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Sample records for calcitonin gene-related peptide

  1. Effects of salmon calcitonin and calcitonin gene related peptide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this investigation was to examine and compare the effects of calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) and salmon calcitonin (sCT) on gastric lesions and mucosal barrier components such as mucus and phospholipids in rats exposed to cold + restraint stress (CRS). Twenty-eight Wistar albino rats (150 – 200 g) ...

  2. Calcitonin gene-related peptide and pain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Wendy Sophie; Ashina, Sait; Amin, Faisal Mohammad

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is widely distributed in nociceptive pathways in human peripheral and central nervous system and its receptors are also expressed in pain pathways. CGRP is involved in migraine pathophysiology but its role in non-headache pain has not been...... to date have investigated the efficacy of monoclonal antibodies against CGRP receptor in non-headache pain conditions. CONCLUSION: The present review revealed the association between measured CGRP levels and somatic, visceral, neuropathic and inflammatory pain. These data suggest that CGRP may act...... clarified. METHODS: We performed a systematic literature search on PubMed, Embase and ClinicalTrials.gov for articles on CGRP and non-headache pain covering human studies including experimental studies and randomized clinical trials. RESULTS: The literature search identified 375 citations of which 50...

  3. Calcitonin gene related peptide and its functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimian M

    1998-07-01

    Full Text Available Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide (CGRP was first reported in 1982. This peptide contains 37 amino acids which could be found in Alpha and Beta forms. CGRP shows diversity both in its receptors and biological effects and up to now four different types of receptors have been reported. It can act like a neurotransmitter, local hormone and neuromodulator. They have a variety of effects on different organs such as a potent effect on vasodilation and smooth muscle relaxation. Ability of CGRP for induction of protein extravasation from blood vessels was uncertain. In this study intra-articular infusion of 10^-6 M CGRP to the rat knee joint induced significant protein extravasation into the rat knee joint space. The amount of protein was detected by modified Iawata method which could detect amount of protein between 5-500 mg/L. Higher and lower concentrations failed to induce protein extravasation. Failure in higher concentration was likely due to significant fall in blood pressure. In the presence of an arterial hypotension induced by an ? adenoreceptor antagonist, 10^-6 M of CGRP failed to produce protein extravasation. This effect of CGRP was a specific active effect and not a passive effect due to its potent vasodilation effect, as similar vasodilatory response induced by a ?-adrenoreceptor agonist failed to induce protein extravasation. There is more than 50% of sensory neurons which contain CGRP and they are spread in all over the body and joints, therefore CGRP induced protein extravasation can potentiate inflammation in different organs.

  4. Calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonism and cluster headache

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashina, Håkan; Newman, Lawrence; Ashina, Sait

    2017-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a key signaling molecule involved in migraine pathophysiology. Efficacy of CGRP monoclonal antibodies and antagonists in migraine treatment has fueled an increasing interest in the prospect of treating cluster headache (CH) with CGRP antagonism. The exact...... role of CGRP and its mechanism of action in CH have not been fully clarified. A search for original studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in English was performed in PubMed and in ClinicalTrials.gov . The search term used was "cluster headache and calcitonin gene related peptide......" and "primary headaches and calcitonin gene related peptide." Reference lists of identified articles were also searched for additional relevant papers. Human experimental studies have reported elevated plasma CGRP levels during both spontaneous and glyceryl trinitrate-induced cluster attacks. CGRP may play...

  5. Calcitonin gene-related peptide, neurokinin A and substance P

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, U; Nielsen, L B; Jensen, Kai

    1991-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was injected alone and in combination with substance P (SP) or neurokinin A (NKA) into the forearm skin and temporal muscle of human volunteers. In the skin, 50 pmol of CGRP induced a wheal response and a delayed erythema. No pain was recorded. No interaction...

  6. Calcitonin gene-related peptide and migraine with aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob M; Ashina, Messoud

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a key molecule in migraine pathophysiology. Most studies have focused on CGRP in relation to migraine without aura (MO). About one-third of migraine patients have attacks with aura (MA), and this is a systematic review of the current literature...... of CGRP in MA is less studied than in MO. Further studies of the importance of CGRP for auras and migraine are needed....

  7. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide: Physiology and Pathophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, F. A.; King, R.; Smillie, S.-J.; Kodji, X.; Brain, S. D.

    2014-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37-amino acid neuropeptide. Discovered 30 years ago, it is produced as a consequence of alternative RNA processing of the calcitonin gene. CGRP has two major forms (α and β). It belongs to a group of peptides that all act on an unusual receptor family. These receptors consist of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) linked to an essential receptor activity modifying protein (RAMP) that is necessary for full functionality. CGRP is a highly potent vasodilator and, partly as a consequence, possesses protective mechanisms that are important for physiological and pathological conditions involving the cardiovascular system and wound healing. CGRP is primarily released from sensory nerves and thus is implicated in pain pathways. The proven ability of CGRP antagonists to alleviate migraine has been of most interest in terms of drug development, and knowledge to date concerning this potential therapeutic area is discussed. Other areas covered, where there is less information known on CGRP, include arthritis, skin conditions, diabetes, and obesity. It is concluded that CGRP is an important peptide in mammalian biology, but it is too early at present to know if new medicines for disease treatment will emerge from our knowledge concerning this molecule. PMID:25287861

  8. Serotonin, calcitonin and calcitonin gene-related peptide in acute pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlstrøm, Kirsten Lykke; Novovic, Srdan; Ersbøll, Annette Kjær

    2017-01-01

    with alcohol- or gallstone-induced AP were included over a 15-month period. Patients were treated according to a standardized algorithm and monitored for organ specific morbidity and mortality. Organ functions and blood samples were assessed on days 0, 1, 2 and 14 after hospital admission. Twenty healthy......OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to investigate plasma levels of serotonin, calcitonin and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the course of acute pancreatitis (AP) taking organ failure, etiology and severity into consideration. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty consecutive patients...

  9. Involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, L H; Jacobsen, V B; Haderslev, P A

    2008-01-01

    mug/min) or placebo for 20 min was studied in 12 patients with migraine without aura outside attacks. Xenon-133 inhalation SPECT-determined regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and transcranial Doppler (TCD)-determined blood velocity (V (mean)) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA), as well as the heart......Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing nerves are closely associated with cranial blood vessels. CGRP is the most potent vasodilator known in isolated cerebral blood vessels. CGRP can induce migraine attacks, and two selective CGRP receptor antagonists are effective in the treatment...... of migraine attacks. It is therefore important to investigate its mechanism of action in patients with migraine. We here investigate the effects of intravenous human alpha-CGRP (halphaCGRP) on intracranial hemodynamics. In a double-blind, cross-over study, the effect of intravenous infusion of halphaCGRP (2...

  10. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide in Tension-Type Headache

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ashina

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last 10 years there has been increasing interest in the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP in primary headaches. Tension-type headache is one of the most common and important types of primary headaches, and ongoing nociception from myofascial tissues may play an important role in the pathophysiology of this disorder. CGRP sensory fibers are preferentially located in the walls of arteries, and nerve fibers containing CGRP accompany small blood vessels in human cranial muscles. It is well established that nociception may lead to release of CGRP from sensory nerve endings and from central terminals of sensory afferents into the spinal cord. It has also been shown that density of CGRP fibers around arteries is increased in persistently inflamed muscle. These findings indicate that ongoing activity in sensory neurons in the cranial muscles may be reflected in changes of plasma levels of neuropeptides in patients with chronic tension-type headache. To explore the possible role of CGRP in tension-type headache, plasma levels of CGRP were measured in patients with chronic tension-type headache. This study showed that plasma levels of CGRP are normal in patients and unrelated to headache state. However, the findings of normal plasma levels of CGRP do not exclude the possibility that abnormalities of this neuropeptide at the neuronal or peripheral (pericranial muscles levels play a role in the pathophysiology of tension-type headache. Investigation of CGRP in other compartments with new sensitive methods of analysis is necessary to clarify its role in tension-type headache.

  11. Ureteral relaxation through calcitonin gene-related peptide release from sensory nerve terminals by hypotonic solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Materazzi, Serena; Minocci, Daiana; De Siena, Gaetano; Benemei, Silvia; Nassini, Romina

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the influence of hypotonic solutions on ureteral relaxation mediated by the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide from intramural sensory nerve endings. Urine osmolarity of Sprague-Dawley rats drinking water low in salt content (Fiuggi water) or a reference water for 7 days was measured. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactivity from slices of rat ureter and urinary bladder by hypotonic solutions was assessed by an immunometric assay. The mechanism through which hypotonic solutions inhibit neurokinin A-induced phasic contractions of isolated rat ureters was evaluated by organ bath studies. A 7-day consumption of Fiuggi water in rats reduced urine osmolarity by ~40%. Exposure to hypotonic solutions released calcitonin gene-related peptide-like immunoreactivity from slices of rat ureter. This response was abated in a calcium-free medium, after capsaicin desensitization, and in the presence of the unselective transient receptor potential channel antagonist, ruthenium red. Exposure of isolated rat ureteral preparations to a hypotonic solution inhibited neurokinin A-evoked phasic contraction. This response was attenuated by capsaicin desensitization and in the presence of the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonist, calcitonin gene-related peptide8-37 . Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 or transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 antagonists did not affect the neurogenic and calcitonin gene-related peptide-dependent relaxation. Present data show that hypotonic solution evokes calcitonin gene-related peptide release from capsaicin-sensitive intramural sensory nerves, thus inhibiting ureteral contractility, through a transient receptor potential-dependent mechanism. However, this mechanism does not involve transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 or transient receptor potential vanilloid 4. Future studies with appropriate in vivo models should investigate the hypothesis that hypostenuric urine diffusing into the

  12. Relation of calcitonin gene-related peptide to systemic vasodilatation and central hypovolaemia in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Søren; Bendtsen, Flemming; Schifter, S

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The aetiology of the reduced systemic vascular resistance and abnormal 'filling' of the vascular bed in cirrhosis is still obscure. As increased concentrations of the potent vasodilator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) have recently been reported in cirrhosis, we related CGRP......-central blood volume (P abnormal distribution of the blood volume, which may lead to abnormal sodium and water handling....

  13. Effect of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist telcagepant in human cranial arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L. Edvinsson (Lars); K.Y. Chan (Kayi); S. Eftekhari; E. Nilsson (Elisabeth); R. de Vries (René); H. Säveland (Hans); C.M.F. Dirven (Clemens); A.H.J. Danser (Jan)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIntroduction: Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuronal messenger in intracranial sensory nerves and is considered to play a significant role in migraine pathophysiology. Materials and methods: We investigated the effect of the CGRP receptor antagonist, telcagepant, on

  14. Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationships and Docking Studies of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Antagonists

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard; Mehrabian, Mohadeseh; Kyani, Anahita

    2012-01-01

    of calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonists was performed using a panel of physicochemical descriptors. The computational studies evaluated different variable selection techniques and demonstrated shuffling stepwise multiple linear regression to be superior over genetic algorithm-multiple linear regression....... The linear quantitative structure-activity relationship model revealed better statistical parameters of cross-validation in comparison with the non-linear support vector regression technique. Implementing only five peptide descriptors into this linear quantitative structure-activity relationship model...

  15. Comparison between Brain Natriuretic Peptide and Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide in Children with Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noor Mohammad Noori

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM is revealed with the left ventricular dilatation and systolic dysfunction. This study was performed to determine the level of Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide (CGRP and Brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP in children with dilated cardiomyopathy and controls and comparison of these two biomarkers in patients. Materials and Methods: This case-control study was performed from April 2014 to March 2015 on patients with DCM. The levels of BNP and CGRP were measured by ELISA and final amounts of biomarkers were compared with echocardiographic finding.37 DCM patients compared with 30 healthy children selected randomly from those who referred to the hospital for routine checkup. Results: In this study the mean age was 10.567± 5.50 and 12.135 ± 4.626 years for controls and cases, respectively (P=0.321. The majority of echocardiography indices in the left and right heart had different means in case and controls (P

  16. Calcitonin gene-related peptide does not cause migraine attacks in patients with familial hemiplegic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob M; Thomsen, Lise L; Olesen, Jes

    2011-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a key molecule in migraine pathogenesis. Intravenous CGRP triggers migraine-like attacks in patients with migraine with aura and without aura. In contrast, patients with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) with known mutations did not report more migraine......-like attacks compared to controls. Whether CGRP triggers migraine-like attacks in FHM patients without known mutations is unknown....

  17. Calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonism and cluster headache: an emerging new treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashina, Håkan; Newman, Lawrence; Ashina, Sait

    2017-08-30

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a key signaling molecule involved in migraine pathophysiology. Efficacy of CGRP monoclonal antibodies and antagonists in migraine treatment has fueled an increasing interest in the prospect of treating cluster headache (CH) with CGRP antagonism. The exact role of CGRP and its mechanism of action in CH have not been fully clarified. A search for original studies and randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published in English was performed in PubMed and in ClinicalTrials.gov . The search term used was "cluster headache and calcitonin gene related peptide" and "primary headaches and calcitonin gene related peptide." Reference lists of identified articles were also searched for additional relevant papers. Human experimental studies have reported elevated plasma CGRP levels during both spontaneous and glyceryl trinitrate-induced cluster attacks. CGRP may play an important role in cluster headache pathophysiology. More refined human studies are warranted with regard to assay validation and using larger sample sizes. The results from RCTs may reveal the therapeutic potential of CGRP monoclonal antibodies and antagonists for cluster headache treatment.

  18. Calcitonin gene-related peptide induced migraine attacks in patients with and without familial aggregation of migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Song; Christensen, Anne Francke; Liu, Marie Louise

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcitonin gene-related peptide provokes migraine attacks in 65% of patients with migraine without aura. Whether aggregation of migraine in first-degree relatives (family load) or a high number of risk-conferring single nucleotide polymorphisms contributes to migraine susceptibility...... to calcitonin gene-related peptide infusion in migraine patients is unknown. We hypothesized that genetic enrichment plays a role in triggering of migraine and, therefore, migraine without aura patients with high family load would report more migraine attacks after calcitonin gene-related peptide infusion than...... patients with low family load. METHODS: We allocated 40 previously genotyped migraine without aura patients to receive intravenous infusion of 1.5 µg/min calcitonin gene-related peptide and recorded migraine attacks including headache characteristics and associated symptoms. Information of familial...

  19. Calcitonin gene-related peptide induced migraine attacks in patients with and without familial aggregation of migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Song; Christensen, Anne Francke; Liu, Marie Louise; Janjooa, Benjamin Naveed; Olesen, Jes; Ashina, Messoud

    2017-02-01

    Background Calcitonin gene-related peptide provokes migraine attacks in 65% of patients with migraine without aura. Whether aggregation of migraine in first-degree relatives (family load) or a high number of risk-conferring single nucleotide polymorphisms contributes to migraine susceptibility to calcitonin gene-related peptide infusion in migraine patients is unknown. We hypothesized that genetic enrichment plays a role in triggering of migraine and, therefore, migraine without aura patients with high family load would report more migraine attacks after calcitonin gene-related peptide infusion than patients with low family load. Methods We allocated 40 previously genotyped migraine without aura patients to receive intravenous infusion of 1.5 µg/min calcitonin gene-related peptide and recorded migraine attacks including headache characteristics and associated symptoms. Information of familial aggregation was obtained by telephone interview of first-degree relatives using a validated semi-structured questionnaire. Results Calcitonin gene-related peptide infusion induced a migraine-like attack in 75% (12 out of 16) of patients with high family load compared to 52% (12 out of 23) with low family load ( P = 0.150). In addition, we found that the migraine response after calcitonin gene-related peptide was not associated with specific or a high number of risk-conferring single nucleotide polymorphisms of migraine without aura. Conclusion We found no statistical association between familial aggregation of migraine and hypersensitivity to calcitonin gene-related peptide infusion in migraine without aura patients. We also demonstrated that the currently known single nucleotide polymorphisms conferring risk of migraine without aura have no additive effect on calcitonin gene-related peptide induced migraine-like attacks.

  20. Heat hyperalgesia and mechanical hypersensitivity induced by calcitonin gene-related peptide in a mouse model of neurofibromatosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie White

    Full Text Available This study examined whether mice with a deficiency of neurofibromin, a Ras GTPase activating protein, exhibit a nociceptive phenotype and probed a possible contribution by calcitonin gene-related peptide. In the absence of inflammation, Nf1+/- mice (B6.129S6 Nf1/J and wild type littermates responded comparably to heat or mechanical stimuli, except for a subtle enhanced mechanical sensitivity in female Nf1+/- mice. Nociceptive phenotype was also examined after inflammation induced by capsaicin and formalin, which release endogenous calcitonin gene-related peptide. Intraplantar injection of capsaicin evoked comparable heat hyperalgesia and mechanical hypersensitivity in Nf1+/- and wild type mice of both genders. Formalin injection caused a similar duration of licking in male Nf1+/- and wild type mice. Female Nf1+/- mice licked less than wild type mice, but displayed other nociceptive behaviors. In contrast, intraplantar injection of CGRP caused greater heat hyperalgesia in Nf1+/- mice of both genders compared to wild type mice. Male Nf1+/- mice also exhibited greater mechanical hypersensitivity; however, female Nf1+/- mice exhibited less mechanical hypersensitivity than their wild type littermates. Transcripts for calcitonin gene-related peptide were similar in the dorsal root ganglia of both genotypes and genders. Transcripts for receptor activity-modifying protein-1, which is rate-limiting for the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor, in the spinal cord were comparable for both genotypes and genders. The increased responsiveness to intraplantar calcitonin gene-related peptide suggests that the peripheral actions of calcitonin gene-related peptide are enhanced as a result of the neurofibromin deficit. The analgesic efficacy of calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonists may therefore merit investigation in neurofibromatosis patients.

  1. Heat hyperalgesia and mechanical hypersensitivity induced by calcitonin gene-related peptide in a mouse model of neurofibromatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Stephanie; Marquez de Prado, Blanca; Russo, Andrew F; Hammond, Donna L

    2014-01-01

    This study examined whether mice with a deficiency of neurofibromin, a Ras GTPase activating protein, exhibit a nociceptive phenotype and probed a possible contribution by calcitonin gene-related peptide. In the absence of inflammation, Nf1+/- mice (B6.129S6 Nf1/J) and wild type littermates responded comparably to heat or mechanical stimuli, except for a subtle enhanced mechanical sensitivity in female Nf1+/- mice. Nociceptive phenotype was also examined after inflammation induced by capsaicin and formalin, which release endogenous calcitonin gene-related peptide. Intraplantar injection of capsaicin evoked comparable heat hyperalgesia and mechanical hypersensitivity in Nf1+/- and wild type mice of both genders. Formalin injection caused a similar duration of licking in male Nf1+/- and wild type mice. Female Nf1+/- mice licked less than wild type mice, but displayed other nociceptive behaviors. In contrast, intraplantar injection of CGRP caused greater heat hyperalgesia in Nf1+/- mice of both genders compared to wild type mice. Male Nf1+/- mice also exhibited greater mechanical hypersensitivity; however, female Nf1+/- mice exhibited less mechanical hypersensitivity than their wild type littermates. Transcripts for calcitonin gene-related peptide were similar in the dorsal root ganglia of both genotypes and genders. Transcripts for receptor activity-modifying protein-1, which is rate-limiting for the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor, in the spinal cord were comparable for both genotypes and genders. The increased responsiveness to intraplantar calcitonin gene-related peptide suggests that the peripheral actions of calcitonin gene-related peptide are enhanced as a result of the neurofibromin deficit. The analgesic efficacy of calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor antagonists may therefore merit investigation in neurofibromatosis patients.

  2. Calcitonin gene-related peptide triggers migraine-like attacks in patients with migraine with aura

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Hauge, Anne Werner; Olesen, J.

    2010-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a key molecule in migraine pathogenesis. Intravenous CGRP infusion triggers delayed migraine-like attacks in patients with migraine without aura (MO). In contrast to patients with MO, in prior studies patients with familial hemiplegic migraine (FHM) did...... not report more migraine-like attacks compared to controls. Whether CGRP triggers migraine in patients with typical (non-hemiplegic) migraine with aura is (MA) unknown. In the present study we examined the migraine inducing effect of CGRP infusion in patients suffering from MA and healthy controls....

  3. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) levels during glyceryl trinitrate (GTN)-induced headache in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kruuse, C; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Jansen-Olesen, I

    2010-01-01

    calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). CGRP, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), neuropeptide Y (NPY) and somatostatin plasma levels were measured before and after placebo/sumatriptan injection and during GTN-induced headache. Following a double-blind randomized cross-over design, 10 healthy volunteers...

  4. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP receptors are important to maintain cerebrovascular reactivity in chronic hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenghui Wang

    Full Text Available Cerebral blood flow autoregulation (CA shifts to higher blood pressures in chronic hypertensive patients, which increases their risk for brain damage. Although cerebral vascular smooth muscle cells express the potent vasodilatatory peptides calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP and adrenomedullin (AM and their receptors (calcitonin receptor-like receptor (Calclr, receptor-modifying proteins (RAMP 1 and 2, their contribution to CA during chronic hypertension is poorly understood. Here we report that chronic (10 weeks hypertensive (one-kidney-one-clip-method mice overexpressing the Calclr in smooth muscle cells (CLR-tg, which increases the natural sensitivity of the brain vasculature to CGRP and AM show significantly better blood pressure drop-induced cerebrovascular reactivity than wt controls. Compared to sham mice, this was paralleled by increased cerebral CGRP-binding sites (receptor autoradiography, significantly in CLR-tg but not wt mice. AM-binding sites remained unchanged. Whereas hypertension did not alter RAMP-1 expression (droplet digital (dd PCR in either mouse line, RAMP-2 expression dropped significantly in both mouse lines by about 65%. Moreover, in wt only Calclr expression was reduced by about 70% parallel to an increase of smooth muscle actin (Acta2 expression. Thus, chronic hypertension induces a stoichiometric shift between CGRP and AM receptors in favor of the CGRP receptor. However, the parallel reduction of Calclr expression observed in wt mice but not CLR-tg mice appears to be a key mechanism in chronic hypertension impairing cerebrovascular reactivity.

  5. Bio-Oss® modified by calcitonin gene-related peptide promotes osteogenesis in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanjing; Yang, Lan; Zheng, Zhichao; Li, Zhengmao; Deng, Tian; Ren, Wen; Wu, Caijuan; Guo, Lvhua

    2017-11-01

    Bio-Oss® and α-calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) are involved in osteogenesis. However, it has remained to be assessed how α-CGRP affects the effect of Bio-Oss. In the present study, primary osteoblasts were incubated with α-CGRP, Bio-Oss, α-GGRP-Bio-Oss or mimic-α-CGRP. The proliferation rate, mineralization nodules, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and the expression of osteogenic genes were measured by a Cell Counting Kit-8 assay, Alizarin Red-S staining, ALP activity detection and reverse-transcription quantitative PCR as well as western blot analysis, respectively. The proliferation rate, ALP activity and the number of mineralization nodules were significantly increased in the α-CGRP-modified Bio-Oss group compared to that in the Bio-Oss group. The mRNA and protein levels of osteocalcin, Runt-related transcription factor-2 and ALP were significantly upregulated in the α-CGRP-Bio-Oss group compared with those in the Bio-Oss group. Furthermore, the effect of mimic-α-CGRP on osteogenesis was reduced as it carried a mutation. In conclusion, the present study was the first to demonstrate that Bio-Oss modified with CGRP contributed to osteogenesis and may provide a novel formulation applied in the clinic for restoration of large bone defects.

  6. Acupuncture as Treatment of Hot Flashes and the Possible Role of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna-Clara E. Spetz Holm

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms behind hot flashes in menopausal women are not fully understood. The flashes in women are probably preceded by and actually initiated by a sudden downward shift in the set point for the core body temperature in the thermoregulatory center that is affected by sex steroids, β-endorphins, and other central neurotransmitters. Treatments that influence these factors may be expected to reduce hot flashes. Since therapy with sex steroids for hot flashes has appeared to cause a number of side effects and risks and women with hot flashes and breast cancer as well as men with prostate cancer and hot flashes are prevented from sex steroid therapy there is a great need for alternative therapies. Acupuncture affecting the opioid system has been suggested as an alternative treatment option for hot flashes in menopausal women and castrated men. The heat loss during hot flashes may be mediated by the potent vasodilator and sweat gland activator calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP the concentration of which increases in plasma during flashes in menopausal women and, according to one study, in castrated men with flushes. There is also evidence for connections between the opioid system and the release of CGRP. In this paper we discuss acupuncture as a treatment alternative for hot flashes and the role of CGRP in this context.

  7. Repression of calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in trigeminal neurons by a Theobroma cacao extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Marcie J; Patil, Vinit V; Vause, Carrie V; Durham, Paul L

    2008-01-17

    Cocoa bean preparations were first used by the ancient Maya and Aztec civilizations of South America to treat a variety of medical ailments involving the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and nervous systems. Diets rich in foods containing abundant polyphenols, as found in cocoa, underlie the protective effects reported in chronic inflammatory diseases. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from trigeminal nerves promotes inflammation in peripheral tissues and nociception. To determine whether a methanol extract of Theobroma cacao L. (Sterculiaceae) beans enriched for polyphenols could inhibit CGRP expression, both an in vitro and an in vivo approach was taken. Treatment of rat trigeminal ganglia cultures with depolarizing stimuli caused a significant increase in CGRP release that was repressed by pretreatment with Theobroma cacao extract. Pretreatment with Theobroma cacao was also shown to block the KCl- and capsaicin-stimulated increases in intracellular calcium. Next, the effects of Theobroma cacao on CGRP levels were determined using an in vivo model of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation. Capsaicin injection into the TMJ capsule caused an ipsilateral decrease in CGRP levels. Theobroma cacao extract injected into the TMJ capsule 24h prior to capsaicin treatment repressed the stimulatory effects of capsaicin. Our results demonstrate that Theobroma cacao extract can repress stimulated CGRP release by a mechanism that likely involves blockage of calcium channel activity. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the beneficial effects of diets rich in cocoa may include suppression of sensory trigeminal nerve activation.

  8. Repression of calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in trigeminal neurons by a Theobroma cacao extract☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbey, Marcie J.; Patil, Vinit V.; Vause, Carrie V.; Durham, Paul L.

    2008-01-01

    Ethnopharmacological relevance Cocoa bean preparations were first used by the ancient Maya and Aztec civilizations of South America to treat a variety of medical ailments involving the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and nervous systems. Diets rich in foods containing abundant polyphenols, as found in cocoa, underlie the protective effects reported in chronic inflammatory diseases. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from trigeminal nerves promotes inflammation in peripheral tissues and nociception. Aim of the study To determine whether a methanol extract of Theobroma cacao L. (Sterculiaceae) beans enriched for polyphenols could inhibit CGRP expression, both an in vitro and an in vivo approach was taken. Results Treatment of rat trigeminal ganglia cultures with depolarizing stimuli caused a significant increase in CGRP release that was repressed by pretreatment with Theobroma cacao extract. Pretreatment with Theobroma cacao was also shown to block the KCl- and capsaicin-stimulated increases in intracellular calcium. Next, the effects of Theobroma cacao on CGRP levels were determined using an in vivo model of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) inflammation. Capsaicin injection into the TMJ capsule caused an ipsilateral decrease in CGRP levels. Theobroma cacao extract injected into the TMJ capsule 24 h prior to capsaicin treatment repressed the stimulatory effects of capsaicin. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that Theobroma cacao extract can repress stimulated CGRP release by a mechanism that likely involves blockage of calcium channel activity. Furthermore, our findings suggest that the beneficial effects of diets rich in cocoa may include suppression of sensory trigeminal nerve activation. PMID:17997062

  9. Calcitonin gene-related peptide regulates type IV hypersensitivity through dendritic cell functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihisa Mikami

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs play essential roles in both innate and adaptive immune responses. In addition, mutual regulation of the nervous system and immune system is well studied. One of neuropeptides, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, is a potent regulator in immune responses; in particular, it has anti-inflammatory effects in innate immunity. For instance, a deficiency of the CGRP receptor component RAMP 1 (receptor activity-modifying protein 1 results in higher cytokine production in response to LPS (lipopolysaccharide. On the other hand, how CGRP affects DCs in adaptive immunity is largely unknown. In this study, we show that CGRP suppressed Th1 cell differentiation via inhibition of IL-12 production in DCs using an in vitro co-culture system and an in vivo ovalbumin-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH model. CGRP also down-regulated the expressions of chemokine receptor CCR2 and its ligands CCL2 and CCL12 in DCs. Intriguingly, the frequency of migrating CCR2(+ DCs in draining lymph nodes of RAMP1-deficient mice was higher after DTH immunization. Moreover, these CCR2(+ DCs highly expressed IL-12 and CD80, resulting in more effective induction of Th1 differentiation compared with CCR2(- DCs. These results indicate that CGRP regulates Th1 type reactions by regulating expression of cytokines, chemokines, and chemokine receptors in DCs.

  10. Tapentadol inhibits calcitonin gene-related peptide release from rat brainstem in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Maria Cristina; Lisi, Lucia; Currò, Diego; Navarra, Pierluigi; Tringali, Giuseppe

    2014-06-01

    We have previously developed an in vitro model of rat brainstem explants. The latter release sizable amounts of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP); basal release can be stimulated by such secretagogues as high KCl concentrations, veratridine or capsaicine. In this paradigm we investigated the activity of the analgesic agent tapentadol; the effects of tapentadol were compared to those of a classical opioid receptor agonist, morphine, and the selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor reboxetine. Morphine inhibited basal CGRP release, with statistical significance from 1 nM onward and maximal (-44%) inhibition at 100 μM. Morphine also inhibited K(+)-stimulated peptide release, with a significant effect from 1 μM and maximal (-39%) decrease at 100 μM, but failed to inhibit release stimulated by 10 μM capsaicin. At variance, reboxetine had no effect on baseline CGRP outflow, but was able to inhibit both K(+)-stimulated [significant inhibition from 1 μM onward and maximal (-37%) decrease at 100 μM], and capsaicin-stimulated release [significant effect from 1 μM and maximal (-31%) decrease at 100 μM]. Likewise, tapentadol had no effect on baseline CGRP release up to 100 μM, but decreased secretion stimulated by 56 mM KCl or capsaicin, with significant effects from 0.1 and 1 μM respectively; maximal inhibition over 56 mM KCl and capsaicin stimuli was -29% and -31%, respectively. Naloxone antagonized the effect of morphine, but not those of reboxetine and tapentadol, on K(+)-stimulated CGRP secretion. In conclusion the present study provides consistent pharmacological evidence that tapentadol acts as a noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor agent in this experimental model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Calcitonin gene-related peptide neurons mediate sleep-specific circadian output in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunst, Michael; Hughes, Michael E; Raccuglia, Davide; Felix, Mario; Li, Michael; Barnett, Gregory; Duah, Janelle; Nitabach, Michael N

    2014-11-17

    Imbalances in amount and timing of sleep are harmful to physical and mental health. Therefore, the study of the underlying mechanisms is of great biological importance. Proper timing and amount of sleep are regulated by both the circadian clock and homeostatic sleep drive. However, very little is known about the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which the circadian clock regulates sleep. In this study, we describe a novel role for diuretic hormone 31 (DH31), the fly homolog of the vertebrate neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide, as a circadian wake-promoting signal that awakens the fly in anticipation of dawn. Analysis of loss-of-function and gain-of-function Drosophila mutants demonstrates that DH31 suppresses sleep late at night. DH31 is expressed by a subset of dorsal circadian clock neurons that also express the receptor for the circadian neuropeptide pigment-dispersing factor (PDF). PDF secreted by the ventral pacemaker subset of circadian clock neurons acts on PDF receptors in the DH31-expressing dorsal clock neurons to increase DH31 secretion before dawn. Activation of PDF receptors in DH31-positive DN1 specifically affects sleep and has no effect on circadian rhythms, thus constituting a dedicated locus for circadian regulation of sleep. We identified a novel signaling molecule (DH31) as part of a neuropeptide relay mechanism for circadian control of sleep. Our results indicate that outputs of the clock controlling sleep and locomotor rhythms are mediated via distinct neuronal pathways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Calcitonin gene-related peptide down-regulates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xian-Wei; Li, Xiao-Hui; Du, Jie; Li, Dai; Li, Yuan-Jian; Hu, Chang-Ping

    2016-12-01

    We have found that eIF3a plays an important role in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, and up-regulation of eIF3a induced by TGF-β1 is mediated via the ERK1/2 pathway. Whether ERK1/2 - eIF3a signal pathway is involved in calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-mediated pathogenesis of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis remains unknown. Pulmonary fibrosis was induced by intratracheal instillation of bleomycin (5 mg/kg) in rats. Primary pulmonary fibroblasts were cultured to investigate the proliferation by BrdU incorporation method and flow cytometry. Sensory CGRP depletion by capsaicin exacerbated bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats, as shown by a significant disturbed alveolar structure, marked thickening of the interalveolar septa and dense interstitial infiltration by inflammatory cells and fibroblasts, accompanied with increased expression of TGF-β1, eIF3a, phosphorylated ERK1/2, α-SMA, collagen I, and collagen III. Exogenous application of CGRP significantly inhibited TGF-β1-induced proliferation and differentiation of pulmonary fibroblasts concomitantly with decreased expression of eIF3a, phosphorylated ERK1/2, α-SMA, collagen I, and collagen III. These effects of CGRP were abolished in the presence of CGRP 8-37 . These results suggest that endogenous CGRP is related to the development of pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin, and the inhibitory effect of CGRP on proliferation of lung fibroblasts involves the ERK1/2 - eIF3a signaling pathway.

  13. Calcitonin gene-related peptide and its receptor components in the human sphenopalatine ganglion -- interaction with the sensory system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Csati, Anett; Tajti, Janos; Tuka, Bernadett

    2012-01-01

    , but not in neurons. RAMP1 immunoreactivity was localized in many neurons and SGCs. Thus, the two CGRP receptor components together were found in the SGCs. In addition, Western blot revealed the presence of RAMP1 and CLR in rat SPG. Our results suggest a possible sensory influence in the parasympathetic cranial......Clinical studies have suggested a link between the sensory trigeminal system and the parasympathetic ganglia. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a sensory neuropeptide which plays an important role in vasodilatation and pain transmission in craniocervical structures. The present study...... was designed to examine if CGRP and CGRP receptor components are present in the human sphenopalatine ganglion (SPG) in order to reveal an interaction between the sensory and parasympathetic systems. Indirect immunofluorescence technique was used for immunohistochemical demonstration of CGRP, the calcitonin...

  14. Phosphodiesterases 3 and 5 express activity in the trigeminal ganglion and co-localize with calcitonin gene-related peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordgaard, Julie C; Kruse, Lars S; Møller, Morten

    2014-01-01

    Understanding of the neuropathology leading to migraine pain has centered on either a vascular or neuronal origin. Sildenafil, a specific inhibitor of phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5), induces migraine-like headache in a human headache model without concomitant artery dilation. The presence and activity...... of PDE3 and PDE5 is known in cerebral arteries. However, the presence in the neuronal part of the trigeminovascular pathway, i.e. the trigeminal ganglion and the possible co-localization with calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), is not known....

  15. Involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide in migraine: regional cerebral blood flow and blood flow velocity in migraine patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, L.H.; Jacobsen, V.B.; Haderslev, P.A.

    2008-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-containing nerves are closely associated with cranial blood vessels. CGRP is the most potent vasodilator known in isolated cerebral blood vessels. CGRP can induce migraine attacks, and two selective CGRP receptor antagonists are effective in the treatment...... g/min) or placebo for 20 min was studied in 12 patients with migraine without aura outside attacks. Xenon-133 inhalation SPECT-determined regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and transcranial Doppler (TCD)-determined blood velocity (V-mean) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA), as well as the heart...

  16. Role for voltage gated calcium channels in calcitonin gene-related peptide release in the rat trigeminovascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amrutkar, D V; Ploug, K B; Olesen, J

    2011-01-01

    Clinical and genetic studies have suggested a role for voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in the pathogenesis of migraine. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from trigeminal neurons has also been implicated in migraine. The VGCCs are located presynaptically on neurons and are i......Clinical and genetic studies have suggested a role for voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in the pathogenesis of migraine. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from trigeminal neurons has also been implicated in migraine. The VGCCs are located presynaptically on neurons...... and are involved in the release of these peptides to different stimuli. We have examined the presence and importance of VGCCs in controlling the CGRP release from rat dura mater, freshly isolated trigeminal ganglion (TG) and trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC). Each of the four VGCCs, P/Q-, N-, and L- and T...... the potassium induced CGRP release. In the absence of calcium ions (Ca2+) and in the presence of a cocktail of blockers, the stimulated CGRP release from dura mater was reduced almost to the same level as basal CGRP release. In the TG ¿-conotoxin GVIA inhibited the potassium induced CGRP release significantly...

  17. Role for voltage gated calcium channels in calcitonin gene-related peptide release in the rat trigeminovascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amrutkar, D V; Ploug, K B; Olesen, J

    2011-01-01

    Clinical and genetic studies have suggested a role for voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in the pathogenesis of migraine. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from trigeminal neurons has also been implicated in migraine. The VGCCs are located presynaptically on neurons and are i......Clinical and genetic studies have suggested a role for voltage gated calcium channels (VGCCs) in the pathogenesis of migraine. Release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from trigeminal neurons has also been implicated in migraine. The VGCCs are located presynaptically on neurons...... and are involved in the release of these peptides to different stimuli. We have examined the presence and importance of VGCCs in controlling the CGRP release from rat dura mater, freshly isolated trigeminal ganglion (TG) and trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC). Each of the four VGCCs, P/Q-, N-, and L- and T...... the potassium induced CGRP release. In the absence of calcium ions (Ca2+) and in the presence of a cocktail of blockers, the stimulated CGRP release from dura mater was reduced almost to the same level as basal CGRP release. In the TG ω-conotoxin GVIA inhibited the potassium induced CGRP release significantly...

  18. Fmoc Solid-Phase Synthesis of Human a-Calcitonin Gene- Related Peptide and Two Carboxyfluorescein-labeled Analogs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahmed, L. Sabbah; Abdolalizadeh, Bahareh; Sheykhzade, Majid

    Human-alpha-Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (h-alpha-CGRP) is a naturally occurring 37 amino acid vasodilatory neuropeptide amide, ACDTATCVTHRLAGLLSRSGGVVKNNFVPTNVGSKAF, with a disulfide bond between residues 2 and 7. The peptide is found in primary afferent sensory nerves and is widely distributed...... for biological activity and onset of signal transduction. Fluorescent h-alpha-CGRP analogs are useful for investigating the mechanism of action behind (re)uptake of h-alpha-CGRP into the sensory nerve terminals and monitoring trafficking of CGRP receptors. As part of an ongoing study on the mechanism of action......–17. Following purification by preparative HPLC, concentration-response curves were made with fluorescent CGRP analogues on isolated human subcutaneous arteries. CGRP (fluolysine35) and CGRP (wildtype) showed similar potency (pIC50 = 9.40) while CGRP (fluolysine24) showed approximately 5-fold less potency (pIC50...

  19. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide (Cgrp, Adrenomedullin (Am, Amylin, And Calcitonin (Ct Receptors And Overlapping Biological Actions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.A. Fischer

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available CGRP, AM, amylin, and CT have in common N-terminal 6-7 amino acid ring structures linked by disulfide bridges and amidated C-termini required for biological activity. For the related bioactive peptides, receptor-binding sites linked to cAMP stimulation and to a lesser extent to the phospholipase C signaling pathway have been identified in tissue specific manner. The highest density of CGRP receptors has been recognized in the cerebellum and the spinal cord. There photoaffinity-labeled N-glycosylated 60,000 and 54,000 Mr proteins are converted to 46,000 and 41,000 Mr components following endoglycosidase F/N-glycosidase F treatment. The same proteins were specifically labeled with [125I]-hCGRP-I(1-37 and -(8-37. Some cross-reaction between the CGRP receptor and AM was evident whereas amylin and CT were only recognized at over 10-7 M. A different AM receptor localized predominantly in the lung recognized CGRP at low, and amylin and calcitonin at equally high concentrations. CT receptor binding sites have been identified in osteoclasts and in the periventricular region of the brain. They cross-reacted with amylin at low concentrations and with CGRP and AM at over 10-7 M. Amylin receptor binding sites cross-reacting with salmon CT and CGRP but not with hCT and adrenomedullin to any great extent were originally described by Sexton in the nucleus accumbens and may represent a second CGRP receptor. The structure of a CT receptor was elucidated by the group of Goldring in 1991 through molecular cloning, and of a 60% homologous human CT receptor-like receptor (CRLR shortly thereafter here. The latter was an orphan receptor until the discovery of the receptor-activity-modifying proteins (RAMP by Foord which upon coexpression yield a CGRP receptor with RAMP1 and an AM receptor with RAMP2. Coexpression of the hCT receptor isotype 2 revealed a CGRP/amylin receptor with RAMP1 and an amylin receptor isotype with RAMP3. The CRLR/RAMP1 receptor antagonized by

  20. Sumatriptan does not change calcitonin gene-related peptide in the cephalic and extracephalic circulation in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Møller; Petersen, Jesper; Wienecke, Troels

    2009-01-01

    sumatriptan modulate the baseline CGRP levels in vivo, under conditions without trigeminovascular system activation. We sampled blood from the internal and external jugular, the cubital veins, and the radial artery before and after administration of subcutaneous sumatriptan in 16 healthy volunteers. Repeated-measure...... not differ between the four vascular compartments (P=0.49). It was found that Sumatriptan did not change the levels of circulating CGRP in the intra or extracerebral circulation in healthy volunteers. This speaks against a direct CGRP-reducing effect of sumatriptan in vivo in humans when the trigemino......Triptans are effective and well tolerated in acute migraine management but their exact mechanism of action is still debated. Triptans might exert their antimigraine effect by reducing the levels of circulating calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). To examine this question, we examined whether...

  1. Contribution of kv7.4/kv7.5 heteromers to intrinsic and calcitonin gene-related Peptide-induced cerebral reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chadha, Preet S; Jepps, Thomas A; Carr, Georgina

    2014-01-01

    Middle cerebral artery (MCA) diameter is regulated by inherent myogenic activity and the effect of potent vasodilators such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Previous studies showed that MCAs express KCNQ1, 4, and 5 potassium channel genes, and the expression products (Kv7 channels...

  2. Role of extracellular calcitonin gene-related peptide in spinal cord mechanisms of cancer-induced bone pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Rikke R; Vacca, Valentina; Pitcher, Thomas; Clark, Anna K; Malcangio, Marzia

    2016-03-01

    Severe pain is a common and debilitating complication of metastatic bone cancer. Current analgesics provide insufficient pain relief and often lead to significant adverse effects. In models of cancer-induced bone pain, pathological sprouting of sensory fibers at the tumor-bone interface occurs concomitantly with reactive astrocytosis in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord. We observed that calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-fiber sprouting in the bone was associated with an increase in CGRP content in sensory neuron cell bodies in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and increased basal and activity-evoked release of CGRP from their central terminals in the dorsal horn. Intrathecal administration of a peptide antagonist (α-CGRP8-37) attenuated referred allodynia in the hind paw ipsilateral to bone cancer. CGRP receptor components (CLR and RAMP1) were up-regulated in dorsal horn neurons and expressed by reactive astrocytes. In primary cultures of astrocytes, CGRP incubation led to a concentration-dependent increase of forskolin-induced cAMP production, which was attenuated by pretreatment with CGRP8-37. Furthermore, CGRP induced ATP release in astrocytes, which was inhibited by CGRP8-37. We suggest that the peripheral increase in CGRP content observed in cancer-induced bone pain is mirrored by a central increase in the extracellular levels of CGRP. This increase in CGRP not only may facilitate glutamate-driven neuronal nociceptive signaling but also act on astrocytic CGRP receptors and lead to release of ATP.

  3. Effects of NSAIDs on the Release of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide and Prostaglandin E2 from Rat Trigeminal Ganglia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Vellani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are frequently used to treat migraine, but the mechanisms of their effects in this pathology are not fully elucidated. The trigeminal ganglia and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP have been implicated in the pathophysiology of migraine. The release of CGRP and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 from freshly isolated rat trigeminal ganglia was evaluated after oral administration of nimesulide, etoricoxib, and ketoprofen, NSAIDs with different pharmacological features. Thirty minutes after oral administration, nimesulide, 10 mg/Kg, decreased the GCRP release induced by an inflammatory soup, while the other NSAIDs were ineffective at this point in time. Two hours after oral nimesulide (5 and 10 mg/Kg and ketoprofen (10 mg/Kg, but not of etoricoxib, a significant decrease in the CGRP release was observed. All drugs reduced PGE2, although with some differences in timing and doses, and the action on CGRP does not seem to be related to PGE2 inhibition. The reduction of CGRP release from rat trigeminal ganglia after nimesulide and ketoprofen may help to explain the mechanism of action of NSAIDs in migraine. Since at 30 minutes only nimesulide was effective in reducing CGRP release, these results suggest that this NSAID may exert a particularly rapid effect in patients with migraine.

  4. Skin-bacteria communication: Involvement of the neurohormone Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide (CGRP) in the regulation of Staphylococcus epidermidis virulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    N’Diaye, Awa R.; Leclerc, Camille; Kentache, Takfarinas; Hardouin, Julie; Poc, Cecile Duclairoir; Konto-Ghiorghi, Yoan; Chevalier, Sylvie; Lesouhaitier, Olivier; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococci can sense Substance P (SP) in skin, but this molecule is generally released by nerve terminals along with another neuropeptide, Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide (CGRP). In this study, we investigated the effects of αCGRP on Staphylococci. CGRP induced a strong stimulation of Staphylococcus epidermidis virulence with a low threshold (Staphylococcus aureus was insensitive to CGRP. We observed that CGRP-treated S. epidermidis induced interleukin 8 release by keratinocytes. This effect was associated with an increase in cathelicidin LL37 secretion. S. epidermidis displayed no change in virulence factors secretion but showed marked differences in surface properties. After exposure to CGRP, the adherence of S. epidermidis to keratinocytes increased, whereas its internalization and biofilm formation activity were reduced. These effects were correlated with an increase in surface hydrophobicity. The DnaK chaperone was identified as the S. epidermidis CGRP-binding protein. We further showed that the effects of CGRP were blocked by gadolinium chloride (GdCl3), an inhibitor of MscL mechanosensitive channels. In addition, GdCl3 inhibited the membrane translocation of EfTu, the Substance P sensor. This work reveals that through interaction with specific sensors S. epidermidis integrates different skin signals and consequently adapts its virulence. PMID:27739485

  5. Effect of a calcitonin gene-related peptide-binding L-RNA aptamer on neuronal activity in the rat spinal trigeminal nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Michael J. M.; Schmidt, Jakob; Koulchitsky, Stanislav; Klussmann, Sven; Vater, Axel; Messlinger, Karl

    2018-01-01

    Background Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) plays a major role in the pathogenesis of migraine and other primary headaches. Spinal trigeminal neurons integrate nociceptive afferent input from trigeminal tissues including intracranial afferents, and their activity is thought to reflect facial pain and headache in man. CGRP receptor inhibitors and anti-CGRP antibodies have been demonstrated to be therapeutically effective in migraine. In parallel, CGRP receptor inhibition has been shown t...

  6. Calcitonin gene-related peptide in blood: is it increased in the external jugular vein during migraine and cluster headache? A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer; Le, Han

    2009-01-01

    The involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in migraine pathophysiological mechanisms is shown by the facts that CGRP can induce migraine and that two CGRP antagonists, olcegepant and telcagepant, are effective in the treatment of migraine attacks. Increase of the neuropeptide CGRP ...... likely a 'nervous vasodilatory drive' in the extracranial vascular bed. It remains an enigma how the observed increase of CGRP in the EJV fits into the mechanisms of migraine and cluster headache....

  7. Regulation of calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors in the rat uterus during pregnancy and labor and by progesterone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yallampalli, C; Gangula, P R; Kondapaka, S; Fang, L; Wimalawansa, S

    1999-10-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a potent smooth muscle relaxant in a variety of tissues. We recently demonstrated that CGRP relaxes uterine tissue during pregnancy but not during labor. In the present study we examined whether uterine (125)I-CGRP binding and immunoreactive CGRP receptors are regulated by pregnancy and labor and by sex steroid hormones. We found that (125)I-CGRP binding to membrane preparations from uteri was elevated during pregnancy and decreased during labor and postpartum. Changes in immunoreactive CGRP receptors were similar to the changes in (125)I-CGRP binding in these tissues, suggesting pregnancy-dependent regulation of CGRP receptor protein. CGRP receptors were elevated by Day 7 of gestation, and a precipitous decrease in these receptors occurred on Day 22 of gestation prior to the onset of labor. Both (125)I-CGRP-binding and immunofluorescence studies indicated that CGRP receptors were localized to myometrial cells. Hormonal control of uterine CGRP receptors was assessed by the use of antiprogesterone RU-486, progesterone, and estradiol-17beta. RU-486 induced a decrease in uterine CGRP receptors during pregnancy (Day 19). On the other hand, progesterone prevented the fall in uterine CGRP receptors at term (Day 22). In addition, progesterone also increased uterine CGRP receptors in nonpregnant, ovariectomized rats, while estradiol had no effects. These hormone-induced changes in uterine CGRP receptors were demonstrated by (125)I-CGRP-binding, Western immunoblotting, and immunolocalization methods. These results indicate that CGRP receptors and CGRP binding in the rat uterus are increased with pregnancy and decreased at term. These receptors are localized to the myometrial cells, and progesterone is required for maintaining CGRP receptors in the rat uterus. Thus, the inhibitory effects of CGRP on uterine contractility are mediated through the changes in CGRP receptors and may play a role in uterine quiescence during pregnancy.

  8. Non-excitatory electrical stimulation attenuates myocardial infarction via homeostasis of calcitonin gene-related peptide in myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhi-Jia; Guo, Zheng

    2015-03-01

    Electrical stimulation has been shown protection of brain, retina, optic nerves and pancreatic β-cells but the effect on cardio-protection is still unknown. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) participates in the pathology of injury and protection of myocardium but whether or not electrical stimulation modulates endogenous CGRP is not clear. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 groups: (1) control group, without any treatment. (2) I/R group, animals were subjected to 30 min of myocardial ischemia followed by 60 min reperfusion. (3) NES+I/R group, non-excitatory electrical stimulation (NES) was commenced from 15 min before coronary artery occlusion till the end of reperfusion. (4) I/R+CGRP8-37 group, animals were given with CGRP8-37 (an antagonist of CGRP receptor, 10(-7) mol/L, 0.3 ml, i.v.) at 5 min before reperfusion without any electrical stimulation. The hemodynamics and electrocardiogram were monitored and recorded. Infarct size and troponin I were examined and CGRP expression in the myocardium and serum was analyzed. It was found that the infarct size and TnI were significantly reduced in NES+I/R group, by 45% and 58% respectively, accompanied by an obvious fall back of CGRP in myocardium, compared to I/R group (all pTreatment with CGRP8-37 resulted in the same protection on myocardium as NES did. No significant difference in hemodynamics or ventricular tachycardia was detected among the groups (all p>0.05). It can be concluded that NES reduced the infarction size after acute myocardial ischemia and reperfusion, for which the underlying mechanism may be associated with modulation of endogenous CGRP in myocardium. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Elevated levels of calcitonin gene-related peptide in upper spinal cord promotes sensitization of primary trigeminal nociceptive neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelison, Lauren E; Hawkins, Jordan L; Durham, Paul L

    2016-12-17

    Orofacial pain conditions including temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and migraine are characterized by peripheral and central sensitization of trigeminal nociceptive neurons. The goal of this study was to investigate the role of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in promoting bidirectional signaling within the trigeminal system to mediate sensitization of primary nociceptive neurons. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected intercisternally with CGRP or co-injected with the receptor antagonist CGRP8-37 or KT 5720, a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor. Nocifensive head withdrawal response to mechanical stimulation was investigated using von Frey filaments. Expression of PKA, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba1) in the spinal cord and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (P-ERK) in the ganglion was studied using immunohistochemistry. Some animals were co-injected with CGRP and Fast Blue dye and the ganglion was imaged using fluorescent microscopy. CGRP increased nocifensive responses to mechanical stimulation when compared to control. Co-injection of CGRP8-37 or KT 5720 with CGRP inhibited the nocifensive response. CGRP stimulated PKA and GFAP expression in the spinal cord, and P-ERK in ganglion neurons. Seven days post injection, Fast Blue was observed in ganglion neurons and satellite glial cells. Our results demonstrate that elevated levels of CGRP in the upper spinal cord promote sensitization of primary nociceptive neurons via a mechanism that involves activation of PKA centrally and P-ERK in ganglion neurons. Our findings provide evidence of bidirectional signaling within the trigeminal system that facilitate increased neuron-glia communication within the ganglion associated with trigeminal sensitization. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Calcitonin gene-related peptide exerts anti-inflammatory property through regulating murine macrophages polarization in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jia-Xi; Zhou, Yong; Zhou, Ai-Yuan; Guan, Xin-Xin; Liu, Tian; Yang, Hui-Hui; Xie, Hui; Chen, Ping

    2017-11-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) is a condition resulting from direct or indirect lung injury associated with high mortality and morbidity. The phenotype of macrophages in lung contributes to the pathological progress of ALI. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is one of the most abundant neuropeptides in lung, and attenuates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced ALI in rats. However, the exact effect of CGRP on the activation of macrophages remains unknown. Here we investigate the effect of CGRP on the macrophages activation and inflammation in murine macrophages in vitro. We found that LPS increased the expression of CGRP in a LPS-induced ALI murine model and LPS-stimulated murine macrophages. Although CGRP didn't alter the expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (a marker of pro-inflammatory phenotype of macrophages, M1 macrophages) or Arginase 1 (Arg1, a marker of M2 macrophages) in non-differentiated macrophages, CGRP significantly reduced the NLRP3 and pro-IL-1β mRNA expression induced by LPS, as well as NLRP3 protein and IL-1β secretion induced by LPS+ATP in macrophages in vitro. On the other hand, CGRP dramatically enhanced the Arg1 expression and activity induced by IL-4 in the time- and dose-dependent manners. CGRP also promoted the expression of markers of M2 macrophages (IL-10, Fizz1 and Mrc1) induced by IL-4 in murine macrophages. These effects of CGRP were also observed in primary murine peritoneal macrophages. In addition, we found that CGRP regulated macrophages polarization partially through calmodulin, PKC and PKA pathways. Specifically, CGRP could inhibit the degradation of I-κB induced by LPS, and enhance the phosphorylation of STAT6 induced by IL-4 in macrophages. In conclusion, our results indicate that CGRP regulates macrophage polarization and inhibits inflammation in murine macrophages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Presence and function of the calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor on rat pial arteries investigated in vitro and in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, K A; Nilsson, E; Olesen, J

    2005-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and related peptides may be involved in migraine pathogenesis. To understand their vasomotor role in the cerebral circulation, we performed two studies, a pressurized arteriography study of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) and a genuine closed cranial window......, this was probably secondary to a decrease in blood pressure of 44.8 +/- 3.3 mmHg and 49.2 +/- 3.3 mmHg. Our results suggest that CGRP receptors are probably functional on the smooth muscle cells and not on the endothelium of rat cerebral arteries....

  12. High arterial compliance in cirrhosis is related to low adrenaline and elevated circulating calcitonin gene related peptide but not to activated vasoconstrictor systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Møller, Søren; Schifter, S

    2001-01-01

    catecholamines, renin activity, endothelin-1, and calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP) at baseline and during oxygen inhalation. RESULTS: COMP(art) was significantly increased in cirrhotic patients compared with controls (1.32 v 1.06 ml/mm Hg; p....53; prenin activity, or endothelin-1. COMP(art) was positively related to plasma volume (r=0.50; p... to COMP(art) disappeared. The relation of COMP(art) to CGRP and circulatory variables remained unchanged. CONCLUSION: Elevated arterial compliance in cirrhosis is related to low adrenaline, high CGRP, and systemic hyperdynamics but not to indicators of the activated vasoconstrictor systems (noradrenaline...

  13. Localization of large conductance calcium-activated potassium channels and their effect on calcitonin gene-related peptide release in the rat trigemino-neuronal pathway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulf-Johansson, H.; Amrutkar, D.V.; Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2010-01-01

    Large conductance calcium-activated potassium (BK(Ca)) channels are membrane proteins contributing to electrical propagation through neurons. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuropeptide found in the trigeminovascular system (TGVS). Both BK(Ca) channels and CGRP are involved in migraine...... pathophysiology. Here we study the expression and localization of BK(Ca) channels and CGRP in the rat trigeminal ganglion (TG) and the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC) as these structures are involved in migraine pain. Also the effect of the BK(Ca) channel blocker iberiotoxin and the BK(Ca) channel opener NS...

  14. Role of KATP channels in cephalic vasodilatation induced by calcitonin gene-related peptide, nitric oxide, and transcranial electrical stimulation in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gozalov, Aydin; Jansen-Olesen, Inger; Klærke, Dan Arne

    2008-01-01

    arteries causes a throbbing, migraine-like pain. Both CGRP and NO are potent vasodilators that can induce migraine. Their antagonists are effective in the treatment of migraine attacks. K(ATP) channel openers cause headache in the majority of healthy subjects suggesting a role for K(ATP) channels......OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to explore the role of K(ATP) channels in vasodilatation induced by calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), nitric oxide (NO), and transcranial electrical stimulation (TES) in intracranial arteries of rat. BACKGROUND: Dilatation of cerebral and dural...... in migraine pathogenesis. We hypothesized that vasodilatation induced by CGRP and the NO donor glyceryltrinitrate (GTN) is mediated via K(ATP) channels. METHODS: We examined the effects of the K(ATP) channel inhibitor glibenclamide on dural and pial vasodilatation induced by CGRP, NO, and endogenously...

  15. Nitric oxide synthase, calcitonin gene-related peptide and NK-1 receptor mechanisms are involved in GTN-induced neuronal activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramachandran, Roshni; Bhatt, Deepak Kumar; Ploug, Kenneth Beri

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIM: Infusion of glyceryltrinitrate (GTN), a nitric oxide (NO) donor, in awake, freely moving rats closely mimics a universally accepted human model of migraine and responds to sumatriptan treatment. Here we analyse the effect of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and calcitonin gene......-related peptide (CGRP) systems on the GTN-induced neuronal activation in this model. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The femoral vein was catheterised in rats and GTN was infused (4 µg/kg/min, for 20 minutes, intravenously). Immunohistochemistry was performed to analyse Fos, nNOS and CGRP and Western blot for measuring n......NOS protein expression. The effect of olcegepant, L-nitro-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and neurokinin (NK)-1 receptor antagonist L-733060 were analysed on Fos activation. RESULTS: GTN-treated rats showed a significant increase of nNOS and CGRP in dura mater and CGRP in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC...

  16. Muscle injury in rats induces upregulation of inflammatory cytokines in injured muscle and calcitonin gene-related peptide in dorsal root ganglia innervating the injured muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Yoshihiro; Miyagi, Masayuki; Inoue, Gen; Ishikawa, Tetsuhiro; Kamoda, Hiroto; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Orita, Sumihisa; Suzuki, Miyako; Oikawa, Yasuhiro; Inage, Kazuhide; Kubota, Go; Sainoh, Takeshi; Sato, Jun; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

    2016-10-01

    In this study we evaluated the relationships among the behavioral changes after muscle injury, histological changes, changes in inflammatory cytokines in the injured muscle, and changes in the sensory nervous system innervating the muscle in rats. We established a model of muscle injury in rats using a dropped weight. Behavior was assessed using the CatWalk system. Subsequently, bilateral gastrocnemius muscles and dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) were resected. Muscles were stained with hematoxylin and eosin, and inflammatory cytokines in injured muscles were assayed. DRGs were immunostained for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Changes of behavior and upregulation of inflammatory cytokines in injured muscles subsided within 2 days of injury. Repaired tissue was observed 3 weeks after injury. However, upregulation of CGRP in DRG neurons continued for 2 weeks after injury. These findings may explain in part the pathological mechanism of persistent muscle pain. Muscle Nerve 54: 776-782, 2016. © 2016 The Authors Muscle & Nerve Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Receptor activity-modifying protein dependent and independent activation mechanisms in the coupling of calcitonin gene-related peptide and adrenomedullin receptors to Gs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Michael J; Reynolds, Christopher A; Simms, John; Walker, Christopher S; Mobarec, Juan Carlos; Garelja, Michael L; Conner, Alex C; Poyner, David R; Hay, Debbie L

    2017-10-15

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) or adrenomedullin (AM) receptors are heteromers of the calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR), a class B G protein-coupled receptor, and one of three receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMPs). How CGRP and AM activate CLR and how this process is modulated by RAMPs is unclear. We have defined how CGRP and AM induce Gs-coupling in CLR-RAMP heteromers by measuring the effect of targeted mutagenesis in the CLR transmembrane domain on cAMP production, modeling the active state conformations of CGRP and AM receptors in complex with the Gs C-terminus and conducting molecular dynamics simulations in an explicitly hydrated lipidic bilayer. The largest effects on receptor signaling were seen with H295A5.40b, I298A5.43b, L302A5.47b, N305A5.50b, L345A6.49b and E348A6.52b, F349A6.53b and H374A7.47b (class B numbering in superscript). Many of these residues are likely to form part of a group in close proximity to the peptide binding site and link to a network of hydrophilic and hydrophobic residues, which undergo rearrangements to facilitate Gs binding. Residues closer to the extracellular loops displayed more pronounced RAMP or ligand-dependent effects. Mutation of H3747.47b to alanine increased AM potency 100-fold in the CGRP receptor. The molecular dynamics simulation showed that TM5 and TM6 pivoted around TM3. The data suggest that hydrophobic interactions are more important for CLR activation than other class B GPCRs, providing new insights into the mechanisms of activation of this class of receptor. Furthermore the data may aid in the understanding of how RAMPs modulate the signaling of other class B GPCRs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Calcitonin gene-related peptide erases the fear memory and facilitates long-term potentiation in the central nucleus of the amygdala in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xin; Zhang, Jie-Ting; Liu, Jue; Yang, Si; Chen, Tao; Chen, Jian-Guo; Wang, Fang

    2015-11-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a 37 amino acid neuropeptide, which plays a critical role in the central nervous system. CGRP binds to G protein-coupled receptors, including CGRP1, which couples positively to adenylyl cyclase (AC) and protein kinase A (PKA) activation. CGRP and CGRP1 receptors are enriched in central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), the main part of the amygdala, which regulates conditioned fear memories. Here, we reported the importance of CGRP and CGRP1 receptor for synaptic plasticity in the CeA and the extinction of fear memory in rats. Our electrophysiological and behavioral in vitro and in vivo results showed exogenous application of CGRP induced an immediate and lasting long-term potentiation in the basolateral nucleus of amygdala-CeA pathway, but not in the lateral nucleus of amygdala-CeA pathway, while bilateral intra-CeA infusion CGRP (0, 5, 13 and 21 μM/side) dose dependently enhanced fear memory extinction. The effects were blocked by CGRP1 receptor antagonist (CGRP8-37 ), N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors antagonist MK801 and PKA inhibitor H89. These results demonstrate that CGRP can lead to long-term potentiation of basolateral nucleus of amygdala-CeA pathway through a PKA-dependent postsynaptic mechanism that involved N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors and enhance the extinction of fear memory in rats. Together, the results strongly support a pivotal role of CGRP in the synaptic plasticity of CeA and extinction of fear memory. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) plays an essential role in synaptic plasticity in the amygdala and fear memory. We found that CGRP-induced chemical long-term potentiation (LTP) in a dose-dependent way in the BLA-CeA (basolateral and central nucleus of amygdala, respectively) pathway and enhanced fear memory extinction in rats through a protein kinase A (PKA)-dependent postsynaptic mechanism that involved NMDA receptors. These results support a pivotal role of CGRP in amygdala. © 2015 International

  19. Calcitonin gene-related peptide protects the myocardium from ischemia induced by endothelin-1: intravital microscopic observation and (31)P-MR spectroscopic studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homma, Satoshi; Kimura, Taizo; Sakai, Satoshi; Yanagi, Ken-ichi; Miyauchi, Yumi; Aonuma, Kazutaka; Miyauchi, Takashi

    2014-11-24

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a potent vasodilator neuropeptide. We investigated the ameliorating effect of CGRP in myocardial ischemia induced by endothelin-1 (ET-1), with special emphasis on myocardial microvascular hemodynamics and levels of energy-related metabolites. The Langendorff preparations of rat isolated heart were perfused at a constant flow rate. Microvascular blood flow was also visualized in the anterior epicardium of the left ventricle by means of an intravital fluorescence microscope system. Energy-related metabolite contents in the myocardium were measured by means of (31)P-magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((31)P-MRS). Intracoronary bolus injections of CGRP caused dose-dependent decreases in coronary perfusion pressure (CPP) in the hearts exposed to ET-1 (30 pmol). The vasodilator potency of CGRP was about 10,000-fold greater than that of nitroglycerin and 1,000-fold greater than that of isobutylmethylxanthine. Vasodilation of the small-sized arterioles (10-40 μm in diameter) in response to CGRP (100 pmol) was confirmed by direct microscopic observation. After ET-1 (30 pmol) plus vehicle administration, high energy phosphates (phosphocreatine (PCr), ATP) were markedly reduced (pchanges in the myocardium (decrease in PCr) and macrohemodynamic alterations (increase in CPP, decrease in dP/dt etc.) induced by ET-1. We conclude that CGRP effectively confers hemodynamic and metabolic protections to isolated beating hearts against ET-1-induced myocardial ischemia. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. A research design for the quantification of the neuropeptides substance p and calcitonin gene-related Peptide in rat skin using Western blot analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapin, Guilherme Abbud Franco; Hochman, Bernardo; Nishioka, Michele Akemi; Maximino, Jessica Ruivo; Chadi, Gerson; Ferreira, Lydia Masako

    2015-06-01

    To describe and standardize a protocol that overcomes the technical limitations of Western blot (WB) analysis in the quantification of the neuropeptides substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) following nociceptive stimuli in rat skin. Male Wistar rats (Rattus norvegicus albinus) weighing 250 to 350 g were used in this study. Elements of WB analysis were adapted by using specific manipulation of samples, repeated cycles of freezing and thawing, more thorough maceration, and a more potent homogenizer; increasing lytic reagents; promoting greater inhibition of protease activity; and using polyvinylidene fluoride membranes as transfer means for skin-specific protein. Other changes were also made to adapt the WB analysis to a rat model. University research center. Western blot analysis adapted to a rat model. This research design has proven effective in collecting and preparing skin samples to quantify SP and CGRP using WB analysis in rat skin. This study described a research design that uses WB analysis as a reproducible, technically accessible, and cost-effective method for the quantification of SP and CGRP in rat skin that overcomes technical biases.

