is derived from adequate non-dairy nutrition.

  2. Children's Bone Health and Calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Share Dialog × Print Children's Bone Health and Calcium: Condition Information What is bone health and how ... straight, walk, run, and lead an active life. Calcium is one of the key dietary building blocks ...

  3. Stable prenucleation calcium carbonate clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Gebauer, Denis; Völkel, Antje; Cölfen, Helmut

    2008-01-01

    Calcium carbonate forms scales, geological deposits, biominerals, and ocean sediments. Huge amounts of carbon dioxide are retained as carbonate ions, and calcium ions represent a major contribution to water hardness. Despite its relevance, little is known about the precipitation mechanism of calcium carbonate, and specified complex crystal structures challenge the classical view on nucleation considering the formation of metastable ion clusters. We demonstrate that dissolved calcium carbonate...

  4. Assay for calcium channels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glossmann, H.; Ferry, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter focuses on biochemical assays for Ca/sup 2 +/-selective channels in electrically excitable membranes which are blocked in electrophysiological and pharmacological experiments by verapamil, 1,4-dihydropyridines, diltiazen (and various other drugs), as well as inorganic di- or trivalent cations. The strategy employed is to use radiolabeled 1,4-dihydropyridine derivatives which block calcium channels with ED/sub 50/ values in the nanomolar range. Although tritiated d-cis-diltiazem and verapamil can be used to label calcium channels, the 1,4-dihydropyridines offer numerous advantages. The various sections cover tissue specificity of channel labeling, the complex interactions of divalent cations with the (/sup 3/H)nimodipine-labeled calcium channels, and the allosteric regulation of (/sup 3/H)nimodipine binding by the optically pure enantiomers of phenylalkylamine and benzothiazepine calcium channel blockers. A comparison of the properties of different tritiated 1,4-dihydropyridine radioligands and the iodinated channel probe (/sup 125/I)iodipine is given.

  5. Solar Imagery - Chromosphere - Calcium

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset consists of full-disk images of the sun in Calcium (Ca) II K wavelength (393.4 nm). Ca II K imagery reveal magnetic structures of the sun from about 500...

  6. The Plasma Membrane Calcium Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, H.

    1983-01-01

    Three aspect of cellular calcium metabolism in animal cells was discussed including the importance of the plasma membrane in calcium homeostasis, experiments dealing with the actual mechanism of the calcium pump, and the function of the pump in relationship to the mitochondria and to the function of calmodulin in the intact cell.

  7. Calcium addition in straw gasification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risnes, H.; Fjellerup, Jan Søren; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2003-01-01

    The present work focuses on the influence of calcium addition in gasification. The inorganic¿organic element interaction as well as the detailed inorganic¿inorganic elements interaction has been studied. The effect of calcium addition as calcium sugar/molasses solutions to straw significantly...

  8. Impregnating Coal With Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pramod K.; Voecks, Gerald E.; Gavalas, George R.

    1991-01-01

    Relatively inexpensive process proposed for impregnating coal with calcium carbonate to increase rates of gasification and combustion of coal and to reduce emission of sulfur by trapping sulfur in calcium sulfide. Process involves aqueous-phase reactions between carbon dioxide (contained within pore network of coal) and calcium acetate. Coal impregnated with CO2 by exposing it to CO2 at high pressure.

  9. Acetylation Is Indispensable for p53 Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Yi; Zhao, Wenhui; Chen, Yue; Zhao, Yingming; Gu, Wei

    2008-01-01

    The activation of the tumor suppressor p53 facilitates the cellular response to genotoxic stress; however, the p53 response can only be executed if its interaction with its inhibitor Mdm2 is abolished. There have been conflicting reports on the question of whether p53 posttranslational modifications, such as phosphorylation or acetylation, are essential or only play a subtle, fine-tuning role in the p53 response. Thus, it remains unclear whether p53 modification is absolutely required for its...

  10. Extracellular ATP Induces Calcium Signaling in Odontoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, B M; Jo, H; Park, G; Kim, Y H; Park, C K; Jung, S J; Chung, G; Oh, S B

    2017-02-01

    Odontoblasts form dentin at the outermost surface of tooth pulp. An increasing level of evidence in recent years, along with their locational advantage, implicates odontoblasts as a secondary role as sensory or immune cells. Extracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a well-characterized signaling molecule in the neuronal and immune systems, and its potential involvement in interodontoblast communications was recently demonstrated. In an effort to elaborate the ATP-mediated signaling pathway in odontoblasts, the current study performed single-cell reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunofluorescent detection to investigate the expression of ATP receptors related to calcium signal in odontoblasts from incisal teeth of 8- to 10-wk-old rats, and demonstrated an in vitro response to ATP application via calcium imaging experiments. While whole tissue RT-PCR analysis detected P2Y2, P2Y4, and all 7 subtypes (P2X1 to P2X7) in tooth pulp, single-cell RT-PCR analysis of acutely isolated rat odontoblasts revealed P2Y2, P2Y4, P2X2, P2X4, P2X6, and P2X7 expression in only a subset (23% to 47%) of cells tested, with no evidence for P2X1, P2X3, and P2X5 expression. An increase of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration in response to 100μM ATP, which was repeated after pretreatment of thapsigargin or under the Ca(2+)-free condition, suggested function of both ionotropic and metabotropic ATP receptors in odontoblasts. The enhancement of ATP-induced calcium response by ivermectin and inhibition by 5-(3-bromophenyl)-1,3-dihydro-2H-benzofuro[3,2-e]-1,4-diazepin-2-one (5-BDBD) confirmed a functional P2X4 subtype in odontoblasts. Positive calcium response to 2',3'-O-(benzoyl-4-benzoyl)-ATP (BzATP) and negative response to α,β-methylene ATP suggested P2X2, P2X4, and P2X7 as functional subunits in rat odontoblasts. Single-cell RT-PCR analysis of the cells with confirmed calcium response and immunofluorescent detection further corroborated the expression of P2X

  11. Pathologies Associated with the p53 Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudkov, Andrei V.; Komarova, Elena A.

    2010-01-01

    Although p53 is a major cancer preventive factor, under certain extreme stress conditions it may induce severe pathologies. Analyses of animal models indicate that p53 is largely responsible for the toxicity of ionizing radiation or DNA damaging drugs contributing to hematopoietic component of acute radiation syndrome and largely determining severe adverse effects of cancer treatment. p53-mediated damage is strictly tissue specific and occurs in tissues prone to p53-dependent apoptosis (e.g., hematopoietic system and hair follicles); on the contrary, p53 can serve as a survival factor in tissues that respond to p53 activation by cell cycle arrest (e.g., endothelium of small intestine). There are multiple experimental indications that p53 contributes to pathogenicity of acute ischemic diseases. Temporary reversible suppression of p53 by small molecules can be an effective and safe approach to reduce severity of p53-associated pathologies. PMID:20595398

  12. Arginine methylation regulates the p53 response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jansson, Martin; Durant, Stephen T; Cho, Er-Chieh

    2008-01-01

    Activation of the p53 tumour suppressor protein in response to DNA damage leads to apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest. Enzymatic modifications are widely believed to affect and regulate p53 activity. We describe here a level of post-translational control that has an important functional consequence...... on the p53 response. We show that the protein arginine methyltransferase (PRMT) 5, as a co-factor in a DNA damage responsive co-activator complex that interacts with p53, is responsible for methylating p53. Arginine methylation is regulated during the p53 response and affects the target gene specificity...... of p53. Furthermore, PRMT5 depletion triggers p53-dependent apoptosis. Thus, methylation on arginine residues is an underlying mechanism of control during the p53 response....

  13. Calcium signaling in taste cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medler, Kathryn F

    2015-09-01

    The sense of taste is a common ability shared by all organisms and is used to detect nutrients as well as potentially harmful compounds. Thus taste is critical to survival. Despite its importance, surprisingly little is known about the mechanisms generating and regulating responses to taste stimuli. All taste responses depend on calcium signals to generate appropriate responses which are relayed to the brain. Some taste cells have conventional synapses and rely on calcium influx through voltage-gated calcium channels. Other taste cells lack these synapses and depend on calcium release to formulate an output signal through a hemichannel. Beyond establishing these characteristics, few studies have focused on understanding how these calcium signals are formed. We identified multiple calcium clearance mechanisms that regulate calcium levels in taste cells as well as a calcium influx that contributes to maintaining appropriate calcium homeostasis in these cells. Multiple factors regulate the evoked taste signals with varying roles in different cell populations. Clearly, calcium signaling is a dynamic process in taste cells and is more complex than has previously been appreciated. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 13th European Symposium on Calcium. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. DISTILLATION OF CALCIUM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, J.

    1954-07-27

    This invention relates to an improvement in the process for the purification of caicium or magnesium containing an alkali metal as impurity, which comprises distiiling a batch of the mixture in two stages, the first stage distillation being carried out in the presence of an inert gas at an absolute pressure substantially greater than the vapor pressure of calcium or maguesium at the temperature of distillation, but less than the vaper pressure at that temperature of the alkali metal impurity so that only the alkali metal is vaporized and condensed on a condensing surface. A second stage distilso that substantially only the calcium or magnesium distills under its own vapor pressure only and condenses in solid form on a lower condensing surface.

  15. Calcium metabolism and cardiovascular function after spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Daniel C.; Yue, Qi; Dierickx, Jacqueline; Roullet, Chantal; Otsuka, Keiichi; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Coste, Sarah; Roullet, Jean Baptiste; Phanouvang, Thongchan; Orwoll, Eric; hide

    2002-01-01

    To determine the influence of dietary calcium on spaceflight-induced alterations in calcium metabolism and blood pressure (BP), 9-wk-old spontaneously hypertensive rats, fed either high- (2%) or low-calcium (0.02%) diets, were flown on an 18-day shuttle flight. On landing, flight animals had increased ionized calcium (P platelet free calcium (intracellular calcium concentration) were also reduced (P metabolism (P metabolism are relatively impervious to dietary calcium in the short term, 2) increased ionized calcium did not normalize low-calcium-induced elevations of BP, and 3) parathyroid hormone was paradoxically increased in the high-calcium-fed flight animals after landing.

  16. Models of calcium signalling

    CERN Document Server

    Dupont, Geneviève; Kirk, Vivien; Sneyd, James

    2016-01-01

    This book discusses the ways in which mathematical, computational, and modelling methods can be used to help understand the dynamics of intracellular calcium. The concentration of free intracellular calcium is vital for controlling a wide range of cellular processes, and is thus of great physiological importance. However, because of the complex ways in which the calcium concentration varies, it is also of great mathematical interest.This book presents the general modelling theory as well as a large number of specific case examples, to show how mathematical modelling can interact with experimental approaches, in an interdisciplinary and multifaceted approach to the study of an important physiological control mechanism. Geneviève Dupont is FNRS Research Director at the Unit of Theoretical Chronobiology of the Université Libre de Bruxelles;Martin Falcke is head of the Mathematical Cell Physiology group at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine, Berlin;Vivien Kirk is an Associate Professor in the Depar...

  17. p53 Acetylation: Regulation and Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Sara M.; Quelle, Dawn E.

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of p53 are critical in modulating its tumor suppressive functions. Ubiquitylation, for example, plays a major role in dictating p53 stability, subcellular localization and transcriptional vs. non-transcriptional activities. Less is known about p53 acetylation. It has been shown to govern p53 transcriptional activity, selection of growth inhibitory vs. apoptotic gene targets, and biological outcomes in response to diverse cellular insults. Yet recent in vivo evidence from mouse models questions the importance of p53 acetylation (at least at certain sites) as well as canonical p53 functions (cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis) to tumor suppression. This review discusses the cumulative findings regarding p53 acetylation, with a focus on the acetyltransferases that modify p53 and the mechanisms regulating their activity. We also evaluate what is known regarding the influence of other post-translational modifications of p53 on its acetylation, and conclude with the current outlook on how p53 acetylation affects tumor suppression. Due to redundancies in p53 control and growing understanding that individual modifications largely fine-tune p53 activity rather than switch it on or off, many questions still remain about the physiological importance of p53 acetylation to its role in preventing cancer. PMID:25545885

  18. p53 Acetylation: Regulation and Consequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara M. Reed

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modifications of p53 are critical in modulating its tumor suppressive functions. Ubiquitylation, for example, plays a major role in dictating p53 stability, subcellular localization and transcriptional vs. non-transcriptional activities. Less is known about p53 acetylation. It has been shown to govern p53 transcriptional activity, selection of growth inhibitory vs. apoptotic gene targets, and biological outcomes in response to diverse cellular insults. Yet recent in vivo evidence from mouse models questions the importance of p53 acetylation (at least at certain sites as well as canonical p53 functions (cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis to tumor suppression. This review discusses the cumulative findings regarding p53 acetylation, with a focus on the acetyltransferases that modify p53 and the mechanisms regulating their activity. We also evaluate what is known regarding the influence of other post-translational modifications of p53 on its acetylation, and conclude with the current outlook on how p53 acetylation affects tumor suppression. Due to redundancies in p53 control and growing understanding that individual modifications largely fine-tune p53 activity rather than switch it on or off, many questions still remain about the physiological importance of p53 acetylation to its role in preventing cancer.

  19. p53 Acetylation: Regulation and Consequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reed, Sara M. [Department of Pharmacology, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Medical Scientist Training Program, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Quelle, Dawn E., E-mail: dawn-quelle@uiowa.edu [Department of Pharmacology, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Medical Scientist Training Program, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States); Department of Pathology, The University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Iowa City, IA 52242 (United States)

    2014-12-23

    Post-translational modifications of p53 are critical in modulating its tumor suppressive functions. Ubiquitylation, for example, plays a major role in dictating p53 stability, subcellular localization and transcriptional vs. non-transcriptional activities. Less is known about p53 acetylation. It has been shown to govern p53 transcriptional activity, selection of growth inhibitory vs. apoptotic gene targets, and biological outcomes in response to diverse cellular insults. Yet recent in vivo evidence from mouse models questions the importance of p53 acetylation (at least at certain sites) as well as canonical p53 functions (cell cycle arrest, senescence and apoptosis) to tumor suppression. This review discusses the cumulative findings regarding p53 acetylation, with a focus on the acetyltransferases that modify p53 and the mechanisms regulating their activity. We also evaluate what is known regarding the influence of other post-translational modifications of p53 on its acetylation, and conclude with the current outlook on how p53 acetylation affects tumor suppression. Due to redundancies in p53 control and growing understanding that individual modifications largely fine-tune p53 activity rather than switch it on or off, many questions still remain about the physiological importance of p53 acetylation to its role in preventing cancer.

  20. Limestone reaction in calcium aluminate cement–calcium sulfate systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bizzozero, Julien; Scrivener, Karen

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports a study of ternary blends composed of calcium aluminate cement, calcium sulfate hemihydrate and limestone. Compressive strength tests and hydration kinetics were studied as a function of limestone and calcium sulfate content. The phase evolution and the total porosity were followed and compared to thermodynamic simulation to understand the reactions involved and the effect of limestone on these binders. The reaction of limestone leads to the formation of hemicarboaluminate ...

  1. Mixed calcium-magnesium pre-nucleation clusters enrich calcium

    OpenAIRE

    Verch, Andreas; Antonietti, Markus; Cölfen, Helmut

    2012-01-01

    It is demonstrated that magnesium and carbonate ions can form pre-nucleation clusters in analogy to calcium carbonate. If a mixed calcium and magnesium solution is brought in contact with carbonate ions, mixed pre-nucleation clusters form. The equilibrium constants for their formation are reported revealing that over the entire range of possible cation mixing ratios, calcium gets enriched over magnesium in the pre-nucleation clusters. This can explain high magnesium contents in amorphous calc...

  2. Biological Reactions to Calcium Phosphate-coated Calcium Carbonate Particles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tetsunari NISHIKAWA; Kazuya MASUNO; Tomoharu OKAMURA; Kazuya TOMINAGA; Masahiro WATO; Mayu KOKUBU; Koichi IMAI; Shoji TAKEDA; Yoichro TAGUCHI; Masatoshi UEDA; Akio TANAKA

    2010-01-01

    [SYNOPSIS][Objectives]: In order to histopathologically investigate biological reactions to materials used for scaffolds, we examined the cytotoxicity to calcium particles in vitro and bioabsorption in vivo...

  3. 42 CFR 1008.53 - Affected parties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Affected parties. 1008.53 Section 1008.53 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OIG AUTHORITIES ADVISORY OPINIONS BY THE OIG Scope and Effect of OIG Advisory Opinions § 1008.53 Affected parties. An...

  4. 15 CFR 400.53 - Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Information. 400.53 Section 400.53..., Record and Information § 400.53 Information. (a) Request for information. The Board may request submission of any information, including business proprietary information, and written argument necessary or...

  5. 47 CFR 53.211 - Audit planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Audit planning. 53.211 Section 53.211 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) SPECIAL PROVISIONS CONCERNING BELL OPERATING COMPANIES Separate Affiliate; Safeguards § 53.211 Audit planning. (a...

  6. 40 CFR 230.53 - Aesthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Aesthetics. 230.53 Section 230.53... Characteristics § 230.53 Aesthetics. (a) Aesthetics associated with the aquatic ecosystem consist of the perception of beauty by one or a combination of the senses of sight, hearing, touch, and smell. Aesthetics of...

  7. 28 CFR 32.53 - Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Review. 32.53 Section 32.53 Judicial... BENEFIT CLAIMS Director Appeals and Reviews § 32.53 Review. (a) Upon the filing of the approval (under subpart E of this part) of a claim, the Director shall review the same. (b) The Director may review— (1...

  8. 19 CFR 10.53 - Antiques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Antiques. 10.53 Section 10.53 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. General Provisions Works of Art § 10.53 Antiques. (a...

  9. 43 CFR 2.53 - Government contracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Government contracts. 2.53 Section 2.53 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior RECORDS AND TESTIMONY; FREEDOM OF INFORMATION ACT Privacy Act § 2.53 Government contracts. (a) Required contract provisions. When a contract...

  10. 40 CFR 79.53 - Tier 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tier 2. 79.53 Section 79.53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) REGISTRATION OF FUELS AND FUEL ADDITIVES Testing Requirements for Registration § 79.53 Tier 2. (a) Generally. Subject to...

  11. 7 CFR 3430.53 - Program income.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Program income. 3430.53 Section 3430.53 Agriculture...-GENERAL AWARD ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS Post-Award and Closeout § 3430.53 Program income. (a) General... for program income related to projects financed in whole or in part with Federal funds. (b) Addition...

  12. 27 CFR 53.140 - Registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Registration. 53.140..., Registration, Etc. § 53.140 Registration. (a) General rule. Except as provided in § 53.141, tax-free sales....141. (e) Cross references. (1) For exceptions to the requirement for registration, see section 4222(b...

  13. 14 CFR 23.53 - Takeoff performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Takeoff performance. 23.53 Section 23.53... STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Flight Performance § 23.53 Takeoff performance. (a) For normal, utility, and acrobatic category airplanes, the takeoff distance must be...

  14. 36 CFR 5.3 - Business operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Business operations. 5.3 Section 5.3 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR COMMERCIAL AND PRIVATE OPERATIONS § 5.3 Business operations. Engaging in or soliciting any business in park...

  15. 48 CFR 53.242 - Contract administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contract administration. 53.242 Section 53.242 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Prescription of Forms 53.242 Contract administration...

  16. 14 CFR 171.53 - Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reports. 171.53 Section 171.53 Aeronautics... FACILITIES NON-FEDERAL NAVIGATION FACILITIES Instrument Landing System (ILS) Facilities § 171.53 Reports. The owner of each facility to which this subpart applies shall make the following reports, at the times...

  17. 7 CFR 1794.53 - Environmental report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Environmental report. 1794.53 Section 1794.53... AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ENVIRONMENTAL POLICIES AND PROCEDURES Procedure for Environmental Assessments With Scoping § 1794.53 Environmental report. (a) After scoping procedures have been completed, RUS shall...

  18. 45 CFR 86.53 - Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recruitment. 86.53 Section 86.53 Public Welfare... in Employment in Education Programs or Activities Prohibited § 86.53 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment and hiring. A recipient shall not discriminate on the basis of sex in the recruitment...

  19. 7 CFR 15a.53 - Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recruitment. 15a.53 Section 15a.53 Agriculture Office... Activities Prohibited § 15a.53 Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment and hiring. A recipient shall not discriminate on the basis of sex in the recruitment and hiring of employees. Where a recipient has...

  20. 48 CFR 53.105 - Computer generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Computer generation. 53.105 Section 53.105 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS General 53.105 Computer generation. (a) Agencies may computer-generate the...

  1. 14 CFR 460.53 - Security.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Security. 460.53 Section 460.53 Aeronautics and Space COMMERCIAL SPACE TRANSPORTATION, FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF....53 Security. An operator must implement security requirements to prevent any space flight participant...

  2. 42 CFR 53.113 - Community service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Community service. 53.113 Section 53.113 Public... To Pay; Community Service; Nondiscrimination. § 53.113 Community service. (a) Applicability. The... community service assurance. (b) Definitions. As used in this section: (1) The term community service...

  3. 9 CFR 3.53 - Primary enclosures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Primary enclosures. 3.53 Section 3.53... Facilities and Operating Standards § 3.53 Primary enclosures. All primary enclosures for rabbits shall conform to the following requirements: (a) General. (1) Primary enclosures shall be structurally sound and...

  4. 49 CFR 38.53 - Doorways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Doorways. 38.53 Section 38.53 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT (ADA) ACCESSIBILITY SPECIFICATIONS FOR TRANSPORTATION VEHICLES Rapid Rail Vehicles and Systems § 38.53 Doorways. (a) Clear width. (1...

  5. 29 CFR 1926.53 - Ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ionizing radiation. 1926.53 Section 1926.53 Labor... § 1926.53 Ionizing radiation. (a) In construction and related activities involving the use of sources of ionizing radiation, the pertinent provisions of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's Standards for...

  6. 33 CFR 53.7 - Requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Requirements. 53.7 Section 53.7 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PERSONNEL COAST GUARD WHISTLEBLOWER PROTECTION § 53.7 Requirements. (a) No person within the Department of Homeland Security may...

  7. 27 CFR 53.1 - Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Introduction. 53.1 Section... THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) FIREARMS MANUFACTURERS EXCISE TAXES-FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION Introduction § 53.1 Introduction. The regulations in this part (part 53, subchapter C, chapter I, title 27, Code of...

  8. 33 CFR 53.9 - Responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Responsibilities. 53.9 Section 53.9 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY PERSONNEL COAST GUARD WHISTLEBLOWER PROTECTION § 53.9 Responsibilities. (a) The Inspector General, Department of Homeland Security...

  9. 7 CFR 550.53 - Financial reporting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Financial reporting. 550.53 Section 550.53 Agriculture... Reports and Records § 550.53 Financial reporting. Financial Status Report. (a) Each REE Agency shall.... A financial status report shall consist of the following information: (1) The name and address of...

  10. Gene p53 mutations, protein p53, and anti-p53 antibodies as biomarkers of cancer process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Waldemar; Nowakowska-Swirta, Ewa

    2002-01-01

    The finding that gene mutations and changes in their expression form the basis of cancer processes, has prompted molecular epidemiologists to use biomarkers for detecting damaged genes or proteins synthesized under their control in easily available cellular material or systemic liquids. Mutations in the suppressor gen p53 are thought to be essential for cancer development. This gen is one of the most important regulators of transcription, cellular cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis detected till now. Inactivation of gene p53 leads to uncontrolled cell divisions, and further to transformation of normal cells into the carcinous ones. Observations that mutations in gene p53 appear under conditions of occupational and environmental exposures to chemical and physical carcinogens, such as vinyl chloride, radon, or aflatoxin B1, have proved to be of enormous importance for the occupational and environmental health. Changes in expression of gene p53, and also its mutations, cause variations of cellular protein p53 concentration. Higher cellular protein p53 levels are associated with increased protein transfer to the extracellular liquid and to blood. It has been observed that increased blood serum protein p53 concentrations may have a prognostic value in early diagnosis of lung cancer. The results of a number of studies confirm that accumulation of a mutated form of protein p53, and presumably also large quantities of wild forms of that protein in the cells, may be a factor that triggers the production of anti-p53 antibodies. Statistical analysis showed that anti-p53 antibodies can be regarded as a specific biomarker of cancer process. The prevalence of anti-p53 antibodies correlated with the degree of cancer malignancy. The increased incidence of anti-p53 antibodies was also associated with higher frequency of mutations in gene p53. There are some reports confirming that anti-p53 antibodies emerging in blood serum in the subclinical phase of cancer development may be

  11. Osteoporosis, calcium and physical activity.

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, A. D.; Houston, C S

    1987-01-01

    Sales of calcium supplements have increased dramatically since 1983, as middle-aged women seek to prevent or treat bone loss due to osteoporosis. However, epidemiologic studies have failed to support the hypothesis that larger amounts of calcium are associated with increased bone density or a decreased incidence of fractures. The authors examine the evidence from controlled trials on the effects of calcium supplementation and physical activity on bone loss and find that weight-bearing activit...

  12. Modulation of intracellular calcium levels by calcium lactate affects colon cancer cell motility through calcium-dependent calpain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundaramoorthy, Pasupathi; Sim, Jae Jun; Jang, Yeong-Su; Mishra, Siddhartha Kumar; Jeong, Keun-Yeong; Mander, Poonam; Chul, Oh Byung; Shim, Won-Sik; Oh, Seung Hyun; Nam, Ky-Youb; Kim, Hwan Mook

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cell motility is a key phenomenon regulating invasion and metastasis. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays a major role in cellular adhesion and metastasis of various cancers. The relationship between dietary supplementation of calcium and colon cancer has been extensively investigated. However, the effect of calcium (Ca2+) supplementation on calpain-FAK-motility is not clearly understood. We sought to identify the mechanism of FAK cleavage through Ca2+ bound lactate (CaLa), its downstream signaling and role in the motility of human colon cancer cells. We found that treating HCT116 and HT-29 cells with CaLa immediately increased the intracellular Ca2+ (iCa2+) levels for a prolonged period of time. Ca2+ influx induced cleavage of FAK into an N-terminal FAK (FERM domain) in a dose-dependent manner. Phosphorylated FAK (p-FAK) was also cleaved in to its p-N-terminal FAK. CaLa increased colon cancer cells motility. Calpeptin, a calpain inhibitor, reversed the effects of CaLa on FAK and pFAK cleavage in both cancer cell lines. The cleaved FAK translocates into the nucleus and modulates p53 stability through MDM2-associated ubiquitination. CaLa-induced Ca2+ influx increased the motility of colon cancer cells was mediated by calpain activity through FAK and pFAK protein destabilization. In conclusion, these results suggest that careful consideration may be given in deciding dietary Ca2+ supplementation to patient undergoing treatment for metastatic cancer.

  13. Cardiovascular Effects of Calcium Supplements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian R. Reid

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Calcium supplements reduce bone turnover and slow the rate of bone loss. However, few studies have demonstrated reduced fracture incidence with calcium supplements, and meta-analyses show only a 10% decrease in fractures, which is of borderline statistical and clinical significance. Trials in normal older women and in patients with renal impairment suggest that calcium supplements increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. To further assess their safety, we recently conducted a meta-analysis of trials of calcium supplements, and found a 27%–31% increase in risk of myocardial infarction, and a 12%–20% increase in risk of stroke. These findings are robust because they are based on pre-specified analyses of randomized, placebo-controlled trials and are consistent across the trials. Co-administration of vitamin D with calcium does not lessen these adverse effects. The increased cardiovascular risk with calcium supplements is consistent with epidemiological data relating higher circulating calcium concentrations to cardiovascular disease in normal populations. There are several possible pathophysiological mechanisms for these effects, including effects on vascular calcification, vascular cells, blood coagulation and calcium-sensing receptors. Thus, the non-skeletal risks of calcium supplements appear to outweigh any skeletal benefits, and are they appear to be unnecessary for the efficacy of other osteoporosis treatments.

  14. Laser Sintered Calcium Phosphate Bone

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vail, Neil

    1999-01-01

    ...) technology selective laser sintering (SLS). BME has successfully implemented a pilot facility to fabricate calcium phosphate implants using anatomical data coupled with the selective laser sintering process...

  15. 21 CFR 73.1070 - Calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... precipitated calcium carbonate (CaCO3). (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with calcium carbonate... precipitated calcium carbonate in the United States Pharmacopeia XX (1980). (c) Uses and restrictions. Calcium... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 73.1070 Section 73.1070 Food...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium carbonate. 184.1191 Section 184.1191 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Calcium carbonate (CaCO3, CAS Reg... soda process”; (2) By precipitation of calcium carbonate from calcium hydroxide in the “Carbonation...

  17. Calcium signalling: fishing out molecules of mitochondrial calcium transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajnóczky, György; Csordás, György

    2010-10-26

    Cellular energy metabolism, survival and death are controlled by mitochondrial calcium signals originating in the cytoplasm. Now, RNAi studies link three proteins - MICU1, NCLX and LETM1 - to the previously unknown molecular mechanism of mitochondrial calcium transport. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Calcium electroporation in three cell lines; a comparison of bleomycin and calcium, calcium compounds, and pulsing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; Gissel, Hanne; Hojman, Pernille

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Electroporation with calcium (calcium electroporation) can induce ATP depletion-associated cellular death. In the clinical setting, the cytotoxic drug bleomycin is currently used with electroporation (electrochemotherapy) for palliative treatment of tumors. Calcium electroporation off...

  19. Inhibition of Enterococcus faecalis by Calcium Peroxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yong Liang; Wang, Xiao Yan

    2016-06-01

    To investigate the inhibition of Enterococcus faecalis by calcium peroxide (CaO₂). The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of Enterococcus faecalis by CaO₂ and calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)₂) were determined by direct exposure tests (n = 10). The inhibition zone of E. faecalis mycoderm treated with CaO₂ and Ca(OH)₂ paste (53% w/w) was observed using agar diffusion tests (n = 20). The inhibition of E. faecalis biofilms by CaO₂/phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and Ca(OH)₂/PBS suspensions were observed using confocal laser scanning microscopy and the percentages of live bacteria in the biofilms calculated. The MIC of Ca(OH)₂ (4.5 to 5.5 mg/ml) was higher than the MIC of CaO₂ (2.0 to 2.5 mg/ml) (P faecalis biofilms after treatment (P faecalis by CaO₂ was greater than that by Ca(OH)₂.

  20. Identification of p53 in mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaseva, Angelina V; Moll, Ute M

    2013-01-01

    p53 is a master regulator of cell death pathways and has transcription-dependent and transcription-independent modes of action. Mitochondria are major signal transducers in apoptosis and are critical for p53-dependent cell death. Our lab and others have discovered that a fraction of stress-induced wild-type p53 protein rapidly translocates to mitochondria upon various stress stimuli and exerts p53-dependent apoptosis. Suborganellar localization by various methods shows that p53 localizes to the surface of mitochondria. Direct targeting of p53 to mitochondria is sufficient to induce apoptosis in p53-null cells, without requiring further DNA damage. Recently, p53 has been also shown to localize to other mitochondrial compartments such as the mitochondrial matrix where it plays a role in maintaining mitochondrial genome integrity. Here, we describe subcellular fractionation as a classic technique for detecting mitochondrial p53 in cell extracts. It consists of cell homogenization by hypo-osmotic swelling, removal of nuclear components by low-speed centrifugation, and mitochondrial isolation by a discontinuous sucrose density gradient. Additionally, we describe a method for submitochondrial fractionation, performed by phosphate buffer mediated swelling/shrinking. p53 and other mitochondrial proteins can then be detected by standard immunoblotting procedures. The quality of mitochondrial isolates/subfractions can be verified for purity and intactness.

  1. Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000490.htm Calcium, vitamin D, and your bones To use the sharing ... and maintain strong bones. How Much Calcium and Vitamin D do I Need? Amounts of calcium are ...

  2. Calcium Supplements: Do Men Need Them Too?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lifestyle Nutrition and healthy eating Should men take calcium supplements? Answers from Katherine Zeratsky, R.D., L. ... Most healthy men don't need to take calcium supplements. Calcium is important for men for optimal ...

  3. Dial 9-1-1 for p53: Mechanisms of p53 Activation by Cellular Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Ljungman, Mats

    2000-01-01

    The tumor suppressor protein, p53, is part of the cell's emergency team that is called upon following cellular insult. How do cells sense DNA damage and other cellular stresses and what signal transduction pathways are used to alert p53? How is the resulting nuclear accumulation of p53 accomplished and what determines the outcome of p53 induction? Many posttranslational modifications of p53, such as phosphorylation, dephosphorylation, acetylation and ribosylation, have been shown to occur fol...

  4. Atomic resolution structure of the double mutant (K53,56M) of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekar, K., E-mail: sekar@physics.iisc.ernet.in, E-mail: sekar@serc.iisc.ernet.in [Bioinformatics Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Supercomputer Education and Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Yogavel, M.; Gayathri, D.; Velmurugan, D. [Department of Crystallography and Biophysics, University of Madras, Guindy Campus, Chennai 600 025 (India); Krishna, R. [Bioinformatics Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India); Poi, M.-J. [Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry and the Ohio State Biochemistry Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Dauter, Z.; Dauter, M. [Synchrotron Radiation Research Section, National Cancer Institute, Brookhaven National Laboratory Building, Upton, NY 11973 (United States); Tsai, M.-D. [Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry and the Ohio State Biochemistry Program, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Academia Sinica,Taiwan (China); Bioinformatics Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2006-01-01

    The atomic resolution crystal structure of the double mutant (K53,56M) of bovine pancreatic phospholipase A{sub 2} is reported. The structure of the double mutant K53,56M has previously been refined at 1.9 Å resolution using room-temperature data. The present paper reports the crystal structure of the same mutant K53,56M refined against 1.1 Å data collected using synchrotron radiation. A total of 116 main-chain atoms from 29 residues and 44 side chains are modelled in alternate conformations. Most of the interfacial binding residues are found to be disordered and alternate conformations could be recognized. The second calcium ion-binding site residue Glu92 adopts two alternate conformations. The minor and major conformations of Glu92 correspond to the second calcium ion bound and unbound states.

  5. Stable prenucleation calcium carbonate clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gebauer, Denis; Völkel, Antje; Cölfen, Helmut

    2008-12-19

    Calcium carbonate forms scales, geological deposits, biominerals, and ocean sediments. Huge amounts of carbon dioxide are retained as carbonate ions, and calcium ions represent a major contribution to water hardness. Despite its relevance, little is known about the precipitation mechanism of calcium carbonate, and specified complex crystal structures challenge the classical view on nucleation considering the formation of metastable ion clusters. We demonstrate that dissolved calcium carbonate in fact contains stable prenucleation ion clusters forming even in undersaturated solution. The cluster formation can be characterized by means of equilibrium thermodynamics, applying a multiple-binding model, which allows for structural preformation. Stable clusters are the relevant species in calcium carbonate nucleation. Such mechanisms may also be important for the crystallization of other minerals.

  6. The RD53A Integrated Circuit

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice

    2017-01-01

    Implementation details for the RD53A pixel readout integrated circuit designed by the RD53 Collaboration. This is a companion to the specifications document and will eventually become a reference for chip users. RD53A is not intended to be a final production IC for use in an experiment, and contains design variations for testing purposes, making the pixel matrix non-uniform. The chip size is 20.0 mm by 11.8 mm.

  7. p53 mutations in urinary bladder cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Berggren, P; Steineck, G; Adolfsson, J; Hansson, J; Jansson, O; Larsson, P; Sandstedt, B; Wijkstr?m, H; Hemminki, K

    2001-01-01

    We have screened for mutations in exons 5?8 of the p53 gene in a series consisting of 189 patients with urinary bladder neoplasms. 82 (44%) neoplasms were lowly malignant (Ta, G1?G2a) and 106 (56%) were highly malignant (G2b?G4 or ?T1). Only one mutation was in a lowly malignant urinary bladder neoplasm, in total we found p53 mutations in 26 (14%) of the 189 patients. 30% of the samples had loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for one or both of the p53 exogenic (CA)n repeat and the p53 intragenic (A...

  8. Lysosomal destabilization in p53-induced apoptosis

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Xi-Ming; Li, Wei; Dalen, Helge; Lotem, Joseph; Kama, Rachel; Sachs, Leo; Brunk, Ulf T.

    2002-01-01

    The tumor suppressor wild-type p53 can induce apoptosis. M1-t-p53 myeloid leukemic cells have a temperature-sensitive p53 protein that changes its conformation to wild-type p53 after transfer from 37°C to 32°C. We have now found that these cells showed an early lysosomal rupture after transfer to 32°C. Mitochondrial damage, including decreased membrane potential and release of cytochrome c, and the appearance of apoptotic cells occurred later. Lysosomal rupture, mitochondrial damage, and apop...

  9. Composition and structure of calcium aluminosilicate microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharonova, O. M.; Oreshkina, N. A.; Zhizhaev, A. M.

    2017-06-01

    The composition was studied of calcium aluminosilicate microspheres of three morphological types in high-calcium fly ash from combustion of brown coal from the Kansk-Achinsk basin in slag-tap boilers at temperatures from 1400 to 1500°C and sampled in the first field of electrostatic precipitators at the Krasnoyarsk Cogeneration Power Station no. 2 (TETs-2). Gross compositions and the composition of local areas were determined using a scanning electron microscopy technique and an energy-dispersive analysis with full mapping of globules. With a high content of basic oxides O ox (68 to 79 wt %) and a low content of acid oxides K ox (21 to 31 wt %), type 1 microspheres are formed. They consist of heterogeneous areas having a porous structure and crystalline components in which the content of CaO, SiO2, or Al2O3 differs by two to three times and the content of MgO differs by seven times. With a lower content of O ox (55 to 63 wt %) and an elevated content of K ox (37 to 45 wt %), type 2 microspheres are formed. They are more homogeneous in the composition and structure and consist of similar crystalline components. Having a close content of O ox (46 to 53 wt %) and K ox (47 to 54 wt %), type 3 microspheres, which are a dense matter consisting of amorphous substance with submicron- and nanostructure of crystalline components, are formed. The basic precursor in formation of high-calcium aluminosilicate microspheres is calcium from the organomineral matter of coals with various contribution of Mg, Fe, S, or Na from the coal organic matter and Al, Fe, S, or Si in the form of single mineral inclusions in a coal particle. On the basis of the available data, the effect was analyzed of the composition of a CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2-FeO system on the melting and viscous properties of the matter in microspheres and formation of globules of different morphology. The results of this analysis will help to find a correlation with properties of microspheres in their use as functional

  10. Calcium metabolism & hypercalcemia in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumachi, F; Motta, R; Cecchin, D; Ave, S; Camozzi, V; Basso, S M M; Luisetto, G

    2011-01-01

    Calcium is essential for many metabolic process, including nerve function, muscle contraction, and blood clotting. The metabolic pathways that contribute to maintain serum calcium levels are bone remodeling processes, intestinal absorption and secretion, and renal handling, but hypercalcemia occurs when at least 2 of these 3 metabolic pathways are altered. Calcium metabolism mainly depends on the activity of parathyroid hormone (PTH). Its secretion is strictly controlled by the ionized serum calcium levels through a negative feed-back, which is achieved by the activation of calcium-sensing receptors (CaSRs) mainly expressed on the surface of the parathyroid cells. The PTH receptor in bone and kidney is now referred as PTHR1. The balance of PTH, calcitonin, and vitamin D has long been considered the main regulator of calcium metabolism, but the function of other actors, such as fibroblast growth factor-23 (FGF-23), Klotho, and TPRV5 should be considered. Primary hyperparathyroidism and malignancy are the most common causes of hypercalcemia, accounting for more than 90% of cases. Uncontrolled hypercalcemia may cause renal impairment, both temporary (alteration of renal tubular function) and progressive (relapsing nephrolithiasis), leading to a progressive loss of renal function, as well as severe bone diseases, and heart damages. Advances in the understanding of all actors of calcium homeostasis will be crucial, having several practical consequences in the treatment and prevention of hypercalcemia. This would allow to move from a support therapy, sometimes ineffective, to a specific and addressed therapy, especially in patients with chronic hypercalcemic conditions unsuitable for surgery.

  11. Calcium and Calcium Supplements: Achieving the Right Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Duyff RL. American Dietetic Association Complete Food and Nutrition Guide. 4th ed. Hoboken, N.J.: John Wiley & Sons; 2012:140. Rosen HN. Calcium and vitamin D supplementation in osteoporosis. http://www.uptodate.com/home/index. ...

  12. Inhibiting p53 Acetylation Reduces Cancer Chemotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shunsheng; Koh, Xin Yu; Goh, Hui Chin; Rahmat, Siti Aishah B; Hwang, Le-Ann; Lane, David P

    2017-08-15

    Chemotoxicity due to unwanted p53 activation in the bone marrow remains an unmet clinical challenge. Doxorubicin, a first-line chemotherapy drug, often causes myelosuppression in patients, thus limiting its effectiveness. In this study, we discovered that C646, a reversible p300 inhibitor, downregulates p53 transcription and selectively protects noncancerous cells from p53-dependent apoptosis. C646 treatment blocked acetylation of specific lysine residues that regulate p53 activity. Exploitation of differential p53 genetic backgrounds between human hematopoietic and colorectal cancer cells improved the therapeutic index of doxorubicin with C646 cotreatment. C646 administration in mice afflicted with p53-mutant tumors protected them from doxorubicin-induced neutropenia and anemia while retaining antitumor efficacy. We deduce that temporary and reversible inhibition of p53 acetylation in cancer subjects, especially those with p53-mutant tumors, may protect them from severe chemotoxicity while allowing treatment regimens to effectively proceed. Cancer Res; 77(16); 4342-54. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. 1 CFR 21.53 - Nonstatutory materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Nonstatutory materials. 21.53 Section 21.53 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PREPARATION, TRANSMITTAL, AND... Nonstatutory materials. Nonstatutory documents shall be cited by document designation and by Federal Register...

