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Sample records for calcite precipitation dominates

  1. Calcite precipitation dominates the electrical signatures of zero valent iron columns under simulated field conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuxin; Versteeg, Roelof; Slater, Lee; LaBrecque, Douglas

    2009-05-12

    Calcium carbonate is a secondary mineral precipitate influencing zero valent iron (ZVI) barrier reactivity and hydraulic performance. We conducted column experiments to investigate electrical signatures resulting from concurrent CaCO(3) and iron oxides precipitation under simulated field geochemical conditions. We identified CaCO(3) as a major mineral phase throughout the columns, with magnetite present primarily close to the influent based on XRD analysis. Electrical measurements revealed decreases in conductivity and polarization of both columns, suggesting that electrically insulating CaCO(3) dominates the electrical response despite the presence of electrically conductive iron oxides. SEM/EDX imaging suggests that the electrical signal reflects the geometrical arrangement of the mineral phases. CaCO(3) forms insulating films on ZVI/magnetite surfaces, restricting charge transfer between the pore electrolyte and ZVI particles, as well as across interconnected ZVI particles. As surface reactivity also depends on the ability of the surface to engage in redox reactions via charge transfer, electrical measurements may provide a minimally invasive technology for monitoring reactivity loss due to CaCO(3) precipitation. Comparison between laboratory and field data shows consistent changes in electrical signatures due to iron corrosion and secondary mineral precipitation.

  2. Calcite precipitation dominates the electrical signatures of zero valent iron columns under simulated field conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yuxin; Versteeg, R.; Slater, L.; LaBrecque, D.

    2009-06-01

    Calcium carbonate is a secondary mineral precipitate influencing zero valent iron (ZVI) barrier reactivity and hydraulic performance. We conducted column experiments to investigate electrical signatures resulting from concurrent CaCO{sub 3} and iron oxides precipitation under simulated field geochemical conditions. We identified CaCO{sub 3} as a major mineral phase throughout the columns, with magnetite present primarily close to the influent based on XRD analysis. Electrical measurements revealed decreases in conductivity and polarization of both columns, suggesting that electrically insulating CaCO{sub 3} dominates the electrical response despite the presence of electrically conductive iron oxides. SEM/EDX imaging suggests that the electrical signal reflects the geometrical arrangement of the mineral phases. CaCO{sub 3} forms insulating films on ZVI/magnetite surfaces, restricting charge transfer between the pore electrolyte and ZVI particles, as well as across interconnected ZVI particles. As surface reactivity also depends on the ability of the surface to engage in redox reactions via charge transfer, electrical measurements may provide a minimally invasive technology for monitoring reactivity loss due to CaCO{sub 3} precipitation. Comparison between laboratory and field data shows consistent changes in electrical signatures due to iron corrosion and secondary mineral precipitation.

  3. On the complex conductivity signatures of calcite precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Yuxin; Hubbard, Susan; Williams, Kenneth Hurst; Ajo-Franklin, Jonathan

    2009-11-01

    Calcite is a mineral phase that frequently precipitates during subsurface remediation or geotechnical engineering processes. This precipitation can lead to changes in the overall behavior of the system, such as flow alternation and soil strengthening. Because induced calcite precipitation is typically quite variable in space and time, monitoring its distribution in the subsurface is a challenge. In this research, we conducted a laboratory column experiment to investigate the potential of complex conductivity as a mean to remotely monitor calcite precipitation. Calcite precipitation was induced in a glass bead (3 mm) packed column through abiotic mixing of CaCl{sub 2} and Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} solutions. The experiment continued for 12 days with a constant precipitation rate of {approx}0.6 milimole/d. Visual observations and scanning electron microscopy imaging revealed two distinct phases of precipitation: an earlier phase dominated by well distributed, discrete precipitates and a later phase characterized by localized precipitate aggregation and associated pore clogging. Complex conductivity measurements exhibited polarization signals that were characteristic of both phases of calcite precipitation, with the precipitation volume and crystal size controlling the overall polarization magnitude and relaxation time constant. We attribute the observed responses to polarization at the electrical double layer surrounding calcite crystals. Our experiment illustrates the potential of electrical methods for characterizing the distribution and aggregation state of nonconductive minerals like calcite. Advancing our ability to quantify geochemical transformations using such noninvasive methods is expected to facilitate our understanding of complex processes associated with natural subsurface systems as well as processes induced through engineered treatments (such as environmental remediation and carbon sequestration).

  4. in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshiko Fujita; Robert W. Smith

    2009-08-01

    in situ Calcite Precipitation for Contaminant Immobilization Yoshiko Fujita (Yoshiko.fujita@inl.gov) (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Robert W. Smith (University of Idaho-Idaho Falls, Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA) Subsurface radionuclide and trace metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of DOE’s greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent trace ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide strontium-90, is co-precipitation in calcite. Calcite, a common mineral in the arid western U.S., can form solid solutions with trace metals. The rate of trace metal incorporation is susceptible to manipulation using either abiotic or biotic means. We have previously demonstrated that increasing the calcite precipitation rate by stimulating the activity of urea hydrolyzing microorganisms can result in significantly enhanced Sr uptake. Urea hydrolysis causes the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing pH and alkalinity, and also by liberating the reactive cations from the aquifer matrix via exchange reactions involving the ammonium ion derived from urea: H2NCONH2 + 3H2O ? 2NH4+ + HCO3- + OH- urea hydrolysis >X:2Ca + 2NH4+ ? 2>X:NH4 + Ca2+ ion exchange Ca2+ + HCO3- + OH- ? CaCO3(s) + H2O calcite precipitation where >X: is a cation exchange site on the aquifer matrix. This contaminant immobilization approach has several attractive features. Urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which is produced by many indigenous subsurface microorganisms. Addition of foreign microbes is unnecessary. In turn the involvement of the native microbes and the consequent in situ generation of reactive components in the aqueous phase (e.g., carbonate and Ca or Sr) can allow dissemination of the reaction over a larger volume and/or farther away from an amendment injection point, as compared to direct addition of the reactants at

  5. The role of silicate surfaces on calcite precipitation kinetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stockmann, Gabrielle J.; Wolff-Boenisch, Domenik; Bovet, Nicolas Emile

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to illuminate how calcite precipitation depends on the identity and structure of the growth substrate. Calcite was precipitated at 25°C from supersaturated aqueous solutions in the presence of seeds of either calcite or one of six silicate materials: augite, enstatite......, labradorite, olivine, basaltic glass and peridotite rock. Calcite saturation was achieved by mixing a CaCl2-rich aqueous solution with a NaHCO3-Na2CO3 aqueous buffer in mixed-flow reactors containing 0.5-2g of mineral, rock, or glass seeds. This led to an inlet fluid calcite saturation index of 0.6 and a p......H equal to 9.1. Although the inlet fluid composition, flow rate, and temperature were identical for all experiments, the onset of calcite precipitation depended on the identity of the seeds present in the reactor. Calcite precipitated instantaneously and at a constant rate in the presence of calcite...

  6. Hydrochemical controls on aragonite versus calcite precipitation in cave dripwaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Carlos; Lozano, Rafael P.

    2016-11-01

    Despite the paleoclimatic relevance of primary calcite to aragonite transitions in stalagmites, the relative role of fluid Mg/Ca ratio, supersaturation and CO32- concentration in controlling such transitions is still incompletely understood. Accordingly, we have monitored the hydrochemistry of 50 drips and 8 pools that are currently precipitating calcite and/or aragonite in El Soplao and Torca Ancha Caves (N. Spain), investigating the mineralogy and geochemistry of the CaCO3 precipitates on the corresponding natural speleothem surfaces. The data reveal that, apart from possible substrate effects, dripwater Mg/Ca is the only obvious control on CaCO3 polymorphism in the studied stalagmites and pools, where calcite- and aragonite-precipitating dripwaters are separated by an initial (i.e. at stalactite tips) Mg/Ca threshold at ≈1.1 mol/mol. Within the analyzed ranges of pH (8.2-8.6), CO32- concentration (1-6 mg/L), supersaturation (SIaragonite: 0.08-1.08; SIcalcite: 0.23-1.24), drip rate (0.2-81 drops/min) and dissolved Zn (6-90 μg/L), we observe no unequivocal influence of these parameters on CaCO3 mineralogy. Despite the almost complete overlapping supersaturations of calcite- and aragonite-precipitating waters, the latter are on average less supersaturated because the waters having Mg/Ca above ∼1.1 have mostly achieved such high ratios by previously precipitating calcite. Both calcite and aragonite precipitated at or near oxygen isotopic equilibrium, and Mg incorporation into calcite was consistent with literature-based predictions, indicating that in the studied cases CaCO3 precipitation was not significantly influenced by strong kinetic effects. In the studied cases, the calcites that precipitate at ∼11 °C from dripwaters with initial Mg/Ca approaching ∼1.1 incorporate ∼5 mol% MgCO3, close to the published value above which calcite solubility exceeds aragonite solubility, suggesting that aragonite precipitation in high-relative-humidity caves is

  7. Fracture-aperture alteration induced by calcite precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, T.; Detwiler, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    Mineral precipitation significantly alters the transport properties of fractured rock. Chemical solubility gradients that favor precipitation induce mineral growth, which decreases the local aperture and alters preferential flow paths. Understanding the resulting development of spatial heterogeneities is necessary to predict the evolution of transport properties in the subsurface. We present experimental results that quantify the relationship between mineral precipitation and aperture alteration in a transparent analog fracture, 7.62cm x 7.62cm, with a uniform aperture of ~200 μm. Prior to flow experiments, a pump circulated a super-saturated calcite solution over the bottom glass, coating the glass surface with calcite. This method of seeding resulted in clusters of calcite crystals with large reactive surface area and provided micro-scale variability in the aperture field. A continuous flow syringe pump injected a reactive fluid into the fracture at 0.5 ml/min. The fluid was a mixture of sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3, 0.02M) and calcium chloride (CaCl2 0.0004M) with a saturation index, Ω, of 8.51 with respect to calcite. A strobed LED panel backlit the fracture and a high-resolution CCD camera monitored changes in transmitted light intensity. Light transmission techniques provided a quantitative measurement of fracture aperture over the flow field. Results from these preliminary experiments showed growth near the inlet of the fracture, with decreasing precipitation rates in the flow direction. Over a period of two weeks, the fracture aperture decreased by 17% within the first 4mm of the inlet. Newly precipitated calcite bridged individual crystal clusters and smoothed the reacting surface. This observation is an interesting contradiction to the expectation of surface roughening induced by mineral growth. Additionally, the aperture decreased uniformly across the width of the fracture due to the initial aperture distribution. Future experiments of precipitation

  8. Numerical Simulations of Urea Hydrolysis and Calcite Precipitation in Porous Media Using STOMP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luanjing Guo; Hai Huang; Bill X. Hu

    2010-11-01

    Subsurface radionuclide and trace metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of DOE’s greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising in situ immobilization approach of these contaminants is engineered mineral (co)precipitation of calcite driven by urea hydrolysis that is catalyzed by enzyme urease. The tight nonlinear coupling among flow, transport, reaction and reaction-induced property changes of media of this approach was studied by reactive transport simulations with systematically increasing level of complexities of reaction network and physical/chemical heterogeneities using a numerical simulator named STOMP. Sensitivity studies on the reaction rates of both urea hydrolysis and calcite precipitation are performed via controlling urease enzyme concentration and precipitation rate constant according to the rate models employed. We have found that the rate of ureolysis is a dominating factor in the amount of precipitated mineral; however, the spatial distribution of the precipitates depends on both rates of ureolysis and calcite precipitation. A maximum 5% reduction in the porosity was observed within the simulation time period of 6 pore volumes in our 1-dimensional (1D) column simulations. When a low permeability inclusion is considered in the 2D simulations, the altered flow fields redistribute mineral forming constituents, leading to a distorted precipitation reaction front. The simulations also indicate that mineral precipitation occurs along the boundary of the low permeability zone, which implies that contaminants in the low permeability zone could be encapsulated and isolated from the flow paths.

  9. Constitutive Response of Microbial Induced Calcite Precipitation Cemented Sands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Kai

    In the last decade, microbial induced calcite precipitation (MICP) emerged as a novel technique for implementing soil improvement in an environmentally-friendly and economically beneficial manner. However, the mechanical behavior and constitutive response of these materials are still not fully explored by researchers. In this dissertation, the characteristics of MICP cemented sands are investigated through numerical modelling and experimental tests, including macro and micro tests under both static and dynamic loading. In the first part, the mechanical behavior of MICP cemented sands were probed using monotonic load testing and the existence of calcite precipitation was verified by scanning electron microscopy, with this behavior compared to traditionally cemented soil and naturally cemented soil. Both MICP cementation and traditional cementation were verified to be effective in the increase of stiffness and strength, and unique characteristic of MICP cemented soil was highlighted.

  10. Modeling the evolution of complex conductivity during calcite precipitation on glass beads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Philippe; Li, Shuai; Jougnot, Damien; Revil, André; Wu, Yuxin

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARYWhen pH and alkalinity increase, calcite frequently precipitates and hence modifies the petrophysical properties of porous media. The complex conductivity method can be used to directly monitor calcite precipitation in porous media because it is sensitive to the evolution of the mineralogy, pore structure and its connectivity. We have developed a mechanistic grain polarization model considering the electrochemical polarization of the Stern and diffuse layer surrounding calcite particles. Our complex conductivity model depends on the surface charge density of the Stern layer and on the electrical potential at the onset of the diffuse layer, which are computed using a basic Stern model of the calcite/water interface. The complex conductivity measurements of Wu et al. (2010) on a column packed with glass beads where calcite precipitation occurs are reproduced by our surface complexation and complex conductivity models. The evolution of the size and shape of calcite particles during the calcite precipitation experiment is estimated by our complex conductivity model. At the early stage of the calcite precipitation experiment, modeled particles sizes increase and calcite particles flatten with time because calcite crystals nucleate at the surface of glass beads and grow into larger calcite grains around glass beads. At the later stage of the calcite precipitation experiment, modeled sizes and cementation exponents of calcite particles decrease with time because large calcite grains aggregate over multiple glass beads, a percolation threshold is achieved, and small and discrete calcite crystals polarize.

  11. Arsenite sorption and co-precipitation with calcite

    CERN Document Server

    Roman-Ross, Gabriela; Turrillas, Xavier; Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro; Charlet, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    Sorption of As(III) by calcite was investigated as a function of As(III) concentration, time and pH. The sorption isotherm, i.e. the log As(III) vs. log [As(OH)3 degrees / Assat] plot is S-shaped and has been modelled on an extended version of the surface precipitation model. At low concentrations, As(OH)3 degrees is adsorbed by complexation to surface Ca surface sites, as previously described by the X-ray standing wave technique. The inflexion point of the isotherm, where As(OH)3 degrees is limited by the amount of surface sites (ST), yields 6 sites nm-2 in good agreement with crystallographic data. Beyond this value, the amount of sorbed arsenic increases linearly with solution concentration, up to the saturation of arsenic with respect to the precipitation of CaHAsO3(s). The solid solutions formed in this concentration range were examined by X-ray and neutron diffraction. The doped calcite lattice parameters increase with arsenic content while c/a ratio remains constant. Our results made on bulk calcite on...

  12. Microbiologically Induced Calcite Precipitation Mediated by Sporosarcina pasteurii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhaduri, Swayamdipta; Debnath, Nandini; Mitra, Sushanta; Liu, Yang; Kumar, Aloke

    2016-04-16

    The particular bacterium under investigation here (S. pasteurii) is unique in its ability, under the right conditions, to induce the hydrolysis of urea (ureolysis) in naturally occurring environments through secretion of an enzyme urease. This process of ureolysis, through a chain of chemical reactions, leads to the formation of calcium carbonate precipitates. This is known as Microbiologically Induced Calcite Precipitation (MICP). The proper culture protocols for MICP are detailed here. Finally, visualization experiments under different modes of microscopy were performed to understand various aspects of the precipitation process. Techniques like optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and X-Ray Photo-electron Spectroscopy (XPS) were employed to chemically characterize the end-product. Further, the ability of these precipitates to clog pores inside a natural porous medium was demonstrated through a qualitative experiment where sponge bars were used to mimic a pore-network with a range of length scales. A sponge bar dipped in the culture medium containing the bacterial cells hardens due to the clogging of its pores resulting from the continuous process of chemical precipitation. This hardened sponge bar exhibits superior strength when compared to a control sponge bar which becomes compressed and squeezed under the action of an applied external load, while the hardened bar is able to support the same weight with little deformation.

  13. Direct nanoscale observations of the coupled dissolution of calcite and dolomite and the precipitation of gypsum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offeddu, Francesco Giancarlo; Cama, Jordi; Soler, Josep Maria; Putnis, Christine V

    2014-01-01

    In-situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments were performed to study the overall process of dissolution of common carbonate minerals (calcite and dolomite) and precipitation of gypsum in Na2SO4 and CaSO4 solutions with pH values ranging from 2 to 6 at room temperature (23 ± 1 °C). The dissolution of the carbonate minerals took place at the (104) cleavage surfaces in sulfate-rich solutions undersaturated with respect to gypsum, by the formation of characteristic rhombohedral-shaped etch pits. Rounding of the etch pit corners was observed as solutions approached close-to-equilibrium conditions with respect to calcite. The calculated dissolution rates of calcite at pH 4.8 and 5.6 agreed with the values reported in the literature. When using solutions previously equilibrated with respect to gypsum, gypsum precipitation coupled with calcite dissolution showed short gypsum nucleation induction times. The gypsum precipitate quickly coated the calcite surface, forming arrow-like forms parallel to the crystallographic orientations of the calcite etch pits. Gypsum precipitation coupled with dolomite dissolution was slower than that of calcite, indicating the dissolution rate to be the rate-controlling step. The resulting gypsum coating partially covered the surface during the experimental duration of a few hours.

  14. Holocene record of precipitation seasonality from lake calcite δ18O in the central Rocky Mountains, United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lesleigh

    2011-01-01

    A context for recent hydroclimatic extremes and variability is provided by a ~10 k.y. sediment carbonate oxygen isotope (??18O) record at 5-100 yr resolution from Bison Lake, 3255 m above sea level, in northwestern Colorado (United States). Winter precipitation is the primary water source for the alpine headwater lake in the Upper Colorado River Basin and lake water ??18O measurements reflect seasonal variations in precipitation ??18O. Holocene lake water ??18O variations are inferred from endogenic sedimentary calcite ??18O based on comparisons with historic watershed discharge records and tree-ring reconstructions. Drought periods (i.e., drier winters and/or a more rain-dominated seasonal precipitation balance) generally correspond with higher calcite ??18O values, and vice-versa. Early to middle Holocene ??18O values are higher, implying a rain-dominated seasonal precipitation balance. Lower, more variable ??18O values after ca. 3500 yr ago indicate a snow-dominated but more seasonally variable precipitation balance. The middle to late Holocene ??18O record corresponds with records of El Ni??o Southern Oscillation intensification that supports a teleconnection between Rocky Mountain climate and North Pacific sea-surface temperatures at decade to century time scales. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  15. The potential for phosphorus pollution remediation by calcite precipitation in UK freshwaters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Neal

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the potential for calcium carbonate to reduce phosphate pollution in freshwaters by co-precipitation, a process known as a "self cleansing mechanism". Calcium carbonate saturation levels and phosphate concentrations (SRP - soluble reactive phosphate across the major eastern UK river basins are examined to test for solubility controls. The study shows that calcite saturation varies for each catchment as a function of flow and biological activity rather than by direct regulation by SRP. Indeed, there is no evidence, for any of the rivers studied, that calcite solubility controls hold. However, for groundwater and groundwater-fed springs in the Chalk of the Thames basin, calcite saturation is observed with associated low SRP levels. A self-cleansing mechanism may well be operative within the Chalk due to two factors. Firstly, there is a high potential for nucleation on the calcite micro-crystals in the aquifer. Secondly, there are within aquifer reactions that remove the calcite nucleating inhibitors (SRP and dissolved organic carbon, DOC to levels lower than those occurring within the rivers do. These inhibitors enter the catchment at very high concentrations in association with agricultural pollution (fertilizer application and animal slurry and household contamination (e.g. sewage sources from septic tanks. Under low flow conditions, when the saturation index for calcite is at its highest, so too is the concentration of the nucleation inhibitor SRP. Companion work shows that calcite precipitation can occur at the water-sediment interface of the river and this may involve SRP removal. The data, as a whole, define an apparent bound for calcite solubility control where in the presence of nucleating centres, SRP must be less than 4 mM-P l-1 and DOC must be less than 150 mM-C l-1: a condition that does not seem to pertain within most UK rivers. Keywords: calcite, calcium carbonate, phosphate, soluble reactive phosphate, dissolved

  16. Calcite Precipitation at an Arctic Geothermal Spring Leads to Endolith Colonization and Ecological Succession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, V.; Fogel, M. L.; Steele, A.

    2012-12-01

    A critical question in microbial ecology concerns how environmental conditions affect community makeup. Troll Springs, a geothermal spring at 79°23'N, 13°26'E on Svalbard in the high Arctic, provides an opportunity to study microbial communities and succession along steep environmental gradients that impose strong selective pressures. At Troll, warm water is released into cold, dry climate conditions. Precipitation of calcite from the spring's waters has built terraces that host a range of microbial communities. Microorganisms exist in warm water as periphyton, in moist granular materials, and in cold, dry rock as endoliths. Troll therefore has two distinct ecosystems, aquatic and terrestrial, in close proximity, with different underlying environmental factors shaping their microbial communities. We use microscopic and phylogeny-based molecular methods to study microbial community makeup at Troll Springs. Periphyton are entrapped by precipitation of calcite, becoming precursors for endolithic communities. Much of the pore space originally occupied by periphyton becomes inhabited either by organisms that were already present in minor quantities in the periphyton, or by new organisms that colonized an environment for which they were well suited. This process differs from most endolith colonization, where rock predates the communities that colonize it. In the aquatic environments, the strongest dependence of community makeup is on pH and temperature, with gradual changes in community makeup along a pH/temperature gradient among the pools. Illumination (as limited by calcite precipitation) and thermal stability also appear to exert influence. In contrast, in the granular and endolithic terrestrial environments, where water is scarce and therefore exerts selective pressure, there is a strong relationship between community makeup and water content. The richness, evenness, and diversity of microbial taxa are all strongly correlated at Troll Springs. These parameters all

  17. A generalised chemical precipitation modelling approach in wastewater treatment applied to calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mbamba, Christian Kazadi; Batstone, Damien J.; Flores Alsina, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    , the present study aims to identify a broadly applicable precipitation modelling approach. The study uses two experimental platforms applied to calcite precipitating from synthetic aqueous solutions to identify and validate the model approach. Firstly, dynamic pH titration tests are performed to define...... of the mineral particulate state (Xcryst) and, for calcite, have a 2nd order dependency (exponent n ¼ 2.05 ± 0.29) on thermodynamic supersaturation (s). Parameter analysis indicated that the model was more tolerant to a fast kinetic coefficient (kcryst) and so, in general, it is recommended that a large kcryst...

  18. CO2 sequestration by ureolytic microbial consortia through microbially-induced calcite precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okyay, Tugba O; Nguyen, Hang N; Castro, Sarah L; Rodrigues, Debora F

    2016-12-01

    Urea is an abundant nitrogen-containing compound found in urine of mammals and widely used in fertilizers. This compound is part of the nitrogen biogeochemical cycle and is easily biodegraded by ureolytic microorganisms that have the urease enzyme. Previous studies, with ureolytic isolates, have shown that some ureolytic microorganisms are able to sequester CO2 through a process called microbially-induced calcium carbonate precipitation. The present study investigates 15 ureolytic consortia obtained from the "Pamukkale travertines" and the "Cave Without A Name" using different growth media to identify the possible bacterial genera responsible for CO2 sequestration through the microbially-induced calcite precipitation (MICP). The community structure and diversity were determined by deep-sequencing. The results showed that all consortia presented varying CO2 sequestration capabilities and MICP rates. The CO2 sequestration varied between 0 and 86.4%, and it depended largely on the community structure, as well as on pH. Consortia with predominance of Comamonas, Plesiomonas and Oxalobacter presented reduced CO2 sequestration. On the other hand, consortia dominated by Sporosarcina, Sphingobacterium, Stenotrophomonas, Acinetobacter, and Elizabethkingia showed higher rates of CO2 uptake in the serum bottle headspace.

  19. Effect of organic ligands on Mg partitioning and Mg isotope fractionation during low-temperature precipitation of calcite in the absence of growth rate effects

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    Mavromatis, Vasileios; Immenhauser, Adrian; Buhl, Dieter; Purgstaller, Bettina; Baldermann, Andre; Dietzel, Martin

    2017-06-01

    Calcite growth rate has been previously shown to be the dominating parameter controlling both Mg partitioning and Mg isotope fractionation during calcite growth. In natural calcite precipitation environments - characterized by abundant organic material - the presence of dissolved organic molecules may affect these two parameters. In order to assess the role of organic molecules, steady state calcite growth experiments have been performed at 25 °C, 1 bar pCO2 and constant, within analytical uncertainty growth rate (rp = 10-7.4 mol m-2 s-1) in the presence of aqueous Mg and six organic ligands in the concentration range from 0.01 to 10 mM. The organic ligands used in this study are: (i) acetic acid, (ii) citric acid, (iii) glutamic acid, (iv) salycilic acid, (v) glycine, and (vi) ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA). These contain one or more carboxyl- and amino-groups that are commonly present in natural organic substances found in lacustrine, fluvial, soil, cave, as well as in marine and earliest diagenetic porewater environments. Results shown here indicate that the presence of these carboxyl- and amino-groups promotes an increase in the partition coefficient of Mg in calcite (DMg = (Mg/Ca)calcite/(Mg/Ca)fluid) that can be attributed to their adsorption onto the calcite surfaces and the subsequent reduction of the active sites of growth. This increase of DMg values as a function of the supersaturation degree of calcite in the fluid phase can be described by the linear equation:

  20. Sorption of trace metals on calcite: Applicability of the surface precipitation model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Comans, R.N.J.; Middelburg, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    Published Sorption isotherm data of Cd2+, Mn2+, Zn2+, and Co2+ on calcite are adequately described by the surface precipitation model which was originally developed by FArley et al. (1985) for the sorption of cations on metal oxides. In addition to monolayer adsorption, the model accounts for the fo

  1. Precipitation of Calcite during the Deposition of Paleogene Sangkarewang Oil Shale, Ombilin Basin, West Sumatra, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Haris Widayat

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available DOI: 10.17014/ijog.2.3.185-197Geochemical and petrographical analyses were carried out to investigate the occurrence of calcite in theformer Ombilin lacustrine lake. The study involves eight samples taken from a 56 m long drill core of Sangkarewangoil shale. Geochemical investigation showed that the samples consist of varied terrigenous input represented by Si, Al, K, and Ti, and autochthonous input represented by S, total organic carbon (TOC, and d13C of bulk organic matter. Along the drill core profile the abundance of autochthonous input decreases upwards, while that of terrigenous input oppositely increases upwards. Petrographical analysis revealed that calcite is a major mineral in the samples. In this study, the abundance of calcite could be represented by the abundance of Ca, as calcite is the only significant Ca containing mineral. Ca is abundant in the samples (8.4% in average and its concentration varies similarly with those of S, TOC, and d13C, suggesting that the element as well as calcite incorporates the autochthonous input. Thevariation of calcite abundance in the drill core profile is considered to be related with primary productivity changes during the development of the former lake. Higher primary productivity represented by more positive of d13C value(-24.8‰ during the deposition of the lower part of the drill core profile promoted the higher amount of deposited organic matter. In such environment, the supersaturation of carbonate ion in lake water was also reached and significant precipitation of authigenic calcite occurred. As the lake developed, the primary productivity decreased as indicated by more negative of d13C value (eventually -26.8‰. This condition led to the decreases of deposited organic matterand calcite in the lake sediments.

  2. Surface kinetic model for isotopic and trace element fractionation during precipitation of calcite from aqueous solution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DePaolo, D.

    2010-10-15

    A surface reaction kinetic model is developed for predicting Ca isotope fractionation and metal/Ca ratios of calcite as a function of rate of precipitation from aqueous solution. The model is based on the requirements for dynamic equilibrium; i.e. proximity to equilibrium conditions is determined by the ratio of the net precipitation rate (R{sub p}) to the gross forward precipitation rate (R{sub f}), for conditions where ionic transport to the growing crystal surface is not rate-limiting. The value of R{sub p} has been experimentally measured under varying conditions, but the magnitude of R{sub f} is not generally known, and may depend on several factors. It is posited that, for systems with no trace constituents that alter the surface chemistry, R{sub f} can be estimated from the bulk far-from-equilibrium dissolution rate of calcite (R{sub b} or k{sub b}), since at equilibrium R{sub f} = R{sub b}, and R{sub p} = 0. Hence it can be inferred that R{sub f} {approx} R{sub p} + R{sub b}. The dissolution rate of pure calcite is measureable and is known to be a function of temperature and pH. At given temperature and pH, equilibrium precipitation is approached when R{sub p} (= R{sub f} - R{sub b}) << R{sub b}. For precipitation rates high enough that R{sub p} >> R{sub b}, both isotopic and trace element partitioning are controlled by the kinetics of ion attachment to the mineral surface, which tend to favor more rapid incorporation of the light isotopes of Ca and discriminate weakly between trace metals and Ca. With varying precipitation rate, a transition region between equilibrium and kinetic control occurs near R{sub p} {approx} R{sub b} for Ca isotopic fractionation. According to this model, Ca isotopic data can be used to estimate R{sub f} for calcite precipitation. Mechanistic models for calcite precipitation indicate that the molecular exchange rate is not constant at constant T and pH, but rather is dependent also on solution saturation state and hence R{sub p

  3. Aragonite-calcite precipitation in vertical fractures of the "Erzberg" siderite deposit (Austria): Hydrogeochemical and neotectonic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boch, Ronny; Wang, Xianfeng; Kluge, Tobias; Kurz, Walter; Leis, Albrecht; Lin, Ke; Pluch, Hannes; Mittermayr, Florian; Dietzel, Martin

    2017-04-01

    The ore deposit "Erzberg" represents the worldwide largest FeCO3 occurrence and is amongst Austria's most prominent geological places due to its historic, economic and scientific value. The iron-ore (siderite/ankerite) bearing Devonian carbonates of the open pit mine locally host sequential aragonite-calcite precipitates infilling vertical fractures. These typically laminated carbonates are referred to as erzbergite in mineral collections. To study their formation conditions we recovered samples on-site, i.e. from the rare veins being cm to dm in horizontal and tenths of meters in vertical extension. Additionally, samples from our university collection and private collectors were investigated. Some of the fractures filled with aragonite/calcite further exhibit cataclastic sediments, damage zones and slickenside striations. Modern water samples were collected from fractures currently accessible to conduct hydrochemical analyses and modeling. Selected precipitates were analyzed applying microscopic techniques, XRD, electron microprobe elemental mapping, stable and clumped isotopes, and 238U-234U-230Th radiometric dating. Erzbergite veins show either uni- or bidirectional growth, i.e. on one or both fracture/fault planes toward complete infilling depending on vadose water flow. The laminated precipitates are dominated by aragonite relative to pristine as well as partially diagenetic (Mg)-calcite. Intercalated and recurrent brownish Fe-rich layers consisting of goethite, quartz, muscovite are probably of detrital origin. Stable C and O isotopes of the precipitates reveal pronounced spatiotemporal variations in which low δ18O values (-10.4 to -5.1 ‰ VPDB) reflect a meteoric origin and low temperatures of the erzbergite depositing solutions. Carbonate clumped isotope measurements verify formation temperatures ≤25 °C. High δ13C values (-0.7 to +6.8 ‰ VPDB) of the precipitates indicate an origin from dissolution of local ankerite and limestone, without a

  4. Strontium Co-precipitation During Biomineralization of Calcite in Porous Media Using Differing Treatment Strategies

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    Lauchnor, E. G.; Schultz, L.; Mitchell, A.; Cunningham, A. B.; Gerlach, R.

    2013-12-01

    The process of ureolytically-induced calcium carbonate mineralization has been shown in laboratory studies to be effective in co-precipitation of heavy metals and radionuclides. During this process, the microbially catalyzed hydrolysis of urea increases alkalinity and pH, thus promoting CaCO3 precipitation in the presence of dissolved calcium. One proposed application of biomineralization includes the remediation of radionuclides such as strontium, which can be co-precipitated in situ within calcite. Strontium is of concern at several US DOE sites where it is a radioactive product of uranium fission and groundwater contaminant. Our research focuses on promoting attached bacteria, or biofilms, in subsurface environments where they serve as immobilized catalysts in biomineralization and can aide in co-precipitation of some contaminants. In this work, flat plate reactors with 1 mm etched flow channels designed to mimic a porous medium environment were used. Reactors were inoculated with the model ureolytic bacterium Sporosarcina pasteurii and addition of urea, calcium and strontium containing fluid was performed to induce biomineralization. Continuous flow and stopped-flow injection strategies were investigated to evaluate differences in strontium co-precipitation efficiency. During stopped-flow experiments, injection of cementation fluid containing urea, Ca2+ and Sr2+ was alternated with growth nutrients for stimulation of microbial activity. Control parameters such as urea and calcium concentration and injection flow rate are currently being varied to optimize rate and efficiency of strontium co-precipitation. Ureolytically induced calcite precipitation and strontium incorporation in the calcite was verified by chemical and mineralogical analyses, including X-ray diffraction and ICP-MS. Strontium co-precipitation efficiency was similar under different injection strategies. Alternating calcium-containing fluid with growth nutrients allowed for continued viability of

  5. EFFECT OF MAGNESIUM AS SUBSTITUTE MATERIAL IN ENZYME MEDIATED CALCITE PRECIPITATION (EMCP FOR SOIL IMPROVEMENT TECHNIQUE

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    Heriansyah ePutra

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The optimization of enzyme-mediated calcite precipitation (EMCP was evaluated as a soil improvement technique. In our previous works, purified urease was utilized to bio-catalyze the hydrolysis of urea, which causes the supplied Ca2+ to precipitate with CO32- as calcium carbonate. In the present work, magnesium chloride was newly added to the injecting solutions to delay the reaction rate and to enhance the amount of carbonate precipitation. Soil specimens were prepared in PVC cylinders and treated with concentration-controlled solutions composed of urea, urease, calcium, and magnesium chloride. The mechanical properties of the treated soil specimens were examined through unconfined compressive strength (UCS tests. A precipitation ratio of the carbonate up to 90% of the maximum theoretical precipitation was achieved by adding a small amount of magnesium chloride. Adding magnesium chloride as a delaying agent was indeed found to reduce the reaction rate of the precipitation, which may increase the volume of the treated soil if used in real fields because of the slower precipitation rate and the resulting higher injectivity. A mineralogical analysis revealed that magnesium chloride decreases the crystal size of the precipitated materials and that another carbonate of aragonite is newly formed. Mechanical test results indicated that carbonate precipitates within the soils and brings about a significant improvement in strength. A maximum UCS of 0.6 MPa was obtained from the treated samples.

  6. Calcite precipitation on glass substrates and active stalagmites in Katerloch Cave (Austria): Constraints from environmental monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakoparnig, Marlene; Boch, Ronny; Wang, Xianfeng; Lin, Ke; Spötl, Christoph; Leis, Albrecht; Gollowitsch, Anna; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Located near Graz at the SE-rim of the Alps Katerloch is well-known for its impressive dripstone decoration, e.g. several metres tall and relatively fast growing (0.2-0.7 mm/yr on average) candle-stick-type stalagmites. In the course of an ongoing multi-annual and partially high-resolution cave monitoring program we study modern (active) sites of carbonate deposition focusing on the site-specific growth dynamics and connection of modern regional and cave environmental conditions with petrographic, chemical and stable isotopic information captured in the speleothems. Fresh calcite precipitates on artificial (glass) substrates underneath active drip sites were collected continuously from 2006 to 2014 (eight years!). The samples (up to 7 mm thick) represent cave sections of different temperature and drip sites of partially different characteristics (e.g. drip rate). We also recovered short drill cores (up to 3 cm length, 1 cm diameter) from the top of active stalagmites probably representing the last decades to centuries of calcite crystallization. Moreover, an actively growing stalagmite (K10) comprising both modern and past calcite deposition was collected. 238U-234U-230Th dating using MC-ICP-MS of K10 (71 cm long) revealed several distinct growth intervals (separated by growth interruptions) starting at 129.1 ±1.2 kyr BP (Last Interglacial) up to now, mostly reflecting warm and humid climate intervals. High-resolution (100 μm) isotope profiles micromilled from the multi-annual modern calcite precipitates on artificial substrates revealed low δ13C values of -12.8 to -8.3 ‰ (VPDB) and relatively high δ18O of -6.9 to -4.9 ‰Ṫhe δ18O curves from all collection sites (different growth rate) record a pronounced decrease during their most recent growth period most likely corresponding to a significant decrease towards lower oxygen isotope values observed in drip waters collected in the year 2014 compared with samples from 2005 to 2007. Drip water δ2H /δ18O

  7. Fluoride removal by calcite: evidence for fluorite precipitation and surface adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Brett D; Binning, Philip; Stipp, S L S

    2005-12-15

    Fluoride contamination of groundwater, both anthropogenic and natural, is a major problem worldwide. In this study, fluoride removal by crushed limestone (99% pure calcite) was investigated by batch studies and surface-sensitive techniques from solutions with fluoride concentrations from 150 micromol/L (3 mg/L) to 110 mM (approximately 2100 mg/L). Surface-sensitive techniques, including atomic force microscopy (AFM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) as well as zeta potential measurements, confirm that, in addition to precipitation reactions, adsorption of fluoride also occurs. Results indicate that fluoride adsorption occurs immediately over the entire calcite surface with fluorite precipitating at step edges and kinks, where dissolved Ca2+ concentration is highest. The PHREEQ geochemical model was applied to the observed data and indicates that existing models, especially at low fluoride concentrations and high pH (>7.5) are not equipped to describe this complex system, largely because the PHREEQ model includes only precipitation reactions, whereas a combination of adsorption and precipitation parameters are required.

  8. Environmental controls for the precipitation of different fibrous calcite cement fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Ann-Christine; Wiethoff, Felix; Neuser, Rolf D.; Richter, Detlev K.; Immenhauser, Adrian

    2016-04-01

    Abiogenic calcite cements are widely used as climate archives. They can yield information on environmental change and climate dynamics at the time when the sediment was lithified in a (marine) diagenetic environment. Radiaxial-fibrous (RFC) and fascicular-optic fibrous (FOFC) calcite cements are two very common and similar pore-filling cement fabrics in Palaeozoic and Mesozoic carbonate rocks (Richter et al., 2011) and in Holocene Mg-calcitic speleothems (Richter et al., 2015). Both fabrics are characterised by distinct crystallographic properties. Current research has shown that these fabrics are often underexplored and that a careful combination of conservative and innovative proxies allows for a better applicability of these carbonate archives to paleoenvironmental reconstructions (Ritter et al., 2015). A main uncertainty in this context is that it is still poorly understood which parameters lead to the formation of either RFC or FOFC and if differential crystallographic parameters affect proxy data from these fabrics. This study aims at a better understanding of the environmental factors that may control either RFC or FOFC precipitation. Therefore, suitable samples (a stalagmite and a Triassic marine cement succession), each with clearly differentiable layers of RFC and FOFC, were identified and analysed in high detail using a multi-proxy approach. Detailed thin section and cathodoluminescence analysis of the samples allowed for a precise identification of layers consisting solely of either RFC or FOFC. Isotopic (δ13C, δ18O) as well as trace elemental compositions have been determined and the comparison of data obtained from these different carbonate archives sheds light on changes in environmental parameters during RFC or FOFC precipitation. References: Richter, D.K., et al., 2011. Radiaxial-fibrous calcites: A new look at an old problem. Sedimentary Geology, 239, 26-36 Richter, D.K., et al., 2015. Radiaxial-fibrous and fascicular-optic Mg-calcitic cave

  9. The Effect of the CO32- to Ca2+ Ion activity ratio on calcite precipitation kinetics and Sr2+ partitioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebrehiwet Tsigabu A

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A proposed strategy for immobilizing trace metals in the subsurface is to stimulate calcium carbonate precipitation and incorporate contaminants by co-precipitation. Such an approach will require injecting chemical amendments into the subsurface to generate supersaturated conditions that promote mineral precipitation. However, the formation of reactant mixing zones will create gradients in both the saturation state and ion activity ratios (i.e., aCO32-/aCa2+. To better understand the effect of ion activity ratios on CaCO3 precipitation kinetics and Sr2+ co-precipitation, experiments were conducted under constant composition conditions where the supersaturation state (Ω for calcite was held constant at 9.4, but the ion activity ratio (r=aCO32-/aCa2+ was varied between 0.0032 and 4.15. Results Calcite was the only phase observed, by XRD, at the end of the experiments. Precipitation rates increased from 41.3 ± 3.4 μmol m-2 min-1 at r = 0.0315 to a maximum rate of 74.5 ± 4.8 μmol m-2 min-1 at r = 0.306 followed by a decrease to 46.3 ± 9.6 μmol m-2 min-1 at r = 1.822. The trend was simulated using a simple mass transfer model for solute uptake at the calcite surface. However, precipitation rates at fixed saturation states also evolved with time. Precipitation rates accelerated for low r values but slowed for high r values. These trends may be related to changes in effective reactive surface area. The aCO32-/aCa2+ ratios did not affect the distribution coefficient for Sr in calcite (DPSr2+, apart from the indirect effect associated with the established positive correlation between DPSr2+ and calcite precipitation rate. Conclusion At a constant supersaturation state (Ω = 9.4, varying the ion activity ratio affects the calcite precipitation rate. This behavior is not predicted by affinity-based rate models. Furthermore, at the highest ion ratio tested, no precipitation was observed, while at the lowest ion ratio precipitation

  10. Characterization of urease and carbonic anhydrase producing bacteria and their role in calcite precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achal, Varenyam; Pan, Xiangliang

    2011-03-01

    Urease and carbonic anhydrase (CA) are key enzymes in the chemical reaction of living organisms and have been found to be associated with calcification in a number of microorganisms and invertebrates. Three bacterial strains designated as AP4, AP6, and AP9 were isolated from highly alkaline soil samples using the enrichment culture technique. On the basis of various physiological tests and 16S rRNA sequence analysis, these three bacteria were identified as Bacillus sp., B. megaterium, and B. simplex. Further, these Bacillus species have been characterized for the production of urease and CA in the process of biocalcification. One of the isolates, AP6 produced 553 U/ml of urease and 5.61 EU/ml CA. All the strains were able to produce significant amount of exopolymeric substances and biofilm. Further, efficacy of these strains was tested for calcite production ability and results were correlated with urease and CA. Isolate AP6 precipitated 2.26 mg calcite/cell dry mass (mg). Our observations strongly suggest that it is not only urease but CA also plays an important role in microbially induced calcium carbonate precipitation process. The current work demonstrates that urease and CA producing microbes can be utilized in biocalcification as a sealing agent for filling the gaps or cracks and fissures in constructed facilities and natural formations alike.

  11. Fabrication of calcite blocks from gypsum blocks by compositional transformation based on dissolution-precipitation reactions in sodium carbonate solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kunio; Kawachi, Giichiro; Tsuru, Kanji; Yoshimoto, Ayami

    2017-03-01

    Calcium carbonate (CaCO3) has been used as a bone substitute, and is a precursor for carbonate apatite, which is also a promising bone substitute. However, limited studies have been reported on the fabrication of artificial calcite blocks. In the present study, cylindrical calcite blocks (ϕ6×3mm) were fabricated by compositional transformation based on dissolution-precipitation reactions using different calcium sulfate blocks as a precursor. In the dissolution-precipitation reactions, both CaSO4·2H2O and CaSO4 transformed into calcite, a polymorph of CaCO3, while maintaining their macroscopic structure when immersed in 1mol/L Na2CO3 solution at 80°C for 1week. The diametral tensile strengths of the calcite blocks formed using CaSO4·2H2O and CaSO4 were 1.0±0.3 and 2.3±0.7MPa, respectively. The fabrication of calcite blocks using CaSO4·2H2O and CaSO4 proposed in this investigation may be a useful method to produce calcite blocks because of the self-setting ability and high temperature stability of gypsum precursors.

  12. Calcite Supersaturation and Precipitation Kinetics in the Lower Colorado River, Ail-American Canal and East Highline Canal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, D. L.

    1983-06-01

    In situ pH determinations and analysis of major ions in solution indicated that the lower Colorado River is supersaturated with respect to calcite throughout the entire daily cycle, in both winter and summer. Although the ion activity product was 4 to 6 times greater than the calcite solubility product, there was no detectable precipitation. Chemical analyses of water samples taken along 350 km of the river and canals from Parker Dam to the Salton Sea also revealed no evidence of calcium carbonate precipitation despite the inflow of saline and highly supersaturated irrigation return flows. Laboratory kinetic studies indicated that calcite crystal growth rates with Colorado River water are about 30% of the rate for pure Ca-HCO3 waters and about 70% of that for synthetic Colorado River water. Calcite precipitation by crystal growth in the river is limited by the combination of short residence times and unavailability of reactive calcite. Critical supersaturation levels necessary for heterogeneous nucleation do not occur; a high suspended load limits algal photosynthesis and thus prevents large decreases in daytime H2CO3 levels.

  13. Multi-proxy geochemical evidence for primary aragonite precipitation in a tropical-shelf 'calcite sea' during the Hirnantian glaciation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmig, Sara R.; Holmden, Chris

    2017-06-01

    A positive excursion in sedimentary δ26Mg values (2-3‰) is recorded in a mud dominated carbonate succession spanning the Hirnantian glaciation event in a tropical-shelf sea in Nevada. The increase is coincident with lithofacies and biofacies indicators of sea-level change, and previously reported changes in sedimentary δ13C and δ44/40Ca values in the same section. The synchronousness of the isotopic changes is inconsistent with differences in the oceanic residence times of Mg (13 Myr), Ca (0.5-1 Myr), and C (0.1 Myr), indicating that the isotopic trends cannot be attributed to perturbations in the oceanic cycling of these elements. Instead, a mixing analysis (δ26Mg vs. Ca/Mg) reveals that the stratigraphic shift in sedimentary δ26Mg values is an artifact of changing dolomite abundance in the carbonate succession, which increases by an average of ∼12 mol% during the glaciation. The mixing analysis also uncovers stratigraphic changes in end-member limestone δ26Mg values that are tentatively attributed to variations in aragonite abundance. The aragonite, which inverted to calcite during diagenesis, accumulated during the glacio-eustatically controlled sea-level lowstand in the study setting. Although this interpretation is vulnerable to diagenetic effects that are difficult to evaluate, it is strengthened by shifts to lower δ44/40Ca values and higher δ13C values in the same section. Experiments show that aragonite can precipitate in seawater with the chemistry of a 'calcite sea' at temperatures above 20-23 °C. Considering the warm climates of the early Paleozoic, temperatures above this range were likely common in low latitudes. This study shows that the isotopes of Mg, Ca, and C have the potential to fingerprint aragonite that has inverted to calcite in the rock record. It is important recognize carbonate successions where this has occurred so as to avoid misinterpreting facies-dependent changes in carbonate polymorph mineralogy as genuine records of

  14. Effect of organic ligands on Mg partitioning and Mg isotope fractionation during low-temperature precipitation of calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromatis, Vasileios; Immenhauser, Adrian; Buhl, Dieter; Purgstaller, Bettina; Baldermann, Andre; Dietzel, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Calcite growth experiments have been performed at 25 oC and 1 bar pCO2 in the presence of aqueous Mg and six organic ligands in the concentration range from 10-5 to 10-3 M. These experiments were performed in order to quantify the effect of distinct organic ligands on the Mg partitioning and Mg stable isotope fractionation during its incorporation in calcite at similar growth rates normalized to total surface area. The organic ligands used in this study comprise of (i) acetate acid, (ii) citrate, (iii) glutamate, (iv) salicylate, (v) glycine and (vi) ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA), containing carboxyl- and amino-groups. These fuctional groups are required for bacterial activity and growth as well as related to biotic and abiotic mineralization processes occurring in sedimentary and earliest diagenetic aquatic environments (e.g. soil, cave, lacustrine, marine). The results obtained in this study indicate that the presence of organic ligands promotes an increase in the partition coefficient of Mg in calcite (DMg = (Mg/Ca)calcite (Mg/Ca)fluid). This behaviour can be explained by the temporal formation of aqueous Mg-ligand complexes that are subsequently adsorbed on the calcite surfaces and thereby reducing the active growth sites of calcite. The increase of DMg values as a function of the supersaturation degree of calcite in the fluid phase can be described by the linear equation LogDMg =0.3694 (±0.0329)×SIcalcite - 1.9066 (±0.0147); R2=0.92 In contrast, the presence of organic ligands, with exception of citrate, does not significantly affect the Mg isotope fractionation factor between calcite and reactive fluid (Δ26Mgcalcite-fluid = -2.5 ±0.1). Citrate likely exhibits larger fractionation between the Mg-ligand complexes and free aqueous Mg2+, compared to the other organic ligands studied in this work, as evidenced by the smaller Δ26Mgcalcite-fluid values. These results indicate that in Earth's surface calcite precipitating environments that are

  15. Surface Kinetic Model for the Fractionation of Trace Elements and Isotopes in Calcite Precipitated from Aqueous Solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaolo, D. J.; Ryerson, F. J.; Watkins, J. M.; Bourg, I. C.; Yang, W.; Nielsen, L. C.; Druhan, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    The isotopic and trace element concentrations in calcite and other carbonate minerals form the basis for several paleoceanographic and paleoenvironmental indicators. The chemical and isotopic composition of natural calcites is determined by a combination of equilibrium partitioning and kinetic fractionations. Currently there is no general model that describes when equilibrium applies and how kinetic effects depend on the circumstances and rates of mineral growth. A useful approach is to separate the growth of calcite from aqueous solutions into forward (f) and backward (b) reactions, and to consider the mechanisms and fractionations that may be associated with each. We are evaluating a model where the net precipitation rate of calcite (Rp) is expressed as the difference between a forward rate (Rf) and a backward (dissolution) rate (Rb). Dissolution is approached only as Rp/Rb->0. Much natural calcite, including biogenic, forms under conditions where Rp ≫ Rb, hence the isotopic and trace element partitioning is strongly influenced by the kinetics of the forward reaction. Assuming that there are kinetic fractionations associated with the forward and backward reactions, a simple model can be developed for the dependence of calcite composition on precipitation rate. This model can explain most available experimental data on Ca and O isotopes, as well as Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca in calcite, and can be used to infer the behavior of other trace and minor elements. The critical parameter in applying the model is the value of Rb which to first order can be estimated from mineral dissolution rates, but apparently is not a constant, but instead varies with solution chemistry, especially at saturation conditions close to equilibrium. The surface kinetic model requires three parameters that are measureable experimentally and potentially also predictable from molecular dynamics simulation approaches. In this way it differs from the surface entrapment model of Watson (2004) which

  16. Investigation of the Potential for 90Sr Immobilization in INTEC Perched Water via Microbially Facilitated Calcite Precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshiko Fujita; Karen E. Wright; William A. Smith

    2006-10-01

    The goal of this work is to evaluate the applicability of a biogeochemical sequestration approach for remediation of 90Sr contamination in perched water zones underlying the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). The approach is based on the accelerated co-precipitation of the contaminant in calcite, where the acceleration is catalyzed by the microbial urea hydrolysis. We have previously demonstrated the potential for this remediation mechanism to immobilize strontium. Urea hydrolysis promotes calcite precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing groundwater pH and alkalinity. Ureolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which is produced by many environmental microorganisms. In the Snake River Plain Aquifer, which is saturated with respect to calcite, any co-precipitated 90Sr should be effectively sequestered over the long-term, even after return to pre-manipulation conditions. Another advantage of the ureolysis approach is that the NH4+ ions produced by the reaction can exchange with cations sorbed to subsurface minerals, thereby enhancing the availability of the radionuclides for re-capture via a more stable mechanism (co-precipitation rather than adsorption).

  17. Nanoscale observations of the effect of citrate on calcium oxalate precipitation on calcite surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgos-Cara, Alejandro; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; Putnis, Christine V.

    2016-04-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaC2O4ṡxH2O) minerals are naturally occurring minerals found in fossils, plants, kidney stones and is a by-product in some processes such as paper, food and beverage production [1,2]. In particular, calcium oxalate monohydrate phase (COM) also known as whewellite (CaC2O4ṡH2O), is the most frequently reported mineral phase found in urinary and kidney stones together with phosphates. Organic additives are well known to play a key role in the formation of minerals in both biotic and abiotic systems, either facilitating their precipitation or hindering it. In this regard, recent studies have provided direct evidence demonstrating that citrate species could enhance dissolution of COM and inhibit their precipitation. [3,4] The present work aims at evauate the influence of pH, citrate and oxalic acid concentrations in calcium oxalate precipitation on calcite surfaces (Island Spar, Chihuahua, Mexico) through in-situ nanoscale observation using in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM, Multimode, Bruker) in flow-through experiments. Changes in calcium oxalate morphologies and precipitated phases were observed, as well as the inhibitory effect of citrate on calcium oxalate precipitation, which also lead to stabilization an the amorphous calcium oxalate phase. [1] K.D. Demadis, M. Öner, Inhibitory effects of "green"additives on the crystal growth of sparingly soluble salts, in: J.T. Pearlman (Ed.), Green Chemistry Research Trends, Nova Science Publishers Inc., New York, 2009, pp. 265-287. [2] M. Masár, M. Zuborová, D. Kaniansky, B. Stanislawski, Determination of oxalate in beer by zone electrophoresis on a chip with conductivity detection, J. Sep. Sci. 26 (2003) 647-652. [3] Chutipongtanate S, Chaiyarit S, Thongboonkerd V. Citrate, not phosphate, can dissolve calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals and detach these crystals from renal tubular cells. Eur J Pharmacol 2012;689:219-25. [4] Weaver ML, Qiu SR, Hoyer JR, Casey WH, Nancollas GH, De Yoreo JJ

  18. Ice cores and calcite precipitates from alpine ice caves as useful proxies in paleoclimate reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colucci, Renato R.; Barbante, Carlo; Bertò, Michele; Dreossi, Giuliano; Festi, Daniela; Forte, Emanuele; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Guglielmin, Mauro; Lenaz, Davide; Luetscher, Marc; Maggi, Valter; Princivalle, Francesco; Schwikowski, Margit; Stenni, Barbara; Žebre, Manja

    2017-04-01

    In the last years a growing set of research campaigns have been undertaken in the European southeastern Alps. The aim of such interest is mainly due to the peculiar climatic conditions of this area, allowing the existence of periglacial and glacial evidence at the lowest altitude in the Alps. The reason for such "anomaly" is likely ascribable to very high mean annual precipitation and local topoclimatic amplifications. In the frame of this research, in the fall 2013 a 7.8 m long ice-core has been extracted from a permanent cave ice deposit located in the area of Mt. Canin (2,587 masl) in the Julian Alps. The ice-core has been cut and analysed in terms of: a) oxygen and hydrogen isotope composition; b); black carbon and dust concentrations; c) water conductivity; d) mineralogical analyses via X-ray powder diffraction. In the fall 2016, in the same area, a set of 1.0 m long horizontal ice cores have been extracted in another ice cave deposit, intercepting a preserved layer of coarse cryogenic cave carbonates (CCCcoarse). Such original finding represents the first alpine evidence of in situ CCCcoarse and the first occurrence from the southern side of the Alps. A unique opportunity to better understand the processes associated with the formation of CCCcoarse and the well-preserved status of samples allow planning, besides U/Th datings, several different analyses which may be associated with the precipitation of CCC. Subglacial calcite crusts, widespread in the area, represents a further proxy able to help understanding the evolution of climate during the holocene in this alpine sector. In the light of accelerated climate change we discuss here the potential of this still untapped and fragile cryospheric archives for paleoclimatic reconstructions in high elevated areas of the Alps.

  19. Influence of isotopic re-equilibration on speleothem and fluid inclusion isotope ratios after primary calcite precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kluge, Tobias; Haderlein, Astrid; Weißbach, Therese

    2016-04-01

    Oxygen isotope ratios in speleothems (notably stalagmites) have been used since decades to successfully infer paleotemperatures and deduce paleo-environmental information. In addition, recent technical developments allow to increasingly use fluid inclusions as an archive for drip-water and together with the surrounding calcite as paleothermometer. A basic requirement for isotope data interpretation is the complete knowledge of the fractionation between calcite and fluid. Most laboratory and in-situ cave experiments focus on calcite growth and the isotope fractionation between calcite and feed solution. Potential isotope exchange and re-equilibration processes after the initial deposition have mostly been neglected. However, experiments of Oelkers et al. (2015) showed that the isotope exchange between minerals and fluid can proceed rapidly (within days), even at chemical equilibrium. In hydrous Mg carbonates a similar process of continuous isotope exchange between carbonate and fluid was observed after the carbonate precipitation was completed (Mavromatis et al., 2015). These observations suggest that the isotope ratios of speleothem calcite may be affected by this continuous exchange, likely driving the isotope composition continuously towards equilibrium at the respective cave conditions. In addition, fluid inclusions are suspected to be sensitive to an isotope exchange with the surrounding carbonate highlighting the need to precisely understand and quantify this effect. We assessed the oxygen isotope exchange between calcite and solution at chemical equilibrium conditions with theoretical estimates and laboratory experiments over an intermediate time scale (hours-weeks). A large isotope gradient (~20 ‰)) between solution and calcite was prepared in the experiment to investigate the dynamics of this re-equilibration process. We used a theoretical model based on a Rayleigh fractionation approach and the direct comparison with the experiment to determine

  20. Mineralogical, crystallographic, and isotopic constraints on the precipitation of aragonite and calcite at Shiqiang and other hot springs in Yunnan Province, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brian; Peng, Xiaotong

    2016-11-01

    Two active spring vent pools at Shiqiang (Yunnan Province, China) are characterized by a complex array of precipitates that coat the wall around the pool and the narrow ledges that surround the vent pool. These precipitates include arrays of aragonite crystals, calcite cone-dendrites, red spar calcite, unattached dodecahedral and rhombohedral calcite crystals, and late stage calcite that commonly coats and disguises the earlier formed precipitates. Some of the microbial mats that grow on the ledges around the pools have been partly mineralized by microspheres that are formed of Si and minor amounts of Fe. The calcite and aragonite that are interspersed with each other at all scales are both primary precipitates. Some laminae, for example, change laterally from aragonite to calcite over distances of only a few millimetres. The precipitates at Shiqiang are similar to precipitates found in and around the vent pools of other springs found in Yunnan Province, including those at Gongxiaoshe, Zhuyuan, Eryuan, and Jifei. In all cases, the δDwater and δ18Owater indicate that the spring water is of meteoric origin. These are thermogene springs with the carrier CO2 being derived largely from the mantle and reaction of the waters with bedrock. Variations in the δ13Ctravertine values indicate that the waters in these springs were mixed, to varying degrees, with cold groundwater and its soil-derived CO2. Calcite and aragonite precipitation took place once the spring waters had become supersaturated with respect to CaCO3, probably as a result of rapid CO2 degassing. These precipitates, which were not in isotopic equilibrium with the spring water, are characterized by their unusual crystal morphologies. The precipitation of calcite and aragonite, seemingly together, can probably be attributed to microscale variations in the saturation levels that are, in turn, attributable to microscale variations in the rate of CO2 degassing.

  1. Simulating speleothem growth in the laboratory: Determination of stable isotope fractionation factors during precipitation of speleothem calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Maximilian; Schöne, Bernd R.; Spötl, Christoph; Scholz, Denis

    2016-04-01

    We present laboratory experiments aiming to understand the processes affecting the δ13C and δ18O values of speleothems during precipitation of calcite from a thin layer of solution. In particular, we determined the precipitation rates and the isotope fractionation factors in dependence of several parameters, such as temperature, cave pCO2 and supersaturation with respect to calcite. The experiments were performed in a climate box in order to simulate cave conditions and to control them during the experiments[1]. In the experiments, a thin film of a CaCO3-CO2-H2O-solution supersaturated with respect to calcite flew down an inclined marble surface or a sand-blasted borosilicate glass plate, and the drip water was sampled at different distances and, thus, residence times on the plate. Subsequently, pH, electrical conductivity and the δ13C and δ18O values of the dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) as well as the precipitated CaCO3 were determined. In addition, we determined the stable isotope values of the drip water and the atmosphere inside the box during the experiments. This enabled the identification of carbon and oxygen isotope fractionation factors between all carbonate species. The experiments were conducted at 10, 20 and 30 ° C, a pCO2 of 1000 and 3000 ppmV and with a Ca2+ concentration of 2 and 5 mmol/l. We observed an exponential decay of conductivity with increasing distance of flow documenting progressive precipitation of calcite confirming previous observations[2]. The corresponding time constants of precipitation range from 180 to 660 s. Both the δ13C and δ18O values show a progressive increase along the flow path. The enrichment of the δ13C values seems to be strongly influenced by kinetic isotope fractionation, whereas the δ18O values are in the range of isotopic equilibrium. The fractionation between the precipitated CaCO3 and DIC is between -1 and - 6.5 ‰ for carbon isotopes (13ɛ) and between -1.5 and -3 ‰ for oxygen isotopes (18ɛ). The

  2. Optimization of Enzyme-Mediated Calcite Precipitation as a Soil-Improvement Technique: The Effect of Aragonite and Gypsum on the Mechanical Properties of Treated Sand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heriansyah Putra

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The effectiveness of magnesium as a substitute material in enzyme-mediated calcite precipitation was evaluated. Magnesium sulfate was added to the injecting solution composed of urea, urease, and calcium chloride. The effect of the substitution on the amount of precipitated materials was evaluated through precipitation tests. X-ray powder diffraction and scanning electron microscopy analyses were conducted to examine the mineralogical morphology of the precipitated minerals and to determine the effect of magnesium on the composition of the precipitated materials. In addition to calcite, aragonite and gypsum were formed as the precipitated materials. The effect of the presence of aragonite and gypsum, in addition to calcite, as a soil-improvement technique was evaluated through unconfined compressive strength tests. Soil specimens were prepared in polyvinyl chloride cylinders and treated with concentration-controlled solutions, which produced calcite, aragonite, and gypsum. The mineralogical analysis revealed that the low and high concentrations of magnesium sulfate effectively promoted the formation of aragonite and gypsum, respectively. The injecting solutions which produced aragonite and calcite brought about a significant improvement in soil strength. The presence of the precipitated materials, comprising 10% of the soil mass within a treated sand, generated a strength of 0.6 MPa.

  3. Seawater fluid inclusions preserved within Cambrian-Ordovician marine cements indicate Cambrian-Ordovician seawater precipitated low-magnesium calcite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, W.J.; Goldstein, R.H. (Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    The San Saba Member of the Wilberns Formation (Llano Uplift, Texas) contains a series of Late Cambrian-Early Ordovician hardgrounds. Bladed low-Mg calcite cements are truncated at hardground surfaces and overlain by shallow marine limestones, indicating a syndepositional shallow marine origin. Primary one-phase fluid inclusions within bladed cements have marine salinities, suggesting that these low-Mg calcite cements formed as a precipitate from Late Cambrian and Early Ordovician seawater and have not undergone recrystallization. Stable isotope analysis of the bladed cement yields delta O-18 values that cluster between [minus]5.6--[minus]6.0 ([per thousand] PDB) which is comparable to those previously reported for Early Ordovician marine calcite. The delta C-13 values are more positive than those reported for this time interval (0.6--1.3 [per thousand] PDB). Trace element analysis indicates that strontium content ranges from 200 to 2,200 ppm. Iron ranges from below detection by electron microprobe to 800 ppm. Mg is generally below detection, however, cements in one hardground display Mg contents that increase progressively toward pore centers. Trace element data lack covariance that would suggest recrystallization. In addition, closed system recrystallization cannot be supported here due to a lack of microdolomite inclusions. Stable isotope, trace element, and fluid inclusion data are consistent with submarine cementation at or below the sediment-water interface. These cements have not undergone significant recrystallization and preserve a primary low Mg calcite mineralogy. These data suggest that early Paleozoic seawater differed chemically from modern seawater. Moreover, preservation of ancient seawater, within fluid inclusions, may provide a direct means of determining those differences.

  4. Microbial community composition and endolith colonization at an Arctic thermal spring are driven by calcite precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starke, Verena; Kirshtein, Julie; Fogel, Marilyn L.; Steele, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Environmental conditions shape community composition. Arctic thermal springs provide an opportunity to study how environmental gradients can impose strong selective pressures on microbial communities and provide a continuum of niche opportunities. We use microscopic and molecular methods to conduct a survey of microbial community composition at Troll Springs on Svalbard, Norway, in the high Arctic. Microorganisms there exist under a wide range of environmental conditions: in warm water as periphyton, in moist granular materials, and in cold, dry rock as endoliths. Troll Springs has two distinct ecosystems, aquatic and terrestrial, together in close proximity, with different underlying environmental factors shaping each microbial community. Periphyton are entrapped during precipitation of calcium carbonate from the spring's waters, providing microbial populations that serve as precursors for the development of endolithic communities. This process differs from most endolith colonization, in which the rock predates the communities that colonize it. Community composition is modulated as environmental conditions change within the springs. At Troll, the aquatic environments show a small number of dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs) that are specific to each sample. The terrestrial environments show a more even distribution of OTUs common to multiple samples.

  5. Seasonal dynamics of stable isotopes and element ratios in authigenic calcites during their precipitation and dissolution, Sacrower See (northeastern Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd ZOLITSCHKA

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal evolution of chemical and physical water properties as well as particle fluxes was monitored in Sacrower See (northeastern Germany during two consecutive years (Oct 2003 - Oct 2005. Additonally, we measured δ18O and δ13C as well as Sr:Ca and Mg:Ca ratios of authigenic calcites that were collected in sequencing sediment traps in order to disentangle environmental and climatic factors controlling these parameters. In particular, our aim was to find out if element ratios and the isotopic composition of calcites reflect changes in water and air temperatures. Lake water is highly enriched in 18O (-1.3 to -2.5‰ VSMOW with an evaporative increase of 0.6‰ during summer. Values are 5-6‰ more positive than groundwater values and 4-5‰ more positive than long-term weighted annual means of precipitation. During spring and summer, high amounts of dissolved phosphate cause eutrophic conditions and calcite precipitation in isotopic disequilibrium. Measured values are depleted in 18O by 2 to 10‰ compared to calculated equilibrium values. Resuspension and partial dissolution of calcite in the water column contribute to this isotopic divergence in summer and autumn as δ18Oca and δ13C values increased in the hypolimnion during this time. Mg:Ca and Sr:Ca ratios are altered by dissolution as well. In the hypolimnion these ratios were higher than in the epilimnion. Another reason for the huge deviation between measured and theoretical δ18Oca values during summer is the occurrence of large amounts of Phacotus lenticularis in the carbonate fraction. High amounts of Phacotus lead to more negative δ18Oca and more positive δ13C values. Several characteristics of δ18Oca and δ13C are also reflected by Mg:Ca and Sr:Ca ratios and isotopic composition of oxygen and carbon were influenced by the onset and stability of stratification. Especially the earlier onset of stratification in 2005 caused higher sediment fluxes and more positive carbon and

  6. Influence of Changing Hydrology on Pedogenic Calcite Precipitation in Vertisols, Dance Bayou, Brazoria County, Tx: Implications for Estimating Paleoatmospheric PCO2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mintz, J. S.; Driese, S. G.; Ludvigson, G. A.; Breecker, D. O.

    2010-12-01

    Pedogenic (soil formed) calcites preserved in the sedimentary record enable estimation of paleoatmospheric pCO2 using the calcite paleobarometer. A fundamental assumption for applying this paleobarometer is that the calcite precipitated while the soil was in communication with the atmosphere so that atmospheric CO2 concentrations had a direct influence on the calcite δ13C value. Here we address the timing of calcite precipitation in relation to the soil saturation state and atmosphere connectivity in a modern Vertisol (smectitic, clay-rich soil, seasonally saturated) in Brazoria County, Texas. Luminescent phases of calcite growth have more negative δ13C values (avg. δ13C = -11.1 ‰ PDB) than the non-luminescent phases (avg. δ13C = -2.8 ‰ PDB). The luminescent phase formed during the water-saturated portion of the year limiting the soil connectivity with the atmosphere, minimizing the incorporation of atmospheric CO2 and negating its use for pCO2 estimations. The non-luminescent phase formed during the well-drained portion of the year when atmospheric CO2 mixed with soil-respired CO2 and is therefore useful for pCO2 estimation. From these results we present a model to independently test the saturation state of a paleosol at the time of pedogenic carbonate precipitation. Finally we calculate soil respiration rates that are an order of magnitude lower than those that are typically assumed in the paleobarometer equation. Many of the pCO2 estimates through the Phanerozoic are based on carbonate in paleo-Vertisols and may therefore be overestimated or potentially invalid. A) Comparisons of typical morphotype isotope values with interpreted soil conditions at the time of calcite precipitation. B) Model of carbonate precipitation of non-luminescent calcite nodules (dark circles) in the well-drained portion of the season (top) and luminescent calcite nodules (light circles) in the saturated portion of the season (bottom), in a Vertisol at Dance Bayou, Brazoria Co

  7. Calcite precipitation from aqueous solution: transformation from vaterite and role of solution stoichiometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nehrke, G.

    2007-01-01

    The morphology of vaterite precipitated by bubbling CO2 through a CaCl2 solution is framboidal aggregates. It is not possible, even when using the identical experimental setup and conditions, to reproduce aggregates having identical morphology. The density of the aggregates and crystallite size can

  8. Effect of some biotic factors on microbially-induced calcite precipitation in cement mortar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousef Al-Salloum

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Sporosarcina pasteurii, a common soil bacterium has been tested for microbial treatment of cement mortar. The present study also seeks to investigate the effects of growth medium, bacterial concentration and different buffers concerning the preparation of bacterial suspensions on the compressive strength of cement mortar. Two growth media, six different suspensions and two bacterial concentrations were used in the study. The influence of growth medium on calcification efficiency of S. pasteurii was insignificant. Significant improvement in the compressive as well as the tensile strength of cement mortar was observed. Microbial mineral precipitation visualized by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM shows fibrous material that increased the strength of cement mortar. Formation of thin strands of fillers observed through SEM micrographs improves the pore structure, impermeability and thus the compressive as well as the tensile strengths of the cement mortar. The type of substrate and its molarity have a significant influence on the strength of cement mortar.

  9. Final report for DOE Grant No. DE-SC0006609 - Persistence of Microbially Facilitated Calcite Precipitation as an in situ Treatment for Strontium-90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert W [University of Idaho; Fujita, Yoshiko [Idaho National Laboratory

    2013-11-15

    Subsurface radionuclide and metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of DOE's greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide Sr-90, is co-precipitation in calcite. We have previously found that nutrient addition can stimulate microbial ureolytic activity, that this activity accelerates calcite precipitation and co-precipitation of Sr, and that higher calcite precipitation rates can result in increased Sr partitioning. We have conducted integrated field, laboratory, and computational research to evaluate the relationships between ureolysis and calcite precipitation rates and trace metal partitioning under environmentally relevant conditions, and investigated the coupling between flow/flux manipulations and precipitate distribution. A field experimental campaign conducted at the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site located at Rifle, CO was based on a continuous recirculation design; water extracted from a down-gradient well was amended with urea and molasses (a carbon and electron donor) and re-injected into an up-gradient well. The goal of the recirculation design and simultaneous injection of urea and molasses was to uniformly accelerate the hydrolysis of urea and calcite precipitation over the entire inter-wellbore zone. The urea-molasses recirculation phase lasted, with brief interruptions for geophysical surveys, for 12 days and was followed by long-term monitoring which continued for 13 months. A post experiment core located within the inter-wellbore zone was collected on day 321 and characterized with respect to cation exchange capacity, mineral carbonate content, urease activity, ureC gene abundance, extractable ammonium (a urea hydrolysis product) content, and the C-13 isotopic composition of solid carbonates. It was also subjected to selective extractions for strontium and uranium. Result of the core

  10. Experimental fractionation of stable carbon isotopes during degassing of carbon dioxide and precipitation of calcite from aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, K.; Winde, V.; Escher, P.; von Geldern, R.; Böttcher, M. E.

