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Sample records for calciphylaxis

  1. Calciphylaxis

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    Nicolás Raimondi

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Calciphylaxis is vasculopathy characterized by ischemia and painful skin necrosis due to calcification and intimal fibroplasia of thrombosis of the panicular arterioles. It most frequently compromises patients with terminal chronic renal failure and has a high mortality rate. Biopsy of skin lesions is used as a diagnostic method. No specific laboratory findings have been recorded. Skin lesions usually begin in the extremities like a painful purplish mottling similar to "livedo reticularis". The natural evolution is to ulcers and bedsores. The first line of treatment involves the care of skin lesions and antibiotic therapy. Sodium thiosulfate is used as treatment due to its antioxidant activity and as a chelating. Two clinical cases are here reported

  2. Calcinosis Cutis and Calciphylaxis.

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    Jiménez-Gallo, D; Ossorio-García, L; Linares-Barrios, M

    2015-12-01

    Calcinosis cutis (CC) is defined as the deposition of calcium salts in the skin. The condition is divided into 5 types: calciphylaxis and dystrophic, metastatic, idiopathic, and iatrogenic CC. Dystrophic CC is the most common form and usually occurs in association with autoimmune diseases. CC can be treated surgically or with the use of drugs such as diltiazem, bisphosphonates, warfarin, ceftriaxone, probenecid, minocycline, or aluminum hydroxide. Calciphylaxis is defined as calcification of the media of small- and medium-sized blood vessels in the dermis and subcutaneous tissue. Clinically, calciphylaxis causes livedo racemosa, which progresses to retiform purpura and skin necrosis. First-line treatment is with sodium thiosulfate. We present a review of the calcifying disorders of the skin, focusing on their diagnosis and treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  3. Calciphylaxis following kidney transplantation: a case report

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    Hanvesakul Rajesh

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Calciphylaxis occurring after kidney transplantation is rare and rarely reported. It results in chronic non-healing wounds and is associated with a poor prognosis and is often fatal. We present a case of proximal lower limb calciphylaxis that occurred early after kidney transplantation. The patient had no classic associated risk factors. He had previously had a total parathyroidectomy but had normal serum calcium-phosphate product and parathyroid hormone levels. The clinical outcome of this case was favorable and highlights some fundamental issues relating to management. Case presentation A 70-year-old British Caucasian man with end-stage renal failure secondary to IgA nephropathy presented six months post kidney transplantation with cutaneous calciphylaxis lesions involving the medial aspect of the thigh bilaterally. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of rapid onset cutaneous calciphylaxis occurring soon after kidney transplantation that was associated with a favorable outcome. Cutaneous calciphylaxis lesions should be promptly managed with meticulous wound care, antimicrobial therapy and the correction of calcium-phosphate product where indicated.

  4. Calciphylaxis: Beyond CKD-MBD.

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    Fernández, María; Morales, Enrique; Gutierrez, Eduardo; Polanco, Natalia; Hernández, Eduardo; Mérida, Eva; Praga, Manuel

    Calcific uraemic arteriolopathy (CUA), also called calciphylaxis, is a rare but potentially fatal vascular disorder that almost exclusively affects patients with chronic renal failure. The objective of this study was to analyse various risk factors for developing CUA and its subsequent clinical course according to the treatment received. A retrospective study that included patients diagnosed with CUA from December 1999 to December 2015. Various risk factors, clinical course and treatment options were analysed. A total of 28 patients (53.6% females) with a mean age of 67.2±11.8 (38-88) years were included. At the time of diagnosis, 53.6% were on haemodialysis, 25% were kidney transplant patients and 21.4% had normal renal function. The use of steroids (100%, P=.001) was the main risk factor in renal transplant patients. Skin lesions resolved in 60.7% (especially in those receiving multitargeted therapy). Patient survival at 12 months was 29% in transplant patients, 57% in haemodialysis patients and 100% in normal renal function patients (log-rank 6.88, P=.032). Chronic renal failure (P=.03) and hypoalbuminaemia (P=.02) were the main risk factor for CUA mortality. Although the incidence of CUA remains low, CUA mortality is very high, Special attention to its occurrence in kidney transplant patients and «non-renal» CUA forms is required. Oral anticoagulants and steroids appear to be the main risk factors, CUA is a challenge; a registry of patients and determining standard therapy are required. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. [Calciphylaxis. A review of 9 cases].

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    Loidi Pascual, Leire; Valcayo Peñalba, Ana; Oscoz Jaime, Saioa; Córdoba Iturriagagoitia, Alicia; Rodil Fraile, Raquel; Yanguas Bayona, Juan Ignacio

    2016-08-19

    Calciphylaxis is a cutaneous ischaemic vascular disease of small vessels with high morbidity and mortality. To date very few series of patients with this disease have been published, none from a Spanish hospital. The main objectives of this work are to analyze the demographic, clinical and histological profile of patients diagnosed in our department to identify risk factors and potential therapeutic strategies. We made a retrospective study of the cases seen in the dermatology department with a diagnosis of calciphylaxis and who had a confirmatory biopsy in the period between January 2010 to August 2015. Nine patients were studied, with an age range of 76-86 years. All had cardiovascular comorbidities and 67% had renal failure. A 33% mortality was observed. Faced with a possible diagnosis of calciphylaxis, a complete blood analysis is mandatory to rule out other causes of skin ulcers. The management of these patients should be undertaken by a multidisciplinary team. We emphasize the role of sodium thiosulfate in the treatment of this condition. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Calciphylaxis: A Disease of Pannicular Thrombosis.