  1. Dynamics of calcitonin gene-related peptide-like cells changes in the lungs of two-kidney, one-clip rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Kasacka

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Taking into consideration renal hypertension-induced homeostatic disorders and the key role of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP in many, systemic functions regulating systems, a question arises as to what an extent arterial hypertension affects the morphology and dynamics of pulmonary CGRP-immunopositive cell changes. The aim of the present study was to examine the distribution, morphology and dynamics of changes of CGRP-containing cells in the lungs of rats in the two-kidney, one-clip (2K1C renovascular hypertension model. The studies were carried out on the lungs of rats after 3, 14, 28, 42, and 91 days long period from the renal artery clipping procedure. In order to identify neuroendocrine cells, immunohistochemical reaction was performed with the use of a specific antibody against CGRP. It was revealed that renovascular hypertension caused changes in the neuroendocrine, CGRP-containing cells in the lungs of rats. The changes, observed in the neuroendocrine cells, depended on time periods from experimentally induced hypertension. The highest intensity of changes in the neuroendocrine cells was observed in the lungs of rats after 14 days from the surgery.

  2. Isolation and molecular characterization of porcine calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and its endocrine effects in the porcine pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, T N; Bersani, M; Schmidt, P

    1998-01-01

    was found in the two tissues. The adrenal peptide was sequenced and found to differ from human alpha-CGRP at six positions and from human beta-CGRP at three positions. By immunohistochemistry, CGRP was found in nerve fibers in the pancreatic ganglia. A synthetic replica of the porcine peptide was infused...... significantly by 10(-8) M CGRP. In immunoneutralization studies (n = 6) using a high-affinity somatostatin antibody, the inhibitory effect of CGRP at 10(-8) M was reversed to a significant stimulation of insulin and glucagon secretion. Insulin secretion in response to square-wave increases in glucose...

  3. Impact of Food Components on in vitro Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Secretion—A Potential Mechanism for Dietary Influence on Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Margaret; Bourguignon, Julia; Jackson, Kyle; Orciga, Michael-Angelo

    2016-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a pivotal messenger in the inflammatory process in migraine. Limited evidence indicates that diet impacts circulating levels of CGRP, suggesting that certain elements in the diet may influence migraine outcomes. Interruption of calcium signaling, a mechanism which can trigger CGRP release, has been suggested as one potential route by which exogenous food substances may impact CGRP secretion. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of foods and a dietary supplement on two migraine-related mechanisms in vitro: CGRP secretion from neuroendocrine CA77 cells, and calcium uptake by differentiated PC12 cells. Ginger and grape pomace extracts were selected for their anecdotal connections to reducing or promoting migraine. S-petasin was selected as a suspected active constituent of butterbur extract, the migraine prophylactic dietary supplement. Results showed a statistically significant decrease in stimulated CGRP secretion from CA77 cells following treatment with ginger (0.2 mg dry ginger equivalent/mL) and two doses of grape pomace (0.25 and 1.0 mg dry pomace equivalent/mL) extracts. Relative to vehicle control, CGRP secretion decreased by 22%, 43%, and 87%, respectively. S-petasin at 1.0 μM also decreased CGRP secretion by 24%. Meanwhile, S-petasin and ginger extract showed inhibition of calcium influx, whereas grape pomace had no effect on calcium. These results suggest that grape pomace and ginger extracts, and S-petasin may have anti-inflammatory propensity by preventing CGRP release in migraine, although potentially by different mechanisms, which future studies may elucidate further. PMID:27376323

  4. Role of peptidergic nerve terminals in the skin: reversal of thermal sensation by calcitonin gene-related peptide in TRPV1-depleted neuropathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Lin Hsieh

    Full Text Available To investigate the contribution of peptidergic intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs to nociceptive responses after depletion of the thermal-sensitive receptor, transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1, we took advantage of a resiniferatoxin (RTX-induced neuropathy which specifically affected small-diameter dorsal root ganglion (DRG neurons and their corresponding nerve terminals in the skin. Thermal hypoalgesia (p<0.001 developed from RTX-treatment day 7 (RTXd7 and became normalized from RTXd56 to RTXd84. Substance P (SP(+ and TRPV1(+ neurons were completely depleted (p = 0.0001 and p<0.0001, respectively, but RTX had a relatively minor effect on calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP(+ neurons (p = 0.029. Accordingly, SP(+ (p<0.0001 and TRPV1(+ (p = 0.0008 IENFs were permanently depleted, but CGRP(+ IENFs (p = 0.012 were only transiently reduced and had recovered by RTXd84 (p = 0.83. The different effects of RTX on peptidergic neurons were attributed to the higher co-localization ratio of TRPV1/SP than of TRPV1/CGRP (p = 0.029. Thermal hypoalgesia (p = 0.0018 reappeared with an intraplantar injection of botulinum toxin type A (botox, and the temporal course of withdrawal latencies in the hot-plate test paralleled the innervation of CGRP(+ IENFs (p = 0.0003 and CGRP contents in skin (p = 0.01. In summary, this study demonstrated the preferential effects of RTX on depletion of SP(+ IENFs which caused thermal hypoalgesia. In contrast, the skin was reinnervated by CGRP(+ IENFs, which resulted in a normalization of nociceptive functions.

  5. Somatostatin, substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide-positive intramural nerve structures of the human large intestine affected by carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Kaleczyc

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the arrangement and chemical coding of enteric nerve structures in the human large intestine affected by cancer. Tissue samples comprising all layers of the intestinal wall were collected during surgery form both morphologically unchanged and pathologically altered segments of the intestine (n=15, and fixed by immersion in buffered paraformaldehyde solution. The cryostat sections were processed for double-labelling immunofluorescence to study the distribution of the intramural nerve structures (visualized with antibodies against protein gene-product 9.5 and their chemical coding using antibodies against somatostatin (SOM, substance P (SP and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP. The microscopic observations revealed distinct morphological differences in the enteric nerve system structure between the region adjacent to the cancer invaded area and the intact part of the intestine. In general, infiltration of the cancer tissue resulted in the gradual (depending on the grade of invasion first decomposition and reduction to final partial or complete destruction and absence of the neuronal elements. A comparative analysis of immunohistochemically labeled sections (from the unchanged and pathologically altered areas revealed a statistically significant decrease in the number of CGRP-positive neurons and nerve fibres in both submucous and myenteric plexuses in the transitional zone between morphologically unchanged and cancer-invaded areas. In this zone, a decrease was also observed in the density of SP-positive nerve fibres in all intramural plexuses. Conversely, the investigations demonstrated statistically insignificant differences in number of SP- and SOM-positive neurons and a similar density of SOM-positive nerve fibres in the plexuses of the intact and pathologically changed areas. The differentiation between the potential adaptive changes in ENS or destruction of its elements by cancer invasion should be

  6. Crocin improved locomotor function and mechanical behavior in the rat model of contused spinal cord injury through decreasing calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karami, Masoume; Bathaie, S Zahra; Tiraihi, Taqi; Habibi-Rezaei, Mehran; Arabkheradmand, Jalil; Faghihzadeh, Soghrat

    2013-12-15

    Various approaches have been offered to alleviate chronic pain resulting from spinal cord injuries (SCIs). Application of herbs and natural products, with potentially lower adverse effects, to cure diseases has been recommended in both traditional and modern medicines. Here, the effect of crocin on chronic pain induced by spinal cord contusion was investigated in an animal model. Female Wistar rats were randomly divided into five groups (5 rats in each); three groups were contused at the L1 level. One group was treated with crocin (150mg/kg) two weeks after spinal cord injury; the second group, control, was treated with vehicle only; and the third group was treated with ketoprofen. Two normal groups were also considered with or without crocin treatment. The mechanical behavioral test, the locomotor recovery test and the thermal behavioral test were applied weekly to evaluate the injury and recovery of rats. Significant improvements (p<0.05) in mechanical behavioral and locomotor recovery tests were seen in the rats treated with crocin. Thermal behavioral test did not show any significant changes due to crocin treatment. Plasma concentration of calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP) changed from 780.2±2.3 to 1140.3±4.5pg/ml due to SCI and reached 789.1±2.7pg/ml after crocin treatment. These changes were significant at the level of p<0.05. The present study shows the beneficial effects of crocin treatment on chronic pain induced by SCI, through decreasing CGRP as an important mediator of inflammation and pain. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Amygdalin improves microcirculatory disturbance and attenuates pancreatic fibrosis by regulating the expression of endothelin-1 and calcitonin gene-related peptide in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiangqun; Hu, Jiangong; Zhuo, Yuzhen; Cui, Lihua; Li, Caixia; Cui, Naiqiang; Zhang, Shukun

    2017-11-09

    The pathogenesis of chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a complex process of interaction between tissue injury and repair, which involves microcirculatory disturbance. Amygdalin, an effective component extracted from Semen Persicae (a kind of Chinese herbal medicine), can decrease blood viscosity and improve microcirculation. In this study, we investigated the therapeutic effects of amygdalin on pancreatic fibrosis in rats with CP. The rat CP model was induced by injecting dibutyltin dichloride (DBTC) into the right caudal vein. Amygdalin was administrated via the penile vein at a dose of 10 mg/(kg d) from the next day, after the induction of CP, once a day for the previous 3 days, and then once every 2 days, until the end of the experiment. Body weight was observed every 7 days. Pancreatic blood flow and histopathological changes were assessed at 28 days. The activation of pancreatic stellate cells (PSCs) was estimated by the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA). At the same time, the expression of platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), transforming growth factor β-1 (TGFβ-1), endothelin-1 (ET-1), and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) of pancreatic tissues were detected. Treatment of CP rats with amygdalin improved body weight and pancreatic blood flow, as well as alleviated pancreatic fibrosis and acinar destruction, accompanied by the down-regulation of the expressions of α-SMA, PDGF-BB, TGFβ-1, and ET-1, and the up-regulation of the CGRP's expression. Amygdalin could reduce the production of pro-fibrotic cytokines, inhibit the activation of PSCs, and attenuate pancreatic fibrosis in a rat with CP. The mechanism probably includes improving microcirculatory disturbance by regulating the production of ET-1 and CGRP. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  8. [The expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide in the sensory and motor neurons associated with "Hegu" (LI 4) in the rat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Li-Juan; Cui, Jing-Jing; Wang, Fu-Chun; Jing, Xiang-Hong; Bai, Wan-Zhu

    2014-04-01

    To investigate the chemical expression of the primary sensory and motor neurons associated with "Hegu" (LI 4) area by using neural tracing and fluorescent immunohistochemical techniques. A total of 4 SD rats were used in the present study. After anesthesia, the rats received microinjection of 5 microL of Alexa Fluor 594 conjugated cholera toxin subunit B (AF 594-CTB) into the right "Hegu" (LI 4) area for observing the distribution of the related primary sensory neurons in dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) and motor neurons in the spinal cord (C 1 - C 5). Three days after the microinjection, the rats were anesthetized and transcardiacally perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde, followed by routine section of the DRGs and spinal cord tissues. The labeled neurons were observed by light microscope and their chemical characteristics determined by calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) fluorescent immunohistochemical method. All the AF 594-CTB labeled neurons in DRGs and spinal cord were located on the side of the tracer injection. The labeled sensory neurons distributed in DRGs of cervical (C) 5 to thoracic (T) 1 segments with a high concentration in C 7 DRG in which 73.5% sensory neurons were shown to be CGRP-positive. The labeled motor neurons were found to be in the dorsolateral region of the spinal anterior horns from C 6 to T 1 segments, with a high concentration at C 8 in which 100% motor neurons were shown to be CGRP-positive. Acupoint LI 4 is innervated by sensory neurons from DRGs of C 5 - T 1 and motor neurons from anterior horns of the same segmental spinal cord in rats. Among them, 73.5% of the sensory neurons and 100% of the motor neurons are CGRP-positive, suggesting an involvement of CGRP in acupuncture stimulation-LI 4 induced therapeutic effects.

  9. Impact of Food Components on in vitro Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Secretion—A Potential Mechanism for Dietary Influence on Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret Slavin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP is a pivotal messenger in the inflammatory process in migraine. Limited evidence indicates that diet impacts circulating levels of CGRP, suggesting that certain elements in the diet may influence migraine outcomes. Interruption of calcium signaling, a mechanism which can trigger CGRP release, has been suggested as one potential route by which exogenous food substances may impact CGRP secretion. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of foods and a dietary supplement on two migraine-related mechanisms in vitro: CGRP secretion from neuroendocrine CA77 cells, and calcium uptake by differentiated PC12 cells. Ginger and grape pomace extracts were selected for their anecdotal connections to reducing or promoting migraine. S-petasin was selected as a suspected active constituent of butterbur extract, the migraine prophylactic dietary supplement. Results showed a statistically significant decrease in stimulated CGRP secretion from CA77 cells following treatment with ginger (0.2 mg dry ginger equivalent/mL and two doses of grape pomace (0.25 and 1.0 mg dry pomace equivalent/mL extracts. Relative to vehicle control, CGRP secretion decreased by 22%, 43%, and 87%, respectively. S-petasin at 1.0 μM also decreased CGRP secretion by 24%. Meanwhile, S-petasin and ginger extract showed inhibition of calcium influx, whereas grape pomace had no effect on calcium. These results suggest that grape pomace and ginger extracts, and S-petasin may have anti-inflammatory propensity by preventing CGRP release in migraine, although potentially by different mechanisms, which future studies may elucidate further.

  10. A potent and selective calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist, MK-8825, inhibits responses to nociceptive trigeminal activation: Role of CGRP in orofacial pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Reyes, Marcela; Pardi, Vanessa; Akerman, Simon

    2015-09-01

    Temporomandibular disorders (TMDs) are orofacial pains within the trigeminal distribution, which involve the masticatory musculature, the temporomandibular joint or both. Their pathophysiology remains unclear, as inflammatory mediators are thought to be involved, and clinically TMD presents pain and sometimes limitation of function, but often appears without gross indications of local inflammation, such as visible edema, redness and increase in temperature. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has been implicated in other pain disorders with trigeminal distribution, such as migraine, of which TMD shares a significant co-morbidity. CGRP causes activation and sensitization of trigeminal primary afferent neurons, independent of any inflammatory mechanisms, and thus may also be involved in TMD. Here we used a small molecule, selective CGRP receptor antagonist, MK-8825, to dissect the role of CGRP in inducing spontaneous nociceptive facial grooming behaviors, neuronal activation in the trigeminal nucleus, and systemic release of pro-inflammatory cytokines, in a mouse model of acute orofacial masseteric muscle pain that we have developed, as a surrogate of acute TMD. We show that CFA masseteric injection causes significant spontaneous orofacial pain behaviors, neuronal activation in the trigeminal nucleus, and release of interleukin-6 (IL-6). In mice pre-treated with MK-8825 there is a significant reduction in these spontaneous orofacial pain behaviors. Also, at 2 and 24h after CFA injection the level of Fos immunoreactivity in the trigeminal nucleus, used as a marker of neuronal activation, was much lower on both ipsilateral and contralateral sides after pre-treatment with MK-8825. There was no effect of MK-8825 on the release of IL-6. These data suggest that CGRP may be involved in TMD pathophysiology, but not via inflammatory mechanisms, at least in the acute stage. Furthermore, CGRP receptor antagonists may have therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of TMD, as they

  11. Nocistatin inhibits pregnant rat uterine contractions in vitro: roles of calcitonin gene-related peptide and calcium-dependent potassium channel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deák, Beáta H; Klukovits, Anna; Tekes, Kornélia; Ducza, Eszter; Falkay, George; Gáspár, Róbert

    2013-08-15

    The endogenous neuropeptide nociceptin/orphanin FQ, translated from the prepronociceptin gene, exerts a contraction-inhibitory effect on the rat uterus. As nocistatin has been reported to cause functional antagonism of the pro-nociceptive effects of nociceptin, we set out to investigate its effects on the pregnant rat uterus and to elucidate its signalling pathway. The expression of prepronociceptin mRNA in the uterus and nocistatin levels in the uterus and the plasma were confirmed by RT-PCR and radioimmunoassay. The uterine levels of prepronociceptin mRNA and nocistatin were significantly increased by the last day of pregnancy, while the plasma nocistatin levels remained unchanged. In the isolated organ bath studies nocistatin inhibited the prostaglandin- and the KCl-evoked contractions in the uterus dose-dependently. This latter effect was decreased by preincubation with capsaicin. Incubation with calcitonin gene-related peptide after capsaicin treatment caused an elevation in the contraction-inhibitory effect of nocistatin. The effect of nocistatin was also decreased by the Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channel inhibitor paxilline, against spontaneous uterine contractions. Nociceptin potentiated the action of nocistatin. Naloxone decreased the effect of nocistatin administered either alone or in combination with nociceptin. In Ca(2+)-poor environment, this effect of naloxone was suspended. Enzyme immunoassay for the uterine intracellular cAMP levels partially confirmed the results of in vitro contractility studies. We conclude that nocistatin, generated locally in the uterus, exerts an inhibitory effect, the mechanism being mediated in part by Ca(2+)-dependent K(+) channels, the elevation of cAMP levels and sensory neuropeptides. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. A Novel α-Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Analogue Protects Against End-Organ Damage in Experimental Hypertension, Cardiac Hypertrophy, and Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aubdool, Aisah A; Thakore, Pratish; Argunhan, Fulye; Smillie, Sarah-Jane; Schnelle, Moritz; Srivastava, Salil; Alawi, Khadija M; Wilde, Elena; Mitchell, Jennifer; Farrell-Dillon, Keith; Richards, Daniel A; Maltese, Giuseppe; Siow, Richard C; Nandi, Manasi; Clark, James E; Shah, Ajay M; Sams, Anette; Brain, Susan D

    2017-07-25

    Research into the therapeutic potential of α-calcitonin gene-related peptide (α-CGRP) has been limited because of its peptide nature and short half-life. Here, we evaluate whether a novel potent and long-lasting ( t ½ ≥7 hours) acylated α-CGRP analogue (αAnalogue) could alleviate and reverse cardiovascular disease in 2 distinct murine models of hypertension and heart failure in vivo. The ability of the αAnalogue to act selectively via the CGRP pathway was shown in skin by using a CGRP receptor antagonist. The effect of the αAnalogue on angiotensin II-induced hypertension was investigated over 14 days. Blood pressure was measured by radiotelemetry. The ability of the αAnalogue to modulate heart failure was studied in an abdominal aortic constriction model of murine cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure over 5 weeks. Extensive ex vivo analysis was performed via RNA analysis, Western blot, and histology. The angiotensin II-induced hypertension was attenuated by cotreatment with the αAnalogue (50 nmol·kg -1 ·d -1 , SC, at a dose selected for lack of long-term hypotensive effects at baseline). The αAnalogue protected against vascular, renal, and cardiac dysfunction, characterized by reduced hypertrophy and biomarkers of fibrosis, remodeling, inflammation, and oxidative stress. In a separate study, the αAnalogue reversed angiotensin II-induced hypertension and associated vascular and cardiac damage. The αAnalogue was effective over 5 weeks in a murine model of cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. It preserved heart function, assessed by echocardiography, while protecting against adverse cardiac remodeling and apoptosis. Moreover, treatment with the αAnalogue was well tolerated with neither signs of desensitization nor behavioral changes. These findings, in 2 distinct models, provide the first evidence for the therapeutic potential of a stabilized αAnalogue, by mediating (1) antihypertensive effects, (2) attenuating cardiac remodeling, and (3

  13. Calcitonin gene-related peptide receptor as a novel target for the management of people with episodic migraine: current evidence and safety profile of erenumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giamberardino MA

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Maria Adele Giamberardino,1,* Giannapia Affaitati,1,* Raffaele Costantini,2 Francesco Cipollone,3,* Paolo Martelletti4,* 1Department of Medicine and Science of Aging, Headache Center, Geriatrics Clinic and Ce.S.I.-Met, “G. D’Annunzio” University of Chieti, Chieti, Italy; 2Department of Medical, Oral and Biotechnological Sciences, Institute of Surgical Pathology, “G. D’Annunzio” University of Chieti, Chieti, Italy; 3Department of Medicine and Science of Aging, Medical Clinic and Ce.S.I.-Met, “G. D’Annunzio” University of Chieti, Chieti, Italy; 4Department of Clinical and Molecular Medicine, Regional Referral Headache Center, Sant’Andrea Hospital, Sapienza University of Rome, Rome, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Migraine is a highly disabling neurological condition, and preventative treatment still remains problematic, due to aspecificity of the majority of the currently available prophylactic drugs. Calcitonin-gene-related peptide (CGRP plays a crucial role in migraine pathophysiology; agents aimed at blocking its activity have, therefore, been developed in recent years, among which are monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against CGRP, to prevent migraine. Erenumab is the only mAb that targets the CGRP receptor instead of the ligand, with high specificity and affinity of binding. This review will report on the most recent data on erenumab characteristics and on the results of clinical trials on its employment in the prevention of episodic migraine (4–14 monthly migraine days: one Phase II and two Phase III trials (completed and one Phase III trial (ongoing. Monthly subcutaneous administration (70 mg or 140 mg of erenumab vs placebo for 3–6 months showed significantly higher efficacy in reducing the mean monthly number of migraine days and the use of migraine-specific medication, and in decreasing physical impairment and impact of migraine on everyday activities (P<0.001. A favorable safety profile

  14. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Effects on Phenotype and IL-12 Production of Monocyte-Derived Dendritic Cells in Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Brook

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective(sRecent studies on human indicate that the introduction of therapeutic use of tolerogenic dendritic cell (DC for chronic inflammatory conditions is imminent. For the purpose of defining CGRP potency in tolerogenic DC production, we investigated the phenotype and IL-12 production of DCs generated from the monocytes of rheumatoid arthritis (RA patients in the presence of the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, as a multifunctional neuropeptide.Materials and MethodsDCs were generated from isolated monocytes from four resistant and two early female RA patients using IL-4, GM-CSF, and CGRP at concentrations of 0, 1, and 100 nM. Then, the phenotype of neuropeptide-treated or untreated DCs was determined using flow cytometry and the IL-12 production was measured by ELISA.ResultsOur study showed that, on the last day of the culture, at a concentration of 1 nM CGRP, the mean fluorescence intensity (MFI for CD80 increased (14.13% and the MFIs for CD83, CD86, and HLA-DR decreased (14.57%, 5.28%, and 6.88% respectively. Moreover, at 100 nM CGRP concentration, the MFI for CD80 increased (11.10% and the MFIs for CD83, CD86, and HLA-DR decreased (4.27%, 18.60%, and 19.75% respectively. In addition, our results indicated that the mean concentrations of IL-12 produced at 0, 1, and 100 nm CGRP concentrations measured 13.72±2.41, 11.01±1.61, and 7±1.34 pg/ml respectively. ConclusionDecreased CD83, CD86, and HLA-DR expression and reduced IL-12 production by CGRP were found in the RA patients' monocyte-derived DCs. CD83 is a well-defined DC activation marker. HLA-DR and CD86 are appropriate molecules for inducing an immune response. IL-12 promotes cell-mediated immunity. Therefore we suggest that CGRP may be used as an inducer in the production of tolerogenic DCs.

  15. The effect and safety of monoclonal antibodies to calcitonin gene-related peptide and its receptor on migraine: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Min; Xing, Haiyan; Cai, Yongqing; Li, Bin; Wang, Xianfeng; Li, Pan; Hu, Xiaolin; Chen, Jianhong

    2017-12-01

    Migraine has been recognized as one of the leading causes of disability in the 2013 Global Burden of Disease Study and seriously affects the quality of patients' life, current treatment options are not ideal. Monoclonal antibodies to calcitonin gene-related peptide and its receptor (CGRP-mAbs) appear more promising for migraine because of considerably better effect and safety profiles. The objective of this study is to systematically assess the clinical efficacy and safety of CGRP-mAbs for migraine therapy. A systematic literature search in PubMed, Cochrane Library and Baidu Scholar was performed to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs), which compared the effect and safety of CGRP-mAbs with placebo on migraine. Regarding the efficacy, the reduction of monthly migraine days from baseline to weeks 1-4, 5-8, and 9-12; responder rates were extracted as the outcome measures of the effects of CGRP-mAbs. Regarding the safety, total adverse events, the main adverse events, and other adverse events were evaluated. We found significant reduction of monthly migraine days in CGRP-mAbs vs. placebo (weeks 1-4: SMD -0.49, 95% CI -0.61 to -0.36; weeks 5-8: SMD -0.43, 95% CI -0.56 to -0.30; weeks 9-12: SMD -0.37, 95% CI -0.49 to -0.24). 50% and 75% responder rates (OR 2.59, 95% CI 1.99 to 3.37; and OR 2.91, 95% CI 2.06 to 4.10) were significantly increased compared with placebo. There was no significant difference in total adverse events (OR 1.17, 95% CI 0.91 to 1.51), and the main adverse events including upper respiratory tract infection (OR 1.44, 95% CI 0.82 to 2.55), nasopharyngitis (OR 0.59, 95% CI 0.30 to 1.16), nausea (OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.29 to 1.32), injection-site pain (OR 1.73, 95% CI 0.95 to 3.16) and back pain (OR 0.97, 95% CI 0.49 to 1.90) were not obviously changed compared with placebo control, but the results showed significant increase of dizziness in CGRP-mAbs vs. placebo (OR 3.22, 95% CI 1.09 to 9.45). This meta-analysis suggests that CGRP-mAbs are

  16. A Study of the Early Changes of the Level of Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide and Histopathology of Penises of Rats with Experimentally Induced Type I Diabetes Mellitus by Streptozocin

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kamshoushi, Abdel Aal M; Abdallah, Wafaa I; Helal, Suzan F; El Azhary, Nesrine M; Hassan, Eman M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a multiorgan disease that leads to neurovascular complications that disturb the normal erectile function. Aim The aim of the current work was to study the early changes occurring in the level of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and histopathological changes in penile tissues of uncontrolled diabetic rats. Materials and Methods This study was carried on 50 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats divided into two main groups: group I (control, n = 10) and group II (diabetic, n = 40). Type I DM was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg). The tissue level of CGRP and histopathological examination of rat penises were assessed at 2, 4, 6, and 8 weeks after induction of DM. Results CGRP was higher in the diabetic group at 4, 6, and 8 weeks than in the control group. However, endothelial changes and decreased smooth muscles mass started only 2 weeks after induction of DM. Conclusion Deterioration of histopathological features of the uncontrolled diabetic rats corporeal tissues is time dependent. Furthermore, vascular changes seem to precede the neurological changes. El-Kamshoushi AAM, Abdallah WI, Helal SF, El Azhary NM, and Hassan EM. A study of the early changes of the level of calcitonin gene-related peptide and histopathology of penises of rats with experimentally induced type I diabetes mellitus by streptozocin. Sex Med 2013;1:21–29. PMID:25356283

  17. mRNA expression of 5-hydroxytryptamine 1B, 1D, and 1F receptors and their role in controlling the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide in the rat trigeminovascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amrutkar, Dipak V; Ploug, Kenneth B; Hay-Schmidt, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Triptans, a family of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) 1B, 1D, and 1F receptor agonists, are used in the acute treatment of migraine attacks. The site of action and subtypes of the 5-HT(1) receptor that mediate the antimigraine effect have still to be identified. This study investigated the m......RNA expression of these receptors and the role of 5-HT(1) receptor subtypes in controlling the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in rat dura mater, trigeminal ganglion (TG), and trigeminal nucleus caudalis (TNC). The mRNA for each receptor subtype was quantified by quantitative real......-time polymerase chain reaction. A high potassium concentration was used to release CGRP from dura mater, isolated TG, and TNC in vitro. The immunoreactive CGRP (iCGRP) release was measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay. The mRNA transcripts of the 3 5-HT(1) receptor subtypes were detected in the trigeminovascular...

  18. The Influence of Low Doses of Zearalenone and T-2 Toxin on Calcitonin Gene Related Peptide-Like Immunoreactive (CGRP-LI Neurons in the ENS of the Porcine Descending Colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Makowska

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The enteric nervous system (ENS can undergo adaptive and reparative changes in response to physiological and pathological stimuli. These manifest primarily as alterations in the levels of active substances expressed by the enteric neuron. While it is known that mycotoxins can affect the function of the central and peripheral nervous systems, knowledge about their influence on the ENS is limited. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of low doses of zearalenone (ZEN and T-2 toxin on calcitonin gene related peptide-like immunoreactive (CGRP-LI neurons in the ENS of the porcine descending colon using a double immunofluorescence technique. Both mycotoxins led to an increase in the percentage of CGRP-LI neurons in all types of enteric plexuses and changed the degree of co-localization of CGRP with other neuronal active substances, such as substance P, galanin, nitric oxide synthase, and cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide. The obtained results demonstrate that even low doses of ZEN and T-2 can affect living organisms and cause changes in the neurochemical profile of enteric neurons.

  19. Acid activation of Trpv1 leads to an up-regulation of calcitonin gene-related peptide expression in dorsal root ganglion neurons via the CaMK-CREB cascade: a potential mechanism of inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakanishi, Masako; Hata, Kenji; Nagayama, Tomotaka; Sakurai, Teruhisa; Nishisho, Toshihiko; Wakabayashi, Hiroki; Hiraga, Toru; Ebisu, Shigeyuki; Yoneda, Toshiyuki

    2010-08-01

    Increased production of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in sensory neurons is implicated in inflammatory pain. The inflammatory site is acidic due to proton release from infiltrating inflammatory cells. Acid activation of peripheral nociceptors relays pain signals to the CNS. Here, we examined whether acid activated the transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (Trpv1), a widely recognized acid-sensing nociceptor and subsequently increased CGRP expression. Chemically induced inflammation was associated with thermal hyperalgesia and increased CGRP expression in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) in rats. In organ cultures of DRG, acid (pH 5.5) elevated CGRP expression and the selective Trpv1 antagonist 5'-Iodoresiniferatoxin decreased it. Trpv1-deficient DRG showed reduced CGRP increase by acid. Of note, many of CGRP/Trpv1-positive DRG neurons exhibited the phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), a nociceptive transcription factor. Knockdown of CREB by small interfering RNA or a dominant-negative form of CREB diminished acid-elevated CGRP expression. Acid elevated the transcriptional activity of CREB, which in turn stimulated CGRP gene promoter activity. These effects were inhibited by a Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaMK) inhibitor KN-93. In conclusion, our results suggest that inflammatory acidic environments activate Trpv1, leading to an up-regulation of CGRP expression via CaMK-CREB cascade, a series of events that may be associated with inflammatory pain.

  20. Steroid Treatment Reduces Allergic Airway Inflammation and Does Not Alter the Increased Numbers of Dendritic Cells and Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide-Expressing Neurons in Airway Sensory Ganglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Duc Dung; Funck, Ulrike; Wronski, Sabine; Heck, Sebastian; Tschernig, Thomas; Bischoff, Markus; Sester, Martina; Herr, Christian; Bals, Robert; Welte, Tobias; Braun, Armin; Dinh, Quoc Thai

    2016-01-01

    Our previous data demonstrated that allergic airway inflammation induces migration of dendritic cells (DC) into airway sensory jugular and nodose ganglia (jugular-nodose ganglion complex; JNC). Here we investigated the effects of steroid treatment regarding the expression and migration of DC and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-immunoreactive neurons of vagal sensory ganglia during allergic airway inflammation. A house dust mite (HDM) model for allergic airway inflammation was used. The mice received 0.3 mg fluticasone propionate per kilogram of body weight in the last 9 days. JNC slices were analyzed on MHC II, the neuronal marker PGP9.5, and the neuropeptide CGRP. Allergic airway inflammation increased the numbers of DC and CGRP-expressing neurons in the JNC significantly in comparison to the controls (DC/neurons: HDM 44.58 ± 1.6% vs. saline 33.29 ± 1.6%, p neurons/total neurons: HDM 30.65 ± 1.9% vs. saline 19.49 ± 2.3%, p neurons in the JNC compared to HDM-treated mice. The present findings indicate an important role of DC and CGRP-containing neurons in the pathogenesis of allergic airway inflammation. However, steroid treatment did not have an effect on the population of DC and neurons displaying CGRP in the JNC, whereas steroid treatment was found to suppress allergic airway inflammation. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Role of low-affinity nerve growth factor receptor inhibitory antibody in reducing pain behavior and calcitonin gene-related Peptide expression in a rat model of wrist joint inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwakura, Nahoko; Ohtori, Seiji; Orita, Sumihisa; Yamashita, Masaomi; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Kuniyoshi, Kazuki

    2010-02-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF), via the high-affinity receptor, tyrosine kinase A, has been widely reported as a mediator of pain caused by inflammation. A clinical trial has suggested that anti-NGF antibody is effective for pain caused by osteoarthritis of the knee. However, adverse events such as headache (8.9%), upper respiratory tract infection (7.3%), and paresthesia (6.8%) were reported. We hypothesized that inhibition of the low-affinity NGF receptor, p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR), is also effective for joint pain and may reduce side effects. This study examined suppression of pain behavior and expression of pain-inducing neuropeptides such as calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and p75NTR in dorsal root ganglia neurons by a p75NTR inhibitory antibody in a rat model of wrist joint inflammatory pain. We injected complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) into the wrist joint of rats and used this as a model of inflammatory pain. We applied 10 microL of saline (CFA + saline group; n = 20) or 1, 10, or 50 microL of a p75NTR inhibitory antibody (CFA + p75NTR inhibitory antibody group; n = 40) directly to the inflamed joint in the rats. Mechanical hyperalgesia was measured for 2 weeks using von Frey filaments. We assessed CGRP and p75NTR expression in C8 dorsal root ganglia immunochemically. Adverse events such as loss of weight and/or appetite, constipation, and infection were examined. p75NTR inhibitory antibody reduced mechanical hyperalgesia caused by CFA (pwrist inflammation (p<.01). p75NTR inhibition may be a therapeutic target for inflamed joint pain treatment with reduced adverse events. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Stereological analysis of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II alpha -containing dorsal root ganglion neurons in the rat: colocalization with isolectin Griffonia simplicifolia, calcitonin gene-related peptide, or vanilloid receptor 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlton, Susan M; Hargett, Gregory L

    2002-06-17

    The enzyme Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is widely distributed in the nervous system. A previous report describes immunostaining for CaMKII alpha in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons. In this study, CaMKII alpha is colocalized in the rat with three putative markers of nociceptive DRG neurons, isolectin Griffonia simplicifolia (I-B4), identifying small-diameter, "peptide-poor" neurons; calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), identifying " peptide-rich" neurons; or the vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1), identifying neurons activated by heat, acid, and capsaicin. Lumbar 4 and 5 DRG sections were labeled using immunofluorescence or lectin binding histochemistry, and percentages of single and double-labeled CaMKIIalpha neurons were determined. Stereological estimates of total neuron number in the L4 DRG were 13,815 +/- 2,798 and in the L5 DRG were 14,111 +/- 4,043. Percentages of single-labeled L4 DRG neurons were 41% +/- 2% CaMKII alpha, 38% +/- 3% I-B4, 44% +/- 3% CGRP, and 32% +/- 6% VR1. Percentages of single-labeled L5 DRG neurons were 44% +/- 5% CaMKII alpha, 48% +/- 2% I-B4, 41% +/- 7% CGRP, and 39% +/- 14% VR1. For L4 and L5, respectively, estimates of double-labeled CaMKII alpha neurons showed 34% +/- 2% and 38% +/- 17% labeled for I-B4, 25% +/- 14% and 19% +/- 10% labeled for CGRP, and 37% +/- 7% and 38% +/- 5% labeled for VR1. Conversely, for L4 and L5, respectively, 39% +/- 14% and 38% +/- 7% I-B4 binding neurons, 24% +/- 12% and 23% +/- 10% CGRP neurons, and 42% +/- 7% and 35% +/- 7% VR1 neurons labeled for CaMKIIalpha. The mean diameter of CaMKII alpha - labeled neurons was approximately 27 microm, confirming that this enzyme was preferentially localized in small DRG neurons. The results indicate that subpopulations of DRG neurons containing CaMKII alpha are likely to be involved in the processing of nociceptive information. Thus, this enzyme may play a critical role in the modulation of nociceptor activity and plasticity of primary

  3. De novo sequencing of two novel peptides homologous to calcitonin-like peptides, from skin secretion of the Chinese Frog, Odorrana schmackeri

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geisa P.C. Evaristo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available An MS/MS based analytical strategy was followed to solve the complete sequence of two new peptides from frog (Odorrana schmackeri skin secretion. This involved reduction and alkylation with two different alkylating agents followed by high resolution tandem mass spectrometry. De novo sequencing was achieved by complementary CID and ETD fragmentations of full-length peptides and of selected tryptic fragments. Heavy and light isotope dimethyl labeling assisted with annotation of sequence ion series. The identified primary structures are GCD[I/L]STCATHN[I/L]VNE[I/L]NKFDKSKPSSGGVGPESP-NH2 and SCNLSTCATHNLVNELNKFDKSKPSSGGVGPESF-NH2, i.e. two carboxyamidated 34 residue peptides with an aminoterminal intramolecular ring structure formed by a disulfide bridge between Cys2 and Cys7. Edman degradation analysis of the second peptide positively confirmed the exact sequence, resolving I/L discriminations. Both peptide sequences are novel and share homology with calcitonin, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP and adrenomedullin from other vertebrates. Detailed sequence analysis as well as the 34 residue length of both O. schmackeri peptides, suggest they do not fully qualify as either calcitonins (32 residues or CGRPs (37 amino acids and may justify their classification in a novel peptide family within the calcitonin gene related peptide superfamily. Smooth muscle contractility assays with synthetic replicas of the S–S linked peptides on rat tail artery, uterus, bladder and ileum did not reveal myotropic activity.

  4. Calcitonin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Factor Antibody Iron Iron Tests JAK2 Mutation Kidney Stone Analysis Kidney Stone Risk Panel KRAS Mutation Lactate Lactate Dehydrogenase (LD) ... or breathing Persistent cough not associated with a cold A recent study also recommended measuring calcitonin before ...

  5. Acylation of salmon calcitonin modulates in vitro intestinal peptide flux through membrane permeability enhancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Sofie; Linderoth, Lars; Bjerregaard, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Acylation of peptide drugs with fatty acid chains has proven beneficial for prolonging systemic circulation, as well as increasing enzymatic stability and interactions with lipid cell membranes. Thus, acylation offers several potential benefits for oral delivery of therapeutic peptides, and we...... hypothesize that tailoring the acylation may be used to optimize intestinal translocation. This work aims to characterize acylated analogues of the therapeutic peptide salmon calcitonin (sCT), which lowers blood calcium, by systematically increasing acyl chain length at two positions, in order to elucidate...... is due to a solubilization of the cell membrane, similar to transcellular oral permeation enhancers. The effect is dependent on pH, with larger effect at lower pH, and is impacted by acylation chain length and position. Compared to the unacylated peptide backbone, N-terminal acylation with a short chain...

  6. [Hormones and osteoporosis update. Calcitonin, CGRP and bone].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozono, Keiichi

    2009-07-01

    Calcitonin is the hormone secreted from parafollicular cells in the thyroid and inhibits osteoclast activity, leading to reduced bone resorption and low levels of serum calcium. Calcitonin is approved to use for osteoporosis and hypercalcemia. However, its effect on the prevention of bone fracture is still controversial, although bone mineral content is apparently improved. The same gene, CALCA, encodes another active peptide, calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP). CGRP has been reported to promote bone formation based on the high bone mass phenotype of CALCA - deficient mouse.

  7. Oral calcitonin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdy RC

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Ronald C Hamdy,1,2 Dane N Daley11Osteoporosis Center, College of Medicine, East Tennessee State University, 2Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Johnson City, TN, USAAbstract: Calcitonin is a hormone secreted by the C-cells of the thyroid gland in response to elevations of the plasma calcium level. It reduces bone resorption by inhibiting mature active osteoclasts and increases renal calcium excretion. It is used in the management of postmenopausal osteoporosis, Paget's disease of bone, and malignancy-associated hypercalcemia. Synthetic and recombinant calcitonin preparations are available; both have similar pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles. As calcitonin is a peptide, the traditional method of administration has been parenteral or intranasal. This hinders its clinical use: adherence with therapy is notoriously low, and withdrawal from clinical trials has been problematic. An oral formulation would be more attractive, practical, and convenient to patients. In addition to its effect on active osteoclasts and renal tubules, calcitonin has an analgesic action, possibly mediated through β-endorphins and the central modulation of pain perception. It also exerts a protective action on cartilage and may be useful in the management of osteoarthritis and possibly rheumatoid arthritis. Oral formulations of calcitonin have been developed using different techniques. The most studied involves drug-delivery carriers such as Eligen® 8-(N-2hydroxy-5-chloro-benzoyl-amino-caprylic acid (5-CNAC (Emisphere Technologies, Cedar Knolls, NJ. Several factors affect the bioavailability and efficacy of orally administered calcitonin, including amount of water used to take the tablet, time of day the tablet is taken, and proximity to intake of a meal. Preliminary results looked promising. Unfortunately, in two Phase III studies, oral calcitonin (0.8 mg with 200 mg 5-CNAC, once a day for postmenopausal osteoporosis and twice a day for osteoarthritis failed to

  8. Cellular uptake but low permeation of human calcitonin-derived cell penetrating peptides and Tat(47-57) through well-differentiated epithelial models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tréhin, Rachel; Krauss, Ulrike; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G

    2004-01-01

    To investigate whether cell penetrating peptides (CPP) derived from human calcitonin (hCT) possess, in addition to cellular uptake, the capacity to deliver their cargo through epithelial barriers.......To investigate whether cell penetrating peptides (CPP) derived from human calcitonin (hCT) possess, in addition to cellular uptake, the capacity to deliver their cargo through epithelial barriers....

  9. Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Regulates Type IV Hypersensitivity through Dendritic Cell Functions: e86367

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Norihisa Mikami; Kaori Sueda; Yusuke Ogitani; Ippei Otani; Miku Takatsuji; Yasuko Wada; Keiko Watanabe; Rintaro Yoshikawa; Satoshi Nishioka; Nagisa Hashimoto; Yayoi Miyagi; So-ichiro Fukada; Hiroshi Yamamoto; Kazutake Tsujikawa

    2014-01-01

    .... In this study, we show that CGRP suppressed Th1 cell differentiation via inhibition of IL-12 production in DCs using an in vitro co-culture system and an in vivo ovalbumin-induced delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) model...

  10. Calcitonin gene-related peptide does not cause the familial hemiplegic migraine phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, J.M.; Thomsen, L.L.; Olesen, J.

    2008-01-01

    with aura associated with several gene mutations. FHM shares many phenotypical similarities with common types of migraine, indicating common neurobiological pathways. We tested the hypothesis that the FHM genotype confers a CGRP hypersensitive phenotype. Methods: We included 9 FHM patients with known...

  11. Calcitonin gene–related peptide inhibits Langerhans cell–mediated HIV-1 transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganor, Yonatan; Drillet-Dangeard, Anne-Sophie; Lopalco, Lucia; Tudor, Daniela; Tambussi, Giuseppe; Delongchamps, Nicolas Barry; Zerbib, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Upon its mucosal entry, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is internalized by Langerhans cells (LCs) in stratified epithelia and transferred locally to T cells. In such epithelia, LCs are in direct contact with peripheral neurons secreting calcitonin gene–related peptide (CGRP). Although CGRP has immunomodulatory effects on LC functions, its potential influence on the interactions between LCs and HIV-1 is unknown. We show that CGRP acts via its receptor expressed by LCs and interferes with multiple steps of LC-mediated HIV-1 transmission. CGRP increases langerin expression, decreases selected integrins, and activates NF-κB, resulting in decreased HIV-1 intracellular content, limited formation of LC–T cell conjugates, and elevated secretion of the CCR5-binding chemokine CCL3/MIP-1α. These mechanisms cooperate to efficiently inhibit HIV-1 transfer from LCs to T cells and T cell infection. In vivo, HIV-1 infection decreases CGRP plasma levels in both vaginally SHIV-challenged macaques and HIV-1–infected individuals. CGRP plasma levels return to baseline after highly active antiretroviral therapy. Our results reveal a novel path by which a peripheral neuropeptide acts at the molecular and cellular levels to limit mucosal HIV-1 transmission and suggest that CGRP receptor agonists might be used therapeutically against HIV-1. PMID:24081951

  12. Ghrelin gene-related peptides: multifunctional endocrine / autocrine modulators in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, Inge; Amorim, Laura; Walpole, Carina; Carter, Shea; Chopin, Lisa K; Herington, Adrian C

    2010-01-01

    1. Ghrelin is a multifunctional peptide hormone that affects various processes, including growth hormone and insulin release, appetite regulation, gut motility, metabolism and cancer cell proliferation. Ghrelin is produced in the stomach and in other normal and pathological cell types. It may act as an endocrine or autocrine/paracrine factor. 2. The present article reviews recent findings in the study of ghrelin and its receptor that suggest that the ghrelin gene locus may give rise to a number of functional molecules (peptides and RNA transcripts) in addition to ghrelin. 3. The ghrelin gene encodes a precursor protein, preproghrelin, from which ghrelin and other potentially active peptides are derived by alternative mRNA splicing and/or proteolytic processing. The metabolic role of the peptide obestatin, derived from the preproghrelin C-terminal region, is contentious. However, obestatin has direct effects on cell proliferation. 4. The regulation of ghrelin expression and the mechanisms through which the peptide products arise are unclear. We have recently re-examined the organization of the ghrelin gene and identified several novel exons and transcripts. One transcript, which lacks the ghrelin-coding region of preproghrelin, contains the coding sequence of obestatin. 5. Furthermore, we have identified an overlapping gene on the antisense strand of ghrelin, namely GHRLOS, which generates transcripts that may function as non-coding regulatory RNAs or code for novel, short bioactive peptides. 6. The identification of these novel ghrelin-gene related transcripts and peptides raises critical questions regarding their physiological function and their potential role in obesity, diabetes and cancer.

  13. Early detection of response in small cell bronchogenic carcinoma by changes in serum concentrations of creatine kinase, neuron specific enolase, calcitonin, ACTH, serotonin and gastrin releasing peptide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bork, E; Hansen, M; Urdal, P

    1988-01-01

    Creatine kinase (CK-BB), neuron specific enolase (NSE), ACTH, calcitonin, serotonin and gastrin releasing peptide (GRP) were measured in serum or plasma before and immediately after initiation of treatment in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCC). Pretherapeutic elevated concentrations of CK...

  14. Localisation and neural control of the release of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from the isolated perfused porcine ileum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, T N; Schmidt, P; Poulsen, S S

    2001-01-01

    By immunohistochemistry, CGRP-like immunoreactive (CGRP-LI) nerve fibres were found in the lamina propria along small vessels and in the lamina muscularis mucosae in the porcine ileum. Immunoreactive nerve cell bodies were found in the submucous and myenteric plexus. Upon HPLC-analysis of ileal...

  15. Calcitonin gene-related peptide modulates heat nociception in the human brain - An fMRI study in healthy volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asghar, Mohammad Sohail; Becerra, Lino; Larsson, Henrik B.W.

    2016-01-01

    blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) signals in the brain by functional MRI after infusion of CGRP in a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study of 27 healthy volunteers. BOLD-signals were recorded in response to noxious heat stimuli in the V1-area of the trigeminal nerve. In addition, we...... measured BOLD-signals after injection of sumatriptan (5-HT1B/1D antagonist). Results: Brain activation to noxious heat stimuli following CGRP infusion compared to baseline resulted in increased BOLD-signal in insula and brainstem, and decreased BOLD-signal in the caudate nuclei, thalamus and cingulate...

  16. The analgesic agent tapentadol inhibits calcitonin gene-related peptide release from isolated rat brainstem via a serotonergic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Maria Cristina; Navarra, Pierluigi; Tringali, Giuseppe

    2016-01-15

    In this study we tested the hypothesis that tapentadol inhibits GGRP release from the rat brainstem through a mechanism mediated by the inhibition of NA reuptake; as a second alternative hypothesis, we investigated whether tapentadol inhibits GGRP release via the inhibition of 5-HT reuptake. Rat brainstems were explanted and incubated in short-term experiments. CGRP released in the incubation medium was taken as a marker of CGRP release from the central terminals of trigeminal neurons within the brainstem. CGRP levels were measured by radioimmunoassay under basal conditions or in the presence of tapentadol; NA, 5-HT, clonidine, yohimbine and ondansetron were used as pharmacological tools to investigate the action mechanism of tapentadol. The α2-antagonist yohimbine failed to counteract the effects of tapentadol. Moreover, neither NA nor the α2-agonist clonidine per se inhibited K(+)-stimulated CGRP release, thereby indicating that the effects of tapentadol are nor mediated through the block of NA reuptake. Further experiments showed that 5-HT and tramadol, which inhibits both NA and 5-HT reuptake, significantly reduced K(+)-stimulated CGRP release. Moreover, the 5-HT3 antagonist ondansetron was able to counteract the effects of tapentadol in this system. This study provided pharmacological evidence that tapentadol inhibits stimulated CGRP release from the rat brainstem in vitro through a mechanism involving an increase in 5-HT levels in the system and the subsequent activation of 5-HT3 receptors. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Transcerebral exchange kinetics of nitrite and calcitonin gene-related peptide in acute mountain sickness: evidence against trigeminovascular activation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bailey, Damian M; Taudorf, Sarah; Berg, Ronan M G

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: High-altitude headache is the primary symptom associated with acute mountain sickness, which may be caused by nitric oxide-mediated activation of the trigeminovascular system. Therefore, the present study examined the effects of inspiratory hypoxia on the transcerebral...... from the radial artery and jugular venous bulb. Plasma CGRP and NO(2)(*) were analyzed via radioimmunoassay and ozone-based chemiluminescence. Net cerebral exchange was calculated by the Fick principle and acute mountain sickness/headache scores assessed via clinically validated questionnaires. RESULTS......: Hypoxia increased cerebral blood flow with a corresponding increase in acute mountain sickness and headache scores (P

  18. [Effect of secretory human calcitonin gene-related peptide recombinant AAV on penile erection in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jun-ping; Cui, Xian-feng; Sun, Jian-hua; Qiu, Shu-dong

    2005-10-01

    To determine whether recombinant adeno-associated virus-mediated overexpression of hCGRP in the corpus cavernosum can affect the continuous production of hCGRP in the penile tissue and enhance erectile responses in STZ-induced diabetic rats. Diabetes mellitus was induced by a single intraperitoneal injection of 60 mg/kg streptozotocin in male SD rats. VssHGCMV-hCGRP, VssCMV-GFP and rAAV solution were injected into the corporal cavernosum of STZ-induced diabetic rats, respectively. The corporal tissue was obtained from groups of 8 rats on day 5 post-injection, and the expressions of CGRP and GFP in cavernosal tissue were detected using immunohistochemistry and laser scanning confocal microscopy, respectively. Cavemosal tissue cAMP and cGMP levels were measured using radioimmunoassay. On day 5 post-injection, intracavernous pressure induced by electrostimulation of penile dorsal nerves was measured and recorded with a biological signal processing system in each group rat. rAAV transduction efficiency of GFP reporter gene was measured by laser scanning confocal microscopy and was observed in the penile tissue, especially in the corporal cavernosum and the vessel 5 days after transfection with VssCMV-GFP. Immunohistochemistry showed that the CGRP increased in the corporal cavernosum. In addition, both cAMP and cGMP levels in the corpora cavernosa transfected with VssHGCMV-hCGRP were significantly increased, compared with controls [(48.4 +/- 6.5) nmol/L and (21.2 +/- 13.6) nmol/L vs (16.7 +/- 2.5) nmol/L and (0.42 +/- 0.12) nmol/L, respectively]. More importantly, 5 days after administration of VssHGCMV-hCGRP,a significant increase was observed in the erectile response to penile dorsal nerve stimulation in the diabetic rat [(60.5 +/- 4.5) mm Hg vs (22. 3 +/- 1.3) mm Hg]. This results demonstrate that rAAV-mediated transfer of the CGRP gene can increase production of endogenous CGRP, cAMP and cGMP in corpora cavernosa of STZ-induced diabetic rats. Moreover, overexpression of CGRP enhances ICP and the erectile response to penile dorsal nerve stimulation in the diabetic rat.

  19. Circulating levels of vasoactive peptides in patients with acute bacterial meningitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Ronan M G; Strauss, Gitte Irene; Tofteng, Flemming

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: The underlying mechanisms for cerebral blood flow (CBF) abnormalities in acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) are largely unknown. Putative mediators include vasoactive peptides, e.g. calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), and endothelin-1 (ET-1), all...

  20. The effects of duodenal peptides on glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion from the ileum. A duodeno--ileal loop?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lene; Holst, Jens Juul

    2002-01-01

    is regulated by local somatostatin secretion. In search for an endocrine pathway, we studied the effect of a range of concentrations of cholecystokinin octapeptide (26-33) (CCK 8), gastric inhibitory peptide 1-42 (GIP), secretin, motilin, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and the modified amino acid, 5...... agents from the duodenum regulate GLP-1 secretion in pigs....

  1. Calcitonin blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003699.htm Calcitonin blood test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The calcitonin blood test measures the level of the hormone calcitonin in ...

  2. Topical non-peptide antagonists of sensory neurotransmitters substance P and CGRP do not modify patch test and prick test reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wallengren, Joanna; Edvinsson, Lars

    2014-01-01

    Immunologic responses in the skin can be modulated by such neurotransmitters of sensory nerve fibers as substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). The first-generation receptor antagonists were peptides with large molecules and had to be injected intracutaneously. The aim of thi...

  3. Long-lasting physiological antagonism of calcitonin gene-related peptide towards endothelin-1 in rat mesenteric arteries and human coronary arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Labruijere, Sieneke; Compeer, Matthijs G; van den Bogaerdt, Antoon J

    2013-01-01

    Endothelin-1 causes long-lasting contraction via endothelin type A receptor (ETAR) in isolated rat mesenteric arteries (RMA) that cannot be readily terminated by removing the agonist, or by adding the ETAR antagonist BQ123 or the NO donor sodium nitroprusside. It could be terminated by adding......-lasting non-selective arterial smooth muscle relaxation that may add to the neuropeptide being a physiological antagonist of arterial effects of ET-1. Long-lasting, washout-resistant ET-1/ETAR interaction does not occur in HCMAs....

  4. Effect of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) on motility and on the release of substance P, neurokinin A, somatostatin and gastrin in the isolated perfused porcine antrum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, T N; Schmidt, P; Poulsen, S S

    2001-01-01

    We studied the effect of porcine CGRP (pCGRP) in concentrations from 10(-10) to 10(-8) mol L(-1) on the motility and on the release of substance P, neurokinin A, somatostatin and gastrin in the antrum using the isolated perfused porcine antrum as experimental model. In addition, we studied...... release. The effect of pCGRP was unaffected by the addition of the nonpeptide antagonists for the NK-1 (CP-99994) and NK-2 receptors (SR48968), both at 10(-6) mol L(-1), whereas atropine (10(-6) mol L(-1)) completely abolished the motor effect of pCGRP. The release of somatostatin was significantly....... in addition, pCGRP increases the release of somatostatin but has no effect on gastrin release in the isolated perfused porcine antrum....

  5. Effects of glyceryl trinitrate and calcitonin-gene-related peptide on BOLD signal and arterial diameter –methodological studies by fMRI and MRA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asghar, Mohammed Sohail; Ashina, Messoud

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decades MRI has proved to be very useful in the field of drug development and discovery. Pharmacological MRI (phMRI) explores the interaction between brain physiology, neuronal activity and drugs[1]. The BOLD-signal is an indirect method to investigate brain activity by way of measu......Over the last decades MRI has proved to be very useful in the field of drug development and discovery. Pharmacological MRI (phMRI) explores the interaction between brain physiology, neuronal activity and drugs[1]. The BOLD-signal is an indirect method to investigate brain activity by way...... of measuring task-related hemodynamic changes. Pharmacological substances that induce hemodynamic changes can therefore potentially alter the BOLD-signal that in turn falsely can be interpreted as changes in neuronal activity. It is therefore important to characterize possible effects of a pharmacological...

  6. High arterial compliance in cirrhosis is related to low adrenaline and elevated circulating calcitonin gene related peptide but not to activated vasoconstrictor systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Møller, S; Schifter, S

    2001-01-01

    to COMP(art) disappeared. The relation of COMP(art) to CGRP and circulatory variables remained unchanged. CONCLUSION: Elevated arterial compliance in cirrhosis is related to low adrenaline, high CGRP, and systemic hyperdynamics but not to indicators of the activated vasoconstrictor systems (noradrenaline......BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Static and dynamic functions of the wall of large arteries are largely unknown in cirrhosis in vivo. The present study was undertaken to determine arterial compliance (COMP(art)) in relation to vasodilator and vasoconstrictor systems in patients with cirrhosis. In addition......, vasoactivity was manipulated by inhalation of oxygen. STUDY POPULATION AND METHODS: In 20 patients with alcoholic cirrhosis and 12 controls we determined COMP(art) (stroke volume relative to pulse pressure), cardiac output, plasma volume, systemic vascular resistance, central circulation time, plasma...

  7. Safety and efficacy of ALD403, an antibody to calcitonin gene-related peptide, for the prevention of frequent episodic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dodick, David W; Goadsby, Peter J; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    group compared with -4·6 (3·6) for the placebo group (difference -1·0, 95% CI -2·0 to 0·1; one-sided p=0·0306). INTERPRETATION: No safety concerns were noted with an intravenous dose of ALD403 1000 mg. This study also provides preliminary evidence for the efficacy of ALD403 in the preventive treatment......-controlled, exploratory, proof-of-concept phase 2 trial, patients aged 18-55 years with five to 14 migraine days per 28-day period were randomly assigned (1:1) via an interactive web response system to receive an intravenous dose of ALD403 1000 mg or placebo. Site investigators, patients, and the sponsor were masked...

  8. A Novel α-Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide Analogue Protects Against End-Organ Damage in Experimental Hypertension, Cardiac Hypertrophy and Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aubdool, Aisah A; Thakore, Pratish; Argunhan, Fulye

    2017-01-01

    was investigated over 14 days. Blood pressure was measured by radio-telemetry. The ability of the αAnalogue to modulate heart failure was studied in an abdominal aortic constriction (AAC) model of murine cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure over 5 weeks. Extensive ex vivo analysis was performed via RNA analysis...... by reduced hypertrophy and biomarkers of fibrosis, remodelling, inflammation and oxidative stress. In a separate study, the αAnalogue reversed AngII-induced hypertension and associated vascular and cardiac damage. The αAnalogue was effective over 5 weeks in a murine model of cardiac hypertrophy and heart......, Western blot and histology. Results -The AngII-induced hypertension was attenuated by co-treatment with the αAnalogue (50nmol/kg/day, s.c., at a dose selected for lack of long term hypotensive effects at baseline). The αAnalogue protected against vascular, renal and cardiac dysfunction, characterised...

  9. Calcitonin Salmon Nasal Spray

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bottle and turn to tighten. Then take the plastic cover off of the top of the spray unit. ... room temperature in an upright position. Replace the plastic cover to keep the nozzle clean. Opened calcitonin salmon ...

  10. Investigation of the direct effects of salmon calcitonin on human osteoarthritic chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen Christian

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calcitonin has been demonstrated to have chondroprotective effects under pre-clinical settings. It is debated whether this effect is mediated through subchondral-bone, directly on cartilage or both in combination. We investigated possible direct effects of salmon calcitonin on proteoglycans and collagen-type-II synthesis in osteoarthritic (OA cartilage. Methods Human OA cartilage explants were cultured with salmon calcitonin [100 pM-100 nM]. Direct effects of calcitonin on articular cartilage were evaluated by 1 measurement of proteoglycan synthesis by incorporation of radioactive labeled 35SO4 [5 μCi] 2 quantification of collagen-type-II formation by pro-peptides of collagen type II (PIINP ELISA, 3 QPCR expression of the calcitonin receptor in OA chondrocytes using four individual primer pairs, 4 activation of the cAMP signaling pathway by EIA and, 5 investigations of metabolic activity by AlamarBlue. Results QPCR analysis and subsequent sequencing confirmed expression of the calcitonin receptor in human chondrocytes. All doses of salmon calcitonin significantly elevated cAMP levels (P 35SO4 incorporation, with a 96% maximal induction at 10 nM (P Conclusion Calcitonin treatment increased proteoglycan and collagen synthesis in human OA cartilage. In addition to its well-established effect on subchondral bone, calcitonin may prove beneficial to the management of joint diseases through direct effects on chondrocytes.

  11. The vasorelaxant effect of adrenomedullin, proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide and amylin in human skin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasbak, Philip; Eskesen, Karen; Lind, Peter Henrik

    2006-01-01

    In this study we aimed to assess in vivo, the vasodilator effects of adrenomedullin, proadrenomedullin N-terminal 20 peptide (PAMP) and amylin in human skin vasculature and compare the responses to the effects mediated by the endogenous neuropeptides calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP......) and substance P and to examine the mRNA expression of calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CL-R) and receptor-activity modifying proteins, RAMP1, RAMP 2 and RAMP3 in human subcutaneous arteries. Changes in skin blood flow of the forearm were measured using a Laser Doppler Imager after intradermal injection...... to the transient response induced by substance P. PAMP (10(-6)-10(-5) M) caused distinct itch sensation and local erythema. This effect could be abolished when combining the histamine H1-receptor antagonist mepyramin and PAMP. Real-time PCR data showed a higher level of mRNA for RAMP2 than CL-R, RAMP1 and RAMP3...

  12. Calcitonin-like diuretic hormones in insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandawala, Meet

    2012-10-01

    Insect neuropeptides control various biological processes including growth, development, homeostasis and reproduction. The calcitonin-like diuretic hormone (CT/DH) is one such neuropeptide that has been shown to affect salt and water transport by Malpighian tubules of several insects. With an increase in the number of sequenced insect genomes, CT/DHs have been predicted in several insect species, making it easier to characterize the gene encoding this hormone and determine its function in the species in question. This mini review summarizes the current knowledge on insect CT/DHs, focusing on mRNA and peptide structures, distribution patterns, physiological roles, and receptors in insects. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Q-T interval (QT(C)) in patients with cirrhosis: relation to vasoactive peptides and heart rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Gülberg, V; Fuglsang, S

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Prolonged Q-T interval (QT) has been reported in patients with cirrhosis who also exhibit profound abnormalities in vasoactive peptides and often present with elevated heart rate (HR). The aim of this study was to relate QT to the circulating level of endothelins (ET-1 and ET-3......) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in patients with cirrhosis. In addition, we studied problems with HR correction of QT. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty-eight patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension were studied during a haemodynamic investigation. Circulating levels of ETs and CGRP were determined...

  14. Salmon calcitonin: conformational changes and stabilizer effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Yang Lin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The therapeutic activity of peptides or protein drugs is highly dependent on their conformational structure. The protein structure is flexible and responds to external conditions, which may compromise the protein's native conformation and influence its physical and chemical stability. The physical and chemical stability of peptides or protein drugs are important characteristics of biopharmaceutical products. Calcitonin (CT is a polypeptide hormone that participates in diverse physiological functions in humans; therefore, it is a potentially useful protein for investigations of different aspects of pharmacology and drug delivery systems. Of the different types of CT available for clinical use, salmon CT (sCT is one of the most potent. In this review article, the commercially available sCT was selected as a suitable peptide candidate for the discussion of its stability and conformational changes in the aqueous and solid states using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR spectroscopic analysis under different external conditions, including pH, temperature, drying method, and added excipients. Particularly, excipients that have been optimized as stabilizers of sCT in aqueous solution and as lyophilized and spray-dried drug formulations are also discussed.