    2012-04-01

    Processes in the carbonate system of surface waters are in particular sensitive to variations of boundary conditions as, for instance, the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and the aqueous solution. Examples range from streams, rivers, to coastal marine waters. The flux of carbon dioxide from continental flowing waters was recently included into calculations of the global carbon budget (Butman & Raymond, 2011, Nature Geo.). These solutions, are often supersaturated in carbon dioxide with respect to the atmosphere. The degassing of carbon dioxide is associated with a kinetically controlled fractionation of the stable carbon isotopes, which has to be considered in balancing water-air carbon dioxide fluxes. The degassing process additionally leads to the super-saturation of the aqueous solution with respect to calcium carbonate. Stable isotope fractionation is of particular value to identify and quantify processes at the water-gas phase interface and link these non-equilibrium processes to the formation mechanisms of calcite and the hydrodynamics of surface waters. Experiments were carried out with or without inert N2 gas flow to degas carbon dioxide from initially supersaturated solutions. Natural solutions used are from different stations of the Elbe estuary, the Jade Bay, the backbarrier tidal area of Spiekeroog Island, carbonate springs of Rügen Island, and the Baltic Sea coastline. Results are compared experiments using bottled mineral waters. By following the (physico) chemical changes in the solutions (pH, TA, Ca PHREEQC modeling) it was found, that two evolutionary stages can be differentiated. Reaction progress led to the preferential liberation of carbon dioxide containing the light carbon isotope, following a Rayleigh-type process. After an induction period, where only degassing of carbon dioxide took place, a second stage was observed where calcite began to form from the highly supersaturated solutions. In this stage the carbonate

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROGRAM PROJECT NUMBER 87016 CO-PRECIPITATION OF TRACE METALS IN GROUNDWATER AND VADOSE ZONE CALCITE: IN SITU CONTAINMENT AND STABILIZATION OF STRONTIUM-90 AND OTHER DIVALENT METALS AND RADIONUCLIDES AT ARID WESTERN DOE SITES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferris, F. Grant; Fujita, Yoshiko; Smith, Robert W.

    2004-06-15

    Radionuclide and metal contaminants are present in the vadose zone and groundwater throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex. In situ containment and stabilization of these contaminants in vadose zones or groundwater is a cost-effective treatment strategy. Our facilitated approach relies upon the hydrolysis of introduced urea to cause the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal coprecipitation) by increasing groundwater pH and alkalinity (Fujita et al., 2000; Warren et al., 2001). Subsurface urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which may be either introduced with the urea or produced in situ by ubiquitous subsurface urea hydrolyzing microorganisms. Because the precipitation processes are irreversible and many western aquifers are saturated with respect to calcite, the co-precipitated metals and radionuclides will be effectively removed from groundwater. The rate at which trace metals are incorporated into calcite is a function of calcite precipitation kinetics, adsorption interactions between the calcite surface and the trace metal in solution (Zachara et al., 1991), solid solution properties of the trace metal in calcite (Tesoriero and Pankow, 1996), and also the surfaces upon which the calcite is precipitating. A fundamental understanding of the coupling of calcite precipitation and trace metal partitioning, and how this occurs in aquifers and vadose environments is lacking. This report summarizes work undertaken during the second year of this project.

  12. ENVIRONMENTALMANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROGRAM PROJECT NUMBER 87016 CO-PRECIPITATION OF TRACEMETALS INGROUNDWATER AND VADOSE ZONE CALCITE: IN SITU CONTAINMENT AND STABILIZATION OF STRONTIUM-90 ANDOTHER DIVALENT METALS AND RADIONUCLIDES AT ARIDWESTERN DOE SITES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferris, F. Grant; Fujita, Yoshiko; Smith, Robert W.; Cosgrove, Donna M.; Colwell, F. S.

    2004-06-15

    Radionuclide and metal contaminants are present in the vadose zone and groundwater throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) weapons complex. In situ containment and stabilization of these contaminants in vadose zones or groundwater is a cost-effective treatment strategy. Our facilitated approach relies upon the hydrolysis of introduced urea to cause the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal coprecipitation) by increasing groundwater pH and alkalinity (Fujita et al., 2000; Warren et al., 2001). Subsurface urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which may be either introduced with the urea or produced in situ by ubiquitous subsurface urea hydrolyzing microorganisms. Because the precipitation processes are irreversible and many western aquifers are saturated with respect to calcite, the co-precipitated metals and radionuclides will be effectively removed from groundwater. The rate at which trace metals are incorporated into calcite is a function of calcite precipitation kinetics, adsorption interactions between the calcite surface and the trace metal in solution (Zachara et al., 1991), solid solution properties of the trace metal in calcite (Tesoriero and Pankow, 1996), and also the surfaces upon which the calcite is precipitating. A fundamental understanding of the coupling of calcite precipitation and trace metal partitioning, and how this occurs in aquifers and vadose environments is lacking. This report summarizes work undertaken during the second year of this project.

  13. The Effects of Dominant Driving Forces on Summer Precipitation during Different Periods in Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuxing Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Wavelet analysis methods (CWT, XWT, WTC were employed to evaluate the impact of dominant climatic driving factors on summer precipitation in the Beijing area based on monthly precipitation data of Beijing ranging from 1880 to 2014. The two climatic driving factors, i.e., the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM and the Northern Limit of Western Pacific Subtropical High (NWPSH were considered in particular. The relationships between summer precipitation and EASM/NWPSH were also examined. The results revealed similar periods in low-frequency oscillation (76–95 years and mid-range frequency oscillation (32–60 years for the summer precipitation in the Beijing area and EASM/NWPSH. The summer precipitation correlated positively with the NWPSH and EASM, especially for periods of 43 years and 33 years, respectively. This indicates that summer precipitation during 1880–1960 and during the years after 1960 was significantly affected by NWPSH and EASM, respectively. Based on the periodic change of 33 years for both summer precipitation and EASM, heavy precipitation can be expected to occur again in Beijing at approximately 2026. Understanding the relationships between summer precipitation and climatic factors is of significant importance for precipitation predictions and water resource variations in the Beijing area.

  14. Precipitation rates and kinetics of calcite and aragonite in seawater near equilibrium%近平衡状态海水中方解石和文石沉淀速率及动力学研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陶小晚; 蒲晓强

    2011-01-01

    The influence of carbon doxide partial pressure (p(CO2)) in seawater on the precipitation rates and kinetics of calcite and aragonite was studied using "freedrift" open reaction system at constant temperature (25.0℃±0.2 ℃) and p(CO2). The precipitation rates were measured under different p(CO2). We found that: (1) the precipitation rate of aragonite was higher than that of calcite, and the lower the p(CO2)was, the higher the precipitation rate was at the same saturation state (Ω) and constant p(CO2); (2) as for calcite, the reaction order was 2.4 when p(CO2) was fluctuating between 3 050× 10-6~3 200× 10-6 and 1.5<Ω<3.1, and was 2.6 when p(CO2)≈130× 10-6 and 1.2<Ω<3.0; as for aragonite, the reaction order was 3.2 when p(CO2)≈2 300× 10-6 and 1.1<Ω< 2.0, and was 2.0 when p(CO2)≈320× 10-6 and 1.1 <Ω<1.9. Results of this study have deepened the understanding of the precipitation mechanisms of calcite and aragonite under different sedimentary conditions. In addition, the different precipitation rates of calcite and aragonite under different calcite saturation (Ωc) provide an explanation of why aragonite dominates the carbonate sediments in modern shallow sea while the main authigenic carbonate mineral in marine sediments is calcite.%利用"freedrift"开放反应系统,研究人工海水中近沉淀平衡状态时二氧化碳分压(p(CO2))的变化对方解石、文石沉淀速率及其动力学方程的影响.反应在恒定的温度(25.0℃±0.2℃)、p(CO2)环境下进行,通过实验得到了不同p(CO2)环境下,方解石和丈石的沉淀速率及动力学方程.研究发现:(1)晶体类型和碳酸盐碱度相同时,p(CO2)越低沉淀速率越大;饱和度(Ω)和p(CO2)相同时,方解石沉淀速率低于文石,且p(CO2)越高,沉淀速率越低.(2)对于方解石,当p(CO2)介于3 050×10-6和3 200×10-6之间,1.5<Ω<3.1时,反应级数n=2.4;当p(CO2)≈130×10-6,1.2<Ω<3.0时,n=2.6;对于丈石,当p(CO2)≈ 2300×10

  15. Reactive Transport Modeling of Induced Calcite Precipitation Reaction Fronts in Porous Media Using A Parallel, Fully Coupled, Fully Implicit Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L.; Huang, H.; Gaston, D.; Redden, G. D.; Fox, D. T.; Fujita, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Inducing mineral precipitation in the subsurface is one potential strategy for immobilizing trace metal and radionuclide contaminants. Generating mineral precipitates in situ can be achieved by manipulating chemical conditions, typically through injection or in situ generation of reactants. How these reactants transport, mix and react within the medium controls the spatial distribution and composition of the resulting mineral phases. Multiple processes, including fluid flow, dispersive/diffusive transport of reactants, biogeochemical reactions and changes in porosity-permeability, are tightly coupled over a number of scales. Numerical modeling can be used to investigate the nonlinear coupling effects of these processes which are quite challenging to explore experimentally. Many subsurface reactive transport simulators employ a de-coupled or operator-splitting approach where transport equations and batch chemistry reactions are solved sequentially. However, such an approach has limited applicability for biogeochemical systems with fast kinetics and strong coupling between chemical reactions and medium properties. A massively parallel, fully coupled, fully implicit Reactive Transport simulator (referred to as “RAT”) based on a parallel multi-physics object-oriented simulation framework (MOOSE) has been developed at the Idaho National Laboratory. Within this simulator, systems of transport and reaction equations can be solved simultaneously in a fully coupled, fully implicit manner using the Jacobian Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) method with additional advanced computing capabilities such as (1) physics-based preconditioning for solution convergence acceleration, (2) massively parallel computing and scalability, and (3) adaptive mesh refinements for 2D and 3D structured and unstructured mesh. The simulator was first tested against analytical solutions, then applied to simulating induced calcium carbonate mineral precipitation in 1D columns and 2D flow cells as analogs

  16. Dominant 100,000-year precipitation cyclicity in a late Miocene lake from northeast Tibet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Junsheng; Garzione, Carmala; Su, Qingda; Liu, Qingsong; Zhang, Rui; Heslop, David; Necula, Cristian; Zhang, Shihong; Song, Yougui; Luo, Zeng

    2017-03-01

    East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) precipitation received by northern China over the past 800 thousand years (ky) is characterized by dominant 100-ky periodicity, mainly attributed to CO2 and Northern Hemisphere insolation-driven ice sheet forcing. We established an EASM record in the Late Miocene from lacustrine sediments in the Qaidam Basin, northern China, which appears to exhibit a dominant 100-ky periodicity similar to the EASM records during the Late Quaternary. Because evidence suggests that partial or ephemeral ice existed in the Northern Hemisphere during the Late Miocene, we attribute the 100-ky cycles to CO2 and Southern Hemisphere insolation-driven Antarctic ice sheet forcing. This indicates a >6-million year earlier onset of the dominant 100-ky Asian monsoon and, likely, glacial and CO2 cycles and may indicate dominant forcing of Northern Hemisphere climate by CO2 and Southern Hemisphere ice sheets in a warm world.

  17. Kinetics of near-equilibrium calcite precipitation at 100°C: An evaluation of elementary reaction-based and affinity-based rate laws

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiraki, Ryoji; Brantley, Susan L.

    1995-04-01

    Three affinity-based rate models based upon physical growth mechanisms were used to fit surface-controlled precipitation rate data for calcite using a continuously stirred tank reactor in NaOHCaCl 2CO 2H 2O solutions at 100°C and 100 bars total pressure between pH 6.38 and 6.98. At higher stirring speeds, when a H 2CO 3∗ was smaller than 2.33 × 10 -3, rate showed a parabolic dependence upon exp( Δ G/RT) for exp( Δ G/RT) 1.72 and followed a rate law based upon the assumption that surface nucleation is rate-limiting. When α H 2CO 3∗ was greater than 5.07 × 10 -3, the rate showed a linear dependence upon exp( Δ G/RT), suggesting growth by a simple surface adsorption mechanism. The rate of these three mechanisms at 100°C can be expressed by the following equations: ( spiral growth) R ppt = 10 -9.00±0.15expΔG/RT- 1 1.93±0.14, ( adsorption) R ppt = 10 -8.64±0.07expΔG/RT- 1 1.09±0.10, ( surface nucleation) R ppt = 10 -7.28±0.49exp- 2.36±0.21/ΔG/RT. The mechanistic model of Plummer et al. (1978) given by R net = k 1a H+ + k 2a H2CO3∗ + k 3a H2O - k 4a Ca2+a HCO-3 also describes the precipitation rate when growth followed the spiral growth equation. The rate constant for precipitation, k4, ranges between 7.08 × 10 -4 to 1.01 × 10 -3 moles cm -2 s -1 in the a H 2CO 3∗ range studied. This work shows that precipitation at 100°C in the spiral growth regime is well fit by both the mechanistic model of Plummer et al. (1978), based on multiple elementary reactions, and by a model derived for growth at screw dislocations. Outside of the regime of spiral growth, however, the model of Plummer et al. (1978) fails, suggesting that different elementary reactions control growth in the adsorption or two-dimensional nucleation regimes. However, the model of Plummer et al. (1978), based upon individual elementary reactions, accurately predicts both dissolution and precipitation of calcite under certain conditions; tests of the affinity based models

  18. Microbially Induced Calcite Precipitation (MICP) - A Technology for Managing Flow and Transport in Porous and Fractured Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, A. J.; Hiebert, R.; Kirksey, J.; Lauchnor, E. G.; Rothman, A.; Spangler, L.; Esposito, R.; Gerlach, R.; Cunningham, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Certain microorganisms e.g., Sporosarcina pasteurii contribute enzymes that catalyze reactions which in the presence of calcium, can create saturation conditions favorable for calcium carbonate precipitation (microbially-induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICP)). MICP can be used for a number of engineering applications including securing geologic storage of CO2 or other fluids by sealing fractures, improving wellbore integrity, and stabilizing fractured and unstable porous media. MICP treatment has the advantage of the use of small microorganisms, ~2μm, suggesting applicability to treatment of small aperture fractures not accessible to traditional treatments, for example the use of fine cement. The promotion of MICP in the subsurface is a complex reactive transport problem coupling microbial, abiotic (geochemical), geomechanical and hydrodynamic processes. In the laboratory, MICP has been demonstrated to cement together heavily fractured shale and reduce the permeability of fractures in shale and sandstone cores up to five orders of magnitude under both ambient and subsurface relevant pressure conditions (Figure 1). Most recently, a MICP fracture treatment field study was performed at a well at the Southern Company Gorgas Steam Generation Plant (Alabama) (Figure 1). The Fayetteville Sandstone at approximately 1120' below ground surface was hydraulically fractured prior to MICP treatment. After 4 days of injection of 24 calcium pulses and 6 microbial inoculations, injectivity of brine into the formation was significantly reduced. The experiment also resulted in a reduction in pressure decay which is a measure of improved wellbore integrity. These promising results suggest the potential for MICP treatment to seal fractured pathways at the field scale to improve the long-term security of geologically-stored carbon dioxide or prevent leakage of shale gas or hydraulic fracturing fluids into functional overlying aquifers, reducing environmental impacts.

  19. Rhombohedral calcite precipitation from CO2-H2O-Ca(OH)2 slurry under supercritical and gas CO2 media

    CERN Document Server

    Montes-Hernandez, German; Geoffroy, Nicolas; Charlet, Laurent; Pironon, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    The formation of solid calcium carbonate (CaCO3) from aqueous solutions or slurries containing calcium and carbon dioxide (CO2) is a complex process of considerable importance in the ecological, geochemical and biological areas. Moreover, the demand for powdered CaCO3 has increased considerably recently in various fields of industry. The aim of this study was therefore to synthesize fine particles of calcite with controlled morphology by hydrothermal carbonation of calcium hydroxide at high CO2 pressure (initial PCO2=55 bar) and at moderate and high temperature (30 and 90 degrees C). The morphology of precipitated particles was identified by transmission electron microscopy (TEM/EDS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM/EDS). In addition, an X-ray diffraction analysis was performed to investigate the carbonation efficiency and purity of the solid product. Carbonation of dispersed calcium hydroxide in the presence of supercritical (PT=90 bar, T=90 degrees C) or gaseous (PT=55 bar, T=30 degrees C) CO2 led to t...

  20. The Dominant Synoptic-Scale Modes of North American Monsoon Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serra, Y. L.; Seastrand, S.; Castro, C. L.; Ritchie, E.

    2014-12-01

    In this study we explore the mechanisms of synoptic rainfall variability using observations from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite. While previously shown to have an important impact on North American monsoon rainfall, tropical cyclones are excluded from this analysis, in order to focus on more frequent synoptic disturbances within the region. A rotated empirical orthogonal function analysis of North American monsoon rainfall for June through September 2002-2009 suggests low-level tropical disturbances contribute to the leading two modes of precipitation variability within this region. The low-level disturbances result in gulf surges, or low-level surges of moisture up the Gulf of California, and provide a key low-level moisture source to facilitate development of organized convection. In the first mode the low-level trough brings precipitation to lower elevations along the western slopes of the Sierra Madre Occidental south of Hermosillo, Mexico and over the southern Baja Peninsula. In the second mode the low-level trough interacts with an upper-level inverted trough enhancing precipitation into the southwestern United States and northwest Mexico. In particular, the upper-level trough contributes to the easterly-northeasterly shear across the region, favoring mesoscale convective organization and enhanced deep convection over the Sierra Madre Occidental and higher elevations in southeast Arizona. The EOF methodology offers an objective approach for determining the dominant modes of precipitation for the monsoon region useful for identifying past and monitoring future low-frequency impacts on these modes.

  1. Skill and predictability in multimodel ensemble forecasts for Northern Hemisphere regions with dominant winter precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsan, Muhammad Azhar; Tippett, Michael K.; Almazroui, Mansour; Ismail, Muhammad; Yousef, Ahmed; Kucharski, Fred; Omar, Mohamed; Hussein, Mahmoud; Alkhalaf, Abdulrahman A.

    2016-07-01

    Northern Hemisphere winter precipitation reforecasts from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast System-4 and six of the models in the North American Multi-Model Ensemble are evaluated, focusing on two regions (Region-A: 20°N-45°N, 10°E-65°E and Region-B: 20°N-55°N, 205°E-255°E) where winter precipitation is a dominant fraction of the annual total and where precipitation from mid-latitude storms is important. Predictability and skill (deterministic and probabilistic) are assessed for 1983-2013 by the multimodel composite (MME) of seven prediction models. The MME climatological mean and variability over the two regions is comparable to observation with some regional differences. The statistically significant decreasing trend observed in Region-B precipitation is captured well by the MME and most of the individual models. El Niño Southern Oscillation is a source of forecast skill, and the correlation coefficient between the Niño3.4 index and precipitation over region A and B is 0.46 and 0.35, statistically significant at the 95 % level. The MME reforecasts weakly reproduce the observed teleconnection. Signal, noise and signal to noise ratio analysis show that the signal variance over two regions is very small as compared to noise variance which tends to reduce the prediction skill. The MME ranked probability skill score is higher than that of individual models, showing the advantage of a multimodel ensemble. Observed Region-A rainfall anomalies are strongly associated with the North Atlantic Oscillation, but none of the models reproduce this relation, which may explain the low skill over Region-A. The superior quality of multimodel ensemble compared with individual models is mainly due to larger ensemble size.

  2. Skill and predictability in multimodel ensemble forecasts for Northern Hemisphere regions with dominant winter precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehsan, Muhammad Azhar; Tippett, Michael K.; Almazroui, Mansour; Ismail, Muhammad; Yousef, Ahmed; Kucharski, Fred; Omar, Mohamed; Hussein, Mahmoud; Alkhalaf, Abdulrahman A.

    2017-05-01

    Northern Hemisphere winter precipitation reforecasts from the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast System-4 and six of the models in the North American Multi-Model Ensemble are evaluated, focusing on two regions (Region-A: 20°N-45°N, 10°E-65°E and Region-B: 20°N-55°N, 205°E-255°E) where winter precipitation is a dominant fraction of the annual total and where precipitation from mid-latitude storms is important. Predictability and skill (deterministic and probabilistic) are assessed for 1983-2013 by the multimodel composite (MME) of seven prediction models. The MME climatological mean and variability over the two regions is comparable to observation with some regional differences. The statistically significant decreasing trend observed in Region-B precipitation is captured well by the MME and most of the individual models. El Niño Southern Oscillation is a source of forecast skill, and the correlation coefficient between the Niño3.4 index and precipitation over region A and B is 0.46 and 0.35, statistically significant at the 95 % level. The MME reforecasts weakly reproduce the observed teleconnection. Signal, noise and signal to noise ratio analysis show that the signal variance over two regions is very small as compared to noise variance which tends to reduce the prediction skill. The MME ranked probability skill score is higher than that of individual models, showing the advantage of a multimodel ensemble. Observed Region-A rainfall anomalies are strongly associated with the North Atlantic Oscillation, but none of the models reproduce this relation, which may explain the low skill over Region-A. The superior quality of multimodel ensemble compared with individual models is mainly due to larger ensemble size.

  3. Final report for DOE Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64404 - Field Investigations of Microbially Facilitated Calcite Precipitation for Immobilization of Strontium-90 and Other Trace Metals in the Subsurface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert W; Fujita, Yoshiko; Ginn, Timothy R; Hubbard, Susan S

    2012-10-12

    Subsurface radionuclide and metal contaminants throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex pose one of DOE's greatest challenges for long-term stewardship. One promising stabilization mechanism for divalent ions, such as the short-lived radionuclide 90Sr, is co-precipitation in calcite. We have previously found that that nutrient addition can stimulate microbial ureolytic activity that this activity accelerates calcite precipitation and co-precipitation of Sr, and that higher calcite precipitation rates can result in increased Sr partitioning. We have conducted integrated field, laboratory, and computational research to evaluate the relationships between ureolysis and calcite precipitation rates and trace metal partitioning under environmentally relevant conditions, and investigated the coupling between flow/flux manipulations and precipitate distribution. A field experimental campaign conducted at the Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site located at Rifle, CO was based on a continuous recirculation design; water extracted from a down-gradient well was amended with urea and molasses (a carbon and electron donor) and re-injected into an up-gradient well. The goal of the recirculation design and simultaneous injection of urea and molasses was to uniformly accelerate the hydrolysis of urea and calcite precipitation over the entire inter-wellbore zone. The urea-molasses recirculation phase lasted, with brief interruptions for geophysical surveys, for 12 days followed by long-term monitoring which continued for 13 months. Following the recirculation phase we found persistent increases in urease activity (as determined from 14C labeled laboratory urea hydrolysis rates) in the upper portion of the inter-wellbore zone. We also observed an initial increase (approximately 2 weeks) in urea concentration associated with injection activities followed by decreasing urea concentration and associated increases in ammonium and dissolved inorganic carbon

  4. Biomineralization processes of calcite induced by bacteria isolated from marine sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiping Wei

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Biomineralization is a known natural phenomenon associated with a wide range of bacterial species. Bacterial-induced calcium carbonate precipitation by marine isolates was investigated in this study. Three genera of ureolytic bacteria, Sporosarcina sp., Bacillus sp. and Brevundimonas sp. were observed to precipitate calcium carbonate minerals. Of these species, Sporosarcina sp. dominated the cultured isolates. B. lentus CP28 generated higher urease activity and facilitated more efficient precipitation of calcium carbonate at 3.24 ± 0.25 × 10−4 mg/cell. X-ray diffraction indicated that the dominant calcium carbonate phase was calcite. Scanning electron microscopy showed that morphologies of the minerals were dominated by cubic, rhombic and polygonal plate-like crystals. The dynamic process of microbial calcium carbonate precipitation revealed that B. lentus CP28 precipitated calcite crystals through the enzymatic hydrolysis of urea, and that when ammonium ion concentrations reached 746 mM and the pH reached 9.6, that favored calcite precipitation at a higher level of 96 mg/L. The results of this research provide evidence that a variety of marine bacteria can induce calcium carbonate precipitation, and may influence the marine carbonate cycle in natural environments.

  5. Biomineralization processes of calcite induced by bacteria isolated from marine sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Shiping; Cui, Hongpeng; Jiang, Zhenglong; Liu, Hao; He, Hao; Fang, Nianqiao

    2015-06-01

    Biomineralization is a known natural phenomenon associated with a wide range of bacterial species. Bacterial-induced calcium carbonate precipitation by marine isolates was investigated in this study. Three genera of ureolytic bacteria, Sporosarcina sp., Bacillus sp. and Brevundimonas sp. were observed to precipitate calcium carbonate minerals. Of these species, Sporosarcina sp. dominated the cultured isolates. B. lentus CP28 generated higher urease activity and facilitated more efficient precipitation of calcium carbonate at 3.24 ± 0.25 × 10(-4) mg/cell. X-ray diffraction indicated that the dominant calcium carbonate phase was calcite. Scanning electron microscopy showed that morphologies of the minerals were dominated by cubic, rhombic and polygonal plate-like crystals. The dynamic process of microbial calcium carbonate precipitation revealed that B. lentus CP28 precipitated calcite crystals through the enzymatic hydrolysis of urea, and that when ammonium ion concentrations reached 746 mM and the pH reached 9.6, that favored calcite precipitation at a higher level of 96 mg/L. The results of this research provide evidence that a variety of marine bacteria can induce calcium carbonate precipitation, and may influence the marine carbonate cycle in natural environments.

  6. Dominant plant taxa predict plant productivity responses to CO2 enrichment across precipitation and soil gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, Philip A.; Newingham, Beth A.; Polley, H. Wayne; Morgan, Jack A.; LeCain, Daniel R.; Nowak, Robert S.; Smith, Stanley D.

    2015-01-01

    The Earth's atmosphere will continue to be enriched with carbon dioxide (CO2) over the coming century. Carbon dioxide enrichment often reduces leaf transpiration, which in water-limited ecosystems may increase soil water content, change species abundances and increase the productivity of plant communities. The effect of increased soil water on community productivity and community change may be greater in ecosystems with lower precipitation, or on coarser-textured soils, but responses are likely absent in deserts. We tested correlations among yearly increases in soil water content, community change and community plant productivity responses to CO2 enrichment in experiments in a mesic grassland with fine- to coarse-textured soils, a semi-arid grassland and a xeric shrubland. We found no correlation between CO2-caused changes in soil water content and changes in biomass of dominant plant taxa or total community aboveground biomass in either grassland type or on any soil in the mesic grassland (P > 0.60). Instead, increases in dominant taxa biomass explained up to 85 % of the increases in total community biomass under CO2 enrichment. The effect of community change on community productivity was stronger in the semi-arid grassland than in the mesic grassland, where community biomass change on one soil was not correlated with the change in either the soil water content or the dominant taxa. No sustained increases in soil water content or community productivity and no change in dominant plant taxa occurred in the xeric shrubland. Thus, community change was a crucial driver of community productivity responses to CO2 enrichment in the grasslands, but effects of soil water change on productivity were not evident in yearly responses to CO2 enrichment. Future research is necessary to isolate and clarify the mechanisms controlling the temporal and spatial variations in the linkages among soil water, community change and plant productivity responses to CO2 enrichment. PMID

  7. Consequences of long-term changes in seasonal precipitation for the biochemistry of photosynthesis in dominant desert shrubs and grasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, L. P.; Ogle, K.; Loik, M. E.; Huxman, T. E.; Smith, S. D.; Tissue, D.

    2011-12-01

    Alterations in seasonal precipitation have been demonstrated to have short-term effects on biochemical limitations to photosynthesis, but longer-term effects on plant biochemistry are generally unknown. This study explores the long-term impacts of altered precipitation on the photosynthetic biochemistry of seven dominant desert plants. Seasonal precipitation was experimentally manipulated (addition and/or exclusion) for 5-6 years in four North American deserts prior to a 2-year campaign of photosynthetic measurements. Photosynthetic response curve data were analyzed via a novel hierarchical Bayesian model that enabled the estimation of biochemical limitations to photosynthesis in C3 and C4 plants, while simultaneously incorporating precipitation treatment effects. In the Chihuahuan Desert, an increase in both summer and winter precipitation increased biochemical efficiency in a C3 woody monocot. In the Sonoran Desert, increased winter precipitation increased biochemical efficiency in a C4 non-native grass. Precipitation treatment effects were lacking in the Mojave and Great Basin Deserts, perhaps due to low summer precipitation in these deserts. Seasonal precipitation differentially affects plant- and species-level carbon dynamics over the long-term due to the timing of precipitation and the interaction of precipitation with nitrogen dynamics. Our results emphasize the importance of studying longer-term biochemical responses to changes in environmental conditions because they may not reflect short-term stomatal responses.

  8. Final Technical Report for DOE Award DE-FG02-07ER64403 [Modeling of Microbially Induced Calcite Precipitation for the Immobilization of Strontium-90 Using a Variable Velocity Streamtube Ensemble

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginn, Timothy R. [University of California, Davis; Weathers, Tess [University of California, Davis

    2013-08-26

    Biogeochemical modeling using PHREEQC2 and a streamtube ensemble approach is utilized to understand a well-to-well subsurface treatment system at the Vadose Zone Research Park (VZRP) near Idaho Falls, Idaho. Treatment involves in situ microbially-mediated ureolysis to induce calcite precipitation for the immobilization of strontium-90. PHREEQC2 is utilized to model the kinetically-controlled ureolysis and consequent calcite precipitation. Reaction kinetics, equilibrium phases, and cation exchange are used within PHREEQC2 to track pH and levels of calcium, ammonium, urea, and calcite precipitation over time, within a series of one-dimensional advective-dispersive transport paths creating a streamtube ensemble representation of the well-to-well transport. An understanding of the impact of physical heterogeneities within this radial flowfield is critical for remediation design; we address this via the streamtube approach: instead of depicting spatial extents of solutes in the subsurface we focus on their arrival distribution at the control well(s). Traditionally, each streamtube maintains uniform velocity; however in radial flow in homogeneous media, the velocity within any given streamtube is spatially-variable in a common way, being highest at the input and output wells and approaching a minimum at the midpoint between the wells. This idealized velocity variability is of significance in the case of ureolytically driven calcite precipitation. Streamtube velocity patterns for any particular configuration of injection and withdrawal wells are available as explicit calculations from potential theory, and also from particle tracking programs. To approximate the actual spatial distribution of velocity along streamtubes, we assume idealized radial non-uniform velocity associated with homogeneous media. This is implemented in PHREEQC2 via a non-uniform spatial discretization within each streamtube that honors both the streamtube’s travel time and the idealized

  9. Calcite growth kinetics: Modeling the effect of solution stoichiometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthers, M.; Nehrke, G.; Gustafsson, J.P.; Van Cappellen, P.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently the influence of solution stoichiometry on calcite crystal growth kinetics has attracted little attention, despite the fact that in most aqueous environments calcite precipitates from non-stoichiometric solution. In order to account for the dependence of the calcite crystal growth rat

  10. Precipitation dominates fire occurrence in Greece (1900–2010: its dual role in fuel build-up and dryness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Xystrakis

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Historical fire records and meteorological observations spanning over one century (1894–2010, were assembled in a database to collect long-term fire and weather data in Greece. Positive/negative events of fire occurrence on an annual basis were considered the years where the annual values of the examined parameters were above (positive values or below (negative values the 95% confidence limits around the trend line of the corresponding parameter. To analyze the association of positive/negative events of fire occurrence and meteorological extremes, we proceeded with a cross-tabulation analysis based on a Monte Carlo randomization. Positive/negative values of total annual precipitation were randomly associated with the corresponding values of burned areas, and significant associations were observed for seasonal precipitation totals (spring and fire season. Fire season precipitation is the dominant factor coinciding with negative values of area burned, while years with high spring precipitation coincide with large burnt area burned. These results demonstrate the dual role of precipitation in controlling a fire's extent through fuel build-up and dryness. Additionally, there is a clear outperformance of precipitation-related against temperature-related weather variables revealing that, at least in Greece, fire spread is controlled by precipitation totals rather than air temperature.

  11. Incorporation of Eu(III) into calcite under recrystallization conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hellebrandt, S.E. [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Inst. of Resource Ecology; Jordan, Norbert [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Surface Processes; Barkleit, Astrid [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). Chemistry of the F-Elements; Schmidt, Moritz [Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf e.V., Dresden (Germany). HGF Young Investigator Group; Hofmann, S.

    2017-06-01

    The interaction of three calcite powders with Eu(III) under recrystallization conditions was studied on the molecular level using site-selective time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). Batch contact studies with reaction times from 1 week up to 3 years revealed that the speciation differs from that observed previously in co-precipitation experiments and is dominated by a newly identified species ''γ''. The speed of formation of this species was found to depend greatly on the recrystallization rate of the studied minerals.

  12. Gene expression patterns of two dominant tallgrass prairie species differ in response to warming and altered precipitation

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    To better understand the mechanisms underlying plant species responses to climate change, we compared transcriptional profiles of the co-dominant C4 grasses, Andropogon gerardii Vitman and Sorghastrum nutans (L.) Nash, in response to increased temperatures and more variable precipitation regimes in a long-term field experiment in native tallgrass prairie. We used microarray probing of a closely related model species (Zea mays) to assess correlations in leaf temperature (Tleaf) and leaf water ...

  13. Intracrystalline deformation of calcite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bresser, Hans

    1991-01-01

    It is well established from observations on natural calcite tectonites that intracrystalline plastic mechanisms are important during the deformation of calcite rocks in nature. In this thesis, new data are presented on fundamental aspects of deformation behaviour of calcite under conditions where 'd

  14. Heterodynes dominate precipitation isotopes in the East Asian monsoon region, reflecting interaction of multiple climate factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Elizabeth K.; Clemens, Steven C.; Sun, Youbin; Prell, Warren L.; Huang, Yongsong; Gao, Li; Loomis, Shannon; Chen, Guangshan; Liu, Zhengyu

    2016-12-01

    For the past decade, East Asian monsoon history has been interpreted in the context of an exceptionally well-dated, high-resolution composite record of speleothem oxygen isotopes (δ18Ocave) from the Yangtze River Valley. This record is characterized by a unique spectral response, with variance concentrated predominantly within the precession band and an enigmatic lack of variance at the eccentricity and obliquity bands. Here we examine the spectral characteristics of all existing >250-kyr-long terrestrial water isotope records in Asia, including a new water isotope record using leaf wax hydrogen isotope ratios from the Chinese Loess Plateau. There exist profound differences in spectral characteristics among all orbital-scale Asian water isotope records. We demonstrate that these differences result from latitudinal gradients in the influence of the winter and summer monsoons, both of which impact climate and water isotopes throughout East Asia. Water isotope records therefore do not reflect precipitation during a single season or from a single circulation system. Rather, water isotope records in East Asia reflect the complex interplay of oceanic and continental moisture sources, operating at multiple Earth-orbital periods. These non-linear interactions are reflected in water isotope spectra by the presence of heterodynes. Although complex, we submit that water isotope records, when paired with rapidly developing isotope-enabled model simulations, will have the potential to elucidate mechanisms causing seasonal precipitation variability and moisture source variability in East Asia.

  15. Precipitation dominates fire occurrence in Greece (1900-2010): its dual role in fuel build-up and dryness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xystrakis, F.; Kallimanis, A. S.; Dimopoulos, P.; Halley, J. M.; Koutsias, N.

    2014-01-01

    Historical fire records and meteorological observations spanning over one century (1894-2010) were assembled in a database to collect long-term fire and weather data in Greece. Positive/negative events of fire occurrence on an annual basis were considered as the years where the annual values of the examined parameters were above (positive values) or below (negative values) the 95% confidence limits around the trend line of the corresponding parameter. To analyse the association of positive/negative events of fire occurrence with meteorological extremes, we proceeded with a cross-tabulation analysis based on a Monte Carlo randomization. Positive/negative values of total annual precipitation were randomly associated with the corresponding values of burned areas, and significant associations were observed for seasonal precipitation totals (spring and fire season). Fire season precipitation is the dominant factor coinciding with negative values of area burned, while years with high spring precipitation coincide with years with large areas burned. These results demonstrate the dual role of precipitation in controlling a fire's extent through fuel build-up and dryness. Additionally, there is a clear outperformance of precipitation-related variables compared with temperature-related weather revealing that, at least in Greece, total area burned at the national scale is controlled by precipitation totals rather than air temperature. This analysis improves our understanding of the underlying mechanisms of fire regimes and provides valuable information concerning the development of models relating fire activity to weather parameters, which are essential when facing a changing climate that may be associated with shifts in various aspects of the typical fire regimes of ecosystems. Our results may allow fire managers to more easily incorporate the effect of extreme weather conditions into long-term planning strategies. They contribute to the exploration of fire

  16. Modeling of Calcite Precipitation Driven by Bacteria-facilitated Urea Hydrolysis in A Flow Column Using A Fully Coupled, Fully Implicit Parallel Reactive Transport Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L.; Huang, H.; Gaston, D.; Redden, G. D.

    2009-12-01

    One approach for immobilizing subsurface metal contaminants involves stimulating the in situ production of mineral phases that sequester or isolate contaminants. One example is using calcium carbonate to immobilize strontium. The success of such approaches depends on understanding how various processes of flow, transport, reaction and resulting porosity-permeability change couple in subsurface systems. Reactive transport models are often used for such purpose. Current subsurface reactive transport simulators typically involve a de-coupled solution approach, such as operator-splitting, that solves the transport equations for components and batch chemistry sequentially, which has limited applicability for many biogeochemical processes with fast kinetics and strong medium property-reaction interactions. A massively parallel, fully coupled, fully implicit reactive transport simulator has been developed based on a parallel multi-physics object oriented software environment computing framework (MOOSE) developed at the Idaho National Laboratory. Within this simulator, the system of transport and reaction equations is solved simultaneously in a fully coupled manner using the Jacobian Free Newton-Krylov (JFNK) method with preconditioning. The simulator was applied to model reactive transport in a one-dimensional column where conditions that favor calcium carbonate precipitation are generated by urea hydrolysis that is catalyzed by urease enzyme. Simulation results are compared to both laboratory column experiments and those obtained using the reactive transport simulator STOMP in terms of: the spatial and temporal distributions of precipitates and reaction rates and other major species in the reaction system; the changes in porosity and permeability; and the computing efficiency based on wall clock simulation time.

  17. Ion microprobe assessment of the heterogeneity of Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios in Pecten maximus and Mytilus edulis (bivalvia shell calcite precipitated at constant temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kennedy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Small-scale heterogeneity of biogenic carbonate elemental composition can be a significant source of error in the accurate use of element/Ca ratios as geochemical proxies. In this study ion microprobe (SIMS profiles showed significant small-scale variability of Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios in new shell calcite of the marine bivalves P. maximus and Mytilus edulis that was precipitated during a constant-temperature culturing experiment. Elevated Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios were found to be associated with the deposition of elaborate shell features, i.e. a shell surface stria in P. maximus and surface shell disturbance marks in both species, the latter a common occurrence in bivalve shells. In both species the observed small-scale elemental heterogeneity most likely was not controlled by variable transport of ions to the extra-pallial fluid, but by factors such as shell Mg content influencing Sr and Mn heterogeneity, the influence of shell organic content and/or conditions at the shell crystal-solution interface. Invariant Mg/Ca ratios observed in the mid and innermost regions of the P. maximus shell suggests a potential application as a palaeotemperature proxy.

  18. Ion microprobe assessment of the heterogeneity of Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios in Pecten maximus and Mytilus edulis (bivalvia shell calcite precipitated at constant temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. S. Freitas

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Small-scale heterogeneity of biogenic carbonate elemental composition can be a significant source of error in the accurate use of element/Ca ratios as geochemical proxies. In this study ion microprobe (SIMS profiles showed significant small-scale variability of Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios in new shell calcite of the marine bivalves Pecten maximus and Mytilus edulis that was precipitated during a constant-temperature culturing experiment. Elevated Mg/Ca, Sr/Ca and Mn/Ca ratios were found to be associated with the deposition of elaborate shell features, i.e. a shell surface stria in P. maximus and surface shell disturbance marks in both species, the latter a common occurrence in bivalve shells. In both species the observed small-scale elemental heterogeneity most likely was not controlled by variable transport of ions to the extra-pallial fluid, but by factors such as the influence of shell organic content and/or crystal size and orientation, the latter reflecting conditions at the shell crystal-solution interface. In the mid and innermost regions of the P. maximus shell the lack of significant small-scale variation of Mg/Ca ratios, which is consistent with growth at constant temperature, suggest a potential application as a palaeotemperature proxy. Cross-growth band element/Ca ratio profiles in the interior of bivalve shells may provide more promising palaeo-environmental tools than sampling from the outer region of bivalve shells.

  19. Fracture calcites at Olkiluoto. Evidence from quaternary infills for palaeohydrogeology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehoer, S.; Kaerki, A.; Taikina-aho, O. [Kivitieto Oy (Finland); Karhu, J. [Helsinki Univ. (Finland); Loefman, J. [VTT Processes, Espoo (Finland); Pitkaenen, P. [VTT Building and Transport, Espoo (Finland); Ruotsalainen, P. [TUKES, Helsinki (Finland)

    2002-02-01

    Recently formed secondary minerals, predominantly calcite, occur in varying amounts as fracture infills, and the calcite types, their chemical compositions and isotope ratios reflect the compositions and physicochemical factors of the groundwater system in which they were formed. Fluid inclusions trapped in calcites give direct evidence of trapping temperatures and past salinities and of the chemical compositions of the palaeo fluids. A wide range of mineralogical and geochemical examinations were carried out within the EQUIP project to examine features of this kind. The fracture calcites at the Olkiluoto site are of various origins and represent several textural types. The exact number of calcite-producing events is unknown, but the duration of the period that was appropriate for the precipitation of low temperature calcite is estimated to have exceeded 1000 Ma. Thus the number of genetically related calcite units is assumed to be considerable. This study was focused on the petrogenesis of calcites crystallized in fractures of high water conductivity during the latest stages of geological evolution. The majority of these late stage calcites form physically homogeneous, scaly layers, and in a few cases thin layers composed of idiomorphic crystals. Chemically these are almost stoichiometric calcites (CaCO{sub 3}). The MnO content may exceed 1%, while the amounts of other elements present are minor, although the trace element concentrations, particularly those of large ionic trace elements, can be used as distinguishing features for the recognition of individual precipitates representing different calcite generations. Evidence from fluid inclusions, or more correctly from the absence of these in the late stage calcites, can be interpreted as an indication of slow rates of crystallization under cool conditions. Many chemical variables, e.g. oxygen isotope ratios, demonstrate an equilibrium between the latest calcites and water similar to the present groundwater. Older

  20. The origin of carbon isotope vital effects in coccolith calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, H. L. O.; Bruggeman, J.; Hermoso, M.; Rickaby, R. E. M.

    2017-03-01

    Calcite microfossils are widely used to study climate and oceanography in Earth's geological past. Coccoliths, readily preserved calcite plates produced by a group of single-celled surface-ocean dwelling algae called coccolithophores, have formed a significant fraction of marine sediments since the Late Triassic. However, unlike the shells of foraminifera, their zooplankton counterparts, coccoliths remain underused in palaeo-reconstructions. Precipitated in an intracellular chemical and isotopic microenvironment, coccolith calcite exhibits large and enigmatic departures from the isotopic composition of abiogenic calcite, known as vital effects. Here we show that the calcification to carbon fixation ratio determines whether coccolith calcite is isotopically heavier or lighter than abiogenic calcite, and that the size of the deviation is determined by the degree of carbon utilization. We discuss the theoretical potential for, and current limitations of, coccolith-based CO2 paleobarometry, that may eventually facilitate use of the ubiquitous and geologically extensive sedimentary archive.

  1. The origin of carbon isotope vital effects in coccolith calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, H. L. O.; Bruggeman, J.; Hermoso, M.; Rickaby, R. E. M.

    2017-01-01

    Calcite microfossils are widely used to study climate and oceanography in Earth's geological past. Coccoliths, readily preserved calcite plates produced by a group of single-celled surface-ocean dwelling algae called coccolithophores, have formed a significant fraction of marine sediments since the Late Triassic. However, unlike the shells of foraminifera, their zooplankton counterparts, coccoliths remain underused in palaeo-reconstructions. Precipitated in an intracellular chemical and isotopic microenvironment, coccolith calcite exhibits large and enigmatic departures from the isotopic composition of abiogenic calcite, known as vital effects. Here we show that the calcification to carbon fixation ratio determines whether coccolith calcite is isotopically heavier or lighter than abiogenic calcite, and that the size of the deviation is determined by the degree of carbon utilization. We discuss the theoretical potential for, and current limitations of, coccolith-based CO2 paleobarometry, that may eventually facilitate use of the ubiquitous and geologically extensive sedimentary archive. PMID:28262764

  2. Gene expression patterns of two dominant tallgrass prairie species differ in response to warming and altered precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Melinda D; Hoffman, Ava M; Avolio, Meghan L

    2016-05-13

    To better understand the mechanisms underlying plant species responses to climate change, we compared transcriptional profiles of the co-dominant C4 grasses, Andropogon gerardii Vitman and Sorghastrum nutans (L.) Nash, in response to increased temperatures and more variable precipitation regimes in a long-term field experiment in native tallgrass prairie. We used microarray probing of a closely related model species (Zea mays) to assess correlations in leaf temperature (Tleaf) and leaf water potential (LWP) and abundance changes of ~10,000 transcripts in leaf tissue collected from individuals of both species. A greater number of transcripts were found to significantly change in abundance levels with Tleaf and LWP in S. nutans than in A. gerardii. S. nutans also was more responsive to short-term drought recovery than A. gerardii. Water flow regulating transcripts associated with stress avoidance (e.g., aquaporins), as well as those involved in the prevention and repair of damage (e.g., antioxidant enzymes, HSPs), were uniquely more abundant in response to increasing Tleaf in S. nutans. The differential transcriptomic responses of the co-dominant C4 grasses suggest that these species may cope with and respond to temperature and water stress at the molecular level in distinct ways, with implications for tallgrass prairie ecosystem function.

  3. The coordination of Mg in foraminiferal calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, Oscar; Redfern, Simon A. T.; Tyliszczak, Tolek; Sadekov, Aleksey; Langer, Gerald; Kimoto, Katsunori; Elderfield, Henry

    2013-12-01

    The Mg/Ca ratio of foraminiferal calcite is a widely accepted and applied empirical proxy for ocean temperature. The analysis of foraminifera preserved in ocean sediments has been instrumental in developing our understanding of global climate, but the mechanisms behind the proxy are largely unknown. Analogies have been drawn to the inorganic precipitation of calcite, where the endothermic substitution of Mg for Ca is favoured at higher temperatures. However, evidence suggests that foraminiferal Mg incorporation may be more complex: foraminiferal magnesium is highly heterogeneous at the sub-micron scale, and high Mg areas coincide with elevated concentrations of organic molecules, Na, S and other trace elements. Fundamentally, the incorporation mode of Mg in foraminifera is unknown. Here we show that Mg is uniformly substituted for Ca within the calcite mineral lattice. The consistency of Mg-specific X-ray spectra gathered from nano-scale regions across the shell (‘test’) reveals that the coordination of Mg is uniform. The similarity of these spectra to that produced by dolomite shows that Mg is present in an octahedral coordination, ideally substituted for Ca in a calcite crystal structure. This demonstrates that Mg is heterogeneous in concentration, but not in structure. The degree of this uniformity implies the action of a continuous Mg incorporation mechanism, and therefore calcification mechanism, across these compositional bands in foraminifera. This constitutes a fundamental step towards a mechanistic understanding of foraminiferal calcification processes and the incorporation of calcite-bound palaeoenvironment proxies, such as Mg.

  4. Origin of calcite in the glacigenic Virttaankangas complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina M. Kortelainen

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Groundwaters of the glacigenic Virttaankangas complex in southern Finland are characterized by high pH values ranging up to 9.5. These values are significantly higher than those observed in silicate-rich shallow groundwater formations in crystalline bedrock areas. TheVirttaankangas sediments were discovered to contain small amounts of fine grained, dispersed calcite, which has a high tendency to increase the pH of local groundwaters. The primary goal of this study was to determine the mode of occurrence of calcite and to identifyits sources. The mineralogy of the glacigenic Virttaankangas complex was studied using material from 21 sediment drill cores. Fine-grained calcite is present in trace amounts (<< 1.4 % in the glaciofluvial and glaciolacustrine depositional units of the Virttaankangas complex. The topmost littoral sands were practically devoid of calcite. The isotope records of carbon and oxygen, the angular morphology of the grains and the uniform dispersion of calcite in the complex suggest a clastic origin for calcite, with no evidence for in-situ precipitation. In order to constrain the source of calcite, the isotopic composition of carbon and oxygen in five calcite samples was compared to the isotopic data from five carbonate rock erratics and eight crystalline bedrock samples from the region. Based on carbon and oxygen isotope ratios and chemical compositions, the dispersed calcite grains of the Virttaankangas complex appear to have been derived from the Mesoproterozoic Satakunta Formation, some 30 km NW from the Virttaankangas area. In sandstone, calcite is predominantly present as diagenetic cement in grain interspaces, concretions and interlayers. The source of detrital calcite was unexpected, as prior to this study the Satakunta sandstone hasnot been known to contain calcite.

  5. Reactive transport modeling of leaking CO2-enriched brine through fault zones taking into account the physical and geochemical interactions with calcite formation and the effects of porosity variations on the flow field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Nawaz; Worman, Anders

    2014-05-01

    One of the concerns related to CO2 underground storage is the possibility of CO2 leakage from the injection formation. Although CO2 starts getting dissolved in brine after its injection in the reservoir there is risk of its leakage in dissolved form due to either increased reservoir pressure as a result of CO2 injection or large-scale groundwater motion. The flow of brine through weaker zones like faults may cause the leakage of dissolved CO2. The mobility and spreading of reactive solutes is however significantly affected by diffusion, sorption in the fault zone and the rock-matrix and geochemical reactions with the rock-forming minerals. This study presents the results of numerical modeling of leaking CO2-enriched brine through a fault zone with physical and geochemical interactions with the neighboring limestone rock matrix over a period of 1000 years for 10m long fault zone with 2.5m wide rock matrix domain. Coupled geochemical reactive transport modeling is performed using COMSOL Multiphysics and MATLAB. Calcite dissolution and precipitation are observed in the fault zone and the rock matrix, however, dissolution of calcite dominates the calcite precipitation in the rock matrix. Calcite dissolution/precipitation results in porosity variation in both the fault zone and the rock matrix mainly close to the bottom inlet boundary and along the fault zone. An intense dissolution of calcite is observed, in close vicinity of the fault inlet boundary, in the rock matrix which results in a cave like formation with porosity increasing to unity. A porosity decrease in the rock matrix is also observed due to calcite precipitation. In the fault zone, a cyclic porosity variation is observed due to a cyclic calcite dissolution and precipitation in the fault zone. Overall porosity increase is observed in the fault zone reaching to unity in some parts of the fault zone. The variation in porosity is observed as posing strong effects on the flow field in the fault and the rock

  6. Unusual calcite stromatolites and pisoids from a landfill leachate collection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maliva, Robert G.; Missimer, Thomas M.; Leo, Kevin C.; Statom, Richard A.; Dupraz, Christophe; Lynn, Matthew; Dickson, J. A. D.

    2000-10-01

    Low-magnesium calcite stromatolites and pisoids were found to have precipitated within the leachate collection system piping of a Palm Beach County, Florida, landfill. The stromatolites and pisoids formed in an aphotic and anoxic environment that was at times greatly supersaturated with calcite. The stromatolites are composed of branching cylindrical bundles of concentrically laminated radial fibrous crystals. The pisoids consist of concentric layers of radial fibrous and microcrystalline calcite. Bacteria, likely sulfate reducing, appear to have acted as catalysts for calcite crystal nucleation, and thus the formation of the stromatolites and pisoids. The leachate system stromatolites provide a recent example of stromatolites that formed largely by cement precipitation. By acting as catalysts for calcite nucleation, bacteria may cause more rapid cementation than would have occurred under purely abiotic conditions. Rapid calcite precipitation catalyzed by bacteria has interfered with the operation of the Palm Beach County landfill leachate collection by obstructing pipes and may be an unrecognized problem at other landfill sites.

  7. Study of calcium carbonate and sulfate co-precipitation

    KAUST Repository

    Zarga, Y.

    2013-06-01

    Co-precipitation of mineral based salts in scaling is still not well understood and/or thermodynamically well defined in the water industry. This study focuses on investigating calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and sulfate mixed precipitation in scaling which is commonly observed in industrial water treatment processes including seawater desalination either by thermal-based or membrane-based processes. Co-precipitation kinetics were studied carefully by monitoring several parameters simultaneously measured, including: pH, calcium and alkalinity concentrations as well as quartz microbalance responses. The CaCO3 germination in mixed precipitation was found to be different than that of simple precipitation. Indeed, the co-precipitation of CaCO3 germination time was not anymore related to supersaturation as in a simple homogenous precipitation, but was significantly reduced when the gypsum crystals appeared first. On the other hand, the calcium sulfate crystals appear to reduce the energetic barrier of CaCO3 nucleation and lead to its precipitation by activating heterogeneous germination. However, the presence of CaCO3 crystals does not seem to have any significant effect on gypsum precipitation. IR spectroscopy and the Scanning Electronic Microscopy (SEM) were used to identify the nature of scales structures. Gypsum was found to be the dominant precipitate while calcite and especially vaterite were found at lower proportions. These analyses showed also that gypsum crystals promote calcite crystallization to the detriment of other forms. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Elastic constants of calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peselnick, L.; Robie, R.A.

    1962-01-01

    The recent measurements of the elastic constants of calcite by Reddy and Subrahmanyam (1960) disagree with the values obtained independently by Voigt (1910) and Bhimasenachar (1945). The present authors, using an ultrasonic pulse technique at 3 Mc and 25??C, determined the elastic constants of calcite using the exact equations governing the wave velocities in the single crystal. The results are C11=13.7, C33=8.11, C44=3.50, C12=4.82, C13=5.68, and C14=-2.00, in units of 1011 dyncm2. Independent checks of several of the elastic constants were made employing other directions and polarizations of the wave velocities. With the exception of C13, these values substantially agree with the data of Voigt and Bhimasenachar. ?? 1962 The American Institute of Physics.

  9. Responses of plant biomass, photosynthesis and lipid peroxidation to warming and precipitation change in two dominant species (Stipa grandis and Leymus chinensis) from North China Grasslands

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Xiliang; Wang, Yuhui; Lv, Xiaomin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Influential factors of global change affect plant carbon uptake and biomass simultaneously. Although the effects from warming and precipitation change have been extensive studied separately, the responses of plant biomass, photosynthesis, and lipid peroxidation to the interaction of these factors are still not fully understood. In this study, we examined the physiological responses of two dominant plant species from grasslands of northern China with different functional traits to com...

  10. Calcite biomineralization by bacterial isolates from the recently discovered pristine karstic herrenberg cave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusznyák, Anna; Akob, Denise M; Nietzsche, Sándor; Eusterhues, Karin; Totsche, Kai Uwe; Neu, Thomas R; Frosch, Torsten; Popp, Jürgen; Keiner, Robert; Geletneky, Jörn; Katzschmann, Lutz; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef; Küsel, Kirsten

    2012-02-01

    Karstic caves represent one of the most important subterranean carbon storages on Earth and provide windows into the subsurface. The recent discovery of the Herrenberg Cave, Germany, gave us the opportunity to investigate the diversity and potential role of bacteria in carbonate mineral formation. Calcite was the only mineral observed by Raman spectroscopy to precipitate as stalactites from seepage water. Bacterial cells were found on the surface and interior of stalactites by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Proteobacteria dominated the microbial communities inhabiting stalactites, representing more than 70% of total 16S rRNA gene clones. Proteobacteria formed 22 to 34% of the detected communities in fluvial sediments, and a large fraction of these bacteria were also metabolically active. A total of 9 isolates, belonging to the genera Arthrobacter, Flavobacterium, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus, Serratia, and Stenotrophomonas, grew on alkaline carbonate-precipitating medium. Two cultures with the most intense precipitate formation, Arthrobacter sulfonivorans and Rhodococcus globerulus, grew as aggregates, produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), and formed mixtures of calcite, vaterite, and monohydrocalcite. R. globerulus formed idiomorphous crystals with rhombohedral morphology, whereas A. sulfonivorans formed xenomorphous globular crystals, evidence for taxon-specific crystal morphologies. The results of this study highlighted the importance of combining various techniques in order to understand the geomicrobiology of karstic caves, but further studies are needed to determine whether the mineralogical biosignatures found in nutrient-rich media can also be found in oligotrophic caves.

  11. Calcite Biomineralization by Bacterial Isolates from the Recently Discovered Pristine Karstic Herrenberg Cave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusznyák, Anna; Akob, Denise M.; Nietzsche, Sándor; Eusterhues, Karin; Totsche, Kai Uwe; Neu, Thomas R.; Frosch, Torsten; Popp, Jürgen; Keiner, Robert; Geletneky, Jörn; Katzschmann, Lutz; Schulze, Ernst-Detlef

    2012-01-01

    Karstic caves represent one of the most important subterranean carbon storages on Earth and provide windows into the subsurface. The recent discovery of the Herrenberg Cave, Germany, gave us the opportunity to investigate the diversity and potential role of bacteria in carbonate mineral formation. Calcite was the only mineral observed by Raman spectroscopy to precipitate as stalactites from seepage water. Bacterial cells were found on the surface and interior of stalactites by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Proteobacteria dominated the microbial communities inhabiting stalactites, representing more than 70% of total 16S rRNA gene clones. Proteobacteria formed 22 to 34% of the detected communities in fluvial sediments, and a large fraction of these bacteria were also metabolically active. A total of 9 isolates, belonging to the genera Arthrobacter, Flavobacterium, Pseudomonas, Rhodococcus, Serratia, and Stenotrophomonas, grew on alkaline carbonate-precipitating medium. Two cultures with the most intense precipitate formation, Arthrobacter sulfonivorans and Rhodococcus globerulus, grew as aggregates, produced extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), and formed mixtures of calcite, vaterite, and monohydrocalcite. R. globerulus formed idiomorphous crystals with rhombohedral morphology, whereas A. sulfonivorans formed xenomorphous globular crystals, evidence for taxon-specific crystal morphologies. The results of this study highlighted the importance of combining various techniques in order to understand the geomicrobiology of karstic caves, but further studies are needed to determine whether the mineralogical biosignatures found in nutrient-rich media can also be found in oligotrophic caves. PMID:22179248

  12. Atomistic simulations of calcium uranyl(VI) carbonate adsorption on calcite and stepped-calcite surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doudou, Slimane; Vaughan, David J; Livens, Francis R; Burton, Neil A

    2012-07-17

    Adsorption of actinyl ions onto mineral surfaces is one of the main mechanisms that control the migration of these ions in environmental systems. Here, we present computational classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to investigate the behavior of U(VI) in contact with different calcite surfaces. The calcium-uranyl-carbonate [Ca(2)UO(2)(CO(3))(3)] species is shown to display both inner- and outer-sphere adsorption to the flat {101̅4} and the stepped {314̅8} and {31̅2̅16} planes of calcite. Free energy calculations, using the umbrella sampling method, are employed to simulate adsorption paths of the same uranyl species on the different calcite surfaces under aqueous condition. Outer-sphere adsorption is found to dominate over inner-sphere adsorption because of the high free energy barrier of removing a uranyl-carbonate interaction and replacing it with a new uranyl-surface interaction. An important binding mode is proposed involving a single vicinal water monolayer between the surface and the sorbed complex. From the free energy profiles of the different calcite surfaces, the uranyl complex was also found to adsorb preferentially on the acute-stepped {314̅8} face of calcite, in agreement with experiment.

  13. Paleoclimatic and paleohydrologic records from secondary calcite: Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whelan, J.F.; Stuckless, J.S.; Moscati, R.J. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States); Vaniman, D.T. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Stable isotope analyses of calcite and opal, fluid inclusion formation conditions and gas compositions, Sr isotope ratios, and REE compositions all support formation of secondary calcite in the unsaturated zone of Yucca Mountain from infiltration of surface-derived (and soil zone buffered) waters of meteoric origin. Detailed sampling of growth-banding preserved by the secondary calcite should provide a record of past variations in the stable isotope chemistry of these infiltrating waters, and, hence, of precipitation at Yucca Mountain, i.e., a proxy of past climate at Yucca Mountain. The precision of this record depends on how well it can be dated. The distribution and texture of secondary calcite occurrences, if mapped in careful detail from existing bore hole samples and underground workings (as exposures become accessible), could provide a time/space map of fracture and fault unsaturated-zone ground water flow-paths during past wetter climates which might prevail in the future with change in climate.

  14. Genomic and resistance gene homolog diversity of the dominant tallgrass prairie species across the U.S. Great Plains precipitation gradient.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew N Rouse

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Environmental variables such as moisture availability are often important in determining species prevalence and intraspecific diversity. The population genetic structure of dominant plant species in response to a cline of these variables has rarely been addressed. We evaluated the spatial genetic structure and diversity of Andropogon gerardii populations across the U.S. Great Plains precipitation gradient, ranging from approximately 48 cm/year to 105 cm/year. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Genomic diversity was evaluated with AFLP markers and diversity of a disease resistance gene homolog was evaluated by PCR-amplification and digestion with restriction enzymes. We determined the degree of spatial genetic structure using Mantel tests. Genomic and resistance gene homolog diversity were evaluated across prairies using Shannon's index and by averaging haplotype dissimilarity. Trends in diversity across prairies were determined using linear regression of diversity on average precipitation for each prairie. We identified significant spatial genetic structure, with genomic similarity decreasing as a function of distance between samples. However, our data indicated that genome-wide diversity did not vary consistently across the precipitation gradient. In contrast, we found that disease resistance gene homolog diversity was positively correlated with precipitation. SIGNIFICANCE: Prairie remnants differ in the genetic resources they maintain. Selection and evolution in this disease resistance homolog is environmentally dependent. Overall, we found that, though this environmental gradient may not predict genomic diversity, individual traits such as disease resistance genes may vary significantly.

  15. Immobilization of nanoparticles by occlusion into microbial calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skuce, Rebecca L.; Tobler, Dominique Jeanette; MacLaren, Ian

    2017-01-01

    systems. In this study, the ureolytic bacteria Sporosarcina pasteurii was used to induce calcium carbonate precipitation in the presence of organo-metallic manufactured nanoparticles. As calcite crystals grew the nanoparticles in the solution became trapped inside these crystals. Capture of NPs within...

  16. Removal of organic magnesium in coccolithophore calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco-Ameijeiras, S.; Lebrato, M.; Stoll, H. M.; Iglesias-Rodriguez, M. D.; Méndez-Vicente, A.; Sett, S.; Müller, M. N.; Oschlies, A.; Schulz, K. G.

    2012-07-01

    Coccolithophore calcite refers to the plates of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) produced by the calcifying phytoplankton, coccolithophores. The empirical study of the elemental composition has a great potential in the development of paleoproxies. However, the difficulties to separate coccolithophore carbonates from organic phases hamper the investigation of coccoliths magnesium to calcium ratios (Mg/Ca) in biogeochemical studies. Magnesium (Mg) is found in organic molecules in the cells at concentrations up to 400 times higher than in inorganically precipitated calcite in present-day seawater. The aim of this study was to optimize a reliable procedure for organic Mg removal from coccolithophore samples to ensure reproducibility in measurements of inorganic Mg in calcite. Two baseline methods comprising organic matter oxidations with (1) bleach and (2) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were tested on synthetic pellets, prepared by mixing reagent grade CaCO3 with organic matter from the non-calcifying marine algae Chlorella autotrophica and measured with an ICP-AES (inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer). Our results show that treatments with a reductive solution [using hydroxylamine-hydrochloride (NH2OH·HCl + NH4OH)] followed by three consecutive oxidations (using H2O2) yielded the best cleaning efficiencies, removing >99% of organic Mg in 24 h. P/Ca and Fe/Ca were used as indicators for organic contamination in the treated material. The optimized protocol was tested in dried coccolithophore pellets from batch cultures of Emiliania huxleyi, Calcidiscus leptoporus and Gephyrocapsa oceanica. Mg/Ca of treated coccolithophores were 0.151 ± 0.018, 0.220 ± 0.040, and 0.064 ± 0.023 mmol/mol, respectively. Comparison with Mg/Ca literature coccolith values, suggests a tight dependence on modern seawater Mg/Ca, which changes as a consequence of different seawater origins (protocol applicable to field and laboratory studies of trace elemental composition in

  17. Calcites from Ocean Crust Basalts: Reliable Proxy Archives?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Florian; Eisenhauer, Anton

    2017-04-01

    Calcite cements in ocean crust basalts of the deep sea form from mixtures of cold seawater and warm hydrothermal fluids (about 0-70°C). These low temperature alteration (LTA) calcites have recently gained new interest as proxy recorders of seawater composition (Refs. 1-5). Recent LTA calcite reconstructions of the Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca evolution in ocean waters point to considerably lower Sr/Ca and Mg/Ca ratios during the Cretaceous and Paleogene than in the modern ocean. However, diagenetic alteration in contact with the basalt host rock may change the composition of the LTA calcites. For testing the reliability of LTA calcite records of seawater composition multi-proxy approaches are applied: oxygen isotopes indicate precipitation temperatures, strontium isotopes (87Sr/86Sr) and trace elements indicate influences from hydrothermal fluids. Additional information about the influence of basement rocks on LTA calcite composition can be derived from analyses of stable calcium and strontium isotopes (44/40Ca, 88/86Sr). We find low 44/40Ca values for DSDP and ODP sites where the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of LTA calcites indicate basement influence. On the other hand, for some sites the 87Sr/86Sr values inidicate precipitation from pristine seawater, while low 44/40Ca values indicate basement influence. All of these sites are either older than 50 Myr or show calcite precipitation temperatures >50°C. Sites that are younger than 25 Myr and had formation temperatures 50°C significantly higher 88/86Sr values were observed. The calcium isotope results indicate basement influence on LTA calcite composition at temperatures >10°C. Radiogenic strontium isotopes, in contrast, can be used as unequivocal basement influence indicators only at temperatures above 30°C. Below about 20°C 87Sr/86Sr ratios are no reliable indicators of basement influence. All LTA calcites of sites older than 50 Myr formed (or recrystallized) at temperatures >15°C. Low 44/40Ca values indicate that

  18. Effects of elevated CO₂, warming and precipitation change on plant growth, photosynthesis and peroxidation in dominant species from North China grassland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhenzhu; Shimizu, Hideyuki; Ito, Shoko; Yagasaki, Yasumi; Zou, Chunjing; Zhou, Guangsheng; Zheng, Yuanrun

    2014-02-01

    Warming, watering and elevated atmospheric CO₂-concentration effects have been extensively studied separately; however, their combined impact on plants is not well understood. In the current research, we examined plant growth and physiological responses of three dominant species from the Eurasian Steppe with different functional traits to a combination of elevated CO₂, high temperature, and four simulated precipitation patterns. Elevated CO₂ stimulated plant growth by 10.8-41.7 % for a C₃ leguminous shrub, Caragana microphylla, and by 33.2-52.3 % for a C₃ grass, Stipa grandis, across all temperature and watering treatments. Elevated CO₂, however, did not affect plant biomass of a C₄ grass, Cleistogenes squarrosa, under normal or increased precipitation, whereas a 20.0-69.7 % stimulation of growth occurred with elevated CO₂ under drought conditions. Plant growth was enhanced in the C₃ shrub and the C₄ grass by warming under normal precipitation, but declined drastically with severe drought. The effects of elevated CO₂ on leaf traits, biomass allocation and photosynthetic potential were remarkably species-dependent. Suppression of photosynthetic activity, and enhancement of cell peroxidation by a combination of warming and severe drought, were partly alleviated by elevated CO₂. The relationships between plant functional traits and physiological activities and their responses to climate change were discussed. The present results suggested that the response to CO₂ enrichment may strongly depend on the response of specific species under varying patterns of precipitation, with or without warming, highlighting that individual species and multifactor dependencies must be considered in a projection of terrestrial ecosystem response to climatic change.

  19. ANNUAL REPORT FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT SCIENCE PROGRAM PROJECT NUMBER 87016 CO-PRECIPITATION OF TRACE METALS IN GROUNDWATER AND VADOSE ZONE CALCITE: IN SITU CONTAINMENT AND STABILIZATION OF STRONTIUM-90 AND OTHER DIVALENT METALS AND RADIONUCLIDES AT ARID WESTERN DOE SITES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert W.; Fujita, Yoshiko; Ferris, F. Grant; Cosgrove, Donna M.; Colwell, F. S.

    2003-06-15

    Radionuclide and metal contaminants such as 90Sr are present beneath U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) lands in both the groundwater (e.g., 100-N area at Hanford, WA) and vadose zone (e.g., Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory). In situ containment and stabilization of these contaminants is a cost-effective treatment strategy. However, implementing in situ containment and stabilization approaches requires definition of the mechanisms that control contaminant sequestration. We are investigating the in situ immobilization of radionuclides or contaminant metals (e.g., 90Sr) by their facilitated co-precipitation with calcium carbonate in groundwater and vadose zone systems. Our facilitated approach, shown schematically in Figure 1, relies upon the hydrolysis of introduced urea to cause the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing pH and alkalinity. Subsurface urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which may be either introduced with the urea or produced in situ by ubiquitous subsurface urea hydrolyzing microorganisms. Because the precipitation process tends to be irreversible and many western aquifers are saturated with respect to calcite, the coprecipitated metals and radionuclides will be effectively removed from the aqueous phase over the long-term. Another advantage of the ureolysis approach is that the ammonium ions produced by the reaction can exchange with radionuclides sorbed to subsurface minerals, thereby enhancing the availability of the radionuclides for re-capture in a more stable solid phase (co-precipitation rather than adsorption).

  20. PVC mixtures’ mechanical properties with the addition of modified calcite as filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vučinić Dušica R.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study mechanical properties of PVC mixtures (PVC, stabilizer, lubricant, filler such as tensile strength, tensile elongation, breaking strength, and breaking elongation were investigated. Unmodified calcite, as well as calcite modified by stearic acid, were used as fillers in wet and dry processes. The PVC mixtures containing the calcite modified by wet procedure have better mechanical properties compared to those with the calcite modified by the dry process. Tensile and breaking strength of the PVC mixture containing the calcite modified with 1.5% stearic acid using wet process, are higher for 2.8% and 5.2%, respectively, compared to the PVC mixture containing the calcite modified with the same amount of acid used in the dry process. The tensile strength difference between the mixtures increases with the increase of the concentration of used stearic acid up to 3%. The strength of PVC mixture with the calcite modified by wet process is 3.1% higher compared to the mixture containing calcite modified by dry process. The results showed that the bonding strength between calcite and the adsorbed organic component affected tensile strength, tensile elongation and breaking strength of the PVC mixtures. The best filler was obtained by wet modification using 1.5% stearic acid solution that provided the formation of a stearate monolayer chemisorbed on calcite. The PVC mixtures containing the calcite modified by wet process using 1.5% stearic acid solution exhibited the best mechanical properties. This calcite was completely hydrophobic with dominant chemically adsorbed surfactant, which means that stearate chemisorbed on calcite provided stronger interaction in the calcite-stearic acid-PVC system.

  1. Interactions between cadmium and calcite

    OpenAIRE

    Van der Weijden, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The thesis is composed of five chapters, some of which have been published or have been accepted for publication. The contents in some of the chapters may therefore slightly overlap, also because the subjects are closely related. The first two chapters focus mostly on the sorption of Cd on calcite, whereas the next two chapters are devoted to calcite growth and Cd incorporation during growth. In the fifth and final chapter, Cd sorption and incorporation is studied in an environment where calc...

  2. FORWARD AND INVERSE BIO-GEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF MICROBIALLY INDUCED PRECIPITATION IN 0.5M COLUMNAR EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tammer Barkouki; Brian Martinez; Brina Mortensen; Tess Weathers; Jason DeJong; Nic Spycher; Tim Ginn; Yoshiko Fujita; Robert Smith

    2009-09-01

    Microbial ureolysis-induced calcite precipitation may offer an in situ remediation for heavy metal and radionuclide contamination, as well as an alternative to traditional soil strengthening techniques. A microbially mediated calcite precipitation model was built in TOUGHREACT v2 and calibrated to batch and columnar experimental data. Kinetic ureolysis and calcite precipitation-rate expressions were parameterized by coupling TOUCHREACT with UCODE.

