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Sample records for cajamarca peru determined

  1. Frequency of human toxocariasis in a rural population from Cajamarca, Peru determined by DOT-ELISA test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roldán, William H; Espinoza, Yrma A; Huapaya, Pedro E; Huiza, Alina F; Sevilla, Carlos R; Jiménez, Susana

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the frequency of human toxocariasis in Cauday district, Cajamarca, Peru, using a dot-ELISA test. From June to October 2005, a total of 256 adult subjects were studied. Blood samples were collected for serology by a dot-ELISA test and for hematological examination. Parasitological examination was also carried out in stool samples to check cross-reactions in the dot-ELISA. The frequency observed was 44.92%, with a significant higher proportion of positivity in male subjects. From subjects with positive serology, 45.6% had respiratory symptoms, 40.44% abdominal pain, 32.35% hepatic symptoms, 14.7% cutaneous signs, 13.23% ocular manifestations, 43.38% eosinophilia, and all of these were statistically associated to serology. Among the population evaluated, 90.23% (231/256) were parasitized. From subjects with positive serology, 92.17% had at least one intestinal parasite and the most frequent were: Blastocystis hominis (68.38%), Giardia lamblia (28.68%), Hymenolepis nana (20.0%), Ascaris lumbricoides (15.65%), Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar (13.24%), Cyclospora cayetanensis (4.41%), Cryptosporidium sp. (1.47%), Enterobius vermicularis (0.87%), Strongyloides stercoralis (0.87%), Taenia sp. (0.87%), and Trichuris trichiura (0.87%). The rate of false positives in the dot-ELISA test was improved by serum absorption each with A. suum antigens, with a decrease of cross-reactions. In conclusion, human toxocariasis is highly frequent in this population and some risk factors like dog/cat ownership, presence of pets within house, and previous history of geophagia were observed in the present study.

  2. Potencial antioxidante de 10 accesiones de yacon, Smallanthus sonchifolius H. Robinson, procedentes de Cajamarca -- Peru

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Arnao, Ines; Seminario, Juan; Cisneros, Ruth; Trabucco, Juan

    2011-01-01

    ...: Estudio descriptivo, transversal y prospectivo. Instituciones: Centro de Investigacion de Bioquimica y Nutricion, Facultad de Medicina, UNMSM y Universidad Nacional de Cajamarca (UNC), Peru. Material biologico...

  3. Geochemical Background and Baseline Values Determination and Spatial Distribution of Heavy Metal Pollution in Soils of the Andes Mountain Range (Cajamarca-Huancavelica, Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Francés, Fernando; Alonso Rojo, Pilar; García Sánchez, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Concentrations of seven heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn) and one metalloid (As) as well as various parameters (pH, organic carbon, granulometric analysis and cation exchange capacity) were analyzed in 77 soil samples collected in the mining areas of La Zanja and Colquirrumi (Department of Cajamarca) and Julcani (Department of Huancavelica). Our study proposed geochemical baseline values for heavy metals in a natural region (La Zanja) from samples collected during the period of the environmental impact study (2006), that is, from an earlier period which occurred at the beginning of the exploitation of the current gold mine. The baseline values obtained were as follows: 8.26 mg·kg−1 for Cr; 56.97 mg·kg−1 for Ni; 22, 20 mg·kg−1 for the Cu; 47.42 mg·kg−1 for Zn; 27.50 mg·kg−1 for As; 4.36 mg·kg−1 for Cd; 4.89 mg·kg−1 for Hg, and 44.87 mg·kg−1 for Pb. Through the use of different indices of heavy metal contamination (geo-accumulation index (Igeo), improved Nemerow index (IIN) and potential ecological risk index (RI)), the degree of pollution caused by mining activities in two areas, Colquirrumi and Julcani, which have a high density of mining sites in operation, was determined. The values obtained from these indices indicated that the Colquirrumi region was the most contaminated, followed by Julcani. The area of La Zanja, despite being free of mining operations, presented slight diffuse pollution. Several positive correlations were obtained, with a high level of significance, between pH, organic carbon content, cation exchange capacity, and the Cr, Pb and Ni concentrations of the soils. The spatial distribution of the heavy metals was realized by means of the interpolation method of ordinary kriging. The results obtained and the experience gained in this work were necessary to facilitate the identification of soil contamination processes in high altitude areas of the Andes Western Cordillera (Peru) as a basis for taking appropriate

  4. Geochemical Background and Baseline Values Determination and Spatial Distribution of Heavy Metal Pollution in Soils of the Andes Mountain Range (Cajamarca-Huancavelica, Peru).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Francés, Fernando; Martinez-Graña, Antonio; Alonso Rojo, Pilar; García Sánchez, Antonio

    2017-07-31

    Concentrations of seven heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn) and one metalloid (As) as well as various parameters (pH, organic carbon, granulometric analysis and cation exchange capacity) were analyzed in 77 soil samples collected in the mining areas of La Zanja and Colquirrumi (Department of Cajamarca) and Julcani (Department of Huancavelica). Our study proposed geochemical baseline values for heavy metals in a natural region (La Zanja) from samples collected during the period of the environmental impact study (2006), that is, from an earlier period which occurred at the beginning of the exploitation of the current gold mine. The baseline values obtained were as follows: 8.26 mg kg-1 for Cr; 56.97 mg kg-1 for Ni; 22, 20 mg kg-1 for the Cu; 47.42 mg kg-1 for Zn; 27.50 mg kg-1 for As; 4.36 mg kg-1 for Cd; 4.89 mg kg-1 for Hg, and 44.87 mg kg-1 for Pb. Through the use of different indices of heavy metal contamination (geo-accumulation index (Igeo), improved Nemerow index (IIN) and potential ecological risk index (RI)), the degree of pollution caused by mining activities in two areas, Colquirrumi and Julcani, which have a high density of mining sites in operation, was determined. The values obtained from these indices indicated that the Colquirrumi region was the most contaminated, followed by Julcani. The area of La Zanja, despite being free of mining operations, presented slight diffuse pollution. Several positive correlations were obtained, with a high level of significance, between pH, organic carbon content, cation exchange capacity, and the Cr, Pb and Ni concentrations of the soils. The spatial distribution of the heavy metals was realized by means of the interpolation method of ordinary kriging. The results obtained and the experience gained in this work were necessary to facilitate the identification of soil contamination processes in high altitude areas of the Andes Western Cordillera (Peru) as a basis for taking appropriate measures when restoring

  5. Bordetella pertussis diagnosis in children under five years of age in the Regional Hospital of Cajamarca, Northern Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Valle-Mendoza, Juana; Casabona-Oré, Veronica; Petrozzi-Helasvuo, Veronica; Cornejo-Tapia, Angela; Weilg, Pablo; Pons, Maria J; Cieza-Mora, Erico; Bazán-Mayra, Jorge; Cornejo-Pacherres, Hernan; Ruiz, Joaquin

    2015-11-30

    Bordetella pertussis is an important human pathogen that causes whooping cough (pertussis), an endemic illness responsible of significant morbidity and mortality, especially in infants and children. Worldwide, there are an estimated of 16 million cases of pertussis, resulting in about 195,000 child deaths per year. In Peru, pertussis is a major health problem that has been on the increase despite immunization efforts. The objective of this study was to determine the prevalence of B. pertussis among children under five years of age suspected to have whopping cough in Cajamarca, Peru. Children diagnosed with whooping cough admitted to the Hospital Regional de Cajamarca from August 2010 to July 2013 were included. Nasopharyngeal samples were obtained for B. pertussis culture and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detection. In 133 children, the pertussis toxin and IS481 gene were detected in 38.35% (51/133) of the cases by PCR, while only 9.02% (12/133) of the Bordetella cultures were positive. The most frequent symptoms in patients with positive B. pertussis were paroxysm of coughing 68.63% (35/51), cyanosis 56.86% (29/51), respiratory distress 43.14% (22/51), and fever 39.22% (20/51). Pneumonia and acute bronchial obstructive syndrome were present in 17.65% (9/51) and 13.72% (7/51) of the cases, respectively. B. pertussis is responsible for an important proportion of whooping cough in hospitalized children in Cajamarca. Epidemiologic surveillance programs for B. pertussis are essential in Peru, especially in children who could most benefit from the vaccine.

  6. Frequency of human toxocariasis in a rural population from Cajamarca, Peru determined by DOT-ELISA test Freqüência de toxocaríase humana numa população rural de Cajamarca, Peru, mediante o uso do teste DOT-ELISA

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    William H. Roldán

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to estimate the frequency of human toxocariasis in Cauday district, Cajamarca, Peru, using a dot-ELISA test. From June to October 2005, a total of 256 adult subjects were studied. Blood samples were collected for serology by a dot-ELISA test and for hematological examination. Parasitological examination was also carried out in stool samples to check cross-reactions in the dot-ELISA. The frequency observed was 44.92%, with a significant higher proportion of positivity in male subjects. From subjects with positive serology, 45.6% had respiratory symptoms, 40.44% abdominal pain, 32.35% hepatic symptoms, 14.7% cutaneous signs, 13.23% ocular manifestations, 43.38% eosinophilia, and all of these were statistically associated to serology. Among the population evaluated, 90.23% (231/256 were parasitized. From subjects with positive serology, 92.17% had at least one intestinal parasite and the most frequent were: Blastocystis hominis (68.38%, Giardia lamblia (28.68%, Hymenolepis nana (20.0%, Ascaris lumbricoides (15.65%, Entamoeba histolytica/E. dispar (13.24%, Cyclospora cayetanensis (4.41%, Cryptosporidium sp. (1.47%, Enterobius vermicularis (0.87%, Strongyloides stercoralis (0.87%, Taenia sp. (0.87%, and Trichuris trichiura (0.87%. The rate of false positives in the dot-ELISA test was improved by serum absorption each with A. suum antigens, with a decrease of cross-reactions. In conclusion, human toxocariasis is highly frequent in this population and some risk factors like dog/cat ownership, presence of pets within house, and previous history of geophagia were observed in the present study.O propósito do presente estudo foi estimar a freqüência da toxocaríase no distrito de Cauday, Cajamarca, Peru, usando o dot-ELISA teste. Entre junho e outubro de 2005, um total de 256 pessoas foram avaliadas. Coletaram-se amostras de sangue para o teste de dot-ELISA e para o exame hematológico e amostras de fezes para exame parasitol

  7. Ophioninae (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae wasp community in the cloudy forest Monteseco, Cajamarca, Peru

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    Evelyn Sánchez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe the species composition of the subfamily Ophioninae (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae along an altitudinal gradient in the cloudy forest Monteseco, Cajamarca, Peru collected in 2009 and 2010. Eighteen species were recorded in three genera of Ophioninae: Alophophion, Enicospilus y Ophion. Five species are recorded for the first time in Peru: Ophion polyhymniae Gauld, 1988; Enicospilus cubensis (Norton, 1863; E. guatemalensis (Cameron, 1886; E. cressoni Hooker, 1912 y E. mexicanus (Cresson, 1874. Subfamily composition varies with the elevation. The highest species richness (S=11 was found at 2150 m and the lowest (S=3 at 3116 m. Enicospilus is more diverse from low to mid elevation, Ophion from mid to high elevation and Alophophion occurs predominantly at high elevation.

  8. Paleomagnetic study of an arcuate fold belt developed on a marginal orogen: The Cajamarca deflection, northern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitouard, Pierre; Laj, Carlo; Mourier, Thomas; Kissel, Catherine

    1992-08-01

    A paleomagnetic study of over 500 cores from 48 sites sampled in Albian to Turonian sedimentary formations along the Cajamarca deflection in northern Peru indicates that these lithologies carry a stable remanent magnetization. In the two major segments of the deflection, positive fold tests establish that the magnetization predates the folding, except for five sites in the western part which appear to be remagnetized by the intrusion of Paleocene granites. The eastern part of the deflection does not appear to have undergone any significant rotation, whilst a post-late Eocene counterclockwise rotation of about 25° is recorded in the central and western parts. This angular difference only accounts for about half of the difference in the strikes of structures in the two sections of the deflection. When considered with the available tectonic, sedimentological and geodynamic data, these results indicate that the arcuate shape of the Cajamarca fold belt results from complex processes. Early multi-phased compressional events of Paleocene-Eocene age created the folds and built an arcuate structure with non-rotational mechanisms. Then, in post-late-Eocene times the structure reached its present form after rotation of its central and western parts. The bearing of these results on the geodynamic evolution of the Andean Cordillera is discussed.

  9. El pluralismo juridico y politico en Peru: el caso de las Rondas Campesinas de Cajamarca

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Picolli, Emmanuelle

    2008-01-01

    ...). Organizaciones sociales nacidas con la finalidad de protegerse de robos de ganado, las Rondas Campesinas de la zona norte del Peru, fueron convirtiendose en un espacio de administracion de justicia...

  10. Biological aspects and control of a Gracillariidae (Gracillariidae: Lepidoptera in Caesalpinia spinosa (Mol. Kuntze (1898, in Cajamarca, Peru

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    Hipólito Murga

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Determine biological target, identify natural enemies, and establish appropriate periods of controlling a pest gracillariid tare. The biological aspects and natural enemies in field and laboratory were evaluated, appropriate control periods was determined by host-pest interaction. The results, egg lasts 7.8 days and measured 0.34x0.21 mm; presents four instars larvae and lasts 35.7 days, ranging from measures between 1st and the 4th instar from 0.09 to 0.65 mm diameter brain; the pupa lasts 14.3 days and measured 6.7mmx1.1mm; adult takes 7.5 days and measured 13.43 mm wingspan. Presents natural enemies, family Encyrtidae, Ichneumonidae, and genres Chelonus sp., Chrysoperla sp., Hemerobius sp., Cicloneda sp., Hippodamia sp., and Zelus spp. The best times control occur when the phenology of the tara is between R3.1 to R3.3 and R4 to R6.

  11. Evaluación de una prueba de ELISA con antígeno metabólico de Fasciola hepatica para el diagnóstico de fasciolosis humana en Cajamarca, Perú Evaluation of an ELISA test with Fasciola hepatica metabolic antigen for diagnosis of human fascioliasis in Cajamarca, Peru

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    Hernán Cornejo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Se obtuvo el antígeno metabólico (antígeno excreción - secreción de Fasciola hepatica de ovinos infectados de Cajamarca, con una concentración proteica de 1 005 μg/μL, compuesta principalmente por proteνnas de peso molecular entre 1,2 y 170 KDa. Se detectaron bandas de 170; 150; 31; 24; 18-14 y 10 kDa. Con este antνgeno se desarrollσ una prueba de ELISA y se determinσ su punto de corte en 0,140. Se evaluσ 33 sueros de pacientes con fasciolosis confirmada por visualización de huevos en heces, 177 sueros de pacientes sin fasciolosis provenientes de áreas endémicas de Cajamarca y 88 sueros de pacientes con otras infecciones parasitarias y bacterianas. Se encontró una sensibilidad de 97,0%, especificidad de 96,6%, valor predictivo positivo de 78,1% y valor predictivo negativo de 99,6%. Se encontró reacción cruzada en 9/88 sueros evaluados. Se recomienda la implementación y uso de esta prueba para el diagnóstico de fasciolosis.Metabolic (excretion/secretion antigen was obtained from sheep infected with Fasciola hepatica, with a 1005 μg/μL of protein concentration, composed principally by proteins of molecular weight between 1.2 and 170 KDa. Bands of 170, 150, 31, 24, 18-14 and 10 kDa were detected. With this antigen an ELISA test was developed and the cut off was determined in 0.140. We evaluated 33 serums of patient with fascioliasis confirmed by visualization of eggs in feces, 177 serums of persons without fascioliasis from endemic rural areas of Cajamarca and 88 serums of patients with others parasitic and bacterial infections. We found a 97.0% of sensitivity, 96.6 specificity, 78.1% predictive positive value, 99.6 % predictive negative value. In 9/88 serums was found cross reactions. We recommended the implementation and use of this test for the fascioliasis diagnosis.

  12. Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semaan, Leslie

    This document examines the current difficult situation in Peru in light of its historical past. It gives students the opportunity to relate to the problems that the majority of Peruvians are facing and to see how Peru's people are working together for solutions. The text deals with contemporary issues such as the greenhouse effect, the loss of the…

  13. Territorios hidrosociales y minería en Cajamarca, Perú : Monitoreos ambientales como herramientas políticas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yacoub, C.; Vos, J.; Boelens, R.

    2016-01-01

    The present article evaluates how mining enterprises rely on monitoring as a political tool in socio-environmental confl ict areas. It analyzes the case of a watershed affected by stripped gold mining operations in Cajamarca, Peru. The essay differentiates the different stages of the monitoring

  14. Shadows of the colonial past--diverging plant use in Northern Peru and Southern Ecuador

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bussmann, Rainer W; Sharon, Douglas

    2009-01-01

    This paper examines the traditional use of medicinal plants in Northern Peru and Southern Ecuador, with special focus on the Departments of Piura, Lambayeque, La Libertad, Cajamarca, and San Martin...

  15. Heavy metal and metalloids intake risk assessment in the diet of a rural population living near a gold mine in the Peruvian Andes (Cajamarca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barenys, Marta; Boix, Nuria; Farran-Codina, Andreu; Palma-Linares, Imma; Montserrat, Roser; Curto, Ariadna; Gomez-Catalan, Jesus; Ortiz, Pedro; Deza, Nilton; Llobet, Juan M

    2014-09-01

    This study evaluates the diet composition of a rural population near a gold mine in the Cajamarca district of Peru. The main consumed items by this population were tubers and cereals, and the mean energy intake (1990 kcal) was shown not to cover the recommended intake values for the male population. The concentrations of As, Cd, Hg, Pb, Zn, Al, Cr and, Cu in drinking water and food samples of items contributing to 91% of this diet (145 samples, 24 different items) were determined and used to calculate their daily intakes for risk assessment. The As, Cd and Pb daily intakes exceeded the limit values established by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA), entailing serious concerns for the population's health. Moreover, the intake values of As and Pb were shown to be higher, the closer to the gold mine the studied population was. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Imágenes de la conquista: el encuentro de Cajamarca en Crónica de la Conquista del Perú y en Verdadera Relación de la Conquista del Perú

    OpenAIRE

    Luigi Guarnieri Calò Carducci

    2015-01-01

    The news about Peru that reached Europe right after the conquest has always been an object of study and reflection. The first documents that describe Peru and its treasures were soon translated into Italian, shortly after their arrival to Spain; some of them were lost in their original form and remain available in Italian only. These documents played a major role in building the image of Peru along the sixteenth century. The paper is about the Cajamarca events described in those documents.

  17. Annotated checklist of Solanum L. (Solanaceae for Peru

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    Tiina Särkinen

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The genus Solanum is among the most species-rich genera both of the Peruvian flora and of the tropical Andes in general. The present revised checklist treats 276 species of Solanum L., of which 253 are native, while 23 are introduced and/or cultivated. A total of 74 Solanum species (29% of native species are endemic to Peru. Additional 58 species occur only in small number of populations outside Peru, and these species are here labelled as near-endemics to highlight the role Peru playes in their future protection. Species diversity is observed to peak between 2500 – 3000 m elevation, but endemic species diversity is highest between 3000 – 3500 m elevation. Cajamarca has the highest number of endemic (29 spp. and total species (130 spp., even when considering the effect of area. Centers of endemic species diversity are observed in provinces of Cajamarca (Cajamarca, Huaraz and Carhuaz (Ancash, and Canta and Huarochirí (Lima. Secondary centres of endemism with high concentrations of both endemics and near-endemics are found in San Ignacio and Cutervo (Cajamarca, Santiago de Chuco (La Libertad, Oxapampa (Pasco, and Cusco (Cusco. Current diversity patterns are highly correlated with collection densities, and further collecting is needed across all areas, especially from Arequipa, Ayacucho, Puno, Ancash, Huánuco, Amazonas and Cajamarca, where high levels of species diversity and endemism are indicated but only a few collections of many species are known.

  18. 78 FR 58378 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “Peru: Kingdoms of the Sun...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``Peru: Kingdoms of the Sun and the..., 2003), I hereby determine that the objects to be included in the exhibition ``Peru: Kingdoms of the Sun...

  19. Imágenes de la conquista: el encuentro de Cajamarca en Crónica de la Conquista del Perú y en Verdadera Relación de la Conquista del Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigi Guarnieri Calò Carducci

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The news about Peru that reached Europe right after the conquest has always been an object of study and reflection. The first documents that describe Peru and its treasures were soon translated into Italian, shortly after their arrival to Spain; some of them were lost in their original form and remain available in Italian only. These documents played a major role in building the image of Peru along the sixteenth century. The paper is about the Cajamarca events described in those documents.

  20. Determination of distributed generation poles from agricultural residual biomass in Madre de Dios, Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Andrés de Jesús Vargas Soplín; Judith María Ramírez Candia

    2017-01-01

    Context: The region Madre de Dios is located in Peru and is conditioned by the dispersed way in which the people establish settlements. This configuration limits the access these rural settlements have to energy (currently, the rural electrification only reaches 31%). Thus, this investigation focuses on determining distributed energy poles through the use of residual biomass in Madre de Dios region. Method: Through a methodological scheme of four phases, the electric coverage in Madre de ...

  1. Wind, Sun and Water: Complexities of Alternative Energy Development in Rural Northern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Thomas; Garwood, Anna

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on recent research with NGO-driven projects in rural Cajamarca, Peru, we examine the paradoxes of relying on wind, solar and micro-hydro generation of electricity for rural community development. In spite of cost, vagaries of these energy resources and limited material benefits, especially with wind and solar systems, villagers are eagerly…

  2. New species of Ophryosporus (Eupatorieae Asteraceae from Peru

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    Abundio Sagástegui Alva

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Ophryosporus marchii Sagást. & E. Rodr. is described as a new species of Ophryosporus Meyen (Eupatorieae: Asteraceae from the Department of Cajamarca, Peru. This new species is apparently endemic to the province of Contumaza and closest relative to O. sagasteguii H. Rob. It is critically compared with this species and data on its geographical distribution, ecology and conservation status are provided.

  3. Determining a cost effective intervention response to HIV/AIDS in Peru

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    Cáceres Carlos F

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HIV epidemic in Peru is still regarded as concentrated - sentinel surveillance data shows greatest rates of infection in men who have sex with men, while much lower rates are found in female sex workers and still lower in the general population. Without an appropriate set of preventive interventions, continuing infections could present a challenge to the sustainability of the present programme of universal access to treatment. Determining how specific prevention and care strategies would impact on the health of Peruvians should be key in reshaping the national response. Methods HIV/AIDS prevalence levels for risk groups with sufficient sentinel survey data were estimated. Unit costs were calculated for a series of interventions against HIV/AIDS which were subsequently inputted into a model to assess their ability to reduce infection transmission rates. Interventions included: mass media, voluntary counselling and testing; peer counselling for female sex workers; peer counselling for men who have sex with men; peer education of youth in-school; condom provision; STI treatment; prevention of mother to child transmission; and highly active antiretroviral therapy. Impact was assessed by the ability to reduce rates of transmission and quantified in terms of cost per DALY averted. Results Results of the analysis show that in Peru, the highest levels of HIV prevalence are found in men who have sex with men. Cost effectiveness varied greatly between interventions ranging from peer education of female commercial sex workers at $US 55 up to $US 5,928 (per DALY averted for prevention of mother to child transmission. Conclusion The results of this work add evidence-based clarity as to which interventions warrant greatest consideration when planning an intervention response to HIV in Peru. Cost effectiveness analysis provides a necessary element of transparency when facing choices about priority setting, particularly when the country

  4. Determining a cost effective intervention response to HIV/AIDS in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Robert W; Iglesias, David; Cáceres, Carlos F; Miranda, J Jaime

    2009-09-18

    The HIV epidemic in Peru is still regarded as concentrated -- sentinel surveillance data shows greatest rates of infection in men who have sex with men, while much lower rates are found in female sex workers and still lower in the general population. Without an appropriate set of preventive interventions, continuing infections could present a challenge to the sustainability of the present programme of universal access to treatment. Determining how specific prevention and care strategies would impact on the health of Peruvians should be key in reshaping the national response. HIV/AIDS prevalence levels for risk groups with sufficient sentinel survey data were estimated. Unit costs were calculated for a series of interventions against HIV/AIDS which were subsequently inputted into a model to assess their ability to reduce infection transmission rates. Interventions included: mass media, voluntary counselling and testing; peer counselling for female sex workers; peer counselling for men who have sex with men; peer education of youth in-school; condom provision; STI treatment; prevention of mother to child transmission; and highly active antiretroviral therapy. Impact was assessed by the ability to reduce rates of transmission and quantified in terms of cost per DALY averted. Results of the analysis show that in Peru, the highest levels of HIV prevalence are found in men who have sex with men. Cost effectiveness varied greatly between interventions ranging from peer education of female commercial sex workers at $US 55 up to $US 5,928 (per DALY averted) for prevention of mother to child transmission. The results of this work add evidence-based clarity as to which interventions warrant greatest consideration when planning an intervention response to HIV in Peru. Cost effectiveness analysis provides a necessary element of transparency when facing choices about priority setting, particularly when the country plans to amplify its response through new interventions partly

  5. Determining a cost effective intervention response to HIV/AIDS in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Robert W; Iglesias, David; Cáceres, Carlos F; Miranda, J Jaime

    2009-01-01

    Background The HIV epidemic in Peru is still regarded as concentrated - sentinel surveillance data shows greatest rates of infection in men who have sex with men, while much lower rates are found in female sex workers and still lower in the general population. Without an appropriate set of preventive interventions, continuing infections could present a challenge to the sustainability of the present programme of universal access to treatment. Determining how specific prevention and care strategies would impact on the health of Peruvians should be key in reshaping the national response. Methods HIV/AIDS prevalence levels for risk groups with sufficient sentinel survey data were estimated. Unit costs were calculated for a series of interventions against HIV/AIDS which were subsequently inputted into a model to assess their ability to reduce infection transmission rates. Interventions included: mass media, voluntary counselling and testing; peer counselling for female sex workers; peer counselling for men who have sex with men; peer education of youth in-school; condom provision; STI treatment; prevention of mother to child transmission; and highly active antiretroviral therapy. Impact was assessed by the ability to reduce rates of transmission and quantified in terms of cost per DALY averted. Results Results of the analysis show that in Peru, the highest levels of HIV prevalence are found in men who have sex with men. Cost effectiveness varied greatly between interventions ranging from peer education of female commercial sex workers at $US 55 up to $US 5,928 (per DALY averted) for prevention of mother to child transmission. Conclusion The results of this work add evidence-based clarity as to which interventions warrant greatest consideration when planning an intervention response to HIV in Peru. Cost effectiveness analysis provides a necessary element of transparency when facing choices about priority setting, particularly when the country plans to amplify its

  6. Subcutaneous mycoses in Peru: a systematic review and meta-analysis for the burden of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Soto, Max Carlos; Malaga, German

    2017-10-01

    There is a worrying lack of epidemiological data on the geographical distribution and burden of subcutaneous mycoses in Peru, hindering the implementation of surveillance and control programs. This study aimed to estimate the disease burden of subcutaneous mycoses in Peru and identify which fungal species were commonly associated with these mycoses. We performed a meta-analysis after a systematic review of the published literature in PubMed, LILACS, and SciELO to estimate the burden of subcutaneous mycoses in 25 regions in Peru. The disease burden was determined in terms of prevalence (number of cases per 100,000 inhabitants) and the number of reported cases per year per region. A total of 26 studies were eligible for inclusion. Results showed that sporotrichosis was the most common subcutaneous mycosis (99.7%), whereas lobomycosis, chromoblastomycosis, and subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis were rare. Cases of eumycetoma and subcutaneous zygomycosis were not found. Of the 25 regions, the burden of sporotrichosis was estimated for four regions classified as endemic; in nine regions, only isolated cases were reported. The highest burden of sporotrichosis was in Apurimac (15 cases/100,000 inhabitants; 57 cases/year), followed by Cajamarca (3/100,000 inhabitants; 30/year), Cusco (0.5/100,000 inhabitants; 4/year), and La Libertad (0.2/100,000 inhabitants; 2/year). In two regions, the mycoses predominantly affected children. Sporotrichosis is the most common subcutaneous mycosis in Peru, with a high disease burden in Apurimac. Chromoblastomycosis, lobomycosis, and subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis are rare mycoses in Peru. © 2017 The International Society of Dermatology.

  7. [Sociocultural factors determinants of eating habits of kindergarten schoolchildren in Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Jiménez, Rocío; León-Larios, Fátima; Lomas-Campos, Mercedes; Albar, María-Jesús

    2016-01-01

    To examine the sociocultural factors that determine the eating habits of children aged less than 5 years who attend kindergarten school in Chachapoyas in Peru, we carried out a qualitative study by means of semi-structured interviews of 18 fathers and mothers. The key factors related to eating habits were as follows: availability and easiness to prepare foods, schedule and work done by parents, intake of coffee in children as a common practice, lack of resources and economic uncertainty for food planning, and the lack of nutritional knowledge. Similarly, beliefs that might explain some eating habits, such as the beneficial effects of eating food as a family, maternal breastfeeding, and others, or the role of nutrition for the appropriate intellectual and physical development of children were identified. Our results provide evidence about the ways parents tackle and understand their children's nutrition while, in turn, determining its quality.

  8. [Determining factors of overweight and obesity in children at school age in Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mispireta, Monica L

    2012-01-01

    Obesity in children at school age is an increasing problem in Peru. It concentrates in urban areas, mainly in Lima where one out of three children is overweight. An initial study in 80 schools in Lima showed that the lack of physical activity would have a greater impact on overweight and obesity in school children than the amount of food intake. More detailed studies are required. In spite of the limited information available regarding its determining factors, it is necessary to implement culturally-sensitive measures to fight this problem as part of the current nutritional policies, and prevent the problem from spreading, making sure the sustainability of the health system is not affected.

  9. Contaminación fecal en hortalizas que se expenden en mercados de la ciudad de Cajamarca, Perú

    OpenAIRE

    Rivera-Jacinto, Marco; Laboratorio de Microbiología y Parasitología, Departamento de Ciencias Biológicas, facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, universidad Nacional de Cajamarca. Cajamarca, Perú. Biólogo microbiólogo.; Rodríguez-Ulloa, Claudia; Laboratorio de Microbiología y Parasitología, Departamento de Ciencias Biológicas, facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, universidad Nacional de Cajamarca. Cajamarca, Perú. Biólogo microbiólogo.; López-Orbegoso, John; Laboratorio de Microbiología y Parasitología, Departamento de Ciencias Biológicas, facultad de Ciencias de la Salud, universidad Nacional de Cajamarca. Cajamarca, Perú. Biólogo microbiólogo.

    2009-01-01

    We determined the level of fecal coliforms and the frequency of Escherichia coli in 85 samples of vegetables that were taken from randomly and were sold in the main markets of Cajamarca. Processing, isolation and bacterial identification was performed according to the food and Drug Administration (fDA). 40% of samples presented fecal coliforms, with a high index per gram (MPN/g) of E. coli and a high frequency of this in the parsley and lettuce. The analysis reveals a high level of fecal ...

  10. Contaminación fecal en hortalizas que se expenden en mercados de la ciudad de Cajamarca, Perú

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Rivera-Jacinto; Claudia Rodríguez-Ulloa; John López-Orbegoso

    2009-01-01

    Se determinó el nivel de coliformes fecales y la frecuencia de Escherichia coli en 85 muestras de hortalizas, obtenidas de manera aleatoria y expendidas en los principales mercados de Cajamarca. El procesamiento, aislamiento e identificación bacteriana se realizó según la Food and Drug Administration (FDA). El 40% de muestras presentaron coliformes fecales, con elevado numero más probable por gramo (NMP/g) e importante frecuencia de E. coli en perejil y lechuga. El análisis revela un alto niv...

  11. [Experiences in the prevention and control of Carrión's disease in Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maguiña Vargas, Ciro; Pachas, Paul

    2014-04-01

    Carrion's disease, the iconic disease in Peruvian medicine has been found in the mountains of Ecuador, Colombia and the Andean valleys of Peru. In the 1990s, the phenomenon of El Niño was associated with significantly increased risk of disease in Ancash, Cajamarca and Cusco. In Cusco in 1998 there was an acute phase epidemic in various Andean provinces and the jungle area. Between 2001 and 2005 the disease has spread or reactivated in different regions such as Ancash, Cajamarca, Amazonas, Piura, Cusco, La Libertad, Puno, and Ayacucho. In 2004 a major outbreak of the disease in all of Peru was presented, reporting more than 11 164 cases, and therefore diverse strategies based vector susceptibility studies was applied, lowering significantly the number of cases.

  12. Automedicación en cinco provincias de Cajamarca

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    Luis Fernando Llanos Zavalaga

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available La automedicación en poblaciones de bajos recursos es uno de los principales problemas de salud pública. Ello puede incrementar las reacciones adversas, la resistencia antimicrobiana y los costos, ocasionando en la persona un riesgo elevado, evitable, caro e ineficaz. Objetivo: Este estudio pretende determinar las características de la automedicación en la zona rural de Cajamarca. Material y métodos: Se realizó un estudio transversal analítico, entre diciembre de 1999 y enero del 2,000, aplicándose una encuesta a 384 jefes de hogar seleccionados de manera sistemática con probabilidad proporcional al tamaño; el muestreo fue probabilístico y polietápico. Resultados: Se encontró automedicación en 36.19% de hogares, adquiriendo alguna medicación 66.18% de ellos en una farmacia privada. No hubo diferencia significativa en relación a las variables sexo, ocupación y grado de instrucción el jefe de hogar, así como su afiliación a un seguro familiar. Se encontró asociación entre ingreso mayor de 300 nuevos soles y automedicación. El motivo más frecuente mencionado por la población para automedicarse fue: "ya sé que recetan" (41.72%. Conclusiones: La automedicación es un problema frecuente en zonas rurales de Cajamarca. Los medicamentos son comúnmente adquiridos en farmacias privadas. Sólo se encontró asociación entre automedicación y hogares que tienen un ingreso mayor de 300 nuevos soles. (Rev Med Hered 2001; 12: 127-133.

  13. Determinants of heterogeneous blood feeding patterns by Aedes aegypti in Iquitos, Peru.

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    Kelly A Liebman

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous mosquito biting results in different individuals in a population receiving an uneven number of bites. This is a feature of many vector-borne disease systems that, if understood, could guide preventative control efforts toward individuals who are expected to contribute most to pathogen transmission. We aimed to characterize factors determining biting patterns of Aedes aegypti, the principal mosquito vector of dengue virus.Engorged female Ae. aegypti and human cheek swabs were collected from 19 houses in Iquitos, Peru. We recorded the body size, age, and sex of 275 consenting residents. Movement in and out of the house over a week (time in house and mosquito abundance were recorded on eight separate occasions in each household over twelve months. We identified the individuals bitten by 96 engorged mosquitoes over this period by amplifying specific human microsatellite markers in mosquito blood meals and human cheek swabs. Using a multinomial model assuming a saturating relationship (power, we found that, relative to other residents of a home, an individual's likelihood of being bitten in the home was directly proportional to time spent in their home and body surface area (p<0.05. A linear function fit the relationship equally well (ΔAIC<1.Our results indicate that larger people and those who spend more time at home are more likely to receive Ae. aegypti bites in their homes than other household residents. These findings are consistent with the idea that measurable characteristics of individuals can inform predictions of the extent to which different people will be bitten. This has implications for an improved understanding of heterogeneity in different people's contributions to pathogen transmission, and enhanced interventions that include the people and places that contribute most to pathogen amplification and spread.

  14. Morphological variability and agronomic evaluation of maukas, Mirabilis expansa(Ruiz & Pav. Standl. of northern Peru Variabilidad morfológica y evaluación agronómica de maukas Mirabilis expansa(Ruiz & Pav. Standl. del norte peruano

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    Juan F. Seminario

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Forty accessions of mauka, chago or miso, Mirabilis expansa(Nyctaginaceae were studied, in order to deter-mine the morphological variability, geographic distribution and agronomic performance of germplasm collected mainly in northern Peru (between 2300 to 3400 m and maintained at Universidad Nacional de Cajamarca (7°29’45”S, 78°10’12”W, 2670 m, 14 °C of daily temperature and 670 mm of rain annually. Seventeen qualitative descriptors of high heritability were used and seven yield components for three crop years were also evaluated. The phenogram generated five groups or morphotypes (dissimilarity coefficient of 0.0, which implies 87.5% of duplicates in the collection. The morphotypes I, III and V are concentrated in the provinces of Hualgayoc, San Miguel, Chota and Cajamarca. The morphotype II is probably endemic to the La Libertad region. The only accession from the south of Peru (Puno was an independent morphotype (IV. Six accessions: 15, 17, 24, 25, 28 (morphotype I nad 16 (morphotype III reached the highest yields (46 – 76 t. ha-1.Se estudiaron 40 entradas de mauka, chago o miso, Mirabilis expansa (Nyctaginaceae, para determinar la variabilidad morfológica, la distribución geográfica y el comportamiento agronómico del germoplasma, colectado principalmente en el norte peruano (entre los 2300 y 3400 m de altitud y mantenido en la Universidad Nacional de Cajamarca (7°29’45”S, 78°10’12”W, altitud 2670 m, 14 °C de temperatura diaria y 670 mm de lluvia anual. Se usaron 17 descriptores cualitativos de alta heredabilidad y se evaluaron siete componentes de rendimiento, durante tres campañas agrícolas. El fenograma generó cinco grupos o morfotipos (coeficiente de disimilitud de 0,0. Los morfotipos I, III y V se concentran en las provincias de Hualgayoc, San Miguel, Chota y Cajamarca. El morfotipo II probablemente es endémico de la Región La Libertad. La única entrada del sur del Perú (Puno, constituyó un morfotipo

  15. Determination of distributed generation poles from agricultural residual biomass in Madre de Dios, Peru

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    Andrés de Jesús Vargas Soplín

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Context: The region Madre de Dios is located in Peru and is conditioned by the dispersed way in which the people establish settlements. This configuration limits the access these rural settlements have to energy (currently, the rural electrification only reaches 31%. Thus, this investigation focuses on determining distributed energy poles through the use of residual biomass in Madre de Dios region. Method: Through a methodological scheme of four phases, the electric coverage in Madre de Dios was analyzed and the rural settlements with better energization chances were prioritized. Next, the amount of agricultural biomass waste of major crops in Madre de Dios was determined and geographically located; then, the technological options of energetic harnessing were analyzed. Finally, the amount of agricultural biomass waste that can be used for energy was estimated. Results: Five rural settlements were prioritized in Madre de Dios for the possible process of providing energy. The agricultural biomass waste was estimated in 6,645.08 ton/year for rice; 5,191.20 ton/year for yellow corn; and 7,862.37 ton/year for banana. These are the three major crops in the region. For rice husk located in productive areas, the energy was estimated to vary between 838.86 KWh/year and 1,319.23 KWh/year through the use of mobile bed gasifiers; and it varies from 317.99 KWh/year to 897.56 KWh/year for fluidized bed gasifiers, which meets the energetic demand of the prioritized rural settlements (211.9 MWh/year.  Conclusions: The region of Madre de Dios has potential for generating distributed energy, which could meets the demand of five prioritized rural settlements up to 100%. Likewise, using fluidized bed gasifiers, the energy generated in Madre de Dios could meet the demand of 1495 inhabitants, approximately; and by using of mobile bed gasifiers, the coverage could amount to 3945 inhabitants.

  16. New knowledge in determining the astronomical orientation of Incas object in Ollantaytambo, Peru

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    K. Hanzalová

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals about astronomical orientation of Incas objects in Ollantaytambo, which is located about 35 km southeast from Machu Picchu, about 40 km northwest from Cusco, and lies in the Urubamba valley. Everybody writing about Ollantaytambo, shoud read Protzen (1993. He devoted his monograph to description and interpretation of that locality. Book of Salazar and Salazar (2005 deals, among others, with the orientation of objects in Ollantaytambo with respect to the cardinal direction. Zawaski and Malville (2007 documented astronomical context of major monuments of nine sites in Peru, including Ollantaytambo. We tested astronomical orientation in these places and confirm or disprove hypothesis about purpose of Incas objects. For assessment orientation of objects we used our measurements and also satellite images on Google Earth and digital elevation model from ASTER. The satellite images used to approximate estimation of astronomical orientation. The digital elevation model is useful in the mountains, where we need the really horizon for a calculation of sunset and sunrise on specific days (solstices, which were for Incas people very important. By Incas is very famous that they worshiped the Sun. According to him they determined when to plant and when to harvest the crop. In this paper we focused on Temple of the Sun, also known the Wall of six monoliths. We tested which astronomical phenomenon is connected with this Temple. First, we tested winter solstice sunrise and the rides of the Pleiades for the epochs 2000, 1500 and 1000 A.D. According with our results the Temple isn't connected neither with winter solstice sunrise nor with the Pleiades. Then we tested also winter solstice sunset. We tried to use the line from an observation point near ruins of the Temple of Sun, to west-north, in direction to sunset. The astronomical azimuth from this point was about 5° less then we need. From this results we found, that is possible to find another

  17. New knowledge in determining the astronomical orientation of Incas object in Ollantaytambo, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanzalová, K.; Klokočník, J.; Kostelecký, J.

    2014-06-01

    This paper deals about astronomical orientation of Incas objects in Ollantaytambo, which is located about 35 km southeast from Machu Picchu, about 40 km northwest from Cusco, and lies in the Urubamba valley. Everybody writing about Ollantaytambo, shoud read Protzen (1993). He devoted his monograph to description and interpretation of that locality. Book of Salazar and Salazar (2005) deals, among others, with the orientation of objects in Ollantaytambo with respect to the cardinal direction. Zawaski and Malville (2007) documented astronomical context of major monuments of nine sites in Peru, including Ollantaytambo. We tested astronomical orientation in these places and confirm or disprove hypothesis about purpose of Incas objects. For assessment orientation of objects we used our measurements and also satellite images on Google Earth and digital elevation model from ASTER. The satellite images used to approximate estimation of astronomical orientation. The digital elevation model is useful in the mountains, where we need the really horizon for a calculation of sunset and sunrise on specific days (solstices), which were for Incas people very important. By Incas is very famous that they worshiped the Sun. According to him they determined when to plant and when to harvest the crop. In this paper we focused on Temple of the Sun, also known the Wall of six monoliths. We tested which astronomical phenomenon is connected with this Temple. First, we tested winter solstice sunrise and the rides of the Pleiades for the epochs 2000, 1500 and 1000 A.D. According with our results the Temple isn't connected neither with winter solstice sunrise nor with the Pleiades. Then we tested also winter solstice sunset. We tried to use the line from an observation point near ruins of the Temple of Sun, to west-north, in direction to sunset. The astronomical azimuth from this point was about 5° less then we need. From this results we found, that is possible to find another observation

  18. Observaciones sobre la verruga en el departamento de Cajamarca: I. Hemocultivos

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    Arístides Herrer

    1943-12-01

    Full Text Available En personas que no mostraban síntomas de verruga hasta el momento de extraérseles la sangre, se ha llevado a cabo las dos series, siguientes de hemocultivos: P un total de 182 en escolares delas ciudades de Cajamarca, Cajabamba, Celendín y Utco; y, 2º, 28 cultivos en personas que habitaban la parte alta de la ciudad de Cajamarca. Solamente en dos casos de la segunda serie se obtuvo cultivos positivos para la Bartonella bacilliformis.

  19. Determinants of burnout in acute and critical care military nursing personnel: a cross-sectional study from Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Elizabeth; Carnero, Andrés M

    2013-01-01

    Evidence on the prevalence and determinants of burnout among military acute and critical care nursing personnel from developing countries is minimal, precluding the development of effective preventive measures for this high-risk occupational group. In this context, we aimed to examine the association between the dimensions of burnout and selected socio-demographic and occupational factors in military acute/critical care nursing personnel from Lima, Peru. We conducted a cross-sectional study in 93 nurses/nurse assistants from the acute and critical care departments of a large, national reference, military hospital in Lima, Peru, using a socio-demographic/occupational questionnaire and a validated Spanish translation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Total scores for each of the burnout dimensions were calculated for each participant. Higher emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation scores, and lower personal achievement scores, implied a higher degree of burnout. We used linear regression to evaluate the association between each of the burnout dimensions and selected socio-demographic and occupational characteristics, after adjusting for potential confounders. The associations of the burnout dimensions were heterogeneous for the different socio-demographic and occupational factors. Higher emotional exhaustion scores were independently associated with having children (pintensive care unit compared with the recovery room (pcare nursing personnel, potential screening and preventive interventions should focus on younger/less experienced nurses/nurse assistants, who are single, have children, or work in the most acute critical care areas (e.g. the emergency room/intensive care unit).

  20. Contaminación fecal en hortalizas que se expenden en mercados de la ciudad de Cajamarca, Perú

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    Marco Rivera-Jacinto

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Se determinó el nivel de coliformes fecales y la frecuencia de Escherichia coli en 85 muestras de hortalizas, obtenidas de manera aleatoria y expendidas en los principales mercados de Cajamarca. El procesamiento, aislamiento e identificación bacteriana se realizó según la Food and Drug Administration (FDA. El 40% de muestras presentaron coliformes fecales, con elevado numero más probable por gramo (NMP/g e importante frecuencia de E. coli en perejil y lechuga. El análisis revela un alto nivel de contaminación fecal, un estado sanitario inaceptable y la necesidad de establecer medidas de control frente al riesgo que esto representa para la salud.

  1. Determinants of Burnout in Acute and Critical Care Military Nursing Personnel: A Cross-Sectional Study from Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Elizabeth; Carnero, Andrés M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Evidence on the prevalence and determinants of burnout among military acute and critical care nursing personnel from developing countries is minimal, precluding the development of effective preventive measures for this high-risk occupational group. In this context, we aimed to examine the association between the dimensions of burnout and selected socio-demographic and occupational factors in military acute/critical care nursing personnel from Lima, Peru. Methods and Findings We conducted a cross-sectional study in 93 nurses/nurse assistants from the acute and critical care departments of a large, national reference, military hospital in Lima, Peru, using a socio-demographic/occupational questionnaire and a validated Spanish translation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Total scores for each of the burnout dimensions were calculated for each participant. Higher emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation scores, and lower personal achievement scores, implied a higher degree of burnout. We used linear regression to evaluate the association between each of the burnout dimensions and selected socio-demographic and occupational characteristics, after adjusting for potential confounders. The associations of the burnout dimensions were heterogeneous for the different socio-demographic and occupational factors. Higher emotional exhaustion scores were independently associated with having children (pdepersonalization scores were independently associated with being single compared with being divorced, separated or widowed (p<0.01), working in the emergency room/intensive care unit compared with the recovery room (p<0.01), and inversely associated with age (p<0.05). Finally, higher personal achievement scores were independently associated with having children (p<0.05). Conclusion Among Peruvian military acute and critical care nursing personnel, potential screening and preventive interventions should focus on younger/less experienced nurses/nurse assistants, who are

  2. Identifying the social and environmental determinants of plague endemicity in Peru: insights from a case study in Ascope, La Libertad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivière-Cinnamond, Ana; Santandreu, Alain; Luján, Anita; Mertens, Frederic; Espinoza, John Omar; Carpio, Yesenia; Bravo, Johnny; Gabastou, Jean-Marc

    2018-02-06

    Plague remains a public health problem in specific areas located in Bolivia, Brazil, Ecuador and Peru. Its prevention and control encompasses adequate clinical management and timely laboratory diagnosis. However, understanding communities' interaction with its surrounding ecosystem as well as the differences between community members and institutional stakeholders regarding the root causes of plague might contribute to understand its endemicity. We aim at bridging the traditionally separate biological and social sciences by elucidating communities' risk perception and identifying knowledge gaps between communities and stakeholders. This approach has been used in other areas but never in understanding plague endemicity, nor applied in the Latin American plague context. The objectives were to identify (i) plague risk perception at community level, (ii) perceived social and environmental determinants of plague endemicity, and (iii) institutions that need to be involved and actions needed to be taken as proposed by stakeholders and community members. The study was performed in 2015 and took place in Ascope rural province, La Libertad Region, in Peru, where the study areas are surrounded by intensive private sugarcane production. We propose using a multi-level discourse analysis. Community households were randomly selected (n = 68). Structured and semi-structured questionnaires were applied. A stakeholder analysis was used to identify policy makers (n = 34). In-depth interviews were performed, recorded and transcribed. Descriptive variables were analyzed with SPSS®. Answers were coded following variables adapted from the Commission on Social Determinants of Health and analyzed with the assistance of ATLAS.ti®. Results showed that risk perception was low within the community. Policy-makers identified agriculture and sugarcane production as the root cause while community answers ranked the hygiene situation as the main cause. Stakeholders first ranked

  3. First record of the beetle family Throscidae (Insecta: Coleoptera, a new species of Aulonothroscus Horn, and new species records to the fauna of Peru

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    Paul J. Johnson

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The beetle family Throscidae is documented from Peru for the first time, based on specimens collected in the regions of Cajamarca, Junín, Loreto and Madre de Dios. Aulonothroscus tambopata new species is described from Madre de Dios. Also, three additional species of Aulonothroscus are reported from Peru for the first time – A. alvarengai Cobos new country record, A. freudi Cobos new country record, and A. oculatissimus Cobos new country record. A key separating these four species is given. This report is part of the “Beetles of Peru” project.

  4. Current progress in using multiple electromagnetic indicators to determine location, time, and magnitude of earthquakes in California and Peru (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleier, T. E.; Dunson, C.; Roth, S.; Heraud, J.; Freund, F. T.; Dahlgren, R.; Bryant, N.; Bambery, R.; Lira, A.

    2010-12-01

    Since ultra-low frequency (ULF) magnetic anomalies were discovered prior to the 1989 Loma Prieta, Ca. M7.0 earthquake, QuakeFinder, a small R&D group based in Palo Alto California has systematically monitored ULF magnetic signals with a network of 3-axis induction magnetometers since 2000 in California. This raw magnetometer data was collected at 20-50 samples per sec., with no preprocessing, in an attempt to collect an accurate time history of electromagnetic waveforms prior to, during, and after large earthquakes within 30 km. of these sensors. Finally in October 2007, the QuakeFinder team observed a series of strange magnetic pulsations at the Alum Rock, California site, 14 days prior to M5.4 earthquake. These magnetic signals observed were relatively short, random pulsations, not continuous waveform signals like Pc1 or Pc3 micropulsations. The magnetic pulses have a characteristic uni-polar shapes and 0.5 sec. to 30 sec. durations, much longer than lightning signals. In May of 2010, very similar pulses were observed at Tacna, Peru, 13 days prior to a M6.2 earthquake, using a QuakeFinder station jointly operated under collaboration with the Catholic University in Lima Peru (PUCP). More examples of these pulsations were sought, and a historical review of older California magnetic data discovered fewer but similar pulsations occurred at the Hollister, Ca. site operated by UC Berkeley (e.g. San Juan Bautista M5.1 earthquake on August 12, 1998). Further analysis of the direction of arrival of the magnetic pulses showed an interesting “azimuth clustering” observed in both Alum Rock, Ca. and Tacna, Peru data. The complete time series of the Alum Rock data allowed the team to analyze subsequent changes observed in magnetometer “filter banks” (0.001 Hz to 10 Hz filter bands, similar to those used by Fraser-Smith in 1989), but this time using time-adjusted limits based on time of day, time of year, Kp, and site background noise. These site-customized limits

  5. Determinants of burnout in acute and critical care military nursing personnel: a cross-sectional study from Peru.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Ayala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Evidence on the prevalence and determinants of burnout among military acute and critical care nursing personnel from developing countries is minimal, precluding the development of effective preventive measures for this high-risk occupational group. In this context, we aimed to examine the association between the dimensions of burnout and selected socio-demographic and occupational factors in military acute/critical care nursing personnel from Lima, Peru. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We conducted a cross-sectional study in 93 nurses/nurse assistants from the acute and critical care departments of a large, national reference, military hospital in Lima, Peru, using a socio-demographic/occupational questionnaire and a validated Spanish translation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory. Total scores for each of the burnout dimensions were calculated for each participant. Higher emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation scores, and lower personal achievement scores, implied a higher degree of burnout. We used linear regression to evaluate the association between each of the burnout dimensions and selected socio-demographic and occupational characteristics, after adjusting for potential confounders. The associations of the burnout dimensions were heterogeneous for the different socio-demographic and occupational factors. Higher emotional exhaustion scores were independently associated with having children (p<0.05 and inversely associated with the time working in the current department (p<0.05. Higher depersonalization scores were independently associated with being single compared with being divorced, separated or widowed (p<0.01, working in the emergency room/intensive care unit compared with the recovery room (p<0.01, and inversely associated with age (p<0.05. Finally, higher personal achievement scores were independently associated with having children (p<0.05. CONCLUSION: Among Peruvian military acute and critical care nursing personnel, potential

  6. La Red de Bibliotecas Rurales de Cajamarca: ¿una acción afirmativa?

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    Natalia Duque Cardona

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available El propósito del artículo es considerar la Red de Bibliotecas Rurales de Cajamarca como acción afirmativa. Para tal fin, se realiza inicialmente una contextualización de la biblioteca y la cultura escrita como banderas del proyecto moderno/eurocentrado. Posterior a ello, se realiza el estudio de caso de la Red de Bibliotecas Rurales de Cajamarca como posible acción afirmativa. A modo de cierre, se presenta una propuesta bibliotecaria pensada desde y con epistemologías del sur, un proyecto bibliotecario intercultural; como propuesta a prácticas de decolonización del ser y el poder a través del saber. El enfoque teórico-metodológico es hermenéutico-crítico y parte de la indagación documental a la propuesta de la Red. El artículo es parte de la revisión de casos análogos realizada en el marco de la propuesta de investigación El lugar de la biblioteca en la reducción de las desigualdades sociales: una posibilidad para la conservación del patrimonio inmaterial, la recuperación de la memoria y la inclusión de la diversidad cultural. El caso del Sistema de Bibliotecas Públicas de la ciudad de Medellín a partir del Acuerdo 079 de 2010 enmarcada en el Doctorado en Ciencias Humanas y Sociales de la Universidad Nacional de Colombia. The purpose of this article is to consider the Cajamarca Rural Library Network (in Spanish, Red de Bibliotecas Rurales de Cajamarca as an affirmative action. To do so, the first step is to contextualize the library and a culture written as the flag of the modern/euro centered project. After this, the case of the Cajamarca Rural Library Networks is studied as a possible affirmative action. Finally, a library proposal is submitted based on and with southern epistemology. An Intercultural library project also responds to the decolonization practices of a being and power via knowledge. Moreover, the theoretical methodological approach is hermeneutical- critical and part of a document review the network

  7. [Antimicrobial resistance of Bartonella bacilliformis strains from regions endemic to bartonellosis in Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Mujica, Giovanna; Flores-León, Diana

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility to chloramphenicol (CHL) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) in strains of Bartonella bacilliformis from areas that are endemic to Bartonellosis in Peru, through three laboratory methods. Antimicrobial susceptibility to CHL and CIP from 100 strains of Bartonella bacilliformis isolated in patients from the regions of Ancash, Cusco, Cajamarca, Lima and La Libertad were evaluated. Strains were evaluated by: disk diffusion, E-test and agar dilution. 26% of the strains of Bartonella bacilliformis evaluated were resistant to CIP and 1% to CHL. Similar patterns of antimicrobial sensitivity / resistance were obtained in all three methods. Bartonella bacilliformis strains circulating in Peru have high levels of in vitro resistance to CIP, so it is advisable to expand research on the use of drug treatment regimens of the Bartonellosis. The methods of E-test and disk diffusion were the most suitable for assessment in vitro of antimicrobial susceptibility of the microorganism.

  8. Fleas and Flea-Associated Bartonella Species in Dogs and Cats from Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzo, M F; Billeter, S A; Osikowicz, L; Luna-Caipo, D V; Cáceres, A G; Kosoy, M

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, we investigated 238 fleas collected from cats and dogs in three regions of Peru (Ancash, Cajamarca, and Lima) for the presence of Bartonella DNA. Bartonella spp. were detected by amplification of the citrate synthase gene (16.4%) and the 16S-23S intergenic spacer region (20.6%). Bartonella rochalimae was the most common species detected followed by Bartonella clarridgeiae and Bartonella henselae. Our results demonstrate that dogs and cats in Peru are infested with fleas harboring zoonotic Bartonella spp. and these infected fleas could pose a disease risk for humans. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America 2015. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  9. Transcription d'un document inédit: répartition de Mita en 1666, rationalisation e l'économie et main-d'oeurvre indienne dans le Corregimiento de Cajamarca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Le texte que nous présentons ici est la transcription de la répartition du travail personnel des indiens (mita pour l’année 1666 dans le Corregimiento de Cajamarca. On peut percevoir le haut degré de rationalisation de l’économie dans la distribution de la main d’œuvre indienne pour faire face à une baisse de l’offre. Ce document peut remettre en cause la chute démographique catastrophique souvent constatée pour le XVIIe siècle au Pérou. La faible baisse de la population indienne enregistrée semble être davantage due à des migrations et à un changement de statut de la part d’un nombre significatif d’Indiens, qui ne sont alors plus enregistrés comme tels, que d’une hausse de la mortalité au sein de cette population. El documento presentado es la transcripción de una repartición (mita de trabajadores indígenas para el año de 1666 en el Corregimiento de Cajamarca. Puede percibirse el alto grado de racionalización de la economía mediante la distribución de la mano de obra para enfrentar la caída de la oferta. Este documento podría motivar una discusión alrededor de lo que se suele considerar una catastrófica bajada demográfica que caracteriza el siglo XVII en el Perú. La baja de la población registrada parece ser debida a un cambio de estatus de parte de un número significativo de indígenas, que ya no son registrados como tal, y no a una subida de la mortalidad en el seno de la población indígena. The document presented here is the transcription of the repartition of indian workers (mita for the year 1666 in the corregimiento of Cajamarca. One can perceive the high degree of rationalization of the economy through the distribution of manpower to face the drop of supply. This document raises questions about assumptions of the catastrophic fall of indigenous populations that often characterizes the XVIIth century in Peru. The weak registered drop in indigenous population seems to be due to migrations and to

  10. Inventario de la infraestructura de riego, drenaje y vías de acceso: Irrigación Cholocal - Cajamarca

    OpenAIRE

    Ministerio de Agricultura. Dirección General de Irrigaciones; Pérez Villa, José; Alarcón Caballero, Enrique

    1988-01-01

    Da a conocer las obras hidráulicas de la Irrigación Cholocal (Cajamarca) destinadas a la regulación, mejor conducción, control y distribución de agua; además contempla los medios de comunicación de la zona al servicio de la producción agropecuaria.

  11. Diarrhoea caused by rotavirus in a regional Peruvian hospital: determination of circulating genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espejo, Pablo Weilg; Peralta, Fiorella Orellana; Pacheres, Hernán Cornejo; del Valle, Luis J; Tapia, Angela Cornejo; Mayra, Jorge Bazán; Ruiz, Joaquim; Mendoza, Juana Del Valle

    2014-07-01

    Gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus is responsible for approximately 810 deaths per year in children under 5 years of age in Peru and emerging rotavirus genotypes have led to concerns regarding cross-protection by the vaccines available. Moreover, there are no reports on the molecular epidemiology of rotavirus diarrhoea in Peru. A total of 131 stool samples were obtained from children under 5 years hospitalised from January 2010 to December 2012 in the Hospital Regional de Cajamarca (Peru). ELISA and RT-PCR techniques were performed for rotavirus detection. G and P typing of rotavirus-positive samples were performed by semi-nested multiplex RT-PCR, and sequencing was performed to confirm the PCR results. Of the 117 samples available, 22 (18.8%) tested positive for rotavirus by ELISA and 42 (35.9%) tested positive by RT-PCR. Among the G genotypes identified, G9 (35.7%; 15/42) and G12 (33.3%; 14/42) were the most prevalent, with the most common combination being G12/P[6] (23.8%; 10/42). A high prevalence of the G12/P[6] genotype was detected. It is known that this genotype is not covered by the current vaccines available. More in-depth studies are needed to determine the current rotavirus genotypes presents in Peru. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Diversidad de la familia Orchidaceae en los bosques montanos de San Ignacio (Cajamarca, Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Calatayud

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available La insuficiente información sobre la flora, específicamente sobre la familia Orchidaceae y la inminente desaparición de los bosques en la Vertiente Oriental del río Chinchipe (San Ignacio, Cajamarca, fueron las razones suficientes que motivaron a realizar la presente investigación. La evaluación se realizó en cuatro localidades de la provincia San Ignacio (Cajamarca, durante el año 2000, con 27 cuadrantes de 500 m², distribuidos cada 100 m de altitud, desde los 800 hasta los 2700 m, el método de muestreo fue aleatorio. Según el índice de diversidad de Shannon–Wiener, la zona de estudio posee un alto grado de diversidad (entre H’= 5,93 en Selva Andina y H’= 4,02 en Camaná, gracias al buen estado de conservación de los bosques y a la topografía de la zona. Las localidades de Camaná-Crucero (173,55 son menos disímiles por presentar hábitats similares. Selva Andina (969,619 es la localidad más disímil con el grupo Crucero-Camaná-Nuevo Mundo, la cual a los 2700 m presenta un alto endemismo. Para las localidades evaluadas se reportan 205 especies distribuidas en 58 géneros, los cuales son reportes nuevos para la zona, 15 son registros nuevos para Perú, ocho de éstas dejan de ser endémicas para Ecuador. Se reporta por primera vez para Perú el género Chrysocycnis, y dos especies nuevas para la ciencia Sarcoglottis sp. y Maxillaria sp.