  15. Calcitonin secretion in normal human subjects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parthemore, J.G.; Deftos, L.J.

    1978-07-01

    A sensitive RIA for human calcitonin has been developed which can detect 1 to 2 pg hormone. This procedure permits the measurement of the low concentrations of calcitonin in the unextracted plasma of normal human subjects. In 55 normal adults, mean plasma calcitonin was 24 pg/ml with an SD of +-18 pg/ml, an SE of +-2 pg/ml, and a range of less than 10 to 75 pg/ml. There were no discernible age or sex differences in basal hormone concentration. Infusions of calcium, pentagastrin, and glucagon stimulated plasma calcitonin, whereas food and oral calcium did not. The stimulatory effect of pentagastrin was greater in males than in females. These data demonstrate that the low concentration of calcitonin in humans can be stimulated by several secretagogues and suggest that females may have decreased calcitonin reserve.

  16. Positive effect of calcitonin on the seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksoy, Durdane; Solmaz, Volkan; Erbas, Oytun

    2014-03-01

    There are many difficulties involved with the treatment of epilepsy, and these problems have driven the search for new agents to control epileptic seizures. Calcitonin is a peptide hormone that has been well studied and shown to have a positive effect on neuropathic and chronic pain. The mechanism by which calcitonin affects these pain syndromes is thought to be similar to the effect of antiepileptic drugs, such as pregabalin, gabapentin and carbamazepine. In this study, we aim to investigate the effects of calcitonin on seizures induced by pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) in rats. The rats were divided into four groups. The first group was the control group, and the rats were given no medications. The second group was given saline+PTZ. The third group was given 50IU/kg calcitonin+PTZ, and the fourth group was given 100IU/kg calcitonin+PTZ. EEG traces, Racine's convulsion stages and the time of onset of the first myoclonic jerk were compared between the groups. Between the groups, there were significant differences in the Racine's convulsion stages, the onset of the 'first myoclonic jerk', and the rate of the spikes in the EEG traces. The differences were more pronounced in the 100IU/kg calcitonin-treated group (p<0.001). It has been stated that calcitonin relieves pain via regulating voltage-gated Ca(2+) and/or Na(+) channels. Calcitonin has a positive effect on convulsions in epileptic rats, possibly using the same mechanisms as is used in the treatment of neuropathic and chronic pain. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. 21 CFR 862.1140 - Calcitonin test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry Test Systems § 862... measure the thyroid hormone calcitonin (thyrocalcitonin) levels in plasma and serum. Calcitonin...

  18. Direct interactions between calcitonin-like receptor (CLR) and CGRP-receptor component protein (RCP) regulate CGRP receptor signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, Sophie C; Dickerson, Ian M

    2012-04-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is a neuropeptide with multiple neuroendocrine roles, including vasodilation, migraine, and pain. The receptor for CGRP is a G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) that requires three proteins for function. CGRP binds to a heterodimer composed of the GPCR calcitonin-like receptor (CLR) and receptor activity-modifying protein (RAMP1), a single transmembrane protein required for pharmacological specificity and trafficking of the CLR/RAMP1 complex to the cell surface. In addition, the CLR/RAMP1 complex requires a third protein named CGRP-receptor component protein (RCP) for signaling. Previous studies have demonstrated that depletion of RCP from cells inhibits CLR signaling, and in vivo studies have demonstrated that expression of RCP correlates with CLR signaling and CGRP efficacy. It is not known whether RCP interacts directly with CLR to exert its effect. The current studies identified a direct interaction between RCP and an intracellular domain of CLR using yeast two-hybrid analysis and coimmunoprecipitation. When this interacting domain of CLR was expressed as a soluble fusion protein, it coimmunoprecipitated with RCP and inhibited signaling from endogenous CLR. Expression of this dominant-negative domain of CLR did not significantly inhibit trafficking of CLR to the cell surface, and thus RCP may not have a chaperone function for CLR. Instead, RCP may regulate CLR signaling in the cell membrane, and direct interaction between RCP and CLR is required for CLR activation. To date, RCP has been found to interact only with CLR and represents a novel neuroendocrine regulatory step in GPCR signaling.

  19. Structural Basis for Receptor Activity-Modifying Protein-Dependent Selective Peptide Recognition by a G Protein-Coupled Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booe, Jason M; Walker, Christopher S; Barwell, James; Kuteyi, Gabriel; Simms, John; Jamaluddin, Muhammad A; Warner, Margaret L; Bill, Roslyn M; Harris, Paul W; Brimble, Margaret A; Poyner, David R; Hay, Debbie L; Pioszak, Augen A

    2015-06-18

    Association of receptor activity-modifying proteins (RAMP1-3) with the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CLR) enables selective recognition of the peptides calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and adrenomedullin (AM) that have diverse functions in the cardiovascular and lymphatic systems. How peptides selectively bind GPCR:RAMP complexes is unknown. We report crystal structures of CGRP analog-bound CLR:RAMP1 and AM-bound CLR:RAMP2 extracellular domain heterodimers at 2.5 and 1.8 Å resolutions, respectively. The peptides similarly occupy a shared binding site on CLR with conformations characterized by a β-turn structure near their C termini rather than the α-helical structure common to peptides that bind related GPCRs. The RAMPs augment the binding site with distinct contacts to the variable C-terminal peptide residues and elicit subtly different CLR conformations. The structures and accompanying pharmacology data reveal how a class of accessory membrane proteins modulate ligand binding of a GPCR and may inform drug development targeting CLR:RAMP complexes. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Calcitonin

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2010). Clinical Chemistry: Theory, Analysis, Correlation , 5th Edition: Mosby, Inc. p 626. Mayo Clinic Interpretive Handbook. Test ... Edition]. Pagana, Kathleen D. & Pagana, Timothy J. (2001). Mosby's Diagnostic and Laboratory Test Reference 5th Edition: Mosby, ...

  1. High serum calcitonin levels in heroin addicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliaro, F; Capra, F; Dorizzi, R; Luisetto, G; Accordini, A; Renda, E; Parolin, A

    1984-08-01

    An involvement of calcitonin in the mechanism of pain perception has recently been hypothesized. In order to collect information about the relationship between this hormone and well known analgesic substances such as opioids, we have studied the serum levels of calcitonin in a group of heroin addicts, finding higher average concentrations than in normal subjects of matched age and sex. In these addicts there were no severe signs of impaired renal or hepatic function, or alterations of the serum levels of calcium and phosphate. So we think that opioids, in a direct or indirect way, can stimulate the secretion of calcitonin.

  2. Adrenomedullin A Novel Peptide Requires Coordination Of Genetic Physiologic And Environmental Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. R. Padma

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A healthy pregnancy requires strict coordination of genetic physiologic and environmental factors. The relatively common incidence of infertility and pregnancy complications has resulted in increased interest in understanding the mechanisms that underlie normal versus abnormal pregnancy. The peptide hormone adrenomedullin has recently been the focus of some exciting breakthroughs in the pregnancy field. Adrenomedullin ADM is a 52-amino acid peptide with structural homology to calcitonin gene-related peptide CGRP initially isolated from human pheochromocytoma. ADM is synthesized by many mammalian tissues including the adrenal medulla endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cells myocardium and central nervous system. ADM binds to plasma membrane receptors composed of calcitonin receptor-like receptor CRLR a member of serpentine receptor superfamily and receptor activity modifying protein RAMP type 2 or 3. ADM has also some affinity for CGRP receptor composed of CRLR and RAMP1. Supported by mechanistic studies in genetic animal models there continues to be a growing body of evidence demonstrating the importance of adrenomedullin protein levels in a variety of human pregnancy complications. With measurement of foetal resorption sites we can examine the importance of adrenomedullin a peptide hormone in pregnancy which alters due to genetic physiologic and environmental factors. A growing body of evidence illustrates AM as a pivotal component in normal physiology and disease with marked beneficial effects in the host defense mechanism.

  3. Calcitonin receptor expression in medullary thyroid carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappagli, Virginia; Potes, Catarina Soares; Ferreira, Luciana Bueno; Tavares, Catarina; Eloy, Catarina; Elisei, Rossella; Sobrinho-Simões, Manuel; Wookey, Peter J; Soares, Paula

    2017-01-01

    Calcitonin expression is a well-established marker for medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC); yet the role of calcitonin receptor (CTR), its seven-transmembrane G-protein coupled receptor, remains to be established in C-cells derived thyroid tumors. The aim of this work was to investigate CTR expression in MTC and to correlate such expression with clinicopathological features in order to evaluate its possible role as a prognostic indicator of disease aggressiveness and outcome. Calcitonin receptor expression was analyzed in a series of 75 MTCs by immunohistochemistry, and by qPCR mRNA quantification in specimens from four patients. Statistical tests were used to evaluate the correlation between CTR expression and the clinicopathological and molecular characteristics of patients and tumors. Calcitonin receptor expression was detected in 62 out of 75 samples (82.7%), whereas 13 of the 75 samples (17.3%) were completely negative. CTR expression was significantly associated with expression of cytoplasmatic phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 and osteopontin, as well as with wild type RET/RAS genes and absence of tumor stroma, suggesting that CTR expression do not associate with clinicopathological signs of worse prognosis. Calcitonin receptor expression appears to be associated in MTC with more differentiated status of the neoplastic cells.

  4. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide stimulates neurite growth in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez, A; Kimball, B; Romanchuk, G; Mulholland, M W

    1995-01-01

    The ability of PACAP-38 to stimulate morphological development was studied using rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. PACAP-38 produced concentration-dependent increases in percentage of cells exhibiting neurite extension. Similar increases were produced by forskolin (28 +/- 2% at 96 h) and 8-bromo cAMP (30 +/- 2%). Vasoactive intestinal peptide and alpha-calcitonin gene-related peptide were without effect. PACAP-38 produced significant increases in PC12 cell cAMP content and inositol phosphate turnover. Intracellular [Ca2+] increased from 169 +/- 14 nM to 560 +/- 58 nM in response to 1 microM PACAP-38. PACAP-stimulated neurite outgrowth was abolished by RpcAMPS, an inhibitor of cAMP-dependent kinases but was unaffected by the protein kinase C antagonist H7.

  5. Gallium-68 Dotatate PET/CT is superior to other imaging modalities in the detection of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid in the presence of high serum calcitonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Kathryn; Khan, Sairah; Taghizadehasl, Mina; Palazzo, Fausto; Frilling, Andrea; Todd, Jeannie F; Al-Nahhas, Adil

    2015-01-01

    Medullary carcinoma of the thyroid (MTC) is a rare neuroendocrine tumour (NET) that expresses somatostatin receptors on the cell membrane and secretes calcitonin. Surgery is the primary curative modality but is achieved only when the diagnosis is timely so there is a high rate of persistent and recurrent disease indicated by a rise in the serum calcitonin levels. Successful management of recurrent disease requires accurate localisation with cross sectional and functional imaging. The introduction of gallium-68-Dotatate ((68)Ga-Dotatate) peptides positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT) has significantly improved the detection of NET and has been reported as a valuable adjunct in MTC localisation. We retrospectively reviewed our cases of MTC to correlate the detectability of (68)Ga-Dotatate in relation to calcitonin levels and assess suitability of inoperable patients for peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT). Seven patients (age range 31-66 years, M:F 3:4) with raised calcitonin (mean=7,143pg/mL) were referred for (68)Ga-Dotatate PET/CT scan for localisation of persisting recurrent MTC. Six patients were known to have MTC treated with thyroidectomy and one patient was presenting for the first time. All patients had multiple imaging including ultrasound (US), CT, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) PET/CT and iodine-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123)I-MIBG). Positive findings were defined as areas of increased uptake other than the organs of normal distribution and were correlated with results of biopsies, other imaging, long term monitoring of calcitonin and clinical follow up. In 6/7 patients with very high serum calcitonin (range= 672-37,180, mean=8,320pg/mL) (68)Ga-Dotatate PET/CT confirmed the presence of active disease seen on other modalities or detected hitherto unsuspected lesions. In at least 3 cases, (68)Ga-Dotatate PET/CT showed many more lesions compared to other imaging combined. In 1

  6. Serum levels of calcitonin in Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luisetto, G; Mantero, F; Boscaro, M; Tizian, L; Zangari, M; Ziliotto, D

    1986-06-01

    Serum levels of calcitonin (CT) were studied in 21 patients with Cushing's syndrome (CS), 18 females and 3 males aging from 16 to 59 years, and in 70 age and sex matched normal subjects. Patients with CS showed CT values significantly lower than those found in controls (9.9 +/- 5.0 pg/ml vs. 15.9 +/- 6.3 pg/ml, mean +/- SD; p less than 0.01), while no difference was observed in total serum calcium and phosphate and calcium corrected for albumin. No correlation between CT and serum calcium and phosphate, serum cortisol and urinary free cortisol was found. It is possible that low CT levels are involved in the pathogenesis of bone loss observed in CS.

  7. Vasorelaxant effect of glucagon-like peptide-(7-36)amide and amylin on the pulmonary circulation of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golpon, H A; Puechner, A; Welte, T; Wichert, P V; Feddersen, C O

    2001-12-15

    The gastrointestinal peptides glucagon-like peptide-1(7-36)amide (GLP-1) and amylin are currently being tested in clinical trials for the treatment of diabetes mellitus due to their effects in lowering blood glucose. Receptors for these polypeptides also exist in the lung and since polypeptides are known to modulate airway and pulmonary vascular tone, we investigated whether GLP-1 and amylin act similarly in the lung. We compared their effects with the well-known actions of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). Both GLP-1 and amylin induced a dose-dependent and time-reversible endothelial-dependent relaxation of preconstricted pulmonary artery rings. Amylin was approximately as strong as VIP and CGRP, GLP-1 however, was 2.3-fold less potent. GLP-1 as well as amylin also reduced the vascular tone in the isolated, perfused and ventilated rat lung. In contrast to their action on the pulmonary vasculature, neither GLP-1 nor amylin showed any effect on the tone of isolated preconstricted trachea rings. In conclusion, GLP-1 and amylin represent two additional peptides which may modulate pulmonary vascular tone.

  8. Localization of regulatory peptides in the gastrointestinal tract of the striped dolphin, Stenella coeruleoalba (Mammalia: Cetacea). An immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domeneghini, C; Massoletti, P; Arrighi, S

    1997-01-01

    Samples of oesophagus, first, second and third stomach, duodenal ampulla, proximal intestine and distal intestine including rectum were obtained from striped dolphins (Stenella coeruleoalba) stranded along Italian coasts, fixed in formalin and used for immunohistochemistry. The possible presence of neuropeptides and the biogenic amine serotonin was investigated by a labelled streptavidin-biotin method. Neuropeptide Y (NPY)-, substance P-, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-, metenkephalin-, gastrin releasing peptide (GRP)/bombesin-, and somatostatin-like immunoreactivities were present in the submucosal as well as the myenteric plexuses, even with differences of distribution in the various organs. Vasoactive intestinal poly-peptide (VIP)-like immunoreactivity was detected in the submucosal plexus, whereas beta-endorphin- and leu-enkephalin-like immunoreactivities were shown in the myenteric plexus only. NPY-, substance P-, CGRP- and VIP-like-immunoreactivities were also observed in perivascular nerve fibres. In addition, VIP-, GRP- and somatostatin-like immunoreactivities were detected in myelinated nervous bundles. These were localized in the submucosal and muscular layers all along the gastrointestinal tract, and possibly sustain an exceptionally rapid response of the target structures. It is note-worthy that peptidergic axons in the wall of the gut of the majority of mammals are unmyelinated. A somatostatin-like peptide was identified in epithelial cells only in the second stomach, whereas in terrestrial mammals this endocrine cell type occurs widely. Immunoreactivity to serotonin was never detected, and this is a further difference in comparison with the majority of other mammals.

  9. Interaction between Pirenzepine and Ninjinto, a Traditional Japanese Herbal Medicine, on the Plasma Gut-Regulated Peptide Levels in Humans

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    Yuhki Sato

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Japanese herbal medicine (Kampo Ninjinto has been used for the treatment of gastroenteritis, esogastritis, gastric atony, gastrectasis, vomiting, and anorexia. The pharmacological effects of Ninjinto on the gastrointestine are due to changes in the levels of gut-regulated peptide, such as motilin, somatostatin, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP, substance P, and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP. The release of these peptides is controlled by acetylcholine (ACh from the preganglionic fibers of the parasympathetic nerve. Thus, we examined the effects of the selective M1 muscarinic receptor antagonist pirenzepine on the elevation of Ninjinto-induced plasma the area under the plasma gut-regulated peptide concentration-time curve from 0 to 240 min ( in humans. Oral pretreatment with pirenzepine significantly reduced the Ninjinto-induced elevation of plasma motilin and substance P release (. Combined treatment with Ninjinto and pirenzepine significantly increased the release of plasma somatostatin ( compared with administration of Ninjinto alone or placebo. Ninjinto appeared to induce the release of substance P and motilin into plasma mainly through the activation of M1 muscarinic receptors, and pirenzepine may affect the pharmacologic action of Ninjinto by the elevation of plasma substance P, motilin, and somatostatin.

  10. Calcitonin Receptor Plays a Physiological Role to Protect Against Hypercalcemia in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Davey, Rachel A; Turner, Andrew G.; McManus, Julie F; Chiu, WS Maria; Tjahyono, Francisca; Moore, Alison J; Gerald J. Atkins; Anderson, Paul H.; Ma, Cathy; Glatt, Vaida; MacLean, Helen E.; Vincent, Cristina; Bouxsein, Mary,; Morris, Howard A.; Findlay, David M.

    2008-01-01

    It is well established that calcitonin is a potent inhibitor of bone resorption; however, a physiological role for calcitonin acting through its cognate receptor, the calcitonin receptor (CTR), has not been identified. Data from previous genetically modified animal models have recognized a possible role for calcitonin and the CTR in controlling bone formation; however, interpretation of these data are complicated, in part because of their mixed genetic background. Therefore, to elucidate the ...

  11. [Calcitonin as an alternative treatment for root resorption].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, A; Berg, J O; Lindskog, S

    1989-01-01

    Inflammatory root resorption is a common finding following trauma and will cause eventual destruction of the tooth root if left untreated. This study examined the effects of intrapulpal application of calcitonin, a hormone known to inhibit osteoclastic bone resorption, on experimental inflammatory root resorption induced in monkeys. Results were histologically evaluated using a morphometric technique and revealed that calcitonin was an effective medicament for the treatment of inflammatory root resorption. It was concluded that this hormone could be a useful therapeutic adjunct in difficult cases of external root resorption.

  12. [Prevention of recurrence of Sudeck's disease with calcitonin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissling, R O; Bloesch, A C; Sager, M; Dambacher, M A; Schreiber, A

    1991-01-01

    In patients suffering from, or with a history of, reflex sympathetic dystrophy (RSD), there is always a risk of exacerbation or reactivation of this disease after surgery or trauma. The use of calcitonin in the treatment of this type of disorder is well established. Starting in 1984, 18 patients with clinical symptoms of RSD or a history of this disease were given daily prophylactic treatment with salmon calcitonin (100 IU subcutaneously or as a spray). Ten of the patients underwent orthopaedic surgery and 8 received conservative treatment following trauma. The mean duration of prophylactic treatment was 4 days before and 23 days after surgery or trauma. Only one recurrence was observed (3 per cent). For comparison, a retrospective analysis of a group with the same inclusion criteria who underwent surgery or received conservative treatment after trauma, without prophylactic administration of calcitonin showed a recurrence of the underlying disease 28 per cent of the cases. It is therefore possible to recommend prophylactic administration of calcitonin, to patients with a history of RSD who are about to undergo orthopaedic surgery or conservative treatment following trauma.

  13. Calcitonin serum levels in different pituitary diseases. A preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziliotto, D; Luisetto, G; Cecchini, M; Gastaldo, M; Francia, G; Padovan, L; Heynen, G

    1980-01-01

    The calcitonin (CT) concentration has been determined in the serum of 17 patients with different pituitary diseases. More or less elevated levels were found in 7 of them. No definite correlation has been observed between the immunoreactive CT and the different pituitary hormones.

  14. Further studies in the developmental hyperserotonemia model (DHS) of autism: social, behavioral and peptide changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, Ilan M; Borella, Alice W; Bialowas, Lynn A; Whitaker-Azmitia, Patricia M

    2008-01-16

    Prior research has reliably found high blood (hyperserotonemia) - but low brain - serotonin levels in autistic individuals. At early stages of development, high levels of serotonin in the blood may enter the brain of a developing fetus, causing a loss of serotonin terminals through negative feedback and thus disrupting subsequent serotonergic function. The current study extends earlier findings in a developmental hyperserotonemia (DHS) model of autism in Sprague-Dawley rats by treating 8 dams of developing rat pups with a serotonergic agonist, 5-methoxytryptamine (5-MT; 1 mg/kg) during development (from gestational day 12 to post-natal day 20; PND 20). DHS pups exhibited post-injection seizures, which were non-existent in saline-treated pups (pDHS pups spent less time with the dam during the active phase on PNDs 15-17 (pDHS animals exhibited greater gnawing reactions to a novel stimulus (p0.05). Post mortem analyses revealed that DHS animals had a loss of oxytocin (OT)-containing cells in the paraventricular nucleus in the hypothalamus (PVN; p<0.05) as well as an increase in calcitonin-gene related peptide (CGRP; p<0.05, one tailed) processes in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) on PND 198. These results may correspond to hypothalamic and amygdalar changes in the human condition and suggest that the hyperserotonemia model of autism may be a valid model which produces many of the social, behavioral, and peptide changes inherent to autism.

  15. Bone repair in rats treated with sodic diclofenac and calcitonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassioto, Maria Cristina Pita; Inouye, Celso Massaschi; Aydos, Ricardo Dutra; Figueiredo, Arthur Silveira de

    2006-01-01

    To investigate clinical and histologically the bone repair in treated animals with calcitonin and sodic diclofenac. Ninety-six femoral defects were created in forty-eight animals distributed in four groups (n=24): either left untreated, treated with the sodic diclofenac or calcitonin or both. Follow-up was 7, 14 and 21 days. Histological sections stained by haematoxylin-eosin was observed under light microscopy (100X) and quantitatively scored for their trabecular formation. The groups and subgroups were compared being used the Kruskall-Wallis test. Smaller trabecular formation was observed in the animals of the group II and larger trabecular formation in the animals of the group III. Was found significant differences in the comparison between all the groups (Kruskall-Wallis, p sodic diclofenac and accelerated by the calcitonina, when used separately. The associated use of calcitonina and sodic diclofenac didn't show to be the best therapeutic option in the treatment of bone defects surgically created.

  16. Identification of the calcitonin receptor in osteoarthritic chondrocytes

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    Christensen Tjorbjoern

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preclinical and clinical studies have shown that salmon calcitonin has cartilage protective effects in joint degenerative diseases, such as osteoarthritis (OA. However, the presence of the calcitonin receptor (CTR in articular cartilage chondrocytes is yet to be identified. In this study, we sought to further investigate the expression of the CTR in naïve human OA articular chondrocytes to gain further confirmation of the existents of the CTR in articular cartilage. Methods Total RNA was purified from primary chondrocytes from articular cartilage biopsies from four OA patients undergoing total knee replacement. High quality cDNA was produced using a dedicated reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR protocol. From this a nested PCR assay amplifying the full coding region of the CTR mRNA was completed. Western blotting and immunohistochemistry were used to characterize CTR protein on protein level in chondrocytes. Results The full coding transcript of the CTR isoform 2 was identified in all four individuals. DNA sequencing revealed a number of allelic variants of the gene including two potentially novel polymorphisms: a frame shift mutation, +473del, producing a shorter form of the receptor protein, and a single nucleotide polymorphism in the 3' non coding region of the transcript, +1443 C>T. A 53 kDa protein band, consistent with non-glycosylated CTR isoform 2, was detected in chondrocytes with a similar size to that expressed in osteoclasts. Moreover the CTR was identified in the plasma membrane and the chondrocyte lacuna of both primary chondrocytes and OA cartilage section. Conclusions Human OA articular cartilage chondrocytes do indeed express the CTR, which makes the articular a pharmacological target of salmon calcitonin. In addition, the results support previous findings suggesting that calcitonin has a direct anabolic effect on articular cartilage.

  17. Circulating parathyroid hormone and calcitonin in rats after spaceflight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Sara B.; Fung, Paul; Popova, Irina A.; Morey-Holton, Emily R.; Grindeland, Richard E.

    1992-01-01

    Parathyroid hormone and calcithonin, two major calcium-regulating hormones, were measured in the plasma of five experimental groups of rats to evaluate postflight calcium homeostasis after the 14-day Cosmos 2044 flight. Parathyroid hormone values were slightly higher in the flight animals (F) than in the appropriate cage and diet controls (S) (44 +/- 21 vs 21 +/- 4 pg/ml, P less than 0.05), but they were the same as in the vivarium controls (V), which had different housing and feeding schedules. The difference in F and V (22 +/- 11 vs 49 +/- 16 pg/ml, P less than 0.05) was most likely due to failure of circulating calcitonin in F to show the normal age-dependent increase which was demonstrated in age-matched controls in a separate experiment. Basal values for parathyroid hormone and calcitonin were unchanged after 2 wk of hindlimb suspension, a flight simulation model, in age-matched and younger rats. From a time course experiment serum calcium was higher and parathyroid hormone lower after 4 wk than in ambulatory controls. Postflight circulating levels of parathyroid hormone appear to reflect disturbances in calcium homeostasis from impaired renal function of undetermined cause, whereas levels of calcitonin reflect depression of a normal growth process.

  18. Effects of salmon calcitonin on fracture healing in ovariectomized rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaolin; Luo, Xinle; Yu, Nansheng; Zeng, Bingfang

    2007-01-01

    To explore the effects of salmon calcitonin on the healing process of osteoporotic fractures in ovariectomized rats. We performed this study in The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou Medical College, Guangzhou, China, during the period March 2002 to December 2004. We used 120 female adult Wistar rats in this experiment, among which 90 underwent ovariectomy (OVX) and the other 30 had sham-operation. All rats had their left tibias fractured 3 months later. The 90 OVX rats were randomly divided into 3 groups with 30 in each, while the 30 sham-operated rats served as control group. After the fracture the rats had subcutaneous injection of normal saline, salmon calcitonin and estrogen, respectively. X-ray film, histological examination, bone mineral density (BMD) measurement and biomechanics testing were carried out to evaluate the fracture healing. Compared with OVX rats treated with normal saline, the rats with salmon calcitonin had significantly higher BMD values in the left tibia, higher max torque, shear stress of the left tibia 8 weeks after fracture (pbiomechanical properties and improve the process of fracture healing in fractured osteoporotic bone.

  19. Role of sensory nervous system vasoactive peptides in hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.E. Watson

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The goal of the present research was to elucidate the roles and mechanisms by which the sensory nervous system, through the actions of potent vasodilator neuropeptides, regulates cardiovascular function in both the normal state and in the pathophysiology of hypertension. The animal models of acquired hypertension studied were deoxycorticosterone-salt (DOC-salt, subtotal nephrectomy-salt (SN-salt, and Nomega-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME-induced hypertension during pregnancy in rats. The genetic model was the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR. Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP and substance P (SP are potent vasodilating neuropeptides. In the acquired models of hypertension, CGRP and SP play compensatory roles to buffer the blood pressure (BP increase. Their synthesis and release are increased in the DOC-salt model but not in the SN-salt model. This suggests that the mechanism by which both models lower BP in SN-salt rats is by increased vascular sensitivity. CGRP functions in a similar manner in the L-NAME model. In the SHR, synthesis of CGRP and SP is decreased. This could contribute to the BP elevation in this model. The CGRP gene knockout mouse has increased baseline mean arterial pressure. The long-term synthesis and release of CGRP is increased by nerve growth factor, bradykinin, and prostaglandins and is decreased by alpha2-adrenoreceptor agonists and glucocorticoids. In several animal models, sensory nervous system vasoactive peptides play a role in chronic BP elevation. In the acquired models, they play a compensatory role. In the genetic model, their decreased levels may contribute to the elevated BP. The roles of CGRP and SP in human hypertension are yet to be clarified.

  20. Molecular cloning of otoconin-22 complementary deoxyribonucleic acid in the bullfrog endolymphatic sac: effect of calcitonin on otoconin-22 messenger ribonucleic acid levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaoi, Yuichi; Suzuki, Masakazu; Tomura, Hideaki; Sasayama, Yuichi; Kikuyama, Sakae; Tanaka, Shigeyasu

    2003-08-01

    Anuran amphibians have a special organ called the endolymphatic sac (ELS), containing many calcium carbonate crystals, which is believed to have a calcium storage function. The major protein of aragonitic otoconia, otoconin-22, which is considered to be involved in the formation of calcium carbonate crystals, has been purified from the saccule of the Xenopus inner ear. In this study, we cloned a cDNA encoding otoconin-22 from the cDNA library constructed for the paravertebral lime sac (PVLS) of the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana, and sequenced it. The bullfrog otoconin-22 encoded a protein consisting of 147 amino acids, including a signal peptide of 20 amino acids. The protein had cysteine residues identical in a number and position to those conserved among the secretory phospholipase A(2) family. The mRNA of bullfrog otoconin-22 was expressed in the ELS, including the PVLS and inner ear. This study also revealed the presence of calcitonin receptor-like protein in the ELS, with the putative seven-transmembrane domains of the G protein-coupled receptors. The ultimobranchialectomy induced a prominent decrease in the otoconin-22 mRNA levels of the bullfrog PVLS. Supplementation of the ultimobranchialectomized bullfrogs with synthetic salmon calcitonin elicited a significant increase in the mRNA levels of the sac. These findings suggest that calcitonin secreted from the ultimobranchial gland, regulates expression of bullfrog otoconin-22 mRNA via calcitonin receptor-like protein on the ELS, thereby stimulating the formation of calcium carbonate crystals in the lumen of the ELS.

  1. Preoperative calcitonin levels are predictive of tumor size and postoperative calcitonin normalization in medullary thyroid carcinoma. Groupe d'Etudes des Tumeurs a Calcitonine (GETC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, R; Campos, J M; Salaün, C; Heshmati, H M; Kraimps, J L; Proye, C; Sarfati, E; Henry, J F; Niccoli-Sire, P; Modigliani, E

    2000-02-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) is a calcitonin (CT)-secreting endocrine tumor. Although plasma CT level is a specific and sensitive marker of MTC, its preoperative usefulness in predicting tumor size and postoperative CT normalization has not been documented. From a nationwide database set up by the French CT Tumor Study Group, 226 MTC patients were selected according to the following criteria: preoperative CT level determination by an immunoradiometric assay (normal value, normalization was ascertained by negative response of CT to pentagastrin stimulation (forms (15.0 vs. 7.0 mm, P forms. Furthermore, preoperative CT levels under 50 pg/mL appeared to be predictive of postoperative CT normalization (44 of 45 patients). However, higher CT levels did not mean absence of postoperative CT normalization (50 of 120 patients). We conclude that low preoperative CT levels are predictive of tumor size and postoperative CT normalization.

  2. Anti-hyperalgesic effects of calcitonin on neuropathic pain interacting with its peripheral receptors

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    Ito Akitoshi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The polypeptide hormone calcitonin is clinically well known for its ability to relieve neuropathic pain such as spinal canal stenosis, diabetic neuropathy and complex regional pain syndrome. Mechanisms for its analgesic effect, however, remain unclear. Here we investigated the mechanism of anti-hyperalgesic action of calcitonin in a neuropathic pain model in rats. Results Subcutaneous injection of elcatonin, a synthetic derivative of eel calcitonin, relieved hyperalgesia induced by chronic constriction injury (CCI. Real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis revealed that the CCI provoked the upregulation of tetrodotoxin (TTX-sensitive Nav.1.3 mRNA and downregulation of TTX-resistant Nav1.8 and Nav1.9 mRNA on the ipsilateral dorsal root ganglion (DRG, which would consequently increase the excitability of peripheral nerves. These changes were reversed by elcatonin. In addition, the gene expression of the calcitonin receptor and binding site of 125I-calcitonin was increased at the constricted peripheral nerve tissue but not at the DRG. The anti-hyperalgesic effect and normalization of sodium channel mRNA by elcatonin was parallel to the change of the calcitonin receptor expression. Elcatonin, however, did not affect the sensitivity of nociception or gene expression of sodium channel, while it suppressed calcitonin receptor mRNA under normal conditions. Conclusions These results suggest that the anti-hyperalgesic action of calcitonin on CCI rats could be attributable to the normalization of the sodium channel expression, which might be exerted by an unknown signal produced at the peripheral nerve tissue but not by DRG neurons through the activation of the calcitonin receptor. Calcitonin signals were silent in the normal condition and nerve injury may be one of triggers for conversion of a silent to an active signal.

  3. Calcitonin directly attenuates collagen type II degradation by inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase expression and activity in articular chondrocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergaard, B C; Wulf, H; Henriksen, K

    2006-01-01

    -dependently increased cAMP levels in isolated chondrocytes. Explants cultured with TNF-alpha and OSM showed a 100-fold increase in CTX-II release compared to vehicle-treated controls (Pconcentration-dependently inhibited by calcitonin, 65% protection.......0001-1 microM]. In vivo, cartilage degradation was investigated in ovariectomized (OVX) rats administered with oral calcitonin [2 mg/kg calcitonin] for 9 weeks. RESULTS: The calcitonin receptor was identified in articular chondrocytes by immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR. Calcitonin concentration...

  4. Sugarcane genes related to mitochondrial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fonseca Ghislaine V.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria function as metabolic powerhouses by generating energy through oxidative phosphorylation and have become the focus of renewed interest due to progress in understanding the subtleties of their biogenesis and the discovery of the important roles which these organelles play in senescence, cell death and the assembly of iron-sulfur (Fe/S centers. Using proteins from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Homo sapiens and Arabidopsis thaliana we searched the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database for the presence of expressed sequence tags (ESTs with similarity to nuclear genes related to mitochondrial functions. Starting with 869 protein sequences, we searched for sugarcane EST counterparts to these proteins using the basic local alignment search tool TBLASTN similarity searching program run against 260,781 sugarcane ESTs contained in 81,223 clusters. We were able to recover 367 clusters likely to represent sugarcane orthologues of the corresponding genes from S. cerevisiae, H. sapiens and A. thaliana with E-value <= 10-10. Gene products belonging to all functional categories related to mitochondrial functions were found and this allowed us to produce an overview of the nuclear genes required for sugarcane mitochondrial biogenesis and function as well as providing a starting point for detailed analysis of sugarcane gene structure and physiology.

  5. Distribution of CGRP and CGRP receptor components in the rat brain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warfvinge, Karin; Edvinsson, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Background Calcitonin gene-related peptide and its receptor, consisting of receptor activity-modifying protein 1 and calcitonin receptor-like receptor, are of considerable interest because of the role they play in migraine and recently developed migraine therapies. Methods To better understand th...... a possible role in migraine. However, currently, the presence of calcitonin gene-related peptide and the nature of its receptors throughout the brain is an enigma yet to be solved....

  6. Effects of neutral endopeptidase (neprilysin) inhibition on the response to other vasoactive peptides in small human resistance arteries: studies with thiorphan and omapatrilat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalzell, Jonathan R; Seed, Alison; Berry, Colin; Whelan, Carol J; Petrie, Mark C; Padmanabhan, Neal; Clarke, Amanda; Biggerstaff, Fiona; Hillier, Christopher; McMurray, John J V

    2014-02-01

    New compounds with neprilysin or neutral endopeptidase (NEP) inhibiting activity are under clinical investigation in heart failure and hypertension. We investigated the effect of NEP inhibition on the functional vasomotor responses to a range of vasoactive peptides in human blood vessels. Small human resistance arteries from patients with coronary artery disease and preserved left ventricular systolic function were studied. Thiorphan (a NEP inhibitor) was compared with captopril (an ACE inhibitor) and omapatrilat (a dual NEP-ACE inhibitor) with regard to their effects on the response of human arteries to key vasoactive peptides. As expected, both captopril and omapatrilat (but not thiorphan) inhibited the vasoconstrictor effect of angiotensin I (maximal response [SEM]: 27 ± 8% vehicle, 6 ± 2% captopril, 39 ± 10% thiorphan, 8 ± 7% omapatrilat, P < 0.05). Thiorphan, captopril, and omapatrilat all enhanced the vasodilator response to bradykinin (all P < 0.01). Omapatrilat markedly augmented the vasodilator action of adrenomedullin (P < 0.05), whilst thiorphan and captopril did not. None of the three inhibitors studied affected the vasodilator action of c-type natriuretic peptide, calcitonin gene-related peptide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide or substance P. NEP inhibition with thiorphan modestly augmented the vasodilator action of bradykinin, but did not potentiate the response to adrenomedullin; dual ACE and NEP inhibition with omapatrilat, as expected, markedly augmented the response to bradykinin and also potentiated the effect of adrenomedullin. Thiorphan weakly enhanced the vasoconstrictor response to angiotensin I. Neither omapatrilat nor thiorphan had any effect on the action of a range of other vasoactive peptides including CNP. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. CRMP-2 peptide mediated decrease of high and low voltage-activated calcium channels, attenuation of nociceptor excitability, and anti-nociception in a model of AIDS therapy-induced painful peripheral neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piekarz Andrew D

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ubiquity of protein-protein interactions in biological signaling offers ample opportunities for therapeutic intervention. We previously identified a peptide, designated CBD3, that suppressed inflammatory and neuropathic behavioral hypersensitivity in rodents by inhibiting the ability of collapsin response mediator protein 2 (CRMP-2 to bind to N-type voltage-activated calcium channels (CaV2.2 [Brittain et al. Nature Medicine 17:822–829 (2011]. Results and discussion Here, we utilized SPOTScan analysis to identify an optimized variation of the CBD3 peptide (CBD3A6K that bound with greater affinity to Ca2+ channels. Molecular dynamics simulations demonstrated that the CBD3A6K peptide was more stable and less prone to the unfolding observed with the parent CBD3 peptide. This mutant peptide, conjugated to the cell penetrating motif of the HIV transduction domain protein TAT, exhibited greater anti-nociception in a rodent model of AIDS therapy-induced peripheral neuropathy when compared to the parent TAT-CBD3 peptide. Remarkably, intraperitoneal administration of TAT-CBD3A6K produced none of the minor side effects (i.e. tail kinking, body contortion observed with the parent peptide. Interestingly, excitability of dissociated small diameter sensory neurons isolated from rats was also reduced by TAT-CBD3A6K peptide suggesting that suppression of excitability may be due to inhibition of T- and R-type Ca2+ channels. TAT-CBD3A6K had no effect on depolarization-evoked calcitonin gene related peptide (CGRP release compared to vehicle control. Conclusions Collectively, these results establish TAT-CBD3A6K as a peptide therapeutic with greater efficacy in an AIDS therapy-induced model of peripheral neuropathy than its parent peptide, TAT-CBD3. Structural modifications of the CBD3 scaffold peptide may result in peptides with selectivity against a particular subset of voltage-gated calcium channels resulting in a multipharmacology of

  8. Medullary thyroid carcinoma and duodenal calcitonin-secreting neuroendocrine tumour: more than coincidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huguet, I; Lamas, C; Vera, R; Lomas, A; Quilez, R P; Grossman, A; Botella, F

    2013-01-01

    Summary Neuroendocrine tumours (NETs) are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms whose management can be problematic. In many cases, multiple tumours may occur in the same patient or his or her family, and some of these have now been defined genetically, although in other cases the underlying gene or genes involved remain unclear. We describe a patient, a 63-year-old female, who was diagnosed with a medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC), which was confirmed pathologically after thyroidectomy, but whose circulating calcitonin levels remained elevated after thyroidectomy with no evidence of metastatic disease. Subsequently, an entirely separate and discrete duodenal NET was identified; this was 2.8 cm in diameter and was removed at partial duodenectomy. The tumour stained immunohistochemically for calcitonin, and its removal led to persistent normalisation of the circulating calcitonin levels. There was no germline mutation of the RET oncogene. This is the first identification of a duodenal NET secreting calcitonin and also the first demonstration of a second tumour secreting calcitonin in a patient with MTC. We suggest that where calcitonin levels remain high after removal of a MTC a search for other NETs should be conducted. Learning points NETs are a complex and heterogeneous group of related neoplasms, and multiple tumours may occur in the same patient.Calcitonin can be produced ectopically by several tumours outside the thyroid.Persistently elevated calcitonin levels after removal of a MTC may not necessarily indicate persisting or metastatic disease from the tumour.The real prevalence of calcitonin-producing NETs may be underestimated, as serum determination is only recommended in the diagnosis of pancreatic NETs. PMID:24616764

  9. Calcitonin Forms Oligomeric Pore-Like Structures in Lipid Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diociaiuti, Marco; Polzi, Laura Zanetti; Valvo, Luisa; Malchiodi-Albedi, Fiorella; Bombelli, Cecilia; Gaudiano, Maria Cristina

    2006-01-01

    Calcitonin is a polypeptidic hormone involved in calcium metabolism in the bone. It belongs to the amyloid protein family, which is characterized by the common propensity to aggregate acquiring a β-sheet conformation and include proteins associated with important neurodegenerative diseases. Here we show for the first time, to our knowledge, by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) that salmon-calcitonin (sCT) forms annular oligomers similar to those observed for β-amyloid and α-sinuclein (Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases). We also investigated the interaction between sCT and model membranes, such as liposomes, with particular attention to the effect induced by lipid “rafts” made of cholesterol and GM1. We observed, by TEM immunogold labeling of sCT, that protein binding is favored by the presence of rafts. In addition, we found by TEM that sCT oligomers inserted in the membrane have the characteristic pore-like morphology of the amyloid proteins. Circular dichroism experiments revealed an increase in β-content in sCT secondary structure when the protein was reconstituted in rafts mimicking liposomes. Finally, we showed, by spectrofluorimetry experiments, that the presence of sCT allowed Ca2+ entry in rafts mimicking liposomes loaded with the Ca2+-specific fluorophore Fluo-4. This demonstrates that sCT oligomers have ion-channel activity. Our results are in good agreement with recent electrophysiological studies reporting that sCT forms Ca2+-permeable ion channels in planar model membranes. It has been proposed that, beyond the well-known interaction of the monomer with the specific receptor, the formation of Ca2+ channels due to sCT oligomers could represent an extra source of Ca2+ entry in osteoblasts. Structural and functional data reported here support this hypothesis. PMID:16940475

  10. Noninvasive delivery systems for peptides and proteins in osteoporosis therapy: a retroperspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyer, Herbert; Perera, Glen; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide the reader general and inspiring prospects in various attempts to make noninvasive delivery systems of calcitonin and teriparatide feasible and as convenient as possible. Calcitonin and teriparatide play an important role in both calcium homeostasis and bone remodelling. Currently calcitonin is available as a subcutaneous injection and as a nasal spray whereas teriparatide is administered subcutaneously. In the past few years, an increasing number of articles about drug delivery systems for calcitonin and teriparatide have been published. These delivery systems have been developed to overcome the inherent barriers for the uptake across the diverse membranes on the various routes for protein and peptide delivery. Co-administration of permeation enhancers, mucoadhesive agents, viscosity modifying agents, multifunctional polymers, protease inhibitors as well as encapsulation and chemical modification are utilized in order to improve calcitonin and teriparatide absorption after oral, nasal, pulmonal, or buccal administration. The majority of research groups have been working on the development of formulations based on the encapsulation of molecules in biodegradable and biocompatible polymeric nanoparticles. However these observations are based on data obtained under different experimental conditions. Hence, it is difficult to compare the obtained results in order to draw general conclusions about the most promising characteristics required for oral and nasal formulations for these peptides.

  11. [Effect of calcitonin, somatostatin and cimetidine on stress ulcer in rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakesz, R; Hofbauer, F; Lehr, L; Schiessel, R

    1978-05-01

    The prophylactic effect of calcitonin, somatostatin and cimetidine on stress ulcer formation in rats was investigated in two stress models: restraint + ketamin (4 h) and hypovolemia (4 h). The basis of the comparative study was a 70% inhibition of acid secretion for 4 h in pyloric ligated animals. This was achieved with 1000 microgram/kg somatostatin s.c., 10 microgram/kg calcitonin s.c., and 2 X 100 mumol/kg cimetidine s.c. In restraint stress and ketamin with calcitonin and cimetidine a significantly lower frequency of gastric lesions was found than with somatostatin. The most potent substance in hypovolemia was calcitonin, with a significant difference in the frequency of mucosal lesions to the groups with cimetidine and somatostatin.

  12. Calcitonin in the treatment of Paget’s disease of bone

    OpenAIRE

    Mallia, Carmel;

    1989-01-01

    A retrospective survey at the request of Pharmacy & Therapeutics Committee, St. Luke’s Hospital was undertaken to evaluate prescribing habits of calcitonin in Paget’s disease of bone, as well as to assess its effectiveness.

  13. Low-Level Laser Therapy and Calcitonin in Bone Repair: Densitometric Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatiana Pinto Ribeiro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to evaluate the association of low-level laser therapy (LLLT, 830 nm and calcitonin in bone repair considering that bone healing remains a challenge to health professionals. Calcitonin has antiosteoclastic action and LLLT is a treatment that uses low-level lasers or light-emitting diodes to alter cellular function. Both are used to improve bone healing. Densitometry is a clinical noninvasive valuable tool used to evaluate bone mineral density (BMD. Sixty male rats were submitted to bone defect with a trephine bur, randomly divided into four groups of 15 animals each: control (C; synthetic salmon calcitonin (Ca; LLLT (La; LLLT combined with calcitonin (LaCa. Animals from Ca and LaCa received 2 UI/Kg synthetic salmon calcitonin intramuscularly on alternate days after surgery. Animals from groups La and LaCa were treated with infrared LLLT (830 nm, 10 mW, 20 J/cm2, 6 s, contact mode. Five animals from each group were euthanized 7, 14, and 21 days after surgery and bone defects were analyzed by densitometry. Statistical analysis showed a significant difference in BMD values in LaCa group at 7 and 21 days (=0,005. The results of the densitometric study showed that LLLT (830 nm combined with calcitonin improved bone repair.

  14. False positive results using calcitonin as a screening method for medullary thyroid carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Rafael Loch; Toscanini, Andrea Cecilia; Brandão, Lenine Garcia; Cunha-Neto, Malebranche Berardo C.

    2013-01-01

    The role of serum calcitonin as part of the evaluation of thyroid nodules has been widely discussed in literature. However there still is no consensus of measurement of calcitonin in the initial evaluation of a patient with thyroid nodule. Problems concerning cost-benefit, lab methods, false positive and low prevalence of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) are factors that limit this approach. We have illustrated two cases where serum calcitonin was used in the evaluation of thyroid nodule and rates proved to be high. A stimulation test was performed, using calcium as secretagogue, and calcitonin hyper-stimulation was confirmed, but anatomopathologic examination did not evidence medullar neoplasia. Anatomopathologic diagnosis detected Hashimoto thyroiditis in one case and adenomatous goiter plus an occult papillary thyroid carcinoma in the other one. Recommendation for routine use of serum calcitonin in the initial diagnostic evaluation of a thyroid nodule, followed by a confirming stimulation test if basal serum calcitonin is showed to be high, is the most currently recommended approach, but questions concerning cost-benefit and possibility of diagnosis error make the validity of this recommendation discussible. PMID:23869316

  15. False positive results using calcitonin as a screening method for medullary thyroid carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Loch Batista

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of serum calcitonin as part of the evaluation of thyroid nodules has been widely discussed in literature. However there still is no consensus of measurement of calcitonin in the initial evaluation of a patient with thyroid nodule. Problems concerning cost-benefit, lab methods, false positive and low prevalence of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC are factors that limit this approach. We have illustrated two cases where serum calcitonin was used in the evaluation of thyroid nodule and rates proved to be high. A stimulation test was performed, using calcium as secretagogue, and calcitonin hyper-stimulation was confirmed, but anatomopathologic examination did not evidence medullar neoplasia. Anatomopathologic diagnosis detected Hashimoto thyroiditis in one case and adenomatous goiter plus an occult papillary thyroid carcinoma in the other one. Recommendation for routine use of serum calcitonin in the initial diagnostic evaluation of a thyroid nodule, followed by a confirming stimulation test if basal serum calcitonin is showed to be high, is the most currently recommended approach, but questions concerning cost-benefit and possibility of diagnosis error make the validity of this recommendation discussible.

  16. Regulatory peptides modulate adhesion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes to bronchial epithelial cells through regulation of interleukins, ICAM-1 and NF-kappaB/IkappaB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Song; Tan, Yu-Rong; Xiang, Yang; Luo, Zi-Qiang; Qin, Xiao-Qun

    2006-02-01

    A complex network of regulatory neuropeptides controls airway inflammation reaction, in which airway epithelial cells adhering to and activating leukocytes is a critical step. To study the effect of intrapulmonary regulatory peptides on adhesion of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) to bronchial epithelial cells (BECs) and its mechanism, several regulatory peptides including vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), epidermal growth factor (EGF), endothelin-1 (ET-1) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), were investigated. The results demonstrated that VIP and EGF showed inhibitory effects both on the secretion of IL-1, IL-8 and the adhesion of PMNs to BECs, whereas ET-1 and CGRP had the opposite effect. Anti-intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) antibody could block the adhesion of PMNs to ozone-stressed BECs. Using immunocytochemistry and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), it was shown that VIP and EGF down-regulated the expression of ICAM-1 in BECs, while ET-1 and CGRP up-regulated ICAM-1 expression. NF-kappaB inhibitor MG132 blocked ICAM-1 expression induced by ET-1 and CGRP. Furthermore, in electric mobility shift assay (EMSA), VIP and EGF restrained the binding activity of NF-kappaB to the NF-kappaB binding site within the ICAM-1 promoter in ozone-stressed BECs, while CGRP and ET-1 promoted this binding activity. IkappaB degradation was consistent with NF-kappaB activation. These observations indicate that VIP and EGF inhibit inflammation, while ET-1 and CGRP enhance the inflammation reaction.

  17. Calcitonin as Biomarker for the Medullary Thyroid Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Yoon Ju; Schaab, Michael; Kratzsch, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Calcitonin (CTN) is a polypeptide hormone consisting of 32 amino acids with a disulfide bridge between position 1 and 7 that is mainly produced by the C-cells of thyroid gland. The measurement of CTN concentrations in blood reflects C-cell activity and is performed in general by immunoassay methods. However, there are analytical, physiological, pharmacological, and pathological factors that can influence results of serum CTN values. Due to the influence of these factors, there is a high variability in assay-dependent cutoffs used to discriminate between MTC, C-cell hyperplasia (CCH), and the absence of the pathological impairment of C-cells. There is a lot of evidence that the measurement of serum CTN concentrations in patients with thyroid nodules can lead to an earlier diagnosis of MTC or CCH than the exclusive use of imaging procedures and/or fine-needle aspiration cytology. Basal CTN concentrations higher than 60-100 pg/mL are highly indicative for the diagnosis MTC. In the range between cutoff and 60 pg/mL CTN, both MTC and HCC may be a relevant diagnosis. PCT and CTN appear to have a comparable diagnostic capability to diagnose MTCs. However, "positive" PCT values of more than 50 pg/mL may be reached also in subclinical infections and will lead, therefore, to an overdiagnosis of the tumor. Pentagastrin- or calcium-stimulated serum CTN concentrations higher than cutoff values might improve diagnostics of MTC, but the non-availability of the first and the lacking of relevant cutoff values for the second tool favors the use of only basal values currently.

  18. Oral salmon calcitonin attenuates hyperglycaemia and preserves pancreatic beta-cell area and function in Zucker diabetic fatty rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feigh, M; Andreassen, K V; Neutzsky-Wulff, A V

    2012-01-01

    Oral salmon calcitonin (sCT), a dual-action amylin and calcitonin receptor agonist, improved glucose homeostasis in diet-induced obese rats. Here, we have evaluated the anti-diabetic efficacy of oral sCT using parameters of glycaemic control and beta-cell morphology in male Zucker diabetic fatty...... (ZDF) rats, a model of type 2 diabetes....

  19. Skeletal blood flow in Paget's disease of bone and its response to calcitonin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootton, R; Reeve, J; Spellacy, E; Tellez-Yudilevich, M

    1978-01-01

    1. Blood flow to the skeleton was measured by the 18F clearance method of Wooton, Reeve & Veall (1976) in 24 patients with untreated Paget's disease. In every patient but one, resting skeletal blood flow was increased. There was a significant positive correlation between skeletal blood flow and serum alkaline phosphatase and between skeletal blood flow and urinary total hydroxyproline excretion. 2. Fourteen patients were re-studied after they had received short-term (7 days or less) or long-term (7 weeks or more) calcitonin. Skeletal blood flow, alkaline phosphatase and urinary hydroxy-proline excretion fell towards normal in every case. There was some evidence from the short-term studies that calcitonin produced a more rapid fall in skeletal blood flow than in alkaline phosphatase. 3. Glomerular filtration rate appeared to increase transiently in response to calcitonin.

  20. A phase 3 trial of the efficacy and safety of oral recombinant calcitonin: the Oral Calcitonin in Postmenopausal Osteoporosis (ORACAL) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkley, Neil; Bolognese, Michael; Sidorowicz-Bialynicka, Anna; Vally, Tasneem; Trout, Richard; Miller, Colin; Buben, Christine E; Gilligan, James P; Krause, David S

    2012-08-01

    The Oral Calcitonin in Postmenopausal Osteoporosis (ORACAL) study was a randomized, double-blind, double-dummy, active- and placebo-controlled, multiple-dose, phase 3 study to assess the efficacy and safety of oral recombinant calcitonin for treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. A total of 565 women age 46 to 86 (mean 66.5) years were randomized (4:3:2) to receive oral recombinant salmon calcitonin (rsCT) tablets (0.2  mg/d) plus placebo nasal spray, synthetic salmon calcitonin (ssCT) nasal spray (200 IU/d) plus placebo tablets, or placebo (placebo tablets plus placebo nasal spray), respectively for 48 weeks. All women received calcium (≥1000  mg/d) and vitamin D (800 IU/d). Women randomized to oral rsCT had a mean ± SD percent increase from baseline in lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) (1.5% ± 3.2%) that was greater than those randomized to ssCT nasal spray (0.78% ± 2.9%) or placebo (0.5% ± 3.2%). Lumbar spine BMD change in those receiving nasal calcitonin did not differ from placebo. Oral rsCT treatment also resulted in greater improvements in trochanteric and total proximal femur BMD than ssCT nasal spray. Reductions in bone resorption markers with oral rsCT were greater than those observed in ssCT nasal spray or placebo recipients. Approximately 80% of subjects in each treatment group experienced an adverse event, the majority of which were mild or moderate in intensity. Gastrointestinal system adverse events were reported by nearly one-half of women in all treatment groups and were the principal reason for premature withdrawals. Less than 10% of women experienced a serious adverse event and no deaths occurred. Overall, oral rsCT was superior to nasal ssCT and placebo for increasing BMD and reducing bone turnover. Oral rsCT was safe and as well tolerated as ssCT nasal spray or placebo. Oral calcitonin may provide an additional treatment alternative for women with postmenopausal osteoporosis. Copyright © 2012 American Society

  1. Carbopol-lectin conjugate coated liposomes for oral peptide delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werle, Martin; Makhlof, Abdallah; Takeuchi, Hirofumi

    2010-03-01

    Within the current study, a delivery system based on a novel polymer-lectin conjugate (carbopol-lectin) was evaluated for the oral delivery of therapeutic peptides and proteins. It was demonstrated that covalent attachment of lectin to carbopol does neither decrease nor abolish the specific binding properties of lectin. Bioadhesion studies revealed that liposomes coated with carbopol lectin are more bioadhesive than liposomes coated with unmodified carbopol. Finally, the in vivo data suggest that carbopol-lectin conjugate coated liposomes are effective oral peptide delivery systems which are capable of increasing the pharmacological effect of orally administered calcitonin.

  2. An immunohistochemical study of the antinociceptive effect of calcitonin in ovariectomized rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sekiguchi Miho

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calcitonin is used as a treatment to reduce the blood calcium concentration in hypercalcemia and to improve bone mass in osteoporosis. An analgesic effect of calcitonin has been observed and reported in clinical situations. Ovariectomaized (OVX rats exhibit the same hormonal changes as observed in humans with osteoporosis and are an animal model of postmenopousal osteoporosis. The aim of this study to investigate antinociceptive effect of calcitonin in OVX rats using the immunohistochemical study. Methods We assessed the antinociceptive effects of calcitonin in an ovariectomized (OVX rat model, which exhibit osteoporosis and hyperalgesia, using the immunohistochemical method. Fifteen rats were ovariectomized bilaterally, and ten rats were received the same surgery expected for ovariectomy as a sham model. We used five groups: the OVX-CT (n = 5, the sham-CT (n = 5, and the OVX-CT-pcpa (n = 5 groups recieved calcitonin (CT: 4 U/kg/day, while OVX-vehi (n = 5 and the sham-vehi (n = 5 groups received vehicle subcutaneously 5 times a week for 4 weeks. The OVX-CT-pcpa-group was given traperitoneal injection of p-chlorophenylalanine (pcpa; an inhibitor of serotonin biosynthesis (100 mg/kg/day in the last 3 days of calcitonon injection. Two hours after 5% formalin (0.05 ml subcutaneously into the hind paw, the L5 spinal cord were removed and the number of Fos-immunoreactive (ir neurons were evaluated using the Mann-Whitney-U test. Results The numbers of Fos-ir neurons in the OVX-CT and sham-CT groups were significantly less than in the OVX-vehi and sham-vehi groups, respectively (p = 0.0090, p = 0.0090. The number of Fos-ir neurons in the OVX-CT-pcpa-group was significantly more than that of the OVX-CT-group (p = 0.0283, which means pcpa inhibits calcitonin induced reduction of c-Fos production. Conclusion The results in this study demonstrated that 1 the increase of c-Fos might be related to hyperalgesia in OVX-rats. 2 Calcitonin has

  3. Association of Basal and Calcium-stimulated Calcitonin Levels with Pathological Findings After Total Thyroidectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, Georgios; Keramidas, Ioannis; Triantafillou, Eleni; Kanouta, Fotini; Pappa, Theodora; Kaltzidou, Victoria; Tertipi, Athanasia; Iordanidou, Lydia; Trivizaki, Erasmia; Vecchini, Gino; Villiotou, Vassiliki; Pappas, Anastasios

    2015-07-01

    Medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) originates from thyroid C-cells and is a calcitonin-secreting tumor. Calcitonin is also elevated in C-cell hyperplasia (CCH). The objective of the study was to determine the optimal basal (bCT) and peak stimulated calcitonin (psCT) cut-off value for differentiating MTC from CCH, and to examine the histological findings of thyroidectomy in patients with maximum psCT >100 pg/ml. Fifty-five patients had a maximum calcium-psCT >100 pg/ml and underwent total thyroidectomy. A total of 20 patients were diagnosed with MTC and the remaining 35 with CCH. A bCT level >17.4 pg/ml and psCT level >452 pg/ml demonstrated the best sensitivity and positive predictive value for differenting MTC from CCH. The overlap of calcitonin levels between MTC and CCH reduces the accuracy of the calcium stimulation test. Remarkably, an appreciable number of patients with psCT levels >100 pg/ml harbor differentiated thyroid carcinoma of follicular origin. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  4. Calcitonin gingival crevicular fluid levels and pain discomfort during early orthodontic tooth movement in young patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcón, José Antonio; Linde, Dolores; Barbieri, Germán; Solano, Patricia; Caba, Octavio; Rios-Lugo, María Judith; Sanz, Mariano; Martin, Conchita

    2013-06-01

    To investigate the previously unreported presence of calcitonin (CT) levels in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), its variations during initial orthodontic tooth movement in both tension and compression sites, and its possible association with the experienced dental pain. Fifteen children (mean age: 12.6 years) requiring orthodontic closure of the upper midline diastema were included. We collected GCF from the compression and tension sites of the upper right central incisor (experimental) and first bicuspid (control), before and after (1h, 24h, 7d, 15d) beginning of treatment. Calcitonin levels were determined by Western blot. Pain intensity was assessed using a visual analogue scale. Calcitonin levels were higher in the compression site versus the control site at 7d (p=0.014). Intragroup comparisons showed an increment of CT between 1h and 7d (680.81±1672.60pg/30s, p=0.010) in the compression site. No significant changes were found in the tension and control sites. Calcitonin levels and pain intensity were negatively associated during the period from 24h to 15d (r=-0.54, p=0.05). CT levels in the GCF significantly increased in the compression site after the short term after application of orthodontic forces. These changes were negatively associated with the perceived patient's dental pain during the period from 24h to 15d. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of calcium carbonate combined with calcitonin on hypercalcemia in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yong; Kong, Xiang Lei; Li, Wen Bin; Wang, Zun Song

    2014-12-01

    This short-term study assessed the efficacy and safety of calcium carbonate combined with calcitonin in the treatment of hypercalcemia in hemodialysis patients. Patients (n=64) on hemodialysis for chronic kidney disease for more than 6 months were included based on total serum calcium more than 10.5 mg/dL. All patients were randomized (1:1) to receive calcium carbonate combined with calcitonin (Group I) or lanthanum carbonate (Group II) for 12 weeks. Blood levels of calcium, phosphorus and intact parathyroid hormone (iPTH) were measured every month, bone mass density (BMD) and coronary artery calcium scores (CACS) were measured at 3 months. During the study period, serum calcium decreased from 10.72 ± 0.39 to 10.09 ± 0.28 mg/dL (P Calcium carbonate combined with calcitonin and lanthanum carbonate were equally effective in the suppression of hypercalcemia in hemodialysis patients. There were no serious treatment-related adverse events in treatment with calcium carbonate combined with calcitonin. © 2014 The Authors. Therapeutic Apheresis and Dialysis © 2014 International Society for Apheresis.

  6. Impact of congenital calcitonin deficiency due to dysgenetic hypothyroidism on bone mineral density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daripa M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of chronic calcitonin deficiency on bone mass development. The results of 11 patients with thyroid dysgenesis (TD were compared to those of 17 normal individuals (C and of 9 patients with other forms of hypothyroidism (OH: 4 with hypothyroidism due to inborn errors of thyroid hormone synthesis and 5 with Hashimoto's thyroiditis. The subjects received an intravenous calcium stimulus and blood was collected for the determination of ionized calcium (Ca2+, calcitonin, and intact parathyroid hormone. Bone mineral density (BMD was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. After calcium administration the levels of Ca2+ in the two groups of hypothyroidism were significantly higher than in the normal control group (10 min after starting calcium infusion: C = 1.29 ± 0.08 vs TD = 1.34 ± 0.03 vs OH = 1.34 ± 0.02 mmol/l; P < 0.05, and only the TD group showed no calcitonin response (5 min after starting calcium infusion: C = 27.9 ± 5.8 vs TD = 6.6 ± 0.3 vs OH = 43.0 ± 13.4 ng/l. BMD values did not differ significantly between groups (L2-L4: C = 1.116 ± 0.02 vs TD = 1.109 ± 0.03 vs OH = 1.050 ± 0.04 g/cm². These results indicate that early deficiency of calcitonin secretion has no detrimental effect on bone mass development. Furthermore, the increased calcitonin secretion observed in patients with inborn errors of thyroid hormone biosynthesis does not confer any advantage in terms of BMD.

  7. Relative expression of genes related with cold tolerance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    For analysis, the Spanish cultivar, Susan, was used as check tolerance and Oryzica 1 as susceptible check. Oxidative stress was measured through lipid peroxidation. To find mechanisms of cold tolerance in Chilean cultivars, we determined the relative expression of genes related with oxidative stress, such as superoxide ...

  8. High-Sensitivity LC-MS/MS Quantification of Peptides and Proteins in Complex Biological Samples : The Impact of Enzymatic Digestion and Internal Standard Selection on Method Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bronsema, Kees J.; Bischoff, Rainer; van de Merbel, Nico C.

    2013-01-01

    Two important aspects of peptide and protein quantification by LC-MS/MS, the enzymatic digestion step and the internal standardization approach, were systematically investigated with a small protein, salmon calcitonin, which could be analyzed both without and with digestion. Quantification of

  9. Effects of ionotropic glutamate receptor antagonists on rat dural artery diameter in an intravital microscopy model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, K Y; Gupta, S; de Vries, R

    2010-01-01

    During migraine, trigeminal nerves may release calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), inducing cranial vasodilatation and central nociception; hence, trigeminal inhibition or blockade of craniovascular CGRP receptors may prevent this vasodilatation and abort migraine headache. Several preclinical...

  10. Long-term tolerability of telcagepant for acute treatment of migraine in a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connor, Kathryn M; Aurora, Sheena K; Loeys, Tom

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the long-term tolerability of telcagepant for acute treatment of intermittent migraine attacks. Background.- Telcagepant is a calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist being investigated for the acute treatment of migraine....