  3. Calcite Farming at Hollow Ridge Cave: Calibrating Net Rainfall and Cave Microclimate to Dripwater and Calcite Chemical Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremaine, D. M.; Kilgore, B. P.; Froelich, P. N.

    2012-04-01

    Stable isotope (δ18O and δ13C) and trace element records in cave speleothems are often interpreted as climate changes in rainfall amount or source, cave air temperature, overlying vegetation and atmospheric pCO2. However, these records are difficult to verify without in situ calibration of changes in cave microclimate (e.g., net rainfall, interior ventilation changes) to contemporaneous variations in dripwater and speleothem chemistry. In this study at Hollow Ridge Cave (HRC) in Marianna, Florida (USA), cave dripwater, bedrock, and modern calcite (farmed in situ) were collected in conjunction with continuous cave air pCO2, temperature, barometric pressure, relative humidity, radon-222 activity, airflow velocity and direction, rainfall amount, and drip rate data [1]. We analyzed rain and dripwater δD and δ18O, dripwater Ca2+, pH, δ13C and TCO2, cave air pCO2 and δ13C, and farmed calcite δ18O and δ13C to examine the relationships among rainwater isotopic composition, cave air ventilation, cave air temperature, calcite growth rate and seasonal timing, and calcite isotopic composition. Farmed calcite δ13C decreases linearly with distance from the front entrance to the interior of the cave during all seasons, with a maximum entrance-to-interior gradient of Δδ13C = -7‰ . A whole-cave "Hendy test" at distributed contemporaneous farming sites reveals that ventilation induces a +1.9 ± 0.96‰ δ13C offset between calcite precipitated in a ventilation flow path and out of flow paths. Farmed calcite δ18O exhibits a +0.82 ± 0.24‰ offset from values predicted by both theoretical calcite-water calculations and by laboratory-grown calcite [2]. Unlike calcite δ13C, oxygen isotopes show no ventilation effects and are a function only of temperature. Combining our data with other speleothem studies, we find a new empirical relationship for cave-specific water-calcite oxygen isotope fractionation across a range of temperatures and cave environments: 1000 ln α = 16

  4. Evolution and the Calcite Eye Lens

    CERN Document Server

    Williams, Vernon L

    2013-01-01

    Calcite is a uniaxial, birefringent crystal, which in its optically transparent form, has been used for animal eye lenses, the trilobite being one such animal. Because of the calcite birefringence there is a difficulty in using calcite as a lens. When the propagation direction of incoming light is not exactly on the c-axis, the mages blur. In this paper, calcite blurring is evaluated, and the non-blurring by a crystallin eye lens is compared to a calcite one.

  5. Responses of plant biomass, photosynthesis and lipid peroxidation to warming and precipitation change in two dominant species (Stipa grandis and Leymus chinensis) from North China Grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Xiliang; Wang, Yuhui; Lv, Xiaomin

    2016-03-01

    Influential factors of global change affect plant carbon uptake and biomass simultaneously. Although the effects from warming and precipitation change have been extensive studied separately, the responses of plant biomass, photosynthesis, and lipid peroxidation to the interaction of these factors are still not fully understood. In this study, we examined the physiological responses of two dominant plant species from grasslands of northern China with different functional traits to combinations of five simulated warming patterns and five simulated precipitation patterns in environment-controlled chambers. Our results showed that the biomass, net CO 2 assimilation rate (P n), maximal efficiency of photosystem II photochemistry (F v/F m), and chlorophyll content (Chl) of Stipa grandis and Leymus chinensis were enhanced by moderate warming and plus precipitation, but they declined drastically with high temperature and drought. High temperature and drought also led to significant malondialdehyde (MDA) accumulation, which had a negative correlation with leaf biomass. The lower level of lipid peroxidation in leaves of S. grandis suggests that this species is better protected from oxidative damage under heat stress, drought stress and their interactive conditions than L. chinensis. Using the subordinate function values method, we found S. grandis to be more sensitive to climate change than L. chinensis and the gross biomass and root biomass of S. grandis and the leaf biomass of L. chinensis were most sensitive to climate change. Furthermore, the P n of both S. grandis and L. chinensis had a significant linear relationship with F v/F m and Chl, indicating that carbon assimilation may be caused by nonstomatal limitations.

  6. Seafloor-precipitated carbonate fans in the Neoproterozoic Rainstorm Member, Johnnie Formation, Death Valley Region, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Pruss, Sara Brady; Corsetti, Frank A.; Fischer, Woodward W.

    2008-01-01

    Cm-sized carbonate seafloor fans occur in the Neoproterozoic Rainstorm Member of the Johnnie Formation, Death Valley, USA. The fans formed in a mixed carbonate-clastic succession near storm wave base at the base of parasequences on a storm-dominated ramp. Petrographic observations indicate that the fans were originally precipitated as aragonite and later inverted to calcite during diagenesis. Although not directly dated, the Rainstorm Member preserves a large magnitude negative carbon isotopi...

  7. Precipitation of minerals by 22 species of moderately halophilic bacteria in artificial marine salts media: influence of salt concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivadeneyra, M A; Delgado, R; Párraga, J; Ramos-Cormenza, A; Delgado, G

    2006-01-01

    Precipitation of minerals was shown by 22 species of moderately halophilic bacteria in both solid and liquid artificial marine salts media at different concentration and different Mg2+-to-Ca2+ ratio. Precipitation of minerals was observed for all the bacteria used. When salt concentration increased, the quantity and the size of bioliths decreased, the time required for precipitation being increased. The precipitated minerals were calcite, magnesian calcite, aragonite, dolomite, monohydrocalcite, hydromagnesite and struvite in variable proportions, depending on the bacterial species, the salinity and the physical state of the medium; the Mg content of the magnesian calcite also varied according to the same parameters. The precipitated minerals do not correspond exactly to those which could be precipitated inorganically according to the saturation indices. Scanning electron microscopy showed that the formation of the bioliths is initiated by grouping of calcified cells and that the dominant final morphologies were spherulitic with fibrous radiated interiors. It was demonstrated that moderately halophilic bacteria play an active role in the precipitation of carbonates and we hypothesize about this process of biomineralization.

  8. Calcium carbonate precipitation in the Cueva di Watapana on Bonaire, Netherlands Antilles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer Mohr, van der C.G.

    1978-01-01

    Calcium carbonate precipitates as low Mg-calcite and aragonite in slightly brackish water in a cave in the Pleistocene Middle Terrace of southern Bonaire. The calcium carbonate precipitates at the atmosphere-water interface forming floating calcite scales (calcite ice). Aragonite crystals frequently

  9. Morphology of calcite crystals in clast coatings from four soils in the Mojave desert region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chadwick, Oliver A.; Sowers, Janet M.; Amundson, Ronald G.

    1989-01-01

    Pedogenic calcite-crystal coatings on clasts were examined in four soils along an altitudinal gradient on Kyle Canyon alluvium in southern Nevada. Clast coatings were studied rather than matrix carbonate to avoid the effects of soil matrix on crystallization. Six crystal sizes and shapes were recognized and distinguished. Equant micrite was the dominant crystal form with similar abundance at all elevations. The distributions of five categories of spar and microspar appear to be influenced by altitudinally induced changes in effective moisture. In the drier, lower elevation soils, crystals were equant or parallel prismatic with irregular, interlocking boundaries while in the more moist, higher elevation soils they were randomly oriented, euhedral, prismatic, and fibrous. There was little support for the supposition that Mg(+2) substitution or increased (Mg + Ca)/HCO3 ratios in the precipitating solution produced crystal elongation.

  10. Cryogenic and non-cryogenic pool calcites reflect alternating permafrost and interglacial periods (Breitscheid-Erdbach Cave, Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Richter

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Weichselian cryogenic calcites collected in what is referred to as the "Rätselhalle" of the Breitscheid-Erdbach Cave were structurally classified as rhombohedral crystal and spherulitic crystal sinters. The carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of these precipitates corresponds to those of known cryogenic calcites of slow genesis of Central European caves (δ13C=+0.6 and −7.3‰; δ18O=−6.9 to −18.0‰. The variant carbon and oxygen isotope pattern differing between different caves is attributed to cave specific ventilation. Particularly, Breitscheid cryogenic calcites reflect mean levels of cave ventilation. By petrographic and geochemical comparisons of Weichselian cryogenic calcite with recent to sub-recent precipitates as well as Weichselian non-cryogenic calcites of the same locality, a model for the precipitation of these calcites is proposed. While the recent and sub-recent pool-calcites isotopically match the geochemistry of interglacial speleothems (stalagmites, etc., isotope ratios of Weichselian non-cryogenic pool-calcites reflect cooler conditions. Weichselian cryogenic calcites show a trend towards 18O-depleted values with higher carbon isotope ratios reflecting slow freezing of the precipitating solution. In essence, the isotope geochemistry of the Weichselian calcites reflects the climate history changing from overall initial permafrost (glacial conditions to an interglacial and subsequently to renewed permafrost conditions. The last stage then grades into the present-day warm period. Judging from the data compiled here, the last permafrost stage is followed by only one interglacial. During this interglacial, the cave ice melted and non-cryogenic Weichselian calcite precipitates were deposited on the cave ground or on fallen blocks, respectively.

  11. Sorption of phosphate onto calcite; results from batch experiments and surface complexation modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sø, Helle Ugilt; Postma, Dieke; Jakobsen, Rasmus;

    2011-01-01

    The adsorption of phosphate onto calcite was studied in a series of batch experiments. To avoid the precipitation of phosphate-containing minerals the experiments were conducted using a short reaction time (3h) and low concentrations of phosphate (⩽50μM). Sorption of phosphate on calcite...... was studied in 11 different calcite-equilibrated solutions that varied in pH, PCO2, ionic strength and activity of Ca2+, CO32- and HCO3-. Our results show strong sorption of phosphate onto calcite. The kinetics of phosphate sorption onto calcite are fast; adsorption is complete within 2–3h while desorption...... of a high degree of super-saturation with respect to hydroxyapatite (SIHAP⩽7.83). The amount of phosphate adsorbed varied with the solution composition, in particular, adsorption increases as the CO32- activity decreases (at constant pH) and as pH increases (at constant CO32- activity). The primary effect...

  12. Shell microstructure and its inheritance in the calcitic helcionellid Mackinnonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J. Vendrasco

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Mackinnonia davidi from the Cambrian (Series 2 of Australia has a prismatic outer shell layer and, as newly described here, a calcitic semi-nacre inner layer. The pattern is the same as in stenothecids such as Mellopegma, providing more evidence for a strong phylogenetic signal in the shell microstructure of Cambrian molluscs. In addition, calcite now appears to have been common in helcionellids and other molluscs during the early and middle Cambrian, with many species exhibiting foliated calcite. This is surprising given the dominance of aragonite in molluscs, both modern and from post-Cambrian fossil deposits with exceptional shell microstructure preservation, including localities from the Ordovician of the Cincinnati region, USA.

  13. Interactions between cadmium and calcite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Weijden, R.D.

    1995-01-01

    The thesis is composed of five chapters, some of which have been published or have been accepted for publication. The contents in some of the chapters may therefore slightly overlap, also because the subjects are closely related. The first two chapters focus mostly on the sorption of Cd on calcite,

  14. Interactions of arsenic with calcite surfaces revealed by in-situ nanoscale imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, Francois; Putnis, Christine; Montes-Hernandez, German; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; Hövelmann, Jörn; Sarret, Géraldine

    2015-04-01

    Arsenic dissolved in water represents a key environmental and health challenge because several million people are under the threat of contamination. In calcareous environments calcite may play an important role in arsenic solubility and transfer in water. Arsenic-calcite interactions remain controversial, especially for As(III) which was proposed to be either incorporated as such, or as As(V) after oxidation. Here, we provide the first time-lapse in-situ study of calcite dissolution and growth in the presence of solutions with various amounts of As(III) or As(V). This was performed at room temperature and pH range 6-9 using a flow through cell connected to an atomic force microscope (AFM), to study the evolution of the (10-14) calcite cleavage surface morphology. Reaction products were then characterized by Raman spectroscopy. In parallel, co-precipitation experiments with either As(III) or As(V) were performed in batch reactors, and the speciation of arsenic in the resulting solids was studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). For As(V), AFM results showed that it interacts strongly with the calcite surface, and XAS results showed that As(V) was mostly incorporated in the calcite structure. For As(III), AFM results showed much less impact on calcite growth and dissolution and less incorporation was observed. This was confirmed by XAS results that indicate that As(III) was partly oxidized into As(V) before being incorporated into calcite and the resulting calcite contained 36% As(III) and 64% As(V). All these experimental results confirm that As(V) has a much stronger interaction with calcite than As(III) and that calcite may represent an important reservoir for arsenic in various geological environments.

  15. Biotic control of skeletal growth by scleractinian corals in aragonite-calcite seas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomihiko Higuchi

    Full Text Available Modern scleractinian coral skeletons are commonly composed of aragonite, the orthorhombic form of CaCO3. Under certain conditions, modern corals produce calcite as a secondary precipitate to fill pore space. However, coral construction of primary skeletons from calcite has yet to be demonstrated. We report a calcitic primary skeleton produced by the modern scleractinian coral Acropora tenuis. When uncalcified juveniles were incubated from the larval stage in seawater with low mMg/Ca levels, the juveniles constructed calcitic crystals in parts of the primary skeleton such as the septa; the deposits were observable under Raman microscopy. Using scanning electron microscopy, we observed different crystal morphologies of aragonite and calcite in a single juvenile skeleton. Quantitative analysis using X-ray diffraction showed that the majority of the skeleton was composed of aragonite even though we had exposed the juveniles to manipulated seawater before their initial crystal nucleation and growth processes. Our results indicate that the modern scleractinian coral Acropora mainly produces aragonite skeletons in both aragonite and calcite seas, but also has the ability to use calcite for part of its skeletal growth when incubated in calcite seas.

  16. The Coordination of Mg in Foraminiferal Calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, O.; Redfern, S. A.; Tyliszczak, T.; Sadekov, A.; Langer, G.; Elderfield, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Mg/Ca ratio in calcite shells ('tests') of foraminifera is an empirical ocean temperature proxy widely used to interpret palaeoclimates. We explore the distribution and local environment of Mg in foram tests using STXM and NEXAFS spectroscopy to test the fundamental assumptions behind the proxy, and shed light on the mechanisms underpinning this vital oceanographic tool. Throughout the development of the Mg/Ca proxy, it has been assumed that Mg in foraminifera tests substitutes directly into the calcite lattice (1). This assumption is based on XRD analyses of various high-Mg biogenic carbonates, where Mg concentrations are manifest in the shifted position of diffraction peaks (2, 3). The extrapolation of this trend to foraminiferal calcite links the proxy to inorganic precipitation experiments, and provides a theoretical mechanistic framework to understand the link between Mg/Ca and temperature: the substitution of Mg is endothermic, and favoured at higher temperatures. However, the concentration of Mg in most foraminifera (0-10 mmol/mol Mg/Ca) is below the detection limit of XRD methods, and the analogy to inorganic systems has not been explicitly tested. Electron microprobe (4-6), LA-ICP-MS (7) and high-resolution nanoSIMS mapping (Sadekov, unpub.) of foraminifera tests have revealed the presence of high 'trace element' bands running in plane with the test surface, enriched in Mg, Sr, S, organic molecules and other trace elements. This emphasises a key question highlighted by Dodd (1) when the proxy was still in its infancy: how is Mg incorporated into mineral skeletons? By direct substitution into the calcite lattice, interstitially in a separate distinct mineral phase, or associated with organic compounds? We address this fundamental question using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy at ALS beamline 11.0.2 to examine the distribution and local atomic environment of Mg in two contrasting species of foraminifera

  17. Determination of aragonite trace element distribution coefficients from speleothem calcite-aragonite transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassenburg, J. A.; Scholz, D.; Jochum, K. P.; Cheng, H.; Oster, J.; Immenhauser, A.; Richter, D. K.; Häger, T.; Jamieson, R. A.; Baldini, J. U. L.; Hoffmann, D.; Breitenbach, S. F. M.

    2016-10-01

    The processes that govern the incorporation of (trace) elements into speleothems can often be linked to environmental changes. Although element incorporation into speleothem calcite is now reasonably well understood, current knowledge regarding trace element variability in speleothem aragonite is very limited. Of particular interest is whether trace element distribution coefficients are above or below one in order to assess the extent to which prior aragonite precipitation has affected speleothem aragonite trace element records. This study uses nine calcite-to-aragonite transitions in seven speleothems from diverse environmental settings to derive the first quantitative estimates of the distribution coefficients for several elements in speleothem aragonite: DMg(Ar) = 9.7E-5 ± 9.01E-5, DBa(Ar) = 0.91 ± 0.88, DSr(Ar) = 1.38 ± 0.53, and DU(Ar) = 6.26 ± 4.54 (1σ SD). For one speleothem from western Germany, the distribution coefficients are generally higher, which is potentially related to the very low growth rates (negative correlation with growth rate when growth rate is below 20 μm/year. In summary, our results demonstrate that speleothem aragonite DMg(Ar) is below one, DU(Ar) is considerably above one, and DSr(Ar) is above one or close to unity. For DBa(Ar), reaching a similar conclusion is difficult due to the relatively high uncertainty. Enhanced prior aragonite precipitation will thus result in lower U and higher Mg concentrations in speleothem aragonite, although in many cases Mg in speleothem aragonite is most likely dominated by other processes. This result suggests that U concentrations in aragonitic stalagmites could serve as a very effective proxy for palaeo-rainfall.

  18. Altervalent substitution of sodium for calcium in biogenic calcite and aragonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Toshihiro; Tamenori, Yusuke; Suzuki, Atsushi; Kawahata, Hodaka; Iwasaki, Nozomu; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Nguyen, Luan T.; Kuroyanagi, Azumi; Yamazaki, Toshitsugu; Kuroda, Junichiro; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2017-04-01

    Sodium concentrations in biogenic CaCO3 are several thousands of parts per million, and, on a molar basis, Na is among the most abundant constituent minor element in these carbonates. Nevertheless, the chemical form of Na in CaCO3 is not well constrained. We used synchrotron X-ray spectroscopy to identify the dominant molecular host sites for Na in biogenic calcite and aragonite precipitated by corals, bivalves, and foraminifera. We also used the K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure to investigate the chemical environment of Na in biogenic calcium carbonates and identify the altervalent substitution of Na into Ca sites in the lattice structures of calcite and aragonite. Minor cation and anion concentrations in biogenic CaCO3 suggest that the principal substitution mechanism involves charge compensation through the creation of CO32- vacancies. The mostly homogeneous Na concentrations in the skeletal microstructures of the various biota we examined indicate that environmental and biological controls, such as temperature, skeletal microstructure, and calcification rates, have only minor influences on skeletal Na concentrations. A decrease of Na:Ca ratios with increasing age of foraminiferal shells picked from a Quaternary sediment core, indicates progressive release of Na, which suggests that structurally-substituted Na in biogenic CaCO3 is readily leached during burial diagenesis. Whereas the sediment that undergo diagenesis release some Na back to the water column, sodium co-precipitation in biogenic CaCO3 serves as a potential sink of Na for the ocean.

  19. Interactions of arsenic with calcite surfaces revealed by in situ nanoscale imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renard, François; Putnis, Christine V.; Montes-Hernandez, German; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; Hovelmann, Jörn; Sarret, Géraldine

    2015-06-01

    Arsenic dissolved in water represents a key environmental and health challenge because several million people are under the threat of contamination. In calcareous environments calcite may play an important role in arsenic solubility and transfer in water. Arsenic-calcite interactions remain controversial, especially for As(III) which was proposed to be either incorporated as such, or as As(V) after oxidation. Here, we provide the first time-lapse in situ study of the evolution of the (10-14) calcite cleavage surface morphology during dissolution and growth in the presence of solutions with various amounts of As(III) or As(V) at room temperature and pH range 6-11 using a flow-through cell connected to an atomic force microscope (AFM). Reaction products were then characterized by Raman spectroscopy. In parallel, co-precipitation experiments with either As(III) or As(V) were performed in batch reactors, and the speciation of arsenic in the resulting solids was studied by X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). For As(V), AFM results showed that it interacts strongly with the calcite surface, and XAS results showed that As(V) was mostly incorporated in the calcite structure. For As(III), AFM results showed much less impact on calcite growth and dissolution and less incorporation was observed. This was confirmed by XAS results that indicate that As(III) was partly oxidized into As(V) before being incorporated into calcite and the resulting calcite contained 36% As(III) and 64% As(V). All these experimental results confirm that As(V) has a much stronger interaction with calcite than As(III) and that calcite may represent an important reservoir for arsenic in various geological environments.

  20. Incorporation of Eu(III) into Calcite under Recrystallization conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellebrandt, S E; Hofmann, S; Jordan, N; Barkleit, A; Schmidt, M

    2016-09-13

    The interaction of calcite with trivalent europium under recrystallization conditions was studied on the molecular level using site-selective time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). We conducted batch studies with a reaction time from seven days up to three years with three calcite powders, which differed in their specific surface area, recrystallization rates and impurities content. With increase of the recrystallization rate incorporation of Eu(3+) occurs faster and its speciation comes to be dominated by one species with its excitation maximum at 578.8 nm, so far not identified during previous investigations of this process under growth and phase transformation conditions. A long lifetime of 3750 μs demonstrates complete loss of hydration, consequently Eu must have been incorporated into the bulk crystal. The results show a strong dependence of the incorporation kinetics on the recrystallization rate of the different calcites. Furthermore the investigation of the effect of different background electrolytes (NaCl and KCl) demonstrate that the incorporation process under recrystallization conditions strongly depends on the availability of Na(+). These findings emphasize the different retention potential of calcite as a primary and secondary mineral e.g. in a nuclear waste disposal site.

  1. Incorporation of Eu(III) into Calcite under Recrystallization conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellebrandt, S. E.; Hofmann, S.; Jordan, N.; Barkleit, A.; Schmidt, M.

    2016-09-01

    The interaction of calcite with trivalent europium under recrystallization conditions was studied on the molecular level using site-selective time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). We conducted batch studies with a reaction time from seven days up to three years with three calcite powders, which differed in their specific surface area, recrystallization rates and impurities content. With increase of the recrystallization rate incorporation of Eu3+ occurs faster and its speciation comes to be dominated by one species with its excitation maximum at 578.8 nm, so far not identified during previous investigations of this process under growth and phase transformation conditions. A long lifetime of 3750 μs demonstrates complete loss of hydration, consequently Eu must have been incorporated into the bulk crystal. The results show a strong dependence of the incorporation kinetics on the recrystallization rate of the different calcites. Furthermore the investigation of the effect of different background electrolytes (NaCl and KCl) demonstrate that the incorporation process under recrystallization conditions strongly depends on the availability of Na+. These findings emphasize the different retention potential of calcite as a primary and secondary mineral e.g. in a nuclear waste disposal site.

  2. Review of calcium carbonate polymorph precipitation in spring systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brian

    2017-05-01

    Many spring deposits throughout the world are characterized by spectacular deposits of calcium carbonate that are formed of various combinations of aragonite and calcite, and in very rare cases vaterite. The factors that control the precipitation of the aragonite and calcite have been the subject of considerable debate that has been based on natural precipitates and information gained from numerous laboratory experiments. Synthesis of this information indicates that there is probably no single universal factor that controls calcite and aragonite precipitation in all springs. Instead, the reason for aragonite as opposed to calcite precipitation should be ascertained by considering the following ordered series of possibilities for each system. First, aragonite, commonly with calcite as a co-precipitate, will form from spring water that has a high CO2 content and rapid CO2 degassing, irrespective of the Mg:Ca ratio and scale of precipitation. Second, aragonite can be precipitated from waters that have low levels of CO2 degassing provided that the Mg:Ca ratio is high enough to inhibit calcite precipitation. Third, the presence of biofilms may lead to the simultaneous precipitation of aragonite and calcite (irrespective of CO2 degassing or Mg:Ca ratio) either within the different microdomains that develop in the biofilm or because of diurnal changes in various geochemical parameters associated with the biofilm. Although the precipitation of calcite and aragonite has commonly been linked directly to water temperature, there is no clear evidence for this proposition. It is possible, however, that temperature may be influencing another parameter that plays a more direct role in the precipitation of these CaCO3 polymorphs. Despite the advances that have been made, the factors that ultimately control calcite and aragonite are still open to debate because this long-standing problem has still not been fully resolved.

  3. Stable isotopes in pedogenic calcite: Can the positive linear covariant trends be used to quantify paleo-evaporation rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gröcke, D.; Ufnar, D.; Beddows, P. A.

    2007-12-01

    Paleoclimatological models suggest enhanced evaporation rates in subtropical regions during greenhouse- world conditions. Laboratory evaporation experiments show that calcites precipitated from variably saturated solutions yield a positive linear covariant trend (PLCT) in δ18O vs δ13C values. This investigation experimentally quantifies calcite PLCT so that δ13C of subtropical paleosol calcretes may be used as a regional proxy of paleo-evaporation rates. A series of powdered CaCO3 samples with δ18O and δ13C values of -19.6‰ and -37.2‰ VPDB respectively were dissolved in deionized water in a pressure sealed container; it also contained separate vials of calcite reacted with HCl to generate a range of pCO2 environments, thus simulating a soil atmosphere. The variable pCO2 conditions simulate expected soil atmosphere pCO2 conditions in a calcrete horizon during alternative phases of calcite dissolution and precipitation. After 24 hrs, the solutions were placed in an open beaker in an incubator at 36°C and allowed to evaporate. Aliquots of 100 μL were removed at 24 hr intervals and the time of calcite crystal nucleation was also noted. Water analyses yielded δ18O enrichments ranging from an initial value of -4.8‰ VSMOW to a range of +10.0‰ to +14.8‰ VSMOW after an evaporation period of 75 hrs. The most enriched water values were attained from the solutions formed under lower pCO2 conditions (more enriched calcite δ18O, δ13C). The array of calcite δ18O vs δ13C values fall upon a PLCT that projects from a theoretical meteoric calcite line (MCL) calculated from the incubation temperature and deionized water δ18O and δ13C values. The precipitated calcite δ18O values range from the MCL value of -8.8‰ VPDB to +0.5‰ VPDB. The higher pCO2 waters precipitated calcite very early during evaporation, and thus the δ18O and δ13C calcite values are slightly enriched relative to the theoretical MCL. The lower pCO2 conditions precipitated calcite late in

  4. Shock-induced devolatilization of calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boslough, M. B.; Ahrens, T. J.; Vizgirda, J.; Becker, R. H.; Epstein, S.

    1982-01-01

    Experimental measurements of the release adiabats by Vizgirda (1981) indicate that substantial vaporization takes place upon release from shock pressures of 37 GPa for calcite and 14 GPa for aragonite. The present investigation includes the first controlled partial vaporization experiments on calcite. The experiments were conducted to test the predictions of the release adiabat experiments. The quantities of the gaseous species produced from shocked calcite and their carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions were determined, and the shock-induced effect on the Mn(2+) electron spin resonance spectrum in the shock-recovered calcite was observed. On the basis of the obtained results, it is concluded that shock stresses at the 17-18 GPa level give rise to volatilization of 0.03-0.3 (mole) percent of calcite to CO2 and CO. The devolatilization of calcite occurs at low pressure at significantly lower entropy densities than predicted on the basis of thermodynamic continuum models.

  5. Calcite Formation in Soft Coral Sclerites Is Determined by a Single Reactive Extracellular Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M. Azizur; Oomori, Tamotsu; Wörheide, Gert

    2011-01-01

    Calcium carbonate exists in two main forms, calcite and aragonite, in the skeletons of marine organisms. The primary mineralogy of marine carbonates has changed over the history of the earth depending on the magnesium/calcium ratio in seawater during the periods of the so-called “calcite and aragonite seas.” Organisms that prefer certain mineralogy appear to flourish when their preferred mineralogy is favored by seawater chemistry. However, this rule is not without exceptions. For example, some octocorals produce calcite despite living in an aragonite sea. Here, we address the unresolved question of how organisms such as soft corals are able to form calcitic skeletal elements in an aragonite sea. We show that an extracellular protein called ECMP-67 isolated from soft coral sclerites induces calcite formation in vitro even when the composition of the calcifying solution favors aragonite precipitation. Structural details of both the surface and the interior of single crystals generated upon interaction with ECMP-67 were analyzed with an apertureless-type near-field IR microscope with high spatial resolution. The results show that this protein is the main determining factor for driving the production of calcite instead of aragonite in the biocalcification process and that –OH, secondary structures (e.g. α-helices and amides), and other necessary chemical groups are distributed over the center of the calcite crystals. Using an atomic force microscope, we also explored how this extracellular protein significantly affects the molecular-scale kinetics of crystal formation. We anticipate that a more thorough investigation of the proteinaceous skeleton content of different calcite-producing marine organisms will reveal similar components that determine the mineralogy of the organisms. These findings have significant implications for future models of the crystal structure of calcite in nature. PMID:21768106

  6. Calcite formation in soft coral sclerites is determined by a single reactive extracellular protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M Azizur; Oomori, Tamotsu; Wörheide, Gert

    2011-09-09

    Calcium carbonate exists in two main forms, calcite and aragonite, in the skeletons of marine organisms. The primary mineralogy of marine carbonates has changed over the history of the earth depending on the magnesium/calcium ratio in seawater during the periods of the so-called "calcite and aragonite seas." Organisms that prefer certain mineralogy appear to flourish when their preferred mineralogy is favored by seawater chemistry. However, this rule is not without exceptions. For example, some octocorals produce calcite despite living in an aragonite sea. Here, we address the unresolved question of how organisms such as soft corals are able to form calcitic skeletal elements in an aragonite sea. We show that an extracellular protein called ECMP-67 isolated from soft coral sclerites induces calcite formation in vitro even when the composition of the calcifying solution favors aragonite precipitation. Structural details of both the surface and the interior of single crystals generated upon interaction with ECMP-67 were analyzed with an apertureless-type near-field IR microscope with high spatial resolution. The results show that this protein is the main determining factor for driving the production of calcite instead of aragonite in the biocalcification process and that -OH, secondary structures (e.g. α-helices and amides), and other necessary chemical groups are distributed over the center of the calcite crystals. Using an atomic force microscope, we also explored how this extracellular protein significantly affects the molecular-scale kinetics of crystal formation. We anticipate that a more thorough investigation of the proteinaceous skeleton content of different calcite-producing marine organisms will reveal similar components that determine the mineralogy of the organisms. These findings have significant implications for future models of the crystal structure of calcite in nature.

  7. Cryogenic and non-cryogenic pool calcites indicating permafrost and non-permafrost periods: a case study from the Herbstlabyrinth-Advent Cave system (Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. K. Richter

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Weichselian cryogenic calcites collected in what is referred to as the Rätselhalle of the Herbstlabyrinth-Advent Cave system are structurally classified as rhombohedral crystals and spherulitic aggregates. The carbon and oxygen isotopic composition of these precipitates (δ13C = +0.6 to −7.3‰ δ18O = −6.9 to −18.0‰ corresponds to those of known slowly precipitated cryogenic cave calcites under conditions of isotopic equilibrium between water and ice of Central European caves. The carbon and oxygen isotopic composition varies between different caves which is attributed to the effects of cave air ventilation before the freezing started.

    By petrographic and geochemical comparisons of Weichselian cryogenic calcite with recent to sub-recent precipitates as well as Weichselian non-cryogenic calcites of the same locality, a model for the precipitation of these calcites is proposed. While the recent and sub-recent pool-calcites isotopically match the composition of interglacial speleothems (stalagmites, etc., isotope ratios of Weichselian non-cryogenic pool-calcites reflect cooler conditions. Weichselian cryogenic calcites show a trend towards low δ18O values with higher carbon isotope ratios reflecting slow freezing of the precipitating solution. In essence, the isotope geochemistry of the Weichselian calcites reflects the climate history changing from overall initial permafrost conditions to permafrost-free and subsequently to renewed permafrost conditions. Judging from the data compiled here, the last permafrost stage in the Rätselhalle is followed by a warm period (interstadial and/or Holocene. During this warmer period, the cave ice melted and cryogenic and non-cryogenic Weichselian calcite precipitates were deposited on the cave ground or on fallen blocks, respectively.

  8. Aragonite-calcite transformation in fossil snail shells of loess sequences in Loess Plateau, Central China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENG Xuefen; CHEN Jun; CAI Yuanfeng; CHEN Yang; JI Junfeng

    2005-01-01

    The methods of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and ICP-AES are applied to analyzing the mineral composition of modern and fossil snail shells in Luochuan section and Xifeng section. The results show that the mineral phase of calcium carbonate in modern snail shells is aragonite, but for some fossil snail shells in certain layers of loess sequences, a part of aragonite is transformed into calcite. In Luochuan and Xifeng sections, the stratigraphic borderline of aragonite-calcite transformation appearing obviously is between L5 and L6. Under the earth surface condition, the aragonite-calcite transformation is influenced by the factor of temperature only in a long time scale. It seems that the pressure is not the factor influencing the aragonite-calcite transformation. The results also show that existing age of snail shells is possibly the dominant and principal factor for the aragonite-calcite transformation. To a certain extent, the degree of aragonite-calcite transformation in snail shell is controlled by the content of trace element, such as Mg2+. The trace element can improve the stability of snail shell aragonite and impede the process of aragonite transforming into calcite.

  9. Interactions of salicylic acid derivatives with calcite crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ukrainczyk, Marko; Gredičak, Matija; Jerić, Ivanka; Kralj, Damir

    2012-01-01

    Investigation of basic interactions between the active pharmaceutical compounds and calcium carbonates is of great importance because of the possibility to use the carbonates as a mineral carrier in drug delivery systems. In this study the mode and extent of interactions of salicylic acid and its amino acid derivates, chosen as pharmaceutically relevant model compounds, with calcite crystals are described. Therefore, the crystal growth kinetics of well defined rhombohedral calcite seed crystals in the systems containing salicylic acid (SA), 5-amino salicylic acid (5-ASA), N-salicyloil-l-aspartic acid (N-Sal-Asp) or N-salicyloil-l-glutamic acid (N-Sal-Glu), were investigated. The precipitation systems were of relatively low initial supersaturation and of apparently neutral pH. The data on the crystal growth rate reductions in the presence of the applied salicylate molecules were analyzed by means of Cabrera & Vermileya's, and Kubota & Mullin's models of interactions of the dissolved additives and crystal surfaces. The crystal growth kinetic experiments were additionally supported with the appropriate electrokinetic, spectroscopic and adsorption measurements. The Langmuir adsorption constants were determined and they were found to be in a good correlation with values obtained from crystal growth kinetic analyses. The results indicated that salicylate molecules preferentially adsorb along the steps on the growing calcite surfaces. The values of average spacing between the adjacent salicylate adsorption active sites and the average distance between the neighboring adsorbed salicylate molecules were also estimated.

  10. A sedimentary record of middle Holocene precipitation and terrestrial vertebrates from Great Cistern Blue Hole (Abaco Island), The Bahamas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, R.; van Hengstum, P. J.; Winkler, T. S.; Donnelly, J. P.; Albury, N. A.; Steadman, D. W.

    2016-12-01

    Sinkholes and blueholes provide sheltered basins on carbonate landscapes for sediments and fossils to accumulate and remain protected from reworking by coastal processes. These sedimentary archives can span hundreds to thousands of years and may contain detailed records of environmental change and landscape evolution. Great Cistern Blue Hole on Great Abaco Island in the northern Bahamas provides such an archive. Today situated a few meters above sea level in the coastal zone, Great Cistern was likely located further inland prior to a geometric change to the local coastline and during lower sea-level. To explore the long-term record of environmental change in this region, sediment cores were collected between 2014 and 2015 that yielded an 8,000-year record of continuous sedimentation. Visual inspection of the core revealed multiple intervals dominated by coarse-grained sediment that subsequent microscopic examination identified as fragments of calcite rafts. Calcite rafts (common in caves) precipitate at an air-groundwater interface in quiescent environments from the offgassing of calcium carbonate saturated groundwater. The recurrent precipitation of calcite rafts in a sinkhole potentially reflects intervals of increased discharge of the local coastal aquifer in response to increased precipitation. The onset, peak, and decline of the calcite raft deposits are consistent with other precipitation proxy records from the Caribbean region, suggesting that the deposition is providing direct evidence for middle Holocene precipitation patterns in the northern Bahamas. In addition, numerous vertebrate bones have accumulated in Great Cistern including those of a Bahamian Boa (age: 7ka yBP), a species of crocodile no longer present on Abaco Island (age: 2ka yBP), and pre-European contact human remains (age: 600 yBP). As the project continues, other bones will be identified that may serve to enhance our knowledge of human and animal activity on the island.

  11. The calcite → aragonite transformation in low-Mg marble: Equilibrium relations, transformations mechanisms, and rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Bradley R.; Rubie, David C.; Kirby, Stephen H.; Bohlen, Steven R.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental transformation of a rather pure natural calcite marble to aragonite marble did not proceed via the expected straightforward polymorphic replacement. Instead, the small amount of Mg in the starting material (0.36 wt %) was excluded from the growing aragonite and diffused preferentially into the remaining calcite grains, producing Mg-rich calcite rods that persisted as relicts. Nucleation of aragonite occurred exclusively on grain boundaries, with aragonite [001] oriented subparallel to calcite [0001]. The aragonite crystals preferentially consumed the calcite crystal on which they nucleated, and the reaction fronts developed preferentially along the {010} and {110} planes of aragonite. Each aragonite neoblast that grew was nearly free of Mg (typically growth rates are approximately linear and range from ∼3 × 10−11 m s−1 at 600°C to ∼9 × 10−9 m s−1 at 850°C, with an apparent activation enthalpy of 166 ± 91 kJ mol−1. This reaction mechanism and the resultant texture are akin to cellular precipitation reactions in metals. Similar transformation textures have been reported from high-Mg marbles in Japan and China that disproportionated to low-Mg calcite and dolomite.

  12. Calcite biomineralization in coccoliths: Evidence from atomic force microscopy (AFM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Karen; Stipp, S.L.S.

    2002-01-01

    geochemistry, crystal orientation, coccolith function, biomineralization, biological calcite, atomic force microscopy......geochemistry, crystal orientation, coccolith function, biomineralization, biological calcite, atomic force microscopy...

  13. Unravelling the enigmatic origin of calcitic nanofibres in soils and caves: purely physicochemical or biogenic processes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Bindschedler

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcitic nanofibres are ubiquitous habits of secondary calcium carbonate (CaCO3 accumulations observed in calcareous vadose environments. Despite their widespread occurrence, the origin of these nanofeatures remains enigmatic. Three possible mechanisms fuel the debate: (i purely physicochemical processes, (ii mineralization of rod-shaped bacteria, and (iii crystal precipitation on organic templates. Nanofibres can be either mineral (calcitic or organic in nature. They are very often observed in association with Needle Fibre Calcite (NFC, another typical secondary CaCO3 habit in terrestrial environments. This association has contributed to some confusion between both habits, however they are truly two distinct calcitic features and their recurrent association is likely to be an important fact to help understanding the origin of nanofibres. In this manuscript the different hypotheses that currently exist to explain the origin of calcitic nanofibres are critically reviewed. In addition to this, a new hypothesis for the origin of nanofibres is proposed based on the fact that current knowledge attributes a fungal origin to NFC. As this feature and nanofibres are recurrently observed together, a possible fungal origin for nanofibres which are associated with NFC is investigated. Sequential enzymatic digestion of the fungal cell wall of selected fungal species demonstrates that the fungal cell wall can be a source of organic nanofibres. The obtained organic nanofibres show a striking morphological resemblance when compared to their natural counterparts, emphasizing a fungal origin for part of the organic nanofibres observed in association with NFC. It is further hypothesized that these organic nanofibres may act as templates for calcite nucleation in a biologically-influenced mineralization process, generating calcitic nanofibres. This highlights the possible involvement of Fungi in CaCO3 biomineralization processes, a role still poorly documented at

  14. Heterogeneous growth of cadmium and cobalt carbonate phases at the (101¯4) calcite surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Man; Ilton, Eugene S.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Qafoku, Odeta; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2015-03-01

    The ability of surface precipitates to form heteroepitaxially is an important factor that controls the extent of heterogeneous growth. In this work, the growth of cadmium and cobalt carbonate phases on (10-14) calcite surfaces is compared for a range of initial saturation states with respect to otavite (CdCO3) and sphaerocobaltite (CoCO3), two isostructural metal carbonates that exhibit different lattice misfits with respect to calcite. Calcite single crystals were reacted in static conditions for 16 hours with CdCl2 and CoCl2 aqueous solutions with initial concentrations 0.3 ≤ [Cd2+]0 ≤ 100 μM and 25 ≤ [Co2+]0 ≤ 200 μM. The reacted crystals were imaged in situ with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and analyzed ex situ with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). AFM images of Cd-reacted crystals showed the formation of large islands elongated along the direction, clear evidence of heteroepitaxial growth, whereas surface precipitates on Co-reacted crystals were small round islands. Deformation of calcite etch pits in both cases indicated the incorporation of Cd and Co at step edges. XPS analysis pointed to the formation of a Cd-rich (Ca,Cd)CO3 solid solution coating atop the calcite substrate. In contrast, XPS measurements of the Co-reacted crystals provided evidence for the formation of a mixed hydroxy-carbonate cobalt phase. The combined AFM and XPS results suggest that the lattice misfit between CoCO3 and CaCO3 ( 15% based on surface areas) is too large to allow for heteroepitaxial growth of a pure cobalt carbonate phase on calcite surfaces in aqueous solutions and at ambient conditions. The use of the satellite structure of the Co 2p3/2 photoelectron line as a tool for determining the nature of cobalt surface precipitates is also discussed.

  15. Impact of amorphous precursor phases on magnesium isotope signatures of Mg-calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavromatis, Vasileios; Purgstaller, Bettina; Dietzel, Martin; Buhl, Dieter; Immenhauser, Adrian; Schott, Jacques

    2017-04-01

    Various marine calcifiers form exoskeletons via an amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) precursor phase and magnesium plays an important role in the temporary stabilization of this metastable phase. Thus, the use of Mg isotope ratios of marine biogenic carbonates as a proxy to reconstruct past seawater chemistry calls for a detailed understanding of the mechanisms controlling Mg isotope signatures during the formation and transformation of ACC to the final crystalline carbonate mineral. For this purpose we have investigated the Mg isotope fractionation between (Ca,Mg)CO3 solids and aqueous fluids at 25 °C and pH = 8.3 during (i) the direct precipitation of crystalline Mg-calcite and (ii) the formation of Mg-rich ACC (Mg-ACC) and its transformation to Mg-calcite. The outcome documents that the small Mg isotope fractionation between Mg-ACC and reactive fluid (ΔMg26ACC-fluid = - 1.0 ± 0.1 ‰) is not preserved during the transformation of the ACCs into Mg-calcite. Following a pronounced isotopic shift accompanying the transformation of Mg-ACC into Mg-calcite, Δ26Mgcalcite-fluid progressively decreases with reaction progress from ∼ - 3.0 ‰ to - 3.6 ‰, reflecting both the approach of isotopic equilibrium and the increase of calcite Mg content (to near 20 mol % Mg). In contrast the crystalline Mg-calcite precipitated directly from the reacting fluid, i.e. lacking a discernable formation of an amorphous precursor, exhibits only small temporal variations in Δ26Mgcalcite-fluid which overall is affected by the precipitation kinetics. The values found in this study at the onset of Mg-ACC precipitation for Mg isotope fractionation between Mg-ACC and the fluid (ΔMg26ACC-fluid = - 1.0 ‰) and between Mg-ACC and Mg2+(aq) (Δ(aq) 26 Mg ACC-Mg2+ = + 2.0 ‰) are consistent with the formation of a hydrated Ca nanoporous solid accommodating Mg bicarbonate/carbonate species in combination with hydrated magnesium. This material crossed by percolating channels filled with the

  16. Hydrothermal replacement of calcite by Mg-carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Laura; Mueller, Thomas; Dohmen, Ralf

    2014-05-01

    The transport of heat and mass through the Earth's crust is coupled to mineral reactions and the exchange of isotopes and elements between different phases. Carbonate minerals are a major constituent of the Earth's crust and play an important role in different physical, chemical and even biological processes. In this experimental study, the element exchange reaction between calcite (CaCO3) and a Mg-rich fluid phase is investigated under hydrothermal conditions. Single crystals of calcite (2x2x2 mm) react with 1 ml of a 1 M MgCl2 solution at 200° C in a Teflon-lined steel autoclave for different times between one day and four weeks. The reaction leads to the formation of a porous reaction front and the pseudomorphic replacement of calcite by dolomite [CaMg(CO3)2] and magnesite (MgCO3). Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the reaction rim consists of small Mg-carbonate rhombs closely attached to each other, suggesting that the replacement reaction takes place by a dissolution-precipitation mechanism. Typically, the observed reaction front can be divided into two different domains. The outer part of the reaction rim, i.e. from the mineral surface in contact to the fluid inwards, consists of magnesite, whereas the inner part of the rim surrounding the unreacted calcite core consists of Ca-rich dolomite. The formation of a porous microstructure that varies in different parts of the reaction rim is a direct result of the large molar volume change induced by the replacement of calcite by magnesite and dolomite. The developing porosity therefore creates fluid pathways that promote the progress of the reaction front towards the unreacted core of the single crystal. Compositional profiles measured perpendicular to the mineral surface across the reactions rims using electron microprobe (EMPA) further revealed a compositional gradient within the reaction rim with regard to the structure-forming elements Mg and Ca. Here, the amount of Mg incorporated in both product

  17. U and sr isotopes in ground water and calcite, yucca mountain, nevada: evidence against upwelling water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuckless, J S; Peterman, Z E; Muhs, D R

    1991-10-25

    Hydrogenic calcite and opaline silica deposits in fault zones at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, have created considerable public and scientific controversy because of the possible development of a high-level nuclear waste repository at this location. Strontium and uranium isotopic compositions of hydrogenic materials were used to test whether the veins could have formed by upwelling of deep-seated waters. The vein deposits are isotopically distinct from ground water in the two aquifers that underlie Yucca Mountain, indicating that the calcite could not have precipitated from ground water. The data are consistent with a surficial origin for the hydrogenic deposits.

  18. Mechanism for calcite dissolution and its contribution to development of reservoir porosity and permeability in the Kela 2 gas field, Tarim Basin, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU BingSong; DONG HaiLiang; RUAN Zhuang

    2008-01-01

    This study is undertaken to understand how calcite precipitation and dissolution contributes to depth-related changes in porosity and permeability of gas-bearing sandstone reservoirs in the Kela 2 gas field of the Tarim Basin, Northwestern China. Sandstone samples and pore water samples are collected from well KL201 in the Tarim Basin. Vertical profiles of porosity, permeability, pore water chemistry, and the relative volume abundance of calcite/dolomite are constructed from 3600 to 4000 m below the ground surface within major oil and gas reservoir rocks. Porosity and permeability values are inversely correlated with the calcite abundance, indicating that calcite dissolution and precipitation may be controlling porosity and permeability of the reservoir rocks. Pore water chemistry exhibits a systematic variation from the Na2SO4 type at the shallow depth (3600-3630 m), to the NaHCO3 type at the intermediate depth (3630-3695 m), and to the CaCl2 type at the greater depth (3728-3938 m). The geochemical factors that control the calcite solubility include pH, temperature, pressure, Ca2+ concentration, the total inorganic carbon concentration (∑CO2), and the type of pore water. Thermodynamic phase equilibrium and mass conservation laws are applied to calculate the calcite saturation state as a function of a few key parameters. The model calculation illustrates that the calcite solubility is strongly dependent on the chemical composition of pore water, mainly the concentration difference between the total dissolved inorganic carbon and dissolved calcium concentration (i.e., [ΣCO2]-[Ca2+]). In the Na2SO4 water at the shallow depth, this index is close to 0, pore water is near the calcite solubility. Calcite does not dissolve or precipitate in significant quantities. In the NaHCO3 water at the intermediate depth, this index is greater than 0, and pore water is supersaturated with respect to calcite. Massive calcite precipitation was observed at this depth interval and

  19. Are Sierran Lakes Warming as a Result of Climate Change? The Effects of Climate Warming and Variation in Precipitation on Water Temperature in a Snowmelt-Dominated Lake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadro, S.; Melack, J. M.; Sickman, J. O.; Skeen, K.

    2016-12-01

    Water temperature regulates a broad range of fundamental ecosystem processes in lakes. While climate can be an important factor regulating lake temperatures, heterogeneity in the warming response of lakes is large, and variation in precipitation is rarely considered. We analyzed three decades of climate and water temperature data from a high-elevation catchment in the southern Sierra Nevada of California to illustrate the magnitude of warming taking place during different seasons and the role of precipitation in regulating lake temperatures. Significant climate warming trends were evident during all seasons except spring. Nighttime rates of climate warming were approximately 25% higher than daytime rates. Spatial patterns in warming were elevation dependent, with rates of temperature increase higher at sites above 2800 m.a.s.l. than below. Although interannual variation in snow deposition was high, the frequency and severity of recent droughts has contributed to a significant 3.4 mm year -1 decline in snow water equivalent over the last century. Snow accumulation, more than any other climate factor, regulated lake temperature; 94% of variation in summer lake temperature was regulated by precipitation as snow. For every 100 mm decrease in snow water equivalent there was a 0.62 ° increase in lake temperature. Drought years amplify warming in lakes by reducing the role of cold spring meltwaters in lake energy budgets and prolonging the ice-free period during which lakes warm. The combination of declining winter snowpack and warming air temperatures has the capacity to amplify the effect of climate warming on lake temperatures during drought years. Interactions among climatic factors need to be considered when evaluating ecosystem level effects, especially in mountain regions. For mountain lakes already affected by drought, continued climate warming during spring and autumn has the greatest potential to impact mean lake temperatures.

  20. Formation Process and Thermodynamic Poperties of Calcite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NAN,Zhao-Dong; SHI,Zuo-Yi; QIN,Mei; HOU,Wan-Guo; TAN,Zhi-Cheng

    2007-01-01

    The fast mixing of aqueous solutions of calcium chloride and sodium carbonate resulted in crystalline forms of vaterite and calcite under vigorous stirring. Then, the vaterite was transformed to pure calcite within about 180 min.The crystalline forms all grew with experimental time increase. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), and X-ray diffraction spectroscopy (XRD) techniques were employed to characterize the as-prepared samples. The heat capacity of the stable as-synthesized calcite was determined by means of an adiabatic calorimeter from 80 to 390 K. The thermodynamic functions of the calcite were derived based on the relationships among the thermodynamic functions and the function of the measured heat capacity with respect to temperature.

  1. Interaction of alcohols with the calcite surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bovet, Nicolas Emile; Yang, Mingjun; Javadi, Meshkat Sadat

    2015-01-01

    A clearer understanding of calcite interactions with organic molecules would contribute to a range of fields including harnessing the secrets of biomineralisation where organisms produce hard parts, increasing oil production from spent reservoirs, remediating contaminated soils and drinking water...

  2. Diffusion of Ca and Mg in Calcite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cygan, R.T.; Fisler, D.K.

    1999-02-10

    The self-diffusion of Ca and the tracer diffusion of Mg in calcite have been experimentally measured using isotopic tracers of {sup 25}Mg and {sup 44}Ca. Natural single crystals of calcite were coated with a thermally-sputtered oxide thin film and then annealed in a CO{sub 2} gas at one atmosphere total pressure and temperatures from 550 to 800 C. Diffusion coefficient values were derived from the depth profiles obtained by ion microprobe analysis. The resultant activation energies for Mg tracer diffusion and Ca self-diffusion are respectively: E{sub a}(Mg) = 284 {+-} 74 kJ/mol and E{sub a}(Ca) = 271 {+-} 80 kJ/mol. For the temperature ranges in these experiments, the diffusion of Mg is faster than Ca. The results are generally consistent in magnitude with divalent cation diffusion rates obtained in previous studies and provide a means of interpreting the thermal histories of carbonate minerals, the mechanism of dolomitization, and other diffusion-controlled processes. The results indicate that cation diffusion in calcite is relatively slow and cations are the rate-limiting diffusing species for the deformation of calcite and carbonate rocks. Application of the calcite-dolomite geothermometer to metamorphic assemblages will be constrained by cation diffusion and cooling rates. The direct measurement of Mg tracer diffusion in calcite indicates that dolomitization is unlikely to be accomplished by Mg diffusion in the solid state but by a recrystallization process.

  3. Co-precipitation of phosphate and carbonate minerals: geological and ecological implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez-Román, Monica; McKenzie, Judith; Vasconcelos, Crisogono

    2015-04-01

    Microorganisms play an important role in natural environments by controlling the metal cations (e.g., Ca2+, Mg2+, Fe2+) and the anions (CO32-, NH4+, PO43-) that precipitate as biominerals (e.g., carbonates, phosphates). In contrast to phosphate minerals, precipitation of carbonate minerals by bacteria has been widely studied in culture experiments and in natural environments. Moreover, studies of sedimentary phosphate minerals and their geological and ecological implications are rare. Nevertheless, phosphate minerals frequently co-precipitate with carbonates in culture experiments and in natural systems. In the present work, we investigate how microorganisms control the mineralogy and geochemistry of phosphate and carbonate minerals. For this, culture experiments were performed to study the co-precipitation of phosphate and carbonate minerals using aerobic heterotrophic bacteria at sedimentary Earth's surface conditions. Ca-Mg carbonate (dolomite, Mg-calcite) and/or Mg-carbonate (hydromagnesite) precipitated with Mg-phosphate (struvite). In most of the cultures, phosphate was the dominant mineral phase found in the bacterial precipitates and carbonates precipitated after phosphate phases. Notably, in all the cultures, we found a mixture of phosphate and carbonate minerals. This study shines new light into the microbial diagenetic processes involved in the co-precipitation of phosphate and carbonate minerals and links the P and C cycles.

  4. The Influence of Exotic Calcite on the Mechanical Behavior of Quartz Bearing Fault Gouge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, B. M.; Di Stefano, G.; Collettini, C.

    2014-12-01

    The interseismic recovery of frictional strength is a fundamental part of the seismic cycle. This restrengthening, and related phenomena, plays a key role in determining the stability and mode of tectonic faulting. Recent experimental data has shown that gouge mineralogy has a strong influence on the rate of frictional healing, with calcite-dominated gouges showing the highest rates. Combining these data with widespread observations of calcite as cement or veins in non-carbonate hosted faults, indicates that the presence of calcite within a fault gouge could play an important role in shallow- and mid-crustal earthquakes. We report on laboratory experiments designed to explore the mechanical behavior of quartz/calcite mixtures as a means to better understand the evolution of fault behavior in faults where carbonate materials are present. We sheared mixtures of powdered Carrara marble (>98% CaCO3) and disaggregated Ottawa sand (99.8% SiO2) at constant normal stress of 5 MPa under saturated conditions at room temperature. We performed slide-hold-slide tests, 1-3,000 seconds, and velocity stepping tests, 0.1-1000 μm/s, to measure the amount of frictional healing and velocity dependence of friction respectively. Small subsets of experiments were conducted at different boundary conditions. Preliminary results show that the presence of calcite in quartz-based fault gouge has a hardening effect, both in overall frictional strength, where the strength of our mixtures increases with increasing calcite content, and in single experiments, where mixtures with low percentages of calcite show a consistent strain-hardening trend. We also observe that the rates of frictional healing and creep relaxation increase with increasing calcite content. Finally, our results show that the addition of as little as 2.5% calcite within a fault gouge results in a 30% increase in the rate of frictional healing, with further increases in calcite content resulting in larger increases in the rate

  5. Alkaline flocculation of Phaeodactylum tricornutum induced by brucite and calcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandamme, Dries; Pohl, Philip I; Beuckels, Annelies; Foubert, Imogen; Brady, Patrick V; Hewson, John C; Muylaert, Koenraad

    2015-11-01

    Alkaline flocculation holds great potential as a low-cost harvesting method for marine microalgae biomass production. Alkaline flocculation is induced by an increase in pH and is related to precipitation of calcium and magnesium salts. In this study, we used the diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum as model organism to study alkaline flocculation of marine microalgae cultured in seawater medium. Flocculation started when pH was increased to 10 and flocculation efficiency reached 90% when pH was 10.5, which was consistent with precipitation modeling for brucite or Mg(OH)2. Compared to freshwater species, more magnesium is needed to achieve flocculation (>7.5mM). Zeta potential measurements suggest that brucite precipitation caused flocculation by charge neutralization. When calcium concentration was 12.5mM, flocculation was also observed at a pH of 10. Zeta potential remained negative up to pH 11.5, suggesting that precipitated calcite caused flocculation by a sweeping coagulation mechanism.

  6. Climate and cave control on Pleistocene/Holocene calcite-to-aragonite transitions in speleothems from Morocco: Elemental and isotopic evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wassenburg, Jasper A.; Immenhauser, Adrian; Richter, Detlev K.; Jochum, Klaus Peter; Fietzke, Jan; Deininger, Michael; Goos, Manuela; Scholz, Denis; Sabaoui, Abdellah

    2012-09-01

    The occurrence of aragonite in speleothems has commonly been related to high dripwater Mg/Ca ratios, because Mg is known to be a growth inhibitor for calcite. Laboratory aragonite precipitation experiments, however, suggested a more complex array of controlling factors. Here, we present data from Pleistocene to Holocene speleothems collected from both a dolostone and a limestone cave in northern Morocco. These stalagmites exhibit both lateral and stratigraphic calcite-to-aragonite transitions. Aragonite fabrics are well-preserved and represent primary features. In order to shed light on the factors that control alternating calcite and aragonite precipitation, elemental (Mg, Sr, Ba, U, P, Y, Pb, Al, Ti and Th) abundances were measured using LA-ICP-MS, and analysed with Principal Component Analysis. Samples were analyzed at 100-200 μm resolution across stratigraphic and lateral transitions. Carbon and oxygen isotope ratios were analysed at 100 μm resolution covering stratigraphic calcite-to-aragonite transitions. Results show that the precipitation of aragonite was driven by a decrease in effective rainfall, which enhanced prior calcite precipitation. Different geochemical patterns are observed between calcite and aragonite when comparing data from the Grotte de Piste and Grotte Prison de Chien. This may be explained by the increased dripwater Mg/Ca ratio and enhanced prior aragonite precipitation in the dolostone cave versus lower dripwater Mg/Ca ratio and prior calcite precipitation in the limestone cave. A full understanding for the presence of lateral calcite-to-aragonite transitions is not reached. Trace elemental analysis, however, does suggest that different crystallographic parameters (ionic radius, amount of crystal defect sites, adsorption potential) may have a direct effect on the incorporation of Sr, Mg, Ba, Al, Ti, Th and possibly Y and P.

  7. Phosphorus speciation in calcite speleothems determined from solid-state NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Harris E.; Frisia, Silvia; Tang, Yuanzhi; Reeder, Richard J.; Phillips, Brian L.

    2007-02-01

    Variations in speleothem P concentration show cyclic patterns that have important implications for high resolution palaeoclimate and palaeoenvironmental reconstructions. However, little is known about the speciation of P in calcite speleothems. Here we employ solid-state 31P and 1H magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (MAS NMR) spectroscopic techniques as a non-destructive method for analyzing the distribution of P in speleothems. The 31P MAS NMR results show three peaks indicating the presence of three primary types of phosphate species in samples from the Grotta di Ernesto (northeastern Italy): a broad peak at a chemical shift δP-31 = 3.1 to 3.7 ppm from individual phosphate ions incorporated within calcite, a narrow set of peaks near δP-31 = - 0.9 ppm from crystalline monetite and a narrow peak at δP-31 = 2.9 ppm from an unidentified crystalline phosphate phase. Essentially identical results were obtained for a synthetic calcite/phosphate coprecipitate. Spectra collected for a sample from Grotte de Clamouse (southern France) show only a broad peak near 3.5 ppm suggesting a possible limit for phosphate incorporation into the calcite structure. These data suggest that P in this system can interact to form calcium phosphate surface precipitates during infiltration events and are subsequently enclosed during calcite growth.

  8. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Calcite Reactions with Saline Waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorman, Brian P [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-09-02

    Project Description: The general objective of the proposed research is to determine the kinetics and mechanisms of calcite reactions with saline waters over a wide range of saline water composition, pCO2, and modest ranges in T and P. This will be accomplished by studying both reaction rates and solubility from changes in solution chemistry, and making nanoscale observations of calcite precipitate surface morphology and composition at the micro-to-nano-scale to provide an understanding of controlling reaction mechanisms and pathways. The specific objectives necessary to reach the general objective are: a) determination of how pCO2, Ca2+, ionic strength and “foreign” ions influence reaction rates; and b) investigate the influence of these parameters on apparent kinetic solubility from dissolution and precipitation reactions. This information will clearly be central to the construction of reliable reaction-transport models to predict reservoir and formation response to increased CO2 in saline waters. This program was initially collaborative with John Morse at Texas A&M, however his passing shortly after the beginning of this program resulted in abbreviated research time and effort. Summary of Results: Early studies using electron microscopy and spectroscopy indicated that carbonate precipitation from natural seawater (NSW) conditions onto aragonite substrates was mediated by a surface amorphous calcium carbonate layer. It was hypothesized that this ACC layer (observed after < 5days reaction time) was responsible for the abnormal reaction kinetics and also served as a metastable seed layer for growth of epitaxial aragonite. Further studies of the ACC formation mechanism indicated a strong dependence on the Mg concentration in solution. Subsequent studies at shorter times (10 hrs) on calcite substrates and in a wide range of supersaturation conditions did not indicate any ACC layer. Instead, an epitaxial layer by layer

  9. Intraspecific variation of a dominant grass and local adaptation in reciprocal garden communities along a US Great Plains' precipitation gradient: implications for grassland restoration with climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Loretta C; Olsen, Jacob T; Tetreault, Hannah; DeLaCruz, Angel; Bryant, Johnny; Morgan, Theodore J; Knapp, Mary; Bello, Nora M; Baer, Sara G; Maricle, Brian R

    2015-08-01

    Identifying suitable genetic stock for restoration often employs a 'best guess' approach. Without adaptive variation studies, restoration may be misguided. We test the extent to which climate in central US grasslands exerts selection pressure on a foundation grass big bluestem (Andropogon gerardii), widely used in restorations, and resulting in local adaptation. We seeded three regional ecotypes of A. gerardii in reciprocal transplant garden communities across 1150 km precipitation gradient. We measured ecological responses over several timescales (instantaneous gas exchange, medium-term chlorophyll absorbance, and long-term responses of establishment and cover) in response to climate and biotic factors and tested if ecotypes could expand range. The ecotype from the driest region exhibited greatest cover under low rainfall, suggesting local adaptation under abiotic stress. Unexpectedly, no evidence for cover differences between ecotypes exists at mesic sites where establishment and cover of all ecotypes were low, perhaps due to strong biotic pressures. Expression of adaptive differences is strongly environment specific. Given observed adaptive variation, the most conservative restoration strategy would be to plant the local ecotype, especially in drier locations. With superior performance of the most xeric ecotype under dry conditions and predicted drought, this ecotype may migrate eastward, naturally or with assistance in restorations.

  10. Origin of zoning within dedolomite and calcitized gypsum of the Mississippian Arroyo Penasco Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulmer, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    The Mississippian Arroyo Penasco Group carbonates are the oldest Paleozoic rocks present in north-central New Mexico. These supratidal to shallow,subtidal sediments exhibit complex diagenetic fabrics produced by periods of pre-Pennsylvanian subaerial exposure. Both extensive recrystallization of the Espiritu Santo carbonates and brecciation of the overlying Macho Member of the Tererro Formation resulted from an extended period of Mississippian subaerial exposure of broad, low-relief tidal flats. Cathodoluminescent petrography indicates that the recrystallized limestones consist of calcite pseudomorphs of dolomite and gypsum. Dedolomite and calcitized gypsum crystals, with /sup 13/C//sup 12/C ratios of -2 to +1.5% PDB, range from highly zoned to uniformly luminescent. Electron microprobe analyses reveals variable Mn and Fe contents across the pseudomorphs which are responsible for differences in observed luminosity. These features are interpreted to reflect a period of subaerial exposure after deposition of Macho Member sediments, which caused dissolution of gypsum and dolomite by sulfate and Mg depleted meteoric fluids and produced the collapse breccia. Preservation of zoning within some pseudomorphs required simultaneous dissolution of gypsum and dolomite and precipitation of calcite. C-isotope data indicates a meteoric to mixed phreatic origin for pore fluids which precipitated calcite; repetitive zoning within dolomite and gypsum pseudomorphs is indicative of interactions between marine and meteoric phreatic fluids in the intertidal environment.

  11. Noncrystallographic calcite dendrites from hot-spring deposits at Lake Bogoria, Kenya

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, B. [Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Geology; Renaut, R.W. [Univ. of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon (Canada). Dept. of Geological Sciences

    1995-01-02

    Complex calcite crystals are an integral component of precipitates that form around the orifices of the Loburu and Mawe Moto hot springs on the shores of Lake bogoria, Kenya. Two types of large (up to 4 cm long) noncrystallographic dendrites are important components of these deposits. Feather dendrites are characterized by multiple levels of branching with individual branches developed through crystal splitting and spherulitic growth. Scandulitic (from Latin meaning shingle) dendrites are formed of stacked calcite crystals and are generally more compact than feather dendrites. These developed through the incremental stacking of rectangular-shaped calcite crystals that initially grew as skeletal crystals. Feather and scandulitic dendrites precipitated from the same waters in the same springs. The difference in morphology is therefore related to microenvironments in which they grew. Feather dendrites grew in any direction in pools of free-standing water provided that they were in constant contact with the solute. Conversely, scandulitic dendrites grew on rims of dams where water flowed over the surface in concert with the pulses of spring water. Thus, each calcite crystal in these dendrites represents one episode of crystal growth. The orientation of the component crystals in scandulitic dendrites is controlled by the topography of the dam or surface, not crystallographic criteria. The noncrystallographic dendrites formed from spring waters with initial temperatures of 90--99 C. Surficial water cooling, loss of CO{sub 2}, and presence of other elements that can interfere with crystal growth contributed to the formation of these unusual crystals.

  12. Do organic ligands affect calcite dissolution rates?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelkers, Eric H.; Golubev, Sergey V.; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Bénézeth, Pascale

    2011-04-01

    Steady state Iceland-spar calcite dissolution rates were measured at 25 °C in aqueous solutions containing 0.1 M NaCl and up to 0.05 M dissolved bicarbonate at pH from 7.9 to 9.1 in the presence of 13 distinct dissolved organic ligands in mixed-flow reactors. The organic ligands considered in this study include those most likely to be present in either (1) aquifers at the conditions pertinent to CO 2 sequestration or (2) soil/early diagenetic environments: acetate, phthalate, citrate, EDTA 4-, succinate, D-glucosaminate, L-glutamate, D-gluconate, 2,4-dihydroxybenzoate, 3,4-dihydroxybenzoate, fumarate, malonate, and gallate. Results show that the presence of extract, humic acid, pectin, and gum xanthan. In no case did the presence of <100 ppm of these organics change calcite dissolution rates by more than a factor of 2.5. Results obtained in this study suggest that the presence of aqueous organic anions negligibly affects calcite forward dissolution rates in most natural environments. Some effect on calcite reactivity may be observed, however, by the presence of organic anions if they change substantially the chemical affinity of the fluid with respect to calcite.

  13. Calcite Biohybrids as Microenvironment for Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razi Vago

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available A new type of composite 3D biomaterial that provides extracellular cues that govern the differentiation processes of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs has been developed. In the present study, we evaluated the chondrogenecity of a biohybrid composed of a calcium carbonate scaffold in its calcite polymorph and hyaluronic acid (HA. The source of the calcite scaffolding is an exoskeleton of a sea barnacle Tetraclita rifotincta (T. rifotincta, Pilsbry (1916. The combination of a calcium carbonate-based bioactive scaffold with a natural polymeric hydrogel is designed to mimic the organic-mineral composite of developing bone by providing a fine-tuned microenvironment. The results indicate that the calcite-HA interface creates a suitable microenvironment for the chondrogenic differentiation of MSCs, and therefore, the biohybrid may provide a tool for tissue-engineered cartilage.

  14. Effect of Mg on the Grain Growth and Dislocation Creep of Calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, L.

    2004-12-01

    We tested the effect of variations in the amount of the solute impurity (Mg) on grain growth and strength of calcite aggregate. Synthetic marbles were produced by hot isostatic pressing mixtures of powders of calcite and dolomite at 850° C and 300 MPa confining pressure for different intervals (2 to 30 hrs). The HIP treatment resulted in homogeneous aggregates of calcite with Mg content from 0.5 to 17 mol%. Stress stepping tests and constant strain rate tests were used to examine the effect of Mg content on the dislocation creep of calcite. The grain growth rate under static conditions was decreased with Mg content from 7 to 17 mol%, indicating perhaps that grain boundary mobility is suppressed by the solute drag effect. In the diffusion creep at stresses below 40 Mpa, the strength of calcite decreases with increasing Mg content owing to the difference in grain size at 800° C and 300 MPa confining pressure. The contribution of dislocation creep increases with increasing stress, and the transition between diffusion and dislocation creep occurs at higher stresses for the samples with higher magnesium content and smaller grain size. The creep data were fit assuming a composite flow law consisting of a linear combination of diffusion and dislocation creep and a single-valued grain size. The best agreement was obtained by using a dislocation creep law with exponential dependence of strain rate on stress (e.g. Peierls law). More evidence from microstructure is needed to identify the dominant deformation mechanism conclusively. Most of the samples were compressed up to strains of 0.25; small recrystallized grains are formed resulting in a bimodal grain size distribution in some of the deformed samples. Preliminary data shows that the recrystallized grain sizes are smaller for Mg-calcite compared with that of pure calcite. This study will help to understand the effect of impurities on grain-growth kinetics and strain weakening in localized shear zones.

  15. Acidization of shales with calcite cemented fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwiatkowski, Kamil; Szymczak, Piotr; Jarosiński, Marek

    2017-04-01

    Investigation of cores drilled from shale formations reveals a relatively large number of calcite-cemented fractures. Usually such fractures are reactivated during fracking and can contribute considerably to the permeability of the resulting fracture network. However, calcite coating on their surfaces effectively excludes them from production. Dissolution of the calcite cement by acidic fluids is investigated numerically with focus on the evolution of fracture morphology. Available surface area, breakthrough time, and reactant penetration length are calculated. Natural fractures in cores from Pomeranian shale formation (northern Poland) were analyzed and classified. Representative fractures are relatively thin (0.1 mm), flat and completely sealed with calcite. Next, the morphology evolution of reactivated natural fractures treated with low-pH fluids has been simulated numerically under various operating conditions. Depth-averaged equations for fracture flow and reactant transport has been solved by finite-difference method coupled with sparse-matrix solver. Transport-limited dissolution has been considered, which corresponds to the treatment with strong acids, such as HCl. Calcite coating in reactivated natural fractures dissolves in a highly non-homogeneous manner - a positive feedback between fluid transport and calcite dissolution leads to the spontaneous formation of wormhole-like patterns, in which most of the flow is focused. The wormholes carry reactive fluids deeper inside the system, which dramatically increases the range of the treatment. Non-uniformity of the dissolution patterns provides a way of retaining the fracture permeability even in the absence of the proppant, since the less dissolved regions will act as supports to keep more dissolved regions open. Evolution of fracture morphology is shown to depend strongly on the thickness of calcite layer - the thicker the coating the more pronounced wormholes are observed. However the interaction between

  16. DC CONDUCTIVITY OF CERAMICS WITH CALCITE WASTE IN THE TEMPERATURE RANGE 20 - 1050C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Ondruska

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The temperature dependences of the electrical DC conductivity of calcite waste, kaolinite and illite based ceramics were measured in the temperature range of 20 - 1050oC. The ceramic mass that was used was a mixture of 60 wt. % kaolinitic-illitic clay, 20 - 40 wt. % of this clay was fired at 1000oC for 90 min and 0, 10 and 20 wt. % of calcite waste. During heating, several processes take place - the release of the physically bound water, the burning of organic impurities, the dehydroxylation of kaolinite and illite, the decomposition of calcite, and the creation of anorthite and mullite. All of these processes were checked by means of differential thermal analysis (DTA, derivative thermogravimetry (DTG and thermodilatometry (TDA. At low temperatures (20 - 200oC, due to the release and decomposition of physically bound water, H+ and OH- are dominant charge carriers. After completion of release of physically bound water, up to the start of dehydroxylation at the temperature of ~ 450oC, the DC conductivity is dominated by a transport of Na+, K+, and Ca2+ ions. During dehydroxylation, H+ and OH- ions, which are released from kaolinite and illite lattices, contribute to the DC conductivity. Decomposition of calcite runs between ~ 700oC and 900oC. The glassy phase has a dominant influence on the DC conductivity in the fired ceramics. Its high conductivity is determined by the high mobility of Na+, K+, and Ca2+ ions.