  13. The relict forests of Northwest Peru and Southwest Ecuador

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximilian Weigend

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The forest fragments or relict forests on the Western slopes of the Andes in northwest Peru and in south-west Ecuador are fragile ecosystems, which were largely continuous at some stage in the past. The importance and uniqueness of these forests as «refuges» and stable habitats roots partly in their complex diversity and their high levels of endemicity. These in turn are the outcome of a complex topography and ecology. In this introductory chapter 12 studies are analysed, which were presented at the Taller sobre Bosques Relictos de la Vertiente Occidental Andina del Norte del Perú y Sur del Ecuador in May 2004 at the X CONABOT, Trujillo-Perú. This helps to consolidate and update our knowledge on these over 20 forests fragments in northern Peru and two previously unknown fragments are presented for the first time: Bosque La Oscurana (Cajamarca and Kañaris (Lambayeque. Some ideas are exposed on the the relationships between the relict forests, how to analyse their dynamics, how to characterize their structure and how their conservation may be achieved. It is proposed that crucial elements in a conservation of these forests are a urgently inventorizing them to demonstrate their high diversity b emphasizing their economic potential with respect to the abundance of phytogenetic ressources c evaluating their role as catchment areas for the rivers which are the primary source of water for agriculture and urban life on the coast.

  14. La infección de cangrejos procedentes del valle de Condebamba (Cajamarca por metacercarias de Paragonimus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Tantaleán V.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available En los meses de febrero y julio de 1973 se colectaron cangrejos del Valle de Condebamba (Cajamarca correspondientes a Pseudothelphusa chilensis, 69 de ellos (34 machos y 35 hembras fueron examinados, buscando metacercarias de Paragonimus; 22 (64.7% de los machos y 29 (28.85 % de las hembras resultaron infectados con metacercarias, o sea 52 (72.46% de los 69 cangrejos estaban infectados, esta cifra es coincidente con la obtenida por Cuba y cols. (1974.

  15. [Spatial analysis of gestational anemia in Peru, 2015].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Vásquez, Akram; Azañedo, Diego; Antiporta, Daniel A; Cortés, Sandra

    2017-01-01

    To establish regional prevalences of anemia in pregnant women receiving care at public clinics in Peru in 2015 and identify high-prevalence district conglomerates. An ecological study was carried out on data from pregnant women with anemia registered on the Nutritional Status Information System (SIEN) who received care in 7703 public clinics in 2015. Regional and district prevalences of gestational anemia were calculated. District conglomerates with a high prevalence of gestational anemia were identified using the Moran Index. Information was gathered from 311,521 pregnant women distributed in 1638 districts in Peru. The national prevalence of anemia was 24.2% (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 24.0-24.3%), the rural prevalence was 30.5%, and the urban prevalence was 22.0%. The regions of Huancavelica (45.5%; 95% CI: 44.2-46.7%), Puno (42.8%; 95% CI: 41.9-43.7%), Pasco (38.5%; 95% CI: 36.9-40.0%), Cusco (36.0%; 95% CI: 35.3-36.8%), and Apurímac (32.0%; 95% CI: 30.8-33.1%) had the highest prevalences of anemia. The local Moran Index identified 202 high-priority districts (hot spots) (12.3% of total; 44 urban and 158 rural) located in Ancash, Apurímac, Arequipa, Ayacucho, Cajamarca, Cusco, Huancavelica, Huánuco, Junín, La Libertad, Lima, Pasco, and Puno containing high-prevalence district conglomerates. Gestational anemia in Peru has its highest prevalence rates in rural and southern mountainous areas. The district conglomerates with high prevalence rates of gestational anemia coincide with the areas of high regional prevalence.

  16. Alcoholism in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, J; Silva, J A; Sasao, T; Wang, C; Nguyen, L

    1993-07-01

    Alcoholism is a problem of worldwide concern. Full appreciation of this international problem requires that adequate diagnostic measures be constructed and that comparable measures for different cultures be available so that valid differences in prevalence across cultures can be detected. A Spanish-language version of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule (DIS) has been used for epidemiologic studies of alcohol abuse and dependence in Los Angeles Mexican-Americans and mainland Puerto Ricans, and the authors used the same instrument to conduct a similar study in Peru. A population sample (N = 815) from the Independencia district of Lima, Peru, was chosen for interviews with a revised form of the Spanish translation of the DIS. Lifetime prevalence rates of alcoholism and other DSM-III diagnoses were determined. The prevalence of alcohol abuse or dependence was higher among the men (34.80%) than among the women (2.46%), but the onset for women was earlier. Alcoholism was strongly associated with antisocial personality disorder and with drug abuse or dependence. The prevalence of alcoholism for the Peruvian men is higher than prevalences for men in U.S. studies, but the prevalence among the Peruvian women is one of the lowest reported. The high prevalence among men is likely due to cultural mores but may also be linked to the stresses found in impoverished societies undergoing rapid social, cultural, and economic change.

  17. Patterns and Determinants of Physical Inactivity in Rural and Urban Areas in Peru: A Population-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, J Jaime; Carrillo-Larco, Rodrigo M; Gilman, Robert H; Avilez, Jose L; Smeeth, Liam; Checkley, William; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    Physical inactivity and sedentary behaviors have been linked with impaired health outcomes. Establishing the physical inactivity profiles of a given population is needed to establish program targets and to contribute to international monitoring efforts. We report the prevalence of, and explore sociodemographical and built environment factors associated with physical inactivity in 4 resource-limited settings in Peru: rural Puno, urban Puno, Pampas de San Juan de Miraflores (urban), and Tumbes (semiurban). Cross-sectional analysis of the CRONICAS Cohort Study's baseline assessment. Outcomes of interest were physical inactivity of leisure time (physical activity (not reporting walking or cycling trips) domains of the IPAQ, as well as watching TV, as a proxy of sedentarism (≥2 hours per day). Exposures included demographic factors and perceptions about neighborhood's safety. Associations were explored using Poisson regression models with robust standard errors. Prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) are presented. Data from 3593 individuals were included: 48.5% males, mean age 55.1 (SD: 12.7) years. Physical inactivity was present at rates of 93.7% (95% CI 93.0%-94.5%) and 9.3% (95% CI 8.3%-10.2%) within the leisure time and transport domains, respectively. In addition, 41.7% (95% CI 40.1%-43.3%) of participants reported watching TV for more than 2 hours per day. Rates varied according to study settings (P time physical inactivity relative to highly urban Lima. The pattern was different for transport-related physical inactivity: both Puno sites had around 75% to 50% lower prevalence of physical inactivity. Too much traffic was associated with higher levels of transport-related physical inactivity (PR = 1.24; 95% CI 1.01-1.54). Our study showed high levels of inactivity and marked contrasting patterns by rural/urban sites. These findings highlight the need to generate synergies to expand nationwide physical activity surveillance systems.

  18. Colombia's War on Drugs: Can Peru Provide the Recipe for Success

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hobaugh, Michael

    2000-01-01

    This thesis examines counternarcotics strategies of interdiction, eradication, and alternative development used in Peru during the 199Os to determine if Peru's success can provide the recipe for success in Colombia...

  19. Shadows of the colonial past--diverging plant use in Northern Peru and Southern Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussmann, Rainer W; Sharon, Douglas

    2009-02-02

    This paper examines the traditional use of medicinal plants in Northern Peru and Southern Ecuador, with special focus on the Departments of Piura, Lambayeque, La Libertad, Cajamarca, and San Martin, and in Loja province, with special focus on the development since the early colonial period. Northern Peru represents the locus of the old Central Andean "Health Axis." The roots of traditional healing practices in this region go as far back as the Cupisnique culture early in the first millennium BC. Northern Peru and Southern Ecuador share the same cultural context and flora but show striking differences in plant use and traditional knowledge. Two hundred fifteen plant species used for medicinal purposes in Ecuador and 510 plant species used for medicinal purposes in Peru were collected, identified,. and their vernacular names, traditional uses, and applications recorded. This number of species indicates that the healers, market vendors, and members of the public interviewed in Peru still have a very high knowledge of plants in their surroundings, which can be seen as a reflection of the knowledge of the population in general. In Ecuador much of the original plant knowledge has already been lost. In Peru, 433 (85%) were Dicotyledons, 46 (9%) Monocotyledons, 21 (4%) Pteridophytes, and 5 (1%) Gymnosperms. Three species of Giartina (Algae) and one species of the Lichen genus Siphula were used. The families best represented were Asteraceae with 69 species, Fabaceae (35), Lamiaceae (25), and Solanaceae (21). Euphorbiaceae had 12 species, and Poaceae and Apiaceae each accounted for 11 species. In Ecuador the families best represented were Asteraceae (32 species), Euphorbiaceae, Lamiaceae, and Solanaceae (11 species each), and Apiaceae, Fabaceae, Lycopodiaceae (9 species each). One hundred eighty-two (85%) of the species used were Dicotyledons, 20 Monocotyledons (9.3%), 12 ferns (5.5%), and one unidentified lichen was used. Most of the plants used (83%) were native to Peru

  20. Genotipos del Gen Kappa-Caseína en Ganado Bovino Criollo del Distrito de Bambamarca, Cajamarca, Perú

    OpenAIRE

    Almeyda R., Marcos; Sección de Biología y Genética Molecular, Laboratorio de Microbilogía y Parasitología Veterinaria, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Rosadio A., Raúl; Laboratorio de Microbilogía y Parasitología Veterinaria, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Maturrano H., Lenin; Laboratorio de Zootecnia y Producción Agropecuaria, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima

    2016-01-01

    El presente estudio tuvo como objetivo determinar la frecuencia alélica y genotípica del gen kappa-caseína (κ-CN) en ganado bovino criollo. Se recolectaron 48 muestras de sangre de bovinos de nueve centros poblados del distrito de Bambamarca (Cajamarca, Perú). Se extrajo el ADN y la genotipificación se realizó mediante análisis de RFLP-PCR del gen κ-CN. Las frecuencias genotípicas encontradas fueron de 0.56, 0.27 y 0.17 para los genotipos AB, AA y BB, respectivamente, en tanto que las frecuen...

  1. Factores asociados a la demanda de salud en cinco provincias de Cajamarca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fernando Llanos Zavalaga

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Determinar los factores asociados a la demanda de servicios de salud en cinco provincias de la zona rural de Cajamarca. Material y métodos: Se realizó un estudio transversal analítico, entre diciembre de 1999 y enero del 2000. Fueron seleccionadas 369 viviendas, siendo encuestadas 1916 personas. Se utilizó un muestreo probabilístico, polietápico, de áreas e independiente en cada dominio de estudio. Fueron analizados los aspectos demográficos, educacionales, ocupacionales y aquellos relacionados con el acceso a los servicios de salud, según las siguientes características: percepción de enfermedad, realización de consulta y consulta a un establecimiento del Ministerio de Salud. Para el análisis estadístico se utilizó regresión logística y probit. Resultados: El 70.4% de los individuos consideró estar en buen estado de salud. 23.6% declaró enfermedad o malestar en salud o accidente en las últimas 4 semanas previas a la encuesta. De este grupo, 41.4% realizó una consulta, acudiendo 53.8% a un establecimiento del MINSA. Se encontró asociación estadística de percepción de enfermedad con mayor edad y saber leer y escribir, realización de consulta con saber leer y escribir, y consulta a un establecimiento del Ministerio de Salud con sexo femenino, percepción de enfermedad y tener un ingreso económico bajo (p<0.05. Conclusiones: Los modelos epidemiológicos pueden explicar la percepción de enfermedad y la probabilidad de consulta, sin embargo para la elección del lugar de consulta se sugiere un modelo econométrico. (Rev Med Hered 2004; 15:11-18.

  2. Expansión del Aedes aegypti a localidades rurales de Cajamarca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinda Troyes R

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Determinar la presencia, magnitud y expansión de Aedes aegypti en las localidades rurales de las provincias de Jaén y San Ignacio, departamento de Cajamarca. Materiales y métodos: Estudio transversal realizado entre abril y mayo de 2004, en 21 (100% localidades rurales ubicadas en las márgenes de la carretera Jaén-San Ignacio y al interior de ella, hasta en 90 minutos. Se inspeccionó recipientes de 1460 viviendas para la búsqueda de larvas y adultos del mosquito, se determinaron los índices aédicos, de recipiente y de Breteau. Resultados: Se demostró la presencia de Aedes aegypti en tres localidades rurales de la provincia de Jaén y en cuatro de la provincia de San Ignacio. Los índices aédicos variaron de 1,2 a 16,6%. Los recipientes infestados con mayor frecuencia fueron las llantas y los artículos en desuso. Conclusiones: Se reporta la expansión de A. aegypti en la tercera parte de localidades rurales de las provincias de Jaén y San Ignacio; esta expansión necesita ser más estudiada y considerada al implementarse las estrategias de prevención y control del dengue en la DISA Jaén, para evitar la aparición de brotes de dengue clásico, dengue hemorrágico, incluso fiebre amarilla urbana.

  3. (Solanum tuberosum, grupo Phureja de la región Cajamarca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz P. Rojas Mercado

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluó la productividad de diez cultivares de papa chaucha de la Región Cajamarca, en Diseño de BloquesCompletos al Azar, con diez tratamientos (cultivares y tres repeticiones:Peruanita 3, Montañera 2, Limeña,Amarilla, Clavelina 2, Roja 2, Mulla,Huagalina, Amarilla mahuay y Chimbina colorada. Se evaluóaltura deplanta, número de tallos,número total de tubérculos, número de tubérculos comerciales, peso total detubérculos, peso de tubérculos comerciales,materia seca de tubérculos, peso seco delfollaje e índice decosecha. El rendimiento varió de 5,0 (Huagalina a 11,5 t ha-1(Amarilla mahuay con una media de 8,6 t ha-1.El peso total de tubérculos, el peso de tubérculos comerciales, el número total de tubérculos y el peso seco delfollaje, presentaron diferencias estadísticas significativas entre cultivares. Los cultivares Limeña y Huagalinafueron estadísticamente inferiores al resto de cultivares, en peso total de tubérculos y peso de tubérculoscomerciales. Se encontraron diferencias estadísticas altamente significativas para número de tallos e índice decosecha. Los mejores índices de cosechase registraron en Huagalina (46%, Amarilla mahuay (45% yClavelina 2 (42%.

  4. Determinants of burnout in acute and critical care military nursing personnel: a cross-sectional study from Peru

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ayala, Elizabeth; Carnero, Andrés M

    2013-01-01

    Evidence on the prevalence and determinants of burnout among military acute and critical care nursing personnel from developing countries is minimal, precluding the development of effective preventive...

  5. Chimney stoves modestly improved indoor air quality measurements compared with traditional open fire stoves: results from a small-scale intervention study in rural Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartinger, S M; Commodore, A A; Hattendorf, J; Lanata, C F; Gil, A I; Verastegui, H; Aguilar-Villalobos, M; Mäusezahl, D; Naeher, L P

    2013-08-01

    Nearly half of the world's population depends on biomass fuels to meet domestic energy needs, producing high levels of pollutants responsible for substantial morbidity and mortality. We compare carbon monoxide (CO) and particulate matter (PM2.5) exposures and kitchen concentrations in households with study-promoted intervention (OPTIMA-improved stoves and control stoves) in San Marcos Province, Cajamarca Region, Peru. We determined 48-h indoor air concentration levels of CO and PM2.5 in 93 kitchen environments and personal exposure, after OPTIMA-improved stoves had been installed for an average of 7 months. PM2.5 and CO measurements did not differ significantly between OPTIMA-improved stoves and control stoves. Although not statistically significant, a post hoc stratification of OPTIMA-improved stoves by level of performance revealed mean PM2.5 and CO levels of fully functional OPTIMA-improved stoves were 28% lower (n = 20, PM2.5, 136 μg/m(3) 95% CI 54-217) and 45% lower (n = 25, CO, 3.2 ppm, 95% CI 1.5-4.9) in the kitchen environment compared with the control stoves (n = 34, PM2.5, 189 μg/m(3), 95% CI 116-261; n = 44, CO, 5.8 ppm, 95% CI 3.3-8.2). Likewise, although not statistically significant, personal exposures for OPTIMA-improved stoves were 43% and 17% lower for PM2.5 (n = 23) and CO (n = 25), respectively. Stove maintenance and functionality level are factors worthy of consideration for future evaluations of stove interventions. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Earthquake engineering in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, N.J

    1983-01-01

    During the last decade, earthquake engineering research in Peru has been carried out at the Catholic University of Peru and at the Universidad Nacional de Ingeniera (UNI). The Geophysical Institute (IGP) under the auspices of the Organization of American States (OAS) has initiated in Peru other efforts in regional seismic hazard assessment programs with direct impact to the earthquake engineering program. Further details on these programs have been reported by L. Ocola in the Earthquake Information Bulletin, January-February 1982, vol. 14, no. 1, pp. 33-38. 

  7. Huaraz, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    A chunk of glacier was threatening to fall into an Andean lake and cause major flooding in a Peruvian city of 60,000. A fissure has appeared in the glacier that feeds the Lake Palcacocha near the city of Huaraz, 270 km north of Lima. If the piece breaks off, ensuing floods would take 15 minutes to reach the city. In 1941, the lake overflowed and caused massive destruction, killing 7,000 people. The city can be seen in the left-center part of the image. Lake Palcacocha is in the upper right corner of the image at the head of a valley, below the snow and glacier cap. The ASTER instrument is being tasked to obtain current images of the glacier to help monitor the situation. This image was acquired on November 5, 2001 by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite. With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet. ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products. The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER will provide scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance. Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena

  8. Small vertebrates in the spectacled bear’s diet (Tremarctos ornatus Cuvier, 1825 in the north of Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiorella N. Gonzales

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available There have been numerous studies about Spectacled bear´s diet, however little is known about the small vertebrates it consumes. This study present nine vertebrate species (seven rodent and two birds as preys of the Spectacled bear, based on the analysis of six feces collected from two locations Upa (Amazonas and Lagunas Arreviatadas (Cajamarca in northern Peru. Six of these records were new food items and a new family Caviidae. Vertebrates were found only in the Upa location. Additionally a sampling of small non flying mammals was conducted in there. Our results suggest that the Spectacled bear would be a generalist species. It prefers plants, however if it finds vertebrates in the environment, it could feed on them.

  9. [Determination of serologic markers of hepatitis B virus in high risk areas at the Central Air Force Hospital of Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares Alvarez, G; Galarza, J; Espinoza, J; Nieri, A; Makino, R; Berrocal, A; Grados, N

    1989-01-01

    In the present paper, the serologic markers of Hepatitis B virus were studied in 123 people belonging to the Hospital Central de la Fuerza Aérea del Perú that had been working in areas of high risk to get contact with this virus. The determination was done with the enzimo inmuno assay (EIA Abbot) and the results were the following: In 15 individuals (12.1%), at least one positive marker was found, evidence which proved to have been in contact with the virus in some moment of his life. Only one carrier (0.8%) was found, in 6 (4.8%) the presence of anti-HBc as only marker was found and in 8 (6.5%) the presence of Anti-HBc and Anti-HBs was observed which means post infection immunity. The great number of the individuals in which the markers were found, were male: 13 (16.0%) against only 2 (4.7%) female. There wasn't great difference with relation to the prevalency of markers according to the years of work like there has been observed in other greater series. It can be concluded that in this group the incidence of infection due to VHB was no greater than that of general population, which indicates us the little contact that they have had with the contaminating material during their professional life.

  10. INFECCIÓN DE HYPOLOBOCERA CHILENSIS EIGENMANI POR METACERCARIAS DE PARAGONIMUS MEXICANUS (= PERUVIANUS EN EL DISTRITO DE CONDEBAMBA (CAJAMARCA, PERÚ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Huiza F.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cangrejos de rio Hypolobocera chilensis eigenmanni fueron colectados de acequias durante el año 1997 en estación seca (mayo a diciembre en Chaquicocha, Área que pertenece al distrito de Condebamba (departamento de Cajamarca en la parte norte del Perú. Ciento treinta y un cangrejos colectados fueron transportados al Laboratorio de Parasitología y examinados por disección, 27 de 131 (20,6% estaban infectados por metacercarias de Paragonimus mexicanus(=peruvianus. La intensidad de la infección fue de 1 a 5 en la mayoría de los; casos (81,5% con un promedio de 4,85 por cangrejo. Estos datos son diferentes; a los de estudios anteriores; en la misma Área donde fueron más; altos, lo que indica una tendencia al decrecimiento del número de cangrejos infectados.

  11. Impacto económico de la peste bubónica en Cajamarca - Perú¹

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Modesto C

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Conocer el impacto económico de la peste en tres provincias de Cajamarca en los años 1994 y 1999. Materiales y métodos: en este estudio observacional, transversal y descriptivo se estimaron los costos directos e indirectos (institucionales, de las familias y comunidades de la peste en las provincias de San Miguel, San Pablo y Contumazá del departamento de Cajamarca en los años de 1994 y 1999. La información necesaria para el cálculo de los costos se obtuvo de diversas fuentes: recopilación de datos documentados, entrevistas a personal de salud y/o directores o jefes de instituciones o establecimientos, encuestas a hogares, etc. Resultados: en 1994, el costo total estimado de la peste ascendió a 2 333 169 dólares: insumos- MINSA (65 034 dólares, atención directa-MINSA (81 388 dólares, otras instituciones (106 428 dólares, de las familias (663 449 dólares y por mortalidad (1 416 870 dólares. En tanto que en 1999, el costo total ascendió a 741 431 dólares: insumos-MINSA (322 371 dólares, atención directa-MINSA (34 063 dólares, otras instituciones (15 477 dólares, de las familias (369 550 dólares y ningún costo por mortalidad. Conclusiones: La peste tiene un alto costo en la economía peruana a nivel regional, existiendo variaciones en el tiempo, de acuerdo al comportamiento de la enfermedad y a las políticas adoptadas para su control y prevención.

  12. Calidad del agua en relación con las propiedades del geoecosistema: un estudio de caso de una zona de jalca cerca de Cajamarca, Perú

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cammeraat, L.H.; Seijmonsbergen, A.C.; Sevink, J.; Hoogzaad, Y.P.G.; Stoops, W.S.; de Vet, S.J.; de Vries, M.E.; van Veelen, M.; Weiler, H.A.; Weiss, N.; Sánchez-Vega, I.; Chunga-Castro, F.; Roncal-Rabanal, M.; Cuesta, F.; Sevink, J.; Llambí, L.D.; De Bièvre, B.; Posner, J.

    2014-01-01

    Resumen Este estudio presenta una primera aproximación a la relación entre hidrología,calidad del agua, geología y suelos para un ecosistema de jalca cerca de Cajamarca en el norte de Perú. Debido a que las áreas de jalca son propensas a la degradación de sus suelos húmicos, como resultado del uso

  13. IDRC in Peru

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC-supported research showed how to reduce the number of malaria mosquitoes in Northern Peru by up to 93%. IDRCINTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH CENTRE. IDRC in ... and obesity that can cause these diseases? Researchers are analyzing advertising con- tent, children's exposure to television, and.

  14. Religious Regimes in Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spier, Fred

    1994-01-01

    This inquiry deals with religion and politics in Peru from the beginning of agrarisation, c. 8000 B.C. up until AD 1991. Of central importance for the analysis are state formation and development, the relations between church and state, the internal and external relations within and among the

  15. My Classroom: Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paglia, Deanna

    2015-01-01

    Angela Huanca Barrantes, a highly respected teacher of English as a foreign language (EFL) in the city of Ilo, has a strong impact on the lives of students at the Admirante Miguel Grau secondary school and at Centro Cultural Peruano Norteamericano, which is one of four binational centers in southern Peru. Due to Ms. Huanca's lack of understanding…

  16. Peru : Accounting and Auditing

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2004-01-01

    The report provides an assessment of accounting, financial reporting, and auditing practices within the corporate sector in Peru, using International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS), and International Standards on Auditing (ISA) as benchmarks, drawing on international experience and best practices in that field. This Report on the Observance of Standards and Codes (ROSC) Accounting & ...

  17. Peru's Gentle Revolutionary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Thomas W.; Toledo, Alejandro

    2003-01-01

    Alejandro Toledo, the first Native person to be elected president of Peru, talks about his Quechua roots; his proposed constitutional amendment to ensure equal rights for indigenous peoples; financial support for Native cultural preservation efforts; and his number one priority--to fight poverty through education, focusing on basic education,…

  18. IDRC in Peru

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    malaria-carrying mosquitoes. Not only did the number of mosquito larvae decrease by 80-85%, farmers also con- served water and increased rice yields by up to 35%. IDRC is now funding research on how to spread this safer and more profitable farming technique. In July 2014, the Government of Peru endorsed the.

  19. Giant Otters in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Schenk C.; Staib E.

    1992-01-01

    We are in the second year of fieldwork surveying for Giant Otters in the southeastern rainforest of Peru, in three areas with differing levels of legal protection. While there is some illegal hunting still happening outside the protected areas, the main threat to the otters is badly-conducted tourism. Well-organised tourism can be a promising argument for establishing protected areas like national parks.

  20. Peru : Trajectories towards Formality

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2008-01-01

    This report is the outcome of very close cooperation with the authorities of the Government of Peru. The authorities have been involved in all stages of the process, going back to the first phase of this programmatic study. The authorities proved instrumental in helping design the focus of this report, including the scope of a survey of businesses conducted for this study, the survey quest...

  1. Waterborne diseases in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, Sheila

    1992-01-01

    The cholera epidemic in Peru brought to light the miserable state of local water and sanitation conditions. The author discusses the relationship between waterbone diseases and water and sewerage conditions in Peruvian peri-urban areas, or pueblos jovenes. These diseases are associated with poor living conditions. In 1989, only 52 percent of the population had access to piped water, and only 39 percent to sewerage. About 52 percent of schools lack light, water, and sewerage. In Lima, 2 millio...

  2. Violence in Peru 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Garmendia Lorena, Fausto; Médico-Cirujano, Doctor en Medicina; Instituto de Investigaciones Clínicas “Fausto Garmendia Lorena”, Programa Permanente de Capacitación para la Atención Integral de las Víctimas de la Violencia, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Académico Honorario, Academia Nacional de Medicina

    2016-01-01

    The most frequent types of violence occurring currently in Peru, including the political, self-inflicted, interpersonal within the family, produced to women, adolescents and older adults are reviewed. A historical reference to Dante Alighieri's Divine Comedy is made as to its contents on violence and its perspectives for today. It highlights emerging forms of economic, criminal, labor and ecological types of violence. A new classification of violence taking into account the new modalities is ...

  3. [Counterfeit pharmaceuticals in Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exebio, Luis E Moreno; Rodríguez, Javier; Sayritupac, Freddy

    2010-02-01

    To determine the quantity of counterfeit pharmaceutical drugs found by the National Quality Control Center (Centro Nacional de Control de Calidad (CNCC), Instituto Nacional de Salud, Peru) during the period from 2005&2008, and the types and properties of these drugs. A form was created to amass the relevant data collected directly from CNCC reports. The reports underwent a review and analysis process, and where counterfeiting was confirmed, it was categorized by type into one of four groups. The percentage of counterfeit drugs relative to the total drugs evaluated was: 3.0% in 2005, 5.0% in 2006, 7.3% in 2007, and 9.2% in 2008. The main groups of counterfeit drugs, classified according to the World Health Organization Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical Classification System, were: alimentary tract and metabolism, 34.5% (29.1%-39.8%); antiinfectives for systemic use, 21.1% (16.5%-25.7%); nervous system, 17.1% (12.8%-21.3%); and musculo-skeletal system, 15.4% (11.3%-19.5%). The most common type of forgery occurred in cases where the drug contained the correct amount of active ingredients, but the manufacturer was one other than the one indicated (62.4% of the total counterfeit drugs); and medications that did not contain any active ingredient (22.4%). Of the counterfeit drugs, 61.0% (56.0%-67.0%) were national brands and 39.0%, (33.0%-44.0%) were imported. The pharmaceutical formulations with the highest rate of forgery were tablets, 66.0% (60.0%-71.0%); injectables, 19.0% (14.0%-23.0%); and capsules 7.0% (4.0%-10.0%). From 2005-2008, drug counterfeiting had an average annual variation of 45%. Drug counterfeiting was shown to be most prevalent among national brands - as opposed to imported medications - although the types and formulations of the fake drugs attest to a certain level of sophistication employed in the forgery process. The counterfeiting of life-saving drugs, such as antimicrobials, signifies a serious public health threat.

  4. [Epidemiological clinical and laboratory characterization of sporotrichosis in patients of a tertiary care hospital in Lima, Peru, from 1991 to 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oyarce, James A; García, Coralith; Alave, Jorge; Bustamante, Beatriz

    2016-06-01

    Sporothricosis is endemic in numerous Latin American countries and the rest of the world. In Peru is concentrated in regions with warm and humid climate being little known in the rest of the country. To describe the epidemiological, clinical and laboratory characteristics of patients diagnosed of sporotrichosis in a tertiary-care level hospital in Lima, Peru from 1991 to 2014. This was a retrospective, case series. Ninety four patients were involved; most of them were male adults. This condition was acquired more frequently in Cajamarca, Apurímac, and Amazonas. Fixed and lymphocutaneous form were the most frequent forms of presentation in adults and were mostly distributed in upper limbs. Lesions located in head and neck were most frequent in children. Comorbidities were present in 15% of patients and were more frequent in those who presented disseminated cutaneous form. Seventy eight percent of cultures from skin lesions were positive within 7 days. The time to positivity of cultures was longer if the sample came from skin biopsies than skin scraping or skin aspiration. Most cases of sporotrichosis were acquired in areas of extreme poverty in Peru. The clinical, epidemiological and laboratory findings were similar to those reported elsewhere. The time to positivity of cultures varies based on the type of skin sample. This finding needs to be further evaluated in studies with an increased number of cases.

  5. Diabetes Mellitus in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villena, Jaime E

    2015-01-01

    Peru is an upper medium-income developing country with an increasing prevalence of chronic diseases, including diabetes. To review and describe the epidemiology, drivers, and diabetes care plan in Peru. The medical literature was reviewed based on systematic searching of PubMed, Scielo, and various gray literature from the International Diabetes Federation, World Health Organization, and local Peruvian agencies. In Peru, diabetes affects 7% of the population. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 96.8% of outpatients visits with this condition. Type 1 diabetes has an incidence of 0.4/100,000 per year, and gestational diabetes affects 16% of pregnancies. The prevalence of glucose intolerance is 8.11% and that of impaired fasting glucose 22.4%. The prevalence of overweight, obesity, and metabolic syndrome in adults is 34.7%, 17.5%, and 25%, respectively. Metabolic syndrome prevalence is greater in women and the elderly and at urban and low-altitude locations. Diabetes is the eighth cause of death, the sixth cause of blindness, and the leading cause of end-stage kidney disease and nontraumatic lower limb amputation. In Peru, diabetes accounts for 31.5% of acute myocardial infarctions and 25% of strokes. Infections, diabetic emergencies, and cardiovascular disorders are the main causes for admissions, with a mortality rate < 10%, mainly as a result of infections, chronic kidney disease, and stroke. Sixty-two percent of the population has health insurance coverage, with inequities in the distribution of health care personnel across the country. Less than 30% of treated patients have a hemoglobin A1c < 7%. Diabetes is a major health care issue in Peru that exposes difficult challenges and shortcomings. The national strategy for tackling diabetes includes promotion of healthy lifestyles; training primary care physicians and providing them with evidence-based clinical practice guidelines, safe and effective medications, and tools for monitoring treatment; and, finally, construction

  6. Peru Mercury Inventory 2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, William E.; Sandoval, Esteban; Yepez, Miguel A.; Howard, Howell

    2007-01-01

    In 2004, a specific need for data on mercury use in South America was indicated by the United Nations Environmental Programme-Chemicals (UNEP-Chemicals) at a workshop on regional mercury pollution that took place in Buenos Aires, Argentina. Mercury has long been mined and used in South America for artisanal gold mining and imported for chlor-alkali production, dental amalgam, and other uses. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provides information on domestic and international mercury production, trade, prices, sources, and recycling in its annual Minerals Yearbook mercury chapter. Therefore, in response to UNEP-Chemicals, the USGS, in collaboration with the Economic Section of the U.S. Embassy, Lima, has herein compiled data on Peru's exports, imports, and byproduct production of mercury. Peru was selected for this inventory because it has a 2000-year history of mercury production and use, and continues today as an important source of mercury for the global market, as a byproduct from its gold mines. Peru is a regional distributor of imported mercury and user of mercury for artisanal gold mining and chlor-alkali production. Peruvian customs data showed that 22 metric tons (t) of byproduct mercury was exported to the United States in 2006. Transshipped mercury was exported to Brazil (1 t), Colombia (1 t), and Guyana (1 t). Mercury was imported from the United States (54 t), Spain (19 t), and Kyrgyzstan (8 t) in 2006 and was used for artisanal gold mining, chlor-alkali production, dental amalgam, or transshipment to other countries in the region. Site visits and interviews provided information on the use and disposition of mercury for artisanal gold mining and other uses. Peru also imports mercury-containing batteries, electronics and computers, fluorescent lamps, and thermometers. In 2006, Peru imported approximately 1,900 t of a wide variety of fluorescent lamps; however, the mercury contained in these lamps, a minimum of approximately 76 kilograms (kg), and in

  7. New species and host plants of Anastrepha (Diptera: Tephritidae) primarily from Peru and Bolivia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norrbom, Allen L; Rodriguez, Erick J; Steck, Gary J; Sutton, Bruce A; Nolazco, Norma

    2015-11-16

    Twenty-eight new species of Anastrepha are described and illustrated: A. acca (Bolivia, Peru), A. adami (Peru), A. amplidentata (Bolivia, Peru), A. annonae (Peru), A. breviapex (Peru), A. caballeroi (Peru), A. camba (Bolivia, Peru), A. cicra (Bolivia, Peru), A. disjuncta (Peru), A. durantae (Peru), A. echaratiensis (Peru), A. eminens (Peru), A. ericki (Peru), A. gonzalezi (Bolivia, Peru), A. guevarai (Peru), A. gusi (Peru), A. kimi (Colombia, Peru), A. korytkowskii (Bolivia, Peru), A. latilanceola (Bolivia, Peru), A. melanoptera (Peru), A. mollyae (Bolivia, Peru), A. perezi (Peru), A. psidivora (Peru), A. robynae (Peru), A. rondoniensis (Brazil, Peru), A. tunariensis (Bolivia, Peru), A. villosa (Bolivia), and A. zacharyi (Peru). The following host plant records are reported: A. amplidentata from Spondias mombin L. (Anacardiaceae); A. caballeroi from Quararibea malacocalyx A. Robyns & S. Nilsson (Malvaceae); A. annonae from Annona mucosa Jacq. and Annona sp. (Annonaceae); A. durantae from Duranta peruviana Moldenke (Verbenaceae); and A. psidivora from Psidium guajava L. (Myrtaceae).

  8. IMPACTOS SOCIO ECONÓMICOS Y AMBIENTALES DE LA MINERÍA AURÍFERA POR LIXIVIACIÓN DE PILAS A TAJO ABIERTO EN CAJAMARCA, 1992 – 2007

    OpenAIRE

    DEZA ARROYO, NILTON

    2008-01-01

    The main aim of this research is to assess the principal risks caused by open pit heap leach cyanide gold mining in Cajamarca. The research focuses on Yanacocha Mine, as the main gold mine in the area. Arsenic content in nails and hair of three groups of people are presented here. All the information generated upon gold mining in Cajamarca, both locally and internationally has been processed. Although higher investment and the economy becoming more dynamic in the area; it was found that pover...

  9. Frecuencia relativa de fasciolosis en niños de edad escolar en las provincias de San Marcos, Cajabamba y Celendín, departamento de Cajamarca - año 2010

    OpenAIRE

    Orfanos, Nikolás; Cabanillas, Oswaldo; León, Daphne

    2016-01-01

    El objetivo del estudio fue determinar la frecuencia relativa de casos de Fasciolosis en niños en edad escolar en las provincias de San Marcos, Cajabamba y Celendín, departamento de Cajamarca, que formaron parte del “Estudio de prevalencia de fasciolosis en humanos en la región Cajamarca – periodo 2010”. Para ello se recuperaron 248 fichas epidemiológicas en los que se encontraron 27 niños positivos a la prueba de ELISA, representando una frecuencia relativa de 10.9 %. La única variable asoci...

  10. Vulnerabilidad sísmica de las viviendas de albañilería confinada en la ciudad de Cajamarca

    OpenAIRE

    Bazán Arbildo, Joen Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess info:eu-repo/semantics/openAccess El objeto principal de esta investigación es la de conocer y estudiar las características técnicas de las viviendas construidas en la ciudad de Cajamarca; se estimó el comportamiento sísmico de las mismas y su consecuente vulnerabilidad sísmica. Para dicho estudio se eligió toda la ciudad; es decir, la zona urbana y peri-urbana (zonas de expansión urbana que aún no son incluidas en el Plan de Desarrollo Urbano de la ciu...

  11. Enfermedad de chagas en la Región Nororiental del Perú. I. Triatominos (Hemiptera, Reduviidae presentes en Cajamarca y Amazonas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abraham G Cáceres

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Conocer la diversidad de triatominos presentes en las provincias de San Ignacio y Jaén (Cajamarca y en Bagua, Condorcanqui y Utcubamba (Amazonas. Materiales y métodos: los triatominos fueron capturados de mayo 1995 a diciembre 2000 en el intra y peridomicilios de las viviendas de las provincias de San Ignacio (5 distritos y Jaén (10 distritos del departamento de Cajamarca, y en 5 distritos de Bagua, un distrito de Condorcanqui y en seis de Utcubamba (Amazonas. El muestreo fue de 08:00 a 19:00 horas con alambre de 30 cm de largo, pinzas largas y linterna de mano. Resultados: se capturaron 5567 triatominos pertenecientes a cinco especies. Panstrongylus herreri fue la especie más predominante (94%. 90% del total de triatominos fueron capturados en ambientes intradomiciliarios. Se reporta Rhodnius robustus por primera vez para Amazonas. Ejemplares de R. ecuadoriensis y R. robustus, fueron colectados en intradomicilios en porcentajes mínimos en Sallique, provincia de Jaén (Cajamarca y Nieva, provincia de Condorcanqui (Amazonas. Panstrongylus geniculatus fue colectado en intradomicilios. Se reporta en ciertas localidades de La Coipa, Huarango y Namballe (San Ignacio; así como en Bellavista y Santa Rosa (Jaén y en Aramango, Copallín e Imaza (Bagua; además, en Jamalca, Cajaruro y Bagua Grande (Utcubamba. Panstrongylus chinai, especie silvestre con tendencia a domesticarse, se encontró en Santa Rosa, Bellavista, Chontalí y San José del Alto (Jaén y en Namballe, San Ignacio, La Coipa y Chirinos (San Ignacio. También se encontró en Cajaruro y Bagua Grande (Utcubamba. 90% de P. herreri fueron colectados en el interior de las viviendas. Para Cajamarca se ha colectado en Pomahuaca, Pucará, San José del Alto, Pirias, Bellavista, Santa Rosa, La Coipa y Huarango; mientras que para Amazonas en Aramango, Parco, Bagua Grande, Cajaruro y El Milagro.

  12. El pluralismo jurídico y político en Perú: el caso de las Rondas Campesinas de Cajamarca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuelle Piccoli

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available El artículo analiza, desde un enfoque antropológico, algunos desafíos del pluralismo político y jurídico en el caso de las Rondas Campesinas de Cajamarca (Perú. Organizaciones sociales nacidas con la finalidad de protegerse de robos de ganado, las Rondas Campesinas de la zona norte del Perú, fueron convirtiéndose en un espacio de administración de justicia y de gestión pública comunitaria.

  13. El pluralismo jurídico y político en Perú: el caso de las Rondas Campesinas de Cajamarca

    OpenAIRE

    Emmanuelle Piccoli

    2008-01-01

    El artículo analiza, desde un enfoque antropológico, algunos desafíos del pluralismo político y jurídico en el caso de las Rondas Campesinas de Cajamarca (Perú). Organizaciones sociales nacidas con la finalidad de protegerse de robos de ganado, las Rondas Campesinas de la zona norte del Perú, fueron convirtiéndose en un espacio de administración de justicia y de gestión pública comunitaria.

  14. MODELO DE GESTIÓN DEL CONOCIMIENTO BASADO EN HERRAMIENTAS HABILITADORAS Y SU RELACIÓN CON EL PROCESO DE APRENDIZAJE EN LA UNIVERSIDAD NACIONAL DE CAJAMARCA

    OpenAIRE

    ROJAS SANTILLÁN, LUIS EDUARDO

    2016-01-01

    La investigación tiene como objetivo proponer y luego aplicar un modelo de gestión del conocimiento en la Universidad Nacional de Cajamarca para determinar la relación que se establezca entre el nivel de satisfacción por el uso de las herramientas habilitadoras del modelo y el nivel de satisfacción por el aprendizaje alcanzado y las competencias desarrolladas, es decir, medir la relación existente entre el modelo de gestión del conocimiento y el proceso de aprendizaje. La muestra fue de 29 es...

  15. Carbon monoxide exposures and kitchen concentrations from cookstove-related woodsmoke in San Marcos, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commodore, Adwoa A; Hartinger, Stella M; Lanata, Claudio F; Mäusezahl, Daniel; Gil, Ana I; Hall, Daniel B; Aguilar-Villalobos, Manuel; Butler, Corey J; Naeher, Luke P

    2013-01-01

    Nearly half of the world's population is exposed to household air pollution (HAP) due to long hours spent in close proximity to biomass-fueled fires. We compare CO exposures and concentrations among study promoted intervention stove users and control stove users in San Marcos Province, Cajamarca region, Peru. Passive CO diffusion tubes were deployed over a 48-hour sampling period to measure kitchen CO concentrations and personal mother and child CO exposures in 197 control and 182 intervention households. Geometric means (95% CI) for child, mother, and kitchen measurements were 1.1 (0.9-1.2), 1.4 (1.3-1.6), and 7.3 (6.4-8.3) ppm in control households, and 1.0 (0.9-1.1), 1.4 (1.3-1.6), and 7.3 (6.4-8.2) ppm among intervention households, respectively. With no significant differences between control and intervention CO measurements, results suggest that intervention stove maintenance may be necessary for long-term reductions in CO exposures.

  16. Two new endemic species of Epictia Gray, 1845 (Serpentes: Leptotyphlopidae) from Northern Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Claudia; Cruz, Roy Santa; Cárdenas, Heidy

    2016-08-11

    Herein, we describe two new thread snake species of the genus Epictia from elevations higher than 2000 meters above sea level in the Andes of the Cajamarca Region in Northern Peru. Both species share 10 midtail scale rows, a broad contact between the anterior supralabial and the supraocular scales in most of the specimens, and a yellow spot on the snout and the terminal part of the tail. Epictia venegasi sp. nov. is described on the basis of nine specimens and can further be differentiated from its congeners by having 211-221 mid-dorsal scale rows and a color pattern where each body scale is black on the anterior half and yellow on the posterior half. The description of Epictia vonmayi sp. nov. is based on two specimens which can further be differentiated from their congeners by having 196-205 mid-dorsal scale rows and 14 distinct black longitudinal stripes around the body, which run through the center of each scale and are separated by bright yellow interspaces; accordingly the tail exhibits 10 black longitudinal stripes which likewise run through the center of each scale.

  17. Cost-effectiveness analysis of breast cancer control interventions in peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, S.G.; Vidaurre, T.; Abugattas, J.E.; Manrique, J.E.; Sarria, G.; Jeronimo, J.; Seinfeld, J.N.; Lauer, J.A.; Sepulveda, C.R.; Venegas, D.; Baltussen, R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In Peru, a country with constrained health resources, breast cancer control is characterized by late stage treatment and poor survival. To support breast cancer control in Peru, this study aims to determine the cost-effectiveness of different breast cancer control interventions relevant

  18. Cost-effectiveness analysis of breast cancer control interventions in Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zelle, S.G.; Vidaurre, T.; Abugattas, J.E.; Manrique, J.E.; Sarria, G.; Jeronimo, J.; Seinfeld, J.N.; Lauer, J.A.; Sepulveda, C.R.; Venegas, D.; Baltussen, R.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In Peru, a country with constrained health resources, breast cancer control is characterized by late stage treatment and poor survival. To support breast cancer control in Peru, this study aims to determine the cost-effectiveness of different breast cancer control interventions relevant

  19. Ante los ojos del mundo: música, minería y conflicto social en el norte andino de Cajamarca, Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marino Martínez

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Desde tiempos prehispánicos Cajamarca ha sido una importante zona agropecuaria. Pero en las décadas recientes se ha convertido en una zona de agudas convulsiones sociales. Durante el gobierno anticonstitucional de Alberto Fujimori (1990-2002, el estado permitió el ingreso de trasnacionales mineras para la extracción de oro a gran escala. Estas han dañado considerablemente el eco-sistema, la salud y el bienestar de la población local, creando descontento social y protestas. En ese contexto, el estado y la minería han impulsado una satanización de Cajamarca como un espacio cultural atrasado, reacio a las inversiones y al desarrollo. El presente artículo explora el rol que la música viene jugando en la representación de las protestas contra la minería y las actividades musicales y etnomusicológicas se complementan para contrarrestar una imagen demonizada por quienes defienden la inversión minera.

  20. May 1970 Huaraz, Peru Images

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — In 1970, an earthquake-induced rock and snow avalanche on Mt. Huascaran, Peru, buried the towns of Yungay and Ranrahirca. The magnitude 7.8 earthquake killed 66,794...

  1. Country watch: Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzotti, G

    1995-01-01

    In 1991-1992, Via Libre, a nongovernmental organization (NGO), developed an information program for the general public in Lima using a portable pavilion. The metallic structure is 32 square meters and houses 30 posters with prevention messages. Collaboration with another NGO, Instituto Generacion, resulted in the production of a 7 minute video of basic information that is shown continuously at the pavilion. Facilitators distribute printed materials. Occasionally, a third NGO, Asociacion Germinal, provides street clowns who carry prevention messages to accompany the exhibit. Due to positive public response, the exhibit became "The Information Traveling Pavilion" in 1993; the exhibit has traveled to more than seven cities throughout Peru. Via Libre staff provide local health workers with information update courses and counseling workshops in order to respond to increased public demands for information and support following the activities. 75 private enterprises have provided support for the program. Radio and television collaborate in publicizing the activities.

  2. Inhalants in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerner, R; Ferrando, D

    1995-01-01

    In Peru, the prevalence and consequences of inhalant abuse appear to be low in the general population and high among marginalized children. Inhalant use ranks third in lifetime prevalence after alcohol and tobacco. Most of the use appears to be infrequent. Among marginalized children, that is, children working in the streets but living at home or children living in the street, the problem of inhalant abuse is a serious problem. Among children working in the streets but living at home, the lifetime prevalence rate for inhalant abuse is high, ranging from 15 to 45 percent depending on the study being cited. For children living in the streets, the use of inhalant is even more severe. As mentioned earlier in this chapter, most of these street children use inhalants on a daily basis. The lack of research on the problem of inhalant abuse is a serious impediment to development of intervention programs and strategies to address this problem in Peru. Epidemiologic and ethnographic research on the nature and extent of inhalant abuse are obvious prerequisites to targeted treatment and preventive intervention programs. The urgent need for current and valid data is underscored by the unique vulnerability of the youthful population at risk and the undisputed harm that results from chronic abuse of inhalants. Nonetheless, it is important to mention several programs that work with street children. Some, such as the Information and Education Center for the Prevention of Drug Abuse, Generation, and Centro Integracion de Menores en Abandono have shelters where street children are offered transition to a less marginal lifestyle. Teams of street educators provide the children with practical solutions and gain their confidence, as well as offer them alternative socialization experiences to help them survive the streets and avoid the often repressive and counterproductive environments typical of many institutions. Most of the children who go through these programs tend to abandon

  3. Promoting multi-micronutrient powders (MNP) in Peru: acceptance by caregivers and role of health personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creed-Kanashiro, Hilary; Bartolini, Rosario; Abad, Melissa; Arevalo, Varinia

    2016-01-01

    Iron deficiency causes anaemia and other adverse effects on the nutritional status and development of millions of children. Multi-micronutrient powders (MNP) have been shown to reduce anaemia in young children. In Peru, 50% of children 6-36 months are anaemic. Since 2009, the government has started distributing MNP. This qualitative study explored the acceptability of MNP by caregivers and the role of health personnel (HP) in three regions (Apurimac, Ayacucho and Cajamarca), piloting the MNP programme between 2009 and 2011. Data collection consisted of interviews (35) and observations (13) with caregivers and HP (11). In Cajamarca, 16 families were visited three times in their homes to understand caregivers' use and difficulties. Results showed the critical role HP has in influencing caregiver understanding and use of the MNP, as well as the need for training to avoid confusing messages and provide counselling techniques that consider cultural sensitivity to optimize HP interactions with caregivers and adapt the recommendations for MNP use to local family feeding routines. There was greater acceptance of MNP by caregivers giving semi-solid foods (e.g. purees) to their children than those who served dilute preparations (e.g. soups). Acceptance was similar across regions, but there were some differences between urban and rural settings. Home visits were shown to be a key in improving the use of MNP by caregivers as misunderstandings on preparation, required consistency and optimum practices were common. These findings can contribute to strategies to enhance acceptability and use. Acceptance and use of multi-micronutrient powders (MNP) by caregivers greatly depend upon how it is presented, promoted and counselled by health personnel. Counselling for MNP use needs to consider and adapt to the local cultural context and incorporate family and child feeding routines. MNP are presented as part of appropriate feeding practices, encouraging caregivers to find simple and

  4. Ecological and socio-cultural factors influencing in situ conservation of crop diversity by traditional Andean households in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velásquez-Milla Dora

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Peruvian Andean region is a main center of plant domestication of the world. There, several tuber species were domesticated and the area lodges one of the most important reservoirs of their varieties and wild relatives. It is also the setting of traditional cultures using and conserving them. However, crop genetic erosion has been reported in the region since several decades ago; therefore, understanding factors influencing both loss and maintenance of crop variation is relevant to design conservation policies. Previous researches have examined factors influencing agrobiodiversity conservation in the region but additional case studies are recognized to be still necessary for a deeper understanding of causes of genetic erosion and for policy design to prevent and remedy it. Our study focused on analyzing (1 variation in richness of traditional varieties of tubers cultivated among households, (2 changes in varieties richness occurred in four consecutive agricultural cycles, and (3 ecological, social, and cultural factors influencing loss and conservation of varieties. Methods Richness of farmer varieties of tuber species cultivated by 28 peasant households was monitored in communities of Cajamarca and Huánuco, Peru during four consecutive agricultural cycles (from 2001 to 2005. In-depth interviews were conducted with 12 of the households with higher reputation as conservationists, in order to document farmers' perception of tubers qualities in ecological, social, economic, technological and culinary aspects and how these influence their decisions of conservation priorities. Traditional varieties were identified according to their local names, which were then confronted among farmers and with scientific catalogues in order to identify synonyms. Based on the information documented, indexes of ecological and socio-cultural factors affecting agricultural practices were designed, and their linear correlations and multivariate

  5. Peru mitigation assessment of greenhouse gases: Sector -- Energy. Peru climate change country study; Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-08-01

    The aim of this study is to determine the Inventory and propose Greenhouse Gases Mitigation alternatives in order to face the future development of the country in a clean environmental setting without delaying the development process required to improve Peruvian standard of living. The main idea of this executive abstract is to show concisely the results of the Greenhouse Gases Mitigation for Peru in the period 1990--2015. The studies about mitigation for the Energy Sector are shown in this summary.

  6. Peru`s national greenhouse gas inventory, 1990. Peru climate change country study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-01

    The aim of this study has been to determine the Inventory and to propose greenhouse gases mitigation alternatives in order to face the future development of the country in a clean environmental setting, improving in this way the Peruvian standard of life. The main objective of this executive summary is to show concisely the results of the National Inventory about greenhouse gases emitted by Peru in 1990.

  7. Environmental Exposure and Leptospirosis, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Michael A.S.; Smith, Hannah; Joseph, Priya; Gilman, Robert H.; Bautista, Christian T.; Campos, Kalina J.; Cespedes, Michelle; Klatsky, Peter; Vidal, Carlos; Terry, Hilja; Calderon, Maritza M.; Coral, Carlos; Cabrera, Lilia; Parmar, Paminder S.

    2004-01-01

    Human infection by leptospires has highly variable clinical manifestations, which range from subclinical infection to fulminant disease. We conducted a population-based, cross-sectional seroepidemiologic study in Peru to determine potential relationships of environmental context to human exposure to Leptospira and disease associated with seroconversion. Three areas were studied: a flooded, urban slum in the Peruvian Amazon city of Iquitos; rural, peri-Iquitos villages; and a desert shantytown near Lima. Seroprevalence in Belen was 28% (182/650); in rural areas, 17% (52/316); and in a desert shantytown, 0.7% (1/150). Leptospira-infected peridomestic rats were found in all locales. In Belen, 20 (12.4%) of 161 patients seroconverted between dry and wet seasons (an incidence rate of 288/1,000). Seroconversion was associated with history of febrile illness; severe leptospirosis was not seen. Human exposure to Leptospira in the Iquitos region is high, likely related both to the ubiquity of leptospires in the environment and human behavior conducive to transmission from infected zoonotic sources. PMID:15207052

  8. Pottery from Peru. A Handbook. Second Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rammage, Alix

    One of three handbooks dealing with pottery traditions from around the world, this packet draws together information about historical, ethnographic, and pottery traditions of Peru. The first of 13 brief subsections focuses on Peru's land and people. A presentation of a potter's history of Peru is followed by a discussion of the Chavin Cult (800…

  9. Susceptibilidad a betalactámicos y resistencia por betalactamasas de espectro extendido (BLEE en Enterobacteriaceae aisladas de reservorios ambientales de un hospital general en Cajamarca, Perú.*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Rivera-Jacinto

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Objetivos: Identificar enterobacterias en reservorios intrahospitalarios, evaluar su sensibilidad a betalactámicos y determinar su capacidad de producir betalactamasas de espectro extendido (BLEE, en el Hospital Regional de Cajamarca. Material y métodos: Se obtuvieron muestras mediante hisopado de grifos, lavatorios, mesas, camas y tablillas de historia clínica en las áreas de cirugía y pediatría; se recuperaron, aislaron e identificaron 45 cultivos de importancia clínica: 14 Enterobacter cloacae, 11 Escherichia coli, 5 Citrobacter freundii, 4 Klebsiella pneumoniae y 11 de otros géneros. Se determinó la sensibilidad antimicrobiana a los antibióticos betalactámicos: ampicilina, cefalotina, cefoxitina, ceftazidima, cefotaxima, ceftriaxona, amoxicilina-clavulanato, aztreonam e imipenem. Teniendo en cuenta los diámetros críticos de tamizaje, se realizó el test confirmatorio para BLEE. Para el análisis estadístico se utilizó el programa estadístico SPSS v15. Resultados: De los 45 cultivos aislados 34 fueron resistentes a ampicilina, 34 a cefalotina, 14 a cefoxitina, 12 a cefotaxima, 11 a ceftriaxona, 5 a ceftazidima, 19 a amoxicilina-clavulanato y 15 a aztreonam. Doce cultivos presentaron resistencia por BLEE a cefalosporinas de tercera generación y/o monobactámicos, cuatro E. coli y cuatro E. cloacae fueron los más relevantes. Todos fueron sensibles a imipenem. Conclusiones: Dada la capacidad de algunos de estos cultivos de producir BLEE existe el riesgo de brotes intrahospitalarios que pueden complicarse cuando son originados por microorganismos multirresistentes. La producción de BLEE como mecanismo de resistencia en los cultivos hallados debe ser motivo de preocupación por las implicancias que tiene.(Rev Med Hered 2011;22:69-75.

  10. ESTADO ACTUAL DE LA DIVERSIDAD FLORÍSTICA DEL PÁRAMO SECTORES: EL ESPINO Y PALAMBE, SALLIQUE, JAÉN. CAJAMARCA. PERÚ

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo Peña, José Luís; Universidad Nacional Agraria La Molina (Perú).; Sánchez Vega, Isidoro; Universidad Nacional de Cajamarca(Perú).; Millán Tapia, José F.; Universidad Nacional de Cajamarca(Perú).

    2006-01-01

    Se presentan los resultados de un estudio realizado al Norte de la Depresión Huancabamba, en los páramos de El Espino y Palambe, Jaén, Cajamarca - Perú. Se reportan un total de 252 especies de 130 géneros pertenecientes a 58 familias. Se encontraron tres nuevos géneros y 40 especies para el páramo del Neotrópico. La diversidad florística es rica en la zona, con respecto a otros páramos del Perú y Sur del Ecuador, que por sus niveles de endemismos califica como prioritaria para conservación....

  11. Primer registro del ratón colombiano del bosque Chilomys instans (Cricetidae: Rodentia en Cajamarca: actualizando el listado de mamíferos del Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César E. Medina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available El roedor Chilomys instans (Thomasomyini, Cricetidae es una especie común en la comunidad de mamíferos que habita los Andes del Norte en Sudamérica. Aquí presentamos el primer registro de la especie para el Perú, en base a la revisión morfológica de tres ejemplares colectados en el departamento de Cajamarca (Andes del Centro. Se presentan comentarios sobre la taxonomía de C. instans e información sobre su historia natural. La amplia distribución del género Chilomys en los Andes pone de manifiesto la necesidad de realizar la revisión taxonómica de éste género para esclarecer los límites de las especies que la conforman.

  12. Intestinal parasitism in preschool and school students treated in the EsSalud Medical Center of Celendín, Cajamarca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Rinaldo Morales Del Pino

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVES: Intestinal parasitism in preschool and school students treated in the EsSalud Medical Center of Celendín, Cajamarca MATERIAL AND METHODS: Observational, descriptive, cross-sectional research, conducted between July 2015 and January 2016 in the clinical laboratory service of EsSalud Medical Center of Celendín, Cajamarca. A data collection sheet was used for each participant to collect clinical data, demographic data and personal interaction. Parasitological samples of 96 children were processed by using direct examination, test of Graham and spontaneous sedimentation technique. Univariate analysis was used to find frequencies, percentages and standard deviations, and for the bivariate analysis we used Chi-square and Fisher's exact tests to associate the degree of parasitism with each variable obtained. RESULTS: The prevalence was 90.6% (87/96. Blastocystis hominis 81.2%, iodamoeba bütschlii 6.3%, Endolimax nana 19.8%, Entamoeba coli 35.4%, Chilomastix mesnilii 13.5%, Giardia lamblia 9.4%, Enterobius vermicularis 16.7% was found and Ascaris lumbricoides 1.0%. 20.8% (20/96 of the participants had similar structures to Urbanorum spp. Multiparasitism predominated (60.4% and there was a statistically significant association between the level of education and parasitical degree (p = 0.017. CONCLUSIONS: There was a high prevalence of parasitic infections in children in preschool and school age of Celendín district attended at the EsSalud medical center being Blastocystis hominis parasite the most predominant.