  14. Expression of p53 in oligodendrogliomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Kros (Johan); J.J.C.J. Godschalk (J. J C J); K.K. Krishnadath (Kausilia); C.G. van Eden (C.)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe expression of the nuclear protein p53 in oligodendrogliomas was investigated by immunohistochemistry, using a monoclonal anti-p53 antibody (DO-7) on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded material in 84 histologically verified cases, and compared with the histopathological grade and

  15. 43 CFR 6.53 - Unpatented inventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Unpatented inventions. 6.53 Section 6.53... Unpatented inventions. The Secretary of the Interior may also have transferable interests in inventions which... benefit of the public, a license may be granted with respect to such an invention only if (a) a patent...

  16. 18 CFR 157.53 - Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 157.53 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION, DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY REGULATIONS UNDER NATURAL GAS ACT APPLICATIONS FOR CERTIFICATES OF PUBLIC CONVENIENCE AND... Exemption of Natural Gas Service for Drilling, Testing, or Purging from Certificate Requirements § 157.53...

  17. 32 CFR 1605.53 - Designation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Designation. 1605.53 Section 1605.53 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM... shall be assigned in numerical sequence beginning with the numeral 1. ...

  18. 7 CFR 915.53 - Exemption certificates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exemption certificates. 915.53 Section 915.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AVOCADOS GROWN IN SOUTH FLORIDA...

  19. 7 CFR 53.20 - Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Identification. 53.20 Section 53.20 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE...

  20. 7 CFR 53.3 - Authority.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Authority. 53.3 Section 53.3 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL...

  1. 34 CFR 106.53 - Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Recruitment. 106.53 Section 106.53 Education... Recruitment. (a) Nondiscriminatory recruitment and hiring. A recipient shall not discriminate on the basis of sex in the recruitment and hiring of employees. Where a recipient has been found to be presently...

  2. 10 CFR 74.53 - Process monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Process monitoring. 74.53 Section 74.53 Energy NUCLEAR... process, a licensee shall establish a production quality control program capable of monitoring the status of material in process. The program shall include: (1) A statistical test that has at least a 95...

  3. 48 CFR 53.111 - Contract clause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contract clause. 53.111... AND FORMS FORMS General 53.111 Contract clause. Contracting officers shall insert the clause at 52.253-1, Computer Generated Forms, in solicitations and contracts that require the contractor to submit...

  4. 48 CFR 53.236-1 - Construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Construction. 53.236-1... AND FORMS FORMS Prescription of Forms 53.236-1 Construction. The following forms are prescribed, as stated below, for use in contracting for construction, alteration, or repair, or dismantling, demolition...

  5. 44 CFR 5.3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Definitions. 5.3 Section 5.3 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... transaction of public business and preserved, or appropriate for preservation, as evidence of the organization...

  6. 33 CFR 62.53 - Racons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Racons. 62.53 Section 62.53 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES... transmit a coded reply to the interrogating radar. This reply serves to identify the aid station by...

  7. 29 CFR 1956.53 - [Reserved

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 1956.53 Section 1956.53 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) STATE PLANS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT AND ENFORCEMENT OF STATE STANDARDS APPLICABLE TO STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES...

  8. Masses of exotic calcium isotopes pin down nuclear forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wienholtz, F; Beck, D; Blaum, K; Borgmann, Ch; Breitenfeldt, M; Cakirli, R B; George, S; Herfurth, F; Holt, J D; Kowalska, M; Kreim, S; Lunney, D; Manea, V; Menéndez, J; Neidherr, D; Rosenbusch, M; Schweikhard, L; Schwenk, A; Simonis, J; Stanja, J; Wolf, R N; Zuber, K

    2013-06-20

    The properties of exotic nuclei on the verge of existence play a fundamental part in our understanding of nuclear interactions. Exceedingly neutron-rich nuclei become sensitive to new aspects of nuclear forces. Calcium, with its doubly magic isotopes (40)Ca and (48)Ca, is an ideal test for nuclear shell evolution, from the valley of stability to the limits of existence. With a closed proton shell, the calcium isotopes mark the frontier for calculations with three-nucleon forces from chiral effective field theory. Whereas predictions for the masses of (51)Ca and (52)Ca have been validated by direct measurements, it is an open question as to how nuclear masses evolve for heavier calcium isotopes. Here we report the mass determination of the exotic calcium isotopes (53)Ca and (54)Ca, using the multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer of ISOLTRAP at CERN. The measured masses unambiguously establish a prominent shell closure at neutron number N = 32, in excellent agreement with our theoretical calculations. These results increase our understanding of neutron-rich matter and pin down the subtle components of nuclear forces that are at the forefront of theoretical developments constrained by quantum chromodynamics.

  9. Masses of exotic calcium isotopes pin down nuclear forces

    CERN Document Server

    Wienholtz, F; Blaum, K; Borgmann, Ch; Breitenfeldt, M; Cakirli, R B; George, S; Herfurth, F; Holt, J D; Kowalska, M; Kreim, S; Lunney, D; Manea, V; Menéndez, J; Neidherr, D; Rosenbusch, M; Schweikhard, L; Schwenk, A; Simonis, J; Stanja, J; Wolf, R N; Zuber, K

    2013-01-01

    The properties of exotic nuclei on the verge of existence play a fundamental part in our understanding of nuclear interactions. Exceedingly neutron-rich nuclei become sensitive to new aspects of nuclear forces. Calcium, with its doubly magic isotopes $^{40}$Ca and $^{48}$Ca, is an ideal test for nuclear shell evolution, from the valley of stability to the limits of existence. With a closed proton shell, the calcium isotopes mark the frontier for calculations with three-nucleon forces from chiral effective field theory. Whereas predictions for the masses of $^{51}$Ca and $^{52}$Ca have been validated by direct measurements$^4$, it is an open question as to how nuclear masses evolve for heavier calcium isotopes. Here we report the mass determination of the exotic calcium isotopes $^{53}$Ca and $^{54}$Ca, using the multi-reflection time-of-flight mass spectrometer of ISOLTRAP at CERN. The measured masses unambiguously establish a prominent shell closure at neutron number N = 32, in excellent agreement with our t...

  10. Emerging Non-Canonical Functions and Regulation by p53: p53 and Stemness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivos, David J; Mayo, Lindsey D

    2016-11-26

    Since its discovery nearly 40 years ago, p53 has ascended to the forefront of investigated genes and proteins across diverse research disciplines and is recognized most exclusively for its role in cancer as a tumor suppressor. Levine and Oren (2009) reviewed the evolution of p53 detailing the significant discoveries of each decade since its first report in 1979. In this review, we will highlight the emerging non-canonical functions and regulation of p53 in stem cells. We will focus on general themes shared among p53's functions in non-malignant stem cells and cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) and the influence of p53 on the microenvironment and CSC niche. We will also examine p53 gain of function (GOF) roles in stemness. Mutant p53 (mutp53) GOFs that lead to survival, drug resistance and colonization are reviewed in the context of the acquisition of advantageous transformation processes, such as differentiation and dedifferentiation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stem cell senescence and quiescence. Finally, we will conclude with therapeutic strategies that restore wild-type p53 (wtp53) function in cancer and CSCs, including RING finger E3 ligases and CSC maintenance. The mechanisms by which wtp53 and mutp53 influence stemness in non-malignant stem cells and CSCs or tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are poorly understood thus far. Further elucidation of p53's effects on stemness could lead to novel therapeutic strategies in cancer research.

  11. Calcium carbonate and calcium sulfate in Martian meteorite EETA79001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, J. L.; Wentworth, S. J.

    1987-01-01

    Chips of glassy Lithology C of EETA79001 were studied by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to determine the mineralogy and petrogenesis of the glass that was shown by others to contain trapped Mars-like gases. Calcium carbonite was identified as massive to acicular crystals for which Ca, C, and O were the major elements. Calcium sulfate was identified as prismatic-acicular crystals with Ca and S as the major elements.

  12. Microbial Regulation of p53 Tumor Suppressor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander I Zaika

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available p53 tumor suppressor has been identified as a protein interacting with the large T antigen produced by simian vacuolating virus 40 (SV40. Subsequent research on p53 inhibition by SV40 and other tumor viruses has not only helped to gain a better understanding of viral biology, but also shaped our knowledge of human tumorigenesis. Recent studies have found, however, that inhibition of p53 is not strictly in the realm of viruses. Some bacterial pathogens also actively inhibit p53 protein and induce its degradation, resulting in alteration of cellular stress responses. This phenomenon was initially characterized in gastric epithelial cells infected with Helicobacter pylori, a bacterial pathogen that commonly infects the human stomach and is strongly linked to gastric cancer. Besides H. pylori, a number of other bacterial species were recently discovered to inhibit p53. These findings provide novel insights into host-bacteria interactions and tumorigenesis associated with bacterial infections.

  13. AHP 2B: China's na53 mʑi 53 Tibetans: Life, Language and Folklore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libu Lakhi (Li Jianfu 李建富, Dawa Tenzin ཟླ་བ་བསྟན་འཛིན།

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This remarkable book is the product of a fruitful collaboration among a native speaker of na53 mʑi53 kha11 tho11, Tibetan and Chinese consultants, and a dedicated group of Westerners resident in China. It affords the reader an intimate glimpse into traditional na53 mʑi53 life, now well on its way to disappearing along with hundreds of similar minority cultures in the world.

  14. AHP 2A: China's na53 mʑi 53 Tibetans: Life, Language and Folklore

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Libu Lakhi (Li Jianfu 李建富, Dawa Tenzin ཟླ་བ་བསྟན་འཛིན།

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This remarkable book is the product of a fruitful collaboration among a native speaker of na53 mʑi53 kha11 tho11, Tibetan and Chinese consultants, and a dedicated group of Westerners resident in China. It affords the reader an intimate glimpse into traditional na53 mʑi53 life, now well on its way to disappearing along with hundreds of similar minority cultures in the world.

  15. 21 CFR 184.1187 - Calcium alginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium alginate. 184.1187 Section 184.1187 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1187 Calcium alginate. (a) Calcium alginate (CAS Reg. No. 9005.... Calcium alginate is prepared by the neutralization of purified alginic acid with appropriate pH control...

  16. Extracellular and Intracellular Regulation of Calcium Homeostasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felix Bronner

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available An organism with an internal skeleton must accumulate calcium while maintaining body fluids at a well-regulated, constant calcium concentration. Neither calcium absorption nor excretion plays a significant regulatory role. Instead, isoionic calcium uptake and release by bone surfaces causes plasma calcium to be well regulated. Very rapid shape changes of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, in response to hormonal signals, modulate the available bone surfaces so that plasma calcium can increase when more low-affinity bone calcium binding sites are made available and can decrease when more high-affinity binding sites are exposed. The intracellular free calcium concentration of body cells is also regulated, but because cells are bathed by fluids with vastly higher calcium concentration, their major regulatory mechanism is severe entry restriction. All cells have a calcium-sensing receptor that modulates cell function via its response to extracellular calcium. In duodenal cells, the apical calcium entry structure functions as both transporter and a vitamin D–responsive channel. The channel upregulates calcium entry, with intracellular transport mediated by the mobile, vitamin D–dependent buffer, calbindin D9K, which binds and transports more than 90% of the transcellular calcium flux. Fixed intracellular calcium binding sites can, like the body's skeleton, take up and release calcium that has entered the cell, but the principal regulatory tool of the cell is restricted entry.

  17. Calcium phosphates for biomedical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Canillas, M.; Pena, P.; Aza, A.H. de; Rodriguez, M.A.

    2017-07-01

    The history of calcium phosphates in the medicine field starts in 1769 when the first evidence of its existence in the bone tissue is discovered. Since then, the interest for calcium phosphates has increased among the scientific community. Their study has been developed in parallel with new advances in materials sciences, medicine or tissue engineering areas. Bone tissue engineering is the field where calcium phosphates have had a great importance. While the first bioceramics are selected according to bioinert, biocompatibility and mechanical properties with the aim to replace bone tissue damaged, calcium phosphates open the way to the bone tissue regeneration challenge. Nowadays, they are present in the majority of commercial products directed to repair or regenerate damaged bone tissue. Finally, in the last few decades, they have been suggested and studied as drug delivering devices and as vehicles of DNA and RNA for the future generation therapies. (Author)

  18. Polysulfide calcium as multyfunctional product

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Abramova

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A modified method of producing of polysulfide calcium, the influence of various factors on the degree of polysulfide of product, as well as possible directions for its use as a multifunctional compound were considered.

  19. [Calcium metabolism after the menopause].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanovitch, D; Klotz, H P

    1976-02-16

    The authors recall the antagonism between estradiol and parathormone. Estradiol tends to lower serum calcium and fix calcium in the bones as shown by one of us 25 years ago. The mechanism of this action of estrogen on calcium metabolism has been determined by numerous authors but some points are still not clear, e.g. the interferences between estrogen and calcitonin. Classically, parathormone is known to increase bony reabsorption and raise serum calcium. After the menopause the gradual reduction in estradiol secretion leads to post-menopausal osteoporosis. It is better to administer estrogens prophylactically to women after the menopause provided a cervical smear and mammography have been carried out to eliminate latent carcinoma of the breast or uterine cervix.

  20. Calcium-sensing beyond neurotransmitters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustavsson, Natalia; Han, Weiping

    2009-01-01

    Neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones are released through the regulated exocytosis of SVs (synaptic vesicles) and LDCVs (large dense-core vesicles), a process that is controlled by calcium. Synaptotagmins are a family of type 1 membrane proteins that share a common domain structure. Most....... Also, we discuss potential roles of synaptotagmins in non-traditional endocrine systems....... synaptotagmins are located in brain and endocrine cells, and some of these synaptotagmins bind to phospholipids and calcium at levels that trigger regulated exocytosis of SVs and LDCVs. This led to the proposed synaptotagmin-calcium-sensor paradigm, that is, members of the synaptotagmin family function...... as calcium sensors for the regulated exocytosis of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides and hormones. Here, we provide an overview of the synaptotagmin family, and review the recent mouse genetic studies aimed at understanding the functions of synaptotagmins in neurotransmission and endocrine-hormone secretion...

  1. 48 CFR 53.302-17-53.302-1419A - Illustration of optional forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Illustration of optional... FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Illustrations of Forms 53.302-17—53.302-1419A Illustration of optional forms. Editorial Note: The forms appearing in sections 53.302-17 through...

  2. 48 CFR 53.303-254-53.303-347 - Illustration of agency forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Illustration of agency... FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Illustrations of Forms 53.303-254—53.303-347 Illustration of agency forms. Editorial Note: The forms appearing in sections 53.303-DD-254...

  3. 48 CFR 53.301-18-53.301-1449 - Illustration of standard forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Illustration of standard... FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Illustrations of Forms 53.301-18—53.301-1449 Illustration of standard forms. Editorial Note: The forms appearing in sections 53.301-18 through...

  4. 21 CFR 172.330 - Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium pantothenate, calcium chloride double salt. 172.330 Section 172.330 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN..., calcium chloride double salt. The food additive calcium chloride double salt of calcium pantothenate may...

  5. Modulation of intracellular calcium levels by calcium lactate affects colon cancer cell motility through calcium-dependent calpain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasupathi Sundaramoorthy

    Full Text Available Cancer cell motility is a key phenomenon regulating invasion and metastasis. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK plays a major role in cellular adhesion and metastasis of various cancers. The relationship between dietary supplementation of calcium and colon cancer has been extensively investigated. However, the effect of calcium (Ca2+ supplementation on calpain-FAK-motility is not clearly understood. We sought to identify the mechanism of FAK cleavage through Ca2+ bound lactate (CaLa, its downstream signaling and role in the motility of human colon cancer cells. We found that treating HCT116 and HT-29 cells with CaLa immediately increased the intracellular Ca2+ (iCa2+ levels for a prolonged period of time. Ca2+ influx induced cleavage of FAK into an N-terminal FAK (FERM domain in a dose-dependent manner. Phosphorylated FAK (p-FAK was also cleaved in to its p-N-terminal FAK. CaLa increased colon cancer cells motility. Calpeptin, a calpain inhibitor, reversed the effects of CaLa on FAK and pFAK cleavage in both cancer cell lines. The cleaved FAK translocates into the nucleus and modulates p53 stability through MDM2-associated ubiquitination. CaLa-induced Ca2+ influx increased the motility of colon cancer cells was mediated by calpain activity through FAK and pFAK protein destabilization. In conclusion, these results suggest that careful consideration may be given in deciding dietary Ca2+ supplementation to patient undergoing treatment for metastatic cancer.

  6. p53, oxidative stress, and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongping; Xu, Yang

    2011-09-15

    Mammalian aging is associated with elevated levels of oxidative damage of DNA, proteins, and lipids as a result of unbalanced prooxidant and antioxidant activities. Accumulating evidence indicates that oxidative stress is a major physiological inducer of aging. p53, the guardian of the genome that is important for cellular responses to oxidative stresses, might be a key coordinator of oxidative stress and aging. In response to low levels of oxidative stresses, p53 exhibits antioxidant activities to eliminate oxidative stress and ensure cell survival; in response to high levels of oxidative stresses, p53 exhibits pro-oxidative activities that further increase the levels of stresses, leading to cell death. p53 accomplishes these context-dependent roles by regulating the expression of a panel of genes involved in cellular responses to oxidative stresses and by modulating other pathways important for oxidative stress responses. The mechanism that switches p53 function from antioxidant to prooxidant remains unclear, but could account for the findings that increased p53 activities have been linked to both accelerated aging and increased life span in mice. Therefore, a balance of p53 antioxidant and prooxidant activities in response to oxidative stresses could be important for longevity by suppressing the accumulation of oxidative stresses and DNA damage.

  7. The MDM2-p53 pathway revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Subhasree; Qin, Jiangjiang; Srivenugopal, Kalkunte S.; Wang, Minghai; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2013-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a key transcription factor regulating cellular pathways such as DNA repair, cell cycle, apoptosis, angiogenesis, and senescence. It acts as an important defense mechanism against cancer onset and progression, and is negatively regulated by interaction with the oncoprotein MDM2. In human cancers, the TP53 gene is frequently mutated or deleted, or the wild-type p53 function is inhibited by high levels of MDM2, leading to downregulation of tumor suppressive p53 pathways. Thus, the inhibition of MDM2-p53 interaction presents an appealing therapeutic strategy for the treatment of cancer. However, recent studies have revealed the MDM2-p53 interaction to be more complex involving multiple levels of regulation by numerous cellular proteins and epigenetic mechanisms, making it imperative to reexamine this intricate interplay from a holistic viewpoint. This review aims to highlight the multifaceted network of molecules regulating the MDM2-p53 axis to better understand the pathway and exploit it for anticancer therapy. PMID:23885265

  8. Calcium affects on vascular endpoints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Vaishali B

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Calcium is one of the most abundant minerals in the body and its metabolism is one of the basic biologic processes in humans. Although historically linked primarily to bone structural development and maintenance, calcium is now recognized as a key component of many physiologic pathways necessary for optimum health including cardiovascular, neurological, endocrine, renal, and gastrointestinal systems. A recent meta-analysis published in August 2011 showed a potential increase in cardiovascular events related to calcium supplementation. The possible mechanism of action of this correlation has not been well elucidated. This topic has generated intense interest due to the widespread use of calcium supplements, particularly among the middle aged and elderly who are at the most risk from cardiac events. Prior studies did not control for potential confounding factors such as the use of statins, aspirin or other medications. These controversial results warrant additional well-designed studies to investigate the relationship between calcium supplementation and cardiovascular outcomes. The purpose of this review is to highlight the current literature in regards to calcium supplementation and cardiovascular health; and to identify areas of future research.

  9. Evaluation of calcium ion release and change in pH on combining calcium hydroxide with different vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charu Grover

    2014-01-01

    of 99.53, 17.98, 74.93% respectively with a significant difference among all groups. Group 1 reached the highest Ca 2+ level (39.79% at the end of 1 day but showed almost complete release of calcium hydroxide at the end of 15 days. Group 3 showed least calcium ion release (17.98% at 15 days. Group 4 showed a sustained release of Ca +2 ions from 74% at 15 days to 95% at the end of 30 days. After the 1 st h; Group 1 showed the highest pH level (11.8. However, pH reduced to 7.8 at the end of 30 days in this group. Group 2 showed the highest pH value (10.35, followed by Group 4 (10.32 after 30 days. Conclusion: Chitosan can be used as a promising vehicle for calcium hydroxide to maintain an alkaline pH and to allow sustained release of calcium ions in the root canal system.

  10. Mechanisms of p53-Mediated Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    terminus. Cell 81:1021–1029. 27. Juan , L. J., W. J. Shia, M. H. Chen, W. M. Yang, E. Seto, Y. S. Lin, and C. W. VOL. 25, 2005 THE C TERMINUS REGULATES p53...functionally resembles p53. Nat. Med. 4:839–843. 45. Pariat, M., S. Carillo, M. Molinari, C. Salvat , L. Debussche, L. Bracco, J. Milner, and M. Piechaczyk. 1997...apoptosis. Nature 2000;408:377-81. 27. Juan LJ, Shia WJ, Chen MH, et al. Histone deacetylases specifically down-regulate p53- dependent gene

  11. In vitro effect of calcium dobesilate on oxidative/inflammatory stress in human varicose veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alda, O; Valero, M S; Pereboom, D; Serrano, P; Azcona, J M; Garay, R P

    2011-12-01

    To determine whether calcium dobesilate can act in chronic venous insufficiency by similar antioxidant, anti-inflammatory mechanisms as in diabetic retinopathy. Calcium dobesilate was tested in vitro for its protective action against oxidative/inflammatory stress in human varicose veins. Varicose greater saphenous veins were obtained from 14 patients (11 men, 3 women) aged 53-65 years. Oxidative stress was induced exogenously in the vein segments, with the phenazine methosulphate (PMS)/NADH couple. Total antioxidant status (TAS) and malondialdehyde (MDA) contents were used as markers of oxidative stress. Calcium dobesilate significantly prevented oxidative disturbances in the micromolar range. PMS/NADH-dependent TAS decrease was fully prevented with IC(50) = 11.4 ± 2.3 µmol/L (n = 6 veins), whereas MDA increase was fully prevented with IC(50) = (102 ± -3) µmol/L (n = 6 veins). Calcium dobesilate acted quali- and quantitatively like rutin, the reference compound. Comparison with pharmacokinetic data suggests that calcium dobesilate can act at therapeutic concentrations. Calcium dobesilate protected human varicose veins against oxidative stress in vitro at levels that correspond to therapeutic concentrations. Further studies are required to investigate whether a similar action is found in varicose veins from patients orally treated with calcium dobesilate.

  12. GPCR Interaction: 53 [GRIPDB[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available is the truncation mutant starting at amino acids 53, bradykinin did not induce di...merization of the truncation mutant of B2R(65) starting amino acids 65. Both receptor variants are similar t

  13. African Studies Abstracts Online : number 53, 2016

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    African Studies Centre Leiden (ASCL),

    2016-01-01

    ASA Online provides a quarterly overview of journal articles and edited works on Africa in the field of the social sciences and the humanities available in the ASC library. Issue 53 (2016). African Studies Centre, Leiden.

  14. RD53A Integrated Circuit Specifications

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Sciveres, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Specifications for the RD53 collaboration’s first engineering wafer run of an integrated circuit (IC) for hybrid pixel detector readout, called RD53A. RD53A is intended to demonstrate in a large format IC the suitability of the technology (including radiation tolerance), the stable low threshold operation, and the high hit and trigger rate capabilities, required for HL-LHC upgrades of ATLAS and CMS. The wafer scale production will permit the experiments to prototype bump bonding assembly with realistic sensors in this new technology and to measure the performance of hybrid assemblies. RD53A is not intended to be a final production IC for use in an experiment, and will contain design variations for testing purposes, making the pixel matrix non-uniform.

  15. Calcium: the molecular basis of calcium action in biology and medicine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pochet, Roland; Donato, Rosario

    2000-01-01

    ... of Calcium Calcium Signalling in Excitable Cells Ca2+ Release in Muscle Cells by N. Macrez and J. Mironneau Calcium Signalling in Neurons Exemplified by Rat Sympathetic Ganglion Cells by S.J. M...

  16. 18 CFR 1308.53 - Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Service. 1308.53... Subpoenas § 1308.53 Service. A subpoena may be served at any place, and may be served by any individual not a party who is at least 18 years of age, or as otherwise provided by law. Service may be made by an...

  17. p53 switches off pluripotency on differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tongxiang; Lin, Yi

    2017-02-28

    The role of p53 as "a guardian of the genome" has been well established in somatic cells. However, its role in pluripotent stem cells remains much more elusive. Here, we discuss research progress in understanding the role of p53 in pluripotent stem cells and in pluripotent stem cell-like cancer stem cells. The p53 protein, which plays a key role in embryonic stem cells, was first discovered in 2005. Landmark studies of p53-related reprogramming elucidated this protein's importance in induced pluripotent stem cells in 2009. The p53-related safety concerns in pluripotent stem cells have been raised in stem cell-based therapy although the use of iPSCs in therapeutic application is promising. Because cancer stem cells have profiles similar to those of pluripotent stem cells, we also describe potential strategies for studies in cancer stem cells and cancer treatments. The new discoveries of p53 family proteins in pluripotent stem cells have made possible stable progress in stem cell transplantation efficiency and safety, as well as treatment strategies targeting cancer stem cells based on pluripotent stem cell technology.

  18. Serum Ionized Calcium May Be Related to White Matter Lesion Volumes in Older Adults: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. B. Anderson

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available White matter lesions have detrimental effects upon older adults, while serum calcium levels have been associated with elevated vascular risk and may be associated with these lesions. Depression, a serious mental disorder characterized by disturbances in calcium metabolism, may be an important contributor to any calcium-lesion relationship. This cross-sectional pilot study examined the association between serum ionized calcium (the physiologically active form of calcium and white matter lesion volumes in a sample of depressed and non-depressed older adults (N = 42; 60 years and older. Serum ionized calcium was determined using an ion-selective electrode technique, while lesion volumes were estimated from magnetic resonance imaging using an automated expectation-maximization segmentation. A linear regression model, controlling for age and group (depression vs. comparison, showed a trend for a positive relationship between serum ionized calcium and white matter lesion volume (β = 4.34, SE = 2.27, t = 1.91, p = 0.063. Subsample analyses with depressed participants showed a significant positive relationship between higher ionic calcium and greater lesion volume (β = 6.41, SE = 2.53, t = 2.53, p = 0.018, but no association was found for non-depressed participants. Sex-specific subsample analyses showed a significant positive relationship between higher calcium and greater lesion volume in men only (β = 7.49, SE = 3.42, t = 2.19, p = 0.041. These preliminary results indicate that serum ionized calcium may be associated with white matter lesions in older adults, particularly among men and individuals with depression. Larger studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  19. Presynaptic calcium signalling in cerebellar mossy fibres

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Louiza Bohn; Jörntell, Henrik; Midtgaard, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Whole-cell recordings were obtained from mossy fibre terminals in adult turtles in order to characterize the basic membrane properties. Calcium imaging of presynaptic calcium signals was carried out in order to analyse calcium dynamics and presynaptic GABA B inhibition. A tetrodotoxin (TTX....... Calcium imaging using Calcium-Green dextran revealed a stimulus-evoked all-or-none TTX-sensitive calcium signal in simple and complex rosettes. All compartments of a complex rosette were activated during electrical activation of the mossy fibre, while individual simple and complex rosettes along an axon...... appeared to be isolated from one another in terms of calcium signalling. CGP55845 application showed that GABA B receptors mediated presynaptic inhibition of the calcium signal over the entire firing frequency range of mossy fibres. A paired-pulse depression of the calcium signal lasting more than 1 s...

  20. Emerging Non-Canonical Functions and Regulation by p53: p53 and Stemness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Olivos

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery nearly 40 years ago, p53 has ascended to the forefront of investigated genes and proteins across diverse research disciplines and is recognized most exclusively for its role in cancer as a tumor suppressor. Levine and Oren (2009 reviewed the evolution of p53 detailing the significant discoveries of each decade since its first report in 1979. In this review, we will highlight the emerging non-canonical functions and regulation of p53 in stem cells. We will focus on general themes shared among p53’s functions in non-malignant stem cells and cancer stem-like cells (CSCs and the influence of p53 on the microenvironment and CSC niche. We will also examine p53 gain of function (GOF roles in stemness. Mutant p53 (mutp53 GOFs that lead to survival, drug resistance and colonization are reviewed in the context of the acquisition of advantageous transformation processes, such as differentiation and dedifferentiation, epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT and stem cell senescence and quiescence. Finally, we will conclude with therapeutic strategies that restore wild-type p53 (wtp53 function in cancer and CSCs, including RING finger E3 ligases and CSC maintenance. The mechanisms by which wtp53 and mutp53 influence stemness in non-malignant stem cells and CSCs or tumor-initiating cells (TICs are poorly understood thus far. Further elucidation of p53’s effects on stemness could lead to novel therapeutic strategies in cancer research.

  1. Atomic Resolution Structure of the Double Mutant (K53,56M) of Bovine Pancreatic Phospholipase A2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekar,K.; Yogavel, M.; Gayathri, D.; Velmurugan, D.; Krishna, R.; Poi, M.; Dauter, Z.; Dauter, M.; Tsai, M.

    2006-01-01

    The structure of the double mutant K53,56M has previously been refined at 1.9 Angstroms resolution using room-temperature data. The present paper reports the crystal structure of the same mutant K53,56M refined against 1.1 Angstroms data collected using synchrotron radiation. A total of 116 main-chain atoms from 29 residues and 44 side chains are modeled in alternate conformations. Most of the interfacial binding residues are found to be disordered and alternate conformations could be recognized. The second calcium ion-binding site residue Glu92 adopts two alternate conformations. The minor and major conformations of Glu92 correspond to the second calcium ion bound and unbound states.

  2. Mdm2 RING mutation enhances p53 transcriptional activity and p53-p300 interaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary V Clegg

    Full Text Available The p53 transcription factor and tumor suppressor is regulated primarily by the E3 ubiquitin ligase Mdm2, which ubiquitinates p53 to target it for proteasomal degradation. Aside from its ubiquitin ligase function, Mdm2 has been believed to be capable of suppressing p53's transcriptional activity by binding with and masking the transactivation domain of p53. The ability of Mdm2 to restrain p53 activity by binding alone, without ubiquitination, was challenged by a 2007 study using a knockin mouse harboring a single cysteine-to-alanine point mutation (C462A in Mdm2's RING domain. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts with this mutation, which abrogates Mdm2's E3 ubiquitin ligase activity without affecting its ability to bind with p53, were unable to suppress p53 activity. In this study, we utilized the Mdm2(C462A mouse model to characterize in further detail the role of Mdm2's RING domain in the control of p53. Here, we show in vivo that the Mdm2(C462A protein not only fails to suppress p53, but compared to the complete absence of Mdm2, Mdm2(C462A actually enhances p53 transcriptional activity toward p53 target genes p21/CDKN1A, MDM2, BAX, NOXA, and 14-3-3σ. In addition, we found that Mdm2(C462A facilitates the interaction between p53 and the acetyltransferase CBP/p300, and it fails to heterodimerize with its homolog and sister regulator of p53, Mdmx, suggesting that a fully intact RING domain is required for Mdm2's inhibition of the p300-p53 interaction and for its interaction with Mdmx. These findings help us to better understand the complex regulation of the Mdm2-p53 pathway and have important implications for chemotherapeutic agents targeting Mdm2, as they suggest that inhibition of Mdm2's E3 ubiquitin ligase activity may be sufficient for increasing p53 activity in vivo, without the need to block Mdm2-p53 binding.

  3. Calcium metabolism and cardiovascular function after spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Daniel C.; Yue, Qi; Dierickx, Jacqueline; Roullet, Chantal; Otsuka, Keiichi; Watanabe, Mitsuaki; Coste, Sarah; Roullet, Jean Baptiste; Phanouvang, Thongchan; Orwoll, Eric; hide

    2002-01-01

    To determine the influence of dietary calcium on spaceflight-induced alterations in calcium metabolism and blood pressure (BP), 9-wk-old spontaneously hypertensive rats, fed either high- (2%) or low-calcium (0.02%) diets, were flown on an 18-day shuttle flight. On landing, flight animals had increased ionized calcium (P parathyroid hormone levels (P animals (P = 0.057). However, mean arterial pressure was elevated (P animals fed low- compared with high-calcium diets (P parathyroid hormone was paradoxically increased in the high-calcium-fed flight animals after landing.

  4. [Regulatory mechanism of calcium metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozono, Keiichi

    It is often difficult for terrestrial animals to take enough calcium. To maintain serum or extracellular calcium levels is very important for muscle and nerve function. Two major regulators to increase the serum calcium levels are parathyroid hormone(PTH)and vitamin D. PTH binds to the G protein coupling receptor, PTH1R, and increases intracellular cAMP levels. Impirement in the PTH signalling causes many diseases such as pseudohypoparathyroidism and acrodysostosis with hormone resistance. Vitamin D is activated to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D[1,25(OH)2D]by two steps of hydroxylation which occurs in the Liver and Kidney. Then, 1,25(OH)2D binds to vitamin D receptor(VDR), which works as a ligand-dependent transcription factor. Hypocalcemia and hypercalcemia are caused by various disorders including abnormal regulation of PTH and vitamin D production and their signal transduction.

  5. Calcium signaling and cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Mauro Cunha Xavier; Kihara, Alexandre Hiroaki; Goulart, Vânia A M; Tonelli, Fernanda M P; Gomes, Katia N; Ulrich, Henning; Resende, Rodrigo R

    2015-11-01

    Cell proliferation is orchestrated through diverse proteins related to calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling inside the cell. Cellular Ca(2+) influx that occurs first by various mechanisms at the plasma membrane, is then followed by absorption of Ca(2+) ions by mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum, and, finally, there is a connection of calcium stores to the nucleus. Experimental evidence indicates that the fluctuation of Ca(2+) from the endoplasmic reticulum provides a pivotal and physiological role for cell proliferation. Ca(2+) depletion in the endoplasmatic reticulum triggers Ca(2+) influx across the plasma membrane in an phenomenon called store-operated calcium entries (SOCEs). SOCE is activated through a complex interplay between a Ca(2+) sensor, denominated STIM, localized in the endoplasmic reticulum and a Ca(2+) channel at the cell membrane, denominated Orai. The interplay between STIM and Orai proteins with cell membrane receptors and their role in cell proliferation is discussed in this review. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Calcium regulation of muscle contraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szent-Györgyi, A G

    1975-07-01

    Calcium triggers contraction by reaction with regulatory proteins that in the absence of calcium prevent interaction of actin and myosin. Two different regulatory systems are found in different muscles. In actin-linked regulation troponin and tropomyosin regulate actin by blocking sites on actin required for complex formation with myosin; in myosin-linked regulation sites on myosin are blocked in the absence of calcium. The major features of actin control are as follows: there is a requirement for tropomyosin and for a troponin complex having three different subunits with different functions; the actin displays a cooperative behavior; and a movement of tropomyosin occurs controlled by the calcium binding on troponin. Myosin regulation is controlled by a regulatory subunit that can be dissociated in scallop myosin reversibly by removing divalent cations with EDTA. Myosin control can function with pure actin in the absence of tropomyosin. Calcium binding and regulation of molluscan myosins depend on the presence of regulatory light chains. It is proposed that the light chains function by sterically blocking myosin sites in the absence of calcium, and that the "off" state of myosin requires cooperation between the two myosin heads. Both myosin control and actin control are widely distributed in different organisms. Many invertebrates have muscles with both types of regulation. Actin control is absent in the muscles of molluscs and in several minor phyla that lack troponin. Myosin control is not found in striated vertebrate muscles and in the fast muscles of crustacean decapods, although regulatory light chains are present. While in vivo myosin control may not be excluded from vertebrate striated muscles, myosin control may be absent as a result of mutations of the myosin heavy chain.

  7. RELAP5-3D User Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riemke, Richard Allan

    2002-09-01

    The Reactor Excursion and Leak Analysis Program with 3D capability1 (RELAP5-3D) is a reactor system analysis code that has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). The 3D capability in RELAP5-3D includes 3D hydrodynamics2 and 3D neutron kinetics3,4. Assessment, verification, and validation of the 3D capability in RELAP5-3D is discussed in the literature5,6,7,8,9,10. Additional assessment, verification, and validation of the 3D capability of RELAP5-3D will be presented in other papers in this users seminar. As with any software, user problems occur. User problems usually fall into the categories of input processing failure, code execution failure, restart/renodalization failure, unphysical result, and installation. This presentation will discuss some of the more generic user problems that have been reported on RELAP5-3D as well as their resolution.

  8. RELAP5-3D User Problems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riemke, Richard Allan

    2001-09-01

    The Reactor Excursion and Leak Analysis Program with 3D capability1 (RELAP5-3D) is a reactor system analysis code that has been developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE). The 3D capability in RELAP5-3D includes 3D hydrodynamics2 and 3D neutron kinetics3,4. Assessment, verification, and validation of the 3D capability in RELAP5-3D is discussed in the literature5,6,7,8,9. Additional assessment, verification, and validation of the 3D capability of RELAP5-3D will be presented in other papers in this users seminar. As with any software, user problems occur. User problems usually fall into the categories of input processing failure, code execution failure, restart/renodalization failure, unphysical result, and installation. This presentation will discuss some of the more generic user problems that have been reported on RELAP5-3D as well as their resolution.

  9. p53 regulation and activity in mouse embryonic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Solozobova, Valeriya

    2010-01-01

    P53 is a tumour development p53. The aim of this work was to study the regulation of p53 in embryonic stem cells and its activation in response to DNA damage. p53 was found that p53 becomes transcriptionally active in ES cells after DNA damage. Embryonic stem cells contain a relatively high amount of p53 protein and p53 RNA. After differentiation p53 level is rapidly downregulated. The high abundance of p53 in undifferentiated ES cells is a result of enhanced translation.

  10. The p53HMM algorithm: using profile hidden markov models to detect p53-responsive genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A computational method (called p53HMM is presented that utilizes Profile Hidden Markov Models (PHMMs to estimate the relative binding affinities of putative p53 response elements (REs, both p53 single-sites and cluster-sites. These models incorporate a novel "Corresponded Baum-Welch" training algorithm that provides increased predictive power by exploiting the redundancy of information found in the repeated, palindromic p53-binding motif. The predictive accuracy of these new models are compared against other predictive models, including position specific score matrices (PSSMs, or weight matrices. We also present a new dynamic acceptance threshold, dependent upon a putative binding site's distance from the Transcription Start Site (TSS and its estimated binding affinity. This new criteria for classifying putative p53-binding sites increases predictive accuracy by reducing the false positive rate. Results Training a Profile Hidden Markov Model with corresponding positions matching a combined-palindromic p53-binding motif creates the best p53-RE predictive model. The p53HMM algorithm is available on-line: http://tools.csb.ias.edu Conclusion Using Profile Hidden Markov Models with training methods that exploit the redundant information of the homotetramer p53 binding site provides better predictive models than weight matrices (PSSMs. These methods may also boost performance when applied to other transcription factor binding sites.

  11. The p53 Isoform Δ133p53β Promotes Cancer Stem Cell Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikola Arsic

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSC are responsible for cancer chemoresistance and metastasis formation. Here we report that Δ133p53β, a TP53 splice variant, enhanced cancer cell stemness in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, while its depletion reduced it. Δ133p53β stimulated the expression of the key pluripotency factors SOX2, OCT3/4, and NANOG. Similarly, in highly metastatic breast cancer cells, aggressiveness was coupled with enhanced CSC potential and Δ133p53β expression. Like in MCF-7 cells, SOX2, OCT3/4, and NANOG expression were positively regulated by Δ133p53β in these cells. Finally, treatment of MCF-7 cells with etoposide, a cytotoxic anti-cancer drug, increased CSC formation and SOX2, OCT3/4, and NANOG expression via Δ133p53, thus potentially increasing the risk of cancer recurrence. Our findings show that Δ133p53β supports CSC potential. Moreover, they indicate that the TP53 gene, which is considered a major tumor suppressor gene, also acts as an oncogene via the Δ133p53β isoform.

