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Sample records for caged neuron mea

  1. "Caged calcium" in Aplysia pacemaker neurons. Characterization of calcium-activated potassium and nonspecific cation currents

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    We have studied calcium-activated potassium current, IK(Ca), and calcium-activated nonspecific cation current, INS(Ca), in Aplysia bursting pacemaker neurons, using photolysis of a calcium chelator (nitr-5 or nitr-7) to release "caged calcium" intracellularly. A computer model of nitr photolysis, multiple buffer equilibration, and active calcium extrusion was developed to predict volume-average and front-surface calcium concentration transients. Changes in arsenazo III absorbance were used to...

  2. Novel modulatory effects of neurosteroids and benzodiazepines on excitatory and inhibitory neurons excitability: a multi-electrode array (MEA recording study"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia ePuia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The balance between glutamate- and GABA-mediated neurotransmission in the brain is fundamental in the nervous system, but it is regulated by the ‘tonic’ release of a variety of endogenous factors. One such important group of molecules are the neurosteroids (NSs which, similarly to benzodiazepines (BDZs, enhance GABAergic neurotransmission. The purpose of our work was to investigate, at in-vivo physiologically relevant concentrations, the effects of NSs and BDZs as GABA modulators on dissociated neocortical neuron networks grown in long-term culture. We used a multi-electrode array (MEA recording technique and a novel analysis that was able to both identify the action potentials of engaged excitatory and inhibitory neurons and to detect drug-induced network up-states (burst. We found that the NSs tetrahydrodeoxycorticosterone (THDOC and allopregnanolone (ALLO applied at low nM concentrations, produced different modulatory effects on the two neuronal clusters. Conversely, at high concentrations (1 µM, both NSs, decreased excitatory and inhibitory neuron cluster excitability; however, even several hours after washout, the excitability of inhibitory neurons continued to be depressed, leading to a network long term depression (LTD. The BDZs clonazepam (CLZ and midazolam (MDZ also decreased the network excitability, but only MDZ caused LTD of inhibitory neuron cluster. To investigate the origin of the LTD after MDZ application, we tested finasteride (FIN, an inhibitor of endogenous NSs synthesis. FIN did not prevent the LTD induced by MDZ, but surprisingly induced it after application of CLZ. The significance and possible mechanisms underlying these LTD effects of NSs and BDZs are discussed. Taken together, our results not only demonstrate that ex-vivo networks show a sensitivity to NSs and BDZs comparable to that expressed in vivo, but also provide a new global in-vitro description that can help in understanding their activity in more complex

  3. Mobilization of intracellular calcium by intracellular flash photolysis of caged dihydrosphingosine in cultured neonatal rat sensory neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayar, A; Thatcher, N M; Zehavi, U; Trentham, D R; Scott, R H

    1998-01-01

    The ability of dihydrosphingosine to release Ca2+ from intracellular stores in neurones was investigated by combining the whole cell patch clamp technique with intracellular flash photolysis of caged, N-(2-nitrobenzyl)dihydrosphingosine. The caged dihydrosphingosine (100 microM) was applied to the intracellular environment via the CsCl-based patch pipette solution which also contained 0.3% dimethylformamide and 2 mM dithiothreitol. Cultured dorsal root ganglion neurones from neonatal rats were voltage clamped at -90 mV and inward whole cell Ca2+-activated currents were recorded in response to intracellular photorelease of dihydrosphingosine. Intracellular photorelease of dihydrosphingosine (about 5 microM) was achieved using a Xenon flash lamp. Inward Ca2+-activated currents were evoked in 50 out of 57 neurones, the mean delay to current activation following photolysis was 82+/-13 s. The responses were variable with neurones showing transient, oscillating or sustained inward currents. High voltage-activated Ca2+ currents evoked by 100 ms voltage step commands to 0 mV were not attenuated by photorelease of dihydrosphingosine. Controls showed that alone a flash from the Xenon lamp did not activate currents, and that the unphotolysed caged dihydrosphingosine, and intracellular photolysis of 2-(2-nitrobenzylamino) propanediol also did not evoke responses. The dihydrosphingosine current had a reversal potential of -11+/-3 mV (n = 11), and was carried by two distinct Cl- and cation currents which were reduced by 85% and about 20% following replacement of monovalent cations with N-methyl-D-glucamine or application of the Cl- channel blocker niflumic acid (10 microM) respectively. The responses to photoreleased dihydrosphingosine were inhibited by intracellular application of 20 mM EGTA, 10 microM ryanodine or extracellular application of 10 microM dantrolene, but persisted when Ca2+ free saline was applied to the extracellular environment. Intracellular application of

  4. Nucleus Accumbens Dopamine D2-Receptor Expressing Neurons Control Behavioral Flexibility in a Place Discrimination Task in the IntelliCage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, Tom; Morita, Makiko; Wang, Yanyan; Sasaoka, Toshikuni; Sawa, Akira; Hikida, Takatoshi

    2016-01-01

    Considerable evidence has demonstrated a critical role for the nucleus accumbens (NAc) in the acquisition and flexibility of behavioral strategies. These processes are guided by the activity of two discrete neuron types, dopamine D1- or D2-receptor expressing medium spiny neurons (D1-/D2-MSNs). Here we used the IntelliCage, an automated…

  5. MEA vacuum system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes construction and operation of the MEA vacuum system of NIKHEF (Netherlands). First, the klystron vacuum system, beam transport system, diode pump and a triode pump are described. Next, the isolation valve and the fast valves of the vacuum system are considered. Measuring instruments, vacuum system commands and messages of failures are treated in the last chapter. (G.J.P.)

  6. Synthesis of FMRFaNV, a Photoreleasable Caged Transmitter Designed to Study Neuron-Glia Interactions in the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janett, Elia; Bernardinelli, Yann; Müller, Dominique; Bochet, Christian G

    2015-12-16

    Neuroscience studies require technologies able to deliver compounds with both scale and timing compatibility with morphological and physiological synaptic properties. In this light, two-photon flash photolysis has been extensively used to successfully apply glutamate or other neurotransmitters at the synaptic level. However, the set of commercially available caged compounds is restricted and incompatible with studies demanding high cell specificity. The gain in cell specificity is especially relevant and challenging when studying neuron-glia interactions in the central nervous system. Here we develop a system to mimic the metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent response of astrocytes, a glial cell type, following synaptic glutamate release. For this, we expressed an exogeneous orphan Gq-coupled protein of the Mas-related-gene (Mrg) family in glial cells and generated an MrgR's agonist peptide (FMRFa) that was chemically caged with a nitroveratryl photolabile protecting group (NV). NV has an appropriate quantum yield and a high absorption maximum that makes it very adapted to experiments with very short irradiation time. This novel caged compound allowed the activation of MrgR with both single- and two-photon light sources. Indeed, MrgR activation induced calcium transients and morphological changes in astrocytes as described previously. Thus, FMRFaNV is a very promising tool to study neuron-glia interactions. PMID:26511675

  7. Burst and Principal Components Analyses of MEA Data Separates Chemicals by Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) detect drug and chemical induced changes in action potential "spikes" in neuronal networks and can be used to screen chemicals for neurotoxicity. Analytical "fingerprinting," using Principal Components Analysis (PCA) on spike trains recorded from prim...

  8. Integrated Manufacturing for Advanced MEAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emory S. De Castro; Yu-Min Tsou; Mark G. Roelofs; Olga Polevaya

    2007-03-30

    This program addressed a two-pronged goal for developing fuel cell components: lowering of precious metal content in membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs), thereby reducing the fuel cell cost, and creating MEAs that can operate at 120oC and 25% RH whereby the system efficiency and effectiveness is greatly improved. In completing this program, we have demonstrated a significant reduction in precious metal while at the same time increasing the power output (achieved 2005 goal of 0.6g/Kw). We have also identified a technology that allows for one step fabrication of MEAs and appears to be a feasible path toward achieving DOE’s 2010 targets for precious metal and power (approaches 0.2g/Kw). Our team partner Du Pont invented a new class of polymer electrolyte membrane that has sufficient stability and conductivity to demonstrate feasibility for operation at 120 oC and low relative humidity. Through the course of this project, the public has benefited greatly from numerous presentations and publications on the technical understanding necessary to achieve these goals.

  9. 3D plasmonic nanoantennas integrated with MEA biosensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipalo, Michele; Messina, Gabriele C.; Amin, Hayder; La Rocca, Rosanna; Shalabaeva, Victoria; Simi, Alessandro; Maccione, Alessandro; Zilio, Pierfrancesco; Berdondini, Luca; de Angelis, Francesco

    2015-02-01

    Neuronal signaling in brain circuits occurs at multiple scales ranging from molecules and cells to large neuronal assemblies. However, current sensing neurotechnologies are not designed for parallel access of signals at multiple scales. With the aim of combining nanoscale molecular sensing with electrical neural activity recordings within large neuronal assemblies, in this work three-dimensional (3D) plasmonic nanoantennas are integrated with multielectrode arrays (MEA). Nanoantennas are fabricated by fast ion beam milling on optical resist; gold is deposited on the nanoantennas in order to connect them electrically to the MEA microelectrodes and to obtain plasmonic behavior. The optical properties of these 3D nanostructures are studied through finite elements method (FEM) simulations that show a high electromagnetic field enhancement. This plasmonic enhancement is confirmed by surface enhancement Raman spectroscopy of a dye performed in liquid, which presents an enhancement of almost 100 times the incident field amplitude at resonant excitation. Finally, the reported MEA devices are tested on cultured rat hippocampal neurons. Neurons develop by extending branches on the nanostructured electrodes and extracellular action potentials are recorded over multiple days in vitro. Raman spectra of living neurons cultured on the nanoantennas are also acquired. These results highlight that these nanostructures could be potential candidates for combining electrophysiological measures of large networks with simultaneous spectroscopic investigations at the molecular level.Neuronal signaling in brain circuits occurs at multiple scales ranging from molecules and cells to large neuronal assemblies. However, current sensing neurotechnologies are not designed for parallel access of signals at multiple scales. With the aim of combining nanoscale molecular sensing with electrical neural activity recordings within large neuronal assemblies, in this work three-dimensional (3D) plasmonic

  10. Optogenetic stimulation of multiwell MEA plates for neural and cardiac applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clements, Isaac P.; Millard, Daniel C.; Nicolini, Anthony M.; Preyer, Amanda J.; Grier, Robert; Heckerling, Andrew; Blum, Richard A.; Tyler, Phillip; McSweeney, K. M.; Lu, Yi-Fan; Hall, Diana; Ross, James D.

    2016-03-01

    Microelectrode array (MEA) technology enables advanced drug screening and "disease-in-a-dish" modeling by measuring the electrical activity of cultured networks of neural or cardiac cells. Recent developments in human stem cell technologies, advancements in genetic models, and regulatory initiatives for drug screening have increased the demand for MEA-based assays. In response, Axion Biosystems previously developed a multiwell MEA platform, providing up to 96 MEA culture wells arrayed into a standard microplate format. Multiwell MEA-based assays would be further enhanced by optogenetic stimulation, which enables selective excitation and inhibition of targeted cell types. This capability for selective control over cell culture states would allow finer pacing and probing of cell networks for more reliable and complete characterization of complex network dynamics. Here we describe a system for independent optogenetic stimulation of each well of a 48-well MEA plate. The system enables finely graded control of light delivery during simultaneous recording of network activity in each well. Using human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC) derived cardiomyocytes and rodent primary neuronal cultures, we demonstrate high channel-count light-based excitation and suppression in several proof-of-concept experimental models. Our findings demonstrate advantages of combining multiwell optical stimulation and MEA recording for applications including cardiac safety screening, neural toxicity assessment, and advanced characterization of complex neuronal diseases.

  11. CO2 Absorbing Capacity of MEA

    OpenAIRE

    José I Huertas; Gomez, Martin D.; Nicolas Giraldo; Jessica Garzón

    2015-01-01

    We describe the use of a gas bubbler apparatus in which the gas phase is bubbled into a fixed amount of absorbent under standard conditions as a uniform procedure for determining the absorption capacity of solvents. The method was systematically applied to determine the CO2 absorbing capacity of MEA (Ac) at several aqueous MEA (β) and gas-phase CO2 concentrations. Ac approached the nominal CO2 absorbing capacity of MEA (720 g CO2/kg MEA) at very low β levels, increasing from 447.9±18.1 to 581...

  12. High performance MEAs. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-07-15

    The aim of the present project is through modeling, material and process development to obtain significantly better MEA performance and to attain the technology necessary to fabricate stable catalyst materials thereby providing a viable alternative to current industry standard. This project primarily focused on the development and characterization of novel catalyst materials for the use in high temperature (HT) and low temperature (LT) proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). New catalysts are needed in order to improve fuel cell performance and reduce the cost of fuel cell systems. Additional tasks were the development of new, durable sealing materials to be used in PEMFC as well as the computational modeling of heat and mass transfer processes, predominantly in LT PEMFC, in order to improve fundamental understanding of the multi-phase flow issues and liquid water management in fuel cells. An improved fundamental understanding of these processes will lead to improved fuel cell performance and hence will also result in a reduced catalyst loading to achieve the same performance. The consortium have obtained significant research results and progress for new catalyst materials and substrates with promising enhanced performance and fabrication of the materials using novel methods. However, the new materials and synthesis methods explored are still in the early research and development phase. The project has contributed to improved MEA performance using less precious metal and has been demonstrated for both LT-PEM, DMFC and HT-PEM applications. New novel approach and progress of the modelling activities has been extremely satisfactory with numerous conference and journal publications along with two potential inventions concerning the catalyst layer. (LN)

  13. A device to facilitate preparation of high-density neural cell cultures in MEAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, S Y; Lim, Y M; Goh, S Y

    2009-05-15

    A device to facilitate high-density seeding of dissociated neural cells on planar multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) is presented in this paper. The device comprises a metal cover with two concentric cylinders-the outer cylinder fits tightly on to the external diameter of a MEA to hold it in place and an inner cylinder holds a central glass tube for introducing a cell suspension over the electrode area of the MEA. An O-ring is placed at the bottom of the inner cylinder and the glass tube to provide a fluid-tight seal between the glass tube and the MEA electrode surface. The volume of cell suspension in the glass tube is varied according to the desired plating density. After plating, the device can be lifted from the MEA without leaving any residue on the contact surface. The device has enabled us to increase and control the plating density of neural cell suspension with low viability, and to prepare successful primary cultures from cryopreserved neurons and glia. The cultures of cryopreserved dissociated cortical neurons that we have grown in this manner remained spontaneously active over months, exhibited stable development and similar network characteristics as reported by other researchers. PMID:19428539

  14. PEMFC MEA and System Design Considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knights, Shanna [Ballard Power Systems, Inc.; Bashyam, Rajesh [Ballard Power Systems, Inc.; He, Ping [Ballard Power Systems, Inc.; Lauritzen, Michael [Ballard Power Systems, Inc.; Startek, Cara [Ballard Power Systems, Inc.; Colbow, Vesna [Ballard Power Systems, Inc.; Cheng, Tommy [Ballard Power Systems, Inc.; Kolodziej, Joanna [Ballard Power Systems, Inc.; Wessel, Silvia [Ballard Power Systems, Inc.

    2011-07-01

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are being developed and sold commercially for multiple near term markets. Ballard Power Systems is focused on the near term markets of backup power, distributed generation, materials handling, and buses. Significant advances have been made in cost and durability of fuel cell products. Improved tolerance to a wide range of system operation and environmental noises will enable increased viability across a broad range of applications. In order to apply the most effective membrane electrode assembly (MEA) design for each market, the system requirements and associated MEA failures must be well understood. The failure modes associated with the electrodes and membrane degradation are discussed with respect to associated system operation and mitigating approaches. A few key system considerations that influence MEA design include expected fuel quality, balance-of-plant materials, time under idle or open circuit operation, and start-up and shut-down conditions.

  15. Maine Educational Assessment (MEA) Operational Procedures, March 2005 Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maine Department of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This document is intended for use in conjunction with "Policies and Procedures for Accommodations and Alternate Assessment to the MEA," and both the "MEA Principal/Test Coordinator's Manual" and the "MEA Test Administrator's Manual." The first section, Enrollment, covers the following subjects: (1) Participation of Enrolled Students; (2) Students…

  16. Neurotoxicity screening of (illicit) drugs using novel methods for analysis of microelectrode array (MEA) recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hondebrink, L; Verboven, A H A; Drega, W S; Schmeink, S; de Groot, M W G D M; van Kleef, R G D M; Wijnolts, F M J; de Groot, A; Meulenbelt, J; Westerink, R H S

    2016-07-01

    Annual prevalence of the use of common illicit drugs and new psychoactive substances (NPS) is high, despite the often limited knowledge on the health risks of these substances. Recently, cortical cultures grown on multi-well microelectrode arrays (mwMEAs) have been used for neurotoxicity screening of chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and toxins with a high sensitivity and specificity. However, the use of mwMEAs to investigate the effects of illicit drugs on neuronal activity is largely unexplored. We therefore first characterised the cortical cultures using immunocytochemistry and show the presence of astrocytes, glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. Neuronal activity is concentration-dependently affected following exposure to six neurotransmitters (glutamate, GABA, serotonin, dopamine, acetylcholine and nicotine). Most neurotransmitters inhibit neuronal activity, although glutamate and acetylcholine transiently increase activity at specific concentrations. These transient effects are not detected when activity is determined during the entire 30min exposure window, potentially resulting in false-negative results. As expected, exposure to the GABAA-receptor antagonist bicuculline increases neuronal activity. Exposure to a positive allosteric modulator of the GABAA-receptor (diazepam) or to glutamate receptor antagonists (CNQX and MK-801) reduces neuronal activity. Further, we demonstrate that exposure to common drugs (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and amphetamine) and NPS (1-(3-chlorophenyl)piperazine (mCPP), 4-fluoroamphetamine (4-FA) and methoxetamine (MXE)) decreases neuronal activity. MXE most potently inhibits neuronal activity with an IC50 of 0.5μM, whereas 4-FA is least potent with an IC50 of 113μM. Our data demonstrate the importance of analysing neuronal activity within different time windows during exposure to prevent false-negative results. We also show that cortical cultures grown on mwMEAs can successfully be applied to investigate the effects of

  17. Burst and Principal Components Analyses of MEA Data for 16 Chemicals Describe at Least Three Effects Classes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) detect drug and chemical induced changes in neuronal network function and have been used for neurotoxicity screening. As a proof-•of-concept, the current study assessed the utility of analytical "fingerprinting" using Principal Components Analysis (P...

  18. Application of multielectrode array (MEA) chips for the evaluation of mixtures neurotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cortical neurons grown on multielectrode array (MEA) chips have been shown to be a valuable alternative method to study electrophysiological properties of the central nervous system neurons and to perform functional toxicological screening. Here we studied the effects of binary mixtures on neuronal networks cultured on MEAs. We have considered compounds with similar and different mode-of-action (MoA) to characterize and assess their combined effects. Individual and binary mixture dose–response curves based on spontaneous neuronal activity have been generated and the IC50 has been considered as the end-point for neurotoxicity assessment. The two classical approaches of mixtures toxicity studies: concentration addition (CA) and independent action (IA) have been applied to compare calculated and experimental results. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been employed to confirm no chemical reaction or complexation between mixtures components. The results suggest that both CA and IA are able to predict the toxicity of the mixture and that the combination of in vitro test methods with theoretical dose–response models has a strong potential as an alternative tool for the prediction of mixtures neurotoxicity.

  19. One-photon and two-photon stimulation of neurons in a microfluidic culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jae Myung; Lee, Jeonghyeon; Kim, Hyeongeun; Jeon, Noo Li; Jung, Woonggyu

    2016-04-26

    In this study, we demonstrate a novel platform for optical stimulation of neural circuits combined with a microfluidic culture method and microelectrode array measurements. Neuron-on-a-chip was designed and fabricated to isolate axons without a soma or dendrite. Thus, it is readily able to manipulate the neuronal alignment and to investigate the neuronal activity at the locations we want to observe. We adapted the optical stimulation technique to the arranged neurons to generate the neuronal signals in a non-invasive fashion. A blue light-emitting diode and a femtosecond laser with 780 nm center wavelength were used for neuronal activation and the corresponding neuronal signals were measured by MEAs at the same time. We found that one-photon light via caged glutamate provoked periodic spiking. In contrast, the femtosecond pulse irradiation generated repetitive firing at constant rates. Response times of one-photon and two-photon stimulation were around 200 ms and 50 ms, respectively. We also quantified neural responses, by varying optical parameters such as exposure time and irradiation power. PMID:27053163

  20. Feasibility assessment of Micro electrode chip assay (MEA as a method of detecting neurotoxicity in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrico eDefranchi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Detection and characterization of chemically-induced toxic effects in the nervous system represent a challenge for the hazard assessment of chemicals. In vivo, neurotoxicological assessments exploit the fact that the activity of neurons in the central and peripheral nervous system has functional consequences. And so far, no in vitro method for evaluating the neurotoxic hazard has yet been validated and accepted for regulatory purpose.The microelectrode array (MEA assay consists of a culture chamber into which an integrated array of microelectrodes is capable of measuring extracellular electrophysiology (spikes and bursts from electro-active tissues. A wide variety of electrically excitable biological tissues may be placed onto the chips including primary cultures of nervous system tissue. Recordings from this type of in vitro cultured system are non invasive, give label free evaluations and provide a higher throughput than conventional electrophysiological techniques. In this paper, twenty substances were tested in a blinded study for their toxicity and dose-response curves were obtained from foetal rat cortical neuronal networks coupled to MEAs. The experimental procedure consisted of evaluating the firing activity (spiking rate and modification/reduction in response to chemical administration. Native/reference activity, 30 minutes of activity recording per dilution, plus the recovery points (after 24 hours were recorded. The preliminary data, using a set of chemicals with different mode-of-actions (13 known to be neurotoxic, 2 non-neuroactive and not toxic and 5 non-neuroactive but toxic show good predictivity (sensitivity: 0.77; specificity: 0.86; accuracy: 0.85. Thus, the MEA with a neuronal network has the potency to become an effective tool to evaluate the neurotoxicity of substances in vitro.