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    El-Azhary, Rokea A; Patzelt, Michelle T; McBane, Robert D; Weaver, Amy L; Albright, Robert C; Bridges, Alina D; Claus, Paul L; Davis, Mark D P; Dillon, John J; El-Zoghby, Ziad M; Hickson, LaTonya J; Kumar, Rajiv; McCarthy-Fruin, Kathleen A M; McEvoy, Marian T; Pittelkow, Mark R; Wetter, David A; Williams, Amy W; McCarthy, James T

    2016-10-01

    To identify coagulation risk factors in patients with calciphylaxis and the relationship between anticoagulation use and overall survival. Study subjects were 101 patients with calciphylaxis seen at Mayo Clinic from 1999 to September 2014. Data including thrombophilia profiles were extracted from the medical records of each patient. Survival status was determined using patient registration data and the Social Security Death Index. Survival was estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and associations were evaluated using Cox proportional hazards models. Sixty-four of the 101 patients underwent thrombophilia testing. Of these, a complete test panel was performed in 55 and a partial panel in 9. Severe thrombophilias observed in 60% (33 of 55) of the patients included antiphospholipid antibody syndrome protein C, protein S, or antithrombin deficiencies or combined thrombophilias. Of the 55 patients, severe thrombophilia (85%, 23 of 27) was noted in patients who were not on warfarin at the time of testing (27). Nonsevere thrombophilias included heterozygous factor V Leiden (n=2) and plasminogen deficiency (n=1). For the comparison of survival, patients were divided into 3 treatment categories: Warfarin (n=63), other anticoagulants (n=20), and no anticoagulants (n=18). There was no statistically significant survival difference between treatment groups. Laboratory testing reveals a strikingly high prevalence of severe thrombophilias in patients with calciphylaxis, underscoring the importance of congenital and acquired thrombotic propensity potentially contributing to the pathogenesis of this disease. These findings may have therapeutic implications; however, to date, survival differences did not vary by therapeutic choice. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Tumour Calcification and Calciphylaxis in End-Stage Renal Disease

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    Jia Di

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although soft tissue and vascular calcifications are common in CKD and progress as an independent risk factor of all-cause mortality, tumour calcification and calciphylaxis are uncommon in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD. Here, we discuss a rare case of a patient with tumour calcification complicated with calciphylaxis developed septic shock from infection. Our patient is a 57-year-old man in his late stage of renal disease who presented with a huge mass at the right hip and necrotic cutaneous ulcers on the lower legs followed by local and systemic infection and death due to septic shock.

  8. Calcific uraemic arteriolopathy (calciphylaxis) in patients on renal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Calcific uraemic arteriolopathy (systemic calciphylaxis) is a rare, life- threatening condition characterised pathologically by small-vessel calcification and ischaemic skin necrosis.[1] It occurs most frequently in the setting of end-stage renal diasease (ESRD) with secondary hyperparathyroidism and is more common in ...

  9. Calcific uraemic arteriolopathy (calciphylaxis in patients on renal replacement therapy

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    S Sebastian

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background. Calcific uraemic arteriolopathy (calciphylaxis is an unusual and potentially fatal condition characterised by small-vessel calcification and ischaemic skin necrosis. It mainly affects patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD on haemodialysis, but may rarely occur in the absence of ESRD in conditions such as primary hyperparathyroidism, malignancy, alcoholic liver disease and connective tissue disease. Methods. We reviewed the records of all patients diagnosed with calciphylaxis while on renal replacement therapy at Tygerberg Hospital, Cape Town, South Africa, between 1990 and 2014, to describe its presentation, course and final outcome. Results. Nineteen patients developed calciphylaxis over this period. Their median age was 34 years and 13 (68.4% were female. Fifteen (78.9% had received a kidney transplant. All patients had painful skin lesions that rapidly progressed to infarction. Small-vessel calcification was seen on skin biopsy in 13 patients. Twelve patients had hyperparathyroidism. Several of the transplanted patients had been treated for graft rejection in the year preceding the diagnosis. Treatment consisted of good wound care and efforts to normalise serum calcium and phosphate levels. Five patients received an urgent parathyroidectomy. The outcome was fatal in 17 patients, with sepsis being the main cause of death. Conclusions. In our patients, calciphylaxis carried a worse prognosis than previously reported internationally. It should always be considered in the differential diagnosis of painful skin lesions in the dialysis or transplant patient.

  10. Calciphylaxis in chronic, non-dialysis-dependent renal disease

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    Paschke Ralf

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calciphylaxis cutis is characterized by media calcification of arteries and, most prominently, of cutaneous and subcutaneous arterioles occurring in renal insufficiency patients. Case Report A 53-year-old woman with chronic cardiac and renal failure complained of painful crural, non-varicosis ulcers. She was hospitalized in an immobilized condition due to both the crural ulcerations and the existing heart-failure state (NYHA III-IV having pleural and pericardial effusions, atrial fibrillation and weight loss of 30 kg over the past year. Despite normalization of calcium-phosphorus balance and improvement of renal function, the clinical course of crural ulcerations deteriorated during the following 3 months. After failure of surgical debridements, multiple courses of sterile-maggot therapy were introduced at a late stage to stabilize the wounds. The patient died of recurrent wound infections and sepsis paralleled by exacerbations of renal malfunction. Conclusions The role of renal disease in vascular complications is discussed. Sterile-maggot debridement may constitute a therapy for the ulcerated calciphylaxis at an earlier stage, i.e. when first ulcerations appear.

  11. Calciphylaxis and bone scintigraphy: case report with histological confirmation and review of the literature.

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    Han, Myo M; Pang, Judy; Shinkai, Kanade; Franc, Ben; Hawkins, Randy; Aparici, Carina M

    2007-06-01

    We present a patient with a history of end-stage renal disease, who developed skin lesions in the bilateral calves a month after the initiation of hemodialysis. The lesions were biopsied, and the histological findings were consistent with a diagnosis of calciphylaxis. The patient had a baseline pretreatment bone scan that showed extensive systemic disease. The patient died 20 days after the imaging study. A review of the literature on bone scans and calciphylaxis is presented.

  12. Bilateral optic neuropathy, acral gangrene and visceral ischaemia as a rare presentation of calciphylaxis: A case report.

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    Komurcu, Hatice Ferhan; Basar, Emel; Kucuksahin, Orhan; Uz, Ebru; Orhun Yavuz, Huban Sibel; Anlar, Omer

    2016-10-01

    We report a case with calciphylaxis very rarely presenting with bilateral optic neuropathy, acral gangrene and visceral ischaemia. Bilateral papilloedaema was found in a 43 year-old female with chronic renal failure. Acral dry gangrene was observed. Pathological examination of her amputated thumb revealed calcification, thrombi, obstructive endovascular fibrotic areas in the walls of arteries. She was diagnosed with calciphylaxis. Bilateral optic neuropathy was defined secondary to calciphylaxis. Abdominal computerized tomography revealed prominent calcifications in mesenteric, spleen and renal arteries. She died eight months after the diagnosis. Calciphylaxis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of the optic neuropathy.