  11. Conjugation of salmon calcitonin to a combed-shaped end functionalized poly(poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) yields a bioactive stable conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Sinéad M; Wang, Xuexuan; Mantovani, Guiseppe; Sayers, Claire T; Haddleton, David M; Brayden, David J

    2009-04-02

    Salmon calcitonin (sCT) was conjugated via its N-terminal cysteine to a comb-shaped end-functionalized poly(poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate) (PolyPEG, 6.5 kDa), and to linear PEG (5 kDa). Conjugate molecular weight and purity was assessed by SEC-HPLC and MALDI-TOF MS. Bioactivity of conjugates was measured by cyclic AMP assay in T47D cells. Calcium and calcitonin levels were measured in rats following intravenous injections. Stability of conjugates was tested against serine proteases, intestinal and liver homogenates and serum. Cytotoxicity of conjugates was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) assay and by haemolytic assay of rat red blood cells. Results showed that the two conjugates were of high purity with molecular weights similar to predictions. Both conjugates retained more than 85% bioactivity in vitro and had nanomolar EC(50) values similar to sCT. While both sCT-PolyPEG(6.5 K) and sCT-PEG(5 K) were resistant to metabolism by serine proteases, homogenates and serum, PolyPEG (6.5 K) was more so. Although both conjugates reduced serum calcium to levels similar to those achieved with sCT, PolyPEG(6.5 K) extended the T(1/2) and AUC of serum sCT over values achieved with sCT-PEG and sCT itself. None of PolyPEG, PEG or methacrylic acid displayed significant cytotoxicity. PolyPEG may therefore have potential to improve pharmacokinetic profiles of injected peptides.

  12. Possible Links among Mirror Neurons and Genes Related to Autism

    OpenAIRE

    Mochizuki, Mai; 望月,麻衣

    2016-01-01

    Autism includes many neurodevelopmental disorders and defi cits in communication. Althoughresearchers have considered various origins, the onset mechanism is still not clear. The aim ofthis article is to provide some clues for interaction of autism with mirror neuronal and geneticfactors. First, the impact of neural brain cells considered to infl uence autism will be discussedwith reference to mirror neurons. Then, the discussion will move to genes related to autism.Consequently, it is argued...

  13. Long-term tolerability of telcagepant for acute treatment of migraine in a randomized trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Connor, Kathryn M; Aurora, Sheena K; Loeys, Tom

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the long-term tolerability of telcagepant for acute treatment of intermittent migraine attacks. Background.- Telcagepant is a calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist being investigated for the acute treatment of migraine.......To evaluate the long-term tolerability of telcagepant for acute treatment of intermittent migraine attacks. Background.- Telcagepant is a calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist being investigated for the acute treatment of migraine....

  14. Associations of Osteocalcin, Osteoprotegerin, and Calcitonin with Inflammation Biomarkers in Atherosclerotic Plaques of Coronary Arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polonskaya, Ya V; Kashtanova, E V; Murashov, I S; Volkov, A M; Kurguzov, A V; Chernyavsky, A M; Ragino, Yu I

    2017-04-01

    We studied associations of osteocalcin, osteoprotegerin, and calcitonin with markers of inflammation in atherosclerotic plaques in coronary arteries and assessed the influence of these biomolecules on calcification of atherosclerotic plaques. The initial stage of calcification of atherosclerotic plaques is characterized by activation of inflammatory processes, which is seen from increased levels of proinflammatory biomarkers (IL-6, IL 8, TNF-α, and IL-1β). Progressive calcification of atherosclerotic plaques is accompanied by insignificant accumulation of calcitonin and osteoprotegerin. The exception is osteocalcin, its concentration significantly increased during calcification. The results suggest that severe vascular calcification can be regarded as non-specific marker of atherosclerosis. Instability of atherosclerotic plaques is associated with higher level of calcification.

  15. Effect of antibodies to calcitonin on the pharmacokinetics and the pharmacodynamics of the hormone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliaro, F; Dorizzi, R; Luisetto, G

    1995-01-01

    Calcitonin pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics were studied in two groups of patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis, who, treated for one year with intranasal Asu1.7-eel calcitonin (eCT), had (Ab+) and had not (Ab-) developed a specific immune response to the drug. The treatment consisted of daily intranasal administrations of eCT (80 IU/die) with 1 g supplemental calcium. Eight women who had developed specific antibodies and 5 who had not, were given 50 IU of CT i.m., in order to assess the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the drug. The rise of serum levels of the hormone was significantly greater in Ab+ than in Ab- patients. At the end of the study, no significant differences in mineral bone loss between the two groups were found. In conclusion, the presence of antibodies to eCT does not represent a negative event in the therapy of osteoporosis, but significantly affects the pharmacokinetics of the drug.

  16. Use of calcitonin in recalcitrant phantom limb pain complicated by heterotopic ossification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Ricardo; Payne, Michael W C

    2015-01-01

    Phantom limb pain (PLP) is a common complication after amputation, affecting up to 80% of the amputee population. However, only 5% to 10% of amputees have severe PLP impacting daily function. The present report details the management of severe, treatment-resistant PLP in a 72-year-old man with a traumatic left transradial amputation and a comorbid complication of heterotopic ossification (HO). To describe a case of PLP with HO and the possible role of calcitonin in the treatment of both conditions. A systematic review of the literature regarding the management of PLP. Seventeen articles that directly addressed PLP were identified; 11 were randomized controlled trials. All involved small samples and follow-up ranged from 6 h to one year, with the majority limited to six weeks. In the present case, medication management was limited by side effects, lack of response and the patient's desire to avoid long-term medication. Investigations revealed HO, which was suspected to envelop the median nerve in the proximal forearm. After several unsuccessful medication trials, the literature was reviewed in search of common variables between HO formation and persistent PLP. Ultimately, the biochemical effects associated with nerve injury were identified to be a possible factor in both HO and PLP development. Calcitonin's proposed mechanisms of action may help to manage HO and PLP at multiple stages of disease development and maintenance. In the present case, a four-week trial of intranasal calcitonin was successful, with pain control lasting at least 18 months. The present case report provided a review of the current literature in PLP pharmacological management and the current understanding of the etiology of PLP and HO, as well as how the two may coexist. It also provided an opportunity to discuss the proposed mechanisms of action of calcitonin in the management of PLP and HO.

  17. Comparison of Calcitonin and Pamidronate Treatments in Children with Osteogenesis Imperfecta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neslihan Onenli Mungan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The main objective of this study was to compare the treatments of calcitonin and pamidronate by clinical, biochemical, and radiological findings in children with osteogenesis imperfecta and evaluate the efficiency of pamidronate treatment. Patients and methods: A total of 12 patients, aged 41±38 (1-120 months were studied. Group 1 was consisted of six patients who had received intranasal calcitonin at a dosage of 4-6 U/kg three times a week before switching to pamidronate treatment. Group 2 was also consisted of six patients who had received only pamidronate infusion at a dosage of 0.5-2 mg/kg every two months. Results: Annual fracture rates decreased from 2.72 ± 0.80 to 0.40 ± 0.70 (p0.05, and from -3.08 ± -0.61 to -2.29 ± -0.56 in pamidronate group. The difference between the Z-scores of bone mineral density after calcitonin and pamidronate treatments was statistically significant (p<0.05. The Z-scores of pre (-3.44 ± -0.96 and post (-2.47 ± -0.60 pamidronate treatments of whole 12 patients were significantly different (p<0.001. Conclusion: Pamidronate was significantly more effective in reducing pain, annual fracture rate, and increasing bone mineral density and mobility than calcitonin without any severe adverse effects even in the neonatal period and severe forms of osteogenesis imperfecta. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(4.000: 667-674

  18. [Calcifediol and calcitonin in the therapy of rheumatoid arthritis. A short-term controlled study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dottori, L; D'Ottavio, D; Brundisini, B

    1982-11-10

    A short-term study (30 days) has been carried out on 45 patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis with radiologically verified osteoporosis and definite pain symptomatology. The patients were divided at random into three groups (A, B, C) of 15 each. Group A was given basic therapy (calcium, dichlrophenac, nor-androstenolone) with addition of calcifediol. Group B received basic therapy plus calcitonine in paraphysiological doses. Group C was treated with basic therapy only (highly effective on its own). Observation and treatment were brief but able to provide useful indications regarding the implementation of longer courses of treatment (3-6 months). At the end of treatment, results were submitted to biometric control. With the aid of statistics it can thus be stated that alkaline phosphatase and hydroxyprolinuria fall in group B (basic treatment + calcitonine) and this suggests that the treatment causes some improvement in the exchangeable bone calcium pool. The values of these parameters also fall with the addition of calcifediol to basic therapy, but this fall is not very high. Pain symptomatology is also favourably affected, and to a statistically significant extent, by the three treatments: group A patients (basic + calcifediol) show greater improvement compared with straightforward basic therapy, but the best results are encountered in group B, treated with an association of basic and calcitonine. No side-effects were observed.

  19. (CGRP) on gastric mucosal barrier in stress induced rats

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-04-20

    Apr 20, 2009 ... The aim of this investigation was to examine and compare the effects of calcitonin gene related peptide. (CGRP) and salmon calcitonin (sCT) on gastric lesions and mucosal barrier components such as mucus and phospholipids in rats exposed to cold + restraint stress (CRS). Twenty-eight Wistar albino.

  20. Coated minispheres of salmon calcitonin target rat intestinal regions to achieve systemic bioavailability: Comparison between intestinal instillation and oral gavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguirre, Tanira A S; Aversa, Vincenzo; Rosa, Mónica; Guterres, Sílvia S; Pohlmann, Adriana R; Coulter, Ivan; Brayden, David J

    2016-09-28

    Achieving oral peptide delivery is an elusive challenge. Emulsion-based minispheres of salmon calcitonin (sCT) were synthesized using single multiple pill (SmPill®) technology incorporating the permeation enhancers (PEs): sodium taurodeoxycholate (NaTDC), sodium caprate (C10), or coco-glucoside (CG), or the pH acidifier, citric acid (CA). Minispheres were coated with an outer layer of Eudragit® L30 D-55 (designed for jejunal release) or Surelease®/Pectin (designed for colonic release). The process was mild and in vitro biological activity of sCT was retained upon release from minispheres stored up to 4months. In vitro release profiles suggested that sCT was released from minispheres by diffusion through coatings due to swelling of gelatin and the polymeric matrix upon contact with PBS at pH6.8. X-ray analysis confirmed that coated minispheres dissolved at the intended intestinal region of rats following oral gavage. Uncoated minispheres at a dose of ~2000I.U.sCT/kg were administered to rats by intra-jejunal (i.j.) or intra-colonic (i.c.) instillation and caused hypocalcaemia. Notable sCT absolute bioavailability (F) values were: 5.5% from minispheres containing NaTDC (i.j), 17.3% with CG (i.c.) and 18.2% with C10 (i.c.). Coated minispheres administered by oral gavage at threefold higher doses also induced hypocalcaemia. A highly competitive F value of 2.7% was obtained for orally-administered sCT-minispheres containing CG (45μmol/kg) and coated with Eudragit®. In conclusion, the SmPill® technology is a potential dosage form for several peptides when formulated with PEs and coated for regional delivery. PK data from instillations over-estimates oral bioavailability and poorly predicts rank ordering of formulations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Physiological studies in heterozygous calcium sensing receptor (CaSR gene-ablated mice confirm that the CaSR regulates calcitonin release in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovacs Christopher S

    2004-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The calcium sensing receptor (CaSR regulates serum calcium by suppressing secretion of parathyroid hormone; it also regulates renal tubular calcium excretion. Inactivating mutations of CaSR raise serum calcium and reduce urine calcium excretion. Thyroid C-cells (which make calcitonin express CaSR and may, therefore, be regulated by it. Since calcium stimulates release of calcitonin, the higher blood calcium caused by inactivation of CaSR should increase serum calcitonin, unless CaSR mutations alter the responsiveness of calcitonin to calcium. To demonstrate regulatory effects of CaSR on calcitonin release, we studied calcitonin responsiveness to calcium in normal and CaSR heterozygous-ablated (Casr+/- mice. Casr+/- mice have hypercalcemia and hypocalciuria, and live normal life spans. Each mouse received either 500 μl of normal saline or one of two doses of elemental calcium (500 μmol/kg or 5 mmol/kg by intraperitoneal injection. Ionized calcium was measured at baseline and 10 minutes, and serum calcitonin was measured on the 10 minute sample. Results At baseline, Casr+/- mice had a higher blood calcium, and in response to the two doses of elemental calcium, had greater increments and peak levels of ionized calcium than their wild type littermates. Despite significantly higher ionized calcium levels, the calcitonin levels of Casr+/- mice were consistently lower than wild type at any ionized calcium level, indicating that the dose-response curve of calcitonin to increases in ionized calcium had been significantly blunted or shifted to the right in Casr+/- mice. Conclusions These results confirm that the CaSR is a physiological regulator of calcitonin; therefore, in response to increases in ionized calcium, the CaSR inhibits parathyroid hormone secretion and stimulates calcitonin secretion.

  2. Treatment of aneurysmal bone cysts by percutaneous CT-guided injection of calcitonin and steroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Connie Y.; Kattapuram, Susan V.; Huang, Ambrose J.; Simeone, F.J.; Torriani, Martin; Bredella, Miriam A. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Radiology Division of Musculoskeletal Imaging and Intervention, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-01-15

    To determine the efficacy and safety of percutaneous calcitonin and steroid injection in the treatment of aneurysmal bone cysts (ABCs). Our study was IRB-approved and HIPAA-compliant. We reviewed pre- and post-procedural imaging studies and medical records of all CT-guided percutaneous injections of ABCs with calcitonin and steroid performed at our institution between 2003 and 2015. Treatment success based on imaging was categorized as substantial (51-100 %), partial (1-50 %), or none (0 %) by comparing radiographs of the lesion before and after treatment. Our study group comprised 9 patients (7 female, 2 male; mean age 19 ± 5 (range 12-25) years). ABCs were located in the pubis (n = 3), femur (n = 2), and humerus/scapula/ilium/sacrum (n = 1 for each). One patient did not have any clinical or imaging follow-up. For the other 8 patients, clinical and imaging follow-up ranged from 1 to 93 months (mean 16 ± 29 months). One patient had two injections, and 1 patient had three injections. Six out of eight patients (75 %) had complete symptomatic relief and 2 patients (25 %) had partial symptomatic relief after initial injection. Imaging follow-up revealed substantial imaging response in 4 out of 8 patients (50 %). There was a partial imaging response in 2 patients (25 %) and no imaging response in 2 out of 8 patients (25 %), and all 4 of these patients had local recurrence. There were no complications. Percutaneous CT-guided injection of ABCs with calcitonin and steroid is a safe and effective treatment. Lack of imaging response may necessitate more aggressive treatment to minimize local recurrence. (orig.)

  3. Amphiphilic cationic peptides mediate cell adhesion to plastic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rideout, D C; Lambert, M; Kendall, D A; Moe, G R; Osterman, D G; Tao, H P; Weinstein, I B; Kaiser, E T

    1985-09-01

    Four amphiphilic peptides, each with net charges of +2 or more at neutrality and molecular weights under 4 kilodaltons, were found to mediate the adhesion of normal rat kidney fibroblasts to polystyrene surfaces. Two of these peptides, a model for calcitonin (peptide 1, MCT) and melittin (peptide 2, MEL), form amphiphilic alpha-helical structures at aqueous/nonpolar interfaces. The other two, a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone model (peptide 3, LHM) and a platelet factor model (peptide 4, MPF) form beta-strand structures in amphiphilic environments. Although it contains only 10 residues, LHM mediated adhesion to surfaces coated with solutions containing as little as 10 pmoles/ml of peptide. All four of these peptides were capable of forming monolayers at air-buffer interfaces with collapse pressures greater than 20 dynes/cm. None of these four peptides contains the tetrapeptide sequence Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser, which has been associated with fibronectin-mediated cell adhesion. Ten polypeptides that also lacked the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser but were nonamphiphilic and/or had net charges less than +2 at neutrality were all incapable of mediating cell adhesion (Pierschbacher and Ruoslahti, 1984). The morphologies of NRK cells spread on polystyrene coated with peptide LHM resemble the morphologies on fibronectin-coated surfaces, whereas cells spread on surfaces coated with MCT or MEL exhibit strikingly different morphologies. The adhesiveness of MCT, MEL, LHM, and MPF implies that many amphiphilic cationic peptides could prove useful as well defined adhesive substrata for cell culture and for studies of the mechanism of cell adhesion.

  4. Aerosolized Medications for Gene and Peptide Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laube, Beth L

    2015-06-01

    Inhalation therapy has matured to include drugs that: (1) deliver nucleic acids that either lead to the restoration of a gene construct or protein coding sequence in a population of cells or suppress or disrupt production of an abnormal gene product (gene therapy); (2) deliver peptides that target lung diseases such as asthma, sarcoidosis, pulmonary hypertension, and cystic fibrosis; and (3) deliver peptides to treat diseases outside the lung whose target is the systemic circulation (systemic drug delivery). These newer applications for aerosol therapy are the focus of this paper, and I discuss the status of each and the challenges that remain to their successful development. Drugs that are highlighted include: small interfering ribonucleic acid to treat lung cancer and Mycobacterium tuberculosis; vectors carrying the normal alpha-1 antitrypsin gene to treat alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency; vectors carrying the normal cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator gene to treat cystic fibrosis; vasoactive intestinal peptide to treat asthma, pulmonary hypertension, and sarcoidosis; glutathione to treat cystic fibrosis; granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor to treat pulmonary alveolar proteinosis; calcitonin for postmenopausal osteoporosis; and insulin to treat diabetes. The success of these new aerosol applications will depend on many factors, such as: (1) developing gene therapy formulations that are safe for acute and chronic administrations to the lung, (2) improving the delivery of the genetic material beyond the airway mucus barrier and cell membrane and transferring the material to the cell cytoplasm or the cell nucleus, (3) developing aerosol devices that efficiently deliver genetic material and peptides to their lung targets over a short period of time, (4) developing devices that increase aerosol delivery to the lungs of infants, (5) optimizing the bioavailability of systemically delivered peptides, and (6) developing peptide formulations for

  5. Long-term treatment of osteogenesis imperfects tarda in adults with salmon calcitonin and calcium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanzi, I.; Wallach, S.; Ellis, K.J.; Aloia, J.F.; Atkins, H.L.; Cohn, S.H.

    1976-02-01

    Three postmenopausal women with osteogenesis imperfecta (O.I.) tarda were treated with daily salmon calcitonin (sCT) and calcium supplements for 12 to 33 months. Total body calcium (TBCa) measured by total body neutron activation analysis revealed a marked deficit exceeding that of severely osteoporotic women. In one patient a rapid loss of TBCa of 5 percent at five months of treatment was partially reversed after twelve months of treatment. In eight subsequent months of Ca supplementation alone, the loss of TBCa resumed and amounted to 11 percent. The second patient increased TBCa by 9 percent after a total of 33 months of sCT and Ca supplementation. The third patient also showed a rapid decrease in TBCa of 8 percent during one year of sCT and Ca, but she was also receiving systemic corticosteroids for asthma. Her TBCa recovered to 8 percent above baseline eight months after stopping sCT, continuation of the Ca and a drastic decrease in the dose of corticosteroids. The action of sCT in this patient might have been impaired by the concomitant administration of corticosteroids. Urinary hydroxyproline decreased from initial normal values in two patients suggesting continued inhibition of bone resorption. The results confirm previous work using calcitonin in children with O.I. and suggest that sCT may also be of benefit in adults with O.I. (auth)

  6. Leptin regulates gallbladder genes related to absorption and secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz-Basile, Deborah A; Lu, Debao; Basile, David P; Graewin, Shannon J; Al-Azzawi, Hayder; Kiely, James M; Mathur, Abhishek; Yancey, Kyle; Pitt, Henry A

    2007-07-01

    Dysregulation of gallbladder ion and water absorption and/or secretion has been linked to cholesterol crystal and gallstone formation. We have recently demonstrated that obese, leptin-deficient (Lep(ob)) mice have enlarged gallbladder volumes and decreased gallbladder contractility and that leptin administration to these mice normalizes gallbladder function. However, the effect of leptin on gallbladder absorption/secretion is not known. Therefore, we sought to determine whether leptin would alter the expression of genes involved in water and ion transport across the gallbladder epithelium. Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarrays representing 39,000 transcripts were used to compare gallbladder gene-expression profiles from 12-wk-old control saline-treated Lep(ob) and from leptin-treated Lep(ob) female mice. Leptin administration to Lep(ob) mice decreased gallbladder volume, bile sodium concentration, and pH. Leptin repletion upregulated the expression of aquaporin 1 water channel by 1.3-fold and downregulated aquaporin 4 by 2.3-fold. A number of genes involved in sodium transport were also influenced by leptin replacement. Epithelial sodium channel-alpha and sodium hydrogen exchangers 1 and 3 were moderately downregulated by 2.0-, 1.6-, and 1.3-fold, respectively. Carbonic anhydrase-IV, which plays a role in the acidification of bile, was upregulated 3.7-fold. In addition, a number of inflammatory cytokines that are known to influence gallbladder epithelial cell absorption and secretion were upregulated. Thus leptin, an adipocyte-derived cytokine involved with satiety and energy balance, influences gallbladder bile volume, sodium, and pH as well as multiple inflammatory cytokine genes and genes related to water, sodium, chloride, and bicarbonate transport.

  7. Bioactive Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Banan-Mwine Daliri

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The increased consumer awareness of the health promoting effects of functional foods and nutraceuticals is the driving force of the functional food and nutraceutical market. Bioactive peptides are known for their high tissue affinity, specificity and efficiency in promoting health. For this reason, the search for food-derived bioactive peptides has increased exponentially. Over the years, many potential bioactive peptides from food have been documented; yet, obstacles such as the need to establish optimal conditions for industrial scale production and the absence of well-designed clinical trials to provide robust evidence for proving health claims continue to exist. Other important factors such as the possibility of allergenicity, cytotoxicity and the stability of the peptides during gastrointestinal digestion would need to be addressed. This review discusses our current knowledge on the health effects of food-derived bioactive peptides, their processing methods and challenges in their development.

  8. Bioactive Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daliri, Eric Banan-Mwine; Oh, Deog H; Lee, Byong H

    2017-04-26

    The increased consumer awareness of the health promoting effects of functional foods and nutraceuticals is the driving force of the functional food and nutraceutical market. Bioactive peptides are known for their high tissue affinity, specificity and efficiency in promoting health. For this reason, the search for food-derived bioactive peptides has increased exponentially. Over the years, many potential bioactive peptides from food have been documented; yet, obstacles such as the need to establish optimal conditions for industrial scale production and the absence of well-designed clinical trials to provide robust evidence for proving health claims continue to exist. Other important factors such as the possibility of allergenicity, cytotoxicity and the stability of the peptides during gastrointestinal digestion would need to be addressed. This review discusses our current knowledge on the health effects of food-derived bioactive peptides, their processing methods and challenges in their development.

  9. A novel oral form of salmon calcitonin improves glucose homeostasis and reduces body weight in diet-induced obese rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feigh, M; Henriksen, K; Andreassen, K V

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the effects of acute and chronic administration of a novel oral formulation of salmon calcitonin (sCT) on glycaemic control, glucose homeostasis and body weight regulation in diet-induced obese (DIO) rats-an animal model of obesity-related insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes....

  10. Parathyroid hormone, calcitonin, and vitamin D 1974: Present status of physiological studies and analysis of calcium homeostasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potts, J. T., Jr.; Swenson, K. G.

    1975-01-01

    The role of parathyroid hormone, calcitonin, and vitamin D in the control of calcium and bone metabolism was studied. Particular emphasis was placed on the physiological adaptation to weightlessness and, as a potential model for this purpose, on the immobilization characteristic of space flight or prolonged bed rest. The biosynthesis, control of secretion, and metabolism of these hormonal agents is considered.

  11. Peptide YY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandarana, Keval; Batterham, Rachel

    2008-02-01

    This review discusses recent studies examining the effects of peptide YY on energy homeostasis, highlights the emerging hedonic effects of peptide YY and evaluates the therapeutic potential of the peptide YY system. A role for exogenous PYY3-36 as an anorectic agent in obese humans and rodents has been established and weight loss effects demonstrated in obese rodents. New lines of evidence support a role for endogenous peptide YY in regulating energy homeostasis. The NPY-Y2 receptor mediates the anorectic actions of PYY3-36 with rodent studies implicating the hypothalamus, vagus and brainstem as key target sites. Functional imaging in humans has confirmed that PYY3-36 activates brainstem and hypothalamic regions. The greatest effects, however, were observed within the orbitofrontal cortex, a brain region involved in reward processing. Further evidence for a hedonic role for PYY3-36 is supported by rodent studies showing that PYY3-36 decreases the motivation to seek high-fat food. Rodent studies using selective Y2 agonists and strategies combining PYY3-36/Y2 agonists with other anorectic agents have revealed increased anorectic and weight-reducing effects. Peptide YY plays a role in the integrative regulation of metabolism. The emerging hedonic effects of peptide YY together with the weight-reducing effects observed in obese rodents suggest that targeting the peptide YY system may offer a therapeutic strategy for obesity.

  12. [Isolation of maize genes related to aluminum tolerance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hua; Zheng, Yong-Lian; He, Li-Yuan; Li, Jian-Sheng

    2005-10-01

    To investigate gene expression profile in response to aluminum stress and to cloning the key genes related to aluminum tolerance, are crucial to genetic improvement of plant aluminum tolerance. In this study, suppression subtractive hybridization method was adopted to construct SSH-cDNA libraries at seedling stage of two maize inbred lines (Fig. 1), of which Mo17 is sensitive to aluminum toxicity and TL94B is tolerant. As a result, a forward SSH-cDNA library including 762 clones and a reverse SSH-cDNA library including 382 clones were constructed for Mo17. In the same way, a forward SSH-cDNA library including 760 clones and a reverse SSH-cDNA library including 380 clones were constructed for TL94B. Identification of these SSH-cDNA libraries shows that the length of inserted fragments ranges from 250 bp to 1.0 kb (Fig. 2), of which nearly 18% are positive clones. Through differential hybridization screening (Fig. 3), 124 and 47 positive clones were screened from forward and reverse SSH-cDNA libraries of Mo17 respectively; 103 and 64 positive clones from forward and reverse SSH-cDNA libraries of TL94B respectively. Total 338 positive clones from four SSH-cDNA libraries were sequenced, and all of the sequences of inserted fragments were analyzed using bioinformatical methods. A total of 232 kinds of EST sequences were obtained. Among these ESTs, 70.2% had significant homology with known genes, and the remaining 29.8% were function-unknown including 21 kinds of newly found ESTs (Table 1). An aluminum tolerant gene, GDP dissociation inhibitor gene, was detected its expression character by Northern hybridization (Fig. 4). These results indicate that the responses of maize to aluminum stress involve the interactions among different signal/metabolism pathways, such as signal transduction of stress-related factors, transcription and regulation of responsive genes, synthesis and transport of substances, changes in cell structures and functions.

  13. The central anorexigenic mechanism of amylin in Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) involves pro-opiomelanocortin, calcitonin receptor, and the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jingwei; Gilbert, Elizabeth R; Cline, Mark A

    2017-08-01

    Amylin is a 37-amino acid peptide hormone that exerts anorexigenic effects in humans and animals. We demonstrated that central injection of amylin into chicks affected feeding and related behaviors via the hypothalamus and brainstem, although the molecular mechanisms remained elusive. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying anorexigenic effects of amylin in 7 day-old Japanese quail. Food but not water intake was reduced after intracerebroventricular amylin injection, and the behavior analysis indicated that this was associated with decreased food pecks and preening. Whole hypothalamus and hypothalamic nuclei including the arcuate nucleus (ARC), paraventricular nucleus (PVN), ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), dorsomedial nucleus (DMN) and lateral hypothalamic area (LH) were extracted from quail at 1h post-injection for total RNA isolation. Real time PCR was performed to quantify mRNA abundance of amylin receptors, appetite-associated neuropeptides and monoamine-synthesis-related enzymes. Central amylin injection increased the mRNA abundance of calcitonin receptor (CALCR), receptor activity modifying protein 1 (RAMP1), pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC), and aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) in the hypothalamus and individual hypothalamic nuclei. Relative quantities of CALCR and POMC mRNA were greater in the ARC of the amylin- than vehicle-treated group. Thus, amylin-mediated effects on food intake may involve POMC, monoamine synthesis, and amylin receptor 1 (a complex of CALCR and RAMP1) in the ARC. Together, these data provide novel insights on the hypothalamic-specific molecular mechanisms of amylin-induced food intake. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Effect of Alendronate and Calcitonin Treatments on Bone Mineral Density and Quality of Life in Women With Postmenopausal Osteoporosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Taşçıoğlu

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the effect of alendronate and calcitonin treatments on bone mineral density (BMD and quality of life of women with postmenopausal osteoporosis. One hundred ninety-three patients were randomly assigned to two groups: 93 patients received daily doses of 10 mg alendronate and calcium 1000 mg, and 98 patients used intranasal salmon calcitonin (sCt at a dosage of 200 IU/day and they also received daily doses of 1000 mg calcium supplements. DXA was used for the measurement of BMD of the lumbar spine and proximal femur before and after the study period. SF-36 was used as a measure of health-related quality of life. At the end of the treatment, ALN produced significant increases in BMD at the lumbar spine (p< 0.001, femur neck (p<0.05, trochanteric region (p<0.001 and at the Ward triangle (p<0.05. In contrast, intranasal sCt treatment resulted in a significant bone loss in the femur neck (p<0.01 and Ward triangle (p<0.05, and only a significant increase in BMD of the lumbar spine was observed with calcitonin treatment(p< 0.05. Quality of life as assessed by SF-36 improved significantly in both groups(p<0.05. In conclusion, alendronate seemed to be more effective than calcitonin, increasing both spinal and femoral BMD, for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Both treatments were found to be effective for the improvement of quality of life.

  15. Immunohistochemical expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin and glucocorticoid and calcitonin receptors in central giant-cell lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiz, Nancy Noya; de la Rosa-García, Estela; Camacho, María Esther Irigoyen

    2016-04-01

    Central giant-cell lesions (CGCLs) are reactive lesions that consist histologically of spindle-shaped stromal cells, (fibroblasts and myofibroblasts) loosely arranged in a fibrous stroma, multinucleated giant cells and mononuclear cells with haemorrhagic areas. This study identified the immunoexpression of alpha-smooth muscle actin in spindle-shaped stromal cells, and glucocorticoid and calcitonin receptors in multinucleated giant cells and mononuclear cells. Their association with the clinical and radiographic characteristics of these lesions was identified. Thirty-five cases of CGCLs were studied. Expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin, glucocorticoid and calcitonin was evaluated by immunohistochemistry. The labelling index was 100 times the quotient of the number of positive cells divided by the total number of cells of each type. Logistic regression analysis was applied. Alpha-smooth muscle actin was positive (54%) for spindle stromal cells (myofibroblasts). A significant association was observed with root resorption (P = 0.004) and cortical bone destruction (P = 0.024). Glucocorticoid immunoexpression was positive for 99% of the giant cells and 86.7% of the mononuclear cells. Glucocorticoid immunoexpression in the mononuclear cells was associated with root resorption (P = 0.031). A longer evolution time was associated with lower immunoexpression of glucocorticoid (OR 12.4: P = 0.047). Calcitonin immunoexpression was positive in 86% of the giant cells. Immunoexpression of calcitonin was associated with age (P = 0.040). Myofibroblasts are important components of CGCLs, stromal cells and alpha-smooth muscle. Actin immunoexpression was associated with root and cortical bone resorption. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. A calcitonin receptor (CALCR) single nucleotide polymorphism is associated with growth performance and bone integrity in response to dietary phosphorus deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, L S; Qu, A; Cutler, S A; Mahajan, A; Rothschild, M F; Cai, W; Dekkers, J C; Stahl, C H

    2010-03-01

    Although concerns over the environmental impact of excess P in the excreta from pig production and governmental regulations have driven research toward reducing dietary supplementation of P to swine diets for over a decade, recent dramatic increases in feed costs have further motivated researchers to identify means to further reduce dietary P supplementation. We have demonstrated that genetic background impacts P utilization in young pigs and have identified genetic polymorphisms in several target genes related to mineral utilization. In this study, we examined the impact of a SNP in the calcitonin receptor gene (CALCR) on P utilization in growing pigs. In Exp. 1, 36 gilts representing the 3 genotypes identified by this CALCR SNP (11, 12, and 22) were fed a P-adequate (PA) or a marginally P-deficient (approximately 20% less available P; PD) diet for 14 wk. As expected, P deficiency reduced plasma P concentration, bone strength, and mineral content (P < 0.05). However, the dietary P deficiency was mild enough to not affect the growth performance of these pigs. A genotype x dietary P interaction (P < 0.05) was observed in measures of bone integrity and mineral content, with the greatest reduction in bone strength and mineral content due to dietary P deficiency being associated with the allele 1. In Exp. 2, 168 pigs from a control line and low residual feed intake (RFI) line were genotyped for the CALCR SNP and fed a PA diet. As expected, pigs from the low RFI line consumed less feed but also gained less BW when compared with the control line (P < 0.05). Although ADFI did not differ between genotypes, pigs having the 11 genotype gained less BW (P < 0.05) than pigs having the 12 or 22 genotypes. Pigs of the 11 and 12 genotypes had bones that tolerated greater load when compared with animals having the 22 genotype (P < 0.05). A similar trend was observed in bone modulus and ash % (P < 0.10). These data are supportive of the association of this CALCR SNP with bone

  17. Effects of calcitonin on plasma calcium and phosphate in the mudskipper, Periophthalmodon schlosseri (Teleostei), in water and during exposure to air.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, J C; Lam, T J

    1988-05-01

    After 7 days in air on wet filter paper mudskippers had normal body weight and normal levels of plasma sodium, potassium, and phosphate. They were, however, significantly hypercalcemic. The hypercalcemia could be reduced by the daily intraperitoneal injection of synthetic eel calcitonin (1.67 microgram kg-1 day-1) and this effect was dose dependent with a maximal response at a dose of 3.33 micrograms kg-1 day-1. Calcitonin had no effect on plasma calcium levels of fish held in water but did induce significant hyperphosphatemia whether the fish were held in water or in air on wet filter paper with this effect being greater under the latter conditions. The hypocalcemic action of calcitonin was restricted to conditions under which the fish displayed patent hypercalcemia. Under no conditions did calcitonin produce significant hypocalcemia so it appears that the action of synthetic eel calcitonin in the mudskipper, Periophthalmodon schlosseri, is dependent upon the presence of excess plasma calcium and is thus more accurately described as being anti-hypercalcemic rather than hypocalcemic.

  18. Oral salmon calcitonin improves fasting and postprandial glycemic control in lean healthy rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigh, M; Nielsen, R H; Hansen, C; Henriksen, K; Christiansen, C; Karsdal, M A

    2012-02-01

    A novel oral form of salmon calcitonin (sCT) was recently demonstrated to improve both fasting and postprandial glycemic control and induce weight loss in diet-induced obese and insulin-resistant rats. To further explore the glucoregulatory efficacy of oral sCT, irrespective of obesity and metabolic dysfunction, the present study investigated the effect of chronic oral sCT treatment on fasting and postprandial glycemic control in male lean healthy rats. 20 male rats were divided equally into a control group receiving oral vehicle or an oral sCT (2 mg/kg) group. All rats were treated twice daily for 5 weeks. Body weight and food intake were monitored during the study period and fasting blood glucose, plasma insulin and insulin sensitivity were determined and an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) performed at study end. Compared with the vehicle group, rats receiving oral sCT had improved fasting glucose homeostasis and insulin resistance, as measured by homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR), with no change in body weight or fasting plasma insulin. In addition, the rats receiving oral sCT had markedly reduced glycemia and insulinemia during OGTT. This is the first report showing that chronic oral sCT treatment exerts a glucoregulatory action in lean healthy rats, irrespective of influencing body weight. Importantly, oral sCT seems to exert a dual treatment effect by improving fasting and postprandial glycemic control and insulin sensitivity. This and previous studies suggest oral sCT is a promising agent for the treatment of obesity-related insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  19. Benefit of measuring basal serum calcitonin to detect medullary thyroid carcinoma in a Danish population with a high prevalence of thyroid nodules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselgren, Martin; Hegedüs, Laszlo; Godballe, Christian

    2009-01-01

    ; thyroidectomy was performed in 307 of these patients. RESULTS: Thirty-nine patients had elevated serum calcitonin; 6 of these patients had MTC detected by the initial diagnostic setup. No additional patient in the cohort was registered in the Danish Thyroid Cancer Database, reflecting that all patients with MTC......BACKGROUND: Routine measurement of serum calcitonin to detect medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) continues to be fiercely debated, although less attention has been paid to the positive predictive value (PPV) of this method. METHODS: We collected data from 959 patients with nontoxic nodular goiter....... The low PPV might lead to unnecessary thyroid surgery. Thus, the result of serum calcitonin measurement should always be interpreted in the context of other clinical variables. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck, 2009....

  20. Cytologic diagnosis of a medullary carcinoma of the thyroid by Sevier-Munger silver staining and calcitonin immunocytochemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastad, J; Wilander, E; Lindgren, P G; Ljunghall, S; Stenkvist, B G; Akerström, G

    1987-01-01

    A medullary carcinoma of the thyroid was preoperatively diagnosed on ultrasonically guided fine needle aspiration biopsies. After cytocentrifugation, the tumor cells displayed a dense cytoplasmic silver granulation with the Sevier-Munger technique when applied to air-dried or acetone-ethanol-fixed samples and an obvious calcitonin immunoreactivity after fixation in Bouin's fluid. These methods may prove useful in the identification of nonpalpable metastases and recurrences of medullary carcinomas of the thyroid, especially since the cytologic typing of medullary thyroid carcinoma cells may be difficult with routine stainings.

  1. Human peptide transporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Carsten Uhd; Brodin, Birger; Jørgensen, Flemming Steen

    2002-01-01

    Peptide transporters are epithelial solute carriers. Their functional role has been characterised in the small intestine and proximal tubules, where they are involved in absorption of dietary peptides and peptide reabsorption, respectively. Currently, two peptide transporters, PepT1 and PepT2...... to peptide transporters, as well as their role in drug delivery and in potential future drug design and targeted tissue delivery of peptides and peptidomimetics....

  2. Magnesium-based implants: Beyond fixators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodan Chen

    2017-07-01

    The translational potential of this article: For the first time, magnesium is shown to be beneficial for fracture healing at the weight-bearing site. In addition, calcitonin gene-related peptide-delivery system will also be another translational direction, as the promotive role of calcitonin gene-related peptide in fracture healing is supportive. These cost-effective and innovative treatment approaches will definitely bring a reduction not only in the suffering of patients, but also in the economic burden for their families and our society.

  3. Metabolic cleavage of cell-penetrating peptides in contact with epithelial models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tréhin, Rachel; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Jahnke, Heinz-Georg

    2004-01-01

    We assessed the metabolic degradation kinetics and cleavage patterns of some selected CPP (cell-penetrating peptides) after incubation with confluent epithelial models. Synthesis of N-terminal CF [5(6)-carboxyfluorescein]-labelled CPP, namely hCT (human calcitonin)-derived sequences, Tat(47...... models and the CPP. The Calu-3 model exhibited the highest proteolytic activity. The patterns of metabolic cleavage of hCT(9-32) were similar in all three models. Initial cleavage of this peptide occurred at the N-terminal domain, possibly by endopeptidase activity yielding both the N- and the C......-57) and penetratin(43-58), was through Fmoc (fluoren-9-ylmethoxycarbonyl) chemistry. Metabolic degradation kinetics of the tested CPP in contact with three cell-cultured epithelial models, MDCK (Madin-Darby canine kidney), Calu-3 and TR146, was evaluated by reversed-phase HPLC. Identification of the resulting...

  4. The lung as a route for systemic delivery of therapeutic proteins and peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchenna Agu, Remigius; Ikechukwu Ugwoke, Michael; Armand, Michoel; Kinget, Renaat; Verbeke, Norbert

    2001-01-01

    The large surface area, good vascularization, immense capacity for solute exchange and ultra-thinness of the alveolar epithelium are unique features of the lung that can facilitate systemic delivery via pulmonary administration of peptides and proteins. Physical and biochemical barriers, lack of optimal dosage forms and delivery devices limit the systemic delivery of biotherapeutic agents by inhalation. Current efforts to overcome these difficulties in order to deliver metabolic hormones (insulin, calcitonin, thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], follicle-stimulating hormone [FSH] and growth hormones) systemically, to induce systemic responses (immunoglobulins, cyclosporin A [CsA], recombinant-methionyl human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [r-huG-CSF], pancreatic islet autoantigen) and to modulate other biological processes via the lung are reviewed. Safety aspects of pulmonary peptide and protein administration are also discussed. PMID:11686885

  5. The lung as a route for systemic delivery of therapeutic proteins and peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kinget Renaat

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The large surface area, good vascularization, immense capacity for solute exchange and ultra-thinness of the alveolar epithelium are unique features of the lung that can facilitate systemic delivery via pulmonary administration of peptides and proteins. Physical and biochemical barriers, lack of optimal dosage forms and delivery devices limit the systemic delivery of biotherapeutic agents by inhalation. Current efforts to overcome these difficulties in order to deliver metabolic hormones (insulin, calcitonin, thyroid-stimulating hormone [TSH], follicle-stimulating hormone [FSH] and growth hormones systemically, to induce systemic responses (immunoglobulins, cyclosporin A [CsA], recombinant-methionyl human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [r-huG-CSF], pancreatic islet autoantigen and to modulate other biological processes via the lung are reviewed. Safety aspects of pulmonary peptide and protein administration are also discussed.

  6. No Evidence of Increase in Calcitonin Concentrations or Development of C-Cell Malignancy in Response to Liraglutide for Up to 5 Years in the LEADER Trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hegedüs, Laszlo; Sherman, Steven I; Tuttle, R Michael

    2018-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the changes in serum levels of calcitonin in liraglutide- and placebo-treated patients in the Liraglutide Effect and Action in Diabetes: Evaluation of Cardiovascular Outcome Results (LEADER) trial over a 3.5-5-year period. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Patients (n = 9......,340) with type 2 diabetes and high risk for cardiovascular events were randomized 1:1 to liraglutide or placebo. We analyzed calcitonin levels throughout the trial, and thyroid and C-cell adverse events and neoplasms. RESULTS: At 36 months, patients randomized to liraglutide versus placebo showed no evidence...

  7. Expression and localization of prohormone convertase PC1 in the calcitonin-producing cells of the bullfrog ultimobranchial gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaoi, Yuichi; Suzuki, Masakazu; Tomura, Hideaki; Kurabuchi, Shingo; Sasayama, Yuichi; Tanaka, Shigeyasu

    2003-11-01

    We examined the expression and localization of the prohormone convertases, PC1 and PC2, in the ultimobranchial gland of the adult bullfrog using immunohistochemical (IHC) and in situ hybridization (ISH) techniques. In the ultimobranchial gland, PC1-immunoreactive cells were columnar, and were present in the follicular epithelium. When serial sections were immunostained with anti-calcitonin, anti-CGRP, anti-PC1, and anti-PC2 sera, PC1 was found only in the calcitonin/CGRP-producing cells. No PC2-immunopositive cells were detected. In the ISH, PC1 mRNA-positive cells were detected in the follicle cells in the ultimobranchial gland. No PC2 mRNA-positive cells were detected. RT-PCR revealed expression of the mRNAs of PC1 and the PC2 in the ultimobranchial gland. However, very little of the PC2 mRNA is probably translated because no PC2 protein was detected either by IHC staining or by Western blotting analysis. We conclude that the main prohormone convertase that is involved in the proteolytic cleavage of procalcitonin in the bullfrog is PC1.

  8. Permeation of Insulin, Calcitonin and Exenatide across Caco-2 Monolayers: Measurement Using a Rapid, 3-Day System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vivek; Doshi, Nishit; Mitragotri, Samir

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Caco-2 monolayers are one of the most widely used in vitro models for prediction of intestinal permeability of therapeutic molecules. However, the conventional Caco-2 monolayer model has several drawbacks including labor-intensive culture process, unphysiological growth conditions, lack of reproducibility and limited throughput. Here, we report on the use of 3-day Caco-2 monolayers for assessing permeability of polypeptide drugs. Methods The 3-day monolayers were grown in a commercially available transwell set-up, which facilitates rapid development of the Caco-2 monolayers in an intestinal epithelial differentiation mimicking environment. This set-up included use of serum-free medium of defined composition with supplements such as butyric acid, hormones, growth factors, and other metabolites, reported to regulate the differentiation of intestinal epithelial cells in vivo. We measured permeability of 3 different therapeutic polypeptides; insulin, calcitonin, and exenatide across the monolayer. Results Preliminary validation of the monolayer was carried out by confirming dose-dependent permeation of FITC-insulin and sulforhodamine-B. Transport of insulin, calcitonin, and exenatide measured at different loading concentrations suggests that the permeability values obtained with 3-day cultures resemble more closely the values obtained with ex vivo models compared to permeability values obtained with conventional 21-day cultures. Conclusions Short-term 3-day Caco-2 monolayers provide new opportunities for developing reproducible and high-throughput models for screening of therapeutic macromolecules for oral absorption. PMID:23483881

  9. Antimicrobial peptides in action

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leontiadou, Hari; Mark, Alan E.; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2006-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations of the magainin MG-H2 peptide interacting with a model phospholipid membrane have been used to investigate the mechanism by which antimicrobial peptides act. Multiple copies of the peptide were randomly placed in solution close to the membrane. The peptide readily

  10. No Evidence of Increase in Calcitonin Concentrations or Development of C-Cell Malignancy in Response to Liraglutide for Up to 5 Years in the LEADER Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegedüs, Laszlo; Sherman, Steven I; Tuttle, R Michael; von Scholten, Bernt J; Rasmussen, Søren; Karsbøl, Julie D; Daniels, Gilbert H

    2017-12-26

    To describe the changes in serum levels of calcitonin in liraglutide- and placebo-treated patients in the Liraglutide Effect and Action in Diabetes: Evaluation of Cardiovascular Outcome Results (LEADER) trial over a 3.5-5-year period. Patients (n = 9,340) with type 2 diabetes and high risk for cardiovascular events were randomized 1:1 to liraglutide or placebo. We analyzed calcitonin levels throughout the trial, and thyroid and C-cell adverse events and neoplasms. At 36 months, patients randomized to liraglutide versus placebo showed no evidence of increase in calcitonin concentrations in male (estimated treatment ratio [ETR] 1.03 [95% CI 1.00, 1.06]; P = 0.068) and female (ETR 1.00 [95% CI 0.97, 1.02]; P = 0.671) subgroups. There were no episodes of C-cell hyperplasia or medullary thyroid carcinoma in liraglutide-treated patients. There was no evidence of a difference in calcitonin concentrations between the liraglutide and placebo groups, and no C-cell malignancies occurred in the liraglutide group. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  11. Identifying Novel Candidate Genes Related to Apoptosis from a Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoman Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis is the process of programmed cell death (PCD that occurs in multicellular organisms. This process of normal cell death is required to maintain the balance of homeostasis. In addition, some diseases, such as obesity, cancer, and neurodegenerative diseases, can be cured through apoptosis, which produces few side effects. An effective comprehension of the mechanisms underlying apoptosis will be helpful to prevent and treat some diseases. The identification of genes related to apoptosis is essential to uncover its underlying mechanisms. In this study, a computational method was proposed to identify novel candidate genes related to apoptosis. First, protein-protein interaction information was used to construct a weighted graph. Second, a shortest path algorithm was applied to the graph to search for new candidate genes. Finally, the obtained genes were filtered by a permutation test. As a result, 26 genes were obtained, and we discuss their likelihood of being novel apoptosis-related genes by collecting evidence from published literature.

  12. Amorphous Calcium Carbonate Based-Microparticles for Peptide Pulmonary Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewes, Frederic; Gobbo, Oliviero L; Ehrhardt, Carsten; Healy, Anne Marie

    2016-01-20

    Amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) is known to interact with proteins, for example, in biogenic ACC, to form stable amorphous phases. The control of amorphous/crystalline and inorganic/organic ratios in inhalable calcium carbonate microparticles may enable particle properties to be adapted to suit the requirements of dry powders for pulmonary delivery by oral inhalation. For example, an amorphous phase can immobilize and stabilize polypeptides in their native structure and amorphous and crystalline phases have different mechanical properties. Therefore, inhalable composite microparticles made of inorganic (i.e., calcium carbonate and calcium formate) and organic (i.e., hyaluronan (HA)) amorphous and crystalline phases were investigated for peptide and protein pulmonary aerosol delivery. The crystalline/amorphous ratio and polymorphic form of the inorganic component was altered by changing the microparticle drying rate and by changing the ammonium carbonate and HA initial concentration. The bioactivity of the model peptide, salmon calcitonin (sCT), coprocessed with alpha-1-antitrypsin (AAT), a model protein with peptidase inhibitor activity, was maintained during processing and the microparticles had excellent aerodynamic properties, making them suitable for pulmonary aerosol delivery. The bioavailability of sCT after aerosol delivery as sCT and AAT-loaded composite microparticles to rats was 4-times higher than that of sCT solution.

  13. Improved glucose control and reduced body weight in rodents with dual mechanism of action peptide hybrids.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James L Trevaskis

    Full Text Available Combination therapy is being increasingly used as a treatment paradigm for metabolic diseases such as diabetes and obesity. In the peptide therapeutics realm, recent work has highlighted the therapeutic potential of chimeric peptides that act on two distinct receptors, thereby harnessing parallel complementary mechanisms to induce additive or synergistic benefit compared to monotherapy. Here, we extend this hypothesis by linking a known anti-diabetic peptide with an anti-obesity peptide into a novel peptide hybrid, which we termed a phybrid. We report on the synthesis and biological activity of two such phybrids (AC164204 and AC164209, comprised of a glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor (GLP1-R agonist, and exenatide analog, AC3082, covalently linked to a second generation amylin analog, davalintide. Both molecules acted as full agonists at their cognate receptors in vitro, albeit with reduced potency at the calcitonin receptor indicating slightly perturbed amylin agonism. In obese diabetic Lep(ob/Lep (ob mice sustained infusion of AC164204 and AC164209 reduced glucose and glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c equivalently but induced greater weight loss relative to exenatide administration alone. Weight loss was similar to that induced by combined administration of exenatide and davalintide. In diet-induced obese rats, both phybrids dose-dependently reduced food intake and body weight to a greater extent than exenatide or davalintide alone, and equal to co-infusion of exenatide and davalintide. Phybrid-mediated and exenatide + davalintide-mediated weight loss was associated with reduced adiposity and preservation of lean mass. These data are the first to provide in vivo proof-of-concept for multi-pathway targeting in metabolic disease via a peptide hybrid, demonstrating that this approach is as effective as co-administration of individual peptides.

  14. Mild to moderate increase of serum calcitonin levels only in presence of large medullary thyroid cancer deposits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelizzo, M R; Torresan, F; Da Roit, A; Merante Boschin, I; Chondrogiannis, S; Rampin, L; Colletti, P M; Vinjamury, S; Perkins, A J; Rubello, D

    2015-01-01

    Many open questions remain to be elucidated about the diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC). The most intriguing concerns the outcome of MTC patients after surgery. Great importance is usually given to serum calcitonin (Ct) and carcinoembryonic (CEA) levels. It is commonly believed that the higher are the levels of these tumor markers and their kinetics (double time and velocity of markers levels) the worst is the prognosis. However, this is not the rule, as there are huge MTC metastatic deposits characterized by low serum Ct and CEA levels, and this condition is not closely related to the outcome of the disease during post-surgical follow-up. A series is reported here of patients who have these characteristics, as well as a description of their prognosis and clinical outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and SEMNIM. All rights reserved.

  15. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of WGA-carbopol modified liposomes as carriers for oral peptide delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makhlof, Abdallah; Fujimoto, Shiho; Tozuka, Yuichi; Takeuchi, Hirofumi

    2011-02-01

    Surface modification of liposomal nanocarriers with a novel polymer-lectin conjugate was proposed for enhancing the systemic uptake of encapsulated peptide and protein therapeutics after oral administration. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) was covalently attached to carbopol (CP) using the carbodiimide method. The prepared WGA-CP conjugate retained the biological cell binding activity of WGA without any evidence of cytotoxicity to Caco-2 monolayers. Cationic liposomes in the size range of 100 nm were prepared by the lipid film hydration method followed by probe sonication and surface modification with negatively charged WGA-CP. The uptake of WGA-CP liposomes by Caco-2 cells was significantly higher than that of non-modified or CP liposomes. The uptake was dependent on the surface concentration of WGA, temperature, and incubation period and was significantly inhibited in the presence of chlorpromazine and 10-fold excess of free WGA. These results suggest the involvement of active transport mechanism for the cellular uptake of the modified liposomes, mediated mainly by binding of WGA to its specific cell membrane receptors. Dual channel confocal microscopy confirmed the simultaneous association and internalization of the polymer conjugate and the liposomal carrier by Caco-2 cells and intestinal membrane of rats. In addition, the pharmacological efficacy of calcitonin, a model peptide drug, was enhanced by more than 20- and 3-fold following peroral administration of calcitonin-loaded WGA-CP liposomes when compared to non-modified and CP liposomes, respectively. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Surface modification of liposomes using polymer-wheat germ agglutinin conjugates to improve the absorption of peptide drugs by pulmonary administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Mitsutaka; Yonamine, Takashi; Tanaka, Shota; Tahara, Kohei; Tozuka, Yuichi; Takeuchi, Hirofumi

    2013-04-01

    In this study, we investigated the feasibility of a system based on liposomal surface modification with a novel mucoadhesive polymer-lectin conjugate for the pulmonary delivery of therapeutic peptides and proteins. We covalently attached wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), a ligand that specifically interacts with alveolar epithelial cells, to carbopol (CP), a mucoadhesive polymer, using the carbodiimide method and then evaluated the efficacy and potential toxicity of CP-WGA surface-modified liposomes in vivo and in vitro. In association studies, CP-WGA modification enhanced the interaction with A549 lung epithelial cells compared with unmodified or CP-modified liposomes. This increased association was dependent on temperature and the surface concentration of free WGA. These results suggested synergy of WGA and CP, and retention of the biological cell binding activity of WGA, leading to improved liposome-cell interactions. Moreover, improvement of liposomal bioadhesion to lung epithelia significantly enhanced and prolonged the therapeutic efficacy of calcitonin, a model peptide drug, without any evidence of toxicity, following administration of calcitonin-loaded CP-WGA-modified liposomes. Hence, surface modification of liposomes with CP-WGA has potential for effective pulmonary administration of peptides. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Brain natriutetic peptide test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007509.htm Brain natriuretic peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) test is a blood test that measures ...

  18. Vasoactive intestinal peptide test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003508.htm Vasoactive intestinal peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is a test that measures the amount ...

  19. TRH-like peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bílek, R; Bičíková, M; Šafařík, L

    2011-01-01

    TRH-like peptides are characterized by substitution of basic amino acid histidine (related to authentic TRH) with neutral or acidic amino acid, like glutamic acid, phenylalanine, glutamine, tyrosine, leucin, valin, aspartic acid and asparagine. The presence of extrahypothalamic TRH-like peptides was reported in peripheral tissues including gastrointestinal tract, placenta, neural tissues, male reproductive system and certain endocrine tissues. Work deals with the biological function of TRH-like peptides in different parts of organisms where various mechanisms may serve for realisation of biological function of TRH-like peptides as negative feedback to the pituitary exerted by the TRH-like peptides, the role of pEEPam such as fertilization-promoting peptide, the mechanism influencing the proliferative ability of prostatic tissues, the neuroprotective and antidepressant function of TRH-like peptides in brain and the regulation of thyroid status by TRH-like peptides.

  20. PeptideAtlas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — PeptideAtlas is a multi-organism, publicly accessible compendium of peptides identified in a large set of tandem mass spectrometry proteomics experiments. Mass...

  1. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  2. Peptide Nucleic Acids (PNA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2002-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  3. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1998-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  4. PH dependent adhesive peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomich, John; Iwamoto, Takeo; Shen, Xinchun; Sun, Xiuzhi Susan

    2010-06-29

    A novel peptide adhesive motif is described that requires no receptor or cross-links to achieve maximal adhesive strength. Several peptides with different degrees of adhesive strength have been designed and synthesized using solid phase chemistries. All peptides contain a common hydrophobic core sequence flanked by positively or negatively charged amino acids sequences.

  5. Antimicrobial Peptides in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights new members, novel mechanisms of action, new functions, and interesting applications of antimicrobial peptides reported in 2014. As of December 2014, over 100 new peptides were registered into the Antimicrobial Peptide Database, increasing the total number of entries to 2493. Unique antimicrobial peptides have been identified from marine bacteria, fungi, and plants. Environmental conditions clearly influence peptide activity or function. Human α-defensin HD-6 is only antimicrobial under reduced conditions. The pH-dependent oligomerization of human cathelicidin LL-37 is linked to double-stranded RNA delivery to endosomes, where the acidic pH triggers the dissociation of the peptide aggregate to release its cargo. Proline-rich peptides, previously known to bind to heat shock proteins, are shown to inhibit protein synthesis. A model antimicrobial peptide is demonstrated to have multiple hits on bacteria, including surface protein delocalization. While cell surface modification to decrease cationic peptide binding is a recognized resistance mechanism for pathogenic bacteria, it is also used as a survival strategy for commensal bacteria. The year 2014 also witnessed continued efforts in exploiting potential applications of antimicrobial peptides. We highlight 3D structure-based design of peptide antimicrobials and vaccines, surface coating, delivery systems, and microbial detection devices involving antimicrobial peptides. The 2014 results also support that combination therapy is preferred over monotherapy in treating biofilms.

  6. Peptide Nucleic Acid Synthons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  7. C-Peptide Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Weisenberger, J. (2013 March) Why Does a C-Peptide Test Matter? Diabetes Forecast [On-line information]. Available online at http:// ... Updated). What is c-peptide? What do c-peptide levels mean? Misc.health.diabetes, diabetes FAQ [On-line information from newsgroup]. Available ...

  8. Differential inhibitory response to telcagepant on αCGRP induced vasorelaxation and intracellular Ca(2+) levels in the perfused and non-perfused isolated rat middle cerebral artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erdling, André; Sheykhzade, Majid; Edvinsson, Lars

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is one of the most potent endogenous vasodilators identified to date. The present study elucidates the differential interaction of CGRP, its receptor and the effect of the CGRP-receptor antagonist telcagepant on intracellular Ca(2+) -levels and t...

  9. Pharmacological characterisation of capsaicin-induced relaxations in human and porcine isolated arteries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Gupta (Sanjay); J. Lozano-Cuenca (Jair); C.M. Villalón (Carlos); R. de Vries (René); I.M. Garrelds (Ingrid); C.J.J. Avezaat (Cees); J.P. van Kats (Sjors); P.R. Saxena (Pramod Ranjan); A. Maassen van den Brink (Antoinette)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractCapsaicin, a pungent constituent from red chilli peppers, activates sensory nerve fibres via transient receptor potential vanilloid receptors type 1 (TRPV1) to release neuropeptides like calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and substance P. Capsaicin-sensitive nerves are widely

  10. CGRP infusion in unanesthetized rats increases expression of c-Fos in the nucleus tractus solitarius and caudal ventrolateral medulla, but not in the trigeminal nucleus caudalis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatt, Deepak K; Ramachandran, Roshni; Christensen, Sarah Louise Tangsgaard

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and glyceryl trinitrate (GTN) infusion in migraineurs provokes headache resembling spontaneous migraine, and CGRP receptor antagonists are effective in the treatment of acute migraine. We hypothesized that CGRP infusion would increase mo...

  11. CGRP may play a causative role in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, L H; Haderslev, P A; Jacobsen, V B

    2002-01-01

    Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has been detected in increased amounts in external jugular venous blood during migraine attacks. However, it is unknown whether this is secondary to migraine or whether CGRP may cause headache. In a double-blind crossover study, the effect of human alphaCGRP...... attacks may play a causative role....

  12. Excellent tolerability but relatively low initial clinical efficacy of telcagepant in migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tfelt-Hansen, Peer

    2011-01-01

    In 3 randomized clinical trials (n = 1585) the calcitonin gene-related peptide antagonist telcagepant 300 mg orally had an incidence of adverse events similar to placebo when used in the acute treatment of migraine. Telcagepant, thus, has excellent tolerability in migraine. Only a quarter (26%) (...

  13. Safety and efficacy of erenumab for preventive treatment of chronic migraine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tepper, Stewart; Ashina, Messoud; Reuter, Uwe

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) pathway is important in migraine pathophysiology. We assessed the efficacy and safety of erenumab, a fully human monoclonal antibody against the CGRP receptor, in patients with chronic migraine. METHODS: This was a phase 2, randomised, double...

  14. Zerumbone improved immunoreactivity of neuropeptides in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The main objective of this investigation was to explore the improvement effect of oral administration of zerumbone on the density of protein gene product; calcitonin gene related peptide and neuropeptide Y immunoreactive nerve fibers against monosodium iodoacetate induced osteoarthritis changes in rat's knee synovial ...

  15. SACS gene-related autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay from South India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Suraj Menon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal recessive spastic ataxia of Charlevoix-Saguenay (ARSACS is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by late infantile onset spastic ataxia and other neurological features. Initially described in the Charlevoix-Saguenay region of Quebec, Canada, it is being increasingly reported from many other countries. Here, we present the case of a 20-year-old male from South India, who presented with progressive ataxia, spasticity, and peripheral neuropathy with imaging features and genetic testing suggestive of SACS gene-related ARSACS. The phenotypic variability from other cases and occurrence in a geographically distinct region is stressed upon to alert the clinicians to consider ARSACS in progressive ataxias.

  16. Hypospadias and variants in genes related to sex hormone biosynthesis and metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, SL; Witte, JS; Ma, C; Lammer, EJ; Shaw, GM

    2013-01-01

    We examined whether variants in genes related to sex hormone biosynthesis and metabolism were associated with hypospadias in humans. We examined 332 relatively common tagSNPs in 20 genes. Analyses included 633 cases (84 mild, 322 moderate, 212 severe, 15 undetermined severity) and 855 population-based non-malformed male controls born in California from 1990–2003. We used logistic regression models to estimate odds ratios (OR) and 95 percent confidence intervals (CI) for each SNP. Several of the 332 studied SNPs had phypospadias risk. PMID:24281767

  17. Differential utilization of calcitonin gene regulatory DNA sequences in cultured lines of medullary thyroid carcinoma and small-cell lung carcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    De Bustros, A; Lee, R Y; Compton, D; Tsong, T.Y.; Baylin, S B; Nelkin, B D

    1990-01-01

    Regulation of expression of the human calcitonin gene was found to differ between two tumor lines of different tissue origin, medullary thyroid carcinoma (TT line) and small-cell lung carcinoma (DMS53 line). Distal 5' DNA elements between -750 and -2000 exhibited a stronger basal activity in DMS53 than in TT cells, whereas proximal DNA sequences between -132 and -252 mediated a dramatic cyclic AMP response in TT but not DMS53 cells.

  18. Transcriptomic analyses reveal biosynthetic genes related to rosmarinic acid in Dracocephalum tanguticum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huie; Fu, Yaru; Sun, Hao; Zhang, Yanfu; Lan, Xiaozhong

    2017-03-06

    Dracocephalum tanguticum Maxim, a Lamiaceae species endemic to the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau and adjacent regions, is an important ornamental, medicinal and aromatic herb. In this study, a comprehensive transcriptome of 18 libraries from six organs namely, roots, stems, leaves, sepals, flowers and seeds of D. tanguticum were generated. More than 100 Gb of sequence data were obtained and assembled de novo into 187,447 transcripts, including 151,463 unigenes, among which the six organs shared 17.7% (26,841). In addition, all unigenes were assigned to 362 pathways, in which 'biosynthesis of secondary metabolites' is the second enriched pathway. Furthermore, rosmarinic acid (RA) is one of the multifunctional phenolic bioactive compounds produced in some Lamiaceae species. The six organs of D. tanguticum were confirmed to produce RA. A total of 22 predicted biosynthetic genes related to RA from the transcriptome were further isolated. Two of these genes were identified as candidates by evaluating the correlation coefficient between the RA contents and the expression of the predicted biosynthetic genes in the six organs. The new sequence information will improve the knowledge of D. tanguticum, as well as provide a reference tool for future studies of biosynthetic genes related to RA in this species.

  19. Extracting microRNA-gene relations from biomedical literature using distant supervision.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Lamurias

    Full Text Available Many biomedical relation extraction approaches are based on supervised machine learning, requiring an annotated corpus. Distant supervision aims at training a classifier by combining a knowledge base with a corpus, reducing the amount of manual effort necessary. This is particularly useful for biomedicine because many databases and ontologies have been made available for many biological processes, while the availability of annotated corpora is still limited. We studied the extraction of microRNA-gene relations from text. MicroRNA regulation is an important biological process due to its close association with human diseases. The proposed method, IBRel, is based on distantly supervised multi-instance learning. We evaluated IBRel on three datasets, and the results were compared with a co-occurrence approach as well as a supervised machine learning algorithm. While supervised learning outperformed on two of those datasets, IBRel obtained an F-score 28.3 percentage points higher on the dataset for which there was no training set developed specifically. To demonstrate the applicability of IBRel, we used it to extract 27 miRNA-gene relations from recently published papers about cystic fibrosis. Our results demonstrate that our method can be successfully used to extract relations from literature about a biological process without an annotated corpus. The source code and data used in this study are available at https://github.com/AndreLamurias/IBRel.