  12. The p53 Isoform Δ133p53β Promotes Cancer Stem Cell Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsic, Nikola; Gadea, Gilles; Lagerqvist, E. Louise; Busson, Muriel; Cahuzac, Nathalie; Brock, Carsten; Hollande, Frederic; Gire, Veronique; Pannequin, Julie; Roux, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cancer stem cells (CSC) are responsible for cancer chemoresistance and metastasis formation. Here we report that Δ133p53β, a TP53 splice variant, enhanced cancer cell stemness in MCF-7 breast cancer cells, while its depletion reduced it. Δ133p53β stimulated the expression of the key pluripotency factors SOX2, OCT3/4, and NANOG. Similarly, in highly metastatic breast cancer cells, aggressiveness was coupled with enhanced CSC potential and Δ133p53β expression. Like in MCF-7 cells, SOX2, OCT3/4, and NANOG expression were positively regulated by Δ133p53β in these cells. Finally, treatment of MCF-7 cells with etoposide, a cytotoxic anti-cancer drug, increased CSC formation and SOX2, OCT3/4, and NANOG expression via Δ133p53, thus potentially increasing the risk of cancer recurrence. Our findings show that Δ133p53β supports CSC potential. Moreover, they indicate that the TP53 gene, which is considered a major tumor suppressor gene, also acts as an oncogene via the Δ133p53β isoform. PMID:25754205

  13. Urodele p53 tolerates amino acid changes found in p53 variants linked to human cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Villiard Éric

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Urodele amphibians like the axolotl are unique among vertebrates in their ability to regenerate and their resistance to develop cancers. It is unknown whether these traits are linked at the molecular level. Results Blocking p53 signaling in axolotls using the p53 inhibitor, pifithrin-α, inhibited limb regeneration and the expression of p53 target genes such as Mdm2 and Gadd45, suggesting a link between tumor suppression and regeneration. To understand this relationship we cloned the p53 gene from axolotl. When comparing its sequence with p53 from other organisms, and more specifically human we observed multiple amino acids changes found in human tumors. Phylogenetic analysis of p53 protein sequences from various species is in general agreement with standard vertebrate phylogeny; however, both mice-like rodents and teleost fishes are fast evolving. This leads to long branch attraction resulting in an artefactual basal emergence of these groups in the phylogenetic tree. It is tempting to assume a correlation between certain life style traits (e.g. lifespan and the evolutionary rate of the corresponding p53 sequences. Functional assays of the axolotl p53 in human or axolotl cells using p53 promoter reporters demonstrated a temperature sensitivity (ts, which was further confirmed by performing colony assays at 37°C. In addition, axolotl p53 was capable of efficient transactivation at the Hmd2 promoter but has moderate activity at the p21 promoter. Endogenous axolotl p53 was activated following UV irradiation (100 j/m2 or treatment with an alkylating agent as measured using serine 15 phosphorylation and the expression of the endogenous p53 target Gadd45. Conclusion Urodele p53 may play a role in regeneration and has evolved to contain multiple amino acid changes predicted to render the human protein defective in tumor suppression. Some of these mutations were probably selected to maintain p53 activity at low temperature. However

  14. Can total cardiac calcium predict the coronary calcium score?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressman, Gregg S; Crudu, Vitalie; Parameswaran-Chandrika, Anoop; Romero-Corral, Abel; Purushottam, Bhaskar; Figueredo, Vincent M

    2011-01-21

    Mitral annular calcification (MAC) shares the same risk factors as atherosclerosis and is associated with coronary artery disease as well as cardiovascular events. However, sensitivity and positive predictive value are low. We hypothesized that a global echocardiographic calcium score would better predict coronary atherosclerotic burden, as assessed by coronary artery calcium score (CAC), than MAC alone. An echocardiographic score was devised to measure global cardiac calcification in a semi-quantitative manner; this included calcification in the aortic valve and root, the mitral valve and annulus, and the sub-mitral apparatus. This score, and a simplified version, were compared with a similar calcification score by CT scan, as well as the CAC. There was a good correlation between the two global calcification scores; the echocardiographic score also correlated with CAC. Using CAC >400 as a measure of severe coronary atherosclerosis, an echocardiographic score ≥5 had a positive predictive value of 60%. Importantly, the simplified score performed equally well (≥3 had a positive predictive value of 62%). Global cardiac calcification, assessed by CT scan or echocardiography, correlates with the extent of coronary calcium. A semi-quantitative calcium score can be easily applied during routine echocardiographic interpretation and can alert the reader to the possibility of severe coronary atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Calcium ferrite formation from the thermolysis of calcium tris (maleato)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    stoichiometric quantities of aqueous solutions of calcium maleate, iron(III) maleate and maleic acid. The reaction mixture was concentrated on a water bath until a brown coloured product formed after the addition of excess of acetone. The complex was vacuum dried and its identity was established by chemical analysis.

  16. Calcium ferrite formation from the thermolysis of calcium tris ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Various physico-chemical techniques i.e. TG, DTG, DTA, Mössbauer, XRD, IR etc have been used to study the decomposition behaviour from ambient to 900°C and ferrite formation. Three consecutive decomposition steps leading to the formation of -Fe2O3 and calcium carbonate have been observed at various stages of ...

  17. Estimation of presynaptic calcium currents and endogenous calcium buffers at the frog neuromuscular junction with two different calcium fluorescent dyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry eSamigullin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available At the frog neuromuscular junction, under physiological conditions, the direct measurement of calcium currents and of the concentration of intracellular calcium buffers—which determine the kinetics of calcium concentration and neurotransmitter release from the nerve terminal—has hitherto been technically impossible. With the aim of quantifying both Ca2+ currents and the intracellular calcium buffers, we measured fluorescence signals from nerve terminals loaded with the low-affinity calcium dye Magnesium Green or the high-affinity dye Oregon Green BAPTA-1, simultaneously with microelectrode recordings of nerve-action potentials and end-plate currents. The action-potential-induced fluorescence signals in the nerve terminals developed much more slowly than the postsynaptic response. To clarify the reasons for this observation and to define a spatiotemporal profile of intracellular calcium and of the concentration of mobile and fixed calcium buffers, mathematical modeling was employed. The best approximations of the experimental calcium transients for both calcium dyes were obtained when the calcium current had an amplitude of 1.6 ± 0.08 рА and a half-decay time of 1.2 ± 0.06 ms, and when the concentrations of mobile and fixed calcium buffers were 250 ± 13 µM and 8 ± 0.4 mM, respectively. High concentrations of endogenous buffers define the time course of calcium transients after an action potential in the axoplasm, and may modify synaptic plasticity.

  18. Calcium fertilization increases the concentration of calcium in sapwood and calcium oxalate in foliage of red spruce

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith; Walter C. Shortle; Jon H. Connolly; Rakesh Minocha; Jody Jellison

    2009-01-01

    Calcium cycling plays a key role in the health and productivity of red spruce forests in the northeastern US. A portion of the flowpath of calcium within forests includes translocation as Ca2+ in sapwood and accumulation as crystals of calcium oxalate in foliage. Concentrations of Ca in these tree tissues have been used as markers of...

  19. Calcium release from experimental dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okulus, Zuzanna; Buchwald, Tomasz; Voelkel, Adam

    2016-11-01

    The calcium release from calcium phosphate-containing experimental dental restorative materials was examined. The possible correlation of ion release with initial calcium content, solubility and degree of curing (degree of conversion) of examined materials was also investigated. Calcium release was measured with the use of an ion-selective electrode in an aqueous solution. Solubility was established by the weighing method. Raman spectroscopy was applied for the determination of the degree of conversion, while initial calcium content was examined with the use of energy-dispersive spectroscopy. For examined materials, the amount of calcium released was found to be positively correlated with solubility and initial calcium content. It was also found that the degree of conversion does not affect the ability of these experimental composites to release calcium ions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia and calcium sensing receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mrgan, Monija; Nielsen, Sanne; Brixen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Familial hypocalciuric hypercalcemia (FHH) is a lifelong, benign autosomal dominant disease characterized by hypercalcemia, normal to increased parathyroid hormone level, and a relatively low renal calcium excretion. Inactivation of the calcium-sensing receptor in heterozygous patients results in...

  1. Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bone Health Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Vitamin D, Calcium, and Bone Health March 2012 Download ... also helps keep your bones strong. Why are vitamin D and calcium important to bone health? Vitamin ...

  2. HPV and p53 in cervical cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Ngan, H Y; Stanley, M; Liu, S S; Ma, H K

    1994-01-01

    Objective - To determine the prevalence of HPV 16 and 18 E6 by DNA detection and p53 abnormal protein expression in cervical cancers in Hong Kong. Materials and methods - Seventy-three squamous cell cervical cancer biopsy were analysed. Detection of HPV DNA was carried out by the polymerase chain reaction and Southern blotting (PCR/SB) technique using primers to the HPV16 and 18 E6 region and consensus primers to the L1 region. Abnormal expression of the p53 protein was detected by immunohist...

  3. Diverse p53/DNA binding modes expand the repertoire of p53 response elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyas, Pratik; Beno, Itai; Xi, Zhiqun; Stein, Yan; Golovenko, Dmitrij; Kessler, Naama; Rotter, Varda; Shakked, Zippora; Haran, Tali E

    2017-10-03

    The tumor suppressor protein p53 acts as a transcription factor, binding sequence-specifically to defined DNA sites, thereby activating the expression of genes leading to diverse cellular outcomes. Canonical p53 response elements (REs) are made of two decameric half-sites separated by a variable number of base pairs (spacers). Fifty percent of all validated p53 REs contain spacers between 1 and 18 bp; however, their functional significance is unclear at present. Here, we show that p53 forms two different tetrameric complexes with consensus or natural REs, both with long spacers: a fully specific complex where two p53 dimers bind to two specific half-sites, and a hemispecific complex where one dimer binds to a specific half-site and the second binds to an adjacent spacer sequence. The two types of complexes have comparable binding affinity and specificity, as judged from binding competition against bulk genomic DNA. Structural analysis of the p53 REs in solution shows that these sites are not bent in both their free and p53-bound states when the two half-sites are either abutting or separated by spacers. Cell-based assay supports the physiological relevance of our findings. We propose that p53 REs with long spacers comprise separate specific half-sites that can lead to several different tetrameric complexes. This finding expands the universe of p53 binding sites and demonstrates that even isolated p53 half-sites can form tetrameric complexes. Moreover, it explains the manner in which p53 binds to clusters of more than one canonical binding site, common in many natural REs.

  4. WDR5 positively regulates p53 stability by inhibiting p53 ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qingqing; Li, Zengpeng; Chen, Jianming

    2017-05-27

    WD40 repeat protein WDR5 is a core component of the Set/MLL histone methyltransferase complex which catalyzes histone H3 Lys4 trimethylation and activates gene transcription in human cells. WDR5 promotes Set/MLL complex assembly and mediates the complex binding to Lys4-dimethylated histone H3 tail. Most earlier studies report that WDR5 exerts profound effects on various cellular and organismal processes mainly through epigenetic regulation of gene transcription. However, the functions of WDR5 in lung cancer remain largely unknown. Here, we report that WDR5 positively regulates p53 stability by inhibiting p53 ubiquitination in human lung cancer A549 cells. Overexpression of WDR5 dramatically increases p53 protein levels and its half-life in A549 cells, while depletion of WDR5 with WDR5-specific siRNAs significantly decreases p53 protein levels. We also observe that WDR5 is required for p53 induction in response to cisplatin treatment. Mechanistically, WDR5 colocalizes with p53 and inhibits p53 ubiquitination, resulting in p53 stabilization. Consequently, overexpression of WDR5 induces G1 phase arrest in A549 cells, and knocking down WDR5 by siRNAs reduces the population at G1 phase. Furthermore, p53 expression levels is at least in part determined by the p53 positive regulator WDR5 in some cancer cells. Taken together, these data suggest that WDR5 is directly involved in p53 signaling pathway. Our studies provide a new insight into WDR5 functions in A549 cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. 21 CFR 184.1229 - Calcium stearate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1229 Calcium stearate. (a) Calcium stearate (Ca(C17H35COO)2, CAS Reg. No. 1529-23-0) is the calcium salt of stearic acid derived from edible sources. It is prepared as... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium stearate. 184.1229 Section 184.1229 Food...

  6. Bioactive and Hemocompatible Calcium Sulphoaluminate Cement

    OpenAIRE

    Acuña-Gutiérrez, Iván Omar; Escobedo-Bocardo, José Concepción; Almanza-Robles, José Manuel; Cortés-Hernández, Dora Alicia; Saldívar-Ramírez, Mirna María Guadalupe; Reséndiz-Hernández, Perla Janet; Zugasti-Cruz, Alejandro

    2015-01-01

    Calcium sulphoaluminate cement (CSAC) is an attractive candidate for biomedical applications due to its appropriate mechanical properties and high calcium content. In vitro bioactivity and hemocompatibility of calcium sulphoaluminate cement were assessed. The cement was prepared from a mixture of calcium sulphoaluminate (CSA) clinker, gypsum and water. Cement samples were immersed in a simulated body fluid (SBF) at 37 °C for different periods of time (7, 14 and 21 days). The analyses of these...

  7. Calcium Balance in Chronic Kidney Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Hill Gallant, Kathleen M.; Spiegel, David M.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose of Review The kidneys play a critical role in the balance between the internal milieu and external environment. Kidney failure is known to disrupt a number of homeostatic mechanisms that control serum calcium and normal bone metabolism. However, our understanding of calcium balance throughout the stages of chronic kidney disease is limited and the concept of balance itself, especially with a cation as complex as calcium, is often misunderstood. Both negative and positive calcium balan...

  8. Calcium Balance in Chronic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill Gallant, Kathleen M; Spiegel, David M

    2017-06-01

    The kidneys play a critical role in the balance between the internal milieu and external environment. Kidney failure is known to disrupt a number of homeostatic mechanisms that control serum calcium and normal bone metabolism. However, our understanding of calcium balance throughout the stages of chronic kidney disease is limited and the concept of balance itself, especially with a cation as complex as calcium, is often misunderstood. Both negative and positive calcium balance have important implications in patients with chronic kidney disease, where negative balance may increase risk of osteoporosis and fracture and positive balance may increase risk of vascular calcification and cardiovascular events. Here, we examine the state of current knowledge about calcium balance in adults throughout the stages of chronic kidney disease and discuss recommendations for clinical strategies to maintain balance as well as future research needs in this area. Recent calcium balance studies in adult patients with chronic kidney disease show that neutral calcium balance is achieved with calcium intake near the recommended daily allowance. Increases in calcium through diet or supplements cause high positive calcium balance, which may put patients at risk for vascular calcification. However, heterogeneity in calcium balance exists among these patients. Given the available calcium balance data in this population, it appears clinically prudent to aim for recommended calcium intakes around 1000 mg/day to achieve neutral calcium balance and avoid adverse effects of either negative or positive calcium balance. Assessment of patients' dietary calcium intake could further equip clinicians to make individualized recommendations for meeting recommended intakes.

  9. The high prevalence of pathologic calcium crystals in pre-operative knees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derfus, Beth A; Kurian, Jason B; Butler, Jeffrey J; Daft, Laureen J; Carrera, Guillermo F; Ryan, Lawrence M; Rosenthal, Ann K

    2002-03-01

    Calcium pyrophosphate dihydrate (CPPD) and basic calcium phosphate (BCP) crystals are important in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis (OA) but are under recognized even in end stage disease. We determined the prevalence of these calcium crystals in synovial fluid (SF) of persons undergoing total knee arthroplasty for degenerative arthritis. SF samples were obtained from 53 knee joints undergoing total arthroplasty for a pre-operative diagnosis of OA. SF were analyzed via compensated light microscopy for CPPD crystals and a semiquantitative radiometric assay for BCP crystals. Fifty pre-operative radiographs were analyzed and graded according to the scale of Kellgren and Lawrence. Patients had an average age of 70 years at the time of surgery. CPPD and/or BCP crystals were identified in 60% of SF. Overall radiographic scores correlated with mean concentrations of BCP crystals. Higher mean radiographic scores correlated with the presence of calcium-containing crystals of either type in SF Radiographic chondrocalcinosis was identified in only 31% of those with SF CPPD. Pathologic calcium crystals were present in a majority of SF at the time of total knee arthroplasty. Intraoperative SF analysis could conveniently identify pathologic calcium crystals providing information that may be relevant to the future care of the patient's replaced joint and that of other joints. This information could also potentially aid in predicting the likelihood of the need for contralateral total knee arthroplasty.

  10. Electrochemical Induced Calcium Phosphate Precipitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lei, Yang; Song, Bingnan; Weijden, van der Renata D.; Saakes, M.; Buisman, Cees J.N.

    2017-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is an essential nutrient for living organisms and cannot be replaced or substituted. In this paper, we present a simple yet efficient membrane free electrochemical system for P removal and recovery as calcium phosphate (CaP). This method relies on in situ formation of hydroxide

  11. 21 CFR 582.7187 - Calcium alginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium alginate. 582.7187 Section 582.7187 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Calcium alginate. (a) Product. Calcium alginate. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  12. Abnormalities of serum calcium and magnesium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neonatal hypocalcemia is defined as a total serum calcium concentration of <7 mg/dL or an ionized calcium concentration of <4 mg/dL (1mmol/L). In very low birth weight (VLBW) infants, ionized calcium values of 0.8 to 1 mmol/L are common and not usually associated with clinical symptoms. In larger in...

  13. Modularized study of human calcium signalling pathway

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    When there is an extracellular change, cells get the message either by introduction of calcium ions into ... as it precipitates phosphate, the established energy currency of cells. Prolonged high intracellular calcium ... trigger proteins upon binding with free calcium ion(s) change their confirmation to modulate enzymes and ion ...

  14. 21 CFR 582.1191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Additives § 582.1191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use. This... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.1191 Section 582.1191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL...

  15. 21 CFR 582.5191 - Calcium carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Supplements 1 § 582.5191 Calcium carbonate. (a) Product. Calcium carbonate. (b) Conditions of use. This... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium carbonate. 582.5191 Section 582.5191 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL...

  16. Mechanism of store-operated calcium entry

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Activation of receptors coupled to the phospholipase C/IP3 signalling pathway results in a rapid release of calcium from its intracellular stores, eventually leading to depletion of these stores. Calcium store depletion triggers an influx of extracellular calcium across the plasma membrane, a mechanism known as the ...

  17. Mitochondrial Calcium Sparkles Light Up Astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacVicar, Brian A; Ko, Rebecca W Y

    2017-02-27

    Discrete calcium signals in the fine processes of astrocytes are a recent discovery and a new mystery. In a recent issue of Neuron, Agarwal et al. (2017) report that calcium efflux from mitochondria during brief openings of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) contribute to calcium microdomains. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. 21 CFR 182.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium phosphate. 182.1217 Section 182.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR... Substances § 182.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b...

  19. 21 CFR 582.1217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Calcium phosphate. 582.1217 Section 582.1217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1217 Calcium phosphate. (a) Product. Calcium phosphate (mono-, di-, and tribasic). (b...

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLES Calcium supplementation to prevent pre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ORIGINAL ARTICLES. Calcium supplementation to prevent pre-eclampsia - a systematic review. G J Hofmeyr, A Roodt, A N Atallah, L Duley. Background. Calcium supplementation during pregnancy may prevent high blood pressure and preterm labour. Objective. To assess the effects of calcium supplementation.

  1. Calcium Orthophosphate-Based Bioceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Dorozhkin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Various types of grafts have been traditionally used to restore damaged bones. In the late 1960s, a strong interest was raised in studying ceramics as potential bone grafts due to their biomechanical properties. A bit later, such synthetic biomaterials were called bioceramics. In principle, bioceramics can be prepared from diverse materials but this review is limited to calcium orthophosphate-based formulations only, which possess the specific advantages due to the chemical similarity to mammalian bones and teeth. During the past 40 years, there have been a number of important achievements in this field. Namely, after the initial development of bioceramics that was just tolerated in the physiological environment, an emphasis was shifted towards the formulations able to form direct chemical bonds with the adjacent bones. Afterwards, by the structural and compositional controls, it became possible to choose whether the calcium orthophosphate-based implants remain biologically stable once incorporated into the skeletal structure or whether they were resorbed over time. At the turn of the millennium, a new concept of regenerative bioceramics was developed and such formulations became an integrated part of the tissue engineering approach. Now calcium orthophosphate scaffolds are designed to induce bone formation and vascularization. These scaffolds are often porous and harbor different biomolecules and/or cells. Therefore, current biomedical applications of calcium orthophosphate bioceramics include bone augmentations, artificial bone grafts, maxillofacial reconstruction, spinal fusion, periodontal disease repairs and bone fillers after tumor surgery. Perspective future applications comprise drug delivery and tissue engineering purposes because calcium orthophosphates appear to be promising carriers of growth factors, bioactive peptides and various types of cells.

  2. 40 CFR 53.1 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... slope of a linear plot fitted to corresponding candidate and reference method mean measurement data... MONITORING REFERENCE AND EQUIVALENT METHODS General Provisions § 53.1 Definitions. Terms used but not defined... entity who submits an application for a Federal reference method or Federal equivalent method...

  3. 21 CFR 808.53 - Arizona.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EXEMPTIONS FROM FEDERAL PREEMPTION OF STATE AND LOCAL MEDICAL DEVICE REQUIREMENTS Listing of Specific State and Local Exemptions § 808.53 Arizona. The following Arizona medical device requirements are preempted...

  4. 28 CFR 2.53 - Mandatory parole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS, YOUTH OFFENDERS, AND JUVENILE DELINQUENTS United States Code Prisoners and Parolees § 2.53 Mandatory parole. (a) A prisoner (including a prisoner sentenced under the Narcotic Addict Rehabilitation Act...

  5. 46 CFR 32.53-3 - Exemptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... System § 32.53-3 Exemptions. (a) The Assistant Commandant for Marine Safety and Environmental Protection grants exemptions for crude oil tankers of less than 40,000 deadweight tons not fitted with high capacity.... (c) Each request must be supported by documentation showing that: (1) The system would be detrimental...

  6. Final measurement. Deliverable D5.3

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtzer, A.C.G.; Giessen, A.M. van der; Djurica, M.; Gruber, G.; Krengel, M.; Kokkinos, P.; Varvarigos, M.; Prusa, J.; Schulting, H.W.; Holzmann-Kaiser, U.; Schmoll, C.; Hatzakis, I.; Silva, F.M. da; Reymund, A.; Strebler, R.; Moreno, J.J.R.; Munoz, C.G.; Gheorghe, G.; Nikolopoulos, V.; Mavridis, T.; Bektas, O.; Yuce, E.; Volk, M.; Sterle, J.; Skarmeta, A.

    2015-01-01

    This deliverable D5.3 presents the GEN6 Final Measurement. It describes the outputs, outcomes and impact of the GEN6 project, based on other project deliverables inputs of the pilot leaders of the active GEN6 pilots and the individual consortium partners. The final measurement aims to show the

  7. Reference: 53 [Arabidopsis Phenome Database[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 53 http://metadb.riken.jp/db/SciNetS_ria224i/cria224u4ria224u14521841i Hunter Christine... heterochronic gene ZIPPY is an ARGONAUTE family member. 19 1734-9 14521841 2003 Sep Current biology Hunter Christine|Poethig R Scott|Sun Hui

  8. 19 CFR 134.53 - Examination packages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... TREASURY COUNTRY OF ORIGIN MARKING Articles Found Not Legally Marked § 134.53 Examination packages. (a) Site of marking—(1) Customs custody. Articles (or containers) in examination packages may be marked by... the public stores. (2) Importer's premises or elsewhere. If it is impracticable to mark the articles...

  9. Naphthoquinone Derivative PPE8 Induces Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in p53 Null H1299 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-Cherng Lien

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER plays a key role in synthesizing secretory proteins and sensing signal function in eukaryotic cells. Responding to calcium disturbance, oxidation state change, or pharmacological agents, ER transmembrane protein, inositol-regulating enzyme 1 (IRE1, senses the stress and triggers downstream signals. Glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78 dissociates from IRE1 to assist protein folding and guard against cell death. In prolonged ER stress, IRE1 recruits and activates apoptosis signal-regulating kinase 1 (ASK1 as well as downstream JNK for cell death. Naphthoquinones are widespread natural phenolic compounds. Vitamin K3, a derivative of naphthoquinone, inhibits variant tumor cell growth via oxygen uptake and oxygen stress. We synthesized a novel naphthoquinone derivative PPE8 and evaluated capacity to induce ER stress in p53 null H1299 and p53 wild-type A549 cells. In H1299 cells, PPE8 induced ER enlargement, GRP78 expression, and transient IER1 activation. Activated IRE1 recruited ASK1 for downstream JNK phosphorylation. IRE1 knockdown by siRNA attenuated PPE8-induced JNK phosphorylation and cytotoxicity. Prolonged JNK phosphorylation may be involved in PPE8-induced cytotoxicity. Such results did not arise in A549 cells, but p53 knockdown by siRNA restored PPE8-induced GRP78 expression and JNK phosphorylation. We offer a novel compound to induce ER stress and cytotoxicity in p53-deficient cancer cells, presenting an opportunity for treatment.

  10. Morphological Investigation of Calcium Carbonate during Ammonification-Carbonization Process of Low Concentration Calcium Solution

    OpenAIRE

    Huaigang Cheng; Xiaoxi Zhang; Huiping Song

    2014-01-01

    Ultrafine calcium carbonate is a widely used cheap additive. The research is conducted in low degree supersaturation solution in order to study the polymorphic phases’ change and its factors of the calcium carbonate precipitate in the ammonification-carbonization process of the solution with calcium. Fine particles of calcium carbonate are made in the solution containing 0.015 mol/L of Ca2+. Over 98% of the calcium carbonate precipitate without ammonification resembles the morphology of calci...

  11. Mammary-Specific Ablation of the Calcium-Sensing Receptor During Lactation Alters Maternal Calcium Metabolism, Milk Calcium Transport, and Neonatal Calcium Accrual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamillapalli, Ramanaiah; VanHouten, Joshua; Dann, Pamela; Bikle, Daniel; Chang, Wenhan; Brown, Edward

    2013-01-01

    To meet the demands for milk calcium, the lactating mother adjusts systemic calcium and bone metabolism by increasing dietary calcium intake, increasing bone resorption, and reducing renal calcium excretion. As part of this adaptation, the lactating mammary gland secretes PTHrP into the maternal circulation to increase bone turnover and mobilize skeletal calcium stores. Previous data have suggested that, during lactation, the breast relies on the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) to coordinate PTHrP secretion and milk calcium transport with calcium availability. To test this idea genetically, we bred BLG-Cre mice with CaSR-floxed mice to ablate the CaSR specifically from mammary epithelial cells only at the onset of lactation (CaSR-cKO mice). Loss of the CaSR in the lactating mammary gland did not disrupt alveolar differentiation or milk production. However, it did increase the secretion of PTHrP into milk and decreased the transport of calcium from the circulation into milk. CaSR-cKO mice did not show accelerated bone resorption, but they did have a decrease in bone formation. Loss of the mammary gland CaSR resulted in hypercalcemia, decreased PTH secretion, and increased renal calcium excretion in lactating mothers. Finally, loss of the mammary gland CaSR resulted in decreased calcium accrual by suckling neonates, likely due to the combination of increased milk PTHrP and decreased milk calcium. These results demonstrate that the mammary gland CaSR coordinates maternal bone and calcium metabolism, calcium transport into milk, and neonatal calcium accrual during lactation. PMID:23782944

  12. Apatite Formation from Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Mixed Amorphous Calcium Phosphate/Amorphous Calcium Carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibsen, Casper J S; Chernyshov, Dmitry; Birkedal, Henrik

    2016-08-22

    Crystallization from amorphous phases is an emerging pathway for making advanced materials. Biology has made use of amorphous precursor phases for eons and used them to produce structures with remarkable properties. Herein, we show how the design of the amorphous phase greatly influences the nanocrystals formed therefrom. We investigate the transformation of mixed amorphous calcium phosphate/amorphous calcium carbonate phases into bone-like nanocrystalline apatite using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction and IR spectroscopy. The speciation of phosphate was controlled by pH to favor HPO4 (2-) . In a carbonate free system, the reaction produces anisotropic apatite crystallites with large aspect ratios. The first formed crystallites are highly calcium deficient and hydrogen phosphate rich, consistent with thin octacalcium phosphate (OCP)-like needles. During growth, the crystallites become increasingly stoichiometric, which indicates that the crystallites grow through addition of near-stoichiometric apatite to the OCP-like initial crystals through a process that involves either crystallite fusion/aggregation or Ostwald ripening. The mixed amorphous phases were found to be more stable against phase transformations, hence, the crystallization was inhibited. The resulting crystallites were smaller and less anisotropic. This is rationalized by the idea that a local phosphate-depletion zone formed around the growing crystal until it was surrounded by amorphous calcium carbonate, which stopped the crystallization. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Computational study of a calcium release-activated calcium channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Keka; Shantappa, Anil

    2016-05-01

    The naturally occurring proteins that form hole in membrane are commonly known as ion channels. They play multiple roles in many important biological processes. Deletion or alteration of these channels often leads to serious problems in the physiological processes as it controls the flow of ions through it. The proper maintenance of the flow of ions, in turn, is required for normal health. Here we have investigated the behavior of a calcium release-activated calcium ion channel with pdb entry 4HKR in Drosophila Melanogaster. The equilibrium energy as well as molecular dynamics simulation is performed first. The protein is subjected to molecular dynamics simulation to find their energy minimized value. Simulation of the protein in the environment of water and ions has given us important results too. The solvation energy is also found using Charmm potential.

  14. The Calcium Wave of Vegetable Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TD. Geydan

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Calcium is an essential nutrient for plants; it is involved in developmental processes and in responses to biotic and abiotic factors. Several signals that modify the calcium concentration in the cytoplasm, endoplasmic reticulum, nucleus and/or plastids have been observed. These changes in the calcium concentration in the cell interior are rapidly returned to basal levels, in the meantime, innumerable and complex signaling cascades. This note exposes the mechanisms of calcium transport through the cell membranes of the entrance of calcium in the plant cells.

  15. FTIR Microspectroscopy Probes Particle-Radiation Effect on HCT116 cells (p53+/+, p53-/-).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jingwen; Zhang, Fengqiu; Huang, Qing

    2018-02-01

    p53 is a crucial tumor suppressor and plays an important role in cell cycle arrest, DNA damage repair, promotion of cell senescence and apoptosis, prevention of DNA damage and maintaining genomic stability and integrity. It has been reported that p53 might also be related to radiation sensitivity, for which the involved effects and processes could be further examined biochemically at the molecular level. In this study, we explored a new spectroscopic approach to probe the radiation-induced biological effects related to p53. Infrared microspectroscopy was used to detect the metabolic changes related to p53 under particle radiation. After alpha-particle irradiation of HCT116 cells (p53+/+, p53-/-), cell cycle arrest, DNA damage and lipid peroxidation in the cancer cells were observed using Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and microspectroscopy imaging. A remarkable difference in radiosensitivity between the two genotypes of cells was observed as well. This work provides a biochemical analysis of the p53-related radiation effects in cells and demonstrates the potential usefulness of FTIR microspectroscopy in the field of radiation research.

  16. p53 Aggregates penetrate cells and induce the co-aggregation of intracellular p53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolyn J Forget

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are unique pathologies in which the infectious particles are prions, a protein aggregate. The prion protein has many particular features, such as spontaneous aggregation, conformation transmission to other native PrP proteins and transmission from an individual to another. Protein aggregation is now frequently associated to many human diseases, for example Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease or type 2 diabetes. A few proteins associated to these conformational diseases are part of a new category of proteins, called prionoids: proteins that share some, but not all, of the characteristics associated with prions. The p53 protein, a transcription factor that plays a major role in cancer, has recently been suggested to be a possible prionoid. The protein has been shown to accumulate in multiple cancer cell types, and its aggregation has also been reproduced in vitro by many independent groups. These observations suggest a role for p53 aggregates in cancer development. This study aims to test the «prion-like» features of p53. Our results show in vitro aggregation of the full length and N-terminally truncated protein (p53C, and penetration of these aggregates into cells. According to our findings, the aggregates enter cells using macropinocytosis, a non-specific pathway of entry. Lastly, we also show that once internalized by the cell, p53C aggregates can co-aggregate with endogenous p53 protein. Together, these findings suggest prion-like characteristics for p53 protein, based on the fact that p53 can spontaneously aggregate, these aggregates can penetrate cells and co-aggregate with cellular p53.

  17. Calcium Intake in the Moroccan Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebbar El-houcine

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Calcium intakes of elderly people are often below the recommendations which are 1200 mg/day. The advancing age may be accompanied by a loss of capacity to absorb additional calcium in case of deficiency. The aim of our work is to evaluate the calcium intake in the Moroccan elderly. Methods: The version translated into Arabic dialect Fardellone questionnaire is tested on a sample of 159 subjects aged over 60 years. Results: The study population includes 87 women (55%, 72 men (45%. The mean calcium intake was respectively 3078 mg by week (that means 440 mg/day. The assessment of calcium intake showed a deficiency and the average consumption of calcium per day is significantly lower than the recommended daily amount for this population. The comparison of both gender found a deficit higher among women than among men. Conclusion: Evaluation of the calcium intake is an essential tool for better management of metabolic bone diseases.

  18. Calcium Impact on Milk Gels Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutina, Glykeria

    Calcium is one of the several elements that can be found in milk distributed between the micellar and the serum milk phase. Calcium is important from a nutritional point of view, but its contribution to the functional and structural properties of dairy products has only recently been...... acknowledgement. The presence of calcium in a dynamic equilibrium between the serum and the micellar milk phase make the distribution susceptible to certain physicochemical conditions and to technological treatments of milk resulting in fluctuations in pH and temperature and also sensitive to addition of calcium...... salts. The perturbation of calcium equilibria by these factors will affect the final properties of acid, calcium and rennet milk gels. By decreasing the pH from 6.0 to 5.2 (acid gels), the calcium equilibrium was significantly affected by temperature (4, 20, 30, 40 oC), and different combinations...

  19. TP53 Codon 72 Polymorphism and P53 Protein Expression in Colorectal Cancer Specimens in Isfahan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Nikbahkt Dastjerdi

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The TP53 tumor suppressor gene plays important roles in genomic stability. A common polymorphism at codon 72 of TP53 gene has been associated with increased risk for many human cancers. The p53 protein is expressed in colorectal cancer, but the reported prevalence of its expression varies widely. In the present study, the p53 protein expression in different genotypes of its codon 72 , was investigated. We undertook a case-control study on 250 controls and 250 paraffin block specimens of sporadic colorectal adenocarcinomas from the city of Isfahan. PCR amplification of TP53 codon 72 polymorphism: TP53 codon 72 genotypes were detected by PCR using specific primer pairs for amplifying the proline or the arginine Alleles. The PCR reaction was done separately for each of the two polymorphic variants. The amplified products were subjected to electrophoresis on 1% agarose gel in 1× TBE buffer and visualized on a transilluminator using ethidium bromide. Immunohistochemical Staining: We evaluated the expression patterns of p53 protein, as potential prognostic marker in colorectal cancer specimens by immunohistochemical staining. Statistical analyses: The χ2-test was used to assess the significance of any difference in the prevalence of TP53 codon 72 polymorphism between colorectal cancer patients and controls. The odds ratio and 95% CI (confidence intervals was used as a measure of the strength of the association. Statistical significance level was set to P≤0.05. In control samples, the genotype distribution for TP53 polymorphism showed 30.4%, 45.2% and 24.4% for the arginine/arginine, arginine/proline and proline/proline genotypes, respectively. Allelic frequencies corresponded to 0.663 for the arginine allele and 0.338 for the proline allele. In the cancer group 38.8% of the cases were arginine/arginine, 40.4% were arginine/proline and 20.8% were proline/proline. The corresponding frequencies were 0.590 for the arginine allele and 0.410 for the

  20. Exopolysaccharides regulate calcium flow in cariogenic biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astasov-Frauenhoffer, Monika; Varenganayil, Muth M; Decho, Alan W; Waltimo, Tuomas; Braissant, Olivier

    2017-01-01

    Caries-associated biofilms induce loss of calcium from tooth surfaces in the presence of dietary carbohydrates. Exopolysaccharides (EPS) provide a matrix scaffold and an abundance of primary binding sites within biofilms. The role of EPS in binding calcium in cariogenic biofilms is only partially understood. Thus, the aim of the present study is to investigate the relationship between the calcium dissolution rates and calcium tolerance of caries-associated bacteria and yeast as well as to examine the properties of EPS to quantify its binding affinity for dissolved calcium. Calcium dissolution was measured by dissolution zones on Pikovskaya's agar. Calcium tolerance was assessed by isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC) by adding CaCl2 to the bacterial cultures. Acid-base titration and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to identify possible functional groups responsible for calcium binding, which was assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Lactobacillus spp. and mutans streptococci demonstrated calcium dissolution in the presence of different carbohydrates. All strains that demonstrated high dissolution rates also revealed higher rates of calcium tolerance by IMC. In addition, acidic functional groups were predominantly identified as possible binding sites for calcium ions by acid-base titration and FTIR. Finally, ITC revealed EPS to have a higher binding affinity for calcium compared, for example, to lactic acid. In conclusion, this study illustrates the role of EPS in terms of the calcium tolerance of cariogenic microbiota by determining the ability of EPS to control free calcium concentrations within the biofilms as a self-regulating mode of action in the pathogenesis of dental caries.

  1. Exopolysaccharides regulate calcium flow in cariogenic biofilms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Astasov-Frauenhoffer

    Full Text Available Caries-associated biofilms induce loss of calcium from tooth surfaces in the presence of dietary carbohydrates. Exopolysaccharides (EPS provide a matrix scaffold and an abundance of primary binding sites within biofilms. The role of EPS in binding calcium in cariogenic biofilms is only partially understood. Thus, the aim of the present study is to investigate the relationship between the calcium dissolution rates and calcium tolerance of caries-associated bacteria and yeast as well as to examine the properties of EPS to quantify its binding affinity for dissolved calcium. Calcium dissolution was measured by dissolution zones on Pikovskaya's agar. Calcium tolerance was assessed by isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC by adding CaCl2 to the bacterial cultures. Acid-base titration and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopy were used to identify possible functional groups responsible for calcium binding, which was assessed by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC. Lactobacillus spp. and mutans streptococci demonstrated calcium dissolution in the presence of different carbohydrates. All strains that demonstrated high dissolution rates also revealed higher rates of calcium tolerance by IMC. In addition, acidic functional groups were predominantly identified as possible binding sites for calcium ions by acid-base titration and FTIR. Finally, ITC revealed EPS to have a higher binding affinity for calcium compared, for example, to lactic acid. In conclusion, this study illustrates the role of EPS in terms of the calcium tolerance of cariogenic microbiota by determining the ability of EPS to control free calcium concentrations within the biofilms as a self-regulating mode of action in the pathogenesis of dental caries.

  2. Calcium precipitate induced aerobic granulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Chunli; Lee, Duu-Jong; Yang, Xue; Wang, Yayi; Wang, Xingzu; Liu, Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic granulation is a novel biotechnology for wastewater treatment. This study refined existing aerobic granulation mechanisms as a sequencing process including formation of calcium precipitate under alkaline pH to form inorganic cores, followed by bacterial attachment and growth on these cores to form the exopolysaccharide matrix. Mature granules comprised an inner core and a matrix layer and a rim layer with enriched microbial strains. The inorganic core was a mix of different crystals of calcium and phosphates. Functional strains including Sphingomonas sp., Paracoccus sp. Sinorhizobium americanum strain and Flavobacterium sp. attached onto the cores. These functional strains promote c-di-GMP production and the expression by Psl and Alg genes for exopolysaccharide production to enhance formation of mature granules. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Supernumerary molars. A review of 53 cases

    OpenAIRE

    Menardía Pejoan, V.; Berini Aytés, Leonardo; Gay Escoda, Cosme

    2000-01-01

    Supernumerary molars are not uncommon and may be found nearly anywhere in the dental alveolar arches. A series of 36 patients that presented with 53 supernumerary molars are reviewed. They occurred more frequently in the maxilla (86.8%), had little or no clinical significance, tended to be impacted, and were not associated with the impactation of the third molar. Four cases of maxillary fifth molars are described

  4. Testosterone increases urinary calcium excretion and inhibits expression of renal calcium transport proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hsu, Yu-Juei; Dimke, Henrik Anthony; Schoeber, Joost P H

    2010-01-01

    Although gender differences in the renal handling of calcium have been reported, the overall contribution of androgens to these differences remains uncertain. We determined here whether testosterone affects active renal calcium reabsorption by regulating calcium transport proteins. Male mice had...... higher urinary calcium excretion than female mice and their renal calcium transporters were expressed at a lower level. We also found that orchidectomized mice excreted less calcium in their urine than sham-operated control mice and that the hypocalciuria was normalized after testosterone replacement...... calcium transport. Thus, our study shows that gender differences in renal calcium handling are, in part, mediated by the inhibitory actions of androgens on TRPV5-mediated active renal calcium transport....

  5. A Closer look at calcium absorption and the benefits and risks of dietary versus supplemental calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Anna; Camacho, Pauline

    2013-11-01

    To perform a thorough search of the literature on calcium research and specifically address the topic of calcium absorption. PubMed and Ovid were the main engines used for primary literature searches; textbooks, review articles, and book chapters are examples of the other sources used for supplemental information. Regarding calcium absorption, it seems apparent that the absorption efficiency of all calcium salts, regardless of solubility, is fairly equivalent and not significantly less than the absorption efficiency of dietary calcium. However, dietary calcium has been shown to have greater impact in bone building than supplemental calcium. This is likely due to improved absorption with meals and the tendency of people to intake smaller amounts more frequently, which is more ideal for the body's method of absorption. In addition, the cardiovascular risks of excessive calcium intake appear to be more closely related to calcium supplements than dietary calcium; this relationship continues to be controversial in the literature. We conclude that further studies are needed for direct comparison of supplemental and dietary calcium to fully establish if one is superior to the other with regard to improving bone density. We also propose further studies on the cardiovascular risk of long-term increased calcium intake and on physician estimates of patients' daily calcium intake to better pinpoint those patients who require calcium supplementation.

  6. CCN3 and calcium signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Chang Long

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The CCN family of genes consists presently of six members in human (CCN1-6 also known as Cyr61 (Cystein rich 61, CTGF (Connective Tissue Growth Factor, NOV (Nephroblastoma Overexpressed gene, WISP-1, 2 and 3 (Wnt-1 Induced Secreted Proteins. Results obtained over the past decade have indicated that CCN proteins are matricellular proteins, which are involved in the regulation of various cellular functions, such as proliferation, differentiation, survival, adhesion and migration. The CCN proteins have recently emerged as regulatory factors involved in both internal and external cell signaling. CCN3 was reported to physically interact with fibulin-1C, integrins, Notch and S100A4. Considering that, the conformation and biological activity of these proteins are dependent upon calcium binding, we hypothesized that CCN3 might be involved in signaling pathways mediated by calcium ions. In this article, we review the data showing that CCN3 regulates the levels of intracellular calcium and discuss potential models that may account for the biological effects of CCN3.

  7. Kinetics of calcium sulfoaluminate formation from tricalcium aluminate, calcium sulfate and calcium oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xuerun, E-mail: xuerunli@163.com; Zhang, Yu; Shen, Xiaodong, E-mail: xdshen@njut.edu.cn; Wang, Qianqian; Pan, Zhigang

    2014-01-15

    The formation kinetics of tricalcium aluminate (C{sub 3}A) and calcium sulfate yielding calcium sulfoaluminate (C{sub 4}A{sub 3}$) and the decomposition kinetics of calcium sulfoaluminate were investigated by sintering a mixture of synthetic C{sub 3}A and gypsum. The quantitative analysis of the phase composition was performed by X-ray powder diffraction analysis using the Rietveld method. The results showed that the formation reaction 3Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6} + CaSO{sub 4} → Ca{sub 4}Al{sub 6}O{sub 12}(SO{sub 4}) + 6CaO was the primary reaction < 1350 °C with and activation energy of 231 ± 42 kJ/mol; while the decomposition reaction 2Ca{sub 4}Al{sub 6}O{sub 12}(SO{sub 4}) + 10CaO → 6Ca{sub 3}Al{sub 2}O{sub 6} + 2SO{sub 2} ↑ + O{sub 2} ↑ primarily occurred beyond 1350 °C with an activation energy of 792 ± 64 kJ/mol. The optimal formation region for C{sub 4}A{sub 3}$ was from 1150 °C to 1350 °C and from 6 h to 1 h, which could provide useful information on the formation of C{sub 4}A{sub 3}$ containing clinkers. The Jander diffusion model was feasible for the formation and decomposition of calcium sulfoaluminate. Ca{sup 2+} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2−} were the diffusive species in both the formation and decomposition reactions. -- Highlights: •Formation and decomposition of calcium sulphoaluminate were studied. •Decomposition of calcium sulphoaluminate combined CaO and yielded C{sub 3}A. •Activation energy for formation was 231 ± 42 kJ/mol. •Activation energy for decomposition was 792 ± 64 kJ/mol. •Both the formation and decomposition were controlled by diffusion.