  13. Calciphylaxis: Temporal Artery Calcification Preceding Widespread Skin Lesions and Penile Necrosis

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    Manzoor A. Shah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Temporal artery calciphylaxis has rarely been described in chronic kidney disease patients on dialysis. We report a case of 72-year-old Caucasian man with multiple comorbidities and end-stage renal disease on dialysis who presented with temporal artery calcification leading to bilateral loss of vision followed by extensive skin lesions including one on glans penis. While on peritoneal dialysis, he developed anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, had no improvement on high dose steroids, and temporal artery biopsy showed marked calcification without any evidence of vasculitis. Few weeks later on hemodialysis, he developed widespread cutaneous lesions on extremities and penile necrosis with skin biopsy revealing calciphylaxis. On literature review of calciphylaxis in chronic kidney disease, we found only four cases of temporal artery calciphylaxis leading to anterior ischemic optic neuropathy and blindness. We believe this is the first case in which the rare temporal artery calciphylaxis and the uncommon penile necrosis are being described together. The objective is to emphasize the need to recognize this condition early in the CKD patients on dialysis presenting with visual symptoms as the different treatment strategies may help prevent complete loss of vision and also modify or prevent a full blown calciphylaxis.

  14. Calciphylaxis after renal transplant. Three clinical cases report

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    Rita Marcela Fortunato

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Calciphylaxis (CFX is a syndrome characterized by deposition of calcium in the intima and media of vessels, intimal proliferation, fibrosis, luminal thrombosis, tissue ischemia and necrosis. Its initial report and subsequent descriptions were associated with chronic renal failure. There is little information regarding the possible effect of the recovery of renal function secondary to kidney transplantation in the incidence of this disease. Methods: Center retrospective study. We analyze in this report the three cases of patients who developed CFX after a renal transplant within a cohort of 448 kidney and kidney-pancreas transplant patients from January 1th 2001 to January 1th 2014 in our Hospital. Results: Three patients were found to have CFX. All of them had hypercalcemia (serum calcium average 11.5 mg/dl at first year post transplant and 2 patients at diagnosis of CFX. PTHi in the three CFX patients was 2 pg/ml, 62,3pg/ml and 3561pg/ml respectively. Hypoalbuminemia was found in all patients. Two patients were diabetic. Only one patient was obese and under anticoagulation treatment. In all cases a biopsy provided the diagnosis of certainty for calciphylaxis. Median serum creatinine at diagnosis was 1.5 mg/dl (1.2 mg/dl 1.2 mg/dl and 2 mg/dl, respectively and the average time between transplantation and calciphylaxis diagnosis was 32 months. In all cases, strict control of phosphorus and hypercalcemia and sodium IV thiosulfate treatment was performed. The evolution was successful in two patients, controlling blood calcium and improving cutaneous manifestations with preservation of renal function. Conclusions: CFX prevalence in a cohort of 448 kidney and kidney-pancreas transplant patients from 2001 to 2014 was 0.66%, less than reported in dialysis patients. Factors associated with CFX in our patients were hypercalcemia in the first year after renal transplant and at the time of the event, hypoalbuminemia, diabetes and disorders

  15. Warfarin skin necrosis mimicking calciphylaxis in a patient with secondary hyperparathyroidism undergoing peritoneal dialysis

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    Jee Eun Park

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Warfarin skin necrosis (WSN is an infrequent complication of warfarin treatment and is characterized by painful ulcerative skin lesions that appear a few days after the start of warfarin treatment. Calciphylaxis also appears as painful skin lesions caused by tissue injury resulting from localized ischemia caused by calcification of small- to medium-sized vessels in patients with end-stage renal disease. We report on a patient who presented with painful skin ulcers on the lower extremities after the administration of warfarin after a valve operation. Calciphylaxis was considered first because of the host factors; eventually, the skin lesions were diagnosed as WSN by biopsy. The skin lesions improved after warfarin discontinuation and short-term steroid therapy. Most patients with end-stage renal disease have some form of cardiovascular disease and some require temporary or continual warfarin treatment. It is important to differentiate between WSN and calciphylaxis in patients with painful skin lesions.

  16. Vitamin K-Dependent Carboxylation of Matrix Gla Protein Influences the Risk of Calciphylaxis.

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    Nigwekar, Sagar U; Bloch, Donald B; Nazarian, Rosalynn M; Vermeer, Cees; Booth, Sarah L; Xu, Dihua; Thadhani, Ravi I; Malhotra, Rajeev

    2017-06-01

    Matrix Gla protein (MGP) is a potent inhibitor of vascular calcification. The ability of MGP to inhibit calcification requires the activity of a vitamin K-dependent enzyme, which mediates MGP carboxylation. We investigated how MGP carboxylation influences the risk of calciphylaxis in adult patients receiving dialysis and examined the effects of vitamin K deficiency on MGP carboxylation. Our study included 20 patients receiving hemodialysis with calciphylaxis (cases) and 20 patients receiving hemodialysis without calciphylaxis (controls) matched for age, sex, race, and warfarin use. Cases had higher plasma levels of uncarboxylated MGP (ucMGP) and carboxylated MGP (cMGP) than controls. However, the fraction of total MGP that was carboxylated (relative cMGP concentration = cMGP/[cMGP + uncarboxylated MGP]) was lower in cases than in controls (0.58±0.02 versus 0.69±0.03, respectively; P=0.003). In patients not taking warfarin, cases had a similarly lower relative cMGP concentration. Each 0.1 unit reduction in relative cMGP concentration associated with a more than two-fold increase in calciphylaxis risk. Vitamin K deficiency associated with lower relative cMGP concentration in multivariable adjusted analyses (β=-8.99; P=0.04). In conclusion, vitamin K deficiency-mediated reduction in relative cMGP concentration may have a role in the pathogenesis of calciphylaxis. Whether vitamin K supplementation can prevent and/or treat calciphylaxis requires further study. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  17. Serum calcium and phosphorus concentrations and the outcome of calciphylaxis treatment with sodium thiosulfate

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    Hlušička, J.; Veisová, E.; Ullrych, M.; Kubeček, J.; Navrátil, Tomáš; Zakharov, S.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 148, č. 3 (2017), s. 435-440 ISSN 0026-9247 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : Calciphylaxis * Sodium thiosulfate * Serum calcium Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry OBOR OECD: Physical chemistry Impact factor: 1.282, year: 2016

  18. Vitamin K-dependent carboxylation of matrix gla protein influences the risk of calciphylaxis

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    Matrix Gla protein (MGP) is a potent inhibitor of vascular calcification. The ability of MGP to inhibit calcification requires the activity of a vitamin K-dependent enzyme, which mediates MGP carboxylation. We investigated how MGP carboxylation influences the risk of calciphylaxis in adult patients ...