  1. New MEA Materials for Improved DMFC Performance, Durability and Cost

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fletcher, James H. [University of North Florida; Campbell, Joseph L. [University of North Florida; Cox, Philip [University of North Florida; Harrington, William J. [University of North Florida

    2013-09-16

    Abstract Project Title: New MEA Materials for Improved DMFC Performance, Durability and Cost The University of North Florida (UNF)--with project partners the University of Florida, Northeastern University, and Johnson Matthey--has recently completed the Department of Energy (DOE) project entitled “New MEA Materials for Improved DMFC Performance, Durability and Cost”. The primary objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell MEA technology towards the commercial targets as laid out in the DOE R&D roadmap by developing a passive water recovery MEA (membrane electrode assembly). Developers at the University of North Florida identified water management components as an insurmountable barrier to achieving the required system size and weight necessary to achieve the energy density requirements of small portable power applications. UNF developed an innovative “passive water recovery” MEA for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) which provides a path to system simplification and optimization. The passive water recovery MEA incorporates a hydrophobic, porous, barrier layer within the cathode electrode, so that capillary pressure forces the water produced at the cathode through holes in the membrane and back to the anode. By directly transferring the water from the cathode to the anode, the balance of plant is very much simplified and the need for heavy, bulky water recovery components is eliminated. At the heart of the passive water recovery MEA is the UNF DM-1 membrane that utilizes a hydrocarbon structure to optimize performance in a DMFC system. The membrane has inherent performance advantages, such as a low methanol crossover (high overall efficiency), while maintaining a high proton conductivity (good electrochemical efficiency) when compared to perfluorinated sulfonic acid membranes such as Nafion. Critically, the membrane provides an extremely low electro-osmotic drag coefficient of approximately one water molecule per proton (versus the 2-3 for

  2. Program of energy saving measures at NIKHEF-MEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report a package of energy-saving measures for NIKHEF-MEA are presented. The proposed measures have reference to the raising, in relatively short time, of the modulation frequency to the desired value when, in behalf of maintenance or tuning the repetition frequency is set low. A second group of measures consists in the limitation of the energy consumption of the cooling systems at MEA and AFBU. At MEA important economizations can be achieved by the limitation of the heat-leaching to outside when the accelerator is out of operation while at AFBU the tuning of the r.p.m. of the circulation pumps in the cooling systems seems to be attractive. As least measure of the package the power control of NIKHEF is incorporated. This should allow for exploiting the available power as economical as possible and for keeping the costs for electricity supply as low as possible. 4 tabs

  3. Final Report - MEA and Stack Durability for PEM Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yandrasits, Michael A.

    2008-02-15

    Proton exchange membrane fuel cells are expected to change the landscape of power generation over the next ten years. For this to be realized one of the most significant challenges to be met for stationary systems is lifetime, where 40,000 hours of operation with less than 10% decay is desired. This project conducted fundamental studies on the durability of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) and fuel cell stack systems with the expectation that knowledge gained from this project will be applied toward the design and manufacture of MEAs and stack systems to meet DOE’s 2010 stationary fuel cell stack systems targets. The focus of this project was PEM fuel cell durability – understanding the issues that limit MEA and fuel cell system lifetime, developing mitigation strategies to address the lifetime issues and demonstration of the effectiveness of the mitigation strategies by system testing. To that end, several discoveries were made that contributed to the fundamental understanding of MEA degradation mechanisms. (1) The classically held belief that membrane degradation is solely due to end-group “unzipping” is incorrect; there are other functional groups present in the ionomer that are susceptible to chemical attack. (2) The rate of membrane degradation can be greatly slowed or possibly eliminated through the use of additives that scavenge peroxide or peroxyl radicals. (3) Characterization of GDL using dry gases is incorrect due to the fact that fuel cells operate utilizing humidified gases. The proper characterization method involves using wet gas streams and measuring capillary pressure as demonstrated in this project. (4) Not all Platinum on carbon catalysts are created equally – the major factor impacting catalyst durability is the type of carbon used as the support. (5) System operating conditions have a significant impact of lifetime – the lifetime was increased by an order of magnitude by changing the load profile while all other variables remain

  4. Doped golden fullerene cages

    OpenAIRE

    Baletto, Francesca; Ferrando, Riccardo

    2015-01-01

    A first-principles investigation of the effect of the doping of golden cages of 32 atoms is proposed. It is shown that Ag and Cu doping affects the geometrical stability of the icosahedral fullerene Au-32 cage, where Ag-doping leads to a new, low symmetric, and prolate motif while Cu-doping leads to a lump, incomplete decahedral shape. Most significantly, the HOMO-LUMO gap depends strongly on the cluster geometry while its dependence on the cluster chemical composition seems to be weaker.

  5. Evidence of hollow golden cages

    OpenAIRE

    Bulusu, Satya; Li, Xi; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Zeng, Xiao Cheng

    2006-01-01

    The fullerenes are the first “free-standing” elemental hollow cages identified by spectroscopy experiments and synthesized in the bulk. Here, we report experimental and theoretical evidence of hollow cages consisting of pure metal atoms, Aun− (n = 16–18); to our knowledge, free-standing metal hollow cages have not been previously detected in the laboratory. These hollow golden cages (“bucky gold”) have an average diameter >5.5 Å, which can easily accommodate one guest atom inside.

  6. John Cage Discusses Fluxus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Ellsworth

    1992-01-01

    Presents an informal discussion with composer John Cage which includes his response to George Maciunas' work, his recollections of Marcel Duchamp, the complex relationship between inelegant material and revealing works of art, neo-Dada and neo-Fluxus, Wittgenstein and the artist's ultimate responsibility to initiate a change in the viewer or…

  7. Caged vanilloid ligands for activation of TRPV1 receptors by 1- and 2-photon excitation†

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Jun; Gover, Tony D; Muralidharan, Sukumaran; Auston, Darryl A.; Weinreich, Daniel; Kao, Joseph P.Y.

    2006-01-01

    Nociceptive neurons in the peripheral nervous system detect noxious stimuli and report the information to the central nervous system. Most nociceptive neurons express the vanilloid receptor, TRPV1, a non-selective cation channel gated by vanilloid ligands such as capsaicin, the pungent essence of chili peppers. Here, we report the synthesis and biological application of two caged vanilloids—biologically inert precursors that, when photolyzed, release bioactive vanilloid ligands. The two caged...

  8. Tracking burst patterns in hippocampal cultures with high-density CMOS-MEAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfo, M.; Maccione, A.; Tedesco, M.; Martinoia, S.; Berdondini, L.

    2010-10-01

    In this work, we investigate the spontaneous bursting behaviour expressed by in vitro hippocampal networks by using a high-resolution CMOS-based microelectrode array (MEA), featuring 4096 electrodes, inter-electrode spacing of 21 µm and temporal resolution of 130 µs. In particular, we report an original development of an adapted analysis method enabling us to investigate spatial and temporal patterns of activity and the interplay between successive network bursts (NBs). We first defined and detected NBs, and then, we analysed the spatial and temporal behaviour of these events with an algorithm based on the centre of activity trajectory. We further refined the analysis by using a technique derived from statistical mechanics, capable of distinguishing the two main phases of NBs, i.e. (i) a propagating and (ii) a reverberating phase, and by classifying the trajectory patterns. Finally, this methodology was applied to signal representations based on spike detection, i.e. the instantaneous firing rate, and directly based on voltage-coded raw data, i.e. activity movies. Results highlight the potentialities of this approach to investigate fundamental issues on spontaneous neuronal dynamics and suggest the hypothesis that neurons operate in a sort of 'team' to the perpetuation of the transmission of the same information.

  9. Anaerobic degradation of carbon capture reclaimer MEA waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S; Hovland, J; Bakke, R

    2013-01-01

    The anaerobic biodegradation of reclaimer MEA (monoethanolamine) waste (MEAw) with easily degradable co-substrates was investigated in a laboratory-scale bioreactor at room temperature during a 160 d experimental run. The reactor that was constructed with three phases to facilitate attached biofilm and suspended biomass retention for degradation of the complex and challenging MEAw performed well. A feed strategy of step-wise increasing organic loading rate (OLR) by either increasing feed MEAw concentration or the hydraulic loading rate was applied. The system performance was evaluated by chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency, methane yield, MEA removal, and the accumulation of ammonia and volatile fatty acid (VFA). The total COD removal efficiency initially was 93% when the feed was mainly easily degradable co-substrate. The total removal dropped to 75% at the end when MEAw constituted 60% of the feed COD. Ion chromatography results show that the MEA and some unidentified feed chemicals were almost completely consumed. The main products of MEAw degradation were ammonia, VFAs and biogas. The ammonia nitrogen concentration reached about 2.0 g/L, which may explain the observed inhibition of acetoclastic methanogenesis leading to acetate accumulation. Methane accounted for up to 80% of the biogas generated. The highest methane yield was 0.34 L/g-COD while the yield was 0.16 L/g-COD at the highest load. This study shows that more than 80% reclaimer MEAw COD degradation with a co-substrate can be maintained in a hybrid anaerobic bioreactor operated in a wide loading range. PMID:23752388

  10. Metabolic Pathway Involved in 2-Methyl-6-Ethylaniline Degradation by Sphingobium sp. Strain MEA3-1 and Cloning of the Novel Flavin-Dependent Monooxygenase System meaBA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Weiliang; Chen, Qiongzhen; Hou, Ying; Li, Shuhuan; Zhuang, Kai; Huang, Fei; Zhou, Jie; Li, Zhoukun; Wang, Jue; Fu, Lei; Zhang, Zhengguang; Huang, Yan; Wang, Fei

    2015-01-01

    2-Methyl-6-ethylaniline (MEA) is the main microbial degradation intermediate of the chloroacetanilide herbicides acetochlor and metolachlor. Sphingobium sp. strain MEA3-1 can utilize MEA and various alkyl-substituted aniline and phenol compounds as sole carbon and energy sources for growth. We isolated the mutant strain MEA3-1Mut, which converts MEA only to 2-methyl-6-ethyl-hydroquinone (MEHQ) and 2-methyl-6-ethyl-benzoquinone (MEBQ). MEA may be oxidized by the P450 monooxygenase system to 4-hydroxy-2-methyl-6-ethylaniline (4-OH-MEA), which can be hydrolytically spontaneously deaminated to MEBQ or MEHQ. The MEA microbial metabolic pathway was reconstituted based on the substrate spectra and identification of the intermediate metabolites in both the wild-type and mutant strains. Plasmidome sequencing indicated that both strains harbored 7 plasmids with sizes ranging from 6,108 bp to 287,745 bp. Among the 7 plasmids, 6 were identical, and pMEA02′ in strain MEA3-1Mut lost a 37,000-bp fragment compared to pMEA02 in strain MEA3-1. Two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and protein mass fingerprinting (PMF) showed that MEA3-1Mut lost the two-component flavin-dependent monooxygenase (TC-FDM) MeaBA, which was encoded by a gene in the lost fragment of pMEA02. MeaA shared 22% to 25% amino acid sequence identity with oxygenase components of some TC-FDMs, whereas MeaB showed no sequence identity with the reductase components of those TC-FDMs. Complementation with meaBA in MEA3-1Mut and heterologous expression in Pseudomonas putida strain KT2440 resulted in the production of an active MEHQ monooxygenase. PMID:26386060

  11. Effect of mea on DNA degradation in permeable irradiated Bac. stearothermophilus cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was shown that DNA-degrading activity of permeable, intact and γ-irradiated cells of Bac. stearothermophilus decreased under the effect of β-mercaptoethylamine (MEA). MEA decreased also a DNAase activity, in a crude acellular extract of Bac. stearothermophilus, and activities of S1-nuclease and DNAase. I. The data obtained prompt an assumption that MEA has an inhibitory action on the activity of endonucleases irrespective of their substrate specificity

  12. High Performance Fuel Cell and Electrolyzer Membrane Electrode Assemblies (MEAs) for Space Energy Storage Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Thomas I.; Billings, Keith J.; Kisor, Adam; Bennett, William R.; Jakupca, Ian J.; Burke, Kenneth; Hoberecht, Mark A.

    2012-01-01

    Regenerative fuel cells provide a pathway to energy storage system development that are game changers for NASA missions. The fuel cell/ electrolysis MEA performance requirements 0.92 V/ 1.44 V at 200 mA/cm2 can be met. Fuel Cell MEAs have been incorporated into advanced NFT stacks. Electrolyzer stack development in progress. Fuel Cell MEA performance is a strong function of membrane selection, membrane selection will be driven by durability requirements. Electrolyzer MEA performance is catalysts driven, catalyst selection will be driven by durability requirements. Round Trip Efficiency, based on a cell performance, is approximately 65%.

  13. Building a better Faraday cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    MartinAlfven; Wright, David; skocpol; Rounce, Graham; Richfield, Jon; W, Nick; wheelsonfire

    2015-11-01

    In reply to the physicsworld.com news article “Are Faraday cages less effective than previously thought?” (15 September, http://ow.ly/SfklO), about a study that indicated, based on mathematical modelling, that conducting wire-mesh cages may not be as good at excluding electromagnetic radiation as is commonly assumed.

  14. Cage-based performance capture

    CERN Document Server

    Savoye, Yann

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, highly-detailed animations of live-actor performances are increasingly easier to acquire and 3D Video has reached considerable attentions in visual media production. In this book, we address the problem of extracting or acquiring and then reusing non-rigid parametrization for video-based animations. At first sight, a crucial challenge is to reproduce plausible boneless deformations while preserving global and local captured properties of dynamic surfaces with a limited number of controllable, flexible and reusable parameters. To solve this challenge, we directly rely on a skin-detached dimension reduction thanks to the well-known cage-based paradigm. First, we achieve Scalable Inverse Cage-based Modeling by transposing the inverse kinematics paradigm on surfaces. Thus, we introduce a cage inversion process with user-specified screen-space constraints. Secondly, we convert non-rigid animated surfaces into a sequence of optimal cage parameters via Cage-based Animation Conversion. Building upon this re...

  15. Automatic Monitoring Electronic Tongue with MEAs for Environmental Analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shaofang Zou; Hong Men; Yi Li; Yinping Wang; Ping Wang

    2006-01-01

    An automatic monitoring electronic tongue based on differential pulse stripping voltammetry (DPSV) was developed for heavy metals analysis. Simultaneous detections of trace Zn(Ⅱ), Cd(Ⅱ), Pb(Ⅱ), Cu(Ⅱ), Fe(Ⅲ) and Cr(Ⅲ) in water samples were performed with three electrochemical sensors. The sensor chip combined a silicon-based Hg-coated Au microelectrode array (MEA) as the working electrode on one side with an Ag/AgCl reference electrode and a Pt counter electrode on the other side. With a computer controlled multipotentiostat, pumps and valves, the electronic tongue realized in-situ real-time detection of the six metals mentioned above at parts-per-billion level without manual operation.

  16. Blueprints for dodecahedral DNA cages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cage structures engineered from nucleic acids are of interest in nanotechnology, for example as a means of drug delivery (Destito et al 2007). Until now, most experimentally realized DNA cages have crystallographic symmetry, such as the shape of a cube (Chen and Seeman 1991 Nature 350 631-3), a tetrahedron (Goodman et al 2005 Science 310 1661-5), an octahedron (Shih et al 2004 Nature 427 618-21) or a truncated octahedron (Zhang and Seeman 1994 J. Am. Chem. Soc. 116 1661-9). Two examples of cages with non-crystallographic symmetry, a dodecahedron and a buckyball, have been realized recently (He et al 2008 Nature 452 198-201). A characteristic feature of these realizations is the fact that the cages are built from a number of identical building blocks called tiles: 20 for the case of the dodecahedron, and 60 for the case of the buckyball. We derive here a blueprint for the organization of nucleic acid in a dodecahedral cage such that the final product has a minimal number of strands. In particular, we show that a dodecahedral cage can be realized in terms of only two circular DNA molecules. We focus on the dodecahedral cage, because the volume to surface ratio of such a cage is larger than that of its crystallographic counterparts given the same fixed radial distance of the polyhedral vertices from the centre of the structure, whilst still requiring a smaller complexity than the truncated icosahedron (buckyball). We therefore expect that the dodecahedral DNA cages discussed here may be of interest in further applications in nanotechnology

  17. Photorelease of GABA with Visible Light Using an Inorganic Caging Group

    OpenAIRE

    Rial Verde, Emiliano M.; Zayat, Leonardo; Etchenique, Roberto; Yuste, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    We describe the selective photorelease of γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) with a novel caged-GABA compound that uses a ruthenium complex as photosensor. This compound (“RuBi-GABA”) can be excited with visible wavelengths, providing greater tissue penetration, less photo-toxicity, and faster photorelease kinetics than currently used UV light-sensitive caged compounds. Using pyramidal neurons from neocortical brain slices, we show that RuBi-GABA uncaging induces GABA-A receptor-mediated responses, ...

  18. A Framework for the Comparative Assessment of Neuronal Spike Sorting Algorithms towards More Accurate Off-Line and On-Line Microelectrode Arrays Data Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Giulia Regalia; Stefania Coelli; Emilia Biffi; Giancarlo Ferrigno; Alessandra Pedrocchi

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal spike sorting algorithms are designed to retrieve neuronal network activity on a single-cell level from extracellular multiunit recordings with Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs). In typical analysis of MEA data, one spike sorting algorithm is applied indiscriminately to all electrode signals. However, this approach neglects the dependency of algorithms’ performances on the neuronal signals properties at each channel, which require data-centric methods. Moreover, sorting is commonly perfor...

  19. Investigation of membrane electrode assembly (MEA) hot-pressing parameters for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hot-pressing conditions for fabricating the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was investigated by using a 2n full factorial design. Time, temperature and pressure were key parameters that were varied from 500 to 1500 psi, 1 to 5 min and 100 to 160 deg. C, respectively. The results from the full factorial analysis indicated that the order of significance of the main MEA fabricating effects was temperature, pressure, time-temperature interaction and pressure-time-temperature interaction. By examining the cell performance curves, the lower fabrication conditions of temperature and pressure were suitable for MEA preparation. The conductive layer between the membrane and the catalyst layer became thin at high pressure and high temperature, as seen from scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images. In the ranges of condition studied, the most suitable hot-pressing condition for MEA fabrication was at 100 deg. C, 1000 psi and 2 min. This condition provided the highest maximum power density from the MEA and the best contact at the interfaces between the gas diffusion layer, the active layer and the electrolyte membrane. The experimental results were verified by testing with a commercial MEA in the same operating condition and with the same equipment. The performance of the fabricated MEA was better than that of the commercial one

  20. Fulfilling environment related international commitments through implementation of multilateral environmental agreements (meas) in pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multilateral Environmental Agreements (MEAS) help addresses the environmental problem being faced by the international community as a whole. The ultimate goal of reaching MEAs is to realize sustainable development across the globe. According to World Bank (2006), Pakistan's economy loses Rs.365 billion annually to environmental hazards. A key mechanism available under international law for countries to work together on global environmental issues is through MEAs. Pakistan is signatory to several MEAs and has acceded to other non-legally binding instruments, such as Agenda-21, Rio Principles and Johannesburg Plan of Implementation aiming at sustainable development of natural resources. As a party to various Conventions and Protocols, Pakistan has participating in different Conferences of Parties (COPs), Meetings of Parties (MOPs), and international consultative and technical meetings regarding MEAs organized by the United Nations and other international forum. Pakistan has been actively participating in and keeping liaison with institutional elements of each of these MEAs, i.e. COPs, the secretariat, advisory bodies, subsidiary bodies, clearing-house mechanisms, for effective decision making regarding the overall implementation and development of programme of work and strategic plans, budget and the revision of annexes to the treaties. Priorities and objectives of MEAs vary significantly from one international instrument to another while the common aspects include the sustainable development and use of natural resources and the protection of the environment in such a way as to ensure its judicious use. Based on different stages of implementation of these MEAs, the spectrum in priorities of Pakistan has quite broad. Pakistan attaches greater emphasis to crosscutting themes for MEAs that are primarily of a functional nature, such as strengthening of the capacities to meet the country's obligations or responsibilities under these agreements; enhancing coordination

  1. Transformation of the Methylotrophic Actinomycete Amycolatopis methanolica with Plasmid DNA : Stimulatory Effect of a pMEA300-Encoded Gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vrijbloed, J.W.; Madoń, J.; Dijkhuizen, L.