  17. The puzzling presence of calcite in skeletons of modern solitary corals from the Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goffredo, Stefano; Caroselli, Erik; Mezzo, Francesco; Laiolo, Leonardo; Vergni, Patrizia; Pasquini, Luca; Levy, Oren; Zaccanti, Francesco; Tribollet, Aline; Dubinsky, Zvy; Falini, Giuseppe

    2012-05-01

    The skeleton of scleractinian corals is commonly believed to be composed entirely of aragonite due to the current Mg/Ca molar ratio of seawater, which thermodynamically favours the deposition of this polymorph of calcium carbonate (CaCO3). However, some studies have shown that other forms of CaCO3 such as calcite can be present in significant amount (1-20%) inside tropical coral skeletons, significantly impacting paleo-reconstructions of SST or other environmental parameters based on geochemical proxies. This study aims at investigating for the first time, (1) the skeletal composition of two Mediterranean solitary corals, the azooxanthellate Leptopsammia pruvoti and the zooxanthellate Balanophyllia europaea, across their life cycle, (2) the distribution of the different CaCO3 forms inside skeletons, and (3) their implications in paleoclimatology. The origin of the different forms of CaCO3 observed inside studied coral skeletons and their relationships with the species' habitat and ecological strategies are also discussed. CaCO3 composition of L. pruvoti and B. europaea was investigated at six sites located along the Italian coasts. Skeleton composition was studied by means of X-ray powder diffraction and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. A significant amount of calcite (1-23%) was found in more than 90% of the studied coral skeletons, in addition to aragonite. This calcite was preferentially located in the basal and intermediate areas than at the oral pole of coral skeletons. Calcite was also mainly located in the epitheca that covered the exposed parts of the coral in its aboral region. Interestingly in B. europaea, the calcite content was negatively correlated with skeleton size (age). The presence of calcite in scleractinian corals may result from different mechanisms: (1) corals may biologically precipitate calcite crystals at their early stages in order to insure their settlement on the substrate of fixation, especially in surgy environments; (2

  18. Rapid changes in water hardness and alkalinity: Calcite formation is lethal to Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogart, Sarah J; Woodman, Samuel; Steinkey, Dylan; Meays, Cindy; Pyle, Greg G

    2016-07-15

    There is growing concern that freshwater ecosystems may be negatively affected by ever-increasing anthropogenic inputs of extremely hard, highly alkaline effluent containing large quantities of Ca(2+), Mg(2+), CO3(2-), and HCO3(-) ions. In this study, the toxicity of rapid and extreme shifts in water hardness (38-600mg/L as CaCO3) and alkalinity (30-420mg/L as CaCO3) to Daphnia magna was tested, both independently and in combination. Within these ranges, where no precipitation event occurred, shifts in water hardness and/or alkalinity were not toxic to D. magna. In contrast, 98-100% of D. magna died within 96h after exposure to 600mg/L as CaCO3 water hardness and 420mg/L as CaCO3 alkalinity (LT50 of 60h with a 95% CI of 54.2-66.0h). In this treatment, a CaCO3 (calcite) precipitate formed in the water column which was ingested by and thoroughly coated the D. magna. Calcite collected from a mining impacted stream contained embedded organisms, suggesting field streams may also experience similar conditions and possibly increased mortality as observed in the lab tests. Although further investigation is required to determine the exact fate of aquatic organisms exposed to rapid calcite precipitation in the field, we caution that negative effects may occur more quickly or at lower concentrations of water hardness and alkalinity in which we observed effects in D. magna, because some species, such as aquatic insects, are more sensitive than cladocerans to changes in ionic strength. Our results provide evidence that both calcite precipitation and the major ion balance of waters should be managed in industrially affected ecosystems and we support the development of a hardness+alkalinity guideline for the protection of aquatic life.

  19. Magnetic Field Effects on CaCO3 Precipitation Process in Hard Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Saksono

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Magnetic treatment is applied as physical water treatment for scale prevention especially CaCO3, from hard water in piping equipment by reducing its hardness.Na2CO3 and CaCl2 solution sample was used in to investigate the magnetic fields influence on the formation of particle of CaCO3. By changing the strength of magnetic fields, exposure time and concentration of samples solution, this study presents quantitative results of total scale deposit, total precipitated CaCO3 and morphology of the deposit. This research was run by comparing magnetically and non-magnetically treated  samples. The results showed an increase of deposits formation rate and total number of precipitated CaCO3 of magnetically treated samples. The increase of concentration solution sample will also raised the deposit under magnetic  field. Microscope images showed a greater number but smaller size of CaCO3 deposits form in magnetically treated samples, and aggregation during the processes. X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis showed that magnetically samples were dominated by calcite. But, there was a significant decrease of calcite’s peak intensities from magnetized  samples that indicated the decrease of the amount of calcite and an increase of total amorphous of deposits. This result  showed that magnetization of hard water leaded to the decreasing of ion Ca2+ due to the increasing of total CaCO3 precipitation process.

  20. Cyclic Cratonic Carbonates and Phanerozoic Calcite Seas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Bruce H.

    1982-01-01

    Discusses causes of cyclicity in cratonic carbonate sequences and evidence for and potential significance of postulated primary calcite sediment components in past Paleozoic seas, outlining problems, focusing on models explaining existing data, and identifying background. Future sedimentary geologists will need to address these and related areas…

  1. Adsorption of arsenic and phosphate onto the surface of calcite as revealed by batch experiments and surface complexation modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sø, Helle Ugilt

    The adsorption of phosphate, arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(III)) onto synthetic calcite was studied in a series of batch experiments. The adsorption of the three ions was studied separately followed by studies of the competition between arsenate and phosphate. The experimental data was utilized...... is complete after 1 and 2-3 hours, respectively). Also desorption is fast and complete for both ions within 0.5 h. The reversibility of the sorption process indicates that neither arsenate nor phosphate is readily incorporated into the calcite crystal lattice under our experimental conditions. The phosphate....... This clearly shows the importance of competition studies in validating multicomponent models. Extrapolation of the experimental results to calcite bearing aquifers suggests a large variability in the mobility of arsenic. Under reduced conditions, arsenite, which does not adsorb onto calcite, will dominate and...

  2. Interaction of europium and nickel with calcite studied by Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry and Time-Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabau, A. [Agence Nationale pour la gestion des Déchets RAdioactifs, 1-7 rue J. Monnet, Parc de la Croix Blanche, 92298 Châtenay-Malabry Cedex (France); Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Ecosystèmes Côtiers Marins et Réponses aux Stress (ECOMERS), 28 avenue Valrose, 06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Pipon, Y., E-mail: pipon@ipnl.in2p3.fr [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Institut Universitaire de Technologie (IUT) Lyon-1, Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Toulhoat, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); CEA/DEN, Saclay, 91191 Gif sur Yvette (France); Lomenech, C. [Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Ecosystèmes Côtiers Marins et Réponses aux Stress (ECOMERS), 28 avenue Valrose, 06108 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Jordan, N. [Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf (HZDR), Institute of Resource Ecology (IRE) (Germany); Moncoffre, N. [Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon (IPNL), Université Lyon 1, CNRS/IN2P3, 4 rue Enrico Fermi, 69 622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Barkleit, A. [Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf (HZDR), Institute of Resource Ecology (IRE) (Germany); and others

    2014-08-01

    This study aims at elucidating the mechanisms regulating the interaction of Eu and Ni with calcite (CaCO{sub 3}). Calcite powders or single crystals (some mm sized) were put into contact with Eu or Ni solutions at concentrations ranging from 10{sup −3} to 10{sup −5} mol L{sup −1} for Eu and 10{sup −3} mol L{sup −1} for Ni. The sorption durations ranged from 1 week to 1 month. Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS) well adapted to discriminate incorporation processes such as: (i) adsorption or co precipitation at the mineral surfaces or, (ii) incorporation into the mineral structure (through diffusion for instance), has been carried out. Moreover, using the fluorescence properties of europium, the results have been compared to those obtained by Time-Resolved Laser Fluorescence Spectroscopy (TRLFS) on calcite powders. For the single crystals, complementary SEM observations of the mineral surfaces at low voltage were also performed. Results showed that Ni accumulates at the calcite surface whereas Eu is also incorporated at a greater depth. Eu seems therefore to be incorporated into two different states in calcite: (i) heterogeneous surface accumulation and (ii) incorporation at depth greater than 160 nm after 1 month of sorption. Ni was found to accumulate at the surface of calcite without incorporation.

  3. Dissolution and Sorption Processes on the Surface of Calcite in the Presence of High Co2+ Concentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge González-López

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of the calcite surface with Co2+-rich aqueous solutions ([Co2+aq]initial = 1000 ppm, i.e., ca. 17 mM was investigated by means of macroscopic experiments and surface spectroscopic techniques. In the case of the macroscopic experiments, calcite powder and monocrystals were immersed into solutions for different time periods (from 1 min to one month. The Ca concentrations in the filtrates was measured by means of atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS while the interacted solids were studied using a combination of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS and 12C-rutherford backscattering spectrometry (12C-RBS. The macroscopic data showed a characteristic surface dissolution process, in parallel to the surface sorption processes. Adsorption and co-precipitation were seen for almost the entire immersion period for both calcite powder and monocrystals. The surface study by XPS (analyzed at a depth of approximately 12 nm suggested that adsorption takes place in the first hour of the interaction, followed by incorporation of Co2+ into calcite surface layers, leading to the formation of a Co2+-bearing surface (coprecipitate, which occurs over a period of hours and days. The 12C-RBS measurements on calcite { 10 1 ¯ 4 } indicated that the thickness of this surface co-precipitate was 270 nm after one day and then stabilized at 320 nm after more than a week.

  4. High-Magnesian Calcite Mesocrystals : A Coordination Chemistry Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenders, Jos J. M.; Dey, Archan; Bomans, Paul H. H.; Spielmann, Jan; Hendrix, Marco M. R. M.; de With, Gijsbertus; Meldrum, Fiona C.; Harder, Sjoerd; Sommerdijk, Nico A. J. M.

    2012-01-01

    While biogenic calcites frequently contain appreciable levels of magnesium, the pathways leading to such high concentrations remain unclear. The production of high-magnesian calcites in vitro is highly challenging, because Mg-free aragonite, rather than calcite, is the favored product in the presenc

  5. Biosorption of divalent Pb, Cd and Zn on aragonite and calcite mollusk shells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du Yang; Lian Fei [Key Laboratory of Pollution Process and Environmental Criteria, Ministry of Education, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Urban Ecology Environmental Remediation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China); Zhu Lingyan, E-mail: zhuly@nankai.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Pollution Process and Environmental Criteria, Ministry of Education, Tianjin Key Laboratory of Urban Ecology Environmental Remediation and Pollution Control, College of Environmental Science and Engineering, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2011-07-15

    The potential of using mollusk shell powder in aragonite (razor clam shells, RCS) and calcite phase (oyster shells, OS) to remove Pb{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+} and Zn{sup 2+} from contaminated water was investigated. Both biogenic sorbents displayed very high sorption capacities for the three metals except for Cd on OS. XRD, SEM and XPS results demonstrated that surface precipitation leading to crystal growth took place during sorption. Calcite OS displayed a remarkably higher sorption capacity to Pb than aragonite RCS, while the opposite was observed for Cd. However, both sorbents displayed similar sorption capacities to Zn. These could be due to the different extent of matching in crystal lattice between the metal bearing precipitate and the substrates. The initial pH of the solution, sorbent's dosage and grain size affected the removal efficiency of the heavy meals significantly, while the organic matter in mollusk shells affected the removal efficiency to a lesser extent. - Highlights: > Mollusk shells display high removal efficiency to heavy metals in contaminated water. > Surface precipitation leading to crystal growth takes place during the sorption. > Crystal structure similarity between precipitates and substrates affects the sorption. > pH, sorbent dosage and grain size of adsorbent affects the removal efficiency. > Organic matter in mollusk shells affects the removal efficiency to a less extent. - Mollusk shells display high sorption ability to heavy metals and crystal structure similarity between precipitates and substrates affects the sorption.

  6. Unusual biogenic calcite structures in two shallow lakes, James Ross Island, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elster, J.; Nedbalová, L.; Vodrážka, R.; Láska, K.; Haloda, J.; Komárek, J.

    2016-01-01

    The floors of two shallow endorheic lakes, located on volcanic surfaces on James Ross Island, are covered with calcareous organosedimentary structures. Their biological and chemical composition, lake water characteristics, and seasonal variability of the thermal regime are introduced. The lakes are frozen down to the bottom for 8-9 months a year and their water chemistry is characterised by low conductivity and neutral to slightly alkaline pH. The photosynthetic microbial mat is composed of filamentous cyanobacteria and microalgae that are considered to be Antarctic endemic species. The mucilaginous black biofilm is covered by green spots formed by a green microalga and the macroscopic structures are packed together with fine material. Thin sections consist of rock substrate, soft biofilm, calcite spicules and mineral grains originating from different sources. The morphology of the spicules is typical of calcium carbonate monocrystals having a layered structure and specific surface texture, which reflect growth and degradation processes. The spicules' chemical composition and structure correspond to pure calcite. The lakes' age, altitude, morphometry, geomorphological and hydrological stability, including low sedimentation rates, together with thermal regime predispose the existence of this community. We hypothesise that the precipitation of calcite is connected with the photosynthetic activity of the green microalgae that were not recorded in any other lake in the region. This study has shown that the unique community producing biogenic calcite spicules is quite different to any yet described.

  7. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acid and magnesium ion—Possible influence on biogenic calcite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Michael M.

    2012-08-01

    Increases in ocean surface water dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations retard biocalcification by reducing calcite supersaturation (Ωc). Reduced calcification rates may influence growth-rate dependent magnesium ion (Mg) incorporation into biogenic calcite modifying the use of calcifying organisms as paleoclimate proxies. Fulvic acid (FA) at biocalcification sites may further reduce calcification rates. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by FA and Mg, two common constituents of seawater and soil water involved in the formation of biogenic calcite, was measured separately and in combination under identical, highly reproducible experimental conditions. Calcite growth rates (pH=8.5 and Ωc=4.5) are reduced by FA (0.5 mg/L) to 47% and by Mg (10-4 M) to 38%, compared to control experiments containing no added growth-rate inhibitor. Humic acid (HA) is twice as effective a calcite growth-rate inhibitor as FA. Calcite growth rate in the presence of both FA (0.5 mg/L) and Mg (10-4 M) is reduced to 5% of the control rate. Mg inhibits calcite growth rates by substitution for calcium ion at the growth site. In contrast, FA inhibits calcite growth rates by binding multiple carboxylate groups on the calcite surface. FA and Mg together have an increased affinity for the calcite growth sites reducing calcite growth rates.

  8. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by fulvic acid and magnesium ion—Possible influence on biogenic calcite formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Michael M.

    2012-01-01

    Increases in ocean surface water dissolved carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations retard biocalcification by reducing calcite supersaturation (Ωc). Reduced calcification rates may influence growth-rate dependent magnesium ion (Mg) incorporation into biogenic calcite modifying the use of calcifying organisms as paleoclimate proxies. Fulvic acid (FA) at biocalcification sites may further reduce calcification rates. Calcite growth-rate inhibition by FA and Mg, two common constituents of seawater and soil water involved in the formation of biogenic calcite, was measured separately and in combination under identical, highly reproducible experimental conditions. Calcite growth rates (pH=8.5 and Ωc=4.5) are reduced by FA (0.5 mg/L) to 47% and by Mg (10−4 M) to 38%, compared to control experiments containing no added growth-rate inhibitor. Humic acid (HA) is twice as effective a calcite growth-rate inhibitor as FA. Calcite growth rate in the presence of both FA (0.5 mg/L) and Mg (10−4 M) is reduced to 5% of the control rate. Mg inhibits calcite growth rates by substitution for calcium ion at the growth site. In contrast, FA inhibits calcite growth rates by binding multiple carboxylate groups on the calcite surface. FA and Mg together have an increased affinity for the calcite growth sites reducing calcite growth rates.

  9. Face-specific Replacement of Calcite by Amorphous Silica Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liesegang, M.; Milke, R.; Neusser, G.; Mizaikoff, B.

    2016-12-01

    Amorphous silica, composed of nanoscale spheres, is an important biomineral, alteration product of silicate rocks on the Earth's surface, and precursor material for stable silicate minerals. Despite constant progress in silica sphere synthesis, fundamental knowledge of natural silica particle interaction and ordering processes leading to colloidal crystals is absent so far. To understand the formation pathways of silica spheres in a geologic environment, we investigated silicified Cretaceous mollusk shell pseudomorphs from Coober Pedy (South Australia) using focused ion beam (FIB)-SEM tomography, petrographic microscopy, µ-XRD, and EMPA. The shells consist of replaced calcite crystals (product, the advancement of synchronized dissolution and precipitation fronts along lattice planes is essential. We assume that the volume-preserving replacement process proceeds via a face-specific dissolution-precipitation mechanism with intermediate subparticle aggregation and subsequent layer-by-layer deposition of spheres along a planar surface. Porosity created during the replacement reaction allows permanent fluid access to the propagating reaction interface. Fluid pH and ionic strength remain constant throughout the replacement process, permitting continuous silica nanoparticle formation and diffusion-limited colloid aggregation. Our study provides a natural example of the transformation of an atomic crystal to an amorphous, mesoscale ordered material; thus, links the research fields of natural colloidal crystal formation, carbonate-silica replacement, and crystallization by oriented particle aggregation (CPA).

  10. The evolution of Carbon isotopes in calcite in the presence of cyanobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Christian; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Pokrovsky, Oleg S.; Oelkers, Eric H.

    2016-04-01

    Stable isotopic compositions in carbonates are widely used as indicators of environmental conditions prevailing during mineral formation. This reconstruction is substantially based on the assumption that there is no change in the mineral composition over geological time. However, recent experimental studies have shown that carbon and magnesium isotopes in hydrous Mg-carbonates undergo continuous re-equilibration with the ambient solution even after mineral precipitation stopped ([1] and [2], respectively). To verify whether this holds true for anhydrous Ca-bearing carbonates which readily form at earth's surface environments, a series of batch system calcite precipitation experiments were performed in the presence of actively growing cyanobacteria Synechococcus sp. The bacteria were grown at ambient temperature in a BG11 culture medium (SIGMA C3061) and continuous stirring, air-bubbling and illumination. Calcite precipitation was initiated by the addition of 8.5mM CaCl2 and 0-50 mM NaHCO3 or NaHCO3-Na2CO3 mixtures. The presence of cyanobacteria is on one hand promoting CaCO3 formation due to increasing pH resulting from photosynthesis. On the other hand, actively growing cyanobacteria drastically change carbon isotope signature of the aqueous fluid phase by preferably incorporating the lighter 12C isotope into biomass [1]. This study explores the effect of continuously changing carbon isotope compositions in dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) on precipitated calcite which is in chemical equilibrium with the ambient fluid phase. [1] Mavromatis et al. (2015). The continuous re-equilibration of carbon isotope compositions of hydrous Mg-carbonates in the presence of cyanobacteria. Chem. Geol. 404, 41-51 [2] Mavromatis et al. (2012). Magnesium isotope fractionation during hydrous magnesium carbonate precipitation with and without cyanobacteria. Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta 76, 161-174

  11. 四川拉拉IOCG矿床方解石REE与C,O同位素地球化学特征及意义%REE and carbon-oxygen isotope geochemistry of calcite from Lala IOCG deposit, Sichuan and its significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄从俊; 李泽琴

    2016-01-01

    calcite, and the features and source of ore-forming fluids were discussed through systematic investigation of REE and C-O isotope geochemistry of calcites. The results show that the average åwREE ,δ(13CPDB) andδ(18OSMOW) of calcite (Ⅰ) are 75.98×10−6, −3.84‰−0‰ and 9.45‰−12.2‰, respectively, while the calcite (Ⅱ) are 313.85×10−6,−3.98‰~−1.40‰and 8.1‰~11.6‰, respectively. The results show that calcite (Ⅰ) is not the main carrier of REE in the MMS, and its ore-forming fluid has very low åwREE . Calcite (Ⅱ) is the dominate REE carrier of HMS, and its ore-forming fluid has higher åwREE than calcite (Ⅰ). Both calcite (Ⅰ) and calcite (Ⅱ) are hydrothermal origin,water-rock interaction and cooling effect the precipitation of calcite, but their ore-forming fluids have different sources. REE distribution pattern of calcite (Ⅰ) is flat type. There are both positive and negative Eu anomalies, and no Ce anomaly, which is controlled by the stability of REE complexes in the fluid. The ore-forming fluid of calcite(Ⅰ) is a kind of high temperature residual fluid after the precipitation of a large number of LREE, and has inherited characteristics of the surrounding marine eruption volcanic rock. REE distribution pattern of calcite (Ⅱ) is leftist type, with significant positive Eu anomaly and no Ce anomaly, which is controlled by crystal chemical factors. The ore-forming fluid of calcite (Ⅱ) is a kind of hot brine originated from the reaction between meteoric water and surrounding rocks, which has a feature of low temperature and high oxygen fugacity. C of calcite (Ⅰ) is derived from mantle fluids and marine carbonates, while C of calcite (Ⅱ) is sourced from CO2 which is released by gabbro magma. O isotope obviously has negative drift being affected by meteoric water.

  12. An explanation for the 18O excess in Noelaerhabdaceae coccolith calcite

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Coccoliths have dominated the sedimentary archive in the pelagic environment since the Jurassic. The biominerals produced by the coccolithophores are ideally placed to infer sea surface temperatures from their oxygen isotopic composition, as calcification in this photosynthetic algal group only occurs in the sunlit surface waters. In the present study, we dissect the isotopic mechanisms contributing to the "vital effect”, which overprints the oceanic temperatures recorded in coccolith calcite...

  13. Calcite saturation state effects on cultured benthic foraminiferal trace-element distribution coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hintz, C. J.; Shaw, T. J.; Chandler, G. T.; McCorkle, D. C.; Bernhard, J. M.; Blanks, J. K.

    2006-12-01

    Field studies have suggested that calcite saturation states (Ømega) near and below saturation alter trace element distribution coefficients in benthic foraminifera. Recent benthic foraminiferal culture experiments at the University of South Carolina investigated the response of trace element signatures to three different calcite saturation seawater environments by manipulating total alkalinity (TA). Starting with near-surface Gulf Stream water (Ømega = 3, TA=2380 μeq kg-1), two seawater reservoirs were titrated with HCl to lower their calcite saturation states (Ømega = 2, TA = 1910 μeq kg-1; Ømega = 1.1, TA = 1320 μeq kg-1). Mixed-species foraminiferal assemblages, with the calcite-specific fluorescent label calcein, were inoculated into 13 total culture chambers evenly distributed among the control and 2 treatment seawater reservoirs. These cultures were maintained at 7.2 ± 0.1 °C temperature and 36.6 ± 0.4 ‰ salinity for 8 months. Total alkalinity and dissolved inorganic carbon, measured biweekly, characterized the carbonate system and verified that the calcite saturation state remained stable over the culture duration. Trace element concentrations were also measured biweekly. Foraminiferal reproduction ( Bulimina marginata) was observed in each seawater chemistry. These individuals were utilized for trace element and stable isotope (data not presented here) analysis. Additionally, terminal chambers precipitated in alkalinity-adjusted cultures were identified by the absence of the pre-culture calcein label used on all inoculated foraminifera. These cultured chambers were separated by laser microdissection and analyzed for trace element content by isotope dilution inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry. We present the initial results of these trace element distribution coefficients measured in cultured benthic foraminifera from three different Ømega. This research was funded by National Science Foundation grants OCE-0351029 and OCE-0437366.

  14. Diagenetic Mg-calcite overgrowths on foraminiferal tests in the vicinity of methane seeps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panieri, Giuliana; Lepland, Aivo; Whitehouse, Martin J.; Wirth, Richard; Raanes, Morten P.; James, Rachael H.; Graves, Carolyn A.; Crémière, Antoine; Schneider, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Methane is a potent greenhouse gas and some episodes of past global warming appear to coincide with its massive release from seafloor sediments as suggested by carbon isotope records of foraminifera. Here, we present structural, geochemical, and stable carbon isotope data from single foraminiferal calcite tests and authigenic Mg-calcite overgrowths in a sediment core recovered from an area of active methane seepage in western Svalbard at ca. 340 m water depth. The foraminifera are from intervals in the core where conventional bulk foraminiferal δ13 C values are as low as -11.3 ‰. Mg/Ca analyses of the foraminiferal tests reveal that even tests for which there is no morphological evidence for secondary authigenic carbonate can contain Mg-rich interlayers with Mg/Ca up to 220 mmol/mol. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of the contact point between the biogenic calcite and authigenic Mg-calcite layers shows that the two phases are structurally indistinguishable and they have the same crystallographic orientation. Secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) analyses reveal that the Mg-rich layers are strongly depleted in 13C (δ13 C as low as -34.1 ‰). These very low δ13 C values indicate that the authigenic Mg-calcite precipitated from pore waters containing methane-derived dissolved inorganic carbon at the depth of the sulfate-methane transition zone (SMTZ). As the depth of the SMTZ can be located several meters below the sediment-seawater interface, interpretation of low foraminiferal δ13 C values in ancient sediments in terms of the history of methane seepage at the seafloor must be undertaken with care.

  15. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Cadmium Carbonate Heteroepitaxial Growth at the Calcite (101¯4) Surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Man; Kovarik, Libor; Arey, Bruce W.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2014-06-01

    Elucidating the kinetics and mechanisms of heteroepitaxial nucleation and growth at mineral-water interfaces is essential to understanding surface reactivity in geochemical systems. In the present work, the formation of heteroepitaxial cadmium carbonate coatings at calcite-water interfaces was investigated by exposing calcite (10-14) surfaces to Cd-bearing aqueous solutions. In situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed as the primary technique. The AFM results indicate that the heteroepitaxial growth of cadmium carbonate proceeds via three different mechanisms depending on the initial supersaturation of the aqueous solution: advancement of existing steps, nucleation and growth of three-dimensional (3D) islands, and nucleation and spread of two-dimensional (2D) nuclei. The 3D islands and 2D nuclei exhibit different morphologies and growth kinetics. The effects of supersaturation on heteroepitaxial growth mechanisms can be interpreted in terms of the free energy barrier for nucleation. At low initial supersaturation, where 3D nucleation dominates, it is hypothesized, from the growth rate and morphology of the 3D islands observed with AFM, that the crystallization of the overgrowth follows a non-classical pathway involving the formation of a surface precursor that is not fully crystalline, whereas high supersaturation favors the formation of crystalline 2D nuclei whose morphology is based on the atomic structure of the calcite substrate. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images reveal that the atomic structure of the interface between the cadmium carbonate coating and calcite shows perfect, dislocation-free epitaxy.

  16. Kinetics and mechanisms of cadmium carbonate heteroepitaxial growth at the calcite (10 1bar 4) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Man; Kovarik, Libor; Arey, Bruce W.; Felmy, Andrew R.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Kerisit, Sebastien

    2014-06-01

    Elucidating the kinetics and mechanisms of heteroepitaxial nucleation and growth at mineral-water interfaces is essential to understanding surface reactivity in geochemical systems. In the present work, the formation of heteroepitaxial cadmium carbonate coatings at calcite-water interfaces was investigated by exposing calcite (10 1bar 4) surfaces to Cd-bearing aqueous solutions. In situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) was employed as the primary technique. The AFM results indicate that the heteroepitaxial growth of cadmium carbonate proceeds via three different mechanisms depending on the initial supersaturation of the aqueous solution: advancement of existing steps, nucleation and growth of three-dimensional (3D) islands, and nucleation and spread of two-dimensional (2D) nuclei. The 3D islands and 2D nuclei exhibit different morphologies and growth kinetics. The effects of supersaturation on heteroepitaxial growth mechanisms can be interpreted in terms of the free energy barrier for nucleation. At low initial supersaturation, where 3D nucleation dominates, it is hypothesized, from the growth rate and morphology of the 3D islands observed with AFM, that the crystallization of the overgrowth follows a non-classical pathway involving the formation of a surface precursor that is not fully crystalline, whereas high supersaturation favors the formation of crystalline 2D nuclei whose morphology is based on the atomic structure of the calcite substrate. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images reveal that the atomic structure of the interface between the cadmium carbonate coating and calcite shows perfect, dislocation-free epitaxy.

  17. Iodate in calcite and vaterite: Insights from synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy and first-principles calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, J.; Lin, J.; Sun, W.; Botis, S. M.; Tse, J.; Chen, N.; Hu, Y.; Li, D.; Seaman, J.; Pan, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Calcium carbonates such as calcite are the dominant hosts of inorganic iodine in nature and are potentially important for the retention and removal of radioactive iodine isotopes (129I and 131I) in contaminated water. However, little is known about the structural environment of iodine in carbonates. In this study, iodate (IO3-) doped calcite and vaterite have been synthesized using the gel-diffusion method at three NaIO3 concentrations (0.002; 0.004; 0.008 M) and a pH value of 9.0, under ambient temperature and pressure. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) analyses show that iodine is preferentially incorporated into calcite over vaterite. Synchrotron iodine K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectra confirm that IO3- is the dominant iodine species in synthetic calcite and vaterite. Analyses of iodine K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) data, complemented by periodic first-principles calculations at the density functional theory (DFT) levels, demonstrate that the I5+ ion of the IO3- group in calcite and vaterite is bonded by three and two additional O atoms (i.e., coordination numbers = 6 and 5), respectively, and is incorporated via the charged coupled substitution I5+ + Na+ ↔ C4+ + Ca2+, with the Na+ cation at a nearest Ca2+ site being the most energetically favorable configuration.

  18. U-Th dating of vein calcite by LA-MC-ICP-MS: preliminary results from geothermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGee, L. E.; Reich, M.; Rodriguez, V.; Leisen, M.; Barra, F.

    2014-12-01

    The measurement of U-series isotopes in precipitated minerals such as calcite holds various challenges, including low U and Th concentrations (in the ppb-ppt range), and the presence of detrital 232Th which can lead to age overestimations. Additionally, as yet there does not exist a calcite standard reference material for inter-laboratory accuracy and precision comparison, with most laboratories using their own in-house standard material and focussing largely on application to paleoclimate studies (e.g. corals and speleothems). In actively deforming regions, high-pressure hydrothermal fluids play an important role in faulting and vein formation, and commonly fault rupture is followed by rapid sealing through mineral precipitation. Therefore, precise dating of vein growth is of special importance to our understanding of the complex interplay between seismic events and fluid flow in the upper crust, and opens up a new field of study using U-Th techniques. The ability to accurately date fault-filling calcite within such settings has the power to elucidate the connection between structure and fluid flow in the development of geothermal systems, and provide valuable information on the longevity of the heat/water source, in addition to regional magmatic history. We are developing U-Th measurements and ages of vein calcite from geothermal systems using a Neptune Plus MC-ICP-MS (with 5 CDDs and 3 SEMs) coupled to an excimer 193nm Photon Machines laser. We will be comparing our results with an 189ka in-house flowstone calcite standard previously dated by TIMS, as well as developing a geothermal calcite standard.

  19. Resetting of Mg isotopes between calcite and dolomite during burial metamorphism: Outlook of Mg isotopes as geothermometer and seawater proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Zhongya; Hu, Wenxuan; Wang, Xiaomin; Lu, Yizhou; Wang, Lichao; Liao, Zhiwei; Li, Weiqiang

    2017-07-01

    Magnesium isotopes are an emerging tool to study the geological processes recorded in carbonates. Calcite, due to its ubiquitous occurrence and the large Mg isotope fractionation associated with the mineral, has attracted great interests in applications of Mg isotope geochemistry. However, the fidelity of Mg isotopes in geological records of carbonate minerals (e.g., calcite and dolomite) against burial metamorphism remains poorly constrained. Here we report our investigation on the Mg isotope systematics of a dolomitized Middle Triassic Geshan carbonate section in eastern China. Magnesium isotope analysis was complemented by analyses of Sr-C-O isotopic compositions, major and trace element concentrations, and petrographic and mineralogical features. Multiple lines of evidence consistently indicated that post-depositional diagenesis of carbonate minerals occurred to the carbonate rocks. Magnesium isotope compositions of the carbonate rocks closely follow a mixing trend between a high δ26Mg dolomite end member and a low δ26Mg calcite end member, irrespective of sample positions in the section and calcite/dolomite ratio in the samples. By fitting the measured Mg isotope data using a two-end member mixing model, an inter-mineral Δ26Mgdolomite-calcite fractionation of 0.72‰ was obtained. Based on the experimentally derived Mg isotope fractionation factors for dolomite and calcite, a temperature of 150-190 °C was calculated to correspond to the 0.72‰ Δ26Mgdolomite-calcite fractionation. Such temperature range matches with the burial-thermal history of the local strata, making a successful case of Mg isotope geothermometry. Our results indicate that both calcite and dolomite had been re-equilibrated during burial metamorphism, and based on isotope mass balance of Mg, the system was buffered by dolomite in the section. Therefore, burial metamorphism may reset Mg isotope signature of calcite, and Mg isotope compositions in calcite should be dealt with caution in

  20. Production of calcite nanocrystal by a urease-positive strain of enterobacter ludwigii and study of its structure by SEM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghashghaei, Sara; Emtiazi, Giti

    2013-10-01

    The present research aimed at evaluating the effects of urease enzyme and increasing pH on calcite nanocrystal formation. Unlike some researches, the results showed that CaCO3 precipitation is not a general phenomenon among the bacteria and if a bacterium has not this ability, it will not be able to produce calcite even with an increase in pH. All urease-positive bacteria had this ability, while only some urease-negative bacteria were able to produce calcite. Production and characterization of nanocrystals on precipitating medium were shown primarily by light microscopy and then confirmed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. Crystallite particle size was determined using Scherrer formula that was sub-100-nm in all samples. Based on qualitative and quantitative studies, strain C8 was selected as the best calcite-producing strain. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that this isolate has 99 % similarity with Enterobacter ludwigii. 16S rRNA sequence of isolate was deposited in GenBank with accession number JX666242. The morphology and exact composition of nanocrystalline particles were determined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). According to data obtained by SEM, we suggest that nanocrystals of CaCO3 adhere to bacteria and each other to form small aggregates and then complex crystalline networks to trap bacteria. Many holes are present in these crystalline networks that seem to be due to the aggregation of nanocrystals.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of spider silk calcite composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana Dmitrović

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Spider silk poses excellent mechanical properties, tenacity and elasticity and it has been used as a template for calcite mineralization to improve load bearing strength of osteoconductive calcite. The samples were obtained by mimicking biomineralization for five days in order to follow formation and growth of calcite on the surface of spider silk. Crystal phase was detected by XRD and FTIR spectroscopy. Microstructure, crystal size and its morphology were studied by means of FESEM. After two days of processing, pure calcite phase was obtained, and a size of the formed crystals increased with prolongation of biomineralization.

  2. Biogenic and synthetic high magnesium calcite - a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Xia; Ma, Yurong; Qi, Limin

    2014-01-01

    Systematic studies on the Mg distributions, the crystal orientations, the formation mechanisms and the mechanical properties of biogenic high-Mg calcites in different marine organisms were summarized in detail in this review. The high-Mg calcites in the hard tissues of marine organisms mentioned generally own a few common features as follows. Firstly, the Mg distribution is not uniform in most of the minerals. Secondly, high-Mg calcite biominerals are usually composed of nanoparticles that own almost the same crystallographic orientations and thus they behave like single crystals or mesocrystals. Thirdly, the formation of thermodynamically unstable high-Mg calcites in marine organisms under mild conditions is affected by three key factors, that is, the formation of amorphous calcium (magnesium) carbonate precursor, the control of polymorph via biomolecules and the high Mg/Ca ratios in modern sea. Lastly, the existence of Mg ions in the Mg-containing calcite may improve the mechanical properties of biogenic minerals. Furthermore, the key progress in the synthesis of high-Mg calcites in the laboratory based on the formation mechanisms of the biogenic high-Mg calcites was reviewed. Many researchers have realized the synthesis of high-Mg calcites in the laboratory under ambient conditions with the help of intermediate amorphous phase, mixed solvents, organic/inorganic surfaces and soluble additives. Studies on the structural analysis and formation mechanisms of thermodynamically unstable biogenic high-Mg calcite minerals may shed light on the preparation of functional materials with enhanced mechanical properties.

  3. Spectroscopic characterization of natural calcite minerals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekaran, S; Anbalagan, G

    2007-11-01

    The FT-IR, FT-Raman, NMR spectral data of ten different limestone samples have been compared. FT-IR and FT-Raman spectral data show that calcium carbonate in limestone, principally in the form of calcite, as identified by its main absorption bands at 1426, 1092, 876 and 712 cm(-1). The sharp diffractions at the d-spacings, 3.0348, 1.9166 and 1.8796 confirm the presence of calcite structure and the calculated lattice parameters are: a=4.9781 A, c=17.1188 A. The range of 13C chemical shifts for different limestone samples is very small, varying from 198.38 to 198.42 ppm. The observed chemical shifts are consistent with the identical C-O bonding in different limestone samples. 27Al MAS NMR spectra of the samples exhibit a central line at 1 ppm and another line at 60 ppm corresponding to octahedral and tetrahedral Al ions, respectively. The five component resonances were observed in 29Si MAS NMR spectrum of limestone and these resonances were assigned to Si (4 Al), Si (3 Al), Si (2 Al), Si (1 Al) and Si (0 Al) from low field to high field.

  4. Calcite-forming bacteria for compressive strength improvement in mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Jin; Park, Yu-Mi; Chun, Woo-Young; Kim, Wha-Jung; Ghim, Sa-Youl

    2010-04-01

    Microbiological calcium carbonate precipitation (MCP) has been investigated for its ability to improve the compressive strength of concrete mortar. However, very few studies have been conducted on the use of calcite-forming bacteria (CFB) to improve compressive strength. In this study, we discovered new bacterial genera that are capable of improving the compressive strength of concrete mortar. We isolated 4 CFB from 7 environmental concrete structures. Using sequence analysis of the 16S rRNA genes, the CFB could be partially identified as Sporosarcina soli KNUC401, Bacillus massiliensis KNUC402, Arthrobacter crystallopoietes KNUC403, and Lysinibacillus fusiformis KNUC404. Crystal aggregates were apparent in the bacterial colonies grown on an agar medium. Stereomicroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction analyses illustrated both the crystal growth and the crystalline structure of the CaCO3 crystals. We used the isolates to improve the compressive strength of concrete mortar cubes and found that KNUC403 offered the best improvement in compressive strength.

  5. Effects of pore-scale precipitation on permeability and flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noiriel, Catherine; Steefel, Carl I.; Yang, Li; Bernard, Dominique

    2016-09-01

    The effects of calcite precipitation on porous media permeability and flow were evaluated with a combined experimental and modeling approach. X-ray microtomography images of two columns packed with glass beads and calcite (spar crystals) or aragonite (Bahamas ooids) injected with a supersaturated solution (log Ω = 1.42) were processed in order to calculate rates of calcite precipitation with a spatial resolution of 4.46 μm. Identification and localization of the newly precipitated crystals on the 3D images was performed and results used to calculate the crystal growth rates and velocities. The effects of carbonate precipitation were also evaluated in terms of the integrated precipitation rate over the length of the column, crystal shape, surface area and pore roughness changes. While growth was epitaxial on calcite spar, calcite rhombohedra formed on glass beads and clusters of polyhedrons formed on aragonite ooids. Near the column inlet, calcite precipitation occurred preferentially on carbonate grains compared to glass beads, with almost 100% of calcite spar surface area covered by new crystals versus 92% in the case of aragonite and 11% in the case of glass beads. Although the experimental chemistry and flow boundary conditions in the two columns were similar, their porosity-permeability evolution was different because the nucleation and subsequent crystal growth on the two substrates (i.e., calcite spar and aragonite ooids) was very different. The impact of mineral precipitation on pore-scale flow and permeability was evaluated using a pore-scale Stokes solver that accounted for the changes in pore geometry. For similar magnitude reductions in porosity, the decrease in permeability was highest within the sample that experienced the greatest increase in pore roughness. Various porous media models were generated to show the impact of different crystal growth patterns and pore roughness changes on flow and permeability-porosity relationship. Under constant flow

  6. Mechanism for calcite dissolution and its contribution to development of reservoir porosity and permeability in the Kela 2 gas field,Tarim Basin,China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    This study is undertaken to understand how calcite precipitation and dissolution contributes to depth-related changes in porosity and permeability of gas-bearing sandstone reservoirs in the Kela 2 gas field of the Tarim Basin, Northwestern China. Sandstone samples and pore water samples are col-lected from well KL201 in the Tarim Basin. Vertical profiles of porosity, permeability, pore water chem-istry, and the relative volume abundance of calcite/dolomite are constructed from 3600 to 4000 m below the ground surface within major oil and gas reservoir rocks. Porosity and permeability values are in-versely correlated with the calcite abundance, indicating that calcite dissolution and precipitation may be controlling porosity and permeability of the reservoir rocks. Pore water chemistry exhibits a sys-tematic variation from the Na2SO4 type at the shallow depth (3600-3630 m), to the NaHCO3 type at the intermediate depth (3630―3695 m),and to the CaCl2 type at the greater depth (3728―3938 m). The geochemical factors that control the calcite solubility include pH, temperature, pressure, Ca2+ concen-tration, the total inorganic carbon concentration (ΣCO2), and the type of pore water. Thermodynamic phase equilibrium and mass conservation laws are applied to calculate the calcite saturation state as a function of a few key parameters. The model calculation illustrates that the calcite solubility is strongly dependent on the chemical composition of pore water, mainly the concentration difference between the total dissolved inorganic carbon and dissolved calcium concentration (i.e., [ΣCO2] -[Ca2+]). In the Na2SO4 water at the shallow depth, this index is close to 0, pore water is near the calcite solubility. Calcite does not dissolve or precipitate in significant quantities. In the NaHCO3 water at the intermedi-ate depth, this index is greater than 0, and pore water is supersaturated with respect to calcite. Massive calcite precipitation was observed at this depth

  7. Trace metal distribution and isotope variations in low-temperature calcite and groundwater in granitoid fractures down to 1 km depth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drake, Henrik; Tullborg, Eva-Lena; Hogmalm, K. Johan; Åström, Mats E.

    2012-05-01

    methods used depended on the crystal homogeneity (one or several calcite generations), discerned by detailed SEM-investigations (back-scatter and cathodo-luminescence). 87Sr/86Sr ratios as well as δ18O signatures in calcite are in the range expected for the precipitates from present-day groundwater, or older groundwater with similar composition (except in sections with a considerable portion of glacial water, where calcite definitely is older than the latest glaciation). Stable carbon isotopes in calcite generally show values typically associated with HCO3- originating from soil organic matter but at intermediate depth frequently with HCO3- originating from in situ microbial anaerobic oxidation of methane (highly depleted δ13C). For one of the studied metals - manganese - there was a strong correlation between the sampled calcite coatings and hypothetical calcite predicted by applying laboratory-based partition coefficients (literature data) on groundwater chemistry for sections corresponding to those where the calcites were sampled. This points to temporal and spatial stability in groundwater Mn/Ca ratios over millions of years, or even more, and show that it is possible to assess, based on laboratory-derived data on Mn partitioning, past groundwater Mn-composition from fracture calcites. For other metals - Fe, Sr, and Mg - which are expected to interact with co-precipitating minerals to a higher degree than Mn, the correlations between measured and predicted calcite were weaker for various reasons.

  8. Interaction of ethanol and water with the {1014} surface of calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cooke, David; Gray, R J; Sand, K K;

    2010-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to model the interaction between ethanol, water, and the {1014} surface of calcite. Our results demonstrate that a single ethanol molecule is able to form two interactions with the mineral surface (both Ca-O and O-H), resulting in a highly ordered......, stable adsorption layer. In contrast, a single water molecule can only form one or other of these interactions and is thus less well bound, resulting in a more unstable adsorption layer. Consequently, when competitive adsorption is considered, ethanol dominates the adsorption layer that forms even when...... the starting configuration consists of a complete monolayer of water at the surface. The computational results are in good agreement with the results from atomic force microscopy experiments where it is observed that a layer of ethanol remains attached to the calcite surface, decreasing its ability to interact...

  9. Nanobacteria-like calcite single crystals at the surface of the Tataouine meteorite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzerara, Karim; Menguy, Nicolas; Guyot, Francois; Dominici, Christian; Gillet, Philippe

    2003-06-24

    Nanobacteria-like objects evidenced at the surface of the orthopyroxenes of the Tataouine meteorite in South Tunisia have been studied by scanning and transmission electron microscopies. A method of micromanipulation has been developed to ensure that exactly the same objects were studied by both methods. We have shown that the nanobacteria-like objects are spatially correlated with filaments of microorganisms that colonized the surface of the meteoritic pyroxene during its 70 years of residence in the aridic Tataouine soil. Depressions of a few micrometers in depth are observed in the pyroxene below the carbonates, indicating preferential dissolution of the pyroxene and calcite precipitation at these locations. The nanobacteria-like small rods that constitute calcium carbonate rosettes are well crystallized calcite single crystals surrounded by a thin amorphous layer of carbonate composition that smoothes the crystal edges and induces rounded shapes. Those morphologies are unusual for calcite single crystals observed in natural samples. A survey of recent literature suggests that the intervention of organic compounds derived from biological activity is likely in their formation.

  10. Sorption and desorption of arsenate and arsenite on calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sø, Helle Ugilt; Postma, Diederik Jan; Jakobsen, Rasmus

    2008-01-01

    The adsorption and desorption of arsenate (As(V)) and arsenite (As(111)) oil calcite was investigated in a series of batch experiments in calcite-equilibrated solutions. The solutions covered a broad range of pH, alkalinity, calcium concentration and ionic strength. The initial arsenic...

  11. Single-contact pressure solution creep on calcite monocrystals

    CERN Document Server

    Zubtsov, Sergei; Gratier, Jean-Pierre; Dysthe, Dag; Traskine, Vladimir

    2005-01-01

    Pressure solution creep rates and interface structures have been measured by two methods on calcite single crystals. In the first kind of experiments, calcite monocrystals were indented at 40 degrees C for six weeks using ceramic indenters under stresses in the 50-200 MPa range in a saturated solution of calcite and in a calcite-saturated aqueous solution of NH4Cl. The deformation (depth of the hole below the indenter) is measured ex-situ at the end of the experiment. In the second type of experiment, calcite monocrystals were indented by spherical glass indenters for 200 hours under stresses in the 0-100 MPa range at room temperature in a saturated aqueous solution of calcite. The displacement of the indenter was continuously recorded using a specially constructed differential dilatometer. The experiments conducted in a calcite-saturated aqueous solution of NH4Cl show an enhanced indentation rate owing to the fairly high solubility of calcite in this solution. In contrast, the experiments conducted in a calc...

  12. Geochemistry of speleothems affected by aragonite to calcite recrystallization - Potential inheritance from the precursor mineral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Villar, David; Krklec, Kristina; Pelicon, Primož; Fairchild, Ian J.; Cheng, Hai; Edwards, Lawrence R.

    2017-03-01

    of critical importance for inheritance of different elements. The volume of solution is controlled by (1) the discharge of water passing through the sample and (2) the lapse time between aragonite dissolution and calcite precipitation. Hydrology and hydrochemistry of the interacting solution, together with the mineralogy and texture of the speleothem are the essential controls for the diagenesis of the speleothem. Recrystallization of aragonite speleothems does not follow stratigraphical levels of the sample but occurs along sites with preferential flow paths in any sector of the speleothem. In these cases the relationship between age and distance from base is not preserved. However, alternation of periods of recrystallization with periods of aragonite precipitation causing speleothem accretion can result in recrystallized speleothems with coherent distance from the base-age relationship. Thus, early diagenesis of speleothems affected by seasonal or inter-annual oscillation of drip waters supersaturated and subsaturated in aragonite may provide best-scenario conditions for dating and preservation of paleoenvironmental records along recrystallized speleothems. However, even in this scenario, the variable discharge and the diagenetic rate control the geochemical inheritance from the primary aragonite crystals.

  13. Emission polarization study on quartz and calcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, R. K.

    1972-01-01

    Calculation of the spectral emission polarization of quartz and calcite polished plates for observation angles of 20 and 70 deg by the substitution of complex index of refraction values for each mineral into Fresnel's equations. The emission polarization is shown to be quite wavelength-dependent, demonstrating that selected narrow or medium-width spectral bands exhibit a significantly higher percentage of polarization than a broad spectral band for these two minerals. Field measurements with a broadband infrared radiometer yield polarizations on the order of 2% for a coarse-grained granite rock and beach sand (both quartz-rich). This implies that a more sensitive detector with a selected medium-width filter may be capable of measuring emission polarization accurately enough to make this parameter useful as a remote sensing tool for discrimination among rocks on the basis of texture.

  14. Origin of epigenetic calcite in coal from Antarctica and Ohio based on isotope compositions of oxygen, carbon and strontium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure, G.; Botoman, G.

    1984-01-01

    Isotopic compositions of oxygen, carbon and strontium of calcite cleats in coal seams of southern Victoria Land, Antarctica, and Tuscarawas County, Ohio, contain a record of the conditions a the time of their formation. The Antarctic calcites (?? 18O(SMOW) = +9.14 to +11.82%0) were deposited from waters enriched in 16O whose isotopic composition was consistent with that of meteoric precipitation at low temperature and high latitude. The carbon of the calcite cleats (?? 13C(PDB) = -15.6 to -16.9%0) was derived in part from the coal (?? 13C(PDB) = -23.5 to -26.7%0) as carbon dioxide and by oxidation of methane or other hydrocarbon gases. The strontium ( 87Sr 86Sr = 0.71318-0.72392) originated primarily from altered feldspar grains in the sandstones of the Beacon Supergroup. Calcite cleats in the Kittaning No. 6 coal seam of Ohio (?? 18O(SMOW) = +26.04 to +27.79%0) were deposited from waters that had previously exchanged oxygen, possibly with marine carbonate at depth. The carbon (?? 13C(PDB) = 0.9 to +2.4%0) is enriched in 13C even though that cleats were deposited in coal that is highly enriched in 12C and apparently originated from marine carbonates. Strontium in the cleats ( Sr 87 0.71182-0.71260) is not of marine origin but contains varying amounts of radiogenic 87Sr presumably derived from detrital Rb-bearing minerals in the adjacent sedimentary rocks. The results of this study suggest that calcite cleats in coal of southern Victoria Land, Antarctica, were deposited after the start of glaciation in Cenozoic time and that those in Ohio precipitated from formation waters derived from the underlying marine carbonate rocks, probably in the recent geologic past. ?? 1984.

  15. Precipitation of low-temperature dolomite from an anaerobic microbial consortium: the role of methanogenic Archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenward, P A; Goldstein, R H; González, L A; Roberts, J A

    2009-12-01

    Here we report precipitation of dolomite at low temperature (30 degrees C) mediated by a mixed anaerobic microbial consortium composed of dissimilatory iron-reducing bacteria (DIRB), fermenters, and methanogens. Initial solution geochemistry is controlled by DIRB, but after 90 days shifts to a system dominated by methanogens. In live experiments conditions are initially saturated with respect to dolomite (Omega(dol) = 19.40) and increase by two orders of magnitude (Omega(dol) = 2 330.77) only after the onset of methanogenesis, as judged by the increasing [CH(4)] and the detection of methanogenic micro-organisms. We identify ordered dolomite in live microcosms after 90 days via powder X-ray diffraction, while sterile controls precipitate only calcite. Scanning electron microscopy and transmitted electron microscopy demonstrate that the precipitated dolomite is closely associated with cell walls and putative extra-cellular polysaccharides. Headspace gas measurements and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis confirm the presence of both autotrophic and acetoclastic methanogens and exclude the presence of DIRB and sulfate-reducing bacteria after dolomite begins forming. Furthermore, the absence of dolomite in the controls and prior to methanogenesis confirm that methanogenic Archaea are necessary for the low-temperature precipitation of dolomite under the experimental conditions tested.

  16. The role of spring insolation in the seasonality of precipitation of the eastern United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardt, B. F.; Rowe, H. D.; Springer, G. S.; Edwards, R.; Cheng, H.

    2012-12-01

    Milankovitch theory emphasizes the dominant role of summer insolation changes on the growth and decay of continental ice sheets during the Pleistocene. Evidence from speleothems also shows the clear impacts of summer insolation on precipitation in monsoon regions. In contrast, relatively few records show climatic variability in phase with spring or autumn insolation. Here we present stable isotope records from two stalagmites collected in Buckeye Creek Cave (BCC) in east central North America that is the first to show ten complete precessional cycles that is anti-phased with spring insolation. Based on analysis of modern precipitation, δ18O of speleothem calcite most likely represents changes in the balance of seasonal precipitation, suggesting a relative increase in summer precipitation during spring insolation minima. This variability may be driven by the North Atlantic subtropical anticyclone and a seasonally-lagged sea surface temperature response to spring insolation forcing. Millennial-scale events observed at BCC are weak (~0.3‰) relative to orbital variability (~2‰), but are broadly coincident with the timing found in Chinese and Brazilian speleothem records of monsoon intensity. As the subtropical North Atlantic is the primary moisture source for the Arctic, the limited evidence of Dansgaard-Oeschger or Heinrich events in the BCC stalagmites supports the idea that millennial features of glacial climate originate in the North Atlantic.

  17. Calcite surface structure and reactivity: molecular dynamics simulations and macroscopic surface modelling of the calcite-water interface

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolthers, M.; Di Tommaso, D.; Du, Z.; de Leeuw, N.H.

    2012-01-01

    Calcite–water interactions are important not only in carbon sequestration and the global carbon cycle, but also in contaminant behaviour in calcite-bearing host rock and in many industrial applications. Here we quantify the effect of variations in surface structure on calcite surface reactivity. Fir

  18. Calcite Twinning in the Ordovician Martinsburg Formation, Delaware Water Gap, New Jersey, USA: Implications for Cleavage Formation and Tectonic Shortening in the Appalachian Piedmont Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. Craddock

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available A traverse across the Stone Church syncline in the Ordovician Martinsburg turbidites reveals an axial planar cleavage (N40°E, SE dips in regional thrust-related folds (N40°E, shallow plunges and five phases of sparry calcite. Calcite fillings are bedding-parallel, cleavage-parallel, and one vein set cross-cuts both earlier phases; the youngest calcite filling is a bedding-parallel fault gouge that crosscuts the cleavage and preserves top-down-to-the-southeast normal fault kinematics. Calcite veins unique to disharmonically-folded calcareous siltstones (Maxwell, 1962 were also analyzed. Stable isotopic analysis (O, C of all of the calcite phases indicates a uniform fluid source (δ13C −2.0, δ18O −13.3 VPDB and, potentially, a similar precipitation and mechanical twinning age. The twinning strains (n = 1341; average Δσ = −32 MPa; average ε1 = −2.9% in the calcite suite are consistent with SE-NW thrust shortening, and sub-horizontal shortening perpendicular to evolving axial planar cleavage planes in the Stone Church syncline. Calcareous siltstone layers within the Martinsburg Fm. turbidites share concordant bedding planes and are unique, chemically (XRF, but folded and cleaved differently than the surrounding clay-rich Martinsburg turbidites. Neither sediment type yielded detrital zircons. Electron backscatter X-ray diffraction (EBSD and calcite twinning results in a folded calcareous siltstone layer preserving a layer-normal SE-NW shortening strain and Lattice Preferred Orientation (LPO. Shortening axes for the five-phase calcite suite trends ~N40°W, consistent with tectonic transport associated with crystalline nappe emplacement of the Reading Prong within the Piedmont province.

  19. Geometry of calcite cemented zones in shallow marine sandstones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walderhaug, O.; Prestholm, E.; Oexnevad, I.E.I.

    1995-12-31

    In offshore oil production, tightly cemented calcite zones often form impermeable barriers to fluid flow an so adversely affect reservoir performance. Based on recent breakthroughs in the theory of the formation of calcite cemented zones, the project discussed in this paper was concerned with (1) Performing outcrop studies in order to increase the existing database on the geometry of calcite cemented zones, (2) Extending and refining methods of predicting the geometry of cored calcite cemented zones, and (3) Applying and illustrating the use of these methods by studying calcite cementation in shallow marine reservoir sandstones on the Norwegian shelf. The paper presents results from field work and applies these results and the criteria for recognizing geometrical forms of calcite cementation in cores to the Ula Formation of the Ula Field and the Rannoch Formation of the Gullfax Field. The results from the core and outcrop studies are integrated in a tentative identification key for cored calcite cemented zones. The work is part of PROFIT (Program for Research On Field oriented Improved recovery Technology), a research project conducted by RF - Rogaland Research in 1991-1994. 32 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. An unusual isotopic fractionation of boron in synthetic calcium carbonate precipitated from seawater and saline water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Yingkai; LI Shizhen; WEI Haizhen; SUN Aide; ZHOU Weijian; LIU Weiguo

    2006-01-01

    Inorganic calcium carbonate precipitation from natural seawater and saline water at various pH values was carried out experimentally. The results show the clear positive relationships between boron concentration and δ11B of inorganic calcium carbonate with the pH of natural seawater and saline water. However, the variations of boron isotopic fractionation between inorganic calcite and seawater/saline water with pH are inconsistent with the hypothesis that B(OH)4- is the dominant species incorporated into the biogenic calcite structure. The isotopic fractionation factors α Between synthetic calcium carbonate precipitate and parent solutions increase systematically as pH increases, from 0.9884 at pH 7.60 to 1.0072 at pH 8.60 for seawater and from 0.9826 at pH 7.60 to 1.0178 at pH 8.75 for saline water. An unusual boron isotopic fractionation factor of larger than 1 in synthetic calcium carbonate precipitated from seawater/saline water at higher pH is observed, which implies that a substantial amount of the isotopically heavier B(OH)3 species must be incorporated preferentially into synthetic inorganic carbonate. The results propose that the incorporation of B(OH)3 is attributed to the formation of Mg(OH)2 at higher pH of calcifying microenvironment during the synthetic calcium carbonate precipitation. The preliminary experiment of Mg(OH)2 precipitated from artificial seawater shows that heavier 11B is enriched in Mg(OH)2 precipitation, which suggests that isotopically heavier B(OH)3 species incorporated preferentially into Mg(OH)2 precipitation.This result cannot be applied to explain the boron isotopic fractionation of marine bio-carbonate because of the possibility that the unusual environment in this study appears in formation of marine bio-carbonate is infinitesimal. We, however, must pay more attention to this phenomenon observed in this study, which accidentally appears in especially natural environment.

  1. Stable isotope variations in the Quaternary epithermal calcite-fluorite deposit at Monte delle Fate near Cerveteri (Latium, central Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masi, U.; O'Neil, J.R.

    1980-01-01

    Carbon, oxygen and hydrogen isotope variations have been measured in samples from the epithermal fluorite vein deposit at Monte delle Fate, Latium. The ranges in ?? 13C and ??18O of calcite are -1.3 to 3.4 and 9.5 to 17.3, respectively. ??D values of water extracted from fluid inclusions are -49 to -39 for calcite and -41 to -34 for fluorite. Fluid inclusion filling temperatures (225??-240??C) and salinites (3.75) are nearly the same for both fluorite and sparry calcite. An elongated form of calcite, of minor abundance, precipitated at lower temperatures. The data indicate that (1) the CO2 involved in the mineralization was provided by the local marine limestones, (2) the waters were meteoric in origin and underwent an 18O shift of ??? 10 permil by exchange with marine country rocks, and (3) all geochemical features can be explained by the action of two hydrothermal fluids. Hot brines recently discovered in the Cesano geothermal area, 30 km to the east, have temperatures and some chemical characteristics similar to the hydrothermal fluids at Monte delle Fate. ?? 1980 Springer-Verlag.

  2. Microstructural analysis of calcite-filled fractures inherited from basement structures, southern Ontario, Canada: long term instability of the craton?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalding, Jennifer; Schneider, David

    2016-04-01

    Intra-cratonic regions are generally characterized by tectonic stability and low seismicity. In southern Ontario, Canada, moderate levels of seismicity have been recorded over the last few decades reaching magnitudes of 5 MN, indicating that the geosphere is not as stable as predicted. The stratigraphy of the region consists of Ordovician limestone with a thickness of ~200 m that unconformably overlays the Mesoproterozoic crystalline Grenville Province. Subsequent tectonism including repeated Paleozoic orogenies and rifting along the east coast of North America has reactivated Proterozoic structures that have propagated into the overlying carbonate platform forming mesoscopic-scale brittle structures. Exposed along the shores of Lake Ontario are decameter-scale fracture zones, with a fracture spacing of 0.5 to 10 meters. The dominant fracture set trends E-W, and often forms conjugate sets with less prominent NNE-oriented fractures. More locally, an older NW-oriented fracture set is cross cut by the E-W and NNE oriented fractures. Regionally, there have been six directions of maximum horizontal stress in southern Ontario since the Precambrian, with the current orientation of maximum stress oriented ENE as a consequence of far field Atlantic ridge-push forces generated at distant plate boundaries. Calcite mineralization along fractured surfaces locally form sub-horizontal slickenside fabrics which are covered by a layer of euhedral calcite crystals, suggesting that fracture dilation (and fluid flow) occurred after fracture slip to allow the growth of calcite crystals. Due to the proximity of the carbonate units to the crystalline basement, we expect the calcitic veins to be enriched in rare earth elements and are presently conducting geochemical analyses. The calcite veins and surfaces vary from 2.5 cm to 1 mm thicknesses, often with larger calcite crystals in the center of the vein and smaller crystals at the vein boundaries, likely representing nucleation on small

  3. Molecular ordering of ethanol at the calcite surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasarín, I. S.; Yang, M.; Bovet, Nicolas Emile

    2012-01-01

    -743 ] and molecular dynamics (MD) modeling [ Yang, M., Stipp, S. L. S., and Harding, J. H.Cryst. Growth Des. 2008, 8 (11), 4066-4074 ], have suggested that OH functional groups control polysaccharide attachment. The purpose of this work was to characterize, using X-ray reflectivity (XR) combined with molecular...... dynamics (MD) simulations, the structuring on calcite of a layer of the simplest carbon chain molecule that contains an OH group, ethanol (CH 3-CH2-OH). We found evidence that EtOH forms a highly ordered structure at the calcite surface, where the first layer molecules bond with calcite. The ethanol...

  4. Microbial Activity and Precipitation at Solution-Solution Mixing Zones in Porous Media -- Subsurface Biogeochemical Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colwell, Frederick [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Wildenschild, Dorthe [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Wood, Brian [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States); Gerlach, Robin [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Mitchell, Andrew [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States); Redden, George [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-08-29

    The goal for this research was to understand how best to add compounds to receptive microbial communities in porous media in order to achieve optimal calcite precipitation in a volumetrically significant space and to understand the physiological health of the cells that are responsible for the calcite precipitation. The specific objectives were to: (1) develop better tools for visually examining biofilms in porous media and calcium carbonate precipitation being mediated by microbes in porous media, and (2) demonstrate the effectiveness of using that tool within a flow cell model system.

  5. Grain coarsening of calcite: Fundamental mechanisms and biogenic inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Logan Nicholas

    In a saturated solution, submicrometer calcite (CaCO3) crystals recrystallize and coarsen to minimize surface area. The thermodynamic driving force is described by the Gibbs-Thomson equation, but the rates and mechanism are poorly understood. Calcite grain coarsening has many implications...... in industry and nature, but the specific focus of this research project was to understand how small, biogenic calcite particles in chalk have resisted grain coarsening for over 60 million years in saturated reservoir fluids. A new method was developed to produce pure calcite powder that has submicrometer...... coarsening – small grains coarsen by aggregation at high temperatures, followed by Ostwald ripening. Alginate, a model for the acidic polysaccharides produced by coccolithiphores, inhibited coarsening at a steady rate. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm preserved particles for at least 60 days before...

  6. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by polycarboxylic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, M.M.; Hoch, A.R.

    2001-01-01

    Calcite crystal growth rates measured in the presence of several polycarboxyclic acids show that tetrahydrofurantetracarboxylic acid (THFTCA) and cyclopentanetetracarboxylic acid (CPTCA) are effective growth rate inhibitors at low solution concentrations (0.01 to 1 mg/L). In contrast, linear polycarbocylic acids (citric acid and tricarballylic acid) had no inhibiting effect on calcite growth rates at concentrations up to 10 mg/L. Calcite crystal growth rate inhibition by cyclic polycarboxyclic acids appears to involve blockage of crystal growth sites on the mineral surface by several carboxylate groups. Growth morphology varied for growth in the absence and in the presence of both THFTCA and CPTCA. More effective growth rate reduction by CPTCA relative to THFTCA suggests that inhibitor carboxylate stereochemical orientation controls calcite surface interaction with carboxylate inhibitors. ?? 20O1 Academic Press.

  7. An AFM study of calcite dissolution in concentrated electrolyte solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz Agudo, E.; Putnis, C. V.; Putnis, A.; Rodriguez-Navarro, C.

    2009-04-01

    Calcite-solution interactions are of a paramount importance in a range of processes such as the removal of heavy metals, carbon dioxide sequestration, landscape modeling, weathering of building stone and biomineralization. Water in contact with minerals often carries significant amounts of solutes; additionally, their concentration may vary due to evaporation and condensation. It is well known that calcite dissolution is affected dramatically by the presence of such solutes. Here we present investigations on the dissolution of calcite in the presence of different electrolytes. Both bulk (batch reactors) experiments and nanoscale (in situ AFM) techniques are used to study the dissolution of calcite in a range of solutions containing alkaly cations balanced by halide anions. Previous works have indicated that the ionic strength has little influence in calcite dissolution rates measured from bulk experiments (Pokrovsky et al. 2005; Glendhill and Morse, 2004). Contrary to these results, our quantitative analyses of AFM observations show an enhancement of the calcite dissolution rate with increasing electrolyte concentration. Such an effect is concentration-dependent and it is most evident in concentrated solutions. AFM experiments have been carried out in a fluid cell using calcite cleavage surfaces in contact with solutions of simple salts of the alkaly metals and halides at different undersaturations with respect to calcite to try to specify the effect of the ionic strength on etch pit spreading rate and calcite dissolution rate. These results show that the presence of soluble salts may critically affect the weathering of carbonate rocks in nature as well as the decay of carbonate stone in built cultural heritage. References: Pokrosky, O.S.; Golubev, S.V.; Schott, J. Dissolution kinetics of calcite, dolomite and magnesite at 25°C and 0 to 50 atm pCO2. Chemical Geology, 2005, 217 (3-4) 239-255. Glendhill, D.K.; Morse, J.W. Dissolution kinetics of calcite in Na

  8. Thermoluminescence glow curve of {gamma}-irradiated calcite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, S.D.; Ingotombi, S. [Manipur Univ. (India). Dept. of Physics

    1995-07-14

    The trapping parameters, namely the activation energy E, frequency factor s and b order of kinetics of the thermoluminescence (TL) peaks of calcites (brown and colourless varieties) irradiated with 4.08 kGy of {gamma}-rays, are determined using the least-squares curve-fitting technique. The electron lifetime {tau} of the peaks of calcite are calculated in order to estimate the upper limit of their utility in TL dating. (author).

  9. Selective Flotation of Calcite from Fluorite: A Novel Reagent Schedule

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiyong Gao

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Fluorite is an important strategic mineral. In general, fluorite ores will contain a certain amount of calcite gangue mineral. Thus, they need to be separated from each other. For an economic separation, a reverse flotation process is used to float calcite gangue from fluorite. However, little information on the separation is available. In this study, a novel reagent schedule using citric acid (CA as the depressant, sodium fluoride (NaF as the regulator and sulfoleic acid (SOA as the collector, was developed to separate calcite from fluorite. The results demonstrated a high selectivity for the flotation of calcite from fluorite using this new reagent schedule. The best selective separation for a single mineral and mixed binary minerals was obtained when 200 mg/L of NaF, 50 mg/L of CA, and 6 mg/L of SOA were used at pH 9. In addition, a batch flotation experiment was carried out using a run-of-mine feed material. Selective separation was achieved with 85.18% calcite removal while only 11.2% of fluorite was lost. An attempt was made to understand the effect of the new reagent schedule on the flotation of calcite. The results from both microflotation and bench scale flotation demonstrated a great potential for industrial application using this novel reagent schedule to upgrade fluorite ore.

  10. Defluoridation of drinking water by boiling with brushite and calcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, M J; Pearce, E I F

    2002-01-01

    Existing methods for defluoridating drinking water involve expensive high technology or are slow, inefficient and/or unhygienic. A new method is now suggested, encompassing brushite and calcite suspension followed by boiling. Our aim was to examine the efficiency of the method and the chemical reactions involved. Brushite, 0.3-0.5 g, and an equal weight of calcite were suspended in 1 litre water containing 5-20 ppm fluoride. The suspensions were boiled in an electric kettle, left to cool and the calcium salts to sediment. Solution ion concentrations were determined and sediments were examined by X-ray diffraction. In distilled water initially containing 5, 10 and 20 ppm fluoride the concentration was reduced to 0.06, 0.4 and 5.9 ppm, respectively. Using Aarhus tap water which contained 2.6 mmol/l calcium the final concentrations were 1.2, 2.5 and 7.7 ppm, respectively, and runs without calcite gave results similar to those with calcite. Without boiling the fluoride concentration remained unaltered, as did the brushite and calcite salts, despite occasional agitation by hand. All solutions were supersaturated with respect to fluorapatite and hydroxyapatite and close to saturation with respect to brushite. Boiling produced well-crystallised apatite and traces of calcite, while boiling of brushite alone left a poorly crystallised apatite. We conclude that boiling a brushite/calcite suspension rapidly converts the two salts to apatite which incorporates fluoride if present in solution, and that this process may be exploited to defluoridate drinking water.

  11. Role of Fungi in the Biomineralization of Calcite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saskia Bindschedler

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In the field of microbial biomineralization, much of the scientific attention is focused on processes carried out by prokaryotes, in particular bacteria, even though fungi are also known to be involved in biogeochemical cycles in numerous ways. They are traditionally recognized as key players in organic matter recycling, as nutrient suppliers via mineral weathering, as well as large producers of organic acids such as oxalic acid for instance, an activity leading to the genesis of various metal complexes such as metal-oxalate. Their implications in the transformation of various mineral and metallic compounds has been widely acknowledged during the last decade, however, currently, their contribution to the genesis of a common biomineral, calcite, needs to be more thoroughly documented. Calcite is observed in many ecosystems and plays an essential role in the biogeochemical cycles of both carbon (C and calcium (Ca. It may be physicochemical or biogenic in origin and numerous organisms have been recognized to control or induce its biomineralization. While fungi have often been suspected of being involved in this process in terrestrial environments, only scarce information supports this hypothesis in natural settings. As a result, calcite biomineralization by microbes is still largely attributed to bacteria at present. However, in some terrestrial environments there are particular calcitic habits that have been described as being fungal in origin. In addition to this, several studies dealing with axenic cultures of fungi have demonstrated the ability of fungi to produce calcite. Examples of fungal biomineralization range from induced to organomineralization processes. More examples of calcite biomineralization related to direct fungal activity, or at least to their presence, have been described within the last decade. However, the peculiar mechanisms leading to calcite biomineralization by fungi remain incompletely understood and more research is

  12. Geochemical evidence for repetitive intracrystal recrystallization during the mineralogical stabilization of some biogenic Mg calcites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budd, D.A. (Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    Mineralogical stabilization of porcellaneous foraminifera is unique relative to other types of bioclasts in that these foraminifera is unique relative to other types of bioclasts in that these foraminifera can undergo stabilization to low-Mg calcite without any textural change. Holocene porcellaneous foraminifer from the freshwater diagenetic zone of the Schooner Cays, Bahamas, are in the midst of this alteration and thus provide a rare insight into the stabilization process. These bioclasts exhibit Mg loss and oxygen isotopic changes with no textural alteration at any scale. The mineralogical stabilization, or recrystallization, is a repetitive intracrystal process. Each recrystallization produces a calcite with a slightly lower Mg content than its predecessor. The stabilization rate is dependent on time and hydrologic flux; older phreatic-zone material is the most altered and younger vadose-zone material is the least altered. Numerical modeling of the chemical diagenesis suggests that the molar water:rock ratio of a single recrystallization is about 1:100 and that the resultant precipitate is not in equilibrium with the ambient pore waters. Repetitive recrystallizations, however, eventually yield a mineralogically stable low-Mg calcite that can be in equilibrium with the bulk pore waters. Complete mineralogical stabilization to LMC should occur at cumulative molar water:rock ratios of about 16 and requires hundreds to thousands of recrystallizations, each reducing Mg content by less than 0.01 mole %. The large number of recrystallizations with incrementally small chemical changes per recrystallization makes alteration of these foraminifera significantly different from single-step recrystallization of other types of bioclasts.