  13. Adenovirus Respiratory Tract Infections in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ampuero, Julia S.; Ocaña, Víctor; Gómez, Jorge; Gamero, María E.; Garcia, Josefina; Halsey, Eric S.; Laguna-Torres, V. Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Background Currently, there is a paucity of data regarding human adenovirus (HAdv) circulation in Andean regions of South America. To address this shortcoming, we report the clinical, phylogenetic, and epidemiologic characteristics of HAdv respiratory tract infection from a large sentinel surveillance study conducted among adults and children in Peru. Methods/Principal Findings Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from participants visiting any of 38 participating health centers, and viral pathogens were identified by immunofluorescence assay in cell culture. In addition, molecular characterization was performed on 226 randomly selected HAdv samples. Between 2000 and 2010, a total of 26,375 participants with influenza-like illness (ILI) or severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) were enrolled in the study. HAdv infection was identified in 2.5% of cases and represented 6.2% of all viral pathogens. Co-infection with a heterologous virus was found in 15.5% of HAdv cases. HAdv infection was largely confined to children under the age of 15, representing 88.6% of HAdv cases identified. No clinical characteristics were found to significantly distinguish HAdv infection from other respiratory viruses. Geographically, HAdv infections were more common in sites from the arid coastal regions than in the jungle or highland regions. Co-circulation of subgroups B and C was observed each year between 2006 and 2010, but no clear seasonal patterns of transmission were detected. Conclusions/Significance HAdv accounted for a significant fraction of those presenting with ILI and SARI in Peru and tended to affect the younger population disproportionately. Longitudinal studies will help better characterize the clinical course of patients with HAdv in Peru, as well as determine the role of co-infections in the evolution of illness. PMID:23056519

  14. Determinantes del sobrepeso y la obesidad en niños en edad escolar en Perú Determining factors of overweight and obesity in children at school age in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica L Mispireta

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available La obesidad en escolares es un problema que se encuentra en incremento en el Perú. Está concentrado en las zonas urbanas, principalmente en Lima donde uno de cada tres niños tiene exceso de peso. Un estudio inicial en 80 colegios de Lima mostró que más importante sería la falta de actividad física que el volumen de la ingesta para explicar el sobrepeso y la obesidad en escolares. Se requieren estudios más detallados al respecto. A pesar de la limitada información disponible de sus determinantes, es necesario implementar medidas culturalmente apropiadas para combatirla como parte de las políticas nutricionales actuales, y así prevenir que el problema continúe incrementándose y que la sostenibilidad del sistema de salud no se vea afectadaObesity in children at school age is an increasing problem in Peru. It concentrates in urban areas, mainly in Lima where one out of three children is overweight. An initial study in 80 schools in Lima showed that the lack of physical activity would have a greater impact on overweight and obesity in school children than the amount of food intake. More detailed studies are required. In spite of the limited information available regarding its determining factors, it is necessary to implement culturally-sensitive measures to fight this problem as part of the current nutritional policies, and prevent the problem from spreading, making sure the sustainability of the health system is not affected

  15. Conocimientos, actitudes y prácticas sobre fascioliasis en madres de una zona rural andina del norte peruano Knowledge, attitudes and practices about fascioliasis among mothers from an andean rural area of north Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Rivera-Jacinto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una encuesta para determinar los conocimientos, actitudes y prácticas sobre fascioliasis en 62 madres de familia de una zona rural endémica de la región andina de Cajamarca, Perú. Sólo el 37,0% reconoce a la alicuya (nombre popular de la Fasciola hepática como parásito responsable de la enfermedad; 56,5 y 85,5% conocen que afecta el hígado de humanos y de los animales respectivamente; 98,4% tiene predisposición positiva para participar de charlas informativas sobre la enfermedad y 75,8% para apoyar activamente a sus autoridades en la solución del problema. El 38,7% indica que bebe emolientes en la calle y 75,6% cría animales considerados huéspedes del parásito. En conclusión, las actitudes de las encuestadas son mayoritariamente favorables para realizar actividades de prevención y control, pese a que sus conocimientos son incorrectos y el entorno familiar realiza ciertas prácticas de riesgo para la enfermedad.A survey to determine knowledge, attitudes and practices about fascioliasis was administered to 62 mothers from a rural endemic zone of Cajamarca’s Andean Region, Peru. Only 37.0% recognized the alicuya (local name for Fasciola hepatica as the parasite responsible for the disease; 56.5% knows that the disease affects the liver in the humans and 85.5% knows affects also animals; 98.4% have a positive predisposition to attend informative talks about the disease and 75.8% to support their authorities actively to solve of the problem. 38.7% referred drinking emollients in the street, 75.6% have domestic animals considered host for the parasite. In conclusion, attitudes of mothers are mostly favourable for prevention and control activities, despite their mistaken knowledge risky practices for fasciolasis among members of their families.

  16. 79 FR 77597 - Peru Land Acquisition 2, LLC-Acquisition Exemption-Rail Line of The City of Peru, Ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-24

    ... No. FD 35885] Peru Land Acquisition 2, LLC--Acquisition Exemption--Rail Line of The City of Peru, Ill. Peru Land Acquisition 2, LLC (PLA2), a noncarrier, has filed a verified notice of exemption under 49 CFR 1150.31 to acquire from the City of Peru, Ill. (Peru) ownership of approximately 3.5 miles of rail...

  17. [The determination of serological markers of the hepatitis B virus in high-risk areas of the Central Air Force Hospital of Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valladares, G; Galarza, J; Espinoza, J; Nieri, A; Makino, R; Berrocal, A; Grados, N

    1989-01-01

    In the present paper, the serologic markers of Hepatitis B virus were studied in 123 people belonging to the Hospital Central de la Fuerza Aérea del Perú that had been working in areas of high risk to get contact with this virus. The determination was done with the enzyme immunoassay (EIA Abbot) and the results were the following: In 15 individuals (12.1%), at least one positive marker was found, evidence which proved to have been in contact with the virus in some moment of his life. Only one carrier (0.8%) was found, in 6 (4.8%) the presence of anti-HBc as only marker was found and in 8 (6.5%) the presence of anti-HBc and anti-HBs was observed which means post infection immunity. The great number of the individuals in which the markers were found, were male: 13 (16.0%) against only 2 (4.7%) female. There wasn't great difference with relation to the prevalence of markers according to the years of work like there has been observed in other greater series. It can be concluded that in this group the incidence of infection due to VHB was no greater than that of general population, which indicates us the little contact that they have had with the contaminating material during their professional life.

  18. All projects related to Peru | Page 5 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    This project, supported by IDRC and GAC through the Canadian International Food Security Research Fund (CIFSRF), aims to increase the effectiveness of organic farming in two regions of the Peruvian Andes (Cusco and Cajamarca) known for their high biodiversity and active farmers' associations. Start Date: March 1, ...

  19. Camera trap survey of medium and large mammals in a montane rainforest of northern Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos F. Jiménez

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Camera traps are a powerful tool for inventorying elusive and rare species and very useful to obtain ecologi- cal data for plans that involve wildlife conservation. In Peru, several surveys have been carried out in lowland Amazonia especially in the southeastern part of the country, but none in montane cloud forests or Yungas. We present the first camera trap studies produced in Peruvian Yungas at the locality of Querocoto village (Chota, Cajamarca, based on 2002 (dry season and 1264 (wet season camera traps-days (CTD. Two localities were surveyed in wet and dry season: The Pagaibamba Protection Forest and the San Lorenzo Forest. The wet season study was carried out in October and November, and the dry season in July to September of 2008. Eight mammalian species were recorded in both seasons. Some 66 (91.7% independent records were obtained in the dry season, but only six (8.3% in the wet one, suggesting a seasonality effect. The Mountain Paca Cunicu- lus taczanowskii was the most commonly photographed species, with 17.0 and 1.6 capture frequencies (dry and wet season respectively, whereas the Long-tailed weasel Mustela frenata (0.5 capture frequency in the dry season was the most rare species. Activity patterns suggest that Mountain Paca C. taczanowskii and the Andean Skunk C. chinga are nocturnal, while Spectacled Bear T. ornatus and Tayra E. barbara are diurnal in the study area. Our records of the Ocelot Leopardus pardalis and the Tayra E. barbara are among the highest altitudinal records known for each species. In addition, the Anta Tapirus pinchaque was also identified by its tracks, representing one of the first record known south of the Huancabamba Depression.

  20. An astronomical observatory for Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Mar, Juan Quintanilla; Sicardy, Bruno; Giraldo, Víctor Ayma; Callo, Víctor Raúl Aguilar

    2011-06-01

    Peru and France are to conclude an agreement to provide Peru with an astronomical observatory equipped with a 60-cm diameter telescope. The principal aims of this project are to establish and develop research and teaching in astronomy. Since 2004, a team of researchers from Paris Observatory has been working with the University of Cusco (UNSAAC) on the educational, technical and financial aspects of implementing this venture. During an international astronomy conference in Cusco in July 2009, the foundation stone of the future Peruvian Observatory was laid at the top of Pachatusan Mountain. UNSAAC, represented by its Rector, together with the town of Oropesa and the Cusco regional authority, undertook to make the sum of 300,000€ available to the project. An agreement between Paris Observatory and UNSAAC now enables Peruvian students to study astronomy through online teaching.

  1. Environmental research Management in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Sabogal Dunin Borkowski, Ana

    2016-01-01

    The article looks over the situation and management of the environmental research in Peru, with regard to the national politic to increase the budget for research. Moreover, the characteristics and methodology of the environmental sciences research are addressed and its difficulties are discussed. The national efforts and strategy to improve the management of environmental research are analyzed, establishing the need to emphasize efforts in the promotion of applied environmental research. Fin...

  2. Applying n-dimensional hypervolumes for species delimitation: unexpected molecular, morphological, and ecological diversity in the Leaf-Toed Gecko Phyllodactylus reissii Peters, 1862 (Squamata: Phyllodactylidae) from northern Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Claudia; Flecks, Morris; Venegas, Pablo J; Bialke, Patrick; Valverde, Sebastian; Rödder, Dennis

    2016-09-02

    An integrative taxonomic approach based on morphology, molecular analyses, and climatic niche modeling was used to uncover cryptic diversity in the phyllodactylid gecko species Phyllodactylus reissii. At least three distinct species could be identified among the examined specimens from southern Ecuador and northern Peru. Phyllodactylus magister, described by Noble (1924) from arid Andean valleys of the Chinchipe and Marañón rivers in the Peruvian Department of Cajamarca and synonymized with P. reissii by Dixon & Huey (1970) is elevated from synonymy and a detailed redescription is provided. A new species of the genus Phyllodactylus from the Andean dry forest of the southern Marañón valley is identified and described herein. Phyllodactylus pachamama sp. nov. is differentiated from other South American congeners on the basis of mtDNA sequence divergence, morphological characters, and differences in the realized climatic niche. At least in Peru, P. reissii seems to primarily inhabit the northern coastal region west of the Andes, while the inter-Andean area along the Río Marañón and its tributaries seems to be inhabited mostly by other species of the genus, which are endemic to this area. The Andean valleys are underestimated in terms of biodiversity and lack thorough investigation and conservation actions.

  3. Factors that Matter for Financial Inclusion: Evidence from Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Noelia Camara; Ximena Pena; David Tuesta

    2014-01-01

    This study comprises a quantitative approach to the determinants of financial inclusion in Peru based on micro-data from surveys. Significant correlations are used to identify those socioeconomic characteristics that may affect financial inclusion (or exclusion) of households and enterprises. We also analyse the sensitivity to some barriers on the part of individuals who do not use banking services. The results show that the traditionally more vulnerable groups (women, individuals living in r...

  4. New Trends in Talent Development in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumen, Sheyla

    2013-01-01

    A comprehensive portrait of the current status of gifted and talented concepts, identification of the gifted, and associated provisions within Peru is presented. The major purposes of this article are (a) to analyze the primary conception of giftedness in Peru; (b) to describe the beliefs that people have about gifted individuals; (c) to present…

  5. New Trends on Intellectual Assessment in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumen, Sheyla

    2016-01-01

    The history of intellectual assessment with children and youth in Peru is presented from the foundation of scientific psychology in Peru until now. Current practices are affected by the multicultural ethnolinguistic diversity of the country, the quality of the different training programs, as well as by Peruvian regulations for becoming an academic…

  6. Engineering aspects of seismological studies in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocola, L.

    1982-01-01

    Large and small earthquakes occur frequently in Peru. Official institutions in charge of the study of seismological and geophysical aspects of such large natural events have a responsibility to provide engineers, planners, and government officials with basic data to implement safety measures to minimize the destructive impact of great earthquakes. The Geophysical Institute of Peru (IGP) is one such institution.

  7. 80 FR 22885 - Importation of Papayas From Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-24

    ... Service 7 CFR Part 319 [Docket No. APHIS-2012-0014] RIN 0579-AD68 Importation of Papayas From Peru AGENCY... from Peru into the continental United States. The conditions for the importation of papayas from Peru... action will allow for the importation of papayas from Peru while continuing to provide protection against...

  8. Seasonal Distribution, Biology, and Human Attraction Patterns of Culicine Mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae) in a Forest Near Puerto Almendras, Iquitoes, Peru

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, James

    2004-01-01

    This study was conducted, as part of a field-ecology study of arboviral activity in the Amazon Basin of Peru, to determine the taxonomy, frequency, seasonal, and vertical distributions of potential mosquito vectors...

  9. The Cyber Media in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ing. Lyudmyla Yezers´ka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of an investigation whose primary target is to analyze the panorama of media on the Internet in Peru in the last quarter of the 2004 are presented. The birth and the consolidation of the Peruvian media on the Internet have been influenced by the economic, political and social problems that this country has lived through throughout its history. In spite of the few users which the media still have on the Internet, however, Peruvian journalism is making an effort to experiment with new formats and is conscious that in the future these means of communication will become essential elements for publication on the Web.

  10. [Supervising road safety in Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagástegui, Freddy

    2010-06-01

    In this article some problems in road safety are described, which have been detected by the Ombudsman of Peru, as part of its role of public administration supervisor, amongst these problems we mention: lack of and inadequate elaboration of the statistics on road traffic accidents, the inconsistency of the National Council for Road Security and the lack of responsibility of the local and regional governments reflected by the lack of application of the National Plan of Road Safety. Facing this, the Ombudsman suggests that the State develops a rigorous statistical system, strengthens the National Council of Road Safety and that the different sectors of the government develop the mentioned National Plan.

  11. Archaeoastronomical Fieldwork in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawaski, Mike J.; Malville, J.

    2006-09-01

    During June-July 2005, sets of 14 horizon photographs were obtained at 10 major monumental sites of the Inca as identified in Hemming and Ranney (1982) . The photographs were combined to yield complete 360o panoramas at each of the sites. To calibrate the panoramas a Wild T-2 theodolite was used to obtain 5 pairs of altitude/azimuth measurements of the Sun at each site. The standard deviation of multiple determinations of true north was typically 0.25'to 0.5'. As a check on the sun sights, a line-of-sight azimuth was also established with GPS measurements at each site. Agreement between these baselines and the sun sights are satisfactory. We find evidence of June solstice and/or Pleiades orientations at Llactapata, Sayhuite, and Ollantaytambo; cardinal orientation at Vilcashuman; June solstice established by horizon towers above Urubamba; and both zenith and anti-zenith solar alignments at the tower of Muyuc Marca of Sacsayhuman. Terracing, walls, and water features at Ollantaytambo suggest interest in both June and December solstices. The statistical significance of these orientations is evaluated. A permit was issued by the office of the Institute Cultura National in Cusco for field work at all of these sites. This work was undertook as partial fulfillment of the requirement for a MA degree in Earth Sciences at the University of Northern Colorado. Funding was provided by Sigma Xi and The University of Northern Colorado. Hemming, J. and E. Ranney. 1982. Monuments of the Inca, Boston: Little, Brown

  12. Los organizadores de conocimiento para potencializar el aprendizaje desarrollador en los educandos del 4º grado de educación primaria, área personal social de la IE. N°00925 Santa Isabel – Nueva Cajamarca

    OpenAIRE

    Hidalgo Napo, Yolanda

    2012-01-01

    El presente estudio tuvo por objetivo determinar que los organizadores de conocimiento potencializan el aprendizaje desarrollador en los educandos del 4º grado de educación primaria, Área Personal Social de la Institución Educativa Nº 00925 Santa Isabel – Nueva Cajamarca. Los organizadores de conocimiento utilizados fueron: mapa semántico, mapa de ideas, meta plan y hexagrama; las teorías que sustentan son: la teoría de la codificación dual, la teoría de los esquemas y la teorí...

  13. Proyección del posible impacto hídrico, de capa vegetal y de suelo, generado en el aprovechamiento del oro - caso mina la Colosa, Cajamarca, Tolima mediante imágenes obtenidas por sensores remotos

    OpenAIRE

    Campos Orjuela, Aureliano; Hernández Camelo, Freddy Hernando

    2014-01-01

    Tesis (Maestría en Desarrollo Sostenible y Medio Ambiente). Universidad de Manizales. Facultad de Ciencias Contables Económicas y Administrativas, 2014 La presente investigación pone de manifiesto la necesidad de la utilización de la teledetección para identificar los impactos ambientales que se presentarán en el municipio de Cajamarca-Tolima con la entrada en operación de la Mina de oro La Colosa, la cual será operada por la Anglo Gold Ashanti; dentro de las actividades ...

  14. La Oscurana (Cajamarca, un bosque relicto más para conservar en las vertientes occidentales andinas del norte del Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana M. Juárez

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un análisis de la composición florística, formas de vida, importancia y estrategias para la conservación de un bosque relicto de la Vertiente Occidental Andina del norte del Perú, descrito por primera vez y denominado La Oscurana (caserío El Nogal, distrito Bolívar, provincia San Miguel de Pallaques, Cajamarca; 6°90’S y 79°08’O, 2000-2800 m. El análisis preliminar incluye 85 familias, 169 géneros y 258 especies de plantas vasculares, de las cuales 15 familias corresponden a Pteridophyta y 70 a Magnoliophyta. En los ámbitos genérico y específico las Asteraceae son las mejor representadas de las Magnoliopsida y las Orchidaceae de las Liliopsida. Las formas de vida predominantes en cuanto a familia se reúnen en seis categorías: hierbas con 29 familias (34%, arbustos con 14 (16%, árboles con 9 (11%, trepadoras/lianas con 9 (11%, hierbas/arbustos con 7 (8% y hierbas/epífitas con 5 familias (6%. Se encontró que además de albergar una diversidad excepcional y brindar utilidad económica local, muchas de las especies no están registradas en las vertientes occidentales andinas del norte y del sur. Por la importancia que posee y por ser uno de los últimos bosques relictos existentes, la conservación legal de éste frágil ecosistema es urgente. Se propone que debe ser declarada zona de protección o intangible y que su conservación debe ser integral, involucrando a científicos, Estado, gobiernos regionales, gobiernos locales y población.

  15. Implications of raising cigarette excise taxes in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Rozada, Martin; Ramos-Carbajales, Alejandro

    2016-10-01

    To assess how raising cigarette excise taxes in Peru might impact cigarette consumption, and to determine if higher taxes would be regressive. Total demand price elasticity was estimated by income groups using two datasets: quarterly time-series data from 1993 - 2012 and data from a cross-sectional survey of income and expenses conducted in 2008 - 2009 . A functional form of the cigarette demand in Peru was specified using the quarterly data set, and the demand price elasticity was estimated for the short and long run. Using the second data set and Deaton methodology, the implementation of elasticity estimation and by groups' elasticity was done in a two-step procedure. Demand price elasticity was -0.7, implying that a 10% price increase via a new tax would reduce consumption by 7%. Demand price elasticity estimations by income group suggested that poorer families are not more price sensitive than richer ones, which implies that increasing cigarette taxes could be regressive. Increasing cigarette taxes is the most efficient policy for inducing a reduction in smoking. However, in the case of Peru, an increase in cigarette taxes could be regressive.

  16. [Prevalence and associated factors of macrosomia in Peru, 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, Antonio José Ledo Alves da; Toro, Manuel Sobrino; Gutiérrez, César; Alarcón-Villaverde, Jorge

    2017-01-01

    To determine the prevalence of macrosomia and factors associated with it in Peru and to describe the occurrence of complications peri- and postpartum. Birth weights of children under the age of 5 years were analyzed using data from the 2013 Demographic and Family Health Survey (ENDES) carried out by the Instituto Nacional de Estadística e Informática. Children with a birth weight higher than 4000 g were considered macrosomic. A logistic regression analysis was used to establish the independent association of sociodemographic factors with macrosomia. The sample comprised 6121 children. The prevalence of macrosomia was 5.3% (95% interval confidence: 4.8-5.9%). Being male, a higher birth order, maternal obesity, and greater maternal height were independently linked with macrosomia. Caesarean births were more common in macrosomic children than unaffected ones (43.9% vs 26.9%). Complications during birth and postpartum were common but not statistically linked with macrosomia. The prevalence of macrosomia in Peru is relatively low compared to other low-to-middle income countries. The factors associated with macrosomia were mainly unmodifiable, with the exception of maternal obesity. Macrosomic children were more frequently born by caesarean. Weight reduction and the prevention of obesity in women of childbearing age in Peru could potentially reduce macrosomia and caesarean rates.

  17. Counterfeit medicines in Peru: a retrospective review (1997-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Edwin; Bel, Elvira; Suñé, Josep María

    2016-04-04

    To consolidate and assess information on counterfeit medicines subject to pharmaceutical alerts issued by the Peruvian Medicines Regulatory Authority over 18 years (1997-2014) of health monitoring and enforcement. A retrospective review of drug alerts. A search of the website of the General Directorate of Medicines, Supplies and Drugs (DIGEMID) of the Ministry of Health of Peru for drug alerts issued between 1997 and 2014. Drug alerts related to counterfeit medicines. A total of 669 DIGEMID alerts were issued during the study period, 354 (52.91%) of which cover 1738 cases of counterfeit medicines (many alerts deal with several cases at a time). 1010 cases (58.11%) involved pharmaceutical establishments and 349 (20.08%) involved non-pharmaceutical commercial outlets. In 126 cases (7.25%), counterfeit medicines were seized in an unauthorised trade (without any marketing authorisation); in 253 cases (14.56%) the type of establishment or business associated with the seized product was not identified. Counterfeit medicines are a serious public health problem in Peru. A review of the data cannot determine whether counterfeit medicines in Peru increased during the study period, or if monitoring by different government health agencies highlighted the magnitude of the problem by providing more evidence. The problem is clearly structural, since the majority of cases (58.11% of the total) were detected in legitimate supply chains. Most counterfeit medicines involve staple pharmaceutical products and common dosage forms. Considerable work remains to be done to control the serious problem of counterfeit medicines in Peru. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Machu Picchu, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.Dr. Anne Kahle at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, California, is the U.S. Science team leader; Bjorn Eng of JPL is the project manager. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Earth Science Enterprise, a long-term research and technology program designed to examine Earth's land, oceans, atmosphere, ice and life as a total integrated system.Size: 12 x 15 km (7.3 x 9.44 miles) Location: 13.2 deg. South lat., 72.5 deg. West long. Orientation: North at top Image Data: ASTER bands 1,2, and 3. Original Data Resolution: 15 m Date Acquired: June 25, 2001

  19. A pilot study characterizing real time exposures to particulate matter and carbon monoxide from cookstove related woodsmoke in rural Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commodore, Adwoa A.; Hartinger, Stella M.; Lanata, Claudio F.; Mäusezahl, Daniel; Gil, Ana I.; Hall, Daniel B.; Aguilar-Villalobos, Manuel; Naeher, Luke P.

    2013-11-01

    Nearly half of the world's population is exposed to household air pollution (HAP) due to long hours spent in close proximity to unvented cooking fires. We aimed to use PM2.5 and CO measurements to characterize exposure to cookstove generated woodsmoke in real time among control (n = 10) and intervention (n = 9) households in San Marcos, Cajamarca Region, Peru. Real time personal particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5 μm (PM2.5), and personal and kitchen carbon monoxide (CO) samples were taken. Control households used a number of stoves including open fire and chimney stoves while intervention households used study-promoted chimney stoves. Measurements were categorized into lunch (9 am-1 pm) and dinner (3 pm-7 pm) periods, where applicable, to adjust for a wide range of sampling periods (2.8-13.1 h). During the 4-h time periods, mean personal PM2.5 exposures were correlated with personal CO exposures during lunch (r = 0.67 p = 0.024 n = 11) and dinner (r = 0.72 p = 0.0011 n = 17) in all study households. Personal PM2.5 exposures and kitchen CO concentrations were also correlated during lunch (r = 0.76 p = 0.018 n = 9) and dinner (r = 0.60 p = 0.018 n = 15). CO may be a useful indicator of PM during 4-h time scales measured in real time, particularly during high woodsmoke exposures, particularly during residential biomass cooking.

  20. Peru Brand: a Nation under Construction?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elder Cuevas-Calderón

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available During the last decade Peru has experienced a euphoric rediscovery –pseudo revaluation as a country– due to its booming gastronomy, tourism and economic growth.In this context, the presentresearch uses semio-psychoanalytic and postcolonial theories to explain Peru’s social outlook regarding the concept of nation, its reunion with a non-existent identity and the construction of the idea of nation based on the marketing campaign titled the Peru Brand. Thus, Peru Brand, far from uniting all Peruvians and bring them together into the wellknown “melting pot”, becomes the resemantization of the old colonial discourse longing for a republic without natives. Therefore, in the Peru Brand advertising discourse, the “primitive natives” are white people brought from Nebraska and speak English.

  1. Scaling-up Rural Innovations (Peru)

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    up innovation in farm production, natural resource management and off-farm income generation and develop policies and programs in consequence. The project will focus initially on Peru and be extended to other Andean countries, and ...

  2. Adenovirus respiratory tract infections in Peru

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ampuero, Julia S; Ocaña, Víctor; Gómez, Jorge; Gamero, María E; Garcia, Josefina; Halsey, Eric S; Laguna-Torres, V Alberto

    2012-01-01

    ... adults and children in Peru. Oropharyngeal swabs were collected from participants visiting any of 38 participating health centers, and viral pathogens were identified by immunofluorescence assay in cell culture...

  3. Psychosocial competencies and risky behaviours in Peru

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Favara, Marta; Sanchez, Alan

    2017-01-01

    We use a unique longitudinal dataset from Peru to investigate the relationship between psychosocial competencies related to the concepts of self-esteem, self-efficacy, and aspirations, and a number...

  4. PREVALENCIA DEL ENDO Y ECTOPARASITISMO EN CANIS FAMILIARIS ATENDIDOS EN DOS CENTROS VETERINARIOS DE TRUJILLO (PERU), 2015

    OpenAIRE

    HUAMAN DÁVILA, ANGÉLICA MARÍA

    2016-01-01

    Parasitism is a common phenomenon in domestic animals, among them the dog, Canis familiaris; however, no data regarding the frequency of infestation and infection by ecto and endoparasites in different parts of Peru. In this research, we was determinated the prevalence of endo and ectoparasitism in Canis familiaris treated at two veterinary centers in Trujillo (Peru): Clinican located in urban area and San Francisco, located in marginal area between July and September 2015 and its distributio...

  5. Republic of Peru - Environmental Sustainability : A Key to Poverty Reduction in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2007-01-01

    This report on a key to poverty reduction in Peru identifies a number of cost-effective policy interventions that could be adopted in the short and medium term to support sustainable development goals as the Government of Peru attempts to combat the problems of inadequate water supply, sanitation and hygiene; urban air pollution; natural disasters; lead exposure; indoor air pollution; land...

  6. Joint Peru/United States report on Peru/United States cooperative energy assessment. Volume 2. Annex 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-08-01

    An examination of the energy sources of Peru was undertaken by the USA in collaboration with Peru. First, an introduction establishes the purpose and summarizes results, after which the status of energy supply is presented. The ensuing sections contain the contributions of the participating technical specialists, namely: Peru's hydrocarbon potential, estimated reserves, and projected production rates; coal deposits in Peru; geothermal energy; uranium; miscellaneous energy sources; energy-related minerals; water resources in Peru; and geologic hazards in Peru. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the sections. (MCW)

  7. The deep Peru 2015 doublet earthquakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, S.; Tavera, H.; Poli, P.; Herrera, C.; Flores, C.; Rivera, E.; Madariaga, R.

    2017-11-01

    On 24 November 2015 two events of magnitude Mw 7.5 and Mw 7.6 occurred at 600 km depth under the Peru-Brazil boundary. These two events were separated in time by 300 s. Deep event doublets occur often under South America. The characteristics that control these events and the dynamic interaction between them are an unresolved problem. We used teleseismic and regional data, situated above the doublet, to perform source inversion in order to characterize their ruptures. The overall resemblance between these two events suggests that they share similar rupture process. They are not identical but occur on the same fault surface dipping westward. Using a P-wave stripping and stretching method we determine rupture speed of 2.25 km/s. From regional body wave inversion we find that stress drop is similar for both events, they differ by a factor of two. The similarity in geometry, rupture velocity, stress drop and radiated energy, suggests that these two events looked like simple elliptical ruptures that propagated like classical sub-shear brittle cracks.

  8. All projects related to Peru | Page 2 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-08-09

    , and citizenship education in six regions of Peru. End Date: August 9, 2017 ... This project seeks to empower women as social scientists to increase their visibility and participation in Peru's academic community. End Date: October 24, 2017.

  9. [Outbreak of norovirus Group II in a military training center, Peru 2013].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Mariana; Soto, Giselle; Loayza, Luis; Valle, Rubén; Luna, Giannina; Gonzalez, Sofia; Quispe, Jose; Silva, Maria; Wong, Juan; Bausch, Daniel G

    2015-01-01

    We report an outbreak of norovirus(NoV) which occurred at a military training center in Peru. Thirteenstool samples that were taken from initial cases turned out positive for NoV GII by RT-PCR. A case-control study was performedto determine factorsassociated with infection.164 probable cases (45.2%clinical attack rate) were identified. The only factor associatedwith infection was "having shared room with a case" (ORa = 1.7; 95% CI 1.1 to 2.7).Epidemiological findings suggestthat the virus was spread person to person. Future investigations of outbreaks of diarrhea in Peru should consider the NoV as an etiologicagent.

  10. Human hydatid disease in Peru is basically restricted to Echinococcus granulosus genotype G1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santivañez, Saul J; Gutierrez, Ariana M; Rosenzvit, Mara C; Muzulin, Patricia M; Rodriguez, Mary L; Vasquez, Julio C; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gonzalez, Armando E; Gilman, Robert H; Garcia, Hector H

    2008-07-01

    A molecular PCR study using DNA from 21 hydatid cysts was performed to determine which strain type is responsible for human infection in Peru. The mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (CO1) gene was amplified in 20 out of 21 samples, revealing that all but 1 sample (19/20, 95%) belonged to the common sheep strain (G1). The remaining samples belonged to the camel strain (G6). The G1 genotype was most frequently found in human cases of cystic hydatid disease (CHD) in Peru. Local control measures should focus primarily on decreasing dog and sheep infection rather than intermediate reservoirs.

  11. 77 FR 64031 - United States-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-18

    ... 178 RIN 1515-AD79 United States-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement AGENCIES: U.S. Customs and Border... States-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement. DATES: Final rule effective November 19, 2012. FOR FURTHER... implement the preferential tariff treatment and other customs-related provisions of the United States-Peru...

  12. 80 FR 76661 - Healthcare Trade and Investment Mission to Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-10

    ... Trade and Investment Mission to Peru March 7-9, 2016. AGENCY: International Trade Administration... Administration, is organizing a healthcare trade and investment mission to Peru. The mission is designed to... mission also will assist U.S. companies already doing business in Peru to expand their footprint. This...

  13. 81 FR 62810 - Modification of Class D Airspace; Peru, IN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-13

    ... Airspace; Peru, IN AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), DOT. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This..., this action will add Peru, Grissom ARB, IN to the subtitle of the airspace designation. DATES... within the scope of that authority as it modifies Class D airspace at Grissom ARB, Peru, IN. History On...

  14. La formation Cajamarca (Turonien Supérieur dans la région de Bambamarca (Andes nord-péruviennes. Approche sédimentologique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    1985-01-01

    Full Text Available L'étude sédimentologique de la formation Cajamarca le long d'une coupe levée près de Bambamarca, permet d'en préciser les conditions de dépôt. L'analyse des faciès et de leur évolution conduit à reconnaître deux mégaséquences, elles-mêmes composées de séquences d'ordre inférieur bien individualisées. Dans la première mégaséquence, l'évolution est marquée par le passage progressif de marnes et calcaires de plateforme calme et relativement profonde, à des calcaires plus massifs de plateforme confinée, calme, très peu profonde à émersive. Elle est interprétée comme une mégaséquence régressive de progradation d'une plateforme carbonatée très calme, sans barrière, et peu accidentée. Une surface perforée et rubéfiée la sépare de la deuxième mégaséquence. Dans celle-ci, la plus grande profondeur moyenne des milieux de dépôt, l'évolution régressive moins marquée, le plus grand confinement et l'apparition de quelques décharges détritiques traduisent un léger changement dans le comportement de la plateforme, préludant possiblement à la crise détritique coniacienne enregistrée, au-dessus de surfaces oxydées, par la formation Celendin. El estudio sedimentológico de la formación Cajamarca siguiendo un corte cerca de Bambamarca permite precisar sus modalidades de depositación. El análisis de las facies y de sus evoluciones, conduce a reconocer dos megasecuencias, compuestas por secuencias de orden inferior bien individualizadas (S1 a S7, fig. 4 y 5. En la primera megasecuencia (fig. 4, la secuencia inferior (S1 está compuesta por margas y calizas de plataforma relativamente profunda. Después de una discontinuidad (superficie bioturbada, lumaquela, la segunda secuencia (S2 indica una evolución desde un medio sedimentario de plataforma relativamente profunda, hasta un medio tranquilo intertidal. Otro nivel margoso destaca la secuencia siguiente (S3-4 en donde predominan facies tranquilas y

  15. Resistance to deltamethrine in two populations of Aedes aegypti (Diptera, Culicidae from Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Chávez

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present work was to determine the resistance levels to deltamethrine in two populations of Aedes aegypti from Peru. Bioassays in adults were carried out following the methodology of the World Health Organization. We met resistance in the Sullana population with 70% of mortality and susceptibility in the population The Future El Porvenir with 99% of mortality.

  16. Occupational Safety and Health in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz, Ismael; Huerta-Mercado, Raul

    2015-01-01

    Peru is a country located on the Pacific coast of South America with a population of more than 30 million inhabitants. In the past 10 years, Peru has had a steady economic growth. Peru is predominantly an extractive industry country, but the manufacturing and construction sectors are booming. It is in this context that regulations have been implemented to protect the safety and health of workers. One of the most important regulations is the Law on Safety and Health at Work, which has been recently promulgated. Regulations are complemented by training and education in occupational safety and health. The measures are yet to be fully implemented thus a positive effect in reducing accidents and occupational diseases at work has not yet been seen. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mineral resources of Peru's ancient societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, W.E.

    2003-01-01

    Northern Peru has an exceptionally rich archaeological heritage that includes metalwork, ceramics and textiles. The success of at least a half-dozen pre-Columbian societies dating back 3,000 years and subsequent Spanish colonization in the 1400s has rested on the effective use of northern Peru's abundant resources. In the summer of 2000, my son Matt and I learned about that connection firsthand by volunteering at the Santa Rita B archaeological site in the Chao Valley near Trujillo in northern Peru. Riding donkey-back through the Andes and talking with local people, we got our hands dirty in the rich archaeology and geology of the area. We were able to correlate mineral occurrences to their various roles in society - opening a window into the region's fascinating past. From construction to metallurgy, pre-Columbian societies flourished and advanced because of their understanding and use of the available mineral resources.

  18. Epidemiology of Plasmodium vivax Malaria in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Aguirre, Angel; Gamboa, Dionicia; Manrique, Paulo; Conn, Jan E.; Moreno, Marta; Lescano, Andres G.; Sanchez, Juan F.; Rodriguez, Hugo; Silva, Hermann; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Vinetz, Joseph M.

    2016-01-01

    Malaria in Peru, dominated by Plasmodium vivax, remains a public health problem. The 1990s saw newly epidemic malaria emerge, primarily in the Loreto Department in the Amazon region, including areas near to Iquitos, the capital city, but sporadic malaria transmission also occurred in the 1990s–2000s in both north-coastal Peru and the gold mining regions of southeastern Peru. Although a Global Fund-supported intervention (PAMAFRO, 2005–2010) was temporally associated with a decrease of malaria transmission, from 2012 to the present, both P. vivax and Plasmodium falciparum malaria cases have rapidly increased. The Peruvian Ministry of Health continues to provide artemesinin-based combination therapy for microscopy-confirmed cases of P. falciparum and chloroquine–primaquine for P. vivax. Malaria transmission continues in remote areas nonetheless, where the mobility of humans and parasites facilitates continued reintroduction outside of ongoing surveillance activities, which is critical to address for future malaria control and elimination efforts. Ongoing P. vivax research gaps in Peru include the following: identification of asymptomatic parasitemics, quantification of the contribution of patent and subpatent parasitemics to mosquito transmission, diagnosis of nonparasitemic hypnozoite carriers, and implementation of surveillance for potential emergence of chloroquine- and 8-aminoquinoline-resistant P. vivax. Clinical trials of tafenoquine in Peru have been promising, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in the region has not been observed to be a limitation to its use. Larger-scale challenges for P. vivax (and malaria in general) in Peru include logistical difficulties in accessing remote riverine populations, consequences of government policy and poverty trends, and obtaining international funding for malaria control and elimination. PMID:27799639

  19. Epidemiology of Plasmodium vivax Malaria in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosas-Aguirre, Angel; Gamboa, Dionicia; Manrique, Paulo; Conn, Jan E; Moreno, Marta; Lescano, Andres G; Sanchez, Juan F; Rodriguez, Hugo; Silva, Hermann; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Vinetz, Joseph M

    2016-12-28

    Malaria in Peru, dominated by Plasmodium vivax, remains a public health problem. The 1990s saw newly epidemic malaria emerge, primarily in the Loreto Department in the Amazon region, including areas near to Iquitos, the capital city, but sporadic malaria transmission also occurred in the 1990s-2000s in both north-coastal Peru and the gold mining regions of southeastern Peru. Although a Global Fund-supported intervention (PAMAFRO, 2005-2010) was temporally associated with a decrease of malaria transmission, from 2012 to the present, both P. vivax and Plasmodium falciparum malaria cases have rapidly increased. The Peruvian Ministry of Health continues to provide artemesinin-based combination therapy for microscopy-confirmed cases of P. falciparum and chloroquine-primaquine for P. vivax Malaria transmission continues in remote areas nonetheless, where the mobility of humans and parasites facilitates continued reintroduction outside of ongoing surveillance activities, which is critical to address for future malaria control and elimination efforts. Ongoing P. vivax research gaps in Peru include the following: identification of asymptomatic parasitemics, quantification of the contribution of patent and subpatent parasitemics to mosquito transmission, diagnosis of nonparasitemic hypnozoite carriers, and implementation of surveillance for potential emergence of chloroquine- and 8-aminoquinoline-resistant P. vivax Clinical trials of tafenoquine in Peru have been promising, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency in the region has not been observed to be a limitation to its use. Larger-scale challenges for P. vivax (and malaria in general) in Peru include logistical difficulties in accessing remote riverine populations, consequences of government policy and poverty trends, and obtaining international funding for malaria control and elimination. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  20. The societal burden of blindness secondary to retinopathy of prematurity in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dave, Hreem B; Gordillo, Luz; Yang, Zhou; Zhang, Monica S; Hubbard, G Baker; Olsen, Timothy W

    2012-10-01

    To determine the cost-effectiveness of laser treatment for retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in Lima, Peru. A cost-of-illness study (in US dollars) to determine the direct cost of treatment, the indirect lifetime cost of blindness, and the quality-adjusted life years. The direct cost of ROP-related treatment was determined by reviewing data retrospectively from a social security sector hospital. The indirect cost was determined using national economic data of Peru published by the Central Information Agency (CIA), including the per capita gross domestic product, the sex-adjusted income distribution, and years spent in the work force. Indirect costs per child that were avoided by treatment were calculated using the known natural history of ROP vs evidence-based treatment. For ROP-related neonatal blindness in Peru, we estimate the total indirect cost saving at $197,753 per child and the direct cost of laser treatment at $2496 per child. The societal lifetime cost saving per child is estimated at $195,257. The mean annual income per educated adult in Peru is $8000 and treating 1 child is equivalent to employing 24 educated Peruvians per year. The generational cost savings for society is approximately $516 million, or the equivalent of 64,500 educated Peruvian work years. The societal burden of blindness far exceeds the costs of treatment per child. Proper screening and treatment of ROP prevents blindness and leads to substantial cost savings for society. Public health policy in Peru and other middle-income countries should consider financial impact when allocating healthcare resources. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Checklist of the marine bivalves from Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Paredes

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A checklist of the marine bivalve species from Peru is presented, this list has 401 species which are distributed in 65 families and 195 genera. The taxonomical classification and nomenclature is based on classical and current bibliography including Bernard (1983 and Coan & Valentich-Scott (2012. We give distribution and hábitat information about every species.

  2. Citizenship and Political Violence in Peru

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Fiona

    Citizenship and Political Violence in Peru recounts the hidden history of how local processes of citizen formation in an Andean town were persistently overruled from the nineteenth century on, thereby perpetuating antagonism toward the Peruvian state and political centralism. The analysis points...

  3. Peru | IDRC - International Development Research Centre

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    ... small business development, to manage natural resources, and to keep citizens safe. The Consortium has grown from a handful of institutes in Lima to astrong national network of 48 members, including Peru's most prestigious universities. IDRC and Global Affairs Canada have supported many of their research activities.

  4. Economic Impact of Cystic Echinococcosis in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Pedro L.; Budke, Christine M.; Schantz, Peter M.; Vasquez, Julio; Santivañez, Saul J.; Villavicencio, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    Background Cystic echinococcosis (CE) constitutes an important public health problem in Peru. However, no studies have attempted to estimate the monetary and non-monetary impact of CE in Peruvian society. Methods We used official and published sources of epidemiological and economic information to estimate direct and indirect costs associated with livestock production losses and human disease in addition to surgical CE-associated disability adjusted life years (DALYs) lost. Findings The total estimated cost of human CE in Peru was U.S.$2,420,348 (95% CI:1,118,384–4,812,722) per year. Total estimated livestock-associated costs due to CE ranged from U.S.$196,681 (95% CI:141,641–251,629) if only direct losses (i.e., cattle and sheep liver destruction) were taken into consideration to U.S.$3,846,754 (95% CI:2,676,181–4,911,383) if additional production losses (liver condemnation, decreased carcass weight, wool losses, decreased milk production) were accounted for. An estimated 1,139 (95% CI: 861–1,489) DALYs were also lost due to surgical cases of CE. Conclusions This preliminary and conservative assessment of the socio-economic impact of CE on Peru, which is based largely on official sources of information, very likely underestimates the true extent of the problem. Nevertheless, these estimates illustrate the negative economic impact of CE in Peru. PMID:21629731

  5. Economic impact of cystic echinococcosis in peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Pedro L; Budke, Christine M; Schantz, Peter M; Vasquez, Julio; Santivañez, Saul J; Villavicencio, Jaime

    2011-05-01

    Cystic echinococcosis (CE) constitutes an important public health problem in Peru. However, no studies have attempted to estimate the monetary and non-monetary impact of CE in Peruvian society. We used official and published sources of epidemiological and economic information to estimate direct and indirect costs associated with livestock production losses and human disease in addition to surgical CE-associated disability adjusted life years (DALYs) lost. The total estimated cost of human CE in Peru was U.S.$2,420,348 (95% CI:1,118,384-4,812,722) per year. Total estimated livestock-associated costs due to CE ranged from U.S.$196,681 (95% CI:141,641-251,629) if only direct losses (i.e., cattle and sheep liver destruction) were taken into consideration to U.S.$3,846,754 (95% CI:2,676,181-4,911,383) if additional production losses (liver condemnation, decreased carcass weight, wool losses, decreased milk production) were accounted for. An estimated 1,139 (95% CI: 861-1,489) DALYs were also lost due to surgical cases of CE. This preliminary and conservative assessment of the socio-economic impact of CE on Peru, which is based largely on official sources of information, very likely underestimates the true extent of the problem. Nevertheless, these estimates illustrate the negative economic impact of CE in Peru.

  6. Economic impact of cystic echinococcosis in peru.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro L Moro

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cystic echinococcosis (CE constitutes an important public health problem in Peru. However, no studies have attempted to estimate the monetary and non-monetary impact of CE in Peruvian society. METHODS: We used official and published sources of epidemiological and economic information to estimate direct and indirect costs associated with livestock production losses and human disease in addition to surgical CE-associated disability adjusted life years (DALYs lost. FINDINGS: The total estimated cost of human CE in Peru was U.S.$2,420,348 (95% CI:1,118,384-4,812,722 per year. Total estimated livestock-associated costs due to CE ranged from U.S.$196,681 (95% CI:141,641-251,629 if only direct losses (i.e., cattle and sheep liver destruction were taken into consideration to U.S.$3,846,754 (95% CI:2,676,181-4,911,383 if additional production losses (liver condemnation, decreased carcass weight, wool losses, decreased milk production were accounted for. An estimated 1,139 (95% CI: 861-1,489 DALYs were also lost due to surgical cases of CE. CONCLUSIONS: This preliminary and conservative assessment of the socio-economic impact of CE on Peru, which is based largely on official sources of information, very likely underestimates the true extent of the problem. Nevertheless, these estimates illustrate the negative economic impact of CE in Peru.

  7. Fighting malaria in Northern Peru | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... When large-scale irrigation came to Peru's northern coast in the 1960s and 1970s, it brought with it an explosion in agriculture — and one of the world's deadliest diseases. An IDRC-funded project is changing irrigation practices to help turn the tide against malaria​. This article is part of an ongoing series ...

  8. [Urban employment and internal migration in Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotlear, D

    1984-06-01

    The relationship between internal migration and employment problems in Peru is examined. The author argues that regional differences in income distribution are the primary causes of migration, particularly to urban areas. A model of the migration process is developed and tested using data from official sources, surveys, and the published literature.

  9. Calibration of the local magnitude scale ( M L ) for Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condori, Cristobal; Tavera, Hernando; Marotta, Giuliano Sant'Anna; Rocha, Marcelo Peres; França, George Sand

    2017-07-01

    We propose a local magnitude scale ( M L ) for Peru, based on the original Richter definition, using 210 seismic events between 2011 and 2014, recorded by 35 broadband stations of the National Seismic Network operated by the Geophysical Institute of Peru. In the solution model, we considered 1057 traces of maximum amplitude records on the vertical channel from simulated Wood-Anderson seismograms of shallow events (depths between 0 and 60 km) and hypocentral distances less than 600 km. The attenuation factor has been evaluated in terms of geometrical spreading and anelastic attenuation coefficients. The magnitude M L was defined as M L = L o g 10 A W A +1.5855 L o g 10( R/100)+0.0008( R-100)+3± S, where, A W A is the displacement amplitude in millimeters (Wood-Anderson), R is the hypocentral distance (km), and S is the station correction. The results obtained for M L have good correlation with the m b , M s and M w values reported the ISC and NEIC. The anelastic attenuation curve obtained has a similar behavior to that other highly seismic regions. Station corrections were determined for all stations during the regression analysis resulting in values ranging between -0.97 and +0.73, suggesting a strong influence of local site effects on amplitude.

  10. Two new species of the orb-weaving spider genus Alpaida (Araneae, Araneidae) from Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deza, Mariajosé; Andía, Juan Manuel

    2014-07-02

    Two new species of the orb-weaving spider genus Alpaida O. P.-Cambridge, 1889 are described and illustrated; Alpaida losamigos n. sp. based on females from Madre de Dios, and Alpaida penca n. sp. based on females and males from Cajamarca.

  11. Peru Subduction Zone Seismic Experiment (PeruSZE): Preliminary Results From a Seismic Network Between Mollendo and Lake Titicaca, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, R.; Stubailo, I.; Skinner, S.; Phillips, K.; Foote, E.; Lukac, M.; Aguilar, V.; Tavera, H.; Audin, L.; Husker, A.; Clayton, R.; Davis, P. M.

    2008-12-01

    This work describes preliminary results from a 50 station broadband seismic network recently installed from the coast to the high Andes in Peru. UCLA's Center for Embedded Network Sensing (CENS) and Caltech's Tectonic Observatory are collaborating with the IRD (French L'Institut de Recherche pour le Developpement) and the Institute of Geophysics, in Lima Peru in a broadband seismic experiment that will study the transition from steep to shallow slab subduction. The currently installed line has stations located above the steep subduction zone at a spacing of about 6 km. In 2009 we plan to install a line of 50 stations north from this line along the crest of the Andes, crossing the transition from steep to shallow subduction. A further line from the end of that line back to the coast, completing a U shaped array, is in the planning phase. The network is wirelessly linked using multi-hop network software designed by computer scientists in CENS in which data is transmitted from station to station, and collected at Internet drops, from where it is transmitted over the Internet to CENS each night. The instrument installation in Peru is almost finished and we have been receiving data daily from 10 stations (out of total 50) since June 2008. The rest are recording on-site while the RF network is being completed. The software system provides dynamic link quality based routing, reliable data delivery, and a disruption tolerant shell interface for managing the system from UCLA without the need to travel to Peru. The near real-time data delivery also allows immediate detection of any problems at the sites. We are building a seismic data and GPS quality control toolset that would greatly minimize the station's downtime by alerting the users of any possible problems.

  12. [Framework for the strengthening of health information systems in Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curioso, Walter H; Espinoza-Portilla, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    In this article we present the essential components and policies that are most relevant regarding the conceptual framework to strengthen the health information systems in Peru. The article also presents the main policies, actions and strategies made in the field of electronic health in Peru that are most significant. The health information systems in Peru play a key role and are expected to achieve an integrated and interoperable information system. This will allow health information to be complete, efficient, of good quality and available in a timely manner to achieve better quality of life for people and allow meaningful modernization of public health in the context of health reform in Peru.

  13. Eugenics, medicine and psychiatry in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stucchi-Portocarrero, Santiago

    2017-11-01

    Eugenics was defined by Galton as 'the science which deals with all influences that improve the inborn qualities of a race'. In Peru, eugenics was related to social medicine and mental hygiene, in accordance with the neo-Lamarckian orientation, that predominated in Latin America. Peruvian eugenists assumed the mission of fighting hereditary and infectious diseases, malnutrition, alcoholism, drug addiction, prostitution, criminality and everything that threatened the future of the 'Peruvian race'. There were some enthusiastic advocates of 'hard' eugenic measures, such as forced sterilization and eugenic abortion, but these were never officially implemented in Peru (except for the compulsory sterilization campaign during the 1995-2000 period). Eugenics dominated scientific discourse during the first half of the twentieth century, but eugenic discourse did not disappear completely until the 1970s.

  14. A snapshot of training practices in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivia Hernández Pozas, Ph.D

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Organizations need well trained employees in order to maintain a competitive advantage. The purpose of this paper is to describe current training practices in Peru and to provide recommendations for improving organizational performance. This paper also aims to set priorities for future research work. Human capital theory and contributions on need assessment, and training planning, implementation and evaluation served as theoretical framework. This is a cross-sectional, exploratory study that used information from surveys conducted in 24 Peru-vian companies. The findings reveal a strong interest in training, particularly with regard to the improvement of competencies, preference for face-to-face training, and the use of reaction evaluation methods. The recommendations include, among others, improving the provisions for internal support, policies, technology, behavioral evaluation, and resources.

  15. Peru; Drivers of De-dollarization

    OpenAIRE

    Mercedes Garcia-Escribano

    2010-01-01

    Peru has successfully pursued a market-driven financial de-dollarization during the last decade. Dollarization of credit and deposit of commercial banks - across all sectors and maturities - has declined, with larger declines for commercial credit and time and saving deposits. The analysis presented in this paper confirms that de-dollarization has been driven by macroeconomic stability, introduction of prudential policies to better reflect currency risk (such as the management of reserve requ...

  16. Citizenship and Political Violence in Peru

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilson, Fiona

    Citizenship and Political Violence in Peru recounts the hidden history of how local processes of citizen formation in an Andean town were persistently overruled from the nineteenth century on, thereby perpetuating antagonism toward the Peruvian state and political centralism. The analysis points...... violence in the 1980s. The book builds on the detailed study of a unique municipal archive in Tarma and ethnographic research from both before and after the violence....

  17. Cryptosporidium Infections Among Children in Peru

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-09-25

    Cryptosporidium is a waterborne bacteria that can cause severe diarrhea and vomiting. In this podcast, Dr. Vita Cama, CDC microbiologist, discusses an article in the October 2008 issue of Emerging Infectious Diseases. The paper examines Cryptosporidium infections among children in Peru, including the number of infections, symptoms experienced, and what species of Crypto were responsible.  Created: 9/25/2008 by Emerging Infectious Diseases.   Date Released: 9/25/2008.

  18. Sub-national Revenue Mobilization in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Canavire-Bacarreza, Gustavo; Martinez-Vazquez, Jorge; Sepulveda, Cristian

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes the problem of sub-national revenue mobilization in Peru and proposes several policy reforms to improve collection performance while maintaining a sound revenue structure. In particular, the paper analyzes the current revenues of regional and municipal governments and identifies the main priorities for reform. Among the most important problems are the acute inequalities and inefficiencies associated with revenue sharing from extractive industries. These revenues represent ...

  19. Epidemiology of Road Traffic Incidents in Peru 1973–2008: Incidence, Mortality, and Fatality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, J. Jaime; López-Rivera, Luis A.; Quistberg, D. Alex; Rosales-Mayor, Edmundo; Gianella, Camila; Paca-Palao, Ada; Luna, Diego; Huicho, Luis; Paca, Ada; Luis, López; Luna, Diego; Rosales, Edmundo; Best, Pablo; Best, Pablo; Egúsquiza, Miriam; Gianella, Camila; Lema, Claudia; Ludeña, Esperanza; Miranda, J. Jaime; Huicho, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Background The epidemiological profile and trends of road traffic injuries (RTIs) in Peru have not been well-defined, though this is a necessary step to address this significant public health problem in Peru. The objective of this study was to determine trends of incidence, mortality, and fatality of RTIs in Peru during 1973–2008, as well as their relationship to population trends such as economic growth. Methods and Findings Secondary aggregated databases were used to estimate incidence, mortality and fatality rate ratios (IRRs) of RTIs. These estimates were standardized to age groups and sex of the 2008 Peruvian population. Negative binomial regression and cubic spline curves were used for multivariable analysis. During the 35-year period there were 952,668 road traffic victims, injured or killed. The adjusted yearly incidence of RTIs increased by 3.59 (95% CI 2.43–5.31) on average. We did not observe any significant trends in the yearly mortality rate. The total adjusted yearly fatality rate decreased by 0.26 (95% CI 0.15–0.43), while among adults the fatality rate increased by 1.25 (95% CI 1.09–1.43). Models fitted with splines suggest that the incidence follows a bimodal curve and closely followed trends in the gross domestic product (GDP) per capita Conclusions The significant increasing incidence of RTIs in Peru affirms their growing threat to public health. A substantial improvement of information systems for RTIs is needed to create a more accurate epidemiologic profile of RTIs in Peru. This approach can be of use in other similar low and middle-income settings to inform about the local challenges posed by RTIs. PMID:24927195

  20. Epidemiology of road traffic incidents in Peru 1973-2008: incidence, mortality, and fatality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Jaime Miranda

    Full Text Available The epidemiological profile and trends of road traffic injuries (RTIs in Peru have not been well-defined, though this is a necessary step to address this significant public health problem in Peru. The objective of this study was to determine trends of incidence, mortality, and fatality of RTIs in Peru during 1973-2008, as well as their relationship to population trends such as economic growth.Secondary aggregated databases were used to estimate incidence, mortality and fatality rate ratios (IRRs of RTIs. These estimates were standardized to age groups and sex of the 2008 Peruvian population. Negative binomial regression and cubic spline curves were used for multivariable analysis. During the 35-year period there were 952,668 road traffic victims, injured or killed. The adjusted yearly incidence of RTIs increased by 3.59 (95% CI 2.43-5.31 on average. We did not observe any significant trends in the yearly mortality rate. The total adjusted yearly fatality rate decreased by 0.26 (95% CI 0.15-0.43, while among adults the fatality rate increased by 1.25 (95% CI 1.09-1.43. Models fitted with splines suggest that the incidence follows a bimodal curve and closely followed trends in the gross domestic product (GDP per capita.The significant increasing incidence of RTIs in Peru affirms their growing threat to public health. A substantial improvement of information systems for RTIs is needed to create a more accurate epidemiologic profile of RTIs in Peru. This approach can be of use in other similar low and middle-income settings to inform about the local challenges posed by RTIs.

  1. Epidemiology of road traffic incidents in Peru 1973-2008: incidence, mortality, and fatality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, J Jaime; López-Rivera, Luis A; Quistberg, D Alex; Rosales-Mayor, Edmundo; Gianella, Camila; Paca-Palao, Ada; Luna, Diego; Huicho, Luis; Paca, Ada

    2014-01-01

    The epidemiological profile and trends of road traffic injuries (RTIs) in Peru have not been well-defined, though this is a necessary step to address this significant public health problem in Peru. The objective of this study was to determine trends of incidence, mortality, and fatality of RTIs in Peru during 1973-2008, as well as their relationship to population trends such as economic growth. Secondary aggregated databases were used to estimate incidence, mortality and fatality rate ratios (IRRs) of RTIs. These estimates were standardized to age groups and sex of the 2008 Peruvian population. Negative binomial regression and cubic spline curves were used for multivariable analysis. During the 35-year period there were 952,668 road traffic victims, injured or killed. The adjusted yearly incidence of RTIs increased by 3.59 (95% CI 2.43-5.31) on average. We did not observe any significant trends in the yearly mortality rate. The total adjusted yearly fatality rate decreased by 0.26 (95% CI 0.15-0.43), while among adults the fatality rate increased by 1.25 (95% CI 1.09-1.43). Models fitted with splines suggest that the incidence follows a bimodal curve and closely followed trends in the gross domestic product (GDP) per capita. The significant increasing incidence of RTIs in Peru affirms their growing threat to public health. A substantial improvement of information systems for RTIs is needed to create a more accurate epidemiologic profile of RTIs in Peru. This approach can be of use in other similar low and middle-income settings to inform about the local challenges posed by RTIs.

  2. Cost-effectiveness analysis of breast cancer control interventions in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelle, Sten G; Vidaurre, Tatiana; Abugattas, Julio E; Manrique, Javier E; Sarria, Gustavo; Jeronimo, José; Seinfeld, Janice N; Lauer, Jeremy A; Sepulveda, Cecilia R; Venegas, Diego; Baltussen, Rob

    2013-01-01

    In Peru, a country with constrained health resources, breast cancer control is characterized by late stage treatment and poor survival. To support breast cancer control in Peru, this study aims to determine the cost-effectiveness of different breast cancer control interventions relevant for the Peruvian context. We performed a cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) according to WHO-CHOICE guidelines, from a healthcare perspective. Different screening, early detection, palliative, and treatment interventions were evaluated using mathematical modeling. Effectiveness estimates were based on observational studies, modeling, and on information from Instituto Nacional de Enfermedades Neoplásicas (INEN). Resource utilizations and unit costs were based on estimates from INEN and observational studies. Cost-effectiveness estimates are in 2012 United States dollars (US$) per disability adjusted life year (DALY) averted. The current breast cancer program in Peru ($8,426 per DALY averted) could be improved through implementing triennial or biennial screening strategies. These strategies seem the most cost-effective in Peru, particularly when mobile mammography is applied (from $4,125 per DALY averted), or when both CBE screening and mammography screening are combined (from $4,239 per DALY averted). Triennially, these interventions costs between $63 million and $72 million per year. Late stage treatment, trastuzumab therapy and annual screening strategies are the least cost-effective. Our analysis suggests that breast cancer control in Peru should be oriented towards early detection through combining fixed and mobile mammography screening (age 45-69) triennially. However, a phased introduction of triennial CBE screening (age 40-69) with upfront FNA in non-urban settings, and both CBE (age 40-49) and fixed mammography screening (age 50-69) in urban settings, seems a more feasible option and is also cost-effective. The implementation of this intervention is only meaningful if

  3. [Neurogenetics in Peru, example of translational research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzetti, Pilar; Inca-Martínez, Miguel; Tirado-Hurtado, Indira; Milla-Neyra, Karina; Silva-Paredes, Gustavo; Vishnevetsky, Anastasia; Cornejo-Olivas, Mario

    2015-10-01

    Neurogenetics is an emerging discipline in Peru that links basic research with clinical practice. The Neurogenetics Research Center located in Lima, Peru is the only unit dedicated to the specialized care of neurogenetic diseases in the country. From the beginning, neurogenetics research has been closely linked to the study of Huntington’s Disease (HD), from the PCR genotyping of the HTT gene, to the current haplogroup studies in HD. Research in other monogenic diseases led to the implementation of alternative methodologies for the genotyping of Fragile X and Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1. Both, national and international collaborative efforts have facilitated the discovery of new genetic variants in complex multigenic diseases such as Parkinson’s disease and Alzheimer’s disease. Additionally, multidisciplinary education and mentoring have allowed for the training of new neurogenetics specialists, supporting the sustained growth of the discipline in the country. The promotion of research in Peru has spurred the growth of neurogenetics research, although limitations in infrastructure, technology, and education remain a challenge for the further growth of research in this field.

  4. Landscape and soil governance: A rapid vulnerability assessment method applied in a Paramo landscape in Northern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cammeraat, L. H.; Seijmonsbergen, A. C.; Sevink, J.