    1995-01-01

    Amycolatopsis methanolica contains a 13.29-kb plasmid (pMEA300) present both in the free state and integrated at a unique genomic location. A pMEA300-free derivative (strain WV1) was selected, allowing further analysis of pMEA300-encoded functions. Whole cells of strain WV1 could be transformed at h

  2. Adaptive Process Controls and Ultrasonics for High Temperature PEM MEA Manufacture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walczyk, Daniel F. [Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst., Troy, NY (United States)

    2015-08-26

    The purpose of this 5-year DOE-sponsored project was to address major process bottlenecks associated with fuel cell manufacturing. New technologies were developed to significantly reduce pressing cycle time for high temperature PEM membrane electrode assembly (MEA) through the use of novel, robust ultrasonic (U/S) bonding processes along with low temperature (<100°C) PEM MEAs. In addition, greater manufacturing uniformity and performance was achieved through (a) an investigation into the causes of excessive variation in ultrasonically and thermally bonded MEAs using more diagnostics applied during the entire fabrication and cell build process, and (b) development of rapid, yet simple quality control measurement techniques for use by industry.

  3. An evaluation of intra-cage ventilation in three animal caging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, L S; White, W J; Snider, M T; Lang, C M

    1989-05-01

    Although temperature and relative humidity have been quantitated and their effects on research data studied, few studies have measured the air turnover rates at cage level. We evaluated the air distribution and air turnover rates in unoccupied shoe-box mouse cages, filter-top covered cages and shoe-box mouse cages housed in a flexible film isolator by using discontinuous gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and smoke. Results showed that air turnover was most rapid in the unoccupied shoe-box mouse cage and slowest in the filter-top covered cage. Placing mice in the filter-top covered cage did not significantly improve the air turnover rate. Although filter-top covered cages reduce cage-to-cage transmission of disease, the poor airflow observed within these cages could lead to a buildup of gaseous pollutants that may adversely affect the animal's health. PMID:2724925

  4. MEaSUREs Land Surface Temperature from GOES satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinker, Rachel T.; Ma, Yingtao; Chen, Wen; Hulley, Glynn; Borbas, Eva; Hain, Chris; Hook, Simon

    2016-04-01

    to generate the MOD21 product. The MEaSUREs (MODIS- ASTER Global Infrared Combined Emissivity) product produced from the University of Wisconsin Global Infrared Land Surface Emissivity (UWIREMIS) and the ASTER Global Emissivity (GED) Database have been used in both methods. We will describe the two methodologies and present results of evaluation for the year 2004 against various available products, such as MOD11, and ground observations.

  5. Cage culture of sea bass in Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    The article discusses the cage culture practice of sea bass (Lates calcarifer) in Malaysia. Problems on feed and seed supply and overcrowding are also discussed. Despite these problems, seabass cage culture still continuously booms.

  6. DNA Cages with Icosahedral Symmetry in Bionanotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonoska, Nataša; Taormina, Anne; Twarock, Reidun

    Blueprints for polyhedral cages with icosahedral symmetry made of circular DNA molecules are provided. The basic rule is that every edge of the cage is met twice in opposite directions by the DNA strand(s), and vertex junctions are realized by a set of admissible junction types. As nanocontainers for cargo storage and delivery, the icosidodecahedral cages are of special interest because they have the largest volume per surface ratio of all cages discussed here.

  7. A Mobile Phone Faraday Cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, M. M. J.

    2011-01-01

    A Faraday cage is an interesting physical phenomenon where an electromagnetic wave can be excluded from a volume of space by enclosure with an electrically conducting material. The practical application of this in the classroom is to block the signal to a mobile phone by enclosing it in a metal can. The background of the physics behind this is…

  8. [A case of a nonseminomatous germ cell tumor responding to MEA therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Yasuharu; Minami, Takafumi; Itami, Yoshitaka; Kobayashi, Yasuyuki; Shimizu, Nobutaka; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Hayashi, Taiji; Nozawa, Masahiro; Yoshimura, Kazuhiro; Ishii, Tokumi; Uemura, Hirotugu

    2013-10-01

    We experienced a case of testicular cancer that was successfully treated by salvage chemotherapy comprised of methotrexate, actinomycin D and etoposide (MEA). A 25-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with a diagnosis of stage III B2 (JUA classification) testicular cancer. The patient had multiple lung metastases, and underwent a left orchiectomy. A histopathological examination revealed a choriocarcinoma, embryonal carcinoma, mature teratoma, and a yolk sac tumor. Tumor marker levels were elevated ; human chorionic gonadotropin β was 46 mIU/ml and alpha fetoprotein was 437 ng/ml. Although he was treated post-operatively with two courses of bleomycin, etoposide and cisplatin therapy, four courses of high-dose carboplatin, etoposide and iphosphamide (VIP) therapy, and two courses of CPT-11+ cisplatin therapy, tumor maker levels remained elevated and lung metastases were stable. Accordingly, he received three courses of MEA therapy. MEA therapy is regimen used to treat gestational trophoblastic neoplasia. After MEA therapy, levels of the tumor markers normalized. He then underwent a partial resection of lung and enucleation of lung metastasis by the video assisted thoracoscopic surgery method. Histopathological examination of the lung metastasis revealed only necrotic tissue. Tumor recurrence has not been observed in the 14 months since the MEA therapy. PMID:24262714

  9. Electronic cages for living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Saeed, Sarah; Bakewell, David J

    2015-08-01

    Design and construction of an electronic cage is described which enables real-time manipulation of live and dead eukaryotic cells. Non-uniform, radio frequency (RF) AC electric fields are used to enable translational and rotational movement of cells, known as dielectrophoresis (DEP) and electro-rotation (EROT), and distinguish their state as viable and non-viable. A concentric multilayered mathematical model, applicable for eukaryotic cells, is also developed, coded and implemented. The simulations predict three dielectric dispersions in the DEP and EROT spectra, though in practice the third is very small so that two are observed. The cage is part of a multi-staged project incorporating controller and DEP/EROT digital signal generator and image processing. PMID:26736401

  10. Polymers containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

    2013-04-23

    Polymers comprising residues of cage compound monomers having at least one polyalkoxy silyl substituent are provided. The cage compound monomers are selected from borane cage compound monomers comprising at least 7 cage atoms and/or carborane cage compound monomers comprising 7 to 11 cage compound monomers. Such polymers can further comprise one or more reactive matrices and/or co-monomers covalently bound with the cage compound monomer residues. Articles of manufacture comprising such polymers are also disclosed.

  11. Four-dimensional multi-site photolysis of caged neurotransmitters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Ann eGo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurons receive thousands of synaptic inputs that are distributed in space and time. The systematic study of how neurons process these inputs requires a technique to stimulate multiple yet highly targeted points of interest along the neuron's dendritic tree. Three-dimensional multi-focal patterns produced via holographic projection combined with two-photon photolysis of caged compounds can provide for highly localized release of neurotransmitters within each diffraction-limited focus, and in this way emulate simultaneous synaptic inputs to the neuron. However, this technique so far cannot achieve time-dependent stimulation patterns due to fundamental limitations of the hologram-encoding device and other factors that affect the consistency of controlled synaptic stimulation. Here, we report an advanced technique that enables the design and application of arbitrary spatio-temporal photostimulation patterns that resemble physiological synaptic inputs. By combining holographic projection with a programmable high-speed light-switching array, we have overcome temporal limitations with holographic projection, allowing us to mimic distributed activation of synaptic inputs leading to action potential generation. Our experiments uniquely demonstrate multi-site two-photon glutamate uncaging in three dimensions with submillisecond temporal resolution. Implementing this approach opens up new prospects for studying neuronal synaptic integration in four dimensions.

  12. Four-dimensional multi-site photolysis of caged neurotransmitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Mary Ann; To, Minh-Son; Stricker, Christian; Redman, Stephen; Bachor, Hans-A.; Stuart, Greg J.; Daria, Vincent R.

    2013-01-01

    Neurons receive thousands of synaptic inputs that are distributed in space and time. The systematic study of how neurons process these inputs requires a technique to stimulate multiple yet highly targeted points of interest along the neuron's dendritic tree. Three-dimensional multi-focal patterns produced via holographic projection combined with two-photon photolysis of caged compounds can provide for highly localized release of neurotransmitters within each diffraction-limited focus, and in this way emulate simultaneous synaptic inputs to the neuron. However, this technique so far cannot achieve time-dependent stimulation patterns due to fundamental limitations of the hologram-encoding device and other factors that affect the consistency of controlled synaptic stimulation. Here, we report an advanced technique that enables the design and application of arbitrary spatio-temporal photostimulation patterns that resemble physiological synaptic inputs. By combining holographic projection with a programmable high-speed light-switching array, we have overcome temporal limitations with holographic projection, allowing us to mimic distributed activation of synaptic inputs leading to action potential generation. Our experiments uniquely demonstrate multi-site two-photon glutamate uncaging in three dimensions with submillisecond temporal resolution. Implementing this approach opens up new prospects for studying neuronal synaptic integration in four dimensions. PMID:24348330

  13. Cleaning Animals' Cages With Little Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harman, Benjamin J.

    1989-01-01

    Proposed freeze/thaw method for cleaning animals' cages requires little extra weight and consumes little power and water. Cleaning concept developed for maintaining experimental rat cages on extended space missions. Adaptable as well to similar use on Earth. Reduces cleaning time. Makes use of already available facilities such as refrigerator, glove box, and autoclave. Rat waste adheres to steel-wire-mesh floor of cage. Feces removed by loosening action of freezing-and-thawing process, followed by blast of air.

  14. Caged vanilloid ligands for activation of TRPV1 receptors by 1- and 2-photon excitation†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jun; Gover, Tony D.; Muralidharan, Sukumaran; Auston, Darryl A.; Weinreich, Daniel; Kao, Joseph P. Y.

    2008-01-01

    Nociceptive neurons in the peripheral nervous system detect noxious stimuli and report the information to the central nervous system. Most nociceptive neurons express the vanilloid receptor, TRPV1, a non-selective cation channel gated by vanilloid ligands such as capsaicin, the pungent essence of chili peppers. Here, we report the synthesis and biological application of two caged vanilloids—biologically inert precursors that, when photolyzed, release bioactive vanilloid ligands. The two caged vanilloids, Nb-VNA and Nv-VNA, are photoreleased with quantum efficiency of 0.13 and 0.041, respectively. Under flash photolysis conditions, photorelease of Nb-VNA and Nv-VNA is 95% complete in ∼40 μs and ∼125 μs, respectively. Through 1-photon excitation with ultraviolet light (360 nm), or 2-photon excitation with red light (720 nm), the caged vanilloids can be photoreleased in situ to activate TRPV1 receptors on nociceptive neurons. The consequent increase in intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) can be visualized by laser-scanning confocal imaging of neurons loaded with the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator, fluo-3. Stimulation results from TRPV1 receptor activation, because the response is blocked by capsazepine, a selective TRPV1 antagonist. In Ca2+-free extracellular medium, photoreleased vanilloid can still elevate [Ca2+]i, which suggests that TRPV1 receptors also reside on endomembranes in neurons and can mediate Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. Notably, whole-cell voltage clamp measurements showed that flash photorelease of vanilloid can activate TRPV1 channels in < 4 msec at 22°C. In combination with 1- or 2-photon excitation, caged vanilloids are a powerful tool for probing morphologically distinct structures of nociceptive sensory neurons with high spatial and temporal precision. PMID:16605259

  15. Listening to Cage: Nonintentional philosophy and music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Fleming

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Listening to Cage: Nonintentional Philosophy and Music threads together the writings of ordinary language philosophy and the music of John Cage, responding specifically to requests made by Cage and Stanley Cavell. While many texts downplay or ignore the philosophical demands in Cage’s music and other texts find grandiose spiritual and philosophical material tied to his work, this text rejects both efforts. It challenges the basic directions of the growing secondary source material on Cage, finding it largely contrary to what Cage himself and his music teaches. That secondary material constantly offers an intentional approach to the music which is to make Cage understandable or easier to understand. The present text makes him appropriately difficult and basically unapproachable, asking the reader for serious acknowledgment of what Cage says he does, namely, “I have nothing to say and I am saying it.” While there is little hope of stopping the Cage industry that academia and publishers have grown, this text wishes at least to try to slow it down. The footnotes of this text include direct conversation material with Cage from the 1980s and 1990s regarding many subjects—his own compositions, our life struggles, remarks on Wittgenstein, Thoreau, philosophy, and music—all with a new context for their hearing.

  16. Humidity and Cage and Bedding Temperatures in Unoccupied Static Mouse Caging after Steam Sterilization

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Gina M; Cole, Kelly; Faerber, Jennifer; Hankenson, F Claire

    2009-01-01

    Contemporary rodent caging and equipment often are sterilized by steam autoclaves prior to use in facilities. This work assessed the microenvironment of unoccupied static mouse cages after steam sterilization to determine when internal temperatures had cooled to levels appropriate for rodent housing. Polycarbonate static cages containing food and corncob bedding were stacked (10 rows × 7 columns) in duplicate (front and back; n = 140 cages) on a storage truck and autoclaved to 249 °F (121 °C)...

  17. 76 FR 35110 - Federal Travel Regulation (FTR); Miscellaneous Expense Allowance (MEA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-16

    ... continues to read as follows: Authority: 5 U.S.C. 5738; 20 U.S.C. 905(a); E.O. 11609, 36 FR 13747; 3 CFR...] RIN 3090-AJ17 Federal Travel Regulation (FTR); Miscellaneous Expense Allowance (MEA) AGENCY: Office of... Federal Travel Regulation (FTR) by increasing the set lump-sum rate amount to be paid for...

  18. MEA [Municipal Electric Association] declares opposition to 1991 Ontario Hydro rate increase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In hearings before the Ontario Energy Board, the Municipal Electric Association (MEA) called for an average 1992 rate increase of 10.3%, lower than Ontario Hydro's revised figure of 10.4%, and a $129 million reduction in its operations, maintenance and administration budget. As it has been noted that Hydro pays considerably higher wages than the surrounding reference community, MEA recommended that the utility reduce and eventually eliminate the premium paid to employees, and also called for staff reductions and layoffs for 1991 and 1992. In the area of transmission reliability, MEA stated that Ontario Hydro's transmission maintenance is suffering at the expense of other priorities, and called for reorganizing its transmission plan to achieve target performance by 1996 rather than 1999. In 1991, only 65-70% of maintenance targets were being achieved. MEA also accused Hydro of deferring operational expenditures into deferment and capitalization, creating a false picture of the utility's financial condition. Also discussed at the hearing were the possible overestimating of the effects of Ontario Hydro's demand management programs, the possibility that a shift to time-of-use rates for industrial customers may increase demand, a downgrading of the province's and the utility's credit rating, and the unpleasant side effects of the non-utility generation program

  19. Final Report - Membranes and MEA's for Dry, Hot Operating Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamrock, Steven J

    2011-06-30

    The focus of this program was to develop a new Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) which can operate under hotter, dryer conditions than the state of the art membranes today and integrate it into a Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA). These MEA's should meet the performance and durability requirements outlined in the solicitation, operating under low humidification conditions and at temperatures ranging from -20ºC to 120ºC, to meet 2010 DOE technical targets for membranes. This membrane should operate under low humidification conditions and at temperatures ranging from -20ºC to 120ºC in order to meet DOE HFCIT 2010 commercialization targets for automotive fuel cells. Membranes developed in this program may also have improved durability and performance characteristics making them useful in stationary fuel cell applications. The new membranes, and the MEA's comprising them, should be manufacturable at high volumes and at costs which can meet industry and DOE targets. This work included: A) Studies to better understand factors controlling proton transport within the electrolyte membrane, mechanisms of polymer degradation (in situ and ex situ) and membrane durability in an MEA; B) Development of new polymers with increased proton conductivity over the range of temperatures from -20ºC to 120ºC and at lower levels of humidification and with improved chemical and mechanical stability; C) Development of new membrane additives for increased durability and conductivity under these dry conditions; D) Integration of these new materials into membranes and membranes into MEA's, including catalyst and gas diffusion layer selection and integration; E) Verification that these materials can be made using processes which are scalable to commercial volumes using cost effective methods; F) MEA testing in single cells using realistic automotive testing protocols. This project addresses technical barriers A (Durability) and C (Performance) from the Fuel Cells section of the

  20. A Low-Noise, Modular, and Versatile Analog Front-End Intended for Processing In Vitro Neuronal Signals Detected by Microelectrode Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Regalia

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The collection of good quality extracellular neuronal spikes from neuronal cultures coupled to Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs is a binding requirement to gather reliable data. Due to physical constraints, low power requirement, or the need of customizability, commercial recording platforms are not fully adequate for the development of experimental setups integrating MEA technology with other equipment needed to perform experiments under climate controlled conditions, like environmental chambers or cell culture incubators. To address this issue, we developed a custom MEA interfacing system featuring low noise, low power, and the capability to be readily integrated inside an incubator-like environment. Two stages, a preamplifier and a filter amplifier, were designed, implemented on printed circuit boards, and tested. The system is characterized by a low input-referred noise (70 dB, and signal-to-noise ratio values of neuronal recordings comparable to those obtained with the benchmark commercial MEA system. In addition, the system was successfully integrated with an environmental MEA chamber, without harming cell cultures during experiments and without being damaged by the high humidity level. The devised system is of practical value in the development of in vitro platforms to study temporally extended neuronal network dynamics by means of MEAs.

  1. Pilot Plant Studies for CO2 Capture from Waste Incinerator Flue Gas Using MEA Based Solvent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental study of carbon dioxide (CO2) capture from waste incinerator flue gas is presented. A specific pilot plant has been achieved based on absorption/desorption process using Monoethanolamine (MEA) solvent. Several experiments have been carried out at laboratory and industrial site. The pilot is fully instrumented to establish precise balances. Laboratory experiments allow to measure overall mass transfer coefficient KGaw for several pilot operating conditions. Long laboratory and industrial runs provide an estimation of MEA chemical resistance against waste incinerator flue gas. The experiments also allowed the analysis of NO2 and SO2 absorption through the solvent as well as the accumulation of Heat Stable Salts (HSS) for a full scale CO2 capture unit fed by a waste incinerator flue gas. (authors)

  2. Stress and plastic deformation of MEA in fuel cells. Stresses generated during cell assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bograchev, Daniil [Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Elecrtrochemistry RAN, Leninski prospekt 31, Moscow 117071 (Russian Federation); Gueguen, Mikael; Grandidier, Jean-Claude [Laboratoire de Physique et Mecanique des Materiaux, LMPM UMR CNRS 6617, ENSMA, Teleport 2, 1 av. Clement Ader, BP 40109 86962 Futuroscope Cedex (France); Martemianov, Serguei [Laboratoire d' Etudes Thermiques, LET UMR CNRS 6608, ESIP-University of Poitiers, 40 av. du Recteur Pineau, 86022 Poitiers (France)

    2008-05-15

    A linear elastic-plastic 2D model of fuel cell with hardening is developed for analysis of mechanical stresses in MEA arising in cell assembly procedure. The model includes the main components of real fuel cell (membrane, gas diffusion layers, graphite plates, and seal joints) and clamping elements (steel plates, bolts, nuts). The stress and plastic deformation in MEA are simulated with ABAQUS code taking into account the realistic clamping conditions. The stress distributions are obtained on the local and the global scales. The first one corresponds to the single tooth/channel structure. The global scale deals with features of the entire cell (the seal joint and the bolts). Experimental measurements of the residual membrane deformations have been provided at different bolts torques. The experimental data are in a good agreement with numerical predictions concerning the beginning of the plastic deformation. (author)

  3. Mixed hydrocarbon/fluoropolymer membrane/ionomer MEAs for durability studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bo [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kim, Yu Seung [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, Mahlon S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Welch, Cynthia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fenton, James [FLORIDA SOLAR ENERGY CENTER

    2010-01-01

    The durability of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells is a major barrier to the commercialization of these systems for stationary and transportation power applications. Commercial viability depends on improving the durability of the fuel cell components to increase the system reliability. The aim of this work is to separate ionomer degradation from membrane degradation via mixed membrane/ionomer MEA experiments. The challenges of mixed MEA fabrication due to the incompatibility of the membrane and the electrode are addressed. OCV accelerated testing experiment (AST) were performed. Development of in situ diagnostics and unique experiments to characterize the performance and properties of the ionomer in the electrode as a function of time is reported. These measurements, along with extensive ex situ and post-mortem characterization, can delineate the degradation mechanisms in order to develop more durable fuel cells and fuel cell components.

  4. Controllability and flexibility analysis of CO2 post-combustion capture using piperazine and MEA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaspar, Jozsef; Ricardez-Sandoval, Luis; Jørgensen, John Bagterp;

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we developed a decentralized control scheme and investigate the performance of the piperazine (PZ) and monoethanolamine (MEA) CO2 capture process for industrially-relevant operation scenarios. The base for the design of the control schemes is Relative Gain Array (RGA) analysis comb...... the need for advanced control structures, e.g. MPC, which can explicitly account for constraints in the process variables....