  13. Additivity dominance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Rozin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Judgments of naturalness of foods tend to be more influenced by the process history of a food, rather than its actual constituents. Two types of processing of a ``natural'' food are to add something or to remove something. We report in this study, based on a large random sample of individuals from six countries (France, Germany, Italy, Switzerland, UK and USA that additives are considered defining features of what makes a food not natural, whereas ``subtractives'' are almost never mentioned. In support of this, skim milk (with major subtraction of fat is rated as more natural than whole milk with a small amount of natural vitamin D added. It is also noted that ``additives'' is a common word, with a synonym reported by a native speaker in 17 of 18 languages, whereas ``subtractive'' is lexicalized in only 1 of the 18 languages. We consider reasons for additivity dominance, relating it to omission bias, feature positive bias, and notions of purity.

  14. Constraints on the vital effect in coccolithophore and dinoflagellate calcite by oxygen isotopic modification of seawater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermoso, Michaël; Horner, Tristan J.; Minoletti, Fabrice; Rickaby, Rosalind E. M.

    2014-09-01

    In this study, we show that there are independent controls of 18O/16O and 13C/12C fractionation in coccolithophore and dinoflagellate calcite due to the contrasting kinetics of each isotope system. We demonstrate that the direction and magnitude of the oxygen isotope fractionation with respect to equilibrium is related to the balance between calcification rate and the replenishment of the internal pool of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC). As such, in fast growing cells, such as those of Emiliania huxleyi and Gephyrocapsa oceanica (forming the so-called “heavy group”), calcification of the internal carbon pool occurs faster than complete isotopic re-adjustment of the internal DIC pool with H2O molecules. Hence, coccoliths reflect the heavy oxygen isotope signature of the CO2 overprinting the whole DIC pool. Conversely, in large and slow growing cells, such as Coccolithus pelagicus ssp. braarudii, complete re-equilibration is achieved due to limited influx of CO2 leading to coccoliths that are precipitated in conditions close to isotopic equilibrium (“equilibrium group”). Species exhibiting the most negative oxygen isotope composition, such as Calcidiscus leptoporus (“light group”), precipitate coccolith under increased pH in the coccolith vesicle, as previously documented by the “carbonate ion effect”. We suggest that, for the carbon isotope system, any observed deviation from isotopic equilibrium is only “apparent”, as the carbon isotopic composition in coccolith calcite is controlled by a Rayleigh fractionation originating from preferential incorporation of 12C into organic matter. Therefore, species with low PIC/POC ratios as E. huxleyi and G. oceanica are shifted towards positive carbon isotope values as a result of predominant carbon fixation into the organic matter. By contrast, cells with higher PIC/POC as C. braarudii and C. leptoporus maintain, to some extent, the original negative isotopic composition of the CO2. The calcareous

  15. A Raman spectroscopic comparison of calcite and dolomite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Junmin; Wu, Zeguang; Cheng, Hongfei; Zhang, Zhanjun; Frost, Ray L

    2014-01-03

    Raman spectroscopy was used to characterize and differentiate the two minerals calcite and dolomite and the bands related to the mineral structure. The (CO3)(2-) group is characterized by four prominent Raman vibrational modes: (a) the symmetric stretching, (b) the asymmetric deformation, (c) asymmetric stretching and (d) symmetric deformation. These vibrational modes of the calcite and dolomite were observed at 1440, 1088, 715 and 278 cm(-1). The significant differences between the minerals calcite and dolomite are observed by Raman spectroscopy. Calcite shows the typical bands observed at 1361, 1047, 715 and 157 cm(-1), and the special bands at 1393, 1098, 1069, 1019, 299, 258 and 176 cm(-1) for dolomite are observed. The difference is explained on the basis of the structure variation of the two minerals. Calcite has a trigonal structure with two molecules per unit cell, and dolomite has a hexagonal structure. This is more likely to cause the splitting and distorting of the carbonate groups. Another cause for the difference is the cation substituting for Mg in the dolomite mineral.

  16. Thermal behavior of calcite as an expansive agent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahraki B.K.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, thermal behavior of calcite as raw material of CaO-based expansive agent was investigated. The products were characterized by using differential thermal analysis (DTA, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD. DTA curves show that calcite has endothermic peak and impurity affects the onset of reactions. The more the impurity increases, the more energy changes increase. At 800-900°C, calcite was decomposed into solid calcium oxide (CaO and gaseous CO2. Lime (CaO used as the base of expandable material is the ultimate product of heated calcite. The calcium oxide phase, in reaction to water forms portlandite, at an onset temperature of about 900°C was also characterized by the appearance of the FT-IR mode at 867,3424 and 3644 cm-1. XRD results show that quartz impurity in calcite samples at 900°C forms larnite phase (Ca2SiO4. The expansions are mainly generated from the hydrations of CaO in the CaO-type expansive agent.

  17. Impacts of pH and [CO32-] on the incorporation of Zn in foraminiferal calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dijk, Inge; de Nooijer, Lennart Jan; Wolthers, Mariëtte; Reichart, Gert-Jan

    2017-01-01

    The trace elemental composition of foraminiferal shell calcite is known to reflect the environment in which the shell was precipitated. Whereas conservative elements incorporated in foraminiferal shell carbonate reflect factors such as temperature (Mg), carbonate chemistry (B) and salinity (Na), the nutrient type elements (Ba, Cd, and possibly Zn) are useful tools to reconstruct biogeochemical cycling and past ocean circulation. Still also nutrient-type elements will be most likely influenced by factors other than their relative concentrations. Culturing benthic foraminifera under controlled carbonate chemistry conditions allows for disentanglement of impacts of different parameters of the carbon system on the elemental composition of foraminiferal calcite. Here we show that zinc incorporation in cultured specimens of the benthic foraminifer Ammonia tepida is correlated to changes in carbonate ion concentration ([CO32-]). By modeling activities of different chemical species of Zn in seawater over a range of [CO32-], we suggest that Zn2+ , rather than other relatively abundant Zn-species (e.g. ZnCO30 and ZnHCO3+) is taken up during biomineralization. Our results suggest that foraminiferal Zn/Ca might be especially useful when combined with other [CO32-] proxies, enabling reconstruction of past seawater element concentrations. Conversely, when the nutrient-type element concentrations are known, incorporation of Zn in foraminiferal shells can be used to reconstruct past sea water carbon speciation.

  18. Monoclinic deformation of calcite crystals at ambient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Przeniosło, R.; Fabrykiewicz, P.; Sosnowska, I.

    2016-09-01

    High resolution synchrotron radiation powder diffraction shows that the average crystal structure of calcite at ambient conditions is described with the trigonal space group R 3 bar c but there is a systematic hkl-dependent Bragg peak broadening. A modelling of this anisotropic peak broadening with the microstrain model from Stephens (1999) [15] is presented. The observed lattice parameters' correlations can be described by assuming a monoclinic-type deformation of calcite crystallites. A quantitative model of this monoclinic deformation observed at ambient conditions is described with the space group C 2 / c . The monoclinic unit cell suggested at ambient conditions is related with the monoclinic unit cell reported in calcite at high pressure (Merrill and Bassett (1975) [10]).

  19. Nucleation and Epitaxy-Mediated Phase Transformation of a Precursor Cadmium Carbonate Phase at the Calcite/Water Interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riechers, Shawn L.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.

    2017-02-24

    Mineral nucleation can be catalyzed by the presence of mineral substrates; however, the mechanisms of heterogeneous nucleation remain poorly understood. A combination of in situ time-sequenced measurements and nano-manipulation experiments were performed using atomic force microscopy (AFM) to probe the mechanisms of heteroepitaxial nucleation of otavite (CdCO3) on calcite (CaCO3) single crystals that exposed the (10-14) surface. Otavite and calcite are isostructural carbonates that display a 4% lattice mismatch, based on their (10-14) surface areas. AFM observations revealed a two-stage process in the nucleation of cadmium carbonate surface precipitates. As evidenced by changes in height, shape, growth behavior, and friction signal of the precipitates, a precursor phase was observed to initially form on the surface and subsequently undergo an epitaxy-mediated phase transformation to otavite, which then grew epitaxially. Nano-manipulation experiments, in which the applied force was increased progressively until precipitates were removed from the surface, showed that adhesion of the precursor phase to the substrate was distinctively weaker than that of the epitaxial phase, consistent with that of an amorphous phase. These findings demonstrate for the first time that heterogeneous mineral nucleation can follow a non-classical pathway like that found in homogenous aqueous conditions.

  20. Fingerprinting the temperature and fluid source of fracture-filling calcite in geothermal systems using clumped isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, John M.; Davies, Amelia; Faithfull, John; Holdsworth, Chris; Newton, Michael; Williamson, Sam; John, Cedric

    2017-04-01

    Geothermal energy production relies on maintaining open fractures within the rock through which fluids can flow, but precipitation of minerals in fractures can modify and reduce fluid flow. Most geothermal fluids are rich in dissolved material, and readily precipitate minerals such as calcite within fracture systems. Such mineral deposition can be a key limiting factor in viable geothermal energy production. We need to better understand the relationship between fluid temperatures, mineral precipitation, and fracture filling in such systems. Clumped isotopes offer a new way of characterising the temperature and fluid source of fracture-filling calcite. This technique is based on the thermodynamic relationship between carbonate mineral growth temperature and the abundance of chemical bonding ("clumping") between 13C and 18O isotopes (expressed as Δ47) within single carbonate ions (e.g. Eiler, 2007). In the gas phase, isotopic exchange between CO2 molecules and water is continuous and so CO2 gas will record the ambient fluid temperature. When the CO2 is trapped in a solid mineral phase, the isotope ratio is fixed. As a result, clumped isotopes will record the temperature of crystallisation, enabling the application of clumped isotope palaeothermometry to a range of geological problems. Samples from active geothermal fields (the Kawerau geothermal field, New Zealand (McNamara et al., 2017)) and analogues to basaltic geothermal systems in Western Scotland have been analysed with clumped isotopes. We present petrography, δ13C and δ18O, and clumped isotope data from these samples to show how clumped isotopes can fingerprint the temperature and fluid source of fracture-filling calcite in geothermal systems. Having this understanding of fracture filling conditions can lead to focused development of remediation measures. References Eiler, J. M., 2007. EPSL 262(3-4), 309-327. McNamara, D. D., Lister, A., Prior, D. J., 2016. JVGR 323, 38-52.

  1. Small scale shear zone in calcite: AMS and microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxerová, Zuzana; Machek, Matěj; Kusbach, Vladimír; Racek, Martin; Silva, Pedro F.

    2016-04-01

    Two structural profiles across thin shear zone in calcite from quarry in Estremoz (Portugal) were studied to find a relationship between AMS and strain in natural rocks. The mesoscopic fabric is characterized by the change from the subhorizontal coarse-grained foliation towards the ~2cm-wide shear zone center with subvertical fine-grained foliation. In microstructure, the shear zone records dynamic recrystallization of calcite aggregate which resulted in development of porphyroclastic microstructure with increasing proportion of fine-grained recrystallized matrix towards the shear zone center. Two distinct crystallographic preferred orientations of calcite were recorded. One related with porphyroclasts, characterized by subvertical orientation of calcite axes and another associated with recrystallized matrix showing subhorizontal calcite axes orientation. The magnetic susceptibility ranges from -8e-6SI to 9e-6SI, with the average -4e-6SI. The majority of the rock mass is diamagnetic, corresponding well with the thermomagnetic curves, with local paramagnetic accumulations in form of thin bands. The AMS of the both profiles exhibits stable subvertical foliation bearing vertical lineation which is locally alternated by the medium-angle foliation. We interpret the AMS fabric pattern which is perpendicular to the mineral one as a type of inverse AMS fabric, due to high iron content in major part of calcite grains The magnetic and microstructural description of the shear zone is accompanied by numerical modeling of AMS based on CPO and different proportion of porphyroclasts, matrix and mica for purposes of deciphering the influence of present microstructural features on AMS.

  2. Strontium and Magnesium in Water and in Crassostrea Calcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerman, A

    1965-11-05

    Distribution of magnesium and strontium was determined between waters and calcites secreted by the oyster species Crassostrea virginica and C. rhizophorae in natural habitats at eight localities, from Maine to Puerto Rico. The concentration of strontium in the calcite shells increases with increasing temperature in the range 13 degrees to 25 degrees C, and also with increasing Sr(++)/Ca(++) molal ratio in the water. The concentration of magnesium in the shells increases irregularly with temperature, and it is apparently independent of the Mg(++)/Ca(++) ratio in the water. The greater variation with temperature in the distribution factor for magnesium may be related to genetic differences between semi-isolated populations.

  3. Isotopic and elemental proxies in mollusc and brachiopod calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullmann, Clemens Vinzenz

    This thesis summarizes the findings of studies conducted at the University of Copenhagen from September 2010 to September 2013, aiming at a better understanding of the geochemical signatures in marine, biogenic calcite. Throughout the history of the Earth, the climatic conditions and the chemical...... for a meaningful interpretation of isotopic and elemental ratios in shell materials. Without this knowledge the correct interpretation of the shell composition in terms of past environments is impossible. Calcite shells of brachiopods, bivalves and belemnites were analyzed here for shell ultra...

  4. Diagenetic alteration in low-Mg calcite from macrofossils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ullmann, Clemens Vinzenz; Korte, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    microscopy) and chemical (trace element abundances, isotopic ratios) screening techniques used to assess the alteration degree of low-Mg calcite macrofossils and summarize the findings on diagenetic trends observed for elemental and isotopic systems in such materials. For a robust evaluation...... of the preservation state of biogenic calcite, it is advisable to combine a set of complementary techniques. Absolute limiting values of element and isotope ratios for discarding diagenetically altered materials cannot be universally applied, but should rather be evaluated on a case to case basis. The evaluation can...

  5. Reconstructing Cambro-Ordovician Seawater Composition using Clumped Isotope Paleothermometry on Calcitic and Phosphatic Brachiopods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, K.; Robles, M.; Finnegan, S.; Hughes, N. C.; Eiler, J. M.; Fischer, W. W.

    2012-12-01

    they faithfully record seawater temperatures following a calibration similar to the canonical calcite clumped isotope thermometer. Samples from Japan yield a temperature of 23±1.5°C (1 SD) and δ18O water composition of 0.2±0.5‰ VSMOW (calculated assuming CO3 groups have fractionations with respect to water equal to that of calcite). Nine samples of calcitic brachiopods from the 455 Ma Ordovician Decorah Formation yield a mean temperature of 36±3°C and a δ18Owater composition of -0.7±1‰ VSMOW, excluding three brachiopods with temperatures in the low 40s. Four measurements of well-preserved phosphatic brachiopods from the 500 Ma Eau Claire Formation yield a mean temperature of 34±3°C and a δ18Owater composition of -3.3±1‰ VSMOW. The δ18O measurements of PO4 groups from the brachiopods suggest similar water compositions based on equilibrium precipitation at 34°C (Pucéat et al., 2010). These results constrain the climate and potential variation in δ18O of seawater during the early Paleozoic, suggesting that shallow tropical marine environments were somewhat warmer than today, but less so than some predicted (e.g. Trotter et al., 2008). Future measurements of phosphatic brachiopods from the Decorah Formation and modern phosphatic and calcitic brachiopods from a range of environments will provide a direct comparison of the calcitic and phosphatic record.

  6. An explanation for the 18O excess in Noelaerhabdaceae coccolith calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermoso, M.; Minoletti, F.; Aloisi, G.; Bonifacie, M.; McClelland, H. L. O.; Labourdette, N.; Renforth, P.; Chaduteau, C.; Rickaby, R. E. M.

    2016-09-01

    Coccoliths have dominated the sedimentary archive in the pelagic environment since the Jurassic. The biominerals produced by the coccolithophores are ideally placed to infer sea surface temperatures from their oxygen isotopic composition, as calcification in this photosynthetic algal group only occurs in the sunlit surface waters. In the present study, we dissect the isotopic mechanisms contributing to the "vital effect", which overprints the oceanic temperatures recorded in coccolith calcite. Applying the passive diffusion model of carbon acquisition by the marine phytoplankton widely used in biogeochemical and palaeoceanographic studies, our results suggest that the oxygen isotope offsets from inorganic calcite in fast dividing species Emiliania huxleyi and Gephyrocapsa oceanica originates from the legacy of assimilated 18O-rich CO2 that induces transient isotopic disequilibrium to the internal dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) pool. The extent to which this intracellular isotopic disequilibrium is recorded in coccolith calcite (1.5 to +3‰ over a 10 to 25 °C temperature range) is set by the degree of isotopic re-equilibration between CO2 and water molecules before intracellular mineralisation. We show that the extent of re-equilibration is, in turn, set by temperature through both physiological (dynamics of the utilisation of the DIC pool) and thermodynamic (completeness of the re-equilibration of the relative 18O-rich CO2 influx) processes. At the highest temperature, less ambient aqueous CO2 is present for algal growth, and the consequence of carbon limitation is exacerbation of the oxygen isotope vital effect, obliterating the temperature signal. This culture dataset further demonstrates that the vital effect is variable for a given species/morphotype, and depends on the intricate relationship between the environment and the physiology of biomineralising algae.

  7. Climate proxies from Sr/Ca of coccolith calcite: calibrations from continuous culture of Emiliania huxleyi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Heather M.; Rosenthal, Yair; Falkowski, Paul

    2002-03-01

    Continuous culture of the coccolithophorid Emiliania huxleyi reveals that coccolith Sr/Ca ratios depend on temperature and growth rate. At a constant temperature of 18°C, coccolith Sr/Ca ratios increased nearly 15% as growth rate increased from 0.1 to 1.5 divisions per day and calcification rate increased from 1.5 to 50 pg calcite per cell per day. When temperature increased from 7 to 26°C, Sr/Ca ratios increased by more than 25% (i.e., 1%/1°C), although the range in growth and calcification rates was the same as for experiments at constant temperature. The temperature dependence of Sr/Ca ratios in coccoliths is consistent with that observed in planktonic foraminifera and abiogenic calcites, suggesting that it is controlled by thermodynamic processes. However, the positive correlation of coccolith Sr/Ca with temperature contrasts with field studies in the equatorial Pacific, where Sr/Ca ratios are highest at the locus of maximum upwelling and productivity despite depressed temperatures. This paradox may reflect different calcification rate effects between E. huxleyi and the other species dominating assemblages in the equatorial Pacific sediments, which may be resolved by new techniques for separation of monospecific coccolith samples from sediments. Models of crystal growth indicate that kinetic effects on Sr partitioning in calcite due to surface enrichment could explain the Sr/Ca variations observed in constant temperature experiments but not the larger amplitude calcification rate effects observed in equatorial Pacific sediments. Despite the dual influence of temperature and growth rate on coccolith Sr/Ca, coccolith Sr/Ca correlates with "b," the slope of the dependence of carbon isotope fractionation in biomarkers (ɛ p) on CO 2(aq) at a range of growth rates and temperatures. Consequently, using coccolith Sr/Ca in combination with alkenone ɛ p may improve paleo-CO 2 determinations.

  8. Trends in Precipitation Extremes over Southeast Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endo, N.; Matsumoto, J.

    2010-12-01

    Trends in precipitation extremes were examined using daily precipitation data from Southeast Asian countries during 1950's to 2000's. Number of wet day, defined by a day with daily precipitation exceeding 1 mm, tends to decrease over these countries, while average precipitation intensity of wet day shows an increasing trend. Heavy precipitation indices, which are defined by precipitation amount and percentile, demonstrate that the number of stations with significant upward trend is larger than that with significant downward trend. Heavy precipitation increases in southern Vietnam, northern part of Myanmar, and the Visayas and Luzon Islands in the Philippines, while heavy precipitation decreases in northern Vietnam. Annual maximum number of consecutive dry days decreases in the region where winter monsoon precipitation dominates. Prolongation of the dry season is suggested in Myanmar.

  9. Iron oxide and calcite associated with Leptothrix sp. biofilms within an estavelle in the upper Floridan aquifer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florea Lee J.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In Thornton’s Cave, an estavelle in west-central Florida, SEM, EDS, and XRD data reveal biofilms that are predominantly comprisedof FeOOH-encrusted hollow sheaths that are overgrown and intercalated with calcite. Fragments of this crystalline biofilm adhereto the walls and ceiling as water levels vary within the cave. Those on the wall have a ‘cornflake’ appearance and those affixed tothe ceiling hang as fibrous membranes. PCR of DNA in the active biofilm, combined with morphologic data from the tubes in SEMmicrographs, point to Leptothrix sp., a common Fe-oxidizing bacteria, as the primary organism in the biofilm. Recent discoveries of‘rusticles’ in other Florida caves suggest that Fe-oxidizing bacteria may reside elsewhere in Florida groundwater and may play a rolein the mobility of trace metals in the Upper Florida aquifer. SEM micrographs from two marble tablets submerged for five months, oneexposed to microbial activity and a second isolated from microbial action, revealed no visible etchings or borings and very limited lossof mass. EDS data from the electron micrographs of the unfiltered tablet document the same FeOOH-encrusted hollow sheaths andsimilar deposits of calcite as seen in the ‘cornflakes’. These results, combined with water chemistry data imply that the biofilm mayfocus or even promote calcite precipitation during low-water level conditions when CO2 degasses from the cave pools.

  10. Trace Metals in Groundwater & Vadose Zone Calcite: In Situ Containment & Stabilization of Stronthium-90 & Other Divalent Metals & Radionuclides at Arid West DOE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert W

    2003-06-01

    Radionuclide and metal contaminants such as strontium-90 are present beneath U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) lands in both the groundwater (e.g., 100-N area at Hanford, WA) and vadose zone (e.g., Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory). In situ containment and stabilization of these contaminants is a cost-effective treatment strategy. However, implementing in situ containment and stabilization approaches requires definition of the mechanisms that control contaminant sequestration. We are investigating the in situ immobilization of radionuclides or contaminant metals (e.g., strontium-90) by their facilitated co-precipitation with calcium carbonate in groundwater and vadose zone systems. Our facilitated approach, shown schematically in Figure 1, relies upon the hydrolysis of introduced urea to cause the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing pH and alkalinity. Subsurface urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which may be either introduced with the urea or produced in situ by ubiquitous subsurface urea hydrolyzing microorganisms. Because the precipitation process tends to be irreversible and many western aquifers are saturated with respect to calcite, the co-precipitated metals and radionuclides will be effectively removed from the aqueous phase over the long-term. Another advantage of the ureolysis approach is that the ammonium ions produced by the reaction can exchange with radionuclides sorbed to subsurface minerals, thereby enhancing the availability of the radionuclides for recapture in a more stable solid phase (co-precipitation rather than adsorption). Our specific research objectives include: * Elucidation of the mechanisms and rates for the release of sorbed trace metals and their subsequent sequestration by co-precipitation in calcite induced by urea hydrolysis. * Evaluation at the field scale of the influence of

  11. Sulphate reduction and calcite precipitation in relation to internal eutrophication of groundwater fed alkaline fens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cirkel, D.G.; Beek, van C.G.E.M.; Witte, J.P.M.; Zee, van der S.E.A.T.M.

    2014-01-01

    Although in Europe atmospheric deposition of sulphur has decreased considerably over the last decades, groundwater pollution by sulphate may still continue due to pyrite oxidation in the soil as a result of excessive fertilisation. Inflowing groundwater rich in sulphate can change biogeochemical cyc

  12. A study of oxygen isotopic fractionation during bio-induced calcite precipitation in eutrophic Baldeggersee, Switzerland

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teranes, J.L.; McKenzie, J.A.; Bernasconi, S.M.; Lotter, A.F.; Sturm, M.

    1999-01-01

    Abstract—In order to better understand environmental factors controlling oxygen isotope shifts in autochthonous lacustrine carbonate sequences, we undertook an extensive one-year study (March, 1995 to February, 1996) of water-column chemistry and daily sediment trap material from a small lake in Cen

  13. Treatment Of Metal-Mine Effluents By Limestone Neutralization And Calcite Co-Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Geological Survey - Leetown Science Center and the Colorado School of Mines have developed a remediation process for the treatment of metals in circumneutral mining influenced waters. The process involves treatment with a pulsed limestone bed (PLB) system, followed by c...

  14. Treatment Of Metal-Mine Effluents By Limestone Neutralization And Calcite Co-Precipitation (Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The U.S. Geological Survey - Leetown Science Center and the Colorado School of Mines have developed a remediation process for the treatment of metals in circumneutral mining influenced waters. The process involves treatment with a pulsed limestone bed (PLB) system, followed by c...

  15. Mn content of reservoir calcite cement: A novel inorganic geotracer of secondary petroleum migration in the tectonically complex Junggar Basin (NW China)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CAO; Jian; HU; WenXuan; YAO; SuPing; ZHANG; YiJie; WANG; XuLong; ZHANG; YueQian; TANG; Yong; SHI; XinPu

    2007-01-01

    Electronic probe microanalysis (EPMA) results of reservoir calcite cement from fourteen core samples in the Junggar Basin show that Mn-content varies largely between different samples from below the detect limitation to 4.14%, while it displays a generally good correlation with oil-gas shows. This, therefore, likely indicates that concentration of the Mn-content of the calcite cement has a close relation to the intensity of petroleum fluid charging during hydrocarbon secondary migration. In order to assess this hypothesis, oxygen and strontium isotopic measurements on sixteen calcite veins host in source sequences were carried out to investigate the feature of the oil-source petroleum fluid. Analytical results imply that during hydrocarbon generation and migration, deep hot fluid has dissolved volcanic minerals interlined between mudstone source rocks. As Mn is a kind of typical trace element enriched in volcanic rocks, it is reasonable to conclude that the petroleum fluid formed in the source sequences would be Mn-rich. Consequently, calcite cements precipitated from such Mn-rich petroleum fluid would be Mn-rich accordingly. Due to the geologic chromatographic effect during migration along reservoir rocks, the decreasing of the Mn-content of the reservoir calcite cements indicates the migration direction. Then, this novel geotracer was further successfully applied in the study of hydrocarbon migration in the Junggar Basin in combination with organic geochemical analyses during the hydrocarbon migration. The Mn content of the reservoir calcite cement appears promising as a novel inorganic geotracer for the petroleum migration. This paper represents a search for novel indicators of secondary petroleum migration in tectonically complex basins based on fundamentals of the reservoir fluid-rock interactions.

  16. Adsorption of polar aromatic hydrocarbons on synthetic calcite

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lene; Grahl-Madsen, Laila; Grøn, Christian

    1996-01-01

    The wettability of hydrocarbon reservoirs depends on how and to what extent the organic compounds are adsorbed onto the surfaces of calcite, quartz and clay. A model system of synthetic call cite, cyclohexane and the three probe molecules: benzoic acid, benzyl alcohol and benzylamine, have been...

  17. Oxygen isotope fractionation between bird eggshell calcite and body water: application to fossil eggs from Lanzarote (Canary Islands).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzerini, Nicolas; Lécuyer, Christophe; Amiot, Romain; Angst, Delphine; Buffetaut, Eric; Fourel, François; Daux, Valérie; Betancort, Juan Francisco; Flandrois, Jean-Pierre; Marco, Antonio Sánchez; Lomoschitz, Alejandro

    2016-10-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotope compositions of fossil bird eggshell calcite (δ(18)Ocalc and δ(13)Ccalc) are regularly used to reconstruct paleoenvironmental conditions. However, the interpretation of δ(18)Ocalc values of fossil eggshells has been limited to qualitative variations in local climatic conditions as oxygen isotope fractionations between calcite, body fluids, and drinking water have not been determined yet. For this purpose, eggshell, albumen water, and drinking water of extant birds have been analyzed for their oxygen and carbon isotope compositions. Relative enrichments in (18)O relative to (16)O between body fluids and drinking water of +1.6 ± 0.9 ‰ for semi-aquatic birds and of +4.4 ± 1.9 ‰ for terrestrial birds are observed. Surprisingly, no significant dependence to body temperature on the oxygen isotope fractionation between eggshell calcite and body fluids is observed, suggesting that bird eggshells precipitate out of equilibrium. Two empirical equations relating the δ(18)Ocalc value of eggshell calcite to the δ(18)Ow value of ingested water have been established for terrestrial and semi-aquatic birds. These equations have been applied to fossil eggshells from Lanzarote in order to infer the ecologies of the Pleistocene marine bird Puffinus sp. and of the enigmatic giant birds from the Pliocene. Both δ(13)Ccalc and δ(18)Ocalc values of Puffinus eggshells point to a semi-aquatic marine bird ingesting mostly seawater, whereas low δ(13)Ccalc and high δ(18)Ocalc values of eggshells from the Pliocene giant bird suggest a terrestrial lifestyle. This set of equations can help to quantitatively estimate the origin of waters ingested by extinct birds as well as to infer either local environmental or climatic conditions.

  18. Oxygen isotope fractionation between bird eggshell calcite and body water: application to fossil eggs from Lanzarote (Canary Islands)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzerini, Nicolas; Lécuyer, Christophe; Amiot, Romain; Angst, Delphine; Buffetaut, Eric; Fourel, François; Daux, Valérie; Betancort, Juan Francisco; Flandrois, Jean-Pierre; Marco, Antonio Sánchez; Lomoschitz, Alejandro

    2016-10-01

    Oxygen and carbon isotope compositions of fossil bird eggshell calcite (δ18Ocalc and δ13Ccalc) are regularly used to reconstruct paleoenvironmental conditions. However, the interpretation of δ18Ocalc values of fossil eggshells has been limited to qualitative variations in local climatic conditions as oxygen isotope fractionations between calcite, body fluids, and drinking water have not been determined yet. For this purpose, eggshell, albumen water, and drinking water of extant birds have been analyzed for their oxygen and carbon isotope compositions. Relative enrichments in 18O relative to 16O between body fluids and drinking water of +1.6 ± 0.9 ‰ for semi-aquatic birds and of +4.4 ± 1.9 ‰ for terrestrial birds are observed. Surprisingly, no significant dependence to body temperature on the oxygen isotope fractionation between eggshell calcite and body fluids is observed, suggesting that bird eggshells precipitate out of equilibrium. Two empirical equations relating the δ18Ocalc value of eggshell calcite to the δ18Ow value of ingested water have been established for terrestrial and semi-aquatic birds. These equations have been applied to fossil eggshells from Lanzarote in order to infer the ecologies of the Pleistocene marine bird Puffinus sp. and of the enigmatic giant birds from the Pliocene. Both δ13Ccalc and δ18Ocalc values of Puffinus eggshells point to a semi-aquatic marine bird ingesting mostly seawater, whereas low δ13Ccalc and high δ18Ocalc values of eggshells from the Pliocene giant bird suggest a terrestrial lifestyle. This set of equations can help to quantitatively estimate the origin of waters ingested by extinct birds as well as to infer either local environmental or climatic conditions.

  19. Carbon export and transfer to depth across the Southern Ocean Great Calcite Belt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Z. Rosengard

    2015-02-01

    234Th-derived export fluxes and size-fractionated concentrations of POC, particulate inorganic carbon (PIC, and biogenic silica (BSi were measured from the upper 1000 m of 27 stations across the Atlantic and Indian sectors of the Great Calcite Belt. POC export out of the euphotic zone was correlated with BSi export. PIC export was not, but did correlate positively with POC flux transfer efficiency. Moreover, regions of high BSi concentrations, which corresponded to regions with proportionally larger particles, exhibited higher attenuation of >51 μm POC concentrations in the mesopelagic zone. The interplay among POC size partitioning, mineral composition and POC attenuation suggests a more fundamental driver of POC transfer through both depth regimes in the Great Calcite Belt. In particular, we argue that diatom-dominated communities produce large and labile POC aggregates, which generate high export fluxes but also drive more remineralization in the mesopelagic zone. We observe the opposite in communities with smaller calcifying phytoplankton, such as coccolithophores. We hypothesize that these differences are influenced by inherent differences in the lability of POC exported by different phytoplankton communities.

  20. Jet-Suspended, Calcite-Ballasted Cyanobacterial Waterwarts in a Desert Spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pichel-Garcia, Ferran; Wade, Bman D.; Farmer, Jack D.

    2002-01-01

    We describe a population of colonial cyanobacteria (waterwarts) that develops as the dominant primary producer in a bottom-fed, warm spring in the Cuatro Cienegas karstic region of the Mexican Chihuahuan Desert. The centimeter-sized waterwarts were suspended within a central, conically shaped, 6-m deep well by upwelling waters. Waterwarts were built by an unicellular cyanobacterium and supported a community of epiphytic filamentous cyanobacteria and diatoms but were free of heterotrophic bacteria inside. Sequence analysis of genes revealed that this cyanobacterium is only distantly related to several strains of other unicellular teria Cyanothece, Waterwarts contained orderly arrangements of mineral made up of microcrystalline low-magnesium calcite with high levels of strontium and sulfur. Waterwarts were 95.9% (v/v) glycan, 2.8% cells, and 1.3% mineral grains and had a buoyant density of 1.034 kg/L. An analysis of the hydrological properties of the spring well and the waterwarts demonstrated that both large colony size and the presence of controlled amounts of mineral ballast are required to prevent the population from being washed out of the well. The unique hydrological characteristics of the spring have likely selected for both traits. The mechanisms by which controlled nucleation of extracellular calcite is achieved remain to be explored.

  1. Tuning calcite morphology and growth acceleration by a rational design of highly stable protein-mimetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chunlong; Qi, Jiahui; Tao, Jinhui; Zuckermann, Ronald; De Yoreo, James J.

    2014-09-05

    In nature, proteins play a significant role in biomineral formation. One of the ultimate goals of bioinspired materials science is to develop highly stable synthetic molecules that mimic the function of these natural proteins by controlling crystal formation. Here, we demonstrate that both the morphology and the degree of acceleration or inhibition observed during growth of calcite in the presence of peptoids can be rationally tuned by balancing the electrostatic interactions (EI) and hydrophobic interactions (HI), with HI playing the dominant role. While either strong EI or HI inhibit growth and suppress (104) face expression, correlations between peptoid-crystal binding energies and observed changes in calcite growth indicate moderate EI allow peptoids to weakly adsorb while moderate HI cause disruption of surface-adsorbed water layers, leading to growth acceleration with retained expression of (104) faces. This study provides fundamental principles for designing peptoids as crystallization promoters, and offers a straightforward screening method based on macroscopic crystal morphology. Because peptoids are sequence-specific, highly stable, and easily synthesized, peptoid-enhanced crystallization offers a broad range of potential applications.

  2. Tuning calcite morphology and growth acceleration by a rational design of highly stable protein-mimetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Long; Qi, Jiahui; Tao, Jinhui; Zuckermann, Ronald N.; Deyoreo, James J.

    2014-09-01

    In nature, proteins play a significant role in biomineral formation. One of the ultimate goals of bioinspired materials science is to develop highly stable synthetic molecules that mimic the function of these natural proteins by controlling crystal formation. Here, we demonstrate that both the morphology and the degree of acceleration or inhibition observed during growth of calcite in the presence of peptoids can be rationally tuned by balancing the electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions, with hydrophobic interactions playing the dominant role. While either strong electrostatic or hydrophobic interactions inhibit growth and reduces expression of the {104} faces, correlations between peptoid-crystal binding energies and observed changes in calcite growth indicate moderate electrostatic interactions allow peptoids to weakly adsorb while moderate hydrophobic interactions cause disruption of surface-adsorbed water layers, leading to growth acceleration with retained expression of the {104} faces. This study provides fundamental principles for designing peptoids as crystallization promoters, and offers a straightforward screening method based on macroscopic crystal morphology. Because peptoids are sequence-specific, highly stable, and easily synthesized, peptoid-enhanced crystallization offers a broad range of potential applications.

  3. The Contribution of Extreme Precipitation to the Total Precipitation in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jian-Qi

    2012-01-01

    Using daily precipitation data from weather stations in China, the variations in the contribution of extreme precipitation to the total precipitation are analyzed. It is found that extreme precipitation accounts for approximately one third of the total precipitation based on the overall mean for China. Over the past half century, extreme precipitation has played a dominant role in the year-to-year variability of the total precipitation. On the decadal time scale, the extreme precipitation makes different contributions to the wetting and drying regions of China. The wetting trends of particular regions are mainly attributed to increases in extreme precipitation; in contrast, the drying trends of other regions are mainly due to decreases in non-extreme precipitation.

  4. Texture evolution in calcite gouge formed at sub-seismic slip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delle Piane, Claudio; Luzin, Vladimir; Timms, Nick E.; Ben Clennell, M.; Giwelli, Ausama

    2016-04-01

    Carbonate rocks are abundant in the upper crust and are notoriously seismogenic with Mw>6 earthquakes nucleating in fault zones in carbonate dominated units around the world. Field observations describe fault zones as characterised by a narrow principal slip zone at their core, containing fine, granular wear material referred to as fault gouge, produced during cumulative slip. The current literature on the link between texture and frictional properties of calcite gouges is very limited and somewhat contradictory: based on the study of a natural calcite gouge a link has been proposed between the presence of a crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) and past seismic activity on the gouge hosting fault zone. However, similar features in terms of CPO were also identified on gouges experimentally generated at slip velocities well below the seismic ones, therefore questioning their interpretation as diagnostic of past seismic events. We studied the evolution of friction coefficient and texture on calcite gouges experimentally produced by means of high pressure direct shear experiments on large, water saturated, intact blocks of travertine (calcite 99 % wt.). Several blocks were deformed at room temperature up to different amounts of maximum displacements (20 mm, 70 mm and 120 mm) under an imposed sub-seismic slip rate of approximately 0.1 microns/s. Microstructural characterization of the deformed blocks was subsequently carried out on samples representing the highest strained portion s of each blocks (i.e. gouge zones). Local and bulk texture of the original and deformed materials was studied by means of electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and neutron diffraction, respectively. Direct shear experiments consistently indicate an evolution of the friction coefficient stabilizing at around values of 0.6 after 15 mm of slip. Macroscopic observations on the deformed blocks indicate that deformation is localised in a narrow band of extreme grain size reduction

  5. Calcite dissolution along a transect in the western tropical Indian Ocean: A multiproxy approach

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Naik, S.S.; Naidu, P.D.

    ].Thoughthese studies could quantify the CO 3 = concentrations to some extent, they could certainly identify the calcite dissolution and preservation events [Broecker et al., 2003]. Recently calcite crystal- linity was also used as a proxy of carbonate ion...) calcite peak on XRD powder diagrams are interpreted as being better crystallized than those showing a broader diffraction peak and dissolution improves shell crystallinity [Bassinot et al., 2004]. Therefore the calcite crystallinity could be used as a...

  6. PVC mixtures’ mechanical properties with the addition of modified calcite as filler

    OpenAIRE

    Vučinić Dušica R.; Jovanović Vladimir D.; Kolonja Božo M.; Sekulić Živko T.; Mihajlović Slavica R.

    2012-01-01

    In this study mechanical properties of PVC mixtures (PVC, stabilizer, lubricant, filler) such as tensile strength, tensile elongation, breaking strength, and breaking elongation were investigated. Unmodified calcite, as well as calcite modified by stearic acid, were used as fillers in wet and dry processes. The PVC mixtures containing the calcite modified by wet procedure have better mechanical properties compared to those with the calcite modified by the dry process. Tensile and breaki...

  7. Mechanical properties of polyvinyl chloride mixtures with the addition of modified calcite as filler

    OpenAIRE

    Mihajlović, Slavica R.; Sekulić, Živko T.; Vučinić, Dušica R.; Jovanović, Vladimir D.; Kolonja, Božo M.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, mechanical properties of PVC mixtures (PVC, stabilizer, lubricant and filler) such as tensile strength, tensile elongation, breaking strength and breaking elongation were investigated. Unmodified calcite, as well as calcite modified by stearic acid, were used as fillers in wet and dry processes. The PVC mixtures containing the calcite modified by wet procedure had better mechanical properties compared to those with the calcite modified by the dry process. Tensile and breaking s...

  8. Structural incorporation of Neptunyl(V) into Calcite: Interfacial Reactions and Kinetics

    OpenAIRE

    Heberling, Frank

    2010-01-01

    In this experimental work the calcite-water interface is characterized by means of zetapotential and surface diffraction measurements. Based on the experimental results a new Basic Stern Surface Complexation model for calcite is developed. Neptunyl(V) adsorption at the calcite surface and incorporation into the calcite structure is studied by batch type adsorption- and mixed flow reactor experiments. Adsorption and incorporation species of Neptunyl are investigated by EXAFS spectroscopy.

  9. Domination, Eternal Domination, and Clique Covering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klostermeyer William F.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Eternal and m-eternal domination are concerned with using mobile guards to protect a graph against infinite sequences of attacks at vertices. Eternal domination allows one guard to move per attack, whereas more than one guard may move per attack in the m-eternal domination model. Inequality chains consisting of the domination, eternal domination, m-eternal domination, independence, and clique covering numbers of graph are explored in this paper.

  10. Geochemical models of metasomatism in ultramafic systems: Serpentinization, rodingitization, and sea floor carbonate chimney precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palandri, J.L.; Reed, M.H.

    2004-01-01

    In a series of water-rock reaction simulations, we assess the processes of serpentinization of harzburgite and related calcium metasomatism resulting in rodingite-type alteration, and seafloor carbonate chimney precipitation. At temperatures from 25 to 300??C (P = 10 to 100 bar), using either fresh water or seawater, serpentinization simulations produce an assemblage commonly observed in natural systems, dominated by serpentine, magnetite, and brucite. The reacted waters in the simulations show similar trends in composition with decreasing water-rock ratios, becoming hyper-alkaline and strongly reducing, with increased dissolved calcium. At 25??C and w/r less than ???32, conditions are sufficiently reducing to yield H2 gas, nickel-iron alloy and native copper. Hyperalkalinity results from OH- production by olivine and pyroxene dissolution in the absence of counterbalancing OH- consumption by alteration mineral precipitation except at very high pH; at moderate pH there are no stable calcium minerals and only a small amount of chlorite forms, limited by aluminum, thus allowing Mg2+ and Ca2+ to accumulate in the aqueous phase in exchange for H+. The reducing conditions result from oxidation of ferrous iron in olivine and pyroxene to ferric iron in magnetite. Trace metals are computed to be nearly insoluble below 300??C, except for mercury, for which high pH stabilizes aqueous and gaseous Hg??. In serpentinization by seawater at 300??C, Ag, Au, Pd, and Pt may approach ore-forming concentrations in sulfide complexes. Simulated mixing of the fluid derived from serpentinization with cold seawater produces a mineral assemblage dominated by calcite, similar to recently discovered submarine, ultramafic rock-hosted, carbonate mineral deposits precipitating at hydrothermal vents. Simulated reaction of gabbroic or basaltic rocks with the hyperalkaline calcium- and aluminum-rich fluid produced during serpentinization at 300??C yields rodingite-type mineral assemblages, including

  11. Geochemical models of metasomatism in ultramafic systems: serpentinization, rodingitization, and sea floor carbonate chimney precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palandri, James L.; Reed, Mark H.

    2004-03-01

    In a series of water-rock reaction simulations, we assess the processes of serpentinization of harzburgite and related calcium metasomatism resulting in rodingite-type alteration, and seafloor carbonate chimney precipitation. At temperatures from 25 to 300°C (P = 10 to 100 bar), using either fresh water or seawater, serpentinization simulations produce an assemblage commonly observed in natural systems, dominated by serpentine, magnetite, and brucite. The reacted waters in the simulations show similar trends in composition with decreasing water-rock ratios, becoming hyper-alkaline and strongly reducing, with increased dissolved calcium. At 25°C and w/r less than ˜32, conditions are sufficiently reducing to yield H 2 gas, nickel-iron alloy and native copper. Hyperalkalinity results from OH - production by olivine and pyroxene dissolution in the absence of counterbalancing OH - consumption by alteration mineral precipitation except at very high pH; at moderate pH there are no stable calcium minerals and only a small amount of chlorite forms, limited by aluminum, thus allowing Mg 2+ and Ca 2+ to accumulate in the aqueous phase in exchange for H +. The reducing conditions result from oxidation of ferrous iron in olivine and pyroxene to ferric iron in magnetite. Trace metals are computed to be nearly insoluble below 300°C, except for mercury, for which high pH stabilizes aqueous and gaseous Hg°. In serpentinization by seawater at 300°C, Ag, Au, Pd, and Pt may approach ore-forming concentrations in sulfide complexes. Simulated mixing of the fluid derived from serpentinization with cold seawater produces a mineral assemblage dominated by calcite, similar to recently discovered submarine, ultramafic rock-hosted, carbonate mineral deposits precipitating at hydrothermal vents. Simulated reaction of gabbroic or basaltic rocks with the hyperalkaline calcium- and aluminum-rich fluid produced during serpentinization at 300°C yields rodingite-type mineral assemblages

  12. Chemical evolution of acid precipitation in the unsaturated zone of the Pennsylvanian siltstones and shale of central Ohio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Yoram; Lewis, Valerie E.; Bonta, James V.

    2007-12-01

    The North Appalachian Experimental Watershed in Coshocton, Ohio, USA has recorded average pH of precipitation of 4.7 over a 30-year period. The area lies within the Pennsylvanian siltstones and shale, dominated by aluminosilicates and lateral flow and seepage. The results from water-rock chemical reactions modeled using PHREEQM demonstrate the percolating precipitation water is neutralized to pH 7.5 within the top 1.5 m. The model suggests that, along with calcite, dissolution of albite, illite, and kaolinite are the dominant mechanisms of neutralization. The cation exchange capacity of the siltstone and shale, in the range 54.6-386 meq/100 g, appears to be a function of high organic carbon content of 2.0-3.2%. While cation exchange is responsible for some of the Na+ in solution, it is not the primary source of Ca2+, Mg2+, or K+ ions. Exchange onto clays is occurring, but is secondary to exchange on organic matter. Chemical composition of groundwater perched within a coal seam is controlled by oxidation and dissolution of pyrite, returning pH to approximately 4.0.

  13. Sorption and catalytic oxidation of Fe(II) at the surface of calcite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mettler, S.; Wolthers, M.; Charlet, L.; Von Gunten, U.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of sorption and coprecipitation of Fe(II) with calcite on the kinetics of Fe(II) oxidation was investigated. The interaction of Fe(II) with calcite was studied experimentally in the absence and presence of oxygen. The sorption of Fe(II) on calcite occurred in two distinguishable steps: (a

  14. Review: geological and experimental evidence for secular variation in seawater Mg/Ca (calcite-aragonite seas) and its effects on marine biological calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, J. B.

    2010-09-01

    Synchronized transitions in the polymorph mineralogy of the major reef-building and sediment-producing calcareous marine organisms and abiotic CaCO3 precipitates (ooids, marine cements) throughout Phanerozoic time are believed to have been caused by tectonically induced variations in the Mg/Ca ratio of seawater (molar Mg/Ca>2="aragonite seas", experimental seawaters formulated with seawater Mg/Ca ratios that favor their skeletal mineral. These results support the assertion that seawater Mg/Ca played an important role in determining which hypercalcifying marine organisms were the major reef-builders and sediment-producers throughout Earth history. The observation that primary production increased along with calcification within the bryopsidalean and coccolithophorid algae in mineralogically favorable seawater is consistent with the hypothesis that calcification promotes photosynthesis within some species of these algae through the liberation of CO2. The experiments also revealed that aragonite-secreting bryopsidalean algae and scleractinian corals, and bacterial biofilms that secrete a mixture of aragonite and high Mg calcite, began secreting an increased proportion of their calcium carbonate as the calcite polymorph in the lower-Mg/Ca experimental seawaters. Furthermore, the Mg/Ca ratio of calcite secreted by the coccolithophores, coralline red algae, reef-dwelling animals (crustacea, urchins, calcareous tube worms), bacterial biofilms, scleractinian corals, and bryopsidalean algae declined with reductions in seawater Mg/Ca. Notably, Mg fractionation in autotrophic organisms was more strongly influenced by changes in seawater Mg/Ca than in heterotrophic organisms, a probable consequence of autotrophic organisms inducing a less controlled mode of calcification simply through the removal of CO2 via photosynthesis. These results indicate that biomineralogical control can be partially overridden by ambient seawater Mg/Ca and suggest that modern aragonite

  15. Lithofacies palaeogeography and sedimentology Beef and cone-in-cone calcite fibrous cements associated with the end-Permian and end-Triassic mass extinctions:Reassessment of processes of formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephen Kershaw; Li Guo

    2016-01-01

    This paper reassesses published interpretation that beef and cone-in-cone (B-CIC) fibrous calcite cements were precipitated contemporaneously just below the sea floor in uncon-solidated sediment, in limestones associated with the end-Permian (P/T) and end-Triassic (T/J) mass extinctions. That interpretation introduced the concept of a sub-seafloor car-bonate factory associated with ocean acidification by raised carbon dioxide driven by volcanic eruption, coinciding with mass extinction. However, our new fieldwork and petrographic analysis, with literature comparison, reveals several problems with this concept. Two key points based on evidence in the T/J transition of the UK are:(1) that B-CIC calcite deposits form thin scattered layers and lenses at several horizons, not a distinct deposit associated with volcanic activity; and (2) B-CIC calcite is more common in Early Jurassic sediments after the extinction and after the end of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province volcanism proposed to have supplied the carbon dioxide required. Our samples from Late Triassic, Early Jurassic and Early Cretaceous limestones in southern UK show that B-CIC calcite occurs in both marine and non-marine sediments, therefore ocean processes are not mandatory for its formation. There is no proof that fibrous calcite was formed before lithification, but our Early Jurassic samples do prove fibrous calcite formed after compaction, thus interpretation of crystal growth in uncon-solidated sediment is problematic. Furthermore, B-CIC crystals mostly grew both upwards and downwards equally, contradicting the interpretation of the novel carbonate factory that they grew preferentially upwards in soft sediment. Finally, Early Jurassic and Early Cretaceous examples are not associated with mass extinction. Three further key points derived from the literature include: (1) B-CIC calcite is wide-spread geographically and stratigraphically, not clustered around mass extinctions or the Paleocene

  16. Geochemical signatures of fluid paleo-transfer in fracture filling calcite from low permeability rock masses: examples taken from Bure's and Tournemire's site in France and northern Switzerland; Signatures geochimiques de paleocirculations aqueuses dans la calcite de remplissage de fracture de massifs argileux peu permeables et de leurs encaissants: exemples pris sur les sites de Bure, Tournemire et Suisse du nord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lecocq, D

    2002-12-15

    Fractures in rock masses represent preferential path for fluid transfer and, as such, are the most efficient way for migration of radionuclides at a regional scale. The impact of fracturing on hydrogeological system is a major challenge for underground radioactive waste storage projects. In this context, geochemistry of fracture-filling calcite is used to better understand physical and chemical properties of palaeo-fluids. A new methodology has been developed to analyze Mg, Mn, Fe, Sr and Rare Earth Elements REE (La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Dy and Yb) in calcite by Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry. Analyses of calcite crystals have been performed in fractures from Jurassic clays and limestones in France (Bure and Tournemire sites) and northern Switzerland (Mt Terri's tunnel and deep borehole). On each case, several geochemical signatures are observed, according to REE partitioning and Mn and Fe concentrations. In the Bure site, a dependence of calcite geochemistry from fracture host rock has been evidenced. On the other hand, speciation of REE in solution equilibrated with clayey or calcareous rocks at circum-neutral pH (7 to 8) is not significantly influenced by the media: speciation is dominated by carbonate species in both cases and phosphate complexes can modify heavy REE availability in relatively to light REE. These results point out that in fractures in clays, calcite crystallizes at equilibrium with a fluid expulsed during diagenesis from clay minerals, recording the effect of clays and accessory phases. In limestone fractures, calcite records a later event related to the past functioning of the present aquifer, and the fluid has reached equilibrium with the rock minerals. In secondary filling calcite from Toarcian Argilites faults close to Tournemire's tunnel, three successive generations of calcite are observed in an extensive fault, and a fourth in a compressive one. In Aalenian Opalinus Clays veins, comparison between existing isotopic data and Mn, Fe

  17. Surface tension alteration on calcite, induced by ion substitution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sakuma, Hiroshi; Andersson, Martin Peter; Bechgaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    The interaction of water and organic molecules with mineral surfaces controls many processes in nature and industry. The thermodynamic property, surface tension, is usually determined from the contact angle between phases, but how does one understand the concept of surface tension at the nanoscale...... in the pore water. Incorporation of MgSO4 into calcite, which is energetically favored, decreases surface tension and releases polar oil compounds......., where particles are smaller than the smallest droplet? We investigated the energy required to exchange Mg2+ and SO4 2- from aqueous solution into calcite {10.4} surfaces using density functional theory. Mg2+ substitution for Ca2+ is favored but only when SO4 2- is also present and MgSO4 incorporates...

  18. Tuning hardness in calcite by incorporation of amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Carloni, Joseph D.; Demarchi, Beatrice; Sparks, David; Reid, David G.; Kunitake, Miki E.; Tang, Chiu C.; Duer, Melinda J.; Freeman, Colin L.; Pokroy, Boaz; Penkman, Kirsty; Harding, John H.; Estroff, Lara A.; Baker, Shefford P.; Meldrum, Fiona C.

    2016-08-01

    Structural biominerals are inorganic/organic composites that exhibit remarkable mechanical properties. However, the structure-property relationships of even the simplest building unit--mineral single crystals containing embedded macromolecules--remain poorly understood. Here, by means of a model biomineral made from calcite single crystals containing glycine (0-7 mol%) or aspartic acid (0-4 mol%), we elucidate the origin of the superior hardness of biogenic calcite. We analysed lattice distortions in these model crystals by using X-ray diffraction and molecular dynamics simulations, and by means of solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance show that the amino acids are incorporated as individual molecules. We also demonstrate that nanoindentation hardness increased with amino acid content, reaching values equivalent to their biogenic counterparts. A dislocation pinning model reveals that the enhanced hardness is determined by the force required to cut covalent bonds in the molecules.

  19. Magnesium-Calcite Crystal Formation Mediated by the Thermophilic Bacterium Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius Requires Calcium and Endospores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murai, Rie; Yoshida, Naoto

    2016-11-01

    Fresh Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius cells grown on soybean-casein digest nutrient agar were inoculated as a parent colony 1 cm in diameter on the surface of an agar gel containing acetate and calcium ions (calcite-promoting hydrogel) and incubated at 60 °C for 4 days, after which magnesium-calcite single crystals of 50-130 µm in size formed within the parent colony. Addition of EDTA, polyacrylic acid or N,N-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide to the calcite-forming hydrogel inhibited the parent colony from forming magnesium-calcite crystals. Inoculation of G. thermoglucosidasius on calcite-forming hydrogel containing 5 µM cadmium and 20 µM zinc resulted in a decrease in the sporulation rate from 55 to 7-8 %. Magnesium-calcite synthesis decreased relative to the sporulation rate. G. thermoglucosidasius exhibited higher adsorption/absorbance of calcium than other Geobacillus sp. that do not mediate calcite formation and higher levels of magnesium accumulation. Calcium ions contained in the calcite-promoting hydrogel and magnesium ions concentrated in G. thermoglucosidasius cells serve as the elements for magnesium-calcite synthesis. The observed decreases in sporulation rate and magnesium-calcite formation support the hypothesis that endospores act as nuclei for the synthesis of magnesium-calcite single crystals.

  20. Molecular dynamics simulations of peptides on calcite surface

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Mingjun; Rodger, Mark; Harding, John; Stipp, Susan S.L.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract A series of Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations has been carried out to investigate the interaction between peptides and a calcite (1 0 -1 4) surface in water. A 16-amino acid and a 17-amino acid peptide have been built and three different configurations for each peptide are used as starting configurations. The dynamic behaviour of these peptides has been investigated by calculating their radii of gyration and distribution of dihedral angles. For comparison, the simulatio...

  1. Copper incorporation in foraminiferal calcite: results from culturing experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. van der Zwaan

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available A partition coefficient for copper (DCu in foraminiferal calcite has been determined by culturing individuals of two benthic species under controlled laboratory conditions. The partition coefficient of a trace element (TE is an emperically determined relation between the TE/Ca ratio in seawater and the TE/Ca ratio in foraminiferal calcite and has been established for many divalent cations. Despite its potential to act as a tracer of human-induced, heavy metal pollution, data is not yet available for copper. Since partition coefficients are usually a function of multiple factors (seawater temperature, pH, salinity, metabolic activity of the organism, etc., we chose to analyze calcite from specimens cultured under controlled laboratory conditions. They were subjected to different concentrations of Cu2+ (0.1–20 µmol/l and constant temperature (10 and 20°C, seawater salinity and pH. We monitored the growth of new calcite in specimens of the temperate, shallow-water foraminifer Ammonia tepida and in the tropical, symbiont-bearing Heterostegina depressa. Newly formed chambers were analyzed for Cu/Ca ratios by laser ablation-ICP-MS. The estimated partition coefficient (0.1–0.4 was constant to within experimental error over a large range of (Cu/Caseawater ratios and was remarkably similar for both species. Neither did the presence or absence of symbionts affect the DCu, nor did we find a significant effect of temperature or salinity on Cu-uptake.

  2. Production Engineering for Growth of Synthetic Calcite Polarizer Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-08-01

    sources, uniform quality, and geological formation have been more Intensely studied. Numerous techniques for the preparation of...Throughout nature there are many forms of consolidated CaC03 such as limestone, marine life, and stalactites . Most of these are known to be formed...Hydrothermally Grown Calcite (Continued) a slight retr the effects o temperature i formation on density was c crystal. The morphology most

  3. Meteoric calcitization of magnesite in Miocene lacustrine deposits (Calatayud basin, NE Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cañaveras, J. C.; Sánchez-Moral, S.; Sanz-Rubio, E.; Hoyos, M.

    1998-08-01

    Sedimentary magnesite deposits are commonly present in evaporite successions in the Tertiary Calatayud basin (NE Spain). Outcropping evaporite sequences, mainly composed of secondary gypsum after anhydrite-glauberite, show centimetre-thick layers of magnesite passing laterally into calcite pseudospar. Petrographic and stable isotope data indicate that calcite pseudospar formed via late-stage calcitization of magnesite under near-surface conditions. Calcitization occurred by the interaction between magnesite and Ca-enriched waters derived from the dissolution of gypsum and/or glauberite. The geochemical simulation of this process, petrographic evidence, and the correlation between the magnesite/calcite ratio and the δ18O values of both magnesite and calcite samples across the reaction front are in agreement with the existence of neoformed 18O-depleted magnesite during the waning stages of the calcitization process.

  4. Is bicarbonate stable in and on the calcite surface?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Rodriguez Blanco, Juan Diego; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2016-01-01

    We have used density functional theory with the COSMO-RS implicit solvent model to predict the pKa for the deprotonation of bicarbonate to carbonate, i.e. HCO3− CO32− + H+, when HCO3− is included in, and adsorbed on, a calcite surface. We have used cluster models (80–100 atoms) to represent...... the flat {10.4} surface, acute steps, obtuse steps, two types of kinks on the acute step and two types of kinks on the obtuse steps. Based on the predicted pKa values, which range from −6.0 to 2.4 depending on the surface site, we conclude that bicarbonate deprotonates to carbonate when it is in calcite...... even when pH in solution is very low. This is true for all surface sites, even for solutions where 2.4 calcite, the predicted pKa for deprotonation is 7.5, which is ∼3 pH units lower than in aqueous solution...

  5. Rate of radiocarbon retention onto calcite by isotope exchange

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lempinen, Janne; Lehto, Jukka [Helsinki Univ. (Finland). Lab. of Radiochemistry

    2016-11-01

    Radiocarbon ({sup 14}C) is a top priority class radionuclide associated with the long-term safety of spent nuclear fuel disposal. Dissolved inorganic radiocarbon can be retained in bedrock via isotope exchange with calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) at solubility equilibrium with groundwater. In the present study, the rate of the isotope exchange process was investigated on synthetic calcite using batch experiments. Experiments were performed in solutions with a calcium concentration of 0.0002-0.1 M, including two synthetic reference groundwaters. The radiocarbon activity in the solutions decreased exponentially as a function of time, thus following first-order kinetics. The rate of isotope exchange was quantified from an exponential fit to the activity data over time. The rate of radiocarbon retention increased as a function of the calcium activity. The isotope exchange half-life was only 4.3 days at calcium ion activities over 0.01. This half-life is very much shorter than the half-life of {sup 14}C or the time scale of groundwater movements; consequently calcite can effectively retain radiocarbon from brackish and saline groundwaters.

  6. Sex-linked dominant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inheritance - sex-linked dominant; Genetics - sex-linked dominant; X-linked dominant; Y-linked dominant ... can be either an autosomal chromosome or a sex chromosome. It also depends on whether the trait ...

  7. Kinetics of calcium phosphate nucleation and growth on calcite: implications for predicting the fate of dissolved phosphate species in alkaline soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijun; Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnación; Putnis, Christine V; Menneken, Martina; Putnis, Andrew

    2012-01-17

    Unraveling the kinetics of calcium orthophosphate (Ca-P) precipitation and dissolution is important for our understanding of the transformation and mobility of dissolved phosphate species in soils. Here we use an in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) coupled with a fluid reaction cell to study the interaction of phosphate-bearing solutions with calcite surfaces. We observe that the mineral surface-induced formation of Ca-P phases is initiated with the aggregation of clusters leading to the nucleation and subsequent growth of Ca-P phases on calcite, at various pH values and ionic strengths relevant to soil solution conditions. A significant decrease in the dissolved phosphate concentration occurs due to the promoted nucleation of Ca-P phases on calcite surfaces at elevated phosphate concentrations and more significantly at high salt concentrations. Also, kinetic data analyses show that low concentrations of citrate caused an increase in the nucleation rate of Ca-P phases. However, at higher concentrations of citrate, nucleation acceleration was reversed with much longer induction times to form Ca-P nuclei. These results demonstrate that the nucleation-modifying properties of small organic molecules may be scaled up to analyze Ca-P dissolution-precipitation processes that are mediated by a more complex soil environment. This in situ observation, albeit preliminary, may contribute to an improved understanding of the fate of dissolved phosphate species in diverse soil systems.

  8. Novel Determination of the Orientation of Calcite on Mineral Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, L.; Ji, X.; Teng, H.

    2016-12-01

    In the threat of global warming, the transformation from CO2 to stable carbonate minerals is significant to geological CO2 sequestration in the long term.Previous efforts have found that when carbonate minerals nucleate on some mineral substrates ,the time of carbon capture can be shorted .Many efforts have been focused on the dynamics when carbonate minerals nucleate on mineral substrates, but few have studied the orientation of carbonate minerals on mineral substrates. In our experiment, we mainly focused on the orientation of calcite on mineral substrates.We mixed NaHCO3 and CaCl2 to nucleate when mineral substrates were added and a multi-parameter analyzer was used to monitor in real time to determine the induction time for nucleation. On the basis of classical nucleation theory, we got a brand new formula to decide the orientation of calcite on mineral substrates. lntind=(2-cosθ+cos3θ)*16πγ3vm2(12*(kBT)3*(lnS)2)+ln(1/N0v)+ ΔEa/(kBT)where θ is the angle between the substrate and the nuclei, tind is the induction time for nucleation, γ is he average surface free energy, N0 is the total number of particles per unit volume of solution, ΔEa is the activation energy for molecular motion across the embryo-matrix interface, S is the supersaturation index ,kB is the Boltzmann constant. Using the new formula above , when biotite was used as substrate mineral ,we found that the angle between the biotite and the nuclei was 119°. Angle measured on SEM images also supported our conclusion above. Combined with SEM and Debye ring analysed by Rigaku 2D data processing software, we only found one point of (006) in Debye ring, unlike (104)(many points in one ring and it meant that the orientation of (104) is random ). That meant (001) of calcite was first formed on biotite (001). In that case we inferred that 119° was formed by (001) of botite and (012) of calcite for the intersection angle of (001) and (012) was 120°. Future research will focus on the orientation of

  9. Novel identification of matrix proteins involved in calcitic biomineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose-Martel, Megan; Smiley, Sandy; Hincke, Maxwell T

    2015-02-26

    Calcitic biomineralization is essential for otoconia formation in vertebrates. This process is characterized by protein-crystal interactions that modulate crystal growth on an extracellular matrix. An excellent model for the study of calcitic biomineralization is the avian eggshell, the fastest known biomineralization process. The objective of this study is to identify and characterize matrix proteins associated with the eggshell mammillary cones, which are hypothesized to regulate the earliest stage of eggshell calcification. Mammillary cones were isolated from 2 models, fertilized and unfertilized, and the released proteins were identified by RP-nanoLC and ES-MS/MS proteomics. Proteomics analysis identified 49 proteins associated with the eggshell membrane fibers and, importantly, 18 mammillary cone-specific proteins with an additional 18 proteins identified as enriched in the mammillary cones. Among the most promising candidates for modulating protein-crystal interactions were extracellular matrix proteins, including ABI family member 3 (NESH) binding protein (ABI3BP), tiarin-like, hyaluronan and proteoglycan link protein 3 (HAPLN3), collagen alpha-1(X), collagen alpha-1(II) and fibronectin, in addition to the calcium binding proteins calumenin, EGF-like repeats and discoidin 1-like domains 3 (EDIL3), nucleobindin-2 and SPARC. In conclusion, we identified several cone-resident proteins that are candidates to regulate initiation of eggshell calcification. Further study of these proteins will determine their roles in modulating calcitic biomineralization and lead to insight into the process of otoconia formation/regeneration. Biomineralization is essential for the development of hard tissues in vertebrates, which includes both calcium phosphate and calcium carbonate structures. Calcitic mineralization by calcium carbonate is an important process in the formation of otoconia, which are gravity receptor organs located in the inner ear and are responsible for balance

  10. Note on the temporal relationships between sandstone compaction and precipitation of authigenic minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavazza, William; Dahl, Jeremy

    1990-11-01

    Several diagenetic minerals (i.e., calcite, kaolinite, illite/smectite, dolomite, quartz and chlorite) are present in the sandstones of the Stilo-Capo d'Orlando Formation (Miocene, southern Italy), but calcite and kaolinite are the only major cementing agents. Textural characteristics of calcite- and kaolinite-cemented sandstones are markedly different. Calcite-cemented samples have an average packing density of 82%, and most grains touch each other tangentially. On the other hand, kaolinite-cemented samples are closely packed (average packing density = 95%), and most commonly display long and concavo-convex intergranular contacts. Textural and geochemical data show that calcite precipitated during progressive burial of the Stilo-Capo d'Orlando Formation over temperatures ranging from 39° to 81°C ( δ18O PDB = -5 to -11%), while kaolinite represents the latest cementation episode. Sandstones of the Stilo-Capo d'Orlando Formation illustrate effectively the combined effects of compaction and cementation during progressive burial. Early formation of carbonate cement prevented further compaction, whereas the remaining uncemented portions underwent severe compaction before later precipitation of kaolinite cement.

  11. Relative importance of precipitation frequency and intensity in inter-annual variation of precipitation in Singapore during 1980-2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Babovic, Vladan

    2017-04-01

    Observed studies on inter-annual variation of precipitation provide insight into the response of precipitation to anthropogenic climate change and natural climate variability. Inter-annual variation of precipitation results from the concurrent variations of precipitation frequency and intensity, understanding of the relative importance of frequency and intensity in the variability of precipitation can help fathom its changing properties. Investigation of the long-term changes of precipitation schemes has been extensively carried out in many regions across the world, however, detailed studies of the relative importance of precipitation frequency and intensity in inter-annual variation of precipitation are still limited, especially in the tropics. Therefore, this study presents a comprehensive framework to investigate the inter-annual variation of precipitation and the dominance of precipitation frequency and intensity in a tropical urban city-state, Singapore, based on long-term (1980-2013) daily precipitation series from 22 rain gauges. First, an iterative Mann-Kendall trend test method is applied to detect long-term trends in precipitation total, frequency and intensity at both annual and seasonal time scales. Then, the relative importance of precipitation frequency and intensity in inducing the inter-annual variation of wet-day precipitation total is analyzed using a dominance analysis method based on linear regression. The results show statistically significant upward trends in wet-day precipitation total, frequency and intensity at annual time scale, however, these trends are not evident during the monsoon seasons. The inter-annual variation of wet-day precipitation is mainly dominated by precipitation intensity for most of the stations at annual time scale and during the Northeast monsoon season. However, during the Southwest monsoon season, the inter-annual variation of wet-day precipitation is mainly dominated by precipitation frequency. These results have

  12. Precipitation Recycling and the Vertical Distribution of Local and Remote Sources of Water for Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosilovich, Michael G.; Atlas, Robert (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Precipitation recycling is defined as the amount of water that evaporates from a region that precipitates within the same region. This is also interpreted as the local source of water for precipitation. In this study, the local and remote sources of water for precipitation have been diagnosed through the use of passive constituent tracers that represent regional evaporative sources along with their transport and precipitation. We will discuss the differences between this method and the simpler bulk diagnostic approach to precipitation recycling. A summer seasonal simulation has been analyzed for the regional sources of the United States Great Plains precipitation. While the tropical Atlantic Ocean (including the Gulf of Mexico) and the local continental sources of precipitation are most dominant, the vertically integrated column of water contains substantial water content originating from the Northern Pacific Ocean, which is not precipitated. The vertical profiles of regional water sources indicate that local Great Plains source of water dominates the lower troposphere, predominantly in the PBL. However, the Pacific Ocean source is dominant over a large portion of the middle to upper troposphere. The influence of the tropical Atlantic Ocean is reasonably uniform throughout the column. While the results are not unexpected given the formulation of the model's convective parameterization, the analysis provides a quantitative assessment of the impact of local evaporation on the occurrence of convective precipitation in the GCM. Further, these results suggest that local source of water is not well mixed throughout the vertical column.

  13. First-principles study of boron speciation in calcite and aragonite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Etienne; Pietrucci, Fabio; Gervais, Christel; Blanchard, Marc; Schott, Jacques; Gaillardet, Jérome

    2016-11-01

    Despite the importance of boron as a proxy of past ocean pH, the crystal-chemical factors controlling its incorporation in the structure of calcium carbonates are still poorly understood. This is partly linked to an imperfect knowledge of the coordination, protonation state and local environment of boron species in these minerals. In the present study, we use first-principles quantum mechanical tools to model selected trigonal and tetragonal boron species in calcite and aragonite. The stable geometry of the models is obtained from standard energy minimization schemes or using a more advanced metadynamics exploration of their configurational space. The computation of 11B NMR chemical shifts and quadrupolar coupling parameters enables a straightforward comparison of the models to existing experimental NMR data. The results show that B in calcium carbonates does occur as structural species substituted for CO32- anions. The B speciation depends on the polymorph considered. In calcite, structural boron is present as partially deprotonated trigonal BO2(OH)2- species coexisting with a fraction of substituted B(OH)4- groups. In aragonite, the B(OH)4- substitution for CO32- anions is dominant. Different species, including entrapped B(OH)3 molecules and substituted BO33- groups also occur in biogenic samples. The diversity of B speciation reflects a diversity of B incorporation mechanisms and sheds light on previous studies confronting B isotopic composition determination with NMR observations. The mechanisms of boron incorporation in calcium carbonates are probably more complex than usually assumed in the literature using boron isotopes as a proxy of paleo-atmospheric CO2 reconstructions. Although not invalidating the empirical paleo-pH proxy, these results call for a better understanding of the fundamental mechanisms of boron incorporation in carbonates.