  8. Calcium intake of rural Gambian infants: a quantitative study of the relative contributions of breast milk and complementary foods at 3 and 12 months of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarjou, L M A; Goldberg, G R; Coward, W A; Prentice, A

    2012-06-01

    There is a paucity of information from developing countries on total calcium intake during infancy, and potential consequences for growth and bone development. Observational longitudinal study of rural Gambian infants (13 males and 17 females) at 3 and 12 months of age. Breast-milk intake and calcium concentration, weighed dietary intake, anthropometry, midshaft radius bone mineral content (BMC) and bone width (BW). At 3 and 12 months (mean ± s.d.) calcium intake from breast milk was 179 ± 53 and 117 ± 38, and from other foods 12 ± 38 and 73 ± 105 mg/day. There was no difference in total calcium intake; 94% and 62% of calcium came from breast milk. At 3 and 12 months, weight s.d.-scores were -0.441 ± 1.07 and -1.967 ± 1.06; length s.d.-scores were -0.511 ± 1.04 and -1.469 ± 1.13. Breast-milk calcium intake positively predicted weight (P = 0.0002, P ≤ 0.0001) and length (P = 0.056, P = 0.001). These relationships were not independent of breast-milk intake, which positively predicted weight (P ≤ 0.002) and length (P = 0.06, P = 0.004). At 3, but not 12 months, weight and length correlated with total calcium intake. There were no relationships between total calcium intake and breast-milk intake with BW or BMC. The combination of low calcium intake from breast milk and complementary foods resulted in a low total calcium intake close to the estimated biological requirement for bone mineral accretion. Relationships between calcium intake and growth were largely accounted for by breast-milk intake, suggesting that low calcium intake per se was not the limiting factor in the poor growth. These findings have potential implications for deriving calcium requirements in developing countries.

  9. The p53-MDM2 network: from oscillations to apoptosis

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    PRAKASH KUMAR

    developed a class of small molecules known as nutlins which occupy the p53 binding pocket in MDM2, thus preventing the binding of MDM2 to p53 and facilitating the activation of the p53 pathways in human cancer cell lines. The efficacy of the strategy has been demonstrated in experiments paving. Figure 4. Pulses of p53 ...

  10. 48 CFR 53.106 - Special construction and printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... printing. 53.106 Section 53.106 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS General 53.106 Special construction and printing. Contracting offices may request exceptions (see 53.103) to standard forms for special construction and printing. Examples of...

  11. USP3 stabilizes p53 protein through its deubiquitinase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Song; Shao, Shize; Wang, Longqiang; Liu, Haijun; Hou, Haitao; Wang, Yanan; Wang, Huan; Huang, Xiangpeng; Lv, Renhua

    2017-10-14

    p53 is the guardian of the genome integrity and the degradation of p53 protein is mediated by MDM2. Here we report that USP3 interacts with p53 and regulates p53 stability. Depletion of USP3 lead to accelerated degradation of p53 in normal cells thereby enhanced cell proliferation and transformation. Reconstitution of wildtype USP3, but not the USP3 C168S mutant, restored the stability of p53 protein and inhibited cell proliferation and transformation. These findings suggest that USP3 is an important regulator of p53 and regulates normal cell transformation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Deletions linked to TP53 loss drive cancer through p53-independent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu; Chen, Chong; Xu, Zhengmin; Scuoppo, Claudio; Rillahan, Cory D; Gao, Jianjiong; Spitzer, Barbara; Bosbach, Benedikt; Kastenhuber, Edward R; Baslan, Timour; Ackermann, Sarah; Cheng, Lihua; Wang, Qingguo; Niu, Ting; Schultz, Nikolaus; Levine, Ross L; Mills, Alea A; Lowe, Scott W

    2016-03-24

    Mutations disabling the TP53 tumour suppressor gene represent the most frequent events in human cancer and typically occur through a two-hit mechanism involving a missense mutation in one allele and a 'loss of heterozygosity' deletion encompassing the other. While TP53 missense mutations can also contribute gain-of-function activities that impact tumour progression, it remains unclear whether the deletion event, which frequently includes many genes, impacts tumorigenesis beyond TP53 loss alone. Here we show that somatic heterozygous deletion of mouse chromosome 11B3, a 4-megabase region syntenic to human 17p13.1, produces a greater effect on lymphoma and leukaemia development than Trp53 deletion. Mechanistically, the effect of 11B3 loss on tumorigenesis involves co-deleted genes such as Eif5a and Alox15b (also known as Alox8), the suppression of which cooperates with Trp53 loss to produce more aggressive disease. Our results imply that the selective advantage produced by human chromosome 17p deletion reflects the combined impact of TP53 loss and the reduced dosage of linked tumour suppressor genes.

  13. Deletions linked to TP53 loss drive cancer through p53–independent mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhengmin; Scuoppo, Claudio; Rillahan, Cory D.; Gao, Jianjiong; Spitzer, Barbara; Bosbach, Benedikt; Kastenhuber, Edward R.; Baslan, Timour; Ackermann, Sarah; Cheng, Lihua; Wang, Qingguo; Niu, Ting; Schultz, Nikolaus; Levine, Ross L.; Mills, Alea A.; Lowe, Scott W.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations disabling the TP53 tumour suppressor gene represent the most frequent events in human cancer and typically occur through a two-hit mechanism involving a missense mutation in one allele and a ‘loss of heterozygosity’ deletion encompassing the other. While TP53 missense mutations can also contribute gain-of-function activities that impact tumour progression, it remains unclear whether the deletion event, which frequently includes many genes, impacts tumorigenesis beyond TP53 loss alone. Here we show that somatic heterozygous deletion of mouse chromosome 11B3, a 4-megabase region syntenic to human 17p13.1, produces a greater effect on lymphoma and leukaemia development than Trp53 deletion. Mechanistically, the effect of 11B3 loss on tumorigenesis involves co-deleted genes such as Eif5a and Alox15b (also known as Alox8), the suppression of which cooperates with Trp53 loss to produce more aggressive disease. Our results imply that the selective advantage produced by human chromosome 17p deletion reflects the combined impact of TP53 loss and the reduced dosage of linked tumour suppressor genes. PMID:26982726

  14. The Role of Calcium in Osteoporosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, C. D.; Sanchez, S. D.

    1991-01-01

    Calcium requirements may vary throughout the lifespan. During the growth years and up to age 25 to 30, it is important to maximize dietary intake of calcium to maintain positive calcium balance and achieve peak bone mass, thereby possibly decreasing the risk of fracture when bone is subsequently lost. Calcium intake need not be greater than 800 mg/day during the relatively short period of time between the end of bone building and the onset of bone loss (30 to 40 years). Starting at age 40 to 50, both men and women lose bone slowly, but women lose bone more rapidly around the menopause and for about 10 years after. Intestinal calcium absorption and the ability to adapt to low calcium diets are impaired in many postmenopausal women and elderly persons owing to a suspected functional or absolute decrease in the ability of the kidney to produce 1,25(OH)2D2. The bones then become more and more a source of calcium to maintain critical extracellular fluid calcium levels. Excessive dietary intake of protein and fiber may induce significant negative calcium balance and thus increase dietary calcium requirements. Generally, the strongest risk factors for osteoporosis are uncontrollable (e.g., sex, age, and race) or less controllable (e.g., disease and medications). However, several factors such as diet, physical activity, cigarette smoking, and alcohol use are lifestyle related and can be modified to help reduce the risk of osteoporosis.

  15. Assessment of calcium intake by adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Franco de Oliveira

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the daily calcium intake of adolescents in schools from Chapecó, Santa Catarina, Southern Brazil, to check if calcium intake is in accordance with the Dietary Reference Intakes (DRI, and to investigate variables associated with daily calcium intake.METHODS: Cross-sectional study approved by the Institutional Review Board and developed in 2010. Students of the 8th grade completed questionnaires with personal data and questions about the calcium-rich foods intake frequency. In order to compare students with adequate (1300mg or inadequate intake of calcium/day (<1300mg, parametric and nonparametric tests were used.RESULTS: A total of 214 students with a mean age of 14.3±1.0 years were enrolled. The median daily calcium intake was 540mg (interquartile range - IQ: 312-829mg and only 25 students (11.7% had calcium intake within the recommendations of the DRI for age. Soft drink consumption ≥3 times/week was associated with a lower intake of calcium.CONCLUSIONS: Few students ingested adequate levels of calcium for the age group. It is necessary to develop a program to encourage a greater intake of calcium-rich foods in adolescence.

  16. The Risks and Benefits of Calcium Supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chan Soo Shin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The association between calcium supplementation and adverse cardiovascular events has recently become a topic of debate due to the publication of two epidemiological studies and one meta-analysis of randomized controlled clinical trials. The reports indicate that there is a significant increase in adverse cardiovascular events following supplementation with calcium; however, a number of experts have raised several issues with these reports such as inconsistencies in attempts to reproduce the findings in other populations and questions concerning the validity of the data due to low compliance, biases in case ascertainment, and/or a lack of adjustment. Additionally, the Auckland Calcium Study, the Women's Health Initiative, and many other studies included in the meta-analysis obtained data from calcium-replete subjects and it is not clear whether the same risk profile would be observed in populations with low calcium intakes. Dietary calcium intake varies widely throughout the world and it is especially low in East Asia, although the risk of cardiovascular events is less prominent in this region. Therefore, clarification is necessary regarding the occurrence of adverse cardiovascular events following calcium supplementation and whether this relationship can be generalized to populations with low calcium intakes. Additionally, the skeletal benefits from calcium supplementation are greater in subjects with low calcium intakes and, therefore, the risk-benefit ratio of calcium supplementation is likely to differ based on the dietary calcium intake and risks of osteoporosis and cardiovascular diseases of various populations. Further studies investigating the risk-benefit profiles of calcium supplementation in various populations are required to develop population-specific guidelines for individuals of different genders, ages, ethnicities, and risk profiles around the world.

  17. Mutant p53 in Cancer: New Functions and Therapeutic Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Patricia A.J.; Vousden, Karen H.

    2014-01-01

    Many different types of cancer show a high incidence of TP53 mutations, leading to the expression of mutant p53 proteins. There is growing evidence that these mutant p53s have both lost wild-type p53 tumor suppressor activity and gained functions that help to contribute to malignant progression. Understanding the functions of mutant p53 will help in the development of new therapeutic approaches that may be useful in a broad range of cancer types. PMID:24651012

  18. Vitamin D deficiency and calcium intake in reference to increased body mass index in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Musharaf, Sara; Al-Othman, Abdulaziz; Al-Daghri, Nasser M; Krishnaswamy, Soundararajan; Yusuf, Deqa S; Alkharfy, Khalid M; Al-Saleh, Yousef; Al-Attas, Omar S; Alokail, Majed S; Moharram, Osama; Yakout, Sobhy; Sabico, Shaun; Chrousos, George P

    2012-07-01

    Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to several chronic diseases in adults. Studies focusing on children and adolescents, however, are limited. In this randomized cross-sectional study, we aimed to determine the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and its relationship with childhood obesity and dietary calcium intake among a population of healthy urban Saudi children and adolescents. To achieve this, 331 randomly selected Saudi children (53.8% females and 46.2% males) aged 6-17 years were included. Demographic, medical, and dietary information were collected; anthropometrics were measured. Levels of serum fasting glucose, lipid profile, 25(OH) D, and for albumin corrected calcium were analyzed. Vitamin D deficiency was noted in all subjects, with girls having significantly lower vitamin D levels than boys. Mean calcium intake was found to be 60% of the required dietary allowance (RDA), while the mean vitamin D intake was 23% of RDA. Vitamin D status and calcium intake were comparable in both normal and overweight/obese children and adolescents. Vitamin D status was highest among children who had calcium intake >800 mg/day. In adolescents there was insignificant but decreasing trend in BMI, which was observed to be highest among those whose calcium intake was 800 mg/day. results from this study suggest the importance of vitamin D fortification and increased dietary calcium in the Saudi diet to meet RDA requirements and avoid onset of vitamin D deficiency-related diseases in Saudi children and adolescents.

  19. Calcium signals can freely cross the nuclear envelope in hippocampal neurons: somatic calcium increases generate nuclear calcium transients

    OpenAIRE

    Eder, Anja; Bading, Hilmar

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background In hippocampal neurons, nuclear calcium signaling is important for learning- and neuronal survival-associated gene expression. However, it is unknown whether calcium signals generated by neuronal activity at the cell membrane and propagated to the soma can unrestrictedly cross the nuclear envelope to invade the nucleus. The nuclear envelope, which allows ion transit via the nuclear pore complex, may represent a barrier for calcium and has been suggested to insulate the nuc...

  20. Calcium gluconate supplementation is effective to balance calcium homeostasis in patients with gastrectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, M; Keller, J; Beil, B; van Driel, I; Zustin, J; Barvencik, F; Schinke, T; Amling, M

    2015-03-01

    We demonstrate histological evidence for hyperparathyroidism in patients with gastrectomy. This is, at least in part, explained by impaired calcium absorption, resulting in mineralization defects and secondary hyperparathyroidism. Additionally, we demonstrate improved bone mineralization in patients with gastrectomy after gluconate therapy and showed the effectiveness of calcium gluconate over carbonate to balance impaired calcium hemostasis in mice. Gastrectomy and hypochlorhydria due to long-term proton pump inhibitor therapy are associated with increased fracture risk because of intestinal calcium malabsorption. Hence, our objectives were to histologically investigate bone metabolism in patients with gastrectomy and to analyze the impact of calcium gluconate supplementation on skeletal integrity in the setting of impaired gastric acidification. Undecalcified bone biopsies of 26 gastrectomized individuals were histologically analyzed. In the clinical setting, we retrospectively identified 5 gastrectomized patients with sufficient vitamin D level, who were additionally supplemented with calcium gluconate and had a real bone mineral density (aBMD) follow-up assessments. A mouse model of achlorhydria (ATP4b-/-) was used to compare the effect of calcium gluconate and calcium carbonate supplementation on bone metabolism. Biopsies from gastrectomized individuals showed significantly increased osteoid, osteoclast, and osteoblast indices and fibroosteoclasia (p < 0.05) as well as impaired calcium distribution in mineralized bone matrix compared to healthy controls. Five gastrectomized patients with sufficient vitamin D level demonstrated a significant increase in aBMD after a treatment with calcium gluconate alone for at least 6 months (p < 0.05). Calcium gluconate was superior to calcium carbonate in maintaining calcium metabolism in a mouse model of achlorhydria. Gastrectomy is associated with severe osteomalacia, marrow fibrosis, and impaired calcium distribution

  1. Influence of calcium sources on microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation by Bacillus sp. CR2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achal, Varenyam; Pan, Xiangliang

    2014-05-01

    Stimulation of microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICCP) is likely to be influenced by calcium sources. In order to study such influences, we performed MICCP using Bacillus sp. CR2 in nutrient broth containing urea, supplemented with different calcium sources (calcium chloride, calcium oxide, calcium acetate and calcium nitrate). The experiment lasted 7 days, during which bacterial growth, urease activity, calcite production and pH were measured. Our results showed that calcium chloride is the better calcium source for MICCP process, since it provides higher urease activity and more calcite production. The influences of calcium sources on MICCP were further studied using Fourier transform-infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses. These analyses confirmed that the precipitate formed was CaCO3 and composed of predominantly calcite crystals with a little amount of aragonite and vaterite crystals. The maximum yield of calcite precipitation was achievable with calcium chloride followed by calcium nitrate as a calcium source. The results of present study may be applicable to media preparation during efficient MICCP process.

  2. Calcium signals can freely cross the nuclear envelope in hippocampal neurons: somatic calcium increases generate nuclear calcium transients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bading Hilmar

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In hippocampal neurons, nuclear calcium signaling is important for learning- and neuronal survival-associated gene expression. However, it is unknown whether calcium signals generated by neuronal activity at the cell membrane and propagated to the soma can unrestrictedly cross the nuclear envelope to invade the nucleus. The nuclear envelope, which allows ion transit via the nuclear pore complex, may represent a barrier for calcium and has been suggested to insulate the nucleus from activity-induced cytoplasmic calcium transients in some cell types. Results Using laser-assisted uncaging of caged calcium compounds in defined sub-cellular domains, we show here that the nuclear compartment border does not represent a barrier for calcium signals in hippocampal neurons. Although passive diffusion of molecules between the cytosol and the nucleoplasm may be modulated through changes in conformational state of the nuclear pore complex, we found no evidence for a gating mechanism for calcium movement across the nuclear border. Conclusion Thus, the nuclear envelope does not spatially restrict calcium transients to the somatic cytosol but allows calcium signals to freely enter the cell nucleus to trigger genomic events.

  3. Calcium signals can freely cross the nuclear envelope in hippocampal neurons: somatic calcium increases generate nuclear calcium transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eder, Anja; Bading, Hilmar

    2007-01-01

    Background In hippocampal neurons, nuclear calcium signaling is important for learning- and neuronal survival-associated gene expression. However, it is unknown whether calcium signals generated by neuronal activity at the cell membrane and propagated to the soma can unrestrictedly cross the nuclear envelope to invade the nucleus. The nuclear envelope, which allows ion transit via the nuclear pore complex, may represent a barrier for calcium and has been suggested to insulate the nucleus from activity-induced cytoplasmic calcium transients in some cell types. Results Using laser-assisted uncaging of caged calcium compounds in defined sub-cellular domains, we show here that the nuclear compartment border does not represent a barrier for calcium signals in hippocampal neurons. Although passive diffusion of molecules between the cytosol and the nucleoplasm may be modulated through changes in conformational state of the nuclear pore complex, we found no evidence for a gating mechanism for calcium movement across the nuclear border. Conclusion Thus, the nuclear envelope does not spatially restrict calcium transients to the somatic cytosol but allows calcium signals to freely enter the cell nucleus to trigger genomic events. PMID:17663775

  4. The p53 target Wig-1 regulates p53 mRNA stability through an AU-rich element

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vilborg, Anna; Glahder, Jacob-Andreas Harald; Wilhelm, Margareta T

    2009-01-01

    The p53 target gene Wig-1 encodes a double-stranded-RNA-binding zinc finger protein. We show here that Wig-1 binds to p53 mRNA and stabilizes it through an AU-rich element (ARE) in the 3' UTR of the p53 mRNA. This effect is mirrored by enhanced p53 protein levels in both unstressed cells and cells...... exposed to p53-activating stress agents. Thus, the p53 target Wig-1 is a previously undescribed ARE-regulating protein that acts as a positive feedback regulator of p53, with implications both for the steady-state levels of p53 and for the p53 stress response. Our data reveal a previously undescribed link...... between the tumor suppressor p53 and posttranscriptional gene regulation via AREs in mRNA....

  5. Elemental Content of Calcium Oxalate Stones from a Canine Model of Urinary Stone Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Killilea

    Full Text Available One of the most common types of urinary stones formed in humans and some other mammals is composed of calcium oxalate in ordered hydrated crystals. Many studies have reported a range of metals other than calcium in human stones, but few have looked at stones from animal models such as the dog. Therefore, we determined the elemental profile of canine calcium oxalate urinary stones and compared it to reported values from human stones. The content of 19 elements spanning 7-orders of magnitude was quantified in calcium oxalate stones from 53 dogs. The elemental profile of the canine stones was highly overlapping with human stones, indicating similar inorganic composition. Correlation and cluster analysis was then performed on the elemental profile from canine stones to evaluate associations between the elements and test for potential subgrouping based on elemental content. No correlations were observed with the most abundant metal calcium. However, magnesium and sulfur content correlated with the mineral hydration form, while phosphorous and zinc content correlated with the neuter status of the dog. Inter-elemental correlation analysis indicated strong associations between barium, phosphorous, and zinc content. Additionally, cluster analysis revealed subgroups within the stones that were also based primarily on barium, phosphorous, and zinc. These data support the use of the dog as a model to study the effects of trace metal homeostasis in urinary stone disease.

  6. Effect of Blumea balsamifera extract on the phase and morphology of calcium oxalate crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montealegre, Charlimagne M; De Leon, Rizalinda L

    2017-10-01

    Calcium oxalate crystals are found in majority of kidney stones with calcium oxalate monohydrate (COM) as one of the primary types of kidney stones. Various methods of treatment exist, including herbal treatment in the Philippines that uses the medicinal herb Blumea balsamifera (B. balsamifera). The effect of B. balsamifera extract on the morphology of calcium oxalate crystals was studied by light microscopy, image analysis, powder X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The extract decreased the crystal size by 5.22%-82.62% depending on the degree of supersaturation. Through analysis of the projected area of the crystals, the extract was found to shift the phase of the crystals from COM to calcium oxalate dihydrate (COD). This shift in phase is significant with a COM to COD shift of 88.26% at 0.5 mg/mL of extract and 91.53% at 1.0 mg/mL of extract. Scanning election microscopic (SEM) images revealed aggregation of crystals at 0 mg/mL of extract. At 1.0 mg/mL of extract, the scanning electron micrographs showed discernible crystal unit boundaries. B. balsamifera extract was observed to have decreased crystal size, shifted crystal phase from COM to COD and prevented the aggregation of calcium oxalate crystals.

  7. The effects of a calcium-rich pre-exercise meal on biomarkers of calcium homeostasis in competitive female cyclists: a randomised crossover trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C Haakonssen

    Full Text Available To examine whether a calcium-rich pre-exercise meal attenuates exercise-induced perturbations of bone calcium homeostasis caused by maintenance of sweat calcium losses.Using a randomized, counterbalanced crossover design, 32 well-trained female cyclists completed two 90 min cycling trials separated by 1 day. Exercise trials were preceded 2 hours by either a calcium-rich (1352 ± 53 mg calcium dairy based meal (CAL or a control meal (CON; 46 ± 7 mg calcium. Blood was sampled pre-trial; pre-exercise; and immediately, 40 min, 100 min and 190 min post-exercise. Blood was analysed for ionized calcium and biomarkers of bone resorption (Cross Linked C-Telopeptide of Type I Collagen (CTX-I, Cross Linked C-Telopeptide of Type II Collagen (CTX-II, Parathyroid Hormone (PTH, and bone formation (Procollagen I N-Terminal Propeptide (PINP using the established enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technique.PTH and CTX-I increased from pre-exercise to post-exercise in both conditions but was attenuated in CAL (p < 0.001. PTH was 1.55 [1.20, 2.01] times lower in CAL immediately post-exercise and 1.45 [1.12, 1.88] times lower at 40 min post-exercise. CTX-I was 1.40 [1.15, 1.70] times lower in CAL at immediately post-exercise, 1.30 [1.07, 1.57] times lower at 40 min post-exercise and 1.22 [1.00, 1.48] times lower at 190 min post-exercise (p < 0.05. There was no significant interaction between pre-exercise meal condition and time point for CTX-II (p = 0.732 or PINP (p = 0.819.This study showed that a calcium-rich pre-exercise breakfast meal containing ~1350 mg of calcium consumed ~90 min before a prolonged and high intensity bout of stationary cycling attenuates the exercise induced rise in markers of bone resorption--PTH and CTX-I.Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12614000675628.

  8. Induced calcium carbonate precipitation using Bacillus species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifan, Mostafa; Samani, Ali Khajeh; Berenjian, Aydin

    2016-12-01

    Microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation is an emerging process for the production of self-healing concrete. This study was aimed to investigate the effects and optimum conditions on calcium carbonate biosynthesis. Bacillus licheniformis, Bacillus sphaericus, yeast extract, urea, calcium chloride and aeration were found to be the most significant factors affecting the biomineralization of calcium carbonate. It was noticed that the morphology of microbial calcium carbonate was mainly affected by the genera of bacteria (cell surface properties), the viscosity of the media and the type of electron acceptors (Ca2+). The maximum calcium carbonate concentration of 33.78 g/L was achieved at the optimum conditions This value is the highest concentration reported in the literature.

  9. Calcium excretion in feces of ungulates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schryver, H F; Foose, T J; Williams, J; Hintz, H F

    1983-01-01

    1. Fecal excretion of calcium was examined in 122 individual ungulates representing 7 species of Equidae, 3 species of Tapiridae, 3 species of Rhinocerotidae, 2 species of Elephantidae, 2 species of Hippopotamidae, 12 species of Bovidae, 2 species of Cervidae, 3 species of Camellidae and 1 species of Giraffidae. 2. Animals were fed timothy hay, a low calcium diet or alfalfa hay, a high calcium diet. 3. In a few cases oat straw or prairie hay was used instead of timothy hay. 4. Samples of feces were obtained from individuals daily for 4 days following a 20 day dietary equilibration period. 5. Feces of equids, tapirs, rhinoceros and elephants had a lower calcium concentration and a lower Ca/P ratio than feces of ruminants when the animals were fed diets of equivalent calcium content. 6. The findings suggest that the non-ruminant ungulate equids, tapirs, rhinoceros and elephants absorb a larger proportion of dietary calcium than ruminants do.

  10. Binding of calcium and carbonate to polyacrylates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tribello, Gareth A; Liew, CheeChin; Parrinello, Michele

    2009-05-21

    Polyacrylate molecules can be used to slow the growth of calcium carbonate. However, little is known about the mechanism by which the molecules impede the growth rate. A recent computational study (Bulo et al. Macromolecules 2007, 40, 3437) used metadynamics to investigate the binding of calcium to polyacrylate chains and has thrown some light on the coiling and precipitation of these polymers. We extend these simulations to examine the binding of calcium and carbonate to polyacrylate chains. We show that calcium complexed with both carbonate and polyacrylate is a very stable species. The free energies of calcium-carbonate-polyacrylate complexes, with different polymer configurations, are calculated, and differences in the free energy of the binding of carbonate are shown to be due to differences in the amount of steric hindrance about the calcium, which prevents the approach of the carbonate ion.

  11. WAYS TO CORRECT CALCIUM DEFFICIT AMONG CHILDREN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.I. Taibulatov

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to the urgent issue of the pediatrics — calcium deficit among children. The authors provide modern data on the scheme of the normal calcium exchange in the human body. They also review the main diseases related to the disorders of the pho sphorocalcic metabolism, requiring prompt prevention and treatment by calcium based medications. The researchers stress the diseases of the musculoskeletal system, as insufficient calcium, phosphorus and vitamins supply of the child's body chiefly effects the state of the skeletal and muscular tissue. They give recommendations how to use the vitamin and mineral complex to correct calcium deficit.Key words: calcium deficit, diseases of the musculoskeletal system, vitamin and mineral complex, children.

  12. Altered calcium signaling in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Teneale A; Yapa, Kunsala T D S; Monteith, Gregory R

    2015-10-01

    It is the nature of the calcium signal, as determined by the coordinated activity of a suite of calcium channels, pumps, exchangers and binding proteins that ultimately guides a cell's fate. Deregulation of the calcium signal is often deleterious and has been linked to each of the 'cancer hallmarks'. Despite this, we do not yet have a full understanding of the remodeling of the calcium signal associated with cancer. Such an understanding could aid in guiding the development of therapies specifically targeting altered calcium signaling in cancer cells during tumorigenic progression. Findings from some of the studies that have assessed the remodeling of the calcium signal associated with tumorigenesis and/or processes important in invasion and metastasis are presented in this review. The potential of new methodologies is also discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. 47 CFR 76.53 - Reference points.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CABLE TELEVISION SERVICE Carriage of Television Broadcast Signals § 76.53 Reference points. The...°41′30″ 97°20′16″ Kentucky: Ashland 38°28′36″ 82°38′23″ Bowling Green 36°59′41″ 86°26′33″ Covington 39...°19′38″ 82°06′09″ Bowling Green 41°22′37″ 83°39′03″ Canton 40°47′50″ 81°22′37″ Cincinnati 39°06′07″ 84...

  14. Calcium dobesilate: pharmacology and future approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tejerina, T; Ruiz, E

    1998-09-01

    1. Calcium dobesilate (2,5-dihydroxybenzene sulfonate) is a drug commonly used in the treatment of diabetic retinopathy and chronic venous insufficiency. 2. The pharmacology of calcium dobesilate reveals its ability to decrease capillary permeability, as well as platelet aggregation and blood viscosity. 3. Furthermore, recent data show that calcium dobesilate increases endothelium-dependent relaxation owing to an increase in nitric oxide synthesis.

  15. Presynaptic calcium dynamics of learning neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer-Hermann, Michael; Erler, Frido; Soff, Gerhard

    2002-01-01

    We present a new model for the dynamics of the presynaptic intracellular calcium concentration in neurons evoked by various stimulation protocols. The aim of the model is twofold: We want to discuss the calcium transients during and after specific stimulation protocols as they are used to induce long-term-depression and long-term-potentiation. In addition we would like to provide a general tool which allows the comparison of different calcium experiments. This may help to draw conclusions on ...

  16. Protein-Mediated Precipitation of Calcium Carbonate

    OpenAIRE

    Izabela Polowczyk; Anna Bastrzyk; Marta Fiedot

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is an important component in exoskeletons of many organisms. The synthesis of calcium carbonate was performed by mixing dimethyl carbonate and an aqueous solution of calcium chloride dihydrate. The precipitation product was characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements. In addition, the turbidity of the reaction solution was acquire...

  17. Serum levels of vitamin D, parathyroid hormone and calcium in relation to survival following breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huss, Linnea; Butt, Salma; Borgquist, Signe; Almquist, Martin; Malm, Johan; Manjer, Jonas

    2014-09-01

    Vitamin D, parathyroid hormone (PTH) and calcium in blood are correlated with each other. Previous studies have suggested vitamin D to have anti-proliferative effects on tumor cells, whereas PTH may have carcinogenic effects. A cancer disease may influence calcium levels in blood, but less is known about calcium and its potential effect on cancer risk and survival. The aim of this study was to examine pre-diagnostic levels of vitamin D (25OHD), PTH and calcium in relation to survival after breast cancer. The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study enrolled 17,035 women between 1991 and 1996. 672 patients developed incident invasive breast cancer up until 31 December 2006. Serum samples collected at baseline were analyzed for 25OHD, PTH and calcium. All patients were followed until 31 December 2010 using the Swedish Cause of Death Registry. The analytes were divided into tertiles and the risk of death from breast cancer was analyzed using an adjusted Cox proportional hazards analysis, yielding hazard ratios with 95 % confidence intervals. Levels of 25OHD and breast cancer mortality were associated in a u-shaped manner with the highest mortality among patients in the first (2.46: 1.38-4.37) and third tertiles (1.99: 1.14-3.49), as compared to the second. An inverse relation was found between calcium levels and breast cancer mortality, with the lowest mortality in the third tertile, (0.53: 0.30-0.92) as compared to the first. There was no clear association between PTH and breast cancer mortality. This study shows that pre-diagnostic 25OHD and calcium may affect survival following breast cancer.

  18. Isg15 controls p53 stability and functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yi-Fu; Wee, Sheena; Gunaratne, Jayantha; Lane, David P; Bulavin, Dmitry V

    2014-01-01

    Degradation of p53 is a cornerstone in the control of its functions as a tumor suppressor. This process is attributed to ubiquitin-dependent modification of p53. In addition to polyubiquitination, we found that p53 is targeted for degradation through ISGylation. Isg15, a ubiquitin-like protein, covalently modifies p53 at 2 sites in the N and C terminus, and ISGylated p53 can be degraded by the 20S proteasome. ISGylation primarily targets a misfolded, dominant-negative p53, and Isg15 deletion in normal cells results in suppression of p53 activity and functions. We propose that Isg15-dependent degradation of p53 represents an alternative mechanism of controlling p53 protein levels, and, thus, it is an attractive pathway for drug discovery. PMID:24844324

  19. Mechanical Properties of a Calcium Dietary Supplement, Calcium Fumarate Trihydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shijing; Henke, Sebastian; Wharmby, Michael T; Yeung, Hamish H-M; Li, Wei; Cheetham, Anthony K

    2015-12-07

    The mechanical properties of calcium fumarate trihydrate, a 1D coordination polymer considered for use as a calcium source for food and beverage enrichment, have been determined via nanoindentation and high-pressure X-ray diffraction with single crystals. The nanoindentation studies reveal that the elastic modulus (16.7-33.4 GPa, depending on crystallographic orientation), hardness (1.05-1.36 GPa), yield stress (0.70-0.90 GPa), and creep behavior (0.8-5.8 nm/s) can be rationalized in view of the anisotropic crystal structure; factors include the directionality of the inorganic Ca-O-Ca chain and hydrogen bonding, as well as the orientation of the fumarate ligands. High-pressure single-crystal X-ray diffraction studies show a bulk modulus of ∼ 20 GPa, which is indicative of elastic recovery intermediate between small molecule drug crystals and inorganic pharmaceutical ingredients. The combined use of nanoindentation and high-pressure X-ray diffraction techniques provides a complementary experimental approach for probing the critical mechanical properties related to tableting of these dietary supplements.

  20. Expression of Androgen Receptor Is Negatively Regulated By p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatouma Alimirah

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Increased expression of androgen receptor (AR in prostate cancer (PC is associated with transition to androgen independence. Because the progression of PC to advanced stages is often associated with the loss of p53 function, we tested whether the p53 could regulate the expression of AR gene. Here we report that p53 negatively regulates the expression of AR in prostate epithelial cells (PrECs. We found that in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells that express the wild-type p53 and AR and in human normal PrECs, the activation of p53 by genotoxic stress or by inhibition of p53 nuclear export downregulated the expression of AR. Furthermore, forced expression of p53 in LNCaP cells decreased the expression of AR. Conversely, knockdown of p53 expression in LNCaP cells increased the AR expression. Consistent with the negative regulation of AR expression by p53, the p53-null HCT116 cells expressed higher levels of AR compared with the isogenic HCT116 cells that express the wildtype p53. Moreover, we noted that in etoposide treated LNCaP cells p53 bound to the promoter region of the AR gene, which contains a potential p53 DNA-binding consensus sequence, in chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Together, our observations provide support for the idea that the loss of p53 function in prostate cancer cells contributes to increased expression of AR.

  1. Calcium dependence of inactivation of calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in skeletal muscle fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, B J; Klein, M G; Schneider, M F

    1991-03-01

    The steady-state calcium dependence of inactivation of calcium release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum was studied in voltage-clamped, cut segments of frog skeletal muscle fibers containing two calcium indicators, fura-2 and anti-pyrylazo III (AP III). Fura-2 fluorescence was used to monitor resting calcium and relatively small calcium transients during small depolarizations. AP III absorbance signals were used to monitor larger calcium transients during larger depolarizations. The rate of release (Rrel) of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum was calculated from the calcium transients. The equilibrium calcium dependence of inactivation of calcium release was determined using 200-ms prepulses of various amplitudes to elevate [Ca2+] to various steady levels. Each prepulse was followed by a constant test pulse. The suppression of peak Rrel during the test pulse provided a measure of the extent of inactivation of release at the end of the prepulse. The [Ca2+] dependence of inactivation indicated that binding of more than one calcium ion was required to inactivate each release channel. Half-maximal inactivation was produced at a [Ca2+] of approximately 0.3 microM. Variation of the prepulse duration and amplitude showed that the suppression of peak release was consistent with calcium-dependent inactivation of calcium release but not with calcium depletion. The same calcium dependence of inactivation was obtained using different amplitude test pulses to determine the degree of inactivation. Prepulses that produced near maximal inactivation of release during the following test pulse produced no suppression of intramembrane charge movement during the test pulse, indicating that inactivation occurred at a step beyond the voltage sensor for calcium release. Three alternative set of properties that were assumed for the rapidly equilibrating calcium-binding sites intrinsic to the fibers gave somewhat different Rrel records, but gave very similar calcium dependence of

  2. Protein-Mediated Precipitation of Calcium Carbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polowczyk, Izabela; Bastrzyk, Anna; Fiedot, Marta

    2016-11-22

    Calcium carbonate is an important component in exoskeletons of many organisms. The synthesis of calcium carbonate was performed by mixing dimethyl carbonate and an aqueous solution of calcium chloride dihydrate. The precipitation product was characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements. In addition, the turbidity of the reaction solution was acquired to monitor the kinetics of the calcium carbonate structure's growth in the investigated system. In this study, samples of CaCO₃ particles obtained with individual proteins, such as ovalbumin, lysozyme, and a mixture of the proteins, were characterized and compared with a control sample, i.e., synthesized without proteins. The obtained data indicated that the addition of ovalbumin to the reaction changed the morphology of crystals from rhombohedral to 'stack-like' structures. Lysozyme, however, did not affect the morphology of calcium carbonate, yet the presence of the protein mixture led to the creation of more complex composites in which the calcium carbonate crystals were constructed in protein matrices formed by the ovalbumin-lysozyme interaction. It was also observed that in the protein mixture, ovalbumin has a major influence on the CaCO₃ formation through a strong interaction with calcium ions, which leads to the coalescence and creation of a steric barrier reducing particle growth. The authors proposed a mechanism of calcium carbonate grain growth in the presence of both proteins, taking into account the interaction of calcium ions with the protein.

  3. Diuretics and disorders of calcium homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grieff, Marvin; Bushinsky, David A

    2011-11-01

    Diuretics commonly are administered in disorders of sodium balance. Loop diuretics inhibit the Na-K-2Cl transporter and also increase calcium excretion. They are often used in the treatment of hypercalcemia. Thiazide diuretics block the thiazide-sensitive NaCl transporter in the distal convoluted tubule, and can decrease calcium excretion. They are often used in the treatment of nephrolithiasis. Carbonic anhydrase inhibitors decrease bicarbonate absorption and the resultant metabolic acidosis can increase calcium excretion. Their use can promote nephrocalcinosis and nephrolithiasis. This review will address the use of diuretics on disorders of calcium homeostasis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. [ZINK IS ACTIVATOR OF ENTERAL CALCIUM METABOLISM].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakova, E P; Ksenofontov, D A; Revyakin, A O; Ivanov, A A

    2015-01-01

    Experiments on goats and rabbits showed that zinc supplement to the diet leads to calcium concentration rise in muscle, bone and blood of animals. However, this rise was not adequate to increase in.zinc consumption. The bulk of alimentary zinc stayed in soluble fraction, dense endogen fraction and infusoria fraction of digesta and stimulated calcium release from food particles, it's accumulation in digesta fractions and calcium utilization on the whole. Authors estimate animal digesta as homeostatic, spatial organized, endogenic formation in which zinc and calcium are functionally dependent through enteral mucosa.

  5. Nuclear inclusion bodies of mutant and wild-type p53 in cancer: a hallmark of p53 inactivation and proteostasis remodelling by p53 aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Smet, Frederik; Saiz Rubio, Mirian; Hompes, Daphne; Naus, Evelyne; De Baets, Greet; Langenberg, Tobias; Hipp, Mark S; Houben, Bert; Claes, Filip; Charbonneau, Sarah; Delgado Blanco, Javier; Plaisance, Stephane; Ramkissoon, Shakti; Ramkissoon, Lori; Simons, Colinda; van den Brandt, Piet; Weijenberg, Matty; Van England, Manon; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Amant, Frederic; D'Hoore, André; Ligon, Keith L; Sagaert, Xavier; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic

    2017-05-01

    Although p53 protein aggregates have been observed in cancer cell lines and tumour tissue, their impact in cancer remains largely unknown. Here, we extensively screened for p53 aggregation phenotypes in tumour biopsies, and identified nuclear inclusion bodies (nIBs) of transcriptionally inactive mutant or wild-type p53 as the most frequent aggregation-like phenotype across six different cancer types. p53-positive nIBs co-stained with nuclear aggregation markers, and shared molecular hallmarks of nIBs commonly found in neurodegenerative disorders. In cell culture, tumour-associated stress was a strong inducer of p53 aggregation and nIB formation. This was most prominent for mutant p53, but could also be observed in wild-type p53 cell lines, for which nIB formation correlated with the loss of p53's transcriptional activity. Importantly, protein aggregation also fuelled the dysregulation of the proteostasis network in the tumour cell by inducing a hyperactivated, oncogenic heat-shock response, to which tumours are commonly addicted, and by overloading the proteasomal degradation system, an observation that was most pronounced for structurally destabilized mutant p53. Patients showing tumours with p53-positive nIBs suffered from a poor clinical outcome, similar to those with loss of p53 expression, and tumour biopsies showed a differential proteostatic expression profile associated with p53-positive nIBs. p53-positive nIBs therefore highlight a malignant state of the tumour that results from the interplay between (1) the functional inactivation of p53 through mutation and/or aggregation, and (2) microenvironmental stress, a combination that catalyses proteostatic dysregulation. This study highlights several unexpected clinical, biological and therapeutically unexplored parallels between cancer and neurodegeneration. Copyright © 2017 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great

  6. The Electronic Structure of Calcium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jan, J.-P.; Skriver, Hans Lomholt

    1981-01-01

    .149 Ryd, respectively, relative to the s band, give the best possible agreement. Under increasing pressure the s and p electrons are found to transfer into the d band, and Ca undergoes metal-semimetal-metal electronic transitions. Calculations of the bandstructure and the electronic pressure, including......The electronic structure of calcium under pressure is re-examined by means of self-consistent energy band calculations based on the local density approximation and using the linear muffin-tin orbitals (LMTO) method with corrections to the atomic sphere approximation included. At zero pressure...