  5. Modeling and simulation of lab-scale anaerobic co-digestion of MEA waste

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaerobic digestion model No.1 (ADM1 was applied and expanded in this study to model and simulate anaerobic digestion (AD of an industrial carbon capture reclaimer MEA (monoethanolamine waste (MEAw together with easily degradable organics. The general structure of ADM1 was not changed except for introducing state variables of MEA and complex organics (CO in the waste and biochemical reactions of MEA uptake and CO hydrolysis in the model ADM1_MEAw. Experimental batch test results were used for calibrating kinetics variables. The obtained kinetics were employed in the ADM1_MEAw to simulate semi-continuously fed experimental test for 486 days at room temperature (22 +/- 2oC. The validation results show that the ADM1_MEAw was able to predict the process performance with reasonable accuracy, including process pH, biogas generation and inorganic nitrogen concentrations, for a wide range of feed scenarios. Free ammonia inhibition, was observed to be the main inhibitory effects on acetoclastic methanogenesis, leading to volatile fatty acids (VFA accumulation at high loads. Inhibition assumed to be caused by potentially toxic constituents of MEAw appears to be much less important than ammonia, suggesting that such constituents were broken down by AD.

  6. Detailed H2 and CO Electrochemistry for a MEA Model Fueled by Syngas

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, W. Y.

    2015-07-17

    © The Electrochemical Society. SOFCs can directly oxidize CO in addition to H2, which allows them to be coupled to a gasifier. Many membrane-electrode-assembly (MEA) models neglect CO electrochemistry due to sluggish kinetics and the water-gas-shift reaction, but CO oxidation may be important for high CO-content syngas. The 1D-MEA model presented here incorporates detailed mechanisms for both H2 and CO oxidation, individually fitted to experimental data. These mechanisms are then combined into a single model, which provides a good fit to experimental data for H2/CO mixtures. Furthermore, the model fits H2/CO data best when a single chargetransfer step in the H2 mechanism is assumed to be rate-limiting for all current densities. This differs from the result for H2/H2O mixtures, where H2 adsorption becomes rate-limiting at high current densities. These results indicate that CO oxidation cannot be neglected in MEA models running on CO-rich syngas, and that CO oxidation can alter the H2 oxidation mechanism.

  7. Active cage model of glassy dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fodor, Étienne; Hayakawa, Hisao; Visco, Paolo; van Wijland, Frédéric

    2016-07-01

    We build up a phenomenological picture in terms of the effective dynamics of a tracer confined in a cage experiencing random hops to capture some characteristics of glassy systems. This minimal description exhibits scale invariance properties for the small-displacement distribution that echo experimental observations. We predict the existence of exponential tails as a crossover between two Gaussian regimes. Moreover, we demonstrate that the onset of glassy behavior is controlled only by two dimensionless numbers: the number of hops occurring during the relaxation of the particle within a local cage and the ratio of the hopping length to the cage size. PMID:27575182

  8. Compositions containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

    2013-05-28

    Compositions comprising a polymer-containing matrix and a filler comprising a cage compound selected from borane cage compounds, carborane cage compounds, metal complexes thereof, residues thereof, mixtures thereof, and/or agglomerations thereof, where the cage compound is not covalently bound to the matrix polymer. Methods of making and applications for using such compositions are also disclosed.

  9. Compositions containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

    2014-11-11

    Compositions comprising a polymer-containing matrix and a filler comprising a cage compound selected from borane cage compounds, carborane cage compounds, metal complexes thereof, residues thereof, mixtures thereof, and/or agglomerations thereof, where the cage compound is not covalently bound to the matrix polymer. Methods of making and applications for using such compositions are also disclosed.

  10. Compositions containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowen, III, Daniel E.; Eastwood, Eric A.

    2015-09-15

    Compositions comprising a polymer-containing matrix and a filler comprising a cage compound selected from borane cage compounds, carborane cage compounds, metal complexes thereof, residues thereof, mixtures thereof, and/or agglomerations thereof, where the cage compound is not covalently bound to the matrix polymer. Methods of making and applications for using such compositions are also disclosed.

  11. MEaSUREs Arctic Sea Ice Characterization Daily 25km EASE-Grid 2.0 V001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set, part of the NASA Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) program, provides a daily record of Arctic sea ice...

  12. Fabrication of multi-electrode array platforms for neuronal interfacing with bi-layer lift-off resist sputter deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a bi-layer lift-off resist (LOR) technique in combination with sputter deposition of silicon dioxide (SiO2) as a new passivation method in the fabrication of a multi-electrode array (MEA). Using the photo-insensitive LOR as a sacrificial bottom layer and the negative photoresist as a patterning top layer, and performing low-temperature sputter deposition of SiO2 followed by lift-off, we could successfully fabricate damage-free indium-tin oxide (ITO) and Au MEA. The bi-layer LOR sputter deposition processed Au MEA showed an impedance value of 6 × 105 Ω (at 1 kHz), with good consistency over 60 electrodes. The passivation performance of the bi-layer LOR sputter-deposited SiO2 was tested by electrodepositing Au nanoparticles (NPs) on the Au electrode, resulting in the well-confined and uniformly coated Au NPs. The bi-layer LOR sputter deposition processed ITO, Au, and Au NP-modified MEAs were evaluated and found to have a neuronal spike recording capability at a single unit level, confirming the validity of the bi-layer LOR sputter deposition as an effective passivation technique in fabrication of a MEA. These results suggest that the damage-free Au MEA fabricated with bi-layer LOR sputter deposition would be a viable platform for screening surface modification techniques that are available in neuronal interfacing. (technical note)

  13. Synthesis of caged Garcinia xanthone analogues

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Woo Cheal

    2009-01-01

    A new synthetic strategy is developed toward the synthesis of the caged Garcinia xanthone analogues. The key to the strategy is a Pd-catalyzed reverse prenylation reaction. This new synthetic approach provides a rapid and efficient access to various caged analogues, including cluvenone which is known to induce apoptosis and exhibit significant cytotoxicity in various cancer cell lines. Evaluation of their growth inhibitory activities also leads to identification of the pharmacophoric motif of...

  14. Modelling atmospheric oxidation of 2-aminoethanol (MEA) emitted from post-combustion capture using WRF-Chem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karl, M; Svendby, T; Walker, S-E; Velken, A S; Castell, N; Solberg, S

    2015-09-15

    Carbon capture and storage (CCS) is a technological solution that can reduce the amount of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from the use of fossil fuel in power plants and other industries. A leading method today is amine based post-combustion capture, in which 2-aminoethanol (MEA) is one of the most studied absorption solvents. In this process, amines are released to the atmosphere through evaporation and entrainment from the CO2 absorber column. Modelling is a key instrument for simulating the atmospheric dispersion and chemical transformation of MEA, and for projections of ground-level air concentrations and deposition rates. In this study, the Weather Research and Forecasting model inline coupled with chemistry, WRF-Chem, was applied to quantify the impact of using a comprehensive MEA photo-oxidation sequence compared to using a simplified MEA scheme. Main discrepancies were found for iminoethanol (roughly doubled in the detailed scheme) and 2-nitro aminoethanol, short MEA-nitramine (reduced by factor of two in the detailed scheme). The study indicates that MEA emissions from a full-scale capture plant can modify regional background levels of isocyanic acid. Predicted atmospheric concentrations of isocyanic acid were however below the limit value of 1 ppbv for ambient exposure. The dependence of the formation of hazardous compounds in the OH-initiated oxidation of MEA on ambient level of nitrogen oxides (NOx) was studied in a scenario without NOx emissions from a refinery area in the vicinity of the capture plant. Hourly MEA-nitramine peak concentrations higher than 40 pg m(-3) did only occur when NOx mixing ratios were above 2 ppbv. Therefore, the spatial variability and temporal variability of levels of OH and NOx need to be taken into account in the health risk assessment. The health risk due to direct emissions of nitrosamines and nitramines from full-scale CO2 capture should be investigated in future studies. PMID:25958366

  15. Exact distinction of excitatory and inhibitory neurons in neural networks: a study with GAD67-GFP neurons optically and electrophysiologically recognized on multi-electrode arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Andrea Becchetti

    2012-01-01

    Distinguishing excitatory from inhibitory neurons with multielectrode array (MEA) recordings is a serious experimental challenge. The current methods, developed in vitro, mostly rely on spike waveform analysis. These however often display poor resolution and may produce errors caused by the variability of spike amplitudes and neuron shapes. Recent recordings in human brain suggest that the spike waveform features correlate with time-domain statistics such as spiking rate, autocorrelation and ...

  16. Quantitative Analysis of Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons Cultured on Microelectrode Arrays Based on Fluorescence Microscopy Image Processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, João Fernando; Saito, José Hiroki; Neves, Amanda Ferreira; Lotufo, Celina Monteiro da Cruz; Destro-Filho, João-Batista; Nicoletti, Maria do Carmo

    2015-12-01

    Microelectrode Arrays (MEA) are devices for long term electrophysiological recording of extracellular spontaneous or evocated activities on in vitro neuron culture. This work proposes and develops a framework for quantitative and morphological analysis of neuron cultures on MEAs, by processing their corresponding images, acquired by fluorescence microscopy. The neurons are segmented from the fluorescence channel images using a combination of segmentation by thresholding, watershed transform, and object classification. The positioning of microelectrodes is obtained from the transmitted light channel images using the circular Hough transform. The proposed method was applied to images of dissociated culture of rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neuronal cells. The morphological and topological quantitative analysis carried out produced information regarding the state of culture, such as population count, neuron-to-neuron and neuron-to-microelectrode distances, soma morphologies, neuron sizes, neuron and microelectrode spatial distributions. Most of the analysis of microscopy images taken from neuronal cultures on MEA only consider simple qualitative analysis. Also, the proposed framework aims to standardize the image processing and to compute quantitative useful measures for integrated image-signal studies and further computational simulations. As results show, the implemented microelectrode identification method is robust and so are the implemented neuron segmentation and classification one (with a correct segmentation rate up to 84%). The quantitative information retrieved by the method is highly relevant to assist the integrated signal-image study of recorded electrophysiological signals as well as the physical aspects of the neuron culture on MEA. Although the experiments deal with DRG cell images, cortical and hippocampal cell images could also be processed with small adjustments in the image processing parameter estimation. PMID:26510475

  17. Welfare assessment of laying hens in furnished cages and non-cage systems: an on-farm comparison

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, T.B.; Tuyttens, F.; Reu, de K.; Herman, L.; Zoons, J.; Sonck, B.

    2008-01-01

    From 2012 onwards, all laying hens in Europe will need to be housed either in furnished cages or non-cage systems (aviaries or floor-housing systems). In terms of animal welfare, furnished cages and non-cage systems both have advantages and disadvantages. Data on direct comparisons between the two,

  18. Creation of defined single cell resolution neuronal circuits on microelectrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirlo, Russell Kirk

    2009-12-01

    The way cell-cell organization of neuronal networks influences activity and facilitates function is not well understood. Microelectrode arrays (MEAs) and advancing cell patterning technologies have enabled access to and control of in vitro neuronal networks spawning much new research in neuroscience and neuroengineering. We propose that small, simple networks of neurons with defined circuitry may serve as valuable research models where every connection can be analyzed, controlled and manipulated. Towards the goal of creating such neuronal networks we have applied microfabricated elastomeric membranes, surface modification and our unique laser cell patterning system to create defined neuronal circuits with single-cell precision on MEAs. Definition of synaptic connectivity was imposed by the 3D physical constraints of polydimethylsiloxane elastomeric membranes. The membranes had 20mum clear-through holes and 2-3mum deep channels which when applied to the surface of the MEA formed microwells to confine neurons to electrodes connected via shallow tunnels to direct neurite outgrowth. Tapering and turning of channels was used to influence neurite polarity. Biocompatibility of the membranes was increased by vacuum baking, oligomer extraction, and autoclaving. Membranes were bound to the MEA by oxygen plasma treatment and heated pressure. The MEA/membrane surface was treated with oxygen plasma, poly-D-lysine and laminin to improve neuron attachment, survival and neurite outgrowth. Prior to cell patterning the outer edge of culture area was seeded with 5x10 5 cells per cm and incubated for 2 days. Single embryonic day 7 chick forebrain neurons were then patterned into the microwells and onto the electrodes using our laser cell patterning system. Patterned neurons successfully attached to and were confined to the electrodes. Neurites extended through the interconnecting channels and connected with adjacent neurons. These results demonstrate that neuronal circuits can be

  19. Vestibular Neuronitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevent Painful Swimmer's Ear Additional Content Medical News Vestibular Neuronitis By Lawrence R. Lustig, MD NOTE: This ... Drugs Herpes Zoster Oticus Meniere Disease Purulent Labyrinthitis Vestibular Neuronitis Vestibular neuronitis is a disorder characterized by ...

  20. Estrogen receptor-a in medial amygdala neurons regulates body weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrogen receptor–a (ERa) activity in the brain prevents obesity in both males and females. However, the ERa-expressing neural populations that regulate body weight remain to be fully elucidated. Here we showed that single-minded–1 (SIM1) neurons in the medial amygdala (MeA) express abundant levels ...

  1. PEMFC performance of MEAS based on Nafion{sup R} and sPSEBS hybrid membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Carretero, F.J.; Compan, V. [Univ, Politecnica de Valencia, Valencia (Spain). Dept. Termodinamica Aplicada; Suarez, K.; Solorza, O. [Inst. Politecnico Nacional, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, Mexico City (Mexico). Dept. de Quimica; Riande, E. [Inst. de Ciencia y Tecnologia de Polimeros, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-07-15

    Important scientific, technical and economic problems must be solved before widespread commercialization of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). The main issues facing the development of commercial low temperature fuel cells are the synthesis of efficient solid electrolytes separating the anode from the cathode as well as the development of cheaper catalysts for fuel oxidation. This study involved the preparation of hybrid membranes based on Nafion 117 and sulfonated Calprene H6120 containing partially sulfonated inorganic fillers such as silica, SBA-15 and sepiolite. The feasibility of using the membranes as polyelectrolytes for low temperature fuel cells was then evaluated. The water uptake of Nafion hybrid membranes is 1/3 to 1/4 of that in composite membranes based on sulfonated Calprene H6120. The proton conductivity of Nafion 117 hybrid membranes-electrode assemblies is nearly 1/5 of the pristine Nafion membrane assembly. Sulfonated Calprene H6120 hybrid membranes typically have better proton conductivity than the Nafion 117 composites. The performance of fuel cells containing different MEAs was examined by measuring their polarization curves in different operating conditions. The kinetic parameters governing the voltage dependence on current density were also estimated. It was concluded that the superior performance of the fuel cells with MEAs of NAF-SEP, sPSEBS-SIL and sPSEBS-SBA is not due to the membranes themselves, but to the kinetic processes that occur at the electrodes, which in this study were less efficient for fuel cells with the Nafion MEA. 34 refs., 3 tabs., 9 figs.

  2. LP DAAC MEaSUREs Project Artifact Tracking Via the NASA Earthdata Collaboration Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) is a NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and Information System (EOSDIS) DAAC that supports selected EOS Community non-standard data products such as the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) Global Emissivity Database (GED), and also supports NASA Earth Science programs such as Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) to contribute in providing long-term, consistent, and mature data products. As described in The LP DAAC Project Lifecycle Plan (Daucsavage, J.; Bennett, S., 2014), key elements within the Project Inception Phase fuse knowledge between NASA stakeholders, data producers, and NASA data providers. To support and deliver excellence for NASA data stewardship, and to accommodate long-tail data preservation with Community and MEaSUREs products, the LP DAAC is utilizing NASA's own Earthdata Collaboration Environment to bridge stakeholder communication divides. By leveraging a NASA supported platform, this poster describes how the Atlassian Confluence software combined with a NASA URS/Earthdata support can maintain each project's members, status, documentation, and artifact checklist. Furthermore, this solution provides a gateway for project communities to become familiar with NASA clients, as well as educating the project's NASA DAAC Scientists for NASA client distribution.

  3. ANALISIS TINGKAT KAPABILITAS SISTEM INFORMASI RUMAH SAKIT BERDASARKAN COBIT 5 (MEA01 PADA RSUD TUGUREJO SEMARANG

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ariel Bagus Nugroho

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available RSUD Tugurejo Semarang merupakan Rumah Sakit kelas B milik pemerintah Provinsi Jawa Tengah yang menyediakan pelayanan jasa untuk masyarakat. Dalam manajemen pengolahan data, RSUD Tugurejo Semarang telah menggunakan sistem informasi rumah sakit. Untuk mengetahui apakah sistem informasi telah berjalan seperti yang diharapkan, maka perlu dilakukan analisis tatakelola teknologi informasi. Pada penelitian ini analisis tatakelola teknologi informasi berfokus pada proses pengawasan, evaluasi dan penilaian kinerja, dan kesesuaian kinerja teknologi informasi, yaitu domain MEA01 pada framework COBIT 5.Tujuan penelitian ini untuk mengetahui tingkat kapabilitas dan strategi perbaikan untuk proses pengawasan, evaluasi dan penilaian kinerja dan kesesuaian TI. Metode pengumpulan  data penelitian ini dengan menggunakan studi dokumen, kuesioner dan wawancara kemudian dianalisis tingkat kapabilitas dan kesenjangan. Tingkat kapabilitas yang didapat dari hasil penelitian yaitu berada level 2 (managed. Untuk menaikkan tingkat kapabilitas pada level 3 maka maka perlu dilakukan secara bertahap strategi perbaikan pada PA 2.1, PA2.2, PA 3.1, dan 3.2. Kata kunci: Analisis Tata Kelola TI, COBIT 5, MEA01, Tingkat Kapabilitas, Rumah Sakit.

  4. Phosphonate Based High Nuclearity Magnetic Cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Javeed Ahmad; Jena, Himanshu Sekhar; Clearfield, Abraham; Konar, Sanjit

    2016-06-21

    Transition metal based high nuclearity molecular magnetic cages are a very important class of compounds owing to their potential applications in fabricating new generation molecular magnets such as single molecular magnets, magnetic refrigerants, etc. Most of the reported polynuclear cages contain carboxylates or alkoxides as ligands. However, the binding ability of phosphonates with transition metal ions is stronger than the carboxylates or alkoxides. The presence of three oxygen donor sites enables phosphonates to bridge up to nine metal centers simultaneously. But very few phosphonate based transition metal cages were reported in the literature until recently, mainly because of synthetic difficulties, propensity to result in layered compounds, and also their poor crystalline properties. Accordingly, various synthetic strategies have been followed by several groups in order to overcome such synthetic difficulties. These strategies mainly include use of small preformed metal precursors, proper choice of coligands along with the phosphonate ligands, and use of sterically hindered bulky phosphonate ligands. Currently, the phosphonate system offers a library of high nuclearity transition metal and mixed metal (3d-4f) cages with aesthetically pleasing structures and interesting magnetic properties. This Account is in the form of a research landscape on our efforts to synthesize and characterize new types of phosphonate based high nuclearity paramagnetic transition metal cages. We quite often experienced synthetic difficulties with such versatile systems in assembling high nuclearity metal cages. Few methods have been emphasized for the self-assembly of phosphonate systems with suitable transition metal ions in achieving high nuclearity. We highlighted our journey from 2005 until today for phosphonate based high nuclearity transition metal cages with V(IV/V), Mn(II/III), Fe(III), Co(II), Ni(II), and Cu(II) metal ions and their magnetic properties. We observed that

  5. Cage RACK ventilation options for laboratory animal facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stakutis, Richard E

    2003-09-01

    Individually ventilated cage systems have become the method of choice for housing rodents. The author describes the various options for cage ventilation, from using supply and exhaust fans to directly connecting the racks to the building ventilation system. PMID:12966448

  6. High-throughput Transcriptome analysis, CAGE and beyond

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2008-11-25

    1. Current research - PhD work on discovery of new allergens - Postdoctoral work on Transcriptional Start Sites a) Tag based technologies allow higher throughput b) CAGE technology to define promoters c) CAGE data analysis to understand Transcription - Wo

  7. Chemical contamination of animal feeding systems: evaluation of two caging systems and standard cage-washing equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J G; Helfrich-Smith, M E

    1980-12-01

    Sodium fluorescein was added as a tracer to an ager gel diet which was fed for 5 day to 90 of 180 rats housed in two different polycarbonate caging systems, shoe-box cages and suspension solid-bottom cages. Cage racks, supplementary equipment, and case washer surfaces were analysed for fluorescein both before and after a complete wash and rinse cycle. Efficacy of washing was greater than 99% for both the inside and outside of the suspended cages and greater than 99% for the inside, but only 93% for the outside, of the shoe-box cages. The shoe-box cages, which were larger than the suspended cages, were spaced closer together on the washer rack, which may account for this variation in cleaning effectiveness. The cage washer surfaces and the water, which was recirculated during each cycle, also became contaminated with fluorescein. Strict adherence to proper cage-washing procedures and careful selection of cage design are important factors in controlling the potential for residual contamination of caging and cage-washing equipment. PMID:7464031

  8. Convective Cage Release in Model Colloidal Glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Alan R; Poulos, Andreas S; Kim, Sunhyung; Vermant, Jan; Petekidis, George

    2015-11-20

    The mechanism of flow in glassy materials is interrogated using mechanical spectroscopy applied to model nearly hard sphere colloidal glasses during flow. Superimposing a small amplitude oscillatory motion orthogonal onto steady shear flow makes it possible to directly evaluate the effect of a steady state flow on the out-of-cage (α) relaxation as well as the in-cage motions. To this end, the crossover frequency deduced from the viscoelastic spectra is used as a direct measure of the inverse microstructural relaxation time, during flow. The latter is found to scale linearly with the rate of deformation. The microscopic mechanism of flow can then be identified as a convective cage release. Further insights are provided when the viscoelastic spectra at different shear rates are shifted to scale the alpha relaxation and produce a strain rate-orthogonal frequency superposition, the colloidal analogue of time temperature superposition in polymers with the flow strength playing the role of temperature. Whereas the scaling works well for the α relaxation, deviations are observed both at low and high frequencies. Brownian dynamics simulations point to the origins of these deviations; at high frequencies these are due to the deformation of the cages which slows down the short-time diffusion, while at low frequency, deviations are most probably caused by some mild hydroclustering. PMID:26636876

  9. Stabilizing a 22 karat nanogolden cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Q.; Sun, Q.; Jena, P.

    2009-11-01

    Since the discovery of C60 fullerene, considerable efforts have been devoted to find other elements with similar hollow cage structures. However, search for hollow metallic cages with a diameter similar to that of C60 fullerene has been elusive. We describe a procedure for the rational design of metallic cages by suitably choosing their size, composition, and charge state. A 22 karat nanogolden cage with a diameter of about 8.5 Å and consisting of 12 Al and 20 Au atoms is found to be metastable, which can be stabilized by embedding a Mn4 cluster. In contrast to bulk Mn, which is antiferromagnetic, and isolated Mn4 cluster, which is ferromagnetic with a giant magnetic moment of 20μB, the Mn4@Al12Au20 endohedral complex exhibits magnetic bistability with 0μB and 14μB configurations being energetically nearly degenerate. These results, based on density functional theory, open the door to design a novel class of endohedral complexes with possible applications.