  19. Survival, Risk Factors, and Effect of Treatment in 101 Patients With Calciphylaxis.

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    McCarthy, James T; El-Azhary, Rokea A; Patzelt, Michelle T; Weaver, Amy L; Albright, Robert C; Bridges, Alina D; Claus, Paul L; Davis, Mark D P; Dillon, John J; El-Zoghby, Ziad M; Hickson, LaTonya J; Kumar, Rajiv; McBane, Robert D; McCarthy-Fruin, Kathleen A M; McEvoy, Marian T; Pittelkow, Mark R; Wetter, David A; Williams, Amy W

    2016-10-01

    To report on the survival and the associations of treatments upon survival of patients with calciphylaxis seen at a single center. Using the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnosis code of 275.49 and the keyword "calciphylaxis" in the dismissal narrative, we retrospectively identified 101 patients with calciphylaxis seen at our institution between January 1, 1999, through September 20, 2014, using a predefined, consensus-developed classification scheme. The average age of patients was 60 years: 81 (80.2%) were women; 68 (68.0%) were obese; 19 (18.8%) had stage 0 to 2 chronic kidney disease (CKD), 19 (18.9%) had stage 3 or 4 CKD; 63 (62.4%) had stage 5 or 5D (dialysis) CKD. Seventy-five patients died during follow-up. Six-month survival was 57%. Lack of surgical debridement was associated with insignificantly lower 6-month survival (hazard ratio [HR]=1.99; 95% CI, 0.96-4.15; P=.07) and significantly poorer survival for the entire duration of follow-up (HR=1.98; 95% CI, 1.15-3.41; P=.01), which was most pronounced in stage 5 or 5D CKD (HR=1.91; 95% CI, 1.03-3.56; P=.04). Among patients with stage 5/5D CKD, subtotal parathyroidectomy (performed only in patients with hyperparathyroidism) was associated with better 6-month (HR=0.12; 95% CI, 0.02-0.90; P=.04) and overall survival (HR= 0.37; 95% CI, 0.15-0.87; P=.02). Calciphylaxis is associated with a high mortality rate. Significantly effective treatments included surgical debridement and subtotal parathyroidectomy in patients with stage 5/5D CKD with hyperparathyroidism. Treatments with tissue-plasminogen activator, sodium thiosulfate, and hyperbaric oxygen therapy were not associated with higher mortality. Copyright © 2016 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Calciphylaxis in end-stage renal disease prior to dialytic treatment: a case report and literature review

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    Tamayo-Isla RA

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Ramón Alberto Tamayo-Isla, Mauro Cuba de la Cruz Internal Medicine Department, Pietersburg Provincial Hospital, Polokwane Kidney and Dialysis Centre, Limpopo Province, South Africa Introduction: Calciphylaxis is a rare medical condition that is usually diagnosed in patients suffering from end-stage renal disease who are already receiving renal replacement therapy and in those post-transplantation. The pathogenesis still remains to be fully elucidated; hence, the treatment is not uniform. The prognosis is generally poor. The ulcerative stage exhibits a worse prognosis than the nonulcerative one. Calciphylaxis presenting in terminal kidney disease prior to dialytic treatment has only rarely been reported. Case presentation: A 32-year-old female Caucasian clerk sought medical attention for increasing tiredness and lower limb skin ulcers. Polycystic kidney disease was diagnosed in her late father and two of her siblings. At the first nephrology consultation, obesity, pallor, bilateral flank masses with ballottement, and two ulcers with a dark necrotic center on the distal left leg were noted. In addition, another indurated light bluish lesion of 5 cm just above the right knee with intact skin was observed. All lesions were very tender and warm on touch. Laboratory results yielded hypercalcemia, hyperphosphatemia, anemia, and parathyroid hormone levels that were more than ten times the normal values in the patient, and with a glomerular filtration rate of 4 mL/minute. Skin biopsy confirmed the suspicion of calciphylaxis. The patient was placed on peritoneal dialysis with low Ca concentration baths, cinacalcet, and aluminum hydroxide. The results included correction of hypercalcemia, improvement of phosphate levels, and the product of both Ca and phosphate, but only a transitory decrease in serum parathyroid hormone levels. The ulcerations were completely healed after 2 months of treatment. Cinacalcet was discontinued after 18 months, but multiple

  1. Multi-Modal Treatment Of Calciphylaxis With Sodium-Thiosulfate, Cinacalcet And Sevelamer Including Long-Term Data

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    Hermann Salmhofer

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Calciphylaxis is a rare, yet life-threatening disease mainly occurring in dialysis patients. Traditional options of treatment remain unsatisfactory. Methods: Here we present a novel, combined approach, treating calciphylaxis with IV sodium thiosulfate, cinacalcet and sevelamer. In a case series five hemodialysis patients, have been successfully treated with this regimen. Treatment and survival data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Results: In all patients, a rapid decrease in pain, improvement of general condition and wound healing within six months occurred. Side effects were low. Drug dosages: IV sodium thiosulfate initial dose 119.4 +/- 84.9 g/m2/week, maintenance dose 40.6 +/- 9 g/m2/week; cinacalcet: maintenance dose 36 +/- 32.9 mg/d and sevelamer maintenance dose 3320 +/-1671 mg/d. One and two year survivals were 100 % and 80 %, respectively. We also report on long-term application of IV sodium thiosulfate of up to 52 months. Patient survival after diagnosis was 52, 84, 21, 36 and 30 months, respectively. Survival since initiation of hemodialysis was 76, 136, 89, 36 and 35 months, respectively. Conclusion: This novel combined approach, a multi-modal treatment of calciphylaxis with persistent hyperparathyroidism, using IV sodium thiosulfate, cinacalcet and sevelamer seems to improve the outcome of this devastating disease.