    2009-04-01

    The Andean paramo ecosystems constitute geodiversity hotspots of global importance, but also have important ecosystem functions. These include agricultural production (mostly livestock and high altitude crops such potatoes, but also forestry) and deliverance of water to be used for various purposes (drink water, irrigation water, hydroelectric power) in downstream catchments, often hosting major population concentrations and industries. Because of their alpine relief, extreme climate and overall fragile soils, Paramo ecosystems are susceptible to degradation upon land use, particularly under increased human pressure such as by encroaching agriculture, accelerated by climate change posing a further threat to the functioning of remaining more or less conserved or pristine Paramo areas. Throughout the more populated parts of the Andes, where land use has seriously intensified over the past decades, degradation has become rampant with associated losses of the functions mentioned. To this comes an increased worldwide demand for minerals, leading to their exploration and large-scale exploitation in hitherto inaccessible and remote areas, such as the higher parts of the Andes. Not surprising, the mining issue and related environmental hazards are high on the political agenda of most Andean countries, though not always based on scientific knowledge of its potential impacts in specific areas. A rapid assessment methodology is presented for the Las Lagunas region near Cajamarca in Northern Peru. The method includes prefield segmentation and classification of Landsat ETM+ and ASTER imagery, complemented with detailed aerial photo interpretation. The results are stored in a GIS geodatabase and supplemented with data from field surveys. This leads to rapid and sound postfield analyses and vulnerability classifications using simple GIS tools. The results are pointing at four important issues in relation to soil and landscape governance and identification of vulnerability zones

  5. Elimination of Taenia solium Transmission in Northern Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Hector H; Gonzalez, Armando E; Tsang, Victor C W; O'Neal, Seth E; Llanos-Zavalaga, Fernando; Gonzalvez, Guillermo; Romero, Jaime; Rodriguez, Silvia; Moyano, Luz M; Ayvar, Viterbo; Diaz, Andre; Hightower, Allen; Craig, Philip S; Lightowlers, Marshall W; Gauci, Charles G; Leontsini, Elli; Gilman, Robert H

    2016-06-16

    Taeniasis and cysticercosis are major causes of seizures and epilepsy. Infection by the causative parasite Taenia solium requires transmission between humans and pigs. The disease is considered to be eradicable, but data on attempts at regional elimination are lacking. We conducted a three-phase control program in Tumbes, Peru, to determine whether regional elimination would be feasible. We systematically tested and compared elimination strategies to show the feasibility of interrupting the transmission of T. solium infection in a region of highly endemic disease in Peru. In phase 1, we assessed the effectiveness and feasibility of six intervention strategies that involved screening of humans and pigs, antiparasitic treatment, prevention education, and pig replacement in 42 villages. In phase 2, we compared mass treatment with mass screening (each either with or without vaccination of pigs) in 17 villages. In phase 3, we implemented the final strategy of mass treatment of humans along with the mass treatment and vaccination of pigs in the entire rural region of Tumbes (107 villages comprising 81,170 people and 55,638 pigs). The effect of the intervention was measured after phases 2 and 3 with the use of detailed necropsy to detect pigs with live, nondegenerated cysts capable of causing new infection. The necropsy sampling was weighted in that we preferentially included more samples from seropositive pigs than from seronegative pigs. Only two of the strategies implemented in phase 1 resulted in limited control over the transmission of T. solium infection, which highlighted the need to intensify the subsequent strategies. After the strategies in phase 2 were implemented, no cyst that was capable of further transmission of T. solium infection was found among 658 sampled pigs. One year later, without further intervention, 7 of 310 sampled pigs had live, nondegenerated cysts, but no infected pig was found in 11 of 17 villages, including all the villages in which mass

  6. Cost-effectiveness of norovirus vaccination in children in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirelman, Andrew J; Ballard, Sarah Blythe; Saito, Mayuko; Kosek, Margaret N; Gilman, Robert H

    2015-06-17

    With candidate norovirus (NV) vaccines in a rapid phase of development, assessment of the potential economic value of vaccine implementation will be necessary to aid health officials in vaccine implementation decisions. To date, no evaluations have been performed to evaluate the benefit of adopting NV vaccines for use in the childhood immunization programs of low- and middle-income countries. We used a Markov decision model to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of adding a two-dose NV vaccine to Peru's routine childhood immunization schedule using two recent estimates of NV incidence, one for a peri-urban region and one for a jungle region of the country. Using the peri-urban NV incidence estimate, the annual cost of vaccination would be $13.0 million, offset by $2.6 million in treatment savings. Overall, this would result in 473 total DALYs averted; 526,245 diarrhea cases averted;153,735 outpatient visits averted; and 414 hospitalizations averted between birth and the fifth year of life. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio would be $21,415 per DALY averted; $19.86 per diarrhea case; $68.23 per outpatient visit; and $26,298 per hospitalization. Using the higher jungle NV incidence rates provided a lower cost per DALY of $10,135. The incremental cost per DALY with per-urban NV incidence is greater than three times the 2012 GDP per capita of Peru but the estimate drops below this threshold using the incidence from the jungle setting. In addition to the impact of incidence, sensitivity analysis showed that vaccine price and efficacy play a strong role in determining the level of cost-effectiveness. The introduction of a NV vaccine would prevent many healthcare outcomes in the Peru and potentially be cost-effective in scenarios with high NV incidence. The vaccine cost-effectiveness model could also be applied to the evaluation of NV vaccine cost-effectiveness in other countries. In resource-poor settings, where NV incidence rates are expected to be higher. Published

  7. Prevalence of hypertension and diabetes in residents from Lima and Callao, Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Revilla, Luis; Dirección General de Epidemiología, Ministerio de Salud. Lima, Perú. Médico epidemiólogo; López, Tania; Dirección General de Epidemiología, Ministerio de Salud. Lima, Perú. médico epidemiólogo, magíster en Gerencia y Gobierno, doctor en Salud Pública; Sánchez, Sixto; Hospital Nacional Dos de Mayo. Lima, Perú. médico ginecólogo obstetra, magíster en Epidemiología, doctor en Salud Pública; Yasuda, Myriam; Instituto Nacional de Salud. Lima, Perú. médico patólogo clínico; Sanjinés, Giovanna; Instituto Nacional de Salud. Lima, Perú. licenciada en Tecnología Médica

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To determine the prevalence of hypertension and diabetes in residents of districts in metropolitan Lima and Callao, Peru. Materials and methods. This was a cross-sectional study conducted during September 2006 in people aged 15 years and older, residing in metropolitan Lima and Callao. Participants were selected using a sample of “conglomerados” (neighborhoods) in three stages. Standardized procedures were used to measure weight, height, waist circumference, blood pressure and blo...

  8. Physical activity in outpatients with type 2 diabetes in a national hospital of Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Manzaneda, Ana Josefina; Facultad de Medicina. Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú.; Lazo-Porras, María; Facultad de Medicina. Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú.; Málaga, Germán; Facultad de Medicina. Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú.

    2015-01-01

    In order to determine the level of physical activity performed by outpatients with type 2 diabetes seen at a NationalHospital in Lima, Peru, we surveyed 120 patients with the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ). 66% werewomen, the mean age was 61.6 years, and 70% had poor glycemic control. 20% of the patients qualified as inactive,68% as minimally active, and 12% had adequate physical activity. No relationship between physical activity, durationof disease, glycemic control, a...

  9. Field experiments in Economics: Risk preferences and demand for intertemporal contracts in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Galarza, Francisco

    2010-01-01

    This article looks at the determinants of the choice of productive projects involving intertemporal contracts in rural Peru. In a setting where the formal education is limited, the successful launching of new financial instruments may be affected by the lack of proper understanding of their main features, as well as judgment biases. We find that education, a source of judgment bias, and (weakly) risk aversion, affect such a project choice. In contrast, wealth does not appear to play a role in...

  10. Japanese investment in Peru: limits of developmental investment

    OpenAIRE

    Kamiya, Marco

    2004-01-01

    Japanese Investment in Latin America was considerable in the 1960s and 1970s, but the investment never took off in the developmental style as in East Asia. The author examines why Japanese Foreign Direct Investment in Peru did not follow the pattern of developmental investment, analyzing the elements involved regarding policies in Peru and particular circumstances in Japan in the 1990 decade.

  11. All projects related to Peru | Page 3 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-06-08

    Peru is one of the fastest growing economies in Latin America, but Peruvians continue to face large disparities in incomes, opportunities, and access to public services. End Date: June 8, 2017 ... Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) are a major cause of death in Peru, accounting for 60% of deaths in 2010. Unhealthy diet is ...

  12. Bridging cultural and social divides for indigenous health in Peru ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-02-01

    Feb 1, 2017 ... As the mother of three children under the age of 12, Raquel Tello faces the difficulty of providing healthy meals on a daily basis to her family in Huallhua, a tiny farming community in Peru's Andes Mountains. Although child malnutrition and anemia rates have generally dropped in Peru over the past ...

  13. MLVA genotyping of human Brucella isolates from Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, Henk L.; Espinosa, Benjamin; Castillo, Rosa; Hall, Eric; Guillen, Alfredo; Zevaleta, Milagros; Gilman, Robert H.; Melendez, Paolo; Guerra, Carlos; Draeger, Angelika; Broglia, Alessandro; Nöckler, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    Recent human Brucella melitensis isolates from Peru were genotyped by multiple locus variable number repeat analysis. All 24 isolates originated from hospitalized patients living in the central part of Peru and consisted of six genomic groups comprising two to four isolates and nine unique

  14. Missed Opportunities for Health Education on Pap Smears in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Angela M.; Nussbaum, Lauren; Cabrera, Lilia; Paz-Soldan, Valerie A.

    2011-01-01

    Despite cervical cancer being one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths among women in Peru, cervical Pap smear coverage is low. This article uses findings from 185 direct clinician observations in four cities of Peru (representing the capital and each of the three main geographic regions of the country) to assess missed opportunities for…

  15. An Ancient Inca Tax and Metallurgy in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The discovery of ancient Inca tax rulers and other metallurgical objects in Peru show that the ancient civilizations of the country smelted metals. The analysis shows that the smelters in Peru switched from the production of copper to silver after a tax was imposed on them by the Inca rulers.

  16. Climate change threatens mangrove ecosystem in Peru | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Researchers are helping fishing communities on Peru's northwestern coast preserve an ecosystem treasure and adapt to a more hostile environment.More than 150 animal species, including the infamous howler monkey, call the Tumbes mangroves on Peru's northern coast home. Living there has proved to be no easy task ...

  17. All projects related to peru | Page 2 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: LATIN AMERICA, PRIVATE SECTOR, LEGAL ASPECTS, CORRUPTION, LAW. Region: Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Paraguay, Peru. Program: Governance and Justice. Total Funding: CA$ 622,300.00. Improving quality of maternal health care for indigenous women in Argentina, Mexico, and Peru.

  18. U.S.-Peru Economic Relations and the U.S.-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-06

    significant trade partner, accounting for 10% of Peru’s exports and 10% of Peru’s imports. Other major trade partners for Peru are Brazil, Chile , Ecuador...International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES). The annex includes a section on enforcement measures on forest sector

  19. The occurrence and frequency of Witches’ Broom Disease associated with Wild Cacao from the Upper Amazon of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Peruvian Amazon is within the center of origin and diversity for cacao (Theobroma cacao). One of the primary disease of cacao in Peru and Latin America is withes’ broom disease (WBD) caused by Moniliophthora perniciosa. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of WBD in wild ca...

  20. Factors influencing the productivity of irrigated crops in Southern Peru, in relation to prediction by simulation models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Versteeg, M.N.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine the growth potential of alfalfa, potato, Rhodes grass and maize in the irrigated desert of S. Peru, as at that production level the highest utilization efficiency of irrigation water is usually obtained. Important growth- influencing factors were

  1. Physical Growth, Biological Age, and Nutritional Transitions of Adolescents Living at Moderate Altitudes in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossio-Bolaños, Marco; Campos, Rossana Gómez; Andruske, Cynthia Lee; Flores, Antonio Viveros; Luarte-Rocha, Cristian; Olivares, Pedro R; Garcia-Rubio, Javier; de Arruda, Miguel

    2015-09-25

    Peru is experiencing a stage of nutritional transition where the principal characteristics are typical of countries undergoing development. The objectives of this study were the following: (a) compare physical growth patterns with an international standard; (b) determine biological age; and (c) analyze the double nutritional burden of adolescents living at a moderate altitude in Peru. Weight, standing height, and sitting height were measured in 551 adolescents of both sexes (12.0 to 17.9 years old) from an urban area of Arequipa, Peru (2328 m). Physical growth was compared with the international standard of the CDC-2000. Biological age was determined by using a non-invasive transversal technique based on years from age at peak height velocity (APHV). Nutritional state was determined by means of weight for age and height for age. Z scores were calculated using international standards from the CDC-2000. Body weight for both sexes was similar to the CDC-2000 international standards. At all ages, the girls' height (p nutritional burden (stunted growth and excessive weight).

  2. Syndromic Management and STI Control in Urban Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jesse L.; Lescano, Andres G.; Konda, Kelika A.; Leon, Segundo R.; Jones, Franca R.; Klausner, Jeffrey D.; Coates, Thomas J.; Caceres, Carlos F.

    2009-01-01

    Background Syndromic management is an inexpensive and effective method for the treatment of symptomatic sexually transmitted infections (STIs), but its effectiveness as a method of STI control in at-risk populations is questionable. We sought to determine the potential utility of syndromic management as a public health strategy to control STI transmission in high-risk populations in urban Peru. Methodology We surveyed 3,285 at-risk men and women from three Peruvian cities from 2003–05. Participants were asked about the presence of genital ulcers, discharge, or dysuria in the preceding six months. Participants reporting symptoms were asked about subsequent health-seeking and partner notification behavior. Urine and vaginal swab samples were tested for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis by nucleic acid testing. Serum was tested for syphilis and Herpes Simplex Virus-Type 2 antibodies. Findings Recent urogenital discharge or dysuria was reported by 42.1% of participants with gonorrhea or chlamydia versus 28.3% of participants without infection. Genital ulceration was reported by 6.2% of participants with, and 7.4% of participants without, recent syphilis. Many participants reporting symptoms continued sexual activity while symptomatic, and approximately half of all symptomatic participants sought treatment. The positive and negative predictive values of urogenital discharge or genital ulcer disease in detecting STIs that are common in the study population were 14.4% and 81.5% for chlamydia in women and 8.3% and 89.5% for syphilis among gay-identified men. Conclusions In our study, STIs among high-risk men and women in urban Peru were frequently asymptomatic and symptomatic participants often remained sexually active without seeking treatment. Additional research is needed to assess the costs and benefits of targeted, laboratory-based STI screening as part of a comprehensive STI control program in developing countries. PMID:19779620

  3. Syndromic management and STI control in urban Peru.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse L Clark

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Syndromic management is an inexpensive and effective method for the treatment of symptomatic sexually transmitted infections (STIs, but its effectiveness as a method of STI control in at-risk populations is questionable. We sought to determine the potential utility of syndromic management as a public health strategy to control STI transmission in high-risk populations in urban Peru.We surveyed 3,285 at-risk men and women from three Peruvian cities from 2003-05. Participants were asked about the presence of genital ulcers, discharge, or dysuria in the preceding six months. Participants reporting symptoms were asked about subsequent health-seeking and partner notification behavior. Urine and vaginal swab samples were tested for Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Chlamydia trachomatis by nucleic acid testing. Serum was tested for syphilis and Herpes Simplex Virus-Type 2 antibodies.Recent urogenital discharge or dysuria was reported by 42.1% of participants with gonorrhea or chlamydia versus 28.3% of participants without infection. Genital ulceration was reported by 6.2% of participants with, and 7.4% of participants without, recent syphilis. Many participants reporting symptoms continued sexual activity while symptomatic, and approximately half of all symptomatic participants sought treatment. The positive and negative predictive values of urogenital discharge or genital ulcer disease in detecting STIs that are common in the study population were 14.4% and 81.5% for chlamydia in women and 8.3% and 89.5% for syphilis among gay-identified men.In our study, STIs among high-risk men and women in urban Peru were frequently asymptomatic and symptomatic participants often remained sexually active without seeking treatment. Additional research is needed to assess the costs and benefits of targeted, laboratory-based STI screening as part of a comprehensive STI control program in developing countries.

  4. A Multi-disciplinary Overview of Chagas in Periurban Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah McCune

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available There are between 8 and 11 million cases of America Human Trypanosomiasis, commonly known as Chagas disease, in Latin America. Chagas is endemic in southern Peru, especially the Arequipa region, where it has expanded from poor, rural areas to periurban communities. This paper summarizes the findings of four studies in periurban Arequipa: on determinants of disease-vector infestation; on prevalence, spatial patterns, and risk factors of Chagas; on links between migration, settlement patterns, and disease-vector infestation; and on the relationship between discordant test results and spatially clustered transmission hotspots. These studies identified two risk factors associated with the disease: population dynamics and the urbanization of poverty. Understanding the disease within this new urban context will allow for improved public health prevention efforts and policy initiatives. Discovered in 1909 by Brazilian physician Carlos Chagas, American Human Trypanosomiasis is a chronic and potentially life-threatening illness found throughout Latin America (Moncayo, 2003. Indeed, it is estimated that there are between 8 and 11 million cases in Mexico and Central and South America (Centers for Disease Control [CDC], 2009. Chagas disease, as it is most commonly known, is endemic in southern Peru, especially in the region of Arequipa. Once thought to be limited to poor, rural areas, the disease is now appearing in the periurban communities that surround Arequipa City, the capital of the region (Cornejo del Carpio, 2003. Understanding the urbanization of Chagas disease will allow public health and medical professionals to better combat the further transmission of the disease. After providing an overview of Chagas and introducing the scope of the disease in Latin America, this paper will summarize the findings of four recent studies conducted in periurban districts in Arequipa. Ultimately, this paper seeks to identify the risk factors associated with Chagas

  5. Bismuth bronze from machu picchu, peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, R B; Rutledge, J W

    1984-02-10

    The decorative bronze handle of a tumi excavated at the Inca city of Machu Picchu, Peru, contains 18 percent bismuth and appears to be the first known example of the use of bismuth with tin to make bronze. The alloy is not embrittled by the bismuth because the bismuth-rich constituent does not penetrate the grain boundaries of the matrix phase. The use of bismuth facilitates the duplex casting process by which the tumi was made and forms an alloy of unusual color.

  6. [Neonatal dengue in Peru: a case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva Delgado, Hermann; Ruiz Ríos, Juan Carlo; Vela Barbarán, Erick Leray; Rengifo Del Aguila, Deicy; García M, María; Rodríguez Benavides, Luis; Mendoza-Ticona, Alberto

    2011-03-01

    We present the case of a full-term female newborn, whose mother died seven days postpartum from multi-organ failure due to severe dengue confirmed by NS1 antigen detection and positive IgM. The newborn did not have any complication, but at the fourth day of life she developed fever, jaundice, signs of plasma leakage, thrombocytopenia, hepatomegaly, ascitis, and others signs of systemic inflammation response syndrome. She fully recovered with supportive treatment. The RT-PCR test of a peripheral blood sample revealed a positive result for the dengue virus serotype 2, confirming the first case of neonatal dengue reported in Peru.

  7. Perilous Uncertainty: Situating Women's Breast-Health Seeking in Northern Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes Constant, Tara K; Winkler, Jennifer L; Bishop, Amie; Taboada Palomino, Leyla G

    2014-06-01

    Breast cancer rates in Peru, as in other low- and middle-income countries, continue to rise, and survival rates are poor, in part because many women are diagnosed with late-stage disease. As part of a pilot project to improve breast cancer screening and diagnostic services in remote regions of Peru, the Program for Appropriate Technology in Health (PATH) partnered with Peruvian organizations to train community health workers in breast health promotion and providers in clinical breast exam (CBE). To inform these strategies, we undertook a qualitative study to determine factors that influence Peruvian women's decisions to seek CBE. Anthropological approaches incorporating the PRECEDE/PROCEED public health model guided our conversations with providers and women living in the region of the pilot intervention. Grounded theory analysis helped us uncover a central theme of uncertainty, a state of doubt and insecurity that created a sense of impotent worry and impeded clinical health-seeking behaviors. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Astrology in seventeenth-century Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosseder, Claudia

    2010-06-01

    This article discusses three aspects of the history of astrology in seventeenth-century Peru that are of larger interest for the history of science in Latin America: Creole concerns about indigenous idolatry, the impact of the Inquisition on natural philosophy, and communication between scholars within the Spanish colonies and the transatlantic world. Drawing mainly on the scholars Antonio de la Calancha, Juan de Figueroa, and Ruiz de Lozano, along with several Jesuits, the article analyzes how natural and medical astrology took shape in Peru and how they fostered astronomical investigations of the southern skies. While natural and medical astrology, showing New and Old World influences, oscillated between orthodoxy and heterodoxy, and between scholasticism and new science, judicial astrology remained undeveloped. Toward the end of the seventeenth century the discourse about astrology took an unexpected turn, reflecting a newly invigorated moral and Christian reading of the heavens that was in part a response to a deep-rooted dissatisfaction with the failure of the extirpation of idolatry campaigns. Inscribing divine and cardinal virtues, the Virgin Mary, Christian saints, and Greco-Roman allegories into the heavens was considered a way to finally solve the problem of idolatry and to convey Creole greatness.

  9. O3:K6 serotype of Vibrio parahaemolyticus identical to the global pandemic clone associated with diarrhea in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Ana I; Miranda, Hernan; Lanata, Claudio F; Prada, Ana; Hall, Eric R; Barreno, Carmen M; Nusrin, Suraia; Bhuiyan, Nurul A; Sack, David A; Nair, Gopinath Balakrish

    2007-07-01

    To determine if the Vibrio parahaemolyticus O3:K6 global pandemic clone has spread into Peru. A collection of 100 V. parahaemolyticus strains isolated from diarrhea cases in Peru were serotyped for O:K antigens and genotyped for the presence of the species-specific toxR gene and for the tdh and trh genes. In addition, the group-specific PCR (GS-PCR) and PCR for the presence of the open reading frame ORF8 of the filamentous phage f237 was performed to determine the pandemic status of the strains. Fifty strains of V. parahaemolyticus in this collection were identified as pandemic strains. Forty-six ORF8 and GS-PCR positive strains were identical to the global pandemic clone O3:K6, while four strains that also possessed the pandemic genotype and were ORF8 and GS-PCR positive belonged to serotypes O3:K68, O3:K58 and OUT (untypable):K6. One of the O3:K6 strains was isolated in 1996, indicating that the pandemic strain was present in Peru at about the same time that it caused the first outbreak in Calcutta in February 1996. Based on this first report in Peru of such strains, we recommend including V. parahaemolyticus in the differential diagnosis of the etiologic agents for diarrhea in this part of the world.

  10. Use of rapid needs assessment as a tool to identify vaccination delays in Guatemala and Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Ardenne, Katie K; Darrow, Juliana; Furniss, Anna; Chavez, Catia; Hernandez, Herminio; Berman, Stephen; Asturias, Edwin J

    2016-03-29

    To explore the use of rapid needs assessment (RNA) surveys to determine the prevalence and factors contributing to delays in vaccination of children in two low middle-income countries (LMIC). Data from two RNA surveys performed as part of program improvement evaluations in Guatemala and Peru were used for this analysis. The primary endpoint was the timeliness of immunization with delay defined as administration of vaccines beyond 28 days from recommended age for DTwP-HepB-Hib (Penta) and measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccines, as well as past age-restrictions for rotavirus vaccine. Independent risk factors analyzed included child's gender, birth year, number of children in household, maternal age, maternal education, and food insecurity. Vaccine information was available from 811 children from 838 households surveyed. High rate of immunization delays was observed, with 75.6% of children in Guatemala and 57.8% of children in Peru being delayed for the third dose of Penta primary series. Factors associated with delayed vaccination in Guatemala included advanced maternal age and increased number of children in household. In Peru, significant associations were birth year before 2009, lower maternal education level, and increased number of children in household. RNA is a fast and effective method to identify timely vaccine coverage and derive a hypothesis of factors possibly associated with vaccination delay. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Gestational syphilis and associated factors in public hospitals of Peru during 2000-2010].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Gustavo F; Tapia, Vilma; Serruya, Suzanne J

    2014-04-01

    To determine the epidemiological profile of gestational syphilis and associated factors in a Peruvian population. The study is a secondary analysis of data obtained from public hospitals in Peru for the 2000-2010 period. 652,636 pregnant women were included from 37 cities and 45 health centers in Peru. The prevalence of gestational syphilis was 0.7%, while 80.7% reported screening for gestational syphilis. The highest prevalence of maternal syphilis is found in the lowland rainforest followed by the highland rainforest. In the three regions of Peru decreased prevalence of gestational syphilis has been seen throughout the years. The prevalence for 2010 are 0.2% on the coast, in the highlands 0.23% and 0.47% in the jungle. The lack of education and prenatal care, high parity, cohabiting or single, and living in the jungle, are associated with having a positive syphilis test. The results suggests that prevalence of gestational syphilis has declined over the decade 2000-2010.

  12. Routine laboratory screening for acute and recent HIV infection in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jesse L; Segura, Eddy R; Montano, Silvia M; Leon, Segundo R; Kochel, Tadeusz; Salvatierra, Hector J; Alcantara, Jorge; Cáceres, Carlos F; Coates, Thomas J; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2010-12-01

    Before implementing screening programmes for acute HIV infection in developing countries, key issues, including cost, feasibility and public health impact, must be determined. Fourth-generation enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was compared with HIV-1 RNA PCR for the detection of acute and early HIV infection in counselling and testing populations in Lima, Peru. Adults presenting for HIV testing at designated clinics in Lima-Callao, Peru were offered additional screening for acute HIV infection. All serum samples were tested with fourth-generation Ag/Ab EIA and confirmed by line immunoassay. Negative specimens were combined into 50-sample pools for HIV-1 RNA screening by PCR analysis in standard pooling algorithms. RNA-positive samples were retested with a third-generation EIA to evaluate the relative sensitivity of standard testing procedures. Between 2007 and 2008 1191 participants were recruited. The prevalence of HIV infection was 3.2% (38/1191; 95% CI 2.2% to 4.2%) overall and 10.5% (25/237; 95% CI 6.6% to 14.5%) among men who reported sex with men (MSM). The prevalence of acute or recent HIV infection was 0.2% (95% CI 0% to 0.4%) overall and 0.8% (95% CI 0% to 2.0%) among MSM. Compared with third-generation EIA testing, both fourth-generation EIA and RNA PCR increased the rate of HIV case identification by 5.3% overall and by 8.0% within the subpopulation of MSM. Screening for acute HIV infection within Peru's resource-limited public health system was acceptable and detected a high prevalence of acute and recent HIV infection among MSM. Additional efforts are needed to screen for, and prevent, transmission of HIV among MSM in Peru during the acute seroconversion stage.

  13. Performance of the tourniquet test for diagnosing dengue in Peru

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Halsey, Eric S; Vilcarromero, Stalin; Forshey, Brett M; Rocha, Claudio; Bazan, Isabel; Stoddard, Steven T; Kochel, Tadeusz J; Casapia, Martin; Scott, Thomas W; Morrison, Amy C

    2013-01-01

    .... In the dengue-endemic city of Iquitos, Peru, we performed TTs and dengue laboratory assays on 13,548 persons with febrile disease, recruited through either active (n = 1,095) or passive (n = 12,453) surveillance...

  14. All projects related to Peru | Page 7 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: AGRICULTURAL INNOVATIONS, Urban agriculture, Capacity building, ORGANIZATIONAL CHANGE, AGRICULTURAL PRODUCTIVITY, ACCESS TO MARKETS. Region: Argentina, South America, Peru, Uruguay, North and Central America. Program: Climate Change. Total Funding: CA$ 345,841.00. Fair Access to ...

  15. All projects related to peru | Page 5 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Recent policy initiatives suggest that efforts are underway to improve the traditionally limited support granted to science, technology and innovation (STI) activities in Peru. ... Topic: AGRICULTURAL POLICY, ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH, ECOSYSTEMS, AGRICULTURAL INNOVATIONS, SOUTH AMERICA, Disease control.

  16. Vertebrados naturalizados en el Peru: historia y estado del conocimiento

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cossios, E. Daniel

    2010-01-01

    .... En el Peru, la informacion publicada sobre el tema es rara y se encuentra muchas veces restringida a publicaciones poco conocidas, lo que dificulta el analisis del problema y la toma de decisiones para su manejo...

  17. All projects related to Peru | Page 6 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: SOLID WASTES, WASTE MANAGEMENT, RECYCLING, INFORMAL SECTOR, GENDER ANALYSIS, GENDER EQUALITY, PARTICIPATORY RESEARCH. Region: Bolivia, South America, Brazil, Peru, Uruguay, North and Central America. Program: Climate Change. Total Funding: CA$ 575,000.00. Helpdesk for ...

  18. All projects related to Peru | Page 5 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2013-10-24

    End Date: October 24, 2013. Topic: RESEARCH CENTRES, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY POLICY, RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT, INNOVATIONS, DEVELOPMENT RESEARCH, INCOME GENERATION, DISADVANTAGED GROUPS, INFORMAL SECTOR. Region: Peru, South America, North and Central America.

  19. Adapting to Climate Change in Peru's Mantaro Valley | IDRC ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    The Mantaro Valley in central Peru is highly vulnerable to extreme weather events, such as droughts, floods, and frost. According to recent projections, this vulnerability will increase in coming years due to climate change.

  20. Peru and Guatemala Internal Midline Monitoring Assessment of Reading

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Agency for International Development — Save the Children is implementing Leer Juntos, a USAID-funded three-year project targeting rural, indigenous communities in Guatemala and Peru with the objective of...

  1. Identificación y cuantificación de los efectos y consecuencias de los impactos ambientales generados por la mineria de extracción de oro por lixiviación de cianuro. Caso Mineria Yanacocha SRL, en Cajamarca, Perú

    OpenAIRE

    Yacoub López, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    En el proyecto realizado se ha estudiado la situación de vulnerabilidad medioambiental, específicamente del recurso hídrico, causada por la empresa Minera Yanacocha S.R.L (MYSRL) situada en la región de Cajamarca, en el Perú. La empresa minera es origen de conflictos en relación al agua, por su situación (cabecera de cuatro cuencas hidrográficas) y por la contaminación en la cantidad y calidad de sus aguas percibida por la población local. Para conocer los posibles impactos del...

  2. Estudio cualitativo y orientaciones estratégicas: hacia el diagnóstico sobre el estado situacional de la cultura del agua en 5 cuencas de la vertiente del Atlántico, en los departamentos de Cajamarca y Amazonas

    OpenAIRE

    Autoridad Nacional del Agua; Consorcio de Investigación Económica y Social

    2014-01-01

    Expone información etnográfica sobre las distintas dimensiones de la cultura del agua de 12 localidades distribuidas entre zonas altas, medias y bajas de las administraciones locales del agua Cajamarca, Yangas-Suite, Crisnejas y Chotano-Llaucano, y tres localidades ribereñas (zona baja) de la Autoridad Local del Agua (ALA) Bagua-Santiago. El documento consta de las siguientes partes: institucionalidad hídrica multisectorial, infraestructura hídrica local, usos locales del agua, concepciones s...

  3. Aplicación de estrategias de investigación en el aprendizaje de la histología humana por los estudiantes de ll ciclo de enfermería de la Universidad Nacional de Cajamarca - sede Chota, 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Cieza Yrigoín, Demetrio

    2015-01-01

    Universidad Nacional de Educacion - UNE El presente trabajo de Investigación tuvo por finalidad analizar en qué medida dichas estrategias impactan en el aprendizaje de los estudiantes citados. Se desarrolló bajo el enfoque cuantitativo orientado por el diseño pre-experimental, con el propósito de mejorar los aprendizajes de los estudiantes en la asignatura de Histología Humana, con una población de 31 estudiantes del II ciclo de Enfermería de la Universidad Nacional de Cajamarca - sede Cho...

  4. Estrategias Metodológicas Participativas para mejorar el estilo del trabajo cooperativo en los alumnos del primer grado de educación secundaria de la Institución Educativa Privada "Delta" de la Provincia y Región Cajamarca, 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Mendoza Sanchez, Juan.

    2014-01-01

    El presente trabajo de investigación se refiere al trabajo en equipo en los estudiantes del primer grado de educación secundaria de ia institución Educativa Privada "DELTA" de la ciudad de Cajamarca. Con este trabajo nos permite contribuir a mejorar el trabajo cooperativo en nuestros estudiantes, con la finalidad de crear convicciones de superación y desarrollo en las relaciones interpersonales, solidaridad, respeto, toma de decisiones, liderazgo, en cada uno de ellos. Se evidencia que en los...

  5. Pre-travel advice concerning vector-borne diseases received by travelers prior to visiting Cuzco, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Christian R; Centeno, Emperatriz; Cruz, Briggitte; Cvetkovic-Vega, Aleksandar; Delgado, Edison; Rodriguez-Morales, Alfonso J

    2016-01-01

    Peru is an increasingly popular tourist destination that poses a risk to travelers due to endemic vector-borne diseases (VBDs). The objective of our study was to determine which factors are associated with receiving pre-travel advice (PTA) for VBDs among travelers visiting Cuzco, Peru. A cross-sectional secondary analysis based on data from a survey among travelers departing Cuzco at Alejandro Velazco Astete International Airport during the period January-March 2012 was conducted. From the 1819 travelers included in the original study, 1717 were included in secondary data analysis. Of these participants, 42.2% received PTA and 2.9% were informed about vector-borne diseases, including yellow fever (1.8%), malaria (1.6%) and dengue fever (0.1%). Receiving information on VBDs was associated with visiting areas endemic to yellow fever and dengue fever in Peru. The only disease travelers received specific recommendations for before visiting an endemic area for was yellow fever. Only 1 in 30 tourists received information on VBD prevention; few of those who traveled to an endemic area were warned about specific risks for infectious diseases prior to their trip. These important findings show that most tourists who travel to Peru do not receive PTA for the prevention of infectious and VBD, which can affect not only the travelers but their countries of origin as well. Copyright © 2015 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Brucella melitensis Isolates in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    2011, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved. Antin1icrobial Susceptibility of Brucella melitensis Isolates in Peru 9 Ryan C. Maves,1...48 human Brucella melitensis biotype 1 strains from Peru between 2000 and 2006. MICs of isolates to doxycycline, azithromycin, gentamicin, rifampin...of testing. Relapses did nut appear to be related tu drug resistance. Infection by Brucella species is a major cause of zoonotic disease

  7. Constrained Choices: Adolescents Speak on Sexuality in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Bayer, Angela M.; Tsui, Amy O.; Hindin, Michelle J.

    2010-01-01

    While numerous studies have explored adolescent sexual behavior in Peru, to date, none have explored how adolescents situate sexuality within the context of their broader lives. This information is needed to inform policies and programs. Life history interviews were conducted with 20 12–17 year-old females and males from a low-income settlement near Lima, Peru. Data were analyzed using holistic content analysis and grounded theory. Sexuality had a strong presence in adolescents’ lives. Howeve...

  8. Motives and Effectiveness of Forex Interventions; Evidence from Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Melesse Tashu

    2014-01-01

    This paper assesses empirically the motives and effectiveness of forex interventions in Peru. While the central bank of Peru states that its forex interventions aim only at containing excessive exchange rate volatility, the results of this paper show that, in practice, the interventions seem to have aimed at “leaning against the wind” as well. The results also show that forex sales, but not forex purchases, react to volatility, indicating asymmetry in the central bank’s reactions to episodes ...

  9. International Briefing 27: Training and Development in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talleri, Andres Velarde; Llinas-Audet, Xavier; Escardibul, Josep-Oriol

    2013-01-01

    Peru is in the central, western part of South America. It is the third largest country in South America and number 20 in the world. It is the country with the fourth highest population in South America. In 2010, the gross domestic product (GDP) of Peru was 154 billion USD, and its rate of growth was 8.8% (higher than the average for the region for…

  10. Quality and equity in early childhood care in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izu, Regina Moromizato

    2007-01-01

    The present study examines educational policy documents and programs on early childhood development and education in Peru. The author provides an evaluation of early childhood learning programs and their outcomes in different education centers in Peru. Health, nutrition, development, and participation are identified as key areas of concern. The study concludes with a reference to the importance of monitoring quality and equity in early childhood care.

  11. Peru : tous les projets | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Région: Guatemala, India, Mexico, Peru. Financement total : CA$ ... La majeure partie de la croissance urbaine dans le monde fait suite soit à une migration du milieu rural vers le milieu urbain, soit à une croissance démographique rapide parmi les migrants de deuxième et troisième génération. Région: Peru, Tanzania.

  12. Tendencies of the digital newspapers in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dra. Lyudmyla Yezers´ka

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes some of the tendencies of the development of the digital media in Peru. The results that are presented were obtained by means of a survey carried out to responsible people of the digital redactions of the national generalist newspapers that, when concluding the first decade of the existence of the online journalism in the country (1995-2005, had digital editions. From historical perspective, different stages of evolution and consolidation of the Peruvian daily editions in the Global Network have not had temporary clear definition. The media progressed at their own pace, depending among other factors –at the time of entry into the network, the staff assigned to the publication, and especially on the strength of the journalistic company and its policy regarding digital editing. With regard to the presence on the Internet, digital newspapers have shown a steady and numerous growth, over the first decade (1995-2005.

  13. Coal and cremation in ancient Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, William E.

    2004-01-01

    After my visit to the adobe-walled archaeological site of Chan Chan, near Trujillo in northern Peru in the summer of 2000 (Geotimes, August 2003), my guide asked if I would like to see the metallurgical furnaces used by the Chimú, ancient residents and master metalsmiths of the region. Chan Chan was the capital of the Chimú Empire (A.D. 1100-1400) and the largest pre-Columbian city in the Americas. These furnaces, my guide explained, were where Andean gold, silver and copper ores were smelted and fabricated into jewelry, masks and plates sought by the Spaniards. We left the main part of the complex, followed a dusty trail, and arrived at a site marked by fresh-looking, redbrown, clinker-like debris.

  14. Additions of angiosperms to the Flora of Peru from the Andean-Amazonian forests of southern Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isau Huamantupa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We present 25 new records of angiosperms for the Peruvian flora, as a result of different botanical explorations conducted in southern Peru, mainly in the areas of the departments of Cusco, Apurimac and Madre de Dios.

  15. Chagas Disease, Migration and Community Settlement Patterns in Arequipa, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, Robert H.; Cornejo del Carpio, Juan G.; Naquira, Cesar; Bern, Caryn; Levy, Michael Z.

    2009-01-01

    Background Chagas disease is one of the most important neglected tropical diseases in the Americas. Vectorborne transmission of Chagas disease has been historically rare in urban settings. However, in marginal communities near the city of Arequipa, Peru, urban transmission cycles have become established. We examined the history of migration and settlement patterns in these communities, and their connections to Chagas disease transmission. Methodology/Principal Findings This was a qualitative study that employed focus group discussions and in-depth interviews. Five focus groups and 50 in-depth interviews were carried out with 94 community members from three shantytowns and two traditional towns near Arequipa, Peru. Focus groups utilized participatory methodologies to explore the community's mobility patterns and the historical and current presence of triatomine vectors. In-depth interviews based on event history calendars explored participants' migration patterns and experience with Chagas disease and vectors. Focus group data were analyzed using participatory analysis methodologies, and interview data were coded and analyzed using a grounded theory approach. Entomologic data were provided by an ongoing vector control campaign. We found that migrants to shantytowns in Arequipa were unlikely to have brought triatomines to the city upon arrival. Frequent seasonal moves, however, took shantytown residents to valleys surrounding Arequipa where vectors are prevalent. In addition, the pattern of settlement of shantytowns and the practice of raising domestic animals by residents creates a favorable environment for vector proliferation and dispersal. Finally, we uncovered a phenomenon of population loss and replacement by low-income migrants in one traditional town, which created the human settlement pattern of a new shantytown within this traditional community. Conclusions/Significance The pattern of human migration is therefore an important underlying determinant of

  16. Concentrations of urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and 8-isoprostane in women exposed to woodsmoke in a cookstove intervention study in San Marcos, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commodore, Adwoa A; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Chang, Yan; Hartinger, Stella M; Lanata, Claudio F; Mäusezahl, Daniel; Gil, Ana I; Hall, Daniel B; Aguilar-Villalobos, Manuel; Vena, John E; Wang, Jia-Sheng; Naeher, Luke P

    2013-10-01

    Nearly half of the world's population is exposed to household air pollution (HAP) due to long hours spent in close proximity to unvented cooking fires. The effect of woodsmoke exposure on oxidative stress was examined by investigating the association between woodsmoke exposure and biomarkers of DNA oxidation (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine [8-OHdG]) and lipid peroxidation (8-isoprostane) among control and intervention stove users. HAP exposure assessment was conducted within the framework of a community-randomized controlled trial of 51 communities in San Marcos Province, Cajamarca Region, Peru. The first morning urine voids after 48h HAP exposure assessment from a subset of 45 control and 39 intervention stove users were analyzed for 8-OHdG and 8-isoprostane. General linear models and correlation analyses were performed. Urinary oxidative stress biomarkers ranged from 11.2 to 2270.0μg/g creatinine (median: 132.6μg/g creatinine) for 8-OHdG and from 0.1 to 4.5μg/g creatinine (median: 0.8μg/g creatinine) for 8-isoprostane among all study subjects (n=84). After controlling for the effects of traffic in the community and eating food exposed to fire among all subjects, cooking time was weakly, but positively associated with urinary 8-OHdG (r=0.29, p=0.01, n=80). Subjects' real-time personal CO exposures were negatively associated with 8-OHdG, particularly the maximum 30-second CO exposure during the sampling period (r=-0.32, p=0.001, n=73). 48h time integrated personal PM2.5 was negatively, but marginally associated with urinary 8-isoprostane (r=-0.21, p=0.09, n=69) after controlling for the effect of distance of homes to the road. Urinary 8-isoprostane levels reported in the available literature are comparable to results found in the current study. However there were relatively high levels of urinary 8-OHdG compared to data in the available literature for 8-OHdG excretion. Results suggest a sustained systemic oxidative stress among these Peruvian women chronically

  17. Concentrations of Urinary 8-Hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine and 8-isoprostane in Women Exposed to Woodsmoke in a Cookstove Intervention Study in San Marcos, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Commodore, Adwoa A.; Zhang, Junfeng (Jim); Chang, Yan; Hartinger, Stella M.; Lanata, Claudio F.; Mäusezahl, Daniel; Gil, Ana I.; Hall, Daniel B.; Aguilar-Villalobos, Manuel; Vena, John E.; Wang, Jia-Sheng; Naeher, Luke P.

    2013-01-01

    Nearly half of the world’s population is exposed to household air pollution (HAP) due to long hours spent in close proximity to unvented cooking fires. The effect of woodsmoke exposure on oxidative stress was examined by investigating the association between woodsmoke exposure and biomarkers of DNA oxidation (8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine [8-OHdG]) and lipid peroxidation (8-isoprostane) among control and intervention stove users. HAP exposure assessment was conducted within the framework of a community-randomized controlled trial of 51 communities in San Marcos Province, Cajamarca Region, Peru. The first morning urine voids after 48hr HAP exposure assessment from a subset of 45 control and 39 intervention stove users were analyzed for 8-OHdG and 8-isoprostane. General linear models and correlation analyses were performed. Urinary oxidative stress biomarkers ranged from 11.2 to 2270.0 μg/g creatinine (median: 132.6 μg/g creatinine) for 8-OHdG and from 0.1 to 4.5 μg/g creatinine (median: 0.8 μg/g creatinine) for 8-isoprostane among all study subjects (n=84). After controlling for the effects of traffic in the community and eating food exposed to fire among all subjects, cooking time was weakly, but positively associated with urinary 8-OHdG (r=0.29, p=0.01, n=80). Subjects’ real-time personal CO exposures were negatively associated with 8-OHdG, particularly the maximum 30-second CO exposure during the sampling period (r=−0.32, p=0.001, n=73). 48hr time integrated personal PM2.5 was negatively, but marginally associated with urinary 8-isoprostane (r=−0.21, p=0.09, n=69) after controlling for the effect of distance of homes to the road. Urinary 8-isoprostane levels reported in the available literature are comparable to results found in the current study. However there were relatively high levels of urinary 8-OHdG compared to data in the available literature for 8-OHdG excretion. Results suggest a sustained systemic oxidative stress among these Peruvian women

  18. [Characteristics of violence during teenage pregnancy in Lima, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contreras-Pulache, Hans; Mori-Quispe, Elizabeth; Hinostroza-Camposano, Willy D; Yancachajlla-Apaza, Maribel; Lam-Figueroa, Nelly; Chacón-Torrico, Horacio

    2013-07-01

    To determine the characteristics of violence seen in pregnant teenagers who were treated at the Instituto Nacional Materno Perinatal (INMP) in Lima, Peru. A cross-sectional study was carried out by INMP between January and March, 2010 using a probabilistic and systematic sampling. The study unit comprises every hospitalized teenager who had just given birth and who lived in Lima. A semi-structured interview was conducted. History of violence was operationalized into: verbal violence (insults, ridicule, and humiliation), physical violence (arm pulling, hair pulling, pushes), direct aggression (slaps, kicking, burns) and sexual violence (sexual intercourse without consent). 292 teenage mothers aged 16,5 ± 1 in average took part in the study. 47.9% lived with their partners and 51.4% were single. In 97.3% of the cases, they got pregnant as a result of a conserted sexual relationship, while 2.7% got pregnant as a result of rape. 90.1% of teenage mothers reported not having planned the pregnancy. Conserning history of violence: 48.1% had had verbal violence, 17.1% physical violence, 8.2% direct aggression and 6.8% sexual violence. Violence during teenage pregnancy is not an isolated event; actually, it is rather common in any of its forms.

  19. Lead exposure in indigenous communities of the Amazon basin, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anticona, Cynthia; Bergdahl, Ingvar A; Lundh, Thomas; Alegre, Yuri; Sebastian, Miguel San

    2011-12-01

    Since 2006, three studies have reported elevated levels of lead (Pb) among the indigenous population of the Corrientes river, in the Amazon basin of Peru. Due to the large evidence of environmental pollution related to oil exploitation in the area, this activity has been suggested as the source of exposure. This study aimed to evaluate Pb levels in the population and environment of two communities exposed and one community non-exposed to the oil exploitation activity. Blood lead levels (BLL) were determined by the instrument Leadcare. A comparison with the graphite furnace atomic absorption technique was performed in order to validate the Leadcare results. Environmental samples were analyzed by inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy. Among 361 capillary samples, the mean BLL was 9.4 μg/dl. Mean BLL of the communities exposed (n=171, x¯=9.5 μg/dl) and non-exposed (n=190, x¯=9.2 μg/dl) to the oil activity were not significantly different. Pb levels in environmental samples were below the maximum permissible levels. The sources of exposure could not be identified. Elevated levels of Pb in the oil-non-exposed community pointed out at other sources not yet clarified. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessment of Rehabilitation Infrastructure in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhs, Amy K; LaGrone, Lacey N; Moscoso Porras, Miguel G; Rodríguez Castro, Manuel J; Ecos Quispe, Rosa Lizbeth; Mock, Charles N

    2017-11-21

    To assess rehabilitation infrastructure in Peru in terms of the World Health Organization (WHO) health systems building blocks. Anonymous quantitative survey; questions were based on the WHO's Guidelines for Essential Trauma Care and rehabilitation professionals' input. Large public hospitals and referral centers and an online survey platform. Convenience sample of hospital personnel working in rehabilitation and neurology (N=239), recruited through existing contacts and professional societies. Not applicable. Outcome measures were for 4 WHO domains: health workforce, health service delivery, essential medical products and technologies, and health information systems. Regarding the domain of health workforce, 47% of physical therapists, 50% of occupational therapists, and 22% of physiatrists never see inpatients. Few reported rehabilitative nurses (15%) or prosthetist/orthotists (14%) at their hospitals. Even at the largest hospitals, most reported ≤3 occupational therapists (54%) and speech-language pathologists (70%). At hospitals without speech-language pathologists, physical therapists (49%) or nobody (34%) perform speech-language pathology roles. At hospitals without occupational therapists, physical therapists most commonly (59%) perform occupational therapy tasks. Alternate prosthetist/orthotist task performers are occupational therapists (26%), physical therapists (19%), and physicians (16%). Forty-four percent reported interdisciplinary collaboration. Regarding the domain of health services, the most frequent inpatient and outpatient rehabilitation barriers were referral delays (50%) and distance/transportation (39%), respectively. Regarding the domain of health information systems, 28% reported rehabilitation service data collection. Regarding the domain of essential medical products and technologies, electrophysical agents (88%), gyms (81%), and electromyography (76%) were most common; thickened liquids (19%), swallow studies (24%), and cognitive

  1. Poverty Dynamics in Peru 2001-2003: A Probit Model Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Gambetta Podesta, Renzo

    2007-01-01

    The objectives of this paper consist on two main parts:a descriptive one and an explanatory one. For the first part I used transition matrices to identify people who entered and left the poverty line in Peru between 2001-2003.Probabilistic regressions models were used to explain the main determinants of poverty dynamics. Changes in house members, decrease of active members,changes in years of schooling and changes in the access of essential public services play an important role to expl...

  2. High blood pressure and obesity in indigenous ashaninkas of Junin region, Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, Candice; Área de Investigación y Desarrollo, A. B. PRISMA, Lima, Perú. Médico cirujano.; Zavaleta, Carol; Unidad Salud Indígena-Fundación Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú.6 Departamento de Geografía, Universidad McGill. Montreal, Canadá. Médico cirujano.; Cabrera, Lilia; Área de Investigación y Desarrollo, A. B. PRISMA, Lima, Perú. enfermera, especialista en Salud Pública.; Gilman, Robert H.; Área de Investigación y Desarrollo, A. B. PRISMA, Lima, Perú. CRONICAS Centro de Excelencia en Enfermedades Crónicas, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Baltimore, EE. UU. médico, especialista en enfermedades infecciosas.; Miranda, J. Jaime; CRONICAS Centro de Excelencia en Enfermedades Crónicas, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia. Lima, Perú. médico, magíster y doctor en Epidemiología.

    2014-01-01

    In order to determine the prevalence of high blood pressure and obesity in indigenous Ashaninkas, with limited contact with Western culture, a cross-sectional study was conducted in 2008 in five Ashaninka communities of the Junin region in the jungle of Peru. Individuals aged 35 or older were included. 76 subjects were evaluated (average age 47.4 years old, 52.6 % women) corresponding to 43.2% of the eligible population. The prevalence of hypertension was 14.5% (CI 95%: 6.4-22.6) and the prev...

  3. Respiratory Syncytial Virus-Associated Hospitalizations in Pre-Mature Infants in Lima, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ochoa, Theresa J.; Bautista, Rossana; Dávila, Carmen; Salazar, José Antonio; Bazán, Carlos; Guerra, Oscar; Llanos, Jean Pierre; López, Luis; Zea-Vera, Alonso; Ecker, Lucie

    2014-01-01

    We conducted a prospective cohort study in four hospitals in Lima, Peru in infants with a birth weight ≤ 1,500 g followed from birth hospital discharge up to 1 year of age to determine the incidence of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) hospitalizations. We enrolled 222 infants from March of 2009 to March of 2010: 48 infants with a birth weight hospitalizations was 116.2 per 1,000 child-years (244.9 in infants with a birth weight hospitalization is high among pre-mature infants in Lima. PMID:25294617

  4. Seroprevalence of caprine artritis-encephalitis virus in goats of Lima region, Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes M., Angel; Laboratorio de Microbiología y Parasitología Veterinaria, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Rivera G., Hermelinda; Laboratorio de Microbiología y Parasitología Veterinaria, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima Perú.; Ramírez V., Mercy; Laboratorio de Microbiología y Parasitología Veterinaria, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima; Cardozo Z., Imelda; Servicio Nacional de Sanidad Animal (SENASA), Lima; Manchego S., Alberto; Laboratorio de Microbiología y Parasitología Veterinaria, Facultad de Medicina Veterinaria, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima

    2015-01-01

    The seroprevalence of caprine artritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV) in four provinces of Lima Region, Peru was determined in 381 goat serum samples (325 females and 56 males) older than 12 months from 89 flocks reared under intensive (n=3), semiextensive (n=49) and transhumant (n=46) production systems. The detection of antibodies against CAEV was done by a competitive-inhibition ELISA test. The overall seroprevalence of CAEV was 0.26 ± 0.09% (1/381). The seropositive goat belonged to one flock ...

  5. Outbreak of norovirus group II in a military training center, Peru 2013

    OpenAIRE

    Ramos, Mariana; Centro de Investigación de Enfermedades Tropicales de la Marina de EE. UU., Lima, Perú.; Soto, Giselle; Centro de Investigación de Enfermedades Tropicales de la Marina de EE. UU., Lima, Perú.; Loayza, Luis; Dirección de Salud de la Marina de Guerra del Perú, Lima, Perú.; Valle, Rubén; Centro de Investigación de Enfermedades Tropicales de la Marina de EE. UU., Lima, Perú; Luna, Giannina; Centro de Investigación de Enfermedades Tropicales de la Marina de EE. UU., Lima, Perú.; Gonzales, Sofia; Centro Médico Naval “CMST”, Lima, Perú.; Quispe, Jose; Dirección de Salud de la Marina de Guerra del Perú, Lima, Perú.; Silva, Maria; Centro de Investigación de Enfermedades Tropicales de la Marina de EE. UU., Lima, Perú.; Wong, Juan; Centro de Investigación de Enfermedades Tropicales de la Marina de EE. UU., Lima, Perú.; Bausch, Daniel G.; Centro de Investigación de Enfermedades Tropicales de la Marina de EE. UU., Lima, Perú

    2015-01-01

    We report an outbreak of norovirus (NoV) which occurred at a military training center in Peru. Thirteen stool samples that were taken from initial cases turned out positive for NoV GII by RT-PCR. A case-control study was performed to determine factors associated with infection.164 probable cases (45.2% clinical attack rate) were identified. The only factor associated with infection was “having shared room with a case” (ORa = 1.7; 95% CI 1.1 to 2.7).Epidemiological findings suggest that the vi...

  6. 80 FR 24838 - Importation of Citrus From Peru; Expansion of Citrus-Growing Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    ... From Peru; Expansion of Citrus-Growing Area AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA... citrus fruit from the entire country of Peru into the continental United States. Currently, the... zones in Peru, subject to a systems approach. However, based on the findings of a pest list and...

  7. 79 FR 46404 - Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Trade Policy Mission to Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Trade Policy Mission to Peru AGENCY... Trade Policy Mission to Peru originally scheduled for November 12-13, 2014, in Lima, Peru, to revise the...

  8. 81 FR 36214 - Proposed Modification of Class D Airspace; Peru, IN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-06

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Part 71 Proposed Modification of Class D Airspace; Peru, IN AGENCY.... Additionally, this action would add Peru, Grissom ARB, IN to the subtitle of the airspace designation. DATES... within the scope of that authority as it would modify Class D airspace at Grissom ARB, Peru, IN. Comments...

  9. 79 FR 28683 - Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Trade Policy Mission to Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-05-19

    ... International Trade Administration Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Trade Policy Mission to Peru AGENCY... Efficiency (RE&EE) Trade Policy Mission to Lima, Peru for November 12- 13, 2014. The mission is designed to... environment conducive to growth in Peru's RE&EE market; (2) introducing U.S. RE&EE exporters to key Peruvian...

  10. 80 FR 55015 - Importation of Citrus From Peru; Expansion of Citrus-Growing Area

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-14

    ... Service 7 CFR Part 319 [Docket No. APHIS-2015-0005] RIN 0579-AE09 Importation of Citrus From Peru... entire country of Peru to be imported into the continental United States. Currently, the regulations... Peru, subject to a systems approach. However, based on the findings of a pest list and commodity import...

  11. 77 FR 33624 - Extension of Import Restrictions Imposed on Archaeological and Ethnological Materials From Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-07

    ... Extension of Import Restrictions Imposed on Archaeological and Ethnological Materials From Peru AGENCY: U.S... reflect the extension of import restrictions on certain archaeological and ethnological material from Peru... seq.), the United States entered into a bilateral agreement with the Republic of Peru on June 9, 1997...

  12. [Child development in poor areas of Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, Adrián Alberto; Gallestey, Jorge Bacallao; Vargas-Machuca, Rocío; Velarde, Roxana Aguilar

    2017-06-08

    The objective of the study was to demonstrate the influence of several socioeconomic factors on the motor and language development of children under 5 from the baseline study conducted within the framework of the Joint Program for Children, Food Security, and Nutrition, implemented by five United Nations agencies across 65 districts in the departments of Loreto, Ayacucho, Huancavelica, and Apurímac, Peru. Dichotomous logistic regression models were used to estimate the likelihood of achievement of motor and language milestones, while polynomial regression models were used to estimate the last milestone achieved and the number of milestones achieved. The study analyzes the influence that maternal education, urban vs. rural housing, and unmet basic needs have on the difference between actual results and expected results for age was analyzed. Children living in rural areas, those whose mothers had low educational attainment, and those from households with unmet basic needs exhibited poorer outcomes in the two areas of development assessed. As the number of risk factors increased, so did the developmental delay. Evaluation of child development and follow-up of families during the child-rearing process should be prioritized by health systems and social programs. The instruments used were sensitive to three criteria for validation.

  13. Mass media in Peru promotes "responsible parenthood".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brace, J; Pareja, R

    1985-01-01

    This article describes a media campaign being carried out in Peru under the auspices of the Ministry of Health. The overall theme of the campaign is Responsible Parenthood, specifically in the areas of family planing, oral rehydration, and immunization. The mass media campaign was based on the results of extensive audience research data that identified knowledge and beliefs in these areas. The research identified 2 target audiences for family planning messages: those who want no more children and those who are using traditional contraceptive methods. In addition to quantitative audience surveys, focus group discussions were held. These groups revealed important information about contraceptive habits, male attitudes toward family planning, and the folk vocabulary used for family planning activities. They further suggested that the quality of services given in health centers affects future use of that service and that the most credible source of information about family planning is considered to be a mature female doctor, herself a mother. Pretesting of television spots for the campaign was valuable for identifying unacceptable or ineffective images. It was also learned that radio and telvision spots cannot be the same; rather, they require unique content.

  14. Smoothing the way to opportunity in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdivia, B

    1999-11-01

    Since 1990, poor women in Peru have suffered from the impact of structural adjustment policies, which have lead to low wages, poor working conditions, and a general deterioration in the status of women workers. To address these problems, the Asociacion Aurora Vivar began its Alternative Technical Training Program for Women in July 1992, with the aim of increasing the entrepreneurial skills of women. The project aimed to support women who have problems at work, those who are unemployed and those with low income. Moreover, the project sought to increase women's participation in nontraditional areas of work. Training focused on increasing women's technical skills, including the repair of home appliances, and on personal development, such as leadership skills, confidence building, and business management. The project attracted a diverse group of women who took part in the training for a variety of reasons. The women's new capacities and skills create a positive image for them within the household. Aurora Vivar acknowledges the importance of vocational education to increase women's opportunities to earn a living. The association is proposing reforms in the educational system to introduce courses on business management, credit, and other technical skills as part of the formal education system.

  15. Overweight, obesity and chronic malnutrition in 6 to 9 year-old children in Peru, 2009-2010

    OpenAIRE

    Pajuelo-Ramírez, Jaime; Instituto de Investigaciones Clínicas, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú. Médico cirujano, magister en Nutrición.; Sánchez-Abanto, José; Centro Nacional de Alimentación y Nutrición, Instituto Nacional de Salud. Lima, Perú. nutricionista, magister en Nutrición.; Alvarez-Dongo, Doris; Centro Nacional de Alimentación y Nutrición, Instituto Nacional de Salud. Lima, Perú. nutricionista.; Tarqui-Mamani, Carolina; Centro Nacional de Alimentación y Nutrición, Instituto Nacional de Salud. Lima, Perú. Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima, Perú. obstetriz, magister en Epidemiología con especialidad en Estadística.; Aguero-Zamora, Rosario; Hospital Nacional Dos de Mayo. Lima, Perú. médico cirujano.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. To determine the prevalence of overweight, obesity and chronic malnutrition in 6- to 9-year-old children in Peru. Materials and methods. A cross-cutting study based on the 2009-2010 National Household Survey. The size/age ratio was analyzed with references of the National Center for Health Statistic (NCSH) and the World Health Organization (WHO), considering less than two standard deviations for chronic malnutrition (CM); and the Must and WHO reference tables to measure the bo...

  16. High Prevalence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae in Children with Acute Respiratory Infections from Lima, Peru

    OpenAIRE

    del Valle-Mendoza, Juana; Orellana-Peralta, Fiorella; Marcelo-Rodr?guez, Alvaro; Verne, Eduardo; Esquivel-Vizcarra, M?nica; Silva-Caso, Wilmer; Aguilar-Luis, Miguel Angel; Weilg, Pablo; Casabona-Or?, Ver?nica; Ugarte, Claudia; del Valle, Luis J.

    2017-01-01

    Background Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae are atypical pathogens responsible for pneumonia and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in low income countries. The study objective is to determine the prevalence of this pathogens in Peruvian children with acute respiratory infections. Methods A consecutive cross-sectional study was conducted in Lima, Peru from May 2009 to September 2010. A total of 675 children admitted with clinical diagnoses of acute respiratory ...