  14. Carbonate "clumped" isotope signatures in aragonitic scleractinian and calcitic gorgonian deep-sea corals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kimball

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Deep-sea corals are a potentially valuable archive of the temperature and ocean chemistry of intermediate and deep waters. Living in near constant temperature, salinity and pH, and having amongst the slowest calcification rates observed in carbonate-precipitating biological organisms, deep-sea corals can provide valuable constraints on processes driving mineral equilibrium and disequilibrium isotope signatures. Here we report new data to further develop "clumped" isotopes as a paleothermometer in deep-sea corals as well as to investigate mineral-specific, taxon-specific, and growth-rate related effects. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry is based on measurements of the abundance of the doubly-substituted isotopologue 13C18O16O2 in carbonate minerals, analyzed in CO2 gas liberated on phosphoric acid digestion of carbonates and reported as Δ47 values. We analyzed Δ47 in live-collected aragonitic scleractinian (Enallopsammia sp. and calcitic gorgonian (Isididae and Coralliidae deep-sea corals, and compared results to published data for other aragonitic scleractinian taxa. Measured Δ47 values were compared to in situ temperatures and the relationship between Δ47 and temperature was determined for each group to investigate taxon-specific effects. We find that aragonitic scleractinian deep-sea corals exhibit higher values than calcitic gorgonian corals and the two groups of coral produce statistically different relationship between Δ47-temperature calibrations. These data are significant in the interpretation of all carbonate "clumped" isotope calibration data as they show that distinct Δ47-temperature calibrations can be observed in different materials recovered from the same environment and analyzed using the same instrumentation, phosphoric acid composition, digestion temperature and technique, CO2 gas purification apparatus, and data handling. There are three possible explanations for the origin of these different calibrations. The offset

  15. Carbonate "clumped" isotope signatures in aragonitic scleractinian and calcitic gorgonian deep-sea corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimball, Justine; Eagle, Robert; Dunbar, Robert

    2016-12-01

    Deep-sea corals are a potentially valuable archive of the temperature and ocean chemistry of intermediate and deep waters. Living in near-constant temperature, salinity, and pH and having amongst the slowest calcification rates observed in carbonate-precipitating biological organisms, deep-sea corals can provide valuable constraints on processes driving mineral equilibrium and disequilibrium isotope signatures. Here we report new data to further develop "clumped" isotopes as a paleothermometer in deep-sea corals as well as to investigate mineral-specific, taxon-specific, and growth-rate-related effects. Carbonate clumped isotope thermometry is based on measurements of the abundance of the doubly substituted isotopologue 13C18O16O2 in carbonate minerals, analyzed in CO2 gas liberated on phosphoric acid digestion of carbonates and reported as Δ47 values. We analyzed Δ47 in live-collected aragonitic scleractinian (Enallopsammia sp.) and high-Mg calcitic gorgonian (Isididae and Coralliidae) deep-sea corals and compared results to published data for other aragonitic scleractinian taxa. Measured Δ47 values were compared to in situ temperatures, and the relationship between Δ47 and temperature was determined for each group to investigate taxon-specific effects. We find that aragonitic scleractinian deep-sea corals exhibit higher values than high-Mg calcitic gorgonian corals and the two groups of coral produce statistically different relationships between Δ47-temperature calibrations. These data are significant in the interpretation of all carbonate clumped isotope calibration data as they show that distinct Δ47-temperature calibrations can be observed in different materials recovered from the same environment and analyzed using the same instrumentation, phosphoric acid composition, digestion temperature and technique, CO2 gas purification apparatus, and data handling. There are three possible explanations for the origin of these different calibrations. The offset

  16. Principles of calcite dissolution in human and artificial otoconia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leif Erik Walther

    Full Text Available Human otoconia provide mechanical stimuli to deflect hair cells of the vestibular sensory epithelium for purposes of detecting linear acceleration and head tilts. During lifetime, the volume and number of otoconia are gradually reduced. In a process of degeneration morphological changes occur. Structural changes in human otoconia are assumed to cause vertigo and balance disorders such as benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV. The aim of this study was to investigate the main principles of morphological changes in human otoconia in dissolution experiments by exposure to hydrochloric acid, EDTA, demineralized water and completely purified water respectively. For comparison reasons artificial (biomimetic otoconia (calcite gelatin nanocomposits and natural calcite were used. Morphological changes were detected in time steps by the use of environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM. Under in vitro conditions three main dissolution mechanisms were identified as causing characteristic morphological changes of the specimen under consideration: pH drops in the acidic range, complex formation with calcium ions and changes of ion concentrations in the vicinity of otoconia. Shifts in pH cause a more uniform reduction of otoconia size (isotropic dissolution whereas complexation reactions and changes of the ionic concentrations within the surrounding medium bring about preferred attacks at specific areas (anisotropic dissolution of human and artificial otoconia. Owing to successive reduction of material, all the dissolution mechanisms finally produce fragments and remnants of otoconia. It can be assumed that the organic component of otoconia is not significantly attacked under the given conditions. Artificial otoconia serve as a suitable model system mimicking chemical attacks on biogenic specimens. The underlying principles of calcite dissolution under in vitro conditions may play a role in otoconia degeneration processes such as BPPV.

  17. Effect of airborne particle on SO 2-calcite reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böke, Hasan; Göktürk, E. Hale; Caner-Saltık, Emine N.; Demirci, Şahinde

    1999-02-01

    In modern urban atmosphere, sulphur dioxide (SO 2) attacks calcite (CaCO 3) in calcareous stone-producing gypsum (CaSO 4·2H 2O) which forms crust at rain sheltered surfaces and accelerates erosion at areas exposed to rain. The airborne particles collected on stone surfaces have always been considered to enhance the gypsum crust formation and thus it is believed that they should be removed from the surface to decrease the effects of SO 2. In this study, our aim was to investigate this event by carrying out a series of experiments in laboratory using pure calcium carbonate powder to represent calcareous stone. Sodium montmorillonite, activated carbon, ferric oxide, vanadium pentoxide and cupric chloride were mixed in the pure calcium carbonate powder as substitutes of the airborne particles in the polluted atmosphere. The samples have been exposed at nearly 10 ppmv SO 2 concentrations at 90% relative humidity conditions in a reaction chamber for several days. The mineralogical composition of the exposed samples were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and infrared spectrometer (IR). Sulphation reaction products, calcium sulphite hemihydrate, gypsum and unreacted calcite, were determined quantitatively using IR. Exposed samples have also been investigated morphologically using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Experimental results reveal that calcium sulphite hemihydrate is the main reaction product of the SO 2-calcite reaction. It turns out that airborne particles play an important catalytic role in the oxidation of calcium sulphite hemihydrate into gypsum, although their presence does not very significantly affect the extent of sulphation reaction. This behaviour of airborne particles is explained by the presence of liquid film on the calcium carbonate surface where a series of reactions in the gas-liquid-solid interfaces takes place.

  18. The sensitized luminescence of manganese-activated calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, J.H.; Evans, L.W.; Ginther, R.J.; Murata, K.J.

    1947-01-01

    Synthetic manganese-activated calcites are shown to be practically inert to ultraviolet excitation in the range 2000-3500A, while they are luminescent under cathode-ray excitation. The incorporation of small amounts of an auxiliary impurity along with the manganese produces the strong response to ultraviolet radiation hitherto ascribed to CaCO3:Mn itself. Three such impurities have been studied: lead, thallium, and cerium. The first two induce excitation in the neighborhood of the mercury resonance line, while the cerium introduces a response principally to longer wave ultraviolet. The strong response to 2537A excitation shown by some natural calcites is likewise found to be due to the presence of lead along with the manganese, rather than to the manganese alone. The data do not warrant ascribing the longer wave-length ultraviolet-excited luminescence of all natural calcites to the action of an auxiliary impurity. The essential identity of the cathode-ray excited luminescence spectra of CaCO 3:Mn, CaCO3: (Pb+Mn), CaCO3:(Tl+Mn), and CaCO3:(Ce+Mn) with the 2537A-excited spectra of the latter three is evidence that the luminescent center in all cases is the manganese ion or the MnO6 group. It is shown that a "cascade" mechanism for the action of the auxiliary impurities, lead, thallium, and cerium, is incorrect; and that the phenomenon must be considered as a case of sensitized luminescence. Owing to the nature of cathode-ray excitation, the manganese activator can be excited by this agent even in the absence of a second impurity. For optical excitation, however, an absorption band for the ultraviolet must be established by building into the CaCO3:Mn a second impurity or "sensitizer.".

  19. Simulating Succinate-Promoted Dissolution at Calcite {104} Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mkhonto, D.; Sahai, N.

    2008-12-01

    Organic molecules of a wide range of molecular weights from small organic acids, amino-acids, acidic peptides and acidic proteins to humic and fulvic acids play a key role in modulating nucleation, crystal growth and dissolution of calcium carbonate polymorphs. In general, these acidic molecules inhibit calcite growth and, promote dissolution preferentially along specific crystallographic directions, in the process, regulating crystal shape and size, and even whether a metastable polymorph (e.g., vaterite or aragonite) is nucleated first. For example, chiral faces of calcite are selected by chiral amino-acids and the unusual {hk0} faces are expressed in the presence of amino-acids [Orme et al., 2001], and unusual heptagonal dissolution etch-pit are seen in the presence of succinate compared to the normal rhombohedral pits in water alone [Teng et al., 2006]. Thus, the presence of unusual crystal morphologies may indicate organic-mediated growth, thus serving as a biosignature. We have conducted the Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations using the Consistent Valence Force Field (CVFF) as implemented in the FORCITE© module of the Materials Studio © software package (Accelrys, Inc. TM) to model the adsorption of succinate, a dicarboxylic acid, and charge- balancing Na+ ions on dry and hydrated steps in different directions on the {104} cleavage face of calcite [Mkhonto and Sahai, in prep.]. At the site of succinate adsorption, we find elongation of the interatomic distances (Ca-OCO3,i) between surface Ca2+ cation and the oxygen of the underlying inorganic CO32- anion the first surface layer of calcite, compared to the corresponding distances in the presence of water alone, suggesting greater ease of surface Ca2+ detachment. This result is consistent with the empirically observed increase in overall dissolution rate with succinate [Teng et al., 2006]. Furthermore, succinate adsorption lowers the step energies, which explains the appearance of steps in the unsusual [42

  20. Study of Biomass Calcite as Fine Aggregate of Concrete

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jian; YU Yan

    2012-01-01

    The possibility of using crushed oyster shell to partly replace the fine aggregate of concrete was evaluated. The compressive strength and slump of concrete mixture with different amount of crushed oyster shell were tested and thus the appropriate dosage was determined. Additionally, the compatibility with super plasticizer and the stability in NazSO4 solution were also discussed to prove the feasibility of oyster shell as fine aggregate of concrete. The microstructure of concrete was observed with XRD and SEM techniques. This research provides the basis for the application of waste biomass calcite.

  1. Grain coarsening of calcite: Fundamental mechanisms and biogenic inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schultz, Logan Nicholas

    grain diameter: The small particle size was similar to coccolith elements in chalk. Calcite was aged in saturated solutions for up to 261 days at temperatures up to 200 °C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and BET surface area data showed fundamental insight into grain...... coarsening – small grains coarsen by aggregation at high temperatures, followed by Ostwald ripening. Alginate, a model for the acidic polysaccharides produced by coccolithiphores, inhibited coarsening at a steady rate. A Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm preserved particles for at least 60 days before...

  2. Timing of atmospheric precipitation in the Zagros Mountains inferred from a multi-proxy record from Lake Mirabad, Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Lora R.; Ito, Emi; Schwalb, Antje; Wright, Herbert E.

    2006-11-01

    A sediment core 7.2 m long from Lake Mirabad, Iran, was examined for loss-on-ignition, mineralogy, oxygen-isotopic composition of authigenic calcite, and trace-element composition of ostracodes to complement earlier pollen and ostracode-assemblage studies. Pollen, ostracode-inferred lake level, and high Sr/Ca ratios indicate that the early Holocene (10000 to 6500 cal yr BP) was drier than the late Holocene. Low δ18O values during this interval are interpreted as resulting from winter-dominated precipitation, characteristic of a Mediterranean climate. Increasing δ18O values after 6500 cal yr BP signal a gradual increase in spring rains, which are present today. A severe 600-yr drought occurred at ca. 5500 cal yr BP, shortly after the transition from pistachio-almond to oak forest. During the late Holocene, two milder droughts occurred at about 1500 and 500 cal yr BP. Within the resolution of the record, no drought is evident during the collapse of the Akkadian empire (4200-3900 cal yr BP). Rather, a decrease in δ18O values to early-Holocene levels may indicate the return to a Mediterranean precipitation regime.

  3. Prediction of calcite Cement Distribution in Shallow Marine Sandstone Reservoirs using Seismic Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakke, N.E.

    1996-12-31

    This doctoral thesis investigates how calcite cemented layers can be detected by reflection seismic data and how seismic data combined with other methods can be used to predict lateral variation in calcite cementation in shallow marine sandstone reservoirs. Focus is on the geophysical aspects. Sequence stratigraphy and stochastic modelling aspects are only covered superficially. Possible sources of calcite in shallow marine sandstone are grouped into internal and external sources depending on their location relative to the presently cemented rock. Well data and seismic data from the Troll Field in the Norwegian North Sea have been analysed. Tuning amplitudes from stacks of thin calcite cemented layers are analysed. Tuning effects are constructive or destructive interference of pulses resulting from two or more closely spaced reflectors. The zero-offset tuning amplitude is shown to depend on calcite content in the stack and vertical stack size. The relationship is found by regression analysis based on extensive seismic modelling. The results are used to predict calcite distribution in a synthetic and a real data example. It is found that describing calcite cemented beds in shallow marine sandstone reservoirs is not a deterministic problem. Hence seismic inversion and sequence stratigraphy interpretation of well data have been combined in a probabilistic approach to produce models of calcite cemented barriers constrained by a maximum amount of information. It is concluded that seismic data can provide valuable information on distribution of calcite cemented beds in reservoirs where the background sandstones are relatively homogeneous. 63 refs., 78 figs., 10 tabs.

  4. Calcite sealing in a fractured geothermal reservoir: Insights from combined EBSD and chemistry mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, David D.; Lister, Aaron; Prior, Dave J.

    2016-09-01

    Fractures play an important role as fluid flow pathways in geothermal resources hosted in indurated greywacke basement of the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand, including the Kawerau Geothermal Field. Over time, the permeability of such geothermal reservoirs can be degraded by fracture sealing as minerals deposit out of transported geothermal fluids. Calcite is one such fracture sealing mineral. This study, for the first time, utilises combined data from electron backscatter diffraction and chemical mapping to characterise calcite vein fill morphologies, and gain insight into the mechanisms of calcite fracture sealing in the Kawerau Geothermal Field. Two calcite sealing mechanisms are identified 1) asymmetrical syntaxial growth of calcite, inferred by the presence of single, twinned, calcite crystals spanning the entire fracture width, and 2) 3D, interlocking growth of bladed vein calcite into free space as determined from chemical and crystallographic orientation mapping. This study also identifies other potential uses of combined EBSD and chemical mapping to understand geothermal field evolution including, potentially informing on levels of fluid supersaturation from the study of calcite lattice distortion, and providing information on a reservoir's history of stress, strain, and deformation through investigation of calcite crystal deformation and twinning patterns.

  5. Review: geological and experimental evidence for secular variation in seawater Mg/Ca (calcite-aragonite seas and its effects on marine biological calcification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. Ries

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Synchronized transitions in the polymorph mineralogy of the major reef-building and sediment-producing calcareous marine organisms and abiotic CaCO3 precipitates (ooids, marine cements throughout Phanerozoic time are believed to have been caused by tectonically induced variations in the Mg/Ca ratio of seawater (molar Mg/Ca>2="aragonite seas", <2="calcite seas". Here, I assess the geological evidence in support of secular variation in seawater Mg/Ca and its effects on marine calcifiers, and review a series of recent experiments that investigate the effects of seawater Mg/Ca (1.0–5.2 on extant representatives of calcifying taxa that have experienced variations in this ionic ratio of seawater throughout the geologic past.

    Secular variation in seawater Mg/Ca is supported by synchronized secular variations in (1 the ionic composition of fluid inclusions in primary marine halite, (2 the mineralogies of late stage marine evaporites, abiogenic carbonates, and reef- and sediment-forming marine calcifiers, (3 the Mg/Ca ratios of fossil echinoderms, molluscs, rugose corals, and abiogenic carbonates, (4 global rates of tectonism that drive the exchange of Mg2+ and Ca2+ along zones of ocean crust production, and (5 additional proxies of seawater Mg/Ca including Sr/Mg ratios of abiogenic carbonates, Sr/Ca ratios of biogenic carbonates, and Br concentrations in marine halite.

    Laboratory experiments have revealed that aragonite-secreting bryopsidalean algae and scleractinian corals and calcite-secreting coccolithophores exhibit higher rates of calcification and growth in experimental seawaters formulated with seawater Mg/Ca ratios that favor their skeletal mineral. These results support the assertion that seawater Mg/Ca played an important role in determining which hypercalcifying marine organisms were the major reef-builders and sediment-producers throughout Earth history. The observation that primary

  6. Microbially-Mediated Precipitation of Calcium Carbonate Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ser Ku; Roh, Yul

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the biomineralization of carbonate minerals using microorganisms (Wu Do-1) enriched from rhodoliths. A 16S rRNA sequence analysis showed that Wu Do-1 mainly contained Proteus mirabilis. The pH decreased from 6.5 to 5.3 over the first 4 days of incubation due to microbial oxidation of organic acids, after which it increased to 7.8 over the remaining incubation period. XRD analysis showed that the precipitates were Mg-rich cal- cite (MgxCa(1-x)CO3), whereas no precipitates were formed without the addition of Wu Do-1 in D-1 medium. SEM-EDS analyses showed that the Mg-rich calcite had a rhombohedron shape and consisted of Ca, Si and Mg with an extracelluar polymeric substance (EPS). In addition, TEM-EDS analyses revealed they were hexagon in shape, 500-700 nm in size, and composed of Ca, Mg, C, and O. These results indicated that Wu Do-1 induced precipitation of Mg-rich calcite on the cell walls and EPS via the accumulation of Ca and/or Mg ions. Therefore, microbial precipitation of carbonate nanoparticles may play an important role in metal and carbon biogeochemistry, as well as in carbon sequestration in natural environments.

  7. Acceleration of calcite kinetics by abalone nacre proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fu, G; Qiu, S R; Orme, C A; Morse, D E; De Yoreo, J J

    2005-06-09

    The fascinating shapes and hierarchical designs of biomineralized structures have long been an inspiration to materials scientists because of the potential they suggest for biomolecular control over synthesis of crystalline materials. One prevailing view is that mineral-associated macromolecules are responsible for initiating and stabilizing non-equilibrium crystal polymorphs and morphologies through interactions between anionic moieties and cations in solution or at mineral surfaces. Indeed, numerous studies have demonstrated that bio-organic additives can dramatically alter crystal shapes and growth-rates in vitro. However, previous molecular-scale studies revealing mechanisms of growth modification focused on small molecules such as amino acids or peptides and always observed growth inhibition. In contrast, studies using full proteins were non-quantitative and underlying sources of growth modification were ill-defined. Here we investigate interactions between proteins isolated from abalone shell nacre and growing surfaces of calcite. We find that these proteins significantly accelerate the molecular-scale kinetics and, though much larger than atomic steps, alter growth morphology through step-specific interactions that lower their free energies. We propose that these proteins act as surfactants to promote ion attachment at calcite surfaces.

  8. Environmental controls on the Emiliania huxleyi calcite mass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horigome, M. T.; Ziveri, P.; Grelaud, M.; Baumann, K.-H.; Marino, G.; Mortyn, P. G.

    2013-06-01

    Although ocean acidification is expected to impact (bio)calcification by decreasing the seawater carbonate ion concentration, [CO32-], there exists evidence of non-uniform response of marine calcifying plankton to low seawater [CO32-]. This raises questions on the role of environmental factors other than acidification and on the complex physiological responses behind calcification. Here we investigate the synergistic effect of multiple environmental parameters, including temperature, nutrient (nitrate and phosphate) availability, and seawater carbonate chemistry on the coccolith calcite mass of the cosmopolitan coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi, the most abundant species in the world ocean. We use a suite of surface (late Holocene) sediment samples from the South Atlantic and southwestern Indian Ocean taken from depths lying well above the modern lysocline. The coccolith calcite mass in our results presents a latitudinal distribution pattern that mimics the main oceanographic features, thereby pointing to the potential importance of phosphorus and temperature in determining coccolith mass by affecting primary calcification and possibly driving the E. huxleyi morphotype distribution. This evidence does not necessarily argue against the potentially important role of the rapidly changing seawater carbonate chemistry in the future, when unabated fossil fuel burning will likely perturb ocean chemistry beyond a critical point. Rather our study highlights the importance of evaluating the combined effect of several environmental stressors on calcifying organisms to project their physiological response(s) in a high CO2 world and improve interpretation of paleorecords.

  9. Molecular simulation of oligomer inhibitors for calcite scale

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiuyu Zhang; Hua Ren; Wenwen Wang; Junping Zhang; Hepeng Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Molecular simulation was performed to study the interaction between CaCO3 crystal and several oligomer inhibitors,by using the equilibrium morphology method to calculate the growth morphology of CaCO3 without inhibitors.The calculated morphology agreed well with SEM photographs.Then,a double-layer model was built to investigate the interaction between calcite crystal and oligomer inhibitors containing maleic anhydride (MA) and acrylic acid (AA).Interaction energy per gram of an oligomer inhibitor was introduced as a scale of inhibition efficiency of different monomers.The results indicated that,for calcite scale inhibition,acrylamide (AM) and vinyl phosphonic acid (VPA) were the most efficient monomers,while allylsulfonic acid (AS) was the poorest.Increasing proportion of AM in dimer inhibitor molecule would improve the inhibition efficiency of MA,though,for a trimer,such as MA-AA-AM,certain sequence of monomers in the inhibitor molecule was necessary besides higher proportion of AM.

  10. Isotopic analysis for degradation diagnosis of calcite matrix in mortar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dotsika, E; Psomiadis, D; Poutoukis, D; Raco, B; Gamaletsos, P

    2009-12-01

    Mortar that was used in building as well as in conservation and restoration works of wall paintings have been analysed isotopically (delta(13)C and delta(18)O) in order to evaluate the setting environments and secondary processes, to distinguish the structural components used and to determine the exact causes that incurred the degradation phenomena. The material undergoes weathering and decay on a large proportion of its surface and in depth, due to the infiltration of water through the structural blocks. Mineralogical analysis indicated signs of sulphation and dissolution/recrystallisation processes taking place on the material, whereas stable isotopes provided information relative to the origin of the CO(2) and water during calcite formation and degradation processes. Isotopic change of the initial delta(13)C and delta(18)O in carbonate matrix was caused by alteration of the primary source of CO(2) and H(2)O in mortar over time, particularly by recrystallisation of calcite with porewater, evaporated or re-condensed water, and CO(2) from various sources of atmospheric and biogenic origin. Human influence (surface treatment) and biological growth (e.g. fungus) are major exogenic processes which may alter delta(18)O and delta(13)C in lime mortar.

  11. Controls by saturation state on etch pit formation during calcite dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, H. Henry

    2004-01-01

    Dissolution experiments were conducted on {101¯4} cleavage faces of calcite at various under-saturations to determine how the saturation state controls etch pit formation. Experimental observations were made by using in situ fluid cell Atomic Force Microscopy. Three dissolution modes were observed. When the saturation index Ω > 0.541, no etch pit formation was seen and dissolution primarily occurred at existing steps. When Ω decreased to Ω c = 0.541-0.410, the first visible pits appeared and continuous reduction in saturation state slowly increased the pit density on terraces while dissolution simultaneously proceeded at step edges. Finally, when the saturation state fell below Ω max = ˜0.007, a precipitous increase in pit density took place that sharply contrasted to the ordered fashion of pit formation observed at saturation conditions above this level. These observations are interpreted to be two-dimensional and unassisted pit formation at Ω 0.541. The values of Ω c are in good agreement with the dislocation theory's predicted critical under-saturations for pit formation at line dislocations. The occurrence of Ω max is not directly predicted but is a logical consequence of dissolution thermodynamics. These findings suggest that (1) dissolution near and far from equilibrium (i.e., Ω > Ω c, Ω unassisted pit nucleation at Ω ˜ Ω max is not predicted by the current dissolution rate equations. This suggests that an accurate 'general' rate law describing universal dissolution processes has yet to be developed.

  12. The surface reactivity of chalk (biogenic calcite) with hydrophilic and hydrophobic functional groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okhrimenko, D. V.; Dalby, K. N.; Skovbjerg, L. L.; Bovet, N.; Christensen, J. H.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2014-03-01

    The surface properties of calcium carbonate minerals play an important role in a number of industrial and biological processes. Properties such as wettability and adsorption control liquid-solid interface behaviour and thus have a strong influence on processes such as biomineralisation, remediation of aquifers and oil recovery. We investigated how two model molecules of different polarity, namely water and ethanol, interact with reservoir and outcrop chalk samples and we compared their behaviour with that of pure, inorganically precipitated calcite. Thermodynamic quantities, such as the work of wetting, surface energy and isosteric adsorption enthalpy, were determined from vapour adsorption isotherms. The chalks were studied fresh and after extraction of organic residues that were originally present in these samples. The work of wetting correlates with the amount of organic matter present in the chalk samples but we observed a fundamental difference between the adsorption properties of chalk and pure, inorganically precipitated calcite toward the less polar, ethanol molecule. Further analysis of the chemical composition of the organic matter extracted from the chalk samples was made by gas chromatography (GC-MS). Monitoring surface composition by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) before and after extraction of the organic material, and with atomic force microscopy (AFM), showed that nanometer sized clay crystals observed on the chalk particle surfaces could be an important part of the reason for the differences. Removal of the extractable portion of the hydrocarbons liberates adsorption sites that have different wetting properties than the rest of the chalk and these have an energy distribution that is similar to clays. Thus, the results exemplify the complexity of biogenic calcite adsorption behaviour and demonstrate that chalk wetting in drinking water aquifers as well as oil reservoirs is controlled partly by the nanoparticles of clay that have grown on the

  13. PRECIPITATION OF PLUTONOUS PEROXIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrick, J.G.; Manion, J.P.

    1961-08-15

    A precipitation process for recovering plutonium values contained in an aqueous solution is described. In the process for precipitating plutonium as plutonous peroxide, hydroxylamine or hydrazine is added to the plutoniumcontaining solution prior to the addition of peroxide to precipitate plutonium. The addition of hydroxylamine or hydrazine increases the amount of plutonium precipitated as plutonous peroxide. (AEC)

  14. Use of multiple attributes decision-making Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution (TOPSIS for Ghare-Gheshlagh calcite in determination of optimum geochemical sampling sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour Rezaei Azizi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Several valuable calcite deposits are located in Ghare-Gheshlagh, south basin of Urmia Lake, NW Iran. Ghare-Gheshlagh area is situated in the northern part of tectono-sedimentary unit, forming NW part of Tertiary Sanandaj-Sirjan geological belt (Stocklin and Nabavi, 1972. The predominant rock types of the area include light color limestones (Qom Formation and Quaternary alluviums and underlined dolomite in depth (Eftekharnejhad, 1973. The thickness of these units varies between 10 cm and 6 meters and up to some hundred meters in length. In the present study, the effect of geochemical parameters responsible for precipitating calcite from the carbonate aqueous fluids is interpreted by the TOPSIS method to find the most preferable sampling sites and geochemical data. Materials and Methods A total of 20 samples were taken from a NE-SW trending profile including 15 calcites of fresh surface outcrops (5 samples per each colored calcite units in order to determine the nature of the rocks. The mineral assemblages were analyzed by optical methods in combination with XRD powder diffraction analysis. Major elements were determined by X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (XRF, trace and rare earth elements were determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS in Geological Survey of Iran. Results The abundances of trace elements were normalized to the continental crust values (Taylor and McLennan, 1981. The green calcite revealed enrichment in Rb and Sr, while green and white calcite were enriched in U. The U enrichment in the green calcite indicates the reduction condition of deposition. Incompatible elements such as Ba, Th, Nb and P depleted in all calcites. Varying the Sr/Ba value between 3.18 and 5.21% indicates the continental deposition environment and non-magmatic waters as well (Cheng et al., 2013. The Sr2+ content of calcites varies from 123 to 427 ppm, indicates suitable condition for calcite precipitation. Eu anomalies

  15. Assessing the impact of diagenesis on δ11B, δ13C, δ18O, Sr/Ca and B/Ca values in fossil planktic foraminiferal calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Kirsty M.; Anagnostou, Eleni; Pearson, Paul N.; Foster, Gavin L.

    2015-10-01

    The geochemical composition of foraminiferal tests is a valuable archive for the reconstruction of paleo-climatic, -oceanographic and -ecological changes. However, dissolution of biogenic calcite and precipitation of inorganic calcite (overgrowth and recrystallization) at the seafloor and in the sediment column can potentially alter the original geochemical composition of the foraminiferal test, biasing any resulting paleoenvironmental reconstruction. The δ11B of planktic foraminiferal calcite is a promising ocean pH-proxy but the effect of diagenesis is still poorly known. Here we present new δ11B, δ13C, δ18O, Sr/Ca and B/Ca data from multiple species of planktic foraminifera from time-equivalent samples for two low latitude sites: clay-rich Tanzanian Drilling Project (TDP) Site 18 from the Indian Ocean containing well-preserved ('glassy') foraminifera and carbonate-rich Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Site 865 from the central Pacific Ocean hosting recrystallized ('frosty') foraminifera. Our approach makes the assumption that environmental conditions were initially similar at both sites so most chemical differences are attributable to diagenesis. Planktic foraminiferal δ18O and δ13C records show offsets in both relative and absolute values between the two sites consistent with earlier findings that these isotopic ratios are strongly influenced by diagenetic alteration. Sr/Ca and B/Ca ratios in planktic foraminiferal calcite are also offset between the two sites but there is little change in the relative difference between surface and deep dwelling taxa. In contrast, δ11B values indicate no large differences between well-preserved and recrystallized foraminifera suggesting that despite extensive diagenetic alteration the δ11B of biogenic calcite appears robust, potentially indicative of a lack of free exchange of boron between pore fluids and the recrystallizing CaCO3. Our finding may remove one potential source of uncertainty in δ11B based p

  16. Dependence of calcite growth rate and Sr partitioning on solution stoichiometry: Non-Kossel crystal growth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nehrke, G.; Reichart, G.-J.; Van Cappellen, P.; Meile, C.; Bijma, J.

    2007-01-01

    Seeded calcite growth experiments were conducted at fixed pH (10.2) and two degrees of supersaturation (Ω = 5, 16), while varying the Ca2+ to CO3 2- solution ratio over several orders of magnitude. The calcite growth rate and the incorporation of Sr in the growing crystals strongly depended on

  17. Ethanol adsorption on the {10(1)over-bar4} calcite surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sand, Karina Krarup; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane; Hassenkam, Tue

    2008-01-01

    Preliminary atomic force microscopy investigations of the {10 (1) over bar4} calcite Surface cleaved in ethanol indicate a different surface behaviour than that of the {10 (1) over bar4} surface cleaved in air. The results are consistent with recent theoretical studies and suggest strong ordering...... of ethanol over the termination of the bulk calcite structure....

  18. Shock-induced effects in calcite from Cactus Crater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vizgirda, J.; Ahrens, T. J.; Tsay, F.-D.

    1980-01-01

    The paper discusses shock metamorphism of calcite from coralline limestone samples retrieved from a borehole drilled into rocks beneath Cactus Crater, a nuclear explosion crater at Eniwetok Atoll. The metamorphism was detected and quantified using electron spin resonance (ESR); the ESR spectra of Mn(+) present as a trace constituent in the coral samples, show a consistent decrease in hyperfine peak splitting with decreasing depth of sample. It is suggested that the decrease in hyperfine peak splitting reflects a decrease in crystal field splitting, and therefore, small increases on cation-anion distances produced by mechanical energy input during the shock process. Two alternative crater models suggested by the ESR results are a depiction of a steady decay of the shock wave, and a delineation of a breccia lens with a breccia-bedrock interface at 20 plus or minus 5 m.

  19. Revisiting diagenesis on the Ontong Java Plateau: Evidence for authigenic crust precipitation in Globorotalia tumida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, Oscar; Read, Elizabeth; Redfern, Simon A. T.; Rau, Christoph; Elderfield, Henry

    2015-11-01

    The calcite tests of foraminifera lie in marine sediments for thousands to millions of years, before being analyzed to generate trace element and isotope paleoproxy records. These sediments constitute a distinct physio-chemical environment from the conditions in which the tests formed. Storage in sediments can modify the trace element and isotopic content of foraminiferal calcite through diagenetic alteration, which has the potential to confound their paleoceanographic interpretation. A previous study of Globorotalia tumida from the Ontong Java Plateau, western equatorial Pacific, found that preferential dissolution of higher-Mg chamber calcite and the preservation of a low-Mg crust on the tests significantly reduced whole-test Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca. Here we revisit specimens with a combination of synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (sXCT) and electron probe microanalyses to reevaluate the nature of their diagenetic alteration. The dissolution of higher-Mg calcite with depth was directly observed in the sXCT data, confirming the inference of the previous study. The sXCT data further reveal a thickening of the chemically and structurally distinct calcite crust with depth. We propose that these crusts have a diagenetic origin, driven by the simultaneous dissolution of high-Mg chamber calcite and precipitation of low-Mg crust from the resulting modified pore water solution. While the breadth of the study is limited by the nature of the techniques, the observation of both dissolution and reprecipitation of foraminiferal calcite serves to demonstrate the action of two simultaneous diagenetic alteration processes, with significant impacts on the resulting paleoproxy signals.

  20. Trace Metals in Groundwater & Vadose Zone Calcite: In Situ Containment & Stabilization of Stronthium-90 & Other Divalent Metals & Radionuclides at Arid West DOE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert W.

    2005-06-01

    Radionuclide and metal contaminants such as strontium-90 are present beneath U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) lands in both the groundwater (e.g., 100-N area at Hanford, WA) and vadose zone (e.g., Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center [INTEC] at the Idaho National Laboratory [INL]). In situ containment and stabilization of these contaminants is a cost-effective treatment strategy. However, implementing in situ containment and stabilization approaches requires definition of the mechanisms that control contaminant sequestration. We are investigating the in situ immobilization of radionuclides or contaminant metals (e.g., strontium-90) by their facilitated co-precipitation with calcium carbonate (primarily calcite) in groundwater and vadose zone systems. Our facilitated approach relies upon the hydrolysis of introduced urea to cause the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by (a) increasing pH and alkalinity and (b) liberating cations from the aquifer matrix by cation exchange reactions. Subsurface urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which is produced in situ by native urea hydrolyzing microorganisms. Because the precipitation process tends to be irreversible and many western aquifers are saturated with respect to calcite, the co-precipitated metals and radionuclides will be effectively removed from the aqueous phase over the long term. We are currently conducting field based activities at both the INL Vadose Zone Research Park (VZRP), an uncontaminated surrogate site for the strontium-90 contaminated vadose zone at INTEC and at the strontium-90 contaminated aquifer of 100-N area of the Hanford site.

  1. A global deglacial negative carbon isotope excursion in speleothem calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breecker, D.

    2015-12-01

    δ13C values of speleothem calcite decreased globally during the last deglaciation defining a carbon isotope excursion (CIE) despite relatively constant δ13C values of carbon in the ocean-atmosphere system. The magnitude of the CIE varied with latitude, increasing poleward from ~2‰ in the tropics to as much as 7‰ at high latitudes. This recent CIE provides an interesting comparison with CIEs observed in deep time. A substantial portion of this CIE can be explained by the increase in atmospheric pCO2 that accompanied deglaciation. The dependence of C3 plant δ13C values on atmospheric pCO2 predicts a 2‰ δ13C decrease driven by the deglacial pCO2 increase. I propose that this signal was transferred to caves and thus explains nearly 100% of the CIE magnitude observed in the tropics and no less than 30% at the highest latitudes in the compilation. An atmospheric pCO2 control on speleothem δ13C values, if real, will need to be corrected for using ice core data before δ13C records can be interpreted in a paleoclimate context. The decrease in the magnitude of the equilibrium calcite-CO2 carbon isotope fractionation factor explains a maximum of 1‰ of the CIE at the highest northern latitude in the compilation, which experienced the largest deglacial warming. Much of the residual extratropical CIE was likely driven by increasing belowground respiration rates, which were presumably pronounced at high latitudes as glacial retreat exposed fresh surfaces and/or vegetation density increased. The largest increases in belowground respiration would have therefore occurred at the highest latitudes, explaining the meridional trend. This work supports the notion that increases in atmospheric pCO2 and belowground respiration rates can result in large CIEs recorded in terrestrial carbonates, which, as previously suggested, may explain the magnitude of the PETM CIE as recorded by paleosol carbonates.

  2. Unusual micrometric calcite-aragonite interface in the abalone shell Haliotis (Mollusca, Gastropoda).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauphin, Yannicke; Cuif, Jean-Pierre; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Chevallard, Corinne; Farre, Bastien; Meibom, Anders

    2014-02-01

    Species of Haliotis (abalone) show high variety in structure and mineralogy of the shell. One of the European species (Haliotis tuberculata) in particular has an unusual shell structure in which calcite and aragonite coexist at a microscale with small patches of aragonite embedded in larger calcitic zones. A detailed examination of the boundary between calcite and aragonite using analytical microscopies shows that the organic contents of calcite and aragonite differ. Moreover, changes in the chemical composition of the two minerals seem to be gradual and define a micrometric zone of transition between the two main layers. A similar transition zone has been observed between the layers in more classical and regularly structured mollusk shells. The imbrication of microscopic patches of aragonite within a calcitic zone suggests the occurrence of very fast physiological changes in these taxa.

  3. Influence of surface conductivity on the apparent zeta potential of calcite

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Shuai; Heberling, Frank; Devau, Nicolas; Jougnot, Damien; Chiaberge, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Zeta potential is a physicochemical parameter of particular importance in describing the surface electrical properties of charged porous media. However, the zeta potential of calcite is still poorly known because of the difficulty to interpret streaming potential experiments. The Helmholtz-Smoluchowski (HS) equation is widely used to estimate the apparent zeta potential from these experiments. However, this equation neglects the influence of surface conductivity on streaming potential. We present streaming potential and electrical conductivity measurements on a calcite powder in contact with an aqueous NaCl electrolyte. Our streaming potential model corrects the apparent zeta potential of calcite by accounting for the influence of surface conductivity and flow regime. We show that the HS equation seriously underestimates the zeta potential of calcite, particularly when the electrolyte is diluted (ionic strength < 0.01 M) because of calcite surface conductivity. The basic Stern model successfully predicted ...

  4. Evolution of a calcite marble shear zone complex on Thassos Island, Greece: microstructural and textural fabrics and their kinematic significance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bestmann, Michel; Kunze, Karsten; Matthews, Alan

    2000-11-01

    The deformation history of a monophase calcite marble shear zone complex on Thassos Island, Northern Greece, is reconstructed by detailed geometric studies of the textural and microstructural patterns relative to a fixed reference system (shear zone boundary, SZB). Strain localization within the massive marble complex is linked to decreasing P- T conditions during the exhumation process of the metamorphic core complex. Solvus thermometry indicates that temperatures of 300-350°C prevailed during part of the shear zone deformation history. The coarse-grained marble protolith outside the shear zone is characterized by symmetrically oriented twin sets due to early coaxial deformation. A component of heterogeneous non-coaxial deformation is first recorded within the adjacent protomylonite. Enhanced strain weakening by dynamic recrystallization promoted strong localization of plastic deformation in the ultramylonite of the calcite shear zone, where high strain was accommodated by non-coaxial flow. This study demonstrates that both a pure shear and a simple shear strain path can result in similar crystallographic preferred orientations (single c-axis maximum perpendicular to the SZB) by different dominant deformation mechanisms. Separated a-axis pole figures (+ a- and - a-axis) show different density distributions with orthorhombic texture symmetry in the protolith marble and monoclinic symmetry in the ultramylonite marble consistently with the observed grain fabric symmetry.

  5. Linkages between Icelandic Low position and SE Greenland winter precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berdahl, M.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Hammann, A. C.; Mioduszewski, J.; Hameed, S.; Tedesco, M.; Stroeve, J. C.; Mote, T. L.

    2015-12-01

    Greenland's largest flux of precipitation occurs in its Southeast (SE) region. An understanding of the mechanisms controlling precipitation in this region is lacking despite its disproportionate importance in the mass balance of Greenland and the consequent contributions to sea level rise. We use weather station data from the Danish Meteorological Institute to reveal the governing influences on precipitation in SE Greenland during the winter and fall. We find that precipitation in the fall is significantly correlated to the longitude of the Icelandic Low and the NAO. Winter precipitation is correlated with the strength and longitude of the Icelandic Low, as well as the NAO. We show that in years of extreme high precipitation, onshore winds dominate, thereby advecting more moisture inland. In low precipitation years, winds are more westerly, approaching the stations from land. Understanding the controls of SE Greenland precipitation will help us predict how future precipitation in this key region may change in a warming climate.

  6. Ca and S K-edge XANES studies of calcite-acid mine water interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myneni, S.C.B.; Perera, R.C.C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-04-01

    Heavy metal-rich acidic waters (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, AsO{sub 4}{sup 3{minus}}, SeO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}, Fe{sup 2+}, Fe{sup 3+}, Al{sup 3+}, Cu{sup 2+}, Zn{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}) and related ochreous coatings are common around abandoned sulfide and coal mine sites. This is mainly caused by the natural weathering of pyrite (FeS{sub 2}), arsenopyrite (FeAsS), and other metal sulfide containing shales. Acid generation in the case of pyrite can be explained by a general reaction: FeS{sub 2} + 3.5 O{sub 2} + H{sub 2}O {leftrightarrow} Fe{sup 2+} + SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} + 2H{sup +}. Also, these low pH waters interact with the soils, and mobilize their soluble elements. One of the common remediation strategies is to allow these acid waters to react with limestone (CaCO{sub 3}-rich rock) and neutralize the pH and precipitate out soluble metals. Yet, the associated problem is the precipitation of Fe and Al oxides and hydroxy sulfate coatings on limestone surfaces, which block calcite reactive sites, and make them ineffective a few hours after initiation of treatment. The main objectives of this research are to examine: (1) the chemistry of limestone surface coatings, and (2) their toxic metal uptake and the conditions that inhibit their formation. Previous molecular studies using X-ray diffraction, and vibrational spectroscopy on limestone surface coatings (sampled from Athens, OH) indicate that the surface-most layer (the layer in contact with water) is composed of schwertmannite (Fe(III)-hydroxy sulfate) like phases. However, white, X-ray amorphous; Al-, sulfate- and carbonate-rich; and Ca-poor phases appeared at the interface between the limestone and the iron oxide coatings. The structure, morphology, and coordination chemistry of component major and trace elements of these white precipitate phases have not previously been examined.

  7. The influence of rigid second phases on the mechanical evolution of calcite rocks, with implications for strain localization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, N.; Evans, B.; Dresen, G.; Rybaki, E.

    2007-12-01

    Interactions between rheologically distinct phases may strongly influence both the microstructure and mechanical properties of shear zones, thus playing a key role in the development or inhibition of localized deformation. However, experimental, theoretical, and field observations have produced conflicting suggestions that either A) rigid phases may pin the grain-size of a dominant weak phase, driving deformation into the diffusion creep regime, and promoting weakening, or B) rigid phases may be load supporting, thus increasing the strength of the aggregate. To investigate the influence of chemically inert, rigid second phases on the strength, microstructural evolution, and dominant deformation mechanism of calcite rocks, we have performed conventional triaxial experiments (MIT), and high strain torsion experiments (GFZ-Potsdam) on synthetic calcite aggregates with no second phases added, 1% (by vol.) 4 μm carbon spheres, 10% (by vol.) 4 μm carbon spheres, and 10% (by vol.) 5 μm carbon splinters. Glassy carbon spheres and splinters were chosen as they are chemically inert under the experimental conditions, are mechanically strong compared to the calcite, and can be obtained with a narrow grain size distribution. Prior to deformation, samples were hot isostatically pressed (HIPed) at 1023K and 300 MPa, to control the starting grain-size. The presence of carbon spheres or splinters has a dramatic influence on the grain-size after HIPing: samples with 10% spheres or splinters have an initial grain-size that is a factor of three finer than pure samples after 2.25 hrs while samples with 1% spheres are ~1.5 times finer than pure samples, again after 2.25 hrs. Deformation experiments were performed at 1023K, at a confining pressure of 300 MPa (trixial) or 400 MPa (torsion), at constant equivalent strain rates between 5e-6 s-1 and 1e-3 s-1. In both triaxial compression and torsion experiments, samples containing 10% splinters are stronger than pure samples and those

  8. Topics on domination

    CERN Document Server

    Hedetniemi, ST

    1991-01-01

    The contributions in this volume are divided into three sections: theoretical, new models and algorithmic. The first section focuses on properties of the standard domination number &ggr;(G), the second section is concerned with new variations on the domination theme, and the third is primarily concerned with finding classes of graphs for which the domination number (and several other domination-related parameters) can be computed in polynomial time.

  9. Dominance in domestic dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borg, Van Der J.A.M.; Schilder, M.B.H.; Vinke, C.M.; Vries, De Han; Petit, Odile

    2015-01-01

    A dominance hierarchy is an important feature of the social organisation of group living animals. Although formal and/or agonistic dominance has been found in captive wolves and free-ranging dogs, applicability of the dominance concept in domestic dogs is highly debated, and quantitative data are

  10. Total well dominated trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finbow, Arthur; Frendrup, Allan; Vestergaard, Preben D.

    cardinality then G is a total well dominated graph. In this paper we study composition and decomposition of total well dominated trees. By a reversible process we prove that any total well dominated tree can both be reduced to and constructed from a family of three small trees....

  11. Dominance in domestic dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borg, Van Der J.A.M.; Schilder, M.B.H.; Vinke, C.M.; Vries, De Han; Petit, Odile

    2015-01-01

    A dominance hierarchy is an important feature of the social organisation of group living animals. Although formal and/or agonistic dominance has been found in captive wolves and free-ranging dogs, applicability of the dominance concept in domestic dogs is highly debated, and quantitative data are

  12. Dominating Sets and Domination Polynomials of Paths

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeid Alikhani

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Let G=(V,E be a simple graph. A set S⊆V is a dominating set of G, if every vertex in V\\S is adjacent to at least one vertex in S. Let 𝒫ni be the family of all dominating sets of a path Pn with cardinality i, and let d(Pn,j=|𝒫nj|. In this paper, we construct 𝒫ni, and obtain a recursive formula for d(Pn,i. Using this recursive formula, we consider the polynomial D(Pn,x=∑i=⌈n/3⌉nd(Pn,ixi, which we call domination polynomial of paths and obtain some properties of this polynomial.

  13. Infrared spectroscopy and density functional theory investigation of calcite, chalk, and coccoliths-do we observe the mineral surface?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Hem, Caroline Piper; Schultz, Logan Nicholas

    2014-01-01

    We have measured infrared spectra from several types of calcite: chalk, freshly cultured coccoliths produced by three species of algae, natural calcite (Iceland Spar), and two types of synthetic calcite. The most intense infrared band, the asymmetric carbonate stretch vibration, is clearly asymme...

  14. Fluid Inclusions of Calcite and Sources of Ore-forming Fluids in the Huize Zn-Pb-(Ag-Ge) District, Yunnan, China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Runsheng; LIU Congqiang; HUANG Zhilong; MA Deyun; LI Yuan; HU Bin; MA Gengsheng; LEI Li

    2004-01-01

    The Huize Zn-Pb- (Ag-Ge) district is a typical representative of the well-known medium-to large-sized carbonate-hosted Zn-Pb- (Ag-Ge) deposits, occurring in the Sichuan-Yunnan-Guizhou Pb-Zn Ore-forming Zone.Generally, fluid inclusions within calcite, one of the major gangue minerals, are dominated by two kinds of small (1-10μm) inclusions including pure-liquid and liquid. The inclusions exist in concentrated groups along the crystal planes of the calcite. The ore-forming fluids containing Pb and Zn, which belong to the Na+-K+-Ca2+-C1--F--SO42- type, are characterized by temperatures of 164-221 ℃, medium salinity in 5-10.8 wt% NaCl, and medium pressure at 410xl0s to 661 x 10s Pa. The contents of Na+-K+ and Cl--F-, and ratios of Na+/K+-Cl-/F- in fluid inclusions present good linearity. The ratios of Na+/K+ (4.66-6.71) and C1-/F- (1 8.21-31.04) in the fluid inclusions of calcite are relatively high, while those of Na+/K+ (0.29-5.69) and Cl-/F- (5.00-26.0) in the inclusions of sphalerite and pyrite are relatively low. The ratio of Na+/K+increases in accord with those of C1-/F, which indicates that ore-forming fluid of deep source participates in the mineralization. The waters of fluid inclusions have δD values from -43.5‰ to -55.4‰ of calcite. The δ18Ov-sMow values of the ore-forming fluids, calculated values, range from 17.09‰ to 18.56‰ of calcite and 17.80‰ to 23.14‰ for dolomite.δ13 Cv-PDB values range from -1.94‰ to -3.31‰ for calcite and -3.35‰ to 0.85‰ for the ore-bearing dolomite. These data better demonstrate that the ore-forming fluids were mainly derived from metamorphic water and magmatic hot fluid, in relation to the metamorphism of the Kunyang Group in the basement and magmatic hydrothermalism. The deposit itself might have resulted from ascending cycles of ore-forming fluid, enriched in Pb and Zn. The Huize Zn-Pb- (Ag-Ge)deposits related to carbonate-hosted Zn-Pb sulphides.

  15. Influence of surface conductivity on the apparent zeta potential of calcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai; Leroy, Philippe; Heberling, Frank; Devau, Nicolas; Jougnot, Damien; Chiaberge, Christophe

    2016-04-15

    Zeta potential is a physicochemical parameter of particular importance in describing the surface electrical properties of charged porous media. However, the zeta potential of calcite is still poorly known because of the difficulty to interpret streaming potential experiments. The Helmholtz-Smoluchowski (HS) equation is widely used to estimate the apparent zeta potential from these experiments. However, this equation neglects the influence of surface conductivity on streaming potential. We present streaming potential and electrical conductivity measurements on a calcite powder in contact with an aqueous NaCl electrolyte. Our streaming potential model corrects the apparent zeta potential of calcite by accounting for the influence of surface conductivity and flow regime. We show that the HS equation seriously underestimates the zeta potential of calcite, particularly when the electrolyte is diluted (ionic strength ⩽ 0.01 M) because of calcite surface conductivity. The basic Stern model successfully predicted the corrected zeta potential by assuming that the zeta potential is located at the outer Helmholtz plane, i.e. without considering a stagnant diffuse layer at the calcite-water interface. The surface conductivity of calcite crystals was inferred from electrical conductivity measurements and computed using our basic Stern model. Surface conductivity was also successfully predicted by our surface complexation model.

  16. Fabrication of porous calcite using chopped nylon fiber and its evaluation using rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kunio; Tram, Nguyen Xuan Thanh; Tsuru, Kanji; Toita, Riki

    2015-02-01

    Although porous calcite has attracted attention as bone substitutes, limited studies have been made so far. In the present study, porous calcite block was fabricated by introducing chopped nylon fiber as porogen. Ca(OH)2 powder containing 10 wt% chopped nylon fiber was compacted at 150 MPa, and sintered to burn out the fiber and to carbonate the Ca(OH)2 under stream of 1:2 O2-CO2. Sintering of Ca(OH)2 at 750 °C or lower temperature resulted in incomplete burning out of the fiber whereas sintering at 800 °C or higher temperature resulted in the formation of CaO due to the thermal decomposition of Ca(OH)2. However, sintering at 770 °C resulted in complete burning out of the fiber and complete carbonation of Ca(OH)2 to calcite without forming CaO. Macro- and micro-porosities of the porous calcite were approximately 23 and 16%, respectively. Diameter of the macropores was approximately 100 μm which is suitable for bone tissue penetration. Porous calcite block fabricated by this method exhibited good tissue response when implanted in the bone defect in femur of 12-weeks-old rat. Four weeks after implantation, bone bonded on the surface of calcite. Furthermore, bone tissue penetrated interior to the macropore at 8 weeks. These results demonstrated the good potential value of porous calcite as artificial bone substitutes.

  17. Modelled Precipitation Over Greenland

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes the annual total precipitation from 1985 to 1999 and monthly total precipitation from January 1985 to December 1999. The data is derived from...

  18. Uranium isotope fractionation during coprecipitation with aragonite and calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xinming; Romaniello, Stephen J.; Herrmann, Achim D.; Wasylenki, Laura E.; Anbar, Ariel D.

    2016-09-01

    Natural variations in 238U/235U of marine calcium carbonates might provide a useful way of constraining redox conditions of ancient environments. In order to evaluate the reliability of this proxy, we conducted aragonite and calcite coprecipitation experiments at pH ∼7.5 and ∼8.5 to study possible U isotope fractionation during incorporation into these minerals. Small but significant U isotope fractionation was observed in aragonite experiments at pH ∼8.5, with heavier U isotopes preferentially enriched in the solid phase. 238U/235U of dissolved U in these experiments can be fit by Rayleigh fractionation curves with fractionation factors of 1.00007 + 0.00002/-0.00003, 1.00005 ± 0.00001, and 1.00003 ± 0.00001. In contrast, no resolvable U isotope fractionation was observed in an aragonite experiment at pH ∼7.5 or in calcite experiments at either pH. Equilibrium isotope fractionation among different aqueous U species is the most likely explanation for these findings. Certain charged U species are preferentially incorporated into calcium carbonate relative to the uncharged U species Ca2UO2(CO3)3(aq), which we hypothesize has a lighter equilibrium U isotope composition than most of the charged species. According to this hypothesis, the magnitude of U isotope fractionation should scale with the fraction of dissolved U that is present as Ca2UO2(CO3)3(aq). This expectation is confirmed by equilibrium speciation modeling of our experiments. Theoretical calculation of the U isotope fractionation factors between different U species could further test this hypothesis and our proposed fractionation mechanism. These findings suggest that U isotope variations in ancient carbonates could be controlled by changes in the aqueous speciation of seawater U, particularly changes in seawater pH, PCO2 , Ca2+, or Mg2+ concentrations. In general, these effects are likely to be small (<0.13‰), but are nevertheless potentially significant because of the small natural range of

  19. Chemistry and isotopic composition of precipitation and surface waters in Khumbu valley (Nepal Himalaya): N dynamics of high elevation basins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestrini, Raffaella; Polesello, Stefano; Sacchi, Elisa

    2014-07-01

    We monitored the chemical and isotopic compositions of wet depositions, at the Pyramid International Laboratory (5050 ma.s.l.), and surrounding surface waters, in the Khumbu basin, to understand precipitation chemistry and to obtain insights regarding ecosystem responses to atmospheric inputs. The major cations in the precipitation were NH4(+) and Ca(2+), whereas the main anion was HCO3(-), which constituted approximately 69% of the anions, followed by NO3(-), SO4(2-) and Cl(-). Data analysis suggested that Na(+), Cl(-) and K(+) were derived from the long-range transport of marine aerosols. Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and HCO3(-) were related to rock and soil dust contributions and the NO3(-) and SO4(2-) concentrations were derived from anthropogenic sources. Furthermore, NH4(+) was derived from gaseous NH3 scavenging. The isotopic composition of weekly precipitation ranged from -1.9 to -23.2‰ in δ(18)O, and from -0.8 to -174‰ in δ(2)H, with depleted values characterizing the central part of the monsoon period. The chemical composition of the stream water was dominated by calcite and/or gypsum dissolution. However, the isotopic composition of the stream water did not fully reflect the composition of the monsoon precipitation, which suggested that other water sources contributed to the stream flow. Precipitation contents for all ions were the lowest ones among those measured in high elevation sites around the world. During the monsoon periods the depositions were not substantially influenced by anthropogenic inputs, while in pre- and post-monsoon seasons the Himalayas could not represent an effective barrier for airborne pollution. In the late monsoon phase, the increase of ionic contents in precipitation could also be due to a change in the moisture source. The calculated atmospheric N load (0.30 kg ha(-1) y(-1)) was considerably lower than the levels that were measured in other high-altitude environments. Nevertheless, the NO3(-) concentrations in the surface waters

  20. 磷酸盐改性方解石去除水中磷酸盐研究%Removal of phosphate from aqueous solution by phosphate-modified calcite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林建伟; 李佳; 詹艳慧

    2013-01-01

    Previous literatures have shown that calcite can be used to effectively remove phosphate from aqueous solution. In this study, the calcite-phosphate reaction product, i.e., phosphate-modified calcite was reused to remove phosphate from aqueous solution. The phosphate removal kinetics of natural calcite and phosphate-modified calcite were compared. The effect of various experimental conditions such as solution pH, initial phosphate concentration, temperature, Ca2+ and HCO3- on phosphate removal by phosphate-modified calcite was investigated. The phosphate removal efficiency of phosphate-modified calcite was much higher than that of natural calcite. When the reaction time was 2 h, the phosphate removal efficiency of phosphate-modified calcite was 72%under the experimental conditions, which was much higher than that of natural calcite (35%). The phosphate removal efficiency of phosphate-modified calcite was relatively high at pH 5-7, slightly decreased with increasing pH from 7 to 10, and significantly decreased with increasing pH from 10 to 12. The amount of phosphate removed by phosphate-modified calcite increased with increasing initial phosphate concentration. The phosphate removal efficiency of phosphate-modified calcite decreased with increasing initial phosphate concentration at a relatively high initial phosphate-phosphorus concentration (60-160 mg·L-1). The phosphate removal efficiency of phosphate-modified calcite increased with increasing temperature. The phosphate removal kinetics of phosphate-modified calcite followed a pseudo-second-order kinetic model. The removal of phosphate by phosphate-modified calcite occurred predominantly via the precipitation of calcium phosphate according to two consecutive phases:first, the dissolution of calcite produced an increase in the Ca2+concentration;then the Ca2+ions reacted with the phosphate ions to form the precipitate of calcium phosphate. The precipitation of calcium phosphate took place at the surface of

  1. Binding of ethanol on calcite: the role of the OH bond and its relevance to biomineralization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sand, K K; Yang, M; Makovicky, E;

    2010-01-01

    adsorption on calcite relative to OH from water and the consequences of the differences in interaction on crystal growth and dissolution. A combination of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations showed that EtOH attachment on calcite is stronger than HOH binding...... to the surface. The strong influence of calcite in structuring ethanol extends further into the liquid than expected from electrical double-layer theory. This suggests that in fluids where water activity is low, such as in biological systems optimized for biomineralization, organic molecules can control ion...

  2. Recurrent Pure Calcite Urolithiasis Confirmed by Endoscopic Removal and Infrared Spectroscopy in a Malnourished Anorectic Female

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreassen, Kim Hovgaard; Sloth Osther, Palle Jörn

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Often when calcite is found as a component of urinary calculi, they are considered false calculi or artifacts. We present a case of true calcite urolithiasis. The stone material was removed percutaneously from a severely malnourished anorectic woman and analyzed by infrared spectroscopy (IRS). In addition, calcite urolithiasis was confirmed in several recurrent stone events by IRS. Laxative abuse with magnesium oxide was believed to be the underlying cause of stone formation, and ammonium chloride given as one weekly dose turned out to be effective for stone prevention. PMID:27579419

  3. Comparison of galvanic displacement and electroless methods for deposition of gold nanoparticles on synthetic calcite

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chamarthi K Srikanth; P Jeevanandam

    2012-11-01

    Gold nanoparticles have been deposited on synthetic calcite substrate by galvanic displacement reaction and electroless deposition methods. A comparative study has shown that electroless deposition is superior compared to galvanic displacement reaction for uniform deposition of gold nanoparticles on calcite. Characterization of the samples, prepared by two different deposition methods, was carried out by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE–SEM) and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) measurements. FE–SEM studies prove that smaller nanoparticles of gold are deposited uniformly on calcite if electroless deposition method was employed and DRS measurements show the characteristic surface plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles.

  4. A novel salinity proxy based on Na incorporation into foraminiferal calcite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. C. Wit

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Salinity and temperature determine seawater density, and differences in both thereby control global thermohaline circulation. Whereas numerous proxies have been calibrated and applied to reconstruct temperature, a direct and independent proxy for salinity is still missing. Ideally, a new proxy for salinity should target one of the direct constituents of dissolved salt, such as [Na+] or [Cl−]. This study investigates the impact of salinity on foraminiferal Na/Ca values by laser ablation ICP-MS analyses of specimens of the benthic foraminifer Ammonia tepida cultured at a range of salinities (30.0–38.6. Foraminifera at lower salinities (30.0 and 32.5 added more chambers (10–11 to their test over the course of the culturing experiment than those maintained at higher salinities (36.1, 7–8 chambers, and 38.6, 6–7 chambers, suggesting that growth rates in this species are promoted by lower salinities. The Na/Ca of cultured specimens correlates significantly with seawater salinity (Na/Ca = 0.22S–0.75, R2 = 0.96, p DNa vary between 5.17 and 9.29 mmol mol−1 and 0.12–0.16 × 10−3, which are similar to values from inorganic precipitation experiments. The significant correlation between test size and Na/Ca results from co-variation with salinity. This implies that foraminiferal Na/Ca could serve as a robust and independent proxy for salinity, enabling salinity reconstructions independent of calcitic δ18O.

  5. Effects of increased pCO2 and geographic origin on purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus calcite elemental composition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Hosfelt

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification will likely have negative impacts on invertebrates producing skeletons composed of calcium carbonate. Skeletal solubility is partly controlled by the incorporation of "foreign" ions (such as Mg and Sr into the crystal lattice of these skeletal structures, a process that is sensitive to a variety of biological and environmental factors. Here we explore the effects of life stage, oceanographic region of origin, and changes in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in seawater (pCO2 on trace elemental composition in the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. We show that, similar to other urchin taxa, adult purple sea urchins have the ability to precipitate skeleton composed of a range of biominerals spanning low to high magnesium calcites. Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios were substantially lower in adult spines compared to adult tests. On the other hand, trace elemental composition was invariant among adults collected from four oceanographically distinct regions along the US west coast (Oregon, Northern California, Central California, and Southern California. Skeletons of newly settled juvenile urchins that originated from adults from the four regions exhibited intermediate Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca between adult spine and test endmembers, indicating that skeleton precipitated during early life stages is more soluble than adult spines and less soluble than adult tests. Mean skeletal Mg/Ca or Sr/Ca of juvenile skeleton did not vary with source region when larvae were reared under present-day, global-average seawater carbonate conditions (400 ppm; pH = 8.02 ± 0.03 1 SD; Ωcalcite = 3.3 ± 0.2 1 SD. However, when reared under elevated CO2 (900 ppm; pH = 7.72 ± 0.03; Ωcalcite = 1.8 ± 0.1, skeletal Sr/Ca in juveniles exhibited increased variance across the four regions. Although larvae from the northern populations (Oregon, Northern California, Central California did not exhibit differences in Mg or Sr incorporation under elevated CO2

  6. Effects of increased pCO2 and geographic origin on purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) calcite elemental composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaVigne, M.; Hill, T. M.; Sanford, E.; Gaylord, B.; Russell, A. D.; Lenz, E. A.; Hosfelt, J. D.; Young, M. K.

    2012-12-01

    Ocean acidification will likely have negative impacts on invertebrates producing skeletons composed of calcium carbonate. Skeletal solubility is partly controlled by the incorporation of "foreign" ions (such as Mg and Sr) into the crystal lattice of these skeletal structures, a process that is sensitive to a variety of biological and environmental factors. Here we explore the effects of life stage, oceanographic region of origin, and changes in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in seawater (pCO2) on trace elemental composition in the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus). We show that, similar to other urchin taxa, adult purple sea urchins have the ability to precipitate skeleton composed of a range of biominerals spanning low to high magnesium calcites. Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca ratios were substantially lower in adult spines compared to adult tests. On the other hand, trace elemental composition was invariant among adults collected from four oceanographically distinct regions along the US west coast (Oregon, Northern California, Central California, and Southern California). Skeletons of newly settled juvenile urchins that originated from adults from the four regions exhibited intermediate Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca between adult spine and test endmembers, indicating that skeleton precipitated during early life stages is more soluble than adult spines and less soluble than adult tests. Mean skeletal Mg/Ca or Sr/Ca of juvenile skeleton did not vary with source region when larvae were reared under present-day, global-average seawater carbonate conditions (400 ppm; pH = 8.02 ± 0.03 1 SD; Ωcalcite = 3.3 ± 0.2 1 SD). However, when reared under elevated CO2 (900 ppm; pH = 7.72 ± 0.03; Ωcalcite = 1.8 ± 0.1), skeletal Sr/Ca in juveniles exhibited increased variance across the four regions. Although larvae from the northern populations (Oregon, Northern California, Central California) did not exhibit differences in Mg or Sr incorporation under elevated CO2 (Sr/Ca = 2

  7. Identification of appropriate temporal scales of dominant low flow indicators in the Main River, Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demirel, M.C.; Booij, Martijn J.; Servat, Eric; Demuth, Siegfried; Dezetter, Alain; Daniell, Trevor

    2010-01-01

    Models incorporating the appropriate temporal scales of dominant indicators for low flows are assumed to perform better than models with arbitrary selected temporal scales. In this paper, we investigate appropriate temporal scales of dominant low flow indicators: precipitation (P), evapotranspiratio

  8. Early diagenetic high-magnesium calcite and dolomite indicate that coal balls formed in marine or brackish water: Stratigraphic and paleoclimatic implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, Anne

    2016-04-01

    Coal balls are carbonate and pyrite permineralizations of peat that contain three-dimensional plant fossils preserved at the cellular level. Coal balls, which occur in Pennsylvanian and earliest Permian equatorial coals, provide a detailed record of terrestrial ecology and tropical climate during the Late Paleozoic Ice Age; yet their depositional environment remains controversial. The exquisite preservation of some coal-ball fossils, e.g. pollen with pollen tubes and leaves with mesophyll, indicates rapid formation. The presence of abundant, cement-filled, void spaces within and between the plant debris in most coal balls indicates that they formed in uncompacted peat, near the surface of the mire. Botanical, taphonomic and isotopic evidence point to a freshwater origin for coal balls. The nearest living relatives of coal ball plants (modern lycopsids, sphenopsids, marratialean ferns and conifers) grow in fresh water. Coal-ball peat contains a high percentage of aerial debris, similar to modern freshwater peat. The stable oxygen isotopes of coal-ball carbonate (δ18O = 16 to 3 per mil) suggest a freshwater origin. However, the widespread occurrence of marine invertebrates and early diagenetic framboidal pyrite in coal balls suggests that many formed in close proximity to marine water. Indeed, carbonate petrology points to a marine or brackish water origin for the first-formed carbonate cements in coal balls. Petrographic and geochemical (microprobe) analysis of coal-ball carbonates in Pennsylvanian coals from the midcontinent of North America (Western Interior Basin, West Pangaea) and the Ruhr and Donets Basins (East Pangaea) indicate that the first formed carbonate is either radaxial, nonstochiometric dolomite or high magnesium calcite (9 - 17 mol % MgCO3, indicating precipitation in marine or brackish water. Although both primary dolomite and high magnesium calcite can form in lacustrine settings, the lakes in which these minerals form occur in carbonate terranes

  9. Optimum conditions for microbial carbonate precipitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okwadha, George D O; Li, Jin

    2010-11-01

    The type of bacteria, bacterial cell concentration, initial urea concentration, reaction temperature, the initial Ca(2+) concentration, ionic strength, and the pH of the media are some factors that control the activity of the urease enzyme, and may have a significant impact on microbial carbonate precipitation (MCP). Factorial experiments were designed based on these factors to determine the optimum conditions that take into consideration economic advantage while at the same time giving quality results. Sporosarcina pasteurii strain ATCC 11859 was used at constant temperature (25°C) and ionic strength with varying amounts of urea, Ca(2+), and bacterial cell concentration. The results indicate that the rate of ureolysis (k(urea)) increases with bacterial cell concentration, and the bacterial cell concentration had a greater influence on k(urea) than initial urea concentration. At 25 mM Ca(2+) concentration, increasing bacterial cell concentration from 10(6) to 10(8)cells mL⁻¹ increased the CaCO(3) precipitated and CO(2) sequestrated by over 30%. However, when the Ca(2+) concentration was increased 10-fold to 250 mM Ca(2+), the amount of CaCO(3) precipitated and CO(2) sequestrated increased by over 100% irrespective of initial urea concentration. Consequently, the optimum conditions for MCP under our experimental conditions were 666 mM urea and 250 mM Ca(2+) at 2.3×10⁸ cells mL⁻¹ bacterial cell concentration. However, a greater CaCO(3) deposition is achievable with higher concentrations of urea, Ca(2+), and bacterial cells so long as the respective quantities are within their economic advantage. X-ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive X-ray analyzes confirmed that the precipitate formed was CaCO(3) and composed of predominantly calcite crystals with little vaterite crystals.

  10. Ultrasonic Observation of the Calcite-Aragonite Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, T. J.; Katz, S.

    1963-01-01

    Elastic-wave velocities were measured as a function of pressure by ultrasonic pulse Interferometry in Solenhofen and Manilus limestone specimens to pressures of 27 and 38 kb. Longitudinal velocities decrease sharply from 5.3 km/sec at a mean pressure of 4 kb to a minimum of 4.8 km/sec at 8 kb. Transverse velocities decrease from 3.1 to 2.9 km/sec. At the minimum bulk and rigidity moduli are 25 and 20 per cent below their 4-kb values. A density increase of 1.7 per cent is associated with this minimum. The observed effects are attributed to the calcite-aragonite transition, and they may be due to an inherent property of the material, a component of which undergoes a polymorphic transition, the low- and high-pressure phases coexisting over a considerable pressure range. This may be an additional mechanism to account for low-velocity zones in the earth?s interior.

  11. Pore-size-dependent calcium carbonate precipitation controlled by surface chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack, Andrew G; Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro; Allard, Lawrence F; Bañuelos, José L; Rother, Gernot; Anovitz, Lawrence M; Cole, David R; Waychunas, Glenn A

    2014-06-03

    Induced mineral precipitation is potentially important for the remediation of contaminants, such as during mineral trapping during carbon or toxic metal sequestration. The prediction of precipitation reactions is complicated by the porous nature of rocks and soils and their interaction with the precipitate, introducing transport and confinement effects. Here X-ray scattering measurements, modeling, and electron microscopies were used to measure the kinetics of calcium carbonate precipitation in a porous amorphous silica (CPG) that contained two discrete distributions of pore sizes: nanopores and macropores. To examine the role of the favorability of interaction between the substrate and precipitate, some of the CPG was functionalized with a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) similar to those known to enhance nucleation densities on planar substrates. Precipitation was found to occur exclusively in macropores in the native CPG, while simultaneous precipitation in nanopores and macropores was observed in the functionalized CPG. The rate of precipitation in the nanopores estimated from the model of the X-ray scattering matched that measured on calcite single crystals. These results suggest that the pore-size distribution in which a precipitation reaction preferentially occurs depends on the favorability of interaction between substrate and precipitate, something not considered in most studies of precipitation in porous media.

  12. Fluorite's precipitation in KOH solutions in view of removing fluorides from wastewaters

    OpenAIRE

    Taraves, Raquel; Garcia, Daniel; Moutte, Jacques; Cameirão, Ana; Févotte, Gilles; Amaraggi, David; Morel, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    International audience; The process under study aims at removing dissolved fluorides from effluent waters through the addition of calcium and the precipitation of fluorite in a fluidized bed. In the concept developed at COMURHEX, the effluent is a highly concentrated KOH solution and the calcium is provided as a suspension of portlandite with calcite as an impurity. COMURHEX's target is to achieve an efficient defluorination of KOH solutions prior to recycling and to control the growth of the...