  2. [Calciphylaxis: a severe but unrecognized complication in end-stage renal disease patients. A review of 2 cases].

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    Trost, O; Kadlub, N; Trouilloud, P; Malka, G; Danino, A

    2005-12-01

    Calciphylaxis presents like subcutaneous lesions with livedo reticularis leading to necrotic and painful ulcers, predominantly in the lower limbs and the abdomen. They initially simulate dermohypodermitis. Biology reveals secondary hyperparathyroidism, phosphocalcic metabolism abnormalities and state of hypercoagulability. Histological signs are constant: calcifications in the media of small and sub-cutaneous arteries, intimal hyperplasia and intravascular thrombosis. This complication occurs in 4% of end-stage renal disease patients. Its prognostic is awful with a rate of mortality of 60% due to sepsis. Treatment is based upon the normalization of phosphocalcic rates and local debridement.

  3. [Massive panniculectomy and bilateral subtotal mastectomy in a case of calciphylaxis: A case report and up date].

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    Bennis, Y; Becquart, C; Aljudaibi, N; Patenotre, P; Guerreschi, P; Delaporte, E; Duquennoy-Martinot, V

    2015-12-01

    Calciphylaxis or calcific arteriolopathy is a rare, life-threatening obstructive pathology of the small cutaneous and subcutaneous vessels. It mainly affects patients with chronic renal failure but it also has been described in patients with normal renal function. The principal risks factors apart from renal failure and phosphocalcic metabolism imbalance are: the female sex, obesity, peripheral vascular disease, diabetes and oral anti-coagulation. We present a very rare case of abdominal, mammarian and upper thighs calciphylaxis in a patient with normal renal function. She presented a severe obesity with a recent important loss of weight and had been treated by oral anticoagulants for a long time. She benefited of a multidisciplinary approach with dermatologists, plastic surgeons and anesthesists permitting a recovery in fourteen weeks. Multidisciplinary approach is necessary but the place of the surgery is not well defined. We report a case in which early and wide surgical approach permitted to obtain a favourable evolution of the pathology. Then, we propose a therapeutic strategy after review of the literature. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Ecto-5' -Nucleotidase CD73 (NT5E, vitamin D receptor and FGF23 gene polymorphisms may play a role in the development of calcific uremic arteriolopathy in dialysis patients - Data from the German Calciphylaxis Registry.

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    Hansjörg Rothe

    Full Text Available Calciphylaxis/calcific uremic arteriolopathy affects mainly end-stage kidney disease patients but is also associated with malignant disorders such as myeloma, melanoma and breast cancer. Genetic risk factors of calciphylaxis have never been studied before.We investigated 10 target genes using a tagging SNP approach: the genes encoding CD73/ ecto-5'-nucleotidase (purinergic pathway, Matrix Gla protein, Fetuin A, Bone Gla protein, VKORC1 (all related to intrinsic calcification inhibition, calcium-sensing receptor, FGF23, Klotho, vitamin D receptor, stanniocalcin 1 (all related to CKD-MBD. 144 dialysis patients from the German calciphylaxis registry were compared with 370 dialysis patients without history of CUA. Genotyping was performed using iPLEX Gold MassARRAY(Sequenom, San Diego, USA, KASP genotyping chemistry (LGC, Teddington, Middlesex, UK or sequencing. Statistical analysis comprised logistic regression analysis with adjustment for age and sex.165 SNPs were finally analyzed and 6 SNPs were associated with higher probability for calciphylaxis (OR>1 in our cohort. Nine SNPs of three genes (CD73, FGF23 and Vitamin D receptor reached nominal significance (p< 0.05, but did not reach statistical significance after correction for multiple testing. Of the CD73 gene, rs4431401 (OR = 1.71, 95%CI 1.08-2.17, p = 0.023 and rs9444348 (OR = 1.48, 95% CI 1.11-1.97, p = 0.008 were associated with a higher probability for CUA. Of the FGF23 and VDR genes, rs7310492, rs11063118, rs13312747 and rs17882106 were associated with a higher probability for CUA.Polymorphisms in the genes encoding CD73, vitamin D receptor and FGF23 may play a role in calciphylaxis development. Although our study is the largest genetic study on calciphylaxis, it is limited by the low sample sizes. It therefore requires replication in other cohorts if available.

  5. Vascular ossification – calcification in metabolic syndrome, type 2 diabetes mellitus, chronic kidney disease, and calciphylaxis – calcific uremic arteriolopathy: the emerging role of sodium thiosulfate

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    Sowers James R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vascular calcification is associated with metabolic syndrome, diabetes, hypertension, atherosclerosis, chronic kidney disease, and end stage renal disease. Each of the above contributes to an accelerated and premature demise primarily due to cardiovascular disease. The above conditions are associated with multiple metabolic toxicities resulting in an increase in reactive oxygen species to the arterial vessel wall, which results in a response to injury wound healing (remodeling. The endothelium seems to be at the very center of these disease processes, acting as the first line of defense against these multiple metabolic toxicities and the first to encounter their damaging effects to the arterial vessel wall. Results The pathobiomolecular mechanisms of vascular calcification are presented in order to provide the clinician – researcher a database of knowledge to assist in the clinical management of these high-risk patients and examine newer therapies. Calciphylaxis is associated with medial arteriolar vascular calcification and results in ischemic subcutaneous necrosis with vulnerable skin ulcerations and high mortality. Recently, this clinical syndrome (once thought to be rare is presenting with increasing frequency. Consequently, newer therapeutic modalities need to be explored. Intravenous sodium thiosulfate is currently used as an antidote for the treatment of cyanide poisioning and prevention of toxicities of cisplatin cancer therapies. It is used as a food and medicinal preservative and topically used as an antifungal medication. Conclusion A discussion of sodium thiosulfate's dual role as a potent antioxidant and chelator of calcium is presented in order to better understand its role as an emerging novel therapy for the clinical syndrome of calciphylaxis and its complications.