  17. Características morfométricas, genéticas, alimenticias y vectoriales de Panstrongylus herreri procedentes de Jaén (Cajamarca y Cajaruro (Amazonas, Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Ancca

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo. Comparar las características morfológicas, alimenticias y genéticas de dos poblaciones de Panstrongylus herreri, de los distritos de Jaén (Cajamarca y Cajaruro (Amazonas. Materiales y métodos. Se colectó especímenes adultos de P. herreri, 42 (Jaén y 68 (Cajaruro. Se utilizó la morfometría geométrica para evaluar el dimorfismo sexual de tamaño y conformación. El perfil genómico se realizó por amplificación del espaciador interno transcrito del ADNr (ITS-2. La amplificación del espaciador intergénico del gen mini-exón, permitió la caracterización molecular de los trypanosomas aislados. Se utilizó la prueba de precipitina para conocer las fuentes de alimentación de los vectores y así poder asociarlos a posibles reservorios del parásito. Resultados. El análisis morfométrico demostró que el dimorfismo sexual de tamaño fue similar (p>0,05; no ocurrió lo mismo con el dimorfismo de la conformación; asimismo no se encontró diferencias de tamaño al comparar por separado hembras y machos de Jaén y Cajaruro. Por ITS-2, se evaluó cinco especímenes de cada distrito, en ellos se observó una banda de 960 pb aproximadamente. Sólo en Cajaruro se encontraron triatominos parasitados, que fue caracterizado como Trypanosoma cruzi TCI (350 pb. Se identificó al cobayo como la fuente de alimento más frecuente. Conclusiones. Ambas poblaciones de P. herreri por morfometría geométrica e ITS-2, no evidenció diferencias, indicando que se trataría de una misma población y por consiguiente de la misma procedencia. La sangre de cobayo fue la más frecuente fuente de alimento, pudiendo ser el principal reservorio para la enfermedad de Chagas en esta zona del Perú.

  18. Cluster of Imported Vivax Malaria in Travelers Returning From Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weitzel, Thomas; Labarca, Jaime; Cortes, Claudia P; Rosas, Reinaldo; Balcells, M Elvira; Perret, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    We report a cluster of imported vivax malaria in three of five Chilean travelers returning from Peru in March 2015. The cluster highlights the high risk of malaria in the Loreto region in northern Peru, which includes popular destinations for international nature and adventure tourism. According to local surveillance data, Plasmodium vivax is predominating, but Plasmodium falciparum is also present, and the incidence of both species has increased during recent years. Travelers visiting this region should be counseled about the prevention of malaria and the options for chemoprophylaxis. © 2015 International Society of Travel Medicine.

  19. An Ectopic Case of Tunga spp. Infection in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maco, Vicente; Maco, Vicente P.; Gotuzzo, Eduardo

    2010-01-01

    Tungiasis is a neglected ectoparasitism of impoverished areas in South America and sub-Saharan Africa. The sand flea Tunga spp. preferably infests the soles and the periungueal and interdigital regions of the feet. Ectopic tungiasis is rare, even in highly endemic areas. We describe a case of an indigenous patient in Peru who presented with a nodular lesion in the extensor aspect of the knee and whose biopsy was compatible with Tunga spp. This is the first documented case of knee tungiasis in an endemic country. The historical, clinical, histological, and current epidemiological aspects of tungiasis in Peru are discussed here. PMID:20519602

  20. The tribe Phanaeini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Figueroa

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We examine the occurrence of the tribe Phanaeini (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Scarabaeinae in Peru based on the collection at Museo de Historia Natural of the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos and on data provided in literature. Each species is presented with citations of its diagnosis, distribution and related comments. Peruvian Phanaeini includes 30 species in nine genera: Coprophanaeus, Dendropaemon, Gromphas, Oruscatus, Oxysternon, Phanaeus, Sulcophanaeus, Tetramereia and Megatharsis. Oruscatus davus is the only species distributed in the high Andes; Phanaeus lunaris and P. achilles occur in the northern arid zone shared by Peru and Ecuador; the remaining species are Amazonian.

  1. Peru: Forum for a New United States Security Strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-20

    Jovenes , c- zhanty areas, where the facilities that were designed to support a opulation of one million are now trying to maintain ten times that number...Jaime Paz Zamora of Bolivia in public statements. 15. State Department. 16. See for example Gordon H McCormick, The Shining Path and the Future of Peru...Drugs in the Andes, Washington DC, 1991. 52 APPENDIX 1. - PERU, NATURAL TOPOGRAPHY -0 80 7672 0 C-1 n B’pt ovndo( Y repritlnsfo’on ECUADOR -4 Ř SE V

  2. Popular video for rural development in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvelo Rios, J M

    1989-01-01

    Peru developed its first use of video for training and education in rural areas over a decade ago. On completion of the project in 1986, over 400,000 peasants had attended video courses lasting from 5-20 days. The courses included rural health, family planning, reforestation, agriculture, animal husbandry, housing, nutrition, and water sanitation. There were 125 course packages made and 1,260 video programs from 10-18 minutes in length. There were 780 additional video programs created on human resource development, socioeconomic diagnostics and culture. 160 specialists were trained to produce audiovisual materials and run the programs. Also, 70 trainers from other countries were trained. The results showed many used the training in practical applications. To promote rural development 2 things are needed , capital and physical inputs, such as equipment, fertilizers, pesticides, etc. The video project provided peasants an additional input that would help them manage the financial and physical inputs more efficiently. Video was used because many farmers are illiterate or speak a language different from the official one. Printed guides that contained many illustrations and few words served as memory aids and group discussions reinforced practical learning. By seeing, hearing, and doing, the training was effective. There were 46% women which made fertility and family planning subjects more easily communicated. The production of teaching modules included field investigations, academic research, field recording, tape editing, and experimental application in the field. An agreement with the peasants was initiated before a course began to help insure full participation and to also make sure resources were available to use the knowledge gained. The courses were limited to 30 and the cost per participant was $34 per course.

  3. Implementing Climate Services in Peru: CLIMANDES Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavado-Casimiro, Waldo; Mauchle, Fabian; Diaz, Amelia; Seiz, Gabriela; Rubli, Alex; Rossa, Andrea; Rosas, Gabriela; Ita, Niceforo; Calle, Victoria; Villegas, Esequiel; Ambrosetti, Paolo; Brönnimann, Stefan; Hunziker, Stefan; Jacques, Martin; Croci-Maspoli, Mischa; Konzelmann, Thomas; Gubler, Stefanie; Rohrer, Mario

    2014-05-01

    The climate variability and change will have increasing influence on the economic and social development of all countries and regions, such as the Andes in Latin America. The CLIMANDES project (Climate services to support decision-making in the Andean Region) will address these issues in Peru. CLIMANDES supports the WMO Regional Training Centre (RTC) in Lima, which is responsible for the training of specialized human resources in meteorology and climatology in the South American Andes (Module 1). Furthermore, CLIMANDES will provide high-quality climate services to inform policy makers in the Andean region (Module 2). It is coordinated by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) and constitutes a pilot project under the umbrella of the WMO-led Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS). The project is funded by the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation (SDC) and runs from August 2012 - July 2015. Module 1 focuses on restructuring the curricula of Meteorology at the La Molina Agraria University (UNALM) and applied training of meteorologists of the Peruvian National Service of Meteorology and Hydrology (SENAMHI). In Module 2, the skills will be shared and developed in the production and delivery of high-quality climate products and services tailored to the needs of the decision makers in the pilot regions Cusco and Junín. Such services will benefit numerous sectors including agriculture, education, health, tourism, energy, transport and others. The goals of the modules 1 and 2 will be achieved through the collaboration of the UNALM, SENAMHI and the Federal Office of Meteorology and Climatology MeteoSwiss, with the support of the University of Bern (UNIBE), Meteodat and WMO.

  4. Genetic diversity of vaccine candidate antigens in Plasmodium falciparum isolates from the Amazon basin of Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucas Carmen M

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several of the intended Plasmodium falciparum vaccine candidate antigens are highly polymorphic and could render a vaccine ineffective if their antigenic sites were not represented in the vaccine. In this study, characterization of genetic variability was performed in major B and T-cell epitopes within vaccine candidate antigens in isolates of P. falciparum from Peru. Methods DNA sequencing analysis was completed on 139 isolates of P. falciparum collected from endemic areas of the Amazon basin in Loreto, Peru from years 1998 to 2006. Genetic diversity was determined in immunological important regions in circumsporozoite protein (CSP, merozoite surface protein-1 (MSP-1, apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA-1, liver stage antigen-1 (LSA-1 and thrombospondin-related anonymous protein (TRAP. Alleles identified by DNA sequencing were aligned with the vaccine strain 3D7 and DNA polymorphism analysis and FST study-year pairwise comparisons were done using the DnaSP software. Multilocus analysis (MLA was performed and average of expected heterozygosity was calculated for each loci and haplotype over time. Results Three different alleles for CSP, seven for MSP-1 Block 2, one for MSP-1 Block 17, three for AMA-1 and for LSA-1 each and one for TRAP were identified. There were 24 different haplotypes in 125 infections with complete locus typing for each gene. Conclusion Characterization of the genetic diversity in Plasmodium isolates from the Amazon Region of Peru showed that P. falciparum T and B cell epitopes in these antigens have polymorphisms more similar to India than to Africa. These findings are helpful in the formulation of a vaccine considering restricted repertoire populations.

  5. Epidemiology of transfusion-transmitted infections among multi-transfused patients in seven hospitals in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguna-Torres, V A; Pérez-Bao, J; Chauca, G; Sovero, M; Blichtein, D; Chunga, A; Flores, W; Retamal, A; Mendoza, S; Cruz, M; Monge, Z; Lavalle, M; Gutiérrez, J; Málaga, J; Soto, E; Loayza, N; Bolívar, D; Reyna, R; Mendoza, C; Oré, M; González, J; Suárez, M; Montano, S M; Sánchez, J L; Sateren, W; Bautista, C T; Olson, J G; Xueref, S

    2005-12-01

    Transfusion-transmitted infections (TTIs) constitute a major health problem worldwide where routine screening of blood or blood products is improperly done, and where non-medical injecting medications and/or drug use are prevalent. Prevalence and risk factors vary by geographic location and by the specific TTI (including HIV-1, HBV, HCV and HTLV-I). To determine the prevalence and risk factors associated with TTIs among a sample of multi-transfused adult patients in Peru. A cross-sectional multi-center study was conducted across seven major hospitals in Peru from February 2003 to September 2004. Self-reported behavior information (medical procedures, number of sexual partners, and drug use history) was analyzed, along with a review of exposure history from hospital medical records. Prevalences were calculated by TTI for different exposures, along with unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios for infection risk. Overall, 192 (54.7%) of 351 multi-transfused patients were found infected with one or more TTIs. Number of transfusion units, years of transfusion history (6 or more), and number of treatment facilities (2 or more) were associated with HCV infection. Hemodialysis history was a common risk factor associated with HBV, HCV and HTLV-I infection. HIV infection was associated only with total number of transfusion units received. High prevalences of HBV and HCV infection were found among Peruvian multi-transfused patients and were associated with a past history and number of blood transfusions, as well as with past hemodialysis procedures. TTIs continue to represent a significant public health problem in Peru. Continued vigilant attention to blood safety procedures, including universal screening and health care provider education, is recommended.

  6. The etiology and management of genital ulcers in the Dominican Republic and Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Jorge; Volquez, Claudio; Totten, Patricia A; Campos, Pablo E; Ryan, Caroline; Catlin, Mary; Hasbun, Julia; Rosado De Quiñones, Margarita; Sanchez, Cesar; De Lister, Martha Butler; Weiss, Judith B; Ashley, Rhoda; Holmes, King K

    2002-10-01

    Clinical diagnosis of genital ulcers is difficult, and diagnostic tests are least available in settings where rates of disease are highest. The World Health Organization (WHO) has developed protocols for the syndromic management of genital ulcers in resource-poor settings. However, because risk factors, patterns and causes of disease, and antimicrobial susceptibilities differ from region to region and over time, they must be adapted to local situations. The goal of this study was to determine etiologic factors, evaluate syndromic management, and compare polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing with other diagnostic alternatives for genital ulcers among patients attending sexually transmitted disease clinics in the Dominican Republic and Peru. Eighty-one men with genital ulcers in the Dominican Republic and 63 in Peru underwent identical interviews and identical multiplex PCR (M-PCR) tests of genital lesion specimens for etiologic diagnoses. Algorithms for managing genital ulcers were developed. In the Dominican Republic, 5% were M-PCR-positive for, 26% for, and 43% for herpes simplex virus (HSV); in Peru, 10%, 5%, and 43%, respectively, were positive. The WHO algorithm for treating syphilis and chancroid had a sensitivity of 100%, a positive predictive value (PPV) of 24%, and an overtreatment rate of 76%. A modified algorithm for treating only those without vesicular lesions had 88% sensitivity and a 27% PPV, and the overtreatment rate was reduced to 58%. HSV caused 43% of genital ulcers in these populations. The modified algorithm had lower sensitivity but a reduced overtreatment rate. M-PCR testing was more sensitive than standard tests and more specific and sensitive than clinical diagnosis.

  7. Crustal structure of north Peru from analysis of teleseismic receiver functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condori, Cristobal; França, George S.; Tavera, Hernando J.; Albuquerque, Diogo F.; Bishop, Brandon T.; Beck, Susan L.

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we present results from teleseismic receiver functions, in order to investigate the crustal thickness and Vp/Vs ratio beneath northern Peru. A total number of 981 receiver functions were analyzed, from data recorded by 28 broadband seismic stations from the Peruvian permanent seismic network, the regional temporary SisNort network and one CTBTO station. The Moho depth and average crustal Vp/Vs ratio were determined at each station using the H-k stacking technique to identify the arrival times of primary P to S conversion and crustal reverberations (PpPms, PpSs + PsPms). The results show that the Moho depth correlates well with the surface topography and varies significantly from west to east, showing a shallow depth of around 25 km near the coast, a maximum depth of 55-60 km beneath the Andean Cordillera, and a depth of 35-40 km further to the east in the Amazonian Basin. The bulk crustal Vp/Vs ratio ranges between 1.60 and 1.88 with the mean of 1.75. Higher values between 1.75 and 1.88 are found beneath the Eastern and Western Cordilleras, consistent with a mafic composition in the lower crust. In contrast values vary from 1.60 to 1.75 in the extreme flanks of the Eastern and Western Cordillera indicating a felsic composition. We find a positive relationship between crustal thickness, Vp/Vs ratio, the Bouguer anomaly, and topography. These results are consistent with previous studies in other parts of Peru (central and southern regions) and provide the first crustal thickness estimates for the high cordillera in northern Peru.

  8. Relationship between daily exposure to biomass fuel smoke and blood pressure in high-altitude Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burroughs Peña, Melissa; Romero, Karina M; Velazquez, Eric J; Davila-Roman, Victor G; Gilman, Robert H; Wise, Robert A; Miranda, J Jaime; Checkley, William

    2015-05-01

    Household air pollution from biomass fuel use affects 3 billion people worldwide; however, few studies have examined the relationship between biomass fuel use and blood pressure. We sought to determine if daily biomass fuel use was associated with elevated blood pressure in high altitude Peru and if this relationship was affected by lung function. We analyzed baseline information from a population-based cohort study of adults aged ≥ 35 years in Puno, Peru. Daily biomass fuel use was self-reported. We used multivariable regression models to examine the relationship between daily exposure to biomass fuel smoke and blood pressure outcomes. Interactions with sex and quartiles of forced vital capacity were conducted to evaluate for effect modification. Data from 1004 individuals (mean age, 55.3 years; 51.7% women) were included. We found an association between biomass fuel use with both prehypertension (adjusted relative risk ratio, 5.0; 95% confidence interval, 2.6-9.9) and hypertension (adjusted relative risk ratio, 3.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-7.0). Biomass fuel users had a higher systolic blood pressure (7.0 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 4.4-9.6) and a higher diastolic blood pressure (5.9 mm Hg; 95% confidence interval, 4.2-7.6) when compared with nonusers. We did not find interaction effects between daily biomass fuel use and sex or percent predicted forced vital capacity for either systolic blood pressure or diastolic blood pressure. Biomass fuel use was associated with a higher likelihood of having hypertension and higher blood pressure in Peru. Reducing exposure to household air pollution from biomass fuel use represents an opportunity for cardiovascular prevention. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. High Andean butterflies from southern Peru, I. Dry puna Satyrinae, with the description of two new taxa and three new records from Peru (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alfredo Cerdeña

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This is the first part of a series of contributions to the knowledge of the high Andean butterfly fauna in southern Peru. In this work the butterfly species of the subfamily Satyrinae present in the dry puna of Peru are reviewed. A new species, Pampasatyrus gorkyi sp. nov. and a new subspecies Argyrophorus lamna cuzcoensis ssp. nov. are described from the department Cusco, Peru. Three species are recorded for the first time for Peru, Argyrophorus gustavi Staudinger, Faunula euripides (Weymer and Faunula eleates (Weymer previously reported from Chile and Bolivia. Ecological and biogeographical data are provided.

  10. [Availability of psychotropic medications in health care facilities of the Ministry of Health of Peru, 2011].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgkin, Dominic; Piazza, Marina; Crisante, Maruja; Gallo, Carla; Fiestas, Fabián

    2014-01-01

    Describe the availability of psychotropic medications for the treatment of mental disorders in the health care facilities of the Ministry of Health of Peru. Monthly inventory reports of the availability and consumption of medications in facilities of the Ministry of Health during 2011 were analyzed. Using a cross sectional design, the availability of seven classes of psychotropic medications was determined. Also, the level of care of the establishments and the level of decisional autonomy to purchase medications were determined. Anti-anxiety medications were available in health facilities of all levels of care. Antidepressants and antipsychotics were available in about two thirds of hospitals and in less than 20% of health centers and small health clinics. The other four classes of psychotropic medications (lithium, hypnotics and sedatives, psychostimulants/ADHD, and anti-dementia drugs) were only available in hospitals and not in health centers and small health clinics. 5% of hospitals had a sufficient supply to meet the demand for the year. There is a significant gap in the availability of psychotropic medications in the health care facilities of the Ministry of Health of Peru. This was observed both in hospitals and in primary care facilities. Actions are needed in health policy and management, including more funding and greater mental health training for staff in primary care, among other initiatives.

  11. [Major depression in pregnant women served by the National Materno-Perinatal Institute in Lima, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna Matos, Matilde Lena; Salinas Piélago, Joel; Luna Figueroa, Antonio

    2009-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of major depression during pregnancy and to define the sociodemographic and obstetric characteristics of pregnant women with major depression treated by the outpatient clinic at a hospital in Lima, Peru. A descriptive, cross-sectional study with simple association. The analysis consisted of 222 pregnant women 16-42 years of age with low obstetric risk who had visited the outpatient services of the Obstetrics Department at the National Materno-Perinatal Institute in Lima, Peru, from 2 June-28 November 2006. Each pregnant woman was given the Edinburgh Depression Scale and a questionnaire on sociodemographic and obstetric data. The relationship between the study variables was determined by the presence of major depression revealed through either chi2 or Z tests, depending on variable type. Of the 222 pregnant women studied, 89 (40.1%) had major depression. Fewer married women tended to be depressed; those with unplanned pregnancies and pregnancy complications were more often depressed than their peers. Age, number of children, gestational stage, educational level, history of abortion/miscarriage, consumption of alcohol or other drugs, lack of family support, and perceived marital, family, or financial problems were not found to influence depression frequency. The prevalence of major depression among pregnant women was very high. Special attention should be given to women with unplanned pregnancies and those experiencing complications during pregnancy, so that an early diagnosis can be made and appropriate treatment offered.

  12. Species distribution and antifungal susceptibility profile of Candida isolates from bloodstream infections in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustamante, B; Martins, M A; Bonfietti, L X; Szeszs, M W; Jacobs, J; Garcia, C; Melhem, M S C

    2014-06-01

    Yeast identification and in vitro susceptibility testing provide helpful information for appropriate administration of antifungal treatments; however, few reports from the Latin American region have been published. The aim of this study was to identify the species present in isolates from bloodstream infections diagnosed in nine hospitals in Lima, Peru and to determine their in vitro susceptibility to four antifungal drugs. We tested and identified 153 isolates collected between October 2009 and August 2011 using standard methods. PCR and PCR-RFLP assays were performed to distinguish Candida albicans from Candida dubliniensis and to identify species of the Candida parapsilosis and Candida glabrata complexes. Antifungal susceptibility testing for fluconazole, anidulafungin and voriconazole was performed using the CSLI M27-A3 method, and amphotericin B susceptibility was determined using the Etest method. The most frequently isolated species were: C. albicans (61; 39.9 %), C. parapsilosis (43; 28.1 %), C. tropicalis (36; 23.5%) and C. glabrata (8; 5.2 %). The overall susceptibility rates were 98.0 %, 98.7 %, 98.0 % and 97.4 % for amphotericin B, fluconazole, voriconazole and anidulafungin, respectively. No isolate was resistant to more than one drug. These results showed that the rate of resistance to four antifungal drugs was low among Candida bloodstream isolates in Lima, Peru. © 2014 The Authors.

  13. Enterovirus-71 genotype C isolated in Peru between 2006 and 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huaman, Jose L; Carrion, Gladys; Ampuero, Julia S; Ocaña, Victor; Laguna-Torres, V Alberto; Hontz, Robert D

    2016-12-01

    Enterovirus-71 (EV71) was first isolated in California, United States in 1969, belongs to the genus Enterovirus, family Picornaviridae. Although infection normally causes mild, often undiagnosed illness, it can cause central nervous system infections that could turn fatal. Based on VP1 gene analysis, EV71 has been classified into six separate genotypes. Although the molecular epidemiology of EV71 has been well described via studies originating from Asia and Europe, it is mostly unknown in South America. From our study, four EV71 isolates from Peru were characterized using phylogenetic methods to determine their relationship with known reference strains. These four Peruvian EV71 isolates from between 2006 and 2009 were analyzed by RT-PCR using primers capable of amplifying the entire VP1 gene. Reference strains representing all six known genotypes were used to determine any recognizable phylogenetic relationships. In fact, all of our isolates clustered together within the genotype C1 lineage- separate from Asian, European, North American, and Australian strains. We present evidence that EV71 genotype C1 exists in Peru, and this is the first such report documenting EV71 genotype C1 circulating in South America. Gathering additional isolates will help elucidate a more complete global epidemiological picture of EV71 infections. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Regional Analysis of the Hazard Level of Glacial Lakes in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisolm, Rachel E.; Jhon Sanchez Leon, Walter; McKinney, Daene C.; Cochachin Rapre, Alejo

    2016-04-01

    of glacial lakes and their hazard potential. This phase of glacial lake hazard assessment aims to be geographically comprehensive in order to identify potentially dangerous lakes that may have previously been ignored. A second phase of analysis that includes site visits will be necessary for a thorough analysis at each lake to determine the potential hazard for downstream communities. The objective of the work presented here is to identify potentially dangerous lakes that warrant further study rather than provide a final hazard assessment for each lake of the glacial lake inventory in the Cordillera Blanca. References: Emmer, A. and Vilímek, V.: New method for assessing the potential hazardousness of glacial lakes in the Cordillera Blanca, Peru, Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. Discuss., 11, 2391-2439, 2014. UGRH - Unidad de Glaciologia y Recursos Hidricos. Inventario de Lagunas Glaciares del Peru. Ministerio de Agricultura y Riego, Autoridad Nacional del Agua, Direcccion de Conservacion y Planeamiento de Recursos Hidricos, Huaraz, Peru, 2014. Wang, W., Yao, T., Gao, Y., Yang, X., and Kattel, D. B.: A first-order method to identify potentially dangerous glacial lakes in a region of the southeastern Tibetan Plateau, Mountain Res. Develop., 31, 122-130, 2011.

  15. Tigridia arequipensis (Iridaceae: Tigridieae), a new species from South Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Montesinos, D.B.; Pauca, A.; Revilla, I.

    2016-01-01

    Tigridia arequipensis (Iridaceae: Tigridieae) is a new species found in the province of Arequipa (department of Arequipa), South Peru. It is unique by its white to pale white (or pale lilac) flowers, outer tepals with purplish maroon and dark yellow spots and stripes, and inner tepals with pale

  16. Finding decent jobs for Peru's youth | CRDI - Centre de recherches ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    27 avr. 2016 ... There is an urgent need for solid research and policy guidance to tackle youth employment challenges in Latin America. In the region almost 9 million youth are unemployed. Regionally, for every three young workers, two are employed in precarious jobs. Peru surpasses the regional average: almost 4 out ...

  17. The Challenges of Educational Reform in Modern-Day Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Jane; Lammert, Jill

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine a nationwide effort of educational reform in Peru. Specifically, the authors take a close look at the nation's efforts to change secondary education through the implementation of a 2-year postsecondary learning opportunity called the "bachillerato." First, the authors briefly present the…

  18. Peru v. Yale: A Battle Rages over Machu Picchu

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, David

    2009-01-01

    In early 1916, the legendary Yale University archaeologist Hiram Bingham III completed his third and final expedition in southern Peru. He shipped home 74 boxes of artifacts from Machu Picchu, a spectacular site in the Andes that is believed to have been the last major settlement of the Inca empire. Those boxes were supposed to be on temporary…

  19. All projects related to peru | Page 3 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2017-06-08

    Peru is one of the fastest growing economies in Latin America, but Peruvians continue to face large disparities in incomes, opportunities, and access to public services. End Date: June 8, 2017. Topic: SOCIAL INEQUALITY, ECONOMIC GROWTH, ECONOMIC DISPARITY, LATIN AMERICA, GOVERNMENT POLICY. Region: ...

  20. All projects related to peru | Page 4 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2011-10-24

    Program: Food, Environment, and Health. Total Funding: CA$ 215,000.00. Development of a New ... Recent policy initiatives suggest that efforts are underway to improve the traditionally limited support granted to science, technology and innovation (STI) activities in Peru. Start Date: October 24, 2011. End Date: October 24, ...

  1. Improving citizen awareness and democratic elections in Peru ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-07-20

    Jul 20, 2016 ... In 2001, with advice from the Network on how to transition to inflation targeting goals, the Peruvian Central Bank adopted the new model, helping to jumpstart Peru's economy. Read more about the lasting impacts of the Economic and Social Research Consortium. Find out more about CIES's mission, ...

  2. Philogenia nemesioi, a new damselfly from Peru (Odonata, Megapodagrionidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelo B. M. Machado

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Philogenia nemesioi, a new damselfly from Peru (Odonata, Megapodagrionidae. Philogenia nemesioi sp. nov. is described and illustrated based on one male specimen collected on forests of the eastern slope of the Peruvian Andes at 900 m. It belongs to the cristalina group, but differs from other species of the group by the structure of the anal appendage.

  3. All projects related to Peru | Page 8 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: BIODIVERSITY, INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY. Region: China, Far East Asia, India, Kenya, North and Central America, Panama, Peru, South America, North of Sahara, South of Sahara, Central Asia, South Asia. Program: Agriculture and Food Security. Total Funding: CA$ 362,170.00. Israel-Palestinian Occupied ...

  4. All projects related to peru | Page 8 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: BIODIVERSITY, INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY. Region: China, Far East Asia, India, Kenya, North and Central America, Panama, Peru, South America, North of Sahara, South of Sahara, Central Asia, South Asia. Program: Agriculture and Food Security. Total Funding: CA$ 362,170.00. Israel-Palestinian Occupied ...

  5. Naipes (axe moneys: a pre-Hispanic currency in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F. Merkel

    1998-11-01

    Full Text Available Between AD 900 and 1100 in northern Peru, high-status members of the Middle Siccin culture were buried in large tombs accompanied by elaborate grave goods that included gold, silver and copper objects, and also pieces of sheet metal known as naipes. Metallurgical study of naipes at the Institute supports the view that they were a form of "primitive money".

  6. Finding decent jobs for Peru's youth | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-04-27

    Apr 27, 2016 ... There is an urgent need for solid research and policy guidance to tackle youth employment challenges in Latin America. In the region almost 9 million youth are unemployed. Regionally, for every three young workers, two are employed in precarious jobs. Peru surpasses the regional average: almost 4 out ...

  7. All projects related to Peru | Page 6 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2008-12-23

    Enhancing Resilience of Rural Communities to Drought, Floods and Frost in the Mantaro Valley, Peru. Project. The Mantaro Valley in central ... Equitable access to and efficient management of water is critical for sustainable development, ecosystem protection, and social and political stability. Start Date: December 23, 2008.

  8. Employment and Income in Bolivia, Paraguay and Peru : Analysis of ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Reports. Technical report on employment and income in Peru, Bolivia and Paraguay : analysis of the links between labor demand and supply in urban and rural areas (the Peruvian case); final technical report, May 2008 to July 2010. Download PDF. Reports. Reformas, crecimiento e informalidad : propuesta de política.

  9. All projects related to peru | Page 7 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2007-09-30

    Project. Local practices pertaining to biodiversity conservation, crop improvement and natural resource management are under stress. Start Date: September 30, 2007. End Date: December 1, 2011 ... America, South America, Argentina, Brazil, Chile, Colombia, Costa Rica, Mexico, Peru. Program: Maternal and Child Health.

  10. Organic smallholder women supplying the gastronomic sector in Cusco, Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Van den Eeckhout, Hannes; Luján Sánchez, Ángel; Ugas, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Aimed at promoting better conditions of food security, this practitioners’ paper describes the short-chain market integration of smallholder women supplying organic vegetables to the gastronomic sector in tourist destination Cusco (Peru), complementing PGS progress and local organic marketplace initiatives. Economic viability and bottlenecks along the value chain are analyzed as well as suggestions and challenges for sustainability presented.

  11. Emerging and reemerging arboviruses: A new threat in Eastern Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alva-Urcia, Carlos; Aguilar-Luis, Miguel Angel; Palomares-Reyes, Carlos; Silva-Caso, Wilmer; Suarez-Ognio, Luis; Weilg, Pablo; Manrique, Carlos; Vasquez-Achaya, Fernando; Del Valle, Luis J; Del Valle-Mendoza, Juana

    2017-01-01

    Arboviral diseases are one of the most common causes of acute febrile illness (AFI) and a significant health problem in South America. In Peru, laboratory etiologic identification of these infections occurs in less than 50% of cases, leading to underdiagnoses of important emerging arboviruses. To assess the prevalence of the Dengue (DENV), Oropouche (OROV), Chikungunya (CHIKV), Mayaro (MAYV) and Zika (ZIKV) viruses in patients with acute febrile illness from Puerto Maldonado (Peru). Serum samples were obtained from patients with AFI during January 2016 to March 2016. A total of 139 specimens were analyzed for the presence of DENV, OROV, CHIKV, MAYV, and ZIKV using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). CHIKV in 9.4% and OROV in 8.6% were the most prevalent arboviruses, followed by DENV and ZIKV, with a prevalence of 6.5% and 5%, respectively. Among all patients, the most common symptoms accompanying fever were headaches 79.9%, muscle pain 65.5% and joint pain 63.3%. During this short 3-month period, 4 arboviruses were detected by PCR, CHIKV and OROV being the most common arboviruses in Puerto Maldonado (Peru). Thus, it is crucial to include OROV detection in the national health surveillance. Furthermore, the etiologic clinical diagnosis of arboviral infections is not possible due to the low specificity of symptoms; therefore an increase of cases confirmed by molecular diagnostic methods will enhance arboviral surveillance in Peru.

  12. Peru : Diagnostic Review of Consumer Protection and Financial Literacy

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank

    2013-01-01

    The diagnostic review for consumer protection and financial literacy (CPFL) provides a detailed assessment of the institutional, legal, and regulatory framework for consumer protection in four segments of the financial. A World Bank (WB) mission visited Peru from March 18 to 27, 2013 to prepare the review. The objectives of the CPFL review were: (i) to assess the existing consumer protecti...

  13. Maternal Violence, Victimization, and Child Physical Punishment in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, Anastasia J.; Silvestre, Eva A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This study examined whether mothers' experience of violence was a risk factor for physical punishment. Methods: Data were derived from the nationally representative 2000 Peru Demographic and Family Health Survey. Participants were 12,601 currently married women who were living with biological children aged 0-17 years and were…

  14. All projects related to Peru | Page 3 | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Topic: SOUTH AMERICA, LATIN AMERICA, TRADITIONAL MEDICINE, INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE, PUBLIC HEALTH, INDIGENOUS POPULATION. Region: Peru. Program: Maternal and Child Health. Total Funding: CA$ 535,500.00. Violence in three Latin American cities: A comparative study between Bogota, Lima, and ...

  15. 76 FR 68067 - United States-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-03

    ... sections of the Parties' economies; promoting transparency and preventing and combating corruption... references to certain goods originating in Peru for which, like goods originating in Canada, Mexico... States by a resident of Canada, Mexico, Singapore, Chile, Morocco, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras...

  16. The United States Counter Drug Strategy for Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-23

    Policy 85 (Winter 1991-92): 113. 21 13. Oscar Madrid, "Fujimori: un liderazgo firme," Vision 78:1 (15 January 1992): 12. 14. Thomas Kamm, "Peru Leader’s...Cocaine Industry," Journal of InterAmerican Studies and World Affairs 30 (Summer/Fall 1988): 87-103. Madrid, Oscar. "Fujimori: un liderazgo firme." Vision

  17. Language Planning Orientations and Bilingual Education in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornberger, Nancy H.

    1988-01-01

    Considers the status and corpus planning aspects of three of Peru's Quechua policies in light of the language planning orientations of language-as-problem, language-as-right, and language-as-resource. Current Quechua/Spanish bilingual education recognizes the rights of Quechua speakers and the role of the language as a national resource.…

  18. 76 FR 30656 - Multilayered Wood Flooring From the People's Republic of China: Preliminary Determination of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-26

    ... determined that India, the Philippines, Indonesia, Thailand, Ukraine and Peru are countries comparable to the... Pneumatic Off-The-Road Tires From the People's Republic of China; Preliminary Determination of Sales at Less...

  19. Human and porcine Taenia solium infection in a village in the highlands of Cusco, Peru. The Cysticercosis Working Group in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, H H; Gilman, R H; Gonzalez, A E; Pacheco, R; Verastegui, M; Tsang, V C

    1999-05-25

    A serological survey was performed using the enzyme-linked immunoelectrotransfer blot assay (EITB) in a village in the highlands of Peru where there are three distinct but close neighborhoods, to determine if there is a direct relationship between human and porcine Taenia solium infection. One hundred and eight out of 365 individuals were sampled, and 14 were seropositive (human seroprevalence 13%). Most seropositive individuals were neurologically asymptomatic. Thirty-eight out of 89 sampled pigs (43%) were seropositive. There was a clear geographical clustering of cases, and positive correlation between human and porcine seroprevalence found when comparing the three neighborhoods. Cysticercosis is an important cause of neurological morbidity in most developing countries, and control/eradication trials are now being increasingly applied. Porcine serology provides an appropriate indicator of T. solium environmental contamination and should be used to estimate the risk of infection when evaluating control measures.

  20. [Lifetime prevalence and age of onset of mental disorders in Peru: results of the World Mental Health Study, 2005].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiestas, Fabián; Piazza, Marina

    2014-01-01

    To determine the lifetime prevalence of 18 mental disorders and to establish the pattern that those disorders have with the age of onset in five cities of Peru. As part of the World Mental Health Survey, the study in Peru followed a probabilistic multistage sample of people between 18 and 65 years old in Lima, Chiclayo, Arequipa, Huancayo and Iquitos. The desktop version of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI) was administered. The lifetime prevalence of at least one mental disorder was 29% (SE 1.2), and the prevalence of at least two or three was 10.5% (SE 0.7) and 4% (SE 0.4), respectively. Anxiety disorders were more common with 14.9% (SE 0.9) prevalence, followed by mood disorders with 8.2% (SE 0.5), impulse control disorders with 8.1% (SE 0.8), and substance use disorders (5.8%; SE 0.3). The age of onset was earlier for anxiety disorders (15 years old) and for impulse control disorders (20 years old). Younger respondents were more likely to have a mental disorder. Almost a third of the adult population of five cities in Peru has had some psychiatric disorder at a given time in their lives, and comorbidity is common. Most disorders begin before age 30.

  1. Chlamydia trachomatis infection and associated risk factors in a low-income marginalized urban population in coastal Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Segundo R; Konda, Kelika A; Klausner, Jeffrey D; Jones, Franca R; Cáceres, Carlos F; Coates, Thomas J

    2009-07-01

    To estimate Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infection prevalence and associated risk factors among a low-income marginalized urban population in Peru. Between April 2003 and April 2005, men and women at high-risk for sexually transmitted infections (STIs) were recruited from low-income urban areas in three coastal cities in Peru (Chiclayo, Lima, and Trujillo). Consenting participants were studied using a sero-epidemiologic survey. Urine and vaginal swabs collected from men and women were evaluated using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (COBAS AMPLICOR (CT/NG) Test, Roche Molecular Diagnostics, Branchburg, NJ, USA) for CT. Among the 2 440 participants recruited for the study (2 145 men and 295 women), overall prevalence of CT infection was 6.6% (95% CI, 5.6-7.6%): 5.5% (95% CI, 4.5-6.5%) in men and 14.9% (95% CI, 11.7-27.1%) in women. Chlamydial infection was inversely associated with age and positively associated with HIV infection and dysuria in men. Among women, chlamydial infection was inversely associated with age and positively associated with number of sex partners. CT infection was common among high-risk men and women in urban coastal Peru. Because chlamydial infection is associated with complications related to female reproduction, including infertility and ectopic pregnancy, interventions to prevent and treat infection and studies to determine the feasibility of population-based screening for CT should be conducted among the high-risk female population.

  2. [Factors associated with the regular use of sources of information by medical students from four cities of Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía, Christian R; Valladares-Garrido, Mario J; Luyo-Rivas, Aldo; Valladares-Garrido, Danai; Talledo-Ulfe, Lincolth; Vilela-Estrada, Martín A; Araujo Chumacero, Mary M

    2015-01-01

    Objetives. To determine the factors associated with regular use of sources of information by medical students in four cities in Peru. In this cross-sectional study, medical students were surveyed in four cities of Peru, gathering information on the use of 14 sources of information and other educational and computer variables. Frequent use of the information source was defined if the respondent reported that they access an information source at least once a week. P values were obtained by generalized linear models adjusted for each respondent site. 2,300 students were surveyed. The median age was 21 years and 53% were women. Having received training in the use of sources increased the use in twelve of the consulted bases, not in SciELO (p=0.053) or in the university library (p=0.509).When adjusting for owning a laptop/netbook, these associations remained. After also adjusting for owning a smartphone the association was lost with the BVS Peru database (p=0.067). The association was also lost after making the final adjustment, if the respondent had carried out any research activities. The frequent use of sources of information is associated with having received training, conducting research and use of information technologies and communication. This should be taken into account in training programs and continuous improvement in undergraduate education.

  3. [Chronic Malnutrition among Children under Five in Peru: A Spatial Analysis of Nutritional Data, 2010-2016].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Vásquez, Akram; Tapia-López, Elena

    2017-05-19

    Peru has implemented various strategies seeking to improve nutritional indicators in children under five years old. However, high prevalence of malnutrition in some regions still remains. The aim of this study was to assess changes in regional prevalence and to determine the presence of district conglomerates with a high prevalence of chronic childhood malnutrition (CCM) in 2010 and 2016. A comparative descriptive analysis by regions and a district-level spatial analysis were conducted employing indicators reported by the Nutritional Status Information System. 23.9% (561.090/2.343.806) children under five years evaluated in Peru during 2010 and 18.0% (394.049/2.193.268) evaluated during 2016 were chronic malnutrition (reduction of 5.9 percentage points). We identified a decline of 7.6 percent points in rural areas and the persistence of prevalence above 30% in only one region (Huancavelica). The spatial analysis identified clusters of districts with high prevalence in 20% (379/1834) of Peruvian districts in 2010, and 17.2% (316/1834) of those in 2016, which are mainly spread across the sierra and jungle regions. . Peru has made significant progress in reducing stunting in children. Nevertheless, it still represents a health problem due to high prevalence in the sierra region, as well as expansion to jungle districts in 2016. Licencia Creative Commons Atribución-NoComercial-SinDerivadas 3.0 Unported Licencia Creative Commons

  4. Epidemiology of tobacco use and dependence in adults in a poor peri-urban community in Lima, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weygandt Paul

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tobacco smoking is an important public health concern worldwide leading to both chronic disease and early death. In Latin America, smoking prevalence is estimated at approximately 30% and prior studies suggest that the prevalence in Peru is 22% to 38%. We sought to determine the prevalence of daily smoking in a poor peri-urban community in Lima, Peru. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey in a random sample of adults ≥40 years of age living in Pampas de San Juan de Miraflores, Lima, Peru. We asked participants to respond to a survey that included questions on sociodemographics, tobacco use and dependence. Results We enrolled 316 participants. Average monthly household income was ≤ 400 USD and nearly all homes had running water, sewage, and electricity. Most individuals had not completed high school. Smoking prevalence was 16% overall, yet daily smoking prevalence was 1.9%. Former daily smokers comprised 3.8% of current nonsmokers and 9.1% current occasional smokers. Average scores for the Fagerstrom Test for Nicotine Dependence for daily smokers and occasional smokers were 1.5 and 0, respectively. Conclusions Daily use of tobacco is uncommon among adults in peri-urban communities of Lima, Peru, unlike their counterparts in Lima and other Latin American capital cities. Tobacco dependence is also low. Hence, efforts aimed at primary prevention are of utmost importance in these communities. This study provides an accurate baseline using an internationally recognized assessment tool (Global Adult Tobacco Survey, allowing for accurate assessment of tobacco control interventions over time.

  5. Aflatoxin contamination of red chili pepper from Bolivia and Peru, countries with high gallbladder cancer incidence rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asai, Takao; Tsuchiya, Yasuo; Okano, Kiyoshi; Piscoya, Alejandro; Nishi, Carlos Yoshito; Ikoma, Toshikazu; Oyama, Tomizo; Ikegami, Kikuo; Yamamoto, Masaharu

    2012-01-01

    Chilean red chili peppers contaminated with aflatoxins were reported in a previous study. If the development of gallbladder cancer (GBC) in Chile is associated with a high level of consumption of aflatoxin-contaminated red chili peppers, such peppers from other countries having a high GBC incidence rate may also be contaminated with aflatoxins. We aimed to determine whether this might be the case for red chili peppers from Bolivia and Peru. A total of 7 samples (3 from Bolivia, 4 from Peru) and 3 controls (2 from China, 1 from Japan) were evaluated. Aflatoxins were extracted with acetonitrile:water (9:1, v/v) and eluted through an immuno-affinity column. The concentrations of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2 were measured using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and then the detected aflatoxins were identified using HPLC-mass spectrometry. In some but not all of the samples from Bolivia and Peru, aflatoxin B1 or aflatoxins B1 and B2 were detected. In particular, aflatoxin B1 or total aflatoxin concentrations in a Bolivian samples were above the maximum levels for aflatoxins in spices proposed by the European Commission. Red chili peppers from Bolivia and Peru consumed by populations having high GBC incidence rates would appear to be contaminated with aflatoxins. These data suggest the possibility that a high level of consumption of aflatoxin-contaminated red chili peppers is related to the development of GBC, and the association between the two should be confirmed by a case-control study.

  6. Ochratoxin A Contamination of Red Chili Peppers from Chile, Bolivia and Peru, Countries with a High Incidence of Gallbladder Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikoma, Toshikazu; Tsuchiya, Yasuo; Asai, Takao; Okano, Kiyoshi; Ito, Naoko; Endoh, Kazuo; Yamamoto, Masaharu; Nakamura, Kazutoshi

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study detected aflatoxins in red chili peppers from Chile, Bolivia, and Peru, each of which have a high incidence of gallbladder cancer (GBC). Since the aflatoxin B1 concentration was not so high in these peppers, it is important to clarify the presence of other mycotoxins. Here we attempted to determine any associations between the concentrations of aflatoxins and ochratoxin A (OTA) in red chili peppers, and the corresponding GBC incidences. We collected red chili peppers from three areas in Peru: Trujillo (a high GBC incidence area), Cusco (an intermediate GBC incidence area), and Lima (a low GBC incidence rate), and from Chile and Bolivia. Aflatoxins and OTA were extracted with organic solvents. The concentrations of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2, and OTA were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography. The values obtained were compared with the incidence of GBC in each area or country. All of the red chili peppers from the three areas showed contamination with aflatoxins below the Commission of the European Communities (EC) recommended limits (5 μg/kg), but the OTA contamination of two samples was above the EC recommended limit (15 μg/kg). The mean concentrations of OTA in the peppers from Chile (mean 355 μg/kg, range Bolivia (mean 207 μg/kg, range 0.8-628 μg/kg), which has a high incidence of GBC, were higher than that in Peru (14 μg/kg, range Bolivia, and Peru was stronger than that of aflatoxins. Our data suggest that OTA in red chili peppers may be associated with the development of GBC.

  7. Globalisation and Exploitation in Peru. Strategic Selectivities and the Defeat of Labour in the US-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbeek, J.B.

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the socio-economic implications of the US-Peru Trade Promotion Agreement for the governance of Peruvian labour relations. It is argued that the trade agreement aims to lock-in the neoliberal market reforms carried out since the 1990s, which have given rise to an export-oriented

  8. Building Roads to Democracy? The Contribution of the Peru Rural Roads Program to Participation and Civic Engagement in Rural Peru

    OpenAIRE

    McSweeney, Catherine; Remy, Marisa

    2008-01-01

    Projects involving community participation often give communities responsibility to identify, prioritize, plan and implement small-scale investments. While the approach generates high ownership and relevance, it has often been considered inappropriate for large infrastructure projects with requirements of economies of scale, technical standards and efficiency. The Peru Rural Roads Program ...

  9. Prophylaxis and treatment of endemic goiter with iodized oil in rural Ecuador and Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevany, J; Fierro-Benitez, R; Pretell, E A; Stanbury, J B

    1969-12-01

    Endemic goiter is a health problem in many areas of the world; in some areas the disease is so severe that cretinism and other defects are found. In many areas geographic, economic, and other factors prevent the use of iodized salt as a preventive measure. Field studies were begun in 1966 to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of parenteral administration of iodized oil in goiter prevention. Studies were carried out in Ecuador and Peru. In Ecuador 2 villages were chosen in which the prevalence of goiter was about 60%; in Peru 3 villages were chosen where incidence was about 50%. Prevalence of goiter decreased for 20 months during the study but then began to rise again with the maximum reduction seen up to age 18 and minimal reduction after 40 years of age. The control groups in the study experienced only slight decreases in rate of incidence. Cretinism has not yet appeared among the progeny of the population injected with iodized oil but several instances have appeared in control groups. The use of iodized oil as a public health procedure for the prevention of endemic goiter and its associated defects is an acceptable measure in regions where salt iodization cannot be done.

  10. [Intrauterine growth retardation in Peru: stressors and perinatal outcomes Hospital Ministry of Health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ticona-Rendón, Manuel; Pacora-Portella, Percy; Huanco-Apaza, Diana; Ticona-Vildoso, Maricarmen

    2014-11-01

    To determine the incidence, stressors and perinatal outcomes of intrauterine growth retardation in the hospitals of the Ministry of Health of Peru. Cross-sectional, analytical, case-control study of 9777 infants with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) in 29 hospitals of the Ministry of Health of Peru in 2010. The Peruvian intrauterine growth curve was used for the diagnosis of IUGR. IUGR newborns (cases) and newborns appropriate for gestational age (controls) were compared using the odds ratio (OR) with a confidence interval of 95%. The incidence of IUGR was 10.1%. The incidence by region was: 8.1% Coast, 11.8% Selva and Sierra 14.6%. The frequency of stress factors of IUGR were: nutrition (92%), psychological (84.8%), social (53%), anatomical (63.6%), toxic/environmental (52.9%), vascular (29,8%), infection (14.1%) and metabolic (0.3%). The newborn with IUGR had higher perinatal morbidity (OR=2,1) and mortality (OR=3.5). The healthy fetus is the result of a balance between stress factors and the adaptive response of the mother and fetus. When the response of physiological adaptation is overcome by stress factors, IUGR occurs.The political, psychological, nutritional and medical intervention before 12 weeks of gestation has the potential to change the harmful effects of all human stress factors that affect fetal growth.

  11. Postmortem findings and opportunistic infections in HIV-positive patients from a public hospital in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eza, Dominique; Cerrillo, Gustavo; Moore, David A.J.; Castro, Cecilia; Ticona, Eduardo; Morales, Domingo; Cabanillas, Jose; Barrantes, Fernando; Alfaro, Alejandro; Benavides, Alejandro; Rafael, Arturo; Valladares, Gilberto; Arevalo, Fernando; Evans, Carlton A.; Gilman, Robert H.

    2010-01-01

    There is a paucity of HIV autopsy data from South America and none that document the postmortem findings in patients with HIV/AIDS in Peru. The purpose of this autopsy study was to determine the spectrum of opportunistic infections and the causes of mortality in HIV-positive patients at a public hospital in Lima. Clinico-epidemiological information regarding HIV infection in Peru is also reviewed. Sixteen HIV-related hospital postmortems, performed between 1999 and 2004, were included in this retrospective analysis. The primary cause of death was established in 12 patients: one died of neoplasia and 11 of infectious diseases, including 3 from pulmonary infection, 7 from disseminated infection, and 2 from central nervous system infection (one case had dual pathology). Opportunistic infections were identified in 14 cases, comprising cytomegalovirus, histoplasmosis, cryptococcosis, toxoplasmosis, Pneumocystis pneumonia, aspergillosis, tuberculosis, varicella zoster virus, and cryptosporidiosis. Fourteen patients had at least one AIDS-related disease that had been neither clinically suspected nor diagnosed premortem. Moreover, 82% of the diagnoses considered to be of important clinical significance had not been suspected antemortem. The spectrum and frequency of certain opportunistic infections differed from other South American autopsy studies, highlighting the importance of performing HIV/AIDS postmortems in resource-limited countries where locally specific disease patterns may be observed. PMID:16979302

  12. The sensitivity of clinical isolates of Leishmania from Peru and Nepal to miltefosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yardley, Vanessa; Croft, Simon L; De Doncker, Simonne; Dujardin, Jean-Claude; Koirala, Siddhartha; Rijal, Suman; Miranda, Cesar; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro; Chappuis, Francois

    2005-08-01

    Clinical isolates of Leishmania, from visceral leishmaniasis (VL) cases in Nepal and from cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) cases in Peru, were cultured using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) to type species and strain. Promastigotes from 38 isolates, within eight passages from isolation, were used to infect mouse peritoneal macrophage cultures in vitro, and the amastigote sensitivity to miltefosine was determined. The concentration required to kill 50% of intracellular amastigotes from Nepalese VL isolates, all typed as Leishmania (L.) donovani (N = 24) from both Sbv responders and nonresponders, ranged from 8.7 to 0.04 microg/mL. In contrast, the concentration required to kill 50% intracellular amastigotes from isolates from Peru, typed as L.(V.) braziliensis (N = 8), was > 30 to 8.4 microg/mL, L.(V.) guyanensis (N = 2) > 30 to 1.9 microg/mL, L.(L.) mexicana (N = 1) > 30 microg/mL, and L. (V.) lainsoni (N = 4) was 3.4 to 1.9 microg/mL. This demonstrates a notable difference in the intrinsic sensitivity of Leishmania species to miltefosine in vitro. If this model can be correlated to therapeutic outcome, it may have implications for the interpretation of clinical trials.

  13. [Enteroviral central nervous system infections in children treated at a hospital in Lima, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Iván O; Ochoa, Theresa J; Mosquito, Susan; Barletta, Francesca; Hernández, Roger; Medina, María del Pilar; Stiglich, María Luisa; Ugarte, Claudia; Guillén, Daniel

    2011-12-01

    To determine the frequency and clinical features of central nervous system infections caused by enterovirus in children treated at the Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia in Lima, Peru. A prospective, descriptive study was performed from April 2008 to March 2010. Patients aged 1 month - 14 years with clinical diagnosis of encephalitis or aseptic meningitis were included. We investigated the presence of enterovirus, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) and varicella-zoster virus (VZV) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). 97 patients were included, out of which 69 % had acute encephalitis and 31 % acute meningitis. Enteroviruses were identified in 52,6% of all acute non-bacterial central nervous system infections; corresponding to 83,3 % of meningitis and 38,8 % of encephalitis. There were no cases of infection due to HSV-1, HSV-2 or VZV. Enterovirus infections reached 82,9 % in the warm months (November-January) and 28,6 % in the colder months (May-July). Enteroviruses are the principal etiologic agents in acute aseptic meningitis and encephalitis in pediatric patients in Lima, Peru. Enteroviruses have a seasonal epidemiological pattern with a clear increase in the number of cases during the summer months. It is useful to have this rapid diagnostic method available as an aid in the management of acute central nervous system infections.

  14. Genotyping of potentially pathogenic Acanthamoeba strains isolated from nasal swabs of healthy individuals in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello-Vílchez, Alfonso Martín; Martín-Navarro, Carmen María; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Reyes-Batlle, María; González, Ana C; Guerra, Humberto; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Valladares, Basilio; Piñero, José E; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob

    2014-02-01

    Free Living Amoebae (FLA) of Acanthamoeba genus are widely distributed in the environment and can be found in the air, soil and water; and have also been isolated from air-conditioning units. In humans, they are causative agents of a sight-threating infection of the cornea, Acanthamoeba keratitis (AK) and a fatal infection of the central nervous system known as Granulomatous Amoebic Encephalitis (GAE). In this study, a survey was conducted in order to determine the presence and pathogenic potential of free-living amoebae of Acanthamoeba genus in nasal swabs from individuals in two regions of Peru. Identification of isolates was based on cyst morphology and PCR-sequencing of the Diagnostic Fragment 3 to identify strains at the genotype level. The pathogenic potential of the isolates was also assayed using temperature and osmotolerance assays and extracellular proteases zymograms. The obtained results revealed that all isolated strains exhibited pathogenic potential. After sequencing the highly variable DF3 (Diagnostic Fragment 3) region in the 18S rRNA gene as previously described, genotype T4 was found to be the most common one in the samples included in this study but also genotype T15 was identified. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study on the characterization of Acanthamoeba strains at the genotype level and the first report of genotype T4 and T15 in Peru. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of medicinal plants used in Northern Peru as antibacterial remedies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malca-García, G.; Glenn, A.; Sharon, D.; Chait, G.; Díaz, D.; Pourmand, K.; Jonat, B.; Somogy, S.; Guardado, G.; Aguirre, C.; Chan, R.; Meyer, K.; Kuhlman, A.; Townesmith, A.; Effio-Carbajal, J.; Frías-Fernandez, F.; Benito, M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim The plant species reported here are traditionally used in Northern Peru to treat bacterial infections, often addressed by the local healers as “inflammation”. The aim of this study was to evaluate the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of their antibacterial properties against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Materials and methods The antimicrobial activity of ethanolic and water extracts of 141 plant species was determined using a deep-well broth microdilution method on commercially available bacterial strains. Results The ethanolic extracts of 51 species inhibited Escherichia coli, and 114 ethanolic extracts inhibited Staphylococcus aureus. In contrast, only 30 aqueous extracts showed activity against E. coli and 38 extracts against S. aureus. The MIC concentrations were mostly very high and ranged from 0.008 to 256mg/ml, with only 36 species showing inhibitory concentrations of Hyptis sidifolia, Salvia sp., Banisteriopsis caapi, Miconia salicifolia and Polygonum hydropiperoides showed the lowest MIC values and would be interesting candidates for future research. Conclusions The presence of antibacterial activity could be confirmed in most species used in traditional medicine in Peru which were assayed in this study. However, the MIC for the species employed showed a very large range, and were mostly very high. Nevertheless, traditional knowledge might provide some leads to elucidate potential candidates for future development of new antibiotic agents. PMID:20678568

  16. Peru Subduction Experiment (PERUSE) Preliminary results of Gravity measurements, Earthquake locations and Regional Seismicity in Southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foote, E. J.; Davis, P. M.; Guy, R.; Lukac, M. L.; Feng, H. S.; Clayton, R. W.; Phillips, K. E.; Skinner, S.; Audin, L.; Tavera, H.; Aguilar, V.

    2009-12-01

    The Peru Subduction Experiment (PERUSE) is a collaborative project developed by UCLA, Caltech, French L’Institut de Recherche pour le Développement (IRD) and Instituto Geofisico del Peru (IGP) to improve geophysical models of the Andean Orogenic Belt and to image the subduction process in Southern Peru. One area of particular interest is where the Nazca Plate transitions from a normally subducting slab at an angle of about 30 degrees to a shallow subducting slab beneath the South American Plate. The PERUSE project, which started in the summer of 2008, consists of a linear array of 50 broadband seismic stations that are evenly spaced about 6 kilometers apart. They are aligned perpendicular to the coast of Peru, from Mollendo to Juliaca. Caltech will deploy 50 more stations by the end of 2009. Their line will run perpendicular to the current line, from Juliaca to Cusco. By the end of 2010, a third linear array will be installed north of and perpendicular to Caltech’s line in the Altiplano. Preliminary results from gravity measurements indicate that the crustal root of the Andes dips approximately 20 degrees on both sides of the range, and extends to a depth of approximately 70km. This also agrees well with the receiver function results, which show that the crust thickens from the coast of Mollendo through the Altiplano to Juliaca to a depth about 70km (Phillips et al, Fall AGU 2009). Teleseismic studies also indicate that the crustal thickness varies laterally below southern Peru. We are developing a heterogeneous model from the topographic and gravity data, teleseismic events, and the receiver function results to accurately locate earthquakes in the area of interest and to provide a better crustal model of the region.

  17. Validity of Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination to Discriminate between Incipient Dementia and Depression in Elderly Patients of a Private Clinic in Lima, Peru

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    Eder Herrera-Pérez

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Dementia and depression are different clinical conditions, but share common features, and can be indistinguishable in the initial disease stages. We aimed to establish whether the Peruvian version of the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination (ACE-Peru can distinguish between the cognitive profile in patients with incipient dementia and that in patients with depression. Methods: This was a cross-sectional study to assess the performance on the ACE-Peru of 193 elderly subjects (102 with dementia, 21 with depression, and 70 healthy controls. Depending on the diagnosis, there were two groups of cognitive impairment (CI - the primary neurodegenerative (PN-CI subtype and the secondary to depression (SD-CI subtype - as well as a non-CI group. The area under the curve (AUC of the receiver-operating characteristic curve was determined to compare the diagnostic performance, using the diagnosis of CI as the gold standard. Results: In our sample of elderly subjects aged 59-82 years with at least 7 years of education, the ACE-Peru showed a significantly better performance than the MMSE (AUC = 0.997 vs. AUC = 0.887; p Conclusions: The ACE-Peru is able to distinguish between the cognitive profile in patients with incipient dementia and that in patients with depression.

  18. [Serologic prevalence of HCV antibodies in health personnel in Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colichon Yerosh, Alejandro; Figueroa, Rolando; Moreno, Armando; Zumaeta, Eduardo; Ferrandíz, Jorge; Busalleu, Alejandro; Prado, William; Candella, Ricardo; Colichón, Alejandro; Rodriguez, Wilson; Espinoza, Julio; Kianman, Wilfredo; Amaya, Nelly; García Pérez, Segundo A; Tello Rodriguez, José; Valdez, Jesús; Paucar Sotomayor, Héctor; Sanchez, César

    2004-01-01

    In Peru, new cases of asymptomatic HCV infection are reported with certain frequency in patients with or without antecedents of blood transfusion. Although serologic screening has improved notoriously in the last years, there is still a population of polytransfused patients with high HCV risk (e.g. hemodialyzed patients), making up a major reservoir. Based on this premise, we decided to study the risk of the health worker population in Peru as another major HCV risk group. A total of 2,769 health workers from 7 Public Hospitals and 2 Private Hospitals in the City of Lima and from 7 Public Hospitals in 4 major/main cities of Peru (Chiclayo, Trujillo, Arequipa, and Cusco) were studied. All those workers, who due to their area of work had higher contact with blood and/or blood derivatives (Surgery, ICU, Traumatology, Gynecology, Gastroenterology, Hemodialysis and Laboratories-Blood Banks) were studied. The studied population accounts for 30% of the total health worker population in these services. All serums underwent the EIA-3 test (HCV-Cobas-Core, Lab. Roche, USA). The positive results were confirmed by RT-HCV (Ampiclor, Roche). The positive serums were confirmed by PCR and the positive results with high viral load underwent HCV genotyping (AMPICLOR-Roche Diagnostic, IGEN Diagnostic USA). Of the 2,769 health workers studied in Peru, 32 were positive for HCV antibodies (1.16% of the total number). Lima showed a prevalence slightly higher than the provinces: 26 out of 2,112 vs. 6 out of 657, or 1.23% vs. 0.91%, respectively. The higher risk is assumed by professional with higher level of contact with blood: 2 physicians (Hemodialysis), 5 nurses (HD) and Lab-Blood Bank technicians. The physicians and nurses share the same risk. If we segregate Lima from provinces, it can be seen that the highest risk is in Lima (1.34% compared to 1.07% in provinces). There is a major risk in health workers and the figures are slightly above those that were suspected for Peru (between 0

  19. Frequency of fungi in dogs with mycoses in a veterinary clinic from Callao, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luján-Roca, D.Á.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mycoses affecting dogs are widely distributed worldwide. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of fungi isolated from dogs. A retrospective study was performed to determine the main mycoses that affected dogs at a private veterinary clinic in Callao, Peru. Isolates were collected from skin and ear from 2003 to 2012. Fungi species were identified by standard microbiological techniques. A total of 54 fungi were isolated from 124 mycological studies; the most prevalent fungal species were Malassezia pachydermatis (51.86 % and Microsporum canis (27.78 %. The principal breeds affected were mongrel (31.52 %, boxer (11.1% and shih tzu (11.1 %. M. pachydermatis represented 58.8 % and 43.2 % of isolates in mongrel breed and in skin samples respectively. M. pachydermatis was the most frequent fungus getting >50 % of all isolates. Microsporum canis and Aspergillus spp. had >40 % presence.