  10. 50 CFR 648.75 - Cage identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... are issued, or if rendered null and void in accordance with 15 CFR part 904. (d) Return. Tags that... Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION... Clam and Ocean Quahog Fisheries § 648.75 Cage identification. Except as provided in § 648.76,...

  11. An Easy Synthesis of Two Cage Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dao Cong

    1982-01-01

    Describes a simple, three-step synthesis of two cage molecules, birdcage hydrocarbon (VIII) and its homologue, the homobirdcage hydrocarbon IX. Indicates that all products are easily purified and formed in high yields in this activity suitable for advanced undergraduate laboratory courses. (Author/JN)

  12. Development of a Low-Cost, Durable Membrane and MEA for Stationary and Mobile Fuel Cell Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michel Foure, Scott Gaboury, Jim Goldbach, David Mountz and Jung Yi (no longer with company)

    2008-01-31

    The development of low cost, durable membranes and membranes electrode assemblies (MEAs) remain a critical challenge for the successful introduction of fuel cells into mass markets. It was the goal of the team lead by Arkema, Inc. (formerly Atofina, Inc.) to address these shortages. Thus, this project addresses the following technical barriers from the Fuel Cells section of the Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: (A) Durability (B) Cost Arkema’s approach consisted in using blends of polyvinylidenefluoride (PVDF) and proprietary sulfonated polyelectrolytes. The strength and originality of Arkema’s approach lies in the decoupling of ion conductivity from the other requirements. Kynar® (Arkema trade name for PVDF) provides an exceptional combination of properties that make it ideally suited for a membrane matrix. In a first phase, Arkema demonstrated the feasibility of the concept with the M31 membrane generation. After MEA optimization, it was shown that the beginning-of-life (BOL) performance of M31 MEAs was essentially on a par with that of PFSA MEAs at 60ºC under fully humidified conditions. On the other hand, long-term durability studies showed a high decay rate of 45µV/h over a 2100 hr. test. Arkema then designed several families of polyelectrolyte candidates, which – in principle – could not undergo the same failure mechanisms. A new membrane candidate was developed: M41. It offered the same generally good mechanical, ex-situ conductivity and gas barrier properties as M31. In addition, ex-situ accelerated testing suggested a several orders of magnitude improvement in chemical stability. M41 based MEAs showed comparable BOL performance with that of PFSA (80ºC, 100% RH). M41 MEAs were further shown to be able to withstand several hours temperature excursions at 120ºC without apparent damage. Accelerated studies were carried out using the DOE and/or US Fuel Cell Council

  13. 从Have mercy on me,a sinner谈起

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周远梅

    2005-01-01

    @@ 在第一册第七课"Face to Face with Guns"一文中,当作者面对着歹徒凶器的袭击时,他想自己死定了.然而他突然冒出了一句话,让所有的中国学生感到莫名其妙:"Lord,have mercy on me,a sinner."课文中关于sinner的解释是"罪人",这更增加了同学们的疑惑.本是歹徒行凶犯罪,为什么无辜无助的作者却说自己是个"罪人"?如果没有一点关于基督教的文化背景知识,我们还真的很难理解.

  14. Formation and Destruction of NDELA in 30 wt% MEA (Monoethanolamine) and 50 wt% DEA (Diethanolamine) Solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of nitrosodiethanolamine (NDELA) in a lab scale pilot was studied by feeding known amounts of nitrogen oxide and nitrogen dioxide into the gas entering the absorber. In the same pilot, the destruction by UV-irradiation of NDELA present in the solvent was studied. Two campaigns were performed, one with 30 wt% monoethanolamine (MEA) and one with 50 wt% diethanolamine (DEA). During the DEA campaign the destruction of NDELA in the water wash section was also tested. Additionally, degraded solution samples withdrawn from the pilot were tested for thermal degradation. The results show that NDELA was formed when nitrogen oxide and nitrogen dioxide were present. Destruction of NDELA with UV-light in the solvent loop was found to be slow. In the water wash section, the UV-light destroyed the NDELA effectively. NDELA was found to degrade during the thermal degradation studies at 135 deg. C. (authors)

  15. Modeling MEA with the CPA equation of state: A parameter estimation study adding local search to PSO algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santos, Letícia Cotia dos; Tavares, Frederico Wanderley; Ahón, Victor Rolando Ruiz;

    2015-01-01

    parameters for MEA. This work proposes adding LLE information systematically in the CPA parameter estimation procedure. At first, the parameter search space is defined by the results from the PSO sensitivity analysis for VLE considering the experimental error for vapor pressures and liquid densities...

  16. Marine ecosystem acoustics (MEA): Quantifying processes in the sea at the spatio-temporal scales on which they occur

    KAUST Repository

    Godøl, Olav Rune

    2014-07-22

    Sustainable management of fisheries resources requires quantitative knowledge and understanding of species distribution, abundance, and productivity-determining processes. Conventional sampling by physical capture is inconsistent with the spatial and temporal scales on which many of these processes occur. In contrast, acoustic observations can be obtained on spatial scales from centimetres to ocean basins, and temporal scales from seconds to seasons. The concept of marine ecosystem acoustics (MEA) is founded on the basic capability of acoustics to detect, classify, and quantify organisms and biological and physical heterogeneities in the water column. Acoustics observations integrate operational technologies, platforms, and models and can generate information by taxon at the relevant scales. The gaps between single-species assessment and ecosystem-based management, as well as between fisheries oceanography and ecology, are thereby bridged. The MEA concept combines state-of-the-art acoustic technology with advanced operational capabilities and tailored modelling integrated into a flexible tool for ecosystem research and monitoring. Case studies are presented to illustrate application of the MEA concept in quantification of biophysical coupling, patchiness of organisms, predator-prey interactions, and fish stock recruitment processes. Widespread implementation of MEA will have a large impact on marine monitoring and assessment practices and it is to be hoped that they also promote and facilitate interaction among disciplines within the marine sciences.

  17. Porous Organic Cages for Sulfur Hexafluoride Separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasell, Tom; Miklitz, Marcin; Stephenson, Andrew; Little, Marc A; Chong, Samantha Y; Clowes, Rob; Chen, Linjiang; Holden, Daniel; Tribello, Gareth A; Jelfs, Kim E; Cooper, Andrew I

    2016-02-10

    A series of porous organic cages is examined for the selective adsorption of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) over nitrogen. Despite lacking any metal sites, a porous cage, CC3, shows the highest SF6/N2 selectivity reported for any material at ambient temperature and pressure, which translates to real separations in a gas breakthrough column. The SF6 uptake of these materials is considerably higher than would be expected from the static pore structures. The location of SF6 within these materials is elucidated by X-ray crystallography, and it is shown that cooperative diffusion and structural rearrangements in these molecular crystals can rationalize their superior SF6/N2 selectivity. PMID:26757885

  18. Development of more efficient and cheaper MEA's for PEM fuel cells; Membrane-electrode-assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yde Andersen, S. (IRD Fuel Cell A/S, Svendborg (Denmark)); Nilsson, M.S. (Danish Power System Aps, Charlottenlund (Denmark)); Siu, A.; Plackett, D. (Technical Univ. of Denmark. Risoe National Lab. for Sustainable Energy, Dansk Polymer Center, Roskilde (Denmark)); Li, Q. (Technical Univ. of Denmark, Dept. of Chemistry, Kgs. Lyngby (Denmark))

    2008-06-15

    The project covered 5 main areas: 1) polymer and membranes; 2) electrocatalysts; 3) gas diffusion electrodes; 4) MEAs; and 5) evaluation techniques. For the polymers, by purification of monomers and optimizing parameters, high molecular weight polybenzimidazoles have been synthesized in batches of 50 g with good reproducibility. Based on the polymer, two types of new membranes have been prepared. One is the cross-linked (covalently and acid-base) PBI blend membranes. The blend membranes were systematically characterized and show excellent properties such as very high acid doping levels, conductivity, mechanical strength and durability. The other type is composite membranes based on PBI and nanoclay. Using the modified nanoclay, good dispersion and transparent composite membranes have been achieved. For catalyst preparation, the carbon supports have been modified with thermal treatment. Improved corrosion resistance was achieved with little sacrificing of the catalytic activity. High Pt loading catalysts were prepared, based on which high performance gas diffusion electrodes were fabricated. The performance target of both cathode and anode was achieved, as evaluated by the PTFE half cell tests. New gas diffusion layer (GDL) materials have been developed and tested in different MEA configurations. Significant performance improvement has been achieved with also potential to reduce the cost. Techniques for applying micro porous layers and catalyst layers have been optimized, including tape casting, spraying, and catalyst-coated membrane (CCM). Using the developed membranes and gas diffusion electrodes, membrane-electrode assemblies (MEAs) were fabricated for both single cell and stack tests. Selection of sealing materials and design of integrated gaskets have been made for both low and high temperature MEAs. Parameters for hot-pressing such as temperature, pressure and duration were systematically studied. 44 MEAs with an active area of 256 cm{sup 2} have been prepared

  19. Cathodic Cage Plasma Nitriding: An Innovative Technique

    OpenAIRE

    de Sousa, R. R. M.; de Araújo, F. O.; da Costa, J. A. P.; A. de S. Brandim; de Brito, R. A.; Alves, C

    2012-01-01

    Cylindrical samples of AISI 1020, AISI 316, and AISI 420 steels, with different heights, were simultaneously treated by a new technique of ionic nitriding, entitled cathodic cage plasma nitriding (CCPN), in order to evaluate the efficiency of this technique to produce nitrided layers with better properties compared with those obtained using conventional ionic nitriding technique. This method is able to eliminate the edge effect in the samples, promoting a better uniformity of temperature, and...

  20. Titanium mesh cages (TMC) in spine surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Grob, Dieter; Daehn, Sylvia; Mannion, Anne F.

    2004-01-01

    The introduction of the titanium mesh cage (TMC) in spinal surgery has opened up a variety of applications that are realizable as a result of the versatility of the implant. Differing applications of TMCs in the whole spine are described in a series of 150 patients. Replacement and reinforcement of the anterior column represent the classic use of cylindrical TMCs. The TMC as a multisegmental concave support in kyphotic deformities and as a posterior interlaminar spacer or lamina replacement a...

  1. Trace element kinetics in caged Mytilus galloprovincialis

    OpenAIRE

    Richir, Jonathan; Lepoint, Gilles; Donnay, Annick; Gobert, Sylvie

    2014-01-01

    Trace elements (TEs) remain contaminants of concern because of their persistence, ability to concentrate in organisms and toxicity. The Mediterranean mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis Lamarck, 1819 is a relevant bioindicator of TE coastal contamination. However, little research has studied the combined influence of environmental condition changes and physiological processes on their kinetics in that species. Caged M. galloprovincialis were thus immerged in 2 contrasted pristine Corsican (Franc...

  2. Biomechanische Untersuchungen von LWS-Cages

    OpenAIRE

    Gottwald, Maria

    2004-01-01

    Fragestellung: Cages sind Implantate, die der Fusionierung von Wirbelkörpern dienen. Zu ihren wichtigsten biomechanischen Eigenschaften gehört die Gewährleistung einer hohen Stabilität unmittelbar nach Implantation - der Primärstabilität -, die Aufrechterhaltung dieser Stabilität auch nach wiederholten Belastungen - Langzeitstabilität - und eine geringe Sinterungsneigung, worunter man das eindringen der Implantate in die angrenzenden Wirbelkörper versteht. Ziel dieser Arbeit war es nun zwe...

  3. Three-dimensional micro-electrode array for recording dissociated neuronal cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musick, Katherine; Khatami, David; Wheeler, Bruce C

    2009-07-21

    This work demonstrates the design, fabrication, packaging, characterization, and functionality of an electrically and fluidically active three-dimensional micro-electrode array (3D MEA) for use with neuronal cell cultures. The successful function of the device implies that this basic concept-construction of a 3D array with a layered approach-can be utilized as the basis for a new family of neural electrode arrays. The 3D MEA prototype consists of a stack of individually patterned thin films that form a cell chamber conducive to maintaining and recording the electrical activity of a long-term three-dimensional network of rat cortical neurons. Silicon electrode layers contain a polymer grid for neural branching, growth, and network formation. Along the walls of these electrode layers lie exposed gold electrodes which permit recording and stimulation of the neuronal electrical activity. Silicone elastomer micro-fluidic layers provide a means for loading dissociated neurons into the structure and serve as the artificial vasculature for nutrient supply and aeration. The fluidic layers also serve as insulation for the micro-electrodes. Cells have been shown to survive in the 3D MEA for up to 28 days, with spontaneous and evoked electrical recordings performed in that time. The micro-fluidic capability was demonstrated by flowing in the drug tetrotodoxin to influence the activity of the culture. PMID:19568672

  4. Spine morphology of neurons in the Avian forebrain is affected by rearing conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Rollenhagen, Astrid; Bischof, Hans-Joachim

    1994-01-01

    An area of the caudal forebrain of male zebra finches, the Archi-Neostriatum caudale (ANC), which is active during arousal (Bischof and Herrmann, 1986, 1988), shows rearing-dependent changes in neuron morphology (Rollenhagen and Bischof, 1991). We demonstrate here that rearing conditions also affect the shape of spines of one of the four ANC neuron types. This neuron type was examined in birds reared under five different conditions - in isolation (1), caged (2), in the aviary (3), and with so...

  5. Data Curation for the Exploitation of Large Earth Observation Products Databases - The MEA system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, Simone; Natali, Stefano; Barboni, Damiano; Cavicchi, Mario; Della Vecchia, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    National Space Agencies under the umbrella of the European Space Agency are performing a strong activity to handle and provide solutions to Big Data and related knowledge (metadata, software tools and services) management and exploitation. The continuously increasing amount of long-term and of historic data in EO facilities in the form of online datasets and archives, the incoming satellite observation platforms that will generate an impressive amount of new data and the new EU approach on the data distribution policy make necessary to address technologies for the long-term management of these data sets, including their consolidation, preservation, distribution, continuation and curation across multiple missions. The management of long EO data time series of continuing or historic missions - with more than 20 years of data available already today - requires technical solutions and technologies which differ considerably from the ones exploited by existing systems. Several tools, both open source and commercial, are already providing technologies to handle data and metadata preparation, access and visualization via OGC standard interfaces. This study aims at describing the Multi-sensor Evolution Analysis (MEA) system and the Data Curation concept as approached and implemented within the ASIM and EarthServer projects, funded by the European Space Agency and the European Commission, respectively.

  6. The effect of pesticide residue on caged mosquito bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, J A S; Greer, Mike; Coughlin, Jamie

    2006-09-01

    Wind tunnel experiments showed that secondary pickup of insecticide residue by mosquitoes in cage bioassays had a significant effect on mortality. Cage bioassays using adult Ochlerotatus taeniorhynchus (Wiedemann) investigated the effect of exposure time to a contaminated surface. Cages were dosed in a wind tunnel using the LC50 for naled (0.124 mg a.i./ml) and an LC25 (0.0772 mg a.i./ml) for naled. Half of the bioassay mosquitoes were moved directly into clean cages with the other half remaining in the sprayed, hence contaminated, cage. Treatment mortality was assessed at 8, 15, 30, 60, 120, 240, and 1,440 min postapplication. Cage contamination had a significant effect on mosquito mortality for both the LC25 and LC50 between 15 and 30 min postapplication. PMID:17067048

  7. A secure and economical system for caging venomous snakes

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, R. L.

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes an inexpensive and secure cage system for housing venomous snakes. The cages are easily constructed from commercially available plastic containers and are lightweight and can be stacked, minimizing the area needed to house numerous animals. They allow easy access to the animal and can be adequately disinfected. These cages can be individually locked and also allow for full viewing of the animal.

  8. PROBLEMS OF BIOFOULING ON FISH–CAGE NETS IN AQUACULTURE

    OpenAIRE

    Merica Slišković; Gorana Jelić

    2002-01-01

    Biofouling on fish–cage netting is a serious technical and economical problem to aquaculture worldwide. Compensation for the effects of biofouling must be included in cage system design and planning, as fouling can dramatically increase both weight and drag. Settlements of sessile plants and animals, with accumulation of the detritus diminish the size of mesh and can rapidly occlude mesh. Negative effect of smaller mesh size is changing in water flow trough the cages. Biofouling problems nece...

  9. THE PROCEDURE AND THE CRITERIA FOR FISH CAGES ALLOCATION

    OpenAIRE

    Valentina Andrić; Gordana Jelić Mrčelić; Merica Slišković; Ivana Miletić

    2010-01-01

    In the Republic of Croatia, fish cage farming is one of the most important economic activities. Fish cage farms inevitably influence the quality of marine environment. Environment protection measures are established in order to minimize negative effects on the stability of ecosystem. The aim of this paper is to give an overview on the procedure of fish cage farm allocation, environment protection measures, as also as program of monitoring before, during and after fish farming allocation.

  10. THE PROCEDURE AND THE CRITERIA FOR FISH CAGES ALLOCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Andrić

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available In the Republic of Croatia, fish cage farming is one of the most important economic activities. Fish cage farms inevitably influence the quality of marine environment. Environment protection measures are established in order to minimize negative effects on the stability of ecosystem. The aim of this paper is to give an overview on the procedure of fish cage farm allocation, environment protection measures, as also as program of monitoring before, during and after fish farming allocation.