  6. CALCINOSIS CUTIS METASTÁSICA: CALCIFILAXIS (ARTERIOLOPATÍA URÉMICA CALCIFICADA. A PROPÓSITO DE UN CASO. [METASTATIC CALCINOSIS CUTIS: CALCIPHYLAXIS (CALCIFIED UREMIC ARTERIOLOPATHY. A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Bolla de Lezcano

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Resumen La calcifilaxis es un síndrome clínico caracterizado por una calcificación vascular progresiva que ocasiona la aparición de lesiones violáceas, frecuentemente dolorosas, en la piel de pacientes con insuficiencia renal crónica, diálisis o trasplante renal, asociado usualmente a niveles elevados de hormona paratiroidea. Se presenta el caso clínico de una mujer de 44 años, diabética con insuficiencia renal crónica, en hemodiálisis desde hace 2 años, que fue diagnosticada de calcifilaxis tras sospecha clínica y biopsia de lesiones cutáneas. Abstract Calciphylaxis is a clinical syndrome characterized by progressive vascular calcification that causes the appearance of purplish lesions, often painful, in the skin of patients with chronic renal failure, dialysis or kidney transplantation, usually associated with elevated levels of parathyroid hormone. We report a case of a 44-year-old diabetic woman with chronic renal failure on hemodialysis for 2 years. She was diagnosed with calciphylaxis after clinical suspicion and biopsy of skin lesions.

  7. Calciphylaxis: Beyond CKD-MBD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Fernández

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions: Although the incidence of CUA remains low, CUA mortality is very high, Special attention to its occurrence in kidney transplant patients and “non-renal” CUA forms is required. Oral anticoagulants and steroids appear to be the main risk factors, CUA is a challenge; a registry of patients and determining standard therapy are required.

  8. Case Report: Calciphylaxis Causing Digital, Gangrene in End Stage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It is more frequently reported in whites than in blacks and commonly accompanies hyperphosphataemia, elevated calcium-phosphate product and marked secondary hyperparathyroidism. We report a rare case of CUA that complicated end stage renal disease secondary to obstructive uropathy in a 68 year old Nigerian.

  9. Suspected systemic calcinosis and calciphylaxis in 5 horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jean-Yin; Valberg, Stephanie J.; Sebastian, Manu M.; Davis, Gordon D.; Kelly, Jenny R.; Goehring, Lutz S.; Harland, Malte M.; Kuebelbeck, K. Leann; Waldridge, Bryan M.; Newton, Joseph C.; Reimer, Johanna M.

    2010-01-01

    Five horses were presented with signs of myopathy along with systemic malaise, hyperfibrinogenemia, hyperphosphatemia, and an elevated calcium phosphorus product (Ca*P). Postmortem findings were consistent with systemic calcinosis, a syndrome of calcium deposition in the tissue of organs including lungs, kidneys, muscle, and heart that has not been previously described in horses. PMID:21119866

  10. Penile gangrene in diabetes mellitus with renal failure: A poor prognostic sign of systemic vascular calciphylaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayank Mohan Agarwal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Penile gangrene associated with chronic renal failure is very uncommon. A 52-year-old man with diabetes mellitus, diffuse atherosclerosis, ischemic cardiomyopathy and end-stage renal disease presented with blackening of distal penis for 10 days. His general condition was poor and gangrene of prepuce and glans was noted. Doppler and magnetic-resonance angiography revealed bilateral internal iliac artery obstruction. He underwent trocar suprapubic cystostomy and was planned for partial penectomy. But he died of severe diabetic complications in the interim period. Penile gangrene is a manifestation of widespread vascular calcifications associated with end-stage renal disease and is a marker of poor prognosis.

  11. Kalcifylaksi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yderstraede, Knud Bonnet; Clemmensen, Ole; Nielsen, Anna Marie

    2009-01-01

    Calciphylaxis is a serious condition including ischaemic, nodular necrosis of the subcutaneous tissue and occlusion of small and medium-sized arteries. The prevalence of calciphylaxis among patients on chronic haemodialysis constitutes 1-4 percent. The condition is associated with high mortality ...

  12. 1-1-3

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tertiary hyperparathyroidism with severe metabolic bone disease. Five patients presented with rapidly progressing calciphylaxis. Three patients had grossly elevated serum calcium levels (l was comatose and 1 was confused) and an emergency parathyroidectomy was performed in these patients. Other symptoms were ...

  13. Case Series

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    part to the practice of treating severe hyperparathyroidism with calcium-based phosphate binders and vitamin D analogs [10]. A cross sectional study of 242 HD patients in an outpatient unit revealed a prevalence of 4% [11]. The pathogenesis of calciphylaxis is poorly understood. Abnormalities in mineral metabolism that ...

  14. Penil kalcifylaksi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerskov, Mette Wanscher; Comstedt, Lisbeth Rosholm; Bygum, Anette

    2009-01-01

    A 64-year-old diabetic man on peritoneal dialysis developed painful necrotic ulcers of the glans penis over a period of six months. On suspicion of atherosclerotic necrosis, a partial resection of his penis was performed. Histological examination showed calciphylaxis. This vasculopathy...... with calcification and intimal fibrosis in small blood vessels is mostly seen in patients with end-stage renal disease. The condition is characterized by painful livedoid and infiltrated plaques and ulcers. Involvement of the penis is rare, but probably underdiagnosed. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-May-25...

  15. The strength of a calcified tissue depends in part on the molecular structure and organization of its constituent mineral crystals in their organic matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, W. J.

    1995-01-01

    High-voltage electron-microscopic tomographic (3D) studies of the ultrastructural interaction between mineral and organic matrix in a variety of calcified tissues reveal different crystal structural and organizational features in association with their respective organic matrices. In brittle or weak pathologic or ectopic calcifications, including examples of osteogenesis imperfecta, calciphylaxis, calcergy, and dermatomyositis, hydroxyapatite crystals occur in various sizes and shapes and are oriented and aligned with respect to collagen in a manner which is distinct from that found in normal calcified tissues. A model of collagen-mineral interaction is proposed which may account for the observed crystal structures and organization. The results indicate that the ultimate strength, support, and other mechanical properties provided by a calcified tissue are dependent in part upon the molecular structure and arrangement of its constituent mineral crystals within their organic matrix.