  20. Preparation and in vivo absorption evaluation of spray dried powders containing salmon calcitonin loaded chitosan nanoparticles for pulmonary delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinsuebpol C

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Chutima Sinsuebpol, Jittima Chatchawalsaisin, Poj Kulvanich Department of Pharmaceutics and Industrial Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok, Thailand Purpose: The aim of the present study was to prepare inhalable co-spray dried powders of salmon calcitonin loaded chitosan nanoparticles (sCT-CS-NPs with mannitol and investigate pulmonary absorption in rats. Methods: The sCT-CS-NPs were prepared by the ionic gelation method using sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP as a cross-linking polyion. Inhalable dry powders were obtained by co-spray drying aqueous dispersion of sCT-CS-NPs and mannitol. sCT-CS-NPs co-spray dried powders were characterized with respect to morphology, particle size, powder density, aerodynamic diameter, protein integrity, in vitro release of sCT, and aerosolization. The plasmatic sCT levels following intratracheal administration of sCT-CS-NPs spray dried powders to the rats was also determined. Results: sCT-CS-NPs were able to be incorporated into mannitol forming inhalable microparticles by the spray drying process. The sCT-CS-NPs/mannitol ratios and spray drying process affected the properties of the microparticles obtained. The conformation of the secondary structures of sCTs was affected by both mannitol content and spray dry inlet temperature. The sCT-CS-NPs were recovered after reconstitution of spray dried powders in an aqueous medium. The sCT release profile from spray dried powders was similar to that from sCT-CS-NPs. In vitro inhalation parameters measured by the Andersen cascade impactor indicated sCT-CS-NPs spray dried powders having promising aerodynamic properties for deposition in the deep lung. Determination of the plasmatic sCT levels following intratracheal administration to rats revealed that the inhalable sCT-CS NPs spray dried powders provided higher protein absorption compared to native sCT powders. Conclusion: The sCT-CS-NPs with mannitol based spray dried powders were

  1. An Ongoing Role of α-Calcitonin Gene–Related Peptide as Part of a Protective Network Against Hypertension, Vascular Hypertrophy, and Oxidative Stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smillie, Sarah-Jane; King, Ross; Kodji, Xenia

    2014-01-01

    at the vascular level. Wild-type and αCGRP knockout mice that have similar baseline blood pressure were investigated in the angiotensin II hypertension model for 14 and 28 days. αCGRP knockout mice exhibited enhanced hypertension and aortic hypertrophy. αCGRP gene expression was increased in dorsal root ganglia...... and at the conduit and resistance vessel level of wild-type mice at both time points. βCGRP gene expression was also observed and shown to be linked to plasma levels of CGRP. Mesenteric artery contractile and relaxant responses in vitro and endothelial NO synthase expression were similar in all groups. The aorta...

  2. Oral salmon calcitonin enhances insulin action and glucose metabolism in diet-induced obese streptozotocin-diabetic rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feigh, Michael; Hjuler, Sara T; Andreassen, Kim V

    2014-01-01

    We previously reported that oral delivery of salmon calcitonin (sCT) improved energy and glucose homeostasis and attenuated diabetic progression in animal models of diet-induced obesity (DIO) and type 2 diabetes, although the glucoregulatory mode of action was not fully elucidated. In the present...... was enhanced in conjunction with protection of pancreatic insulin content. The results of the present study indicate that oral sCT exerts a novel insulin-sensitizing effect to improve glucose metabolism in obesity and type 2 diabetes....... study we hypothesized that oral sCT as pharmacological intervention 1) exerted anti-hyperglycemic efficacy, and 2) enhanced insulin action in DIO-streptozotocin (DIO-STZ) diabetic rats. Diabetic hyperglycemia was induced in male selectively bred DIO rats by a single low dose (30mg/kg) injection of STZ....... Oral sCT by gavage was delivered as once-daily administration with lead-in (2mg/kg) and maintenance (0.5mg/kg) dose of oral sCT for a total of 21 days. Food intake, body weight, blood glucose, HbA1c, glucose and insulin tolerance test, and parameters of insulin sensitivity were investigated. Plasma...

  3. Topical peptides as cosmeceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varadraj Vasant Pai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Peptides are known to have diverse biological roles, most prominently as signaling/regulatory molecules in a broad variety of physiological processes including defense, immunity, stress, growth, homeostasis and reproduction. These aspects have been used in the field of dermatology and cosmetology to produce short, stable and synthetic peptides for extracellular matrix synthesis, pigmentation, innate immunity and inflammation. The evolution of peptides over the century, which started with the discovery of penicillin, has now extended to their usage as cosmeceuticals in recent years. Cosmeceutical peptides may act as signal modulators of the extracellular matrix component, as structural peptides, carrier peptides and neurotransmitter function modulators. Transdermal delivery of peptides can be made more effective by penetration enhancers, chemical modification or encapsulation of peptides. The advantages of using peptides as cosmeceuticals include their involvement in many physiological functions of the skin, their selectivity, their lack of immunogenicity and absence of premarket regulatory requirements for their use. However, there are disadvantages: clinical evidence for efficacy is often weak, absorption may be poor due to low lipophilicity, high molecular weight and binding to other ingredients, and prices can be quite high.

  4. Antimicrobial Peptides in Reptiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoek, Monique L.

    2014-01-01

    Reptiles are among the oldest known amniotes and are highly diverse in their morphology and ecological niches. These animals have an evolutionarily ancient innate-immune system that is of great interest to scientists trying to identify new and useful antimicrobial peptides. Significant work in the last decade in the fields of biochemistry, proteomics and genomics has begun to reveal the complexity of reptilian antimicrobial peptides. Here, the current knowledge about antimicrobial peptides in reptiles is reviewed, with specific examples in each of the four orders: Testudines (turtles and tortosises), Sphenodontia (tuataras), Squamata (snakes and lizards), and Crocodilia (crocodilans). Examples are presented of the major classes of antimicrobial peptides expressed by reptiles including defensins, cathelicidins, liver-expressed peptides (hepcidin and LEAP-2), lysozyme, crotamine, and others. Some of these peptides have been identified and tested for their antibacterial or antiviral activity; others are only predicted as possible genes from genomic sequencing. Bioinformatic analysis of the reptile genomes is presented, revealing many predicted candidate antimicrobial peptides genes across this diverse class. The study of how these ancient creatures use antimicrobial peptides within their innate immune systems may reveal new understandings of our mammalian innate immune system and may also provide new and powerful antimicrobial peptides as scaffolds for potential therapeutic development. PMID:24918867

  5. Transcriptomic analysis of neuropeptides and peptide hormones in the barnacle Balanus amphitrite: evidence of roles in larval settlement.

    KAUST Repository

    Yan, Xing-Cheng

    2012-10-02

    The barnacle Balanus amphitrite is a globally distributed marine crustacean and has been used as a model species for intertidal ecology and biofouling studies. Its life cycle consists of seven planktonic larval stages followed by a sessile juvenile/adult stage. The transitional processes between larval stages and juveniles are crucial for barnacle development and recruitment. Although some studies have been conducted on the neuroanatomy and neuroactive substances of the barnacle, a comprehensive understanding of neuropeptides and peptide hormones remains lacking. To better characterize barnacle neuropeptidome and its potential roles in larval settlement, an in silico identification of putative transcripts encoding neuropeptides/peptide hormones was performed, based on transcriptome of the barnacle B. amphitrite that has been recently sequenced. Potential cleavage sites andstructure of mature peptides were predicted through homology search of known arthropod peptides. In total, 16 neuropeptide families/subfamilies were predicted from the barnacle transcriptome, and 14 of them were confirmed as genuine neuropeptides by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends. Analysis of peptide precursor structures and mature sequences showed that some neuropeptides of B. amphitrite are novel isoforms and shared similar characteristics with their homologs from insects. The expression profiling of predicted neuropeptide genes revealed that pigment dispersing hormone, SIFamide, calcitonin, and B-type allatostatin had the highest expression level in cypris stage, while tachykinin-related peptide was down regulated in both cyprids and juveniles. Furthermore, an inhibitor of proprotein convertase related to peptide maturation effectively delayed larval metamorphosis. Combination of real-time PCR results and bioassay indicated that certain neuropeptides may play an important role in cypris settlement. Overall, new insight into neuropeptides/peptide hormones characterized in this study shall

  6. Transcriptomic Analysis of Neuropeptides and Peptide Hormones in the Barnacle Balanus amphitrite: Evidence of Roles in Larval Settlement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xing-Cheng; Chen, Zhang-Fan; Sun, Jin; Matsumura, Kiyotaka; Wu, Rudolf S. S.; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2012-01-01

    The barnacle Balanus amphitrite is a globally distributed marine crustacean and has been used as a model species for intertidal ecology and biofouling studies. Its life cycle consists of seven planktonic larval stages followed by a sessile juvenile/adult stage. The transitional processes between larval stages and juveniles are crucial for barnacle development and recruitment. Although some studies have been conducted on the neuroanatomy and neuroactive substances of the barnacle, a comprehensive understanding of neuropeptides and peptide hormones remains lacking. To better characterize barnacle neuropeptidome and its potential roles in larval settlement, an in silico identification of putative transcripts encoding neuropeptides/peptide hormones was performed, based on transcriptome of the barnacle B. amphitrite that has been recently sequenced. Potential cleavage sites andstructure of mature peptides were predicted through homology search of known arthropod peptides. In total, 16 neuropeptide families/subfamilies were predicted from the barnacle transcriptome, and 14 of them were confirmed as genuine neuropeptides by Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends. Analysis of peptide precursor structures and mature sequences showed that some neuropeptides of B. amphitrite are novel isoforms and shared similar characteristics with their homologs from insects. The expression profiling of predicted neuropeptide genes revealed that pigment dispersing hormone, SIFamide, calcitonin, and B-type allatostatin had the highest expression level in cypris stage, while tachykinin-related peptide was down regulated in both cyprids and juveniles. Furthermore, an inhibitor of proprotein convertase related to peptide maturation effectively delayed larval metamorphosis. Combination of real-time PCR results and bioassay indicated that certain neuropeptides may play an important role in cypris settlement. Overall, new insight into neuropeptides/peptide hormones characterized in this study shall

  7. PNA Peptide chimerae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, T.; Næsby, M.; Wittung, P.

    1995-01-01

    Radioactive labelling of PNA has been performed try linking a peptide segment to the PNA which is substrate for protein kinase A. The enzymatic phosphorylation proceeds in almost quantitative yields.......Radioactive labelling of PNA has been performed try linking a peptide segment to the PNA which is substrate for protein kinase A. The enzymatic phosphorylation proceeds in almost quantitative yields....

  8. GROUPS IN PEPTIDE SYNTHESIS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In order to improve the synthesis of peptides with asparagine and glutamine residues, various carboxamide ... protecting groups in solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS). This method eliminates all .... to the filtrate, the solution was washed with three 9 mL portions of 5% aqueous citric acid, three 12 mL portions of 5% ...

  9. Multidimensional Design of Anticancer Peptides

    OpenAIRE

    Lin YC; Lim YF; Russo E.; Schneider P; Bolliger L; Edenharter A; Altmann KH; Halin C; Hiss JA; Schneider G

    2015-01-01

    The computer assisted design and optimization of peptides with selective cancer cell killing activity was achieved through merging the features of anticancer peptides cell penetrating peptides and tumor homing peptides. Machine learning classifiers identified candidate peptides that possess the predicted properties. Starting from a template amino acid sequence peptide cytotoxicity against a range of cancer cell lines was systematically optimized while minimizing the effects on primary human e...

  10. Upregulation of genes related to bone formation by γ-amino butyric acid and γ-oryzanol in germinated brown rice is via the activation of GABAB-receptors and reduction of serum IL-6 in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad SI

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sani Ismaila Muhammad,1,2 Ismail Maznah,1,3 Rozi Mahmud,4 Abu Bakar Zakaria Zuki,5 Mustapha Umar Imam1 1Laboratory of Molecular Biomedicine, Institute of Bioscience, 2Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria; 3Department of Nutrition and Dietetics, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, 4Department of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, 5Department of Veterinary Anatomy, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University Putra Malaysia, Serdang, Selangor, Malaysia Background: Osteoporosis and other bone degenerative diseases are among the most challenging non-communicable diseases to treat. Previous works relate bone loss due to osteoporosis with oxidative stress generated by free radicals and inflammatory cytokines. Alternative therapy to hormone replacement has been an area of interest to researchers for almost three decades due to hormone therapy-associated side effects. Methods: In this study, we investigated the effects of gamma-amino butyric acid (GABA, gamma-oryzanol (ORZ, acylated steryl glucosides (ASG, and phenolic extracts from germinated brown rice (GBR on the expression of genes related to bone metabolism, such as bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP-2, secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC, runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX-2, osteoblast-specific transcription factor osterix (Osx, periostin, osteoblast specific factor (Postn, collagen 1&2 (Col1&2, calcitonin receptor gene (CGRP; body weight measurement and also serum interleukin-6 (IL-6 and osteocalcin, in serum and bone. Rats were treated with GBR, ORZ, GABA, and ASG at (100 and 200 mg/kg; estrogen (0.2 mg/kg, or remifemin (10 and 20 mg/kg, compared to ovariectomized non-treated group as well as non-ovariectomized non-treated (sham group. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was used to measure the IL-6 and osteocalcin levels at week 2, 4, and 8, while the gene expression in the

  11. Acylation of Therapeutic Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Sofie; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Jensen, Simon Bjerregaard

    Oral administration of therapeutic peptides could benefit millions of chronically ill people worldwide, through easier and less stigmatized therapy, and likely improve the long-term effects of currently widespread disease mismanagement. However, oral peptide delivery is a formidable task due......, but it is not widely studied in an oral context. As acylation furthermore increases interactions with the lipid membranes of mammalian cells, it offers several potential benefits for oral delivery of therapeutic peptides, and we hypothesize that tailoring the acylation may be used to optimize intestinal translocation...... to the harsh and selective gastrointestinal system, and development has lacked far behind injection therapy. Peptide acylation is a powerful tool to alter the pharmacokinetics, biophysical properties and chemical stability of injectable peptide drugs, primarily used to prolong blood circulation...

  12. Descriptors for antimicrobial peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, Håvard

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: A frightening increase in the number of isolated multidrug resistant bacterial strains linked to the decline in novel antimicrobial drugs entering the market is a great cause for concern. Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have lately been introduced as a potential new class...... of antimicrobial drugs, and computational methods utilizing molecular descriptors can significantly accelerate the development of new peptide drug candidates. Areas covered: This paper gives a broad overview of peptide and amino-acid scale descriptors available for AMP modeling and highlights which...... examples of different peptide QSAR studies, this review highlights some of the missing links and illuminates some of the questions that would be interesting to challenge in a more systematic fashion. Expert opinion: Computer-aided peptide QSAR using molecular descriptors may provide the necessary edge...

  13. A Role for the Calcitonin Receptor to Limit Bone Loss During Lactation in Female Mice by Inhibiting Osteocytic Osteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Michele V; Russell, Patricia K; Findlay, David M; Sastra, Stephen; Anderson, Paul H; Skinner, Jarrod P; Atkins, Gerald J; Zajac, Jeffrey D; Davey, Rachel A

    2015-09-01

    During lactation, the large transfer of calcium from the mother to the milk is primarily sourced from the maternal skeleton. To determine whether the calcitonin receptor (CTR) plays a physiological role to protect the skeleton from excessive resorption during lactation, we assessed the maternal skeleton of global CTR knockout (CTRKO) and littermate control mice at the end of lactation (postnatal day 21). Micro-computed tomography analyses showed no effect on trabecular or cortical bone in the distal femur and L1 vertebra of maternal global CTR deletion at the end of lactation in global CTRKO mice compared with that in control mice. Bone resorption, as assessed by osteoclast number and activity at the end of lactation, was unaffected by maternal CTR deletion. Cathepsin K, carbonic anhydrase 2, matrix metalloproteinase 13, and receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand mRNA levels, however, were markedly elevated by 3- to 6.5-fold in whole bone of lactating global CTRKO females. Because these genes have been shown to be up-regulated in osteocytes during lactation when osteocytes resorb their surrounding bone matrix, together with their reported expression of the CTR, we determined the osteocyte lacunar area in cortical bone. After lactation, the top 20% of osteocyte lacunar area in global CTRKO mice was 10% larger than the top 20% in control mice. These data are consistent with an increased osteocytic osteolysis in global CTRKO mice during lactation, which is further supported by the increased serum calcium observed in global CTRKO mice after lactation. These results provide evidence for a physiological role for the CTR to protect the maternal skeleton during lactation by a direct action on osteocytes to inhibit osteolysis.

  14. Basal and stimulated calcitonin levels in patients with type 2 diabetes did not change during 1 year of Liraglutide treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunati, Maria Elena; Grancini, Valeria; Colombo, Carla; Palmieri, Eva; Resi, Veronica; Perrino, Michela; Orsi, Emanuela; Fugazzola, Laura

    2016-01-01

    The administration of Liraglutide, a long-acting GLP-1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonist, is associated with C-cell adenomas and carcinomas in rats. In humans, GLP-1R is highly expressed in C-cells hyperplasia (CCH) and in medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), though no changes in basal serum calcitonin (bCT) levels were recorded in type 2 diabetic (T2DM) patients treated with Liraglutide. To diagnose the possible development of CCH during Liraglutide treatment, we evaluated CT levels stimulated by calcium test (sCT). bCT and sCT and metabolic and anthropometric parameters were evaluated in 26 T2DM patients at baseline and at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months of treatment. In all patients, bCT remained within the normal range during the entire study period. In females and males, the higher sCT values were reached after 3 months and 1 month, respectively, with a progressive reduction at 6-12 months. The greater decrease of HbA1c values was reached at 3 months, while body weight and waist circumference decreased over the first 4 weeks of therapy. Lipase levels significantly increased, with a peak value at 1 month. The chronic administration of Liraglutide did not lead to statistically significant variations in both bCT and sCT. Stimulated CT levels increased, though always below the normal range, during the first 1-3 months of treatment, and progressively decreased to baseline levels. This finding is consistent with the effects recorded at the glycometabolic level, and suggests the possible induction of a drug tolerance involving also the C cells and thus preventing CCH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Study of the influence of genes related to muscle oxidative processes on beef color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falomir-Lockhart, A H; Rogberg-Muñoz, A; Papaleo-Mazzucco, J; Goszczynski, D E; Lirón, J P; Fernández, M E; Añon, M C; Melucci, L M; Giovambattista, G

    2015-10-01

    The biochemical bases of meat color are determined by the concentration and redox state of myoglobin, hemoglobin, cytochromes, and other pigments. Post-mortem depletion of cellular oxygen results in oxidative stresses that consume NADH and affects reducing activity, while enzymatic detoxification influences the cellular oxidative processes, both affecting meat color. The aim of this work was to study the influence of several genes related to cellular oxidative processes that could affect CIELAB meat color parameters. The study was performed in steers that received a grass-based diet combined with grain, hays and silages. Results suggest a possible link between colorimetric parameters (a*, b* and chroma) and SNPs in the GSTP1 gene (P<0.05). Although the influence of the enzymes, encoded by GSTP1 gene, on meat color has been proposed previously at biochemical level and protein expression level, further association studies in different populations and functional studies of proteins are needed to confirm the genetic determination of that gene on meat color. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Identification of Genes Related to Paulownia Witches’ Broom by AFLP and MSAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xibing; Fan, Guoqiang; Deng, Minjie; Zhao, Zhenli; Dong, Yanpeng

    2014-01-01

    DNA methylation is believed to play important roles in regulating gene expression in plant growth and development. Paulownia witches’ broom (PaWB) infection has been reported to be related to gene expression changes in paulownia plantlets. To determine whether DNA methylation is associated with gene expression changes in response to phytoplasma, we investigated variations in genomic DNA sequence and methylation in PaWB plantlets treated with methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) techniques, respectively. The results indicated that PaWB seedings recovered a normal morphology after treatment with more than 15 mg·L−1 MMS. PaWB infection did not cause changes of the paulownia DNA sequence at the AFLP level; However, DNA methylation levels and patterns were altered. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) showed that three of the methylated genes were up-regulated and three were down-regulated in the MMS-treated PaWB plantlets that had regained healthy morphology. These six genes might be involved in transcriptional regulation, plant defense, signal transduction and energy. The possible roles of these genes in PaWB are discussed. The results showed that changes of DNA methylation altered gene expression levels, and that MSAP might help identify genes related to PaWB. PMID:25196603

  17. Identification of genes related to Paulownia witches' broom by AFLP and MSAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xibing; Fan, Guoqiang; Deng, Minjie; Zhao, Zhenli; Dong, Yanpeng

    2014-08-21

    DNA methylation is believed to play important roles in regulating gene expression in plant growth and development. Paulownia witches' broom (PaWB) infection has been reported to be related to gene expression changes in paulownia plantlets. To determine whether DNA methylation is associated with gene expression changes in response to phytoplasma, we investigated variations in genomic DNA sequence and methylation in PaWB plantlets treated with methyl methane sulfonate (MMS) using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and methylation-sensitive amplification polymorphism (MSAP) techniques, respectively. The results indicated that PaWB seedings recovered a normal morphology after treatment with more than 15 mg·L(-1) MMS. PaWB infection did not cause changes of the paulownia DNA sequence at the AFLP level; However, DNA methylation levels and patterns were altered. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) showed that three of the methylated genes were up-regulated and three were down-regulated in the MMS-treated PaWB plantlets that had regained healthy morphology. These six genes might be involved in transcriptional regulation, plant defense, signal transduction and energy. The possible roles of these genes in PaWB are discussed. The results showed that changes of DNA methylation altered gene expression levels, and that MSAP might help identify genes related to PaWB.

  18. An integrated method for the identification of novel genes related to oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Yang, Jing; Xing, Zhihao; Yuan, Fei; Shu, Yang; Zhang, YunHua; Kong, XiangYin; Huang, Tao; Li, HaiPeng; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is a significant public health problem worldwide. Complete identification of genes related to one type of cancer facilitates earlier diagnosis and effective treatments. In this study, two widely used algorithms, the random walk with restart algorithm and the shortest path algorithm, were adopted to construct two parameterized computational methods, namely, an RWR-based method and an SP-based method; based on these methods, an integrated method was constructed for identifying novel disease genes. To validate the utility of the integrated method, data for oral cancer were used, on which the RWR-based and SP-based methods were trained, thereby building two optimal methods. The integrated method combining these optimal methods was further adopted to identify the novel genes of oral cancer. As a result, 85 novel genes were inferred, among which eleven genes (e.g., MYD88, FGFR2, NF-κBIA) were identified by both the RWR-based and SP-based methods, 70 genes (e.g., BMP4, IFNG, KITLG) were discovered only by the RWR-based method and four genes (L1R1, MCM6, NOG and CXCR3) were predicted only by the SP-based method. Extensive analyses indicate that several novel genes have strong associations with cancers, indicating the effectiveness of the integrated method for identifying disease genes.

  19. Deregulation of genes related to iron and mitochondrial metabolism in refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica del Rey

    Full Text Available The presence of SF3B1 gene mutations is a hallmark of refractory anemia with ring sideroblasts (RARS. However, the mechanisms responsible for iron accumulation that characterize the Myelodysplastic Syndrome with ring sideroblasts (MDS-RS are not completely understood. In order to gain insight in the molecular basis of MDS-RS, an integrative study of the expression and mutational status of genes related to iron and mitochondrial metabolism was carried out. A total of 231 low-risk MDS patients and 81 controls were studied. Gene expression analysis revealed that iron metabolism and mitochondrial function had the highest number of genes deregulated in RARS patients compared to controls and the refractory cytopenias with unilineage dysplasia (RCUD. Thus mitochondrial transporters SLC25 (SLC25A37 and SLC25A38 and ALAD genes were over-expressed in RARS. Moreover, significant differences were observed between patients with SF3B1 mutations and patients without the mutations. The deregulation of genes involved in iron and mitochondrial metabolism provides new insights in our knowledge of MDS-RS. New variants that could be involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases have been identified.

  20. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis Identifies Candidate Genes Related to Skin Color Differentiation in Red Tilapia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wenbin; Wang, Lanmei; Dong, Zaijie; Chen, Xingting; Song, Feibiao; Liu, Nian; Yang, Hui; Fu, Jianjun

    2016-08-11

    Red tilapia is becoming more popular for aquaculture production in China in recent years. However, the pigmentation differentiation in genetic breeding is the main problem limiting its development of commercial red tilapia culture and the genetic basis of skin color variation is still unknown. In this study, we conducted Illumina sequencing of transcriptome on three color variety red tilapia. A total of 224,895,758 reads were generated, resulting in 160,762 assembled contigs that were used as reference contigs. The contigs of red tilapia transcriptome had hits in the range of 53.4% to 86.7% of the unique proteins of zebrafish, fugu, medaka, three-spined stickleback and tilapia. And 44,723 contigs containing 77,423 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were identified, with 16,646 contigs containing more than one SSR. Three skin transcriptomes were compared pairwise and the results revealed that there were 148 common significantly differentially expressed unigenes and several key genes related to pigment synthesis, i.e. tyr, tyrp1, silv, sox10, slc24a5, cbs and slc7a11, were included. The results will facilitate understanding the molecular mechanisms of skin pigmentation differentiation in red tilapia and accelerate the molecular selection of the specific strain with consistent skin colors.

  1. Utilization of digital differential display to identify differentially expressed genes related to rumen development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Daichi; Suzuki, Yutaka; Haga, Satoshi; So, KyoungHa; Yamauchi, Eri; Nakano, Miwa; Ishizaki, Hiroshi; Choi, Kichoon; Katoh, Kazuo; Roh, Sang-Gun

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to identify the genes associated with the development of the rumen epithelium by screening for candidate genes by digital differential display (DDD) in silico. Using DDD in NCBI's UniGene database, expressed sequence tag (EST)-based gene expression profiles were analyzed in rumen, reticulum, omasum, abomasum and other tissues in cattle. One hundred and ten candidate genes with high expression in the rumen were derived from a library of all tissues. The expression levels of 11 genes in all candidate genes were analyzed in the rumen, reticulum, omasum and abomasum of nine Japanese Black male calves (5-week-old pre-weaning: n = 3; 15-week-old weaned calves: n = 6). Among the 11 genes, only 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA synthase 2 (HMGCS2), aldo-keto reductase family 1, member C1-like (AKR1C1), and fatty acid binding protein 3 (FABP3) showed significant changes in the levels of gene expression in the rumen between the pre- and post-weaning of calves. These results indicate that DDD analysis in silico can be useful for screening candidate genes related to rumen development, and that the changes in expression levels of three genes in the rumen may have been caused by weaning, aging or both. © 2015 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  2. Impact of C-Myc gene-related aberrations in newly diagnosed myeloma with bortezomib/dexamethasone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Naohiro; Ootsubo, Kaori; Wagatsuma, Miyuki; Midorikawa, Kiyoe; Nagata, Akihisa; Noto, Satoshi; Yamada, Kazuaki; Takezako, Naoki

    2014-03-01

    Recent studies have suggested that c-Myc over-expression may be a factor indicating poor prognosis in multiple myeloma (MM), although c-Myc gene-related abnormalities, including translocation and gene amplification, have not been fully investigated in the novel agent era. Additional chromosome 8 may be considered as aggressive disease in the 1990s. To clarify the impact of these aberrations, we retrospectively analyzed newly diagnosed MM (NDMM) and relapsed/refractory MM (RRMM) with bortezomib and dexamethasone induction therapy. In the present study, the high-risk group was defined as having at least one of the following present: non-hyperdiploidy, IgH/FGFR3, and del p53. Forty NDMM cases were analyzed. At the median follow-up duration of 14.1 months, 14 RRMM were recognized. The proportions of patients in the high-risk, c-Myc gene-related aberrations, and additional chromosome 8 groups at diagnosis were 45.5, 22.5, and 10 %, respectively. The proportions of patients who developed RRMM in the high-risk, c-Myc gene-related aberrations, and additional chromosome 8 groups were 41.7, 77.7, and 50 %, respectively. Furthermore, patients with c-Myc gene-related abnormalities tended to exhibit inferior progression-free survival (PFS), and those with c-Myc gene-related abnormalities and/or additional chromosome 8 showed statistically shorter PFS. Therefore, c-Myc gene-related abnormalities and additional chromosome 8 may be related to a poorer prognosis.

  3. Substance P receptor binding sites are expressed by glia in vivo after neuronal injury.

    OpenAIRE

    Mantyh, P W; Johnson, D J; Boehmer, C G; Catton, M D; Vinters, H V; Maggio, J E; Too, H P; Vigna, S R

    1989-01-01

    In vitro studies have demonstrated that glia can express functional receptors for a variety of neurotransmitters. To determine whether similar neurotransmitter receptors are also expressed by glia in vivo, we examined the glial scar in the transected optic nerve of the albino rabbit by quantitative receptor autoradiography. Receptor binding sites for radiolabeled calcitonin gene-related peptide, cholecystokinin, galanin, glutamate, somatostatin, substance P, and vasoactive intestinal peptide ...

  4. Insulin C-peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003701.htm Insulin C-peptide test To use the sharing features ... a product that is created when the hormone insulin is produced and released into the body. The ...

  5. Tumor penetrating peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tambet eTeesalu

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Tumor-homing peptides can be used to deliver drugs into tumors. Phage library screening in live mice has recently identified homing peptides that specifically recognize the endothelium of tumor vessels, extravasate, and penetrate deep into the extravascular tumor tissue. The prototypic peptide of this class, iRGD (CRGDKGPDC, contains the integrin-binding RGD motif. RGD mediates tumor homing through binding to αv integrins, which are selectively expressed on various cells in tumors, including tumor endothelial cells. The tumor-penetrating properties of iRGD are mediated by a second sequence motif, R/KXXR/K. This C-end Rule (or CendR motif is active only when the second basic residue is exposed at the C-terminus of the peptide. Proteolytic processing of iRGD in tumors activates the cryptic CendR motif, which then binds to neuropilin-1 activating an endocytic bulk transport pathway through tumor tissue. Phage screening has also yielded tumor-penetrating peptides that function like iRGD in activating the CendR pathway, but bind to a different primary receptor. Moreover, novel tumor-homing peptides can be constructed from tumor-homing motifs, CendR elements and protease cleavage sites. Pathologies other than tumors can be targeted with tissue-penetrating peptides, and the primary receptor can also be a vascular zip code of a normal tissue. The CendR technology provides a solution to a major problem in tumor therapy, poor penetration of drugs into tumors. The tumor-penetrating peptides are capable of taking a payload deep into tumor tissue in mice, and they also penetrate into human tumors ex vivo. Targeting with these peptides specifically increases the accumulation in tumors of a variety of drugs and contrast agents, such as doxorubicin, antibodies and nanoparticle-based compounds. Remarkably the drug to be targeted does not have to be coupled to the peptide; the bulk transport system activated by the peptide sweeps along any compound that is

  6. Innovative Therapeutics: Designer Natriuretic Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meems, Laura M G; Burnett, John C

    2016-12-01

    Endogenous natriuretic peptides serve as potent activators of particulate guanylyl cyclase receptors and the second messenger cGMP. Natriuretic peptides are essential in maintenance of volume homeostasis, and can be of myocardial, renal and endothelial origin. Advances in peptide engineering have permitted the ability to pursue highly innovative drug discovery strategies. This has resulted in designer natriuretic peptides that go beyond native peptides in efficacy, specificity, and resistance to enzymatic degradation. Together with recent improvements in peptide delivery systems, which have improved bioavailability, further advances in this field have been made. Therefore, designer natriuretic peptides with pleotropic actions together with strategies of chronic delivery have provided an unparalleled opportunity for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. In this review, we report the conceptual framework of peptide engineering of the natriuretic peptides that resulted in designer peptides for cardiovascular disease. We specifically provide an update on those currently in clinical trials for heart failure and hypertension, which include Cenderitide, ANX042 and ZD100.

  7. 6-Gingerol Protects against Nutritional Steatohepatitis by Regulating Key Genes Related to Inflammation and Lipid Metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thing-Fong Tzeng

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, including non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH, appears to be increasingly common worldwide. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of 6-gingerol ((S-5-hydroxy-1-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl-3-decanone, a bioactive ingredient of plants belonging to the Zingiberaceae family, on experimental models of NASH. In HepG2 cells, 6-gingerol (100 μmol/L treatment inhibited free fatty acids mixture (0.33 mmol/L palmitate and 0.66 mmol/L oleate-induced triglyceride and inflammatory marker accumulations. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed with a methionine and choline-deficient (MCD diet to induce steatohepatitis. After four weeks of MCD diet feeding, the mice were dosed orally with 6-gingerol (25, 50 or 100 mg/kg/day once daily for another four weeks. 6-Gingerol (100 mg/kg/day attenuated liver steatosis and necro-inflammation in MCD diet-fed mice. The expressions of inflammatory cytokine genes, including those for monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6, and nuclear transcription factor (NF-κB, which were increased in the livers of MCD diet-fed mice, were attenuated by 6-gingerol. 6-Gingerol possesses a repressive property on hepatic steatosis, which is associated with induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α. Our study demonstrated the protective role of 6-gingerol in ameliorating nutritional steatohepatitis. The effect was mediated through regulating key genes related to lipid metabolism and inflammation.

  8. 6-gingerol protects against nutritional steatohepatitis by regulating key genes related to inflammation and lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzeng, Thing-Fong; Liou, Shorong-Shii; Chang, Chia Ju; Liu, I-Min

    2015-02-04

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, including non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), appears to be increasingly common worldwide. The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of 6-gingerol ((S)-5-hydroxy-1-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-3-decanone), a bioactive ingredient of plants belonging to the Zingiberaceae family, on experimental models of NASH. In HepG2 cells, 6-gingerol (100 μmol/L) treatment inhibited free fatty acids mixture (0.33 mmol/L palmitate and 0.66 mmol/L oleate)-induced triglyceride and inflammatory marker accumulations. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed with a methionine and choline-deficient (MCD) diet to induce steatohepatitis. After four weeks of MCD diet feeding, the mice were dosed orally with 6-gingerol (25, 50 or 100 mg/kg/day) once daily for another four weeks. 6-Gingerol (100 mg/kg/day) attenuated liver steatosis and necro-inflammation in MCD diet-fed mice. The expressions of inflammatory cytokine genes, including those for monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6, and nuclear transcription factor (NF-κB), which were increased in the livers of MCD diet-fed mice, were attenuated by 6-gingerol. 6-Gingerol possesses a repressive property on hepatic steatosis, which is associated with induction of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α. Our study demonstrated the protective role of 6-gingerol in ameliorating nutritional steatohepatitis. The effect was mediated through regulating key genes related to lipid metabolism and inflammation.

  9. Gene-network analysis identifies susceptibility genes related to glycobiology in autism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bert van der Zwaag

    Full Text Available The recent identification of copy-number variation in the human genome has opened up new avenues for the discovery of positional candidate genes underlying complex genetic disorders, especially in the field of psychiatric disease. One major challenge that remains is pinpointing the susceptibility genes in the multitude of disease-associated loci. This challenge may be tackled by reconstruction of functional gene-networks from the genes residing in these loci. We applied this approach to autism spectrum disorder (ASD, and identified the copy-number changes in the DNA of 105 ASD patients and 267 healthy individuals with Illumina Humanhap300 Beadchips. Subsequently, we used a human reconstructed gene-network, Prioritizer, to rank candidate genes in the segmental gains and losses in our autism cohort. This analysis highlighted several candidate genes already known to be mutated in cognitive and neuropsychiatric disorders, including RAI1, BRD1, and LARGE. In addition, the LARGE gene was part of a sub-network of seven genes functioning in glycobiology, present in seven copy-number changes specifically identified in autism patients with limited co-morbidity. Three of these seven copy-number changes were de novo in the patients. In autism patients with a complex phenotype and healthy controls no such sub-network was identified. An independent systematic analysis of 13 published autism susceptibility loci supports the involvement of genes related to glycobiology as we also identified the same or similar genes from those loci. Our findings suggest that the occurrence of genomic gains and losses of genes associated with glycobiology are important contributors to the development of ASD.

  10. Association of the five gene related endothelial cell dysfunction polymorphisms with Buerger's disease development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudian, Mitra; Fazeli, Bahare; Sharebiani, Hiva; Rajabnejad, Atta'ollah; Ravari, Hassan; Akbarin, Mohammad M; Dadgarmoghaddam, Maliheh

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the polymorphisms of four genes related to vascular endothelium dysfunction on the development and outcome of Buerger's disease (BD). The genes studied were eNOS-786 T>C, eNOS894 G>T, ET-1 8000 T>C, PAI-1 4G/5G and ACE I/D. Polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment analysis were used to detect eNOS-786 T>C, eNOS894 G>T, ET-1 8000 T>C, PAI-1(4G/5G) and ACE(I/D) polymorphisms in 36 BD patients and 36 healthy individuals matched for race, age and gender. A decision tree for predicting BD was drawn using Rapidminer 5.3 software. The frequency of eNOS-T786C alleles was significantly different between the BD group and the healthy controls (PC (P=0.1). In logistic regression analysis, the C allele for eNOS-786 and 4G/4G for PAI-1 were significant for predicting BD. According to the decision tree, the proportion of the current gene-polymorphisms likely to develop BD was calculated as maximum 27.7%. It seems that eNOS-T786C, PAI-1(4G/5G) are important polymorphisms in developing BD. However, the decision tree might give confidence to the families of BD patients that if they maintain a healthy lifestyle, they may not develop BD.

  11. Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary DNA and RNA strands, and generally do so more strongly than the corresponding DNA or RNA strands while exhibiting increased sequence specificity and solubility. The peptide nucleic acids comprise ligands selected from a...... a group consisting of naturally-occurring nucleobases and non-naturally-occurring nucleobases, including 2,6-diaminopurine, attached to a polyamide backbone, and contain alkyl amine side chains....

  12. Biosynthesis of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    peptides has only been elucidated during the last decade. The cellular synthesis including amino acid modifications and proteolytic cleavages has proven considerably more complex than initially perceived. Consequently, the elimination phase of the peptide products in circulation is not yet well...... competent endocrine cells. The structurally related atrial natriuretic peptide will be mentioned where appropriate, whereas C-type natriuretic peptide will not be considered as a cardiac peptide of relevance in mammalian physiology....

  13. The Dual Amylin- and Calcitonin-Receptor Agonist KBP-042 Increases Insulin Sensitivity and Induces Weight Loss in Rats with Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjuler, Sara Toftegaard; Gydesen, Sofie; Andreassen, Kim Vietz

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In this study, KBP-042, a dual amylin- and calcitonin-receptor agonist, was investigated as a treatment of obesity and insulin resistance in five different doses (0.625 μg/kg-10 μg/kg) compared with saline-treated and pair-fed controls. Methods: Rats with obesity received daily s.c. ad...... combines two highly relevant features, namely weight loss and insulin sensitivity, and is thus an excellent candidate for chronic treatment of obesity and insulin resistance....... a sustained weight loss of up to 20% without any significant weight reduction in the pair-fed groups. Decreases in adipose tissues and lipid deposition in the liver were observed, while plasma adiponectin was increased and plasma leptin levels were decreased. Acute administration of KBP-042 led to impaired......Objective: In this study, KBP-042, a dual amylin- and calcitonin-receptor agonist, was investigated as a treatment of obesity and insulin resistance in five different doses (0.625 μg/kg-10 μg/kg) compared with saline-treated and pair-fed controls. Methods: Rats with obesity received daily s...

  14. Preparation and in vivo absorption evaluation of spray dried powders containing salmon calcitonin loaded chitosan nanoparticles for pulmonary delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsuebpol, Chutima; Chatchawalsaisin, Jittima; Kulvanich, Poj

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to prepare inhalable co-spray dried powders of salmon calcitonin loaded chitosan nanoparticles (sCT-CS-NPs) with mannitol and investigate pulmonary absorption in rats. The sCT-CS-NPs were prepared by the ionic gelation method using sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP) as a cross-linking polyion. Inhalable dry powders were obtained by co-spray drying aqueous dispersion of sCT-CS-NPs and mannitol. sCT-CS-NPs co-spray dried powders were characterized with respect to morphology, particle size, powder density, aerodynamic diameter, protein integrity, in vitro release of sCT, and aerosolization. The plasmatic sCT levels following intratracheal administration of sCT-CS-NPs spray dried powders to the rats was also determined. sCT-CS-NPs were able to be incorporated into mannitol forming inhalable microparticles by the spray drying process. The sCT-CS-NPs/mannitol ratios and spray drying process affected the properties of the microparticles obtained. The conformation of the secondary structures of sCTs was affected by both mannitol content and spray dry inlet temperature. The sCT-CS-NPs were recovered after reconstitution of spray dried powders in an aqueous medium. The sCT release profile from spray dried powders was similar to that from sCT-CS-NPs. In vitro inhalation parameters measured by the Andersen cascade impactor indicated sCT-CS-NPs spray dried powders having promising aerodynamic properties for deposition in the deep lung. Determination of the plasmatic sCT levels following intratracheal administration to rats revealed that the inhalable sCT-CS NPs spray dried powders provided higher protein absorption compared to native sCT powders. The sCT-CS-NPs with mannitol based spray dried powders were prepared to have appropriate aerodynamic properties for pulmonary delivery. The developed system was able to deliver sCT via a pulmonary route into the systemic circulation.

  15. Natriuretic Peptides, Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.W. Rutten (Joost)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn humans, the natriuretic peptide family consists of three different types of peptides: atrial natriuretic peptide (synonym: atrial natriuretic factor), B-type natriuretic peptide (synonym: brain natriuretic peptide) and C-natriuretic peptide.1 Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was

  16. Natriuretic Peptides, Diagnostic and Prognostic Biomarkers

    OpenAIRE

    Rutten, Joost

    2010-01-01

    textabstractIn humans, the natriuretic peptide family consists of three different types of peptides: atrial natriuretic peptide (synonym: atrial natriuretic factor), B-type natriuretic peptide (synonym: brain natriuretic peptide) and C-natriuretic peptide.1 Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was the fi rst natriuretic peptide to be discovered and in humans ANP is predominantly formed in the cardiomyocytes of the atria.2 B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) was fi rst discovered in porcine brain hen...

  17. Granin-derived peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troger, Josef; Theurl, Markus; Kirchmair, Rudolf; Pasqua, Teresa; Tota, Bruno; Angelone, Tommaso; Cerra, Maria C; Nowosielski, Yvonne; Mätzler, Raphaela; Troger, Jasmin; Gayen, Jaur R; Trudeau, Vance; Corti, Angelo; Helle, Karen B

    2017-07-01

    The granin family comprises altogether 7 different proteins originating from the diffuse neuroendocrine system and elements of the central and peripheral nervous systems. The family is dominated by three uniquely acidic members, namely chromogranin A (CgA), chromogranin B (CgB) and secretogranin II (SgII). Since the late 1980s it has become evident that these proteins are proteolytically processed, intragranularly and/or extracellularly into a range of biologically active peptides; a number of them with regulatory properties of physiological and/or pathophysiological significance. The aim of this comprehensive overview is to provide an up-to-date insight into the distribution and properties of the well established granin-derived peptides and their putative roles in homeostatic regulations. Hence, focus is directed to peptides derived from the three main granins, e.g. to the chromogranin A derived vasostatins, betagranins, pancreastatin and catestatins, the chromogranin B-derived secretolytin and the secretogranin II-derived secretoneurin (SN). In addition, the distribution and properties of the chromogranin A-derived peptides prochromacin, chromofungin, WE14, parastatin, GE-25 and serpinins, the CgB-peptide PE-11 and the SgII-peptides EM66 and manserin will also be commented on. Finally, the opposing effects of the CgA-derived vasostatin-I and catestatin and the SgII-derived peptide SN on the integrity of the vasculature, myocardial contractility, angiogenesis in wound healing, inflammatory conditions and tumors will be discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Peptide Optical waveguides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelman, Amir; Apter, Boris; Shostak, Tamar; Rosenman, Gil

    2017-02-01

    Small-scale optical devices, designed and fabricated onto one dielectric substrate, create integrated optical chip like their microelectronic analogues. These photonic circuits, based on diverse physical phenomena such as light-matter interaction, propagation of electromagnetic waves in a thin dielectric material, nonlinear and electro-optical effects, allow transmission, distribution, modulation, and processing of optical signals in optical communication systems, chemical and biological sensors, and more. The key component of these optical circuits providing both optical processing and photonic interconnections is light waveguides. Optical confinement and transmitting of the optical waves inside the waveguide material are possible due to the higher refractive index of the waveguides in comparison with their surroundings. In this work, we propose a novel field of bionanophotonics based on a new concept of optical waveguiding in synthetic elongated peptide nanostructures composed of ordered peptide dipole biomolecules. New technology of controllable deposition of peptide optical waveguiding structures by nanofountain pen technique is developed. Experimental studies of refractive index, optical transparency, and linear and nonlinear waveguiding in out-of-plane and in-plane diphenylalanine peptide nanotubes have been conducted. Optical waveguiding phenomena in peptide structures are simulated by the finite difference time domain method. The advantages of this new class of bio-optical waveguides are high refractive index contrast, wide spectral range of optical transparency, large optical nonlinearity, and electro-optical effect, making them promising for new applications in integrated multifunctional photonic circuits. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Diversity-oriented peptide stapling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Thu Phuong; Larsen, Christian Ørnbøl; Røndbjerg, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    The introduction of macrocyclic constraints in peptides (peptide stapling) is an important tool within peptide medicinal chemistry for stabilising and pre-organising peptides in a desired conformation. In recent years, the copper-catalysed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) has emerged...... as a powerful method for peptide stapling. However, to date CuAAC stapling has not provided a simple method for obtaining peptides that are easily diversified further. In the present study, we report a new diversity-oriented peptide stapling (DOPS) methodology based on CuAAC chemistry. Stapling of peptides...... incorporating two azide-modified amino acids with 1,3,5-triethynylbenzene efficiently provides (i, i+7)- and (i, i+9)-stapled peptides with a single free alkyne positioned on the staple, that can be further conjugated or dimerised. A unique feature of the present method is that it provides easy access...

  20. Antimicrobial Peptides from Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P. Tam

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Plant antimicrobial peptides (AMPs have evolved differently from AMPs from other life forms. They are generally rich in cysteine residues which form multiple disulfides. In turn, the disulfides cross-braced plant AMPs as cystine-rich peptides to confer them with extraordinary high chemical, thermal and proteolytic stability. The cystine-rich or commonly known as cysteine-rich peptides (CRPs of plant AMPs are classified into families based on their sequence similarity, cysteine motifs that determine their distinctive disulfide bond patterns and tertiary structure fold. Cystine-rich plant AMP families include thionins, defensins, hevein-like peptides, knottin-type peptides (linear and cyclic, lipid transfer proteins, α-hairpinin and snakins family. In addition, there are AMPs which are rich in other amino acids. The ability of plant AMPs to organize into specific families with conserved structural folds that enable sequence variation of non-Cys residues encased in the same scaffold within a particular family to play multiple functions. Furthermore, the ability of plant AMPs to tolerate hypervariable sequences using a conserved scaffold provides diversity to recognize different targets by varying the sequence of the non-cysteine residues. These properties bode well for developing plant AMPs as potential therapeutics and for protection of crops through transgenic methods. This review provides an overview of the major families of plant AMPs, including their structures, functions, and putative mechanisms.

  1. Peptide Integrated Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handelman, Amir; Lapshina, Nadezda; Apter, Boris; Rosenman, Gil

    2018-02-01

    Bio-nanophotonics is a wide field in which advanced optical materials, biomedicine, fundamental optics, and nanotechnology are combined and result in the development of biomedical optical chips. Silk fibers or synthetic bioabsorbable polymers are the main light-guiding components. In this work, an advanced concept of integrated bio-optics is proposed, which is based on bioinspired peptide optical materials exhibiting wide optical transparency, nonlinear and electrooptical properties, and effective passive and active waveguiding. Developed new technology combining bottom-up controlled deposition of peptide planar wafers of a large area and top-down focus ion beam lithography provides direct fabrication of peptide optical integrated circuits. Finding a deep modification of peptide optical properties by reconformation of biological secondary structure from native phase to β-sheet architecture is followed by the appearance of visible fluorescence and unexpected transition from a native passive optical waveguiding to an active one. Original biocompatibility, switchable regimes of waveguiding, and multifunctional nonlinear optical properties make these new peptide planar optical materials attractive for application in emerging technology of lab-on-biochips, combining biomedical photonic and electronic circuits toward medical diagnosis, light-activated therapy, and health monitoring. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Biomimetic peptide nanosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yue; Kim, Sang N; Naik, Rajesh R; McAlpine, Michael C

    2012-05-15

    The development of a miniaturized sensing platform tailored for sensitive and selective detection of a variety of biochemical analytes could offer transformative fundamental and technological opportunities. Due to their high surface-to-volume ratios, nanoscale materials are extremely sensitive sensors. Likewise, peptides represent robust substrates for selective recognition due to the potential for broad chemical diversity within their relatively compact size. Here we explore the possibilities of linking peptides to nanosensors for the selective detection of biochemical targets. Such systems raise a number of interesting fundamental challenges: What are the peptide sequences, and how can rational design be used to derive selective binders? What nanomaterials should be used, and what are some strategies for assembling hybrid nanosensors? What role does molecular modeling play in elucidating response mechanisms? What is the resulting performance of these sensors, in terms of sensitivity, selectivity, and response time? What are some potential applications? This Account will highlight our early attempts to address these research challenges. Specifically, we use natural peptide sequences or sequences identified from phage display as capture elements. The sensors are based on a variety of nanomaterials including nanowires, graphene, and carbon nanotubes. We couple peptides to the nanomaterial surfaces via traditional surface functionalization methods or self-assembly. Molecular modeling provides detailed insights into the hybrid nanostructure, as well as the sensor detection mechanisms. The peptide nanosensors can distinguish chemically camouflaged mixtures of vapors and detect chemical warfare agents with sensitivities as low as parts-per-billion levels. Finally, we anticipate future uses of this technology in biomedicine: for example, devices based on these sensors could detect disease from the molecular components in human breath. Overall, these results provide a

  3. Immunotherapy with Allergen Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larché Mark

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Specific allergen immunotherapy (SIT is disease-modifying and efficacious. However, the use of whole allergen preparations is associated with frequent allergic adverse events during treatment. Many novel approaches are being designed to reduce the allergenicity of immunotherapy preparations whilst maintaining immunogenicity. One approach is the use of short synthetic peptides which representing dominant T cell epitopes of the allergen. Short peptides exhibit markedly reduced capacity to cross link IgE and activate mast cells and basophils, due to lack of tertiary structure. Murine pre-clinical studies have established the feasibility of this approach and clinical studies are currently in progress in both allergic and autoimmune diseases.

  4. Therapeutic HIV Peptide Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccines aim to control chronic HIV infection and eliminate the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART). Therapeutic HIV vaccine is being pursued as part of a functional cure for HIV/AIDS. We have outlined a basic protocol for inducing new T cell immunity during chronic HIV-1...... infection directed to subdominant conserved HIV-1 epitopes restricted to frequent HLA supertypes. The rationale for selecting HIV peptides and adjuvants are provided. Peptide subunit vaccines are regarded as safe due to the simplicity, quality, purity, and low toxicity. The caveat is reduced immunogenicity...

  5. Biosynthesis of cardiac natriuretic peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens Peter

    2010-01-01

    Cardiac-derived peptide hormones were identified more than 25 years ago. An astonishing amount of clinical studies have established cardiac natriuretic peptides and their molecular precursors as useful markers of heart disease. In contrast to the clinical applications, the biogenesis of cardiac....... An inefficient post-translational prohormone maturation will also affect the biology of the cardiac natriuretic peptide system. This review aims at summarizing the myocardial synthesis of natriuretic peptides focusing on B-type natriuretic peptide, where new data has disclosed cardiac myocytes as highly...... competent endocrine cells. The structurally related atrial natriuretic peptide will be mentioned where appropriate, whereas C-type natriuretic peptide will not be considered as a cardiac peptide of relevance in mammalian physiology....

  6. GROUPS IN PEPTIDE SYNTHESIS

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    carboxamide protecting group in peptide synthesis. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION l-Tetralinylamines used as precursors to prepare the carboxamide derivatives of asparagine and glutamine are shown in Table 1: Table 1. Summary of l-tetralinyl amines. Amines Aromatic ring NHZ. X Y Z Z. 1 H H H. 2 OCH; H H. 3 H OCH ...

  7. Natriuretic peptides and cerebral hemodynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guo, Song; Barringer, Filippa; Zois, Nora Elisabeth

    2014-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides have emerged as important diagnostic and prognostic tools for cardiovascular disease. Plasma measurement of the bioactive peptides as well as precursor-derived fragments is a sensitive tool in assessing heart failure. In heart failure, the peptides are used as treatment...

  8. NCAM Mimetic Peptides: An Update

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    of combinatorial peptide libraries. The C3 and NBP10 peptides target the first Ig module whereas the ENFIN2 and ENFIN11 peptides target fibronectin type III (FN3) modules of NCAM. A number of NCAM mimetics can induce neurite outgrowth and exhibit neuroprotective and synaptic plasticity modulating properties...

  9. 'optimization' of animal peptide toxins

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    peptides of ca. 4 to 70 amino acid residues, with a number of potential therapeutic applications.[1]. Because of the intrinsic structural complexities of these peptides (different types of fold and 1-5 disulfide bridges), this size range implicates that only a fraction of them (< 50-mer peptides) can routinely be produced by ...

  10. The Dual Amylin- and Calcitonin-Receptor Agonist KBP-042 Increases Insulin Sensitivity and Induces Weight Loss in Rats with Obesity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjuler, Sara Toftegaard; Gydesen, Sofie; Andreassen, Kim Vietz

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In this study, KBP-042, a dual amylin- and calcitonin-receptor agonist, was investigated as a treatment of obesity and insulin resistance in five different doses (0.625 μg/kg-10 μg/kg) compared with saline-treated and pair-fed controls. Methods: Rats with obesity received daily s...... combines two highly relevant features, namely weight loss and insulin sensitivity, and is thus an excellent candidate for chronic treatment of obesity and insulin resistance........c. administrations for 56 days, and glucose tolerance was assessed after one acute injection, 3 weeks of treatment, and again after 7 weeks of treatment. To assess the effect on insulin sensitivity, rats received 5 μg/kg KBP-042 for 21 days before hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Results: KBP-042 induced...

  11. Optimization of tolerability and efficacy of the novel dual amylin and calcitonin receptor agonist KBP-089 through dose escalation and combination with a GLP-1 analog

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gydesen, Sofie; Andreassen, Kim Vietz; Hjuler, Sara Toftegaard

    2017-01-01

    Amylin and GLP-1 agonism induce a well-known anorexic effect at dose initiation, which is managed by dose escalation. In this study we investigated how to optimize tolerability while maintaining efficacy of a novel, highly potent dual amylin and calcitonin receptor agonist (DACRA), KBP-089......, and the following treatment with 2.5, 10, and 40 µg/kg resulted in an ~15% vehicle-corrected weight loss, a corresponding reduction in adipose tissue (AT), and, in all treatment groups, improved oral glucose tolerance (P ...-089 was well tolerated and induced and sustained a significant weight loss and a reduction in AT in lean and HFD rats, underscoring the potential of KBP-089 as an anti-obesity agent....

  12. The calcitonin receptor gene is a candidate for regulation of susceptibility to herpes simplex type 1 neuronal infection leading to encephalitis in rat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Abdelmagid

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE is a fatal infection of the central nervous system (CNS predominantly caused by Herpes simplex virus type 1. Factors regulating the susceptibility to HSE are still largely unknown. To identify host gene(s regulating HSE susceptibility we performed a genome-wide linkage scan in an intercross between the susceptible DA and the resistant PVG rat. We found one major quantitative trait locus (QTL, Hse1, on rat chromosome 4 (confidence interval 24.3-31 Mb; LOD score 29.5 governing disease susceptibility. Fine mapping of Hse1 using recombinants, haplotype mapping and sequencing, as well as expression analysis of all genes in the interval identified the calcitonin receptor gene (Calcr as the main candidate, which also is supported by functional studies. Thus, using unbiased genetic approach variability in Calcr was identified as potentially critical for infection and viral spread to the CNS and subsequent HSE development.

  13. Peptide vectors for gene delivery: from single peptides to multifunctional peptide nanocarriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raad, Markus de; Teunissen, Erik A; Mastrobattista, Enrico

    2014-07-01

    The therapeutic use of nucleic acids relies on the availability of sophisticated delivery systems for targeted and intracellular delivery of these molecules. Such a gene delivery should possess essential characteristics to overcome several extracellular and intracellular barriers. Peptides offer an attractive platform for nonviral gene delivery, as several functional peptide classes exist capable of overcoming these barriers. However, none of these functional peptide classes contain all the essential characteristics required to overcome all of the barriers associated with successful gene delivery. Combining functional peptides into multifunctional peptide vectors will be pivotal for improving peptide-based gene delivery systems. By using combinatorial strategies and high-throughput screening, the identification of multifunctional peptide vectors will accelerate the optimization of peptide-based gene delivery systems.

  14. [Biosynthesis of opioid peptides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossier, J

    1988-01-01

    The endogenous opioid peptides all contain the enkephalin sequence Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Met and Tyr-Gly-Gly-Phe-Leu at their aminoterminus. Three distinct families of these peptides (endorphins, enkephalins and dynorphins) are present in different neuronal pathways within the central nervous system. Molecular genetics have shown that these three families of opioid peptides are derived from three distinct precursors. Pro-opiomelanocortin gives rise to the endorphins, as well as adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and the melanotropic hormones (MSH's). [Met] enkephalin, [Leu] enkephalin and the related heptapeptide [Met] enkephalin-Arg6-Phe7 and octapeptide [Met] enkephalin-Arg6-Gly7-Leu8 are derived from proenkephalin. The third family is derived from prodynorphin and includes dynorphin A, dynorphin B (also known as rimorphin) and alpha- and beta-neo-endorphin. The structure of the genes coding for these precursors are similar, suggesting the possibility of one common ancestral gene. The most common scheme for enzymatic maturation of precursors proposes the action of a trypsin-like endopeptidase followed by a carboxypeptidase B-like exopeptidase. However, we have provided evidence that this combination of trypsin-like and carboxypeptidase B-like enzymes may not be the only mechanism for liberating enkephalin from low molecular weight enkephalin-containing peptides. Indeed, endo-oligopeptidase A, an enzyme, known to hydrolyze the Phe5-Ser6 bond of bradykinin and the Arg8-Arg9 bond of neurotensin, has been shown to produce, by a single cleavage, [Leu] enkephalin or [Met] enkephalin from small enkephalin-containing peptides, (Camargo et al., 1987, J. Neurochem. 48, 1258-1263).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. Antagonistic peptide technology for functional dissection of CLE peptides revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czyzewicz, Nathan; Wildhagen, Mari; Cattaneo, Pietro; Stahl, Yvonne; Pinto, Karine Gustavo; Aalen, Reidunn B; Butenko, Melinka A; Simon, Rüdiger; Hardtke, Christian S; De Smet, Ive

    2015-08-01

    In the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, over 1000 putative genes encoding small, presumably secreted, signalling peptides can be recognized. However, a major obstacle in identifying the function of genes encoding small signalling peptides is the limited number of available loss-of-function mutants. To overcome this, a promising new tool, antagonistic peptide technology, was recently developed. Here, this antagonistic peptide technology was tested on selected CLE peptides and the related IDA peptide and its usefulness in the context of studies of peptide function discussed. Based on the analyses, it was concluded that the antagonistic peptide approach is not the ultimate means to overcome redundancy or lack of loss-of-function lines. However, information collected using antagonistic peptide approaches (in the broad sense) can be very useful, but these approaches do not work in all cases and require a deep insight on the interaction between the ligand and its receptor to be successful. This, as well as peptide ligand structure considerations, should be taken into account before ordering a wide range of synthetic peptide variants and/or generating transgenic plants. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  16. Radiolabelled peptides for oncological diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laverman, Peter; Boerman, Otto C.; Oyen, Wim J.G. [Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Sosabowski, Jane K. [Queen Mary University of London, Centre for Molecular Oncology, Barts Cancer Institute, London (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-15

    Radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides targeting receptors (over)expressed on tumour cells are widely under investigation for tumour diagnosis and therapy. The concept of using radiolabelled receptor-binding peptides to target receptor-expressing tissues in vivo has stimulated a large body of research in nuclear medicine. The {sup 111}In-labelled somatostatin analogue octreotide (OctreoScan trademark) is the most successful radiopeptide for tumour imaging, and was the first to be approved for diagnostic use. Based on the success of these studies, other receptor-targeting peptides such as cholecystokinin/gastrin analogues, glucagon-like peptide-1, bombesin (BN), chemokine receptor CXCR4 targeting peptides, and RGD peptides are currently under development or undergoing clinical trials. In this review, we discuss some of these peptides and their analogues, with regard to their potential for radionuclide imaging of tumours. (orig.)

  17. Multidimensional Design of Anticancer Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Chu; Lim, Yi Fan; Russo, Erica; Schneider, Petra; Bolliger, Lea; Edenharter, Adriana; Altmann, Karl-Heinz; Halin, Cornelia; Hiss, Jan A; Schneider, Gisbert

    2015-08-24

    The computer-assisted design and optimization of peptides with selective cancer cell killing activity was achieved through merging the features of anticancer peptides, cell-penetrating peptides, and tumor-homing peptides. Machine-learning classifiers identified candidate peptides that possess the predicted properties. Starting from a template amino acid sequence, peptide cytotoxicity against a range of cancer cell lines was systematically optimized while minimizing the effects on primary human endothelial cells. The computer-generated sequences featured improved cancer-cell penetration, induced cancer-cell apoptosis, and were enabled a decrease in the cytotoxic concentration of co-administered chemotherapeutic agents in vitro. This study demonstrates the potential of multidimensional machine-learning methods for rapidly obtaining peptides with the desired cellular activities. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Antimicrobial Peptides (AMPs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehrzad Sadredinamin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs are extensive group of molecules that produced by variety tissues of invertebrate, plants, and animal species which play an important role in their immunity response. AMPs have different classifications such as; biosynthetic machines, biological sources, biological functions, molecular properties, covalent bonding patterns, three dimensional structures, and molecular targets.These molecules have multidimensional properties including antimicrobial activity, antiviral activity, antifungal activity, anti-parasite activity, biofilm control, antitumor activity, mitogens activity and linking innate to adaptive immunity that making them promising agents for therapeutic drugs. In spite of this advantage of AMPs, their clinical developments have some limitation for commercial development. But some of AMPs are under clinical trials for the therapeutic purpose such as diabetic foot ulcers, different bacterial infections and tissue damage. In this review, we emphasized on the source, structure, multidimensional properties, limitation and therapeutic applications of various antimicrobial peptides.

  19. Antimicrobial peptides in annelids

    OpenAIRE

    Tasiemski, A.

    2008-01-01

    Gene encoded antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) are widely distributed among living organisms including plants, invertebrates and vertebrates. They constitute important effectors of the innate immune response by exerting multiple roles as mediators of inflammation with impact on epithelial and inflammatory cells influencing diverse processes such as cytokine release, cell proliferation, angiogenesis, wound healing, chemotaxis and immune induction. In invertebrates, most of the data describe the ch...

  20. Peptide-enhanced oral delivery of therapeutic peptides and proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Mie; Foged, Camilla; Berthelsen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Systemic therapy upon oral delivery of biologics, such as peptide and protein drugs is limited due to their large molecular size, their low enzymatic stability and their inability to cross the intestinal epithelium. Ways to overcome the epithelial barrier include the use of peptide-based excipients...... throughout the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, chemical stability is an inherent challenge when employing amino acid-based excipients for oral delivery, and multiple approaches have been investigated to improve this. The exact mechanisms of transepithelial translocation are discussed, and it is believed...... for oral delivery of peptide and protein drugs highlighting recent studies and the most promising compounds from these classes of peptide excipients....

  1. Proteomic Assessment of the Expression of Genes Related to Toluene Catabolism and Porin Synthesis in Pseudomonas stutzeri ST-9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Esti; Gomila, Margarita; Lalucat, Jorge; Nitzan, Yeshayahu; Pechatnikov, Izabella; Cahan, Rivka

    2017-04-07

    The organization and expression of Pseudomonas stutzeri ST-9 genes related to toluene catabolism and porin synthesis was investigated. Toluene-degrading genes were found to be localized in the chromosome close to a phage-type integrase. A regulatory gene and 21 genes related to an aromatics degradation pathway are organized as a putative operon. These proteins are upregulated in the presence of toluene. Fourteen outer membrane proteins were identified as porins in the ST-9 genome. The identified porins showed that the main detected porins are related to the OmpA and OprD superfamilies. The percentage of porins in the outer membrane protein fraction, as determined by mass spectrometry, was 73% and 54% when the cells were cultured with toluene and with glucose, respectively. Upregulation of OmpA and downregulation of OprD occurred in the presence of toluene. A porin fraction (90% OprD) from both cultures was isolated and examined as a toluene uptake system using the liposome-swelling assay. Liposomes were prepared with the porin fraction from a culture that was grown on toluene (T-proteoliposome) or glucose (G-proteoliposome). There was no significant difference in the permeability rate of the different solutes through the T-proteoliposome and the G-proteoliposome.