  13. Britholite, monazite, REE carbonates, and calcite: Products of hydrothermal alteration of allanite and apatite in A-type granite from Stupné, Western Carpathians, Slovakia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uher, Pavel; Ondrejka, Martin; Bačík, Peter; Broska, Igor; Konečný, Patrik

    2015-11-01

    An uncommon assemblage of primary and secondary accessory REE minerals was identified in a Permian A-type granite clast in polymict conglomerates intercalated in the Cretaceous flysch sequence of the Pieniny Klippen Belt, Western Carpathians, northwest Slovakia. A detailed electron-microprobe study of the granite reveals extensive subsolidus alteration of primary magmatic allanite-(Ce) to ferriallanite-(Ce) and fluorapatite. The Y, Ce-rich fluorapatite was replaced by the dissolution-reprecipitation process to the britholite group mineral members: fluorbritholite-(Y), britholite-(Y), fluorcalciobritholite, and its hydroxyl-dominant analogue ("calciobritholite"). Britholite-(Y) contains up to 5.2 wt.% ThO2 (0.15 apfu Th); the highest Th content yet reported in naturally occurring Y-dominant britholites. Moreover, the alteration of (ferri)allanite-(Ce) resulted to complex pseudomorphs and overgrowths, including mainly REE carbonate phases: [synchysite-(Ce) to its hydroxyl-dominant analogue "hydroxylsynchysite-(Ce)", bastnäsite-(Ce)] and calcite, rarely monazite-(Ce), epidote, clinochlore, titanite, TiO2 phase, and pseudorutile. In some cases, secondary carbonate minerals (mainly synchysite and calcite) replaced a substantial part of former allanite crystals. Moreover, primary magmatic biotite (annite) was partly transformed to acicular stilpnomelane. Textural and compositional data indicate extensive replacement and breakdown of the primary magmatic allanite and apatite by aqueous fluids rich in fluorine and carbon, liberated during a younger post-magmatic, low-temperature hydrothermal-metamorphic overprint of the granite.

  14. Autosomal dominant lamellar ichthyosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toribio, J; Fernández Redondo, V; Peteiro, C; Zulaica, A; Fabeiro, J M

    1986-08-01

    Five members of two generations of one family were affected with lamellar ichthyosis, suggesting autosomal dominant transmission. The clinical and histopathological characteristics of the cases described here are similar to those reported by Traupe et al. (1984) as autosomal dominant lamellar ichthyosis and thus confirm the existence of this new form of ichthyosis.

  15. Calcium sulfoaluminate (Ye'elimite) hydration in the presence of gypsum, calcite, and vaterite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hargis, Craig W. [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Telesca, Antonio [School of Engineering, University of Basilicata, Potenza (Italy); Monteiro, Paulo J.M., E-mail: monteiro@ce.berkeley.edu [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Six calcium sulfoaluminate-based cementitious systems composed of calcium sulfoaluminate, calcite, vaterite, and gypsum were cured as pastes and mortars for 1, 7, 28 and 84 days. Pastes were analyzed with X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses. Mortars were tested for compressive strength, dimensional stability and setting time. Furthermore, pastes with a water/cementitious material mass ratio of 0.80 were tested for heat evolution during the first 48 h by means of isothermal conduction calorimetry. It has been found that: (1) both calcite and vaterite reacted with monosulfoaluminate to give monocarboaluminate and ettringite, with vaterite being more reactive; (2) gypsum lowered the reactivity of both carbonates; (3) expansion was reduced by calcite and vaterite, irrespective of the presence of gypsum; and (4) both carbonates increased compressive strength in the absence of gypsum and decreased compressive strength less in the presence of gypsum, with vaterite's action more effective than that of calcite.

  16. High School Forum: "Invitations to Enquiry": The Calcite/Acid Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herron, J. Dudley, Ed.; Driscoll, D. R.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a high school chemistry experiment which involves the reaction between calcite and hydrochloric and sulfuric acids. This reaction can be carried out as a projected demonstration and on an individual basis. (HM)

  17. Morphological changes of calcite single crystals induced by graphene-biomolecule adducts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvaresi, Matteo; Di Giosia, Matteo; Ianiro, Alessandro; Valle, Francesco; Fermani, Simona; Polishchuk, Iryna; Pokroy, Boaz; Falini, Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    Calcite has the capability to interact with a wide variety of molecules. This usually induces changes in shape and morphology of crystals. Here, this process was investigated using sheets of graphene-biomolecule adducts. They were prepared and made dispersible in water through the exfoliation of graphite by tip sonication in the presence tryptophan or N-acetyl-D-glucosamine. The crystallization of calcium carbonate in the presence of these additives was obtained by the vapor diffusion method and only calcite formed. The analysis of the microscopic observations showed that the graphene-biomolecule adducts affected shape and morphology of rhombohedral {10.4} faced calcite crystals, due to their stabilization of additional {hk.0} faces. The only presence of the biomolecule affected minimally shape and morphology of calcite crystals, highlighting the key role of the graphene sheets as 2D support for the adsorption of the biomolecules.

  18. Enhancing mechanical properties of calcite by Mg substitutions: An ab initio study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elstnerova, Pavlina; Friak, Martin; Hickel, Tilmann; Fabritius, Helge Otto; Lymperakis, Liverios; Petrov, Michal; Raabe, Dierk; Neugebauer, Joerg; Nikolov, Svetoslav; Zigler, Andreas; Hild, Sabine

    2011-03-01

    Arthropoda representing a majority of all known animal species are protected by an exoskeleton formed by their cuticle. The cuticle represents a hierarchically structured multifunctional bio-composite based on chitin and proteins. Some groups like Crustacea reinforce the load-bearing parts of their cuticle with calcite. As the calcite sometimes contains Mg it was speculated that Mg may have a stiffening impact on the mechanical properties of the cuticle. We present a theoretical parameter-free quantum-mechanical study of thermodynamic, structural and elastic properties of Mg-substituted calcite. Our results show that substituting Ca by Mg causes an almost linear decrease in the crystal volume with Mg concentration and of substituted crystals. As a consequence the calcite crystals become stiffer giving rise e.g. to substantially increased bulk moduli.

  19. The mechanical and microstructural behaviour of calcite-dolomite composites: An experimental investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Kushnir, Alexandra R. l.; Kennedy, L. A.; Misra, Santanu; Benson, Philip; White, J C

    2015-01-01

    The styles and mechanisms of deformation associated with many variably dolomitized limestone shear systems are strongly controlled by strain partitioning between dolomite and calcite. Here, we present experimental results from the deformation of four composite materials designed to address the role of dolomite on the strength of limestone. Composites were synthesized by hot isostatic pressing mixtures of dolomite (Dm) and calcite powders (% Dm: 25%-Dm, 35%-Dm, 51%-Dm, and 75%-Dm). In all comp...

  20. The coordination of sulfur in synthetic and biogenic Mg calcites: The red coral case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, J.; Rivard, C.; Vielzeuf, D.; Laporte, D.; Fonquernie, C.; Ricolleau, A.; Cotte, M.; Floquet, N.

    2017-01-01

    Sulfur has been recognized in biogenic calcites for a long time. However, its structural position is matter of debate. For some authors, sulfur is a marker of the organic matrix while it is part of the calcite structure itself for others. To better understand the place of sulfur in calcite, sulfated magnesian calcites (S-MgCalcite) have been synthetized at high pressure and temperature and studied by μ-XANES spectroscopy. S-MgCalcite XANES spectra show two different types of sulfur: sulfate (SO42-) as a predominant species and a small contribution of sulfite (SO32-), both substituting for carbonate ions in the calcite structure. To address the question of the position of sulfur in biogenic calcites, the oxidation states of sulfur in the skeleton and organic tissues of Corallium rubrum have been investigated by micro X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) and sulfur K-edge micro X-ray absorption near edge structure (μ-XANES) spectroscopy at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF, Grenoble, France) on beamline ID21. In the skeleton, sulfur is mainly present as oxidized sulfur SO42- (+VI), plus a weak sulfite contribution. XANES spectra indicate that sulfur is inorganically incorporated as sulfur structurally substituted to carbonate ions (SSS). Although an organic matrix is present in the red coral skeleton, reduced organic sulfur could not be detected by μ-XANES spectroscopy in the skeleton probably due to low organic/inorganic sulfur ratio. In the organic tissues surrounding the skeleton, several sulfur oxidation states have been detected including disulfide (S-S), thioether (R-S-CH3), sulfoxide (SO2), sulfonate (SO2O-) and sulfate (SO42-). The unexpected occurrence of inorganic sulfate within the organic tissues suggests the presence of pre-organized organic/inorganic complexes in the circulatory system of the red coral, precursors to biomineralization ahead of the growth front.

  1. Origin of sulfate in barite and calcite cements in the Jebel Madar salt dome (Oman)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandeginste, V.; John, C. M.; Gilhooly, W. P.

    2012-12-01

    Jebel Madar is a 500-m high mountain rising in the desert at the Oman Foothills. The Jebel consists of Triassic to Cretaceous carbonate host rocks forming the carapace of a salt dome. Halokinesis caused major fracturing and faulting at Jebel Madar, and the resulting structures acted as the main pathways for fluids that generated diagenetic cements composed of both barite and calcite. The spatial distribution of calcite and barite occurrences shows that calcite is formed in large abundance along the three main faults, whereas barite is more concentrated along faults further away from the three main ones. The stable carbon and oxygen isotope composition of calcite and fluid inclusion data from both calcite and barite show a distinct evolution of the fluid with a highly saline component towards more mixing with meteoric water. This is in agreement with clumped isotopes data on calcite cements indicating an evolution towards lower temperatures, consistent with doming of the Jebel and greater input of lower-temperature descending meteoric fluids. Here, we present sulphur and oxygen isotopic data on barite that suggest a link between the barite formation and the Precambrian salt underlying Jebel Madar. The average δ34S measured in barite is 33‰ CDT (1σ = 5‰; n = 33), which falls at the lower end of the δ34S range reported for the Ara Group anhydrite. The average δ18O in the same barite samples is 23‰ VSMOW (1σ = 2‰; n = 33). Data from the barite will be compared with sulphur isotopes from the carbonate-associate sulfate in the calcite cements. The overall goal of our research is to gain a better insight in the formation process of barite and calcite in Jebel Madar and its link with salt tectonics. We would like to acknowledge the financial support of QCCSRC (funded jointly by Qatar Petroleum, Shell and the Qatar Science & Technology Park) and the GSA Laubach fund for this study.

  2. Molecular dynamics simulation of adsorption of an oil-water-surfactant mixture on calcite surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lu Guiwu; Zhang Xuefen; Shao Changjin; Yang Hong

    2009-01-01

    An interface super molecular structure model for oil-water-surfactant mixture and calcite was established. By using a molecular dynamics method, the effects of rhamnolipid, sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate and sodium hexadecyl sulfonate on the interface adsorption behavior of oil molecules were investigated. It was found that these three surfactants could reduce oil-calcite interface binding energy, and play a role of oil-displacing agent.

  3. Accurate measurement of the main refractive indices and thermo-optical coefficients of the calcite crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuang Zhao; Fuquan Wu; Haifeng Wang; Weigang Zhong; Xiuzhen Li; Hengjing Tang; Meng Shi; Hongyan Deng

    2007-01-01

    The main refractive indices of calcite crystal are measured by the means of auto-collimation, and the thermo-optical coefficients are calculated. The coefficient expression of Sellmeier equation is obtained by solving Sellmeier equation strictly and the refractive indices of different wavelengths are calculated, which accord with experimental esultsery well. The measured main refractive indices of calcite at 488-nm wavelength are identical with the values obtained by Sellmeier equation.

  4. Sturgeon and paddlefish (Acipenseridae) sagittal otoliths are composed of the calcium carbonate polymorphs vaterite and calcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pracheil, B M; Chakoumakos, B C; Feygenson, M; Whitledge, G W; Koenigs, R P; Bruch, R M

    2017-02-01

    This study sought to resolve whether sturgeon (Acipenseridae) sagittae (otoliths) contain a non-vaterite fraction and to quantify how large a non-vaterite fraction is using neutron diffraction analysis. This study found that all otoliths examined had a calcite fraction that ranged from 18 ± 6 to 36 ± 3% by mass. This calcite fraction is most probably due to biological variation during otolith formation rather than an artefact of polymorph transformation during preparation.

  5. Trace Metals in Groundwater and Vadose Zone Calcite: In Situ Containment and Stabilization of Stronthium-90 and Other Divalent Metals and Radionuclides at Arid Western DOE Sites: Final Report for Award Number DE-FG07-02ER63486 to the University of Idaho (RW Smith) Environmental Management Science Program Project Number 87016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert W.; Fujita, Yoshiko

    2007-11-07

    Radionuclide and metal contaminants are present in the vadose zone and groundwater throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) energy research and weapons complex. In situ containment and stabilization of these contaminants represents a cost-effective treatment strategy that minimizes workers’ exposure to hazardous substances, does not require removal or transport of contaminants, and generally does not generate a secondary waste stream. We have investigated an in situ bioremediation approach that immobilizes radionuclides or contaminant metals (e.g., strontium-90) by their microbially facilitated co-precipitation with calcium carbonate in groundwater and vadose zone systems. Calcite, a common mineral in many aquifers and vadose zones in the arid west, can incorporate divalent metals such as strontium, cadmium, lead, and cobalt into its crystal structure by the formation of a solid solution. Collaborative research undertaken by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL), University of Idaho, and University of Toronto as part of this Environmental Management Science Program project has focused on in situ microbially-catalyzed urea hydrolysis, which results in an increase in pH, carbonate alkalinity, ammonium, calcite precipitation, and co-precipitation of divalent cations. In calcite-saturated aquifers, microbially facilitated co-precipitation with calcium carbonate represents a potential long-term contaminant sequestration mechanism. Key results of the project include: **Demonstrating the linkage between urea hydrolysis and calcite precipitation in field and laboratory experiments **Observing strontium incorporation into calcite precipitate by urea hydrolyzers with higher distribution coefficient than in abiotic **Developing and applying molecular methods for characterizing microbial urease activity in groundwater including a quantitative PCR method for enumerating ureolytic bacteria **Applying the suite of developed molecular methods to assess the feasibility of the

  6. NMR characterization of hydrocarbon adsorption on calcite surfaces: A first principles study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bevilaqua, Rochele C. A.; Miranda, Caetano R. [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, UFABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Rigo, Vagner A. [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, UFABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Universidade Tecnológica Federal do Paraná, UTFPR, Cornélio Procópio, PR (Brazil); Veríssimo-Alves, Marcos [Centro de Ciências Naturais e Humanas, Universidade Federal do ABC, UFABC, Santo André, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Física, ICEx, Universidade Federal Fluminense, UFF, Volta Redonda, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-11-28

    The electronic and coordination environment of minerals surfaces, as calcite, are very difficult to characterize experimentally. This is mainly due to the fact that there are relatively few spectroscopic techniques able to detect Ca{sup 2+}. Since calcite is a major constituent of sedimentary rocks in oil reservoir, a more detailed characterization of the interaction between hydrocarbon molecules and mineral surfaces is highly desirable. Here we perform a first principles study on the adsorption of hydrocarbon molecules on calcite surface (CaCO{sub 3} (101{sup ¯}4)). The simulations were based on Density Functional Theory with Solid State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (SS-NMR) calculations. The Gauge-Including Projector Augmented Wave method was used to compute mainly SS-NMR parameters for {sup 43}Ca, {sup 13}C, and {sup 17}O in calcite surface. It was possible to assign the peaks in the theoretical NMR spectra for all structures studied. Besides showing different chemical shifts for atoms located on different environments (bulk and surface) for calcite, the results also display changes on the chemical shift, mainly for Ca sites, when the hydrocarbon molecules are present. Even though the interaction of the benzene molecule with the calcite surface is weak, there is a clearly distinguishable displacement of the signal of the Ca sites over which the hydrocarbon molecule is located. A similar effect is also observed for hexane adsorption. Through NMR spectroscopy, we show that aromatic and alkane hydrocarbon molecules adsorbed on carbonate surfaces can be differentiated.

  7. Ion beam modifications of defect sub-structure of calcite cleavages

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    E Venkateshwar Rao; M Ramakrishna Murthy

    2008-04-01

    Experimental investigations on the defect sub-structure and surface modifications, brought about by He+ ion-bombardment of calcite cleavages (100), have been carried out. Optical and scanning electron microscopic investigations revealed drastic modifications on the surface morphology, local symmetry and defect concentration. Additional structural defects on ion-bombardment of calcite surfaces also have been observed. Changes in shape and form of chemical etch pits are found to be a function of ion-beam energy, as studied by optical microscopy. Radiation damage in calcite has been attributed mainly due to desorption of CO$^{-2}_{3}$ ions from the calcite surfaces, on irradiation. Measurements of surface conductivity on irradiated calcite surfaces have been made employing a four-probe technique. Enhancement of surface conductivity has been considered to be due to an increase in concentration of CO$^{-2}_{3}$ ions formed, on ion irradiation and subsequent thermal stimulation. Planar plastic anisotropy has been studied on irradiated calcite cleavages by measurement of microhardness.

  8. Reaction-induced fracturing in a hot pressed calcite-periclase aggregate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuleci, H.; Ulven, O. I.; Rybacki, E.; Wunder, B.; Abart, R.

    2017-01-01

    The chemo-mechanical feedbacks associated with hydration of periclase immersed in a calcite matrix were investigated experimentally. Dense calcite-periclase aggregates with calcite to periclase ratio of 90/10 and 95/5 by volume were prepared by hot isostatic pressing. Subsequent hydration experiments were performed in a hydrothermal apparatus at temperatures of 580-610 °C and a pressure of 200 MPa for run durations of 5-60 min. The rate of the periclase to brucite transformation was primarily controlled by the access of fluid. Where fluid was present, the reaction was too fast for the associated positive volume increase of the solids of about 100% to be accommodated by creep of the calcite matrix, and fracturing was induced. The newly formed cracks greatly enhanced the access of fluid leading to a positive feedback between hydration and fracturing. Mostly the newly formed cracks follow pre-existing grain boundaries in the calcite matrix. Comparison of experimental results with numerical 2D discrete element modelling (DEM) of crack formation revealed that the geometry of the crack pattern around a reacting particle depends on the shape of the original periclase particle, on the mechanical strength of the particle-matrix interface and on the mechanical strength and arrangement of grain boundaries in the calcite matrix in the immediate vicinity of the swelling particle.

  9. Effect of Mg/Ca ratios on microbially induced carbonate precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Nurgul; Demirel, Cansu; Seref Sonmez, M.; Kurt, M. Ali

    2016-04-01

    Influence of Mg/Ca ratios on microbially induced carbonate mineralogy were investigated by series of experiments carried out under various environmental conditions (Mg/Ca ratio, temperature and salinity). Halophilic bacterial cultures used for biomineralization experiments were isolated from hypersaline Lake Acıgöl (Denizli, SW Turkey), displaying extreme water chemistry with an average pH around 8.6 (Balci eta l.,2015). Enriched bacterial culture used in the experiments consisted of Halomonas saccharevitans strain AJ275, Halomonas alimentaria strain L7B; Idiomarina sp. TBZ29, 98% Idiomarina seosensis strain CL-SP19. Biomineralization experiments were set up using above enriched culture with Mg/Ca ratios of 0.05, 1, 4 and 15 and salinity of 8% and 15% experiments at 30oC and 10oC. Additionally, long-term biomineralization experiments were set up to last for a year, for Mg/Ca=4 and Mg/Ca=15 experiments at 30oC. For each experimental condition abiotic experiments were also conducted. Solution chemistry throughout incubation was monitored for Na, K, Mg, Ca, bicarbonate, carbonate, ammonium and phosphate for a month. At the end of the experiments, precipitates were collected and morphology and mineralogy of the biominerals were investigated and results were evaluated using the software DIFFRAC.SUITE EVA. Overall the preliminary results showed chemical precipitation of calcite, halite, hydromagnesite and sylvite. Results obtained from biological experiments indicate that, low Mg/Ca ratios (0.05 and 1) favor chlorapatite precipitation, whereas higher Mg/Ca ratios favor struvite precipitation. Biomineralization of dolomite, huntite and magnesite is favorable at high Mg/Ca ratios (4 and 15), in the presence of halophilic bacteria. Moreover, results indicate that supersaturation with respect to Mg (Mg/Ca=15) combined with NaCl (15%) inhibits biomineralization and forms chemical precipitates. 15% salinity is shown to favor chemical precipitation of mineral phases more than

  10. Low-Temperature Plasticity of Naturally Deformed Calcite Rocks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Optical, cathodoluminescence and transmission electron microscope (TEM) analyses were conducted onfour groups of calcite fault rocks, a cataclastic limestone, cataclastic coarse-grained marbles from two fault zones, and afractured mylonite. These fault rocks show similar microstructural characteristics and give clues to similar processes ofrock deformation. They are characterized by the structural contrast between macroscopic cataclastic (brittle) andmicroscopic mylonitic (ductile) microstructures. Intragranular deformation microstructures (i.e. deformation twins, kinkbands and microfractures) are well preserved in the deformed grains in clasts or in primary rocks. The matrix materials areof extremely fine grains with diffusive features. Dislocation microstructures for co-existing brittle deformation andcrystalline plasticity were revealed using TEM. Tangled dislocations are often preserved at the cores of highly deformedclasts, while dislocation walls form in the transitions to the fine-grained matrix materials and free dislocations, dislocationloops and dislocation dipoles are observed both in the deformed clasts and in the fine-grained matrix materials. Dynamicrecrystallization grains from subgrain rotation recrystallization and subsequent grain boundary migration constitute themajor parts of the matrix materials. Statistical measurements of densities of free dislocations, grain sizes of subgrains anddynamically recrystallized grains suggest an unsteady state of the rock deformation. Microstructural andcathodoluminescence analyses prove that fluid activity is one of the major parts of faulting processes. Low-temperatureplasticity, and thereby induced co-existence of macroscopic brittle and microscopic ductile microstmctures are attributedto hydrolytic weakening due to the involvement of fluid phases in deformation and subsequent variation of rock rheology.During hydrolytic weakening, fluid phases, e.g. water, enhance the rate of dislocation slip and climb, and

  11. The Precipitation Characteristics of ISCCP Tropical Weather States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongmin; Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Huffman, George J.; Rossow, William B.; Kang, In-Sik

    2011-01-01

    We examine the daytime precipitation characteristics of the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) weather states in the extended tropics (35 deg S to 35 deg N) for a 10-year period. Our main precipitation data set is the TRMM Multisatellite Precipitation Analysis 3B42 data set, but Global Precipitation Climatology Project daily data are also used for comparison. We find that the most convective weather state (WS1), despite an occurrence frequency below 10%, is the most dominant state with regard to surface precipitation, producing both the largest mean precipitation rates when present and the largest percent contribution to the total precipitation of the tropical zone of our study; yet, even this weather state appears to not precipitate about half the time. WS1 exhibits a modest annual cycle of domain-average precipitation rate, but notable seasonal shifts in its geographic distribution. The precipitation rates of the other weather states tend to be stronger when occurring before or after WS1. The relative contribution of the various weather states to total precipitation is different between ocean and land, with WS1 producing more intense precipitation on average over ocean than land. The results of this study, in addition to advancing our understanding of the current state of tropical precipitation, can serve as a higher order diagnostic test on whether it is distributed realistically among different weather states in atmospheric models.

  12. Enhanced interannual precipitation variability increases plant functional diversity that in turn ameliorates negative impact on productivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherardi, Laureano A; Sala, Osvaldo E

    2015-12-01

    Although precipitation interannual variability is projected to increase due to climate change, effects of changes in precipitation variance have received considerable less attention than effects of changes in the mean state of climate. Interannual precipitation variability effects on functional diversity and its consequences for ecosystem functioning are assessed here using a 6-year rainfall manipulation experiment. Five precipitation treatments were switched annually resulting in increased levels of precipitation variability while maintaining average precipitation constant. Functional diversity showed a positive response to increased variability due to increased evenness. Dominant grasses decreased and rare plant functional types increased in abundance because grasses showed a hump-shaped response to precipitation with a maximum around modal precipitation, whereas rare species peaked at high precipitation values. Increased functional diversity ameliorated negative effects of precipitation variability on primary production. Rare species buffered the effect of precipitation variability on the variability in total productivity because their variance decreases with increasing precipitation variance.

  13. Downhill Domination in Graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Haynes Teresa W.; Hedetniemi Stephen T.; Jamieson Jessie D.; Jamieson William B.

    2014-01-01

    A path π = (v1, v2, . . . , vk+1) in a graph G = (V,E) is a downhill path if for every i, 1 ≤ i ≤ k, deg(vi) ≥ deg(vi+1), where deg(vi) denotes the degree of vertex vi ∈ V. The downhill domination number equals the minimum cardinality of a set S ⊆ V having the property that every vertex v ∈ V lies on a downhill path originating from some vertex in S. We investigate downhill domination numbers of graphs and give upper bounds. In particular, we show that the downhill domination number of a grap...

  14. A ubiquitous hydrothermal episode recorded in the sheet-crack cements of a Marinoan cap dolostone of South China: Implication for the origin of the extremely 13C-depleted calcite cement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Guanghong; Luo, Taiyi; Zhou, Mingzhong; Xing, Lecai; Gan, Tian

    2017-02-01

    Sheet-crack - primarily filled with chalcedony, quartz and calcite - is a type of significant sedimentary structure in almost all documented cap carbonates in platform-to-slope settings, which sharply overlie the global Marinoan (∼635 Ma) glacial tillite. The Jiulongwan section, located in the Yangtze Gorges areas, South China, is significant for the first discovery of extremely 13C-depleted (δ13C down to -41‰) calcite cements in sheet-crack structure (Jiang et al., 2003a), which provides direct evidence for the methane seep hypothesis (Kennedy et al., 2001). Focusing on the calcite cements in the same section, Bristow et al. (2011) proposed a hydrothermal origin based on high temperatures (378 °C) determined by carbonate clumped isotope thermometry (CCIT). In this study, we provide evidence for the hydrothermal model using fluid inclusion technology (FIT) to quartz cements in the Jiulongwan section. The widespread sheet-crack structures in South China have uniform mineral paragenetic assemblages, which apparently reflect three stages of a hydrothermal fluid activity, including dolomitization at the early stage, silicification comprising chalcedony and quartz at the middle stage, and calcitization characterized by carbonaceous calcite filling preexisting voids at the late stage. Primary aqueous fluid inclusions from quartz crystals have homogenization temperatures of approximately 160-220 °C (mean, 192 °C, n = 31), while the salinity histogram contains two peaks at low salinity (6.3-8.3 wt.% NaCl equiv.) and high salinity (18.0-20.8 wt.% NaCl equiv.), reflecting precipitation caused by mixing of high- and low-salinity fluids. A modified and detailed hydrothermal model is proposed indicating that the sheet-crack structure resulted from successive thermal fluid activity after karstic dissolution due to postglacial isostatic rebound. This model is compatible with the unified sequence of glacio-eustatic events after the termination of Marinoan glaciation (Zhou

  15. Isotopic fractionation of alkali earth metals during carbonate precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yotsuya, T.; Ohno, T.; Muramatsu, Y.; Shimoda, G.; Goto, K. T.

    2014-12-01

    The alkaline earth metals such as magnesium, calcium and strontium play an important role in a variety of geochemical and biological processes. The element ratios (Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca) in marine carbonates have been used as proxies for reconstruction of the past environment. Recently several studies suggested that the study for the isotopic fractionation of the alkaline earth metals in marine carbonates has a potentially significant influence in geochemical research fields (e.g. Eisenhauer et al., 2009). The aim of this study is to explore the influence of carbonate polymorphs (Calcite and Aragonite) and environmental factors (e.g., temperature, precipitation rate) on the level of isotopic fractionation of the alkaline earth metals. We also examined possible correlations between the level of isotopic fractionation of Ca and that of other alkaline earth metals during carbonate precipitation. In order to determine the isotope fractionation factor of Mg, Ca and Sr during carbonate precipitation, calcite and aragonite were synthesized from calcium bicarbonate solution in which the amount of magnesium was controlled based on Kitano method. Calcium carbonates were also prepared from the mixture of calcium chlorite and sodium hydrogen carbonate solutions. The isotope fractionation factors were measured by MC-ICPMS. Results suggested that the level of isotopic fractionation of Mg during carbonate precipitation was correlated with that of Sr and that the change of the carbonate crystal structure could make differences of isotopic fractionations of Mg and Ca, however no difference was found in the case of Sr. In this presentation, the possible mechanism will be discussed.

  16. Downhill Domination in Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haynes Teresa W.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A path π = (v1, v2, . . . , vk+1 in a graph G = (V,E is a downhill path if for every i, 1 ≤ i ≤ k, deg(vi ≥ deg(vi+1, where deg(vi denotes the degree of vertex vi ∈ V. The downhill domination number equals the minimum cardinality of a set S ⊆ V having the property that every vertex v ∈ V lies on a downhill path originating from some vertex in S. We investigate downhill domination numbers of graphs and give upper bounds. In particular, we show that the downhill domination number of a graph is at most half its order, and that the downhill domination number of a tree is at most one third its order. We characterize the graphs obtaining each of these bounds

  17. Dominantly Inherited Nemaline Myopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available A locus on chromosome 15q21-23 for a dominantly inherited nemaline myopathy with core-like lesions is reported in two unrelated families evaluated at University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.

  18. Precipitates in electrical steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenkins, Keith [Development and Market Research, Cogent Power Limited, Corporation Road, Newport, South Wales NP19 OXT (United Kingdom)], E-mail: keith.jenkins@cogent-power.com; Lindenmo, Magnus [Development and Market Research, Cogent Power Limited, Corporation Road, Newport, South Wales NP19 OXT (United Kingdom)

    2008-10-15

    Precipitates heavily influence the magnetic properties of electrical steels, either as a key controlled requirement as part of the manufacturing process or as an unwanted harmful residual in the final product. In this current work copper-manganese sulphides precipitates are the primary inhibitor species in the conventional grain-oriented (CGO) steels examined and grain boundary pinning is effective at a mean precipitate size of 30-70 nm. The growth of CuMnS has been studied and the results show that a precipitate size above {approx}100 nm allows the onset of secondary recrystallisation in the heating conditions applied. The effect of precipitates on the magnetic properties of both grain-oriented and non-oriented steels in their final product form is then examined. Examples of grain-oriented material still containing large numbers of precipitates clearly show the detrimental effects with increases in total power loss of 40% or more. Loss deterioration by about 20% is also seen in samples of high silicon non-oriented material in which titanium carbo-nitride precipitates have been observed. In this case the precipitates are believed to have formed during cooling after final annealing. Finally a grain-oriented steel with a large number of very small precipitates, which do not seem to have any harmful effect on the magnetic properties, is demonstrated.

  19. Ages and Origins of Calcite and Opal in the Exploratory Studies Facility Tunnel, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paces, James B.; Neymark, Leonid A.; Marshall, Brian D.; Whelan, Joseph F.; Peterman, Zell E.

    2001-01-01

    Deposits of calcite and opal are present as coatings on open fractures and lithophysal cavities in unsaturated-zone tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, site of a potential high-level radioactive waste repository. Outermost layers of calcite and opal have radiocarbon ages of 16,000 to 44,000 years before present and thorium-230/uranium ages of 28,000 to more than 500,000 years before present. These ages are young relative to the 13-million-year age of the host rocks. Multiple subsamples from the same outer layer typically show a range of ages with youngest ages from the thinnest subsamples. Initial uranium-234/uranium-238 activity ratios between 1 and 9.5 show a distinct negative correlation with thorium-230/uranium age and are greater than 4 for all but one sample younger than 100,000 years before present. These data, along with micrometer-scale layering and distinctive crystal morphologies, are interpreted to indicate that deposits formed very slowly from water films migrating through open cavities. Exchanges of carbon dioxide and water vapor probably took place between downward-migrating liquids and upward-migrating gases at low rates, resulting in oversaturation of mineral constituents at crystal extremities and more or less continuous deposition of very thin layers. Therefore, subsamples represent mixtures of older and younger layers on a scale finer than sampling techniques can resolve. Slow, long-term rates of deposition (less than about 5 millimeters of mineral per million years) are inferred from subsamples of outermost calcite and opal. These growth rates are similar to those calculated assuming that total coating thicknesses of 10 to 40 millimeters accumulated over 12 million years. Calcite has a wide range of delta carbon-13 values from about -8.2 to 8.5 per mil and delta oxygen-18 values from about 10 to 21 per mil. Systematic microsampling across individual mineral coatings indicates basal (older) calcite tends to have the largest delta carbon-13 values

  20. Thermodynamic Simulation of Carbonate Cements-Water-Carbon Dioxide Equilibrium in Sandstone for Prediction of Precipitation/Dissolution of Carbonate Cements

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Yiping; Feng, Mingshi; Zhong, Xinyan; Shang, Ruishu; Huang, Lihong

    2016-01-01

    Carbonate cements, such as calcite, dolomite, ferrocalcite and ankerite, play important roles in the formation of pores in sandstones: precipitation of carbonate cements modifies pores and inhibits compaction, while dissolution creates secondary pores. This work proposed a precipitation-dissolution model for carbonate cements-CO2-H2O system by means of ion equilibrium concentration ([M2+], M = Ca, Mg, Fe or Mn) with different factors, such as temperature, depth, pH, P CO 2 , variable rock com...

  1. Thermal and Evolved Gas Behavior of Calcite Under Mars Phoenix TEGA Operating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, D.W.; Niles, P.B.; Morris, R.V.; Boynton, W.V.; Golden, D.C.; Lauer, H.V.; Sutter, B.

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Phoenix Scout Mission with its diverse instrument suite successfully examined several soils on the Northern plains of Mars. The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) was employed to detect organic and inorganic materials by coupling a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) with a magnetic-sector mass spectrometer (MS). Martian soil was heated up to 1000 C in the DSC ovens and evolved gases from mineral decomposition products were examined with the MS. TEGA s DSC has the capability to detect endothermic and exothermic reactions during heating that are characteristic of minerals present in the Martian soil. Initial TEGA results indicated the presence of endothermic peaks with onset temperatures that ranged from 675 C to 750 C with corresponding CO2 release. This result suggests the presence of calcite (CaCO3. CaO + CO2). Organic combustion to CO2 is not likely since this mostly occurs at temperatures below 550 C. Fe-carbonate and Mg-carbonate are not likely because their decomposition temperatures are less than 600 C. TEGA enthalpy determinations suggest that calcite, may occur in the Martian soil in concentrations of approx.1 to 5 wt. %. The detection of calcite could be questioned based on previous results that suggest Mars soils are mostly acidic. However, the Phoenix landing site soil pH was measured at pH 8.3 0.5, which is typical of terrestrial soils where pH is controlled by calcite solubility. The range of onset temperatures and calcite concentration as calculated by TEGA is poorly con-strained in part because of limited thermal data of cal-cite at reduced pressures. TEGA operates at calcite literature thermal data was obtained at 1000 mbar or higher pressures.

  2. The influence of final repository relevant electrolyte on the interaction of trivalent lanthanides and actinides with calcite; Der Einfluss endlagerrelevanter Elektrolyte auf die Wechselwirkung dreiwertiger Lanthanide und Actinide mit Calcit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofmann, Sascha

    2015-10-21

    Calcite, a naturally occurring and very abundant mineral, is considered a potential retentive geochemical barrier regarding nuclear waste disposal. In this work, the reactivity of calcite towards trivalent Ln and An has been determined by spectroscopic, microscopic and X-ray scattering techniques. This, in connection with the use of luminescent probes Eu(III) and Cm(III), allowed for the understanding of electrolyte influences on the retention potential of calcite.

  3. Ostracod calcite records the 18O/16O ratio of the bicarbonate and carbonate ions in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devriendt, Laurent S.; McGregor, Helen V.; Chivas, Allan R.

    2017-10-01

    The δ18O of ostracod valves is widely used to infer water δ18O and temperature. However, ostracod δ18O appears sensitive to other environmental variables. In addition, there is species-dependent ostracod calcite 18O enrichment, relative to slowly precipitated inorganic calcite under the same conditions. Together these uncertainties complicate ostracod paleoclimate reconstructions. This study presents a new understanding of the causes of ostracod δ18O variations based on a global database of published ostracod δ18O values in lake, marine and coastal environments, and from culture experiments. The database includes associated field/experiment host water parameters including temperature (-1 to 32 °C), water δ18O (-13.2‰ to 4.3‰ VSMOW), pH (6.9-10.4), salinity (0-72 g/kg), calcite saturation states (0.6-26), and dissolved inorganic carbon concentration [DIC] (0.9-54.3 mmol/kg). The data show that: (1) the δ18O of marine and non-marine ostracods reflects the 18O/16O of the sum of host water CO32- and HCO3- ions. For example, at a given temperature, the δ18O of non-marine ostracods decreases by 4‰ to 6‰ as [CO32-]/[DIC] reaches 70%, depending on the ostracod species. In low [CO32-]/[DIC] settings (i.e. high HCO3-/CO32-), ostracod 18O/16O is close to the 18O/16O of HCO3- ions, which explains why on average ostracod δ18O is higher than the δ18O of inorganic calcite precipitated slowly under the same conditions. (2) Taxonomic offsets in ostracod δ18O vary with the host water [CO32-]/[DIC]. In environments where HCO3- ≫ CO32- (i.e. most freshwater lakes), the 18O/16O of Candonids is indistinguishable from the 18O/16O of HCO3- ions (difference of 0.10 ± 0.16‰) while the 18O/16O of Cyprids is lower than the 18O/16O of HCO3- ions by -0.77‰ to -0.32‰, Cytherids by -0.88 ± 0.29‰, and Limnocytherids by -1.12 ± 0.05‰. (3) The sensitivity of ostracod δ18O to [CO32-]/[DIC] also varies with taxonomy. For each percent increase in [CO32-]/[DIC

  4. Rapid and Portable Methods for Identification of Bacterially Influenced Calcite: Application of Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and AOTF Reflectance Spectroscopy, Fort Stanton Cave, New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, N. J.; Chavez, A.; Chanover, N.; Voelz, D.; Uckert, K.; Tawalbeh, R.; Gariano, J.; Dragulin, I.; Xiao, X.; Hull, R.

    2014-12-01

    Rapid, in-situ methods for identification of biologic and non-biologic mineral precipitation sites permit mapping of biological hot spots. Two portable spectrometers, Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and Acoustic-Optic Tunable Filter Reflectance Spectroscopy (AOTFRS) were used to differentiate between bacterially influenced and inorganically precipitated calcite specimens from Fort Stanton Cave, NM, USA. LIBS collects light emitted from the decay of excited electrons in a laser ablation plasma; the spectrum is a chemical fingerprint of the analyte. AOTFRS collects light reflected from the surface of a specimen and provides structural information about the material (i.e., the presence of O-H bonds). These orthogonal data sets provide a rigorous method to determine the origin of calcite in cave deposits. This study used a set of 48 calcite samples collected from Fort Stanton cave. Samples were examined in SEM for the presence of biologic markers; these data were used to separate the samples into biologic and non-biologic groups. Spectra were modeled using the multivariate technique Partial Least Squares Regression (PLSR). Half of the spectra were used to train a PLSR model, in which biologic samples were assigned to the independent variable "0" and non-biologic samples were assigned the variable "1". Values of the independent variable were calculated for each of the training samples, which were close to 0 for the biologic samples (-0.09 - 0.23) and close to 1 for the non-biologic samples (0.57 - 1.14). A Value of Apparent Distinction (VAD) of 0.55 was used to numerically distinguish between the two groups; any sample with an independent variable value 0.55 was determined to be non-biologic in origin. After the model was trained, independent variable values for the remaining half of the samples were calculated. Biologic or non-biologic origin was assigned by comparison to the VAD. Using LIBS data alone, the model has a 92% success rate, correctly

  5. Global Precipitation Measurement Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azarbarzin, Art

    2010-01-01

    This poster presents an overview of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) constellation of satellites which are designed to measure the Earth's precipitation. It includes the schedule of launches for the various satellites in the constellation, and the coverage of the constellation, It also reviews the mission capabilities, and the mission science objectives.

  6. Identification of dominant hydrogeochemical processes for groundwaters in the Algerian Sahara supported by inverse modeling of chemical and isotopic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slimani, Rabia; Guendouz, Abdelhamid; Trolard, Fabienne; Souffi Moulla, Adnane; Hamdi-Aïssa, Belhadj; Bourrié, Guilhem

    2017-03-01

    Unpublished chemical and isotopic data taken in November 1992 from the three major Saharan aquifers, namely the Continental Intercalaire (CI), the Complexe Terminal (CT) and the phreatic aquifer (Phr), were integrated with original samples in order to chemically and isotopically characterize the largest Saharan aquifer system and investigate the processes through which groundwaters acquire their mineralization. Instead of classical Debye-Hückel extended law, a specific interaction theory (SIT) model, recently incorporated in PHREEQC 3.0, was used. Inverse modeling of hydrochemical data constrained by isotopic data was used here to quantitatively assess the influence of geochemical processes: at depth, the dissolution of salts from the geological formations during upward leakage without evaporation explains the transitions from CI to CT and to a first end member, a cluster of Phr (cluster I); near the surface, the dissolution of salts from sabkhas by rainwater explains another cluster of Phr (cluster II). In every case, secondary precipitation of calcite occurs during dissolution. All Phr waters result from the mixing of these two clusters together with calcite precipitation and ion exchange processes. These processes are quantitatively assessed by the PHREEQC model. Globally, gypsum dissolution and calcite precipitation were found to act as a carbon sink.

  7. Characteristics of the precipitation recycling ratio and its relationship with regional precipitation in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Lijuan; Zhong, Linhao; Ke, Zongjian

    2017-02-01

    increases, especially in the high-precipitation sub-regions. Together with the consideration of soil moisture, it can be inferred that limited soil moisture inhibits evaporation in the low-precipitation sub-regions, while the energy or radiation is the dominant factor controlling evaporation in the high-precipitation sub-regions.

  8. Trace Metals in Groundwater & Vadose Zone Calcite: In Situ Containment & Stabilization of 90Strontium & Other Divalent Metals & Radionuclides at Arid West DOE Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert W.; Fujita, Yoshiko; Ferris, F. Grant; Cosgrove, Donna M.; Colwell, Rick S.

    2004-06-01

    Radionuclide and metal contaminants such as 90Sr are present beneath U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) lands in both the groundwater (e.g., 100-N area at Hanford, WA) and vadose zone (e.g., Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory). In situ containment and stabilization of these contaminants is a cost-effective treatment strategy. However, implementing in situ containment and stabilization approaches requires definition of the mechanisms that control contaminant sequestration. We are investigating the in situ immobilization of radionuclides or contaminant metals (e.g., 90Sr) by their facilitated co-precipitation with calcium carbonate in groundwater and vadose zone systems. Our facilitated approach, shown schematically in Figure 1, relies upon the hydrolysis of introduced urea to cause the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing pH and alkalinity. Subsurface urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which may be either introduced with the urea or produced in situ by ubiquitous subsurface urea hydrolyzing microorganisms. Because the precipitation process tends to be irreversible and many western aquifers are saturated with respect to calcite, the co-precipitated metals and radionuclides will be effectively removed from the aqueous phase over the long-term. Another advantage of the ureolysis approach is that the ammonium ions produced by the reaction can exchange with radionuclides sorbed to subsurface minerals, thereby enhancing the availability of the radionuclides for re-capture in a more stable solid phase (co-precipitation rather than adsorption).

  9. Trace Metals in Groundwater & the Vadose Zone Calcite: In Situ Containment & Stabilization of Strontium-90 & Other Divalent Metals & Radionuclides at Arid West DOE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Robert W.

    2004-12-01

    Radionuclide and metal contaminants such as strontium-90 are present beneath U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) lands in both the groundwater (e.g., 100-N area at Hanford, WA) and vadose zone (e.g., Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory). In situ containment and stabilization of these contaminants is a cost-effective treatment strategy. However, implementing in situ containment and stabilization approaches requires definition of the mechanisms that control contaminant sequestration. We are investigating the in situ immobilization of radionuclides or contaminant metals (e.g., strontium-90) by their facilitated co-precipitation with calcium carbonate in groundwater and vadose zone systems. Our facilitated approach, shown schematically in Figure 1, relies upon the hydrolysis of introduced urea to cause the acceleration of calcium carbonate precipitation (and trace metal co-precipitation) by increasing pH and alkalinity. Subsurface urea hydrolysis is catalyzed by the urease enzyme, which may be either introduced with the urea or produced in situ by ubiquitous subsurface urea hydrolyzing microorganisms. Because the precipitation process tends to be irreversible and many western aquifers are saturated with respect to calcite, the co-precipitated metals and radionuclides will be effectively removed from the aqueous phase over the long-term. Another advantage of the ureolysis approach is that the ammonium ions produced by the reaction can exchange with radionuclides sorbed to subsurface minerals, thereby enhancing the availability of the radionuclides for re-capture in a more stable solid phase (co-precipitation rather than adsorption).

  10. Dominant Voice in Hamlet

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李丹

    2015-01-01

    <正>The Tragedy of Hamlet dramatizes the revenge Prince Hamlet exacts on his uncle Claudius for murdering King Hamlet,Claudius’s brother and Prince Hamlet’s father,and then succeeding to the throne and taking as his wife Gertrude,the old king’s widow and Prince Hamlet’s mother.This paper will discuss something about dominant voice in the play.Dominant voice is the major voice in the country,the society,or the whole world.Those people who have the power or

  11. Model study of initial adsorption of SO{sub 2} on calcite and dolomite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malaga-Starzec, Katarina; Panas, Itai; Lindqvist, Oliver

    2004-01-30

    The rate of calcareous stone degradation is to a significant extent controlled by their surface chemistry with SO{sub 2}. Initial surface sulphite is converted to a harmful gypsum upon, e.g. NO{sub 2} catalysed oxidation. However, it has been observed by scanning electron microscopy that the lateral distributions of gypsum crystals differ between calcitic and dolomitic marbles. The first-principles density functional theory is employed to understand the origin of these fundamentally different morphologies. Here, the stability differences of surface sulphite at calcite CaCO{sub 3} (s) and dolomite Ca{sub x}Mg{sub 1-x}CO{sub 3} (s) are determined. A qualitative difference in surface sulphite stability, favouring the former, is reported. This is taken to imply that calcitic micro-crystals embedded in a dolomitic matrix act as sinks in the surface sulphation process, controlled by SO{sub 2} diffusion. The subsequent formation of gypsum under such conditions will not require SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} (aq) ion transport. This explains the homogeneous distribution of gypsum observed on the calcitic micro-crystals in dolomite. In contrast, sulphation on purely calcitic marbles never reaches such high SO{sub 2} coverage. Rather, upon oxidation, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} (aq) transport to nucleation centres, such as grain boundaries, is required for the growth of gypsum crystals.

  12. Mechanism of Calcite Co-Orientation in the Sea Urchin Tooth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Killian, Christopher; Metzler, Rebecca; Gong, Y. U. T.; Olson, Ian; Aizenberg, Joanna; Politi, Yael; Wilt, Fred; Scholl, Andreas; Young, Anthony; Doran, Andrew; Kunz, Martin; Tamura, Nobumichi; Coppersmith, Susan; Gilbert, P. U. P. A.

    2009-12-01

    Sea urchin teeth are remarkable and complex calcite structures, continuously growing at the forming end and self-sharpening at the mature grinding tip. The calcite (CaCO{sub 3}) crystals of tooth components, plates, fibers, and a high-Mg polycrystalline matrix, have highly co-oriented crystallographic axes. This ability to co-orient calcite in a mineralized structure is shared by all echinoderms. However, the physico-chemical mechanism by which calcite crystals become co-oriented in echinoderms remains enigmatic. Here, we show differences in calcite c-axis orientations in the tooth of the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus), using high-resolution X-ray photoelectron emission spectromicroscopy (X-PEEM) and microbeam X-ray diffraction ({mu}XRD). All plates share one crystal orientation, propagated through pillar bridges, while fibers and polycrystalline matrix share another orientation. Furthermore, in the forming end of the tooth, we observe that CaCO{sub 3} is present as amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC). We demonstrate that co-orientation of the nanoparticles in the polycrystalline matrix occurs via solid-state secondary nucleation, propagating out from the previously formed fibers and plates, into the amorphous precursor nanoparticles. Because amorphous precursors were observed in diverse biominerals, solid-state secondary nucleation is likely to be a general mechanism for the co-orientation of biomineral components in organisms from different phyla.

  13. Dolomite-magnesian calcite relations at elevated temperatures and CO2 pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graf, D.L.; Goldsmith, J.R.

    1955-01-01

    The equilibrium thermal decomposition curve of dolomite has been determined up to a CO2 pressure of 20,000 lb/in.2, at which pressure dolomite decomposes at 857??C. Equilibrium was approached from both directions, by the breakdown and by the solid-state synthesis of dolomite. At elevated temperatures and pressures, calcites in equilibrium with periclase as well as those in equilibrium with dolomite contain Mg in solid solution. In the former, the Mg content increases with increasing CO2 pressure, and decreases with increasing temperature. In the latter, it is a function of temperature only. The exsolution curve of dolomite and magnesian calcite has been determined between 500?? and 800??C; at 500?? dolomite is in equilibrium with a magnesian calcite containing ~6 mol per cent MgCO2; at 800??, ~22 mol per cent. There appears to be a small but real deviation from the ideal 1 : 1 Ca : Mg ratio of dolomite, in the direction of excess Ca, for material in equilibrium with magnesian calcite at high temperature. The experimental findings indicate that very little Mg is stable in the calcites of sedimentary environments, but that an appreciable amount is stable under higher-temperature metamorphic conditions, if sufficient CO2 pressure is maintained. ?? 1955.

  14. Selective Separation of Fluorite, Barite and Calcite with Valonea Extract and Sodium Fluosilicate as Depressants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zijie Ren

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Fluorite, barite and calcite are important industry minerals. However, they often co-exist, presenting difficulty in selectively separating them due to their similar surface properties. In this study, valonea extract and sodium fluosilicate were used as depressants to selectively separate them by flotation, with sodium oleate as the collector. The single mineral flotation results showed that valonea extract displayed the strongest depression on calcite, while sodium fluosilicate displayed the strongest depression on barite. These two depressants allowed selective separation of the three minerals through sequential flotation. The flotation of mixed minerals showed that 94% of the calcite was successfully depressed by the valonea extract, and 95% recovery of the fluorite was achieved in the subsequent flotation with sodium fluosilicate depressing barite. The different depressant–mineral interactions were investigated via electro-kinetic studies and molecular dynamics (MD simulations using the Materials Studio 6.0 program. The valonea extract exhibited the strongest adsorption on the calcite surface, and sodium fluosilicate exhibited the strongest adsorption on the barite surface, which prevented oleate species from reacting with Ca2+ or Ba2+ surface sites. This study provides useful guidance for how to process fluorite, barite and calcite resources.

  15. The kinetics and mechanisms of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) crystallization to calcite, via vaterite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Blanco, Juan Diego; Shaw, Samuel; Benning, Liane G

    2011-01-01

    The kinetics and mechanisms of nanoparticulate amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) crystallization to calcite, via vaterite, were studied at a range of environmentally relevant temperatures (7.5-25 °C) using synchrotron-based in situ time-resolved Energy Dispersive X-ray Diffraction (ED-XRD) in conjunction with high-resolution electron microscopy, ex situ X-ray diffraction and infrared spectroscopy. The crystallization process occurs in two stages; firstly, the particles of ACC rapidly dehydrate and crystallize to form individual particles of vaterite; secondly, the vaterite transforms to calcite via a dissolution and reprecipitation mechanism with the reaction rate controlled by the surface area of calcite. The second stage of the reaction is approximately 10 times slower than the first. Activation energies of calcite nucleation and crystallization are 73±10 and 66±2 kJ mol(-1), respectively. A model to calculate the degree of calcite crystallization from ACC at environmentally relevant temperatures (7.5-40 °C) is also presented.

  16. Trace concentration - Huge impact: Nitrate in the calcite/Eu(III) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Sascha; Voïtchovsky, Kislon; Schmidt, Moritz; Stumpf, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    The interactions of trivalent lanthanides and actinides with secondary mineral phases such as calcite is of high importance for the safety assessment of deep geological repositories for high level nuclear waste (HLW). Due to similar ionic radii, calcium-bearing mineral phases are suitable host minerals for Ln(III) and An(III) ions. Especially calcite has been proven to retain these metal ions effectively by both surface complexation and bulk incorporation. Since anionic ligands (e.g., nitrate) are omnipresent in the geological environment and due to their coordinating properties, their influence on retentive processes should not be underestimated. Nitrate is a common contaminant in most HLW forms as a result of using nitric acid in fuel reprocessing. It is also formed by microbial activity under aerobic conditions. In this study, atomic force microscopy investigations revealed a major influence of nitrate upon the surface of calcite crystals. NaNO3 causes serious modifications even in trace amounts (surface layer of low crystallinity on top of the calcite crystal. Time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy of Eu(III) showed that, within this layer, Eu(III) ions are incorporated, while losing most of their hydration shell. The results show that solid solution modelling for actinides in calcite must take into account the presence of nitrate in pore and ground waters.

  17. Authigenic Mg-calcite at a cold methane seep site in the Laptev Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchishina, M. D.; Lein, A. Yu.; Savvichev, A. S.; Reykhard, L. E.; Dara, O. M.; Flint, M. V.

    2017-01-01

    Authigenic minerals were studied in Holocene shelf sediments of the Laptev Sea (cold methane seep site, water depth 71 m). The study presents the first finds of large hard carbonate concretions with Mg-calcite cement in recent sediments of the Arctic shelf seas. These concretions differ from previously reported glendonites and concretions from bottom sediments of the White Sea, Kara Sea, Sea of Okhotsk, etc. A study of the morphology, microstructure, and composition of these newly reported concretions revealed the multistage formation of carbonates (structural varieties of Mg-calcite and aragonite). It was shown that organic matter played an important role in the formation of authigenic carbonates, i.e., in the formation of sedimentary-diagenetic Mg-calcite. The role of methane as a possible source for authigenic carbonate formation was estimated. It was found that methane-derived Mg-calcite accounts for 17-35% of concretion materials. Mg-calcite had δ13C-Ccarb values between-24 and-23‰ and δ13C-Corg values between-44.5 and-88.5‰.

  18. Competitive adsorption of arsenate and phosphate onto calcite; experimental results and modeling with CCM and CD-MUSIC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sø, Helle Ugilt; Postma, Dieke; Jakobsen, Rasmus;

    2012-01-01

    The competitive adsorption of arsenate and phosphate onto calcite was studied in batch experiments using calcite-equilibrated solutions. The solutions had circum-neutral pH (7–8.3) and covered a wide span in the activity of Ca2+ and View the MathML source. The results show that the adsorption...... that adsorption of arsenate onto calcite is of minor importance in most groundwater aquifers, as phosphate is often present at concentration levels sufficient to significantly reduce arsenate adsorption. The CD-MUSIC model for calcite was used successfully to model adsorption of arsenate and phosphate separately...

  19. Dominant cystoid macular dystrophy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Saksens, N.T.M.; Huet, R.A.C. van; Lith-Verhoeven, J.J. van; Hollander, A.I. den; Hoyng, C.B.; Boon, C.J.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the clinical characteristics and long-term follow-up in patients with autosomal dominant cystoid macular dystrophy (DCMD). DESIGN: Retrospective case series. PARTICIPANTS: Ninety-seven patients with DCMD. METHODS: Extensive ophthalmic examination, including visual acuity (VA),

  20. Iron dominated magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, G.E.

    1985-07-01

    These two lectures on iron dominated magnets are meant for the student of accelerator science and contain general treatments of the subjects design and construction. The material is arranged in the categories: General Concepts and Cost Considerations, Profile Configuration and Harmonics, Magnetic Measurements, a few examples of ''special magnets'' and Materials and Practices. Extensive literature is provided.

  1. discourse of domination

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    suffering justifies the position and work of The Bank and other social forces with similar ... include accounts of the growing and increasingly interwoven resistance in .... tural domination or as parasites able to feed off a social body weakened by the ... through objective analysis of poor people's descriptions of their realities'.

  2. Searching for world domination

    CERN Multimedia

    Quillen, E

    2004-01-01

    "Optimists might believe Microsoft suffered a setback last week that will impede its progress toward world domination, but I suspect the company has already found a way to prevail. At issue before the European Union was Microsoft's bundling of its Windows Media Player with its operating system" (1 page)

  3. Autosomal dominant osteopetrosis revisited

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerslev, Jens; Henriksen, Kim; Nielsen, Morten Frost Munk

    2013-01-01

    Systematic studies of autosomal dominant osteopetrosis (ADO) were followed by the identification of underlying mutations giving unique possibilities to perform translational studies. What was previously designated ADO1 turned out to be a high bone mass phenotype caused by a missense mutation...

  4. Dominant optic atrophy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenaers, Guy; Hamel, Christian; Delettre, Cécile

    2012-01-01

    DEFINITION OF THE DISEASE: Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA) is a neuro-ophthalmic condition characterized by a bilateral degeneration of the optic nerves, causing insidious visual loss, typically starting during the first decade of life. The disease affects primary the retinal ganglion cells (RGC...

  5. Smaller calcite lattice deformation caused by occluded organic material in coccoliths than in mollusk shell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frølich, Simon; Sørensen, Henning Osholm; Hakim, Sepideh Sadat

    2015-01-01

    The growth and nucleation of biominerals are directed and affected by associated biological molecules. In this paper, we investigate the influence of occluded biomolecules on biogenic calcite from the coccolithophorid Pleurochrysis carterae and from chalk, a rock composed predominantly of fossil....... Two heating cycles allow us to differentiate the effects of thermal agitation and organic molecules. Single peak analysis and Rietveld refinement were combined to show significant differences resulting from the occluded biomolecules on the mineral phase in biogenic calcite in the mollusk shell....... This suggests that the interaction between biomolecules and calcite is not as tight in the coccoliths as in the shell. Although the shape of chalk has been preserved over millions of years, no major influence on the crystal lattice was observed in the chalk samples....

  6. Effects of L-Aspartic acid on the step retreat kinetics of calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshino, Toru; Kagi, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Effects of L-Aspartic acid (L-Asp) on step retreat kinetics in the dissolution of calcite were investigated. The step retreat velocities under surface-controlled kinetics were determined from in-situ atomic force microscopic observations using an improved flow-through system. Comparison of the present results with those obtained under a mixed kinetics condition revealed that the addition of L-Asp promotes the transport process in the calcite dissolution through acid-base and/or complex forming reactions in the diffusion boundary layer. Additionally, promotion of the acute and obtuse step retreats by the L-Asp additive was observed under surface-controlled kinetics. This report is the first to clarify that L-Asp promotes surface processes in the dissolution of calcite.

  7. Experimental diagenesis: insights into aragonite to calcite transformation of Arctica islandica shells by hydrothermal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casella, Laura A.; Griesshaber, Erika; Yin, Xiaofei; Ziegler, Andreas; Mavromatis, Vasileios; Müller, Dirk; Ritter, Ann-Christine; Hippler, Dorothee; Harper, Elizabeth M.; Dietzel, Martin; Immenhauser, Adrian; Schöne, Bernd R.; Angiolini, Lucia; Schmahl, Wolfgang W.

    2017-03-01

    Biomineralised hard parts form the most important physical fossil record of past environmental conditions. However, living organisms are not in thermodynamic equilibrium with their environment and create local chemical compartments within their bodies where physiologic processes such as biomineralisation take place. In generating their mineralised hard parts, most marine invertebrates produce metastable aragonite rather than the stable polymorph of CaCO3, calcite. After death of the organism the physiological conditions, which were present during biomineralisation, are not sustained any further and the system moves toward inorganic equilibrium with the surrounding inorganic geological system. Thus, during diagenesis the original biogenic structure of aragonitic tissue disappears and is replaced by inorganic structural features. In order to understand the diagenetic replacement of biogenic aragonite to non-biogenic calcite, we subjected Arctica islandica mollusc shells to hydrothermal alteration experiments. Experimental conditions were between 100 and 175 °C, with the main focus on 100 and 175 °C, reaction durations between 1 and 84 days, and alteration fluids simulating meteoric and burial waters, respectively. Detailed microstructural and geochemical data were collected for samples altered at 100 °C (and at 0.1 MPa pressure) for 28 days and for samples altered at 175 °C (and at 0.9 MPa pressure) for 7 and 84 days. During hydrothermal alteration at 100 °C for 28 days most but not the entire biopolymer matrix was destroyed, while shell aragonite and its characteristic microstructure was largely preserved. In all experiments up to 174 °C, there are no signs of a replacement reaction of shell aragonite to calcite in X-ray diffraction bulk analysis. At 175 °C the replacement reaction started after a dormant time of 4 days, and the original shell microstructure was almost completely overprinted by the aragonite to calcite replacement reaction after 10 days

  8. Coccolithophore responses to environmental variability in the South China Sea: species composition and calcite content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiaobo; Liu, Chuanlian; Poulton, Alex J.; Dai, Minhan; Guo, Xianghui

    2016-08-01

    Coccolithophore contributions to the global marine carbon cycle are regulated by the calcite content of their scales (coccoliths) and the relative cellular levels of photosynthesis and calcification rates. All three of these factors vary between coccolithophore species and with response to the growth environment. Here, water samples were collected in the northern basin of the South China Sea (SCS) during summer 2014 in order to examine how environmental variability influenced species composition and cellular levels of calcite content. Average coccolithophore abundance and their calcite concentration in the water column were 11.82 cells mL-1 and 1508.3 pg C mL-1, respectively, during the cruise. Water samples can be divided into three floral groups according to their distinct coccolithophore communities. The vertical structure of the coccolithophore community in the water column was controlled by the trophic conditions, which were regulated by mesoscale eddies across the SCS basin. The evaluation of coccolithophore-based calcite in the surface ocean also showed that three key species in the SCS (Emiliania huxleyi, Gephyrocapsa oceanica, Florisphaera profunda) and other larger, numerically rare species made almost equal contributions to total coccolith-based calcite in the water column. For Emiliania huxleyi biometry measurements, coccolith size positively correlated with nutrients (nitrate, phosphate), and it is suggested that coccolith length is influenced by light and nutrients through the regulation of growth rates. Larger-sized coccoliths were also linked statistically to low pH and calcite saturation states; however, it is not a simple cause and effect relationship, as carbonate chemistry was strongly co-correlated with the other key environmental factors (nutrients, light).

  9. Storage Gage Precipitation Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A storage gage is a precipitation gage that requires reading and maintenance only monthly or seasonal intervals. This library includes reports from such gages,...

  10. WPA Precipitation Tabulations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hourly precipitation data tabulated under the Work Projects Administration (WPA), a New Deal program created to reduce unemployment during the Great Depression....

  11. Chemisorption And Precipitation Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The transport and bioavailability of chemical components within soils is, in part, controlled by partitioning between solids and solution. General terms used to describe these partitioning reactions include chemisorption and precipitation. Chemisorption is inclusive of the suit...

  12. Templated and self-limiting calcite formation directed by coccolith organic macromolecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Assaf; Wirth, Richard; Barkay, Zahava; Eliaz, Noam; Scheffel, André; Faivre, Damien

    2017-07-06

    The formation of intricately shaped crystalline minerals by organisms is orchestrated by specialized biomacromolecules. The macromolecules associated with coccoliths, nanometer-sized calcite crystal arrays produced by marine microalgae, can form a distinct calcium-rich phase via macromolecular recognition. Here, we show that this calcium-rich phase can be mineralized into a thin film of single-crystalline calcite by the balanced addition of carbonate ions. Such a crystallization process provides a strategy to direct crystalline products via local interactions between soluble macromolecules and compatible templates.

  13. Thickness and structure of the water film deposited from vapour on calcite surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Jakob; Wogelius, Roy A.; Morris, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray reflectivity (SXR) was used to measure the thickness of the water film that adsorbs on a {10¯14} cleavage surface of calcite (CaCO3) in a sample chamber where relative humidity could be controlled within the range from......Synchrotron X-ray reflectivity (SXR) was used to measure the thickness of the water film that adsorbs on a {10¯14} cleavage surface of calcite (CaCO3) in a sample chamber where relative humidity could be controlled within the range from...

  14. Characteristics of a calcite "limestone"-marble from Macedonia, used as flux material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hristova E.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The phase characteristics of calcite "limestone"-marble from Banjany area village (near Skopje, Macedonia were examined by means of XRD, SEM microscope in polarizing and reflected lights, chemical, DT/TG-analyses. It was concluded as follows: - calcite (CaCO3 is a major mineral component (cca 80-90 % prevailing in the marble over the other minerals - dolomite is generally of minor importance (cca 10-20 % in the rock - quartz, micas graphite, pyrite represent typical accessories. As result of the mentioned phase characteristics, this raw materials was for a long time (more than 30 years used as flux in the iron and steel metallurgy in Macedonia.

  15. Birefringence measurements in single crystal sapphire and calcite shocked along the a axis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tear, Gareth R.; Chapman, David J.; Eakins, Daniel E.; Proud, William G.

    2017-01-01

    Calcite and sapphire were shock compressed along the direction (a axis) in a plate impact configuration. Polarimetery and Photonic Doppler Velocimetery (PDV) were used to measure the change in birefringence with particle velocity in the shock direction. Results for sapphire agree well with linear photoelastic theory and current literature showing a linear relationship between birefringence and particle velocity up to 310 m s-1. A maximum change in birefringence of 5% was observed. Calcite however showed anomolous behaviour with no detectable change in birefringence (less than 0.1%) over the range of particle velocities studied (up to 75 m s-1).

  16. Study on vibrational modes by group theory and infrared spectra by D FT for calcite crystal

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Danhua Lou; Fengjiu Sun; Lijuan Li

    2007-01-01

    The factor group symmetry analysis (FSA) method and position symmetry analysis (PSA) method are used to analyze the vibrational modes of calcite (CaCO3) crystal, respectively. With the activated results of infrared and Raman spectra presented, strong points of each method are concluded. The infrared spectra are studied by using dynamics calculations based on density-functional theory (DFT) with the supercell model of calcite crystal. The frequencies of 27 normal modes are achieved, which are consistent with that by the group symmetry analysis very well, and fit with the experimental results better than the lattice dynamical methods.

  17. Galacturonomannan and Golgi-derived membrane linked to growth and shaping of biogenic calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, M. E.; Ridall, A. L.; Azadi, P.; Duke, P. J.

    2002-01-01

    The coccolithophores are valuable models for the design and synthesis of composite materials, because the cellular machinery controlling the nucleation, growth, and patterning of their calcitic scales (coccoliths) can be examined genetically. The coccoliths are formed within the Golgi complex and are the major CaCO(3) component in limestone sediments-particularly those of the Cretaceous period. In this study, we describe mutants lacking a sulfated galacturonomannan and show that this polysaccharide in conjunction with the Golgi-derived membrane is directly linked to the growth and shaping of coccolith calcite but not to the initial orientated nucleation of the mineral phase.

  18. Not all calcite ballast is created equal: differing effects of foraminiferan and coccolith calcite on the formation and sinking of aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Schmidt

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Correlation between particulate organic carbon (POC and calcium carbonate sinking through the deep ocean has led to the idea that ballast provided by calcium carbonate is important for the export of POC from the surface ocean. While this idea is certainly to some extent true, it is worth considering in more nuance, for example, examining the different effects on the aggregation and sinking of POC of small, non-sinking calcite particles like coccoliths and large, rapidly sinking calcite like planktonic foraminiferan tests. We have done that here in a simple experiment carried out in roller tanks that allow particles to sink continuously without being impeded by container walls. Coccoliths were efficiently incorporated into aggregates that formed during the experiment, increasing their sinking speed compared to similarly sized aggregates lacking added calcite ballast. The foraminiferan tests, which sank as fast as 700 m d−1, became associated with only very minor amounts of POC. In addition, when they collided with other, larger, foraminferan-less aggregates, they fragmented them into two smaller, more slowly sinking aggregates. While these effects were certainly exaggerated within the confines of the roller tanks, they clearly demonstrate that calcium carbonate ballast is not just calcium carbonate ballast- different forms of calcium carbonate ballast have notably different effects on POC aggregation, sinking, and export.

  19. In vitro regulation of CaCO(3) crystal growth by the highly acidic proteins of calcitic sclerites in soft coral, Sinularia Polydactyla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, M Azizur; Oomori, Tamotsu

    2009-01-01

    Acidic proteins are generally thought to control mineral formation and growth in biocalcification. Analysis of proteinaceous components in the soluble and insoluble matrix fractions of sclerites in Sinularia polydactyla indicates that aspartic acid composes about 60% of the insoluble and 29% of the soluble matrix fractions. We previously analyzed aspartic acids in the matrix fractions (insoluble = 17 mol%; soluble = 38 mol%) of sclerites from a different type of soft coral, Lobophytum crassum, which showed comparatively lower aspartic acid-rich proteins than S. polydactyla. Thus, characterization of highly acidic proteins in the organic matrix of present species is an important first step toward linking function to individual proteins in soft coral. Here, we show that aspartic-acid rich proteins can control the CaCO(3) polymorph in vitro. The CaCO(3) precipitates in vitro in the presence of aspartic acid-rich proteins and 50 mM Mg(2+) was verified by Raman microprobe analysis. The matrix proteins of sclerites demonstrated that the aspartic-acid rich domain is crucial for the calcite precipitation in soft corals. The crystalline form of CaCO(3) in the presence of aspartic acid-rich proteins in vitro was identified by X-ray diffraction and, revealed calcitic polymorphisms with a strong (104) reflection. The structure of soft coral organic matrices containing aspartate-rich proteins and polysaccharides was assessed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. These results strongly suggest that the aspartic acid-rich proteins within the organic matrix of soft corals play a key role in biomineralization regulation.

  20. Isotopic studies of authigenic sulfides, silicates and carbonates, and calcite and pyrite veinlets in the Creede Formation, San Juan Mountains, Southwest Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethke, Philip M.; Rye, Robert O.; Finkelstein, David B.

    2000-01-01

    Sulfur isotope analysis of authigenic pyrite in the Creede Formation documents its precipitation by the reaction between iron in the volcaniclastic sediments and H2S formed through bacteriogenic reduction of sulfate added to the lake during and immediately following repeated volcanic eruptions during sedimentation. Pyrite veinlets in the underlying Snowshoe Mountain Tuff were formed by the percolation of H2S-bearing pore waters into fractures in the tuff. Conventional analyses of bulk samples of authigenic pyrite range from -20.4% to 34.5% essentially equivalent to the range of -30% to 40% determined using SHRIMP microprobe techniques. Conventional analyses of bulk samples of pyrite from veinlets in the Snowshow Mountain Tiff range from -3.5% to 17.6% much more limited than the ranges of -23% to 111% and -15.6% to 67.0% determined by SHRIMP and laser ablation microbeam techniques, respectively. The extreme range of δ34S for the veinlets is interpreted to be the result of continued fractionation of the already 34S-depleted pore water. Oxygen isotope analysis of authigenic smectite, kaolinite, and K-feldspar together with fluid-inclusion temperatures and oxygen isotope analysis of calcite coexisting with kaolinite indicate that the smectites formed early during burial diagenesis, in accord with petrographic observations. The 40Ar/39Ar dating of K-feldspar, concorfance of K-feldspar, kaolinite, and calcite δ18O values, and fluid-inclusion temperatures in calcite, indicate that the sediments at core hole CCM-1 were subjected to a hydrothermal event at 17.6 Ma. The minerals formed oxygen-shifted meteoric waters with δ18O values of ~-9% Smecities at CCM-1 at least partially exchanged with these waters. Carbon and oxygen isotope analysis of authigenic calcites in the Creede Formation show that they formed over a wide range of temperatures from fluids having a wide range of isotopic composition, presumably over an extended period time. Some of the cements apparently

  1. The large-scale process of microbial carbonate precipitation for nickel remediation from an industrial soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xuejiao; Li, Weila; Zhan, Lu; Huang, Minsheng; Zhang, Qiuzhuo; Achal, Varenyam

    2016-12-01

    Microbial carbonate precipitation is known as an efficient process for the remediation of heavy metals from contaminated soils. In the present study, a urease positive bacterial isolate, identified as Bacillus cereus NS4 through 16S rDNA sequencing, was utilized on a large scale to remove nickel from industrial soil contaminated by the battery industry. The soil was highly contaminated with an initial total nickel concentration of approximately 900 mg kg(-1). The soluble-exchangeable fraction was reduced to 38 mg kg(-1) after treatment. The primary objective of metal stabilization was achieved by reducing the bioavailability through immobilizing the nickel in the urease-driven carbonate precipitation. The nickel removal in the soils contributed to the transformation of nickel from mobile species into stable biominerals identified as calcite, vaterite, aragonite and nickelous carbonate when analyzed under XRD. It was proven that during precipitation of calcite, Ni(2+) with an ion radius close to Ca(2+) was incorporated into the CaCO3 crystal. The biominerals were also characterized by using SEM-EDS to observe the crystal shape and Raman-FTIR spectroscopy to predict responsible bonding during bioremediation with respect to Ni immobilization. The electronic structure and chemical-state information of the detected elements during MICP bioremediation process was studied by XPS. This is the first study in which microbial carbonate precipitation was used for the large-scale remediation of metal-contaminated industrial soil.