  16. Skin manifestations of chronic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles-Mendez, J C; Vazquez-Martinez, O; Ocampo-Candiani, J

    2015-10-01

    Skin manifestations associated with chronic kidney disease are very common. Most of these conditions present in the end stages and may affect the patient's quality of life. Knowledge of these entities can contribute to establishing an accurate diagnosis and prognosis. Severe renal pruritus is associated with increased mortality and a poor prognosis. Nail exploration can provide clues about albumin and urea levels. Nephrogenic systemic fibrosis is a preventable disease associated with gadolinium contrast. Comorbidities, such as diabetes mellitus and secondary hyperparathyroidism, can lead to acquired perforating dermatosis and calciphylaxis, respectively. Effective and innovative treatments are available for all of these conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  17. Necrotizing fasciitis due to Serratia marcescens: case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Rohit; Crum-Cianflone, Nancy F

    2016-06-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a severe, life-threatening infection.  Serratia marcescens, a Gram-negative bacterium, is an extremely rare cause of necrotizing fasciitis. A case of S. marcescens necrotizing fasciitis is described, and a comprehensive review of the literature (1966-2015) of monomicrobial cases due to this organism performed. We report the first case of S. marcescens necrotizing fasciitis in the setting of calciphylaxis associated with end-stage renal disease.  A comprehensive review of the literature of S. marcescens necrotizing fasciitis is provided to enhance the awareness of this increasingly recognized infection, and to provide a concise summary of risk factors, treatment, and outcome. Our case and review highlight the potential risk factors for S. marcescens necrotizing fasciitis, including underlying renal disease and open wounds, and demonstrate the emergence of this organism as a cause of severe, life-threatening soft tissue infections.

  18. Subcutis calcinosis caused by injection of calcium-containing heparin in a chronic kidney injury patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilia Ben Fatma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Subcutis calcinosis, characterized by abnormal calcium deposits in the skin, is a rare complication of using calcium-containing heparin occurring in patients with advanced renal failure. We report the case of an 83-year-old female, a known case of chronic kidney disease (CKD for four years with recent worsening of renal failure requiring hospitalization and hemodialysis. She developed subcutis calcinosis following injection of calcium-containing heparin. Biochemical tests showed serum parathormone level at 400 pg/dL, hypercalcemia, elevated calcium-phosphate product and monoclonal gammopathy related to multiple myeloma. She developed firm subcu-taneous nodules in the abdomen and the thighs, the injection sites of Calciparin ® (calcium nadroparin that was given as a preventive measure against deep vein thrombosis. The diagnosis of subcutis calcinosis was confirmed by the histological examination showing calcium deposit in the dermis and hypodermis. These lesions completely disappeared after discontinuing calcium nadro-parin injections. Subcutis calcinosis caused by injections of calcium-containing heparin is rare, and, to the best our knowledge, not more than 12 cases have been reported in the literature. Pathogenesis is not well established but is attributed to the calcium disorders usually seen in advanced renal failure. Diagnosis is confirmed by histological tests. Outcome is mostly favorable. The main differential diagnosis is calciphylaxis, which has a poor prognosis. Even though rarely reported, we should be aware that CKD patients with elevated calcium-phosphorus product can develop subcutis calcinosis induced by calcium-containing heparin. When it occurs, fortunately and unlike calci-phylaxis, outcome is favorable.

  19. Subcutis calcinosis caused by injection of calcium-containing heparin in a chronic kidney injury patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatma, Lilia Ben; El Ati, Zohra; Azzouz, Haifa; Rais, Lamia; Krid, Madiha; Smaoui, Wided; Maiz, Hédi Ben; Béji, Soumaya; Zouaghi, Karim; Zitouna, Moncef; Moussa, Fatma Ben

    2014-09-01

    Subcutis calcinosis, characterized by abnormal calcium deposits in the skin, is a rare complication of using calcium-containing heparin occurring in patients with advanced renal failure. We report the case of an 83-year-old female, a known case of chronic kidney disease (CKD) for four years with recent worsening of renal failure requiring hospitalization and hemodialysis. She developed subcutis calcinosis following injection of calcium-containing heparin. Biochemical tests showed serum parathormone level at 400 pg/dL, hypercalcemia, elevated calcium-phosphate product and monoclonal gammopathy related to multiple myeloma. She developed firm subcutaneous nodules in the abdomen and the thighs, the injection sites of Calciparin ® (calcium nadroparin) that was given as a preventive measure against deep vein thrombosis. The diagnosis of subcutis calcinosis was confirmed by the histological examination showing calcium deposit in the dermis and hypodermis. These lesions completely disappeared after discontinuing calcium nadroparin injections. Subcutis calcinosis caused by injections of calcium-containing heparin is rare, and, to the best our knowledge, not more than 12 cases have been reported in the literature. Pathogenesis is not well established but is attributed to the calcium disorders usually seen in advanced renal failure. Diagnosis is confirmed by histological tests. Outcome is mostly favorable. The main differential diagnosis is calciphylaxis, which has a poor prognosis. Even though rarely reported, we should be aware that CKD patients with elevated calcium-phosphorus product can develop subcutis calcinosis induced by calcium-containing heparin. When it occurs, fortunately and unlike calciphylaxis, outcome is favorable.

  20. Adipocyte induced arterial calcification is prevented with sodium thiosulfate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Neal X., E-mail: xuechen@iupui.edu [Divison of Nephrology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); O’Neill, Kalisha; Akl, Nader Kassis [Divison of Nephrology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Moe, Sharon M. [Divison of Nephrology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Roudebush VA Medical Center, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2014-06-20

    Highlights: • High phosphorus can induce calcification of adipocytes, even when fully differentiated. • Adipocytes can induce vascular calcification in an autocrine manner. • Sodium thiosulfate inhibits adipocyte calcification. - Abstract: Background: Calcification can occur in fat in multiple clinical conditions including in the dermis, breasts and in the abdomen in calciphylaxis. All of these are more common in patients with advanced kidney disease. Clinically, hyperphosphatemia and obesity are risk factors. Thus we tested the hypothesis that adipocytes can calcify in the presence of elevated phosphorus and/or that adipocytes exposed to phosphorus can induce vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) calcification. Methods: 3T3-L1 preadipocytes were induced into mature adipocytes and then treated with media containing high phosphorus. Calcification was assessed biochemically and PCR performed to determine the expression of genes for osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation. Adipocytes were also co-cultured with bovine VSMC to determine paracrine effects, and the efficacy of sodium thiosulfate was determined. Results: The results demonstrated that high phosphorus induced the calcification of differentiated adipocytes with increased expression of osteopontin, the osteoblast transcription factor Runx2 and decreased expression of adipocyte transcription factors peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) and CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein α (CEBPα), indicating that high phosphorus led to a phenotypic switch of adipocytes to an osteoblast like phenotype. Sodium thiosulfate, dose dependently decreased adipocyte calcification and inhibited adipocyte induced increase of VSMC calcification. Co-culture studies demonstrated that adipocytes facilitated VSMC calcification partially mediated by changes of secretion of leptin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) from adipocytes. Conclusion: High phosphorus induced calcification of mature adipocytes, and