  2. Structural similarities and differences between amyloidogenic and non-amyloidogenic islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP sequences and implications for the dual physiological and pathological activities of these peptides.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Wu

    Full Text Available IAPP, a 37 amino-acid peptide hormone belonging to the calcitonin family, is an intrinsically disordered protein that is coexpressed and cosecreted along with insulin by pancreatic islet β-cells in response to meals. IAPP plays a physiological role in glucose regulation; however, in certain species, IAPP can aggregate and this process is linked to β-cell death and Type II Diabetes. Using replica exchange molecular dynamics with extensive sampling (16 replicas per sequence and 600 ns per replica, we investigate the structure of the monomeric state of two species of aggregating peptides (human and cat IAPP and two species of non-aggregating peptides (pig and rat IAPP. Our simulations reveal that the pig and rat conformations are very similar, and consist of helix-coil and helix-hairpin conformations. The aggregating sequences, on the other hand, populate the same helix-coil and helix-hairpin conformations as the non-aggregating sequence, but, in addition, populate a hairpin structure. Our exhaustive simulations, coupled with available peptide-activity data, leads us to a structure-activity relationship (SAR in which we propose that the functional role of IAPP is carried out by the helix-coil conformation, a structure common to both aggregating and non-aggregating species. The pathological role of this peptide may have multiple origins, including the interaction of the helical elements with membranes. Nonetheless, our simulations suggest that the hairpin structure, only observed in the aggregating species, might be linked to the pathological role of this peptide, either as a direct precursor to amyloid fibrils, or as part of a cylindrin type of toxic oligomer. We further propose that the helix-hairpin fold is also a possible aggregation prone conformation that would lead normally non-aggregating variants of IAPP to form fibrils under conditions where an external perturbation is applied. The SAR relationship is used to suggest the rational design

  3. Solid-phase peptide synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    This chapter provides an introduction to and overview of peptide chemistry with a focus on solid-phase peptide synthesis. The background, the most common reagents, and some mechanisms are presented. This chapter also points to the different chapters and puts them into perspective.......This chapter provides an introduction to and overview of peptide chemistry with a focus on solid-phase peptide synthesis. The background, the most common reagents, and some mechanisms are presented. This chapter also points to the different chapters and puts them into perspective....

  4. Biodiscovery of aluminum binding peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Bryn L.; Sarkes, Deborah A.; Finch, Amethist S.; Hurley, Margaret M.; Stratis-Cullum, Dimitra

    2013-05-01

    Cell surface peptide display systems are large and diverse libraries of peptides (7-15 amino acids) which are presented by a display scaffold hosted by a phage (virus), bacteria, or yeast cell. This allows the selfsustaining peptide libraries to be rapidly screened for high affinity binders to a given target of interest, and those binders quickly identified. Peptide display systems have traditionally been utilized in conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes. However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets, such as metals, for biofabrication, hybrid material assembly and corrosion prevention. While most current peptide display systems employ viruses to host the display scaffold, we have recently shown that a bacterial host, Escherichia coli, displaying peptides in the ubiquitous, membrane protein scaffold eCPX can also provide specific peptide binders to an organic target. We have, for the first time, extended the use of this bacterial peptide display system for the biodiscovery of aluminum binding 15mer peptides. We will present the process of biopanning with macroscopic inorganic targets, binder enrichment, and binder isolation and discovery.

  5. Antitumor Peptides from Marine Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi Sun

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The biodiversity of the marine environment and the associated chemical diversity constitute a practically unlimited resource of new antitumor agents in the field of the development of marine bioactive substances. In this review, the progress on studies of antitumor peptides from marine sources is provided. The biological properties and mechanisms of action of different marine peptides are described; information about their molecular diversity is also presented. Novel peptides that induce apoptosis signal pathway, affect the tubulin-microtubule equilibrium and inhibit angiogenesis are presented in association with their pharmacological properties. It is intended to provide useful information for further research in the fields of marine antitumor peptides.

  6. Improving Peptide Applications Using Nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanaswamy, Radhika; Wang, Tao; Torchilin, Vladimir P

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are being successfully used in various fields including therapy and drug delivery. With advancement in nanotechnology and targeted delivery carrier systems, suitable modification of peptides has enabled achievement of many desirable goals over-riding some of the major disadvantages associated with the delivery of peptides in vivo. Conjugation or physical encapsulation of peptides to various nanocarriers, such as liposomes, micelles and solid-lipid nanoparticles, has improved their in vivo performance multi-fold. The amenability of peptides to modification in chemistry and functionalization with suitable nanocarriers are very relevant aspects in their use and have led to the use of 'smart' nanoparticles with suitable linker chemistries that favor peptide targeting or release at the desired sites, minimizing off-target effects. This review focuses on how nanotechnology has been used to improve the number of peptide applications. The paper also focuses on the chemistry behind peptide conjugation to nanocarriers, the commonly employed linker chemistries and the several improvements that have already been achieved in the areas of peptide use with the help of nanotechnology.

  7. Peptides and Food Intake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobrino Crespo, Carmen; Perianes Cachero, Aránzazu; Puebla Jiménez, Lilian; Barrios, Vicente; Arilla Ferreiro, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    The mechanisms for controlling food intake involve mainly an interplay between gut, brain, and adipose tissue (AT), among the major organs. Parasympathetic, sympathetic, and other systems are required for communication between the brain satiety center, gut, and AT. These neuronal circuits include a variety of peptides and hormones, being ghrelin the only orexigenic molecule known, whereas the plethora of other factors are inhibitors of appetite, suggesting its physiological relevance in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. Nutrients generated by food digestion have been proposed to activate G-protein-coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells, e.g., the L-cells. This stimulates the release of gut hormones into the circulation such as glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptides, peptide tyrosine tyrosine, and cholecystokinin, which inhibit appetite. Ghrelin is a peptide secreted from the stomach and, in contrast to other gut hormones, plasma levels decrease after a meal and potently stimulate food intake. Other circulating factors such as insulin and leptin relay information regarding long-term energy stores. Both hormones circulate at proportional levels to body fat content, enter the CNS proportionally to their plasma levels, and reduce food intake. Circulating hormones can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC) neurons of the hypothalamus, after passing across the median eminence. Circulating factors such as gut hormones may also influence the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) through the adjacent circumventricular organ. On the other hand, gastrointestinal vagal afferents converge in the NTS of the brainstem. Neural projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypothalamus. The ARC acts as an integrative center, with two major subpopulations of neurons influencing appetite, one of them coexpressing neuropeptide Y and agouti-related protein (AgRP) that increases food

  8. Anticancer peptides from bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz M. Karpiński

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a leading cause of death in the world. The rapid development of medicine and pharmacology allows to create new and effective anticancer drugs. Among modern anticancer drugs are bacterial proteins. Until now has been shown anticancer activity among others azurin and exotoxin A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pep27anal2 from Streptococcus pneumoniae, diphtheria toxin from Corynebacterium diphtheriae, and recently discovered Entap from Enterococcus sp. The study presents the current data regarding the properties, action and anticancer activity of listed peptides.

  9. Peptide Vaccines for Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kono K

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In general, the preferable characteristic of the target molecules for development of cancer vaccines are high immunogenicity, very common expression in cancer cells, specific expression in cancer cells and essential molecules for cell survival (to avoid loss of expression. We previously reported that three novel HLA-A24-restricted immunodominant peptides, which were derived from three different oncoantigens, TTK, LY6K, and IMP-3,were promising targets for cancer vaccination for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCCpatients. Then, we had performed a phase I clinical trial using three HLA-A24-binding peptides and the results had been shown to be promising for ESCC. Therefore, we further performed a multicenter, non-randomized phase II clinical trial. Patients and Methods: Sixty ESCC patients were enrolled to evaluate OS, PFS, immunological response employing ELISPOT and pentamer assays. Each of the three peptides was administered with IFA weekly. All patients received the vaccination without knowing an HLA-A type, and the HLA types were key-opened at the analysis point. Hence, the endpoints were set to evaluate differences between HLA-A*2402-positive (24(+ and -negative (24(- groups. Results: The OS in the 24 (+ group (n=35 tended to be better than that in the 24(- group (n=25 (MST 4.6 vs. 2.6 month, respectively, p = 0.121, although the difference was not statistically significant. However, the PFS in the 24(+ group was significantly better than that in the 24(- group (p = 0.032. In the 24(+ group, ELISPOT assay indicated that the LY6K-, TTK-, and IMP3-specific CTL responses were observed after the vaccination in 63%, 45%, and 60% of the 24(+ group, respectively. The patients having LY6K-, TTK-, and IMP3-specific CTL responses revealed the better OS than those not having CTL induction, respectively. The patients showing the CTL induction for multiple peptides have better clinical responses. Conclusion: The immune response induced

  10. Anterograde transneuronal viral tract tracing reveals central sensory circuits from brown fat and sensory denervation alters its thermogenic responses

    OpenAIRE

    Vaughan, Cheryl H.; Bartness, Timothy J.

    2012-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenic activity and growth are controlled by its sympathetic nervous system (SNS) innervation, but nerve fibers containing sensory-associated neuropeptides [substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)] also suggest sensory innervation. The central nervous system (CNS) projections of BAT afferents are unknown. Therefore, we used the H129 strain of the herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1), an anterograde transneuronal viral tract tracer used to delineate sensor...

  11. Pharmacokinetic-Pharmacodynamic Relationship of Erenumab (AMG 334) and Capsaicin-Induced Dermal Blood Flow in Healthy and Migraine Subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Vu, Thuy; Ma, Peiming; Chen, Jiyun Sunny; de Hoon, Jan; Van Hecken, Anne; Yan, Lucy; Wu, Liviawati Sutjandra; Hamilton, Lisa; Vargas, Gabriel

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Capsaicin-induced dermal blood flow (CIDBF) is a validated biomarker used to evaluate the target engagement of potential calcitonin gene-related peptide-blocking therapeutics for migraine. To characterize the pharmacokinetics (PK) and quantify the inhibitory effects of erenumab (AMG 334) on CIDBF, CIDBF data were pooled from a single- and a multiple-dose study in healthy and migraine subjects. Methods Repeated capsaicin challenges and DBF measurements were performed and serum erenumab...

  12. Randomized, controlled trial of telcagepant over four migraine attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ho, Andrew P; Dahlöf, Carl Gh; Silberstein, Stephen D

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptor antagonist telcagepant (tablet formulation) for treatment of a migraine attack and across four attacks. Adults with migraine were randomized, double-blind, to telcagepant 140 mg, telcagepant 280 mg, or control treatment sequ...... was defined as ≥ 3 successes, and lack of consistent efficacy was defined as ≥ 2 failures, in treatment response. A total of 1677 patients treated ≥ 1 attack and 1263 treated all four attacks....

  13. Degeneration of capsaicin sensitive sensory nerves enhances myocardial injury in acute myocardial infarction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rui-Lin; Guo, Zheng; Wang, Li-Li; Wu, Jie

    2012-09-20

    Evidence indicated an involvement of afferent nerves in the pathology of acute myocardial infarction. This study was undertaken to clarify the role and mechanisms by which the sensory afferent degeneration exacerbates the myocardial injury in acute myocardial infarction in rats. The myocardial injury was assessed by analysis of 1) the differences in the infarct size, myocyte apoptosis, the caspase activity in the myocardium and cardiac troponin I in serum between the denervated and non-denervated rats; 2) the differences in the size of infarctiom with and without antagonisms of endogenous neurokinin 1 receptor or calcitonin gene related peptide receptor in acute myocardial infarction. Degeneration of the afferent nerves resulted in marked increase in the pain threshold and decrease in substance P and calcitonin gene related peptide in dorsal root ganglia, spinal dorsal horn and myocardium. Increases of the infarction size (39% ± 4% vs. 26% ± 4%,), troponin-I (28.4 ± 8.89 ng/ml, vs. 14.6 ± 9.75 ng/ml), apoptosis of myocytes (by 1.8 ± 0.2 folds) and caspase-3 activity (1.6 ± 0.3 vs. 1.05 ± 0.18) were observed in the denervated animals at 6h of myocardial infarction, compared with the non-denervated rats. Antagonisms of the endogenous neurokinin 1 receptor or calcitonin gene related peptide receptor caused increase of the size of infarction in the animals. Degeneration of capsaicin sensitive afferent nerves enhances the myocardial injury of acute myocardial infarction, possibly due to reduction of endogenous calcitonin gene related peptide and substance P. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. A Review on the Association between Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists and Thyroid Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Yih Chiu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a concern on the risk of thyroid cancer associated with glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 analogs including liraglutide and exenatide. In this article, we review related experimental studies, clinical trials and observational human studies currently available. In rodents, liraglutide activated the GLP-1 receptors on C-cells, causing an increased incidence of C-cell neoplasia. Animal experiments with monkeys demonstrated no increase in calcitonin release and no C-cell proliferation after long-term liraglutide administration. Longitudinal 2-year data from clinical trials do not support any significant risk for the activation or growth of C-cell cancer in humans in response to liraglutide. However, an analysis of the FDA adverse event reporting system database suggested an increased risk for thyroid cancer associated with exenatide after its marketing. Noticeably, a recent study discovered that GLP-1 receptor could also be expressed in human papillary thyroid carcinomas (PTC, but the impact of GLP-1 analogs on PTC is not known. Therefore, GLP-1 analogs might increase the risk of thyroid C-cell pathology in rodents, but its risk in humans awaits confirmation. Since GLP-1 receptor is also expressed in PTC besides C-cells, it is important to investigate the actions of GLP-1 on different subtypes of thyroid cancer in the future.

  15. Natriuretic peptides in cardiometabolic regulation and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zois, Nora E; Bartels, Emil D; Hunter, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    these conditions can coexist and potentially lead to heart failure, a syndrome associated with a functional natriuretic peptide deficiency despite high circulating concentrations of immunoreactive peptides. Therefore, dysregulation of the natriuretic peptide system, a 'natriuretic handicap', might be an important...

  16. A cold-induced phytosulfokine peptide is related to the improvement of loquat fruit chilling tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Huwei; Wang, Xinfeng; Hu, Weicheng; Yang, Xianghui; Diao, Enjie; Shen, Ting; Qiang, Qian

    2017-10-01

    A novel peptidomics approach was used to discover cold-induced peptides in loquat fruit. Twenty unique peptides derived from 18 proproteins were identified, and they were involved in sugar signalling, protein metabolism and stress response. The quantitative analysis revealed 7 peptides with more than 2-fold upregulation, especially a 4.96-fold increase detected in the phytosulfokine (PSK) peptide. To further evaluate effects of PSK1 on fruit chilling tolerance, weight loss, firmness and internal browning were investigated in PSK1-treated loquat fruit at 0°C. By contrast, these chilling injury symptoms were effectively reduced by PSK1. PSK1 markedly delayed decreases of ATP content and energy charge. The PSK1-treated fruit exhibited significantly lower activities of cell-wall degrading enzymes and transcripts of genes related to lignin synthesis. Our results demonstrated that PSK1 improves chilling tolerance of loquat fruit by maintaining high energy status and cell integrity. Peptidomics analysis provides a promising tool to discover some key peptides. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Chemical Synthesis of Antimicrobial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münzker, Lena; Oddo, Alberto; Hansen, Paul R

    2017-01-01

    Solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) is the method of choice for chemical synthesis of peptides. In this nonspecialist review, we describe commonly used resins, linkers, protecting groups, and coupling reagents in 9-fluorenylmethyloxycarbonyl (Fmoc) SPPS. Finally, a detailed protocol for manual Fmoc SPPS is presented.

  18. Urinary Peptides in Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solaas, K. M.; Skjeldal, O.; Gardner, M. L. G.; Kase, B. F.; Reichelt, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A study found a significantly higher level of peptides in the urine of 53 girls with Rett syndrome compared with controls. The elevation was similar to that in 35 girls with infantile autism. Levels of peptides were lower in girls with classic Rett syndrome than those with congenital Rett syndrome. (Contains references.) (Author/CR)

  19. Imatinib Mesylate Alters the Expression of Genes Related to Disease Progression in an Animal Model of Uveal Melanoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno F. Fernandes

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Imatinib mesylate (IM is a compound that inhibits both BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase and c-kit receptors. Tyrosine kinases are important in cellular signaling and mediate major cellular processes such as proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, attachment, and migration. Twenty-six albino rabbits were injected with 1 × 106 human uveal melanoma (UM cells (92.1 into the suprachoroidal space. Animals were immunosuppressed (cyclosporin A over the course of the 12-week experiment and divided into two groups (n = 13. The experimental group received IM once daily by gavage while the control group received a placebo. One animal per group was sacrificed every week after the 2nd week. Upon necropsy, organs were harvested for histopathological examination. Cells from the primary tumors were recultured and tested in proliferation and invasion assays. A PCR array was used to investigate the differences in expression of 84 genes related to tumor metastasis. In the treated group, 4 rabbits developed intraocular tumors, with an average largest tumor dimension (LTD of 2.5 mm and 5 animals reported metastatic disease. Whereas 6 rabbits in the control group developed intraocular tumors, with an average LTD of 5.8 mm and 6 animals reported metastatic disease. The recultured cells from the treated group demonstrated lower proliferation rates and were less invasive (p < 0.001 The PCR array showed differences in expression of genes related to metastasis. Notably, there was 290-fold increase in SERPINB5, a tumor suppressor gene, and a 10-fold higher expression of KISS1, a metastasis suppressor gene, in the treated group. Proangiogenic genes such as VEGFA, PDGFA and PDGFB were downregulated in the treated group. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report detailing the altered expression of specific genes in UM cells after treatment with IM.

  20. Peptides: A new class of anticancer drugs

    OpenAIRE

    Ryszard Smolarczyk; Tomasz Cichoń; Stanisław Szala

    2009-01-01

    Peptides are a novel class of anticancer agents embracing two distinct categories: natural antibacterial peptides, which are preferentially bound by cancer cells, and chemically synthesized peptides, which bind specifically to precise molecular targets located on the surface of tumor cells. Antibacterial peptides bind to both cell and mitochondrial membranes. Some of these peptides attach to the cell membrane, resulting in its disorganization. Other antibacterial peptides penetrate cancer cel...

  1. Peptide-LNA oligonucleotide conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astakhova, I Kira; Hansen, Lykke Haastrup; Vester, Birte

    2013-01-01

    Although peptide-oligonucleotide conjugates (POCs) are well-known for nucleic acids delivery and therapy, reports on internal attachment of peptides to oligonucleotides are limited in number. To develop a convenient route for preparation of internally labeled POCs with improved biomedical...... properties, peptides were introduced into oligonucleotides via a 2'-alkyne-2'-amino-LNA scaffold. Derivatives of methionine- and leucine-enkephalins were chosen as model peptides of mixed amino acid content, which were singly and doubly incorporated into LNA/DNA strands using highly efficient copper......(i)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC) "click" chemistry. DNA/RNA target binding affinity and selectivity of the resulting POCs were improved in comparison to LNA/DNA mixmers and unmodified DNA controls. This clearly demonstrates that internal attachment of peptides to oligonucleotides can significantly...

  2. The Equine PeptideAtlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bundgaard, Louise; Jacobsen, Stine; Sorensen, Mette A.

    2014-01-01

    Progress in MS-based methods for veterinary research and diagnostics is lagging behind compared to the human research, and proteome data of domestic animals is still not well represented in open source data repositories. This is particularly true for the equine species. Here we present a first...... Equine PeptideAtlas encompassing high-resolution tandem MS analyses of 51 samples representing a selection of equine tissues and body fluids from healthy and diseased animals. The raw data were processed through the Trans-Proteomic Pipeline to yield high quality identification of proteins and peptides....... The current release comprises 24 131 distinct peptides representing 2636 canonical proteins observed at false discovery rates of 0.2% at the peptide level and 1.4% at the protein level. Data from the Equine PeptideAtlas are available for experimental planning, validation of new datasets, and as a proteomic...

  3. Maize Bioactive Peptides against Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Gómez, Jorge L.; Castorena-Torres, Fabiola; Preciado-Ortiz, Ricardo E.; García-Lara, Silverio

    2017-06-01

    Cancer is one of the main chronic degenerative diseases worldwide. In recent years, consumption of whole-grain cereals and their derived food products has been associated with reduction risks of various types of cancer. Cereals main biomolecules includes proteins, peptides, and amino acids present in different quantities within the grain. The nutraceutical properties associated with peptides exerts biological functions that promote health and prevent this disease. In this review, we report the current status and advances on maize peptides regarding bioactive properties that have been reported such as antioxidant, antihypertensive, hepatoprotective, and anti-tumour activities. We also highlighted its biological potential through which maize bioactive peptides exert anti-cancer activity. Finally, we analyse and emphasize the possible areas of application for maize peptides.

  4. Periosteum Metabolism and Nerve Fiber Positioning Depend on Interactions between Osteoblasts and Peripheral Innervation in Rat Mandible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauprivez, Cédric; Bataille, Caroline; Baroukh, Brigitte; Llorens, Annie; Lesieur, Julie; Marie, Pierre J.; Saffar, Jean-Louis; Biosse Duplan, Martin; Cherruau, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system controls bone remodeling by regulating bone formation and resorption. How nerves and bone cells influence each other remains elusive. Here we modulated the content or activity of the neuropeptide Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide to investigate nerve-bone cell interplays in the mandible periosteum by assessing factors involved in nerve and bone behaviors. Young adult rats were chemically sympathectomized or treated with Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide or Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide10-28, a receptor antagonist. Sympathectomy depleted the osteogenic layer of the periosteum in neurotrophic proNerve Growth Factor and neurorepulsive semaphorin3a; sensory Calcitonin-Gene Related Peptide-positive fibers invaded this layer physiologically devoid of sensory fibers. In the periosteum non-osteogenic layer, sympathectomy activated mast cells to release mature Nerve Growth Factor while Calcitonin-Gene Related Peptide-positive fibers increased. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide treatment reversed sympathectomy effects. Treating intact animals with Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide increased proNerve Growth Factor expression and stabilized mast cells. Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide10-28 treatment mimicked sympathectomy effects. Our data suggest that sympathetic Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide modulate the interactions between nervous fibers and bone cells by tuning expressions by osteogenic cells of factors responsible for mandible periosteum maintenance while osteogenic cells keep nervous fibers at a distance from the bone surface. PMID:26509533

  5. Cathepsin-Mediated Cleavage of Peptides from Peptide Amphiphiles Leads to Enhanced Intracellular Peptide Accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acar, Handan; Samaeekia, Ravand; Schnorenberg, Mathew R; Sasmal, Dibyendu K; Huang, Jun; Tirrell, Matthew V; LaBelle, James L

    2017-09-20

    Peptides synthesized in the likeness of their native interaction domain(s) are natural choices to target protein-protein interactions (PPIs) due to their fidelity of orthostatic contact points between binding partners. Despite therapeutic promise, intracellular delivery of biofunctional peptides at concentrations necessary for efficacy remains a formidable challenge. Peptide amphiphiles (PAs) provide a facile method of intracellular delivery and stabilization of bioactive peptides. PAs consisting of biofunctional peptide headgroups linked to hydrophobic alkyl lipid-like tails prevent peptide hydrolysis and proteolysis in circulation, and PA monomers are internalized via endocytosis. However, endocytotic sequestration and steric hindrance from the lipid tail are two major mechanisms that limit PA efficacy to target intracellular PPIs. To address these problems, we have constructed a PA platform consisting of cathepsin-B cleavable PAs in which a selective p53-based inhibitory peptide is cleaved from its lipid tail within endosomes, allowing for intracellular peptide accumulation and extracellular recycling of the lipid moiety. We monitor for cleavage and follow individual PA components in real time using a Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based tracking system. Using this platform, we provide a better understanding and quantification of cellular internalization, trafficking, and endosomal cleavage of PAs and of the ultimate fates of each component.

  6. Purification and use of E. coli peptide deformylase for peptide deprotection in chemoenzymatic peptide synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Toma, Claudia; Sonke, Theo; Quaedflieg, Peter J.; Janssen, Dick B.

    Peptide deformylases (PDFs) catalyze the removal of the formyl group from the N-terminal methionine residue in nascent polypeptide chains in prokaryotes. Its deformylation activity makes PDF an attractive candidate for the biocatalytic deprotection of formylated peptides that are used in

  7. Cathepsin-Mediated Cleavage of Peptides from Peptide Amphiphiles Leads to Enhanced Intracellular Peptide Accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acar, Handan [Institute; Department; Samaeekia, Ravand [Institute; Department; Schnorenberg, Mathew R. [Institute; Department; Medical; Sasmal, Dibyendu K. [Institute; Huang, Jun [Institute; Tirrell, Matthew V. [Institute; Institute; LaBelle, James L. [Department

    2017-08-24

    Peptides synthesized in the likeness of their native interaction domain(s) are natural choices to target protein protein interactions (PPIs) due to their fidelity of orthostatic contact points between binding partners. Despite therapeutic promise, intracellular delivery of biofunctional peptides at concentrations necessary for efficacy remains a formidable challenge. Peptide amphiphiles (PAs) provide a facile method of intracellular delivery and stabilization of bioactive peptides. PAs consisting of biofunctional peptide headgroups linked to hydrophobic alkyl lipid-like tails prevent peptide hydrolysis and proteolysis in circulation, and PA monomers are internalized via endocytosis. However, endocytotic sequestration and steric hindrance from the lipid tail are two major mechanisms that limit PA efficacy to target intracellular PPIs. To address these problems, we have constructed a PA platform consisting of cathepsin-B cleavable PAs in which a selective p53-based inhibitory peptide is cleaved from its lipid tail within endosomes, allowing for intracellular peptide accumulation and extracellular recycling of the lipid moiety. We monitor for cleavage and follow individual PA components in real time using a resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based tracking system. Using this platform, components in real time using a Forster we provide a better understanding and quantification of cellular internalization, trafficking, and endosomal cleavage of PAs and of the ultimate fates of each component.

  8. Radiopharmaceutical development of radiolabelled peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fani, Melpomeni; Maecke, Helmut R. [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Receptor targeting with radiolabelled peptides has become very important in nuclear medicine and oncology in the past few years. The overexpression of many peptide receptors in numerous cancers, compared to their relatively low density in physiological organs, represents the molecular basis for in vivo imaging and targeted radionuclide therapy with radiolabelled peptide-based probes. The prototypes are analogs of somatostatin which are routinely used in the clinic. More recent developments include somatostatin analogs with a broader receptor subtype profile or with antagonistic properties. Many other peptide families such as bombesin, cholecystokinin/gastrin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)/exendin, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) etc. have been explored during the last few years and quite a number of potential radiolabelled probes have been derived from them. On the other hand, a variety of strategies and optimized protocols for efficient labelling of peptides with clinically relevant radionuclides such as {sup 99m}Tc, M{sup 3+} radiometals ({sup 111}In, {sup 86/90}Y, {sup 177}Lu, {sup 67/68}Ga), {sup 64/67}Cu, {sup 18}F or radioisotopes of iodine have been developed. The labelling approaches include direct labelling, the use of bifunctional chelators or prosthetic groups. The choice of the labelling approach is driven by the nature and the chemical properties of the radionuclide. Additionally, chemical strategies, including modification of the amino acid sequence and introduction of linkers/spacers with different characteristics, have been explored for the improvement of the overall performance of the radiopeptides, e.g. metabolic stability and pharmacokinetics. Herein, we discuss the development of peptides as radiopharmaceuticals starting from the choice of the labelling method and the conditions to the design and optimization of the peptide probe, as well as some recent developments, focusing on a selected list of peptide families, including somatostatin

  9. Tryptathionine bridges in peptide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Jonathan P; Perrin, David M

    2007-01-01

    The tryptathionine linkage is a crosslink formed between tryptophan and cysteine. This feature is characteristic of the bicyclic peptides: the phallotoxins and the amatoxins. These peptides both bind to protein folds of their respective targets (F-actin and RNA pol II, respectively) with extremely high affinities. Studies on these peptides have shown that the tryptathionine crosslink is essential for this binding affinity. Tryptathionines have been investigated for many years and several syntheses exist for their formation. In this review, we report on the various methodologies employed in tryptathionine synthesis, and discuss some of the advantages and disadvantages associated with each of them. Copyright (c) 2007 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Next generation natriuretic peptide measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hunter, Ingrid; Goetze, Jens P

    2012-01-01

    Plasma measurement of natriuretic peptides is a "must" for clinical laboratories. For the next generation measurement, the unraveling of the molecular complexity of the peptides points toward a more qualitative assessment, as the posttranslational processing also changes with disease. Changes...... in the molecular heterogeneity could in itself contain valuable information of clinical status, and the time seems right for industry and dedicated researchers in the field to get together and discuss the next generation natriuretic peptide measurement. In such an environment, new strategies can be developed...

  11. Targeting the Eph System with Peptides and Peptide Conjugates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedl, Stefan J; Pasquale, Elena B

    2015-01-01

    Eph receptor tyrosine kinases and ephrin ligands constitute an important cell communication system that controls development, tissue homeostasis and many pathological processes. Various Eph receptors/ephrins are present in essentially all cell types and their expression is often dysregulated by injury and disease. Thus, the 14 Eph receptors are attracting increasing attention as a major class of potential drug targets. In particular, agents that bind to the extracellular ephrin-binding pocket of these receptors show promise for medical applications. This pocket comprises a broad and shallow groove surrounded by several flexible loops, which makes peptides particularly suitable to target it with high affinity and selectivity. Accordingly, a number of peptides that bind to Eph receptors with micromolar affinity have been identified using phage display and other approaches. These peptides are generally antagonists that inhibit ephrin binding and Eph receptor/ ephrin signaling, but some are agonists mimicking ephrin-induced Eph receptor activation. Importantly, some of the peptides are exquisitely selective for single Eph receptors. Most identified peptides are linear, but recently the considerable advantages of cyclic scaffolds have been recognized, particularly in light of potential optimization towards drug leads. To date, peptide improvements have yielded derivatives with low nanomolar Eph receptor binding affinity, high resistance to plasma proteases and/or long in vivo half-life, exemplifying the merits of peptides for Eph receptor targeting. Besides their modulation of Eph receptor/ephrin function, peptides can also serve to deliver conjugated imaging and therapeutic agents or various types of nanoparticles to tumors and other diseased tissues presenting target Eph receptors.

  12. Novel peptides with tyrosinase inhibitory activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schurink, M.; Berkel, van W.J.H.; Wichers, H.J.; Boeriu, C.G.

    2007-01-01

    Tyrosinase inhibition by peptides may find its application in food, cosmetics or medicine. In order to identify novel tyrosinase inhibitory peptides, protein-based peptide libraries made by SPOT synthesis were used to screen for peptides that show direct interaction with tyrosinase. One of the

  13. Fmoc Solid-Phase Peptide Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Paul R; Oddo, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic peptides are important as drugs and in research. Currently, the method of choice for producing these compounds is solid-phase peptide synthesis. In this nonspecialist review, we describe the scope and limitations of Fmoc solid-phase peptide synthesis. Furthermore, we provide a detailed protocol for Fmoc peptide synthesis.

  14. The Pig PeptideAtlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselager, Marianne O.; Codrea, Marius C.; Sun, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    underrepresented in existing repositories. We here present a significantly improved build of the Pig PeptideAtlas, which includes pig proteome data from 25 tissues and three body fluid types mapped to 7139 canonical proteins. The content of the Pig PeptideAtlas reflects actively ongoing research within...... the veterinary proteomics domain, and this article demonstrates how the expression of isoform-unique peptides can be observed across distinct tissues and body fluids. The Pig PeptideAtlas is a unique resource for use in animal proteome research, particularly biomarker discovery and for preliminary design of SRM...... assays, which are equally important for progress in research that supports farm animal production and veterinary health, as for developing pig models with relevance to human health research....

  15. Structural Characterization of Peptide Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chailyan, Anna; Marcatili, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    can be modified to obtain desired properties or conformation, tagged for purification, isotopically labeled for protein quantitation or conjugated to immunogens for antibody production. The antibodies that bind to these peptides represent an invaluable tool for biological research and discovery...

  16. Therapeutical Potential of Venom Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İlker Kelle

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The term of pharmazooticals is known as a few amount of drugs derived from natural sources such as plants, venomous species of snakes, spiders, scorpions, frogs, lizards and cone snails. Peptide components of venoms are directed against wide variety of pharmacological targets such as ion channels and receptors. At the beginning, a number of these peptides have been used in experimental studies for defining the physiological, biochemical and immunological activities of organisms like mammalians. In recent studies, it has been shown that venom peptides can be valuable in treatment of acute and chronic pain, autoimmune and cardiovascular diseases, neurological disorders and chronic inflammatory and tumoral processes. Therefore particularly in clinical approaches, these peptide molecules or their synthetic analogues are considered as alternative agents that can be used instead of classical drugs for many clinical disorders due to their potent activity besides very few side effects.

  17. Hemolytic Activity of Antimicrobial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oddo, Alberto; Hansen, Paul R

    2017-01-01

    For antimicrobial peptides to be interesting for systemic applications, they must show low toxicity against erythrocytes. In this chapter, we describe a protocol for measuring the ability of AMPs to lyse human red blood cells, using melittin as positive control.

  18. Moonlighting peptides with emerging function.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan G Rodríguez Plaza

    Full Text Available Hunter-killer peptides combine two activities in a single polypeptide that work in an independent fashion like many other multi-functional, multi-domain proteins. We hypothesize that emergent functions may result from the combination of two or more activities in a single protein domain and that could be a mechanism selected in nature to form moonlighting proteins. We designed moonlighting peptides using the two mechanisms proposed to be involved in the evolution of such molecules (i.e., to mutate non-functional residues and the use of natively unfolded peptides. We observed that our moonlighting peptides exhibited two activities that together rendered a new function that induces cell death in yeast. Thus, we propose that moonlighting in proteins promotes emergent properties providing a further level of complexity in living organisms so far unappreciated.

  19. Transcriptomic analysis of a tertiary relict plant, extreme xerophyte Reaumuria soongorica to identify genes related to drought adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yong; Yan, Xia; Zhao, Pengshan; Yin, Hengxia; Zhao, Xin; Xiao, Honglang; Li, Xinrong; Chen, Guoxiong; Ma, Xiao-Fei

    2013-01-01

    Reaumuria soongorica is an extreme xerophyte shrub widely distributed in the desert regions including sand dune, Gobi and marginal loess of central Asia which plays a crucial role to sustain and restore fragile desert ecosystems. However, due to the lacking of the genomic sequences, studies on R. soongorica had mainly limited in physiological responses to drought stress. Here, a deep transcriptomic sequencing of R. soongorica will facilitate molecular functional studies and pave the path to understand drought adaptation for a desert plant. A total of 53,193,660 clean paired-end reads was generated from the Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 platform. By assembly with Trinity, we got 173,700 contigs and 77,647 unigenes with mean length of 677 bp and N50 of 1109 bp. Over 55% (43,054) unigenes were successfully annotated based on sequence similarity against public databases as well as Rfam and Pfam database. Local BLAST and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) maps were used to further exhausting seek for candidate genes related to drought adaptation and a set of 123 putative candidate genes were identified. Moreover, all the C4 photosynthesis genes existed and were active in R. soongorica, which has been regarded as a typical C3 plant. The assembled unigenes in present work provide abundant genomic information for the functional assignments in an extreme xerophyte R. soongorica, and will help us exploit the genetic basis of how desert plants adapt to drought environment in the near future.

  20. The stimulatory effect of LED light spectra on genes related to photoreceptors and skin pigmentation in goldfish (Carassius auratus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyun Suk; Choi, Cheol Young

    2014-08-01

    This study aimed to assess differences in genes related to skin color of goldfish (Carassius auratus) exposed to light-emitting diodes (LEDs): red, green, and purple. We investigated differences in the expression of mammalian-like melanopsin (Opn4m), rhodopsin (RH), melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH), melanin-concentrating hormone receptor (MCH-R), and proopiomelanocortin (POMC) in goldfish exposed to different LED light spectra. Opn4m, RH, MCH, and MCH-R mRNA levels were significantly higher in the green and purple LED groups than in the white fluorescent bulb (control) and red LED groups. Furthermore, skin cells were isolated to measure the MCH-R mRNA expression levels. The results show that the mRNA expression levels were significantly higher in the green and purple LED groups than in the control and red LED groups. In addition, body weights in the green and purple LED groups were significantly higher than those in the control and red LED groups. However, POMC mRNA expression levels in the green and purple LED groups were significantly lower than those in the control and red LED groups. These results suggest that specific wavelengths regulate fish skin color through neuropeptide hormones and photoreceptors, and POMC, which is related to stress hormones and melatonin, is associated with stress levels as well as skin color.

  1. Novel Genes Related to Ceftriaxone Resistance Found among Ceftriaxone-Resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae Strains Selected In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Zijian; Liu, Min; Hua, Zhengshuang; Sun, Yayin; Xu, Qingfang; Xia, Yue; Zhao, Yue; Xie, Xiaoyuan

    2016-01-01

    The emergence of ceftriaxone-resistant Neisseria gonorrhoeae is currently a global public health concern. However, the mechanism of ceftriaxone resistance is not yet fully understood. To investigate the potential genes related to ceftriaxone resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, we subcultured six gonococcal strains with increasing concentrations of ceftriaxone and isolated the strains that became resistant. After analyzing several frequently reported genes involved in ceftriaxone resistance, we found only a single mutation in penA (A501V). However, differential analysis of the genomes and transcriptomes between pre- and postselection strains revealed many other mutated genes as well as up- and downregulated genes. Transformation of the mutated penA gene into nonresistant strains increased the MIC between 2.0- and 5.3-fold, and transformation of mutated ftsX increased the MIC between 3.3- and 13.3-fold. Genes encoding the ABC transporters FarB, Tfq, Hfq, and ExbB were overexpressed, while pilM, pilN, and pilQ were downregulated. Furthermore, the resistant strain developed cross-resistance to penicillin and cefuroxime, had an increased biochemical metabolic rate, and presented fitness defects such as prolonged growth time and downregulated PilMNQ. In conclusion, antimicrobial pressure could result in the emergence of ceftriaxone resistance, and the evolution of resistance of Neisseria gonorrhoeae to ceftriaxone is a complicated process at both the pretranscriptional and posttranscriptional levels, involving several resistance mechanisms of increased efflux and decreased entry. PMID:26787702

  2. ThePorphyromonas gingivalis/Host Interactome Shows Enrichment in GWASdb Genes Related to Alzheimer's Disease, Diabetes and Cardiovascular Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Chris J; France, James; Crean, StJohn; Singhrao, Sim K

    2017-01-01

    Periodontal disease is of established etiology in which polymicrobial synergistic ecology has become dysbiotic under the influence of Porphyromonas gingivalis . Following breakdown of the host's protective oral tissue barriers, P. gingivalis migrates to developing inflammatory pathologies that associate with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Periodontal disease is a risk factor for cardiovascular disorders (CVD), type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM), AD and other chronic diseases, whilst T2DM exacerbates periodontitis. This study analyzed the relationship between the P. gingivalis /host interactome and the genes identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) for the aforementioned conditions using data from GWASdb ( P periodontitis or P. gingivalis microarray was compared to microarray datasets from the AD hippocampus and/or from carotid artery plaques. The results demonstrated that the host genes of the P. gingivalis interactome were significantly enriched in genes deposited in GWASdb genes related to cognitive disorders, AD and dementia, and its co-morbid conditions T2DM, obesity, and CVD. The P. gingivalis /host interactome was also enriched in GWAS genes from the more stringent NCBI-EBI database for AD, atherosclerosis and T2DM. The misregulated genes in periodontitis tissue or P. gingivalis infected macrophages also matched those in the AD hippocampus or atherosclerotic plaques. Together, these data suggest important gene/environment interactions between P. gingivalis and susceptibility genes or gene expression changes in conditions where periodontal disease is a contributory factor.

  3. Genome Analysis of a Zygomycete Fungus Choanephora cucurbitarum Elucidates Necrotrophic Features Including Bacterial Genes Related to Plant Colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Byoungnam; Park, Ji-Hyun; Park, Hongjae; Shin, Hyeon-Dong; Choi, In-Geol

    2017-01-16

    A zygomycete fungus, Choanephora cucurbitarum is a plant pathogen that causes blossom rot in cucurbits and other plants. Here we report the genome sequence of Choanephora cucurbitarum KUS-F28377 isolated from squash. The assembled genome has a size of 29.1 Mbp and 11,977 protein-coding genes. The genome analysis indicated that C. cucurbitarum may employ a plant pathogenic mechanism similar to that of bacterial plant pathogens. The genome contained 11 genes with a Streptomyces subtilisin inhibitor-like domain, which plays an important role in the defense against plant immunity. This domain has been found only in bacterial genomes. Carbohydrate active enzyme analysis detected 312 CAZymes in this genome where carbohydrate esterase family 6, rarely found in dikaryotic fungal genomes, was comparatively enriched. The comparative genome analysis showed that the genes related to sexual communication such as the biosynthesis of β-carotene and trisporic acid were conserved and diverged during the evolution of zygomycete genomes. Overall, these findings will help us to understand how zygomycetes are associated with plants.

  4. Discovery of genes related to witches broom disease in Paulownia tomentosa × Paulownia fortunei by a De Novo assembled transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rongning; Dong, Yanpeng; Fan, Guoqiang; Zhao, Zhenli; Deng, Minjie; Cao, Xibing; Niu, Suyan

    2013-01-01

    In spite of its economic importance, very little molecular genetics and genomic research has been targeted at the family Paulownia spp. The little genetic information on this plant is a big obstacle to studying the mechanisms of its ability to resist Paulownia Witches' Broom (PaWB) disease. Analysis of the Paulownia transcriptome and its expression profile data are essential to extending the genetic resources on this species, thus will greatly improves our studies on Paulownia. In the current study, we performed the de novo assembly of a transcriptome on P. tomentosa × P. fortunei using the short-read sequencing technology (Illumina). 203,664 unigenes with a mean length of 1,328 bp was obtained. Of these unigenes, 32,976 (30% of all unigenes) containing complete structures were chosen. Eukaryotic clusters of orthologous groups, gene orthology, and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes annotations were performed of these unigenes. Genes related to PaWB disease resistance were analyzed in detail. To our knowledge, this is the first study to elucidate the genetic makeup of Paulownia. This transcriptome provides a quick way to understanding Paulownia, increases the number of gene sequences available for further functional genomics studies and provides clues to the identification of potential PaWB disease resistance genes. This study has provided a comprehensive insight into gene expression profiles at different states, which facilitates the study of each gene's roles in the developmental process and in PaWB disease resistance.

  5. Discovery of genes related to witches broom disease in Paulownia tomentosa × Paulownia fortunei by a De Novo assembled transcriptome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongning Liu

    Full Text Available In spite of its economic importance, very little molecular genetics and genomic research has been targeted at the family Paulownia spp. The little genetic information on this plant is a big obstacle to studying the mechanisms of its ability to resist Paulownia Witches' Broom (PaWB disease. Analysis of the Paulownia transcriptome and its expression profile data are essential to extending the genetic resources on this species, thus will greatly improves our studies on Paulownia. In the current study, we performed the de novo assembly of a transcriptome on P. tomentosa × P. fortunei using the short-read sequencing technology (Illumina. 203,664 unigenes with a mean length of 1,328 bp was obtained. Of these unigenes, 32,976 (30% of all unigenes containing complete structures were chosen. Eukaryotic clusters of orthologous groups, gene orthology, and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes annotations were performed of these unigenes. Genes related to PaWB disease resistance were analyzed in detail. To our knowledge, this is the first study to elucidate the genetic makeup of Paulownia. This transcriptome provides a quick way to understanding Paulownia, increases the number of gene sequences available for further functional genomics studies and provides clues to the identification of potential PaWB disease resistance genes. This study has provided a comprehensive insight into gene expression profiles at different states, which facilitates the study of each gene's roles in the developmental process and in PaWB disease resistance.

  6. Dynamic changes in genes related to glucose uptake and utilization during pig skeletal and cardiac muscle development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yanqin; Jin, Long; Wang, Fengjiao; He, Mengnan; Liu, Rui; Li, Mingzhou; Shuai, Surong

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal and cardiac muscle have important roles in glucose uptake and utilization. However, changes in expression of protein coding genes and miRNAs that participate in glucose metabolism during development are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the expression of genes related to glucose metabolism during muscle development. We found an age-dependent increase in gene expression in cardiac muscle, with enrichment in heart development- and energy-related metabolic processes. A subset of genes that were up-regulated until 30 or 180 days postnatally, and then down-regulated in psoas major muscle was significantly enriched in mitochondrial oxidative-related processes, while genes that up-regulated in longissimus doris muscle was significantly enriched in glycolysis-related processes. Meanwhile, expression of energy-related microRNAs decreased with increasing age. In addition, we investigated the correlation between microRNAs and mRNAs in three muscle types across different stages of development and found many potential microRNA-mRNA pairs involved in regulating glucose metabolism.

  7. Biomedical Applications of Organometal-Peptide Conjugates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzler-Nolte, Nils

    Peptides are well suited as targeting vectors for the directed delivery of metal-based drugs or probes for biomedical investigations. This chapter describes synthetic strategies for the preparation of conjugates of medically interesting peptides with covalently bound metal complexes. Peptides that were used include neuropeptides (enkephalin, neuropeptide Y, neurotensin), uptake peptides (TAT and poly-Arg), and intracellular localization sequences. To these peptides, a whole variety of transition metal complexes has been attached in recent years by solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) techniques. The metal complex can be attached to the peptide on the resin as part of the SPPS scheme. Alternatively, the metal complex may be attached to the peptide as a postsynthetic modification. Advantages as well as disadvantages for either strategy are discussed. Biomedical applications include radiopharmaceutical applications, anticancer and antibacterial activity, metal-peptide conjugates as targeted CO-releasing molecules, and metal-peptide conjugates in biosensor applications.

  8. Production and characterization of peptide antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig; Hansen, P. R.; Houen, G.

    2012-01-01

    Proteins are effective immunogens for generation of antibodies. However, occasionally the native protein is known but not available for antibody production. In such cases synthetic peptides derived from the native protein are good alternatives for antibody production. These peptide antibodies...... are powerful tools in experimental biology and are easily produced to any peptide of choice. A widely used approach for production of peptide antibodies is to immunize animals with a synthetic peptide coupled to a carrier protein. Very important is the selection of the synthetic peptide, where factors......, including solid-phase peptide-carrier conjugation and peptide-carrier conjugation in solution. Upon immunization, adjuvants such as Al(OH)(3) are added together with the immunogenic peptide-carrier conjugate, which usually leads to high-titred antisera. Following immunization and peptide antibody...

  9. The greening of peptide synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Lawrenson, Stefan B.; Arav, Roy; North, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The synthesis of peptides by amide bond formation between suitably protected amino acids is a fundamental part of the drug discovery process. However, the required coupling and deprotection reactions are routinely carried out in dichloromethane and DMF, both of which have serious toxicity concerns and generate waste solvent which constitutes the vast majority of the waste generated during peptide synthesis. In this work, propylene carbonate has been shown to be a green polar aprotic solvent w...

  10. Material Binding Peptides for Nanotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urartu Ozgur Safak Seker

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Remarkable progress has been made to date in the discovery of material binding peptides and their utilization in nanotechnology, which has brought new challenges and opportunities. Nowadays phage display is a versatile tool, important for the selection of ligands for proteins and peptides. This combinatorial approach has also been adapted over the past decade to select material-specific peptides. Screening and selection of such phage displayed material binding peptides has attracted great interest, in particular because of their use in nanotechnology. Phage display selected peptides are either synthesized independently or expressed on phage coat protein. Selected phage particles are subsequently utilized in the synthesis of nanoparticles, in the assembly of nanostructures on inorganic surfaces, and oriented protein immobilization as fusion partners of proteins. In this paper, we present an overview on the research conducted on this area. In this review we not only focus on the selection process, but also on molecular binding characterization and utilization of peptides as molecular linkers, molecular assemblers and material synthesizers.

  11. Matrix-assisted peptide synthesis on nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandadash, Raz; Machtey, Victoria; Weiss, Aryeh; Byk, Gerardo

    2014-09-01

    We report a new method for multistep peptide synthesis on polymeric nanoparticles of differing sizes. Polymeric nanoparticles were functionalized via their temporary embedment into a magnetic inorganic matrix that allows multistep peptide synthesis. The matrix is removed at the end of the process for obtaining nanoparticles functionalized with peptides. The matrix-assisted synthesis on nanoparticles was proved by generating various biologically relevant peptides. Copyright © 2014 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. A novel dual amylin and calcitonin receptor agonist, KBP-089, induces weight loss through a reduction in fat, but not lean mass, while improving food preference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gydesen, Sofie; Hjuler, Sara Toftegaard; Freving, Zenia; Andreassen, Kim Vietz; Sonne, Nina; Hellgren, Lars I; Karsdal, Morten Asser; Henriksen, Kim

    2017-04-01

    Obesity and associated co-morbidities, such as type 2 diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, are major health challenges. Hence, there is an important need to develop weight loss therapies with the ability to reduce the co-morbidities. The effect of the dual amylin and calcitonin receptor agonist (DACRA), KBP-089, on body weight, glucose homeostasis and fatty acid accumulation in liver and muscle tissue and on food preference was investigated. Furthermore, we elucidated weight-independent effects of KBP-089 using a weight-matched group. Rats fed a high-fat diet were treated, s.c., with KBP-089 0.625, 1.25, 2.5 μg·kg-1 or vehicle. KB-089 induced in a dose-dependent and sustained weight loss (~17% by 2.5 μg·kg-1 ). Moreover, KBP-089 reduced fat depot size and reduced lipid accumulation in muscle and liver. In Zucker Diabetic Fatty rats, KBP-089 improved glucose homeostasis through improved insulin action. To obtain a weight-matched group, significantly less food was offered (9% less than in the KBP-089 group). Weight matching led to improved glucose homeostasis by reducing plasma insulin; however, these effect were inferior compared to those of KBP-089. In the food preference test, rats fed a normal diet obtained 74% of their calories from chocolate. KBP-089 reduced total caloric intake and induced a relative increase in chow consumption while drastically reducing chocolate consumption compared with vehicle. The novel DACRA, KBP-089, induces a sustained weight loss, leading to improved metabolic parameters including food preference, and these are beyond those observed simply by diet-induced weight loss. © 2017 The British Pharmacological Society.

  13. Function of the cytoplasmic tail of human calcitonin receptor-like receptor in complex with receptor activity-modifying protein 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwasako, Kenji, E-mail: kuwasako@fc.miyazaki-u.ac.jp [Frontier Science Research Center, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan); Kitamura, Kazuo; Nagata, Sayaka; Hikosaka, Tomomi [Division of Circulation and Body Fluid Regulation, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan); Kato, Johji [Frontier Science Research Center, University of Miyazaki, 5200 Kihara, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan)

    2010-02-12

    Receptor activity-modifying protein 2 (RAMP2) enables calcitonin receptor-like receptor (CRLR) to form an adrenomedullin (AM)-specific receptor. Here we investigated the function of the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail (C-tail) of human (h)CRLR by co-transfecting its C-terminal mutants into HEK-293 cells stably expressing hRAMP2. Deleting the C-tail from CRLR disrupted AM-evoked cAMP production or receptor internalization, but did not affect [{sup 125}I]AM binding. We found that CRLR residues 428-439 are required for AM-evoked cAMP production, though deleting this region had little effect on receptor internalization. Moreover, pretreatment with pertussis toxin (100 ng/mL) led to significant increases in AM-induced cAMP production via wild-type CRLR/RAMP2 complexes. This effect was canceled by deleting CRLR residues 454-457, suggesting Gi couples to this region. Flow cytometric analysis revealed that CRLR truncation mutants lacking residues in the Ser/Thr-rich region extending from Ser{sup 449} to Ser{sup 467} were unable to undergo AM-induced receptor internalization and, in contrast to the effect on wild-type CRLR, overexpression of GPCR kinases-2, -3 and -4 failed to promote internalization of CRLR mutants lacking residues 449-467. Thus, the hCRLR C-tail is crucial for AM-evoked cAMP production and internalization of the CRLR/RAMP2, while the receptor internalization is dependent on the aforementioned GPCR kinases, but not Gs coupling.

  14. Oral salmon calcitonin protects against impaired fasting glycemia, glucose intolerance, and obesity induced by high-fat diet and ovariectomy in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigh, Michael; Andreassen, Kim V; Hjuler, Sara T; Nielsen, Rasmus H; Christiansen, Claus; Henriksen, Kim; Karsdal, Morten A

    2013-07-01

    Oral salmon calcitonin (sCT) has demonstrated clinical efficacy in treating osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. The postmenopausal state is also associated with obesity-related insulin resistance (IR) and type 2 diabetes. The aim of this study was to investigate the preventive effects of oral sCT on energy and glucose homeostasis in high-fat diet (HFD)- and ovariectomy (OVX)-induced obese rats. Furthermore, the weight-regulatory and gluco-regulatory effects of short-term oral sCT intervention on HFD-induced obese rats were explored. For prevention, female rats exposed to HFD with or without OVX were treated with oral sCT for 5 weeks. As intervention, HFD-induced obese male rats were treated with oral sCT for 4 days. Body weight, food intake, and plasma glucose, insulin, and leptin levels were measured, and the clinical homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index was calculated. In addition, oral glucose tolerance was evaluated in the systemic and portal circulations. For prevention, oral sCT reduced body weight by ∼16% to 19% (P fasting glycemia (P obesity. Furthermore, oral sCT significantly reduced the incremental area under the curve for plasma glucose and insulin by ∼40% and ∼70%, respectively, during glucose tolerance testing. As intervention in HFD-induced obese rats, oral sCT reduced body weight, fasting glycemia, and insulinemia in conjunction with HOMA-IR (P obese rats, indicating the clinical usefulness of oral sCT in postmenopausal obesity-related IR and type 2 diabetes.

  15. Cervical lymph node metastases from thyroid cancer: does thyroglobulin and calcitonin measurement in fine needle aspirates improve the diagnostic value of cytology?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baldini Enke

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Measurement of thyroglobulin (Tg protein in the washout of the needle used for fine needle aspiration biopsy cytology (FNAB-C has been shown to increase the sensitivity of FNAB-C in identifying cervical lymph node (CLN metastasis from well-differentiated thyroid cancer (TC. In this study, we evaluated whether routine measurement of Tg protein (FNAB-Tgp, Tg mRNA (FNAB-Tgm and calcitonin (CT mRNA (FNAB-CTm in the FNAB washout of CLN increases the accuracy of FNAB-C in the diagnosis of suspicious metastatic CLN. Methods In this prospective study 35 CLN from 28 patients were examined. Histology showed metastatic papillary TC (PTC in 26 CLN, metastatic medullary TC (MTC in 3 CLN, metastatic anaplastic TC (ATC in 3 CLN and 3 metastatic CLN from extra-thyroidal cancers. Results The overall accuracy of FNAB-C was 84.4%, reaching 95.7% when the analysis was restricted to PTC. Both FNAB-Tgp and FNAB-Tgm compared favorably with FNAB-C and shown diagnostic performances not statistically different from that of FNAB-C. However, FNAB-Tgp and FNAB-Tgm/FNAB-CTm were found useful in cases in which cytology results were inadequate or provided diagnosis inconsistent with patient's clinical parameters. Conclusions We demonstrated that FNAB-C, Tg/CT mRNA and Tg protein determination in the fine-needle washout showed similar accuracy in the diagnosis of metastatic CLN from TC. The results of this study suggest that samples for Tg protein and Tg/CT mRNA measurements from CLN suspicious for metastatic TC should be collected, but their measurements should be restricted to cases in which FNAB-C provides uninformative or inconsistent diagnosis with respect to patient's clinical parameters.

  16. Design of salmon calcitonin particles for nasal delivery using spray-drying and novel supercritical fluid-assisted spray-drying processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Wonkyung; Kim, Min-Soo; Jung, Min-Sook; Park, Junsung; Cha, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Park, Hee Jun; Alhalaweh, Amjad; Velaga, Sitaram P; Hwang, Sung-Joo

    2015-01-15

    The overall aim of this study was to prepare a nasal powder formulation of salmon calcitonin (sCT) using an absorption enhancer to improve its bioavailability. In this work, powder formulations for nasal delivery of sCT were studied using various absorption enhancers and stabilizers. Powders were prepared by two different methods: conventional spray-drying (SD) and novel supercritical fluid-assisted spray-drying (SASD) to investigate the role of CO2 in the particle formation process. The prepared sCT powder formulations were characterized by several analyses; powder X-ray diffractometry (PXRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and the Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy method. The particle size distribution was also evaluated. In vivo absorption tests were carried out in Sprague-Dawley rat using the prepared powder formulations, and the results were compared to those of raw sCT. Quantitative analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) indicated that sCT was chemically stable after both the SD and SASD processes. Results of PXRD, SEM, and FT-IR did not indicate a strong interaction or defragmentation of sCT. The in vivo absorption test showed that SD- and SASD-processed sCT powders increased the bioavailability of the drug when compared to the nasal administration of raw sCT. In addition, SASD-processed sCT exhibited higher nasal absorption when compared with SD-processed sCT in all formulations due to a reduction of particle size. The results from this study illustrate that the preparation of nasal powders using the SASD process could be a promising approach to improve nasal absorption of sCT. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Diffusion of calcitonin through the wall of the root canal Avaliação da difusão da calcitonina através da dentina radicular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Cristina Cury Camargo

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the in vitro diffusion of synthetic salmon calcitonin (CT, used as an intracanal medication, to the external root surface, with or without the presence of intact root cementum. Fifty-four human central incisors were used in the experiment, and were divided into two groups of 21 (test groups and two groups of 6 teeth (control groups. After root canal preparation, 10 ml of calcitonin was inserted within the root canal chamber. The root was sealed and made externally impermeable. Specimens were then placed in tubes with saline solution buffered with phosphates and stored at 37°C. The diffusion of calcitonin was measured after 1, 4 and 7 days. To count calcitonin present at the external media (PBS, ELISA test (an antigen-antibody reaction was used. Results showed that there was calcitonin diffusion through dentin in all of the test samples. The absence of cementum increased the diffusion of calcitonin (p=0.05. The highest counts of CT were obtained on day 7 for groups with or without cementum - showing a direct relation between time and diffusion of the medication.O presente estudo determinou in vitro a difusão da calcitonina sintética de salmão, como medicação intracanal, até a superfície externa radicular, com e sem a presença de cemento radicular. Foram utilizados cinqüenta e quatro incisivos centrais humanos, divididos em dois grupos com 21 dentes cada e dois grupos com 6 dentes cada (controle negativo. Após o preparo endodôntico, os dentes receberam 10 ml de calcitonina como medicação intracanal. Feitos o selamento e a impermeabilização externa da raiz, os espécimes foram acondicionados em tubos com solução salina tamponada com fosfatos e incubados em estufa a 37°C. Foram colhidas amostras da solução salina nos períodos de 1, 4 e 7 dias. Para a análise das soluções teste, utilizou-se teste ELISA. Os resultados mostram que existe a difusão da medicação testada até a superf

  18. Characterization of the Opp Peptide Transporter of Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis and Its Role in Virulence and Pathogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pablo M. R. O. Moraes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the economic importance of caseous lymphadenitis (CLA, a chronic disease caused by Corynebacterium pseudotuberculosis, few genes related to the virulence of its etiologic agent have been characterized. The oligopeptide permease (Opp transporters are located in the plasma membrane and have functions generally related to the uptake of peptides from the extracellular environment. These peptide transporters, in addition to having an important role in cell nutrition, also participate in the regulation of various processes involving intercellular signaling, including the control of the expression of virulence genes in pathogenic bacteria. To study the role of Opp in C. pseudotuberculosis, an OppD deficient strain was constructed via simple crossover with a nonreplicative plasmid carrying part of the oppD gene sequence. As occurred to the wild-type, the ΔoppD strain showed impaired growth when exposed to the toxic glutathione peptide (GSH, indicating two possible scenarios: (i that this component can be internalized by the bacterium through an Opp-independent pathway or (ii that there is toxicity while the peptide is extracellular. Additionally, the ΔoppD mutant presented a reduced ability to adhere to and infect macrophages compared to the wild-type, although both strains exhibit the same potential to colonize spleens and cause injury and death to infected mice.

  19. Identification of peptide-cross-linked trisdisaccharide peptide trimers in murein of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    Gmeiner, J

    1980-01-01

    Purified murein from Escherichia coli K-12 was degraded into disaccharide peptide fragments by endo-N-acetylmuramidase from Chalaropsis. About 5% of the total murein fragments were recovered as peptide-cross-linked trisdisaccharide peptide trimers.

  20. Versatile Peptide C-Terminal Functionalization via a Computationally Engineered Peptide Amidase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wu, Bian; Wijma, Hein J.; Song, Lu; Rozeboom, Henriette J.; Poloni, Claudia; Tian, Yue; Arif, Muhammad I.; Nuijens, Timo; Quaedflieg, Peter J. L. M.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Feringa, Ben L.; Janssen, Dick B.

    The properties of synthetic peptides, including potency, stability, and bioavailability, are strongly influenced by modification of the peptide chain termini. Unfortunately, generally applicable methods for selective and mild C-terminal peptide functionalization are lacking. In this work, we

  1. A rapid and clean synthetic approach to cyclic peptides via micro-flow peptide chain elongation and photochemical cyclization: synthesis of a cyclic RGD peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifune, Yuto; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Fuse, Shinichiro

    2016-11-29

    A cyclic RGD peptide was efficiently synthesized based on micro-flow, triphosgene-mediated peptide chain elongation and micro-flow photochemical macrolactamization. Our approach enabled a rapid (amidation for peptide chain elongation peptide.

  2. Peptides and Food Intake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sobrino Crespo

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Nutrients created by the digestion of food are proposed to active G protein coupled receptors on the luminal side of enteroendocrine cells e.g. the L-cell. This stimulates the release of gut hormones. Hormones released from the gut and adipose tissue play an important rol in the regulation of food intake and energy expenditure (1.Many circulating signals, including gut hormones, can influence the activity of the arcuate nucleus (ARC neurons directly, after passing across the median eminence. The ARC is adjacent to the median eminence, a circumventricular organ with fenestrated capillaries and hence an incomplete blood-brain barrier (2. The ARC of the hypothalamus is believed to play a crucial role in the regulation of food intake and energy homeostasis. The ARC contains two populations of neurons with opposing effect on food intake (3. Medially located orexigenic neurons (i.e those stimulating appetite express neuropeptide Y (NPY and agouti-related protein (AgRP (4-5. Anorexigenic neurons (i.e. those inhibiting appetite in the lateral ARC express alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH derived from pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC and cocaine and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART (6. The balance between activities of these neuronal circuits is critical to body weight regulation.In contrast, other peripheral signals influence the hypothalamus indirectly via afferent neuronal pathway and brainstem circuits. In this context gastrointestinal’s vagal afferents are activated by mechanoreceptors and chemoreceptors, and converge in the nucleus of the tractus solitaries (NTS of the brainstem. Neuronal projections from the NTS, in turn, carry signals to the hypotalamus (1, 7. Gut hormones also alter the activity of the ascending vagal pathway from the gut to the brainstem. In the cases of ghrelin and Peptide tyrosine tyrosine (PYY, there are evidences for both to have a direct action on the arcuate nucleus and an action via the vagus nerve a

  3. Automated solid-phase peptide synthesis to obtain therapeutic peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronika Mäde

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The great versatility and the inherent high affinities of peptides for their respective targets have led to tremendous progress for therapeutic applications in the last years. In order to increase the drugability of these frequently unstable and rapidly cleared molecules, chemical modifications are of great interest. Automated solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS offers a suitable technology to produce chemically engineered peptides. This review concentrates on the application of SPPS by Fmoc/t-Bu protecting-group strategy, which is most commonly used. Critical issues and suggestions for the synthesis are covered. The development of automated methods from conventional to essentially improved microwave-assisted instruments is discussed. In order to improve pharmacokinetic properties of peptides, lipidation and PEGylation are described as covalent conjugation methods, which can be applied by a combination of automated and manual synthesis approaches. The synthesis and application of SPPS is described for neuropeptide Y receptor analogs as an example for bioactive hormones. The applied strategies represent innovative and potent methods for the development of novel peptide drug candidates that can be manufactured with optimized automated synthesis technologies.