  11. Micro-electrode array recordings reveal reductions in both excitation and inhibition in cultured cortical neuron networks lacking Shank3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, C; Chen, Q; Zhou, T; Bozic, D; Fu, Z; Pan, J Q; Feng, G

    2016-02-01

    Numerous risk genes have recently been implicated in susceptibility to autism and schizophrenia. Translating such genetic findings into disease-relevant neurobiological mechanisms is challenging due to the lack of throughput assays that can be used to assess their functions on an appropriate scale. To address this issue, we explored the feasibility of using a micro-electrode array (MEA) as a potentially scalable assay to identify the electrical network phenotypes associated with risk genes. We first characterized local and global network firing in cortical neurons with MEAs, and then developed methods to analyze the alternation between the network active period (NAP) and the network inactive period (NIP), each of which lasts tens of seconds. We then evaluated the electric phenotypes of neurons derived from Shank3 knockout (KO) mice. Cortical neurons cultured on MEAs displayed a rich repertoire of spontaneous firing, and Shank3 deletion led to reduced firing activity. Enhancing excitation with CX546 rescued the deficit in the spike rate in the Shank3 KO network. In addition, the Shank3 KO network produced a shorter NIP, and this altered network firing pattern was normalized by clonazepam, a positive modulator of the GABAA receptor. MEA recordings revealed electric phenotypes that displayed altered excitation and inhibition in the network lacking Shank3. Thus, our study highlights MEAs as an experimental framework for measuring multiple robust neurobiological end points in dynamic networks and as an assay system that could be used to identify electric phenotypes in cultured neuronal networks and to analyze additional risk genes identified in psychiatric genetics. PMID:26598066

  12. Exact distinction of excitatory and inhibitory neurons in neural networks: a study with GFP-GAD67 neurons optically and electrophysiologically recognized on multielectrode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becchetti, Andrea; Gullo, Francesca; Bruno, Giuseppe; Dossi, Elena; Lecchi, Marzia; Wanke, Enzo

    2012-01-01

    Distinguishing excitatory from inhibitory neurons with multielectrode array (MEA) recordings is a serious experimental challenge. The current methods, developed in vitro, mostly rely on spike waveform analysis. These however often display poor resolution and may produce errors caused by the variability of spike amplitudes and neuron shapes. Recent recordings in human brain suggest that the spike waveform features correlate with time-domain statistics such as spiking rate, autocorrelation, and coefficient of variation. However, no precise criteria are available to exactly assign identified units to specific neuronal types, either in vivo or in vitro. To solve this problem, we combined MEA recording with fluorescence imaging of neocortical cultures from mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in GABAergic cells. In this way, we could sort out "authentic excitatory neurons" (AENs) and "authentic inhibitory neurons" (AINs). We thus characterized 1275 units (from 405 electrodes, n = 10 experiments), based on autocorrelation, burst length, spike number (SN), spiking rate, squared coefficient of variation, and Fano factor (FF) (the ratio between spike-count variance and mean). These metrics differed by about one order of magnitude between AINs and AENs. In particular, the FF turned out to provide a firing code which exactly (no overlap) recognizes excitatory and inhibitory units. The difference in FF between all of the identified AEN and AIN groups was highly significant (p < 10(-8), ANOVA post-hoc Tukey test). Our results indicate a statistical metric-based approach to distinguish excitatory from inhibitory neurons independently from the spike width. PMID:22973197

  13. A new pilot absorber for CO2 capture from flue gases: Measuring and modelling capture with MEA solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderby, Tim L.; Carlsen, Kim B.; Fosbøl, Philip Loldrup;

    2013-01-01

    A pilot absorber column for CO2 recovery from flue gases was constructed and tested with aqueous 30wt% monoethanolamine (MEA), a primary amine, as capture solvent. The pilot plant data were compared with a mathematical rate based packed-column model. The simulation results compared well with the...... changing three parameters: the absorption height, liquid flow rate, and the loading of lean MEA. This was done using a synthetic flue gas consisting of 10% CO2 with a flow rate of approximately 33m3/h at ambient temperature and atmospheric pressure. 23 runs were performed. It was observed that while CO2...... recovery increases with an increase in flow rate of absorbent and absorption height, it decreases as the lean CO2-loading of the absorbent increases. In addition it has been possible to obtain temperature bulges in the bottom part of the absorber by the applied operation conditions. Bulges are observed at...

  14. Advanced behavioural screening: automated home cage ethology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruijt, Berry M; DeVisser, Leonie

    2006-01-01

    Animal behaviour has been studied using two approaches, (1) well-controlled experiments focusing on specific responses and (2) those with natural - fuzzy - but biologically relevant conditions. Ideally, one behavioural test should be able to address both. The home cage provided with various stimuli is proposed as an all-in-one possibility. This, however, results in an exponential increase in complexity regarding observation and analysis tools. It seems difficult to accept that behavioural expressions need a mathematical approach to unravel its organisation and meaning. Developments in artificial intelligence and data mining are essential to accelerate this necessary evolution in behavioural sciences.: PMID:24980412

  15. A Framework for the Comparative Assessment of Neuronal Spike Sorting Algorithms towards More Accurate Off-Line and On-Line Microelectrode Arrays Data Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regalia, Giulia; Coelli, Stefania; Biffi, Emilia; Ferrigno, Giancarlo; Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal spike sorting algorithms are designed to retrieve neuronal network activity on a single-cell level from extracellular multiunit recordings with Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs). In typical analysis of MEA data, one spike sorting algorithm is applied indiscriminately to all electrode signals. However, this approach neglects the dependency of algorithms' performances on the neuronal signals properties at each channel, which require data-centric methods. Moreover, sorting is commonly performed off-line, which is time and memory consuming and prevents researchers from having an immediate glance at ongoing experiments. The aim of this work is to provide a versatile framework to support the evaluation and comparison of different spike classification algorithms suitable for both off-line and on-line analysis. We incorporated different spike sorting "building blocks" into a Matlab-based software, including 4 feature extraction methods, 3 feature clustering methods, and 1 template matching classifier. The framework was validated by applying different algorithms on simulated and real signals from neuronal cultures coupled to MEAs. Moreover, the system has been proven effective in running on-line analysis on a standard desktop computer, after the selection of the most suitable sorting methods. This work provides a useful and versatile instrument for a supported comparison of different options for spike sorting towards more accurate off-line and on-line MEA data analysis. PMID:27239191

  16. A Framework for the Comparative Assessment of Neuronal Spike Sorting Algorithms towards More Accurate Off-Line and On-Line Microelectrode Arrays Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrocchi, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal spike sorting algorithms are designed to retrieve neuronal network activity on a single-cell level from extracellular multiunit recordings with Microelectrode Arrays (MEAs). In typical analysis of MEA data, one spike sorting algorithm is applied indiscriminately to all electrode signals. However, this approach neglects the dependency of algorithms' performances on the neuronal signals properties at each channel, which require data-centric methods. Moreover, sorting is commonly performed off-line, which is time and memory consuming and prevents researchers from having an immediate glance at ongoing experiments. The aim of this work is to provide a versatile framework to support the evaluation and comparison of different spike classification algorithms suitable for both off-line and on-line analysis. We incorporated different spike sorting “building blocks” into a Matlab-based software, including 4 feature extraction methods, 3 feature clustering methods, and 1 template matching classifier. The framework was validated by applying different algorithms on simulated and real signals from neuronal cultures coupled to MEAs. Moreover, the system has been proven effective in running on-line analysis on a standard desktop computer, after the selection of the most suitable sorting methods. This work provides a useful and versatile instrument for a supported comparison of different options for spike sorting towards more accurate off-line and on-line MEA data analysis.

  17. QSpike tools: a generic framework for parallel batch preprocessing of extracellular neuronal signals recorded by substrate microelectrode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmud, Mufti; Pulizzi, Rocco; Vasilaki, Eleni; Giugliano, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Micro-Electrode Arrays (MEAs) have emerged as a mature technique to investigate brain (dys)functions in vivo and in in vitro animal models. Often referred to as "smart" Petri dishes, MEAs have demonstrated a great potential particularly for medium-throughput studies in vitro, both in academic and pharmaceutical industrial contexts. Enabling rapid comparison of ionic/pharmacological/genetic manipulations with control conditions, MEAs are employed to screen compounds by monitoring non-invasively the spontaneous and evoked neuronal electrical activity in longitudinal studies, with relatively inexpensive equipment. However, in order to acquire sufficient statistical significance, recordings last up to tens of minutes and generate large amount of raw data (e.g., 60 channels/MEA, 16 bits A/D conversion, 20 kHz sampling rate: approximately 8 GB/MEA,h uncompressed). Thus, when the experimental conditions to be tested are numerous, the availability of fast, standardized, and automated signal preprocessing becomes pivotal for any subsequent analysis and data archiving. To this aim, we developed an in-house cloud-computing system, named QSpike Tools, where CPU-intensive operations, required for preprocessing of each recorded channel (e.g., filtering, multi-unit activity detection, spike-sorting, etc.), are decomposed and batch-queued to a multi-core architecture or to a computers cluster. With the commercial availability of new and inexpensive high-density MEAs, we believe that disseminating QSpike Tools might facilitate its wide adoption and customization, and inspire the creation of community-supported cloud-computing facilities for MEAs users. PMID:24678297

  18. QSpike Tools: a Generic Framework for Parallel Batch Preprocessing of Extracellular Neuronal Signals Recorded by Substrate Microelectrode Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mufti eMahmud

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Micro-Electrode Arrays (MEAs have emerged as a mature technique to investigate brain (dysfunctions in vivo and in in vitro animal models. Often referred to as smart Petri dishes, MEAs has demonstrated a great potential particularly for medium-throughput studies in vitro, both in academic and pharmaceutical industrial contexts. Enabling rapid comparison of ionic/pharmacological/genetic manipulations with control conditions, MEAs are often employed to screen compounds by monitoring non-invasively the spontaneous and evoked neuronal electrical activity in longitudinal studies, with relatively inexpensive equipment. However, in order to acquire sufficient statistical significance, recordings last up to tens of minutes and generate large amount of raw data (e.g., 60 channels/MEA, 16 bits A/D conversion, 20kHz sampling rate: ~8GB/MEA,h uncompressed. Thus, when the experimental conditions to be tested are numerous, the availability of fast, standardized, and automated signal preprocessing becomes pivotal for any subsequent analysis and data archiving. To this aim, we developed an in-house cloud-computing system, named QSpike Tools, where CPU-intensive operations, required for preprocessing of each recorded channel (e.g., filtering, multi-unit activity detection, spike-sorting, etc., are decomposed and batch-queued to a multi-core architecture or to computer cluster. With the commercial availability of new and inexpensive high-density MEAs, we believe that disseminating QSpike Tools might facilitate its wide adoption and customization, and possibly inspire the creation of community-supported cloud-computing facilities for MEAs users.

  19. Cardiomyocyte MEA data analysis (CardioMDA--a novel field potential data analysis software for pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paruthi Pradhapan

    Full Text Available Cardiac safety pharmacology requires in-vitro testing of all drug candidates before clinical trials in order to ensure they are screened for cardio-toxic effects which may result in severe arrhythmias. Micro-electrode arrays (MEA serve as a complement to current in-vitro methods for drug safety testing. However, MEA recordings produce huge volumes of data and manual analysis forms a bottleneck for high-throughput screening. To overcome this issue, we have developed an offline, semi-automatic data analysis software, 'Cardiomyocyte MEA Data Analysis (CardioMDA', equipped with correlation analysis and ensemble averaging techniques to improve the accuracy, reliability and throughput rate of analysing human pluripotent stem cell derived cardiomyocyte (CM field potentials. With the program, true field potential and arrhythmogenic complexes can be distinguished from one another. The averaged field potential complexes, analysed using our software to determine the field potential duration, were compared with the analogous values obtained from manual analysis. The reliability of the correlation analysis algorithm, evaluated using various arrhythmogenic and morphology changing signals, revealed a mean sensitivity and specificity of 99.27% and 94.49% respectively, in determining true field potential complexes. The field potential duration of the averaged waveforms corresponded well to the manually analysed data, thus demonstrating the reliability of the software. The software has also the capability to create overlay plots for signals recorded under different drug concentrations in order to visualize and compare the magnitude of response on different ion channels as a result of drug treatment. Our novel field potential analysis platform will facilitate the analysis of CM MEA signals in semi-automated way and provide a reliable means of efficient and swift analysis for cardiomyocyte drug or disease model studies.

  20. Approach to Managing MeaSURES Data at the GSFC Earth Science Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Bruce; Kempler, Steven J.; Ramapriyan, Hampapuram K.

    2009-01-01

    A major need stated by the NASA Earth science research strategy is to develop long-term, consistent, and calibrated data and products that are valid across multiple missions and satellite sensors. (NASA Solicitation for Making Earth System data records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) 2006-2010) Selected projects create long term records of a given parameter, called Earth Science Data Records (ESDRs), based on mature algorithms that bring together continuous multi-sensor data. ESDRs, associated algorithms, vetted by the appropriate community, are archived at a NASA affiliated data center for archive, stewardship, and distribution. See http://measures-projects.gsfc.nasa.gov/ for more details. This presentation describes the NASA GSFC Earth Science Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) approach to managing the MEaSUREs ESDR datasets assigned to GES DISC. (Energy/water cycle related and atmospheric composition ESDRs) GES DISC will utilize its experience to integrate existing and proven reusable data management components to accommodate the new ESDRs. Components include a data archive system (S4PA), a data discovery and access system (Mirador), and various web services for data access. In addition, if determined to be useful to the user community, the Giovanni data exploration tool will be made available to ESDRs. The GES DISC data integration methodology to be used for the MEaSUREs datasets is presented. The goals of this presentation are to share an approach to ESDR integration, and initiate discussions amongst the data centers, data managers and data providers for the purpose of gaining efficiencies in data management for MEaSUREs projects.

  1. Influence of metabolic cage on Wistar rat physiological state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judita Zymantiene

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of metabolic cage housing on the Wistar rat physiological state and to analyze the correlation between the minerals in blood and urine. Thirty male rats were used in the experiment. Fifteen rats (control group were housed individually in standard polycarbonate cages and fifteen rats (experimental group in metabolic cages (Techniplast, Italy for two weeks. Body weight, respiration rate, water and food consumptions were recorded for each animal at the beginning of the experiment. The same parameters, as well as blood and urine parameters of control and experimental animals were recorded during the experiment after 72 h, 168 h and 336 h of housing in standard cages and metabolic cages. Urine collection was measured only in the experimental group. Rats weight decreased from 3.84 % to 18.59 % (P<0.05, respiration rate from 18.65 % to 24.59 % (P<0.05 when rats were housed in metabolic cages. Consumption of food and water by the rat depended on how long the animal was kept in metabolic cage. Glucose concentration increased on average by 15.37 %, WBC count decreased by 5.83 % in the blood of rats housed in metabolic cages compared to the animals housed in standard cages. We did not observe significant changes of triglycerides concentration, red blood cells count and total protein between all rats. The positive moderate correlation of rat housing in a metabolic cage was between K blood and K urine, P blood and P urine, Na blood and K blood, between Na urine and P urine and significant negative moderate correlation was determined between K urine and P urine. These present study findings indicate that metabolism cage housing significantly affects rat’s physiological parameters and potentially may influence animal health and well being.

  2. Computed tomography measurement of rib cage morphometry in emphysema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Sverzellati

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Factors determining the shape of the human rib cage are not completely understood. We aimed to quantify the contribution of anthropometric and COPD-related changes to rib cage variability in adult cigarette smokers. METHODS: Rib cage diameters and areas (calculated from the inner surface of the rib cage in 816 smokers with or without COPD, were evaluated at three anatomical levels using computed tomography (CT. CTs were analyzed with software, which allows quantification of total emphysema (emphysema%. The relationship between rib cage measurements and anthropometric factors, lung function indices, and %emphysema were tested using linear regression models. RESULTS: A model that included gender, age, BMI, emphysema%, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1%, and forced vital capacity (FVC% fit best with the rib cage measurements (R(2 = 64% for the rib cage area variation at the lower anatomical level. Gender had the biggest impact on rib cage diameter and area (105.3 cm(2; 95% CI: 111.7 to 98.8 for male lower area. Emphysema% was responsible for an increase in size of upper and middle CT areas (up to 5.4 cm(2; 95% CI: 3.0 to 7.8 for an emphysema increase of 5%. Lower rib cage areas decreased as FVC% decreased (5.1 cm(2; 95% CI: 2.5 to 7.6 for 10 percentage points of FVC variation. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that simple CT measurements can predict rib cage morphometric variability and also highlight relationships between rib cage morphometry and emphysema.

  3. Preinjector for Linac 1, Faraday cage

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The 50 MeV Linac 1 started up in 1958 as injector to the 26 GeV PS, with a 520 kV Cockcroft-Walton generator as its preinjector, housed in a vast Faraday cage, visible here. When the Cockcroft-Walton broke down in 1973, it was replaced by a much smaller SAMES generator, of the kind used for electrostatic separators. From 1980 on, Linac 2 took over as injector for the 800 MeV Booster, and Linac 1 continued as injector for LEAR. In 1984, the electrostatic preinjector (i.e. the Faraday cage with its contents, SAMES generator and all) was replaced by a 520 keV RFQ. At the lower left corner we see the HV connectors to the SAMES generator, at the right edge part of the opened electronics-platform. Jean-Luc Vallet sees to it that all parts are properly grounded. See also 7403073X, 7403074X, 7403081X, 7403083X.

  4. Morphosynthesis of cubic silver cages on monolithic activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Zhao, Hong; Lai, Yijian; Liu, Siyu; Zhao, Binyuan; Ning, Yuesheng; Hu, Xiaobin

    2013-11-14

    Cubic silver cages were prepared on monolithic activated carbon (MAC) pre-absorbed with Cl(-), SO4(2-), or PO4(3-) anions. Silver insoluble salts served as templates for the morphosynthesis of silver cages. The silver ions were reduced by reductive functional groups on MAC micropores through a galvanic cell reaction mechanism. PMID:24080952

  5. 48 CFR 204.7202-1 - CAGE codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ...)(1) If a prospective contractor located in the United States must register in the Central Contractor... registrants must obtain a North Atlantic Treaty Organization CAGE (NCAGE) code in order to register in the CCR... dial-up capability; or (D) The Internet to access the CAGE Lookup Server at...

  6. Design of the UHVDC Corona Cage in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Jian; LU Jiayu; ZHANG Wenliang

    2013-01-01

    For the purpose of testing and analysing the corona characteristics of UHVDC bundle conductors,UHVDC corona cage would be built in China.Corona cage is one of the indispensable equipments for conductor corona performance researches.Tests of conductor cotona characteristics in corona cages can overcome the shortages of those with test lines.The dimensions of several corona cages constructed overseas were introduced in this paper.Based on foreign experiences and the requirement of State Grid Corporation of China,the UHVDC corona cage was designed as double-cage,double-layer,three-seetions,and catenary shape with the size of 70 m×22 m× 13 m.The corona loss measurement system,radio interference measuring system,and the audible noise measuring system are also detailed,including the measurement theory,connection with the cage,the parameters and the designing basis.The UHVDC corona cage has been put into service.It now undergoes a large amount of audible noise and radio frequency interference tests.

  7. Abnormal Behavior in Relation to Cage Size in Rhesus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulk, H. H.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Examines the effects of cage size on stereotyped and normal locomotion and on other abnormal behaviors in singly caged animals, whether observed abnormal behaviors tend to co-occur, and if the development of an abnormal behavior repertoire leads to reduction in the number of normal behavior categories. (Author/RK)

  8. Polymers containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, III, Daniel E.; Eastwood, Eric A.

    2012-06-05

    Polymers comprising residues of borane and/or carborane cage compound monomers having at least one polyalkoxy silyl substituent. Such polymers can further comprise one or more reactive matrices and/or co-monomers covalently bound with the cage compound monomer residues. Methods of making and applications for using such polymers are also disclosed.

  9. Ammonia Levels and Urine-Spot Characteristics as Cage-Change Indicators for High-Density Individually Ventilated Mouse Cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washington, Ida M; Payton, Mark E

    2016-01-01

    Mouse cage and bedding changes are potentially stressful to mice and are also labor- and resource-intensive. These changes are often performed on a calendar-based schedule to maintain a clean microenvironment and limit the concentrations of ammonia to which mice and workers are exposed. The current study sought to establish a performance-based approach to mouse cage-changing that uses urine spot characteristics as visual indicators of intracage ammonia levels. Colorimetric ammonia indicators were used to measure ammonia levels in individually-ventilated cages (IVC) housing male or female mice (n =5 per cage) of various strains at 1 to 16 d after cage change. Urine spot characteristics were correlated with ammonia levels to create a visual indicator of the cage-change criterion of 25 ppm ammonia. Results demonstrated a consistent increase in ammonia levels with days since cage change, with cages reaching the cage-change criterion at approximately 10 d for IVC containing male mice and 16 d for those with female mice. Ammonia levels were higher for male than female mice but were not correlated with mouse age. However, urine spot diameter, color, and edge characteristics were strongly correlated with ammonia levels. Husbandry practices based on using urine spot characteristics as indicators of ammonia levels led to fewer weekly cage changes and concomitant savings in labor and resources. Therefore, urine spot characteristics can be used as visual indicators of intracage ammonia levels for use of a performance (urine spot)-based approach to cage-changing frequency that maintains animal health and wellbeing. PMID:27177558

  10. Permeability changes and incorporation of labelled thymidine into DNA and whole cells of the fibroblast culture of Chinese hamsters affected by MEA and low temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Action of MEA and low temperature (20degC) on the incorporation of labelled thymidine into DNA and whole cells of the fibroblast culture of chinese hamsters has been studied. It has been found that each of the above-mentioned factors equally decreases the label uptake into the cell and DNA. It is concluded that MEA and low temperature do not substantially influence the rate of DNA synthesis

  11. NeuroMap: A spline-based interactive open-source software for spatiotemporal mapping of 2D and 3D MEA data

    OpenAIRE

    Oussama Abdoun

    2011-01-01

    A major characteristic of neural networks is the complexity of their organization at various spatial scales, from microscopic local circuits to macroscopic brain-scale areas. Understanding how neural information is processed thus entails the ability to study them at multiple scales simultaneously. This is made possible using microelectrodes array (MEA) technology. Indeed, high-density MEAs provide large-scale covering (several mm²) of whole neural structures combined with microscopic res...

  12. NeuroMap: A Spline-Based Interactive Open-Source Software for Spatiotemporal Mapping of 2D and 3D MEA Data

    OpenAIRE

    Abdoun, Oussama; Joucla, Sébastien; Mazzocco, Claire; Yvert, Blaise

    2011-01-01

    A major characteristic of neural networks is the complexity of their organization at various spatial scales, from microscopic local circuits to macroscopic brain-scale areas. Understanding how neural information is processed thus entails the ability to study them at multiple scales simultaneously. This is made possible using microelectrodes array (MEA) technology. Indeed, high-density MEAs provide large-scale coverage (several square millimeters) of whole neural structures combined with micro...