  1. Calcific Uremic Arteriolopathy: Pathophysiology, Reactive Oxygen Species and Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt M. Sowers

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcific uremic arteriolopathy (CUA/calciphylaxis is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with chronic kidney disease requiring renal replacement. Once thought to be rare, it is being increasingly recognized and reported on a global scale. The uremic milieu predisposes to multiple metabolic toxicities including increased levels of reactive oxygen species and inflammation. Increased oxidative stress and inflammation promote this arteriolopathy by adversely affecting endothelial function resulting in a prothrombotic milieu and significant remodeling effects on vascular smooth muscle cells. These arteriolar pathological effects include intimal hyperplasia, inflammation, endovascular fibrosis and vascular smooth muscle cell apoptosis and differentiation into bone forming osteoblast-like cells resulting in medial calcification. Systemic factors promoting this vascular condition include elevated calcium, parathyroid hormone and hyperphosphatemia with consequent increases in the calcium × phosphate product. The uremic milieu contributes to a marked increased in upstream reactive oxygen species—oxidative stress and subsequent downstream increased inflammation, in part, via activation of the nuclear transcription factor NFκB and associated downstream cytokine pathways. Consitutive anti-calcification proteins such as Fetuin-A and matrix GLA proteins and their signaling pathways may be decreased, which further contributes to medial vascular calcification. The resulting clinical entity is painful, debilitating and contributes to the excess morbidity and mortality associated with chronic kidney disease and end stage renal disease. These same histopathologic conditions also occur in patients without uremia and therefore, the term calcific obliterative arteriolopathy could be utilized in these conditions.

  2. OC ToGo: bed site image integration into OpenClinica with mobile devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haak, Daniel; Gehlen, Johan; Jonas, Stephan; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2014-03-01

    Imaging and image-based measurements nowadays play an essential role in controlled clinical trials, but electronic data capture (EDC) systems insufficiently support integration of captured images by mobile devices (e.g. smartphones and tablets). The web application OpenClinica has established as one of the world's leading EDC systems and is used to collect, manage and store data of clinical trials in electronic case report forms (eCRFs). In this paper, we present a mobile application for instantaneous integration of images into OpenClinica directly during examination on patient's bed site. The communication between the Android application and OpenClinica is based on the simple object access protocol (SOAP) and representational state transfer (REST) web services for metadata, and secure file transfer protocol (SFTP) for image transfer, respectively. OpenClinica's web services are used to query context information (e.g. existing studies, events and subjects) and to import data into the eCRF, as well as export of eCRF metadata and structural information. A stable image transfer is ensured and progress information (e.g. remaining time) visualized to the user. The workflow is demonstrated for a European multi-center registry, where patients with calciphylaxis disease are included. Our approach improves the EDC workflow, saves time, and reduces costs. Furthermore, data privacy is enhanced, since storage of private health data on the imaging devices becomes obsolete.

  3. The serum protein α2–Heremans-Schmid glycoprotein/fetuin-A is a systemically acting inhibitor of ectopic calcification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Cora; Heiss, Alexander; Schwarz, Anke; Westenfeld, Ralf; Ketteler, Markus; Floege, Jürgen; Müller-Esterl, Werner; Schinke, Thorsten; Jahnen-Dechent, Willi

    2003-01-01

    Ectopic calcification is a frequent complication of many degenerative diseases. Here we identify the serum protein α2–Heremans-Schmid glycoprotein (Ahsg, also known as fetuin-A) as an important inhibitor of ectopic calcification acting on the systemic level. Ahsg-deficient mice are phenotypically normal, but develop severe calcification of various organs on a mineral and vitamin D–rich diet and on a normal diet when the deficiency is combined with a DBA/2 genetic background. This phenotype is not associated with apparent changes in calcium and phosphate homeostasis, but with a decreased inhibitory activity of the Ahsg-deficient extracellular fluid on mineral formation. The same underlying principle may contribute to many calcifying disorders including calciphylaxis, a syndrome of severe systemic calcification in patients with chronic renal failure. Taken together, our data demonstrate a critical role of Ahsg as an inhibitor of unwanted mineralization and provide a novel therapeutic concept to prevent ectopic calcification accompanying various diseases. PMID:12897203

  4. Beyond the futility argument: the fair process approach and time-limited trials for managing dialysis conflict.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Ann

    2013-11-01

    Futility is an ancient concept arising from Greek mythology that was resurrected for its medical application in the 1980s with the proliferation of many lifesaving technologies, including dialysis and renal transplantation. By that time, the domineering medical paternalism that characterized the pre-1960s physician-patient relationship morphed into assertive patient autonomy, and some patients began to claim the right to demand aggressive, high-technology interventions, despite physician disapproval. To counter this power struggle, the establishment of a precise definition of futility offered hope for a futility policy that would allow physicians to justify withholding or withdrawing treatment, despite patient and family objections. This article reviews the various attempts made to define medical futility and describes their limited applicability to dialysis. When futility concerns arise, physicians should recognize the opportunity to address conflict, using best practice communication skills. Physicians would also benefit from understanding the ethical principles of respect for patient autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, justice, and professional integrity that underlie medical decision-making. Also reviewed is the use of a fair process approach or time-limited trial when conflict resolution cannot be achieved. These topics are addressed in the Renal Physician Association's clinical practice guideline Shared Decision-Making in the Appropriate Initiation and Withdrawal from Dialysis, with which nephrologists should be well versed. A case presentation of intractable calciphylaxis in a new dialysis patient illustrates the pitfalls of physicians not fully appreciating the ethics of medical decision-making and failing to use effective conflict management approaches in the clinical practice guideline.