  4. Effects of maternal smoking on the placental expression of genes related to angiogenesis and apoptosis during the first trimester.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Kawashima

    Full Text Available Maternal cigarette smoking is reportedly associated with miscarriage, fetal growth restriction and placental abruption, and is paradoxically associated with a decreased risk of developing preeclampsia. In the present study, we investigated the gene expression levels of villous tissues in early gestation. We compared the expression levels of the genes related to angiogenesis and apoptosis in the villous tissues obtained from smoking and non-smoking pregnant women.We collected villous tissue samples from 57 women requesting surgical termination due to non-medical reasons at 6-8 weeks of gestation. The maternal cigarette smoking status was evaluated by the level of serum cotinine and patients were divided into active smokers and non-smokers by the serum cotinine level. The placental levels of VEGFA, PGF, FLT1, HIF1A, TP53, BAX and BCL2 mRNA were quantified by real time PCR.The gene expression level of PGF and HIF1A in the active smoker group was significantly higher than that in the non-smoker group. We did not observe any significant differences in the VEGFA or FLT1 expression between the groups. In active smoker group, the gene expression levels of TP53 and BAX were significantly higher than those in the non-smoker group. The ratio of BAX/BCL2 mRNA in the active smoker group was significantly higher than that in the non-smoker group.Our findings revealed that smoking might affect the placenta during early pregnancy. Maternal cigarette smoking in early pregnancy may be associated with villus hypoxia, which may influence angiogenesis and apoptosis.

  5. Transcriptomic analysis of a tertiary relict plant, extreme xerophyte Reaumuria soongorica to identify genes related to drought adaptation.

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    Yong Shi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Reaumuria soongorica is an extreme xerophyte shrub widely distributed in the desert regions including sand dune, Gobi and marginal loess of central Asia which plays a crucial role to sustain and restore fragile desert ecosystems. However, due to the lacking of the genomic sequences, studies on R. soongorica had mainly limited in physiological responses to drought stress. Here, a deep transcriptomic sequencing of R. soongorica will facilitate molecular functional studies and pave the path to understand drought adaptation for a desert plant. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 53,193,660 clean paired-end reads was generated from the Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 platform. By assembly with Trinity, we got 173,700 contigs and 77,647 unigenes with mean length of 677 bp and N50 of 1109 bp. Over 55% (43,054 unigenes were successfully annotated based on sequence similarity against public databases as well as Rfam and Pfam database. Local BLAST and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG maps were used to further exhausting seek for candidate genes related to drought adaptation and a set of 123 putative candidate genes were identified. Moreover, all the C4 photosynthesis genes existed and were active in R. soongorica, which has been regarded as a typical C3 plant. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The assembled unigenes in present work provide abundant genomic information for the functional assignments in an extreme xerophyte R. soongorica, and will help us exploit the genetic basis of how desert plants adapt to drought environment in the near future.

  6. Regulation of genes related to cholesterol metabolism in rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed a plant-based diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Tengfei; Corraze, Geneviève; Plagnes-Juan, Elisabeth; Quillet, Edwige; Dupont-Nivet, Mathilde; Skiba-Cassy, Sandrine

    2018-01-01

    When compared with fish meal and fish oil, plant ingredients differ not only in their protein content and amino acid and fatty acid profiles but are also devoid of cholesterol, the major component of cell membrane and precursor of several bioactive compounds. Based on these nutritional characteristics, plant-based diets can affect fish physiology and cholesterol metabolism. To investigate the mechanisms underlying cholesterol homeostasis, rainbow trout were fed from 1 g body wt for 6 mo with a totally plant-based diet (V), a marine diet (M), and a marine-restricted diet (MR), with feed intake adjusted to that of the V group. The expression of genes involved in cholesterol synthesis, esterification, excretion, bile acid synthesis, and cholesterol efflux was measured in liver. Results showed that genes involved in cholesterol synthesis were upregulated in trout fed the V diet, whereas expression of genes related to bile acid synthesis ( cyp7a1) and cholesterol elimination ( abcg8) were reduced. Feeding trout the V diet also enhanced the expression of srebp-2 while reducing that of lxrα and miR-223. Overall, these data suggested that rainbow trout coped with the altered nutritional characteristics and absence of dietary cholesterol supply by increasing cholesterol synthesis and limiting cholesterol efflux through molecular mechanisms involving at least srebp-2, lxrα, and miR-223. However, plasma and body cholesterol levels in trout fed the V diet were lower than in fish fed the M diet, raising the question of the role of cholesterol in the negative effect of plant-based diet on growth.

  7. The Porphyromonas gingivalis/Host Interactome Shows Enrichment in GWASdb Genes Related to Alzheimer's Disease, Diabetes and Cardiovascular Diseases

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    Chris J. Carter

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Periodontal disease is of established etiology in which polymicrobial synergistic ecology has become dysbiotic under the influence of Porphyromonas gingivalis. Following breakdown of the host's protective oral tissue barriers, P. gingivalis migrates to developing inflammatory pathologies that associate with Alzheimer's disease (AD. Periodontal disease is a risk factor for cardiovascular disorders (CVD, type II diabetes mellitus (T2DM, AD and other chronic diseases, whilst T2DM exacerbates periodontitis. This study analyzed the relationship between the P. gingivalis/host interactome and the genes identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS for the aforementioned conditions using data from GWASdb (P < 1E-03 and, in some cases, from the NCBI/EBI GWAS database (P < 1E-05. Gene expression data from periodontitis or P. gingivalis microarray was compared to microarray datasets from the AD hippocampus and/or from carotid artery plaques. The results demonstrated that the host genes of the P. gingivalis interactome were significantly enriched in genes deposited in GWASdb genes related to cognitive disorders, AD and dementia, and its co-morbid conditions T2DM, obesity, and CVD. The P. gingivalis/host interactome was also enriched in GWAS genes from the more stringent NCBI-EBI database for AD, atherosclerosis and T2DM. The misregulated genes in periodontitis tissue or P. gingivalis infected macrophages also matched those in the AD hippocampus or atherosclerotic plaques. Together, these data suggest important gene/environment interactions between P. gingivalis and susceptibility genes or gene expression changes in conditions where periodontal disease is a contributory factor.

  8. Distinct genes related to drug response identified in ER positive and ER negative breast cancer cell lines.

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    Kui Shen

    Full Text Available Breast cancer patients have different responses to chemotherapeutic treatments. Genes associated with drug response can provide insight to understand the mechanisms of drug resistance, identify promising therapeutic opportunities, and facilitate personalized treatment. Estrogen receptor (ER positive and ER negative breast cancer have distinct clinical behavior and molecular properties. However, to date, few studies have rigorously assessed drug response genes in them. In this study, our goal was to systematically identify genes associated with multidrug response in ER positive and ER negative breast cancer cell lines. We tested 27 human breast cell lines for response to seven chemotherapeutic agents (cyclophosphamide, docetaxel, doxorubicin, epirubicin, fluorouracil, gemcitabine, and paclitaxel. We integrated publicly available gene expression profiles of these cell lines with their in vitro drug response patterns, then applied meta-analysis to identify genes related to multidrug response in ER positive and ER negative cells separately. One hundred eighty-eight genes were identified as related to multidrug response in ER positive and 32 genes in ER negative breast cell lines. Of these, only three genes (DBI, TOP2A, and PMVK were common to both cell types. TOP2A was positively associated with drug response, and DBI was negatively associated with drug response. Interestingly, PMVK was positively associated with drug response in ER positive cells and negatively in ER negative cells. Functional analysis showed that while cell cycle affects drug response in both ER positive and negative cells, most biological processes that are involved in drug response are distinct. A number of signaling pathways that are uniquely enriched in ER positive cells have complex cross talk with ER signaling, while in ER negative cells, enriched pathways are related to metabolic functions. Taken together, our analysis indicates that distinct mechanisms are involved in

  9. Identification of candidate polymorphisms on stress oxidative and DNA damage repair genes related with clinical outcome in breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Patricia; Furriol, Jessica; Bermejo, Begoña; Chaves, Felipe Javier; Lluch, Ana; Eroles, Pilar

    2012-12-05

    Diverse polymorphisms have been associated with the predisposition to develop cancer. On fewer occasions, they have been related to the evolution of the disease and to different responses to treatment. Previous studies of our group have associated polymorphisms on genes related to oxidative stress (rs3736729 on GCLC and rs207454 on XDH) and DNA damage repair (rs1052133 on OGG1) with a predisposition to develop breast cancer. In the present work, we have evaluated the hypothesis that these polymorphisms also play a role in a patient's survival. A population-based cohort study of 470 women diagnosed with primary breast cancer and a median follow up of 52.44 months was conducted to examine the disease-free and overall survival in rs3736729, rs207454 and rs1052133 genetic variants. Adjusted Cox regression analysis was used to that end. The Kaplan-Meier analysis shows that rs3736729 on GCLC presents a significant association with disease-free survival and overall survival. The polymorphisms rs1052133 on OGG1 and rs207454 on XDH show a trend of association with overall survival. The analysis based on hormonal receptor status revealed a stronger association. The CC genotype on rs207454 (XDH) was significantly associated with lower time of disease free survival (p = 0.024) in progesterone receptor negative (PGR-) patients and rs3736729 (GCLC) was significantly associated with disease free survival (p = 0.001) and overall survival (p = 0.012) in the subgroup of estrogen receptor negative (ER-) patients. This work suggests that unfavorable genetic variants in the rs207454 (XDH) and rs3736729 (GCLC) polymorphisms may act as predictors of the outcome in negative progesterone receptor and negative estrogen receptor breast cancer patients, respectively.

  10. Identification of Candidate Polymorphisms on Stress Oxidative and DNA Damage Repair Genes Related with Clinical Outcome in Breast Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Rodrigues

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Diverse polymorphisms have been associated with the predisposition to develop cancer. On fewer occasions, they have been related to the evolution of the disease and to different responses to treatment. Previous studies of our group have associated polymorphisms on genes related to oxidative stress (rs3736729 on GCLC and rs207454 on XDH and DNA damage repair (rs1052133 on OGG1 with a predisposition to develop breast cancer. In the present work, we have evaluated the hypothesis that these polymorphisms also play a role in a patient’s survival. A population-based cohort study of 470 women diagnosed with primary breast cancer and a median follow up of 52.44 months was conducted to examine the disease-free and overall survival in rs3736729, rs207454 and rs1052133 genetic variants. Adjusted Cox regression analysis was used to that end. The Kaplan-Meier analysis shows that rs3736729 on GCLC presents a significant association with disease-free survival and overall survival. The polymorphisms rs1052133 on OGG1 and rs207454 on XDH show a trend of association with overall survival. The analysis based on hormonal receptor status revealed a stronger association. The CC genotype on rs207454 (XDH was significantly associated with lower time of disease free survival (p = 0.024 in progesterone receptor negative (PGR− patients and rs3736729 (GCLC was significantly associated with disease free survival (p = 0.001 and overall survival (p = 0.012 in the subgroup of estrogen receptor negative (ER− patients. This work suggests that unfavorable genetic variants in the rs207454 (XDH and rs3736729 (GCLC polymorphisms may act as predictors of the outcome in negative progesterone receptor and negative estrogen receptor breast cancer patients, respectively.

  11. Recent advances in solid-phase peptide synthesis and preparation of antibodies to synthetic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaue, S; Muller, S; Briand, J P; Van Regenmortel, M H

    1990-07-01

    Peptides prepared by the solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) approach are used increasingly in biological research, for instance to elicit anti-peptide antibodies that will recognize the intact, cognate protein. Recent advances in SPPS are reviewed, including the use of new coupling reagents, new methods for evaluating peptide purity and new techniques of automated and multiple peptide synthesis. Methods for enhancing peptide immunogenicity are discussed such as the use of adjuvants and liposomes, and of synthetic branched polypeptides as carriers.

  12. Perspectives and Peptides of the Next Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogden, Kim A.

    Shortly after their discovery, antimicrobial peptides from prokaryotes and eukaryotes were recognized as the next potential generation of pharmaceuticals to treat antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections and septic shock, to preserve food, or to sanitize surfaces. Initial research focused on identifying the spectrum of antimicrobial agents, determining the range of antimicrobial activities against bacterial, fungal, and viral pathogens, and assessing the antimicrobial activity of synthetic peptides versus their natural counterparts. Subsequent research then focused on the mechanisms of antimicrobial peptide activity in model membrane systems not only to identify the mechanisms of antimicrobial peptide activity in microorganisms but also to discern differences in cytotoxicity for prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Recent, contemporary work now focuses on current and future efforts to construct hybrid peptides, peptide congeners, stabilized peptides, peptide conjugates, and immobilized peptides for unique and specific applications to control the growth of microorganisms in vitro and in vivo.

  13. [Peptides: a new class of anticancer drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolarczyk, Ryszard; Cichoń, Tomasz; Szala, Stanisław

    2009-07-22

    Peptides are a novel class of anticancer agents embracing two distinct categories: natural antibacterial peptides, which are preferentially bound by cancer cells, and chemically synthesized peptides, which bind specifically to precise molecular targets located on the surface of tumor cells. Antibacterial peptides bind to both cell and mitochondrial membranes. Some of these peptides attach to the cell membrane, resulting in its disorganization. Other antibacterial peptides penetrate cancer cells without causing cell membrane damage, but they disrupt mitochondrial membranes. Thanks to phage and aptamer libraries, it has become possible to obtain synthetic peptides blocking or activating some target proteins found in cancer cells as well as in cells forming the tumor environment. These synthetic peptides can feature anti-angiogenic properties, block enzymes indispensable for sustained tumor growth, and reduce tumor ability to metastasize. In this review the properties of peptides belonging to both categories are discussed and attempts of their application for therapeutic purposes are outlined.

  14. Peptides: A new class of anticancer drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryszard Smolarczyk

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Peptides are a novel class of anticancer agents embracing two distinct categories: natural antibacterial peptides, which are preferentially bound by cancer cells, and chemically synthesized peptides, which bind specifically to precise molecular targets located on the surface of tumor cells. Antibacterial peptides bind to both cell and mitochondrial membranes. Some of these peptides attach to the cell membrane, resulting in its disorganization. Other antibacterial peptides penetrate cancer cells without causing cell membrane damage, but they disrupt mitochondrial membranes. Thanks to phage and aptamer libraries, it has become possible to obtain synthetic peptides blocking or activating some target proteins found in cancer cells as well as in cells forming the tumor environment. These synthetic peptides can feature anti-angiogenic properties, block enzymes indispensable for sustained tumor growth, and reduce tumor ability to metastasize. In this review the properties of peptides belonging to both categories are discussed and attempts of their application for therapeutic purposes are outlined.

  15. Peptide Selection for Targeted Protein Quantitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiva, Cristina; Sabidó, Eduard

    2017-03-03

    Targeted proteomics methods in their different flavors rely on the use of a few peptides as proxies for protein quantitation, which need to be specified either prior to or after data acquisition. However, in contrast with discovery methods that use all identified peptides for a given protein to estimate its abundance, targeted proteomics methods are limited in the number of peptides that are used for protein quantitation. Because only a few peptides per protein are acquired or extracted in targeted experiments, the selection of peptides that are used for targeted protein quantitation becomes crucial. Several rules have been proposed to guide peptide selection for targeted proteomics studies, which have generally been based on the amino acidic composition of the peptide sequences. However, the compliance of these rules does not imply that not-conformed peptides are not reproducibly generated nor do they guarantee that the selected peptides correctly represent the behavior of the protein abundance under different conditions.

  16. Peptide pool immunization and CD8+ T cell reactivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Susanne B; Harndahl, Mikkel N; Buus, Anette Stryhn

    2013-01-01

    peptides induced normal peptide immunity i.e. the specific T cell reactivity in the Elispot culture was strictly dependent on exposure to the immunizing peptide ex vivo. However, immunization with two of the peptides, a VSV- and a Mycobacterium-derived peptide, resulted in IFNγ spot formation without...... peptide in the Elispot culture. Immunization with a mixture of the VSV-peptide and a "normal" peptide also resulted in IFNγ spot formation without addition of peptide to the assay culture. Peptide-tetramer staining of CD8(+) T cells from mice immunized with a mixture of VSV-peptide and "normal" peptide...

  17. Atomic coordination reflects peptide immunogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgios S.E. Antipas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrated that the immunological identity of variant peptides may be accurately predicted on the basis of atomic coordination of both unprotonated and protonated tertiary structures, provided that the structure of the native peptide (index is known. The metric which was discovered to account for this discrimination is the coordination difference between the variant and the index; we also showed that increasing coordination difference in respect to the index was correlated to a correspondingly weakening immunological outcome of the variant. Additionally, we established that this metric quickly seizes to operate beyond the peptide scale, e.g. over a coordination shell inclusive of atoms up to a distance of 7 Å away from the peptide or over the entire pMHC-TCR complex. Analysis of molecular orbital interactions over a range of formal charges further revealed that the N-terminus of the agonists was always able to sustain a stable ammonium (NH3+ group which was consistently absent in antagonists. We deem that the presence of NH3+ constitutes a secondary observable with a biological consequence, signifying a change in T cell activation. While our analysis of protonated structures relied on the quantum chemical relaxation of the H species, the results were consistent over a wide range of peptide charge and spin polarization conditions.

  18. Delivery systems for antimicrobial peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordström, Randi; Malmsten, Martin

    2017-01-01

    are likely to play a key role in the development of potent and safe AMP-based therapeutics, e.g., through reducing chemical or biological degradation of AMPs either in the formulation or after administration, by reducing adverse side-effects, by controlling AMP release rate, by promoting biofilm penetration......Due to rapidly increasing resistance development against conventional antibiotics, finding novel approaches for the treatment of infections has emerged as a key health issue. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have attracted interest in this context, and there is by now a considerable literature...... on the identification such peptides, as well as on their optimization to reach potent antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory effects at simultaneously low toxicity against human cells. In comparison, delivery systems for antimicrobial peptides have attracted considerably less interest. However, such delivery systems...

  19. Antimicrobial Peptides from Marine Proteobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yannick Fleury

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available After years of inadequate use and the emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR strains, the efficiency of “classical” antibiotics has decreased significantly. New drugs to fight MDR strains are urgently needed. Bacteria hold much promise as a source of unusual bioactive metabolites. However, the potential of marine bacteria, except for Actinomycetes and Cyanobacteria, has been largely underexplored. In the past two decades, the structures of several antimicrobial compounds have been elucidated in marine Proteobacteria. Of these compounds, polyketides (PKs, synthesised by condensation of malonyl-coenzyme A and/or acetyl-coenzyme A, and non-ribosomal peptides (NRPs, obtained through the linkage of (unusual amino acids, have recently generated particular interest. NRPs are good examples of naturally modified peptides. Here, we review and compile the data on the antimicrobial peptides isolated from marine Proteobacteria, especially NRPs.

  20. Dietary bioactive peptides: Human studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouglé, Dominique; Bouhallab, Saïd

    2017-01-22

    Current opinion strongly links nutrition and health. Among nutrients, proteins, and peptides which are encrypted in their sequences and released during digestion could play a key role in improving health. These peptides have been claimed to be active on a wide spectrum of biological functions or diseases, including blood pressure and metabolic risk factors (coagulation, obesity, lipoprotein metabolism, and peroxidation), gut and neurological functions, immunity, cancer, dental health, and mineral metabolism. A majority of studies involved dairy peptides, but the properties of vegetal, animal, and sea products were also assessed. However, these allegations are mainly based on in vitro and experimental studies which are seldom confirmed in humans. This review focused on molecules which were tested in humans, and on the mechanisms explaining discrepancies between experimental and human studies.

  1. Neoglycolipidation for modulating peptide properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Witteloostuijn, Søren Blok

    regulation of appetite, food intake, and glucose homeostasis, and many of these peptides display a signicant potential for treatment of obesity and/or type 2 diabetes. This Ph.D. thesis describes three novel approaches for utilizing gut peptides as the starting point for developing obesity and diabetes drugs....... In addition, neoglycolipidation led to selfassembly and formation of well-dened oligomers as well as non-covalent binding to human serum albumin. In lean mice, acute treatment of lean mice with the neoglycolipidated GLP-1 analogs provided a marked improvement of glucose homeostasis and a potent inhibition......The alarming increase in the prevalence of obesity and associated comorbidities such as type 2 diabetes emphasizes the urgent need for new drugs with both anorectic and antidiabetic eects. Several peptide hormones secreted from the gastrointestinal tract play an important role in the physiological...

  2. A self-replicating peptide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, David H.; Granja, Juan R.; Martinez, Jose A.; Severin, Kay; Ghadiri, M. Reza

    1996-08-01

    THE production of amino acids and their condensation to polypeptides under plausibly prebiotic conditions have long been known1,2. But despite the central importance of molecular self-replication in the origin of life, the feasibility of peptide self-replication has not been established experimentally3-6. Here we report an example of a self-replicating peptide. We show that a 32-residue α-helical peptide based on the leucine-zipper domain of the yeast transcription factor GCN4 can act autocatalytically in templating its own synthesis by accelerating the thioester-promoted amide-bond condensation of 15- and 17-residue fragments in neutral, dilute aqueous solutions. The self-replication process displays parabolic growth pattern with the initial rates of product formation correlating with the square-root of initial template concentration.

  3. The Pig PeptideAtlas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hesselager, Marianne Overgaard; Codrea, Marius; Sun, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Biological research of Sus scrofa, the domestic pig, is of immediate relevance for food production sciences, and for developing pig as a model organism for human biomedical research. Publicly available data repositories play a fundamental role for all biological sciences, and protein data...... repositories are in particular essential for the successful development of new proteomic methods. Cumulative proteome data repositories, including the PeptideAtlas, provide the means for targeted proteomics, system-wide observations, and cross-species observational studies, but pigs have so far been...... underrepresented in existing repositories. We here present a significantly improved build of the Pig PeptideAtlas, which includes pig proteome data from 25 tissues and three body fluid types mapped to 7139 canonical proteins. The content of the Pig PeptideAtlas reflects actively ongoing research within...

  4. Mechanism of action of ZOT-derived peptide AT-1002, a tight junction regulator and absorption enhancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalakrishnan, Shobha; Pandey, Niranjan; Tamiz, Amir P; Vere, John; Carrasco, Rosa; Somerville, Robert; Tripathi, Amit; Ginski, Mark; Paterson, Blake M; Alkan, Sefik S

    2009-01-05

    Tight junctions (TJs) are intercellular structures that control paracellular permeability and epithelial polarity. It is now accepted that TJs are highly dynamic structures that are regulated in response to exogenous and endogenous stimuli. Here, we provide details on the mechanism of action of AT-1002, the active domain of Vibrio cholerae's second toxin, zonula occludens toxin (ZOT). AT-1002, a hexamer peptide, caused the redistribution of ZO-1 away from cell junctions as seen by fluorescence microscopy. AT-1002 also activated src and mitogen activated protein (MAP) kinase pathways, increased ZO-1 tyrosine phosphorylation, and rearrangement of actin filaments. Functionally, AT-1002 caused a reversible reduction in transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) and an increase in lucifer yellow permeability in Caco-2 cell monolayers. In vivo, co-administration of salmon calcitonin with 1 mg of AT-1002 resulted in a 5.2-fold increase in AUC over the control group. Our findings provide a mechanistic explanation for AT-1002-induced tight junction disassembly, and demonstrate that AT-1002 can be used for delivery of other agents in vivo.

  5. Gene-based analysis of regulatory variants identifies 4 putative novel asthma risk genes related to nucleotide synthesis and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Manuel A R; Jansen, Rick; Willemsen, Gonneke; Penninx, Brenda; Bain, Lisa M; Vicente, Cristina T; Revez, Joana A; Matheson, Melanie C; Hui, Jennie; Tung, Joyce Y; Baltic, Svetlana; Le Souëf, Peter; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G; Robertson, Colin F; James, Alan; Thompson, Philip J; Boomsma, Dorret I; Hopper, John L; Hinds, David A; Werder, Rhiannon B; Phipps, Simon

    2017-04-01

    asthma and eQTLs for 4 genes related to nucleotide synthesis/signaling and demonstrated the power of gene-based analyses of GWASs. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Novel Formulations for Antimicrobial Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Maria Carmona-Ribeiro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Peptides in general hold much promise as a major ingredient in novel supramolecular assemblies. They may become essential in vaccine design, antimicrobial chemotherapy, cancer immunotherapy, food preservation, organs transplants, design of novel materials for dentistry, formulations against diabetes and other important strategical applications. This review discusses how novel formulations may improve the therapeutic index of antimicrobial peptides by protecting their activity and improving their bioavailability. The diversity of novel formulations using lipids, liposomes, nanoparticles, polymers, micelles, etc., within the limits of nanotechnology may also provide novel applications going beyond antimicrobial chemotherapy.

  7. Novel Formulations for Antimicrobial Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Ribeiro, Ana Maria; Carrasco, Letícia Dias de Melo

    2014-01-01

    Peptides in general hold much promise as a major ingredient in novel supramolecular assemblies. They may become essential in vaccine design, antimicrobial chemotherapy, cancer immunotherapy, food preservation, organs transplants, design of novel materials for dentistry, formulations against diabetes and other important strategical applications. This review discusses how novel formulations may improve the therapeutic index of antimicrobial peptides by protecting their activity and improving their bioavailability. The diversity of novel formulations using lipids, liposomes, nanoparticles, polymers, micelles, etc., within the limits of nanotechnology may also provide novel applications going beyond antimicrobial chemotherapy. PMID:25302615

  8. Antimicrobial peptides: old molecules with new ideas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nakatsuji, Teruaki; Gallo, Richard L

    2012-01-01

    .... So far, more than 1,200 types of peptides with antimicrobial activity have been isolated from various cells and tissues, and it appears that all living organisms use these antimicrobial peptides (AMPs...

  9. Histidine-Containing Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2000-01-01

    Peptide nucleic acids containing histidine moieties are provided. These compounds have applications including diagnostics, research and potential therapeutics.......Peptide nucleic acids containing histidine moieties are provided. These compounds have applications including diagnostics, research and potential therapeutics....

  10. Tulane/Xavier Vaccine Peptide Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    identified a candidate anti -viral therapeutic peptide, designated Flufirvitide-3. We found that Flufirvitide-3 is a potent inhibitor of infections by...dispersed in an aqueous solution containing the flufirvitide peptide using Tween 80 and propylene glycol co- surfactants. This emulsion preparation is...concentration of peptide at the oil/water interface on the emulsion droplet surface will also improve the effectiveness of Flufirvitide-3 peptide as

  11. Peptides, polypeptides and peptide-polymer hybrids as nucleic acid carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Marya

    2017-10-24

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs), and protein transduction domains (PTDs) of viruses and other natural proteins serve as a template for the development of efficient peptide based gene delivery vectors. PTDs are sequences of acidic or basic amphipathic amino acids, with superior membrane trespassing efficacies. Gene delivery vectors derived from these natural, cationic and cationic amphipathic peptides, however, offer little flexibility in tailoring the physicochemical properties of single chain peptide based systems. Owing to significant advances in the field of peptide chemistry, synthetic mimics of natural peptides are often prepared and have been evaluated for their gene expression, as a function of amino acid functionalities, architecture and net cationic content of peptide chains. Moreover, chimeric single polypeptide chains are prepared by a combination of multiple small natural or synthetic peptides, which imparts distinct physiological properties to peptide based gene delivery therapeutics. In order to obtain multivalency and improve the gene delivery efficacies of low molecular weight cationic peptides, bioactive peptides are often incorporated into a polymeric architecture to obtain novel 'polymer-peptide hybrids' with improved gene delivery efficacies. Peptide modified polymers prepared by physical or chemical modifications exhibit enhanced endosomal escape, stimuli responsive degradation and targeting efficacies, as a function of physicochemical and biological activities of peptides attached onto a polymeric scaffold. The focus of this review is to provide comprehensive and step-wise progress in major natural and synthetic peptides, chimeric polypeptides, and peptide-polymer hybrids for nucleic acid delivery applications.

  12. Development and use of engineered peptide deformylase in chemoenzymatic peptide synthesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Di Toma, Claudia

    2012-01-01

    Deze thesis beschrijft het onderzoek naar potentieel van het gebruik van het peptide deformylase (PDF) in chemo enzymatische peptide synthese. PDF is geschikt voor selective N terminale deformylatie van bepaalde N-formyl-peptides zonder gelijktijdige hydrolyse van de peptide binding. Door de

  13. Structure of asymmetrical peptide dendrimers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okrugin, B.M.; Neelov, I.M.; Leermakers, F.A.M.; Borisov, Oleg V.

    2017-01-01

    Structural properties of asymmetric peptide dendrimers up to the 11th generation are studied on the basis of the self-consistent field Scheutjens-Fleer numerical approach. It is demonstrated that large scale properties such as, e.g., the gyration radius, are relatively weakly affected by the

  14. Peptide-functionalized polyphenylene dendrimers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herrmann, Andreas; Mihov, Gueorgui; Vandermeulen, Guido W.M.; Klok, Harm-Anton; Müllen, Klaus

    2003-01-01

    This contribution describes the synthesis of polyphenylene dendrimers that are functionalized with up to 16 lysine residues or substituted with short peptide sequences composed of 5 lysine or glutamic acid repeats and a C- or N-terminal cysteine residue. Polyphenylene dendrimers were prepared via a

  15. Synthetic Procedures for Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2004-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, bind complementary ssDNA and RNA strands more strongly than a corresponding DNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  16. Double-Stranded Peptide Nucleic Acids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, form double-stranded structures with one another and with ssDNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  17. Identification of multifunctional peptides from human milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Santi M; Bharti, Rashmi; Porto, William F; Gauri, Samiran S; Mandal, Mahitosh; Franco, Octavio L; Ghosh, Ananta K

    2014-06-01

    Pharmaceutical industries have renewed interest in screening multifunctional bioactive peptides as a marketable product in health care applications. In this context, several animal and plant peptides with potential bioactivity have been reported. Milk proteins and peptides have received much attention as a source of health-enhancing components to be incorporated into nutraceuticals and functional foods. By using this source, 24 peptides have been fractionated and purified from human milk using RP-HPLC. Multifunctional roles including antimicrobial, antioxidant and growth stimulating activity have been evaluated in all 24 fractions. Nevertheless, only four fractions show multiple combined activities among them. Using a proteomic approach, two of these four peptides have been identified as lactoferrin derived peptide and kappa casein short chain peptide. Lactoferrin derived peptide (f8) is arginine-rich and kappa casein derived (f12) peptide is proline-rich. Both peptides (f8 and f12) showed antimicrobial activities against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Fraction 8 (f8) exhibits growth stimulating activity in 3T3 cell line and f12 shows higher free radical scavenging activity in comparison to other fractions. Finally, both peptides were in silico evaluated and some insights into their mechanism of action were provided. Thus, results indicate that these identified peptides have multiple biological activities which are valuable for the quick development of the neonate and may be considered as potential biotechnological products for nutraceutical industry. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization of Synthetic Peptides by Mass Spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhala, Bala K; Mirza, Osman; Højrup, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is well suited for analysis of the identity and purity of synthetic peptides. The sequence of a synthetic peptide is most often known, so the analysis is mainly used to confirm the identity and purity of the peptide. Here, simple procedures are described for MALDI...

  19. Peptides and metallic nanoparticles for biomedical applications.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kogan, M.J.; Olmedo, I.; Hosta, L.; Guerrero, A.R.; Cruz Ricondo, L.J.; Albericio, F.

    2007-01-01

    In this review, we describe the contribution of peptides to the biomedical applications of metallic nanoparticles. We also discuss strategies for the preparation of peptide-nanoparticle conjugates and the synthesis of the peptides and metallic nanoparticles. An overview of the techniques used for

  20. Dendritic outgrowth of myenteric plexus neurons in primary culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulholland, M W; Romanchuk, G; Flowe, K

    1992-04-01

    Myenteric plexus neurons derived from neonatal guinea pigs, when exposed to serum, demonstrated a characteristic pattern of growth, including a proliferating outgrowth zone of glial cells, peripheral extension of dendritic processes, and progressive dendritic growth. Serum effects upon dendritic growth, measured morphometrically, was strongly dose- and temporally dependent. Dendritic density was increased 10-fold (120 hr) by the addition of 6% serum, while mean dendritic length was increased 3-fold. Development of cholinergic function was reflected by release of [3H]ACh in response to cholecystokinin octapeptide, vasoactive intestinal peptide, substance P, and calcitonin gene-related peptide (10(-10) and 10(-8) M).

  1. Innervation of the human middle meningeal artery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvinsson, L; Gulbenkian, S; Barroso, C P

    1998-01-01

    The majority of nerve fibers in the middle meningeal artery and branching arterioles are sympathetic, storing norepinephrine and neuropeptide Y (NPY). A sparse supply of fibers contain acetylcholinesterase activity and immunoreactivity toward vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), peptidine histidine...... methionine (PHM), and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). Only few substance P and neuropeptide K immunoreactive fibers are noted. Electronmicroscopy shows axons and terminals at the adventitial medial border of the human middle meningeal artery, with a fairly large distance to the smooth muscle cells...

  2. Inhibition of neurogenic inflammation by the Amazonian herbal medicine sangre de grado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, M J; Vergnolle, N; McKnight, W; Musah, R A; Davison, C A; Trentacosti, A M; Thompson, J H; Sandoval, M; Wallace, J L

    2001-09-01

    This study was designed to determine if the Amazonian medicinal sangre de grado, confers benefit by suppressing the activation of sensory afferent nerves. (i) vasorelaxation of rat mesenteric arteries in response to calcitonin gene-related peptide; (ii) rat paw edema in response to protease- activating peptide receptor 2-activating peptide; (iii) rat paw hyperalgesia in response to low-dose protease-activating peptide receptor 2-activating peptide or prostaglandin E2; (iv) gastric hyperemia in response luminal capsaicin; (v) a clinical trial of a sangre de grado balm in pest control workers. The parent botanical was fractionated for evaluation of potential active components. In preconstricted rat mesenteric arteries, highly diluted sangre de grado (1:10,000) caused a shift to the right of the calcitonin gene-related peptide dose-response curve (p sangre de grado balm (1% concentration, p sangre de grado balm. A fraction possessing analgesic and capsaicin antagonistic properties was isolated and high-performance liquid chromatography and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis indicated that it was a proanthocyandin oligomer. In pest control workers, sangre de grado balm (Zangrado) was preferred over placebo, for the relief of itching, pain, discomfort, edema, and redness in response to wasps, fire ants, mosquitoes, bees, cuts, abrasions, and plant reactions. Subjects reported relief within minutes. We conclude that sangre de grado is a potent inhibitor of sensory afferent nerve mechanisms and supports its ethnomedical use for disorders characterized by neurogenic inflammation.

  3. Insect Peptides - Perspectives in Human Diseases Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowanski, Szymon; Adamski, Zbigniew; Lubawy, Jan; Marciniak, Pawel; Pacholska-Bogalska, Joanna; Slocinska, Malgorzata; Spochacz, Marta; Szymczak, Monika; Urbanski, Arkadiusz; Walkowiak-Nowicka, Karolina; Rosinski, Grzegorz

    2017-01-01

    Insects are the largest and the most widely distributed group of animals in the world. Their diversity is a source of incredible variety of different mechanisms of life processes regulation. There are many agents that regulate immunology, reproduction, growth and development or metabolism. Hence, it seems that insects may be a source of numerous substances useful in human diseases treatment. Especially important in the regulation of insect physiology are peptides, like neuropeptides, peptide hormones or antimicrobial peptides. There are two main aspects where they can be helpful, 1) Peptides isolated from insects may become potential drugs in therapy of different diseases, 2) A lot of insect peptide hormones show structural or functional homology to mammalian peptide hormones and the comparative studies may give a new look on human disorders. In our review we focused on three group of insect derived peptides: 1) immune-active peptides, 2) peptide hormones and 3) peptides present in venoms. In our review we try to show the considerable potential of insect peptides in searching for new solutions for mammalian diseases treatment. We summarise the knowledge about properties of insect peptides against different virulent agents, anti-inflammatory or anti-nociceptive properties as well as compare insect and mammalian/vertebrate peptide endocrine system to indicate usefulness of knowledge about insect peptide hormones in drug design. The field of possible using of insect delivered peptide to therapy of various human diseases is still not sufficiently explored. Undoubtedly, more attention should be paid to insects due to searching new drugs. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Peptides: Production, bioactivity, functionality, and applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hajfathalian, Mona; Ghelichi, Sakhi; García Moreno, Pedro Jesús

    2017-01-01

    Production of peptides with various effects from proteins of different sources continues to receive academic attention. Researchers of different disciplines are putting increasing efforts to produce bioactive and functional peptides from different sources such as plants, animals, and food industry...... by-products. The aim of this review is to introduce production methods of hydrolysates and peptides and provide a comprehensive overview of their bioactivity in terms of their effects on immune, cardiovascular, nervous, and gastrointestinal systems. Moreover, functional and antioxidant properties...... of hydrolysates and isolated peptides are reviewed. Finally, industrial and commercial applications of bioactive peptides including their use in nutrition and production of pharmaceuticals and nutraceuticals are discussed....

  5. Interpreting peptide mass spectra by VEMS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Rune; Lundsgaard, M.; Welinder, Karen G.

    2003-01-01

    of peptide MS/MS spectra imported in text file format. Peaks are annotated, the monoisotopic peaks retained, and the b-and y-ion series identified in an interactive manner. The called peptide sequence is searched against a local protein database for sequence identity and peptide mass. The report compares...... the calculated and the experimental mass spectrum of the called peptide. The program package includes four accessory programs. VEMStrans creates protein databases in FASTA format from EST or cDNA sequence files. VEMSdata creates a virtual peptide database from FASTA files. VEMSdist displays the distribution...

  6. Developments in peptide and amide synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albericio, Fernando

    2004-06-01

    The solid-phase methodology is key for an effective synthesis of peptides, from a milligram scale for research to a multi-kilo scale for drug production. Indeed, small peptides containing up to 20-30 amino acids are most readily synthesized by a solid-phase strategy. Larger peptides (up to 60 amino acids) should be synthesized by a convergent approach (i.e. synthesis of protected constituent peptides in solid-phase and combination of these units in solution). Larger peptides and proteins are prepared by chemical ligation, where unprotected segments have been prepared in solid-phase.

  7. Towards the MHC-peptide combinatorics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangueane, P; Sakharkar, M K; Kolatkar, P R; Ren, E C

    2001-05-01

    The exponentially increased sequence information on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) alleles points to the existence of a high degree of polymorphism within them. To understand the functional consequences of MHC alleles, 36 nonredundant MHC-peptide complexes in the protein data bank (PDB) were examined. Induced fit molecular recognition patterns such as those in MHC-peptide complexes are governed by numerous rules. The 36 complexes were clustered into 19 subgroups based on allele specificity and peptide length. The subgroups were further analyzed for identifying common features in MHC-peptide binding pattern. The four major observations made during the investigation were: (1) the positional preference of peptide residues defined by percentage burial upon complex formation is shown for all the 19 subgroups and the burial profiles within entries in a given subgroup are found to be similar; (2) in class I specific 8- and 9-mer peptides, the fourth residue is consistently solvent exposed, however this observation is not consistent in class I specific 10-mer peptides; (3) an anchor-shift in positional preference is observed towards the C terminal as the peptide length increases in class II specific peptides; and (4) peptide backbone atoms are proportionately dominant at the MHC-peptide interface.

  8. Prognostic factors for survival and for biochemical cure in medullary thyroid carcinoma: results in 899 patients. The GETC Study Group. Groupe d'étude des tumeurs à calcitonine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modigliani, E; Cohen, R; Campos, J M; Conte-Devolx, B; Maes, B; Boneu, A; Schlumberger, M; Bigorgne, J C; Dumontier, P; Leclerc, L; Corcuff, B; Guilhem, I

    1998-03-01

    Prognostic factors of sporadic or inherited medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC) are still controversial and have been assessed in old and small series. A better knowledge of these factors would improve patient management. To evaluate factors involved in the prognosis of MTC in a large series of cases, using uni- and multivariate analysis. Clinical, biological, surgical and epidemiological data on 899 MTC patients, diagnosed between 1952 and 1996, were collected by the French Calcitonin Tumors Study Group (GETC) with a standardized questionnaire, and processed in a national database. Survival and biochemical cure (i.e. normal basal post-operative serum calcitonin levels) were analysed with Kaplan and Meier and log-rank test statistical procedures. Data are presented as adjusted rather than observed survival, to consider only patients who died of MTC. Cox's forward-stepping proportional hazard model was used to analyse factors with a significant influence on survival by univariate analysis. Apart from the large proportion of familial forms (43%), the general characteristics of our population were similar to those in other studies: mean age at surgery = 43.4 years; sex ratio = 1 male/1.35 female; stage I = 20.8%; stage II = 21.2%; stage III = 46.5% and stage IV = 11.5%. 863 (96%) patients underwent surgery; 43% of operated patients were biochemically cured. Adjusted survival was 85.7 +/- 1.5% at 5 years and 78.4 +/- 2.1% at 10 years. Multivariate analysis showed that age and stage were independent predictive factors of survival. Gender, type of surgery, type of familial form were predictive only in univariate analysis. Biochemical cure predicts a survival rate of 97.7% at 10 years. Authentic recurrence, that is subsequent elevation of calcitonin (CT) after post-operative normalization, was found in 4.9%. In non-cured patients (57%), survival was still good: 80.2% (+/- 2.2%) and 70.3% (+/- 2.9%) at 5 and 10 years, respectively. Similarly, prediction of biochemical cure

  9. Taylor Dispersion Analysis as a promising tool for assessment of peptide-peptide interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høgstedt, Ulrich B; Schwach, Grégoire; van de Weert, Marco

    2016-01-01

    . In this work, we show that protein-protein and peptide-peptide interactions can advantageously be investigated by measurement of the diffusion coefficient using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. Through comparison to Dynamic Light Scattering it was shown that Taylor Dispersion Analysis is well suited...... for the characterization of protein-protein interactions of solutions of α-lactalbumin and human serum albumin. The peptide-peptide interactions of three selected peptides were then investigated in a concentration range spanning from 0.5mg/ml up to 80mg/ml using Taylor Dispersion Analysis. The peptide-peptide interactions...... determination indicated that multibody interactions significantly affect the PPIs at concentration levels above 25mg/ml for the two charged peptides. Relative viscosity measurements, performed using the capillary based setup applied for Taylor Dispersion Analysis, showed that the viscosity of the peptide...

  10. Characterization of Peptide Antibodies by Epitope Mapping Using Resin-Bound and Soluble Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trier, Nicole Hartwig

    2015-01-01

    Characterization of peptide antibodies through identification of their target epitopes is of utmost importance. Understanding antibody specificity at the amino acid level provides the key to understand the specific interaction between antibodies and their epitopes and their use as research and diagnostic tools as well as therapeutic agents. This chapter describes a straightforward strategy for mapping of continuous peptide antibody epitopes using resin-bound and soluble peptides. The approach combines three different types of peptide sets for full characterization of peptide antibodies: (1) overlapping peptides, used to locate antigenic regions; (2) truncated peptides, used to identify the minimal peptide length required for antibody binding; and (3) substituted peptides, used to identify the key residues important for antibody binding and to determine the specific contribution of key residues. For initial screening resin-bound peptides are used for epitope estimation, while soluble peptides subsequently are used for fine mapping. The combination of resin-bound peptides and soluble peptides for epitope mapping provides a time-sparing and straightforward approach for characterization of peptide antibodies.

  11. Radio peptide imaging and therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buscombe, Jonh [Royal Free Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1997-12-31

    Full text. The concept of the magic bullet retains its attraction to us. If only we could take a drug or radioisotope and inject this intravenously and then will attach to the target cancer. This may allow imaging if labelled with a radio pharmaceutical or possibly even effective therapy. Initially work was started using antibodies of mouse origin. These have shown some utility in targeting tumors but there are problems in that these are essentially non-human proteins, often derived from mice. This leads to the formation of antibodies against that antibody so that repeat administrations lead to reduced efficacy and possibly may carry a risk anaphylaxis for the patient. Two different methods have evolved to deal with this situation. Either make antibodies more human or use smaller fragments, so that they are less likely to cause allergic reactions. The second method is to try and use a synthetic peptide. This will contain a series of amino acids which recognize a certain cell receptor. For example the somatostatin analogue Octreotide is an 8 amino acid peptide which has the same biological actions as natural somatostatin but an increased plasma half life. To this is added a linker a good example being DTPA and then radioisotope for example In-111. There we can have the complex In-111-DTPA-Octreotide which can be used to image somatostatin receptors in vivo. The main advantage over antibodies is that the cost production is less and many different variation of peptides for a particular receptor can be manufactured and assessed to find which is the optimal agent tumour imaging at a fraction of the cost of antibody production. There are two main approaches. Firstly to take a natural peptide hormone such as insulin or VIP and label by a simple method such as iodination with I-123. A group in Vienna have done it and shown good uptake of I-123 Insulin in primary hepatomas and of I-123 VIP in pancreatic cancers. Many natural peptide hormones however have a short plasma half

  12. Peptides and methods against diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albertini, Richard J.; Falta, Michael T.

    2000-01-01

    This invention relates to methods of preventing or reducing the severity of diabetes. In one embodiment, the method involves administering to the individual a peptide having substantially the sequence of a on-conserved region sequence of a T cell receptor present on the surface of T cells mediating diabetes or a fragment thereof, wherein the peptide or fragment is capable of causing an effect on the immune system to regulate the T cells. In particular, the T cell receptor has the V.beta. regional V.beta.6 or V.beta.14. In another embodiment, the method involves gene therapy. The invention also relates to methods of diagnosing diabetes by determining the presence of diabetes predominant T cell receptors.

  13. Antimicrobial peptides from Capsicum sp.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ajl yemi

    2011-12-30

    Dec 30, 2011 ... alternative: Antimicrobial peptides from Capsicum sp. Moguel-Salazar Fernando, Brito-Argáez Ligia, Díaz-Brito Mayra and Islas-Flores Ignacio*. Unidad de Bioquímica y Biología Molecular de Plantas del Centro de Investigación Científica de Yucatán A.C. Calle 43. No. 130, Colonia Chuburná de Hidalgo, ...

  14. Biodiscovery of Aluminum Binding Peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes . However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic...conjunction with organic-based targets, such as protein toxins or carbon nanotubes . However, this technology has been expanded for use with inorganic targets...8] Rothenstein, D. C., et al., "Isolation of ZnO -binding 12-mer peptides and determination of their binding epitopes by NMR spectroscopy," J. Am

  15. Photosystem Inspired Peptide Hybrid Catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-07

    peptide-based hybrid material can be a promising new class of proton conductor. Contrary to the conventional viewpoint on CO2 as a major contributor of... materials (Figure 2) Tyrosine is known to be an important sequence that helps electron transfer and hydrogen ion transfer in the natural world. In...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Biological systems can inspire to make new hybrid materials defined at the molecular level. We propose a novel

  16. Peptide-targeted polymer cancerostatics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Böhmová, Eliška; Pola, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 65, Suppl. 2 (2016), S153-S164 ISSN 0862-8408 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1507 Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : HPMA copolymers * tumor targeting * peptides Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.461, year: 2016 http://www.biomed.cas.cz/physiolres/pdf/65%20Suppl%202/65_S153.pdf

  17. Biopharmaceuticals: From peptide to drug

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannappel, Margarete

    2017-08-01

    Biologics are therapeutic proteins or peptides that are produced by means of biological processes within living organisms and cells. They are highly specific molecules and play a crucial role as therapeutics for the treatment of severe and chronic diseases (e.g. cancer, rheumatoid arthritis, diabetes, autoimmune disorders). The development of new biologics and biologics-based drugs gains more and more importance in the fight against various diseases. A short overview on biotherapeutical drug development is given. Cone snails are a large group of poisonous, predatory sea snails with more than 700 species. They use a very powerful venom which rapidly inactivates and paralyzes their prey. Most bioactive venom components are small peptides (conotoxins, conopeptides) which are precisely directed towards a specific target (e.g. ion channel, receptors). Due to their small size, their precision and speed of action, naturally occurring cone snail venom peptides represent an attractive source for the identification and design of novel biological drug entities. The Jagna cone snail project is an encouraging initiative to map the ecological variety of cone snails around the island of Bohol (Philippines) and to conserve the biological information for potential future application.

  18. Antihypertensive Peptides from Milk Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heikki Vapaatalo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Dietary proteins possess a wide range of nutritional and functional properties. They are used as a source of energy and amino acids, which are needed for growth and development. Many dietary proteins, especially milk proteins, contain physiologically active peptides encrypted in the protein sequence. These peptides may be released during gastrointestinal digestion or food processing and once liberated, cause different physiological functions. Milk-derived bioactive peptides are shown to have antihypertensive, antimicrobial, immunomodulatory, antioxidative and mineral-binding properties. During the fermentation of milk with certain lactobacilli, two interesting tripeptides Ile-Pro-Pro and Val-Pro-Pro are released from casein to the final product. These lactotripeptides have attenuated the development of hypertension in several animal models and lowered blood pressure in clinical studies. They inhibit ACE in vitro at micromolar concentrations, protect endothelial function in vitro and reduce arterial stiffness in humans. Thus, milk as a traditional food product can after certain processing serve as a functional food and carry specific health-promoting effects, providing an option to control blood pressure.

  19. Synthesis of cyclic tryptathionine peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanotti, G; Beijer, B; Wieland, T

    1987-09-01

    The helicity of the tryptathionine moiety of the phallotoxins has been recognized by comparison with cyclic tryptathionine tripeptides. In order to investigate the influence of the configuration of the component amino acids on the conformation of the cyclic peptides, six analogue thioether tripeptides containing L- and D-alanine and L- and D-cysteine, respectively, have been synthesized. The CD spectra of the peptides are very similar to each other, showing mirror images of the CD of phalloidin and, therefore, negative helicity. The spectra of the D-cysteine containing compounds differ from the L-cysteine containing compounds by their weakly positive ellipticity values around 270 nm. The cyclization reaction of Boc-Hpi-D-Ala-D-Cys(STrt)OCH3, along with the cyclic tripeptide, afforded a cyclic hexapeptide by dimerization. The CD spectrum of the dimer is very similar to that of phalloidin, thus pointing to a positive helicity of its two tryptathionine moieties. The dimeric thioether peptide forms a rather strong complex with Cu2+ ions.

  20. Coffee, hunger, and peptide YY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenberg, James A; Geliebter, Allan

    2012-06-01

    There is evidence from several empirical studies suggesting that coffee may help people control body weight. Our objective was to assess the effects of caffeine, caffeinated coffee, and decaffeinated coffee, both alone and in combination with 75 g of glucose, on perceived hunger and satiety and related peptides. We conducted a placebo-controlled single-blinded randomized 4-way crossover trial. Eleven healthy male volunteers (mean age, 23.5 ± 5.7 years; mean BMI, 23.6 ± 4.2 kg/m(2)) ingested 1 of 3 test beverages (caffeine in water, caffeinated coffee, or decaffeinated coffee) or placebo (water), and 60 minutes later they ingested the glucose. Eight times during each laboratory visit, hunger and satiety were assessed by visual analog scales, and blood samples were drawn to measure 3 endogenous peptides associated with hunger and satiety: ghrelin, peptide YY (PYY), and leptin. Compared to placebo, decaffeinated coffee yielded significantly lower hunger during the whole 180-minute study period and higher plasma PYY for the first 90 minutes (p hunger or PYY. Caffeinated coffee showed a pattern between that of decaffeinated coffee and caffeine in water. These findings suggest that one or more noncaffeine ingredients in coffee may have the potential to decrease body weight. Glucose ingestion did not change the effects of the beverages. Our randomized human trial showed that decaffeinated coffee can acutely decrease hunger and increase the satiety hormone PYY.

  1. SVSVGMKPSPRP: a broad range adhesion peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estephan, Elias; Dao, Jérôme; Saab, Marie-Belle; Panayotov, Ivan; Martin, Marta; Larroque, Christian; Gergely, Csilla; Cuisinier, Frédéric J G; Levallois, Bernard

    2012-12-01

    A combinatorial phage display approach was previously used to evolve a 12-mer peptide (SVSVGMKPSPRP) with the highest affinity for different semiconductor surfaces. The discovery of the multiple occurrences of the SVSVGMKPSPRP sequence in an all-against-all basic local alignment search tool search of PepBank sequences was unexpected, and a Google search using the peptide sequence recovered 58 results concerning 12 patents and 16 scientific publications. The number of patent and articles indicates that the peptide is perhaps a broad range adhesion peptide. To evaluate peptide properties, we conducted a study to investigate peptide adhesion on different inorganic substrates by mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy for gold, carbon nanotubes, cobalt, chrome alloy, titanium, and titanium alloy substrates. Our results showed that the peptide has a great potential as a linker to functionalize metallic surfaces if specificity is not a key factor. This peptide is not specific to a particular metal surface, but it is a good linker for the functionalization of a wide range of metallic materials. The fact that this peptide has the potential to adsorb on a large set of inorganic surfaces suggests novel promising directions for further investigation. Affinity determination of SVSVGMKPSPRP peptide would be an important issue for eventual commercial uses.

  2. Bioprospecting open reading frames for peptide effectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Ling; Scott, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Recent successes in the development of small-molecule antagonists of protein-protein interactions designed based on co-crystal structures of peptides bound to their biological targets confirm that short peptides derived from interacting proteins can be high-value ligands for pharmacologic validation of targets and for identification of druggable sites. Evolved sequence space is likely to be enriched for interacting peptides, but identifying minimal peptide effectors within genomic sequence can be labor intensive. Here we describe the use of incremental truncation to diversify genetic material on the scale of open reading frames into comprehensive libraries of constituent peptides. The approach is capable of generating peptides derived from both continuous and discontinuous sequence elements, and is compatible with the expression of free linear or backbone cyclic peptides, with peptides tethered to amino- or carboxyl-terminal fusion partners or with the expression of peptides displayed within protein scaffolds (peptide aptamers). Incremental truncation affords a valuable source of molecular diversity to interrogate the druggable genome or evaluate the therapeutic potential of candidate genes.

  3. Chemical Methods for Peptide and Protein Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istvan Toth

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the invention of solid phase synthetic methods by Merrifield in 1963, the number of research groups focusing on peptide synthesis has grown exponentially. However, the original step-by-step synthesis had limitations: the purity of the final product decreased with the number of coupling steps. After the development of Boc and Fmoc protecting groups, novel amino acid protecting groups and new techniques were introduced to provide high quality and quantity peptide products. Fragment condensation was a popular method for peptide production in the 1980s, but unfortunately the rate of racemization and reaction difficulties proved less than ideal. Kent and co-workers revolutionized peptide coupling by introducing the chemoselective reaction of unprotected peptides, called native chemical ligation. Subsequently, research has focused on the development of novel ligating techniques including the famous click reaction, ligation of peptide hydrazides, and the recently reported a-ketoacid-hydroxylamine ligations with 5-oxaproline. Several companies have been formed all over the world to prepare high quality Good Manufacturing Practice peptide products on a multi-kilogram scale. This review describes the advances in peptide chemistry including the variety of synthetic peptide methods currently available and the broad application of peptides in medicinal chemistry.

  4. Pharmaceutical and pharmacological importance of peptide transporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandsch, Matthias; Knütter, Ilka; Bosse-Doenecke, Eva

    2008-05-01

    Peptide transport is currently a prominent topic in membrane research. The transport proteins involved are under intense investigation because of their physiological importance in protein absorption and also because peptide transporters are possible vehicles for drug delivery. Moreover, in many tissues peptide carriers transduce peptidic signals across membranes that are relevant in information processing. The focus of this review is on the pharmaceutical relevance of the human peptide transporters PEPT1 and PEPT2. In addition to their physiological substrates, both carriers transport many beta-lactam antibiotics, valaciclovir and other drugs and prodrugs because of their sterical resemblance to di- and tripeptides. The primary structure, tissue distribution and substrate specificity of PEPT1 and PEPT2 have been well characterized. However, there is a dearth of knowledge on the substrate binding sites and the three-dimensional structure of these proteins. Until this pivotal information becomes available by X-ray crystallography, the development of new drug substrates relies on classical transport studies combined with molecular modelling. In more than thirty years of research, data on the interaction of well over 700 di- and tripeptides, amino acid and peptide derivatives, drugs and prodrugs with peptide transporters have been gathered. The aim of this review is to put the reports on peptide transporter-mediated drug uptake into perspective. We also review the current knowledge on pharmacogenomics and clinical relevance of human peptide transporters. Finally, the reader's attention is drawn to other known or proposed human peptide-transporting proteins.

  5. Prediction of twin-arginine signal peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Widdick David

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins carrying twin-arginine (Tat signal peptides are exported into the periplasmic compartment or extracellular environment independently of the classical Sec-dependent translocation pathway. To complement other methods for classical signal peptide prediction we here present a publicly available method, TatP, for prediction of bacterial Tat signal peptides. Results We have retrieved sequence data for Tat substrates in order to train a computational method for discrimination of Sec and Tat signal peptides. The TatP method is able to positively classify 91% of 35 known Tat signal peptides and 84% of the annotated cleavage sites of these Tat signal peptides were correctly predicted. This method generates far less false positive predictions on various datasets than using simple pattern matching. Moreover, on the same datasets TatP generates less false positive predictions than a complementary rule based prediction method. Conclusion The method developed here is able to discriminate Tat signal peptides from cytoplasmic proteins carrying a similar motif, as well as from Sec signal peptides, with high accuracy. The method allows filtering of input sequences based on Perl syntax regular expressions, whereas hydrophobicity discrimination of Tat- and Sec-signal peptides is carried out by an artificial neural network. A potential cleavage site of the predicted Tat signal peptide is also reported. The TatP prediction server is available as a public web server at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/TatP/.

  6. Natriuretic Peptides: Biochemistry, Physiology, Clinical Implication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. A. Kozlova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In the past years, the interest of theorists and clinicians has steadily increased in the myocardially secreted hormones – natriuretic peptides. At the Congress of the European Society of Anesthesiology (Munich, 2007, B-type natriuretic peptides were included into the list of the parameters of perioperative laboratory monitoring that is expedient in the practice of anesthetists and resuscitation specialists. The literature review shows the history of discovery and identification of different types of natriuretic peptides and considers the matters of their biochemistry. It also details information on the synthesis, secretion, and clearance of these peptides, as well as their receptor apparatus in various organs and tissues. The physiology of the regulatory system is described, as applied to the cardiovascular, excretory, central nervous systems, and the neuroendocrine one. Special attention is given to the current publications on the control of B-type natriuretic peptides as biomarkers of cardiac dysfunction. The diagnostic and prognostic values of peptides are analyzed in chronic circulatory insufficiency, coronary heart disease, and other car-diological and non-cardiological diseases. The prognostic value of elevated B-type natriuretic peptide levels in cardiac surgery is separately considered. It is concluded that the changes in the level of B-type natriuretic peptides in different clinical situations are the subject of numerous researches mainly made in foreign countries. The bulk of these researches are devoted to the study of peptides in cardiology and other areas of therapy. Studies on the use of peptides in reanimatology are relatively few and their results are rather discordant. The foregoing opens up wide prospects for studying the use of B-type natriuretic peptides in Russian intensive care and anesthesiology. Key words: natriuretic peptides, brain nautriuretic peptides, NT-proBNP.

  7. Development and characterisation of soluble polymeric particles for pulmonary peptide delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewes, F; Tajber, L; Corrigan, O I; Ehrhardt, C; Healy, A M

    2010-10-09

    Pulmonary administration of protein and peptide drugs using inhaled dry powder particles is an interesting alternative to parenteral delivery. The stabilisation of these molecules is essential to the maintenance of biological activity in such inhalation formulations. Here salmon calcitonin (sCT) was co-spray dried with linear or branched PEG (L-PEG and B-PEG) and PVP in order to formulate aerosolisable particles of the bioactive peptide. Co-spray drying L-PEG and PVP resulted in porous particles, with minimal D(50) (median volume diameter) and MMAD (mass median aerodynamic diameter) values obtained for a PEG/PVP w/w ratio of 1. For particles based on both L-PEG and B-PEG, an increase in acetone, a poor solvent for the PVP, up to 70wt% of the spray dried solution led to a decrease in D(50) and MMAD. Crystallinity of PEG in the particles ranged between 90 and 97% when the PVP content varied between 15 and 70wt%, indicating a low degree of interaction between PVP and PEG. Additionally, dynamic vapour sorption analysis showed that an increase in PVP content increased the particle surface hygroscopicity. Hence, particle properties were adjusted by altering the water/acetone and PEG/PVP ratio in the spray dried solutions. PVP present at the particles surface protects them from melting during the spray drying process but also increases their hygroscopicity, adversely affecting their aerodynamic properties. Targeting a 5wt% of sCT loading resulted in a loading efficiency of 77.9 and 83.6% with L-PEG and B-PEG-based particles, respectively. Loading of sCT in L-PEG or B-PEG-based particles modified particle roughness and D(50), leading to an increase in MMAD of the L-PEG-based particles. However, particles were still considered to be suitable for aerosolisation as their FPFs (fine particle fractions) were higher than 30%. These particles formulated with PVP and PEG allowed sCT biological activity to be maintained when evaluated by measuring cAMP production by T47D cells.

  8. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangshun Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified from a variety of tissues and epithelial surfaces, including skin, eyes, ears, mouths, gut, immune, nervous and urinary systems. These peptides vary from 10 to 150 amino acids with a net charge between −3 and +20 and a hydrophobic content below 60%. The sequence diversity enables human AMPs to adopt various 3D structures and to attack pathogens by different mechanisms. While α-defensin HD-6 can self-assemble on the bacterial surface into nanonets to entangle bacteria, both HNP-1 and β-defensin hBD-3 are able to block cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. Lysozyme is well-characterized to cleave bacterial cell wall polysaccharides but can also kill bacteria by a non-catalytic mechanism. The two hydrophobic domains in the long amphipathic α-helix of human cathelicidin LL-37 lays the basis for binding and disrupting the curved anionic bacterial membrane surfaces by forming pores or via the carpet model. Furthermore, dermcidin may serve as ion channel by forming a long helix-bundle structure. In addition, the C-type lectin RegIIIα can initially recognize bacterial peptidoglycans followed by pore formation in the membrane. Finally, histatin 5 and GAPDH(2-32 can enter microbial cells to exert their effects. It appears that granulysin enters cells and kills intracellular pathogens with the aid of pore-forming perforin. This arsenal of human defense proteins not only keeps us healthy but also inspires the development of a new generation of personalized

  9. Unifying protein inference and peptide identification with feedback to update consistency between peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinhong; Chen, Bolin; Wu, Fang-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    We first propose a new method to process peptide identification reports from databases search engines. Then via it we develop a method for unifying protein inference and peptide identification by adding a feedback from protein inference to peptide identification. The feedback information is a list of high-confidence proteins, which is used to update an adjacency matrix between peptides. The adjacency matrix is used in the regularization of peptide scores. Logistic regression (LR) is used to compute the probability of peptide identification with the regularized scores. Protein scores are then calculated with the LR probability of peptides. Instead of selecting the best peptide match for each MS/MS, we select multiple peptides. By testing on two datasets, the results have shown that the proposed method can robustly assign accurate probabilities to peptides, and have a higher discrimination power than PeptideProphet to distinguish correct and incorrect identified peptides. Additionally, not only can our method infer more true positive proteins but also infer less false positive proteins than ProteinProphet at the same false positive rate. The coverage of inferred proteins is also significantly increased due to the selection of multiple peptides for each MS/MS and the improvement of their scores by the feedback from the inferred proteins. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Recent development of peptide drugs and advance on theory and methodology of peptide inhibitor design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qi-Shi; Xie, Neng-Zhong; Huang, Ri-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Due to the low toxicity, easy synthesis, rapid elimination, and less side effect, more and more peptide inhibitors are emerging as the effective drugs that are clinically used in therapies of a number of diseases. At the same time the computer-aided drug design (CADD) methods have remarkably developed. In this mini review the newly developed peptide inhibitors and drugs are introduced, including peptide vaccines for cancers, peptide inhibitors for HIV, Alzheimer's disease and related diseases, and the peptides as the leading compounds of drugs. The recent progress in the theory and methodology of peptide inhibitor design is reviewed. (1) The flexible protein-peptide docking model is introduced, in which the peptide structures are treated as segment-flexible chains using genetic algorithm and special force field parameters. (2) The "Wenxiang diagram" is illustrated for protein-peptide interaction analysis that has been successfully used in the coiled-coil interaction analysis. (3) The "Distorted key" theory is reviewed, which is an effective method to convert the peptide inhibitors to the small chemical drugs. (4) The amino acid property-based peptide prediction method (AABPP) is described that is a twolevel QSAR prediction network for the bioactivity prediction of peptide inhibitors. (5) Finally, several types of molecular interactions between protein and peptide ligands are summarized, including cation-π interactions; polar hydrogen-π interactions; and π-π stocking interactions.

  11. Peptide Bond Formations through Flow Chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, N

    2017-10-04

    Peptides and proteins play important roles in body functions(1) ,(2) and are used exclusively in drug discoveries, having advantages because of their high biological activity, high specificity, and low toxicity. For peptide synthesis, researchers mostly use the solid-phase peptide synthesis (SPPS)(3) with modern modifications.(4) However, scientists failed to overcome two main factors; the concentration and time required for peptide coupling. The flow-based technology may help in the rapid production of peptides due to having advantages over batch reactions(5-7) in terms of productivity, heat and mixing efficiency, safety, and reproducibility. Herein, we discussed both solution and solid phase synthesis of peptides in flow.(8-12) This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  12. Synthesis of peptide .alpha.-thioesters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarero, Julio A [Livermore, CA; Mitchell, Alexander R [Livermore, CA; De Yoreo, James J [Clayton, CA

    2008-08-19

    Disclosed herein is a new method for the solid phase peptide synthesis (SPPS) of C-terminal peptide .alpha. thioesters using Fmoc/t-Bu chemistry. This method is based on the use of an aryl hydrazine linker, which is totally stable to conditions required for Fmoc-SPPS. When the peptide synthesis has been completed, activation of the linker is achieved by mild oxidation. The oxidation step converts the acyl-hydrazine group into a highly reactive acyl-diazene intermediate which reacts with an .alpha.-amino acid alkylthioester (H-AA-SR) to yield the corresponding peptide .alpha.-thioester in good yield. A variety of peptide thioesters, cyclic peptides and a fully functional Src homology 3 (SH3) protein domain have been successfully prepared.