  20. European hare Lepus europaeus(Lagomorpha: Leporidae an invasive species in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horacio Zeballos

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe the current distribution of the European hare, Lepus europaeus, in Peru which currently covers the highlands, Andean valleys, surrounding areas of the Titicaca Lake and coastal irrigations; in Arequipa, Cusco, Moquegua, Puno and Tacna departments. Based on its current distribution we developed models of potential distribution of this species, which would forecast this species in northern Peru. We make recommendations on the main issues that should be studied in Peru, and the possible consequences of their invasive process of in Peru.

  1. The history of 20th century malaria control in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffing, Sean M; Gamboa, Dionicia; Udhayakumar, Venkatachalam

    2013-08-30

    Malaria has been part of Peruvian life since at least the 1500s. While Peru gave the world quinine, one of the first treatments for malaria, its history is pockmarked with endemic malaria and occasional epidemics. In this review, major increases in Peruvian malaria incidence over the past hundred years are described, as well as the human factors that have facilitated these events, and concerted private and governmental efforts to control malaria. Political support for malaria control has varied and unexpected events like vector and parasite resistance have adversely impacted morbidity and mortality. Though the ready availability of novel insecticides like DDT and efficacious medications reduced malaria to very low levels for a decade after the post eradication era, malaria reemerged as an important modern day challenge to Peruvian public health. Its reemergence sparked collaboration between domestic and international partners towards the elimination of malaria in Peru.

  2. Constrained choices: adolescents speak on sexuality in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Angela M; Tsui, Amy O; Hindin, Michelle J

    2010-10-01

    While numerous studies have explored young people's sexual behaviour in Peru, to date few have explored how adolescents situate sexuality within the context of their broader lives. This information is needed to inform policies and programmes. Life history interviews were conducted with 20 12-17-year-old young women and men from a low-income settlement near Lima, Peru. Data were analysed using holistic content analysis and grounded theory. Sexuality had a strong presence in respondents' lives. However, interviewees viewed the full expression of their sexuality as a constrained choice. Particular constraints derive from the belief that sexual intercourse always results in pregnancy; the nature of sex education; the provision of proscriptive advice; and the family tensions, economic problems, racism and violence present in young people's lives. The results of this study can inform policies and programmes to support young people as they make sexuality-related decisions.

  3. Missed Opportunities for Health Education on Pap Smears in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Angela M.; Nussbaum, Lauren; Cabrera, Lilia; Paz-Soldan, Valerie A.

    2013-01-01

    Despite cervical cancer being one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths among women in Peru, cervical Pap smear coverage is low. This article uses findings from 185 direct clinician observations in four cities of Peru (representing the capital and each of the three main geographic regions of the country) to assess missed opportunities for health education on Pap smears and other preventive women’s health behaviors during women’s visits to a health care provider. Various types of health establishments, provider settings, and provider types were observed. Opportunities for patient education on the importance of prevention were rarely exploited. In fact, health education provided was minimal. Policy and programmatic implications are discussed. PMID:21464205

  4. Globalized research and "national science": the case of Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cáceres, Carlos F; Mendoza, Walter

    2009-10-01

    Issues in the area of international health research are insufficiently discussed in Latin America. We examine the practices of stakeholders such as the state and the academic community regarding research policy processes and funding sources in Peru. Our findings showed that research policy development and evaluation processes are poor in Peru, most of the country's academic research is published in English only, and researchers' access to funding is limited. Given that the relationship between local academic institutions and foreign research centers is key in developing a "national science," there is a clear need to reinforce the state's capacities for management and research oversight and implementation and to encourage the academic community to improve their institutional policies and research frameworks.

  5. Leveraging social capital: multilevel stigma, associated HIV vulnerabilities, and social resilience strategies among transgender women in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Brumer, Amaya G; Reisner, Sari L; McLean, Sarah A; Silva-Santisteban, Alfonso; Huerta, Leyla; Mayer, Kenneth H; Sanchez, Jorge; Clark, Jesse L; Mimiaga, Matthew J; Lama, Javier R

    2017-02-28

    In Peru, transgender women (TW) experience unique vulnerabilities for HIV infection due to factors that limit access to, and quality of, HIV prevention, treatment and care services. Yet, despite recent advances in understanding factors associated with HIV vulnerability among TW globally, limited scholarship has examined how Peruvian TW cope with this reality and how existing community-level resilience strategies are enacted despite pervasive social and economic exclusion facing the community. Addressing this need, our study applies the understanding of social capital as a social determinant of health and examines its relationship to HIV vulnerabilities to TW in Peru. Using qualitative methodology to provide an in-depth portrait, we assessed (1) intersections between social marginalization, social capital and HIV vulnerabilities; and (2) community-level resilience strategies employed by TW to buffer against social marginalization and to link to needed HIV-related services in Peru. Between January and February 2015, 48 TW participated (mean age = 29, range = 18-44) in this study that included focus group discussions and demographic surveys. Analyses were guided by an immersion crystallization approach and all coding was conducted using Dedoose Version 6.1.18. Themes associated with HIV vulnerability included experiences of multilevel stigma and limited occupational opportunities that placed TW at risk for, and limited their engagement with, existing HIV services. Emergent resiliency-based strategies included peer-to-peer and intergenerational knowledge sharing, supportive clinical services (e.g. group-based clinic attendance) and emotional support through social cohesion (i.e. feeling part of a community). This study highlights the importance of TW communities as support structures that create and deploy social resiliency-based strategies aimed at deterring and mitigating the impact of social vulnerabilities to discrimination, marginalization and HIV risk for

  6. Spatial analysis of childhood obesity and overweight in Peru, 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández-Vásquez, Akram; Universidad de Buenos Aires. Buenos Aires, Argentina.; Bendezú-Quispe, Guido; Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional San Luis Gonzaga. Ica, Perú. estudiante de Medicina; Díaz-Seijas, Deysi; Instituto Nacional Cardiovascular - EsSalud. Lima, Perú. enfermera, especialista en Cuidados Intensivos; Santero, Marilina; Universidad de Buenos Aires. Buenos Aires, Argentina.; Minckas, Nicole; Universidad de Buenos Aires. Buenos Aires, Argentina. licenciada en Nutrición, magíster en Efectividad Clínica; Azañedo, Diego; Instituto de Investigación, Universidad Católica los Ángeles de Chimbote. Chimbote, Perú; Antiporta, Daniel A.; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Baltimore, USA. licenciado en Nutrición, magíster en Salud Pública.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. To estimate regional prevalence and identify the spatial patterns of the degree of overweight and obesity by districts in under five years children in Peru during 2014. Materials and methods. Analysis of the information reported by the Information System Nutritional Status (SIEN) of the number of cases of overweight and obesity in children under five years recorded during 2014. Regional prevalence for overweight and obesity, and their respective confidence intervals to 95% were ca...

  7. Moral assemblages of volunteer tourism development in Cusco, Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Burrai, E; Mostafanezhad, M; Hannam, K

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we develop a conceptual approach from which to examine the moral landscape of volunteer tourism development in Cusco, Peru. Drawing from recent work on assemblage theory in geography and tourism studies, we explore how assemblage thinking can facilitate new understandings of volunteer tourism development. Using assemblage as an analytical framework allows us to understand volunteer tourism as a series of relational, processual, unequal and mobile practices. These practices, we ...

  8. peru : tous les projets | CRDI - Centre de recherches pour le ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Le but de ce projet consiste à améliorer la compréhension des complexités du mariage d'enfants et de la parentalité pour éclairer les politiques et les programmes. Région: Ethiopia, Peru, Zambia. Programme: Governance and Justice. Financement total : CA$ 1,120,200.00. Renforcer les réseaux de think tanks. Projet.

  9. Food Plants of 19 butterflies species (Lepidoptera from Loreto, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel Vásquez Bardales

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This work reports the food plants utilized by 19 species of butterflies from Allpahuayo-Mishana Research Center and the Community of San Rafael, Loreto, Peru. We report 23 plant species and one hybrid of angiosperms used by the butterflies. Larval host plants were 21 species and five were adult nectar sources. Two species were both host plant and nectar source: Passiflora coccinea Aubl. and Passiflora edulis Sims. The most frequently used plant families were Solanaceae, Passifloraceae, Fabaceae and Aristolochiaceae.

  10. Evidence of Rickettsial and Leptospira Infections in Andean Northern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    about health in six Latin American countries, 1973- 1992. Rev Panam Salud Publica 1: 23–34. 3. Cowan G, 2000. Rickettsial diseases: the typhus group of...Leonardo Mendoza Instituto Nacional de Salud , Capac Yupanqui No. 1400, Jesús Maria, Lima 11, Peru, Telephone: 51-1-471-9920. Allen L. Richards, Viral and...Colli C, 1997. Leptospira interrogans in a canine population of greater Bue- nos Aires: variables associated with seropositivity. Rev Panam Salud

  11. Tusans (tusheng) and the Changing Chinese Community in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Lausent-Herrera, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    International audience; Since their arrival in Peru 160 years ago, the Chinese have struggled to form a community. Faced with hard living conditions, scattered in haciendas, deprived of Chinese women and suffering from racism, mistreatment and restrictive immigration laws, the task of keeping alive seemed insurmountable. Paradoxically, the emergence and consolidation of the Chinese community came about through mestizaje and conversion to Catholicism. This mestizaje allowed them to rebuild the...

  12. Astigmata and Prostigmata Acari of Medical Importance in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Guillén, Zoila; Instituto de Medicina Tropical "Daniel Alcides Carrión", Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Romero, Giuliana; Departamento de Microbiología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Pareja, Elizabeth; Departamento de Microbiología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Valencia, Miguel; Departamento de Microbiología, Facultad de Medicina, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; López, Martha; Universidad Nacional del Cuzco "San Antonio Abad", Cuzco, Perú; Suárez, Roxana; Universidad Particular Ricardo Palma, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    This article present species of Astigmata and Prostigmata acari that produce human pathology in Peru. Patients who were seen at Instituto de Medicina Tropical Daniel A. Carrion, Huinco, and domestic dust of Lima, Lambayeque, Trujillo and Ucayali, were evaluated, as well as related articles published up to now. In this work, we found the follow Astigmata: Tyrophagus putrescentiae, Acarus siro, Suidasia sp., Dermatophagoides pteromyssinus, Glycyphagus domesticus and Sarcoptes scabiei, and Prost...

  13. Liparis aphylla (Malaxideae, Orchidaceae), a new leafless record from Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damian, Alexander; Ormerod, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Liparis aphylla G.A.Romero & Garay was previously known only from two herbarium specimens collected in 1945 and 1977 in Ecuador and Colombia, respectively. This little-known species is hereby reported for the first time for Peru. An updated description, line illustration, color photographs and distribution map of Liparis aphylla, as well as an identification key to the Peruvian species of Liparis are provided. PMID:27081347

  14. Conservation narratives in Peru: envisioning biodiversity in sustainable development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yves M. Zinngrebe

    2016-06-01

    In a second step, a comparative analysis of the dominant and diverging political perspectives is made. I argue that by deconstructing underlying premises and ideologies, common ground and possible opportunities for collaboration can be identified. Moreover, although the presented results can serve as a discussion scaffold to organize conservation debates in Peru, this example demonstrates how the terms biodiversity and sustainability are operationalized in conservation narratives.

  15. Chronic Liver Disease in Peru: Role of Viral Hepatitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    ceruloplasmin, ferritin, iron, antinuclear anti- by one-third of subjects) in 48% of chronic liver bodies (ANA), and antimitochondrial antibodies to rule...Rebagliati (R.F.) and Naval Medical Research Institute Detachment (I.A.P.), Lima, Peru The prevalence of antibodies to hepatitis C virus 19921. To...development of serologic assays for the abuse, defined as being repeatedly intoxicated at least detection of antibody to hepatitis C virus (anti-HCV

  16. Novel Low-Cost Thermotherapy for Cutaneous Leishmaniasis in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Valencia, Braulio M.; Miller, David; Witzig, Richard S.; Boggild, Andrea K.; Llanos-Cuentas, Alejandro

    2013-01-01

    Author Summary American cutaneous leishmaniasis is an endemic parasitic disease in Peru, with more than a reported thousand cases per year associated with significant disabilities and economic impact. In comparison to old-world cutaneous Leishmaniasis where the infection generally heals on its own, American cutaneous Leishmaniasis is a chronic skin disease and its treatment can be expensive, difficult to administer, and associated with significant adverse events. We developed a heat treatment...

  17. Terrestrial reptiles from San Lorenzo Island, Lima, Peru

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    José Pérez Z.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available We report four species of terrestrial reptiles, a geckonid (Phyllodactlus cf. microphyllus, two lizards (Microlophus peruvianus and M. tigris and one snake (Pseudalsophis elegans from San Lorenzo island, Departament of Lima, Peru. Herein, we report the first record of “Loma’s lizard” M. tigris and the snake P. elegans in Peruvian islands. The presence of Lomas herbaceous and the considerable extent of San Lorenzo island can explain the relatively high species richness of terrestrial reptiles on the island.

  18. Guaroa Virus Infection among Humans in Bolivia and Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Aguilar, Patricia V.; Morrison, Amy C.; Rocha, Claudio; Watts, Douglas M.; Beingolea, Luis; Suarez, Victor; Vargas, Jorge; Cruz, Cristhopher; Guevara, Carolina; Montgomery, Joel M.; Robert B. Tesh; Tadeusz J Kochel

    2010-01-01

    Guaroa virus (GROV) was first isolated from humans in Colombia in 1959. Subsequent isolates of the virus have been recovered from febrile patients and mosquitoes in Brazil, Colombia, and Panama; however, association of the virus with human disease has been unclear. As part of a study on the etiology of febrile illnesses in Peru and Bolivia, 14 GROV strains were isolated from patients with febrile illnesses, and 3 additional cases were confirmed by IgM seroconversion. The prevalence rate of GR...

  19. Aspiration failure: a poverty trap for indigenous children in Peru?

    OpenAIRE

    Laure Pasquier-Doumer; Fiorella Risso Brandon

    2015-01-01

    (english) This paper aims to contribute to understand the mechanisms underlying the complex exclusion process of indigenous people in Peru, by analysing the role played by aspirations in the investment in education of indigenous children. To address these issues, the paper relies on a very rich data set, the Young Lives data, and use an original instrument that allow to cast light on the causal relation between aspiration and educational outcomes. We find that aspiration failure is a channel ...

  20. Promoting sustainable rural development in the Ccapi district, Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Janálová, Karolína

    2015-01-01

    This diploma thesis presents and analyses the possibilities of promoting sustainable rural development in the Ccapi District, Cusco Region in Peru. The aim of the thesis is to propose a development project which contributes to an increase in economic, environmental and social opportunities for the poor and improvement in standard of living of the local communities with regard to their cultural values. The project is designed in response to the major causes of poverty and environmental degrada...

  1. Liparis aphylla (Malaxideae, Orchidaceae), a new leafless record from Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Damian, Alexander; Ormerod, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Liparis aphylla G.A.Romero & Garay was previously known only from two herbarium specimens collected in 1945 and 1977 in Ecuador and Colombia, respectively. This little-known species is hereby reported for the first time for Peru. An updated description, line illustration, color photographs and distribution map of Liparis aphylla , as well as an identification key to the Peruvian species of Liparis are provided.

  2. Mummified trophy heads from Peru: diagnostic features and medicolegal significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verano, John W

    2003-05-01

    Several forms of mummified human trophy heads were produced by prehistoric and historic native groups in South America. This paper describes the diagnostic features of trophy heads produced by the Nasca culture of ancient Peru. A growing interest in these mummified heads among collectors of Pre-Columbian art and antiquities has led to their illegal exportation from Peru, in violation of national and international antiquities laws. Requests from the Peruvian government to protect its cultural patrimony led the United States in 1997 to declare these heads as items subject to U.S. import restriction, along with six other categories of human remains. Despite such restrictions, Nasca trophy heads continue to reach private collectors outside of Peru and thus may be encountered by local, state, or federal law enforcement officials unfamiliar with their characteristic features and origin. The objective of this paper is to describe the features that allow Nasca trophy heads to be identified and distinguished from other archaeological and forensic specimens that may be submitted to a forensic anthropologist for identification.

  3. Drought Monitoring in Peru as a Climate Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavado, Waldo; Felipe, Oscar; Caycho, Tania; Sosa, Jesus; Fernandez, Carlos; Endara, Sofia

    2015-04-01

    Given the need to reduce socio- economic and environmental drought in Peru as well as the vulnerability and increasing responsiveness and recovery to these events, the National Service of Meteorology and Hydrology of Peru (SENAMHI ) in conjunction with the Peru's Environment Ministry has developed a plan Drought Monitoring nationwide, which consists of two components: 1) Monitoring System and 2 ) Dissemination System . The first component consists of calculating drought indicators at national level; and for that purpose we have selected the following indexes: Normal Precipitation Index (NPI), Standardized Precipitation Index (SPI) , Precipitation Concentration Index (PCI) , Vegetation Condition Index (VCI ) , Temperature Condition Index ( TCI) , Healthy Vegetation Index (VHI ) and Streamflow Drought Index (SDI). In order to estimate these index observed climatological and hydrological data of SENAMHI network is used as well as remote sensing data of precipitation, temperature and vegetation (TRMM, CHIRPS and MODIS). The second component is the spread of these indicators and a compilation thereof to a summary document that integrates all indicators (Monthly Bulletin). This will be done through newsletters and a website (www.senamhi.gob.pe/serviciosclimaticos); in the case of exceptional drought events special notes will be made. A date has launched the first newsletter in September 2014. This drought monitoring system will be used as an instrument of climate service and we intend to make it a useful tool for decision makers and the general population .

  4. The Relationship between Substance Use and HIV Transmission in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Alfredo A; Rosen, Marc I

    2012-01-01

    The primary aim of this article is to review literature regarding the relationship between substance use and HIV transmission in Peru. Detailed search of published literature completed in PubMed and Google-Scholar and other local Peruvian publications. Mesh words: "Peru"; "substance-related-disorders"; "HIV"; "sexual-behavior" and their combinations. From 3921 articles, 150 were chosen for more careful review and only 26 were used for the review. No date limit was used in this review. Peruvian HIV epidemic is limited to MSM and its prevalence goes up to 33% in certain MSM-subpopulations. Transmission is mainly through sexual contact. Drug use doubled the risk for casual sex, decreased by half the chances of using condoms, increased the number of partners per year and the risk for STD's. Peruvian HIV-positive populations have higher rates drug use and using drugs have been associated with a higher prevalence of being HIV-positive. This may be also true for other populations such as pregnant women in which there is an association between drug use and HIV. Although the amount of Peruvian research in this area limits the review, there seems to be a relationship between using drugs, having risky-sexual-behaviors and being HIV positive in Peru. HIV-prevention strategies for Peruvians must address the link between sex and substance use.

  5. Natural gas distribution network of Lima and Callao, Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maroye, Stephane; Aerssens, Andre [Tractebel Engineering, Lima (Peru)

    2005-07-01

    In May 2002, Suez-Tractebel was awarded by the government of Peru a 30-year concession for the construction and operation of the gas distribution network in Lima, Peru. On 10 July, 2004, first gas was delivered to Lima, 1 month ahead of the official date. This gas distribution network, operated by GNLC (Gas Natural de Lima y Callao), delivers gas to some of the largest industries and power generators in and around Lima and the harbour area of Callao. Gas delivered in Lima comes through a 700 km HP gas pipeline from Camisea fields. This pipeline is operated by TGP (Transportadora de Gas del Peru). A City Gate is located at Lurin, on the southern side of the city. The gas distribution network is made of a 62 km main pipeline (20') with 25 km laterals. The main pipeline is operated at 50 bar, as the main customer, the Etevensa power plant, is located on the northern side of the city. Due to this high operating pressure combined to the surroundings, specific design philosophies were adopted to meet the extreme safety requirements. This paper highlights the specific measures taken during construction phase and the experience of the first months of operation of this challenging project. (author)

  6. [National congenital hypothyroidism screening in Peru: a broken program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Sáenz, Lina; Del Águila, Carlos; Espinoza, Oscar; Falen-Boggio, Juan; Mitre, Naim

    2015-01-01

    Congenital hypothyroidism (CH) is the most important cause of preventable mental retardation. The prevalence of CH varies by geographic region, race and ethnicity. In the countries of the Northern hemisphere, the prevalence has been reported as 1:4,000 live newborns. The prevalence is remarkably different among the countries of Latin America not only because of their different races and ethnicities but also because of the heterogeneous social-economic development. The prevalence of CH in 1984 in Peru was reported as 1:1250. In 2007, the reported incidence by the Instituto Nacional Materno Perinatal was 1:1638. A recent retrospective study performed by the Instituto Nacional de Salud del Niño in Lima, Peru described the average age of diagnosis of CH as 5,9 months +/- 5,28. This late age of CH diagnosis certainly suggests the poor efficiency of the current neonatal CH screening programs in Peru. Every Peruvian infant deserves a timely newborn screening and treatment for CH. The Peruvian government is responsible for ensuring this mandatory goal is achieved promptly.

  7. Contribution to the Uropodina mites of Peru (Acari: Mesostigmata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontschán, Jenő; Friedrich, Stefan

    2017-02-27

    Soil dwelling Uropodina mites were collected from a primary lowland rainforest in Amazonian Peru. The species found belong to three different families. A new diagnosis and the type genus of Tetrasejaspidae fam. nov. are given, and the family is recorded from Peru for the first time on the basis of Tetrasejaspis sellnicki Hirschmann, 1973. Two rotundabaloghid mites were collected (Rotundabaloghia (Circobaloghia) magna Hirschmann, 1992 and Rotundabaloghia (Circobaloghia) iquitosensis Hirschmann, 1992), both already reported from Peru. A new species (Origmatrachys peruensis sp. nov.) from the family Trachyuropodidae was collected in large numbers from soil, and is described on the basis of females, males, nymphs and larvae. This is the first description of the protonymphs and larvae of Origmatrachys. The new species differs from the previously described ones in the basis of sculptural pattern of dorsal, ventral, sternal shields and the length of the setae in the central part of the dorsal shield. A new key to the known adults and deutonymphs of Origmatrachys is given.

  8. Prevalence and Transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in People of Rural Communities of the High Jungle of Northern Peru

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Alroy, Karen A; Huang, Christine; Gilman, Robert H; Quispe-Machaca, Victor R; Marks, Morgan A; Ancca-Juarez, Jenny; Hillyard, Miranda; Verastegui, Manuela; Sanchez, Gerardo; Cabrera, Lilia; Vidal, Elisa; Billig, Erica M W; Cama, Vitaliano A; Náquira, César; Bern, Caryn; Levy, Michael Z

    2015-01-01

    .... Significant research in southern Peru has been conducted to understand T. cruzi infection and vector control, however, much less is known about the burden of infection and epidemiology in northern Peru...

  9. Prevalence and Transmission of Trypanosoma cruzi in People of Rural Communities of the High Jungle of Northern Peru: e0003779

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karen A Alroy; Christine Huang; Robert H Gilman; Victor R Quispe-Machaca; Morgan A Marks; Jenny Ancca-Juarez; Miranda Hillyard; Manuela Verastegui; Gerardo Sanchez; Lilia Cabrera; Elisa Vidal; Erica M W Billig; Vitaliano A Cama; César Náquira; Caryn Bern; Michael Z Levy; Chagas Disease in Peru

    2015-01-01

    .... Significant research in southern Peru has been conducted to understand T. cruzi infection and vector control, however, much less is known about the burden of infection and epidemiology in northern Peru...

  10. Present state and outlook of mineral resources in Peru; Peru no chika shigen no genjo to shorai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, A. [Mitsui Mineral Development Engineering Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-07-05

    This paper introduces the present state and outlook of mineral resources in Peru. Peru is a great mineral resource country in the world. Silver (the third in the world in 1993), lead (the fifth), zinc (the fourth), tin (the fifth), copper (the sixth), gold (the fourteenth), and iron are occurred as main mineral resources. Peru was laid waste due to long-term colonial rule by Spain. After the independence, confusion caused by the political distrust and breakdown of national economy was continued. Mineral resources were not utilized, effectively. Based on the nationalism of mineral resources, mines were nationalized after the 1970`s. Thus, mines lost the international competitive power due to the withdrawal of overseas capitals. Recently, based on the privatization policy, national mines have been sold through bids with participation of foreign capitals. Law systems for the development have been also arranged, which results in the ambitious participation of major mining companies in the world for the development. Survey companies have gone into the exploration. Prevention of environmental pollution, such as waste water quality standards, has been promoted. Environmental pollution by the illegal alluvial mining is serious. The government is promoting the positive measures. 7 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  11. Peru: Rozvojová krajina s bohatstvom nerastných surovín

    OpenAIRE

    Zelená, Gabriela

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the thesis "Peru: developing country with mineral wealth" is to analyze the most prosperous economic sector in Peru, which is the mining industry. Although Peru is a developing country in the world known for its rich history, also has big economic potential, which still faces many challenges. Peru belongs to the world's ten largest producers and holders of the world's reserves of silver, copper, zinc, lead, tin, and gold. In addition, this sector is important to the global level, i...

  12. Current approaches to gastric cancer in Peru and Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Erlan

    2017-01-01

    In Peru, the incidence of gastric cancer is reported to be around 15.8 per 100,000 inhabitants and it is the second most common oncological disease in men and the third one in women. Additionally, a high mortality index was reported, especially among poor people. To address this issue, in 2008, Peru initiated several insurance treatment plans of oncological diseases with promising results. In Mexico, there is a high predominance of gastric cancer in male gender compared to female gender, even reaching a 2/1 ratio, and the detection rate of early gastric cancer is low (10% to 20%) which results in a mainly palliative treatment with an overall survival rate in 5 years about 10% to 15% only. In Peru, the average age at diagnosis is around 62.96±14.75 years old and the most frequent symptoms includes abdominal pain, indigestion, loss of appetite, weight loss and gastrointestinal bleeding, while in Mexico, some studies reported an average age at diagnosis around 60.3±4.1 years old (range, 23-78 years old) and the most frequent symptoms were postprandial fullness (74.4%), abdominal pain (37.2%), weight loss (18.6%), and melena (4.6%). The anemia rate was 65.1% with a mean Hb level of 6.14 g/dL. In Peru, the most common gastric cancer type is the intestinal-type adenocarcinoma (around 34%), followed by the diffuse-type adenocarcinoma (18.7%), whilst among Mexicans, the diffuse-type was reported in 55.2% of cases, the intestinal-type was reported in 28.2% and the undifferentiated-type corresponded to 6%. In both, Peru and Mexico, 90% of the associated factors includes tabaquismo, diets rich in salt, smoked foods, and a sedentary lifestyle. Family inheritance and advanced age and pharmacological-resistant Helicobacter pylori infection are also important. Poverty has been heavily associated with a higher incidence of gastric cancer. The management of gastric cancer patients in Peru is carried out by general surgeons or general surgical oncologists. In recent years, efforts

  13. CLEANER PRODUCTION OF ETHANOL FUEL IPOMOEA BATATA (POTATO) AND ITS IMPACT ON ACCOUNTING RESERVE ENERGY AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT OF PERU

    OpenAIRE

    Anaya M., Fernando; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Gómez H., Leonel A.; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Guerrero A., Marco; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Porlles L., José; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Woolcott H., Juan; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú; Erazo E., Raymundo; Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima, Perú

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this research work is the design of a cleaner process for the production of fuel ethanol sweet potato. Applying the principles of conceptual design, Pinch analysis and the use of simulators chem cad and pinch cad, it is determined that the process with molecular sieves is the most effective to get ethanol from 99.5% purity with a power demand of 1400 Kj/kg of ethanol. We conclude that these results impacting positively on the economy of Peru by establishing a path of sustainable d...

  14. 79 FR 77598 - Illinois Railway, LLC-Lease and Operation Exemption-Rail Line of Peru Land Acquisition 2, LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-24

    ... No. FD 35886] Illinois Railway, LLC--Lease and Operation Exemption--Rail Line of Peru Land... exemption under 49 CFR 1150.41 to lease from Peru Land Acquisition 2, LLC (PLA2), and to operate... track on its eastern end west of Illinois Route 251, all near Peru, in Bureau and LaSalle Counties, Ill...

  15. 79 FR 68863 - Automotive Trade Mission to Bogota, Colombia and Lima, Peru, April 26-30, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-19

    ... International Trade Administration Automotive Trade Mission to Bogota, Colombia and Lima, Peru, April 26-30... (USCS) posts in Bogota, Colombia and Lima, Peru will organize a Business Development Mission April 26-30... will be on hand to discuss market trends and opportunities in Colombia and Peru. Commercial Setting The...

  16. 75 FR 606 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing Foreign Bird Species in Peru and Bolivia...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-05

    ... Part 17 Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing Foreign Bird Species in Peru and Bolivia... Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing Foreign Bird Species in Peru and Bolivia as Endangered Throughout...)-- all native to Peru. The ash-breasted tit-tyrant and royal cinclodes are also native to Bolivia. This...

  17. Miners, peasants and entrepreneurs : Regional development in the Central Highlands of Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Long, N.; Roberts, B.

    1984-01-01

    This volume traces the development of the central highlands, one of Peru's major mining regions. It draws on extensive fieldwork carried out in Peru between 1970 and 1982, spanning a reforming military government, reaction and a return to civilian politics under Belaunde. Through historical material

  18. Human rabies and rabies in vampire and nonvampire bat species, Southeastern Peru, 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmón-Mulanovich, Gabriela; Vásquez, Alicia; Albújar, Christian; Guevara, Carolina; Laguna-Torres, V Alberto; Salazar, Milagros; Zamalloa, Hernan; Cáceres, Marcia; Gómez-Benavides, Jorge; Pacheco, Victor; Contreras, Carlos; Kochel, Tadeusz; Niezgoda, Michael; Jackson, Felix R; Velasco-Villa, Andres; Rupprecht, Charles; Montgomery, Joel M

    2009-08-01

    After a human rabies outbreak in southeastern Peru, we collected bats to estimate the prevalence of rabies in various species. Among 165 bats from 6 genera and 10 species, 10.3% were antibody positive; antibody prevalence was similar in vampire and nonvampire bats. Thus, nonvampire bats may also be a source for human rabies in Peru.

  19. A new species of Teagueia (Orchidaceae: Pleurothallidinae from Northern of Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Chocce

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A new species of Teagueia (Luer Luer (Orchidaceae: Pleurothallidinae from the highlands of Northern Peru is described and illustrated with a black and white drawing. This species is the first record of genus Teagueia (Luer Luer in Peru.

  20. Taxonomy and new collections of wild potato species in Central and Southern Peru in 1999

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salas, A.R.; Spooner, D.M.; Huamán, Z.; Torres Maita, R.V.; Hoekstra, R.; Schüler, K.; Hijmans, R.J.

    2001-01-01

    Peru contains about half of the described wild potato taxa, and many of these are not yet preserved in genebanks. This paper reports results of the second of a series of five planned collecting expeditions to Peru. Collections were made in the central Peruvian departments of Ancash, Huancavelica, La

  1. 75 FR 5836 - Meeting of the United States-Peru Environmental Affairs Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-04

    ... of the United States-Peru Environmental Affairs Council ACTION: Notice of the meeting of the U.S.-Peru Environmental Affairs Council and request for comments. SUMMARY: The Department of State and the... Environmental, and Scientific Affairs, U.S. Department of State, by electronic mail at [email protected]state.gov with...

  2. 76 FR 21786 - Meetings of The United States-Peru Environmental Affairs Council, Environmental Cooperation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Meetings of The United States-Peru Environmental Affairs Council, Environmental Cooperation Commission and Sub-Committee on Forest Sector Governance ACTION: Notice of meetings of the United States-Peru Environmental...

  3. Bacterial cell wall preservation during organic matter diagenesis in sediments off Peru

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lomstein, Bente Aagaard; Niggemann, Jutta; Jørgensen, Bo Barker

    BACTERIAL CELL WALL PRESERVATION DURING ORGANIC MATTER DIAGENESIS IN SEDIMENTS OFF PERU The spatial distribution of total hydrolysable amino acids, total hydrolysable amino sugars and amino acid enantiomers (D- and L-forms) were investigated in surface sediments at 20 stations in the Peru margin: 9...

  4. Access to health care in relation to socioeconomic status in the Amazonian area of Peru

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansson, Charlotte; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Rodriguez, Hugo

    2009-01-01

    in relation to household socioeconomic status for children in two small Amazonian urban communities of Peru; Yurimaguas, Department of Loreto and Moyobamba, Department of San Martin, Peru. METHODS: Cross-sectional study design included household interviews. Caregivers of 780 children aged 6-72 months...

  5. Association between follicular gastritis and Helicobacter pylori in children seen at a public hospital in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, C R; Vera, C A; Huiza-Espinoza, L

    2016-01-01

    For the last 15 years, infection from Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) has been recognized in gastritis pathogenesis, and is known to trigger an important inflammatory response in these patients. To determine the association between follicular gastritis and H. pylori infection in children seen at a public hospital in Peru. An analytic, cross-sectional study was conducted on all the children treated at the Hospital Nacional Docente Madre "Niño San Bartolomé" in Lima, Peru, within the time frame of 2011-2012. All the personal data from the patients' medical histories and endoscopic procedures were collected. The crude prevalence ratios (PR) were obtained and adjusted (aPR) with their 95% confidence intervals (95%CI), using generalized linear models with the binomial family and log link function. A total of 123 children met the study criteria. Forty-eight (39%) of the study sample were girls and the mean age of the children was 12 years. H. pylori was present in 44% of the sample and 9% presented with more than 100 bacteria per field (classified as +++). Thirty-five percent of the children had esophagitis due to concomitant reflux. The presence of H. pylori was associated with follicular gastritis (Pgastritis had a greater likelihood of having H. pylori than those that did not present with gastritis. These results can be extrapolated to other similar populations and should be evaluated in each setting so that this does not become a public health problem within the next few years. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  6. Factors associated with consumption of fruits and vegetables among Community Kitchens customers in Lima, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia A. Díaz-Garcés

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Community Kitchens (CKs are one of the main food providers to low-income families in Peru and may encourage healthier diets. We aimed to determine the prevalence of fruit and vegetable consumption and associated sociodemographic and behavioral factors among CKs customers. A cross-sectional study enrolling customers of 48 CKs in two areas of Lima, Peru, was performed. The self-reported amount of fruits and vegetables consumed (<5 vs. ≥5 servings/day was the outcome. The exposures were grouped in sociodemographic variables (i.e. age, gender, education level, etc., and self-reported intention to change eating- and exercise-related habits in the last four weeks just prior to the interview. Prevalence ratios (PR were estimated using Poisson regression. Data from 422 subjects were analyzed, 328 females (77.9%, mean age 43.7 (±14.5 years. Only 36 (8.5%; 95% CI 5.9%–11.2% customers reported consuming ≥5 servings of fruits and vegetables daily. This pattern was 4-fold more likely among those with higher levels of education (≥12 vs. <7 years, and 64% less common for migrants relative to non-migrants. In terms of intentions to change habits, those who reported having tried to reduce sugar consumption or to eat more fruits were up to 90% more likely to meet the ≥5 servings/day target. A substantial gap in the consumption of ≥5 servings of fruits and vegetables/day was found among CKs customers that does not appear to be dependent on familial income. The profiles reported in this study can inform appropriate strategies to increase healthier eating in this population.

  7. [Criminal claims about medical professional liability in the Instituto de Medicina Legal of Lima, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Sandoval, Cleyber; Arones-Guevara, Shermany; Carrera-Palao, Rosa; Casana-Jara, Kelly; Colque-Jaliri, Tomasa

    2013-07-01

    To determine the characteristics of the criminal complaints claining medical professional liability, based on the expert reports issued by the Forensic Examination Division of Lima, Peru. A cross-sectional study was carried out, which included all the expert reports issued between 2005 and 2010 at the Forensic Examination Division of Lima, Peru. A descriptive analysis of each of the variables was performed. 60.3% (495/821) of the criminal complaints for medical professional liability were valued as being in accordance with the lex artis while 16.8% (138/821) were not in accordance with the lex artis. In 13% (107/821) of the cases, conclusions could not be drawn;in 9.9% (81/821) of the cases, the conclusions in the expert report did not include an valuations of the medical act.The cases in which the injury was attributed to the process of the disease itself accounted for 80.9% (502/620), and those in which in the injury was considered a result of the health care received were 19.0% (118/620). The distribution of the cause of the injury based on accordance with the lex artis showed significant differences. In our country, the number of claims for claimed medical liability is increasing, predominantly in relation to surgical specialties, where a medical act is more likely to be considered not in accordance with the lex artis. In addition, in a significant percentage of cases, no conclusions are drawn about the medical act.

  8. Chromophoric and fluorescent dissolved organic matter in and above the oxygen minimum zone off Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loginova, A. N.; Thomsen, S.; Engel, A.

    2016-11-01

    As a result of nutrient upwelling, the Peruvian coastal system is one of the most productive regions in the ocean. Sluggish ventilation of intermediate waters, characteristic for the Eastern Tropical South Pacific (ETSP) and microbial degradation of a high organic matter load promotes deoxygenation at depth. Dissolved organic matter (DOM) plays a key role in microbial respiration and carbon cycling, but little is known on DOM distribution and cycling in the ETSP. DOM optical properties give important insights on DOM sources, structure and biogeochemical reactivity. Here, we present data and a conceptual view on distribution and cycling of chromophoric (CDOM) and fluorescent (FDOM) DOM in and above the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) off Peru. Five fluorescent components were identified during PARAFAC analysis. Highest intensities of CDOM and of the amino acid-like fluorescent component (C3) occurred above the OMZ and coincided with maximum chl a concentrations, suggesting phytoplankton productivity as major source. High intensities of a marine humic-like fluorescent component (C1), observed in subsurface waters, indicated in situ microbial reworking of DOM. FDOM release from inner shelf sediment was determined by seawater analysis and continuous glider sensor measurement and included a humic-like component (C2) with a signature typical for terrestrially derived humic acids. Upwelling supplied humic-like substances to the euphotic zone. Photo-reactions were likely involved in the production of a humic-like fluorescent component (C5). Our data show that variable biological and physical processes need to be considered for understanding DOM cycling in a highly dynamic coastal upwelling system like the ETSP off Peru.

  9. Frailty and vulnerability as predictors of radiotoxicity in older adults: A longitudinal study in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runzer-Colmenares, Fernando M; Urrunaga-Pastor, Diego; Aguirre, Luis G; Reategui-Rivera, C Mahony; Parodi, José F; Taype-Rondan, Alvaro

    2017-10-23

    To assess the association between frailty/vulnerability and the development of radiotoxicity in older adults at a hospital in Peru. Cohort study that included patients with cancer with medical recommendation of radiotherapy, who attended the outpatient department of geriatrics at Naval Medical Center (Lima, Peru) between 2013 and 2015. Before receiving radiation therapy sessions, we measured frailty using Fried phenotype, and vulnerability using VES-13 and G-8 scales. During radiotherapy, we determined the development of radiotoxicity. ROC curves and crude/adjusted Cox regression models were prepared to evaluate the association between the frailty/vulnerability scales and the development of radiotoxicity respectively. From a total of 181 patients (mean age: 78.1 years, all males), 33 (18.2%) developed some type of radiotoxicity. The appearance of radiotoxicity was higher in patients with frailty or vulnerability compared with those without these conditions, according to the usual cutoff points of Fried phenotype (10.9% versus 41.9%), VES-13 (5.0% versus 63.4%) and G-8 (5.6% versus 67.6%). The area under the curve was 0.61 (0.55-0.65) for the Fried phenotype, 0.79 (0.69-0.86) for the VES-13, and 0.86 (0.58-0.89) for the G-8. We found an association between frailty/vulnerability and the development of radiotoxicity. The G-8 and the VES-13 scales had a better area under the curve than Fried phenotype, suggesting that those could be useful tools when deciding the dose of radiotherapy in geriatric patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. A population-based estimate of the economic burden of influenza in Peru, 2009-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinoco, Yeny O; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Rázuri, Hugo; Kasper, Matthew R; Romero, Candice; Ortiz, Ernesto; Gomez, Jorge; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Uyeki, Timothy M; Gilman, Robert H; Bausch, Daniel G; Montgomery, Joel M

    2016-07-01

    Influenza disease burden and economic impact data are needed to assess the potential value of interventions. Such information is limited from resource-limited settings. We therefore studied the cost of influenza in Peru. We used data collected during June 2009-December 2010 from laboratory-confirmed influenza cases identified through a household cohort in Peru. We determined the self-reported direct and indirect costs of self-treatment, outpatient care, emergency ward care, and hospitalizations through standardized questionnaires. We recorded costs accrued 15-day from illness onset. Direct costs represented medication, consultation, diagnostic fees, and health-related expenses such as transportation and phone calls. Indirect costs represented lost productivity during days of illness by both cases and caregivers. We estimated the annual economic cost and the impact of a case of influenza on a household. There were 1321 confirmed influenza cases, of which 47% sought health care. Participants with confirmed influenza illness paid a median of $13 [interquartile range (IQR) 5-26] for self-treatment, $19 (IQR 9-34) for ambulatory non-medical attended illness, $29 (IQR 14-51) for ambulatory medical attended illness, and $171 (IQR 113-258) for hospitalizations. Overall, the projected national cost of an influenza illness was $83-$85 millions. Costs per influenza illness represented 14% of the monthly household income of the lowest income quartile (compared to 3% of the highest quartile). Influenza virus infection causes an important economic burden, particularly among the poorest families and those hospitalized. Prevention strategies such as annual influenza vaccination program targeting SAGE population at risk could reduce the overall economic impact of seasonal influenza. © 2015 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The isolation of Balamuthia mandrillaris from environmental sources from Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello-Vílchez, Alfonso Martín; Reyes-Batlle, María; Montalbán-Sandoval, Esmelda; Martín-Navarro, Carmen Ma; López-Arencibia, Atteneri; Elias-Letts, Rafaela; Guerra, Humberto; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Martínez-Carretero, Enrique; Piñero, José E; Maciver, Sutherland K; Valladares, Basilio; Lorenzo-Morales, Jacob

    2014-07-01

    Balamuthia mandrillaris is an opportunistic free-living amoeba that has been reported to cause skin lesions and the fatal Balamuthia amoebic encephalitis (BAE) in humans and other animals. Currently, around 200 human BAE cases have been reported worldwide, although this number is considered to be underestimated. The highest number of BAE cases has been reported in the American continent, mainly in the southwest of the USA. Peru seems to be another hotspot for BAE with around 55 human cases having been identified, usually involving cutaneous infection, especially lesions in the central face area. The isolation of Balamuthia from environmental sources has been reported on only three prior occasions, twice from Californian soils and once from dust in Iran and so it seems that this amoeba is relatively rarely encountered in samples from the environment. We investigated that possibility of finding the amoebae in soil samples from different regions where clinical cases have been reported in Peru. Twenty-one samples were cultured in non-nutrient agar plates and were checked for the presence of B. mandrillaris-like trophozoites and/or cysts. Those samples that were positive for these amoebae by microscopic criteria were then confirmed by PCR amplification and DNA sequencing of the mitochondrial 16S rDNA gene of B. mandrillaris. We have detected the presence of B. mandrillaris in four samples collected in the regions of Piura (3) and Lima (1) where infection cases have been previously reported. We hypothesize that B. mandrillaris is present in Peru in soil and dust which therefore constitutes a source of the infection for the BAE cases previously reported in this country. Further studies should be carried out in the area to confirm the generality of this finding.

  12. Present state of the knowledge of aquatic mollusks in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Paredes, Carlos; Laboratorio de Invertebrados Acuáticos, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, UNMSM, Apdo. 11-0058, Lima 11, Perú; Huamán, Pedro; Laboratorio de Invertebrados Acuáticos, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, UNMSM, Apdo. 11-0058, Lima 11, Perú; Cardoso, Franz; Laboratorio de Invertebrados Acuáticos, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, UNMSM, Apdo. 11-0058, Lima 11, Perú; Vivar, Ronald; Laboratorio de Invertebrados Acuáticos, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, UNMSM, Apdo. 11-0058, Lima 11, Perú; Vera, Víctor; Laboratorio de Invertebrados Acuáticos, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, UNMSM, Apdo. 11-0058, Lima 11, Perú

    2014-01-01

    Se revisa los antecedentes y el estado actual del conocimiento, acerca de los moluscos acuáticos en el Perú. Los moluscos marinos y dulceacuícolas se tratan separadamente, y se da información sobre el número de familias, géneros y especies conocidas, su distribución geográfica y estado de su conservación y utilización por el hombre. Se incluye listas actualizadas de las especies. The present state of knowledge on the aquatic mollusks of Peru is reviewed herein. Marine and freshwater mollus...

  13. Patrimony and partnership: conserving the khipu legacy of Rapaz, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Peters

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Khipu, cord objects used for recordinginformation, are associated with the Incas; however, in two known cases, khipu survive in Peru as communal patrimony, still in ritual use. This article describes the khipu of San Cristóbal de Rapaz and a project of in situ conservation, conducted in collaboration with the local community. It was necessary to develop a strategy to protect the khipu, while allowing their continued use in sacred rituals. This challenged the basic principles of preventive conservation, but through the collaborative process compromises were achieved, acceptable both to conservators and to the community, which has now resumed responsibility for preservation of the patrimony.

  14. Rural Community Disaster Preparedness and Risk Perception in Trujillo, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Matthew; Grahmann, Bridget; Fillmore, Ariel; Benson, L Scott

    2017-08-01

    Introduction Disasters will continue to occur throughout the world and it is the responsibility of the government, health care systems, and communities to adequately prepare for potential catastrophic scenarios. Unfortunately, low-and-middle-income countries (LMICs) are especially vulnerable following a disaster. By understanding disaster preparedness and risk perception, interventions can be developed to improve community preparedness and avoid unnecessary mortality and morbidity following a natural disaster. Problem The purpose of this study was to assess disaster preparedness and risk perception in communities surrounding Trujillo, Peru. After designing a novel disaster preparedness and risk perception survey based on guidelines from the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC; Geneva, Switzerland), investigators performed a cross-sectional survey of potentially vulnerable communities surrounding Trujillo, Peru. Data were entered and analyzed utilizing the Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap; Harvard Catalyst; Boston, Massachusetts USA) database. A total of 230 study participants were surveyed, composed of 37% males, 63% females, with ages ranging from 18-85 years old. Those surveyed who had previously experienced a disaster (41%) had a higher perception of future disaster occurrence and potential disaster impact on their community. Overall, the study participants consistently perceived that earthquakes and infection had the highest potential impact of all disasters. Twenty-six percent of participants had an emergency supply of food, 24% had an emergency water plan, 24% had a first aid kit at home, and only 20% of the study participants had an established family evacuation plan. Natural and man-made disasters will remain a threat to the safety and health of communities in all parts of the world, especially within vulnerable communities in LMICs; however, little research has been done to identify disaster perception

  15. Images of Peru: a national cinema in crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Barrow, Sarah

    2005-01-01

    A brief look at the major trends in the history of the national cinema of Peru suggests that the relationship between the development of the moving image and the onset of modernity in that country has always been awkward. Many have argued that the advent of cinema coincided in most parts of the world with the decades when modernity was already ‘at full throttle . . . a watershed moment in which a series of sweeping changes in technology and culture created distinctive new modes of thinking ab...

  16. The Relationship between Substance Use and HIV Transmission in Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Massa, Alfredo A.; Rosen, Marc I.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The primary aim of this article is to review literature regarding the relationship between substance use and HIV transmission in Peru. Methods Detailed search of published literature completed in PubMed and Google-Scholar and other local Peruvian publications. Mesh words: “Peru”; “substance-related-disorders”; “HIV”; “sexual-behavior” and their combinations. From 3921 articles, 150 were chosen for more careful review and only 26 were used for the review. No date limit was used in t...

  17. Legislation and applicable concepts to protected natural areas in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Solano

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available There are 78 protected areas in Peru covering 22 million hectares corresponding almost 17 percent of national territory. This article reviews essential aspects of protected natural areas studying scopes, purposes, types, categories and levels such as: requirements for setting, amendment and repeal; activities allowed and forbidden within them; institutional management, among others. Finally, this work concludes with some brief thoughts on legal and institutional challenges of the Sistema Nacional de Áreas NaturalesProtegidas por el Estado (SINANPE (National System of State ProtectedNatural Areas.

  18. Avifauna of the Pongos Basin, Amazonas Department, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Daniel M.; O'Neill, John P.; Foster, Mercedes S.; Mark, Todd; Dauphine, Nico; Franke, Irma J.

    2009-01-01

    We provide an inventory of the avifauna of the Pongos Basin, northern Amazonas Department, Peru based on museum specimens collected during expeditions spanning >60 years within the 20th century. Four hundred and thirty-eight species representing 52 families are reported. Differences between lowland and higher elevation avifaunas were apparent. Species accounts with overviews of specimen data are provided for four species representing distributional records, two threatened species, and 26 species of Nearctic and Austral migrants, of which six are considered probable migrants.

  19. Peru: Opportunities for investment in the petroleum industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokashiki, D.H.

    1993-12-31

    Peruvian oil industry are described. The government of Peru has been applying a strict economic stabilization plan that includes deregulation of prices, wages, exchange and interest rates, elimination of subsides, simplification of tariffs, and the elimination of all restrictions on the flow of capital and foreign trade. The plan has been applied with the approval of all social sectors and thanks to the consensus concerning its program. The government has been able to control the hyperinflation it inherited, to reduce the fiscal defect, and to increase foreign currency reserves.

  20. HF beacon network for ionospheric specification in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hysell, D. L.; Milla, M. A.; Vierinen, J.

    2016-12-01

    A growing network of HF beacon transmitters and receivers is being deployed in Peru for specifying the F region ionosphere regionally. The effort is motivated by ionospheric disturbances associated with equatorial spread F (ESF), especially disturbances arising under inauspicious ESF conditions. The beacons use dual frequencies (2.72 and 3.64 MHz). They incorporate PRN coding to afford group-delay measurements. Scatered power, Doppler shift, bearing, and polarization are also measured. An algorithm for inverting the beacon data combined with electron density profiles from Jicamarca is described. Data and representative solutions from recent campaigns will be reviewed.

  1. HUMAN CAPITAL GROWTH AND POVERTY: EVIDENCE FROM ETHIOPIA AND PERU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attanasio, Orazio; Meghir, Costas; Nix, Emily; Salvati, Francesca

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we use high quality data from two developing countries, Ethiopia and Peru, to estimate the production functions of human capital from age 1 to age 15. We characterize the nature of persistence and dynamic complementarities between two components of human capital: health and cognition. We also explore the implications of different functional form assumptions for the production functions. We find that more able and higher income parents invest more, particularly at younger ages when investments have the greatest impacts. These differences in investments by parental income lead to large gaps in inequality by age 8 that persist through age 15.

  2. Prevalence of HIV, Herpes Simplex Virus-2, and Syphilis in male sex partners of pregnant women in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suarez-Ognio Luis

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Sexually active heterosexual men may represent an important risk factor for HIV infection and STI transmission to their female partners and unborn children, though little is known about the prevalence of STIs in this population. We sought to determine the prevalence of HIV, herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2, and syphilis infection and associated risk behaviors among male sex partners of pregnant women in Peru. Methods: Survey and seroprevalence data were collected from 1,835 male partners of pregnant women in four cities in Peru. Serum was tested for antibodies to HIV, HSV-2, and syphilis. Results: Among the 1,835 male participants, HIV prevalence was 0.8% (95% CI = 0.5–1.4%, HSV-2 16.0% (95% CI = 14.3–17.8%, and syphilis 1.6% (95% CI = 1.0–2.2%. Additionally, 11.0% reported a lifetime history of intercourse with men, and 37.1% with female sex workers. Unprotected intercourse with men during the previous year was reported by 0.9% and with female sex workers by 1.2%. Conclusion: Pregnant women's sex partners reported lifetime sexual contact with core risk groups, had an elevated prevalence of HSV-2, and demonstrated the potential to spread HIV and other STIs to their partners. Though the prevalence of HIV in the population was not significantly higher than observed in other samples of heterosexuals in Peru, the risk of HIV transmission to their female partners may be exacerbated by their increased prevalence of HSV-2 infection. Further study of heterosexual populations is necessary to fully understand the epidemiology of HIV/STIs in Latin America.

  3. The Progreso Basin Province of Northwestern Peru and Southwestern Ecuador: Neogene and Cretaceous-Paleogene Total Petroleum Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higley, Debra K.

    2004-01-01

    The Progreso Basin province (6083) in northwestern Peru and southwestern Ecuador consists of the Paleogene Santa Elena block and Peru Bank, and the Neogene Tumbes-Progreso subbasin. The Santa Elena block and Peru Bank are part of the Cretaceous-Paleogene Total Petroleum System (TPS)(608302), which contains the Cretaceous-Paleogene Santa Elena Block Assessment Unit (60830201). The Tumbes- Progreso subbasin includes the Neogene TPS (608301) and associated Neogene Pull-Apart Basin Assessment Unit (60830101). The complex tectonic history of the Progreso Basin province influenced depositional and erosional patterns across the region, and also the location, timing, and types of seals, traps, possible source and reservoir rocks, and hydrocarbon generation and migration. Marine shales that are interbedded with and overlie reservoir intervals are the probable hydrocarbon source rocks. Timing of hydrocarbon generation and migration was probably Miocene and younger, following creation of the Tumbes-Progreso subbasin by movement along the Dolores-Guayaquil megashear. More than 220 million barrels of oil (MMBO) and 255 billion cubic feet of gas (BCFG) have been produced from the Progreso Basin province. The means of estimated recoverable oil, gas, and natural gas liquids (NGL) resources from undiscovered fields in the province are 237 MMBO, 695 BCFG, and 32 MMB NGL, respectively. The means of estimated recoverable oil, gas, and NGL resources from undiscovered onshore fields are 45 MMBO, 113 BCFG, and 5 MMBNGL, and from undiscovered offshore fields are 192 BBO, 582 BCFG, and 27 MMBNGL. These are USGS grown undiscovered resources that were determined by using a minimum field size of 1 million barrels of oil equivalent.

  4. Infection of Domestic Dogs in Peru by Zoonotic Bartonella Species: A Cross-Sectional Prevalence Study of 219 Asymptomatic Dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Pedro Paulo V. P.; Morton, Bridget A.; Tngrian, Maryam; Kachani, Malika; Barrón, Eduardo A.; Gavidia, Cesar M.; Gilman, Robert H.; Angulo, Noelia P.; Brenner, Elliott C.; Lerner, Richard; Chomel, Bruno B.

    2013-01-01

    Bartonella species are emerging infectious organisms transmitted by arthropods capable of causing long-lasting infection in mammalian hosts. Among over 30 species described from four continents to date, 15 are known to infect humans, with eight of these capable of infecting dogs as well. B. bacilliformis is the only species described infecting humans in Peru; however, several other Bartonella species were detected in small mammals, bats, ticks, and fleas in that country. The objective of this study was to determine the serological and/or molecular prevalence of Bartonella species in asymptomatic dogs in Peru in order to indirectly evaluate the potential for human exposure to zoonotic Bartonella species. A convenient sample of 219 healthy dogs was obtained from five cities and three villages in Peru. EDTA-blood samples were collected from 205 dogs, whereas serum samples were available from 108 dogs. The EDTA-blood samples were screened by PCR followed by nucleotide sequencing for species identification. Antibodies against B. vinsonii berkhoffii and B. rochalimae were detected by IFA (cut-off of 1∶64). Bartonella DNA was detected in 21 of the 205 dogs (10%). Fifteen dogs were infected with B. rochalimae, while six dogs were infected with B. v. berkhoffii genotype III. Seropositivity for B. rochalimae was detected in 67 dogs (62%), and for B. v. berkhoffii in 43 (40%) of the 108 dogs. Reciprocal titers ≥1∶256 for B. rochalimae were detected in 19% of dogs, and for B. v. berkhoffii in 6.5% of dogs. This study identifies for the first time a population of dogs exposed to or infected with zoonotic Bartonella species, suggesting that domestic dogs may be the natural reservoir of these zoonotic organisms. Since dogs are epidemiological sentinels, Peruvian humans may be exposed to infections with B. rochalimae or B. v. berkhoffii. PMID:24040427

  5. Infection of domestic dogs in peru by zoonotic bartonella species: a cross-sectional prevalence study of 219 asymptomatic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz, Pedro Paulo V P; Morton, Bridget A; Tngrian, Maryam; Kachani, Malika; Barrón, Eduardo A; Gavidia, Cesar M; Gilman, Robert H; Angulo, Noelia P; Brenner, Elliott C; Lerner, Richard; Chomel, Bruno B

    2013-01-01

    Bartonella species are emerging infectious organisms transmitted by arthropods capable of causing long-lasting infection in mammalian hosts. Among over 30 species described from four continents to date, 15 are known to infect humans, with eight of these capable of infecting dogs as well. B. bacilliformis is the only species described infecting humans in Peru; however, several other Bartonella species were detected in small mammals, bats, ticks, and fleas in that country. The objective of this study was to determine the serological and/or molecular prevalence of Bartonella species in asymptomatic dogs in Peru in order to indirectly evaluate the potential for human exposure to zoonotic Bartonella species. A convenient sample of 219 healthy dogs was obtained from five cities and three villages in Peru. EDTA-blood samples were collected from 205 dogs, whereas serum samples were available from 108 dogs. The EDTA-blood samples were screened by PCR followed by nucleotide sequencing for species identification. Antibodies against B. vinsonii berkhoffii and B. rochalimae were detected by IFA (cut-off of 1∶64). Bartonella DNA was detected in 21 of the 205 dogs (10%). Fifteen dogs were infected with B. rochalimae, while six dogs were infected with B. v. berkhoffii genotype III. Seropositivity for B. rochalimae was detected in 67 dogs (62%), and for B. v. berkhoffii in 43 (40%) of the 108 dogs. Reciprocal titers ≥1∶256 for B. rochalimae were detected in 19% of dogs, and for B. v. berkhoffii in 6.5% of dogs. This study identifies for the first time a population of dogs exposed to or infected with zoonotic Bartonella species, suggesting that domestic dogs may be the natural reservoir of these zoonotic organisms. Since dogs are epidemiological sentinels, Peruvian humans may be exposed to infections with B. rochalimae or B. v. berkhoffii.

  6. Infection of domestic dogs in peru by zoonotic bartonella species: a cross-sectional prevalence study of 219 asymptomatic dogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Paulo V P Diniz

    Full Text Available Bartonella species are emerging infectious organisms transmitted by arthropods capable of causing long-lasting infection in mammalian hosts. Among over 30 species described from four continents to date, 15 are known to infect humans, with eight of these capable of infecting dogs as well. B. bacilliformis is the only species described infecting humans in Peru; however, several other Bartonella species were detected in small mammals, bats, ticks, and fleas in that country. The objective of this study was to determine the serological and/or molecular prevalence of Bartonella species in asymptomatic dogs in Peru in order to indirectly evaluate the potential for human exposure to zoonotic Bartonella species. A convenient sample of 219 healthy dogs was obtained from five cities and three villages in Peru. EDTA-blood samples were collected from 205 dogs, whereas serum samples were available from 108 dogs. The EDTA-blood samples were screened by PCR followed by nucleotide sequencing for species identification. Antibodies against B. vinsonii berkhoffii and B. rochalimae were detected by IFA (cut-off of 1∶64. Bartonella DNA was detected in 21 of the 205 dogs (10%. Fifteen dogs were infected with B. rochalimae, while six dogs were infected with B. v. berkhoffii genotype III. Seropositivity for B. rochalimae was detected in 67 dogs (62%, and for B. v. berkhoffii in 43 (40% of the 108 dogs. Reciprocal titers ≥1∶256 for B. rochalimae were detected in 19% of dogs, and for B. v. berkhoffii in 6.5% of dogs. This study identifies for the first time a population of dogs exposed to or infected with zoonotic Bartonella species, suggesting that domestic dogs may be the natural reservoir of these zoonotic organisms. Since dogs are epidemiological sentinels, Peruvian humans may be exposed to infections with B. rochalimae or B. v. berkhoffii.