  13. High-Performance MEA Prepared by Direct Deposition of Platinum on the Gas Diffusion Layer Using an Atomic Layer Deposition Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A highly performance membrane electrode assembly was prepared by ALD technique. • The platinum atoms were deposited on the gas diffusion layer directly. • The ALD-electrode achieved 2.5 times mass activity of the conventional electrode. - Abstract: A high-performance membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with low platinum loading was successfully prepared using an atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique, in which the platinum was directly deposited on the gas diffusion layer to form the catalyst layer. MEAs were fabricated with an ALD-prepared electrode as the anode, and assembled with pretreated Nafion® membrane (Nafion® 117) and a commercial cathode. The MEAs were evaluated in a single-cell test station and characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV), field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) and grazing incident X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results revealed that the active component, Pt, was highly dispersed in the ALD anode, and the MEA with the ALD anode showed excellent activity and stability. The mass activity reached 4.80 kW g Pt−1, which was 2.53 times higher than that of the MEA with the anode prepared using the commercial catalyst and a conventional screen printing method. In 100 h of durability testing, the ALD–MEA exhibited excellent durability (98.2% voltage retention) compared with the CC–MEA (92.5% voltage retention) when the MEA was discharged at a current density of 400 mA cm−2. The high performance, along with low platinum loading and high platinum utilization, make the ALD technique promising for use in PEM fuel cells

  14. Influence of mea on dna breaks accumulation in bac. stearothermophilus exposed to γ- and UV-radiation and treated with nitrosomethylurea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    β-Mercaptoethylamine (MEA) decreased the accumulation of enzymatic single- and double-strand breaks in DNA of thermophilic bacteria exposed to γ- and UV- radiation and treated with N-nitroso-N-methylurea. The protective effect of MEA, as registered according to accumulation of single-strand and double-strand breaks in DNA of Bac. stearothermophilus immediately after irradiation and after 30 min postirradiation incubation, was similar

  15. Electrofriction method of manufacturing squirrel cage rotors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, John S.

    2005-04-12

    A method of making a squirrel cage rotor of copper material for use in AC or DC motors, includes forming a core with longitudinal slots, inserting bars of conductive material in the slots, with ends extending out of opposite ends of the core, and joining the end rings to the bars, wherein the conductive material of either the end rings or the bars is copper. Various methods of joining the end rings to the bars are disclosed including electrofriction welding, current pulse welding and brazing, transient liquid phase joining and casting. Pressure is also applied to the end rings to improve contact and reduce areas of small or uneven contact between the bar ends and the end rings. Rotors made with such methods are also disclosed.

  16. Protein Cages as Containers for Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Aijie; Verwegen, Martijn; de Ruiter, Mark V; Maassen, Stan J; Traulsen, Christoph H-H; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M

    2016-07-01

    Abundant and highly diverse, viruses offer new scaffolds in nanotechnology for the encapsulation, organization, or even synthesis of novel materials. In this work the coat protein of the cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) is used to encapsulate gold nanoparticles with different sizes and stabilizing ligands yielding stable particles in buffered solutions at neutral pH. The sizes of the virus-like particles correspond to T = 1, 2, and 3 Caspar-Klug icosahedral triangulation numbers. We developed a simple one-step process enabling the encapsulation of commercially available gold nanoparticles without prior modification with up to 97% efficiency. The encapsulation efficiency is further increased using bis-p-(sufonatophenyl)phenyl phosphine surfactants up to 99%. Our work provides a simplified procedure for the preparation of metallic particles stabilized in CCMV protein cages. The presented results are expected to enable the preparation of a variety of similar virus-based colloids for current focus areas. PMID:27135176

  17. Cathodic Cage Plasma Nitriding: An Innovative Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. M. de Sousa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cylindrical samples of AISI 1020, AISI 316, and AISI 420 steels, with different heights, were simultaneously treated by a new technique of ionic nitriding, entitled cathodic cage plasma nitriding (CCPN, in order to evaluate the efficiency of this technique to produce nitrided layers with better properties compared with those obtained using conventional ionic nitriding technique. This method is able to eliminate the edge effect in the samples, promoting a better uniformity of temperature, and consequently, a smaller variation of the thickness/height relation can be obtained. The compound layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and microhardness test profile. The results were compared with the properties of samples obtained with the conventional nitriding, for the three steel types. It was verified that samples treated by CCPN process presented, at the same temperature, a better uniformity in the thickness and absence of the edge effect.

  18. Transcription regulatory networks analysis using CAGE

    KAUST Repository

    Tegnér, Jesper N.

    2009-10-01

    Mapping out cellular networks in general and transcriptional networks in particular has proved to be a bottle-neck hampering our understanding of biological processes. Integrative approaches fusing computational and experimental technologies for decoding transcriptional networks at a high level of resolution is therefore of uttermost importance. Yet, this is challenging since the control of gene expression in eukaryotes is a complex multi-level process influenced by several epigenetic factors and the fine interplay between regulatory proteins and the promoter structure governing the combinatorial regulation of gene expression. In this chapter we review how the CAGE data can be integrated with other measurements such as expression, physical interactions and computational prediction of regulatory motifs, which together can provide a genome-wide picture of eukaryotic transcriptional regulatory networks at a new level of resolution. © 2010 by Pan Stanford Publishing Pte. Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Final Report - Advanced MEA's for Enhanced Operating Conditions, Amenable to High Volume Manufacture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debe, Mark K.

    2007-09-30

    This report summarizes the work completed under a 3M/DOE contract directed at advancing the key fuel cell (FC) components most critical for overcoming the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) performance, durability & cost barriers. This contract focused on the development of advanced ion exchange membranes & electrocatalysts for PEMFCs that will enable operation under ever more demanding automotive operating conditions & the use high volume compatible processes for their manufacture. Higher performing & more durable electrocatalysts must be developed for PEMFCs to meet the power density & lifetime hours required for FC vehicles. At the same time the amount of expensive Pt catalyst must be reduced to lower the MEA costs. While these two properties are met, the catalyst must be made resistant to multiple degradation mechanisms to reach necessary operating lifetimes. In this report, we present the work focused on the development of a completely new approach to PEMFC electrocatalyts, called nanostructured thin film (NSTF) catalysts. The carbon black supports are eliminated with this new approach which eliminates the carbon corrosion issue. The thin film nature of the catalyst significantly improves its robustness against dissolution & grain growth, preserving the surface area. Also, the activity of the NSTF for oxygen reduction is improved by over 500% compared to dispersed Pt catalyts. Finally, the process for fabricating the NSTF catalysts is consistent with high volume roll-good manufacturing & extremely flexible towards the introduction of new catalyst compositions & structures. This report documents the work done to develop new multi-element NSTF catalysts with properties that exceed pure Pt, that are optimized for use with the membranes discussed below, & advance the state-of-the-art towards meeting the DOE 2010 targets for PEMFC electrocatalysts. The work completed advances the understanding of the NSTF catalyst technology, identifies new NSTF

  20. Simultaneous removal of CO2 and H2S using MEA solution in a packed column absorber for biogas upgrading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preecha Kasikamphaiboon

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Biogas production and utilization is an emerging alternative energy technology that has gained importance since the price of oil and gas has increased steadily over the last two decades. Biogas primarily consists of methane (CH4 and carbon dioxide (CO2 with smaller amounts of hydrogen sulfide (H2S and ammonia (NH3. For many applications the quality of biogas has to be improved. The main parameters that may require removal in upgrading systems are CO2 and H2S. This work presents the study of simultaneous absorption of CO2 and H2S by Monoethanolamine (MEA solution in a packed column. Simulated biogas containing 40% CO2 and 60% N2 and biogas generated from an anaerobic digestion plant were used as feed gas streams. The effects of gas flow rate, L/G ratio and absorbent concentration were investigated. The performance of the system was found to vary with process parameters. Increasing L/G ratio and MEA concentration causes the system efficiency to increase whereas increasing gas flow rate results in lower efficiency. An operating condition of L/G ratio of 83.3 ml/L, gas flow rate of 3 L/min and MEA concentration of 3 mol/L was found to remove more than 99.5% of CO2 and H2S from biogas. The volumetric overall mass-transfer coefficient (KGav for CO2 removal initially increases with increasing gas flow rate up to a certain value beyond which the coefficient becomes essentially constant. The KGav also increases with increasing L/G ratio throughout the range tested in this study.

  1. Performance and welfare of rabbit does in various caging systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikó, A; Matics, Zs; Gerencsér, Zs; Odermatt, M; Radnai, I; Nagy, I; Szendrő, K; Szendrő, Zs

    2014-07-01

    The objective of the study was to compare production and welfare of rabbit does and their kits housed in various types of cages. Female rabbits were randomly allocated to four groups with the following cage types: CN: common wire-mesh flat-deck cage, without footrest; CF: cage similar to the CN but with plastic footrest; ECWP: enlarged cage with wire-mesh platform; and ECPP: extra enlarged cage with plastic-mesh platform. All does were inseminated on the same day, 11 days after kindlings. Reproductive performance was evaluated during the first five consecutive kindlings. Severity of sore hocks was scored at each insemination. Location preference of the does and the platform usage of their kits were evaluated. Kindling rate, litter size (total born, born alive, alive at 21 and 35 days) and kit mortality were not significantly influenced by the cage types. The litter weight at 21 days was higher in ECWP and ECPP cages than in the CF group (3516, 3576 and 3291 g, respectively; P2.5 cm) and 3 to 4 (3=callus opened, cracks present; 4=wounds) were 58%, 60%, 78% and 48%, and 0%, 5%, 0% and 48% in groups ECPP, ECWP, CF and CN, respectively. Higher number of daily nest visits was observed for CF does than for ECWP does (12.5 v. 5.9; P2/day) was higher in the CF group than in the ECWP group (12.1 v. 3.2%; Pplastic footrests and plastic-mesh platforms in conventional and/or large cages reduced sore hocks' problems, plastic-mesh platforms were more used by both does and kits compared with the wire-mesh platforms. PMID:26263030

  2. Endohedral dynamics of push-pull rotor-functionalized cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krick, Marcel; Holstein, Julian; Würtele, Christian; Clever, Guido H

    2016-08-16

    A series of [Pd2L4] coordination cages featuring endohedral functionalities in central backbone positions was synthesized. Although attached via C[double bond, length as m-dash]C double bonds, the substituents behave as molecular rotors. This is explained by their pronounced donor-acceptor character which lowers rotational barriers and allows for electronic control over the spinning rates inside the cage. The dynamic behaviour of the free ligands, assembled cages and host-guest complexes is compared with the aid of NMR experiments, X-ray structure analysis and molecular modelling. PMID:27484435

  3. The planimetric unfold method of fullerene cage structure

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Two kinds of planimetric diagrams, which consist of the boat form F6 and F5, the storm petrel form F6 and F5, respectively, were proposed to express the geometric structure of fullerene cage in this study. There are two chief advantages using the diagrams: (ⅰ) the spatial symmetrical characteristic of fullerene cage is not destroyed; (ⅱ) the coordination forms of F5 and F6 in the structure can be clearly expressed. This work has laid the foundation for studying the structural geometry of fullerene cage and its quantum chemistry and property.

  4. Bemisia tabaci: A new clip-cage for biological studies

    OpenAIRE

    Muñiz, M.; Nombela, G.

    2001-01-01

    This new clip-cage has been designed in our laboratory. It is a transparent plastic truncated cone clip-cage (3.6 cm x 2.6 cm diameter; 4 cm high). A very thin polypropylene mesh (30 holes/inch) is attached to the bottom by paraffin wax. We have used this clip-cage attached to the under surface of the leaves in our studies on the biology of both B and Q biotypes of Bemisia tabaci with excellent results.

  5. NeuroMap: A spline-based interactive open-source software for spatiotemporal mapping of 2D and 3D MEA data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oussama Abdoun

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A major characteristic of neural networks is the complexity of their organization at various spatial scales, from microscopic local circuits to macroscopic brain-scale areas. Understanding how neural information is processed thus entails the ability to study them at multiple scales simultaneously. This is made possible using microelectrodes array (MEA technology. Indeed, high-density MEAs provide large-scale covering (several mm² of whole neural structures combined with microscopic resolution (about 50µm of unit activity. Yet, current options for spatiotemporal representation of MEA-collected data remain limited. Here we present NeuroMap, a new interactive Matlab-based software for spatiotemporal mapping of MEA data. NeuroMap uses thin plate spline interpolation, which provides several assets with respect to conventional mapping methods used currently. First, any MEA design can be considered, including 2D or 3D, regular or irregular, arrangements of electrodes. Second, spline interpolation allows the estimation of activity across the tissue with local extrema not necessarily at recording sites. Finally, this interpolation approach provides a straightforward analytical estimation of the spatial Laplacian for better current sources localization. In this software, coregistration of 2D MEA data on the anatomy of the neural tissue is made possible by fine matching of anatomical data with electrode positions using rigid deformation based correction of anatomical pictures. Overall, NeuroMap provides substantial material for detailed spatiotemporal analysis of MEA data. The package is distributed under GNU General Public License (GPL and available at http://sites.google.com/site/neuromapsoftware.

  6. A Comparative Study of the CO2 Absorption in Some Solvent-Free Alkanolamines and in Aqueous Monoethanolamine (MEA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barzagli, Francesco; Mani, Fabrizio; Peruzzini, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    The neat secondary amines 2-(methylamino)ethanol, 2-(ethylamino)ethanol, 2-(isopropylamino)ethanol, 2-(benzylamino)ethanol and 2-(butylamino)ethanol react with CO2 at 50-60 °C and room pressure yielding liquid carbonated species without their dilution with any additional solvent. These single-component absorbents have the theoretical CO2 capture capacity of 0.50 (mol CO2/mol amine) due to the formation of the corresponding amine carbamates and protonated amines that were identified by the (13)C NMR analysis. These single-component absorbents were used for CO2 capture (15% and 40% v/v in air) in two series of different procedures: (1) batch experiments aimed at investigating the efficiency and the rate of CO2 capture; (2) continuous cycles of absorption-desorption carried out in packed columns with absorption temperatures brought at 50-60 °C and desorption temperatures at 100-120 °C at room pressure. A number of different amines and experimental setups gave CO2 capture efficiency greater than 90%. For comparison purposes, 30 wt % aqueous MEA was used for CO2 capture under the same operational conditions described for the solvent-free amines. The potential advantages of solvent-free alkanolamines over aqueous MEA in the CO2 capture process were discussed. PMID:27294832

  7. Mechanical behaviour of membrane electrode assembly (MEA during cold start of PEM fuel cell from subzero environment temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maher A.R. Sadiq Al-Baghdadi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Durability is one of the most critical remaining issues impeding successful commercialization of broad PEM fuel cell transportation energy applications. Automotive fuel cells are likely to operate with neat hydrogen under load-following or load-levelled modes and be expected to withstand variations in environmental conditions, particularly in the context of temperature and atmospheric composition. In addition, they are also required to survive over the course of their expected operational lifetimes i.e., around 5,500 hrs, while undergoing as many as 30,000 startup/shutdown cycles. Cold start capability and survivability of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEM in a subzero environment temperature remain a challenge for automotive applications. A key component of increasing the durability of PEM fuel cells is studying the behaviour of the membrane electrode assembly (MEA at the heart of the fuel cell. The present work investigates how the mechanical behaviour of MEA are influenced during cold start of the PEM fuel cell from subzero environment temperatures. Full three-dimensional, non-isothermal computational fluid dynamics model of a PEM fuel cell has been developed to simulate the stresses inside the PEM fuel cell, which are occurring during fuel cell assembly (bolt assembling, and the stresses arise during fuel cell running due to the changes of temperature and relative humidity. The model is shown to be able to understand the many interacting, complex electrochemical, transport phenomena, and stresses distribution that have limited experimental data.

  8. Comparison of spike parameters from optically identified GABAergic and glutamatergic neurons in sparse cortical cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heiko J Luhmann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary neuronal cultures share many typical features with the in vivo situation, including similarities in distinct electrical activity patterns and synaptic network interactions. Here, we use multi-electrode array (MEA recordings from spontaneously active cultures of wildtype and GAD67-GFP transgenic mice to evaluate which spike parameters differ between GABAergic interneurons and principal, putatively glutamatergic neurons. To analyze this question we combine MEA recordings with optical imaging in sparse cortical cultures to assign individual spikes to visually-identified single neurons. In our culture system, excitatory and inhibitory neurons are present at a similar ratio as described in vivo, and spike waveform characteristics and firing patterns are fully developed after two weeks in vitro. Spike amplitude, but not other spike waveform parameters, correlated with the distance between the recording electrode and the location of the assigned neuron´s soma. Cluster analysis of spike waveform properties revealed no particular cell population that may be assigned to putative inhibitory or excitatory neurons. Moreover, experiments in primary cultures from transgenic GAD67-GFP mice, which allow optical identification of GABAergic interneurons and thus unambiguous assignment of extracellular signals, did not reveal any significant difference in spike timing and spike waveform parameters between inhibitory and excitatory neurons. Despite of our detailed characterization of spike waveform and temporal spiking properties we could not identify an unequivocal electrical parameter to discriminate between individual excitatory and inhibitory neurons in vitro. Our data suggest that under in vitro conditions cellular classifications of single neurons on the basis of their extracellular firing properties should be treated with caution.

  9. Designing optimal stimuli to control neuronal spike timing

    OpenAIRE

    Yashar Ahmadian

    2010-01-01

    We develop fast computational methods for optimally designing a natural or artificial stimulus to make a neuron emit a desired spike train. We consider three specific examples of artificial stimulation methods: extracellular electrical stimulation (Salzman et al. 1990), two-photon uncaging of caged neurotransmitters (Nikolenko et al., 2008), and optical activation of genetically implanted light-sensitive ion channels (Han et al. 2007). We also consider the case of optimizing a sensory stimulu...

  10. Multiparametric characterisation of neuronal network activity for in vitro agrochemical neurotoxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloisio, Susanna; Nobile, Mario; Novellino, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    The last few decades have seen the marketing of hundreds of new pesticide products with a forecasted expansion of the global agrochemical industry. As several pesticides directly target nervous tissue as their mechanism of toxicity, alternative methods to routine in vivo animal testing, such as the Multi Electrode Array (MEAs)-based approach, have been proposed as an in vitro tool to perform sensitive, quick and low cost neuro-toxicological screening. Here, we examined the effects of a training set of eleven active substances known to have neuronal or non-neuronal targets, contained in the most commonly used agrochemicals, on the spontaneous electrical activity of cortical neuronal networks grown on MEAs. A multiparametric characterisation of neuronal network firing and bursting was performed with the aim of investigating how this can contribute to the efficient evaluation of in vitro chemical-induced neurotoxicity. The analysis of MFR, MBR, MBD, MISI_B and % Spikes_B parameters identified four different groups of chemicals: one wherein only inhibition is observed (chlorpyrifos, deltamethrin, orysastrobin, dimoxystrobin); a second one in which all parameters, except the MISI_B, are inhibited (carbaryl, quinmerac); a third in which increases at low chemical concentration are followed by decreases at high concentration, with exception of MISI_B that only decreased (fipronil); a fourth in which no effects are observed (paraquat, glyphosate, imidacloprid, mepiquat). The overall results demonstrated that the multiparametric description of the neuronal networks activity makes MEA-based screening platform an accurate and consistent tool for the evaluation of the toxic potential of chemicals. In particular, among the bursting parameters the MISI_B was the best that correlates with potency and may help to better define chemical toxicity when MFR is affected only at relatively high concentration. PMID:25845298

  11. Leptin counteracts the hypoxia-induced inhibition of spontaneously firing hippocampal neurons: a microelectrode array study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavello, Daniela; Rojo-Ruiz, Jonathan; Marcantoni, Andrea; Franchino, Claudio; Carbone, Emilio; Carabelli, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Besides regulating energy balance and reducing body-weight, the adipokine leptin has been recently shown to be neuroprotective and antiapoptotic by promoting neuronal survival after excitotoxic and oxidative insults. Here, we investigated the firing properties of mouse hippocampal neurons and the effects of leptin pretreatment on hypoxic damage (2 hours, 3% O(2)). Experiments were carried out by means of the microelectrode array (MEA) technology, monitoring hippocampal neurons activity from 11 to 18 days in vitro (DIV). Under normoxic conditions, hippocampal neurons were spontaneously firing, either with prevailing isolated and randomly distributed spikes (11 DIV), or with patterns characterized by synchronized bursts (18 DIV). Exposure to hypoxia severely impaired the spontaneous activity of hippocampal neurons, reducing their firing frequency by 54% and 69%, at 11 and 18 DIV respectively, and synchronized their firing activity. Pretreatment with 50 nM leptin reduced the firing frequency of normoxic neurons and contrasted the hypoxia-induced depressive action, either by limiting the firing frequency reduction (at both ages) or by increasing it to 126% (in younger neurons). In order to find out whether leptin exerts its effect by activating large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BK), as shown on rat hippocampal neurons, we applied the BK channel blocker paxilline (1 µM). Our data show that paxilline reversed the effects of leptin, both on normoxic and hypoxic neurons, suggesting that the adipokine counteracts hypoxia through BK channels activation in mouse hippocampal neurons. PMID:22848520

  12. Linear diffusion into a Faraday cage.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Lin, Yau Tang; Merewether, Kimball O.; Chen, Kenneth C.