  13. Potent peptidic fusion inhibitors of influenza virus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadam, Rameshwar U.; Juraszek, Jarek; Brandenburg, Boerries; Buyck, Christophe; Schepens, Wim B. G.; Kesteleyn, Bart; Stoops, Bart; Vreeken, Rob J.; Vermond, Jan; Goutier, Wouter; Tang, Chan; Vogels, Ronald; Friesen, Robert H. E.; Goudsmit, Jaap; van Dongen, Maria J. P.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2017-09-28

    Influenza therapeutics with new targets and mechanisms of action are urgently needed to combat potential pandemics, emerging viruses, and constantly mutating strains in circulation. We report here on the design and structural characterization of potent peptidic inhibitors of influenza hemagglutinin. The peptide design was based on complementarity-determining region loops of human broadly neutralizing antibodies against the hemagglutinin (FI6v3 and CR9114). The optimized peptides exhibit nanomolar affinity and neutralization against influenza A group 1 viruses, including the 2009 H1N1 pandemic and avian H5N1 strains. The peptide inhibitors bind to the highly conserved stem epitope and block the low pH–induced conformational rearrangements associated with membrane fusion. These peptidic compounds and their advantageous biological properties should accelerate the development of new small molecule– and peptide-based therapeutics against influenza virus.

  14. Anti-angiogenic peptides for cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosca, Elena V; Koskimaki, Jacob E; Rivera, Corban G; Pandey, Niranjan B; Tamiz, Amir P; Popel, Aleksander S

    2011-08-01

    Peptides have emerged as important therapeutics that are being rigorously tested in angiogenesis-dependent diseases due to their low toxicity and high specificity. Since the discovery of endogenous proteins and protein fragments that inhibit microvessel formation (thrombospondin, endostatin) several peptides have shown promise in pre-clinical and clinical studies for cancer. Peptides have been derived from thrombospondin, collagens, chemokines, coagulation cascade proteins, growth factors, and other classes of proteins and target different receptors. Here we survey recent developments for anti-angiogenic peptides with length not exceeding 50 amino acid residues that have shown activity in pre-clinical models of cancer or have been tested in clinical trials; some of the peptides have been modified and optimized, e.g., through L-to-D and non-natural amino acid substitutions. We highlight technological advances in peptide discovery and optimization including computational and bioinformatics tools and novel experimental techniques.

  15. Computer-Aided Design of Antimicrobial Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fjell, Christopher D.; Hancock, Robert E.W.; Jenssen, Håvard

    2010-01-01

    An increasing number of reported cases of drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, demonstrate the urgent need for new therapeutics that are effective against such and other multi-drug resistant bacteria. Antimicrobial peptides have for two decades now been looked upon...... in antimicrobial activity. Consequently, the majority of peptides put into clinical trials have failed at some point, underlining the importance of a thorough peptide optimization. An important tool in peptide design and optimization is quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analysis, correlating...... library, to ensure a successful prediction. In contrast, the neural network model, though significantly less explored in relation to antimicrobial peptide design, has proven extremely promising, demonstrating impressive prediction success and ranking of random peptide libraries correlating well...

  16. Prediction of twin-arginine signal peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Jannick Dyrløv; Nielsen, Henrik; Widdick, D.

    2005-01-01

    a publicly available method, TatP, for prediction of bacterial Tat signal peptides. Results: We have retrieved sequence data for Tat substrates in order to train a computational method for discrimination of Sec and Tat signal peptides. The TatP method is able to positively classify 91% of 35 known Tat signal...... peptides and 84% of the annotated cleavage sites of these Tat signal peptides were correctly predicted. This method generates far less false positive predictions on various datasets than using simple pattern matching. Moreover, on the same datasets TatP generates less false positive predictions than...... expressions, whereas hydrophobicity discrimination of Tat- and Sec- signal peptides is carried out by an artificial neural network. A potential cleavage site of the predicted Tat signal peptide is also reported. The TatP prediction server is available as a public web server at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/TatP/....

  17. Microarray Selection of Cooperative Peptides for Modulating Enzyme Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinglin Fu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Recently, peptide microarrays have been used to distinguish proteins, antibodies, viruses, and bacteria based on their binding to random sequence peptides. We reported on the use of peptide arrays to identify enzyme modulators that involve screening an array of 10,000 defined and addressable peptides on a microarray. Primary peptides were first selected to inhibit the enzyme at low μM concentrations. Then, new peptides were found to only bind strongly with the enzyme–inhibitor complex, but not the native enzyme. These new peptides served as secondary inhibitors that enhanced the inhibition of the enzyme together with the primary peptides. Without the primary peptides, the secondary effect peptides had little effect on the enzyme activity. Conversely, we also selected peptides that recovered the activities of inhibited enzyme–peptide complex. The selection of cooperative peptide pairs will provide a versatile toolkit for modulating enzyme functions, which may potentially be applied to drug discovery and biocatalysis.

  18. Use of Galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong

    2017-03-21

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  19. Use of Galerina marginata genes and proteins for peptide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallen-Adams, Heather E.; Scott-Craig, John S.; Walton, Jonathan D.; Luo, Hong

    2016-03-01

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods comprising genes and peptides associated with cyclic peptides and cyclic peptide production in mushrooms. In particular, the present invention relates to using genes and proteins from Galerina species encoding peptides specifically relating to amatoxins in addition to proteins involved with processing cyclic peptide toxins. In a preferred embodiment, the present invention also relates to methods for making small peptides and small cyclic peptides including peptides similar to amanitin. Further, the present inventions relate to providing kits for making small peptides.

  20. [Research on differentially expressed genes related to substance and energy metabolism between healthy volunteers and splenasthenic syndrome patients with chronic superficial gastritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ze-Min, Yang; Wei-Wen, Chen; Ying-Fang, Wang

    2013-02-01

    To analyze the metabolic states of the lipids, protein, carbohydrate, and nucleic acid for chronic superficial gastritis patients of splenasthenic syndrome (SS), and to explore the pathogenesis mechanism of SS based on substance and energy metabolisms. During June 2004 to March 2005, recruited were four chronic superficial gastritis patients of SS who visited at the First Hospital of Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine and Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine. Four healthy volunteers were recruited from Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine. Their gastric mucosa was extracted to perform experiments of DNA microarray. The dual-channel DNA microarray data were mined and bioinformatics analyzed by BRB ArrayTools and IPA software. Fifteen genes were involved in substance and energy metabolisms in 20 differentially expressed genes, accounting for 75%.Among these genes, one gene was up-regulated, 14 genes down-regulated, and 11 genes were enzyme gene. Differentially expressed genes related to lipid metabolism included ACAA2 and CYP20A1, manifested as fatty acid catabolism and cholesterol transformation. Genes related to protein metabolism included ALDH9A1, ASL, ASS1, PCY-OX1L, RPS28, UBE2D2, UBXN1, B3GNT1, GCNT1, and PPP1R3C, manifested as decreased amino acid metabolism that may affect the biologic processes such as autonomic nerve, urea cycle, etc., reduced protein synthesis, increased ubiquitination of fault fold proteins, and decreased post-translated modification of glycosylation and dephosphorylation. Genes related to carbohydrate metabolism included PPP1R3C, B3GNT1, and GCNT1, manifested as decreased glycogen and glycan syntheses. Genes related to nucleic acid metabolism included RMI1, SMARCD3, and PARP1, manifested as degraded DNA duplication and transcription, and increased DNA damage repair. The metabolisms of the lipids, protein, carbohydrate, and nucleic acid in chronic superficial gastritis patients of SS obviously decreased

  1. An Evaluation of Peptide-Bond Isosteres

    OpenAIRE

    Choudhary, Amit; Raines, Ronald T.

    2011-01-01

    Peptide-bond isosteres can enable a deep interrogation of the structure and function of a peptide or protein by amplifying or attenuating particular chemical properties. In this minireview, the electronic, structural, and conformational attributes of four such isosteres—thioamides, esters, alkenes, and fluoroalkenes—are examined in detail. In particular, the ability of these isosteres to partake in noncovalent interactions is compared with that of the peptide bond. The consequential perturbat...

  2. Opioid Peptides: Potential for Drug Development

    OpenAIRE

    Aldrich, Jane V.; McLaughlin, Jay P.

    2012-01-01

    Opioid receptors are important targets for the treatment of pain and potentially for other disease states (e.g. mood disorders and drug abuse) as well. Significant recent advances have been made in identifying opioid peptide analogs that exhibit promising in vivo activity for treatment of these maladies. This review focuses on the development and evaluation of opioid peptide analogs demonstrating activity after systemic administration, and recent clinical evaluations of opioid peptides for po...

  3. Novel Disulfide Formation Strategies in Peptide Synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Postma, Tobias Maria

    2014-01-01

    Cysteine (Cys) is a unique amino acid due to its ability to form reversible covalent disulfide bonds. These bonds cause conformational constraints which make peptides or proteins more rigid and stable. In addition, the conformational constraints induced by disulfide bonds can result in highly potent molecules as illustrated by the vast number of disulfide-rich plant and animal peptide toxins. Furthermore, disulfide-rich peptides are gaining importance as pharmaceuticals and therefore powerful...

  4. Bioactive peptides in plant-derived foodstuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestri, Elena; Marmiroli, Marta; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2016-09-16

    A literature survey covering the presence of bioactive peptides in plant-derived foodstuffs is presented. Examples are given of plant peptides associated with a beneficial effect on human health. The main bioactive effects of these peptides are defined and their mechanism of action described, when known. Current understanding of the way in which these molecules are adsorbed, distributed, metabolized and finally excreted is discussed. A particular focus is given to potentially immunomodulatory peptides. The leading analytical assay methods used to evaluate their activity are outlined. Inspection of crop proteomic data revealed that at least 6000 proteins may harbour bioactive peptides. The analysis of these proteins using a Gene Ontology approach has provided a number of insights regarding their occurrence and relevance. The review reports an updated survey on bioactive peptides present in food crop plants, with a particular focus on immunomodulatory peptides which might be relevant for therapeutic applications. It employs a bioinformatic approach to search for proteins of crop plants potentially harboring bioactive peptides, summarising through Gene Ontology the main classes of peptide-containing proteins in food. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Neuroprotective peptides fused to arginine-rich cell penetrating peptides: Neuroprotective mechanism likely mediated by peptide endocytic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meloni, Bruno P; Milani, Diego; Edwards, Adam B; Anderton, Ryan S; O'Hare Doig, Ryan L; Fitzgerald, Melinda; Palmer, T Norman; Knuckey, Neville W

    2015-09-01

    Several recent studies have demonstrated that TAT and other arginine-rich cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) have intrinsic neuroprotective properties in their own right. Examples, we have demonstrated that in addition to TAT, poly-arginine peptides (R8 to R18; containing 8-18 arginine residues) as well as some other arginine-rich peptides are neuroprotective in vitro (in neurons exposed to glutamic acid excitotoxicity and oxygen glucose deprivation) and in the case of R9 in vivo (after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion in the rat). Based on several lines of evidence, we propose that this neuroprotection is related to the peptide's endocytosis-inducing properties, with peptide charge and arginine residues being critical factors. Specifically, we propose that during peptide endocytosis neuronal cell surface structures such as ion channels and transporters are internalised, thereby reducing calcium influx associated with excitotoxicity and other receptor-mediated neurodamaging signalling pathways. We also hypothesise that a peptide cargo can act synergistically with TAT and other arginine-rich CPPs due to potentiation of the CPPs endocytic traits rather than by the cargo-peptide acting directly on its supposedly intended intracellular target. In this review, we systematically consider a number of studies that have used CPPs to deliver neuroprotective peptides to the central nervous system (CNS) following stroke and other neurological disorders. Consequently, we critically review evidence that supports our hypothesis that neuroprotection is mediated by carrier peptide endocytosis. In conclusion, we believe that there are strong grounds to regard arginine-rich peptides as a new class of neuroprotective molecules for the treatment of a range of neurological disorders. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs): peptide structure and mode of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoonkyung; Hahm, Kyung-Soo

    2005-09-30

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been isolated and characterized from tissues and organisms representing virtually every kingdom and phylum. Their amino acid composition, amphipathicity, cationic charge, and size allow them to attach to and insert into membrane bilayers to form pores by 'barrel-stave', 'carpet' or 'toroidal-pore' mechanisms. Although these models are helpful for defining mechanisms of AMP activity, their relevance to resolving how peptides damage and kill microorganisms still needs to be clarified. Moreover, many AMPs employ sophisticated and dynamic mechanisms of action to carry out their likely roles in antimicrobial host defense. Recently, it has been speculated that transmembrane pore formation is not the only mechanism of microbial killing by AMPs. In fact, several observations suggest that translocated AMPs can alter cytoplasmic membrane septum formation, reduce cell-wall, nucleic acid, and protein synthesis, and inhibit enzymatic activity. In this review, we present the structures of several AMPs as well as models of how AMPs induce pore formation. AMPs have received special attention as a possible alternative way to combat antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. It may be possible to design synthetic AMPs with enhanced activity for microbial cells, especially those with antibiotic resistance, as well as synergistic effects with conventional antibiotic agents that lack cytotoxic or hemolytic activity.

  7. Atrial natriuretic peptides in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goetze, Jens P; Holst Hansen, Lasse; Terzic, Dijana

    2015-01-01

    Measurement of cardiac natriuretic peptides in plasma has gained a diagnostic role in the assessment of heart failure. Plasma measurement is though hampered by the marked instability of the hormones, which has led to the development of analyses that target N-terminal fragments from the prohormone....... These fragments are stable in plasma and represent surrogate markers of the actual natriuretic hormone. Post-translational processing of the precursors, however, is revealing itself to be a complex event with new information still being reported on proteolysis, covalent modifications, and amino acid...

  8. Peptide Antibiotics for ESKAPE Pathogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Thomas Thyge

    is considered poor compared to medicines for lifestyle diseases. According to the WHO we could be moving towards a post-antibiotic era in which previously treatable infections become fatal. Of special importance are multidrug resistant bacteria from the ESKAPE group (Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus aureus......, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Enterobacter). As a consequence of widespread multi-drug resistance, researchers have sought for alternative sources of antimicrobials. Antimicrobial peptides are produced by almost all living organisms as part of their defense or innate immune...

  9. Glucagon-like peptide-1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deacon, C F; Holst, Jens Juul; Carr, R D

    1999-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disease resulting in raised blood sugar which, if not satisfactorily controlled, can cause severe and often debilitating complications. Unfortunately, for many patients, the existing therapies do not give adequate control. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1......) is an incretin hormone which has a spectrum of activities which oppose the symptoms of diabetes. Of particular significance is the fact that these actions are glucose-dependent, meaning that the risk of severe hypoglycemia is practically eliminated. The recent elucidation of the key role of dipeptidyl peptidase...

  10. Production of peptide antisera specific for mouse and rat proinsulin C-peptide 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blume, N; Madsen, O D; Kofod, Hans

    1990-01-01

    Mice and rats have two functional non-allelic insulin genes. By using a synthetic peptide representing a common sequence in mouse and rat C-peptide 2 as antigen, we have produced rabbit antisera specific for an epitope which is not present in mouse or rat C-peptide 1. Long-term immunization did n...

  11. Synthetic peptide vaccines: palmitoylation of peptide antigens by a thioester bond increases immunogenicity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beekman, N.J.C.M.; Schaaper, W.M.M.; Tesser, G.I.

    1997-01-01

    Synthetic peptides have frequently been used to immunize animals. However, peptides less than about 20 to 30 amino acids long are poor immunogens. In general, to increase its immunogenicity, the presentation of the peptide should be improved, and molecular weight needs to be increased. Many attem...

  12. TAPBPR alters MHC class I peptide presentation by functioning as a peptide exchange catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Clemens; van Hateren, Andy; Trautwein, Nico; Neerincx, Andreas; Duriez, Patrick J; Stevanović, Stefan; Trowsdale, John; Deane, Janet E; Elliott, Tim; Boyle, Louise H

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of the antigen presentation pathway has recently been enhanced with the identification that the tapasin-related protein TAPBPR is a second major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-specific chaperone. We sought to determine whether, like tapasin, TAPBPR can also influence MHC class I peptide selection by functioning as a peptide exchange catalyst. We show that TAPBPR can catalyse the dissociation of peptides from peptide-MHC I complexes, enhance the loading of peptide-receptive MHC I molecules, and discriminate between peptides based on affinity in vitro. In cells, the depletion of TAPBPR increased the diversity of peptides presented on MHC I molecules, suggesting that TAPBPR is involved in restricting peptide presentation. Our results suggest TAPBPR binds to MHC I in a peptide-receptive state and, like tapasin, works to enhance peptide optimisation. It is now clear there are two MHC class I specific peptide editors, tapasin and TAPBPR, intimately involved in controlling peptide presentation to the immune system. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09617.001 PMID:26439010

  13. Connecting peptide (c-peptide) and the duration of diabetes mellitus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: C-peptide is derived from proinsulin and it is secreted in equimolar concentration with insulin. Plasma C-peptide is more stable than insulin and it provides an indirect measure of insulin secretory reserve and beta cell function. To determine relationship between C-peptide and duration of diabetes mellitus, age, ...

  14. Synthetic peptide vaccines: palmitoylation of peptide antigens by an thioester bond increases immunogenicity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekman, N.J.C.M.; Schaaper, W.M.M.; Tesser, G.I.; Dalsgaard, K.; Langeveld, J.P.M.; Boshuizen, R.S.; Meloen, R.H.

    1997-01-01

    Synthetic peptides have frequently been used to immunize animals. However, peptides less than about 20 to 30 amino acids long are poor immunogens. In general, to increase its immunogenicity, the presentation of the peptide should be improved, and molecular weight needs to be increased. Many attempts

  15. peptide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    have shown that while infusion of β-amyloid has effects on behaviour, it does not necessarily induce neurodegenerative effects. The effects on memory formation and cognitive abilities due to injection of amyloid fragments into the brain have been very inconsistent until now. It has been proposed that the aggregation state of ...

  16. Effect of a Fusion Peptide by Covalent Conjugation of a Mitochondrial Cell-Penetrating Peptide and a Glutathione Analog Peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmine Pasquale Cerrato

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Previously, we designed and synthesized a library of mitochondrial antioxidative cell-penetrating peptides (mtCPPs superior to the parent peptide, SS31, to protect mitochondria from oxidative damage. A library of antioxidative glutathione analogs called glutathione peptides (UPFs, exceptional in hydroxyl radical elimination compared with glutathione, were also designed and synthesized. Here, a follow-up study is described, investigating the effects of the most promising members from both libraries on reactive oxidative species scavenging ability. None of the peptides influenced cell viability at the concentrations used. Fluorescence microscopy studies showed that the fluorescein-mtCPP1-UPF25 (mtgCPP internalized into cells, and spectrofluorometric analysis determined the presence and extent of peptide into different cell compartments. mtgCPP has superior antioxidative activity compared with mtCPP1 and UPF25 against H2O2 insult, preventing ROS formation by 2- and 3-fold, respectively. Moreover, we neither observed effects on mitochondrial membrane potential nor production of ATP. These data indicate that mtgCPP is targeting mitochondria, protecting them from oxidative damage, while also being present in the cytosol. Our hypothesis is based on a synergistic effect resulting from the fused peptide. The mitochondrial peptide segment is targeting mitochondria, whereas the glutathione analog peptide segment is active in the cytosol, resulting in increased scavenging ability.

  17. Peptide amphiphile self-assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iscen, Aysenur; Schatz, George C.

    2017-08-01

    Self-assembly is a process whereby molecules organize into structures with hierarchical order and complexity, often leading to functional materials. Biomolecules such as peptides, lipids and DNA are frequently involved in self-assembly, and this leads to materials of interest for a wide variety of applications in biomedicine, photonics, electronics, mechanics, etc. The diversity of structures and functions that can be produced provides motivation for developing theoretical models that can be used for a molecular-level description of these materials. Here we overview recently developed computational methods for modeling the self-assembly of peptide amphiphiles (PA) into supramolecular structures that form cylindrical nanoscale fibers using molecular-dynamics simulations. Both all-atom and coarse-grained force field methods are described, and we emphasize how these calculations contribute insight into fiber structure, including the importance of β-sheet formation. We show that the temperature at which self-assembly takes place affects the conformations of PA chains, resulting in cylindrical nanofibers with higher β-sheet content as temperature increases. We also present a new high-density PA model that shows long network formation of β-sheets along the long axis of the fiber, a result that correlates with some experiments. The β-sheet network is mostly helical in nature which helps to maintain strong interactions between the PAs both radially and longitudinally. Contribution to Focus Issue Self-assemblies of Inorganic and Organic Nanomaterials edited by Marie-Paule Pileni.

  18. Diagnostic potential of circulating natriuretic peptides in chronic kidney disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mark, PB; Stewart, GA; Gansevoort, RT; Petrie, CJ; McDonagh, TA; Dargie, HJ; Rodger, RSC; Jardine, AG

    Background. Measurement of natriuretic peptides, particularly brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is an established method for the diagnosis of cardiovascular disorders, chiefly left ventricular (LV) dysfunction. The influence of renal function on the diagnostic utility of natriuretic peptides is

  19. The immunohistochemical demonstration of parafollicular cells and evaluation of calcium-phosphate balance in patients with thyroid hemiagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Sowinski

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid hemiagenesis (TH is characterized by the congenital absence of one thyroid lobe. The aim of this study was to evaluate the calcium-phosphate balance in TH. Twenty patients with TH and 20 controls with a bilobed thyroid were studied. Serum concentrations of total calcium, parathormon and calcitonin were measured. Additionally, the immunohistochemical expression of calcitonin, chromogranin A (chA, neuron-specific enolase (NSE and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP was evaluated in surgical specimens from patients with TH and controls. There were no significant differences in biochemical parameters between TH and controls. Positive staining for calcitonin was demonstrated in 3/8 thyroid sections from three patients with TH, but only in 2/33 sections from four controls (p < 0.005. All sections from patients with TH positive for calcitonin also expressed chA, NSE and CGRP. Two sections from controls positive for calcitonin presented an additionally positive reaction for chA, and one of them also for NSE. None presented positive staining for CGRP. Of three TH sections, in one, hyperplasia of C cells of medium grade, and in another hyperplasia of C cells of high grade, could be detected. In the controls, hyperplasia of C cells of low and medium grade was observed. TH was associated with slightly enhanced C cells hyperplasia compared to controls, which might indicate compensatory proliferation. However, the calcium-phosphate balance does not seem to be significantly affected. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 2, pp. 299–305

  20. Peptide-stabilized, fluorescent silver nanoclusters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, Simon; Vosch, Tom André Jos; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    on a hydroxymethyl-benzoic acid (HMBA) polyethylene glycol polyacrylamide copolymer (PEGA) resin enabled on-resin screening and evaluation of a peptide library, leading to identification of novel peptide-stabilized, fluorescent AgNCs. Using systematic amino acid substitutions, we synthesized and screened a 144...

  1. New Biodegradable Peptide-based Polymer Constructs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/32581127X

    2009-01-01

    Peptide-based polymers are of increasing interest, since they can be applied for a variety of purposes such as drug delivery devices, scaffolds for tissue engineering and -repair, and as novel biomaterials. Peptide-based polymers are common in nature and often exhibit special characteristics.

  2. Soybean peptide: optimal preparatory conditions, chemical and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study investigated the optimal condition for preparing soybean peptide from soybean isolates using digestive enzyme systems, comprising pepsin, trypsin and α-chymotrypsin set at different pH and temperatures. It was evaluated for closeness of characteristics to the control peptide (a TEK® oligopeptide, designated ...

  3. Protein identification by peptide mass fingerprinting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjernø, Karin

    2007-01-01

      Peptide mass fingerprinting is an effective way of identifying, e.g., gel-separated proteins, by matching experimentally obtained peptide mass data against large databases. However, several factors are known to influence the quality of the resulting matches, such as proteins contaminating...

  4. A cyclic peptidic serine protease inhibitor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, Baoyu; Xu, Peng; Jiang, Longguang

    2014-01-01

    Peptides are attracting increasing interest as protease inhibitors. Here, we demonstrate a new inhibitory mechanism and a new type of exosite interactions for a phage-displayed peptide library-derived competitive inhibitor, mupain-1 (CPAYSRYLDC), of the serine protease murine urokinase...

  5. Constrained Peptides as Miniature Protein Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hang

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the recent developments of protein engineering using both covalent and noncovalent bonds to constrain peptides, forcing them into designed protein secondary structures. These constrained peptides subsequently can be used as peptidomimetics for biological functions such as regulations of protein-protein interactions. PMID:25969758

  6. One Hundred Years of Peptide Chemistry*

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tion of proteins. Poisonous Peptides: The most important component of snake venoms are polypeptide neurotoxins such as cobrotoxin, which produce lethal flaccid paralysis through a neuromuscle block. The peptides of amanita mushrooms such as antamanides are. Two hormones of the pos- terior pituitary gland. They.

  7. Peptide Mass Fingerprinting of Egg White Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alty, Lisa T.; LaRiviere, Frederick J.

    2016-01-01

    Use of advanced mass spectrometry techniques in the undergraduate setting has burgeoned in the past decade. However, relatively few undergraduate experiments examine the proteomics tools of protein digestion, peptide accurate mass determination, and database searching, also known as peptide mass fingerprinting. In this experiment, biochemistry…

  8. Peptide ligands for targeting the extracellular domain of EGFR: Comparison between linear and cyclic peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Tyrslai M; Sable, Rushikesh; Singh, Sitanshu; Vicente, Maria Graca H; Jois, Seetharama D

    2017-10-20

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common solid internal malignancy among cancers. Early detection of cancer is key to increasing the survival rate of colorectal cancer patients. Overexpression of the EGFR protein is associated with CRC. We have designed a series of peptides that are highly specific for the extracellular domain of EGFR, based on our earlier studies on linear peptides. The previously reported linear peptide LARLLT, known to bind to EGFR, was modified with the goals of increasing its stability and its specificity toward EGFR. Peptide modifications, including D-amino acid substitution, cyclization, and chain reversal, were investigated. In addition, to facilitate labeling of the peptide with a fluorescent dye, an additional lysine residue was introduced onto the linear (KLARLLT) and cyclic peptides cyclo(KLARLLT) (Cyclo.L1). The lysine residue was also converted into an azide group in both a linear and reversed cyclic peptide sequences cyclo(K(N3)larllt) (Cyclo.L1.1) to allow for subsequent "click" conjugation. The cyclic peptides showed enhanced binding to EGFR by SPR. NMR and molecular modeling studies suggest that the peptides acquire a β-turn structure in solution. In vitro stability studies in human serum show that the cyclic peptide is more stable than the linear peptide. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Peptide based diagnostics: are random-sequence peptides more useful than tiling proteome sequences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navalkar, Krupa Arun; Johnston, Stephan Albert; Stafford, Phillip

    2015-02-01

    Diagnostics using peptide ligands have been available for decades. However, their adoption in diagnostics has been limited, not because of poor sensitivity but in many cases due to diminished specificity. Numerous reports suggest that protein-based rather than peptide-based disease detection is more specific. We examined two different approaches to peptide-based diagnostics using Coccidioides (aka Valley Fever) as the disease model. Although the pathogen was discovered more than a century ago, a highly sensitive diagnostic remains unavailable. We present a case study where two different approaches to diagnosing Valley Fever were used: first, overlapping Valley Fever epitopes representing immunodominant Coccidioides antigens were tiled using a microarray format of presynthesized peptides. Second, a set of random sequence peptides identified using a 10,000 peptide immunosignaturing microarray was compared for sensitivity and specificity. The scientific hypothesis tested was that actual epitope peptides from Coccidioides would provide sufficient sensitivity and specificity as a diagnostic. Results demonstrated that random sequence peptides exhibited higher accuracy when classifying different stages of Valley Fever infection vs. epitope peptides. The epitope peptide array did provide better performance than the existing immunodiffusion array, but when directly compared to the random sequence peptides, reported lower overall accuracy. This study suggests that there are competing aspects of antibody recognition that involve conservation of pathogen sequence and aspects of mimotope recognition and amino acid substitutions. These factors may prove critical when developing the next generation of high-performance immunodiagnostics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Antioxidant activity of yoghurt peptides: Part 2 – Characterisationof peptide fractions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farvin, Sabeena; Baron, Caroline; Nielsen, Nina Skall

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to elucidate previous findings showing that peptide fractions isolated from yoghurt had antioxidant effects. Therefore, peptides and free amino acids released during fermentation of milk were characterised. Yoghurt samples were stripped from sugars and lactic acid...... the peptides identified contained at least one proline residue. Some of the identified peptides included the hydrophobic amino acid residues Val or Leu at the N-terminus and Pro, His or Tyr in the amino acid sequence, which is characteristic of antioxidant peptides. In addition, the yoghurt contained...... a considerable amount of free amino acids such as His, Tyr, Thr and Lys, which have been reported to have antioxidant properties. Thus, our findings confirm that the antioxidant effects of the peptide fractions from yoghurt are due to the presence of certain peptides and free amino acids with recognised...

  11. New dendrimer - Peptide host - Guest complexes: Towards dendrimers as peptide carriers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boas, Ulrik; Sontjens, S.H.M.; Jensen, Knud Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    the NH- and CO-stretch signals of the peptide amide moieties shift towards lower wave-numbers upon complexation with the dendrimer. Spatial analysis of the complexes with NOESY spectroscopy generally shows close proximity of the N-terminal Boc group of the peptide to the peripheral adamantyl groups......Adamantyl urea and adamantyl thiourea modified poly(propylene imine) dendrimers act as hosts for N-terminal tert-butoxycarbonyl (Boc)-protected peptides and form chloroform-soluble complexes. investigations with NMR spectroscopy show that the peptide is bound to the dendrimer by ionic interactions...... between the dendrimer outer shell tertiary amines and the C-terminal carboxylic acid of the peptide, and also through host-urea to peptide-amide hydrogen bonding. The hydrogen-bonding nature of the peptide dendrimer interactions was further confirmed by using Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, for which...

  12. Use of Peptide Libraries for Identification and Optimization of Novel Antimicrobial Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Martin; Petkova, Asya; Gani, Jurnorain; Mikut, Ralf; Hilpert, Kai

    2017-01-01

    The increasing rates of resistance among bacteria and to a lesser extent fungi have resulted in an urgent need to find new molecules that hold therapeutic promise against multidrug-resistant strains. Antimicrobial peptides have proven very effective against a variety of multidrug-resistant bacteria. Additionally, the low levels of resistance reported towards these molecules are an attractive feature for antimicrobial drug development. Here we summarise information on diverse peptide libraries used to discover or to optimize antimicrobial peptides. Chemical synthesized peptide libraries, for example split and mix method, tea bag method, multi-pin method and cellulose spot method are discussed. In addition biological peptide library screening methods are summarized, like phage display, bacterial display, mRNA-display and ribosomal display. A few examples are given for small peptide libraries, which almost exclusively follow a rational design of peptides of interest rather than a combinatorial approach.

  13. Current trends and perspectives of bioactive peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daliri, Eric Banan-Mwine; Lee, Byong H; Oh, Deog H

    2017-06-12

    The remarkable growth of therapeutic peptide development in the past decade has led to a large number of market approvals and the market value is expected to hit $25 billion by 2018. This significant market increase is driven by the increasing incidences of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases and technological advancements in peptide synthesis. For this reason, the search for bioactive peptides has also increased exponentially. Many bioactive peptides from food and nonfood sources have shown positive health effects yet, obstacles such as the need to implement efficient and cost-effective strategies for industrial scale production, good manufacturing practices as well as well-designed clinical trials to provide robust evidence for supporting health claims continue to exist. Several other factors such as the possibility of allergenicity, toxicity and the stability of biological functions of the peptides during gastrointestinal digestion would need to be addressed.

  14. Peptide-Lipid Interactions: Experiments and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galdiero, Stefania; Falanga, Annarita; Cantisani, Marco; Vitiello, Mariateresa; Morelli, Giancarlo; Galdiero, Massimiliano

    2013-01-01

    The interactions between peptides and lipids are of fundamental importance in the functioning of numerous membrane-mediated cellular processes including antimicrobial peptide action, hormone-receptor interactions, drug bioavailability across the blood-brain barrier and viral fusion processes. Moreover, a major goal of modern biotechnology is obtaining new potent pharmaceutical agents whose biological action is dependent on the binding of peptides to lipid-bilayers. Several issues need to be addressed such as secondary structure, orientation, oligomerization and localization inside the membrane. At the same time, the structural effects which the peptides cause on the lipid bilayer are important for the interactions and need to be elucidated. The structural characterization of membrane active peptides in membranes is a harsh experimental challenge. It is in fact accepted that no single experimental technique can give a complete structural picture of the interaction, but rather a combination of different techniques is necessary. PMID:24036440

  15. The role of RFamide peptides in feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, David A; Luckman, Simon M

    2007-01-01

    In the three decades since FMRFamide was isolated from the clam Macrocallista nimbosa, the list of RFamide peptides has been steadily growing. These peptides occur widely across the animal kingdom, including five groups of RFamide peptides identified in mammals. Although there is tremendous diversity in structure and biological activity in the RFamides, the involvement of these peptides in the regulation of energy balance and feeding behaviour appears consistently through evolution. Even so, questions remain as to whether feeding-related actions represent a primary function of the RFamides, especially within mammals. However, as we will discuss here, the study of RFamide function is rapidly expanding and with it so is our understanding of how these peptides can influence food intake directly as well as related aspects of feeding behaviour and energy expenditure.

  16. Novel peptide-based protease inhibitors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roodbeen, Renée

    This thesis describes the design and synthesis of peptide-based serine protease inhibitors. The targeted protease, urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) activates plasminogen, which plays a major role in cancer metastasis. The peptide upain-2 (S 1 ,S 12-cyclo-AcCSWRGLENHAAC-NH2) is a highly......, the disulfide bridge was replaced with amide bonds of various lengths. The novel peptides did not retain their inhibitory activity, but formed the basis for another strategy. Second, bicyclic peptides were obtained by creating head-to-tail cyclized peptides that were made bicyclic by the addition of a covalent...... bond across the ring. The second bridge was made by a disulfide bridge, amide bond formation or via ring-closing metathesis. A, with upain-2 equipotent, bicyclic inhibitor was obtained and its binding to uPA was studied by ITC, NMR and X-ray. The knowledge of how selective inhibitors bind uPA has been...

  17. Harnessing supramolecular peptide nanotechnology in biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Kiat Hwa; Lee, Wei Hao; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Ni, Ming

    2017-01-01

    The harnessing of peptides in biomedical applications is a recent hot topic. This arises mainly from the general biocompatibility of peptides, as well as from the ease of tunability of peptide structure to engineer desired properties. The ease of progression from laboratory testing to clinical trials is evident from the plethora of examples available. In this review, we compare and contrast how three distinct self-assembled peptide nanostructures possess different functions. We have 1) nanofibrils in biomaterials that can interact with cells, 2) nanoparticles that can traverse the bloodstream to deliver its payload and also be bioimaged, and 3) nanotubes that can serve as cross-membrane conduits and as a template for nanowire formation. Through this review, we aim to illustrate how various peptides, in their various self-assembled nanostructures, possess great promise in a wide range of biomedical applications and what more can be expected.

  18. Antimicrobial Peptides: Mechanisms of Action and Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechinger, B; Gorr, S-U

    2017-03-01

    More than 40 antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) are expressed in the oral cavity. These AMPs have been organized into 6 functional groups, 1 of which, cationic AMPs, has received extensive attention in recent years for their promise as potential antibiotics. The goal of this review is to describe recent advances in our understanding of the diverse mechanisms of action of cationic AMPs and the bacterial resistance against these peptides. The recently developed peptide GL13K is used as an example to illustrate many of the discussed concepts. Cationic AMPs typically exhibit an amphipathic conformation, which allows increased interaction with negatively charged bacterial membranes. Peptides undergo changes in conformation and aggregation state in the presence of membranes; conversely, lipid conformation and packing can adapt to the presence of peptides. As a consequence, a single peptide can act through several mechanisms depending on the peptide's structure, the peptide:lipid ratio, and the properties of the lipid membrane. Accumulating evidence shows that in addition to acting at the cell membrane, AMPs may act on the cell wall, inhibit protein folding or enzyme activity, or act intracellularly. Therefore, once a peptide has reached the cell wall, cell membrane, or its internal target, the difference in mechanism of action on gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria may be less pronounced than formerly assumed. While AMPs should not cause widespread resistance due to their preferential attack on the cell membrane, in cases where specific protein targets are involved, the possibility exists for genetic mutations and bacterial resistance. Indeed, the potential clinical use of AMPs has raised the concern that resistance to therapeutic AMPs could be associated with resistance to endogenous host-defense peptides. Current evidence suggests that this is a rare event that can be overcome by subtle structural modifications of an AMP.

  19. Influence of fluor salts, hormone replacement therapy and calcitonin on the concentration of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, IGF-II and transforming growth factor-beta 1 in human iliac crest bone matrix from patients with primary osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pepene, C E; Seck, T; Diel, I; Minne, H W; Ziegler, R; Pfeilschifter, J

    2004-01-01

    Data from cell culture experiments suggest that local growth factors (GFs) may mediate the effects of estrogens, calcitonin or fluor ions on the skeleton. To assess the in vivo relevance of the in vitro reports, the effect of fluor salts, hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and calcitonin on the concentrations of IGF-I, IGF-II and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta 1 in bone matrix extracts from osteoporotic patients was evaluated. Iliac crest bone biopsies were obtained from 170 patients (76 men and 94 women) with primary osteoporosis aged 55.5+/-0.8 Years. Bone matrix extraction was performed based on a guanidine-HCl/ethylendiamine-tetra-acetic acid method. In comparison with age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched controls, no influence of long-term therapy with fluor ions (n=41) or calcitonin (n=16) on the bone matrix concentration of GFs was noticed. Postmenopausal women with osteoporosis on HRT (n=39) had lower skeletal IGF-I but not IGF-II levels as compared with age- and BMI-matched non-users. However, the lower rate of bone turnover in women with HRT may account for this difference, since the significance was lost after adjustment for alkaline phosphatase. Likewise, a tendency for lower TGF-beta 1 levels was observed in HRT users as compared with non-users but was lost after adjustment for bone turnover. None of the therapies influenced the serum levels of GFs when patients receiving continuous therapy for at least 1 Year before bone biopsy were considered. Our data suggest no direct effect of fluor therapy on skeletal GFs levels. At the concentrations used, neither HRT nor calcitonin appeared to exert any significant influence on serum or bone matrix GF levels.

  20. Antimicrobial peptides interact with peptidoglycan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neelay, Om P.; Peterson, Christian A.; Snavely, Mary E.; Brown, Taylor C.; TecleMariam, Ariam F.; Campbell, Jennifer A.; Blake, Allison M.; Schneider, Sydney C.; Cremeens, Matthew E.

    2017-10-01

    Traditional therapeutics are losing effectiveness as bacterial resistance increases, and antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) can serve as an alternative source for antimicrobial agents. Their mode of action is commonly hypothesized to involve pore formation in the lipid membrane, thereby leading to cell death. However, bacterial cell walls are much more complex than just the lipid membrane. A large portion of the wall is comprised of peptidoglycan, yet we did not find any report of AMP-peptidoglycan interactions. Consequently, this work evaluated AMP-peptidoglycan and AMP-phospholipid (multilamellar vesicles) interactions through tryptophan fluorescence. Given that peptidoglycan is insoluble and vesicles are large particles, we took advantage of the unique properties of Trp-fluorescence to use one technique for two very different systems. Interestingly, melittin and cecropin A interacted with peptidoglycan to a degree similar to vancomycin, a positive control. Whether these AMP-peptidoglycan interactions relate to a killing mode of action requires further study.

  1. A randomized, double-blind, multicenter, placebo-controlled study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of oral salmon calcitonin in the treatment of osteoporosis in postmenopausal women taking calcium and vitamin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriksen, Kim; Byrjalsen, Inger; Andersen, Jeppe R; Bihlet, Asger R; Russo, Luis A; Alexandersen, Peter; Valter, Ivo; Qvist, Per; Lau, Edith; Riis, Bente J; Christiansen, Claus; Karsdal, Morten A

    2016-10-01

    This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III study was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of oral calcitonin (SMC021) for the treatment of postmenopausal osteoporosis. A total of 4665 postmenopausal women with osteoporosis were randomized 1:1 to receive calcium and vitamin D plus either SMC021 tablets (0.8mg/d) or placebo for 36months. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with a new vertebral fracture. The two groups were well balanced at baseline with regards to demographic and clinical data. No effect of SMC021 on preventing new vertebral fractures was observed, nor was any effect seen on new hip or non-vertebral fractures. Women receiving SMC021 had a mean 1.02% (±0.12%) increase in lumbar spine bone mineral density (BMD) compared with a mean 0.18% (±0.12%) increase in the placebo group by the end of the study (p<0.0001). Similarly, small increases in BMD were observed at the femoral neck and hip in both groups. Levels of the biomarkers of bone turnover, urinary CTX-I and CTX-II, were 15% lower in the SMC021 group than in the placebo arm at 12 and 24months, but not at 36months. No change in quality of life between groups, assessed by the Qualeffo-14 questionnaire, was observed in either group between baseline and month 36. Pharmacokinetics analysis confirmed exposure to SMC021, but the drug levels were markedly lower than expected. Approximately 92% of subjects in each treatment group experienced an adverse event (AE), the majority of which were mild or moderate in intensity. AEs associated with SMC021 were primarily of gastrointestinal origin and included nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain, as well as hot flushes which were the reason for the slightly higher drop-out rate in the active treatment arm compared to placebo. The number of severe AEs was low in both groups. Thirty-five deaths were reported but none were considered treatment-related. Due to the lack of efficacy in preventing fractures, the development of the

  2. Genome-wide gene expression array identifies novel genes related to disease severity and excessive daytime sleepiness in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Che Chen

    Full Text Available We aimed to identify novel molecular associations between chronic intermittent hypoxia with re-oxygenation and adverse consequences in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA. We analyzed gene expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 48 patients with sleep-disordered breathing stratified into four groups: primary snoring (PS, moderate to severe OSA (MSO, very severe OSA (VSO, and very severe OSA patients on long-term continuous positive airway pressure treatment (VSOC. Comparisons of the microarray gene expression data identified eight genes up-regulated with OSA and down-regulated with CPAP treatment, and five genes down-regulated with OSA and up-regulated with CPAP treatment. Protein expression levels of two genes related to endothelial tight junction (AMOT P130, and PLEKHH3, and three genes related to anti-or pro-apoptosis (BIRC3, ADAR1 P150, and LGALS3 were all increased in the VSO group, while AMOT P130 was further increased, and PLEKHH3, BIRC3, and ADAR1 P150 were all decreased in the VSOC group. Subgroup analyses revealed that AMOT P130 protein expression was increased in OSA patients with excessive daytime sleepiness, BIRC3 protein expression was decreased in OSA patients with hypertension, and LGALS3 protein expression was increased in OSA patients with chronic kidney disease. In vitro short-term intermittent hypoxia with re-oxygenation experiment showed immediate over-expression of ADAR1 P150. In conclusion, we identified a novel association between AMOT/PLEKHH3/BIRC3/ADAR1/LGALS3 over-expressions and high severity index in OSA patients. AMOT and GALIG may constitute an important determinant for the development of hypersomnia and kidney injury, respectively, while BIRC3 may play a protective role in the development of hypertension.

  3. Large scale expression changes of genes related to neuronal signaling and developmental processes found in lateral septum of postpartum outbred mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian E Eisinger

    Full Text Available Coordinated gene expression changes across the CNS are required to produce the mammalian maternal phenotype. Lateral septum (LS is a brain region critically involved with aspects of maternal care, and we recently examined gene expression of whole septum (LS and medial septum in selectively bred maternal mice. Here, we expand on the prior study by 1 conducting microarray analysis solely on LS in virgin and postpartum mice, 2 using outbred mice, and 3 evaluating the role of sensory input on gene expression changes. Large scale changes in genes related to neuronal signaling were identified, including four GABAA receptor subunits. Subunits α4 and δ were downregulated in maternal LS, likely reflecting a reduction in the extrasynaptic, neurosteroid-sensitive α4/δ containing receptor subtype. Conversely, subunits ε and θ were increased in maternal LS. Fifteen K+ channel related genes showed altered expression, as did dopamine receptors Drd1a and Drd2 (both downregulated, hypocretin receptor 1 (Hcrtr1, kappa opioid receptor 1 (Oprk1, and transient receptor potential channel 4 (Trpc4. Expression of a large number of genes linked to developmental processes or cell differentiation were also altered in postpartum LS, including chemokine (C-X-C motif ligand 12 (Cxcl12, fatty acid binding protein 7 (Fabp7, plasma membrane proteolipid (Pllp, and suppressor of cytokine signaling 2 (Socs2. Additional genes that are linked to anxiety, such as glutathione reductase (Gsr, exhibited altered expression. Pathway analysis also identified changes in genes related to cyclic nucleotide metabolism, chromatin structure, and the Ras gene family. The sensory presence of pups was found to contribute to the altered expression of a subset of genes across all categories. This study suggests that both large changes in neuronal signaling and the possible terminal differentiation of neuronal and/or glial cells play important roles in producing the maternal state.

  4. Deletion of the small RNA chaperone protein Hfq down regulates genes related to virulence and confers protection against wild-type Brucella challenge in mice

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    Shuangshuang eLei

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis is one of the most common zoonotic epidemics worldwide. Brucella, the etiological pathogen of brucellosis, has unique virulence characteristics, including the ability to survive within the host cell. Hfq is a bacterial chaperone protein that is involved in the survival of the pathogen under stress conditions. Moreover, hfq affects the expression of a large number of target genes. In the present study, we characterized the expression and regulatory patterns of the target genes of Hfq during brucellosis. The results revealed that hfq expression is highly induced in macrophages at the early infection stage and at the late stage of mouse infection. Several genes related to virulence, including omp25, omp31, vjbR, htrA, gntR, and dnaK, were found to be regulated by hfq during infection in BALB/c mice. Gene expression and cytokine secretion analysis revealed that an hfq-deletion mutant induced different cytokine profiles compared with that induced by 16M. Infection with the hfq-deletion mutant induced protective immune responses against 16M challenge. Together, these results suggest that hfq is induced during infection and its deletion results in significant attenuation which affects the host immune response caused by Brucella infection. By regulating genes related to virulence, hfq promotes the virulence of Brucella. The unique characteristics of the hfq-deletion mutant, including its decreased virulence and the ability to induce protective immune response upon infection, suggest that it represents an attractive candidate for the design of a live attenuated vaccine against Brucella.

  5. Altered mRNA expression of genes related to nerve cell activity in the fracture callus of older rats: A randomized, controlled, microarray study

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    Meyer Ralph A

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The time required for radiographic union following femoral fracture increases with age in both humans and rats for unknown reasons. Since abnormalities in fracture innervation will slow skeletal healing, we explored whether abnormal mRNA expression of genes related to nerve cell activity in the older rats was associated with the slowing of skeletal repair. Methods Simple, transverse, mid-shaft, femoral fractures with intramedullary rod fixation were induced in anaesthetized female Sprague-Dawley rats at 6, 26, and 52 weeks of age. At 0, 0.4, 1, 2, 4, and 6 weeks after fracture, a bony segment, one-third the length of the femur, centered on the fracture site, including the external callus, cortical bone, and marrow elements, was harvested. cRNA was prepared and hybridized to 54 Affymetrix U34A microarrays (3/age/time point. Results The mRNA levels of 62 genes related to neural function were affected by fracture. Of the total, 38 genes were altered by fracture to a similar extent at the three ages. In contrast, eight neural genes showed prolonged down-regulation in the older rats compared to the more rapid return to pre-fracture levels in younger rats. Seven genes were up-regulated by fracture more in the younger rats than in the older rats, while nine genes were up-regulated more in the older rats than in the younger. Conclusions mRNA of 24 nerve-related genes responded differently to fracture in older rats compared to young rats. This differential expression may reflect altered cell function at the fracture site that may be causally related to the slowing of fracture healing with age or may be an effect of the delayed healing.

  6. Identification of peptides that selectively bind to myoglobin by biopanning of phage displayed-peptide library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanaban, Guruprasath; Park, Hyekyung; Choi, Ji Suk; Cho, Yong-Woo; Kang, Woong Chol; Moon, Chan-Il; Kim, In-San; Lee, Byung-Heon

    2014-10-10

    Biopanning of phage displayed-peptide library was performed against myoglobin, a marker for the early assessment of acute myocardial infarction (AMI), to identify peptides that selectively bind to myoglobin. Using myoglobin-conjugated magnetic beads, phages that bound to myoglobin were collected and amplified for the next round of screening. A 148-fold enrichment of phage titer was observed after five rounds of screening relative to the first round. After phage binding ELISA, three phage clones were selected (3R1, 3R7 and 3R10) and the inserted peptides were chemically synthesized. The analysis of binding affinity showed that the 3R7 (CPSTLGASC) peptide had higher binding affinity (Kd=57 nM) than did the 3R1 (CNLSSSWIC) and 3R10 (CVPRLSAPC) peptide (Kd=125 nM and 293 nM, respectively). Cross binding activity to other proteins, such as bovine serum albumin, troponin I, and creatine kinase-MB, was minimal. In a peptide-antibody sandwich ELISA, the selected peptides efficiently captured myoglobin. Moreover, the concentrations of myoglobin in serum samples measured by a peptide-peptide sandwich assay were comparable to those measured by a commercial antibody-based kit. These results indicate that the identified peptides can be used for the detection of myoglobin and may be a cost effective alternative to antibodies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Analysis of the endogenous peptide profile of milk: identification of 248 mainly casein-derived peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baum, Florian; Fedorova, Maria; Ebner, Jennifer; Hoffmann, Ralf; Pischetsrieder, Monika

    2013-12-06

    Milk is an excellent source of bioactive peptides. However, the composition of the native milk peptidome has only been partially elucidated. The present study applied matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) directly or after prefractionation of the milk peptides by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) or OFFGEL fractionation for the comprehensive analysis of the peptide profile of raw milk. The peptide sequences were determined by MALDI-TOF/TOF or nano-ultra-performance liquid chromatography-nanoelectrospray ionization-LTQ-Orbitrap-MS. Direct MALDI-TOF-MS analysis led to the assignment of 57 peptides. Prefractionation by both complementary methods led to the assignment of another 191 peptides. Most peptides originate from α(S1)-casein, followed by β-casein, and α(S2)-casein. κ-Casein and whey proteins seem to play only a minor role as peptide precursors. The formation of many, but not all, peptides could be explained by the activity of the endogenous peptidases, plasmin or cathepsin D, B, and G. Database searches revealed the presence of 22 peptides with established physiological function, including those with angiotensin-converting-enzyme (ACE) inhibitory, immunomodulating, or antimicrobial activity.

  8. Interactions of Bio-Inspired Membranes with Peptides and Peptide-Mimetic Nanoparticles

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    Michael Sebastiano

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Via Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD and implicit solvent coarse-grained (CG Molecular Dynamics (MD we examine the interaction of an amphiphilic cell-penetrating peptide PMLKE and its synthetic counterpart with a bio-inspired membrane. We use the DPD technique to investigate the interaction of peptide-mimetic nanoparticles, or nanopins, with a three-component membrane. The CG MD approach is used to investigate the interaction of a cell-penetrating peptide PMLKE with single-component membrane. We observe the spontaneous binding and subsequent insertion of peptide and nanopin in the membrane by using CG MD and DPD approaches, respectively. In addition, we find that the insertion of peptide and nanopins is mainly driven by the favorable enthalpic interactions between the hydrophobic components of the peptide, or nanopin, and the membrane. Our study provides insights into the mechanism underlying the interactions of amphiphilic peptide and peptide-mimetic nanoparticles with a membrane. The result of this study can be used to guide the functional integration of peptide and peptide-mimetic nanoparticles with a cell membrane.

  9. Determinants of recombinant production of antimicrobial cationic peptides and creation of peptide variants in bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Falla, T; Wu, M; Fidai, S; Burian, J; Kay, W; Hancock, R E

    1998-06-29

    Cationic peptides possessing antibacterial activity are virtually ubiquitous in nature, and offer exciting prospects as new therapeutic agents. We had previously demonstrated that such peptides could be produced by fusion protein technology in bacteria and several carrier proteins had been tested as fusion partners including glutathione-S-transferase, S. aureus protein A, IgG binding protein and P. aeruginosa outer membrane protein OprF. However these fusion partners, while successfully employed in peptide expression, were not optimized for high level production of cationic peptides (Piers, K., Brow, M. L., and Hancock, R. E. W. 1993, Gene 137, 7-13). In this paper we took advantage of a small replication protein RepA from E. coli and used its truncated version to construct fusion partners. The minimal elements required for high level expression of cationic peptide were defined as a DNA sequence encoding a fusion protein comprising, from the N-terminus, a 68 amino acid carrier region, an anionic prepro domain, a single methionine and the peptide of interest. The 68 amino acid carrier region was a block of three polypeptides consisting of a truncated RepA, a synthetic cellulose binding domain and a hexa histidine domain. The improved system showed high level expression and simplified downstream purification. The active peptide could be yielded by CNBr cleavage of the fusion protein. This novel vector was used to express three classes of cationic peptides including the alpha-helical peptide CEMA, the looped peptide bactenecin and the extended peptide indolicidin. In addition, mutagenesis of the peptide gene to produce peptide variants of CEMA and indolicidin using the improved vector system was shown to be successful.

  10. rapmad: Robust analysis of peptide microarray data

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    Rothermel Andrée

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptide microarrays offer an enormous potential as a screening tool for peptidomics experiments and have recently seen an increased field of application ranging from immunological studies to systems biology. By allowing the parallel analysis of thousands of peptides in a single run they are suitable for high-throughput settings. Since data characteristics of peptide microarrays differ from DNA oligonucleotide microarrays, computational methods need to be tailored to these specifications to allow a robust and automated data analysis. While follow-up experiments can ensure the specificity of results, sensitivity cannot be recovered in later steps. Providing sensitivity is thus a primary goal of data analysis procedures. To this end we created rapmad (Robust Alignment of Peptide MicroArray Data, a novel computational tool implemented in R. Results We evaluated rapmad in antibody reactivity experiments for several thousand peptide spots and compared it to two existing algorithms for the analysis of peptide microarrays. rapmad displays competitive and superior behavior to existing software solutions. Particularly, it shows substantially improved sensitivity for low intensity settings without sacrificing specificity. It thereby contributes to increasing the effectiveness of high throughput screening experiments. Conclusions rapmad allows the robust and sensitive, automated analysis of high-throughput peptide array data. The rapmad R-package as well as the data sets are available from http://www.tron-mz.de/compmed.

  11. Double labelling immunohistochemistry on the sympathetic trunk ganglia neurons projecting to the extrinsic penile smooth musculature of the pig: an experimental study on the retractor penis muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botti, Maddalena; Gazza, Ferdinando; Ragionieri, Luisa; Minelli, Luisa Bo; Panu, Rino

    2013-01-01

    Retrograde neuronal tracing and double labelling immunofluorescence methods were used to define the neurochemical content of sympathetic trunk ganglia neurons projecting to the pig retractor penis muscle, which was taken as an experimental model of the male genital smooth musculature. After the injection of Fast Blue into the bulbo-penile portion of the retractor penis muscle, the eventual co-existence of the catecholaminergic marker tyrosine hydroxylase with calcitonine gene related peptide, leu-enkephalin, neuropeptide Y, neuronal nitric oxide synthase, substance P, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide or vesicular acetylcholine transporter was studied in the ipsilateral S1 sympathetic trunk ganglia, which resulted to contain the greatest number of autonomic retractor penis muscle projecting cells. The observation of Fast Blue positive neurons under the fluorescent microscope allowed the identification of different subpopulations of catecholaminergic and non-catecholaminergic retractor penis muscle-projecting neurons. The majority of catecholaminergic cells contained tyrosine hydroxylase alone, while the remaining part showed co-localization of tyrosine hydroxylase with all the other tested markers. These last neurons were immunoreactive, in decreasing percentages, for neuropeptide Y, leu-enkephalin, neuronal nitric oxide synthase, substance P, calcitonine gene related peptide, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and vesicular acetylcholine transporter. The majority of non-catecholaminergic neurons were immunonegative for all the tested markers. The remaining non-catecholaminergic cells contained, in decreasing percentages, neuropeptide Y, neuronal nitric oxide synthase, leu-enkephalin, vasoactive intestinal polypeptide, vesicular acetylcholine transporter, substance P and calcitonine gene related peptide. Our findings documented the complexity of the neurochemical interactions that regulate both the motor functions of RPM and the blood flow through the muscle.

  12. Bioactive proteins and peptides in foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Barbara; Sieber, Robert

    2011-03-01

    Increasing amounts of data demonstrate a bioactive role of proteins and peptides above and beyond their nutritional impact. The focus of the investigations has mainly been on vitamin- and mineral-binding proteins, on antimicrobial, immunosuppressing/-modulatory proteins, and on proteins with enzyme inhibitory activity as well as on hormones and growth factors from different food proteins; most research has been performed on milk proteins. Because of their molecular size, intact absorption of proteins in the human gastrointestinal tract is limited. Therefore, most of the proteins with biological functions show physiological activity in the gastrointestinal tract by enhancing nutrient absorption, inhibiting enzymes, and modulating the immune system to defend against pathogens. Peptides are released during fermentation or digestion from food proteins by proteolytic enzymes; such peptides have been found mainly in milk. Some of these released peptides exert biological activities such as opiate-like, antihypertensive, mineral-binding, antioxidative, antimicrobial, immuno-, and cytomodulating activity. Intact absorption of these smaller peptides is more likely than that of the larger proteins. Consequently, other organs than the gastrointestinal tract are possible targets for their biological functions. Bioactive proteins as well as bioactive peptides are part of a balanced diet. It is possible to accumulate bioactive peptides in food, for example by using specific microorganisms in fermented dairy products. Although bioactive peptides have been the subject of several studies in vitro and in vivo, their health potential is still under investigation. Up to now, the Commission of European Communities has not (yet) authorized any health claims for bioactive proteins and peptides from food.

  13. MILK PROTEINS-DERIVED BIOACTIVE PEPTIDES

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    Özer KINIK

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available Milk proteins are a source of various biologically active peptides, which are formed enzymatically either by digestive enzymes or during milk fermentation. These peptides have been shown to have different biochemical and physiological effects, such as binding to opioid receptors, inhibition of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE, antimicrobial, antihypertensive, antioxidative, antithrombotic, immunomodulatory and mineral binding effects. This review will focus on chemical structure, physiological properties, production and formation mechanisms in dairy food of milk-derived bioactive peptides and their usage potential as functional food ingredient.

  14. Imaging tumors with peptide-based radioligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behr, T. M.; Gotthardt, M.; Barth, A.; Behe, M. [Philipps-University of Marburg, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Marburg (Germany)

    2001-06-01

    Regulatory peptides are small, readily diffusable and potent natural substances with a wide spectrum of receptor-mediated actions in humans. High affinity receptors for these peptides are (over)-expressed in many neoplasms, and these receptors may represent, therefore, new molecular targets for cancer diagnosis and therapy. This review aims to give an overview of the peptide-based radiopharmaceuticals which are presently already commercially available or which are in advanced stages of their clinical testing so that their broader availability is anticipated soon. Physiologically, these peptides bind to and act through G protein-coupled receptors in the cell membrane. Historically, somatostatin analogs are the first class of receptor binding peptides having gained clinical application. In {sup 111}In-DTPA-(D-Phe{sup 1})-octreotide is the first and only radio peptide which has obtained regulatory approval in Europe and the United States to date. Extensive clinical studies involving several thousands of patients have shown that the major clinical application of somatostatin receptor scintigraphy is the detection and the staging of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (carcinoids). In these tumors, octreotide scintigraphy is superior to any other staging method. However, its sensitivity and accuracy in other, more frequent neoplasms is limited. Radiolabeled vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) has been shown to visualize the majority of gastrointestinal adenocarcinomas, as well as some neuroendocrine tumors, including insulinomas (the latter being often missed by somatostatin receptor scintigraphy). Due to the outstanding diagnostic accuracy of the pentagastrin test in detecting the presence, persistence, or recurrence of medullary thyroid cancer (MTC), it was postulated the expression of the corresponding (i.e. cholecystokinin (CCK-)-B) receptor type in human MTC. This receptor is also widely expressed on human small-cell lung. Indeed, {sup 111}In-labeled DTPA

  15. SICLOPPS cyclic peptide libraries in drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavassoli, Ali

    2017-06-01

    Cyclic peptide libraries have demonstrated significant potential when employed against challenging targets such as protein-protein interactions. While a variety of methods for library generation exist, genetically encoded libraries hold several advantages over their chemically synthesized counterparts; they are more readily accessible and allow straightforward hit deconvolution. One method for the intracellular generation of such libraries is split-intein circular ligation of peptides and proteins (SICLOPPS). Here we detail and discuss the deployment of SICLOPPS libraries for the identification of cyclic peptide inhibitors of a variety of targets. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Maximin H5 is an anticancer peptide

    OpenAIRE

    Dennison, SR; Harris, F; Phoenix, DA

    2017-01-01

    Here we report the first major example of anionic amphibian host defence peptides (HDPs) with anticancer activity. Maximin H5 is a C-terminally amidated, anionic host defence peptide (MH5N) from toads of the Bombina genus, which was shown to possess activity against the glioma cell line, T98G (EC50 = 125 μM). The peptide adopted high levels of α-helical structure (57.3%) in the presence of model cancer membranes (DMPC:DMPS in a molar ratio of 10:1). MH5N also showed a strong ability to penetr...

  17. Cysteine-containing peptides having antioxidant properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielicki, John K [Castro Valley, CA

    2008-10-21

    Cysteine containing amphipathic alpha helices of the exchangeable apolipoproteins, as exemplified by apolipoprotein (apo) A-I.sub.Milano (R173C) and apoA-I.sub.Paris, (R151C) were found to exhibit potent antioxidant activity on phospholipid surfaces. The addition of a free thiol, at the hydrophobic/hydrophilic interface of an amphipathic alpha helix of synthetic peptides that mimic HDL-related proteins, imparts a unique antioxidant activity to these peptides which inhibits lipid peroxidation and protects phospholipids from water-soluble free radical initiators. These peptides can be used as therapeutic agents to combat cardiovascular disease, ischemia, bone disease and other inflammatory related diseases.

  18. The Potential of Antimicrobial Peptides as Biocides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brendan F. Gilmore

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial peptides constitute a diverse class of naturally occurring antimicrobial molecules which have activity against a wide range of pathogenic microorganisms. Antimicrobial peptides are exciting leads in the development of novel biocidal agents at a time when classical antibiotics are under intense pressure from emerging resistance, and the global industry in antibiotic research and development stagnates. This review will examine the potential of antimicrobial peptides, both natural and synthetic, as novel biocidal agents in the battle against multi-drug resistant pathogen infections.

  19. Exploiting protected maleimides to modify oligonucleotides, peptides and peptide nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Clément; Brun, Omar; Pedroso, Enrique; Grandas, Anna

    2015-04-10

    This manuscript reviews the possibilities offered by 2,5-dimethylfuran-protected maleimides. Suitably derivatized building blocks incorporating the exo Diels-Alder cycloadduct can be introduced at any position of oligonucleotides, peptide nucleic acids, peptides and peptoids, making use of standard solid-phase procedures. Maleimide deprotection takes place upon heating, which can be followed by either Michael-type or Diels-Alder click conjugation reactions. However, the one-pot procedure in which maleimide deprotection and conjugation are simultaneously carried out provides the target conjugate more quickly and, more importantly, in better yield. This procedure is compatible with conjugates involving oligonucleotides, peptides and peptide nucleic acids. A variety of cyclic peptides and oligonucleotides can be obtained from peptide and oligonucleotide precursors incorporating protected maleimides and thiols.

  20. Analysis of residue conformations in peptides in Cambridge structural database and protein-peptide structural complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raghavender, Upadhyayula Surya

    2017-03-01

    A comprehensive statistical analysis of the geometric parameters of peptide chains in a reduced dataset of protein-peptide complexes in Protein Data Bank (PDB) is presented. The angular variables describing the backbone conformations of amino acid residues in peptide chains shed insights into the conformational preferences of peptide residues interacting with protein partners. Nonparametric statistical approaches are employed to evaluate the interrelationships and associations in structural variables. Grouping of residues based on their structure into chemical classes reveals characteristic trends in parameter relationships. A comparison of canonical amino acid residues in free peptide structures in Cambridge structural database (CSD) with identical residues in PDB complexes, suggests that the information can be integrated from both the structural repositories enabling efficient and accurate modeling of biologically active peptides. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S.