  7. A Positive Correlation between Atypical Memory B Cells and Plasmodium falciparum Transmission Intensity in Cross-Sectional Studies in Peru and Mali

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Greta E.; Clark, Eva H.; Li, Shanping; Traore, Boubacar; Kayentao, Kassoum; Ongoiba, Aissata; Hernandez, Jean N.; Doumbo, Ogobara K.; Pierce, Susan K.; Branch, OraLee H.; Crompton, Peter D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Antibodies that protect against Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) malaria are only acquired after years of repeated infections. The B cell biology that underlies this observation is poorly understood. We previously reported that “atypical” memory B cells are increased in children and adults exposed to intense Pf transmission in Mali, similar to what has been observed in individuals infected with HIV. In this study we examined B cell subsets of Pf -infected adults in Peru and Mali to determine if Pf transmission intensity correlates with atypical memory B cell expansion. Methodology/Principal Findings In this cross-sectional study venous blood was collected from adults in areas of zero (U.S., n = 10), low (Peru, n = 18) and high (Mali, n = 12) Pf transmission. Adults in Peru and Mali were infected with Pf at the time of blood collection. Thawed lymphocytes were analyzed by flow cytometry to quantify B cell subsets, including atypical memory B cells, defined by the cell surface markers CD19+ CD20+ CD21− CD27− CD10−. In Peru, the mean level of atypical memory B cells, as a percent of total B cells, was higher than U.S. adults (Peru mean: 5.4% [95% CI: 3.61–7.28]; U.S. mean: 1.4% [95% CI: 0.92–1.81]; p<0.0001) but lower than Malian adults (Mali mean 13.1% [95% CI: 10.68–15.57]; p = 0.0001). In Peru, individuals self-reporting ≥1 prior malaria episodes had a higher percentage of atypical memory B cells compared to those reporting no prior episodes (≥1 prior episodes mean: 6.6% [95% CI: 4.09–9.11]; no prior episodes mean: 3.1% [95% CI: 1.52–4.73]; p = 0.028). Conclusions/Significance Compared to Pf-naive controls, atypical memory B cells were increased in Peruvian adults exposed to low Pf transmission, and further increased in Malian adults exposed to intense Pf transmission. Understanding the origin, function and antigen specificity of atypical memory B cells in the context of Pf infection could contribute to our

  8. [Publication of summaries presented at the scientific congresses of medical students, Peru 2002-2009: characteristics and related factors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro-Polo, Miguel; Pereyra-Elías, Reneé; Nizama-Vía, Ayar; Ng-Sueng, Luis Fernando; Vélez-Segovia, Eduardo; Galán-Rodas, Edén; Mayta-Tristán, Percy

    2012-01-01

    To determine the publication rate of abstracts submitted at the national scientific meetings of medical students in Peru between 2002 and 2009, and associated factors. A retrospective cohort was performed; the characteristics of overall abstract submitted were assessed. In addition, whether they were published in scientific journals was determined by way of a search strategy validated using Google Scholar. Crude and adjusted relative risks (RR) were calculated using Poisson regression with robust variance to assess association with the analyzed factors. 532 abstracts were analyzed, 52 (9.8%) of which were published in scientific journals after their presentation at a scientific meeting. All of them were published in Peruvian journals written in Spanish. The most important journal in which they were published was Ciencia e Investigación Médica Estudiantil Latinoamericana (CIMEL) (13/52). The median of publication time was 13 months (range: 0-75). The fact that a student from the Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos (RR: 5.18; CI95%:2.3-11.6) is the author of the abstract and that the abstract was collaboratively written by students from two universities (RR: 3.64; CI95%:1.1-11.7) are associated factors in the multivariate analysis. The publication rate of abstract submitted at national scientific meetings of medical students in Peru is low. New strategies should be taken, and the existing ones should be reinforced in order to increase the publication rate of the abstract submitted.

  9. Short communication: Detection of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) in healthy cattle and pigs in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, F P; Sotelo, E; Morales, I; Menacho, F; Medina, A M; Evaristo, R; Valencia, R; Carbajal, L; Ruiz, J; Ochoa, T J

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) in cattle and pigs as a possible STEC reservoir in Lima, Peru. One hundred and fourteen cattle and 112 pigs from 10 and 4 farms, respectively, were studied. Five E. coli colonies per culture were studied by a multiplex real-time PCR to identify Shiga toxin-producing (stx1, stx2, eaeA), enterotoxigenic (lt, st), enteropathogenic (eaeA), enteroinvasive (ipaH), enteroaggregative (aggR), and diffusely adherent E. coli (daaD). Shiga toxin-producing E. coli were isolated from 16 cattle (14%) but none from pigs. stx1 was found in all bovine isolates, 11 of which also carried eaeA genes (69%); only 1 sample had both stx1 and stx2. Thirteen stx-positive strains were classified as Shiga-toxigenic (81%) using an enzymatic immunoassay, 2 STEC strains were from serogroup O157 (13%), and 7 were sorbitol negative (44%). Enteropathogenic E. coli were detected more frequently in cattle (18%, 20/114) than in pigs (5%, 6/112). To our knowledge, this is the first study on the prevalence of STEC in farms animals in Peru using molecular methods. Further studies are needed in a large number of farms to determine the relevance of these findings and its consequences for public health. Copyright © 2012 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A comparison of ship and satellite chlorophyll from California and Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavez, Francisco P.

    1995-12-01

    Ship surface chlorophyll measurements from coastal California and Peru have been processed for comparison with surface chlorophyll estimated during the lifetime of the coastal zone color scanner (CZCS). The ship data shows that chlorophyll concentrations are higher off Peru than California, consistent with the Peru Current system's being more productive. Off California the ship and satellite measurements yield similar estimates of chlorophyll concentration (the average ratio of ship to satellite is 1.1), but off Peru the satellite yields substantially lower concentrations (average ratio of 3.8). The lower satellite values off Peru are likely due to sparse satellite coverage and/or problems with atmospheric corrections. For California, the inshore (0-100 km) ship and satellite chlorophyll estimates are similar, but offshore (200-250 km) the satellite yields higher values. Both estimates, however, confirm the presence of a winter chlorophyll maximum in offshore California waters (likely due to increased nutrient concentrations), increases in chlorophyll per cell, and mixing of subsurface chlorophyll maximum to the surface. Conversely, off Peru, offshore ship and satellite values are in closer agreement than inshore values. As a result onshore-offshore gradients are weaker in the satellite data for both California and Peru. The gradient problem is likely the result of the satellite algorithm. Different algorithms may be needed for coastal waters, dominated by relatively large and colonial phytoplankton, and open ocean waters, dominated by small solitary phytoplankton.

  11. Residential mercury contamination in adobe brick homes in Huancavelica, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagan, Nicole; Robins, Nicholas; Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Halabi, Susan; Espinoza Gonzales, Ruben Dario; Richter, Daniel deB; Vandenberg, John

    2013-01-01

    This is the first study of adobe brick contamination anywhere in the world. Huancavelica, Peru is the site of historic cinnabar refining and one of the most mercury (Hg) contaminated urban areas in the world. Over 80% of homes in Huancavelica are constructed with adobe bricks made from Hg contaminated soil. In this study we measured total Hg concentrations in adobe brick, dirt floor, surface dust, and air samples from the interior of 60 adobe brick houses located in four neighborhoods. Concentrations of total Hg in adobe bricks, dirt floors, and surface dust ranged from 8.00 to 1070 µg/g, 3.06 to 926 µg/g, and 0.02 to 9.69 µg/wipe, respectively, with statistically significant differences between the four neighborhoods. Concentrations of Hg in adobe brick and dirt floor samples in Huancavelica were orders of magnitude higher than in Ayacucho, a non-mining town in Peru. A strong correlation exists between total Hg concentrations in adobe bricks and dirt floors which confirms that adobe bricks were being made on-site and not purchased from an off-site source. A strong correlation between surface dust and adobe bricks and dirt floors indicates that walls and floors serve as indoor sources of Hg contamination. Elemental Hg vapor concentrations were below detection (adobe bricks, may be a substantial source of residential Hg exposure in silver or gold refining communities where Hg is produced or used for amalgamation in artisanal gold production.

  12. Constrained Choices: Adolescents Speak on Sexuality in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayer, Angela M.; Tsui, Amy O.; Hindin, Michelle J.

    2011-01-01

    While numerous studies have explored adolescent sexual behavior in Peru, to date, none have explored how adolescents situate sexuality within the context of their broader lives. This information is needed to inform policies and programs. Life history interviews were conducted with 20 12–17 year-old females and males from a low-income settlement near Lima, Peru. Data were analyzed using holistic content analysis and grounded theory. Sexuality had a strong presence in adolescents’ lives. However, adolescents viewed the complete expression of their sexuality as a constrained choice. Constraints are due to the belief that sexual intercourse always results in pregnancy; the nature of sex education; the provision of proscriptive advice; and the family tensions, economic problems, racism and violence present in adolescents’ lives. Social and cultural factors seem to surpass and often suppress the physical and psychological dimensions of adolescents’ sexuality. The results of this study can inform policies and programs to support adolescents as they construct their sexuality and make sexuality-related decisions. PMID:20526920

  13. Frequency of maternal and newborn birth outcomes, Lima, Peru, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynn, Adriane; Cabeza, Jeanne; Adachi, Kristina; Needleman, Jack; Garcia, Patricia J; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    This study describes the pregnancy and birth outcomes at two hospitals in Lima, Peru. The data collection and analysis is intended to inform patients, providers, and policy makers on Peru's progress toward achieving the Millennium Development Goals and to help set priorities for action and further research. Data were collected retrospectively from a sample of 237 women who delivered between December 2012 and September 2013 at the Instituto Nacional Materno Perinatal or the Hospital Nacional Arzobispo Loayza. The outcomes were recorded by a trained mid-wife through telephone interviews with patients and by review of hospital records. Associations between participant demographic characteristics and pregnancy outcomes were tested with Chi-squared, Fisher's exact, or Student's t-test. Over 37% of women experienced at least one maternal or perinatal complication, and the most frequent were hypertension/preeclampsia and macrosomia. The women in our sample had a cesarean section rate of 50.2%. Maternal and perinatal complications are not uncommon among women in the lower socioeconomic strata of Lima. Also, the high cesarean rate underpins the need for a more comprehensive understanding of the indications for cesarean section deliveries, which could help reduce the number of unnecessary procedures and preventable complications.

  14. Ten new species of Telipogon (Orchidaceae, Oncidiinae from southern Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galán de Mera, Antonio

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Ten new species of Telipogon, T. antisuyuensis, T. austroperuvianus, T. casadevalliae, T. farfanii, T. javiercastroviejoi, T. kosnipatensis, T. marleneae, T. mesotropicalis, T. santiagocastroviejoi, and T. tupayachii are described and illustrated. These are terrestrial or epiphytes of the montane humid forests from Andean valleys of southern Peru. Diagnostic morphological characters are discussed for each species. A key is provided for the species of the genus found in southern Peru. The number of Telipogon species currently recognized for the Peruvian flora is 46.Se describen e ilustran diez especies nuevas de Telipogon –T. antisuyuensis, T. austroperuvianus, T. casadevalliae, T. farfanii, T. javiercastroviejoi, T. kosnipatensis, T. marleneae, T. mesotropicalis, T. santiagocastroviejoi y T. tupayachii. Éstas son plantas terrestres o epífitas de los bosques húmedos montanos de los valles andinos del sur de Perú. Se discuten sus caracteres morfológicos diagnósticos y se propone una clave dicotómica para diferenciar las especies que crecen en el sur del país. El número de especies de Telipogon actualmente reconocidas para la flora peruana es de 46.

  15. Impacts of Unsustainable Mahogany Logging in Bolivia and Peru

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    Roberto F. Kometter

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Although bigleaf mahogany [Swietenia macrophylla King (Meliaceae] is the premier timber species of Latin America, its exploitation is unsustainable because of a pattern of local depletion and shifting supply. We surveyed experts on the status of mahogany in Bolivia and Peru, the world's past and present largest exporters. Bolivia no longer has commercially viable mahogany (trees > 60 cm diameter at breast height across 79% of its range. In Peru, mahogany's range has shrunk by 50%, and, within a decade, a further 28% will be logged out. Approximately 15% of the mahogany range in these two countries is protected, but low densities and illegal logging mean that this overestimates the extent of mahogany under protection. The international community can support mahogany conservation by funding park management and by encouraging independent verification of the legality of mahogany in trade. Our findings demonstrate that a systematic expert survey can generate reliable and cost-effective information on the status of widespread species of concern and help to inform appropriate management policy.

  16. Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of Fasciola hepatica from Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichikawa-Seki, Madoka; Ortiz, Pedro; Cabrera, Maria; Hobán, Cristian; Itagaki, Tadashi

    2016-06-01

    The causative agent of fasciolosis in South America is thought to be Fasciola hepatica. In this study, Fasciola flukes from Peru were analyzed to investigate their genetic structure and phylogenetic relationships with those from other countries. Fasciola flukes were collected from the three definitive host species: cattle, sheep, and pigs. They were identified as F. hepatica because mature sperms were observed in their seminal vesicles, and also they displayed Fh type, which has an identical fragment pattern to F. hepatica in the nuclear internal transcribed spacer 1. Eight haplotypes were obtained from the mitochondrial NADH dehydrogenase subunit 1 (nad1) sequences of Peruvian F. hepatica; however, no special difference in genetic structure was observed between the three host species. Its extremely low genetic diversity suggests that the Peruvian population was introduced from other regions. Nad1 haplotypes identical to those of Peruvian F. hepatica were detected in China, Uruguay, Italy, Iran, and Australia. Our results indicate that F. hepatica rapidly expanded its range due to human migration. Future studies are required to elucidate dispersal route of F. hepatica from Europe, its probable origin, to other areas, including Peru. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  17. Cancer patterns, trends, and transitions in Peru: a regional perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piñeros, Marion; Ramos, Willy; Antoni, Sébastien; Abriata, Graciela; Medina, Luis E; Miranda, J Jaime; Payet, Eduardo; Bray, Freddie

    2017-10-01

    Peru, like several other South American countries, is experiencing remarkable population growth, ageing, and urbanisation, which has given rise to profound changes in its epidemiological profile. Prostate and breast cancer are the most frequent cancers in men and women, respectively, in Lima and Arequipa, the two areas with population-based cancer registries. However, infection-associated cancers (cervix and stomach) are also common, and rank highest in the national cancer mortality profile. Although a foundation of surveillance informs cancer-control initiatives in Peru, improvements in the vital statistics system, and the quality and use of incidence data for the planning and assessment of cancer prevention and control actions, are needed. Existing population-based cancer registries in Lima and Arequipa, and linkages to the established national mandatory cancer reporting system, are crucial for the collection of high-quality data on national cancer incidence. The delivery of effective cancer prevention and control measures requires sustained investment in the collection of high-quality data capable of informing policies and driving research programmes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Frequency of maternal and newborn birth outcomes, Lima, Peru, 2013.

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    Adriane Wynn

    Full Text Available This study describes the pregnancy and birth outcomes at two hospitals in Lima, Peru. The data collection and analysis is intended to inform patients, providers, and policy makers on Peru's progress toward achieving the Millennium Development Goals and to help set priorities for action and further research.Data were collected retrospectively from a sample of 237 women who delivered between December 2012 and September 2013 at the Instituto Nacional Materno Perinatal or the Hospital Nacional Arzobispo Loayza. The outcomes were recorded by a trained mid-wife through telephone interviews with patients and by review of hospital records. Associations between participant demographic characteristics and pregnancy outcomes were tested with Chi-squared, Fisher's exact, or Student's t-test.Over 37% of women experienced at least one maternal or perinatal complication, and the most frequent were hypertension/preeclampsia and macrosomia. The women in our sample had a cesarean section rate of 50.2%.Maternal and perinatal complications are not uncommon among women in the lower socioeconomic strata of Lima. Also, the high cesarean rate underpins the need for a more comprehensive understanding of the indications for cesarean section deliveries, which could help reduce the number of unnecessary procedures and preventable complications.

  19. Suspended sediment dynamics in the Amazon River of Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armijos, Elisa; Crave, Alain; Vauchel, Philippe; Fraizy, Pascal; Santini, William; Moquet, Jean-Sèbastien; Arevalo, Nore; Carranza, Jorge; Guyot, Jean-Loup

    2013-07-01

    The erosion and transport of sediments allow us to understand many activities of significance, such as crust evolution, climate change, uplift rates, continental processes, the biogeochemical cycling of pollutants and nutrients. The Amazon basin of Peru has contrasting physiographic and climatic characteristics between the Andean piedmont and the plains and between the north and south of the basin which is why there are 8 gauging stations located along the principal rivers of the Andean piedmont (Marañón, Huallaga, Ucayali) and the plain (Marañón, Tigre, Napo, Ucayali and Amazon rivers). Since 2003, the ORE-Hybam (IRD-SENAMHI-UNALM) observatory has performed out regular measurements at strategic points of the Amazon basin to understand and model the systems, behavior and long-term dynamics. On the Andean piedmont, the suspended yields are governed by a simple model with a relationship between the river discharge and the sediment concentration. In the plain, the dilution effect of the concentrations can create hysteresis in this relationship on a monthly basis. The Amazon basin of Peru has a sediment yield of 541 *106 t year-1, 70% comes from the southern basin.

  20. Chronic exposure of sheep to a zinc smelter in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, J S; Ameghino, E; Aaronson, M J

    1989-06-01

    Liver levels of arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, manganese, and zinc were assessed in adult female sheep living in the vicinity of a zinc smelter in Peru. The study was conducted on a large sheep-raising cooperative divided into seven management units, operated under a standardized husbandry system. Soil samples were analyzed for the same metals at varying distances from the smelter. A gradient of concentration of heavy metals in soil was found between 1 and 56 km from the smelter. Soil concentrations for all metals except manganese decreased significantly with increasing distance from the smelter. The strongest correlations were found for copper, lead, and zinc (P less than 0.001). Topographic features and prevailing wind direction appeared to play a role in the dispersion of pollutants. Liver samples were obtained from 153 sheep on five units of the cooperative. The centers of the units sampled were between 13 and 56 km from the smelter. Hepatic concentrations of arsenic, lead, manganese, and zinc decreased significantly with increasing distance from the smelter. Liver arsenic and liver zinc were significantly related to soil concentrations. Liver levels of arsenic, cadmium, lead, and manganese in sheep from the cooperative were significantly higher than those detected in control sheep from southern Peru. Sheep populations may serve as biological monitors for heavy metal accumulation and environmental carcinogenesis.

  1. New lichen biota records from Santuario Histórico de Machu Picchu, Peru

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    Jano Nuñez-Zapata

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available While high species diversity of lichen - lichenized fungi - is reported especially in the tropics, the studies on these organisms are still scarce in Peru. Using conventional methodology and current literature on the description of genera and species, we reported macro-lichens collected from Historic Sanctuary of Machu Picchu (Cusco, Peru. Sixty seven species of macro-lichens are reported to SHMP, nine new records to Peru are documented. Parmeliaceae, Physciaceae and Lobariaceae are the families with major number of species.

  2. Additions to the checklist of the ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) of Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guénard, Benoit; Economo, Evan P

    2015-11-10

    A recent species checklist of the ants of Peru recorded 592 nominal species and 79 genera on the basis of a literature review. Here we complement the previously published checklist with the addition of 83 nominal species and six genera, including three genera recorded only from morphospecies. This increases the list of ants reported from Peru to at least 679 species and subspecies and 85 genera. We also modify the list of species known as endemic from Peru, discuss the historical importance of the Peruvian ant fauna in myrmecology, and highlight potential research for future studies.

  3. Database and Map of Quaternary Faults and Folds in Peru and its Offshore Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machare, Jose; Fenton, Clark H.; Machette, Michael N.; Lavenu, Alain; Costa, Carlos; Dart, Richard L.

    2003-01-01

    This publication consists of a main map of Quaternary faults and fiolds of Peru, a table of Quaternary fault data, a region inset map showing relative plate motion, and a second inset map of an enlarged area of interest in southern Peru. These maps and data compilation show evidence for activity of Quaternary faults and folds in Peru and its offshore regions of the Pacific Ocean. The maps show the locations, ages, and activity rates of major earthquake-related features such as faults and fault-related folds. These data are accompanied by text databases that describe these features and document current information on their activity in the Quaternary.

  4. Interspecies Interactions and Potential Influenza A Virus Risk in Small Swine Farms in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-15

    available soon. Interspecies interactions and potential Influenza A virus risk in small swine farms in Peru BMC Infectious Diseases 2012, 12:58 doi:10.1186...Virus Risk In Small Swine Farms In Peru 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Medical Research Unit - 6,Lima, Peru , , 8. PERFORMING

  5. Tectonic implications of the microearthquake seismicity and fault plane solutions in southern Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grange, F.; Hatzfeld, D.; Cunningham, P.; Molnar, P.; Roecker, S. W.; Suarez, G.; Rodrigues, A.; Ocola, L.

    1984-01-01

    Because the contortion in the seismic zone in southern Peru is aligned approximately parallel to the direction of relative plate motion, rather than perpendicular to the coast of Peru, the position of the contortion need not migrate with respect to the overriding South American plate as the Nazca plate subducts beneath it, and the flow in the surrounding asthenosphere could be in a steady state. In addition, the position of the contortion defines the northern boundary of the volcanic arc in southern Peru. The inference that a wedge of asthenospheric material must overlie the downgoing slab for subduction-related volcanism to occur is thereby strengthened.

  6. High prevalence of extra-genital chlamydial or gonococcal infections among men who have sex with men and transgender women in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan-Blitz, Lao-Tzu; Leon, Segundo R; Bristow, Claire C; Konda, Kelika A; Vargas, Silver K; Flores, Juan A; Brown, Brandon J; Caceres, Carlos F; Klausner, Jeffrey D

    2017-02-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are among the most common sexually transmitted bacterial infections in the world. Data are limited, however, on the burden of extra-genital chlamydial and gonococcal infections among men who have sex with men and transgender women in Lima, Peru. Data were gathered from self-collected anal or pharyngeal swabs from participants in Lima, Peru, and analyzed via cross-sectional methods. Prevalence ratios for the association between extra-genital infection with socio-demographic and sexual behaviors were determined. Overall, 127 (32.8%) participants had anal or pharyngeal infections. On multivariate modeling, anal infection was positively associated with practicing both receptive and insertive anal sex, when compared to insertive alone (PR = 2.49; 95% CI = 1.32-4.71), and negatively associated with any antibiotic use in the prior three months (PR = 0.60; 95% CI = 0.39-0.91). Pharyngeal infection was negatively associated with age greater than 30 years compared to 18-30 years (PR = 0.54; 95% CI = 0.30-0.96), and positively associated with gender identity of transgender women (PR = 2.12; 95% CI = 1.20-3.73). This study demonstrates considerable burden of extra-genital chlamydial and gonococcal infections among men who have sex with men and transgender women in Lima, Peru.

  7. Attitudes, perceptions and awareness concerning quaternary prevention among family doctors working in the Social Security System, Peru: a cross-sectional descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuba Fuentes, María Sofía; Zegarra Zamalloa, Carlos Orlando; Reichert, Sonja; Gill, Dawn

    2016-04-27

    Quaternary Prevention is defined as the action taken to identify patients at risk of overtreatment, to protect them from additional medical treatments, and to suggest interventions that are ethically acceptable. Many countries and organizations have joined in the efforts to practice quaternary prevention. These countries started a campaign called Choosing Wisely that implements recommendations in order to avoid harming patients. To determine the attitudes, perceptions and awareness towards Quaternary Prevention and the practice of “Choosing Wisely Canada Recommendations” among family doctors working in the Social Security System in Peru. A questionnaire was developed after reviewing the literature and contacting experts in the field and was sent by email to all 64 family physicians in the Social Security System (Essalud) in Lima Peru. Responses were received from 40 participants. The response rate was 64%. Approximately 95% reported that they understand the concept of quaternary prevention. Agreement with all the recommendations was 90% or higher. In most of the recommendations the applicability was more than 80%. The most important barriers perceived for the practice of Quaternary Prevention were patients’ expectations (33%). There are positive perceptions towards Quaternary Preventions and Choosing Wisely recommendations in the family doctors of social security in Lima Peru.

  8. Transmission dynamics of pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus in humans and swine in backyard farms in Tumbes, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinoco, Yeny O; Montgomery, Joel M; Kasper, Mathew R; Nelson, Martha I; Razuri, Hugo; Guezala, Maria C; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Barnes, John; Gilman, Robert H; Bausch, Daniel G; Gonzalez, Armando E

    2016-01-01

    We aimed to determine the frequency of pH1N1 transmission between humans and swine on backyard farms in Tumbes, Peru. Two-year serial cross-sectional study comprising four sampling periods: March 2009 (pre-pandemic), October 2009 (peak of the pandemic in Peru), April 2010 (1st post-pandemic period), and October 2011 (2nd post-pandemic period). Backyard swine serum, tracheal swabs, and lung sample were collected during each sampling period. We assessed current and past pH1N1 infection in swine through serological testing, virus culture, and RT-PCR and compared the results with human incidence data from a population-based active surveillance cohort study in Peru. Among 1303 swine sampled, the antibody prevalence to pH1N1 was 0% pre-pandemic, 8% at the peak of the human pandemic (October 2009), and 24% in April 2010 and 1% in October 2011 (post-pandemic sampling periods). Trends in swine seropositivity paralleled those seen in humans in Tumbes. The pH1N1 virus was isolated from three pigs during the peak of the pandemic. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these viruses likely represent two separate human-to-swine transmission events in backyard farm settings. Our findings suggest that human-to-swine pH1N1 transmission occurred during the pandemic among backyard farms in Peru, emphasizing the importance of interspecies transmission in backyard pig populations. Continued surveillance for influenza viruses in backyard farms is warranted. © 2015 The Authors. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. The effect of changes in visibility and price on fruit purchasing at a university cafeteria in Lima, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, María Kathia; Benziger, Catherine P; Pillay, Timesh D; Miranda, J Jaime

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of increasing fruit visibility, adding information and lowering price on fruit purchasing at a university cafeteria in Lima, Peru. Design Quasi-experimental pilot study of a three-phase stepped intervention. In Phase 1, fruit was displayed >3 m from the point of purchase with no additional information. Phase 2 consisted in displaying the fruit near the point of purchase with added health and price information. Phase 3 added a 33 % price reduction. The duration of each phase was 3 weeks and phases were separated by 2-week breaks. Primary outcomes were total pieces of fruit and number of meals sold daily. Setting A university cafeteria in Lima, Peru. Subjects Approximately 150 people, students and non-student adults, who purchased food daily. Twelve students participated in post-intervention interviews. Results Fruit purchasing doubled from Phase 1 to Phase 3 (P price reduction had a positive effect on fruit purchasing in a university cafeteria, especially in males and non-student adults. PMID:25434293

  10. Comparative analysis of antimicrobial resistance in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli isolates from two paediatric cohort studies in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Anicia M; Rivera, Fulton P; Pons, Maria J; Riveros, Maribel; Gomes, Cláudia; Bernal, María; Meza, Rina; Maves, Ryan C; Huicho, Luis; Chea-Woo, Elsa; Lanata, Claudio F; Gil, Ana I; Ochoa, Theresa J; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2015-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance is increasing worldwide, being of special concern in low- and middle-income countries. The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility and mechanisms of resistance in 205 enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) isolates from two cohort studies in children Peru. ETEC were identified by an in-house multiplex real-time PCR. Susceptibility to 13 antimicrobial agents was tested by disk diffusion; mechanisms of resistance were evaluated by PCR. ETEC isolates were resistant to ampicillin (64%), cotrimoxazole (52%), tetracycline (37%); 39% of the isolates were multidrug-resistant. Heat-stable toxin producing (ETEC-st) (48%) and heat-labile toxin producing ETEC (ETEC-lt) (40%) had higher rates of multidrug resistance than isolates producing both toxins (ETEC-lt-st) (21%), pPeru. However, further development of resistance should be closely monitored. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  11. High Prevalence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae in Children with Acute Respiratory Infections from Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Valle-Mendoza, Juana; Orellana-Peralta, Fiorella; Marcelo-Rodríguez, Alvaro; Verne, Eduardo; Esquivel-Vizcarra, Mónica; Silva-Caso, Wilmer; Aguilar-Luis, Miguel Angel; Weilg, Pablo; Casabona-Oré, Verónica; Ugarte, Claudia; Del Valle, Luis J

    2017-01-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae are atypical pathogens responsible for pneumonia and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in low income countries. The study objective is to determine the prevalence of this pathogens in Peruvian children with acute respiratory infections. A consecutive cross-sectional study was conducted in Lima, Peru from May 2009 to September 2010. A total of 675 children admitted with clinical diagnoses of acute respiratory infections were tested for Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and clinical symptoms were registered by the attending physician. Mycoplasma pneumonia was detected in 25.19% (170/675) of nasopharyngeal samples and Chlamydia pneumonia in 10.52% (71/675). The most common symptoms in patients with these atypical pathogens were rhinorrhea, cough and fever. A higher prevalence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae cases were registered in summer, between December 2009 and March 2010. Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumonia are a significant cause of morbidity in Peruvian children with acute respiratory infections (ARI). Further studies should evaluate the use of reliable techniques such as PCR in Peru in order to avoid underdiagnoses of these atypical pathogens.

  12. High Prevalence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae in Children with Acute Respiratory Infections from Lima, Peru.

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    Juana Del Valle-Mendoza

    Full Text Available Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae are atypical pathogens responsible for pneumonia and a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in low income countries. The study objective is to determine the prevalence of this pathogens in Peruvian children with acute respiratory infections.A consecutive cross-sectional study was conducted in Lima, Peru from May 2009 to September 2010. A total of 675 children admitted with clinical diagnoses of acute respiratory infections were tested for Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumoniae detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, and clinical symptoms were registered by the attending physician.Mycoplasma pneumonia was detected in 25.19% (170/675 of nasopharyngeal samples and Chlamydia pneumonia in 10.52% (71/675. The most common symptoms in patients with these atypical pathogens were rhinorrhea, cough and fever. A higher prevalence of Mycoplasma pneumoniae cases were registered in summer, between December 2009 and March 2010.Mycoplasma pneumoniae and Chlamydia pneumonia are a significant cause of morbidity in Peruvian children with acute respiratory infections (ARI. Further studies should evaluate the use of reliable techniques such as PCR in Peru in order to avoid underdiagnoses of these atypical pathogens.

  13. Co-seismic luminescence in Lima, 150 km from the epicenter of the Pisco, Peru earthquake of 15 August 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heraud, J. A.; Lira, J. A.

    2011-04-01

    The first photographs of Co-seismic Luminescence, commonly known as Earthquake lights (EQLs), were reported in 1968 in Japan. However, there have been documented reports of luminescence associated with earthquakes since ancient times in different parts of the world. Besides this, there is modern scientific work dealing with evidence of and models for the production of such lights. During the Peru 15 August 2007 Mw=8.0 earthquake which occurred at 06:40 p.m. LT, hence dark in the southern wintertime, several EQLs were observed along the Peruvian coast and extensively reported in the capital city of Lima, about 150 km northwest of the epicenter. These lights were video-recorded by a security camera installed at the Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru (PUCP) campus and time-correlated with seismic ground accelerations registered at the seismological station on campus, analyzed and related to highly qualified eyewitness observations of the phenomena from other parts of the city and to other video recordings. We believe the evidence presented here contributes significantly to sustain the hypothesis that electromagnetic phenomena related to seismic activity can occur, at least during an earthquake. It is highly probable that continued research in luminescence and the use of magnetometers in studying electromagnetic activity and radon gas emanation detectors will contribute even more towards determining their occurrence during and probably prior to seismic activity.

  14. Joint Peru/United States report on Peru/United States cooperative energy assessment. Volume 4 of 4 Volumes Annexes 8-11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-08-01

    A comprehensive assessment of the biofuel potential of Peru is presented. Topics discussed cover current biofuel utilization practices; evaluation of Peruvian biomass productivity; identification of Peruvian agricultural and forestry resources; assessment of resource development and management concerns; identification of market considerations; description of biofuel technological options; and regional identification of biofuel technology applications. The discussion of current biofuel utilization centers on a qualitative description of the main conversion approaches now being practiced in Peru. Biomass productivity is evaluated in the context of the terrain, soil, and climatic conditions found in Peru. A quantitative description of the energy potential that could be realized from agricultural and forestry resources of Peru follows. A regional picture is given for the production of agricultural residues and forest resources that could potentially supply energy. The assessment of resource development and management concerns focuses on harvesting, reforestation, training, and the environmental consequences of utilization of forest resources. Market factors assessed include: importation, internal market development, external market development, energy policy and pricing, and transportation. Ten biofuel technology options for Peru were identified: small- to medium-scale gasification, a wood waste inventory, stationary and mobile charcoal production systems, wood distillation, forest resource development and management, electrical cogeneration, anaerobic digestion technology, development of ethanol production capabilities, and agricultural strategies for fuel production.Based upon these biofuel options, nine applications were identified for the Costa Region, eight for the Sierra Region, and ten for the Selva Region.

  15. Cooperation and development in local communities of Spain and Peru

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    María Isabel Quevedo Alejos

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, the world faces a scenario of growing competition between companies and territories. The challenges of globalization requires cities and regions to propose strategies that stimulate the processes of capital accumulation by the diffusion of innovation and knowledge, the adoption of more flexible forms of production organization and the development of economies of urbanization, between others. Therefore, in this paper three experiences of endogenous development represented by the Spanish Development Agency Iraurgi Lantzen (Spain, Finca Peru (Peruvian civil non-profit organization and the Rural Community of Cullpe (Peru will be analysed, in order to identify and compare the various aspects related to the autonomous development of communities. The dynamics of development in each region or city is directly related to investment decisions and the attractions of the dependent territories. For Iraurgi Lantzen improvement is reported in the region 1, medium 2 Urola with the construction of a new road, which encourages municipalities in the area to look for a consensus to help generate employment and wealth in line with the interests for development and promotion of the valley. On the other hand, the case of Finca Peru shows a joint initiative to foster progress and development in the hardest hit by poverty and subversion regions, as the provinces of Huancavelica and Ayacucho were, in the Peruvian Andes. This organization ensures the socio-economic improvement of the population, particularly women, through the creation of community bank, acting on the basis of three pillars: human development, credit and savings. Finally, the case of the Rural Community of Cullpe shows an example of social leadership, innovation, ability to call and ethical-moral principles resuscitating a community stricken by poverty and limited resources, creating comparative advantages and opportunities for development rural. In conclusion, the case studies

  16. The 1918–1920 influenza pandemic in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowell, G.; Viboud, C.; Simonsen, L.; Miller, M.A.; Hurtado, J.; Soto, G.; Vargas, R.; Guzman, M.A.; Ulloa, M.; Munayco, C.V.

    2011-01-01

    Background Increasing our knowledge of past influenza pandemic patterns in different regions of the world is crucial to guide preparedness plans against future influenza pandemics. Here, we undertook extensive archival collection efforts from 3 representative cities of Peru (Lima in the central coast, Iquitos in the northeastern Amazon region, Ica in the southern coast) to characterize the age and geographic patterns of the 1918–1920 influenza pandemic in this country. Materials and Methods We analyzed historical documents describing the 1918–1920 influenza pandemic in Peru and retrieved individual mortality records from local provincial archives for quantitative analysis. We applied seasonal excess mortality models to daily and monthly respiratory mortality rates for 1917–1920 and quantified transmissibility estimates based on the daily growth rate in respiratory deaths. Results A total of 52,739 individual mortality records were inspected from local provincial archives. We found evidence for an initial mild pandemic wave during July-September 1918 in Lima, identified a synchronized severe pandemic wave of respiratory mortality in all three locations in Peru during November 1918-February 1919, and a severe pandemic wave during January 1920- March 1920 in Lima and July-October 1920 in Ica. There was no recrudescent pandemic wave in 1920 in Iquitos. Remarkably, Lima experienced the brunt of the 1918–20 excess mortality impact during the 1920 recrudescent wave, with all age groups experiencing an increase in all cause excess mortality from 1918–19 to 1920. Middle age groups experienced the highest excess mortality impact, relative to baseline levels, in the 1918–19 and 1920 pandemic waves. Cumulative excess mortality rates for the 1918–20 pandemic period were higher in Iquitos (2.9%) than Lima (1.6%). The mean reproduction number for Lima was estimated in the range 1.3–1.5. Conclusions We identified synchronized pandemic waves of intense excess

  17. Herbal Medicine Practices of Patients With Liver Cancer in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas Rojas, Teresa; Bourdy, Geneviève; Ruiz, Eloy; Cerapio, Juan-Pablo; Pineau, Pascal; Gardon, Jacques; Doimi, Franco; Deparis, Xavier; Deharo, Eric; Bertani, Stéphane

    2016-12-01

    The highest burden of liver cancer occurs in developing countries, where the use of herbal medicine (HM) is still widespread. Despite this trend, few studies have been conducted to report HM practices of patients with a hepatic tumor in the developing world. Hence, this study aimed to document the use of HM among patients with liver cancer in Peru. A comparative behavioral epidemiological survey was conducted among liver cancer patients attending the National Cancer Institute of Peru. Information was obtained by direct interviews based on a semistructured questionnaire. The use of HM in Peruvian liver cancer patients was reported, first, regarding general consumption prior to the onset of disease, and second, after the appearance of symptoms that patients would relate to their tumor. In parallel, general consumption of HM in noncancerous people was assessed as a comparative figure. A correspondence analysis was performed to reveal potential associations between the symptoms of cancer and the specific use of HM. Eighty-eight patients and 117 noncancerous individuals participated in the survey. Overall, 68.3% of the people interviewed claimed to use HM on a regular basis for general health preservation. Furthermore, 56.8% of the patients turned to plants first to treat the disorders for which they later came to the cancer care center. When compared with the number of plant species used routinely (n = 78), a selection of plants was made by patients in response to the symptoms of cancer (n = 46). At least 2 plant species, Aloe vera and Morinda citrifolia, were significantly associated with the treatment of liver cancer-related symptoms in the patient group. The present study is the first survey on the HM practices of patients with liver cancer in Latin America and, more broadly, in the developing world. Our findings confirm that HM remains one of the principal primary health care resources in Peru, even for a severe disease like liver cancer. These traditional

  18. Influenza-like illness sentinel surveillance in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laguna-Torres, V Alberto; Gómez, Jorge; Ocaña, Víctor; Aguilar, Patricia; Saldarriaga, Tatiana; Chavez, Edward; Perez, Juan; Zamalloa, Hernán; Forshey, Brett; Paz, Irmia; Gomez, Elizabeth; Ore, Roel; Chauca, Gloria; Ortiz, Ernesto; Villaran, Manuel; Vilcarromero, Stalin; Rocha, Claudio; Chincha, Omayra; Jiménez, Gerardo; Villanueva, Miguel; Pozo, Edwar; Aspajo, Jackeline; Kochel, Tadeusz

    2009-07-01

    Acute respiratory illnesses and influenza-like illnesses (ILI) are a significant source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite the public health importance, little is known about the etiology of these acute respiratory illnesses in many regions of South America. In 2006, the Peruvian Ministry of Health (MoH) and the US Naval Medical Research Center Detachment (NMRCD) initiated a collaboration to characterize the viral agents associated with ILI and to describe the clinical and epidemiological presentation of the affected population. Patients with ILI (fever > or =38 degrees C and cough or sore throat) were evaluated in clinics and hospitals in 13 Peruvian cities representative of the four main regions of the country. Nasal and oropharyngeal swabs, as well as epidemiological and demographic data, were collected from each patient. During the two years of this study (June 2006 through May 2008), a total of 6,835 patients, with a median age of 13 years, were recruited from 31 clinics and hospitals; 6,308 were enrolled by regular passive surveillance and 527 were enrolled as part of outbreak investigations. At least one respiratory virus was isolated from the specimens of 2,688 (42.6%) patients, with etiologies varying by age and geographical region. Overall the most common viral agents isolated were influenza A virus (25.1%), influenza B virus (9.7%), parainfluenza viruses 1, 2, and 3, (HPIV-1,-2,-3; 3.2%), herpes simplex virus (HSV; 2.6%), and adenoviruses (1.8%). Genetic analyses of influenza virus isolates demonstrated that three lineages of influenza A H1N1, one lineage of influenza A H3N2, and two lineages of influenza B were circulating in Peru during the course of this study. To our knowledge this is the most comprehensive study to date of the etiologic agents associated with ILI in Peru. These results demonstrate that a wide range of respiratory pathogens are circulating in Peru and this fact needs to be considered by clinicians when treating patients

  19. Influenza-like illness sentinel surveillance in Peru.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Alberto Laguna-Torres

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute respiratory illnesses and influenza-like illnesses (ILI are a significant source of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite the public health importance, little is known about the etiology of these acute respiratory illnesses in many regions of South America. In 2006, the Peruvian Ministry of Health (MoH and the US Naval Medical Research Center Detachment (NMRCD initiated a collaboration to characterize the viral agents associated with ILI and to describe the clinical and epidemiological presentation of the affected population. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Patients with ILI (fever > or =38 degrees C and cough or sore throat were evaluated in clinics and hospitals in 13 Peruvian cities representative of the four main regions of the country. Nasal and oropharyngeal swabs, as well as epidemiological and demographic data, were collected from each patient. During the two years of this study (June 2006 through May 2008, a total of 6,835 patients, with a median age of 13 years, were recruited from 31 clinics and hospitals; 6,308 were enrolled by regular passive surveillance and 527 were enrolled as part of outbreak investigations. At least one respiratory virus was isolated from the specimens of 2,688 (42.6% patients, with etiologies varying by age and geographical region. Overall the most common viral agents isolated were influenza A virus (25.1%, influenza B virus (9.7%, parainfluenza viruses 1, 2, and 3, (HPIV-1,-2,-3; 3.2%, herpes simplex virus (HSV; 2.6%, and adenoviruses (1.8%. Genetic analyses of influenza virus isolates demonstrated that three lineages of influenza A H1N1, one lineage of influenza A H3N2, and two lineages of influenza B were circulating in Peru during the course of this study. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge this is the most comprehensive study to date of the etiologic agents associated with ILI in Peru. These results demonstrate that a wide range of respiratory pathogens are circulating in Peru and this

  20. Two new records of Fabiana stephanii Hunz. & Barboza (Solanaceae from Arequipa and Ayacucho (Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliana Linares Perea

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, two new records of Fabiana stephanii Hunz. & Barboza for the flora of Southern Peru are reported, including taxonomical, biogeographical and phytosociological data on this species.

  1. Heterakis spumosa Schneider, 1866 (Nematoda: Heterakidae in Rattus norvegicus (Rodentia: Muridae in Ica, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rufino Cabrera Ch.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper Heterakis spumosa Schneider, 1866 is redescribed. It is a parasitic heterakid nematoda living in the caecum of murid rodent, Rattus norvegícus "gray rat" from district of Parcona, province of Ica, Peru.

  2. El caso de Shougang: comparando la mineria china y occidental en el Peru

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Irwin, Amos

    2013-01-01

    ... que otras companias mineras extranjeras. Los criticos apuntan a una operacion en particular -Shougang Hierro Peru- como evidencia de la amenaza que representa China para los trabajadores y el medio ambiente en America Latina...

  3. Women's participation in a cervical cancer screening program in northern Peru

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Winkler, J; Bingham, A; Coffey, P; Penn Handwerker, W

    .... In an effort to increase knowledge about screening participation in low-resource settings, this study sought to identify key factors affecting women's participation in a cervical screening program in north central Peru...

  4. Two new species of the catfish genus Corydoras from Brazil and Peru (Pisces, Siluriformes, Callichthyidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijssen, H.; Isbrücker, I.J.H.

    1971-01-01

    This paper contains descriptions and figures of two new species of Corydoras, C. maculifer from Brazil and C. panda from Peru. The relationships of the new species with other species of Corydoras are discussed.

  5. Feeding ecology of the green turtle Chelonia mydas in northern Peru

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Astrid Jiménez; Sergio Pingo; Joanna Alfaro-Shigueto; Jeffrey C Mangel; Yuri Hooker

    2017-01-01

    Diet and food preferences of the green turtle Chelonia mydas were analyzed based on digestive tract contents of dead specimens caught incidentally by an artisanal gillnet fishery in Sechura Bay, northern Peru...

  6. Speciation and bioaccessibility of mercury in adobe bricks and dirt floors in Huancavelica, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Huancavelica, Peru, a historic cinnabar refining site, is one of the most mercury (Hg) contaminated urban areas in the world. Residents’ exposures are amplified because residents build their adobe brick homes from contaminated soil. Objectives: The objectives of th...

  7. Genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Peru and exploration of phylogenetic associations with drug resistance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sheen, Patricia; Couvin, David; Grandjean, Louis; Zimic, Mirko; Dominguez, Maria; Luna, Giannina; Gilman, Robert H; Rastogi, Nalin; Moore, David A J

    2013-01-01

    There is limited available data on the strain diversity of M tuberculosis in Peru, though there may be interesting lessons to learn from a setting where multidrug resistant TB has emerged as a major...

  8. A new species of Petersitocoroides Brailovsky (Hemiptera: Heteroptera: Coreidae: Coreini) from Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruces, Luis; Brailovsky, Harry

    2014-08-11

    Petersitocoroides vergarae, a new species from Peru, is described and placed in the tribe Coreini (Heteroptera). Dorsal illustrations and drawings of the pronotum, head and male genitalia, as well as a key to the known species, are provided. 

  9. TRANSVESTITES RE-EXISTENCES: A COUNTERHISTORY FROM THE VISUAL DIFFERENCE IN PERU

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Belén Romero Caballero

    2017-01-01

    .... Through an approach that focuses on the sensitive aspect of certain cultural practices in the Peruvian political geo-body politics, such as Beauty Salon, Mario Bellatin, and Travesti Museum of Peru...

  10. Phylogenetic Analysis of a Novel Molecular Isolate of Spotted Fever Group Rickettsiae from Northern Peru

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jiang, Ju; Blair, Patrick J; Felices, Vidal; Moron, Cecilia; Cespedes, Manuel; Anaya, Elizabeth; Schoeler, George B; Sumner, John W; Olson, James G; Richards, Allen L

    2005-01-01

    ...) collected from two domestic horses living in two separate locations in northern Peru (Coletas and Naranjo) was conducted to more clearly characterize this recently reported novel spotted fever group...

  11. Detection of CTX-M-type beta-lactamase genes in fecal Escherichia coli isolates from healthy children in Bolivia and Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallecchi, Lucia; Malossi, Monica; Mantella, Antonia; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Trigoso, Christian; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Paradisi, Franco; Kronvall, Göran; Rossolini, Gian Maria

    2004-12-01

    A survey was carried out from August to November 2002 to evaluate the antimicrobial susceptibilities of fecal Escherichia coli isolates from 3,208 healthy children from four different urban areas of Latin America, two in Bolivia (Camiri and Villa Montes) and two in Peru (Yurimaguas and Moyobamba). Ceftriaxone-resistant E. coli isolates were detected in four children, one from each of the areas sampled. The isolates exhibited a multidrug-resistant phenotype, including resistance to oxyimino-cephalosporins and aztreonam, and the MICs of ceftazidime for the isolates were lower than those of cefotaxime. By PCR and sequencing, the bla(CTX-M-2) determinant was detected in three isolates and the bla(CTX-M-15) determinant was detected in one isolate (from Peru). The CTX-M-2-producing isolates belonged to three different phylogenetic groups (groups A, B2, and D), while the CTX-M-15-producing isolate belonged to phylogenetic group D. The bla(CTX-M-2) determinants were transferable to E. coli by conjugation, while conjugative transfer of the bla(CTX-M-15) determinant was not detectable. Plasmids harboring the bla(CTX-M-2) determinant exhibited similar restriction profiles, and in all of them the gene was located on a 2.2-kb PstI fragment, suggesting a genetic environment similar to that present in In35 and InS21. The findings of the present study confirm the widespread distribution of CTX-M-type beta-lactamases and underscore the role that commensal E. coli isolates could play as a potential reservoir of these clinically relevant resistance determinants. This is the first report of CTX-M-type enzymes in Bolivia and Peru and also the first report of the detection of CTX-M-15 in Latin America.

  12. The U.S. Andean Drug Strategy: Why it is Failing in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    United States during the later stages of the Vietnam War significantly expanded the production of each in the northern regions of Mexico. Concerned with...parameters retarded the expansion of capitalism into the rural regions of Peru, and widened economic cleavages within society. Centuries later , the system...34Violence in Peru: The Corner of the Dead," Pensamiento Propio, vol. 11, no. 99, Managua, February 1993. Linz, Juan. The Breakdown of Democratic Regimes

  13. [Interventions to control overweight and obesity in children and adolescents in Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquino-Vivanco, Óscar; Aramburu, Adolfo; Munares-García, Óscar; Gómez-Guizado, Guillermo; García-Torres, Elizabeth; Donaires-Toscano, Fernando; Fiestas, Fabián

    2013-04-01

    Overweight and obesity in children and adolescents represent a serious public health problem in Peru, with high costs for society that require the implementation of a set of public policies directed toward its control. Thus, interventions have been proposed as the regulation of advertising of unhealthy foods, self-regulation, the implementation of kiosks healthy and nutritional labeling. From the analysis of the problem of overweight and obesity in children and adolescents in Peru, this article is a narrative review of such interventions.

  14. Tourism in Peru the missing strategy for economic and social development

    OpenAIRE

    Sharpe, Marie F.

    2006-01-01

    In this thesis, the possibilities of tourism as a strategy for economic and social development in Peru are presented. Through the examination of previous governments, beginning with the Belaunde administration in 1963, the obstacles that Peru has faced in route to development are identified. Identification of the predominant issues at hand, unemployment, poverty and inequality, allows for further analysis of the policies implemented to stabilize the economy as well as provide immediate soluti...

  15. Bird Diversity, Birdwatching Tourism and Conservation in Peru: A Geographic Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Puhakka, Liisa; Salo, Matti; S??ksj?rvi, Ilari E.

    2011-01-01

    In the face of the continuing global biodiversity loss, it is important not only to assess the need for conservation, through e.g. gap analyses, but also to seek practical solutions for protecting biodiversity. Environmentally and socially sustainable tourism can be one such solution. We present a method to spatially link data on conservation needs and tourism-based economic opportunities, using bird-related tourism in Peru as an example. Our analysis highlighted areas in Peru where potential...

  16. The Shining Path: The Successful Blending of Mao and Mariategui in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-06-05

    Escuela Superior de Guerra del Ejercito Peruano, 1991, Section 22. 13"Reporters Interview Shining Path Leader Guzman," JPRS. 29 August 1988, 2...Internal Defense: Subversive Movements in Peru], Chorrillos, Peru: Escuela Superior de Guerra del Ejercito Peruano, 1991, Annex 1« This document provides a...California Press, 1972. Rojas Samanez, Alvaro, and Ouillermo Blanco Woolcott, ed. Sendero de Violencia : Testimonios Periodisticos 1980- 1989

  17. Tourism in Peru: The Missing Strategy for Economic and Social Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    demanding. For positions requiring greater proficiency skills, there is a government-sponsored institution, El Centro de Formacion en Turismo (CENFOTUR...focus of attention became characteristic of the early years of Fernando Belaunde Terry’s first term in office, 1963- 1968. The phrase, “ El Peru ...Estrategico Nacional de Turismo (PENTUR), in an effort to bolster the tourism sector of Peru . While this is a step in the right direction, the plan

  18. An elusive new species of Marsupial Frog (Anura: Hemiphractidae: Gastrotheca) from the Andes of northern Peru

    OpenAIRE

    William E. Duellman

    2013-01-01

    A new species of marsupial frog, genus Gastrotheca, is described from high-elevation grasslands in the Andes in Región Amazonas in northernPeru, where even calling males are well hidden in deep moss. The new species is distinguished from all congeners by its unique color pattern that includes a narrow, blackbordered, yellow middorsal stripe. The species apparently belongs to the Gastrotheca plumbea Group, which ranges in the Andes from northern Colombia to northern Peru.

  19. An elusive new species of Marsupial Frog (Anura: Hemiphractidae: Gastrotheca from the Andes of northern Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William E. Duellman

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available A new species of marsupial frog, genus Gastrotheca, is described from high-elevation grasslands in the Andes in Región Amazonas in northernPeru, where even calling males are well hidden in deep moss. The new species is distinguished from all congeners by its unique color pattern that includes a narrow, blackbordered, yellow middorsal stripe. The species apparently belongs to the Gastrotheca plumbea Group, which ranges in the Andes from northern Colombia to northern Peru.

  20. The IXth Neotropical Ornithological Congress in Peru (Cusco, 8-14 November 2011)

    Science.gov (United States)

    G. P. Servat; J. M. Wunderle Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The IXth Neotropical Ornithological Congress in Peru (Cusco, 8 – 14 November 2011). -The IXth Neotropical Congress of Ornithology (IX NOC), co-sponsored by the Neotropical Ornithological Society (NOS) and the Union of Peruvian Ornithologists (UNOP), took place in Cusco, Peru, from the 8 – 14 November 2011. The IX NOC was dedicated to the memory of Maria Koepcke for her...

  1. A new species of Acanthoscurria (Araneae: Theraphosidae: Theraphosinae without stridulatory organ, from southern Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Ferretti

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Acanthoscurria sacsayhuaman sp. nov. (Araneae: Theraphosidae is described based on a male from Cusco, Peru. The new species is characterized by the absence of stridulatory bristles on retrolateral face of palpal trochanter. Moreover, it can be distinguished by morphology of the male palpal bulb and tibial apophysis of the first pair of legs. The genus is recorded for the first time for Peru.

  2. Japanese investment in Peru: Strategy in Latin America and Investment Platform

    OpenAIRE

    Kamiya, Marco

    1998-01-01

    Japanese Foreign Direct Investment in Peru was substantial in his beginnings, in the 60s and 70s, and has been decreasing unable to achieve sustainable levels as Japanese investment in Asia. Using the development concepts of “flying geese-pattern” model, and explaining the singular business conglomerates system, Keiretsu, and the global commercialization companies, Sogo-Shosha, the author analyzes Japanese investment in Peru.

  3. Evaluation of the occupational exposure to ciclophosphamide in nine hospitals from Peru

    OpenAIRE

    Rosales-Rimache, Jaime A.; Centro Nacional de Salud Ocupacional y Protección del Ambiente para la Salud, Instituto Nacional de Salud. Lima, Perú. Licenciado en Tecnología Médica, magíster en Salud Ocupacional

    2014-01-01

    Objetives. Evaluate occupational exposure to cyclophosphamide in nine hospitals of Peru. Materials and methods. Cross-cutting observational study conducted in 2010, for which 24-hour urine samples were obtained from 96 employees of the oncologic mixture units and oncology services of nine hospitals in Peru, the quantification of cyclophosphamide was done through the GC-MS methodology (Gas Cromathography-Mass Spectroscopy). Additionally, working surfaces were tested by obtaining samples with w...

  4. Costs of the multimicronutrient supplementation program in Chiclayo, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechtig, Aarón; Gross, Rainer; Paulini, Javier; de Romaã, Daniel López

    2006-01-01

    There is little information on the cost parameters of weekly multimicronutrient supplementation programs. To assess the cost parameters and cost-effectiveness of a weekly multimicronutrient supplementation program in an urban population of Peru. Data from the Integrated Food Security Program (Programa Integrado de Seguridad Alimentaria [PISA]), which distributed capsules and foodlets to women and adolescent girls and to children under five, were extrapolated to a population of 100,000 inhabitants. The annual cost per community member was US$1.51. The cost-effectiveness ratio was US$0.12 per 1% of prevented anemia per community member. These costs are in the upper margin of iron supplementation alone. They will decrease notably when weekly multimicronutrient supplementation programs are integrated into health packages and participation by women increases. Focusing on micronutrient deficiencies would prevent these problems, and food-distribution programs would be effectively targeted to food-deficient populations.

  5. [History of Instituto Nacional de Salud Ocupacional del Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cossio-Brazzan, Juan M

    2012-06-01

    In Peru, the industry's development has made economic improvements but at the same time, it has had a major impact on the health of the workers; for that reason, it was necessary to generate control mechanisms. So, in 1940 it was created the Departmento de Higiene Industrial, which in 1956 was changed to Instituto de Salud Ocupacional, but it was deactivated in 1994. However, in 2001 it reappeared into the Ministerio de Salud organizational structure with the name of Instituto de Salud Ocupacional "Alberto Hurtado Abadía". Actually, it is the Centro Nacional de Salud Ocupacional y Protección del Ambiente para la Salud (CENSOPAS), organ of the Instituto Nacional de Salud which continues working in synergy with other institutions and sectors, making research to protect the health of exposed persons (workers and community) to contamination and risks associated with economic activities.

  6. Word play, ritual insult, and volleyball in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Many gay men in the popular sectors of Lima, Peru participate in vóley callejero, or street volleyball. The ethnographic data presented in this article describes verbal and corporal mechanisms through which gay identity emerges within the particular context of the street volleyball game, ultimately highlighting the contextual nature of identity. The volleyball players are not just hitting a ball back and forth, they are engaging in a meaningful activity that illuminates intersections of language, sexuality, and identity. Through the manipulation of the street into a volleyball court, the volleyball players create a space conducive to the articulation of particular verbal and embodied practices that index gay identity. The challenge to the regulations of "proper" volleyball through the practice of ritual insulting and the cultivation of gay volleyball technique are playful reconfigurations of gendered practices prominent in the sites where fieldwork was carried out.

  7. Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis in Confiscated Telmatobius in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zevallos, Samanta; Elías, Roberto K; Berenguel, Raúl A; Weaver, Thomas J; Reading, Richard P

    2016-10-01

    The Peruvian Andes are the home of 27 species of frogs of the genus Telmatobius, many of which are critically endangered. Illegal trade of adult frogs for purported medical properties likely represents the major threat facing these species. This activity, besides reducing their populations, may contribute to the dissemination of the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), which causes chytridiomycosis, a disease posing a threat to many populations of amphibians. We screened frogs confiscated by the Administration of Forestry and Wildlife in Lima, Peru, for Bd. We used real-time PCR to diagnose Bd at the Laboratory of Wildlife, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine and Zootecnics, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, in Lima and Pisces Molecular Laboratory in Boulder, Colorado, US. Of 62 samples collected during this study, 60% (37) were PCR positive for Bd, confirming that illegal trade of amphibians can pose a risk for disseminating Bd.

  8. Use of commercially available oral rehydration solutions in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantenburg, Birte; Ochoa, Theresa J; Ecker, Lucie; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2012-06-01

    Caregivers' practices concerning oral rehydration of young children during diarrheal illness were investigated in a periurban community of low socioeconomic level in Lima, Peru. Data of 330 caregivers of children aged 6-36 months were analyzed; 72.7% of all caregivers would give commercially available oral rehydration solutions (ORSs). However, only 58.6% of those caregivers with children that had experienced diarrhea during the previous week stated that they had used commercially available ORSs, a significantly lower percentage. The main reason for not using commercially available ORSs was that caregivers did not know about them. Of all recipes caregivers provided for homemade ORS, none contained the recommended concentrations of sugar and salt. Educating caregivers about availability, benefits, and use of commercially available ORSs as well as correct preparation of homemade ORS is urgently needed.

  9. Enzootic and epizootic rabies associated with vampire bats, peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condori-Condori, Rene Edgar; Streicker, Daniel G; Cabezas-Sanchez, Cesar; Velasco-Villa, Andres

    2013-01-01

    During the past decade, incidence of human infection with rabies virus (RABV) spread by the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus) increased considerably in South America, especially in remote areas of the Amazon rainforest, where these bats commonly feed on humans. To better understand the epizootiology of rabies associated with vampire bats, we used complete sequences of the nucleoprotein gene to infer phylogenetic relationships among 157 RABV isolates collected from humans, domestic animals, and wildlife, including bats, in Peru during 2002-2007. This analysis revealed distinct geographic structuring that indicates that RABVs spread gradually and involve different vampire bat subpopulations with different transmission cycles. Three putative new RABV lineages were found in 3 non-vampire bat species that may represent new virus reservoirs. Detection of novel RABV variants and accurate identification of reservoir hosts are critically important for the prevention and control of potential virus transmission, especially to humans.

  10. A checklist to the wasps of Peru (Hymenoptera, Aculeata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claus Rasmussen

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The first checklist to the 225 genera and 1169 reported species-group taxa of aculeate wasps of Peru is presented. The list is based on a literature survey and examination of Peruvian entomological collections and include locality references for each taxon. Bibliographic references for the identification of families, genera, and species are provided when available. The occurrence data are published in addition as a downloadable file (doi: 10.3897/zookeys.15.196.app.2.ds, doi: 10.3897/zookeys.15.196.app.3.ds, and 10.3897/zookeys.15.196.app.4.ds and were uploaded onto GBIF infrastructure simultaneously with the publication process. The following new combinations are proposed: Ancistroceroides cirrifer (Zavattari, 1912, Ancistrocerus epicus (Zavattari, 1912, and Stenodynerus corallineipes (Zavattari, 1912.

  11. Current status of ethnobotany research on palms from Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joaquina Albán

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The current situation concerning research in ethnobotany and economic botany of Peruvian palms is analyzed through a review of the literature with emphasis on knowledge related to uses and vernacular names. Of the 136 Peruvian palm species, 104 have at least one use. A total of 268 different uses distributed in 16 categories were registered. The most frequent categories are "construction", "edible", "craft industry" and "medicinal". There are 109 palm species with at least one vernacular name in Peru. The consulted literature is analyzed in four categories: (i general studies in economic botany, (ii ethnographic and ethnobiological studies, (iii studies of South-American palms of economic interest, (iv studies that exclusively deal with the useful Peruvian palms. Ethnobotanical knowledge of Peruvian palms proves to be essentially descriptive, with much repetitive information. Studies that significantly contribute to the genetic or agronomical improvement of the economically promising palms are rare.