  2. Recent changes in precipitation extremes in Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adina-Eliza CROITORU

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Changes in daily extreme precipitations have been identified in many studies conducted at local, regional or global scales. In Romania, only little research on this issue has been done so far. The present study is focused on the analysis of the trends in daily extreme precipitations indices over a period of 53 years (1961-2013. Data sets of daily precipitation recorded in 34 weather stations were analyzed. Among them, three are located in the Carpathian Mountains area and four are located on the Black Sea Coast. The main goal was to find changes in extreme daily precipitation using a set of 13 indices adopted from the core indices developed by ETCCDMI with appropriate modifications to suit to the studied area. The series of the indices as well as their trends were generated using RClimDex software. The trends have been calculated using the linear mean square method. The findings are similar to those obtained at the global and European continental scales and the most noteworthy are: increasing trends dominate for the most of the indices, but only about 25% of them are statistically significant at α=0.05; decreasing trends are more specific to southern area of the country; decreasing trends of  R0.1, CDD and CWD dominate for the great majority of locations; the spatial distribution of the significant slopes in the area is extremely irregular.

  3. The Effect of the Ca2+:CO32- Activity Ratio on Spiral Growth at the Calcite {1014} Surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kirsten Kolbjørn; Bechgaard, Klaus; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2010-01-01

    Variation in the Ca2+ to CO 2¿ activity ratio of natural waters is rarely considered in models intended to describe calcite 3 growth. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy were used to examine spiral growth on calcite f10¿14g surfaces from solutions...

  4. Dominating biological networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijana Milenković

    Full Text Available Proteins are essential macromolecules of life that carry out most cellular processes. Since proteins aggregate to perform function, and since protein-protein interaction (PPI networks model these aggregations, one would expect to uncover new biology from PPI network topology. Hence, using PPI networks to predict protein function and role of protein pathways in disease has received attention. A debate remains open about whether network properties of "biologically central (BC" genes (i.e., their protein products, such as those involved in aging, cancer, infectious diseases, or signaling and drug-targeted pathways, exhibit some topological centrality compared to the rest of the proteins in the human PPI network.To help resolve this debate, we design new network-based approaches and apply them to get new insight into biological function and disease. We hypothesize that BC genes have a topologically central (TC role in the human PPI network. We propose two different concepts of topological centrality. We design a new centrality measure to capture complex wirings of proteins in the network that identifies as TC those proteins that reside in dense extended network neighborhoods. Also, we use the notion of domination and find dominating sets (DSs in the PPI network, i.e., sets of proteins such that every protein is either in the DS or is a neighbor of the DS. Clearly, a DS has a TC role, as it enables efficient communication between different network parts. We find statistically significant enrichment in BC genes of TC nodes and outperform the existing methods indicating that genes involved in key biological processes occupy topologically complex and dense regions of the network and correspond to its "spine" that connects all other network parts and can thus pass cellular signals efficiently throughout the network. To our knowledge, this is the first study that explores domination in the context of PPI networks.

  5. Challenging Credit Dominance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    @@ Europe's widening sovereign debt crisis has brought independent credit ratings to the forefront of the EU's agenda.To directly address the mat ter,the EU announced plans to set up a European creditrating authority for sovereign debt ratings on April 30.This marked a milestone in the international credit history,and the beginning of changes to U.S.-dominated international credit ratings and the pattern of international politics and economics,said Sun Zhe,Director of the Center for U.S.

  6. Differential early diagenetic low-Mg calcite cementation and rhythmic hardground development in Campanian-Maastrichtian chalk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molenaar, Nicolaas; J.J.P., Zijlstra

    1997-01-01

    The Campanian-Maastrichtian limestones in the south of the Netherlands are well-sorted fine-grained mudstones and silt- to fine sand-sized bioclastic grainstones. These limestones show a distinct lithological cyclicity manifested by fining-upward grain-size cycles with calcite-cemented layers...... and differences in the degree of early diagenesis. Cemented layers and hardgrounds are the result of differential early marine calcite cementation. In these limestones early calcite cementation cannot be explained by the supply of cementing materials from saturated seawater, An alternative model for early marine...... calcite cementation is proposed, in which early calcite cementation occurred within the sediment at some distance below the seafloor as a result of organic matter degradation and internal redistribution of bioclastic carbonate. Bacterial organic matter degradation caused dissolution of relatively unstable...

  7. Microstratigraphic logging of calcite fabrics in speleothems as tool for palaeoclimate studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Frisia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The systematic documentation of calcite fabrics in stalagmites and flowstones provides robustness to palaeoclimate interpretation based on geochemical proxies, but it has been neglected because it is difficult to transform crystal morphologies into numerical values, and construct fabric time series. Here, general criteria that allow for coding fabrics of calcite composing stalagmites and flowstones is provided. Being based on known models of fabric development, the coding ascribes sequential numbers to each fabric, which reflect climate-related parameters, such as changes in drip rate variability, bio-mediation or diagenetic modifications. Acronyms are proposed for Columnar types, Dendritic, Micrite, Microsparite and Mosaic fabrics, whose use could then render possible comparison of calcite fabrics in stalagmites and flowstones from diverse latitudinal and altitudinal settings. The climatic and environmental significance of similarities in the geochemical signals and trends analysed in coeval stalagmites and flowstones (or differences in the signals and trends will be more robust when compared with fabric time series. This is particularly true where, such as in the Holocene, changes in geochemical values may be subtle, yet fabrics may show changes related to variations in supersaturation, drip rate or input of detrital particles or organic compounds. The proposed microstratigraphic logging allows recognition of changes in stable isotope ratio or trace element values that can be ascribed to hydrology and diagenesis, with considerable improvement of reconstructions based on the chemical proxies of stalagmites and flowstones composed of calcite.

  8. Morphological and mechanical characterization of composite calcite/SWCNT-COOH single crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvaresi, Matteo; Falini, Giuseppe; Pasquini, Luca; Reggi, Michela; Fermani, Simona; Gazzadi, Gian Carlo; Frabboni, Stefano; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2013-08-01

    A growing number of classes of organic (macro)molecular materials have been trapped into inorganic crystalline hosts, such as calcite single crystals, without significantly disrupting their crystalline lattices. Inclusion of an organic phase plays a key role in enhancing the mechanical properties of the crystals, which are believed to share structural features with biogenic minerals. Here we report the synthesis and mechanical characterization of composite calcite/SWCNT-COOH single crystals. Once entrapped into the crystals SWCNT-COOH appeared both as aggregates of entangled bundles and nanoropes. Their observation was possible only after crystal etching, fracture or FIB (focused ion beam) cross-sectioning. SWCNT-COOHs occupied a small volume fraction and were randomly distributed into the host crystal. They did not strongly affect the crystal morphology. However, although the Young's modulus of composite calcite/SWCNT-COOH single crystals was similar to that of pure calcite their hardness increased by about 20%. Thus, SWCNT-COOHs provide an obstacle against the dislocation-mediated propagation of plastic deformation in the crystalline slip systems, in analogy with the well-known hardness increase in fiber-reinforced composites.

  9. Elasticity and yielding of a calcite paste: scaling laws in a dense colloidal suspension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberto, Teresa; Le Merrer, Marie; Barentin, Catherine; Bellotto, Maurizio; Colombani, Jean

    2017-03-08

    We address the mechanical characterization of a calcite paste as a model system to investigate the relation between the microstructure and macroscopic behavior of colloidal suspensions. The ultimate goal is to achieve control of the elastic and yielding properties of calcite which will prove valuable in several domains, from paper coating to paint manufacture and eventually in the comprehension and control of the mechanical properties of carbonate rocks. Rheological measurements have been performed on calcite suspensions over a wide range of particle concentrations. The calcite paste exhibits a typical colloidal gel behavior, with an elastic regime and a clear yield strain above which it enters a plastic regime. The yield strain shows a minimum when increasing the solid concentration, connected to a change in the power law scaling of the storage modulus. In the framework of the classical fractal elasticity model for colloidal suspensions proposed by Shih et al. [Phys. Rev. A, 1990, 42, 4772], we interpret this behavior as a switch with the concentration from the strong-link regime to the weak-link regime, which had never been observed so far in one well-defined system without external or chemical forcing.

  10. Experimental study of the effect of mica on pressure solution of single crystal calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karcz, Z.; Laronne, L.; Polizzotti, R. S.; Ertas, D.; Aharonov, E.

    2007-12-01

    Field and experimental studies suggest that clays and micas accelerate the rate of pressure solution in various geomaterials. It is not clear however whether the "clay effect" is purely mechanical (i.e., maintaining a thick conduit for fluids at the contact) or whether its surface chemistry plays a critical role. A case in point is the insoluble clay filling of stylolites, which are thought by some to be merely an inert byproduct of dissolution, or by others to be a necessary feature for the propagation of the seam. To study the effect of mica on carbonate pressure solution, the corner of a cleaved calcite single crystal rhomb was polished into a triangular face (edge length ~ 200micron) and pressed against either muscovite or quartz discs to yield a nominal stress of 10-20MPa. Immersing the contact in pre-saturated (with respect to microcrystalline calcite) solutions of distilled water or 0.25M NH4Cl caused axial shortening of the crystal. This axial strain was measured with a capacitance sensor (perimeter roughens. The second stage is distinguished by high axial strain rates (~40nm/h) and changes in the size and spatial position of isolated contacts (diameterfaces adjacent to it. At this point we see no significant difference between the calcite quartz and calcite muscovite experiments under similar load conditions.

  11. Adsorption and migration of single metal atoms on the calcite (10.4) surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, H.; Haapasilta, V.; Lokhandwala, M.; Öberg, S.; Foster, Adam S.

    2017-04-01

    Transition metal atoms are one of the key ingredients in the formation of functional 2D metal organic coordination networks. Additionally, the co-deposition of metal atoms can play an important role in anchoring the molecular structures to the surface at room temperature. To gain control of such processes requires the understanding of adsorption and diffusion properties of the different transition metals on the target surface. Here, we used density functional theory to investigate the adsorption of 3d (Ti, Cr, Fe, Ni, Cu), 4d (Zr, Nb, Mo, Pd, Ag) and 5d (Hf, W, Ir, Pt, Au) transition metal adatoms on the insulating calcite (10.4) surface. We identified the most stable adsorption sites and calculated binding energies and corresponding ground state structures. We find that the preferential adsorption sites are the Ca–Ca bridge sites. Apart from the Cr, Mo, Cu, Ag and Au all the studied metals bind strongly to the calcite surface. The calculated migration barriers for the representative Ag and Fe atoms indicates that the metal adatoms are mobile on the calcite surface at room temperature. Bader analysis suggests that there is no significant charge transfer between the metal adatoms and the calcite surface.

  12. Strontium, nickel, cadmium, and lead substitution into calcite, studied by density functional theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Martin Peter; Sakuma, Hiroshi; Stipp, Susan Louise Svane

    2014-01-01

    We have used density functional theory to predict the ion exchange energies for divalent cations Ni(2+), Sr(2+), Cd(2+), and Pb(2+) into a calcite {10.4} surface in equilibrium with water. Exchange energies were calculated for substitution into the topmost surface layer, at the mineral...

  13. Crystalline order of a water/glycine film coadsorbed on the (104) calcite surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magdans, Uta; Torrelles, Xavier; Angermund, Klaus; Gies, Hermann; Rius, Jordi

    2007-04-24

    For biomineralization processes, the interaction of the surface of calcite crystals with organic molecules is of particular importance. Especially, biologically controlled biomineralization as in exoskeletons of mollusks and echinoderms, e.g., sea urchin with single-crystal-like spines and shells,1-3 requires molecular control of seed formation and growth process. So far, experiments showing the obvious influence of organic molecules on the morphology and habit of calcite crystals have demonstrated the molecular dimension of the interaction.4-7 Details of the kinetics of growth and dissolution of mineral surfaces influenced by additives are available,8,9 but other experimental data about the structure of the organic/inorganic interface on the atomic scale are rare. On the other hand, complicated organic macromolecules which are involved in biomineralization are numerous, with only a small fraction solved in structure and function so far.10-13 Therefore, model systems have to be designed to provide a basic understanding for the interaction process.14 Using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction combined with molecular modeling techniques, we show that glycine molecules order periodically on the calcite (104) face in competition with the solvent water when exposed to an aqueous solution of the most simple amino acid. In contrast to the general concept of the charge-matching fit of organic molecules on mineral surfaces,4,14 glycine is not attached to the calcite surface directly but substitutes for water molecules in the second hydration layer.

  14. Higher Order Elastic Constants, Gruneisen Parameters and Lattice Thermal Expansion of Trigonal Calcite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thresiamma Phlip

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The second- and third-order elastic constants of trigonal calcite have been obtained using the deformation theory. The strain energy density derived using the deformation theory is compared with the strain dependent lattice energy obtained from the elastic continuum model approximation to get the expressions for the second- and third-order elastic constants. Higher order elastic constants are a measure of the anharmonicity of a crystal lattice. The seven second-order elastic constants and the fourteen non-vanishing third-order elastic constants of trigonal calcite are obtained. The second-order elastic constants C11, which corresponds to the elastic stiffness along the basal plane of the crystal is greater than C33, which corresponds to the elastic stiffness tensor component along the c-axis of the crystal. First order pressure derivatives of the second-order elastic constants of calcite are evaluated. The higher order elastic constants are used to find the generalized Gruneisen parameters of the elastic waves propagating in different directions in calcite. The Brugger gammas are evaluated and the low temperature limit of the Gruneisen gamma is obtained. The results are compared with available reported values.

  15. Assembly Synthesis of Sheet-like Calcite Array and Stable-Vaterite by Supported Liquid Membrane

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN,Dong-Mei(孙冬梅); WU,Qing-Sheng(吴庆生)

    2004-01-01

    Sheet-like calcite array and stable vaterite were synthesized by bio-mimetic supported liquid membrane system under different reaction conditions. Both of the FTIR spectra of products showed narrower peak at 1418 cm-1 than that of bulk CaCO3, and that of vaterite has a split in this peak.

  16. EPR OF Mn2+ IMPURITIES IN CALCITE: A DETAILED STUDY PERTINENT TO MARBLE PROVENANCE DETERMINATION

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weihe, H.; Piligkos, S.; Barra, A.L.;

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that the electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of Mn2+ impurities in calcite, and therefore also in marble, may be accurately reproduced by a traditional spin Hamiltonian formalism. The success of such a treatment, however, very much depends on the spin Hamiltonian parameters ha...

  17. Epr of Mn2+ Impurities in Calcite: A Detailed Study Pertinent to Marble Provenance Determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weihe, H.; Piligkos, S.; Barra, A.L.;

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate that the electron paramagnetic resonance spectrum of Mn2+ impurities in calcite, and therefore also in marble, may be accurately reproduced by a traditional spin Hamiltonian formalism. The success of such a treatment, however, very much depends on the spin Hamiltonian parameters ha...

  18. Modelling how incorporation of divalent cations affects calcite wettability–implications for biomineralisation and oil recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, M. P.; Dideriksen, K.; Sakuma, H.; Stipp, S. L. S.

    2016-06-01

    Using density functional theory and geochemical speciation modelling, we predicted how solid-fluid interfacial energy is changed, when divalent cations substitute into a calcite surface. The effect on wettability can be dramatic. Trace metal uptake can impact organic compound adsorption, with effects for example, on the ability of organisms to control crystal growth and our ability to predict the wettability of pore surfaces. Wettability influences how easily an organic phase can be removed from a surface, either organic compounds from contaminated soil or crude oil from a reservoir. In our simulations, transition metals substituted exothermically into calcite and more favourably into sites at the surface than in the bulk, meaning that surface properties are more strongly affected than results from bulk experiments imply. As a result of divalent cation substitution, calcite-fluid interfacial energy is significantly altered, enough to change macroscopic contact angle by tens of degrees. Substitution of Sr, Ba and Pb makes surfaces more hydrophobic. With substitution of Mg and the transition metals, calcite becomes more hydrophilic, weakening organic compound adsorption. For biomineralisation, this provides a switch for turning on and off the activity of organic crystal growth inhibitors, thereby controlling the shape of the associated mineral phase.

  19. as the Strengthening Precipitates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Qi; Xu, Wei; van der Zwaag, Sybrand

    2014-12-01

    Generally, Laves phase and M23C6 are regarded as undesirable phases in creep-resistant steels due to their very high-coarsening rates and the resulting depletion of beneficial alloying elements from the matrix. In this study, a computational alloy design approach is presented to develop martensitic steels strengthened by Laves phase and/or M23C6, for which the coarsening rates are tailored such that they are at least one order of magnitude lower than those in existing alloys. Their volume fractions are optimized by tuning the chemical composition in parallel. The composition domain covering 10 alloying elements at realistic levels is searched by a genetic algorithm to explore the full potential of simultaneous maximization of the volume fraction and minimization of the precipitates coarsening rate. The calculations show that Co and W can drastically reduce the coarsening rate of Laves and M23C6 and yield high-volume fractions of precipitates. Mo on the other hand was shown to have a minimal effect on coarsening. The strengthening effects of Laves phase and M23C6 in the newly designed alloys are compared to existing counterparts, showing substantially higher precipitation-strengthening contributions especially after a long service time. New alloys were designed in which both Laves phase and M23C6 precipitates act as strengthening precipitates. Successfully combining MX and M23C6 was found to be impossible.

  20. Tracing formation and durability of calcite in a Punic-Roman cistern mortar (Pantelleria Island, Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietzel, Martin; Schön, Frerich; Heinrichs, Jens; Deditius, Artur P; Leis, Albrecht

    2016-01-01

    Ancient hydraulic lime mortar preserves chemical and isotopic signatures that provide important information about historical processing and its durability. The distribution and isotopic composition of calcite in a mortar of a well-preserved Punic-Roman cistern at Pantelleria Island (Italy) was used to trace the formation conditions, durability, and individual processing periods of the cistern mortar. The analyses of stable carbon and oxygen isotopes of calcite revealed four individual horizons, D, E, B-1 and B-2, of mortar from the top to the bottom of the cistern floor. Volcanic and ceramic aggregates were used for the production of the mortar of horizons E/D and B-1/B-2, respectively. All horizons comprise hydraulic lime mortar characterized by a mean cementation index of 1.5 ± 1, and a constant binder to aggregate ratio of 0.31 ± 0.01. This suggests standardized and highly effective processing of the cistern. The high durability of calcite formed during carbonation of slaked lime within the matrix of the ancient mortar, and thus the excellent resistance of the hydraulic lime mortar against water, was documented by (i) a distinct positive correlation of δ(18)Ocalcite and δ(13)Ccalcite; typical for carbonation through a mortar horizon, (ii) a characteristic evolution of δ(18)Ocalcite and δ(13)Ccalcite through each of the four mortar horizons; lighter follow heavier isotopic values from upper to lower part of the cistern floor, and (iii) δ(18)Ocalcite varying from -10 to -5 ‰ Vienna Pee Dee belemnite (VPDB). The range of δ(18)Ocalcite values rule out recrystallization and/or neoformation of calcite through chemical attack of water stored in cistern. The combined studies of the chemical composition of the binder and the isotopic composition of the calcite in an ancient mortar provide powerful tools for elucidating the ancient techniques and processing periods. This approach helps to evaluate the durability of primary calcite and demonstrates the

  1. Precipitating factors of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, T H

    1992-01-01

    Asthma is characterised by bronchial hyperresponsiveness. This feature of the asthmatic diathesis predisposes patients to wheezing in response to a number of different factors. These precipitating factors include specific allergen acting via sensitised mediator cells through an IgE-dependent mechanism. There are irritants which may work through a non-specific manner, or stimuli such as exercise and hyperventilation, which probably also act through mediator release via a non-IgE-dependent manner. The mechanism whereby physical stimuli such as exercise induce bronchoconstriction is of interest, because it increases the context in which the mast cell may participate in acute asthmatic bronchoconstriction. Respiratory infections also commonly provoke asthma, especially in infants and may, indeed, precipitate the asthmatic state itself. Finally, drugs can often trigger asthma attacks and the mechanisms of asthma precipitated by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin have been the subject of recent research.

  2. The role of background electrolytes on the kinetics and mechanism of calcite dissolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Agudo, E.; Kowacz, M.; Putnis, C. V.; Putnis, A.

    2010-02-01

    The influence of background electrolytes on the mechanism and kinetics of calcite dissolution was investigated using in situ Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). Experiments were carried out far from equilibrium by passing alkali halide salt (NaCl, NaF, NaI, KCl and LiCl) solutions over calcite cleavage surfaces. This AFM study shows that all the electrolytes tested enhance the calcite dissolution rate. The effect and its magnitude is determined by the nature and concentration of the electrolyte solution. Changes in morphology of dissolution etch pits and dissolution rates are interpreted in terms of modification in water structure dynamics (i.e. in the activation energy barrier of breaking water-water interactions), as well as solute and surface hydration induced by the presence of different ions in solution. At low ionic strength, stabilization of water hydration shells of calcium ions by non-paired electrolytes leads to a reduction in the calcite dissolution rate compared to pure water. At high ionic strength, salts with a common anion yield similar dissolution rates, increasing in the order Cl - salts with a common cation due to an increasing mobility of water around the calcium ion. Changes in etch pit morphology observed in the presence of F - and Li + are explained by stabilization of etch pit edges bonded by like-charged ions and ion incorporation, respectively. As previously reported and confirmed here for the case of F -, highly hydrated ions increased the etch pit nucleation density on calcite surfaces compared to pure water. This may be related to a reduction in the energy barrier for etch pit nucleation due to disruption of the surface hydration layer.

  3. Precipitation of calcium carbonate from a calcium acetate and ammonium carbamate batch system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prah, J.; Maček, J.; Dražič, G.

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we report a novel approach for preparing precipitated calcium carbonate using solutions of ammonium carbamate and calcium acetate as the sources of calcium and carbon dioxide, respectively. Two different concentrations of the starting solutions at three different temperatures (15, 25 and 50 °C) were used for the reaction. The influence of temperature and concentration on the polymorphism and the resulting morphology of calcium carbonate are discussed. The most important parameter for controlling a particular crystal structure and precipitate morphology were the concentrations of the initial solutions. When initial solutions with lower concentrations were used, the crystal form of the precipitate changed with time. Regardless the different polymorphism at different temperatures, after one day only the calcite form was detected in all samples, regardless of at which temperature the samples were prepared. At higher concentrations, pure vaterite or a mixture of vaterite and calcite were present at the beginning of the experiment. After one day, pure vaterite was found in the samples that were prepared at 15 and 25 °C. If calcium carbonate precipitated at 50 °C, the XRD results showed a mixture of calcite and vaterite regardless of the time at which the sample was taken. The morphology of calcium carbonate particles prepared at various conditions changed from calcite cubes to spherical particles of vaterite and aragonite needles. When a low starting concentration was used, the morphology at the initial stage was strongly affected by the temperature at which the experiments were conducted. However, after one day only, cubes were present in all cases at low initial concentrations. In contrast, at high concentrations spherical particles precipitated at all three temperatures at the beginning of the reaction. Spherical particles were made up from smaller particles. Over time, the size of the particles was diminishing due to their disintegration into

  4. Precipitation-Regulated Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voit, Mark

    2016-07-01

    Star formation in the central galaxies of galaxy clusters appears to be fueled by precipitation of cold clouds out of hot circumgalactic gas via thermal instability. I will present both observational and theoretical support for the precipitation mode in large galaxies and discuss how it can be implemented in cosmological simulations of galaxy evolution. Galaxy cluster cores are unique laboratories for studying the astrophysics of thermal instability and may be teaching us valuable lessons about how feedback works in galaxies spanning the entire mass spectrum.

  5. Dynamics of CO2- radiation defects in natural calcite studied by ESR, electron spin echo and electron spin relaxation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wencka, M.; Lijewski, S.; Hoffmann, S. K.

    2008-06-01

    ESR spectra were recorded in the X-band (9.6 GHz) and in the W-band (94 GHz) and electron spin relaxation was measured by electron spin echo (ESE) in the temperature range 4.2-300 K for radicals in natural calcite samples obtained from a cave stalactite and a dripstone layer. Four types of carbonate radical spectra and two sulfate radical spectra were identified and high accuracy g-factors were derived. Time and temperature behaviour of the spectra show that the dominating CO2- radicals are rigidly bonded or undergo free reorientations, whereas CO3-, SO2- and SO3- only undergo free reorientations. Below 200 K the free reorientations of CO2- are suppressed and a hindered rotation around single local axis appears. The ESE detected spectrum proves that the lines of free rotating radicals are homogeneously broadened, thus they cannot participate in electron spin echo formation. Spin-lattice relaxation data show that CO2- radicals are decoupled from lattice phonons and relax via local mode tunnelling motion between inequivalent oxygen positions of CO2- molecules. The tunnelling appears in two excited vibrational states of energy 71 and 138 cm-1. Librational motions of CO2- molecules were detected by electron spin echo decay (phase relaxation) with energy 153 cm-1. Two kinds of impurity hydrogen atoms were distinguished from ESEEM: in-water inclusions and water coordinated to the calcium ions.

  6. Rings dominate western Gulf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal L., Francisco V.; Vidal L., Victor M. V.; Molero, José María Pérez

    Surface and deep circulation of the central and western Gulf of Mexico is controlled by interactions of rings of water pinched from the gulf's Loop Current. The discovery was made by Mexican oceanographers who are preparing a full-color, 8-volume oceanographic atlas of the gulf.Anticyclonic warm-core rings pinch off the Loop Current at a rate of about one to two per year, the scientists of the Grupo de Estudios Oceanográficos of the Instituto de Investigaciones Eléctricas (GEO-IIE) found. The rings migrate west until they collide with the continental shelf break of the western gulf, almost always between 22° and 23°N latitude. On their westward travel they transfer angular momentum and vorticity to the surrounding water, generating cyclonic circulations and vortex pairs that completely dominate the entire surface and deep circulation of the central and western gulf.

  7. Dominant modal decomposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombovari, Zoltan

    2017-03-01

    The paper deals with the automatic decomposition of experimental frequency response functions (FRF's) of mechanical structures. The decomposition of FRF's is based on the Green function representation of free vibratory systems. After the determination of the impulse dynamic subspace, the system matrix is formulated and the poles are calculated directly. By means of the corresponding eigenvectors, the contribution of each element of the impulse dynamic subspace is determined and the sufficient decomposition of the corresponding FRF is carried out. With the presented dominant modal decomposition (DMD) method, the mode shapes, the modal participation vectors and the modal scaling factors are identified using the decomposed FRF's. Analytical example is presented along with experimental case studies taken from machine tool industry.

  8. The Micro-mechanism Involved and Wollastonite Signature in the Calcareous Precipitates of Marine Isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarayu, K; Iyer, Nagesh R; Annaselvi, M; Ramachandra Murthy, A

    2016-03-01

    Micro-mechanical studies connecting the influence of extrinsic factors over intrinsic factors on 30 calcareous isolates obtained from marine sediment biofilms of the Bay of Bengal (Indian Ocean) revealed that the fate of calcareous crystal precipitation is highly dependent on factors like extracellular polysaccharides (EPS), organic carbon and nutrition. Further studies exemplified that EPS and the organic carbon secreted by the isolates controlled the dissemination of the calcareous crystals precipitated. From the study, it is evident that an EPS concentration of 7-15 mg l(-1) was found to enhance the dissemination of the calcareous crystals. Atomic force micrographs explain the nucleation behaviour and morphology of the calcareous crystals precipitated. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDAX) showed that the crystals were mainly composed of calcite and partially wollastonite.

  9. Effect of some organic solvent-water mixtures composition on precipitated calcium carbonate in carbonation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konopacka-Łyskawa, Donata; Kościelska, Barbara; Karczewski, Jakub

    2015-05-01

    Precipitated calcium carbonate particles were obtained during carbonation of calcium hydroxide slurry with carbon dioxide. Aqueous solutions of isopropyl alcohol, n-butanol and glycerol were used as solvents. Concentration of organic additives in the reactive mixture was from 0% to 20% (vol). Precipitation process were performed in a stirred tank reactor equipped with gas distributor. Multimodal courses of particles size distribution were determined for produced CaCO3 particles. Calcium carbonate as calcite was precipitated in all experiments. The mean Sauter diameter of CaCO3 particles decreased when the concentration of all used organic additives increased. The amount of small particle fraction in the product increased with the increasing concentration of organic solvents. Similar physical properties of used liquid phase resulted in the similar characteristics of obtained particles.

  10. Precipitation Reconstruction (PREC)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The PREC data set is an analysis of monthly precipitation constructed on a 2.5(o)lat/lon grid over the global for the period from 1948 to the present. The land...

  11. Reaction systems with precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Rogalski

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes expanding Reaction Systems of Ehrenfeucht and Rozenberg by incorporating precipitation reactions into it. This improves the computing power of Reaction Systems by allowing us to implement a stack. This addition enables us to implement a Deterministic Pushdown Automaton.

  12. Treatment of precipitation uncertainty in rainfall-runoff modelling: a fuzzy set approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskey, Shreedhar; Guinot, Vincent; Price, Roland K.

    2004-09-01

    The uncertainty in forecasted precipitation remains a major source of uncertainty in real time flood forecasting. Precipitation uncertainty consists of uncertainty in (i) the magnitude, (ii) temporal distribution, and (iii) spatial distribution of the precipitation. This paper presents a methodology for propagating the precipitation uncertainty through a deterministic rainfall-runoff-routing model for flood forecasting. It uses fuzzy set theory combined with genetic algorithms. The uncertainty due to the unknown temporal distribution of the precipitation is achieved by disaggregation of the precipitation into subperiods. The methodology based on fuzzy set theory is particularly useful where a probabilistic forecast of precipitation is not available. A catchment model of the Klodzko valley (Poland) built with HEC-1 and HEC-HMS was used for the application. The results showed that the output uncertainty due to the uncertain temporal distribution of precipitation can be significantly dominant over the uncertainty due to the uncertain quantity of precipitation.

  13. Changes in the annual range of precipitation under global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, C.; Lan, C.

    2011-12-01

    The annual range of precipitation, which is the difference between maximum and minimum precipitation within a year, is examined in climate model simulations under global warming. For global averages, the annual range of precipitation tends to increase as the globe warms. On a regional basis, this enhancement is found over most areas of the world, except for the bands along 30°S and 30N°, respectively. The enhancement in the annual range of precipitation is mainly associated with larger upward trends of maximum precipitation and smaller upward trends or downward trends of minimum precipitation. Based on the moisture budget analysis, the dominant mechanism is vertical moisture advection, both on a global average and on a regional scale. The vertical moisture advection, moisture convergence induced by vertical motion, includes the thermodynamic component, which is associated with increased water vapor, and the dynamic component, which is associated with changes in circulation. Generally, the thermodynamic component enhances the annual range of precipitation, while the dynamic component tends to reduce it. Evaporation has a positive contribution to both maximum and minimum precipitation, but very little to the annual range of precipitation. Even though evaporation and horizontal moisture advection are small for a global average, they could be important on a regional basis.

  14. 3D Mapping of calcite and a demonstration of its relevance to permeability evolution in reactive fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Brian R.; Peters, Catherine A.

    2016-09-01

    There is a need to better understand reaction-induced changes in fluid transport in fractured shales, caprocks and reservoirs, especially in the context of emerging energy technologies, including geologic carbon sequestration, unconventional natural gas, and enhanced geothermal systems. We developed a method for 3D calcite mapping in rock specimens. Such information is critical in reactive transport modeling, which relies on information about the locations and accessible surface area of reactive minerals. We focused on calcite because it is a mineral whose dissolution could lead to substantial pathway alteration because of its high solubility, fast reactivity, and abundance in sedimentary rocks. Our approach combines X-ray computed tomography (XCT) and scanning electron microscopy. The method was developed and demonstrated for a fractured limestone core containing about 50% calcite, which was 2.5 cm in diameter and 3.5 cm in length and had been scanned using XCT. The core was subsequently sectioned and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was used to determine elemental signatures for mineral identification and mapping. Back-scattered electron microscopy was used to identify features for co-location. Finally, image analysis resulted in characteristic grayscale intensities of X-ray attenuation that identify calcite. This attenuation mapping ultimately produced a binary segmented 3D image of the spatial distribution of calcite in the entire core. To demonstrate the value of this information, permeability changes were investigated for hypothetical fractures created by eroding calcite from 2D rock surfaces. Fluid flow was simulated using a 2D steady state model. The resulting increases in permeability were profoundly influenced by the degree to which calcite is contiguous along the flow path. If there are bands of less reactive minerals perpendicular to the direction of flow, fracture permeability may be an order of magnitude smaller than when calcite is contiguous

  15. A preliminary study of the calcite beef found in the Cretaceous Jinju Formation, Gyeongsang Basin, South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, S.; Chae, Y. U.; Son, M.; Jeong, G. Y.; Paik, I. S.; Lim, H. S.

    2015-12-01

    The term "beef" refers to fibrous minerals in bedding-parallel veins, where the fibers are approximately perpendicular to the vein margins (Cobbold et al., 2013). It mostly appears within organic-rich black shale layers in sedimentary basin. Although the veins can consist of white gangue minerals, such as calcite, gypsum, or quartz, the commonest mineral in the fibers is calcite. According to the worldwide localities of calcite beef compiled by Cobbold et al (2012), they concentrated in some areas, especially around the Atlantic Ocean. However, they have been rarely reported in the western Pacific margin, except Australia and New Zealand. Recently, calcite beefs have been found in the Cretaceous Jinju Formation, Gyeongsang Basin, Korea. As far as we know, this is the first report of calcite beef in Korea. The lacustrine Jinju Formation is about 1,200 m thick, and made up mainly of lacustrine dark grey to black mudstones. In the study area, calcite beefs were commonly found in the organic-rich black shale layers. The vein thickness is anywhere between a few millimeters to maximum 3 centimeters, and their length ranges from a few centimeters to several tens of meters. The interval between successive veins is from a few centimeters to about 1 meter. Most of them occur parallel to the bedding planes, although some of them are developed along fault planes or within deformed layers. In case of relatively thick beefs, the center of veins often shows a dark grey to black central median line, defined by fine-grained calcite grains, fluid inclusion lines, or wall rock particles. Based on the orientation of fibrous calcite, they can be divided into two types: straight and sigmoidal types. The fibrous calcites are thought to have been symmetrically grown from the median lines to top and bottom of wall rock. The formation mechanism of horizontal fractures, and the formation temperature of beefs in the study area remain as a matter to be studied further.

  16. Onset dominance in lateralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freyman, R L; Zurek, P M; Balakrishnan, U; Chiang, Y C

    1997-03-01

    Saberi and Perrott [Acustica 81, 272-275 (1995)] found that the in-head lateralization of a relatively long-duration pulse train could be controlled by the interaural delay of the single pulse pair that occurs at onset. The present study examined this further, using an acoustic pointer measure of lateralization, with stimulus manipulations designed to determine conditions under which lateralization was consistent with the interaural onset delay. The present stimuli were wideband pulse trains, noise-burst trains, and inharmonic complexes, 250 ms in duration, chosen for the ease with which interaural delays and correlations of select temporal segments of the stimulus could be manipulated. The stimulus factors studied were the periodicity of the ongoing part of the signal as well as the multiplicity and ambiguity of interaural delays. The results, in general, showed that the interaural onset delay controlled lateralization when the steady state binaural cues were relatively weak, either because the spectral components were only sparsely distributed across frequency or because the interaural time delays were ambiguous. Onset dominance can be disrupted by sudden stimulus changes within the train, and several examples of such changes are described. Individual subjects showed strong left-right asymmetries in onset effectiveness. The results have implications for understanding how onset and ongoing interaural delay cues contribute to the location estimates formed by the binaural auditory system.

  17. U-Th dating of calcite corals from the Gulf of Aqaba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yehudai, Maayan; Lazar, Boaz; Bar, Neta; Kiro, Yael; Agnon, Amotz; Shaked, Yonathan; Stein, Mordechai

    2017-02-01

    Most of the fossil corals in the elevated reef terraces along the Gulf of Aqaba (GOA) were extensively altered to calcite. This observation indicates extensive interaction with freshwater, possibly when the terraces passed through a coastal aquifer that existed along the shores of the GOA, implying a wetter climate during the time of recrystallization from aragonite to calcite. Thus, dating of the recrystallization events should yield the timing of past wetter conditions in the current hyper-arid area of the GOA. In the present study, 18 aragonite and calcite corals were collected from several elevated coral reef terraces off the coast, south of the city of Aqaba. While aragonite corals were dated with the conventional closed system age equation (assuming zero initial Th), the dating of the calcite corals required the development of adequate equations to allow the calculation of both the initial formation age of the aragonite corals and the time of recrystallization to calcite. The two age calculations were based on the assumptions that each reef terrace went through a single and rapid recrystallization event and that the pristine aragonite corals were characterized by a rather uniform initial U concentration, typical for pristine modern corals. Two recrystallization events were identified at 104 ± 6 ka and 124 ± 8 ka. The ages coincide with the timing of sapropel events S4 and S5, respectively, when the African monsoon induced enhanced wetness in the desert area. Considering the age uncertainties, the times of formation of the two major reef terraces are estimated to be ∼124 ka (reef terrace R2) and ∼130 ka (reef terrace R3), matching the peaks in the global sea level during the last interglacial MIS 5e stage. Apparently, sea level of the GOA did not fluctuate a lot during the period between ∼130 ka and ∼104 ka and remained close to the Marine Isotopic stage (MIS) 5e highstand. The availability of freshwater (during the sapropel periods) and limited sea

  18. A Non-Electrostatic Surface Complexation Approach to Modeling Radionuclide Migration at the Nevada Test Site: I. Iron Oxides and Calcite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavarin, M; Bruton, C J

    2004-12-17

    Reliable quantitative prediction of contaminant transport in subsurface environments is critical to evaluating the risks associated with radionuclide migration. As part of the Underground Test Area (UGTA) project, radionuclide transport away from various underground nuclear tests conducted in the saturated zone at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is being examined. In the near-field environment, reactive transport simulations must account for changes in water chemistry and mineralogy as a function of time and their effect on radionuclide migration. Unlike the K{sub d} approach, surface complexation (SC) reactions, in conjunction with ion exchange and precipitation, can be used to describe radionuclide reactive transport as a function of changing environmental conditions. They provide a more robust basis for describing radionuclide retardation in geochemically dynamic environments. The interaction between several radionuclides considered relevant to the UGTA project and iron oxides and calcite are examined in this report. The interaction between these same radionuclides and aluminosilicate minerals is examined in a companion report (Zavarin and Bruton, 2004). Selection criteria for radionuclides were based on abundance, half-life, toxicity to human and environmental health, and potential mobility at NTS (Tompson et al., 1999). Both iron oxide and calcite minerals are known to be present at NTS in various locations and are likely to affect radionuclide migration from the near-field. Modeling the interaction between radionuclides and these minerals was based on surface complexation. The effectiveness of the most simplified SC model, the one-site Non-Electrostatic Model (NEM), to describe sorption under various solution conditions is evaluated in this report. NEM reactions were fit to radionuclide sorption data available in the literature, as well as sorption data recently collected for the UGTA project, and a NEM database was developed. For radionuclide-iron oxide sorption

  19. Impact of carbonate precipitation on flow and reactive transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noiriel, C. N.; Yang, L.; Ajo Franklin, J. B.; Steefel, C.

    2010-12-01

    Precipitation of carbonates during CO2 sequestration can affect both flow and transport in porous media, leading to reservoir injectivity decrease. This process has been studied experimentally during early stages of carbonate crystal growth. Supersaturated CO2-rich solutions at saturations states of Ω= 5 or 27 were flowed through cylindrical cores packed with glass beads, calcite spar crystals and aragonite ooids over the course of several weeks to induce calcite precipitation. Samples were characterized using X-ray microtomography at the Berkeley Laboratory (Advanced Light Source) to provide 3D imaging of crystal growth. Observations of the two different supersatuations indicate differences both in the crystal growth rate and morphology, and thus the modification of pore geometry. Porosity decreases most close to the column inlet as expected, where the saturation index is highest. Changes in porosity were modelled at the continuum scale using the multicomponent reactive transport software, CrunchFlow, which accounts for the change in saturation states and rates over the length of the column. Comparison with the results of well-stirred reactor precipitation experiments allow a quantification of the evolving reactive surface area and rates within the porous medium of the column.

  20. Experimental Research on Microscopic Indicators of Temperature's Returning-to-Zero in Deformation of Calcite and Discussions of Correlation Problem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Daquan; Zhai Hongtao

    2005-01-01

    In order to determine the degree of returning-to-zero of temperatures of deformed calcite, a series of rock-breaking experiments were designed to test calcite-rich limestone samples under fixed confining pressures and different temperatures. The consolidated deformed samples in their initial state were observed under a microscope and the microscopic indicators in different zero-returning states were put forward, thus providing a microscopic foundation for evaluation of reliability of dating values of deformation in calcite. At last, the correction of dating values of deformation for samples whose temperature has not yet returned to zero is discussed.

  1. Comparison of Dissolution and Surface Reactions Between Calcite and Aragonite in L-Glutamic and L-Aspartic Acid Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwangsuk You

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated dissolution and surface reaction of calcite and aragonite in amino acid solutions of L-glutamic (L-glu and L-aspartic acid (L-asp at weak acidity of above pH 3. The surface reactions of calcite and aragonite were related with the dissolution. Calcite was dissolved in both solutions but the dissolution was limited by an adsorption of Ca-carboxylate salt. Aragonite was neither dissolved nor reacted in amino acid solutions because the crystal surface consisted of a hard to dissolve structure.

  2. Interactions of the Calcite {10.4} Surface with Organic Compounds: Structure and Behaviour at Mineral – Organic Interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hakim, S. S.; Olsson, M. H. M.; Sørensen, H. O.

    2017-01-01

    The structure and the strength of organic compound adsorption on mineral surfaces are of interest for a number of industrial and environmental applications, oil recovery, CO2 storage and contamination remediation. Biomineralised calcite plays an essential role in the function of many organisms...... that control crystal growth with organic macromolecules. Carbonate rocks, composed almost exclusively of calcite, host drinking water aquifers and oil reservoirs. In this study, we examined the ordering behaviour of several organic compounds and the thickness of the adsorbed layers formed on calcite {10...

  3. The elemental composition of purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus calcite and potential effects of pCO2 during early life stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. LaVigne

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification will likely have negative impacts on invertebrates producing skeletons composed of calcium carbonate. Skeletal solubility is partly controlled by the incorporation of "foreign" ions (e.g. magnesium into the crystal lattice of these skeletal structures, a process that is sensitive to a variety of biological and environmental factors. Here we explore effects of life stage, oceanographic region of origin, and changes in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in seawater (pCO2 on trace elemental composition in the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus. We show that, similar to other urchin taxa, adult purple sea urchins have the ability to precipitate skeleton composed of a range of biominerals spanning low- to high-Mg calcites. Mg / Ca and Sr / Ca ratios were substantially lower in adult spines compared to adult tests. On the other hand, trace elemental composition was invariant among adults collected from four oceanographically distinct regions spanning a range of carbonate chemistry conditions (Oregon, Northern California, Central California, and Southern California. Skeletons of newly settled juvenile urchins that originated from adults from the four regions exhibited intermediate Mg / Ca and Sr / Ca between adult spine and test endmembers, indicating that skeleton precipitated during early life stages is more soluble than adult spines and less soluble than adult tests. Mean skeletal Mg / Ca or Sr / Ca of juvenile skeleton did not vary with source region when larvae were reared under present-day, global-average seawater carbonate conditions (400 μatm; pHT = 8.02 ± 0.03 1 SD; Ωcalcite = 3.3 ± 0.2 1 SD. However, when reared under elevated pCO2 (900 μatm; pHT = 7.73 ± 0.03; Ωcalcite = 1.8 ± 0.1, skeletal Sr / Ca in juveniles exhibited increased variance across the four regions. Although larvae from the northern populations (Oregon, Northern California, Central California did not exhibit differences in Mg or Sr

  4. The elemental composition of purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus) calcite and potential effects of pCO2 during early life stages

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaVigne, M.; Hill, T. M.; Sanford, E.; Gaylord, B.; Russell, A. D.; Lenz, E. A.; Hosfelt, J. D.; Young, M. K.

    2013-06-01

    Ocean acidification will likely have negative impacts on invertebrates producing skeletons composed of calcium carbonate. Skeletal solubility is partly controlled by the incorporation of "foreign" ions (e.g. magnesium) into the crystal lattice of these skeletal structures, a process that is sensitive to a variety of biological and environmental factors. Here we explore effects of life stage, oceanographic region of origin, and changes in the partial pressure of carbon dioxide in seawater (pCO2) on trace elemental composition in the purple sea urchin (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus). We show that, similar to other urchin taxa, adult purple sea urchins have the ability to precipitate skeleton composed of a range of biominerals spanning low- to high-Mg calcites. Mg / Ca and Sr / Ca ratios were substantially lower in adult spines compared to adult tests. On the other hand, trace elemental composition was invariant among adults collected from four oceanographically distinct regions spanning a range of carbonate chemistry conditions (Oregon, Northern California, Central California, and Southern California). Skeletons of newly settled juvenile urchins that originated from adults from the four regions exhibited intermediate Mg / Ca and Sr / Ca between adult spine and test endmembers, indicating that skeleton precipitated during early life stages is more soluble than adult spines and less soluble than adult tests. Mean skeletal Mg / Ca or Sr / Ca of juvenile skeleton did not vary with source region when larvae were reared under present-day, global-average seawater carbonate conditions (400 μatm; pHT = 8.02 ± 0.03 1 SD; Ωcalcite = 3.3 ± 0.2 1 SD). However, when reared under elevated pCO2 (900 μatm; pHT = 7.73 ± 0.03; Ωcalcite = 1.8 ± 0.1), skeletal Sr / Ca in juveniles exhibited increased variance across the four regions. Although larvae from the northern populations (Oregon, Northern California, Central California) did not exhibit differences in Mg or Sr

  5. Chemical and isotope characteristics of a tufa-precipitating stream in Karwów (south-central Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duliński, Marek; Gradziński, Michał; Motyka, Jacek; Czop, Mariusz

    2016-04-01

    Chemical and isotope composition of a tufa-precipitating spring located in Karwów (south-central Poland) is described with the emphasis on the CO2-H2O-CaCO3 system. Carbonate solution is formed with participation of biogenic carbon dioxide and appears at the surface close to saturation state with respect to calcite. At the outflow of the spring the water is characterized by long-term stability of physical and chemical parameters. Along the course of the spring the tufa bed is formed as a result of CO2 outgassing. The carbon and oxygen isotope investigations were performed both on water solutions and the tufa calcite precipitated on CaCO3 plates exposed in water for different periods of time. In general, results of the 13C analyses and numerical modeling using NETPATH code suggest that calcite is precipitated close to carbon isotope equilibrium conditions except for the situations when the extreme outgassing of CO2 takes place. Several measured precipitate samples have shown distinctly lower δ18O values than expected for tufa formation under equilibrium conditions. This cannot be explained by kinetic effects known from karstic caves or lake studies as they lead to higher δ18O values of precipitated carbonates than at isotope equilibrium. Also, short-term fluctuations of water temperature cannot be responsible for the observed deviations in oxygen isotope composition of measured tufa samples from equilibrium values. Further work is needed to better understand the factors controlling 18O isotope composition of tufa deposits.

  6. Waste oil shale ash as a novel source of calcium for precipitated calcium carbonate: Carbonation mechanism, modeling, and product characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velts, O., E-mail: olga.velts@ttu.ee [Laboratory of Inorganic Materials, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, Tallinn 19086 (Estonia); Laboratory of Separation Technology, Lappeenranta University of Technology, P.O. Box 20, Lappeenranta FI-53851 (Finland); Uibu, M.; Kallas, J.; Kuusik, R. [Laboratory of Inorganic Materials, Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, Tallinn 19086 (Estonia)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} A method for converting oil shale waste ash into precipitated CaCO{sub 3} is elucidated. {yields} We discuss the mechanism of hazardous alkaline ash leachates carbonation. {yields} We report a model describing precipitation of CaCO{sub 3} from multi-ionic ash leachates. {yields} Model enables simulation of reactive species concentration profiles. {yields} Product contained {approx}96% CaCO{sub 3} with 4-10 {mu}m size calcite or/and vaterite particles. - Abstract: In this paper, a method for converting lime-containing oil shale waste ash into precipitated calcium carbonate (PCC), a valuable commodity is elucidated. The mechanism of ash leachates carbonation was experimentally investigated in a stirred semi-batch barboter-type reactor by varying the CO{sub 2} partial pressure, gas flow rate, and agitation intensity. A consistent set of model equations and physical-chemical parameters is proposed to describe the CaCO{sub 3} precipitation process from oil shale ash leachates of complex composition. The model enables the simulation of reactive species (Ca{sup 2+}, CaCO{sub 3}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, CaSO{sub 4}, OH{sup -}, CO{sub 2}, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}, H{sup +}, CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}) concentration profiles in the liquid, gas, and solid phases as well as prediction of the PCC formation rate. The presence of CaSO{sub 4} in the product may also be evaluated and used to assess the purity of the PCC product. A detailed characterization of the PCC precipitates crystallized from oil shale ash leachates is also provided. High brightness PCC (containing up to {approx}96% CaCO{sub 3}) with mean particle sizes ranging from 4 to 10 {mu}m and controllable morphology (such as rhombohedral calcite or coexisting calcite and spherical vaterite phases) was obtained under the conditions studied.

  7. The dominance of norm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward L. Rubin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective to revisit the debate about rational choice theory from the legal cultural and historical perspectives. Methods dialectic approach to the cognition of social phenomena allowing to analyze them in their historical development and functioning in the context of the integrity of subjective and objective factors this determines the choice of the research methods systemicstructural formallegal and comparative. Results The first part of this chapter will explain the way in which people in societies different from our own were subject to other motivations in situations where selfinterest would tend to dominate in our society. The reasoning is based on three examples one drawn from the history of Ancient Rome one from the High Middle Ages of the European society and one from a contemporary nonWestern culture. The second part of the chapter analyzes the reason why material selfinterest maximizing became a dominant motivation in the modern Western society. The works on historical sociology attribute this development to Calvinism but this hypothesis suffers from some serious defects. In the article we prove that the modern sensibility resulted from much longeracting trends specifically secularization urbanization and commercialization. The final section of the chapter explores the relationship between the Westrsquos prevailing norm of selfinterest maximization and the particular norms that have been discussed in microeconomic theory. It argues that some of these norms are internal to the prevailing one and are thus explicable in terms of material selfinterest but that others reflect additional norms in the general society that exist alongside and sometimes in competition with the prevailing norm of selfinterest maximization. The historicallybased view that selfinterest maximizing is a prevailing norm rather than a human universal allows these other norms to be acknowledged in a plausible and realistic manner rather than being explained away by a

  8. Thermodynamics of magnesian calcite solid-solutions at 25°C and 1 atm total pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busenberg, Eurybiades; Plummer, L. Niel

    1989-01-01

    The stability of magnesian calcites was reexamined, and new results are presented for 28 natural inorganic, 12 biogenic, and 32 synthetic magnesian calcites. The magnesian calcite solid-solutions were separated into two groups on the basis of differences in stoichiometric solubility and other physical and chemical properties. Group I consists of solids of mainly metamorphic and hydrothermal origin, synthetic calcites prepared at high temperatures and pressures, and synthetic solids prepared at low temperature and very low calcite supersaturations () from artificial sea water or NaClMgCl2CaCl2solutions. Group I solids are essentially binary s of CaCO2 and MgCO2, and are thought to be relatively free of structural defects. Group II solid-solutions are of either biogenic origin or are synthetic magnesian calcites and protodolomites (0–20 and ∼ 45 mole percent MgCO3) prepared at high calcite supersaturations () from NaClNa2SO4MgCl2CaCl2 or NaClMgCl2CaCl2 solutions. Group II solid-solutions are treated as massively defective solids. The defects include substitution foreign ions (Na+ and SO42−) in the magnesian calcite lattice (point defects) and dislocations (~2 · 109 cm−2). Within each group, the excess free energy of mixing, GE, is described by the mixing model , where x is the mole fraction of the end-member Ca0.5Mg0.5CO3 in the solid-solution. The values of A0and A1 for Group I and II solids were evaluated at 25°C. The equilibrium constants of all the solids are closely described by the equation ln , where KC and KD are the equilibrium constants of calcite and Ca0.5Mg0.5CO3. Group I magnesian calcites were modeled as sub-regular solid-solutions between calcite and dolomite, and between calcite and “disordered dolomite”. Both models yield almost identical equilibrium constants for these magnesian calcites. The Group II magnesian calcites were modeled as sub-regular solid-solutions between defective calcite and

  9. Dissolution-precipitation creep at mid-crustal levels of the Scandian Caledonides: the COSC-1 case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntoli, Francesco; Menegon, Luca; Warren, Clare

    2017-04-01

    subparallel to the stretching lineation, but they are also internally strain free. Thus, we interpret the CPO of Plag2 as a result of oriented grain growth during dissolution-precipitation creep. The enrichment of Ca in Plag2 could reflect either a difference in the PT conditions compared to the growth of Plag1 or a possible metasomatic event characterized by an influx of a Ca-rich fluid, as suggested by the presence of intergranular calcite crystals as well as discrete calcite veins. The X-ray chemical maps and the EBSD maps suggest that (micro)cracking and dissolution- precipitation creep were responsible for the development of the mylonitic amphibolites, and that crystal plasticity was not a dominant deformation mechanism, although deformation occurred at pressure and temperature conditions at which plagioclase is expected to deform by dislocation creep. In conclusion, in middle crustal levels the presence of water at the grain boundaries enhances chemical reaction and is responsible for deformation through dissolution and precipitation processes that create a strong preferred crystallographic orientation in the newly grown minerals.

  10. Arsenic uptake by gypsum and calcite: Modeling and probing by neutron and x-ray scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-Martinez, Alejandro; Roman-Ross, Gabriela; Johnson, Mark R; Bardelli, Fabrizio; Turrillas, Xavier; Charlet, Laurent

    2006-01-01

    Here we report on two structural studies performed on As-doped gypsum (CaSO4 2H2O) and calcite (CaCO3), using neutron (D20-ILL) and x-ray (ID11-ESRF) diffraction data and EXAFS (BM8-ESRF). The aim of this study is to determine whether As gets into the bulk of gypsum and calcite structures or is simply adsorbed on the surface. Different mechanisms of substitution are used as hypotheses. The combined Rietveld analysis of neutron and x-ray diffraction data shows an expansion of the unit cell volume proportional to the As concentration within the samples. DFT-based simulations confirm the increase of the unit cell volume proportional to the amount of carbonate or sulphate groups substituted. Interpolation of the experimental Rietveld data allows us to distinguish As substituted within the structure from that adsorbed on the surface of both minerals.

  11. A calcite permeable reactive barrier for the remediation of Fluoride from spent potliner (SPL) contaminated groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turner, B.D.; Binning, Philip John; Sloan, S.W.

    2008-01-01

    The use of calcite (CaCO3) as a substrate for a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) for removing fluoride from contaminated groundwater is proposed and is illustrated by application to groundwater contaminated by spent potliner leachate (SPL), a waste derived from the aluminium smelting process....... The paper focuses on two issues in the implementation of calcite permeable reactive barriers for remediating fluoride contaminated water: the impact of the groundwater chemical matrix and CO2 addition on fluoride removal. Column tests comparing pure NaF solutions, synthetic SPL solutions, and actual SPL...... leachate indicate that the complex chemical matrix of the SPL leachate can impact fluoride removal significantly. For SPL contaminant mixtures, fluoride removal is initially less than expected from idealized, pure, solutions. However, with time, the effect of other contaminants on fluoride removal...

  12. Uranium immobilization by sulfate-reducing biofilms grown on hematite, dolomite, and calcite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsili, Enrico; Beyenal, Haluk; Di Palma, Luca; Merli, Carlo; Dohnalkova, Alice; Amonette, James E; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2007-12-15

    Biofilms of sulfate-reducing bacteria Desulfovibrio desulfuricans G20 were used to reduce dissolved U(VI) and subsequently immobilize U(IV) in the presence of uranium-complexing carbonates. The biofilms were grown in three identically operated fixed bed reactors, filled with three types of minerals: one noncarbonate-bearing mineral (hematite) and two carbonate-bearing minerals (calcite and dolomite). The source of carbonates in the reactors filled with calcite and dolomite were the minerals, while in the reactor filled with hematite it was a 10 mM carbonate buffer, pH 7.2, which we added to the growth medium. Our five-month study demonstrated that the sulfate-reducing biofilms grown in all reactors were able to immobilize/reduce uranium efficiently, despite the presence of uranium-complexing carbonates.

  13. Deformation twinning and the role of amino acids and magnesium in calcite hardness from molecular simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Côté, A S; Darkins, R; Duffy, D M

    2015-08-21

    We employ classical molecular dynamics to calculate elastic properties and to model the nucleation and propagation of deformation twins in calcite, both as a pure crystal and with magnesium and aspartate inclusions. The twinning is induced by applying uniaxial strain to the crystal and relaxing all stress components except the uniaxial component. A detailed analysis of the atomistic processes reveal that the twinning mechanism involves small displacements of the Ca ions and cooperative rotations of the CO3 ions. The volume of the twinned region expands under increased uniaxial strain via the propagation of steps along the twin boundaries. The energy cost of the twin boundaries is compensated by the reduced hydrostatic stress and strain energy. The presence of biogenic impurities is shown to decrease the strain required to induce twin formation in calcite and, thus, the yield stress. This increased propensity for twinning provides a possible explanation for the increased hardness and penetration resistance observed experimentally in biominerals.

  14. 3D visualization of additive occlusion and tunable full-spectrum fluorescence in calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, David C.; Ihli, Johannes; Thornton, Paul D.; Holden, Mark A.; Marzec, Bartosz; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Kulak, Alex N.; Levenstein, Mark A.; Tang, Chiu; Lynch, Christophe; Webb, Stephen E. D.; Tynan, Christopher J.; Meldrum, Fiona C.

    2016-11-01

    From biomineralization to synthesis, organic additives provide an effective means of controlling crystallization processes. There is growing evidence that these additives are often occluded within the crystal lattice. This promises an elegant means of creating nanocomposites and tuning physical properties. Here we use the incorporation of sulfonated fluorescent dyes to gain new understanding of additive occlusion in calcite (CaCO3), and to link morphological changes to occlusion mechanisms. We demonstrate that these additives are incorporated within specific zones, as defined by the growth conditions, and show how occlusion can govern changes in crystal shape. Fluorescence spectroscopy and lifetime imaging microscopy also show that the dyes experience unique local environments within different zones. Our strategy is then extended to simultaneously incorporate mixtures of dyes, whose fluorescence cascade creates calcite nanoparticles that fluoresce white. This offers a simple strategy for generating biocompatible and stable fluorescent nanoparticles whose output can be tuned as required.

  15. Strain-relief by single dislocation loops in calcite crystals grown on self-assembled monolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihli, Johannes; Clark, Jesse N.; Côté, Alexander S.; Kim, Yi-Yeoun; Schenk, Anna S.; Kulak, Alexander N.; Comyn, Timothy P.; Chammas, Oliver; Harder, Ross J.; Duffy, Dorothy M.; Robinson, Ian K.; Meldrum, Fiona C.

    2016-06-01

    Most of our knowledge of dislocation-mediated stress relaxation during epitaxial crystal growth comes from the study of inorganic heterostructures. Here we use Bragg coherent diffraction imaging to investigate a contrasting system, the epitaxial growth of calcite (CaCO3) crystals on organic self-assembled monolayers, where these are widely used as a model for biomineralization processes. The calcite crystals are imaged to simultaneously visualize the crystal morphology and internal strain fields. Our data reveal that each crystal possesses a single dislocation loop that occupies a common position in every crystal. The loops exhibit entirely different geometries to misfit dislocations generated in conventional epitaxial thin films and are suggested to form in response to the stress field, arising from interfacial defects and the nanoscale roughness of the substrate. This work provides unique insight into how self-assembled monolayers control the growth of inorganic crystals and demonstrates important differences as compared with inorganic substrates.

  16. Selective adsorption of L- and D-amino acids on calcite: Implications for biochemical homochirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazen, R. M.; Filley, T. R.; Goodfriend, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    The emergence of biochemical homochirality was a key step in the origin of life, yet prebiotic mechanisms for chiral separation are not well constrained. Here we demonstrate a geochemically plausible scenario for chiral separation of amino acids by adsorption on mineral surfaces. Crystals of the common rock-forming mineral calcite (CaCO(3)), when immersed in a racemic aspartic acid solution, display significant adsorption and chiral selectivity of d- and l-enantiomers on pairs of mirror-related crystal-growth surfaces. This selective adsorption is greater on crystals with terraced surface textures, which indicates that d- and l-aspartic acid concentrate along step-like linear growth features. Thus, selective adsorption of linear arrays of d- and l-amino acids on calcite, with subsequent condensation polymerization, represents a plausible geochemical mechanism for the production of homochiral polypeptides on the prebiotic Earth.

  17. Calcite and dolomite in intrusive carbonatites. II. Trace-element variations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakhmouradian, Anton R.; Reguir, Ekaterina P.; Couëslan, Christopher; Yang, Panseok

    2016-04-01

    The composition of calcite and dolomite from several carbonatite complexes (including a large set of petrographically diverse samples from the Aley complex in Canada) was studied by electron-microprobe analysis and laser-ablation inductively-coupled-plasma mass-spectrometry to identify the extent of substitution of rare-earth and other trace elements in these minerals and the effects of different igneous and postmagmatic processes on their composition. Analysis of the newly acquired and published data shows that the contents of rare-earth elements (REE) and certain REE ratios in magmatic calcite and dolomite are controlled by crystal fractionation of fluorapatite, monazite and, possibly, other minerals. Enrichment in REE observed in some samples (up to ~2000 ppm in calcite) cannot be accounted for by coupled substitutions involving Na, P or As. At Aley, the REE abundances and chondrite-normalized (La/Yb)cn ratios in carbonates decrease with progressive fractionation. Sequestration of heavy REE from carbonatitic magma by calcic garnet may be responsible for a steeply sloping "exponential" pattern and lowered Ce/Ce* ratios of calcite from Magnet Cove (USA) and other localities. Alternatively, the low levels of Ce and Mn in these samples could result from preferential removal of these elements by Ce4+- and Mn3+-bearing minerals (such as cerianite and spinels) at increasing f(O2) in the magma. The distribution of large-ion lithophile elements (LILE = Sr, Ba and Pb) in rock-forming carbonates also shows trends indicative of crystal fractionation effects (e.g., concomitant depletion in Ba + Pb at Aley, or Sr + Ba at Kerimasi), although the phases responsible for these variations cannot be identified unambiguously at present. Overall, element ratios sensitive to the redox state of the magma and its complexing characteristics (Eu/Eu*, Ce/Ce* and Y/Ho) are least variable and in both primary calcite and dolomite, approach the average chondritic values. In consanguineous

  18. Functionalizing single crystals: incorporation of nanoparticles inside gel-grown calcite crystals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yujing; Yuan, Wentao; Shi, Ye; Chen, Xiaoqiang; Wang, Yong; Chen, Hongzheng; Li, Hanying

    2014-04-14

    Synthetic single crystals are usually homogeneous solids. Biogenic single crystals, however, can incorporate biomacromolecules and become inhomogeneous solids so that their properties are also extrinsically regulated by the incorporated materials. The discrepancy between the properties of synthetic and biogenic single crystals leads to the idea to modify the internal structure of synthetic crystals to achieve nonintrinsic properties by incorporation of foreign material. Intrinsically colorless and diamagnetic calcite single crystals are turned into colored and paramagnetic solids, through incorporation of Au and Fe3O4 nanoparticles without significantly disrupting the crystalline lattice of calcite. The crystals incorporate the nanoparticles and gel fibers when grown in agarose gel media containing the nanoparticles, whereas the solution-grown crystals do not. As such, our work extends the long-history gel method for crystallization into a platform to functionalize single-crystalline materials.

  19. Fluids along the North Anatolian Fault, Niksar basin, north central Turkey: Insight from stable isotopic and geochemical analysis of calcite veins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturrock, Colin P.; Catlos, Elizabeth J.; Miller, Nathan R.; Akgun, Aykut; Fall, András; Gabitov, Rinat I.; Yilmaz, Ismail Omer; Larson, Toti; Black, Karen N.

    2017-08-01

    Six limestone assemblages along the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) Niksar pull-apart basin in northern Turkey were analyzed for δ18OPDB and δ13CPDB using bulk isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). Matrix-vein differences in δ18OPDB (-2.1 to 6.3‰) and δ13CPDB (-0.9 to 4.6‰) suggest a closed fluid system and rock buffering. Veins in one travertine and two limestone assemblages were further subjected to cathodoluminescence, trace element (Laser Ablation Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry) and δ18OPDB (Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry, SIMS) analyses. Fluid inclusions in one limestone sample yield Th of 83.8 ± 7.3 °C (±1σ, mean average). SIMS δ18OPDB values across veins show fine-scale variations interpreted as evolving thermal conditions during growth and limited rock buffering seen at a higher-resolution than IRMS. Rare earth element data suggest calcite veins precipitated from seawater, whereas the travertine has a hydrothermal source. The δ18OSMOW-fluid for the mineralizing fluid that reproduces Th is +2‰, in range of Cretaceous brines, as opposed to negative δ18OSMOW-fluid from meteoric, groundwater, and geothermal sites in the region and highly positive δ18OSMOW-fluid expected for mantle-derived fluids. Calcite veins at this location do not record evidence for deeply-sourced metamorphic and magmatic fluids, an observation that differs from what is reported for the NAF elsewhere along strike.

  20. Reconstruction of drip-water δ18O based on calcite oxygen and clumped isotopes of speleothems from Bunker Cave (Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Wackerbarth

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The geochemical signature of many speleothems used for reconstruction of past continental climates is affected by kinetic isotope fractionation. This limits quantitative paleoclimate reconstruction and, in cases where the kinetic fractionation varies with time, also affects relative paleoclimate interpretations. In carbonate archive research, clumped isotope thermometry is typically used as proxy for absolute temperatures. In the case of speleothems, however, clumped isotopes provide a sensitive indicator for disequilibrium effects. The extent of kinetic fractionation co-varies in Δ47 and δ18O so that it can be used to account for disequilibrium in δ18O and to extract the past drip-water composition. Here we apply this approach to stalagmites from Bunker Cave (Germany and calculate drip-water δ18Ow values for the Eemian, Marine Isotope Stage (MIS 3, and the Holocene, relying on independent temperature estimates and accounting for disequilibrium. Applying the co-variation method to modern calcite precipitates yields drip-water δ18Ow values in agreement with modern cave drip-water δ18Ow of −7.9 ± 0.3‰, despite large and variable disequilibrium effects in both calcite δ18Oc and Δ47. Reconstructed paleo-drip-water δ18Ow values are lower during colder periods (e.g., MIS 3: −8.5 ± 0.4‰ and the early Holocene at 11 kyr: −9.3 ± 0.1‰ and show higher values during warmer climatic periods (e.g., the Eemian: −7.5 ± 0.2‰ and the Holocene Climatic Optimum: −7.2 ± 0.3‰. This new approach offers a unique possibility for quantitative climate reconstruction including the assessment of past hydrological conditions while accounting for disequilibrium effects.

  1. Reconstruction of drip-water δ18O based on calcite oxygen and clumped isotopes of speleothems from Bunker Cave (Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Kluge

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The geochemical signature of many speleothems used for reconstruction of past continental climates is affected by kinetic isotope fractionation. This limits quantitative paleoclimate reconstruction and, in cases where the kinetic fractionation varies with time, also affects relative paleoclimate interpretations. In carbonate archive research, clumped isotope thermometry is typically used as proxy for absolute temperatures. In the case of speleothems, however, clumped isotopes provide a sensitive indicator for disequilibrium effects. The extent of kinetic fractionation co-varies in Δ47 and δ18O so that it can be used to account for disequilibrium in δ18O and to extract the past drip-water composition. Here we apply this approach to stalagmites from Bunker Cave (Germany and calculate drip-water δ18Ow values for the Eemian, MIS3, and the Holocene, relying on independent temperature estimates and accounting for disequilibrium. Applying the co-variation method to modern calcite precipitates yields drip-water δ18Ow values in agreement with modern cave drip-water δ18Ow of −7.9 ± 0.3‰, despite large and variable disequilibrium effects in both calcite δ18Oc and Δ47. Reconstructed paleo-drip-water δ18Ow values are lower during colder periods (e.g., MIS3: −8.6 ± 0.4‰ and the early Holocene at 11 ka: −9.7 ± 0.2‰ and show higher values during warmer climatic periods (e.g., the Eemian: −7.6 ± 0.2‰ and the Holocene Climatic Optimum: −7.2 ± 0.3‰. This new approach offers a unique possibility for quantitative climate reconstruction including the assessment of past hydrological conditions while accounting for disequilibrium effects.

  2. Uncertainties in Arctic Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majhi, I.; Alexeev, V. A.; Cherry, J. E.; Cohen, J. L.; Groisman, P. Y.

    2012-12-01

    Arctic precipitation is riddled with measurement biases; to address the problem is imperative. Our study focuses on comparison of various datasets and analyzing their biases for the region of Siberia and caution that is needed when using them. Five sources of data were used ranging from NOAA's product (RAW, Bogdanova's correction), Yang's correction technique and two reanalysis products (ERA-Interim and NCEP). The reanalysis dataset performed better for some months in comparison to Yang's product, which tends to overestimate precipitation, and the raw dataset, which tends to underestimate. The sources of bias vary from topography, to wind, to missing data .The final three products chosen show higher biases during the winter and spring season. Emphasis on equations which incorporate blizzards, blowing snow and higher wind speed is necessary for regions which are influenced by any or all of these factors; Bogdanova's correction technique is the most robust of all the datasets analyzed and gives the most reasonable results. One of our future goals is to analyze the impact of precipitation uncertainties on water budget analysis for the Siberian Rivers.

  3. Quantitative laboratory measurements of biogeochemical processes controlling biogenic calcite carbon sequestration.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zendejas, Frank; Lane, Todd W.; Lane, Pamela D.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this LDRD was to generate data that could be used to populate and thereby reduce the uncertainty in global carbon cycle models. These efforts were focused on developing a system for determining the dissolution rate of biogenic calcite under oceanic pressure and temperature conditions and on carrying out a digital transcriptomic analysis of gene expression in response to changes in pCO2, and the consequent acidification of the growth medium.

  4. The surface interactions of a near-neutral carbon nanoparticle tracer with calcite

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Yan Vivian

    2016-03-02

    A new class of nearly charge-neutral carbon-cored nanoparticle tracers are remarkably non-interactive with solid surfaces and could provide a valuable baseline for diverse hydrological and environmental studies of subsurface flow and particle transport. We investigate the causes of inertness by studying the interactions with calcite of a nanoparticle of this class synthesized from malic acid and ethanolamine (M-dots) dispersed in brine (NaCl, CaCl2, and MgCl2) solutions. None of the M-dots are retained in calcite sand-packed columns when dispersed in DI water. Dispersed in the NaCl and mixed brine solutions, 5.6 % of and 7.3 % of the M-dots are initially retained, but 65 and 13 % of these retained particles are subsequently released when the column is flushed with DI water. When dispersed in the CaCl2 and MgCl2 solutions, 65 and 54 % of the M-dots are initially retained, and 28 and 26 % subsequently released in the DI water flush. The M-dots have a small negative zeta potential in all solutions, but the calcite zeta potential changes from strongly negative to strongly positive across the solution series, and the particle retention tracks this change. Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek (DLVO) modeling of the force between a ca