  7. Glycogen synthase kinase3 beta phosphorylates serine 33 of p53 and activates p53's transcriptional activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Price Brendan D

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The p53 protein is activated by genotoxic stress, oncogene expression and during senescence, p53 transcriptionally activates genes involved in growth arrest and apoptosis. p53 activation is regulated by post-translational modification, including phosphorylation of the N-terminal transactivation domain. Here, we have examined how Glycogen Synthase Kinase (GSK3, a protein kinase involved in tumorigenesis, differentiation and apoptosis, phosphorylates and regulates p53. Results The 2 isoforms of GSK3, GSK3α and GSK3β, phosphorylate the sequence Ser-X-X-X-Ser(P when the C-terminal serine residue is already phosphorylated. Several p53 kinases were examined for their ability to create GSK3 phosphorylation sites on the p53 protein. Our results demonstrate that phosphorylation of serine 37 of p53 by DNA-PK creates a site for GSK3β phosphorylation at serine 33 in vitro. GSK3α did not phosphorylate p53 under any condition. GSK3β increased the transcriptional activity of the p53 protein in vivo. Mutation of either serine 33 or serine 37 of p53 to alanine blocked the ability of GSK3β to regulate p53 transcriptional activity. GSK3β is therefore able to regulate p53 function in vivo. p53's transcriptional activity is commonly increased by DNA damage. However, GSK3β kinase activity was inhibited in response to DNA damage, suggesting that GSK3β regulation of p53 is not involved in the p53-DNA damage response. Conclusions GSK3β can regulate p53's transcriptional activity by phosphorylating serine 33. However, GSK3β does not appear to be part of the p53-DNA damage response pathway. Instead, GSK3β may provide the link between p53 and non-DNA damage mechanisms for p53 activation.

  8. Analysis list: Trp53 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Trp53 Embryo,Embryonic fibroblast + mm9 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Trp53....1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Trp53.5.tsv http://dbarchive.bi...osciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/target/Trp53.10.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Trp53.Em...bryo.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/colo/Trp53.Embryonic_fibr

  9. Short communication: Urinary oxalate and calcium excretion by dogs and cats diagnosed with calcium oxalate urolithiasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijcker, J.C.; Kummeling, A.; Hagen-Plantinga, E.A.; Hendriks, W.H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Urine concentrations of oxalate and calcium play an important role in calcium oxalate (CaOx) urolith formation in dogs and cats, with high excretions of both substances increasing the chance of CaOx urolithiasis. In 17 CaOx-forming dogs, urine calcium:creatinine ratio (Ca:Cr) was found

  10. Impaired body calcium metabolism with low bone density and compensatory colonic calcium absorption in cecectomized rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongwattanapisan, P.; Suntornsaratoon, P.; Wongdee, K.; Dorkkam, N.; Krishnamra, N.; Charoenphandhu, N.

    2012-01-01

    An earlier study reported that cecal calcium absorption contributes less than 10% of total calcium absorbed by the intestine, although the cecum has the highest calcium transport rate compared with other intestinal segments. Thus, the physiological significance of the cecum pertaining to body

  11. Microwave-assisted biomimetic synthesis of hydroxyapatite using different sources of calcium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Türk, S; Altınsoy, I; ÇelebiEfe, G; Ipek, M; Özacar, M; Bindal, C

    2017-07-01

    In this study, some properties of biomimetic synthesized hydroxyapatite by using different sources of calcium were investigated. Biomimetic synthesis of hydroxyapatite was carried out in microwave oven using 1.5 simulated body fluid (SBF) solution having different calcium sources with 800W power for 15min. As phosphorus source di-ammonium hydrogen phosphate ((NH4)2HPO4) while for each sample as a calcium sources calcium chloride (CaCl2), calcium nitrate tetra hydrate (Ca(NO3)2·4H2O) and calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) were utilized, respectively. For comparison, precipitation process was also performed in only 1.5 SBF solution without calcium and phosphorus sources. The presence of phases in synthesized hydroxyapatite was confirmed by XRD. The crystallinity and crystalline size of the phases in as synthesized powders were also calculated by using XRD data. It was found that the unique phase is hydroxyapatite (HAp, Ca5(PO4)3(OH)) by using the calcium nitrate tetra hydrate and calcium hydroxide sources, while the dominant phases are tri-calcium phosphates (TCP) and HAp for CaCl2 source and 1.5SBF which does not contain any additional Ca source. SEM studies revealed that nano-hexagonal rods and nano-spherical hydroxyapatites could be synthesized by using this process. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis revealed that the Ca/P ratio near to be as 1.5 which is the value for HAp in bone. Raman and Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) results combined with the X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicates that dominantly the present of single phase is HAp. The crystal size and fraction crystallinity of as synthesized HAp powders were changed between 29.5 and 45.4nm and 0.53-2.37, respectively. Results showed that microwave assisted biomimetic synthesis is a promising method for obtaining HAp powders in shorter process time. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Recruited renin-containing renal microvascular cells demonstrate the calcium paradox regulatory phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacGriff S

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Spencer MacGriff,1 Richard E Woo,1 M Cecilia Ortiz-Capisano,1 Douglas K Atchison,1,2 William H Beierwaltes1,2 1Department of Internal Medicine, Hypertension and Vascular Research Division, Henry Ford Hospital, 2Department of Physiology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, MI, USA Abstract: Renin is the critical regulatory enzyme for production of angiotensin (Ang-II, a potent vasoconstrictor involved in regulating blood pressure and in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Chronic sodium deprivation enhances renin secretion from the kidney, due to recruitment of additional cells from the afferent renal microvasculature to become renin-producing rather than just increasing release from existing juxtaglomerular (JG cells. JG cells secrete renin inversely proportional to extra- and intracellular calcium, a unique phenomenon characteristic of the JG regulatory phenotype known as the “calcium paradox.” It is not known if renin secreted from recruited renin-containing cells is regulated similarly to native JG cells, and therefore acquires this JG cell phenotype. We hypothesized that non-JG cells in renal microvessels recruited to produce renin in response to chronic dietary sodium restriction would demonstrate the calcium paradox, characteristic of the JG cell phenotype. Histology showed recruitment of upstream arteriolar renin in response to sodium restriction compared to normal-diet rats. Renin fluorescence intensity increased 53% in cortices of sodium-restricted rats (P<0.001. We measured renin release from rat afferent microvessels, isolated using iron oxide nanopowder and incubated in either normal or low-calcium media. Basal renin release from normal sodium-diet rat microvessels in normal calcium media was 298.1±44.6 ng AngI/mL/hour/mg protein, and in low-calcium media increased 39% to 415.9±71.4 ng AngI/mL/hour/mg protein (P<0.025. Renin released from sodium-restricted rat microvessels increased 50% compared to samples from

  13. A p53 Super-tumor Suppressor Reveals a Tumor Suppressive p53-Ptpn14-Yap Axis in Pancreatic Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Stephano S; Valente, Liz J; Raj, Nitin; Seoane, Jose A; Flowers, Brittany M; McClendon, Jacob; Bieging-Rolett, Kathryn T; Lee, Jonghyeob; Ivanochko, Danton; Kozak, Margaret M; Chang, Daniel T; Longacre, Teri A; Koong, Albert C; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Kim, Seung K; Vogel, Hannes; Wood, Laura D; Hruban, Ralph H; Curtis, Christina; Attardi, Laura D

    2017-10-09

    The p53 transcription factor is a critical barrier to pancreatic cancer progression. To unravel mechanisms of p53-mediated tumor suppression, which have remained elusive, we analyzed pancreatic cancer development in mice expressing p53 transcriptional activation domain (TAD) mutants. Surprisingly, the p5353,54 TAD2 mutant behaves as a "super-tumor suppressor," with an enhanced capacity to both suppress pancreatic cancer and transactivate select p53 target genes, including Ptpn14. Ptpn14 encodes a negative regulator of the Yap oncoprotein and is necessary and sufficient for pancreatic cancer suppression, like p53. We show that p53 deficiency promotes Yap signaling and that PTPN14 and TP53 mutations are mutually exclusive in human cancers. These studies uncover a p53-Ptpn14-Yap pathway that is integral to p53-mediated tumor suppression. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Plasma membrane calcium pump and sodium-calcium exchanger in maintenance and control of calcium concentrations in platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juska, Alfonsas

    2010-01-29

    The purpose of this research was to elucidate the activity of the mechanisms responsible for control of cytosolic calcium concentration in platelets by modeling the time-course of the concentration changing in response to discharge of the intracellular stores or store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). The parameters estimated as a result of model fitting to experimental data are related to physiological or pathological state of the cells. It has been shown that: (a) the time-course is determined by the passive calcium fluxes and activities of the corresponding mechanisms; (b) the decline in the concentration (after its rise) develops due to activity of plasma membrane calcium ATPase (PMCA) both in the case of discharge of the stores of platelets contained in calcium-free medium and in the case of SOCE; (c) impulsive extrusion of calcium in response to its sudden influx, presumably, is the main function of PMCA; (d) the function of sodium-calcium exchanger (NCX) is to extrude calcium excess by permanent counteracting its influx. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. TBP-like Protein (TLP) Disrupts the p53-MDM2 Interaction and Induces Long-lasting p53 Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Ryo; Tamashiro, Hiroyuki; Takano, Kazunori; Takahashi, Hiro; Suzuki, Hidefumi; Saito, Shinta; Kojima, Waka; Adachi, Noritaka; Ura, Kiyoe; Endo, Takeshi; Tamura, Taka-Aki

    2017-02-24

    Stress-induced activation of p53 is an essential cellular response to prevent aberrant cell proliferation and cancer development. The ubiquitin ligase MDM2 promotes p53 degradation and limits the duration of p53 activation. It remains unclear, however, how p53 persistently escapes MDM2-mediated negative control for making appropriate cell fate decisions. Here we report that TBP-like protein (TLP), a member of the TBP family, is a new regulatory factor for the p53-MDM2 interplay and thus for p53 activation. We found that TLP acts to stabilize p53 protein to ensure long-lasting p53 activation, leading to potentiation of p53-induced apoptosis and senescence after genotoxic stress. Mechanistically, TLP interferes with MDM2 binding and ubiquitination of p53. Moreover, single cell imaging analysis shows that TLP depletion accelerates MDM2-mediated nuclear export of p53. We further show that a cervical cancer-derived TLP mutant has less p53 binding ability and lacks a proliferation-repressive function. Our findings uncover a role of TLP as a competitive MDM2 blocker, proposing a novel mechanism by which p53 escapes the p53-MDM2 negative feedback loop to modulate cell fate decisions. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Paclitaxel induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells through different calcium--regulating mechanisms depending on external calcium conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Zhi; Avila, Andrew; Gollahon, Lauren

    2014-02-17

    Previously, we reported that endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores were a direct target for paclitaxel initiation of apoptosis. Furthermore, the actions of paclitaxel attenuated Bcl-2 resistance to apoptosis through endoplasmic reticulum-mediated calcium release. To better understand the calcium-regulated mechanisms of paclitaxel-induced apoptosis in breast cancer cells, we investigated the role of extracellular calcium, specifically; whether influx of extracellular calcium contributed to and/or was necessary for paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. Our results demonstrated that paclitaxel induced extracellular calcium influx. This mobilization of extracellular calcium contributed to subsequent cytosolic calcium elevation differently, depending on dosage. Under normal extracellular calcium conditions, high dose paclitaxel induced apoptosis-promoting calcium influx, which did not occur in calcium-free conditions. In the absence of extracellular calcium an "Enhanced Calcium Efflux" mechanism in which high dose paclitaxel stimulated calcium efflux immediately, leading to dramatic cytosolic calcium decrease, was observed. In the absence of extracellular calcium, high dose paclitaxel's stimulatory effects on capacitative calcium entry and apoptosis could not be completely restored. Thus, normal extracellular calcium concentrations are critical for high dose paclitaxel-induced apoptosis. In contrast, low dose paclitaxel mirrored controls, indicating that it occurs independent of extracellular calcium. Thus, extracellular calcium conditions only affect efficacy of high dose paclitaxel-induced apoptosis.

  17. The role of p53 gene family in reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wenwei

    2009-12-01

    The p53 family of genes (p53, p63, and p73) is conserved over evolutionary time scales. Although the functions of p53 gene and its protein as a tumor suppressor have been firmly established, the earliest functions for the p53 ancestral genes in worms and flies are to ensure germ-line genomic integrity and the fidelity of the developmental process. In vertebrates, the p53 family of genes retains those functions in germ-line genomic integrity but have added important functions in regulation of reproduction. Loss of the p53, p63, or p73 genes in female mice leads to a significant decrease of fertility. The p53 gene product regulates maternal reproduction at the implantation stage of the embryo. p63 and p73 play important roles in monitoring the genomic quality of oocytes. The p53 pathway appears to play a similar role in human fertility. In humans, certain alleles containing a functional single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the p53 pathway are under positive evolutionary selection. Selected alleles of these SNPs in the p53 pathway are associated with decreased fertility. This important function of the p53 pathway in reproduction provides a plausible explanation for the evolution of p53 as a tumor suppressor gene and the positive selection of some alleles in the p53 gene and its pathway. These observations provide a good possible example of antagonistic pleiotrophy for fertility, tumor suppression, and longevity.

  18. Effect of calcium on adsorptive removal of As(III) and As(V) by iron oxide-based adsorbents

    KAUST Repository

    Uwamariya, V.

    2014-06-25

    The effects of calcium on the equilibrium adsorption capacity of As(III) and As(V) onto iron oxide-coated sand (IOCS) and granular ferric hydroxide (GFH) were investigated through batch experiments, rapid small-scale column tests (RSSCT) and kinetics modelling. Batch experiments showed that at calcium concentrations≤20 mg/L, high As(III) and As(V) removal efficiencies by IOCS and GFH are achieved at pH 6. An increase of the calcium concentration to 40 and 80 mg/L reversed this trend, giving higher removal efficiencies at higher pH (8). The adsorption capacities of IOCS and GFH at an equilibrium arsenic concentration of 10 g/L were found to be between 2.0 and 3.1 mg/g for synthetic water without calcium and between 2.8 and 5.3 mg/g when 80 mg/L of calcium was present at the studied pH values. After 10 hours of filter run in RSSCT, approximately 1000 empty bed volumes, the ratios of C/Co for As(V) were 26% and 18% for calcium-free model water; and only 1% and 0.2% after addition of 80 mg/L of Ca for filter columns with IOCS and GFH, respectively. The adsorption of As(III) and As(V) onto GFH follows a second-order reaction, with and without addition of calcium. The adsorption of As(III) and As(V) onto IOCS follows a first-order reaction without calcium addition, and moves to the second-reaction-order kinetics when calcium is added. Based on the intraparticle diffusion model, the main controlling mechanism for As(III) adsorption is intraparticle diffusion, while surface diffusion contributes greatly to the adsorption of As(V).

  19. Spatiotemporal intracellular calcium dynamics during cardiac alternans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo, Juan G.; Karma, Alain

    2009-09-01

    Cellular calcium transient alternans are beat-to-beat alternations in the peak cytosolic calcium concentration exhibited by cardiac cells during rapid electrical stimulation or under pathological conditions. Calcium transient alternans promote action potential duration alternans, which have been linked to the onset of life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias. Here we use a recently developed physiologically detailed mathematical model of ventricular myocytes to investigate both stochastic and deterministic aspects of intracellular calcium dynamics during alternans. The model combines a spatially distributed description of intracellular calcium cycling, where a large number of calcium release units are spatially distributed throughout the cell, with a full set of ionic membrane currents. The results demonstrate that ion channel stochasticity at the level of single calcium release units can influence the whole-cell alternans dynamics by causing phase reversals over many beats during fixed frequency pacing close to the alternans bifurcation. They also demonstrate the existence of a wide range of dynamical states. Depending on the sign and magnitude of calcium-voltage coupling, calcium alternans can be spatially synchronized or desynchronized, in or out of phase with action potential duration alternans, and the node separating out-of-phase regions of calcium alternans can be expelled from or trapped inside the cell. This range of states is found to be larger than previously anticipated by including a robust global attractor where calcium alternans can be spatially synchronized but out of phase with action potential duration alternans. The results are explained by a combined theoretical analysis of alternans stability and node motion using general iterative maps of the beat-to-beat dynamics and amplitude equations.

  20. Chemical Variations on the p53 Reactivation Theme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos J. A. Ribeiro

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Among the tumor suppressor genes, p53 is one of the most studied. It is widely regarded as the “guardian of the genome”, playing a major role in carcinogenesis. In fact, direct inactivation of the TP53 gene occurs in more than 50% of malignancies, and in tumors that retain wild-type p53 status, its function is usually inactivated by overexpression of negative regulators (e.g., MDM2 and MDMX. Hence, restoring p53 function in cancer cells represents a valuable anticancer approach. In this review, we will present an updated overview of the most relevant small molecules developed to restore p53 function in cancer cells through inhibition of the p53-MDMs interaction, or direct targeting of wild-type p53 or mutated p53. In addition, optimization approaches used for the development of small molecules that have entered clinical trials will be presented.

  1. Restriction of human herpesvirus 6B replication by p53

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øster, Bodil; Kofod-Olsen, Emil; Bundgaard, Bettina

    2008-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B) induces significant accumulation of p53 in both the nucleus and cytoplasm during infection. Activation of p53 by DNA damage is known to induce either growth arrest or apoptosis; nevertheless, HHV-6B-infected cells are arrested in their cell cycle independently of p53......, and only a minor fraction of the infected cells undergoes apoptosis. Using pifithrin-alpha, a p53 inhibitor, and p53-null cells, this study showed that infected epithelial cells accumulated viral transcripts and proteins to a significantly higher degree in the absence of active p53. Moreover, HHV-6B......-induced cytopathic effects were greatly enhanced in the absence of p53. This suggests that, in epithelial cells, some of the functions of p53 leading to cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis are restrained by HHV-6B infection, whereas other cellular defences, causing inhibition of virus transcription, are partially...

  2. [P53 protein in adenocarcinoma of the large intestine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paluszkiewicz, P; Pawłowska-Wakowicz, B; Cybulski, M; Berbeć, H

    1997-01-01

    P53 gen mutations play significant role in neoplastic transformation of colorectal mucosa. We investigated p53 immunostaining in 80 cases of spontaneous human colorectal adenocarcinomas (with monoclonal DO7 antibody and LSAB+ kit). We found positive, nuclear p53 immunostaining in 64% of nonmucinous adenocarcinoma tissues and in 19% of mucinous adenocarcinomas tissues. P53 protein deposits were most often found in colorectal adenocarcinomas localised in rectum (66.67%) and in advanced (Dukes C, D) colorectal adenocarcinomas (59.38%) as well. There was no statistical significance between the p53 positive immunostaining and the histological differentiation of the colorectal adenocarcinomas. The overall survival of patients with tumours positive for p53 protein was significantly shorter than that of patients with colorectal cancers negative for p53 protein. We conclude that p53 immunohistochemical analysis may be treated as a supplementary prognostic marker for patients with colorectal adenocarcinoma, especially it may be useful for adjuvant therapy selection.

  3. Modeling the basal dynamics of p53 system

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sun, Tingzhe; Yang, Weiwei; Liu, Jing; Shen, Pingping

    2011-01-01

    .... Most previous models have ignored the basal dynamics of p53 under nonstressed conditions. To explore the basal dynamics of p53, we constructed a stochastic delay model by incorporating two negative feedback loops...

  4. Calcium Blood Test: MedlinePlus Lab Test Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: https://medlineplus.gov/labtests/calciumbloodtest.html Calcium Blood Test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. What is a Calcium Blood Test? A calcium blood test measures the ...

  5. Rates of calcium carbonate removal from soils.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breemen, van N.; Protz, R.

    1988-01-01

    Mean annual rates of calcium carbonate removal from soils in a subarctic climate estimated from data on two chronosequences of calcareous storm ridges, appeared to be relatively constant through time. Concentrations of dissolved calcium carbonate in the soil solution in the study sites calculated

  6. Calcium and M'yocardial Infarction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-03-16

    Mar 16, 1974 ... Urinary excretion of calcium tended to be even lower in these .... 16 March 1974. S.A. MEDICAL JOURNAL. 525. 150. 50. Fig. 5. Urine calcium in myocardial infarction (means and standard error relative to age). AGE OF PATIENT .... Plasma proteins and blood urea were also measured in. 10 consecutive ...

  7. Calcium, snails, and birds: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Mänd

    2000-10-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have shown that wild birds breeding in acidified areas have difficulties with obtaining sufficient calcium for their eggshells, and that the cause of it is the shortage of land snails. Many birds have to search for Ca-rich snail shells on a daily basis during egg production. Molluscs depend on litter calcium, which has decreased due to acidification of the environment. Calcium limitation may be a widespread phenomenon also in non-acidified, naturally Ca-poor areas. The problem is that while in the latter areas the time for development of specific adaptations may have been sufficient, then in acidified areas, on the contrary, calcium shortage is a recent phenomenon. Therefore, since the extent of calcium limitation in non-acidified areas is hard to derive from observational data, experimental approach is needed. We provide experimental evidence that specific calcium deficit does affect reproductive traits also in the birds breeding in naturally base-poor habitats. Our study was conducted in a heterogeneous woodland area in Estonia containing deciduous forest patches as well as base-poor pine forest with low snail abundance. Ca supplementation, using snail shell and chicken eggshell fragments, was carried out for pied flycatchers and great tits. Extra calcium affected positively several reproductive traits like egg volume and eggshell thickness, start of breeding, and fledglings’ parameters. The negative relationship between calcium availability and lay-date suggests that birds adjust their breeding tactics to conditions of Ca deficiency, for example, by postponing laying.

  8. 21 CFR 182.8223 - Calcium pyrophosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium pyrophosphate. 182.8223 Section 182.8223 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8223 Calcium...

  9. 21 CFR 182.8217 - Calcium phosphate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Calcium phosphate. 182.8217 Section 182.8217 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8217 Calcium...

  10. Elements from chlorine to calcium nuclear reactions

    CERN Document Server

    Kunz, Wunibald

    1968-01-01

    Nuclear Tables: Part II Nuclear Reactions, Volume 3: The Elements from Chlorine to Calcium contains tabulations of the nuclear reaction values of elements chlorine, argon, potassium, and calcium. These tabulations provide the calculated Q-values of the elements and their isotopes. This book will be of value to general chemistry researchers.

  11. Role of calcium in selenium cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, T R; David, L L

    The purpose of this research was to test the role of certain minerals in the formation of cataract caused by an overdose of selenium. Several pieces of information indicated that lenticular calcium may play an important role in selenite cataractogenesis: 1) Lens calcium concentrations in selenite treated rats were increased more than 5-fold, and the increase in lens calcium was localized in the nucleus. 2) Lens calcium concentrations were elevated at least one full day before actual formation of nuclear cataract, but serum calcium levels were not changed. 3) In older rats not susceptible to selenite cataract, lens calcium was not significantly increased. 4) No evidence was found for a generalized disruption in lens permeability, since no major changes in lens water, sodium, and potassium levels were observed, and 5) when levels of calcium observed in selenite cataract were added to solutions of soluble proteins from rat lenses, light scattering was increased. Selenium-overdose cataracts may provide an important model for studies on the role of calcium in cataractogenesis.

  12. Adding calcium improves lithium ferrite core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessoff, H.

    1969-01-01

    Adding calcium increases uniformity of grain growth over a wide range of sintering temperatures and reduces porosity within the grain. Ferrite cores containing calcium have square hysteresis loops and high curie temperatures, making them useful in coincident current memories of digital electronic computers.

  13. ALG-2, a multifunctional calcium binding protein?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tarabykina, Svetlana; Mollerup, Jens; Winding Gojkovic, P.

    2004-01-01

    ALG-2 was originally discovered as a pro-apoptotic protein in a genetic screen. Due to its ability to bind calcium with high affinity it was postulated to provide a link between the known effect of calcium in programmed cell death and the molecular death execution machinery. This review article...

  14. Comparison of Serum Calcium and Magnesium Between ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study compared serum calcium and magnesium in forty preeclamptic (cases) and forty normotensive (control) pregnant women matched for age, parity, and socioeconomic status. Serum calcium and magnesium levels were measured using atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Statistical analysis was done ...

  15. Dairy Dilemma: Are You Getting Enough Calcium?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body also needs vitamin D to absorb calcium. Nutrition surveys have shown that most people in the U.S. aren’t getting the calcium they need. If you’re avoiding milk and dairy ... taking nutritional supplements and choosing reduced-lactose or non-dairy ...

  16. CALCIUM AND THE PREVENTION OF COLON CANCER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WELBERG, JWM; KLEIBEUKER, JH; VANDERMEER, R; MULDER, NH; DEVRIES, EGE

    1991-01-01

    Diet is a major determinant of colon cancer risk. Calcium may protect against colon cancer, presumably by binding cytotoxic bile acids and fatty acids. Numerous studies support this proposition. In subjects at risk for colon cancer oral calcium supplementation has been shown to reduce rectal

  17. Calcium Impact on Milk Gels Formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koutina, Glykeria

    salts. The perturbation of calcium equilibria by these factors will affect the final properties of acid, calcium and rennet milk gels. By decreasing the pH from 6.0 to 5.2 (acid gels), the calcium equilibrium was significantly affected by temperature (4, 20, 30, 40 oC), and different combinations...... of temperature and pH may result in different final structure properties in dairy products such as cheese. A significant amount of calcium remained in the micelles between pH 4.8 and 4.6, this can contribute to the final strength of acid milk gels, such as in yogurt or in cream cheeses. After the gelation point......, a sudden solubilization of micellar calcium was observed at 50 oC and 60 oC, which revealed an interesting role of calcium during acidification at elevated temperatures. After enrichment of milk with calcium D-lactobionate, the added calcium was distributed between the micellar and serum milk phase at pH 6...

  18. Bespuiten met calcium kan neusrot voorkomen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blom-Zandstra, Greet; Marcelis, L.F.M.

    2000-01-01

    Oorzaak van neusrot bij paprika is een calciumtekort in de vrucht. Een bespuiting met calcium vlak na de bloei heeft een zeer gunstig effect. In bijgaande tabel gegevens over het effect van spuiten met calcium op het optreden van neusrot bij paprika

  19. Census and evaluation of p53 target genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, M

    2017-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 functions primarily as a transcription factor. Mutation of the TP53 gene alters its response pathway, and is central to the development of many cancers. The discovery of a large number of p53 target genes, which confer p53’s tumor suppressor function, has led to increasingly complex models of p53 function. Recent meta-analysis approaches, however, are simplifying our understanding of how p53 functions as a transcription factor. In the survey presented here, a total set of 3661 direct p53 target genes is identified that comprise 3509 potential targets from 13 high-throughput studies, and 346 target genes from individual gene analyses. Comparison of the p53 target genes reported in individual studies with those identified in 13 high-throughput studies reveals limited consistency. Here, p53 target genes have been evaluated based on the meta-analysis data, and the results show that high-confidence p53 target genes are involved in multiple cellular responses, including cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, apoptosis, metabolism, autophagy, mRNA translation and feedback mechanisms. However, many p53 target genes are identified only in a small number of studies and have a higher likelihood of being false positives. While numerous mechanisms have been proposed for mediating gene regulation in response to p53, recent advances in our understanding of p53 function show that p53 itself is solely an activator of transcription, and gene downregulation by p53 is indirect and requires p21. Taking into account the function of p53 as an activator of transcription, recent results point to an unsophisticated means of regulation. PMID:28288132

  20. CLCA2 as a p53-Inducible Senescence Mediator

    OpenAIRE

    Chizu Tanikawa; Hidewaki Nakagawa; Yoichi Furukawa; Yusuke Nakamura; Koichi Matsuda

    2012-01-01

    p53 is a tumor suppressor gene that is frequently mutated in multiple cancer tissues. Activated p53 protein regulates its downstream genes and subsequently inhibits malignant transformation by inducing cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, DNA repair, and senescence. However, genes involved in the p53-mediated senescence pathway are not yet fully elucidated. Through the screening of two genome-wide expression profile data sets, one for cells in which exogenous p53 was introduced and the other for sen...

  1. Calcium and caffeine interaction in increased calcium balance in ovariectomized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Tavares da Silva

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the effects of caffeine intake associated with inadequate or adequate calcium intake in laparotomized or ovariectomized rats by means of the calcium balance. Forty adults Wistar rats were ovariectomized or laparotomized. METHODS: The animals (n=40 were randomly placed in eight groups receiving the AIN-93 diet with 100% or 50% of the recommended calcium intake with or without added caffeine (6mg/kg/day. The animals were kept in individuals metabolic cages at a temperature of 24°±2ºC, light/dark cycles of 12/12 hours, and deionized water available ad libitum. On the 8th week of the experiment, food consumption was measured and 24-hour urine and 4-day feces were collected to determine calcium balance [Balance=Ca intake-(Urinary Ca+Fecal Ca]. RESULTS: Animals with adequate calcium intake presented higher balances and rates of calcium absorption and retention (p<0.05 than those with inadequate calcium intake, regardless of caffeine intake (p<0.05. Caffeine intake did not affect urinary calcium excretion but increased balance (p<0.05 in the groups with adequate calcium intake. CONCLUSION: Adequate calcium intake attenuated the negative effects of estrogen deficiency and improved calcium balance even in the presence of caffeine.

  2. Store-operated calcium entry is essential for glial calcium signalling in CNS white matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanikolaou, M; Lewis, A; Butt, A M

    2017-02-28

    'Calcium signalling' is the ubiquitous response of glial cells to multiple extracellular stimuli. The primary mechanism of glial calcium signalling is by release of calcium from intracellular stores of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Replenishment of ER Ca(2+) stores relies on store-operated calcium entry (SOCE). However, despite the importance of calcium signalling in glial cells, little is known about their mechanisms of SOCE. Here, we investigated SOCE in glia of the mouse optic nerve, a typical CNS white matter tract that comprises bundles of myelinated axons and the oligodendrocytes and astrocytes that support them. Using quantitative RT-PCR, we identified Orai1 channels, both Stim1 and Stim2, and the transient receptor potential M3 channel (TRPM3) as the primary channels for SOCE in the optic nerve, and their expression in both astrocytes and oligodendrocytes was demonstrated by immunolabelling of optic nerve sections and cultures. The functional importance of SOCE was demonstrated by fluo-4 calcium imaging on isolated intact optic nerves and optic nerve cultures. Removal of extracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)]o) resulted in a marked depletion of glial cytosolic calcium ([Ca(2+)]i), which recovered rapidly on restoration of [Ca(2+)]o via SOCE. 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborane (2APB) significantly decreased SOCE and severely attenuated ATP-mediated calcium signalling. The results provide evidence that Orai/Stim and TRPM3 are important components of the 'calcium toolkit' that underpins SOCE and the sustainability of calcium signalling in white matter glia.

  3. Radiation induces p53-dependent cell apoptosis in bladder cancer cells with wild-type- p53 but not in p53-mutated bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinata, Nobuyuki; Shirakawa, Toshiro; Zhang, Zhujun; Matsumoto, Akira; Fujisawa, Masato; Okada, Hiroshi; Kamidono, Sadao; Gotoh, Akinobu

    2003-12-01

    Purpose. It has been reported in several studies that the absence in cancer cells of the p53 tumor suppressor gene, mutations of which are frequently found in bladder cancer, increases their resistance to ionizing radiation. Other studies, however, suggest that mutations of the p53 gene could increase the radiosensitivity of cancer cells, although the evidence is still inconclusive. In the present study, we investigated the relationship between p53 status and radiation response in five different bladder cancer cell lines. Materials and Methods. Five different human bladder cancer cell lines (KK47: with wt- p53, RT4: with wt- p53, T24: with mutated p53, 5637: with mutated p53, UM-UC-3: with mutated p53) were used in the study. Cells were irradiated with 0, 2, 4, 6 or 8 Gy, then trypsinized and re-plated for clonogenic survival assay, quantitative RT-PCR assay, flow-cytometry analysis and TUNEL assay. Results. The clonogenic assay demonstrated that KK47 and RT4 had significantly higher radiosensitivity than other cell lines. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that radiation induced increased expression of p53, Bax, and p21 mRNA in KK47 and RT4. After irradiation, G1 cell-cycle arrest was observed in KK47 and RT4 under flow cytometry analysis, while T24, 5637, and UM-UC-3 showed an increase in the proportion of G2 cells. Increased cell apoptosis was also observed under TUNEL assay in KK47 and RT4, but not in other cell lines. It was demonstrated that ionizing radiation induces p53-dependent cell apoptosis in bladder cancer cells with wt- p53 but not in those with mutated p53.

  4. Plant Calcium Content: Ready to Remodel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Lou Guerinot

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available By identifying the relationship between calcium location in the plant cell and nutrient bioavailability, the plant characteristics leading to maximal calcium absorption by humans can be identified. Knowledge of plant cellular and molecular targets controlling calcium location in plants is emerging. These insights should allow for better strategies for increasing the nutritional content of foods. In particular, the use of preparation-free elemental imaging technologies such as synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF microscopy in plant biology may allow researchers to understand the relationship between subcellular location and nutrient bioavailability. These approaches may lead to better strategies for altering the location of calcium within the plant to maximize its absorption from fruits and vegetables. These modified foods could be part of a diet for children and adults identified as at-risk for low calcium intake or absorption with the ultimate goal of decreasing the incidence and severity of inadequate bone mineralization.

  5. Endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores in dendritic spines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Menahem; Korkotian, Eduard

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the role of calcium stores in dendritic spines structure, function and plasticity is still debated. The reasons for this may have to do with the multitude of overlapping calcium handling machineries in the neuron, including stores, voltage and ligand gated channels, pumps and transporters. Also, different cells in the brain are endowed with calcium stores that are activated by different receptor types, and their differential compartmentalization in dendrites, spines and presynaptic terminals complicates their analysis. In the present review we address several key issues, including the role of calcium stores in synaptic plasticity, their role during development, in stress and in neurodegenerative diseases. Apparently, there is increasing evidence for a crucial role of calcium stores, especially of the ryanodine species, in synaptic plasticity and neuronal survival.

  6. Application of Calcium Phosphate Materials in Dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jabr S. Al-Sanabani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium phosphate materials are similar to bone in composition and in having bioactive and osteoconductive properties. Calcium phosphate materials in different forms, as cements, composites, and coatings, are used in many medical and dental applications. This paper reviews the applications of these materials in dentistry. It presents a brief history, dental applications, and methods for improving their mechanical properties. Notable research is highlighted regarding (1 application of calcium phosphate into various fields in dentistry; (2 improving mechanical properties of calcium phosphate; (3 biomimetic process and functionally graded materials. This paper deals with most common types of the calcium phosphate materials such as hydroxyapatite and tricalcium phosphate which are currently used in dental and medical fields.

  7. Calcium phosphate: a substitute for aluminum adjuvants?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Jean-Daniel; Thibaudon, Michel; Bélec, Laurent; Crépeaux, Guillemette

    2017-03-01

    Calcium phosphate was used as an adjuvant in France in diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis and poliomyelitis vaccines. It was later completely substituted by alum salts in the late 80's, but it still remains as an approved adjuvant for the World Health Organization for human vaccination. Area covered: Thus, calcium phosphate is now considered as one of the substances that could replace alum salts in vaccines. The aim of this paper is to draw a review of existing data on calcium phosphate as an adjuvant in order to bring out the strengths and weaknesses for its use on a large scale. Expert commentary: Calcium phosphate is a compound naturally present in the organism, safe and already used in human vaccination. Beyond comparisons with the other adjuvants, calcium phosphate represents a good candidate to replace or to complete alum salts as a vaccine adjuvant.

  8. Plant Calcium Content: Ready to Remodel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jian; Punshon, Tracy; Guerinot, Mary Lou; Hirschi, Kendal D.

    2012-01-01

    By identifying the relationship between calcium location in the plant cell and nutrient bioavailability, the plant characteristics leading to maximal calcium absorption by humans can be identified. Knowledge of plant cellular and molecular targets controlling calcium location in plants is emerging. These insights should allow for better strategies for increasing the nutritional content of foods. In particular, the use of preparation-free elemental imaging technologies such as synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (SXRF) microscopy in plant biology may allow researchers to understand the relationship between subcellular location and nutrient bioavailability. These approaches may lead to better strategies for altering the location of calcium within the plant to maximize its absorption from fruits and vegetables. These modified foods could be part of a diet for children and adults identified as at-risk for low calcium intake or absorption with the ultimate goal of decreasing the incidence and severity of inadequate bone mineralization. PMID:23016135

  9. The calcium and vitamin D controversy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    or subanalyses while maintaining balancing. Though large clinical RCTs currently evaluate the effects of higher vitamin D doses (equivalent to 50–83 μg/d) there is no current research effort regarding the calcium controversy. In the absence of such studies it is not possible to provide clinicians with evidence......Areas of the world where vitamin D levels are low for months of the year and intakes of calcium are high have a high prevalence of osteoporosis and cardiovascular disease. This suggests a public health message of avoiding calcium supplements and increasing vitamin D intake. No message could be more...... welcome as vitamin D can be given as a bolus while calcium must be taken daily and may be poorly tolerated. This approach is based on no evidence from intervention studies. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) suggest that vitamin D given with calcium elicits a small reduction in fracture risk and deaths...

  10. Expert review on coronary calcium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew J Budoff

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Matthew J Budoff, Khawar M GulDivision of Cardiology, Saint John’s Cardiovascular Research Center, Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA, Torrance, California, USAAbstract: While there is no doubt that high risk patients (those with >20% ten year risk of future cardiovascular event need more aggressive preventive therapy, a majority of cardiovascular events occur in individuals at intermediate risk (10%–20% ten year risk. Accurate risk assessment may be helpful in decreasing cardiovascular events through more appropriate targeting of preventive measures. It has been suggested that traditional risk assessment may be refined with the selective use of coronary artery calcium (CAC or other methods of subclinical atherosclerosis measurement. Coronary calcification is a marker of atherosclerosis that can be quantified with the use of cardiac CT and it is proportional to the extent and severity of atherosclerotic disease. The published studies demonstrate a high sensitivity of CAC for the presence of coronary artery disease but a lower specificity for obstructive CAD depending on the magnitude of the CAC. Several large clinical trials found clear, incremental predictive value of CAC over the Framingham risk score when used in asymptomatic patients. Based on multiple observational studies, patients with increased plaque burdens (increased CAC are approximately ten times more likely to suffer a cardiac event over the next 3–5 years. Coronary calcium scores have outperformed conventional risk factors, highly sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP and carotid intima media thickness (IMT as a predictor of cardiovascular events. The relevant prognostic information obtained may be useful to initiate or intensify appropriate treatment strategies to slow the progression of atherosclerotic vascular disease. Current data suggests intermediate risk patients may benefit most from further risk stratification with cardiac CT, as CAC testing is

  11. 29 CFR 96.53 - Audit resolution generally.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Audit resolution generally. 96.53 Section 96.53 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor AUDIT REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS, CONTRACTS, AND OTHER AGREEMENTS Audit Resolution § 96.53 Audit resolution generally. The DOL official(s) responsible for audit resolution shall...

  12. 48 CFR 53.215 - Contracting by negotiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contracting by negotiation. 53.215 Section 53.215 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Prescription of Forms 53.215 Contracting by negotiation. ...

  13. 42 CFR 431.53 - Assurance of transportation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Assurance of transportation. 431.53 Section 431.53... Requirements § 431.53 Assurance of transportation. A State plan must— (a) Specify that the Medicaid agency will ensure necessary transportation for recipients to and from providers; and (b) Describe the methods that...

  14. 28 CFR 65.53 - Confidentiality of information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Confidentiality of information. 65.53 Section 65.53 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY FEDERAL LAW ENFORCEMENT ASSISTANCE Additional Requirements § 65.53 Confidentiality of information. Section 812 of title I of the...

  15. Targeting the p53 Pathway in Ewing Sarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul M. Neilsen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The p53 tumour suppressor plays a pivotal role in the prevention of oncogenic transformation. Cancers frequently evade the potent antitumour surveillance mechanisms of p53 through mutation of the TP53 gene, with approximately 50% of all human malignancies expressing dysfunctional, mutated p53 proteins. Interestingly, genetic lesions in the TP53 gene are only observed in 10% of Ewing Sarcomas, with the majority of these sarcomas expressing a functional wild-type p53. In addition, the p53 downstream signaling pathways and DNA-damage cell cycle checkpoints remain functionally intact in these sarcomas. This paper summarizes recent insights into the functional capabilities and regulation of p53 in Ewing Sarcoma, with a particular focus on the cross-talk between p53 and the EWS-FLI1 gene rearrangement frequently associated with this disease. The development of several activators of p53 is discussed, with recent evidence demonstrating the potential of small molecule p53 activators as a promising systemic therapeutic approach for the treatment of Ewing Sarcomas with wild-type p53.

  16. 7 CFR 53.1 - Meaning of words.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Meaning of words. 53.1 Section 53.1 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards..., CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) Regulations Definitions § 53.1 Meaning of words. Words used in this subpart in the...

  17. 7 CFR 1786.53 - Discounted present value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Discounted present value. 1786.53 Section 1786.53... Special Discounted Prepayments on RUS Direct/Insured Loans § 1786.53 Discounted present value. The Discounted Present Value shall be calculated five business days before prepayment is made by summing the...

  18. The role of the tumor suppressor p53 in spermatogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beumer, T. L.; Roepers-Gajadien, H. L.; Gademan, I. S.; van Buul, P. P.; Gil-Gomez, G.; Rutgers, D. H.; de rooij, D. G.

    1998-01-01

    The p53 protein appeared to be involved in both spermatogonial cell proliferation and radiation response. During normal spermatogenesis in the mouse, spermatogonia do not express p53, as analyzed by immunohistochemistry. However, after a dose of 4 Gy of X-rays, a distinct p53 staining was present in

  19. 27 CFR 53.103 - Lease considered as sale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Lease considered as sale. 53.103 Section 53.103 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... Provisions Applicable to Manufacturers Taxes § 53.103 Lease considered as sale. For purposes of chapter 32 of...

  20. 46 CFR 78.47-53 - Automatic ventilation dampers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Automatic ventilation dampers. 78.47-53 Section 78.47-53... Fire and Emergency Equipment, Etc. § 78.47-53 Automatic ventilation dampers. (a) The manual operating positions for automatic fire dampers in ventilation ducts passing through main vertical zone bulkheads shall...