  12. [Mobile health for public health in Peru: lessons learned].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Eloy F; Proaño, Álvaro; Ponce, Oscar J; Curioso, Walter H

    2015-01-01

    Mobile communication technologies have become more prevalent in developed and developing countries. These coun- tries -including Peru- are becoming an ideal setting where mobile health (mHealth) projects can provide better health services. The reviewed literature shows that the mHealth interventions have enormous potential to improve access and the quality of health services, increasing the effectiveness of public health programs and reducing healthcare costs. It is noticeable that these projects have a positive impact; however, despite the current information, more research is needed to understand mHealth in-depth. These projects are the foundation for future health policies that will help the Peruvian health system to be more inclusive and more effective.

  13. Tattoos in the Memory: Autobiography and Violence in Contemporary Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betina Campuzano

    2016-12-01

    We propose to analyze the Lurgio Galván Sánchez’s Memories of an unknown soldier. Autobiography of violence (2012, which is the story of a Quechua speaking peasant who attended or participated in the country’s dominant institutions, such as, the guerrilla, the army, the church, and the university, during the outburst of violence occurred in Peru in the course of the ‘80s and ‘90s. We will examine, using discourse, how these institutions struggled to impose a hegemonic account on past events and also to identify the mechanisms these institutions devised in order to prolong the violence from the time of the colonial conquest. Since then, many subjectivities and stereotypes have been created, giving rise to exclusions and aggressions, which have been cyclically imprinting indelible tattoos on the national body right up to the present day.

  14. CIRPLAST: Cleft Lip and Palate Missions in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Carlos E

    2015-06-01

    The author presents a 20-year experience leading cleft lip and palate surgical volunteer missions in Peru for CIRPLAST, a nonprofit volunteer plastic surgery goodwill program that has provided free surgery for patients with cleft lip and palate deformities in remote areas of Peru. Surgical procedures were performed by the author, together with a group of experienced plastic surgeons, under the auspices of the Peruvian Plastic Surgery Society, and local health authorities. CIRPLAST missions are scheduled annually in different locations around Peru. Selected patients for surgery after adequate screening are photographed, and their cleft deformity is recorded. Scheduled patients or their parents, when they are minors, sign an informed consent form. Patients operated on in any given day are examined and photographed 1 day after surgery, before discharge. Between 30 and 35 patients are operated on at each mission site. About 2 weeks after the mission, patients are checked and photographed, and the outcome of surgery is recorded. Complications that may occur are recorded and treated by the CIRPLAST team as soon as possible. Almost all operations are performed under general endotracheal anesthesia coupled by local anesthesia containing a vasoconstrictor, to reduce bleeding and facilitate tissue dissection. All wounds of the lip and palate are closed with absorbable sutures, to avoid the need for suture removal. After cleft lip surgery, patients go to the recovery room for monitoring by nurses until they recover completely. A total of 6108 cleft lip and palate repairs, primary and secondary, were performed by CIRPLAST in 141 missions, between May 12, 1994, and October 15, 2014. The medical records of the 5162 patients (84.5%) who returned for follow-up (ranging from 12 days to 9 years) were reviewed retrospectively. Between 45% and 70% of the patients operated on a mission have returned for early follow-up and some the following year. There were 3176 males (51.9%) and 2932

  15. Enzootic and Epizootic Rabies Associated with Vampire Bats, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streicker, Daniel G.; Cabezas-Sanchez, Cesar; Velasco-Villa, Andres

    2013-01-01

    During the past decade, incidence of human infection with rabies virus (RABV) spread by the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus) increased considerably in South America, especially in remote areas of the Amazon rainforest, where these bats commonly feed on humans. To better understand the epizootiology of rabies associated with vampire bats, we used complete sequences of the nucleoprotein gene to infer phylogenetic relationships among 157 RABV isolates collected from humans, domestic animals, and wildlife, including bats, in Peru during 2002–2007. This analysis revealed distinct geographic structuring that indicates that RABVs spread gradually and involve different vampire bat subpopulations with different transmission cycles. Three putative new RABV lineages were found in 3 non–vampire bat species that may represent new virus reservoirs. Detection of novel RABV variants and accurate identification of reservoir hosts are critically important for the prevention and control of potential virus transmission, especially to humans.

  16. AMS and controversies in history The Spanish conquest of Peru

    CERN Document Server

    Zoppi, U; Jacobsen, G; Laurencich-Minelli, L; Lawson, E M; Sarkisian, G; Tuniz, C

    2000-01-01

    The quest for understanding the past often contains a subjective component. Legends, myths, traditions and personal beliefs can unconsciously influence the interpretation of the scientific outcomes or, in the worst instances, even lead to forgery. Fortunately, an increasing number of scientific tools are available nowadays and can be combined to discredit such detriments and offer more reliable foundations for an objective analysis. Radiocarbon dating by AMS is a relatively non-invasive method and is particularly useful when valuable historical artefacts are involved. In this paper, we will present controversial cases where AMS is playing an important role in understanding the past. In particular, we will discuss the use of AMS to authenticate historical documents revealing a new version of the conquest of Peru by Pizarro in the early 1530s.

  17. Sexual health: some young people's views in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, M; Duran, R

    1996-01-01

    Among lower-class youth in Lima, Peru, sexual activity is frequently initiated at 12 or 13 years of age, with little knowledge about pregnancy prevention or acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Parents may send young boys to brothels, and sexual activity is often associated with alcohol drinking. Few young people receive guidance about sex from their parents, and most cases of sexual abuse are not disclosed. Young women who become pregnant often leave school, and many are banished from their parents' homes. Recommended, to address these issues, are formally scheduled times in the school schedule for students to discuss their sexual and emotional problems; school-based audiovisual presentations by neighborhood youth programs; opportunities, through neighborhood centers, health centers, and schools, for parents and children to talk to each other; and peer counseling in the schools on topics such as equality in relationships, pregnancy prevention, and sexuality.

  18. Magda Mateus Cardenas, director of Centro Amauta, Cusco, Peru: interview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweetman, C

    1997-02-01

    Magda Mateus Cardenas, trained as an anthropologist, is currently director of Centro Amauta, a feminist organization in Peru that addresses issues of gender, class, and culture. In this interview, Mateus Cardenas describes her long involvement with development organizations and grass-roots campaigns to improve women's status. She notes that, although many organizations have adopted a gender perspective, few comprehend its highly political, transformational aspects. Women's rights tend to be viewed by development agencies as just one more factor to be incorporated into development projects rather than as a perspective that changes views of development itself. A genuine gender perspective entails changes in the organizational, social, and political aspects of the themes of autonomy and empowerment, with adaptations of content and methods to local conditions. A precondition to women's emancipation is access to and control of financial and economic resources. This, in turn, requires training in technical skills and access to the marketplace on more competitive terms.

  19. Field test of solar home systems in Puno/Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeitinger, C.P.; Mueller, W.

    1987-01-01

    Far-reaching cables or high-voltage transmission lines make conventional electrification expensive and uneconomic in many countries and areas of the world (developing countries, mountain districts, thinly populated areas). Decentralized photovoltaic electric power generation is considered the better solution. A detailed survey informs about the testing of 144 photovoltaic systems in Peru (Altiplano region). The program was supported by Deutsches Zentrum fuer Entwicklungstechnologien (German Appropriate Technology Exchange). Reference is made to the social and economic acceptance of solar technologies by the target groups, to the solar home systems as such (photovoltaics, technical data), their components (solar modules, battery charge controllers, transistorized fluorescent lamps, batteries, cables and plugs), as well as to the economics of solar home systems (energy consumption of solar home systems, calculation of costs, cost comparisons). The final chapter is dedicated to financing, marketing and maintenance aspects. (HWJ).

  20. Joint Peru/United States report on Peru/United States cooperative energy assessment. Volume 1. Executive summary, main report and appendices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-08-01

    In 1978, the US and Peru conducted a comprehensive assessment of Peru's energy resources, needs, and uses and developed several alternative energy strategies that utilize the available resources to meet their energy requirements. This Volume I reports the findings of the assessment and contains the executive summary, the main report, and five appendices of information that support the integrated energy supply and demand analysis. The following chapters are included: The Energy Situation in Peru (economic context and background, energy resources and production, energy consumption patterns); Reference Supply and Demand Projection (approach, procedures, and assumptions; economic projections; energy demand and supply projections; supply/demand integration; uncertainties); and The Development of Strategies and Options (the analysis of options; strategies; increased use of renewables, hydropower, coal; increased energy efficiency; and financial analysis of strategies).

  1. Residential mercury contamination in adobe brick homes in Huancavelica, Peru.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Hagan

    Full Text Available This is the first study of adobe brick contamination anywhere in the world. Huancavelica, Peru is the site of historic cinnabar refining and one of the most mercury (Hg contaminated urban areas in the world. Over 80% of homes in Huancavelica are constructed with adobe bricks made from Hg contaminated soil. In this study we measured total Hg concentrations in adobe brick, dirt floor, surface dust, and air samples from the interior of 60 adobe brick houses located in four neighborhoods. Concentrations of total Hg in adobe bricks, dirt floors, and surface dust ranged from 8.00 to 1070 µg/g, 3.06 to 926 µg/g, and 0.02 to 9.69 µg/wipe, respectively, with statistically significant differences between the four neighborhoods. Concentrations of Hg in adobe brick and dirt floor samples in Huancavelica were orders of magnitude higher than in Ayacucho, a non-mining town in Peru. A strong correlation exists between total Hg concentrations in adobe bricks and dirt floors which confirms that adobe bricks were being made on-site and not purchased from an off-site source. A strong correlation between surface dust and adobe bricks and dirt floors indicates that walls and floors serve as indoor sources of Hg contamination. Elemental Hg vapor concentrations were below detection (<0.5 µg/m(3 in most homes; however in homes with detectable levels, concentrations up to 5.1 µg/m(3 were observed. No statistically significant differences in Hg vapor measurements were observed between neighborhoods. This study demonstrates that building materials used widely in developing communities, such as adobe bricks, may be a substantial source of residential Hg exposure in silver or gold refining communities where Hg is produced or used for amalgamation in artisanal gold production.

  2. Prevalence of intestinal helminths, anemia, and malnutrition in Paucartambo, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabada, Miguel M; Goodrich, Mary R; Graham, Brittany; Villanueva-Meyer, Pablo G; Deichsel, Emily L; Lopez, Martha; Arque, Eulogia; Clinton White, A

    2015-02-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of soil-transmitted helminth infections, anemia, and malnutrition among children in the Paucartambo province of Cusco region, Peru, in light of demographic, socio-economic, and epidemiologic contextual factors. Children from three to twelve years old from six communities in Huancarani district in the highlands of Peru were evaluated for helminth infections, anemia, and nutritional status. Data collected included demographic variables, socioeconomic status, exposures, complete blood counts, and direct and sedimentation stool tests. Of 240 children analyzed, 113 (47%) were infected with one or more parasites. Giardia (27.5%) and Fasciola (9.6%) were the most commonly identified organisms. Eosinophilia was encountered in 21% of the children. Anemia (48.8%) was associated with age (3-4 vs 5-12 years old; odds ratio (OR): 5.86; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.81-12.21). Underweight (10%) was associated with male sex (OR: 5.97; CI: 1.12-31.72), higher eosinophil count (OR: 4.67; CI: 1.31-16.68) and education of the mother (OR: 0.6; CI: 0.4-0.9). Stunting (31.3%) was associated with education of the mother (OR: 0.83; CI: 0.72-0.95); wasting (2.7%) was associated with higher eosinophil count (OR: 2.75; CI: 1.04-7.25). Anemia and malnutrition remain significant problems in the Peruvian highlands. These findings suggest that demographic factors, socio-economic status, and possibly parasitic infections intertwine to cause these health problems.

  3. Paleomagnetism of the Puente Piedra Formation, Central Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Steven R.; Butler, Robert F.

    1985-02-01

    Paleomagnetic samples were collected from 15 sites in the early Cretaceous Puente Piedra Formation near Lima, Peru. This formation consists of interbedded volcanic flows and marine sediments and represents the oldest known rocks of the Andean coastal province in this region. The Puente Piedra Formation is interpreted as a submarine volcanic arc assemblage which along with an overlying sequence of early Cretaceous clastic and carbonate rocks represents a terrane whose paleogeographic relationship with respect to the Peruvian miogeocline in pre-Albian time is unknown. Moderate to high coercivities, blocking temperatures below 320°C, and diagnostic strong-field thermomagnetic behavior indicate that pyrrhotite is the dominant magnetic phase in the Puente Piedra Formation. This pyrrhotite carries a stable CRM acquired during an event of copper mineralization associated with the intrusion of the Santa Rosa super-unit of the Coastal Batholith at about 90 ± 5 m.y. B.P. The tectonically uncorrected formation mean direction of: D = 343.2°, I = -28.6°, α 95 = 3.4° is statistically concordant in inclination but discordant in declination with respect to the expected direction calculated from the 90-m.y. reference pole for cratonic South America. The observed declination indicates approximately 20° of counterclockwise rotation of the Puente Piedra rocks since about 90 m.y. This is consistent with other paleomagnetic data from a larger crustal block which may indicate modest counterclockwise rotation during the Cenozoic associated with crustal shortening and thickening in the region of the Peru-Chile deflection.

  4. Prevalence of intestinal helminths, anemia, and malnutrition in Paucartambo, Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel M. Cabada

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate the prevalence of soil-transmitted helminth infections, anemia, and malnutrition among children in the Paucartambo province of Cusco region, Peru, in light of demographic, socio-economic, and epidemiologic contextual factors. Methods. Children from three to twelve years old from six communities in Huancarani district in the highlands of Peru were evaluated for helminth infections, anemia, and nutritional status. Data collected included demographic variables, socioeconomic status, exposures, complete blood counts, and direct and sedimentation stool tests. Results. Of 240 children analyzed, 113 (47% were infected with one or more parasites. Giardia (27.5% and Fasciola (9.6% were the most commonly identified organisms. Eosinophilia was encountered in 21% of the children. Anemia (48.8% was associated with age (3-4 vs 5-12 years old; odds ratio (OR: 5.86; 95% confidence interval (CI: 2.81-12.21. Underweight (10% was associated with male sex (OR: 5.97; CI: 1.12-31.72, higher eosinophil count (OR: 4.67; CI: 1.31-16.68 and education of the mother (OR: 0.6; CI: 0.4-0.9. Stunting (31.3% was associated with education of the mother (OR: 0.83; CI: 0.72-0.95; wasting (2.7% was associated with higher eosinophil count (OR: 2.75; CI: 1.04-7.25. Conclusions. Anemia and malnutrition remain significant problems in the Peruvian highlands. These findings suggest that demographic factors, socio-economic status, and possibly parasitic infections intertwine to cause these health problems.

  5. Medication Possession Ratio Predicts Antiretroviral Regimens Persistence in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westfall, Andrew O.; Paz, Jorge; Moran, Fiorella; Carbajal-Gonzalez, Danny; Callacondo, David; Avalos, Odalie; Rodriguez, Martin; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Echevarria, Juan; Willig, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives In developing nations, the use of operational parameters (OPs) in the prediction of clinical care represents a missed opportunity to enhance the care process. We modeled the impact of multiple measurements of antiretroviral treatment (ART) adherence on antiretroviral treatment outcomes in Peru. Design And Methods Retrospective cohort study including ART naïve, non-pregnant, adults initiating therapy at Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia, Lima-Peru (2006-2010). Three OPs were defined: 1) Medication possession ratio (MPR): days with antiretrovirals dispensed/days on first-line therapy; 2) Laboratory monitory constancy (LMC): proportion of 6 months intervals with ≥1 viral load or CD4 reported; 3) Clinic visit constancy (CVC): proportion of 6 months intervals with ≥1 clinic visit. Three multi-variable Cox proportional hazard (PH) models (one per OP) were fit for (1) time of first-line ART persistence and (2) time to second-line virologic failure. All models were adjusted for socio-demographic, clinical and laboratory variables. Results 856 patients were included in first-line persistence analyses, median age was 35.6 years [29.4-42.9] and most were male (624; 73%). In multivariable PH models, MPR (per 10% increase HR=0.66; 95%CI=0.61-0.71) and LMC (per 10% increase 0.83; 0.71-0.96) were associated with prolonged time on first-line therapies. Among 79 individuals included in time to second-line virologic failure analyses, MPR was the only OP independently associated with prolonged time to second-line virologic failure (per 10% increase 0.88; 0.77-0.99). Conclusions The capture and utilization of program level parameters such as MPR can provide valuable insight into patient-level treatment outcomes. PMID:24098475

  6. Medication possession ratio predicts antiretroviral regimens persistence in Peru.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge L Salinas

    Full Text Available In developing nations, the use of operational parameters (OPs in the prediction of clinical care represents a missed opportunity to enhance the care process. We modeled the impact of multiple measurements of antiretroviral treatment (ART adherence on antiretroviral treatment outcomes in Peru.Retrospective cohort study including ART naïve, non-pregnant, adults initiating therapy at Hospital Nacional Cayetano Heredia, Lima-Peru (2006-2010. Three OPs were defined: 1 Medication possession ratio (MPR: days with antiretrovirals dispensed/days on first-line therapy; 2 Laboratory monitory constancy (LMC: proportion of 6 months intervals with ≥1 viral load or CD4 reported; 3 Clinic visit constancy (CVC: proportion of 6 months intervals with ≥1 clinic visit. Three multi-variable Cox proportional hazard (PH models (one per OP were fit for (1 time of first-line ART persistence and (2 time to second-line virologic failure. All models were adjusted for socio-demographic, clinical and laboratory variables.856 patients were included in first-line persistence analyses, median age was 35.6 years [29.4-42.9] and most were male (624; 73%. In multivariable PH models, MPR (per 10% increase HR=0.66; 95%CI=0.61-0.71 and LMC (per 10% increase 0.83; 0.71-0.96 were associated with prolonged time on first-line therapies. Among 79 individuals included in time to second-line virologic failure analyses, MPR was the only OP independently associated with prolonged time to second-line virologic failure (per 10% increase 0.88; 0.77-0.99.The capture and utilization of program level parameters such as MPR can provide valuable insight into patient-level treatment outcomes.

  7. Seroprevalence and risk factors for Taenia solium cysticercosis in rural pigs of northern Peru.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    César M Jayashi

    Full Text Available Taenia solium is a cestode parasite that causes cysticercosis in both humans and pigs. A serological survey was undertaken to assess the seroprevalence and risk factors associated with porcine cysticercosis in the rural district of Morropon, Peru. Pigs aged between 2 and 60 months were assessed by the Enzyme-linked Immunoelectrotransfer blot (EITB assay to determine their serological status against porcine cysticercosis in a cross-sectional study. A total of 1,153 pigs were sampled. Porcine seroprevalence was 45.19% (42.31-48.06. The information about the animals and households was analyzed and risk factors associated with seroprevalence were determined by a multivariate logistic regression analysis. In the porcine population, the risk of being seropositive increased by 7% with every month of age (OR 1.07, 95% CI 1.05-1.09, and by 148% for pigs living in East Morropon (OR 2.48, 95% CI 1.82-3.37. Whereas, the presence of latrines in a household decreased the risk of being seropositive by 49% (OR 0.51; 95% CI 0.39-0.67. Sex and rearing system did not represent either risk or protective factors associated with the seroprevalence of porcine cysticercosis. The findings of this study could be used for further development of control programs that might focus on similar population groups within rural communities of developing countries where cysticercosis is endemic.

  8. Alphus marinonii sp. nov., nova espécie para o Peru e Brasil (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego de Santana Souza

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Alphus marinonii sp. nov., new species from Peru and Brazil (Coleoptera, Cerambycidae, Lamiinae. A new species of Alphus, A. marinonii sp. nov., from Peru and Brazil (Rondônia is described. Key to identification and pictures for the four species of the genus are provided. Notes on distribution of A. tuberosus are included, with a new record for Peru and Brazil (Goiás and Mato Grosso do Sul.

  9. Joint Peru/United States report on Peru/United States cooperative energy assessment. Volume 3. Annexes 2-7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-08-01

    This report presents the results of a brief study of industral, mining, and agricultural sector energy demands in Peru. The study establishes current energy demands and sectoral activities, and projects future energy needs through the year 2000. With respect to energy demands, the subsectors covered are: mining and non-ferrous metals, iron and steel, cement, oil refining, petrochemicals, fertilizers, and agriculture (major crops). Total energy demands for these subsectors are developed for 1976, 1985, and 2000, assuming full-capacity operation for the majority of the plants. Potential options developed for reducing energy use in these sectors are: increased coal use, improved energy efficiency in the manufacturing sector, use of agricultural wastes as fuel, possible displacement of oil by hydroelectricity, use of geothermal energy, increased use of water materials for the cement and construction industries, and possible promotion of cogeneration systems (electricity/steam). (MCW)

  10. Myxomycete diversity in the coastal desert of Peru with emphasis on the lomas formations

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    Lado, Carlos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Results obtained from the first survey for myxomycetes in the hyperarid areas of Peru are reported. Sampling over three consecutive years was carried out at 96 localities between 0 and 1500 m elevation. A total of 78 species from 23 genera in all 6 myxomycete orders were determined from 723 collections of myxomycetes. One new species, Didymium peruvianum, is described, 2 species new to the Neotropics, 4 new records for South America and 41 additional new species for Peru are reported, increasing the country catalogue by over 50%. Results show that arid areas are rich in myxomycetes, and that each area has a unique species assemblage. Endemic plants had a particular relevance as myxomycete substrates. The predominance of the order Physarales in arid areas is reinforced, and the ecological importance of coastal fogs (garúas is evident from the results. Comments are included on interesting or rare collections, as are SEM micrographs of several species and statistical evaluation of the results.Se dan a conocer los resultados del primer estudio realizado sobre los Myxomycetes de las regiones hiperáridas de Perú. El muestreo, realizado en tres años consecutivos, se ha llevado a cabo en 96 localidades situadas entre 0 y 1500 m de altitud. En total se obtuvieron 723 colecciones de mixomicetes, pertenecientes a 6 órdenes, 23 géneros y 78 especies. Se describe una nueva especie, Didymium peruvianum, 2 especies se citan por primera vez en el Neotrópico, 4 son nuevos registros para América del Sur y 41 especies más son nuevos registros para Perú, con lo que el catálogo del país se incrementa en un 50%. Los resultados muestran que las zonas áridas son ricas en mixomicetes, y que cada area tiene un conjunto único de especies. Las plantas endémicas, dominantes en estos ambientes, tuvieron una relevancia especial como sustrato para los myxomycetes. Se pone de manifiesto el predominio de los representantes del órden Physarales en las zonas

  11. Successful malaria elimination in the Ecuador-Peru border region: epidemiology and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krisher, Lyndsay K; Krisher, Jesse; Ambuludi, Mariano; Arichabala, Ana; Beltrán-Ayala, Efrain; Navarrete, Patricia; Ordoñez, Tania; Polhemus, Mark E; Quintana, Fernando; Rochford, Rosemary; Silva, Mercy; Bazo, Juan; Stewart-Ibarra, Anna M

    2016-11-28

    In recent years, malaria (Plasmodium vivax and Plasmodium falciparum) has been successfully controlled in the Ecuador-Peru coastal border region. The aim of this study was to document this control effort and to identify the best practices and lessons learned that are applicable to malaria control and to other vector-borne diseases. A proximal outcome evaluation was conducted of the robust elimination programme in El Oro Province, Ecuador, and the Tumbes Region, Peru. Data collection efforts included a series of workshops with local public health experts who played central roles in the elimination effort, review of epidemiological records from Ministries of Health, and a review of national policy documents. Key programmatic and external factors are identified that determined the success of this eradication effort. From the mid 1980s until the early 2000s, the region experienced a surge in malaria transmission, which experts attributed to a combination of ineffective anti-malarial treatment, social-ecological factors (e.g., El Niño, increasing rice farming, construction of a reservoir), and political factors (e.g., reduction in resources and changes in management). In response to the malaria crisis, local public health practitioners from El Oro and Tumbes joined together in the mid-1990s to forge an unofficial binational collaboration for malaria control. Over the next 20 years, they effectively eradicated malaria in the region, by strengthening surveillance and treatment strategies, sharing of resources, operational research to inform policy, and novel interventions. The binational collaboration at the operational level was the fundamental component of the successful malaria elimination programme. This unique relationship created a trusting, open environment that allowed for flexibility, rapid response, innovation and resilience in times of crisis, and ultimately a sustainable control programme. Strong community involvement, an extensive microscopy network and

  12. Depressive Mood Among Within-Country Migrants in Periurban Shantytowns of Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Grosso, Paulo; Bernabe-Ortiz, Antonio; Diez-Canseco, Francisco; Gilman, Robert H; Checkley, William; Bennett, Ian M; Miranda, J Jaime

    2015-12-01

    In low- and middle-income countries, migration to urban settings has reshaped the sprawl and socio demographic profiles of major cities. Depressive episodes make up a large portion of the burden of disease worldwide and are related to socio-demographic disruptions. As a result of terrorism, political upheaval, followed by economic development, Peru has undergone major demographic transitions over the previous three decades including large migrations within the country. We aimed to determine the prevalence of current depressive mood and its relationship with parameters of internal migration, i.e. region of origin, age at migration, and years since migration. A community-wide census was carried out between January and June 2010 within a shantytown immigrant receiving community in Lima, Peru. One male or female adult per household completed a survey. Depressive mood was assessed with a 2-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CESD) scale. Migration-related variables included place of birth, duration of residence in Lima, and age at migration. Prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated. A total of 8,551 out of 9,561 participants, response rate 89%, participated in the census. Of these, 8,091 records were analyzed: 71.8% were women [average age 39.4 (SD 13.9 years)] and 59.3% were immigrants. The overall prevalence of individuals with current depressive mood was 17.1% (95% CI 16.2-17.9%) and varied significantly by all socio-demographic and migration variables assessed. On unadjusted analyses, immigrants to Lima had higher prevalence of depressive mood if they originated in other costal or Andean areas, had lived in Lima for more than 20 years, or were <30 years of age when they out-migrated. When controlling for age, gender and socio-demographic variables the association was no longer significant, the only exception being a 20% lower prevalence of current depressive mood among those who out-migrated aged ≥30 years old (PR

  13. Estimating instream constituent loads using replicate synoptic sampling, Peru Creek, Colorado

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runkel, Robert L.; Walton-Day, Katherine; Kimball, Briant A.; Verplanck, Philip L.; Nimick, David A.

    2013-01-01

    The synoptic mass balance approach is often used to evaluate constituent mass loading in streams affected by mine drainage. Spatial profiles of constituent mass load are used to identify sources of contamination and prioritize sites for remedial action. This paper presents a field scale study in which replicate synoptic sampling campaigns are used to quantify the aggregate uncertainty in constituent load that arises from (1) laboratory analyses of constituent and tracer concentrations, (2) field sampling error, and (3) temporal variation in concentration from diel constituent cycles and/or source variation. Consideration of these factors represents an advance in the application of the synoptic mass balance approach by placing error bars on estimates of constituent load and by allowing all sources of uncertainty to be quantified in aggregate; previous applications of the approach have provided only point estimates of constituent load and considered only a subset of the possible errors. Given estimates of aggregate uncertainty, site specific data and expert judgement may be used to qualitatively assess the contributions of individual factors to uncertainty. This assessment can be used to guide the collection of additional data to reduce uncertainty. Further, error bars provided by the replicate approach can aid the investigator in the interpretation of spatial loading profiles and the subsequent identification of constituent source areas within the watershed.The replicate sampling approach is applied to Peru Creek, a stream receiving acidic, metal-rich effluent from the Pennsylvania Mine. Other sources of acidity and metals within the study reach include a wetland area adjacent to the mine and tributary inflow from Cinnamon Gulch. Analysis of data collected under low-flow conditions indicates that concentrations of Al, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb, and Zn in Peru Creek exceed aquatic life standards. Constituent loading within the study reach is dominated by effluent from the

  14. Using the e-Chasqui, web-based information system, to determine laboratory guidelines and data available to clinical staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaya, Joaquin A; Yagui, Martin; Contreras, Carmen C; Palma, Betty; Shin, Sonya S; Yale, Gloria; Suarez, Carmen; Fraser, Hamish S F

    2008-11-06

    13% of all drug susceptibility tests (DSTs) performed at a public laboratory in Peru were duplicate. To determine reasons for duplicate requests an online survey was implemented in the e-Chasqui laboratory information system. Results showed that 59.6% of tests were ordered because clinical staff was unaware of ordering guidelines or of a previous result. This shows a benefit of using a web-based system and the lack of laboratory information available to clinical staff in Peru.

  15. Analysis of Luminescence Away from the Epicenter During a Large Earthquake: The Pisco, Peru Mw8 Earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heraud, J. A.; Lira, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    The Mw8.0 earthquake in Pisco, Peru of August 15, 2007, produced high damage with a toll of 513 people dead, 2,291 wounded, 76,000 houses and buildings seriously damaged and 431,000 people overall affected. Co-seismic luminescence was reported by thousands of people along the central coast of Peru and especially in Lima, 150 km from the epicenter, being this the first large nighttime earthquake in about 100 years in a highly populated area. Pictures and videos of the lights are available, however those obtained so far, had little information on the timing and direction of the reported lights. Two important videos are analyzed, the first one from a fixed security camera, in order to determine differential time correlation between the timing of the lights recorded with ground acceleration registered by a three-axis accelerometer 500m away and very good results have been observed. This evidence contains important color, shape and timing information which is shown to be highly differential time correlated with the arrival of the seismic waves. Furthermore, the origin of the lights is on the top of a hilly island about 6 km off the coast of Lima where lights were reported in a written chronicle, to have been seen exactly 21 days before the Mega earthquake of October 28, 1746. This was the largest ever to happen in Peru, and produced a Tsunami that washed the port of Callao and reached up to 5km inland. The second video, from another security camera, in a different location, has been further analyzed in order to determine more exactly the direction of the lights and this new evidence will be presented. The fact that a notoriously large and well documented co-seismic luminous phenomena was video recorded more than 150 km from the epicenter during a very large earthquake, is emphasized together with historical documented evidence of pre-seismic luminous activity on the same island, during a mega earthquake of enormous proportions in Lima. Both previously mentioned videos

  16. New mammalian records in the Parque Nacional Cerros de Amotape, northwestern Peru

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    Cindy M. Hurtado

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Pacific Tropical Rainforest and Equatorial Dry Forest are found only in southern Ecuador and northern Peru, and are among the most poorly known ecosystems of South America. Even though these forests are protected in Parque Nacional Cerros de Amotape (PNCA, they are threatened by fragmentation because of farming and agriculture. The aim of this study was to determine the medium and large mammalian species richness, using transect census, camera trapping, and specimen bone collection. Nine transects were established and 21 camera trap stations were placed along 16 km2 in three localities of PNCA, from August 2012 to April 2013. Total sampling effort was 215 km of transects and 4077 camera-days. We documented 22 species; including 17 with camera trapping, 11 with transect census, and 10 with specimen collection.  Camera traps were the most effective method, and four species (Dasyprocta punctata, Cuniculus paca, Leopardus wiedii and Puma concolor were documented only with this method. This comprised the first Peruvian record for Dasyprocta punctata, and the first record for the western slope of the Peruvian Andes for Cuniculus paca. Also, both specimen collections and sightings confirm the presence of Potos flavus, first record in the western slope of the Peruvian Andes. Panthera onca, Tremarctos ornatus and Saimiri sciureus are considered locally extinct, while several species are in need of further research. We highlight the importance of the high diversity of this rainforests and encourage local authorities to give the area the highest priority in conservation.

  17. Prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus by cobas 4800 HPV test in urban Peru

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    Ricardo Iwasaki

    Full Text Available Background: Molecular tests allow the detection of high-risk human papillomavirus in cervical samples, playing an important role in the prevention of cervical cancer. Objectives: We performed a study to determine the prevalence of HPV 16, HPV 18 and other high-risk human papillomavirus (pool 12 genotypes in Peruvian females from diverse urban areas using the cobas 4800 HPV test. Methods: Routine cervical samples collected in our laboratory were analyzed by cobas 4800 HPV test. Results: A total of 2247 samples from female patients aged 17–79 years were tested. high-risk human papillomavirus was positive in 775 (34.49% samples. Of these, 641 (82.71% were single infections and 134 (17.29% were multiple infections. The positivity rates for HPV 16, HPV 18, and other high-risk human papillomavirus were 10.77%, 2.0%, and 28.08%, respectively. In multiple high-risk human papillomavirus infections, the concomitance of HPV 16 and other high-risk human papillomavirus was more prevalent (13.42%. Conclusion: Our study showed high prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus in urban Peru, mainly among young women. In both single and multiple infections other high-risk human papillomavirus were more prevalent than HPV 16 and HPV 18, which might influence vaccine impact in our country. Furthermore, the cobas 4800 HPV test may be considered a useful tool for HPV molecular diagnosis.

  18. [Characteristics associated with pre travel medical consultation in tourists visiting Cuzco, Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Christian R; Cvetkovic-Vega, Aleksandar; Cruz, Briggite; Cárdenas, Matlin M; Quiñones-Laveriano, Dante M; Rodríguez-Morales, Alfonso J

    2016-02-01

    International tourism is increasing. Preventive Medicine remains important, especially the Pre-Travel Consultation (PTC). To determinate, the characteristics of tourists associated with PTC in tourists at Cuzco, Peru. A cross-sectional, analytical study, a secondary analysis of data from a database generated by survey of foreign tourists who visited Cuzco, in the waiting room of the airport was performed. The main variable was to have had a PTC at the tourist's country of residence, the area of residence was categorized according to health/risk of acquiring infectious diseases as traveler's diarrhea during their stay. These and other variables were analyzed and statistical association with generalized linear models were done. Of the 1827 tourists, 875 (48%) were men, with a median age of 33 years (range 18-88 years); 42% had a PTC. In the multivariate analysis, it was found that a PTC lower frequency was associated with male gender (aPR: 0.84; 95% CI: 0.75-0.94), and a higher frequency was associated with have born (aPR: 1.77; 95% CI: 1.39-2.27) and reside in an area of low risk of acquiring infectious diseases (aPR: 1.95; 95% CI: 1.26-3.00), adjusted for the history of a disease. Sex, region of birth and residence of tourists (as risk of acquiring infectious diseases) are associated with having a PTC. These findings may serve the health and government attending tourists who come to our country.

  19. Characteristics of registration of medical records in a hospital in southern Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cender Udai Quispe-Juli

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the characteristics of registration of medical records of hospitalization in the Hospital III Yanahuara in Arequipa, Peru. Material and methods: The study was observational, cross-sectional and retrospective. 225 medical records of hospitalization were evaluated in November 2015. A tab consisting of 15 items was used; each item was assessed using a scale: "very bad", "bad", "acceptable", "good" and "very good". Adescriptive analysis was done by calculating frequency. Results: Items with a higher proportion of acceptable registration data were: clear therapeutic indication (84%, clinical evolution (74.7%, diagnosis (70.7%, complete and orderly therapeutic indication (54.2%, medical history taking (50.2% and physical examination (43.1%. The very well recorded items were: indication of tests and procedures (97.3%, medical identification (91.1% and allergies (67.1%. Very bad recorded items were: reason for admission (91.1%, life habits (72.9% and prior treatment (38.2%. Conclusions: Most medical records of hospitalization are characterized by an acceptable record of most evaluated items; however they have notable deficiencies in some items.

  20. Biomass fuel smoke exposure was associated with adverse cardiac remodeling and left ventricular dysfunction in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burroughs Peña, M S; Velazquez, E J; Rivera, J D; Alenezi, F; Wong, C; Grigsby, M; Davila-Roman, V G; Gilman, R H; Miranda, J J; Checkley, W

    2017-07-01

    While household air pollution from biomass fuel combustion has been linked to cardiovascular disease, the effects on cardiac structure and function have not been well described. We sought to determine the association between biomass fuel smoke exposure and cardiac structure and function by transthoracic echocardiography. We identified a random sample of urban and rural residents living in the high-altitude region of Puno, Peru. Daily biomass fuel use was self-reported. Participants underwent transthoracic echocardiography. Multivariable linear regression was used to examine the relationship of biomass fuel use with echocardiographic measures of cardiac structure and function, adjusting for age, sex, height, body mass index, diabetes, physical activity, and tobacco use. One hundred and eighty-seven participants (80 biomass fuel users and 107 non-users) were included in this analysis (mean age 59 years, 58% women). After adjustment, daily exposure to biomass fuel smoke was associated with increased left ventricular internal diastolic diameter (P=.004), left atrial diameter (P=.03), left atrial area (four-chamber) (P=.004) and (two-chamber) (P=.03), septal E' (P=.006), and lateral E' (P=.04). Exposure to biomass fuel smoke was also associated with worse global longitudinal strain in the two-chamber view (P=.01). Daily biomass fuel use was associated with increased left ventricular size and decreased left ventricular systolic function by global longitudinal strain. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Framework for energy policy and technology assessment in developing countries: a case study of Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mubayi, V.; Palmedo, P.F.; Doernberg, A.B.

    1979-12-01

    The potential of various energy sources and technology options in meeting national economic and social development goals in developing countries is assessed. The resource options that are of interest are the development of indigenous resources. In general, two categories of options can be considered: those which correspond to the accelerated implementation of existing elements of the energy system and those which correspond to the introduction of a new technology, such as solar electricity. The various resource and technology options that must be analyzed with respect to a number of criteria or payoff functions are: total demand and fuel mix; reduction of oil consumption; national social goals; total energy costs; and environmental quality. First, a view is constructed of the energy implications of current national economic development plans. A consistent description of the future energy system of the country, under the assumption of current trends and policies is constructed for certain reference years in the future. The values of the payoff functions selected are then calculated for that reference case. The major resource and technology options are identified and the rates at which they can be implemented are determined. Finally, the impact on the various payoff functions of the implementation of each option is calculated. The basic element of the framework is the Reference Energy System, discussed in Secton 3. The energy policy analysis for Peru is used as a reference case. 11 references, 10 figures, 2 tables.

  2. Postseismic relocking of the subduction megathrust following the 2007 Pisco, Peru, earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remy, D.; Perfettini, H.; Cotte, N.; Avouac, J. P.; Chlieh, M.; Bondoux, F.; Sladen, A.; Tavera, H.; Socquet, A.

    2016-05-01

    Characterizing the time evolution of slip over different phases of the seismic cycle is crucial to a better understanding of the factors controlling the occurrence of large earthquakes. In this study, we take advantage of interferometric synthetic aperture radar data and 3.5 years of continuous Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements to determine interseismic, coseismic, and postseismic slip distributions in the region of the 2007, Mw 8.0 Pisco, earthquake, Peru, using the same fault geometry and inversion method. Our interseismic model, based on pre-2007 campaign GPS data, suggests that the 2007 Pisco seismic slip occurred in a region strongly coupled before the earthquake while afterslip occurred in low coupled regions. Large afterslip occurred in the peripheral area of coseismic rupture in agreement with the notion that afterslip is mainly induced by coseismic stress changes. The temporal evolution of the region of maximum afterslip, characterized by a relaxation time of about 2.3 years, is located in the region where the Nazca ridge is subducting, consistent with rate-strengthening friction promoting aseismic slip. We estimate a return period for the Pisco earthquake of about 230 years with an estimated aseismic slip that might account for about 50% of the slip budget in this region over the 0-50 km seismogenic depth range. A major result of this study is that the main asperity that ruptured during the 2007 Pisco earthquake relocked soon after this event.

  3. Health workers' attitudes, perceptions and knowledge of influenza immunization in Lima, Peru: A mixed methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazán, Magdalena; Villacorta, Erika; Barbagelatta, Gisella; Jimenez, M Michelle; Goya, Cecilia; Bartolini, Rosario M; Penny, Mary E

    2017-05-19

    Vaccination against seasonal influenza in health workers is recommended but coverage is variable. This study aimed to determine coverage of influenza vaccination among health workers in Lima, Peru in 2010; explore barriers and enabling elements for vaccination; and suggest strategies to improve coverage. Qualitative interviews informed the development of a survey instrument that consisted of open and close-ended questions. Sub-analyses were done by occupational group and results were calculated as percentages for each possible response with confidence intervals of 95%. Coverage of the influenza vaccination was 77.2%. Vaccinated staff were less likely to have permanent contracts (p=0.0150) and vaccination coverage was lower in physicians (p=0.0001). Over 90% cited protection of themselves, families and patients as reasons for vaccination and 48% mentioned peer encouragement. Fear of adverse events (47%) and organizational barriers (>30%) were reasons for non-vaccination. To improve coverage, highest priority was given to strategies providing more information. Key factors in driving health worker vaccination include desire for protection and peer encouragement. Perceptual barriers based on a misunderstanding of the epidemiology of influenza and vaccination could be overcome by targeted education and information. Organizational barriers require attention to how vaccination is implemented within health facilities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Reliability of the MODS assay decentralisation process in three health regions in Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, A.; Castillo, E.; Gamarra, N.; Huamán, T.; Perea, M.; Monroi, Y.; Salazar, R.; Coronel, J.; Acurio, M.; Obregón, G.; Roper, M.; Bonilla, C.; Asencios, L.; Moore, D. A. J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To deliver rapid isoniazid (INH) and rifampicin (RMP) drug susceptibility testing (DST) close to the patient, we designed a decentralisation process for the microscopic observation drug susceptibility (MODS) assay in Peru and evaluated its reliability. METHODS After 2 weeks of training, laboratory staff processed ≥120 consecutive sputum samples each in three regional laboratories. Samples were processed in parallel with MODS testing at an expert laboratory. Blinded paired results were independently analysed by the Instituto Nacional de Salud (INS) according to predetermined criteria: concordance for culture, DST against INH and RMP and diagnosis of multidrug-resistant t uberculosis (MDR-TB) ≥ 95%, McNemar's P > 0.05, kappa index (κ) ≥ 0.75 and contamination 1–4%. Sensitivity and specificity for MDR-TB were calculated. RESULTS The accreditation process for Callao (126 samples, 79.4% smear-positive), Lima Sur (n = 130, 84%) and Arequipa (n = 126, 80%) took respectively 94, 97 and 173 days. Pre-determined criteria in all regional laboratories were above expected values. The sensitivity and specificity for detecting MDR-TB in regional laboratories were >95%, except for sensitivity in Lima Sur, which was 91.7%. Contamination was 1.0–2.3%. Mean delay to positive MODS results was 9.9–12.9 days. CONCLUSION Technology transfer of MODS was reliable, effective and fast, enabling the INS to accredit regional laboratories swiftly. PMID:21219684

  5. Prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus by cobas 4800 HPV test in urban Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Ricardo; Galvez-Philpott, Felipe; Arias-Stella, Javier; Arias-Stella, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Molecular tests allow the detection of high-risk human papillomavirus in cervical samples, playing an important role in the prevention of cervical cancer. We performed a study to determine the prevalence of HPV 16, HPV 18 and other high-risk human papillomavirus (pool 12 genotypes) in Peruvian females from diverse urban areas using the cobas 4800 HPV test. Routine cervical samples collected in our laboratory were analyzed by cobas 4800 HPV test. A total of 2247 samples from female patients aged 17-79 years were tested. high-risk human papillomavirus was positive in 775 (34.49%) samples. Of these, 641 (82.71%) were single infections and 134 (17.29%) were multiple infections. The positivity rates for HPV 16, HPV 18, and other high-risk human papillomavirus were 10.77%, 2.0%, and 28.08%, respectively. In multiple high-risk human papillomavirus infections, the concomitance of HPV 16 and other high-risk human papillomavirus was more prevalent (13.42%). Our study showed high prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus in urban Peru, mainly among young women. In both single and multiple infections other high-risk human papillomavirus were more prevalent than HPV 16 and HPV 18, which might influence vaccine impact in our country. Furthermore, the cobas 4800 HPV test may be considered a useful tool for HPV molecular diagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Factors associated with parasitic infection amongst street children in orphanages across Lima, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Chris; Lopez, Sonia; Camero, Anahí; Taiquiri, Carmen; Arhuay, Yanina; Moore, David A J

    2013-01-01

    Infection caused by intestinal parasites has significant public health consequences amongst children in the developing world. Street children are an under-studied group of society subjected to increased health risks when compared to their peers. To estimate the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infection and ascertain risk factors for parasitosis amongst this population, stool samples were collected from 258 children across four orphanages in three districts of Lima, Peru. Surveys were used to determine associations between risk factors and infection status. The prevalence of parasitic infection within the study sample was 66.3%, with 30.6% testing positive for pathogenic species. Entamoeba coli was the most commonly detected parasite (41.9%) and Giardia lamblia was the most commonly detected pathogenic parasite (17.1%). Of the group 15.1% had helminth infection. When testing for association, age and BMI were risk factors for infection. A notable difference in prevalence (P < 0.00001) based on orphanage was observed, but the duration of residence in an orphanage was not a predictor for infection. A sub-analysis conducted amongst children who were given anti-parasitic treatment 5 months beforehand found no significant difference in parasitosis between those who had been given treatment and those who had not (P  =  0.218). It is suggested that a single dose of albendazole alone may not be effective in combating long-term infection rates. PMID:23683330

  7. Origin of the springs of Costa Verde beach in Lima Peru

    CERN Document Server

    Rojas, Ruben; Mamani, Enoc; Maguina, Jose; Montoya, Eduardo; Baltuano, Oscar; Bedregal, Patricia; Coria, Lucy; Guerra, Alcides; Justo, Santiago; Churasacari, Tania

    2013-01-01

    This paper tries to determine the origin of springs on the Costa Verde beach, located in the district of Barranco, Miraflores and Magdalena, province of Lima, Peru. These springs emerge near the shoreline, from the lower layers of a 80 meter high cliff. They have survived the process of urbanization of agricultural land, started in the early 70, which decreased the water table aquifer of Lima, and wiped the water leaks from the cliffs. To identify the source of the springs, isotopic, physical, chemical and bacteriological analysis was carried out for samples from five springs. The isotopic concentrations in waters from Costa Verde springs are depleted compared to those obtained for Lima aquifer waters, which is recharged by infiltration of the Rimac River. The measured values of those concentrations suggest that water from the Costa Verde springs should come from a direct recharge in the upper and middle basin, due to infiltration of rainfall or the river at an altitude of about 3600 m. Conductivity and tempe...

  8. A phytoremediation approach using Calamagrostis ligulata and Juncus imbricatus in Andean wetlands of Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miguel, Bobadilla; Edell, Aliaga; Edson, Yupanqui; Edwin, Palomino

    2013-01-01

    Emergent plant species growing in Andean natural wetlands have shown efficient phytoremediation capabilities in wetlands polluted by acid mine drainage. However, the types and amounts of heavy metals accumulated by native plant species are not well understood. In this study, we focused on determining heavy metal concentrations and bioaccumulation factors in Calamagrostis ligulata and Juncus imbricatus. Two acid wetlands located above 3,500 m a.s.l. in Ancash, Peru were assessed. Physico-chemical parameters and heavy metals concentrations in control and experimental plant samples were measured in dry and rainy seasons. Results indicated that C. ligulata and J. imbricatus aerial parts accumulated higher amounts of Fe, Zn, As and Al. Also, bioaccumulation factors revealed notable increases in As, Pb and Al, but less so in Cd, Fe and Zn. On the other hand, physico-chemical parameters of water quality (pH, temperature, dissolved oxygen, sulphides) between inflow and outflow of wetlands indicated significant differences in the presence of metals in comparison with their maximum permissible limits. Both emergent plant species showed an accumulation of heavy metals and thus the ability to recovery of water quality in wetland outflows.

  9. [Factors related to the scientific production of gastroenterologists in Lima-Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra Pérez, V; Monge Salgado, E; Vildósola Gonzales, H

    2009-01-01

    The biomedical investigation in Peru is limited; among the implicated factors we have the reduced per-capita expense in investigation, the disperse efforts and the low communication between the investigations and the social productive activities. To determinate the personal, professional and academic factors related with the scientific production of the medical gastroenterologists that work in province Lima. Co-relational, observational, comparative, transversal and retrospective studies that had happened in between march 2007 and april 2008. Was elaborated a survey containing the variables of the investigation which was applied autoadministered to the gastroenterologists. Using bivaried and multivaried, were identified factors related with the scientific production of the gastroenterologist. The bivaried analysis has found, as related factors with the scientific production: Teaching, type of bibliographic research, degree of comprehension of the scientific article, facilities for the investigation at the job, subscription at the scientific magazine, to belong to the scientific society and the number of employments. The multivaried analysis found the previous factors but teaching and subscription to the scientific magazine, related with the scientific production. Those gastroenterologists that, despite being in contact with factors that impede the development of the investigation, had overcome the local negative influence and emerge, deserve consideration, because is on them were we can recognize factors that favor the investigation labor.

  10. How Peru introduced a plan for comprehensive HIV prevention and care for transwomen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, Ximena; Núnez-Curto, Arón; Villayzán, Jana; Castillo, Regina; Benites, Carlos; Caballero, Patricia; Cáceres, Carlos F

    2016-01-01

    As a group, transwomen in Peru have the highest prevalence of HIV (>20%) in the country, but they have little access to HIV prevention, testing and care services. Until recently, Peru's national HIV programme did not recognize transwomen and had remained essentially static for decades. This changed in December 2014, when the Ministry of Health expressed its commitment to improve programming for transwomen and to involve transwomen organizations by prioritizing the development of a "Targeted Strategy Plan of STIs/HIV/AIDS Prevention and Comprehensive Care for Transwomen." A policy dialogue between key stakeholders - Peru's Ministry of Health, academic scientists, civil society, transgender leaders and international agencies - created the conditions for a change in Peru's national HIV policy for transwomen. Supported by the effective engagement of all sectors, the Ministry of Health launched a plan to provide comprehensive HIV prevention and care for transwomen. The five-year plan includes new national guidelines for HIV prevention, care and support, and country-level investments in infrastructure and equipment. In addition to new biomedical strategies, the plan also incorporates several strategies to address structural factors that contribute to the vulnerability of transwomen. We identified three key factors that created the right conditions for this change in Peru's HIV policy. These factors include (1) the availability of solid evidence, based on scientific research; (2) ongoing efforts within the transwomen community to become better advocates of their own rights; and (3) a dialogue involving honest discussions between stakeholders about possibilities of changing the nation's HIV policy. The creation of Peru's national plan for HIV prevention and care for transwomen shows that long-term processes, focused on human rights for transwomen in Peru, can lead to organizational and public-policy change.

  11. Trade and investment liberalization, food systems change and highly processed food consumption: a natural experiment contrasting the soft-drink markets of Peru and Bolivia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Baker, Phillip; Friel, Sharon; Schram, Ashley; Labonte, Ron

    2016-01-01

    .... Few studies have quantified such effects. Using a natural experiment this paper quantifies changes in Peru's soft-drink market before/after entry into the US-Peru FTA, compared with Bolivia, a county with no such...

  12. Impacts of the June 23, 2001 Peru Tsunami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengler, L.

    2001-12-01

    The tsunami generated by the June 23, 2001 Peru earthquake caused significant damage to a 20-km long stretch of coastline in the Municipality of Camana, southern Peru. Over 3000 structures were damaged or destroyed and 2000 hectares of farmland flooded and covered with sand. 22 people were killed in the Municipality and 62 were reported missing. All of the casualties were attributed to the tsunami; in Camana the earthquake produced Modified Mercalli Intensities only of VI or VII. The International Tsunami Survey Team (ITST) were in Peru July 5 - 15 and measured inundation, spoke with City, Red Cross, and Health Department officials, and interviewed survivors. The preliminary ITST findings: All eyewitnesses described an initial draw-down that lasted a substantial amount of time (15 minutes or more). The initial positive wave was small, followed by two destructive waves of near similar impact. Observing the water recede was the key to self-evacuation. No one responded to the ground shaking even though all felt the earthquake strongly. Damage was concentrated along a flat coastal beach no higher than 5 m above sea level. The largest waves (5 to 8 meters) produced by this tsunami coincided with the most developed beach area along the southern Peruvian coast. Tsunami waves penetrated 1.2-km inland and damaged or destroyed nearly all of the structures in this zone. Poorly built adobe and infilled wall structures performed very poorly in the tsunami impacted area. The few structures that survived appeared to have deeper foundations and more reinforcing. The most tsunami-vulnerable populations were newcomers to the coast. Most victims were farm workers and domestic summerhouse sitters who had not grown up along the coast and were unaware of tsunami hazards. Economic impacts are likely to last a long time. The main industries in Camana are tourism and agriculture and the tsunami damaged both. While the extent of inundation and the number of structures damaged or destroyed

  13. Policy outline for the conservation of Peru's renewable natural resources. Lineamientos de politica de conservacion de los recursos naturales renovables del Peru

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1974-01-01

    Information is presented on proposed programs for the conservation of coastal, marine, and mountain region natural resources of Peru, including the introduction of legislation, education, and management. Studies are also made on soil erosion prevention, wildlife preservation, desalination programs, and land reclamation.

  14. First molecular identification of the transgene red fluorescent protein (RFP in transgenic ornamental zebrafish (Danio rerio introduced in Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Scotto

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the transgenic fluorescent red, orange and pink zebra fish (Danio rerio, found in local aquariums in Peru, were identified using the PCR technique to amplify the transgene RFP sea anemone belonging to Discosoma spp. The gene expression of the red fluorescent protein (RFP transgene was found to determine different gradients-of-bioluminescence (shades in color in each GMO fish analyzed. We performed sequence analysis of the two variants of the RFP along with six variants of the existing fluorescent protein GFP from the Genbank, this could help identify quickly if they are new genes or variants thereof as these novel fluorescent proteins may be introduced in aquatic GMO in the future. Thus, developing and improving biosecurity measures through its timely detection at the molecular genetic level.

  15. Multidrug-Resistant Microorganisms Colonizing Lower Extremity Wounds in Patients in a Tertiary Care Hospital, Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendo-Lopez, Rafael; Jasso, Luis; Guevara, Ximena; Astocondor, Aurora Lizeth; Alejos, Saul; Bardossy, Ana C; Prentiss, Tyler; Zervos, Marcus J; Jacobs, Jan; García, Coralith

    2017-10-01

    Multidrug-resistant organism (MDRO) infections cause high morbidity and mortality, and high costs to patients and hospitals. The study aims were to determine the frequency of MDRO colonization and associated factors in patients with lower-extremity wounds with colonization. A cross-sectional study was designed during November 2015 to July 2016 in a tertiary care hospital in Lima, Peru. A wound swab was obtained for culture and susceptibility testing. MDRO colonization was defined if the culture grew with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, vancomycin-resistant enterococci, and/or extended spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) microorganisms. The frequency of MDRO wound colonization was 26.8% among the 97 patients enrolled. The most frequent MDRO obtained was ESBL-producing Escherichia coli, which was significantly more frequent in chronic wounds versus acute wounds (17.2% versus 0%, P wounds are admitted.

  16. Glacial evolution of the Ampato Volcanic Complex (Peru)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalá, J.; Palacios, D.; Zamorano, J. J.; Vázquez, L.

    2009-04-01

    Ice masses on the Western range of the Central Andes are a main source of water resources and act as a geoindicator of variations in the climate of the tropics (Mark, 2008). The study of their evolution is of particular interest since they are situated in the transition zone between the tropical and mid-latitude circulation areas of the atmosphere (Zech et al., 2007). The function of this transition area is currently under debate, and understanding it is essential for the development of global climate models (Kull et al, 2008; Mark, 2008). However our understanding of the evolution of glaciers and their paleoclimatic factors for this sector of the Central Andes is still at a very basic level. This paper presents initial results of a study on the glacial evolution of the Ampato volcanic complex (15°24´- 15° 51´ S, 71° 51´ - 73° W; 6288 m a.s.l.) located in the Western Range of the Central Andes in Southern Peru, 70 km NW of the city of Arequipa. The main objectives are to identify the number of glacial phases the complex has undergone using geomorphological criteria to define a time frame for each phase, based on cosmogenic 36Cl dating of a sequence of moraine deposits; and to estimate the glacier Equilibrium Line Altitude (ELA) of each phase. The Ampato volcanic complex is formed by 3 great andesitic stratovolcanoes, the Nevados HualcaHualca-Sabancaya-Ampato, which started forming between the late Miocene and early Quaternary (Bulmer et al., 1999), aligned N-S and with summits covered with glaciers. The Sabancaya volcano is fully active, with its latest eruption occurring in 2001. Glacial landforms were identified and mapped using photointerpretation of vertical aerial photographs from 1955 (1:35,000 scale, National Geographic Institute of Peru), oblique photographs from 1943 (Aerophotographical Service of Peru), and a geo-referenced high-resolution Mrsid satellite image from 2000 (NASA). This cartography was corrected and improved through fieldwork. It was

  17. New glaciological research projects in the Cordillera Vilcanota - Cusco - Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, Nilton; Molina, Edwin; Schauwecker, Simone; Haeberli, Wilfried; Giraldez, Claudia; Drenkhan, Fabian; Huggel, Christian

    2015-04-01

    Tropical glaciers are highly sensitive to alterations in climate and therefore good indicators for global climate change. Glaciers located in Peru represent 71% of all tropical glaciers in the world, and have shown a significant area reduction of about 43% within the last 40 years mainly due to the increase in surface temperature. Tropical glaciers play a particular role as freshwater reservoirs and buffers to river discharge variability and water scarcity within a pronounced wet and dry season. Their monitoring is extraordinarily important but few studies exist on mass balance. The Cordillera Vilcanota, at the origin of the Rio Vilcanota-Urubamba, contains about 25% of all glaciers in Peru. In recent decades, glacier shrinkage has accelerated in this mountain range. Between 1988 and 2010, glacier area was reduced at an annual rate of about 4 km2 (1.1 %) from some 360 km2 to about 270 km2 (25%). A total volume loss of 40-45% (from 17-20 km3 to 9.2-12.4 km3) can be estimated for the period 1962-2006, with an accelerated rate since the 1980s. In 2010/11, first point net mass balance measurements were carried out on Suyuparina glacier and the adjacent Quisoquipina glacier. In 2013, mass balance measurements were reinitiated in the frame of a long-term monitoring campaign. The first year of direct mass balance measurements (stakes and pits) show that ablation is highly influenced by the complex microtopography of the glacier, mainly characterized by the existence of ice cliffs, causing a spatially heterogeneous ablation pattern. There is a large scatter in point mass balance in function of elevation, which makes it difficult to estimate accurately the equilibrium line altitude (ELA) and the annual total glacier mass balance from these point measurements. For the hydrological year 2013/14, stake measurements for sites on the lower part of the glacier varied between +0.2 and -4 m w.e. (water equivalent), while accumulation in the uppermost part of the glacier showed

  18. Time to initiation of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment and its relation with outcome in a high incidence district in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, L; De Orbegoso, A; Navarro, A F; Ríos, J; Párraga, T; Gotuzzo, E; Seas, C; Van der Stuyft, P

    2015-03-01

    To determine the time from diagnosis to start of multidrug resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) treatment in Lima, Peru. We studied new smear-positive TB adults that were started on MDR TB treatment or that were switched to it between June 2008 and December 2011. Time from the first positive smear to MDR-TB treatment was >30 days in 35% (13/37) of patients. Among the 27% (24/88) of patients that switched to MDR-TB treatment, time from the last dose of a drug-susceptible regimen was >30 days. Start of and switching to MDR TB treatment is still delayed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. CERN–Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics in Peru

    CERN Multimedia

    Nick Ellis, Organising Committee

    2013-01-01

    The 7th CERN–Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics was held in Arequipa, Peru, from 6 to 19 March 2013. The School is held every other year in a Latin-American country. This was the first time it had been hosted in Peru – a choice that reflects the increasing development of high-energy physics in the country, including collaboration in ALICE and experimental neutrino physics.   Participants in the 7th CERN–Latin-American School of High-Energy Physics in the grounds of the El Lago Estelar hotel in Arequipa, Peru. The 2013 School was attended by a total of 69 students, including 19 from Peru, selected from more than 130 applicants. About 80% of the students came from Latin-American countries, with most of the others coming from Europe. All in all, 18 different nationalities were represented. The lecturers and discussion group leaders were also from a variety of different countries including Argentina, Belgium, Brazil, Chile, Israel, Mexico, Peru, Spain, Switz...

  20. Characterisation of the first KPC-2-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae ST340 from Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horna, Gertrudis; Velasquez, Jorge; Fernández, Nathaly; Tamariz, Jesus; Ruiz, Joaquim

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise a KPC-carrying Klebsiella pneumoniae isolate from a Peruvian hospital setting. The identity of the isolate was confirmed by amplification and sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, and the antibiotic resistance profile was determined by disk diffusion and automated methods The sequence type (ST) and phylogenetic group were established by PCR. The presence of different β-lactamase genes was determined, including blaMBL, blaKPC, blaCTX-M, blaSHV, blaOXA-1-like, blaOXA-2-like, blaOXA-5-like, blaOXA-48-like and blaTEM and up to six different plasmid-encoded AmpC genes as well as class 1 integrons. The conjugability of β-lactam resistance was assessed by conjugation. The isolate was confirmed to be K. pneumoniae classified as belonging to the KpI phylogenetic group within ST340, which belongs to the high-risk clonal complex 258 (CC258). The isolate was resistant to all β-lactam agents tested, with only the presence of a non-conjugative blaKPC-2 gene being detected and carried in a non-classical genetic structure. This is the first description of a member of CC258 and of a blaKPC-2 gene in Peru. Intensive surveillance is needed to determine the relevance of both in this area. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Chemotherapy of Infection and Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.