  1. 46 CFR 67.53 - Methods of establishing title.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Methods of establishing title. 67.53 Section 67.53... DOCUMENTATION OF VESSELS Title Requirements for Vessel Documentation § 67.53 Methods of establishing title. Title to a vessel may be established through one of the following methods: (a) Simplified method without...

  2. 27 CFR 53.92 - Exclusions from sale price.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exclusions from sale price. 53.92 Section 53.92 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... Provisions Applicable to Manufacturers Taxes § 53.92 Exclusions from sale price. (a) Tax—(1) Tax not part of...

  3. 27 CFR 53.95 - Constructive sale price; basic rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Constructive sale price; basic rules. 53.95 Section 53.95 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... AMMUNITION Special Provisions Applicable to Manufacturers Taxes § 53.95 Constructive sale price; basic rules...

  4. 27 CFR 53.97 - Constructive sale price; affiliated corporations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Constructive sale price; affiliated corporations. 53.97 Section 53.97 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX... AND AMMUNITION Special Provisions Applicable to Manufacturers Taxes § 53.97 Constructive sale price...

  5. 48 CFR 53.301-330 - Architect-Engineer Qualifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Architect-Engineer Qualifications. 53.301-330 Section 53.301-330 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Illustrations of Forms 53.301-330 Architect-Engineer...

  6. 41 CFR 109-26.501-53 - Acquisitions by transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acquisitions by transfer. 109-26.501-53 Section 109-26.501-53 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property... PROCUREMENT 26-PROCUREMENT SOURCES AND PROGRAM 26.5-GSA Procurement Programs § 109-26.501-53 Acquisitions by...

  7. 24 CFR 26.53 - Exhaustion of administrative remedies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Exhaustion of administrative remedies. 26.53 Section 26.53 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing... Hearings § 26.53 Exhaustion of administrative remedies. In order to fulfill the requirement of exhausting...

  8. 7 CFR 201.53 - Source of seeds for germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Source of seeds for germination. 201.53 Section 201.53..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT REGULATIONS Germination Tests in the Administration of the Act § 201.53 Source of seeds for germination. (a...

  9. 27 CFR 53.184 - Refund to exporter or shipper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Refund to exporter or shipper. 53.184 Section 53.184 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... AMMUNITION Refunds and Other Administrative Provisions of Special Application to Manufacturers Taxes § 53.184...

  10. 7 CFR 989.53 - Research and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Research and development. 989.53 Section 989.53... GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Research and Development § 989.53 Research and development... establishment of projects involving marketing research and development and marketing promotion including paid...

  11. 10 CFR 39.53 - Energy compensation source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Energy compensation source. 39.53 Section 39.53 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR WELL LOGGING Equipment § 39.53 Energy compensation source. The licensee may use an energy compensation source (ECS) which is...

  12. p53 specific (auto)immunity in mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lauwen, Marjolein Monique

    2008-01-01

    Self-tolerance to p53 is a major potential limitation for the activation of the endogenous T-cell repertoire. So far, p53 specific CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell immunity has been described in cancer patients and healthy individuals. However, the restrictions of tolerance on the recruitment of p53 specific T

  13. 20 CFR 631.53 - Certificates of continuing eligibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Certificates of continuing eligibility. 631.53 Section 631.53 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROGRAMS UNDER TITLE III OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Substate Programs § 631.53 Certificates of...

  14. 40 CFR 53.64 - Test procedure: Static fractionator test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test procedure: Static fractionator test. 53.64 Section 53.64 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR... Performance Characteristics of Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 § 53.64 Test procedure: Static...

  15. 7 CFR 400.53 - Yield certification and acceptability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Yield certification and acceptability. 400.53 Section 400.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FEDERAL CROP INSURANCE CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS Actual Production History § 400.53...

  16. 18 CFR 701.53 - Council decisions by Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Members. 701.53 Section 701.53 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL COUNCIL ORGANIZATION Headquarters Organization § 701.53 Council decisions by Members. Council decisions by Members may... is deemed necessary. Issues raised at Council meetings shall be decided by majority vote of Members...

  17. 45 CFR 1801.53 - Postponement of payment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Postponement of payment. 1801.53 Section 1801.53... HARRY S. TRUMAN SCHOLARSHIP PROGRAM Payment Conditions and Procedures § 1801.53 Postponement of payment... other circumstances. (b) If the Foundation grants a postponement, it may impose conditions as it deems...

  18. 27 CFR 53.2 - Attachment of tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Attachment of tax. 53.2 Section 53.2 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... § 53.2 Attachment of tax. (a) For purposes of this part, the manufacturers excise tax generally...

  19. 48 CFR 53.301-26 - Award/Contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Award/Contract. 53.301-26 Section 53.301-26 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Illustrations of Forms 53.301-26 Award/Contract. ER22AP08.000 ...

  20. 48 CFR 53.301-1447 - Solicitation/Contract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Solicitation/Contract. 53.301-1447 Section 53.301-1447 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Illustrations of Forms 53.301-1447 Solicitation/Contract. ER22AP08.001...

  1. P53 MUTATIONS IN HUMAN LUNG-TUMORS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    MILLER, CW; ASLO, A; KOK, K; YOKOTA, J; BUYS, CHCM; TERADA, M; KOEFFLER, HP; Simon, K.

    1992-01-01

    Mutation of one p53 allele and loss of the normal p53 allele [loss of heterozygosity (LOH)] occur in many tumors including lung cancers. These alterations apparently contribute to development of cancer by interfering with the tumor suppressor activity of p53. We directly sequenced amplified DNA in

  2. Role of p53 in Cell Death and Human Cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozaki, Toshinori; Nakagawara, Akira

    2011-01-01

    p53 is a nuclear transcription factor with a pro-apoptotic function. Since over 50% of human cancers carry loss of function mutations in p53 gene, p53 has been considered to be one of the classical type tumor suppressors. Mutant p53 acts as the dominant-negative inhibitor toward wild-type p53. Indeed, mutant p53 has an oncogenic potential. In some cases, malignant cancer cells bearing p53 mutations display a chemo-resistant phenotype. In response to a variety of cellular stresses such as DNA damage, p53 is induced to accumulate in cell nucleus to exert its pro-apoptotic function. Activated p53 promotes cell cycle arrest to allow DNA repair and/or apoptosis to prevent the propagation of cells with serious DNA damage through the transactivation of its target genes implicated in the induction of cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis. Thus, the DNA-binding activity of p53 is tightly linked to its tumor suppressive function. In the present review article, we describe the regulatory mechanisms of p53 and also p53-mediated therapeutic strategies to cure malignant cancers. PMID:24212651

  3. 48 CFR 53.205-1 - Paid advertisements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Paid advertisements. 53... (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Prescription of Forms 53.205-1 Paid advertisements. SF 1449, prescribed in 53.212, shall be used to place orders for paid advertisements as specified in 5.503. ...

  4. 45 CFR 605.53 - Drug and alcohol addicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., Welfare, and Social Services § 605.53 Drug and alcohol addicts. A recipient to which this subpart applies... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Drug and alcohol addicts. 605.53 Section 605.53 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION...

  5. p53 expression in colorectal carcinoma in relation to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: It has been shown that colorectal carcinoma is increasing in incidence in African countries. This could be due to change in life style. Molecular pathogenesis of colorectal cancer commonly involves mutation in p53 gene which leads to expression of p53 protein in tumor cells. Expression of p53 protein has been ...

  6. 21 CFR 640.53 - Testing the blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Testing the blood. 640.53 Section 640.53 Food and... ADDITIONAL STANDARDS FOR HUMAN BLOOD AND BLOOD PRODUCTS Cryoprecipitate § 640.53 Testing the blood. (a) Blood... sample of blood collected at the time of collecting the source blood, and such sample container shall be...

  7. Strontium Substitution for Calcium in Lithogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaschko, Sarah D.; Chi, Thomas; Miller, Joe; Flechner, Lawrence; Fakra, Sirine; Kapahi, Pankaj; Kahn, Arnold; Stoller, Marshall L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Strontium has chemical similarity to calcium, which enables the replacement of calcium by strontium in biomineralization processes. Incorporating strontium into human bone and teeth has been studied extensively but little research has been performed of the incorporation of strontium into urinary calculi. We used synchrotron based x-ray fluorescence and x-ray absorption techniques to examine the presence of strontium in different types of human kidney stones. Materials and Methods Multiple unique human stone samples were obtained via consecutive percutaneous nephrolithotomies/ureteroscopies. A portion of each stone was sent for standard laboratory analysis and a portion was retained for x-ray fluorescence and x-ray absorption measurements. X-ray fluorescence and x-ray absorption measurements determined the presence, spatial distribution and speciation of strontium in each stone sample. Results Traditional kidney stone analyses identified calcium oxalate, calcium phosphate, uric acid and cystine stones. X-ray fluorescence measurements identified strontium in all stone types except pure cystine. X-ray fluorescence elemental mapping of the samples revealed co-localization of calcium and strontium. X-ray absorption measurements of the calcium phosphate stone showed strontium predominately present as strontium apatite. Conclusions Advanced x-ray fluorescence imaging identified strontium in all calcium based stones, present as strontium apatite. This finding may be critical since apatite is thought to be the initial nidus for calcium stone formation. Strontium is not identified by standard laboratory stone analyses. Its substitution for calcium can be reliably identified in stones from multiple calcium based stone formers, which may offer opportunities to gain insight into early events in lithogenesis. PMID:23260568

  8. A comparison of total calcium, corrected calcium, and ionized calcium concentrations as indicators of calcium homeostasis among hypoalbuminemic dogs requiring intensive care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Claire R; Kerl, Marie E; Mann, F A

    2009-12-01

    (1) To evaluate whether total calcium (tCa) correlates with ionized calcium (iCa) in hypoalbuminemic dogs; (2) to evaluate whether calcium adjusted for albumin (Alb), or total protein (TP), or both accurately predict iCa concentrations and hence can be used to monitor calcium homeostasis in critically ill hypoalbuminemic dogs; and (3) to evaluate factors associated with any potential discrepancy in calcium classification between corrected total and ionized values. Prospective observational clinical study. Small animal intensive care unit in a veterinary medical teaching hospital. Twenty-eight client-owned dogs with hypoalbuminemia. None. iCa was determined using ion-specific electrode methodology, on heparinized plasma. The tCa concentration was adjusted for Alb and TP using published equations. In total 29% (8/28) of the hypoalbuminemic, critically ill dogs in this study were hypocalcemic at intensive care unit admission, as determined by iCa measurement. Corrected calcium values failed to accurately classify calcium status in 67.9% and 64.3% of cases, according to whether the Alb-adjusted or TP-adjusted values, respectively, were used. The sensitivity and specificity of the tCa to evaluate hypocalcemia was 100% and 47%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the correction formulae were 37.5% and 79% for the Alb-adjusted values and 37.5% and 74% for TP-adjusted values. tCa overestimated the presence of hypocalcemia and underestimated the presence of normocalcemia, while corrected calcium values overestimated the presence of normocalcemia and underestimated the presence of hypocalcemia. Calcium homeostasis in hypoalbuminemic critically ill dogs should be evaluated by iCa concentrations rather than tCa or calcium adjusted for Alb or TP. Given that tCa has 100% sensitivity for detecting hypocalcemia in this population it is recommended that all hypoalbuminemic and critically ill patients with low tCa should be evaluated with an iCa measurement.

  9. Tuning local calcium availability: cell-type-specific immobile calcium buffer capacity in hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Elizabeth A; Schoch, Susanne; Dietrich, Dirk

    2013-09-04

    It has remained difficult to ascribe a specific functional role to immobile or fixed intracellular calcium buffers in central neurons because the amount of these buffers is unknown. Here, we explicitly isolated the fixed buffer fraction by prolonged whole-cell patch-clamp dialysis and quantified its buffering capacity in murine hippocampal slices using confocal calcium imaging and the "added-buffer" approach. In dentate granule cells, the calcium binding ratio (κ) after complete washout of calbindin D28k (Cb), κfixed, displayed a substantial value of ∼100. In contrast, in CA1 oriens lacunosum moleculare (OLM) interneurons, which do not contain any known calcium-binding protein(s), κfixed amounted to only ∼30. Based on these values, a theoretical analysis of dendritic spread of calcium after local entry showed that fixed buffers, in the absence of mobile species, decrease intracellular calcium mobility 100- and 30-fold in granule cells and OLM cells, respectively, and thereby strongly slow calcium signals. Although the large κfixed alone strongly delays the spread of calcium in granule cells, this value optimizes the benefits of additionally expressing the mobile calcium binding protein Cb. With such high κfixed, Cb effectively increases the propagation velocity to levels seen in OLM cells and, contrary to expectation, does not affect the peak calcium concentration close to the source but sharpens the spatial and temporal calcium gradients. The data suggest that the amount of fixed buffers determines the temporal availability of calcium for calcium-binding partners and plays a pivotal role in setting the repertoire of cellular calcium signaling regimens.

  10. Diagnosis and assessment of skeletal related disease using calcium 41

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillegonds, Darren J [Oakland, CA; Vogel, John S [San Jose, CA; Fitzgerald, Robert L [Encinitas, CA; Deftos, Leonard J [Del Mar, CA; Herold, David [Del Mar, CA; Burton, Douglas W [San Diego, CA

    2012-05-15

    A method of determining calcium metabolism in a patient comprises the steps of administering radioactive calcium isotope .sup.41Ca to the patient, allowing a period of time to elapse sufficient for dissemination and reaction of the radioactive calcium isotope .sup.41Ca by the patient, obtaining a sample of the radioactive calcium isotope .sup.41Ca from the patient, isolating the calcium content of the sample in a form suitable for precise measurement of isotopic calcium concentrations, and measuring the calcium content to determine parameters of calcium metabolism in the patient.

  11. Non-calcium desulphurisation technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian Zhu [IEA Clean Coal Centre, London (United Kingdom)

    2010-06-15

    Flue gas desulphurisation (FGD) is traditionally based on limestone/lime sorbent. The majority of the installed FGD systems worldwide use limestone or lime as sorbent. However, technologies are rapidly evolving that allow desulphurisation in regions where there are limited resources of lime or limestone. These technologies provide alternatives to limestone/lime scrubbers for efficient and cost effective control of SO{sub 2} emissions from coal combustion. This report reviews the existing and emerging non-calcium based FGD processes as well as FGD technologies currently under development that apply new concepts and different approaches. It looks at the fundamentals and features of these processes, the recent technical advances and their applications in coal-fired power plants. The capital and operating costs of the processes are evaluated where information available. 66 refs., 15 figs., 10 tabs.

  12. Calcium-sensitive immunoaffinity chromatography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Maiken L; Lindhardt Madsen, Kirstine; Skjoedt, Karsten

    2014-01-01

    Immunoaffinity chromatography is a powerful fractionation technique that has become indispensable for protein purification and characterization. However, it is difficult to retrieve bound proteins without using harsh or denaturing elution conditions, and the purification of scarce antigens...... to homogeneity may be impossible due to contamination with abundant antigens. In this study, we purified the scarce, complement-associated plasma protein complex, collectin LK (CL-LK, complex of collectin liver 1 and kidney 1), by immunoaffinity chromatography using a calcium-sensitive anti-collectin-kidney-1 m...... chromatography was superior to the traditional immunoaffinity chromatographies and resulted in a nine-fold improvement of the purification factor. The technique is applicable for the purification of proteins in complex mixtures by single-step fractionation without the denaturation of eluted antigens...

  13. Impact of calcium sulphate and calcium carbide on nitrogen use efficiency of wheat in normal and saline sodic soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.A. Mahmood

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available pot experiment was conducted to study the effect of calcium as CaSO4 or CaC2 (20 mg Ca kg-1 of soil from each source on N use efficiency of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. var. Inqlab-91 under normal (ECe=0.7 dS m-1, SAR=4.37 and pH=8.1 and saline-sodic soils (ECe=8.7 dS m-1, SAR=21.43 and pH=9.2 in glass house at National Agricultural Research Centre, Islamabad during Kharif season 2007-08. The crop was grown to maturity and data on tillering, plant height, panicle length, grains spike-1, straw and grain yields were recorded at the time of crop harvest. A considerable reduction in plant height (38% and grain yield (44% was observed when grown in saline-sodic soil (ECe=8.7 dS m-1 as compared to normal soil (ECe=0.7 dS m-1 while N application significantly improved plant growth and yield in both conditions. Among the treatments, N application even at lower rate supplemented with calcium as CaSO4, CaC2 or their mixture (1:1 showed better performance than that of straight N application in both soils. A 41 to 53% increase in plant growth and 36 to 44% in grain yield over control (without N were observed through N fertilization at 25 and 50 mg kg-1 of soil supplemented with calcium as CaC2 in salinesodic soil. Similarly, calcium as CaSO4 application also caused a considerable improvement in plant growth (34 to 52% and grain yield (25 to 43%. However, the effect of mixture application of CaSO4 and CaC2 (1:1 on plant growth and yield was comparatively more pronounced for both the soils. Interestingly, lower dose ofN (25 mg kg-1 with calcium as CaC2 alone or in combination with CaSO4 (1:1 supplementation showed statistically equal performance to that of higher dose (N=50 mg kg-1 alone. Tissue Na+ significantly decreased while K+ and Ca2+ concentrations were elevated due to N application along with calcium nutrition. Maximum N uptake and apparent N recovery were revealed from treatments where N was applied @ 50 mg kg-1 soil supplemented with calcium as CaC2

  14. p53 and survival in early onset breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gentile, M; Bergman Jungeström, M; Olsen, K E

    1999-01-01

    The p53 protein has proven to be central in tumorigenesis by its cell cycle regulatory properties and both gene mutations and protein accumulation have been associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer. The present study was undertaken to investigate the prognostic significance of gene mutations......, p53 protein accumulation and of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at the TP53 locus in young (age ... (46%). Log rank analysis revealed no significant association between survival and TP53 mutations (in general), p53 protein accumulation or LOH. However, missense mutations localised to the zinc binding domain were significantly (P = 0.0007) associated with poorer prognosis. As indicated...

  15. p53 Over-expression and p53 mutations in colon carcinomas: Relation to dietary risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voskuil, D.W.; Kampman, E.; Kraats, A.A. van; Balder, H.F.; Muijen, G.N.P. van; Goldbohm, R.A.; Veer, P. van 't

    1999-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested that dietary factors may differently affect p53-dependent and p53-independent pathways to colon cancer. Results of such studies may depend on the method used to assess p53 status. This case-control study of 185 colon-cancer cases and 259 controls examines this

  16. Screening of medicinal plant phytochemicals as natural antagonists of p53-MDM2 interaction to reactivate p53 functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Muhammad; Ashfaq, Usman A; Qasim, Muhammad; Yasmeen, Erum; Ul Qamar, Muhammad T; Anwar, Farooq

    2017-10-01

    In most types of cancer, overexpression of murine double minute 2 (MDM2) often leads to inactivation of p53. The crystal structure of MDM2, with a 109-residue amino-terminal domain, reveals that MDM2 has a core hydrophobic region to which p53 binds as an amphipathic α helix. The interface depends on the steric complementarity between MDM2 and the hydrophobic region of p53. Especially, on p53's triad, amino acids Phe19, Trp23 and Leu26 bind to the MDM2 core. Results from studies suggest that the structural motif of both p53 and MDM2 can be attributed to similarities in the amphipathic α helix. Thus, in the current investigation it is hypothesized that the similarity in the structural motif might be the cause of p53 inactivation by MDM2. Hence, molecular docking and phytochemical screening approaches are appraised to inhibit the hydrophobic cleft of MDM2 and to stop p53-MDM2 interaction, resulting in reactivation of p53 activity. For this purpose, a library of 2295 phytochemicals were screened against p53-MDM2 to find potential candidates. Of these, four phytochemicals including epigallocatechin gallate, alvaradoin M, alvaradoin E and nordihydroguaiaretic acid were found to be potential inhibitors of p53-MDM2 interaction. The screened phytochemicals, derived from natural extracts, may have negligible side effects and can be explored as potent antagonists of p53-MDM2 interactions, resulting in reactivation of the normal transcription of p53.

  17. P53 mutation analysis of colorectal liver metastases : Relation to actual survival, angiogenic status, and p53 overexpression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, KP; Gouw, ASH; Peeters, PMJG; Bulthuis, M; Menkema, L; Porte, RJ; Slooff, MJH; van Goor, H; van den Berg, Anke

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate TP53 mutations with angiogenic status of the tumor and prognosis after liver surgery in patients with colorectal liver metastases and to correlate immunohistochemical staining of p53 protein with TP53 gene mutations. Experimental Design: Tumors of 44 patients with surgically

  18. Japan's declining fertility: "1.53 shock".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagishita, M

    1992-04-01

    In 1990, the Japanese were upset over the low 1989 total fertility rate (TFR) of 1.57 and continued to be so when they learned that the 1990 rate was even lower (1.53). This meant an annual population growth rate of only 0.33% with population decline beginning after 2010. In the early 1990s, Japan began to feel the demographic effects of such low fertility: a shortage of young workers and rising costs of health care for the elderly. Further, this shortage resulted in increasing business closings between 1988-1990 (1-6%). In 1990, the government began a survey to monitor the beliefs of the population on demographic concerns. The survey revealed that people wanted 2.2 children. Ideal family size was 2.6 which remained the same since 1977. Almost 40% found the falling TFR to be undesirable, especially because the population was aging. Moreover 65% of them though the government should undertake efforts to increase births. The major suggestions included reducing economic costs of raising a child (53%), a more favorable environment to have children such as affordable housing (29%), and developing child care facilities and child care leave (13%). 38% of 25-29 year old women were still unmarried, yet only 2% intended to never marry. Women in their late 20s and early 30s were critical of the 3 generation household with women doing all the housework. Women were more likely to be against premarital and extramarital sex than men. 25-33%, especially women 45 years old, felt the abortion law should be restricted. The 1990 abortion rate was 37.4/100 births. 7% relied on sterilization, yet 25-30% felt it to be an acceptable means of contraception. 75% of those that used a contraceptive used the condom. The government continued to ban oral contraceptives (OCs) claiming they would spread AIDS. Men were more in favor of OCs than women. 48% of those who found the falling population undesirable favored a pronatalist policy over importing foreign laborers. 41% wanted Japan to still help

  19. Molecularly targeted therapies for p53-mutant cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Dekuang; Tahaney, William M; Mazumdar, Abhijit; Savage, Michelle I; Brown, Powel H

    2017-11-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 is lost or mutated in approximately half of human cancers. Mutant p53 not only loses its anti-tumor transcriptional activity, but also often acquires oncogenic functions to promote tumor proliferation, invasion, and drug resistance. Traditional strategies have been taken to directly target p53 mutants through identifying small molecular compounds to deplete mutant p53, or to restore its tumor suppressive function. Accumulating evidence suggest that cancer cells with mutated p53 often exhibit specific functional dependencies on secondary genes or pathways to survive, providing alternative targets to indirectly treat p53-mutant cancers. Targeting these genes or pathways, critical for survival in the presence of p53 mutations, holds great promise for cancer treatment. In addition, mutant p53 often exhibits novel gain-of-functions to promote tumor growth and metastasis. Here, we review and discuss strategies targeting mutant p53, with focus on targeting the mutant p53 protein directly, and on the progress of identifying genes and pathways required in p53-mutant cells.

  20. Combining Oncolytic Virotherapy with p53 Tumor Suppressor Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bressy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virus (OV therapy utilizes replication-competent viruses to kill cancer cells, leaving non-malignant cells unharmed. With the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved OV, dozens of clinical trials ongoing, and an abundance of translational research in the field, OV therapy is poised to be one of the leading treatments for cancer. A number of recombinant OVs expressing a transgene for p53 (TP53 or another p53 family member (TP63 or TP73 were engineered with the goal of generating more potent OVs that function synergistically with host immunity and/or other therapies to reduce or eliminate tumor burden. Such transgenes have proven effective at improving OV therapies, and basic research has shown mechanisms of p53-mediated enhancement of OV therapy, provided optimized p53 transgenes, explored drug-OV combinational treatments, and challenged canonical roles for p53 in virus-host interactions and tumor suppression. This review summarizes studies combining p53 gene therapy with replication-competent OV therapy, reviews preclinical and clinical studies with replication-deficient gene therapy vectors expressing p53 transgene, examines how wild-type p53 and p53 modifications affect OV replication and anti-tumor effects of OV therapy, and explores future directions for rational design of OV therapy combined with p53 gene therapy.

  1. Creation and preliminary characterization of a Tp53 knockout rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Aaron; Besch-Williford, Cynthia L.; Franklin, Craig L.; Weinstein, Edward J.; Cui, Xiaoxia

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The tumor suppressor TP53 plays a crucial role in cancer biology, and the TP53 gene is the most mutated gene in human cancer. Trp53 knockout mouse models have been widely used in cancer etiology studies and in search for a cure of cancer with some limitations that other model organisms might help overcome. Via pronuclear microinjection of zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), we created a Tp53 knockout rat that contains an 11-bp deletion in exon 3, resulting in a frameshift and premature terminations in the open reading frame. In cohorts of 25 homozygous (Tp53Δ11/Δ11), 37 heterozygous (Tp53Δ11/+) and 30 wild-type rats, the Tp53Δ11/Δ11 rats lived an average of 126 days before death or removal from study because of clinical signs of abnormality or formation of tumors. Half of Tp53Δ11/+ were removed from study by 1 year of age because of tumor formation. Both Tp53Δ11/+ and Tp53Δ11/Δ11 rats developed a wide spectrum of tumors, most commonly sarcomas. Interestingly, there was a strikingly high incidence of brain lesions, especially in Tp53Δ11/Δ11 animals. We believe that this mutant rat line will be useful in studying cancer types rarely observed in mice and in carcinogenicity assays for drug development. PMID:22917926

  2. Combining Oncolytic Virotherapy with p53 Tumor Suppressor Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressy, Christian; Hastie, Eric; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2017-06-16

    Oncolytic virus (OV) therapy utilizes replication-competent viruses to kill cancer cells, leaving non-malignant cells unharmed. With the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved OV, dozens of clinical trials ongoing, and an abundance of translational research in the field, OV therapy is poised to be one of the leading treatments for cancer. A number of recombinant OVs expressing a transgene for p53 (TP53) or another p53 family member (TP63 or TP73) were engineered with the goal of generating more potent OVs that function synergistically with host immunity and/or other therapies to reduce or eliminate tumor burden. Such transgenes have proven effective at improving OV therapies, and basic research has shown mechanisms of p53-mediated enhancement of OV therapy, provided optimized p53 transgenes, explored drug-OV combinational treatments, and challenged canonical roles for p53 in virus-host interactions and tumor suppression. This review summarizes studies combining p53 gene therapy with replication-competent OV therapy, reviews preclinical and clinical studies with replication-deficient gene therapy vectors expressing p53 transgene, examines how wild-type p53 and p53 modifications affect OV replication and anti-tumor effects of OV therapy, and explores future directions for rational design of OV therapy combined with p53 gene therapy.

  3. Analysis list: TP53 [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available TP53 Blood,Bone,Breast,Digestive tract,Epidermis,Others,Pluripotent stem cell + hg19 http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/TP53.1.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu...-u/hg19/target/TP53.5.tsv http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/target/TP53.10.tsv http://dbarchiv...e.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/TP53.Blood.tsv,http://dbarchive.bioscienced...bc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/TP53.Bone.tsv,http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/hg19/colo/TP53.Breast.tsv,http:

  4. TP53 gene status affects survival in advanced mycosis fungoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gitte Wooler

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available TP53 is frequently mutated in different types of neoplasms including leukemia and lymphomas. Mutations of TP53 have also been reported in mycosis fungoides (MF, the most common type of cutaneous lymphoma. However, little is known about the frequency, spectrum of mutations and their prognostic significance in MF. In this study we have optimized the protocol for Sanger sequencing of TP53 using DNA extracted from archival paraffin-embedded biopsies. Of 19 samples from patients with stage IIB MF or higher, 31% harboured mutations in TP53. Overall survival of the patients with mutated TP53 was significantly shorter than median survival in the age- and stage-matched patients treated in our Institution. Distribution of mutations was heterogenous in TP53 exons, however C>T transitions were common suggesting the causal role of ultraviolet radiation. We propose that TP53 mutation status would be useful for risk stratification of patients with advanced MF.

  5. p53 and disease: when the guardian angel fails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royds, J A; Iacopetta, B

    2006-06-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene (TP53) is mutated more often in human cancers than any other gene yet reported. Of importance, it is mutated frequently in the common human malignancies of the breast and colorectum and also, but less frequently, in other significant human cancers such as glioblastomas. There is also one inherited cancer predisposing syndrome called Li-Fraumeni that is caused by TP53 mutations. In this review, we discuss the significance of p53 mutations in some of the above tumors with a view to outlining how p53 contributes to malignant progression. We also discuss the usefulness of TP53 status as a prognostic marker and its role as a predictor of response to therapy. Finally, we outline some evidence that abnormalities in p53 function contribute to the etiology of other non-neoplastic diseases.

  6. Relationship of calcium absorption with 25(OH)D and calcium intake in children with rickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thacher, Tom D; Abrams, Steven A

    2010-11-01

    Nutritional rickets has long been considered a disease caused by vitamin D deficiency, but recent data indicate that inadequate dietary calcium intake is an important cause of rickets, particularly in tropical countries. Children with rickets due to calcium deficiency do not have very low 25(OH)D concentrations, and serum 1,25(OH)(2) D values are markedly elevated. Studies of Nigerian children with rickets demonstrated they have high fractional calcium absorption. A high-phytate diet was demonstrated to increase calcium absorption compared with the fasting state, and enzymatic dephytinization did not significantly improve calcium absorption. When given vitamin D, children with rickets have a marked increase in 1,25(OH)(2) D concentrations without any change in fractional calcium absorption. No positive relationship was found between fractional calcium absorption and serum 25(OH)D concentrations in children on low-calcium diets. More research is needed to understand the interaction between calcium and vitamin D and the role of vitamin D in calcium absorption. © 2010 International Life Sciences Institute.

  7. Calcium phosphate scaffold from biogenic calcium carbonate by fast ambient condition reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Abhishek; Fermani, Simona; Arjun Tekalur, Srinivasan; Vanderberg, Abigail; Falini, Giuseppe

    2011-12-01

    Calcium phosphate biogenic materials are biocompatible and promote bioactivity and osteoconductivity, which implies their natural affinity and tendency to bond directly to bones subsequently replacing the host bone after implantation owing to its biodegradability. Calcium hydrogen phosphate dihydrate, CaHPO 4·2H 2O, is known to be a nucleation precursor, in aqueous solutions, for apatitic calcium phosphates and, hence, a potential starting material for bone substitutes. Numerous approaches, via hydrothermal and ambient synthetic routes, have been used to produce calcium phosphate from biogenic calcium carbonate, taking advantage of the peculiar architecture and composition of the latter. In this article, the lamellar region of the cuttlefish bone ( Sepia officinalis) was used as a framework for the organized deposition of calcium phosphate crystals, at ambient conditions via a fast procedure involving an amorphous calcium carbonate intermediate, and ending with a conversion to calcium phosphate and a fixation procedure, thereby resulting in direct conversion of biogenic calcium carbonate into calcium phosphates at ambient conditions from the scale of months to hours.

  8. Vision after 53 Years of Blindness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovan Šikl

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that visual recovery after blindness that occurs early in life is never complete. The current study investigated whether an extremely long period of blindness might also cause a permanent impairment of visual performance, even in a case of adult-onset blindness. We examined KP, a 71-year-old man who underwent a successful sight-restoring operation after 53 years of blindness. A set of psychophysical tests designed to assess KP's face perception, object recognition, and visual space perception abilities were conducted six months and eight months after the surgery. The results demonstrate that regardless of a lengthy period of normal vision and rich pre-accident perceptual experience, KP did not fully integrate this experience, and his visual performance remained greatly compromised. This was particularly evident when the tasks targeted finer levels of perceptual processing. In addition to the decreased robustness of his memory representations, which was hypothesized as the main factor determining visual impairment, other factors that may have affected KP's performance were considered, including compromised visual functions, problems with perceptual organization, deficits in the simultaneous processing of visual information, and reduced cognitive abilities.

  9. Vision after 53 years of blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikl, Radovan; Simecček, Michal; Porubanová-Norquist, Michaela; Bezdíček, Ondřej; Kremláček, Jan; Stodůlka, Pavel; Fine, Ione; Ostrovsky, Yuri

    2013-01-01

    Several studies have shown that visual recovery after blindness that occurs early in life is never complete. The current study investigated whether an extremely long period of blindness might also cause a permanent impairment of visual performance, even in a case of adult-onset blindness. We examined KP, a 71-year-old man who underwent a successful sight-restoring operation after 53 years of blindness. A set of psychophysical tests designed to assess KP's face perception, object recognition, and visual space perception abilities were conducted six months and eight months after the surgery. The results demonstrate that regardless of a lengthy period of normal vision and rich pre-accident perceptual experience, KP did not fully integrate this experience, and his visual performance remained greatly compromised. This was particularly evident when the tasks targeted finer levels of perceptual processing. In addition to the decreased robustness of his memory representations, which was hypothesized as the main factor determining visual impairment, other factors that may have affected KP's performance were considered, including compromised visual functions, problems with perceptual organization, deficits in the simultaneous processing of visual information, and reduced cognitive abilities.

  10. Transgenic plants with increased calcium stores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Sarah (Inventor); Tsou, Pei-Lan (Inventor); Robertson, Dominique (Inventor); Boss, Wendy (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The present invention provides transgenic plants over-expressing a transgene encoding a calcium-binding protein or peptide (CaBP). Preferably, the CaBP is a calcium storage protein and over-expression thereof does not have undue adverse effects on calcium homeostasis or biochemical pathways that are regulated by calcium. In preferred embodiments, the CaBP is calreticulin (CRT) or calsequestrin. In more preferred embodiments, the CaBP is the C-domain of CRT, a fragment of the C-domain, or multimers of the foregoing. In other preferred embodiments, the CaBP is localized to the endoplasmic reticulum by operatively associating the transgene encoding the CaBP with an endoplasmic reticulum localization peptide. Alternatively, the CaBP is targeted to any other sub-cellular compartment that permits the calcium to be stored in a form that is biologically available to the plant. Also provided are methods of producing plants with desirable phenotypic traits by transformation of the plant with a transgene encoding a CaBP. Such phenotypic traits include increased calcium storage, enhanced resistance to calcium-limiting conditions, enhanced growth and viability, increased disease and stress resistance, enhanced flower and fruit production, reduced senescence, and a decreased need for fertilizer production. Further provided are plants with enhanced nutritional value as human food or animal feed.

  11. In vitro antioxidant properties of calcium dobesilate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, J; Farine, J C; Garay, R P; Hannaert, P

    1998-01-01

    Calcium dobesilate, a vascular protective agent, was tested in vitro for its scavenging action against oxygen free radicals. Calcium dobesilate was as potent as rutin to scavenge hydroxyl radicals (IC50 = 1.1 vs 0.7 microM, respectively). It was also able to scavenge superoxide radicals, but with 23 times less potency than rutin (IC50 = 682 vs 30 microM, respectively). Calcium dobesilate significantly reduced platelet activating factor (PAF)-induced chemiluminescence in human PMN cells and lipid peroxidation by oxygen free radicals in human erythrocyte membranes, although these actions required calcium dobesilate concentrations > or = 50 microM. Finally, in cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells, magnesium dobesilate reduced the increase in cytosolic free calcium induced by hydrogen peroxide and inhibited phenazine methosulfate-induced cell potassium loss. In conclusion, calcium dobesilate was effective in scavenging hydroxyl radicals in vitro, at therapeutically relevant concentrations. Conversely, higher concentrations of the compound were required to scavenge superoxide radicals or to protect the cells against the deleterious effects of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Further studies in vivo are required to determine if these antioxidant properties of calcium dobesilate can play a role in its vascular protective mechanisms.

  12. Intracellular sphingosine releases calcium from lysosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglinger, Doris; Haberkant, Per; Aguilera-Romero, Auxiliadora; Riezman, Howard; Porter, Forbes D; Platt, Frances M; Galione, Antony; Schultz, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    To elucidate new functions of sphingosine (Sph), we demonstrate that the spontaneous elevation of intracellular Sph levels via caged Sph leads to a significant and transient calcium release from acidic stores that is independent of sphingosine 1-phosphate, extracellular and ER calcium levels. This photo-induced Sph-driven calcium release requires the two-pore channel 1 (TPC1) residing on endosomes and lysosomes. Further, uncaging of Sph leads to the translocation of the autophagy-relevant transcription factor EB (TFEB) to the nucleus specifically after lysosomal calcium release. We confirm that Sph accumulates in late endosomes and lysosomes of cells derived from Niemann-Pick disease type C (NPC) patients and demonstrate a greatly reduced calcium release upon Sph uncaging. We conclude that sphingosine is a positive regulator of calcium release from acidic stores and that understanding the interplay between Sph homeostasis, calcium signaling and autophagy will be crucial in developing new therapies for lipid storage disorders such as NPC. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10616.001 PMID:26613410

  13. Calcium content of different compositions of gallstones and pathogenesis of calcium carbonate gallstones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Ji-Kuen; Pan, Huichin; Huang, Shing-Moo; Huang, Nan-Lan; Yao, Chung-Chin; Hsiao, Kuang-Ming; Wu, Chew-Wun

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the calcium content of different gallstone compositions and the pathogenic mechanisms of calcium carbonate gallstones. Between August 2001 and July 2007, gallstones from 481 patients, including 68 calcium carbonate gallstones, were analyzed for total calcium content. Gallbladder bile samples from 33 cases and six controls were analyzed for pH, carbonate anion level, free-ionized calcium concentration and saturation index for calcium carbonate. Total calcium content averaged 75.6 %, 11.8 %, and 4.2 % for calcium carbonate, calcium bilirubinate and cholesterol gallstones. In 29.4 % of patients, chronic and/or intermittent cystic duct obstructions were caused by polypoid lesions in the neck region and 70.6 % were caused by stones. A total of 82 % of patients had chronic low-grade inflammation of the gallbladder wall and 18.0 % had acute inflammatory exacerbations. In the bile, we found the mean pH, mean carbonate anion, free-ionized calcium concentrations, and mean saturation index for calcium carbonate to be elevated in comparison to controls. From our study, we found chronic and/or intermittent cystic duct obstructions and low-grade GB wall inflammation lead to GB epithelium hydrogen secretion dysfunction. Increased calcium ion efflux into the GB lumen combined with increased carbonate anion presence increases SI_CaCO(3) from 1 to 22.4. Thus, in an alkaline milieu with pH 7.8, calcium carbonate begins to aggregate and precipitate. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Effect of calcium intake on urinary oxalate excretion in calcium stone-forming patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishiura J.L.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Dietary calcium lowers the risk of nephrolithiasis due to a decreased absorption of dietary oxalate that is bound by intestinal calcium. The aim of the present study was to evaluate oxaluria in normocalciuric and hypercalciuric lithiasic patients under different calcium intake. Fifty patients (26 females and 24 males, 41 ± 10 years old, whose 4-day dietary records revealed a regular low calcium intake (<=500 mg/day, received an oral calcium load (1 g/day for 7 days. A 24-h urine was obtained before and after load and according to the calciuria under both diets, patients were considered as normocalciuric (NC, N = 15, diet-dependent hypercalciuric (DDHC, N = 9 or diet-independent hypercalciuric (DIHC, N = 26. On regular diet, mean oxaluria was 30 ± 14 mg/24 h for all patients. The 7-day calcium load induced a significant decrease in mean oxaluria compared to the regular diet in NC and DIHC (20 ± 12 vs 26 ± 7 and 27 ± 18 vs 32 ± 15 mg/24 h, respectively, P<0.05 but not in DDHC patients (22 ± 10 vs 23 ± 5 mg/24 h. The lack of an oxalate decrease among DDHC patients after the calcium load might have been due to higher calcium absorption under higher calcium supply, with a consequent lower amount of calcium left in the intestine to bind with oxalate. These data suggest that a long-lasting regular calcium consumption <500 mg was not associated with high oxaluria and that a subpopulation of hypercalciuric patients who presented a higher intestinal calcium absorption (DDHC tended to hyperabsorb oxalate as well, so that oxaluria did not change under different calcium intake.

  15. Human neuroblastoma cells with acquired resistance to the p53 activator RITA retain functional p53 and sensitivity to other p53 activating agents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michaelis, M.; Rothweiler, F.; Agha, B.; Barth, S.; Voges, Y.; Loeschmann, N.; von Deimling, A.; Breitling, R.; Doerr, H. Wilhelm; Roedel, F.; Speidel, D.; Cinatl, J.; Cinatl Jr., J.; Stephanou, A.

    Adaptation of wild-type p53 expressing UKF-NB-3 cancer cells to the murine double minute 2 inhibitor nutlin-3 causes de novo p53 mutations at high frequency (13/20) and multi-drug resistance. Here, we show that the same cells respond very differently when adapted to RITA, a drug that, like nutlin-3,

  16. AHP 4: na53 mʑi53 Tibetan Songs, Engagement Chants, and Flute Music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIBU LAKHI (LI JIANFU 李建富, DAWA TENZIN ཟླ་བ་བསྟན་འཛིན།

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study is a straightforward, pragmatic attempt to document the particulars of na53 mi53 song and musical traditions comprising the local 'performance-scape'. The primary researcher, Libu Lakhi, is a native of the community who was trained in a specialized mode of auto-ethnography developed by Charles Kevin Stuart and Gerald Roche at Qinghai Normal University 青海师范大学, Xining City 西宁市, Qinghai Province 青海省. Drawing on ethnomusicology, socio-linguistics, and the 'performance' school of folkloristics, the model is intended to enable local peoples to document and display their own traditions in a form available to scholars and interested persons on a global scale.

  17. Nuclear Calcium Buffering Capacity Shapes Neuronal Architecture*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauceri, Daniela; Hagenston, Anna M.; Schramm, Kathrin; Weiss, Ursula; Bading, Hilmar

    2015-01-01

    Calcium-binding proteins (CaBPs) such as parvalbumin are part of the cellular calcium buffering system that determines intracellular calcium diffusion and influences the spatiotemporal dynamics of calcium signals. In neurons, CaBPs are primarily localized to the cytosol and function, for example, in nerve terminals in short-term synaptic plasticity. However, CaBPs are also expressed in the cell nucleus, suggesting that they modulate nuclear calcium signals, which are key regulators of neuronal gene expression. Here we show that the calcium buffering capacity of the cell nucleus in mouse hippocampal neurons regulates neuronal architecture by modulating the expression levels of VEGFD and the complement factor C1q-c, two nuclear calcium-regulated genes that control dendrite geometry and spine density, respectively. Increasing the levels of nuclear calcium buffers by means of expression of a nuclearly targeted form of parvalbumin fused to mCherry (PV.NLS-mC) led to a reduction in VEGFD expression and, as a result, to a decrease in total dendritic length and complexity. In contrast, mRNA levels of the synapse pruning factor C1q-c were increased in neurons expressing PV.NLS-mC, causing a reduction in the density and size of dendritic spines. Our results establish a close link between nuclear calcium buffering capacity and the transcription of genes that determine neuronal structure. They suggest that the development of cognitive deficits observed in neurological conditions associated with CaBP deregulation may reflect the loss of necessary structural features of dendrites and spines. PMID:26231212

  18. Protein-Mediated Precipitation of Calcium Carbonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Izabela Polowczyk

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Calcium carbonate is an important component in exoskeletons of many organisms. The synthesis of calcium carbonate was performed by mixing dimethyl carbonate and an aqueous solution of calcium chloride dihydrate. The precipitation product was characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR measurements. In addition, the turbidity of the reaction solution was acquired to monitor the kinetics of the calcium carbonate structure’s growth in the investigated system. In this study, samples of CaCO3 particles obtained with individual proteins, such as ovalbumin, lysozyme, and a mixture of the proteins, were characterized and compared with a control sample, i.e., synthesized without proteins. The obtained data indicated that the addition of ovalbumin to the reaction changed the morphology of crystals from rhombohedral to ‘stack-like’ structures. Lysozyme, however, did not affect the morphology of calcium carbonate, yet the presence of the protein mixture led to the creation of more complex composites in which the calcium carbonate crystals were constructed in protein matrices formed by the ovalbumin-lysozyme interaction. It was also observed that in the protein mixture, ovalbumin has a major influence on the CaCO3 formation through a strong interaction with calcium ions, which leads to the coalescence and creation of a steric barrier reducing particle growth. The authors proposed a mechanism of calcium carbonate grain growth in the presence of both proteins, taking into account the interaction of calcium ions with the protein.

  19. Protein-Mediated Precipitation of Calcium Carbonate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polowczyk, Izabela; Bastrzyk, Anna; Fiedot, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Calcium carbonate is an important component in exoskeletons of many organisms. The synthesis of calcium carbonate was performed by mixing dimethyl carbonate and an aqueous solution of calcium chloride dihydrate. The precipitation product was characterized by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) measurements. In addition, the turbidity of the reaction solution was acquired to monitor the kinetics of the calcium carbonate structure’s growth in the investigated system. In this study, samples of CaCO3 particles obtained with individual proteins, such as ovalbumin, lysozyme, and a mixture of the proteins, were characterized and compared with a control sample, i.e., synthesized without proteins. The obtained data indicated that the addition of ovalbumin to the reaction changed the morphology of crystals from rhombohedral to ‘stack-like’ structures. Lysozyme, however, did not affect the morphology of calcium carbonate, yet the presence of the protein mixture led to the creation of more complex composites in which the calcium carbonate crystals were constructed in protein matrices formed by the ovalbumin-lysozyme interaction. It was also observed that in the protein mixture, ovalbumin has a major influence on the CaCO3 formation through a strong interaction with calcium ions, which leads to the coalescence and creation of a steric barrier reducing particle growth. The authors proposed a mechanism of calcium carbonate grain growth in the presence of both proteins, taking into account the interaction of calcium ions with the protein. PMID:28774065

  20. A naturally occurring 4-bp deletion in the intron 4 of p53 creates a spectrum of novel p53 isoforms with anti-apoptosis function

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Hui; Tao, Ting; Huang, Delai; Ou, Zhao; Chen, Jun; Peng, Jinrong

    2014-01-01

    p53 functions as a tumor suppressor by transcriptionally regulating the expression of genes involved in controlling cell proliferation or apoptosis. p53 and its isoform ?133p53/?113p53 form a negative regulation loop in that p53 activates the expression of ?133p53/?113p53 while ?133p53/?113p53 specifically antagonizes p53 apoptotic activity. This pathway is especially important to safeguard the process of embryogenesis because sudden activation of p53 by DNA damage signals or developmental st...

  1. Fractional Absorption of Active Absorbable Algal Calcium (AAACa and Calcium Carbonate Measured by a Dual Stable-Isotope Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven A. Abrams

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available With the use of stable isotopes, this study aimed to compare the bioavailability of active absorbable algal calcium (AAACa, obtained from oyster shell powder heated to a high temperature, with an additional heated seaweed component (Heated Algal Ingredient, HAI, with that of calcium carbonate. In 10 postmenopausal women volunteers aged 59 to 77 years (mean ± S.D., 67 ± 5.3, the fractional calcium absorption of AAACa and CaCO3 was measured by a dual stable isotope method. 44Ca-enriched CaCO3 and AAACa were administered in all subjects one month apart. After a fixed-menu breakfast and pre-test urine collection (Urine 0, 42Ca-enriched CaCl2 was intravenously injected, followed by oral administration of 44Ca-enriched CaCO3 without carrier 15 minutes later, and complete urine collection for the next 24 hours (Urine 24. The fractional calcium absorption was calculated as the ratio of Augmentation of 44Ca from Urine 0 to Urine 24/ augmentation of 42Ca from Urine 0 to Urine 24. Differences and changes of 44Ca and 42Ca were corrected by comparing each with 43Ca. Fractional absorption of AAACa (mean ± S.D., 23.1 ± 6.4, was distinctly and significantly higher than that of CaCO3 (14.7 ± 6.4; p = 0.0060 by paired t-test. The mean fractional absorption was approximately 1.57-times higher for AAACa than for CaCO3. The serum 25(OH vitamin D level was low (mean ± S.D., 14.2 ± 4.95 ng/ml, as is common in this age group in Japan. Among the parameters of the bone and mineral metabolism measured, none displayed a significant correlation with the fractional absorption of CaCO3 and AAACa. Higher fractional absorption of AAACa compared with CaCO3 supports previous reports on the more beneficial effect of AAACa than CaCO3 for osteoporosis.

  2. Oncogenicity evaluation of resveratrol in p53(+/-) (p53 knockout) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, T L; Cwik, M J; Morrissey, R L; Kapetanovic, I; Crowell, J A; Booth, T D; McCormick, D L

    2007-01-01

    A six-month study was conducted in p53(+/-) mice to evaluate the possible oncogenicity of resveratrol (3,5,4'-trihydroxy-trans-stilbene), a cancer chemopreventive agent present in grapes and other foods. p53(+/-) mice (25/sex/group) received daily gavage exposure to vehicle only (negative control), resveratrol doses of 1000, 2000, or 4000 mg/kg/day, or p-cresidine (400 mg/kg/day; positive control). No mortality was seen in mice receiving the low dose of resveratrol. However, the mid and high doses induced mortality associated with impaction of the test article in the gastrointestinal tract. Resveratrol had no effect on body weight, food consumption, or clinical signs in surviving mice in any dose group, but induced dose-related increases in liver weight and serum cholesterol in both sexes. Mild anemia was seen in male mice at the high dose only; hematologic effects were not seen in females. Histopathology identified the kidney (hydronephrosis) and urinary bladder (epithelial hyperplasia) as target tissues for resveratrol toxicity. The incidences of both benign and malignant tumors in mice exposed to resveratrol were comparable to those in vehicle controls. By contrast, the positive control article, p-cresidine, induced urinary bladder cancer in both sexes. When administered to p53(+/-) mice at its maximum tolerated dose, resveratrol demonstrates no evidence of oncogenicity.

  3. Calcium Signaling Is Required for Erythroid Enucleation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina B Wölwer

    Full Text Available Although erythroid enucleation, the property of erythroblasts to expel their nucleus, has been known for 7ore than a century, surprisingly little is known regarding the molecular mechanisms governing this unique developmental process. Here we show that similar to cytokinesis, nuclear extrusion requires intracellular calcium signaling and signal transduction through the calmodulin (CaM pathway. However, in contrast to cytokinesis we found that orthochromatic erythroblasts require uptake of extracellular calcium to enucleate. Together these functional studies highlight a critical role for calcium signaling in the regulation of erythroid enucleation.

  4. Coronary artery calcium score: current status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neves, Priscilla Ornellas; Andrade, Joalbo; Monção, Henry

    2017-01-01

    The coronary artery calcium score plays an Important role In cardiovascular risk stratification, showing a significant association with the medium- or long-term occurrence of major cardiovascular events. Here, we discuss the following: protocols for the acquisition and quantification of the coronary artery calcium score by multidetector computed tomography; the role of the coronary artery calcium score in coronary risk stratification and its comparison with other clinical scores; its indications, interpretation, and prognosis in asymptomatic patients; and its use in patients who are symptomatic or have diabetes. PMID:28670030

  5. Blocking of p53-Snail Binding, Promoted by Oncogenic K-Ras, Recovers p53 Expression and function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Hye Lee

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Differentially from other kinds of Ras, oncogenic K-Ras, which is mutated approximately 30% of human cancer, does not induce apoptosis and senescence. Here, we provide the evidence that oncogenic K-Ras abrogates p53 function and expression through induction of Ataxia telangiectasia-mutated and Rad3-related mediated Snail stabilization. Snail directly binds to DNA binding domain of p53 and diminishes the tumor-suppressive function of p53. Thus, elimination of Snail through si-RNA can induce p53 in K-Ras-mutated cells, whereas Snail and mutant K-Ras can suppress p53 in regardless of K-Ras status. Chemicals, isolated from inhibitor screening of p53-Snail binding, can block the Snail-mediated p53 suppression and enhance the expression of p53 as well as the transcriptional activity of p53 in an oncogenic K-Ras-dependent manner. Among the chemicals, two are very similar in structure. These results can answer why K-Ras can coexist with wild type p53 and propose the Snail-p53 binding as the new therapeutic target for K-Ras-mutated cancers including pancreatic, lung, and colon cancers.

  6. Family feud in chemosensitvity: p73 and mutant p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Meredith S

    2004-03-01

    The importance of p53 in chemotherapy-induced apoptosis of cancer cells is well established. p53 plays a critical role in the cellular response to DNA damage by regulating genes involved in cell cycle progression, apoptosis, and genomic stability. As a result, p53 tumor status is a critical determinant of both responses to anti-cancer treatment and clinical prognosis. Interestingly, tumors expressing certain mutant forms of p53 ("gain of function") are particularly resistant to chemotherapy, even when compared to cells that lack any detectable p53. Until recently, the explanation for this enhanced chemoresistance was not clear. Recent studies have shown that the p53 homologues, p73 and p63, are also activated by chemotherapies, leading to tumor cell death. Now the discovery that mutant p53 interacts with p73, and that regulation of this interaction by a p53 polymorphism can modulate chemosensitvity provide a new model for how p53-family interactions can influence the response of tumors to anti-cancer therapies. Since p53 mutations are found in more than 50% of human tumors, strategies aimed at manipulating these interactions may prove useful in enhancing the chemotherapy response, and perhaps, overcoming chemoresistance.

  7. p53: key conductor of all anti-acne therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnik, Bodo C

    2017-09-19

    This review based on translational research predicts that the transcription factor p53 is the key effector of all anti-acne therapies. All-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and isotretinoin (13-cis retinoic acid) enhance p53 expression. Tetracyclines and macrolides via inhibiting p450 enzymes attenuate ATRA degradation, thereby increase p53. Benzoyl peroxide and hydrogen peroxide elicit oxidative stress, which upregulates p53. Azelaic acid leads to mitochondrial damage associated with increased release of reactive oxygen species inducing p53. p53 inhibits the expression of androgen receptor and IGF-1 receptor, and induces the expression of IGF binding protein 3. p53 induces FoxO1, FoxO3, p21 and sestrin 1, sestrin 2, and tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), the key inducer of isotretinoin-mediated sebocyte apoptosis explaining isotretinoin's sebum-suppressive effect. Anti-androgens attenuate the expression of miRNA-125b, a key negative regulator of p53. It can thus be concluded that all anti-acne therapies have a common mode of action, i.e., upregulation of the guardian of the genome p53. Immortalized p53-inactivated sebocyte cultures are unfortunate models for studying acne pathogenesis and treatment.

  8. p53 RNA interactions: new clues in an old mystery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Kasandra J-L; Maher, L James

    2007-11-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor protein is typically considered to be a sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factor. However, reports over the last 15 years have described RNA binding by p53 in a variety of contexts, suggesting the possibility of new p53 functions. It is clear that p53-RNA interactions are mediated by a nucleic acid-binding domain of p53 independent of the sequence-specific core domain responsible for DNA recognition. Reports disagree on several aspects of the putative RNA interaction, including sequence specificity and biological relevance. Here we review the history and recent advances in the study of p53-RNA interactions. We argue that p53-RNA interactions are sequence nonspecific and depend on incomplete post-translational modification of the p53 C-terminal domain when the protein is expressed in heterologous systems. It is unknown what fraction of p53 protein exists in a state competent for RNA binding in vivo. Thus, potential physiological roles of p53-RNA interactions remain mysterious.

  9. Structures of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases reveal mechanism of activation by calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wernimont, Amy K; Artz, Jennifer D.; Jr, Patrick Finerty; Lin, Yu-Hui; Amani, Mehrnaz; Allali-Hassani, Abdellah; Senisterra, Guillermo; Vedadi, Masoud; Tempel, Wolfram; Mackenzie, Farrell; Chau, Irene; Lourido, Sebastian; Sibley, L. David; Hui, Raymond (Toronto); (WU-MED)

    2010-09-21

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) have pivotal roles in the calcium-signaling pathway in plants, ciliates and apicomplexan parasites and comprise a calmodulin-dependent kinase (CaMK)-like kinase domain regulated by a calcium-binding domain in the C terminus. To understand this intramolecular mechanism of activation, we solved the structures of the autoinhibited (apo) and activated (calcium-bound) conformations of CDPKs from the apicomplexan parasites Toxoplasma gondii and Cryptosporidium parvum. In the apo form, the C-terminal CDPK activation domain (CAD) resembles a calmodulin protein with an unexpected long helix in the N terminus that inhibits the kinase domain in the same manner as CaMKII. Calcium binding triggers the reorganization of the CAD into a highly intricate fold, leading to its relocation around the base of the kinase domain to a site remote from the substrate binding site. This large conformational change constitutes a distinct mechanism in calcium signal-transduction pathways.

  10. P53 family members modulate the expression of PRODH, but not PRODH2, via intronic p53 response elements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Raimondi

    Full Text Available The tumor suppressor p53 was previously shown to markedly up-regulate the expression of the PRODH gene, encoding the proline dehydrogenase (PRODH enzyme, which catalyzes the first step in proline degradation. Also PRODH2, which degrades 4-hydroxy-L-proline, a product of protein (e.g. collagen catabolism, was recently described as a p53 target. Here, we confirmed p53-dependent induction of endogenous PRODH in response to genotoxic damage in cell lines of different histological origin. We established that over-expression of TAp73β or TAp63β is sufficient to induce PRODH expression in p53-null cells and that PRODH expression parallels the modulation of endogenous p73 by genotoxic drugs in several cell lines. The p53, p63, and p73-dependent transcriptional activation was linked to specific intronic response elements (REs, among those predicted by bioinformatics tools and experimentally validated by a yeast-based transactivation assay. p53 occupancy measurements were validated in HCT116 and MCF7 human cell lines. Conversely, PRODH2 was not responsive to p63 nor p73 and, at best, could be considered a weak p53 target. In fact, minimal levels of PRODH2 transcript induction by genotoxic stress was observed exclusively in one of four p53 wild-type cell lines tested. Consistently, all predicted p53 REs in PRODH2 were poor matches to the p53 RE consensus and showed very weak responsiveness, only to p53, in the functional assay. Taken together, our results highlight that PRODH, but not PRODH2, expression is under the control of p53 family members, specifically p53 and p73. This supports a deeper link between proteins of the p53-family and metabolic pathways, as PRODH modulates the balance of proline and glutamate levels and those of their derivative alpha-keto-glutarate (α-KG under normal and pathological (tumor conditions.

  11. p53 E3 ubiquitin protein ligase homolog regulates p53 in vivo in the adult mouse eye lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo-Rangel, Gilberto; Ortega-Martínez, Marta; Sepúlveda-Saavedra, Julio; Saucedo-Cárdenas, Odila; Montes-de-Oca-Luna, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Purpose p53 is a transcription factor that plays an important role in preventing cancer development. p53 participates in relevant aspects of cell biology, including apoptosis and cell cycle control and must be strictly regulated to maintain normal tissue homeostasis. p53 E3 ubiquitin protein ligase homolog (Mdm2) is an important negative regulator of p53. The purpose of this study was to determine if Mdm2 regulates p53 in vivo in the adult lens. Methods We analyzed mice expressing human p53 transgene (Tgp53) selectively in the lens in the presence or absence of Mdm2. Mice with the required genotypes were obtained by crossing transgenic, mdm2+/−, and p53−/− mice. Eye phenotype and lens histology and ultrastructure were analyzed in adult mice. Results In a wild-type genetic background (mdm2+/+), lens damage and microphthalmia were observed only in mice homozygous for Tgp53 (t/t). However, in an mdm2 null background, just one allele of Tgp53 (mdm2−/−/Tgp53t/0 mice) was sufficient to cause lens damage and microphthalmia. Furthermore, Mdm2 in only one allele was sufficient to rescue these deleterious effects, since the mdm2+/−/Tgp53t/0 mice had eye size and lens morphology similar to the control mice. Conclusions Mdm2 regulates p53 in the adult lens in vivo. This information may have relevance for analyzing normal and pathological conditions of the lens, and designing cancer therapies targeting Mdm2–p53 interaction. PMID:24339722

  12. NAD+ Modulates p53 DNA Binding Specificity and Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLure, Kevin G.; Takagi, Masatoshi; Kastan, Michael B.

    2004-01-01

    DNA damage induces p53 DNA binding activity, which affects tumorigenesis, tumor responses to therapies, and the toxicities of cancer therapies (B. Vogelstein, D. Lane, and A. J. Levine, Nature 408:307-310, 2000; K. H. Vousden and X. Lu, Nat. Rev. Cancer 2:594-604, 2002). Both transcriptional and transcription-independent activities of p53 contribute to DNA damage-induced cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and aneuploidy prevention (M. B. Kastan et al., Cell 71:587-597, 1992; K. H. Vousden and X. Lu, Nat. Rev. Cancer 2:594-604, 2002). Small-molecule manipulation of p53 DNA binding activity has been an elusive goal, but here we show that NAD+ binds to p53 tetramers, induces a conformational change, and modulates p53 DNA binding specificity in vitro. Niacinamide (vitamin B3) increases the rate of intracellular NAD+ synthesis, alters radiation-induced p53 DNA binding specificity, and modulates activation of a subset of p53 transcriptional targets. These effects are likely due to a direct effect of NAD+ on p53, as a molecule structurally related to part of NAD+, TDP, also inhibits p53 DNA binding, and the TDP precursor, thiamine (vitamin B1), inhibits intracellular p53 activity. Niacinamide and thiamine affect two p53-regulated cellular responses to ionizing radiation: rereplication and apoptosis. Thus, niacinamide and thiamine form a novel basis for the development of small molecules that affect p53 function in vivo, and these results suggest that changes in cellular energy metabolism may regulate p53. PMID:15509798

  13. Analysis of p53- immunoreactivity in astrocytic brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinkarenko T.V.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available P53 is an antioncogene with the frequently occured mutations in human tumor cells, leading to corresponding protein overexpression which can be detected by immunohistochemistry. Researches dedicated to the investigation of possibilities of using this technique gave controversial results. The authors investigated features of p53 protein expression in astrocytic brain tumors with different degrees of malignancy. Analyzed the relationship of the expression level of p53 by tumor cells with clinical parameters and Ki-67 proliferation index (PI as well. Tissues were collected from 52 cases with diagnosed astrocytic brain tumors. The sections were immunohistochemically stained with p53 and Ki-67. For each marker, 1000 tumor cells were counted and the ratio of positive tumor cells was calculated using software package ImageJ 1,47v. In normal brain tissue p53- expression was not identified. p53-immunoreactive tumor cells were detected in 25% (1/4 pilocytic astrocytomas, 33.3% (2/6 of diffuse astrocytomas, 53.8% (7/13 anaplastic astrocytomas, 58.6% (17/29 glioblastomas. A high proportion of p53-immunoreactive cells (> 30% was observed only in glioblastomas. The level of p53-imunoreactivity was not related to the age, gender and Grade WHO (p> 0,05. Spearman correlation coefficient between the relative quantity of ki-67- and p53-immunoreactive nuclei showed weak direct correlation (0.023, but the one was not statistically significant (p> 0,05. The level of p53-imunoreactivity is not dependent from age and sex of patients, Grade (WHO and proliferative activity (p>0,05 but the high level of p53-immunoreactive cells (>30% is found in glioblastoma specimens only, that may be due to the accumulation of mutations in DNA of tumor cells. There is insignificant weak relationship between relative quantities of ki-67- and p53-immunoreactive tumor cells (p>0,05.

  14. Highly Stable Aqueous Zinc-ion Storage Using Layered Calcium Vanadium Oxide Bronze Cathode

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Chuan

    2018-02-12

    Cost-effective aqueous rechargeable batteries are attractive alternatives to non-aqueous cells for stationary grid energy storage. Among different aqueous cells, zinc-ion batteries (ZIBs), based on Zn2+ intercalation chemistry, stand out as they can employ high-capacity Zn metal as anode material. Herein, we report a layered calcium vanadium oxide bronze as cathode material for aqueous Zn batteries. For the storage of Zn2+ ions in aqueous electrolyte, we demonstrate that calcium based bronze structure can deliver a high capacity of 340 mAh g-1 at 0.2 C, good rate capability and very long cycling life (96% retention after 3000 cycles at 80 C). Further, we investigate the Zn2+ storage mechanism, and the corresponding electrochemical kinetics in this bronze cathode. Finally, we show that our Zn cell delivers an energy density of 267 Wh kg-1 at a power density of 53.4 W kg-1.

  15. Calcium absorption from fortified ice cream formulations compared with calcium absorption from milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Hee, Regine M; Miret, Silvia; Slettenaar, Marieke; Duchateau, Guus S M J E; Rietveld, Anton G; Wilkinson, Joy E; Quail, Patricia J; Berry, Mark J; Dainty, Jack R; Teucher, Birgit; Fairweather-Tait, Susan J

    2009-05-01

    Optimal bone mass in early adulthood is achieved through appropriate diet and lifestyle, thereby protecting against osteoporosis and risk of bone fracture in later life. Calcium and vitamin D are essential to build adequate bones, but calcium intakes of many population groups do not meet dietary reference values. In addition, changes in dietary patterns are exacerbating the problem, thereby emphasizing the important role of calcium-rich food products. We have designed a calcium-fortified ice cream formulation that is lower in fat than regular ice cream and could provide a useful source of additional dietary calcium. Calcium absorption from two different ice cream formulations was determined in young adults and compared with milk. Sixteen healthy volunteers (25 to 45 years of age), recruited from the general public of The Netherlands, participated in a randomized, reference-controlled, double-blind cross-over study in which two test products and milk were consumed with a light standard breakfast on three separate occasions: a standard portion of ice cream (60 g) fortified with milk minerals and containing a low level (3%) of butter fat, ice cream (60 g) fortified with milk minerals and containing a typical level (9%) of coconut oil, and reduced-fat milk (1.7% milk fat) (200 mL). Calcium absorption was measured by the dual-label stable isotope technique. Effects on calcium absorption were evaluated by analysis of variance. Fractional absorption of calcium from the 3% butterfat ice cream, 9% coconut oil ice cream, and milk was 26%+/-8%, 28%+/-5%, and 31%+/-9%, respectively, and did not differ significantly (P=0.159). Results indicate that calcium bioavailability in the two calcium-fortified ice cream formulations used in this study is as high as milk, indicating that ice cream may be a good vehicle for delivery of calcium.

  16. Effects of Adding Chymosin to Milk on Calcium Homeostasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ulla Kristine; Jensen, Lars Thorbjørn; Mosekilde, Leif

    2014-01-01

    either chymosin or similar placebo was added. Compared with placebo, chymosin did not affect 24-h urinary calcium, calcium/creatinine ratio, plasma parathyroid hormone, calcitonin or ionized calcium levels. However, during the first 4 h after intake of milk with chymosin, urinary calcium-creatinine ratio...

  17. Does calcium constrain reproductive activity in insectivorous bats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Insects are a poor source of dietary calcium and since they are seasonally abundant, it has been suggested that calcium availability may play a significant role in controlling the timing of reproduction in insectivorous bats. To assess the possible role of dietary calcium, we have measured bone calcium concentrations in ...

  18. Model of intracellular calcium cycling in ventricular myocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiferaw, Y; Watanabe, M A; Garfinkel, A; Weiss, J N; Karma, A

    2003-12-01

    We present a mathematical model of calcium cycling that takes into account the spatially localized nature of release events that correspond to experimentally observed calcium sparks. This model naturally incorporates graded release by making the rate at which calcium sparks are recruited proportional to the whole cell L-type calcium current, with the total release of calcium from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) being just the sum of local releases. The dynamics of calcium cycling is studied by pacing the model with a clamped action potential waveform. Experimentally observed calcium alternans are obtained at high pacing rates. The results show that the underlying mechanism for this phenomenon is a steep nonlinear dependence of the calcium released from the SR on the diastolic SR calcium concentration (SR load) and/or the diastolic calcium level in the cytosol, where the dependence on diastolic calcium is due to calcium-induced inactivation of the L-type calcium current. In addition, the results reveal that the calcium dynamics can become chaotic even though the voltage pacing is periodic. We reduce the equations of the model to a two-dimensional discrete map that relates the SR and cytosolic concentrations at one beat and the previous beat. From this map, we obtain a condition for the onset of calcium alternans in terms of the slopes of the release-versus-SR load and release-versus-diastolic-calcium curves. From an analysis of this map, we also obtain an understanding of the origin of chaotic dynamics.

  19. Vitamin D with calcium reduces mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rejnmark, Lars; Avenell, Alison; Masud, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    Introduction:Vitamin D may affect multiple health outcomes. If so, an effect on mortality is to be expected. Using pooled data from randomized controlled trials, we performed individual patient data (IPD) and trial level meta-analyses to assess mortality among participants randomized to either...... calcium (odds ratio, 0.94; 95% CI, 0.88-0.99), but not with vitamin D alone (odds ratio, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.91-1.06).Conclusion:Vitamin D with calcium reduces mortality in the elderly, whereas available data do not support an effect of vitamin D alone....... vitamin D alone or vitamin D with calcium.Subjects and Methods:Through a systematic literature search, we identified 24 randomized controlled trials reporting data on mortality in which vitamin D was given either alone or with calcium. From a total of 13 trials with more than 1000 participants each, eight...

  20. On p53 revival using system oriented drug dosage design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haseeb, Muhammad; Azam, Shumaila; Bhatti, A I; Azam, Rizwan; Ullah, Mukhtar; Fazal, Sahar

    2017-02-21

    We propose a new paradigm in the drug design for the revival of the p53 pathway in cancer cells. It is shown that the current strategy of using small molecule based Mdm2 inhibitors is not enough to adequately revive p53 in cancerous cells, especially when it comes to the extracting pulsating behavior of p53. This fact has come to notice when a novel method for the drug dosage design is introduced using system oriented concepts. As a test case, small molecule drug Mdm2 repressor Nutlin 3a is considered. The proposed method determines the dose of Nutlin to revive p53 pathway functionality. For this purpose, PBK dynamics of Nutlin have also been integrated with p53 pathway model. The p53 pathway is the focus of researchers for the last thirty years for its pivotal role as a frontline cancer suppressant protein due to its effect on cell cycle checkpoints and cell apoptosis in response to a DNA strand break. That is the reason for finding p53 being absent in more than 50% of tumor cancers. Various drugs have been proposed to revive p53 in cancer cells. Small molecule based drugs are at the foremost and are the subject of advanced clinical trials. The dosage design of these drugs is an important issue. We use control systems concepts to develop the drug dosage so that the cancer cells can be treated in appropriate time. We investigate by using a computational model how p53 protein responds to drug Nutlin 3a, an agent that interferes with the MDM2-mediated p53 regulation. The proposed integrated model describes in some detail the regulation network of p53 including the negative feedback loop mediated by MDM2 and the positive feedback loop mediated by Mdm2 mRNA as well as the reversible represses of MDM2 caused by Nutlin. The reported PBK dynamics of Nutlin 3a are also incorporated to see the full effect. It has been reported that p53 response to stresses in two ways. Either it has a sustained (constant) p53 response, or there are oscillations in p53 concentration. The

  1. p53: an overview of over two decades of study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheah, P L; Looi, L M

    2001-06-01

    p53 is the most commonly mutated gene in human cancers. It encodes a 53 kilodalton protein with several evolutionarily conserved domains viz sequence-specific DNA binding, tetramerisation, SH3 molecule binding, C-terminal and N-terminal. Existing in the cell at a very low level and in a relatively inactive form, p53 protein is increased and activated during periods of cellular stress. Unlike other proteins, the increase in protein level and its activation result from modification of the protein rather than genetic transcriptional or translational upregulation. Normally, Mdm2 protein interacts with p53 protein and effectively targets it for ubiquitin proteolysis within an autoregulatory feedback loop. Phosphorylation at the N-terminus reduces p53 interaction with Mdm2 with a resultant increase in p53 protein level. Modification at the C and N termini via phosphorylation or acetylation upregulates binding to specific DNA targets increasing transcription of these downstream genes. The net effect of p53 protein increase and activation lies in arrest of the cell in cycle which allows time for repair of the incurred damage or apoptosis or death of the cell. Failure of these normal protective and adaptive mechanisms caused by mutation of the p53 gene with product of an abnormal protein, loss of p53 protein through interaction with and degradation by HPV E6 protein or overexpressed Mdm2 etc. permits DNA-damaged cells to continue replicating. Left unchecked, this frequently contributes to tumourigenesis. Various methods have been devised to screen for mutations of the p53 gene, still the most common source of failed p53 mechanism. These include immunohistochemical detection of mutated proteins or identification of altered electrophoretic mobility of mutated p53 sequences. Sequencing of the gene nonetheless remains the most accurate method for determination of mutation. Major advances have been made in p53 research but the most meaningful probably lies in the promising

  2. Calcium Signaling and Cardiac Arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landstrom, Andrew P; Dobrev, Dobromir; Wehrens, Xander H T

    2017-06-09

    There has been a significant progress in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which calcium (Ca2+) ions mediate various types of cardiac arrhythmias. A growing list of inherited gene defects can cause potentially lethal cardiac arrhythmia syndromes, including catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia, congenital long QT syndrome, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. In addition, acquired deficits of multiple Ca2+-handling proteins can contribute to the pathogenesis of arrhythmias in patients with various types of heart disease. In this review article, we will first review the key role of Ca2+ in normal cardiac function-in particular, excitation-contraction coupling and normal electric rhythms. The functional involvement of Ca2+ in distinct arrhythmia mechanisms will be discussed, followed by various inherited arrhythmia syndromes caused by mutations in Ca2+-handling proteins. Finally, we will discuss how changes in the expression of regulation of Ca2+ channels and transporters can cause acquired arrhythmias, and how these mechanisms might be targeted for therapeutic purposes. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Morphological Investigation of Calcium Carbonate during Ammonification-Carbonization Process of Low Concentration Calcium Solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaigang Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrafine calcium carbonate is a widely used cheap additive. The research is conducted in low degree supersaturation solution in order to study the polymorphic phases’ change and its factors of the calcium carbonate precipitate in the ammonification-carbonization process of the solution with calcium. Fine particles of calcium carbonate are made in the solution containing 0.015 mol/L of Ca2+. Over 98% of the calcium carbonate precipitate without ammonification resembles the morphology of calcite, while the introduction of ammonia can benefit the formation of vaterite. It was inferred that the main cause should be serious partial oversaturation or steric effects. Ammonia also helps to form the twin spherical calcium carbonate. However, particles formed in the process of ammonification-carbonization in solution with low concentration degree of calcium are not even with a scale of the particle diameter from 5 to 12 μm. Inorganic salts, alcohol, or organic acid salts have significant controlling effect on the particle diameter of calcium carbonate and can help to decrease the particle diameter to about 3 μm. Anionic surfactants can prevent the conglobation of calcium carbonate particles and shrink its diameter to 500 nm–1 μm.

  4. Calcium-induced calcium release supports recruitment of synaptic vesicles in auditory hair cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano-Muñoz, Manuel; Schnee, Michael E; Ricci, Anthony J

    2016-01-01

    Hair cells from auditory and vestibular systems transmit continuous sound and balance information to the central nervous system through the release of synaptic vesicles at ribbon synapses. The high activity experienced by hair cells requires a unique mechanism to sustain recruitment and replenishment of synaptic vesicles for continuous release. Using pre- and postsynaptic electrophysiological recordings, we explored the potential contribution of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) in modulating the recruitment of vesicles to auditory hair cell ribbon synapses. Pharmacological manipulation of CICR with agents targeting endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores reduced both spontaneous postsynaptic multiunit activity and the frequency of excitatory postsynaptic currents (EPSCs). Pharmacological treatments had no effect on hair cell resting potential or activation curves for calcium and potassium channels. However, these drugs exerted a reduction in vesicle release measured by dual-sine capacitance methods. In addition, calcium substitution by barium reduced release efficacy by delaying release onset and diminishing vesicle recruitment. Together these results demonstrate a role for calcium stores in hair cell ribbon synaptic transmission and suggest a novel contribution of CICR in hair cell vesicle recruitment. We hypothesize that calcium entry via calcium channels is tightly regulated to control timing of vesicle fusion at the synapse, whereas CICR is used to maintain a tonic calcium signal to modulate vesicle trafficking. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Fractal aspects of calcium binding protein structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isvoran, Adriana [West University of Timisoara, Department of Chemistry, Pestalozzi 16, 300115 Timisoara (Romania)], E-mail: aisvoran@cbg.uvt.ro; Pitulice, Laura [West University of Timisoara, Department of Chemistry, Pestalozzi 16, 300115 Timisoara (Romania); Craescu, Constantin T. [INSERM U759/Institute Curie-Recherche, Centre Universitaire Paris-Sud, Batiment 112, 91405 Orsay (France); Chiriac, Adrian [West University of Timisoara, Department of Chemistry, Pestalozzi 16, 300115 Timisoara (Romania)

    2008-03-15

    The structures of EF-hand calcium binding proteins may be classified into two distinct groups: extended and compact structures. In this paper we studied 20 different structures of calcium binding proteins using the fractal analysis. Nine structures show extended shapes, one is semi-compact and the other 10 have compact shapes. Our study reveals different fractal characteristics for protein backbones belonging to different structural classes and these observations may be correlated to the physicochemical forces governing the protein folding.

  6. Understanding calcium dynamics experiments and theory

    CERN Document Server

    Malchow, Dieter

    2003-01-01

    Intracellular Calcium is an important messenger in living cells. Calcium dynamics display complex temporal and spatial structures created by the concentration patterns which are characteristic for a nonlinear system operating far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Written as a set of tutorial reviews on both experimental facts and theoretical modelling, this volume is intended as an introduction and modern reference in the field for graduate students and researchers in biophysics, biochemistry and applied mathematics.

  7. Senescence and aging: the critical roles of p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rufini, A; Tucci, P; Celardo, I; Melino, G

    2013-10-24

    p53 functions as a transcription factor involved in cell-cycle control, DNA repair, apoptosis and cellular stress responses. However, besides inducing cell growth arrest and apoptosis, p53 activation also modulates cellular senescence and organismal aging. Senescence is an irreversible cell-cycle arrest that has a crucial role both in aging and as a robust physiological antitumor response, which counteracts oncogenic insults. Therefore, via the regulation of senescence, p53 contributes to tumor growth suppression, in a manner strictly dependent by its expression and cellular context. In this review, we focus on the recent advances on the contribution of p53 to cellular senescence and its implication for cancer therapy, and we will discuss p53's impact on animal lifespan. Moreover, we describe p53-mediated regulation of several physiological pathways that could mediate its role in both senescence and aging.

  8. Analytical models of calcium binding in a calcium channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jinn-Liang [Department of Applied Mathematics, National Hsinchu University of Education, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Eisenberg, Bob [Department of Molecular Biophysics and Physiology, Rush University, Chicago, Illinois 60612 (United States)

    2014-08-21

    The anomalous mole fraction effect of L-type calcium channels is analyzed using a Fermi like distribution with the experimental data of Almers and McCleskey [J. Physiol. 353, 585 (1984)] and the atomic resolution model of Lipkind and Fozzard [Biochemistry 40, 6786 (2001)] of the selectivity filter of the channel. Much of the analysis is algebraic, independent of differential equations. The Fermi distribution is derived from the configuration entropy of ions and water molecules with different sizes, different valences, and interstitial voids between particles. It allows us to calculate potentials and distances (between the binding ion and the oxygen ions of the glutamate side chains) directly from the experimental data using algebraic formulas. The spatial resolution of these results is comparable with those of molecular models, but of course the accuracy is no better than that implied by the experimental data. The glutamate side chains in our model are flexible enough to accommodate different types of binding ions in different bath conditions. The binding curves of Na{sup +} and Ca{sup 2+} for [CaCl{sub 2}] ranging from 10{sup −8} to 10{sup −2} M with a fixed 32 mM background [NaCl] are shown to agree with published Monte Carlo simulations. The Poisson-Fermi differential equation—that includes both steric and correlation effects—is then used to obtain the spatial profiles of energy, concentration, and dielectric coefficient from the solvent region to the filter. The energy profiles of ions are shown to depend sensitively on the steric energy that is not taken into account in the classical rate theory. We improve the rate theory by introducing a steric energy that lumps the effects of excluded volumes of all ions and water molecules and empty spaces between particles created by Lennard-Jones type and electrostatic forces. We show that the energy landscape varies significantly with bath concentrations. The energy landscape is not constant.

  9. Contribution of calcium oxalate to soil-exchangeable calcium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauer, Jenny M.; Perakis, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    Acid deposition and repeated biomass harvest have decreased soil calcium (Ca) availability in many temperate forests worldwide, yet existing methods for assessing available soil Ca do not fully characterize soil Ca forms. To account for discrepancies in ecosystem Ca budgets, it has been hypothesized that the highly insoluble biomineral Ca oxalate might represent an additional soil Ca pool that is not detected in standard measures of soil-exchangeable Ca. We asked whether several standard method extractants for soil-exchangeable Ca could also access Ca held in Ca oxalate crystals using spike recovery tests in both pure solutions and soil extractions. In solutions of the extractants ammonium chloride, ammonium acetate, and barium chloride, we observed 2% to 104% dissolution of Ca oxalate crystals, with dissolution increasing with both solution molarity and ionic potential of cation extractant. In spike recovery tests using a low-Ca soil, we estimate that 1 M ammonium acetate extraction dissolved sufficient Ca oxalate to contribute an additional 52% to standard measurements of soil-exchangeable Ca. However, in a high-Ca soil, the amount of Ca oxalate spike that would dissolve in 1 M ammonium acetate extraction was difficult to detect against the large pool of exchangeable Ca. We conclude that Ca oxalate can contribute substantially to standard estimates of soil-exchangeable Ca in acid forest soils with low soil-exchangeable Ca. Consequently, measures of exchangeable Ca are unlikely to fully resolve discrepancies in ecosystem Ca mass balance unless the contribution of Ca oxalate to exchangeable Ca is also assessed.

  10. Self-Setting Calcium Orthophosphate Formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorozhkin, Sergey V.

    2013-01-01

    In early 1980s, researchers discovered self-setting calcium orthophosphate cements, which are bioactive and biodegradable grafting bioceramics in the form of a powder and a liquid. After mixing, both phases form pastes, which set and harden forming either a non-stoichiometric calcium deficient hydroxyapatite or brushite. Since both of them are remarkably biocompartible, bioresorbable and osteoconductive, self-setting calcium orthophosphate formulations appear to be promising bioceramics for bone grafting. Furthermore, such formulations possess excellent molding capabilities, easy manipulation and nearly perfect adaptation to the complex shapes of bone defects, followed by gradual bioresorption and new bone formation. In addition, reinforced formulations have been introduced, which might be described as calcium orthophosphate concretes. The discovery of self-setting properties opened up a new era in the medical application of calcium orthophosphates and many commercial trademarks have been introduced as a result. Currently such formulations are widely used as synthetic bone grafts, with several advantages, such as pourability and injectability. Moreover, their low-temperature setting reactions and intrinsic porosity allow loading by drugs, biomolecules and even cells for tissue engineering purposes. In this review, an insight into the self-setting calcium orthophosphate formulations, as excellent bioceramics suitable for both dental and bone grafting applications, has been provided. PMID:24956191

  11. Calcium signaling in human pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apáti, Ágota; Berecz, Tünde; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2016-03-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells provide new tools for developmental and pharmacological studies as well as for regenerative medicine applications. Calcium homeostasis and ligand-dependent calcium signaling are key components of major cellular responses, including cell proliferation, differentiation or apoptosis. Interestingly, these phenomena have not been characterized in detail as yet in pluripotent human cell sates. Here we review the methods applicable for studying both short- and long-term calcium responses, focusing on the expression of fluorescent calcium indicator proteins and imaging methods as applied in pluripotent human stem cells. We discuss the potential regulatory pathways involving calcium responses in hPS cells and compare these to the implicated pathways in mouse PS cells. A recent development in the stem cell field is the recognition of so called "naïve" states, resembling the earliest potential forms of stem cells during development, as well as the "fuzzy" stem cells, which may be alternative forms of pluripotent cell types, therefore we also discuss the potential role of calcium homeostasis in these PS cell types. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. "Super p53" mice display retinal astroglial changes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan J Salazar

    Full Text Available Tumour-suppressor genes, such as the p53 gene, produce proteins that inhibit cell division under adverse conditions, as in the case of DNA damage, radiation, hypoxia, or oxidative stress (OS. The p53 gene can arrest proliferation and trigger death by apoptosis subsequent to several factors. In astrocytes, p53 promotes cell-cycle arrest and is involved in oxidative stress-mediated astrocyte cell death. Increasingly, astrocytic p53 is proving fundamental in orchestrating neurodegenerative disease pathogenesis. In terms of ocular disease, p53 may play a role in hypoxia due to ischaemia and may be involved in the retinal response to oxidative stress (OS. We studied the influence of the p53 gene in the structural and quantitative characteristics of astrocytes in the retina. Adult mice of the C57BL/6 strain (12 months old were distributed into two groups: 1 mice with two extra copies of p53 ("super p53"; n = 6 and 2 wild-type p53 age-matched control, as the control group (WT; n = 6. Retinas from each group were immunohistochemically processed to locate the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. GFAP+ astrocytes were manually counted and the mean area occupied for one astrocyte was quantified. Retinal-astrocyte distribution followed established patterns; however, morphological changes were seen through the retinas in relation to p53 availability. The mean GFAP+ area occupied by one astrocyte in "super p53" eyes was significantly higher (p<0.05; Student's t-test than in the WT. In addition, astroglial density was significantly higher in the "super p53" retinas than in the WT ones, both in the whole-retina (p<0,01 Student's t-test and in the intermediate and peripheral concentric areas of the retina (p<0.05 Student's t-test. This fact might improve the resistance of the retinal cells against OS and its downstream signalling pathways.

  13. TRIM65 negatively regulates p53 through ubiquitination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yang [Department of Respiration, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Ma, Chengyuan [Department of Neurosurgery, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Zhou, Tong [Department of Endocrinology, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Liu, Ying [Department of Respiration, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Sun, Luyao [Department of Infectious Diseases, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Yu, Zhenxiang, E-mail: zhenxiangyu2015@gmail.com [Department of Respiration, The First Hospital of Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China)

    2016-04-22

    Tripartite-motif protein family member 65 (TRIM65) is an important protein involved in white matter lesion. However, the role of TRIM65 in human cancer remains less understood. Through the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) gene alteration database, we found that TRIM65 is upregulated in a significant portion of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients. Our cell growth assay revealed that TRIM65 overexpression promotes cell proliferation, while knockdown of TRIM65 displays opposite effect. Mechanistically, TRIM65 binds to p53, one of the most critical tumor suppressors, and serves as an E3 ligase toward p53. Consequently, TRIM65 inactivates p53 through facilitating p53 poly-ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation. Notably, chemotherapeutic reagent cisplatin induction of p53 is markedly attenuated in response to ectopic expression of TRIM65. Cell growth inhibition by TRIM65 knockdown is more significant in p53 positive H460 than p53 negative H1299 cells, and knockdown of p53 in H460 cells also shows compromised cell growth inhibition by TRIM65 knockdown, indicating that p53 is required, at least in part, for TRIM65 function. Our findings demonstrate TRIM65 as a potential oncogenic protein, highly likely through p53 inactivation, and provide insight into development of novel approaches targeting TRIM65 for NSCLC treatment, and also overcoming chemotherapy resistance. - Highlights: • TRIM65 expression is elevated in NSCLC. • TRIM65 inactivates p53 through mediating p53 ubiquitination and degradation. • TRIM65 attenuates the response of NSCLC cells to cisplatin.

  14. TP53 Mutation and Its Prognostic Significance in Waldenstrom's Macroglobulinemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulain, Stéphanie; Roumier, Christophe; Bertrand, Elisabeth; Renneville, Aline; Caillault-Venet, Aurélie; Doye, Emmanuelle; Geffroy, Sandrine; Sebda, Sheherazade; Nibourel, Olivier; Nudel, Morgane; Herbaux, Charles; Renaud, Loic; Tomowiak, Cécile; Guidez, Stéphanie; Tricot, Sabine; Roche-Lestienne, Catherine; Quesnel, Bruno; Preudhomme, Claude; Leleu, Xavier

    2017-10-15

    Purpose:TP53 is a tumor-suppressor gene that functions as a regulator influencing cellular responses to DNA damage, and TP53 alterations are associated with pejorative outcome in most B-lymphoid disorders. Little is known regarding TP53 alteration in Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia (WM).Experimental Design: Here, we have explored the incidence of TP53 alteration using Sanger sequencing and ultradeep-targeted sequencing in 125 WM and 10 immunoglobulin M (IgM) monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), along with the clinical features and the associated genomic landscape using single-nucleotide polymorphism array and mutational landscape in an integrative study.Results: Overall, we have identified alteration of TP53 locus including mutation, deletion, and copy-neutral LOH in 11.2% of WM. TP53 mutation was acquired in 7.3% of patients with WM at diagnosis, being absent in IgM MGUS, and was highly correlated to deletion 17p. No correlation with CXCR4 mutations was observed. Patients with TP53 alteration had a greater number of genomic abnormalities. Importantly, WM with TP53 alteration had a significantly shorter overall survival, particularly in symptomatic WM, and independently of the international prognostic scoring system for Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (IPSSWM) score. Specific treatment for WM with TP53 may have to be studied. Nutlin-3a-targeted p53 signaling induced cytotoxicity preclinically, along with new compounds such as ibrutinib, PrimaMet, or CP31398 that bypass p53 pathway in WM, paving the path for future treatment-tailored options.Conclusions: Our results highlight the clinical significance of detection of TP53 alteration in WM to determine the prognosis of WM and guide the treatment choice. Clin Cancer Res; 23(20); 6325-35. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  15. Wild-type alternatively spliced p53: binding to DNA and interaction with the major p53 protein in vitro and in cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Y.; Liu, Y; L. Lee; Miner, Z; Kulesz-Martin, M

    1994-01-01

    A p53 variant protein (p53as) generated from alternatively spliced p53 RNA is expressed in normal and malignant mouse cells and tissues, and p53as antigen activity is preferentially associated with the G2 phase of the cell cycle, suggesting that p53as and p53 protein may have distinct properties. Using p53as and p53 proteins translated in vitro, we now provide evidence that p53as protein has efficient sequence-specific DNA-binding ability. DNA binding by p53 protein is inefficient in comparis...

  16. High speed two-photon imaging of calcium dynamics in dendritic spines: consequences for spine calcium kinetics and buffer capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cornelisse, L.N.; van Elburg, R.A.J.; Meredith, R.M.; Yuste, R.; Mansvelder, H.D.

    2007-01-01

    Rapid calcium concentration changes in postsynaptic structures are crucial for synaptic plasticity. Thus far, the determinants of postsynaptic calcium dynamics have been studied predominantly based on the decay kinetics of calcium transients. Calcium rise times in spines in response to single action

  17. High Speed Two-Photon Imaging of Calcium Dynamics in Dendritic Spines: : Consequences for Spine Calcium Kinetics and Buffer Capacity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Elburg, R.A.J.; Cornelisse, L.N; Meredith, R.M; Yuste, R; Mansvelder, H.D

    2007-01-01

    Rapid calcium concentration changes in postsynaptic structures are crucial for synaptic plasticity. Thus far, the determinants of postsynaptic calcium dynamics have been studied predominantly based on the decay kinetics of calcium transients. Calcium rise times in spines in response to single action

  18. Oral calcium carbonate affects calcium but not phosphorus balance in stage 3-4 chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Kathleen M; Martin, Berdine R; Wastney, Meryl E; McCabe, George P; Moe, Sharon M; Weaver, Connie M; Peacock, Munro

    2013-05-01

    Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are given calcium carbonate to bind dietary phosphorus, reduce phosphorus retention, and prevent negative calcium balance; however, data are limited on calcium and phosphorus balance during CKD to support this. Here, we studied eight patients with stage 3 or 4 CKD (mean estimated glomerular filtration rate 36 ml/min) who received a controlled diet with or without a calcium carbonate supplement (1500 mg/day calcium) during two 3-week balance periods in a randomized placebo-controlled cross-over design. All feces and urine were collected during weeks 2 and 3 of each balance period and fasting blood, and urine was collected at baseline and at the end of each week. Calcium kinetics were determined using oral and intravenous (45)calcium. Patients were found to be in neutral calcium and phosphorus balance while on the placebo. Calcium carbonate supplementation produced positive calcium balance, did not affect phosphorus balance, and produced only a modest reduction in urine phosphorus excretion compared with placebo. Calcium kinetics demonstrated positive net bone balance but less than overall calcium balance, suggesting soft-tissue deposition. Fasting blood and urine biochemistries of calcium and phosphate homeostasis were unaffected by calcium carbonate. Thus, the positive calcium balance produced by calcium carbonate treatment within 3 weeks cautions against its use as a phosphate binder in patients with stage 3 or 4 CKD, if these findings can be extrapolated to long-term therapy.

  19. Battle Against Cancer: An Everlasting Saga of p53

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qian Hao

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is one of the most life-threatening diseases characterized by uncontrolled growth and spread of malignant cells. The tumor suppressor p53 is the master regulator of tumor cell growth and proliferation. In response to various stress signals, p53 can be activated and transcriptionally induces a myriad of target genes, including both protein-encoding and non-coding genes, controlling cell cycle progression, DNA repair, senescence, apoptosis, autophagy and metabolism of tumor cells. However, around 50% of human cancers harbor mutant p53 and, in the majority of the remaining cancers, p53 is inactivated through multiple mechanisms. Herein, we review the recent progress in understanding the molecular basis of p53 signaling, particularly the newly identified ribosomal stress—p53 pathway, and the development of chemotherapeutics via activating wild-type p53 or restoring mutant p53 functions in cancer. A full understanding of p53 regulation will aid the development of effective cancer treatments.

  20. Evolution of the p53-MDM2 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Åberg, Emma; Saccoccia, Fulvio; Grabherr, Manfred; Ore, Wai Ying Josefin; Jemth, Per; Hultqvist, Greta

    2017-08-03

    The p53 signalling pathway, which controls cell fate, has been extensively studied due to its prominent role in tumor development. The pathway includes the tumor supressor protein p53, its vertebrate paralogs p63 and p73, and their negative regulators MDM2 and MDM4. The p53/p63/p73-MDM system is ancient and can be traced in all extant animal phyla. Despite this, correct phylogenetic trees including both vertebrate and invertebrate species of the p53/p63/p73 and MDM families have not been published. Here, we have examined the evolution of the p53/p63/p73 protein family with particular focus on the p53/p63/p73 transactivation domain (TAD) and its co-evolution with the p53/p63/p73-binding domain (p53/p63/p73BD) of MDM2. We found that the TAD and p53/p63/p73BD share a strong evolutionary connection. If one of the domains of the protein is lost in a phylum, then it seems very likely to be followed by loss of function by the other domain as well, and due to the loss of function it is likely to eventually disappear. By focusing our phylogenetic analysis to p53/p63/p73 and MDM proteins from phyla that retain the interaction domains TAD and p53/p63/p73BD, we built phylogenetic trees of p53/p63/p73 and MDM based on both vertebrate and invertebrate species. The trees follow species evolution and contain a total number of 183 and 98 species for p53/p63/p73 and MDM, respectively. We also demonstrate that the p53/p63/p73 and MDM families result from whole genome duplications. The signaling pathway of the TAD and p53/p63/p73BD in p53/p63/p73 and MDM, respectively, dates back to early metazoan time and has since then tightly co-evolved, or disappeared in distinct lineages.

  1. Super p53 for Treatment of Ovarian Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-15-1-0036 TITLE: Super p53 for Treatment of Ovarian Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Carol S. Lim University of Utah...Super p53 for Treatment of Ovarian Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0036 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Carol S. Lim...ABSTRACT In this final report, we show gene therapy using re-engineered super p53 (p53-CC constructs) kills some ovarian cancer cell lines in vitro

  2. NQO1 stabilizes p53 through a distinct pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Asher, Gad; Lotem, Joseph; Kama, Rachel; Sachs, Leo; Shaul, Yosef

    2002-01-01

    Wild-type p53 is a tumor-suppressor gene that encodes a short-lived protein that, upon accumulation, induces growth arrest or apoptosis. Accumulation of p53 occurs mainly by posttranslational events that inhibit its proteosomal degradation. We have reported previously that inhibition of NAD(P)H: quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) activity by dicoumarol induces degradation of p53, indicating that NQO1 plays a role in p53 stabilization. We now have found that wild-type NQO1, but not the inactive p...

  3. Tobacco, alcohol, and p53 overexpression in early colorectal neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansukhani Mahesh

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The p53 tumor suppressor gene is commonly mutated in colorectal cancer. While the effect of p53 mutations on colorectal cancer prognosis has been heavily studied, less is known about how epidemiologic risk factors relate to p53 status, particularly in early colorectal neoplasia prior to clinically invasive colorectal cancer (including adenomas, carcinoma in situ (CIS, and intramucosal carcinoma. Methods We examined p53 status, as measured by protein overexpression, in 157 cases with early colorectal neoplasia selected from three New York City colonoscopy clinics. After collecting paraffin-embedded tissue blocks, immunohistochemistry was performed using an anti-p53 monoclonal mouse IgG2a [BP53-12-1] antibody. We analyzed whether p53 status was different for risk factors for colorectal neoplasia relative to a polyp-free control group (n = 508. Results p53 overexpression was found in 10.3%, 21.7%, and 34.9%, of adenomatous polyps, CIS, and intramucosal cases, respectively. Over 90% of the tumors with p53 overexpression were located in the distal colon and rectum. Heavy cigarette smoking (30+ years was associated with cases not overexpressing p53 (OR = 1.8, 95% CI = 1.1–2.9 but not with those cases overexpressing p53 (OR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.4–2.6. Heavy beer consumption (8+ bottles per week was associated with cases overexpressing p53 (OR = 4.0, 95% CI = 1.3–12.0 but not with cases without p53 overexpression (OR = 1.6, 95% CI = 0.7–3.7. Conclusion Our findings that p53 overexpression in early colorectal neoplasia may be positively associated with alcohol intake and inversely associated with cigarette smoking are consistent with those of several studies of p53 expression and invasive cancer, and suggest that there may be relationships of smoking and alcohol with p53 early in the adenoma to carcinoma sequence.

  4. Expression of Androgen Receptor Is Negatively Regulated By p53

    OpenAIRE

    Fatouma Alimirah; Ravichandran Panchanathan; Jianming Chen; Xiang Zhang; Shuk-Mei Ho; Divaker Choubey

    2007-01-01

    Increased expression of androgen receptor (AR) in prostate cancer (PC) is associated with transition to androgen independence. Because the progression of PC to advanced stages is often associated with the loss of p53 function, we tested whether the p53 could regulate the expression of AR gene. Here we report that p53 negatively regulates the expression of AR in prostate epithelial cells (PrECs). We found that in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells that express the wild-type p53 and AR and in hu...

  5. The influence of environmental calcium concentrations on calcium flux, compensatory drinking and epithelial calcium channel expression in a freshwater cartilaginous fish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Peter J; Weihrauch, Dirk; Grandmaison, Vanessa; Dasiewicz, Patricia; Peake, Stephan J; Anderson, W Gary

    2011-03-15

    Calcium metabolism and mRNA levels of the epithelial calcium channel (ECaC) were examined in a freshwater cartilaginous fish, the lake sturgeon Acipenser fulvescens. Lake sturgeon were acclimated for ≥2 weeks to 0.1 (low), 0.4 (normal) or 3.3 (high) mmol l(-1) environmental calcium. Whole-body calcium flux was examined using (45)Ca as a radioactive marker. Net calcium flux was inward in all treatment groups; however, calcium influx was greatest in the low calcium environment and lowest in the high calcium environment, whereas efflux had the opposite relationship. A significant difference in the concentration of (45)Ca in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of fish in the low calcium environment led to the examination of drinking rate and calcium flux across the anterior-middle (mid) intestine. Drinking rate was not different between treatments; however, calcium influx across the mid-intestine in the low calcium treatment was significantly greater than that in both the normal and high calcium treatments. The lake sturgeon ECaC was 2831 bp in length, with a predicted protein sequence of 683 amino acids that shared a 66% identity with the closest sequenced ECaCs from the vertebrate phyla. ECaC mRNA levels were examined in the gills, kidney, pyloric caeca, mid-intestine and spiral intestine. Expression levels were highest in the gills, then the kidneys, and were orders of magnitude lower in the GIT. Contrary to existing models for calcium uptake in the teleost gill, ECaC expression was greatest in high calcium conditions and kidney ECaC expression was lowest in low calcium conditions, suggesting that cellular transport mechanisms for calcium may be distinctly different in these freshwater cartilaginous fishes.

  6. Acute effects of calcium carbonate, calcium citrate and potassium citrate on markers of calcium and bone metabolism in young women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Heini J; Ketola, Maarit E; Lamberg-Allardt, Christel J E

    2009-11-01

    Both K and Ca supplementation may have beneficial effects on bone through separate mechanisms. K in the form of citrate or bicarbonate affects bone by neutralising the acid load caused by a high protein intake or a low intake of alkalising foods, i.e. fruits and vegetables. Ca is known to decrease serum parathyroid hormone (S-PTH) concentration and bone resorption. We compared the effects of calcium carbonate, calcium citrate and potassium citrate on markers of Ca and bone metabolism in young women. Twelve healthy women aged 22-30 years were randomised into four controlled 24 h study sessions, each subject serving as her own control. At the beginning of each session, subjects received a single dose of calcium carbonate, calcium citrate, potassium citrate or a placebo in randomised order. The diet during each session was identical, containing 300 mg Ca. Both the calcium carbonate and calcium citrate supplement contained 1000 mg Ca; the potassium citrate supplement contained 2250 mg K. Markers of Ca and bone metabolism were followed. Potassium citrate decreased the bone resorption marker (N-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen) and increased Ca retention relative to the control session. Both Ca supplements decreased S-PTH concentration. Ca supplements also decreased bone resorption relative to the control session, but this was significant only for calcium carbonate. No differences in bone formation marker (bone-specific alkaline phosphatase) were seen among the study sessions. The results suggest that potassium citrate has a positive effect on the resorption marker despite low Ca intake. Both Ca supplements were absorbed well and decreased S-PTH efficiently.

  7. Rbm24, a target of p53, is necessary for proper expression of p53 and heart development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Min; Zhang, Yanhong; Xu, Enshun; Mohibi, Shakur; de Anda, Danielle Michelle; Jiang, Yuqian; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Xinbin

    2018-01-22

    Activation of p53-dependent apoptosis is critical for tumor suppression but aberrant activation of p53 also leads to developmental defects and heart failure. Here, we found that Rbm24 RNA-binding protein, a target of p53, regulates p53 mRNA translation. Mechanistically, we found that through binding to p53 mRNA and interaction with translation initiation factor eIF4E, Rbm24 prevents eIF4E from binding to p53 mRNA and inhibits the assembly of translation initiation complex. Importantly, we showed that mice deficient in Rbm24 die in utero due to the endocardial cushion defect in the heart at least in part due to aberrant activation of p53-dependent apoptosis. We also showed that the heart developmental defect in Rbm24-null mice can be partially rescued by p53 deficiency through decreased apoptosis in the heart. Together, we postulate that the p53-Rbm24 loop is critical for the heart development and may be explored for mitigating congenital heart diseases and heart failure.

  8. Restoration of p53 using the novel MDM2-p53 antagonist APG115 suppresses dedifferentiated papillary thyroid cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haibo; Luo, Dingyuan; Zhang, Lin; Lin, Xiaofeng; Luo, Qiuyun; Yi, Hanjie; Wang, Jing; Yan, Xianglei; Li, Baoxia; Chen, Yuelei; Liu, Xingguang; Zhang, Hong; Liu, Sheng; Qiu, Miaozhen; Yang, Dajun; Jiang, Ningyi

    2017-06-27

    Dedifferentiated papillary thyroid cancer (DePTC) is characterized by aggressive growth, recurrence, distant metastasis, and resistance to radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy. DePTC is also accompanied by poor prognosis and high early-mortality. Nevertheless, most DePTC cells show intact p53 downstream functionality. In cells with wild-type p53, the murine double minute2 (MDM2) protein interacts with p53 and abrogates its activity. Inhibition of the MDM2-p53 interaction restores p53 activity and leads to cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Restoring p53 function by inhibiting its interaction with p53 suppressors such as MDM2 is thus a promising therapeutic strategy for the treatment of DePTC. The novel MDM2-p53 interaction antagonist APG115 is an analogue of SAR405838, and is being tested in a phase I clinical trial. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of APG115 as a single-agent to treat DePTC. APG115 diminished the viability of p53 wild-type DePTC cells and induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. In a human xenograft mouse model, APG115 elicited robust tumor regression and cell apoptosis. These data demonstrate that further research is warranted to determine whether APG115 can be used to effectively treat DePTC patients.

  9. Macroporous calcium phosphate glass-ceramic prepared by two-step pressing technique and using sucrose as a pore former.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Cong; Kasuga, Toshihiro; Nogami, Masayuki

    2005-08-01

    Macroporous calcium phosphate glass-ceramic with an initial glass composition of 60CaO.30P2O5.3TiO2.7Na2O in mol% was successfully prepared by sintering the mixture compact consisting of calcium phosphate glass and sucrose powders, which was formed using a two-step pressing technique. After burning off the sucrose phase, a 3D interconnected macroporous structure was formed in the sintered body, in which the skeleton consisting of the calcium phosphate glass-ceramic (including beta-calcium pyrophosphate and beta-tricalcium phosphate as the crystalline phases) was transformed from the initial glass during the sintering. The macropores with several hundred microns in diameter and the large interconnection size (approximately 100 microm), which result from the controllably large-sized sucrose particles and the hot-pressing at a little higher temperature than the sucrose's melting point, are believed to meet the requirements for cell adhesion and bone tissue regeneration well. Moreover, in vitro dissolution behavior study indicates that the calcium phosphate glass-ceramic is soluble to an acetic acid solution of pH 5-7. These, together with the simplicity and feasibility of the innovative fabrication method itself, show that the formed porous glass-ceramic has a promising potential for application to a scaffold for bone tissue engineering.

  10. Association between low bone mass and calcium and caffeine intake among perimenopausal women in Southern Brazil: cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harter, Daniele Lazzarotto; Busnello, Fernanda Michielin; Dibi, Raquel Papandreus; Stein, Airton Tetelbom; Kato, Sérgio Kakuta; Vanin, Carla Maria De Martini

    2013-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a skeletal abnormality characterized by reduction and alteration of bone microarchitecture that results in increased fragility and greater predisposition to fractures. Age and low bone mass are the main non-modifiable risk factors for osteoporotic fractures. The modifiable factors include sedentary lifestyle, inadequate calcium intake, excessive alcohol and/or caffeine consumption, smoking and low body weight. The aim here was to evaluate the association between low bone mass and calcium and caffeine intake among perimenopausal women in Southern Brazil. Cross-sectional study conducted in Porto Alegre and Canoas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. Women (n = 155) of mean age 53.6 ± 9.5 years were evaluated through a cross-sectional study in Southern Brazil. Food frequency questionnaires, bone mass evaluation using calcaneal ultrasound and anthropometric assessment were used. The prevalence of overweight was 67.7%. In the bone mass screening, 30.3% had low bone mass and 4.5% had osteoporosis. The median calcium intake was 574.94 mg/day and the caffeine intake was 108.11 mg/day. No association was found between bone mass and anthropometric parameters, calcium intake or caffeine intake. It was found that 38.4% of the women had low bone mass. No association was found between calcium and caffeine intake and bone mass. High prevalence of low bone mass was observed.

  11. Association between low bone mass and calcium and caffeine intake among perimenopausal women in Southern Brazil: cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniele Lazzarotto Harter

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Osteoporosis is a skeletal abnormality characterized by reduction and alteration of bone microarchitecture that results in increased fragility and greater predisposition to fractures. Age and low bone mass are the main non-modifiable risk factors for osteoporotic fractures. The modifiable factors include sedentary lifestyle, inadequate calcium intake, excessive alcohol and/or caffeine consumption, smoking and low body weight. The aim here was to evaluate the association between low bone mass and calcium and caffeine intake among perimenopausal women in Southern Brazil. DESIGN AND SETTING: Cross-sectional study conducted in Porto Alegre and Canoas, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. METHODS: Women (n = 155 of mean age 53.6 ± 9.5 years were evaluated through a cross-sectional study in Southern Brazil. Food frequency questionnaires, bone mass evaluation using calcaneal ultrasound and anthropometric assessment were used. RESULTS: The prevalence of overweight was 67.7%. In the bone mass screening, 30.3% had low bone mass and 4.5% had osteoporosis. The median calcium intake was 574.94 mg/day and the caffeine intake was 108.11 mg/day. No association was found between bone mass and anthropometric parameters, calcium intake or caffeine intake. It was found that 38.4% of the women had low bone mass. CONCLUSIONS: No association was found between calcium and caffeine intake and bone mass. High prevalence of low bone mass was observed.

  12. PTHrP regulation and calcium balance in sea bream (Sparus auratus L.) under calcium constraint

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbink, W.; Bevelander, G.S.; Hang, X.; Lu, W.; Guerreiro, P.M.; Spanings, T.; Canario, A.V.; Flik, G.

    2006-01-01

    Juvenile gilthead sea bream were exposed to diluted seawater (2.5 per thousand salinity; DSW) for 3 h or, in a second experiment, acclimated to DSW and fed a control or calcium-deficient diet for 30 days. Branchial Ca(2+) influx, drinking rate and plasma calcium levels were assessed. Sea bream

  13. Calcium spikes and calcium plateaux evoked by differential polarization in dendrites of turtle motoneurones in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hounsgaard, J; Kiehn, O

    1993-01-01

    The ability of dendrites in turtle motoneurones to support calcium spikes and calcium plateaux was investigated using differential polarization by applied electric fields. 2. Electric fields were generated by passing current through transverse slices of the turtle spinal cord between two plate......+ spikes and Ca2+ plateaux are present in dendrites of spinal motoneurones of the turtle....

  14. Eggshell powder, a comparable or better source of calcium than purified calcium carbonate: Piglet studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaafsma, A.; Beelen, G.M.

    1999-01-01

    Powdered chicken eggshells might be an interesting and widely available source of calcium. In two studies using piglets we determined the digestibility of calcium from different diets. The first study compared casein-based diets with CaCO3 (CasCC) or eggshell powder (CasES). The second study

  15. Calcium response to vitamin D supplementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco R. Spivacow

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies show the importance of serum vitamin D sufficient levels to prevent multiple chronic diseases. However, vitamin D supplementation and its effects on urine calcium excretion remain controversial. The objective of this prospective and interventional study was to evaluate urine calcium excretion in women with normal calciuria or hypercalciuria, once serum vitamin D sufficiency was achieved. We studied 63 women with idiopathic hypercalciuria, (9 with renal lithiasis and 50 normocalciuric women. Both groups had serum vitamin D levels low (deficiency or insufficiency. Baseline urine calcium excretion was measured before being supplemented with vitamin D2 or D3 weekly or vitamin D3 100.000 IU monthly. Once serum vitamin D levels were corrected achieving at least 30 ng/ml, a second urine calcium excretion was obtained. Although in the whole sample we did not observe significant changes in urine calcium excretion according to the way of supplementation, some of those with weekly supplementation had significant higher urine calcium excretion, 19% (n = 12 of hypercalciuric women and 12% (n = 6 of the normocalciuric group. Monthly doses, also showed higher urine calcium excretion in 40% of hypercalciuric women (n = 4/10 and in 44% (n = 4/9 of the renal lithiasis hypercalciuric patients. In conclusion, different ways of vitamin D supplementation and adequate serum levels are safe in most patients, although it should be taken into account a subgroup, mainly with monthly loading doses, that could increase the calciuria significantly eventually rising renal lithiasis risk or bone mass loss, if genetically predisposed.

  16. 27 CFR 53.11 - Meaning of terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Meaning of terms. 53.11 Section 53.11 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) FIREARMS MANUFACTURERS EXCISE TAXES-FIREARMS AND AMMUNITION Definitions...

  17. 41 CFR 105-53.147 - Public Buildings Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... space is used more effectively and efficiently; providing leadership in the development and maintenance... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Public Buildings Service. 105-53.147 Section 105-53.147 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management...

  18. 12 CFR 5.53 - Change in asset composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Change in asset composition. 5.53 Section 5.53... composition. (a) Authority. 12 U.S.C. 93a, 1818. (b) Scope. This section requires a national bank to obtain the approval of the OCC before changing the composition of all, or substantially all, of its assets...

  19. 53BP1 sensitizes breast cancer cells to 5-fluorouracil.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Li

    Full Text Available Chemoresistance of breast cancer is a worldwide problem for breast cancer and the resistance to chemotherapeutic agents frequently led to the subsequent recurrence and metastasis. In our previous study, we have found that 53BP1 showed a gradual decrease during the progression of breast cancer and loss of 53BP1 was associated with metastasis and poor prognosis in breast cancer. Here we aimed to reveal whether 53BP1 could sensitize breast cancer to 5-Fu. We found that ectopic expression of 53BP1 can significantly sensitize breast cancer cells to 5-Fu while knockdown of 53BP1 conferred the resistance. The in vivo experiments confirmed that overexpression of 53BP1 in combination with 5-Fu markedly inhibited growth of xenotransplanted tumors in nude mice when compared to either agent alone. Furthermore, we demonstrated that 53BP1 regulated the sensitivity to 5-Fu through thymidylate synthase (TS and dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase (DPYD. The present studies provide a new clue that combination of 5-Fu and 53BP1 could be a potential novel targeted strategy for overcoming breast cancer chemoresistance.

  20. 30 CFR 203.53 - What relief will MMS grant?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What relief will MMS grant? 203.53 Section 203...-Life Leases § 203.53 What relief will MMS grant? (a) If we approve your application and you meet certain conditions, we will reduce the pre-application effective royalty rate by one-half on production up...

  1. 9 CFR 53.6 - Disinfection of animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Disinfection of animals. 53.6 Section 53.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... of animals. Animals of species not susceptible to the disease for which a quarantine has been...

  2. 9 CFR 53.9 - Mortgage against animals or materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Mortgage against animals or materials. 53.9 Section 53.9 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT....9 Mortgage against animals or materials. When animals or materials have been destroyed pursuant to...

  3. 9 CFR 53.3 - Appraisal of animals or materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Appraisal of animals or materials. 53.3 Section 53.3 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... animals or materials. (a) Animals affected by or exposed to disease, and materials required to be...

  4. The 52Cr(p, γ)53Mn reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vuister, P.H.

    The 52Cr(p, γ)53Mn reaction was investigated in the energy region Ep = 1.36–2.26 MeV. The resonance energies, the corresponding 53Mn excitation energies and the resonance strengths of 199 resonances, assigned to this reaction, are reported. The excitation energies and gamma-ray branchings of 13

  5. 27 CFR 53.175 - Readjustment for local advertising charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... television station, or appears in a newspaper or magazine, or is displayed by means of an outdoor advertising... advertising charges. 53.175 Section 53.175 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... Readjustment for local advertising charges. (a) In general. If a manufacturer has paid the tax imposed by...

  6. 27 CFR 53.186 - Accounting procedures for like articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... like articles. 53.186 Section 53.186 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... Accounting procedures for like articles. (a) Identification of manufacturer. In applying section 6416 of the Code and the regulations thereunder, a person who has purchased like articles from various...

  7. TP53 gene polymorphism: Importance to cancer, ethnicity and birth ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    weight has been associated to obesity in adulthood, which can have consequences to health problems (Leong et al. 2003). So, considering the role of p53 in embryonic development and the value of birth weight to human development, analysis of a SNP in p53 gene and its role in birth weight is of importance. A very recent ...

  8. 7 CFR 58.53 - Supervisor of packaging required.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Supervisor of packaging required. 58.53 Section 58.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE...

  9. 9 CFR 53.4 - Destruction of animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Destruction of animals. 53.4 Section 53.4 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... animals. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, animals infected with or exposed to...

  10. 16 CFR 802.53 - Certain foreign banking transactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Certain foreign banking transactions. 802.53 Section 802.53 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION RULES, REGULATIONS, STATEMENTS AND... foreign banking transactions. An acquisition which requires the consent or approval of the Board of...

  11. TP53 codon 72 polymorphism in pigmentary phenotypes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In our population, p53 genotypes were in Hardy–Weinberg (HW) equilibrium ( χ HM 2 < 3.84), showing a predominance of arginine allele (total Arg allele frequency of 68%). No significant association between p53 genotype and skin colour, hair or eye colour and susceptibility to sun exposure was found. However, further ...

  12. Overexpression of p53 in Nigerian breast cancers and its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Mutation of the tumour suppressor gene, p53, is implicated in most cancers. This gene has also been associated with high tumour grade in breast cancers. African women are known to generally have high grade tumours. This study sought to determine the expression of p53 protein as well as the relationship ...

  13. 47 CFR 17.53 - Lighting equipment and paint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lighting equipment and paint. 17.53 Section 17.53 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL CONSTRUCTION, MARKING, AND LIGHTING OF... Lighting equipment and paint. The lighting equipment, color or filters, and shade of paint referred to in...

  14. 34 CFR 104.53 - Drug and alcohol addicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Drug and alcohol addicts. 104.53 Section 104.53 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education OFFICE FOR CIVIL RIGHTS, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL...

  15. 27 CFR 53.61 - Imposition and rates of tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Imposition and rates of tax. 53.61 Section 53.61 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE... component parts for firearms are includible in the price for which the article is sold. (3) Nontaxable parts...

  16. 27 CFR 53.115 - Computation of tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Computation of tax. 53.115 Section 53.115 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Computation of tax. (a) Tax based on price. Tax liability incurred on the use of an article shall be computed...

  17. 7 CFR 53.14 - Financial interest of official grader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Financial interest of official grader. 53.14 Section... AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF 1946 AND THE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT (CONTINUED) LIVESTOCK (GRADING, CERTIFICATION, AND STANDARDS) Regulations Service § 53.14 Financial interest...

  18. 7 CFR 1219.53 - Budget and expenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Budget and expenses. 1219.53 Section 1219.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HASS AVOCADO PROMOTION, RESEARCH...

  19. 19 CFR 145.53 - Firearms and munitions of war.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Firearms and munitions of war. 145.53 Section 145.53 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF... munitions of war. Importations of firearms, munitions of war, and related articles are subject to the import...

  20. 12 CFR 229.53 - Substitute check indemnity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Substitute check indemnity. 229.53 Section 229... SYSTEM AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS AND COLLECTION OF CHECKS (REGULATION CC) Substitute Checks § 229.53 Substitute check indemnity. (a) Scope of indemnity. A bank that transfers, presents, or returns a substitute...

  1. 46 CFR 356.53 - Conflicts with international agreements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Conflicts with international agreements. 356.53 Section... DOCUMENTATION International Agreements § 356.53 Conflicts with international agreements. (a) If the owner or... that it is determined that an international agreement covering the petitioner is in conflict with the...

  2. 27 CFR 7.53 - Legibility of mandatory information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Legibility of mandatory information. 7.53 Section 7.53 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU... information shall be so stated in both the print and audiovisual media that it will be readily apparent to the...

  3. Plk1-mediated phosphorylation of Topors regulates p53 stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoming; Li, Hongchang; Zhou, Zinan; Wang, Wen-Horng; Deng, Anping; Andrisani, Ourania; Liu, Xiaoqi

    2009-07-10

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) overexpression is associated with tumorigenesis by an unknown mechanism. Likewise, Plk1 was suggested to act as a negative regulator of tumor suppressor p53, but the mechanism remains to be determined. Herein, we have identified topoisomerase I-binding protein (Topors), a p53-binding protein, as a Plk1 target. We show that Plk1 phosphorylates Topors on Ser(718) in vivo. Significantly, expression of a Plk1-unphosphorylatable Topors mutant (S718A) leads to a dramatic accumulation of p53 through inhibition of p53 degradation. Topors is an ubiquitin and small ubiquitin-like modifier ubiquitin-protein isopeptide ligase (SUMO E3) ligase. Plk1-mediated phosphorylation of Topors inhibits Topors-mediated sumoylation of p53, whereas p53 ubiquitination is enhanced, leading to p53 degradation. These results demonstrate that Plk1 modulates Topors activity in suppressing p53 function and identify a likely mechanism for the tumorigenic potential of Plk1.

  4. Plk1-mediated Phosphorylation of Topors Regulates p53 Stability*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoming; Li, Hongchang; Zhou, Zinan; Wang, Wen-Horng; Deng, Anping; Andrisani, Ourania; Liu, Xiaoqi

    2009-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) overexpression is associated with tumorigenesis by an unknown mechanism. Likewise, Plk1 was suggested to act as a negative regulator of tumor suppressor p53, but the mechanism remains to be determined. Herein, we have identified topoisomerase I-binding protein (Topors), a p53-binding protein, as a Plk1 target. We show that Plk1 phosphorylates Topors on Ser718 in vivo. Significantly, expression of a Plk1-unphosphorylatable Topors mutant (S718A) leads to a dramatic accumulation of p53 through inhibition of p53 degradation. Topors is an ubiquitin and small ubiquitin-like modifier ubiquitin-protein isopeptide ligase (SUMO E3) ligase. Plk1-mediated phosphorylation of Topors inhibits Topors-mediated sumoylation of p53, whereas p53 ubiquitination is enhanced, leading to p53 degradation. These results demonstrate that Plk1 modulates Topors activity in suppressing p53 function and identify a likely mechanism for the tumorigenic potential of Plk1. PMID:19473992

  5. 40 CFR 53.66 - Test procedure: Volatility test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test procedure: Volatility test. 53.66... Characteristics of Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 § 53.66 Test procedure: Volatility test. (a) Overview. This test is designed to ensure that the candidate method's losses due to volatility when sampling semi...

  6. 40 CFR 53.65 - Test procedure: Loading test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test procedure: Loading test. 53.65... Characteristics of Class II Equivalent Methods for PM2.5 § 53.65 Test procedure: Loading test. (a) Overview. (1) The loading tests are designed to quantify any appreciable changes in a candidate method sampler's...

  7. 46 CFR 188.10-53 - Oceanographic research vessel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... research, including those studies about the sea such as seismic, gravity meter, and magnetic exploration... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Oceanographic research vessel. 188.10-53 Section 188.10-53 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) OCEANOGRAPHIC RESEARCH VESSELS...

  8. 40 CFR 282.53 - Arkansas State-Administered Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Arkansas State-Administered Program. 282.53 Section 282.53 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID... administered by the Arkansas Department of Pollution Control and Ecology, was approved by EPA pursuant to 42 U...

  9. 41 CFR 105-53.145 - Federal Supply Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... surplus personal property; managing GSA's Governmentwide transportation, traffic management, travel, fleet... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal Supply Service. 105-53.145 Section 105-53.145 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management...

  10. 26 CFR 53.4955-1 - Tax on political expenditures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tax on political expenditures. 53.4955-1...) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) FOUNDATION AND SIMILAR EXCISE TAXES Second Tier Excise Taxes § 53.4955-1 Tax on political expenditures. (a) Relationship between section 4955 excise taxes and substantive...

  11. TP53 codon 72 polymorphism in pigmentary phenotypes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-01-20

    Jan 20, 2012 ... oedema and possibly pain and blistering (sunburn). Al- though associations between TP53 codon 72 polymorphism and various types of cancer, ..... Radiation-induced cutaneous carcinoma of the head and neck: is there an early role for p53 mutations? Clin. Exp. Dermatol. 31 793–798. Han J, Kraft P, Nan ...

  12. 32 CFR 516.53 - News media and other inquiries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true News media and other inquiries. 516.53 Section... Litigation in Which the United States Has An Interest § 516.53 News media and other inquiries. News media... clearance. Local public affairs officers will refer press inquiries to HQDA (SAPA), WASH DC 20310-1500, with...

  13. 27 CFR 478.53 - Change in trade name.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Change in trade name. 478.53 Section 478.53 Alcohol, Tobacco Products, and Firearms BUREAU OF ALCOHOL, TOBACCO, FIREARMS, AND... license is not required to obtain a new license by reason of a mere change in trade name under which he...

  14. Fermentative metabolism impedes p53-dependent apoptosis in a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    It is known that the Warburg effect and Crabtree effect aredisplayed by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, during growth on abundant glucose. Beyond this similarity, it was also demonstratedthat expression of human pro-apoptotic proteins in S. cerevisiae such as Bax and p53 caused apoptosis. Here, wedemonstrate that p53 ...

  15. 7 CFR 301.53-2 - Regulated articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Regulated articles. 301.53-2 Section 301.53-2... articles. The following are regulated articles: (a) The emerald ash borer; firewood of all hardwood (non... article, product, or means of conveyance not listed in paragraph (a) of this section may be designated as...

  16. 14 CFR 21.53 - Statement of conformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Statement of conformity. 21.53 Section 21... CERTIFICATION PROCEDURES FOR PRODUCTS AND PARTS Type Certificates § 21.53 Statement of conformity. Link to an... conformity (FAA Form 317) to the Administrator for each aircraft engine and propeller presented to the...

  17. Phylogenetic analysis of human Tp53 gene using computational ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    format and was studied for its relationships and percent similarity within human and others species. Genetic variation among TP53 found in human beings and other organisms were studied in detail. Multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis of the human TP53, transcript variant-1 mRNA sequence through ...

  18. 36 CFR 223.53 - Urgent removal contract extensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Urgent removal contract extensions. 223.53 Section 223.53 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF.... Catastrophic events include, but are not limited to, severe wildfire, wind, floods, insects and disease...

  19. 45 CFR 84.53 - Drug and alcohol addicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Drug and alcohol addicts. 84.53 Section 84.53 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF HANDICAP IN PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Health, Welfare, and...

  20. 14 CFR 125.53 - Flight locating requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Flight locating requirements. 125.53... and Miscellaneous Requirements § 125.53 Flight locating requirements. (a) Each certificate holder must have procedures established for locating each flight for which an FAA flight plan is not filed that— (1...