    2011-11-01

    Linear lightning diffusion into a Faraday cage is studied. An early-time integral valid for large ratios of enclosure size to enclosure thickness and small relative permeability ({mu}/{mu}{sub 0} {le} 10) is used for this study. Existing solutions for nearby lightning impulse responses of electrically thick-wall enclosures are refined and extended to calculate the nearby lightning magnetic field (H) and time-derivative magnetic field (HDOT) inside enclosures of varying thickness caused by a decaying exponential excitation. For a direct strike scenario, the early-time integral for a worst-case line source outside the enclosure caused by an impulse is simplified and numerically integrated to give the interior H and HDOT at the location closest to the source as well as a function of distance from the source. H and HDOT enclosure response functions for decaying exponentials are considered for an enclosure wall of any thickness. Simple formulas are derived to provide a description of enclosure interior H and HDOT as well. Direct strike voltage and current bounds for a single-turn optimally-coupled loop for all three waveforms are also given.

  13. In vitro neuronal network activity in NMDA receptor encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jantzen Sabine U

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-NMDA-encephalitis is caused by antibodies against the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR and characterized by a severe encephalopathy with psychosis, epileptic seizures and autonomic disturbances. It predominantly occurs in young women and is associated in 59% with an ovarian teratoma. Results We describe effects of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF from an anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR encephalitis patient on in vitro neuronal network activity (ivNNA. In vitro NNA of dissociated primary rat cortical populations was recorded by the microelectrode array (MEA system. The 23-year old patient was severely affected but showed an excellent recovery following multimodal immunomodulatory therapy and removal of an ovarian teratoma. Patient CSF (pCSF taken during the initial weeks after disease onset suppressed global spike- and burst rates of ivNNA in contrast to pCSF sampled after clinical recovery and decrease of NMDAR antibody titers. The synchrony of pCSF-affected ivNNA remained unaltered during the course of the disease. Conclusion Patient CSF directly suppresses global activity of neuronal networks recorded by the MEA system. In contrast, pCSF did not regulate the synchrony of ivNNA suggesting that NMDAR antibodies selectively regulate distinct parameters of ivNNA while sparing their functional connectivity. Thus, assessing ivNNA could represent a new technique to evaluate functional consequences of autoimmune encephalitis-related CSF changes.

  14. La cage qui cache : La Cage Dorée de Ruben Alves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Marinho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The French Comedy La Cage Dorée (produced by the luso descendant Ruben Alves, 2013 success seems to be mainly due to its clichés of Portuguese epics in Paris, and its miseries may not have been underlined enough. Thus, under this apparently naif portrait an intriguing painting of Portuguese immigrants’ French dis-integration may really be hiding, which is the aim of this essay, on one hand, to bring out and, on the other one, to clarify, by questioning comparative critical common denominators of the two countries.

  15. La cage qui cache : La Cage Dorée de Ruben Alves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Marinho

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The French Comedy La Cage Dorée (produced by the luso descendant Ruben Alves, 2013 success seems to be mainly due to its clichés of Portuguese epics in Paris, and its miseries may not have been underlined enough. Thus, under this apparently naif portrait an intriguing painting of Portuguese immigrants’ French dis-integration may really be hiding, which is the aim of this essay, on one hand, to bring out and, on the other one, to clarify, by questioning comparative critical common denominators of the two countries.

  16. Evaluation of the pharmacophoric motif of the caged Garcinia xanthones†

    OpenAIRE

    Chantarasriwong, Oraphin; Cho, Woo Cheal; Batova, Ayse; Chavasiri, Warinthorn; Moore, Curtis; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A.

    2009-01-01

    The combination of unique structure and potent bioactivity exhibited by several family members of the caged Garcinia xanthones, led us to evaluate their pharmacophore. We have developed a Pd(0)-catalyzed method for the reverse prenylation of catechols that, together with a Claisen/Diels–Alder reaction cascade, provides rapid and efficient access to various caged analogues. Evaluation of the growth inhibitory activity of these compounds leads to the conclusion that the intact ABC ring system c...

  17. Cage experiments in an East African mangrove forest: a synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Schrijvers, J.; Vincx, M.

    1997-01-01

    The impact of epibenthos on endobenthos has frequently been investigated for temperate saltmarsh regions by using cage exclusion experiments. Although the insight into the function of the endobenthos of mangrove forests is crucial for their management, very few cage experiments have so far been carried out in such areas. The present paper summarises the result of such experiments in a typical East African mangrove forest at Gazi Bay about 60 km south of Mombasa, Kenya. Epibenthic animals were...

  18. Catalogue Note on Taner Ceylan's Cage of Flesh (2012)

    OpenAIRE

    Cakirlar, C.; Delice, S.

    2012-01-01

    Cage of Flesh (Ten Kafesi), the most recent piece by the photorealist painter Taner Ceylan, engages with the politics of and the erotics within representation in Orientalist painting by confronting the viewer with a re-imagined figure of an odalisque. Following his highly acclaimed Lost Painting Series that featured Fake World (2011), 1640 (2011), 1879 (2011), 1923 (2010) and 1881 (2010), Cage of Flesh uses an ingenious amalgam of allusions to both Orientalist eroticisation of female flesh an...

  19. Experimental setup for the measurement of induction motor cage currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental setup for measurement of the currents flowing in the rotor bars of induction motors during synchronous no-load tests is described in the paper. The experimental verification of the high-frequency phenomena in the rotor cage is fundamental for a deep insight of the additional loss estimation by numerical methods. The attention is mainly focused on the analysis and design of the transducers developed for the cage current measurement

  20. Extracellular Recording from Neuronal Networks Cultured on Hydrogel-coated Microelectrode Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Miho; Moriguchi, Hiroyuki; Takayama, Yuzo; Saito, Aki; Kotani, Kiyoshi; Jimbo, Yasuhiko

    Microelectrode array (MEA) has been widely used for ensemble recording. One of the advantages of MEA recording is its capability of studying correlation between network structures and the ensemble activity-patterns. Simple neuronal networks, from which activities of individual cells can be identified, are promising for this purpose. We have developed a mask-free cell-patterning method named “micropipette drawing”. In this method, a thin hydrogel layer is formed on the surface of MEA substrates, which acts as the support for growth-guidance patterns. Here in this work, we tested whether electrical signals could be detected through this gel layer. Rat cortical neurons were cultured on substrates with guiding patterns. Electrical activities could be detected after 7 days in vitro (DIV) in both patterned and normal cell cultures, though the signal to noise ratio in the normal culture was clearly higher than that in the patterned culture. Frequency analysis demonstrated that the difference of the power spectra between these cultures was particularly significant in high frequency regions. Decreases in high-frequency components were more prominent in the signals obtained from the patterned cultures. This result suggested that the hydrogel layer acted as low-pass filters probably due to its capacitive properties. The next step is to establish a method to form hydrogel layers, which maintain growth-guidance properties and have better frequency characteristics.

  1. Motivations and APS-based solution for high-resolution extracellular recording from in-vitro neuronal networks

    OpenAIRE

    Imfeld, Kilian; Garenne, André; Martinoia, Sergio; Koudelka-Hep, Milena; Berdondini, Luca

    2007-01-01

    Abstract—Mapping neuronal networks activity of in-vitro cell cultures with microelectrode array (MEA) based systems, providing a spatial resolution down to cellular/sub-cellular levels and an adequate temporal resolution for resolving action potential propagation in both micro- and macro-circuitry, can not be achieved with the conventional implementation. New technological approaches for managing high-density electrode arrays, i.e. at least separations down to cellular dimensions, and for han...

  2. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: Comparison of titanium and polyetheretherketone cages

    OpenAIRE

    Cabraja Mario; Oezdemir Soner; Koeppen Daniel; Kroppenstedt Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Titanium (TTN) cages have a higher modulus of elasticity when compared with polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages. This suggests that TTN-cages could show more frequent cage subsidence after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and therefore might lead to a higher loss of correction. We compared the long term results of stand-alone PEEK- and TTN-cages in a comparable patient collective that was operated under identical operative settings. Methods From 2002 to 2007 15...

  3. The influence of neuronal density and maturation on network activity of hippocampal cell cultures: a methodological study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Biffi

    Full Text Available It is known that cell density influences the maturation process of in vitro neuronal networks. Neuronal cultures plated with different cell densities differ in number of synapses per neuron and thus in single neuron synaptic transmission, which results in a density-dependent neuronal network activity. Although many authors provided detailed information about the effects of cell density on neuronal culture activity, a dedicated report of density and age influence on neuronal hippocampal culture activity has not yet been reported. Therefore, this work aims at providing reference data to researchers that set up an experimental study on hippocampal neuronal cultures, helping in planning and decoding the experiments. In this work, we analysed the effects of both neuronal density and culture age on functional attributes of maturing hippocampal cultures. We characterized the electrophysiological activity of neuronal cultures seeded at three different cell densities, recording their spontaneous electrical activity over maturation by means of MicroElectrode Arrays (MEAs. We had gather data from 86 independent hippocampal cultures to achieve solid statistic results, considering the high culture-to-culture variability. Network activity was evaluated in terms of simple spiking, burst and network burst features. We observed that electrical descriptors were characterized by a functional peak during maturation, followed by a stable phase (for sparse and medium density cultures or by a decrease phase (for high dense neuronal cultures. Moreover, 900 cells/mm(2 cultures showed characteristics suitable for long lasting experiments (e.g. chronic effect of drug treatments while 1800 cells/mm(2 cultures should be preferred for experiments that require intense electrical activity (e.g. to evaluate the effect of inhibitory molecules. Finally, cell cultures at 3600 cells/mm(2 are more appropriate for experiments in which time saving is relevant (e.g. drug screenings

  4. Evaluation of individually ventilated cage systems for laboratory rodents: cage environment and animal health aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglund, A U; Renström, A

    2001-01-01

    The use of individually ventilated cage (IVC) systems has become an attractive housing regime of laboratory rodents. The benefits of IVC systems are, reportedly, a high degree of containment combined with relative ease of handling, and a high degree of protection from allergenes. In the present study we tested whether two IVC systems (BioZone VentiRack, IVC1 and Techniplast SealSafe, IVC2S), in which we held mature male NMRI mice, were constructed to maintain a constant differential pressure, positive or negative, during a prolonged period of time. We also measured ammonia (NH3) concentrations after about 2 weeks of use, and CO2 build-up during a 60 min simulated power failure situation. In addition, animal weight development and bite-wound frequency were recorded (Renström et al. 2000). From the present study it is concluded that the IVC1 air handling system provides a more uniform and balanced differential pressure than the IVC2S. Both systems effectively scavenge NH3 when bedding material is not soaked by urine. Although the IVCs are dependent on the continual function of the fans to work properly, it seems unlikely that CO2 concentrations increase to hazardous levels, as a result of a one hour power failure, with the type of cages used in this study. Differences in weight development and bite-wound occurrence were noted between the two IVC systems. Causes for these differences could not be established and need more investigation. PMID:11201288

  5. 14C-age tracers in global ocean circulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeve, W.; Wagner, H.; Kähler, P.; Oschlies, A.

    2015-07-01

    The natural abundance of 14C in total CO2 dissolved in seawater (DIC) is a property applied to evaluate the water age structure and circulation in the ocean and in ocean models. In this study we use three different representations of the global ocean circulation augmented with a suite of idealised tracers to study the potential and limitations of using natural 14C to determine water age, which is the time elapsed since a body of water has been in contact with the atmosphere. We find that, globally, bulk 14C-age is dominated by two equally important components, one associated with ageing, i.e. the time component of circulation, and one associated with a "preformed 14C-age". The latter quantity exists because of the slow and incomplete atmosphere-ocean equilibration of 14C particularly in high latitudes where many water masses form. In the ocean's interior, preformed 14C-age behaves like a passive tracer. The relative contribution of the preformed component to bulk 14C-age varies regionally within a given model, but also between models. Regional variability in the Atlantic Ocean is associated with the mixing of waters with very different end members of preformed 14C-age. Here, variations in the preformed component over space and time mask the circulation component to an extent that its patterns are not detectable from bulk 14C-age. Between models, the variability of preformed 14C-age can also be considerable (factor of 2), related to the combination of physical model parameters, which influence circulation dynamics or gas exchange. The preformed component was found to be very sensitive to gas exchange and moderately sensitive to ice cover. In our model evaluation, the choice of the gas-exchange constant from within the currently accepted range of uncertainty had such a strong influence on preformed and bulk 14C-age that if model evaluation would be based on bulk 14C-age, it could easily impair the evaluation and tuning of a model's circulation on global and regional

  6. Multicomponent Protein Cage Architectures for Photocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Arunava [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Prevelige, Peter E [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2016-01-04

    The primary goal of the project was to develop protein-templated approaches for the synthesis and directed assembly of semiconductor nanomaterials that are efficient for visible light absorption and hydrogen production. In general, visible-light-driven photocatalysis reactions exhibit low quantum efficiency for solar energy conversion primarily because of materials-related issues and limitations, such as the control of the band gap, band structure, photochemical stability, and available reactive surface area of the photocatalyst. Synthesis of multicomponent hierarchical nano-architectures, consisting of semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) with desired optical properties fabricated to maximize spatial proximity for optimum electron and energy transfer represents an attractive route for addressing the problem. Virus capsids are highly symmetrical, self-assembling protein cage nanoparticles that exist in a range of sizes and symmetries. Selective deposition of inorganic, by design, at specific locations on virus capsids affords precise control over the size, spacing, and assembly of nanomaterials, resulting in uniform and reproducible nano-architectures. We utilized the self-assembling capabilities of the 420 subunit, 60 nm icosahedral, P22 virus capsid to direct the nucleation, growth, and proximity of a range of component materials. Controlled fabrication on the exterior of the temperature stable shell was achieved by genetically encoding specific binding peptides into an externally exposed loop which is displayed on each of the 420 coat protein subunits. Localization of complimentary materials to the interior of the particle was achieved through the use “scaffolding-fusion proteins. The scaffolding domain drives coat protein polymerization resulting in a coat protein shell surrounding a core of approximately 300 scaffolding/fusion molecules. The fusion domain comprises a peptide which specifically binds the semiconductor material of interest.

  7. CAGE BREEDING OF WARM WATER FRESHWATER FISH SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Safner

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In the 1970s, Croatia became actively involved in the contemporary trend of breeding fish in floating cages. In addition to various species of marine fishes, breeding was attempted with trout, carp, catfish, cisco and salmon. Of the above freshwater fish species, specific standards were established only for the cage breeding of rainbow trout. Cage breeding of the remaining species remained at the level of occasional attempts, with more of an experimental than a commercial character. The regular attempts to master this technique for cage breeding of warm water freshwater fish species were aimed at achieving the known benefits of such breeding, such as simplicity of implementing technological measures, easier establishment of the breeding system, simpler manipulation, the possibility of denser colonies per unit volume with a high level of production, easier adaptations to market conditions and fewer initial structural investments. Despite the many advantages, the main reasons for the lack of greater implementation of the cage breeding technology for warm water species of freshwater fish include problems in obtaining the appropriate category and quantity of healthy fry, the specificity and applicability of physical and chemical properties of the recipients and human error. In evaluating the advantages and disadvantages, the final decision on the justification of cage breeding for individual warm water freshwater species must be based on both biological and economic factors. Based on the knowledge of cage breeding acquired to date, the rule for virtually all intensive breeding systems is that it is only recommended for those species with high market demand and a high market price. The technology that demands nutrition with highly concentrated feed and other production expenditures is costly, and is therefore not profitable with less expensive fish species. Furthermore, production must be market oriented, i.e. the appropriate market research measures

  8. Analysis for impedance electrochemistry 'on-line' of membrane/electrode assemble (MEA) of protons exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC); Analise por impedancia eletroquimica 'on-line' de conjuntos eletrodos/membrana (MEA) de celulas a combustivel a membrana polimetrica (PEMFC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Antonio Rodolfo dos

    2007-07-01

    This work reports results of studies and characterization on membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) for proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). Some cell operation conditions and different processes of MEA production were investigated. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique (EIS) (in situ - 0 to 16 A) was used 'on-line' as a tool for diagnosis, concerning the cell performance. The EIS measurements were carried out with a FC350 Fuel Cell EIS System (GAMRY), coupled to a PC4 potentiostat/galvanostat and connected to the electronic load (TDI) for 'on-line' EIS experiments (100 mHz - 10 kHz, dU = 5 mV). MEAs with 25 cm{sup 2} surface area, using PtM/C 20% (M Ru, Sn or Ni) electrocatalysts were manufactured using the alcohol reduction process (ARP). The catalytic ink was applied directly into the carbon cloth (GDL) and pressed in the Nafion membrane (105). MEAs using Pt/C and Pt Ru/C 20% from E-TEK electrocatalysts were manufactured by comparison. All the cathodes were sprayed with Pt/C 20% from E-TEK. The noble metal concentrations used were set to 0.4 mg Pt.cm{sup -2} at the anode and 0.6 mg Pt.cm{sup -2} at the cathode (E-TEK). Nyquist diagrams of the MEAs with Pt/C and PtRu/C from E-TEK or PtM/C (M = Ru, Sn or Ni) ARP showed essentially the same ohmic resistances for the MEAs. This fact can be explained by suppression of agglomerates during the MEA preparation process or by the homogeneity of the anchored electrocatalysts at the carbon surface. It could also be observed, at low current densities, that there was a significant performance difference between the electrocatalysts from E-TEK and those prepared with the alcohol reduction process. The polarization curves results confirmed that the Pt M/C (M = Ru, Sn or Ni) ARP showed an activity increase for the methanol and ethanol fed cells. The technique of EIE was shown efficient for the evaluation of the method preparation of MEAs and the acting of the cell, the results of EIE

  9. Effect of synthetic cannabinoids on spontaneous neuronal activity: Evaluation using Ca(2+) spiking and multi-electrode arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauskela, Joseph S; Comas, Tanya; Hewitt, Melissa; Aylsworth, Amy; Zhao, Xigeng; Martina, Marzia; Costain, Willard J

    2016-09-01

    Activation of cannabinoid receptor 1 (CB1) inhibits synaptic transmission in hippocampal neurons. The goal of this study was to evaluate the ability of benchmark and emerging synthetic cannabinoids to suppress neuronal activity in vitro using two complementary techniques, Ca(2+) spiking and multi-electrode arrays (MEAs). Neuron culture and fluorescence imaging conditions were extensively optimized to provide maximum sensitivity for detection of suppression of neural activity by cannabinoids. The neuronal Ca(2+) spiking frequency was significantly suppressed within 10min by the prototypic aminoalkylindole cannabinoid, WIN 55,212-2 (10µM). Suppression by WIN 55,212-2 was not improved by pharmacological intervention with signaling pathways known to interfere with CB1 signaling. The naphthoylindole CB1 agonist, JWH-018 suppressed Ca(2+) spiking at a lower concentration (2.5µM), and the CB1 antagonist rimonabant (5µM), reversed this suppression. In the MEA assay, the ability of synthetic CB1 agonists to suppress spontaneous electrical activity of hippocampal neurons was evaluated over 80min sessions. All benchmark (WIN 55,212-2, HU-210, CP 55,940 and JWH-018) and emerging synthetic cannabinoids (XLR-11, JWH-250, 5F-PB-22, AB-PINACA and MAM-2201) suppressed neural activity at a concentration of 10µM; furthermore, several of these compounds also significantly suppressed activity at 1µM concentrations. Rimonabant partially reversed spiking suppression of 5F-PB-22 and, to a lesser extent, of MAM-2201, supporting CB1-mediated involvement, although the inactive WIN 55,212-3 also partially suppressed activity. Taken together, synthetic cannabinoid CB1-mediated suppression of neuronal activity was detected using Ca(2+) spiking and MEAs. PMID:27262380

  10. PROBLEMS OF BIOFOULING ON FISH–CAGE NETS IN AQUACULTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merica Slišković

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Biofouling on fish–cage netting is a serious technical and economical problem to aquaculture worldwide. Compensation for the effects of biofouling must be included in cage system design and planning, as fouling can dramatically increase both weight and drag. Settlements of sessile plants and animals, with accumulation of the detritus diminish the size of mesh and can rapidly occlude mesh. Negative effect of smaller mesh size is changing in water flow trough the cages. Biofouling problems necessitating purchase of a second sets of nets or more, and frequent cleaning and changing of biofouling. Changing and cleaning frequency depend on many factors such as: location of cages (near the coast or off shore, productivity of that location, time of the year, time period in which the cages are placed on that location (cause of loading of phosphorus and nitrogen from the unconsumed food in the sediment. Net changing and cleaning procedures are labor and capital intensive. Process of the cleaning of the nets is inadequate, especially when there isnžt adequate equipment available as it is case in smaller aquaculture industry. Chemical control of biofouling e. g. use of antifoulants is questioningly cause of their possible negative effects on breeding species and environment.

  11. Effects of Furnished Cage Type on Behavior and Welfare of Laying Hens

    OpenAIRE

    LI, XIANG; Chen, Donghua; Li, Jianhong; Bao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to compare the effects of layout of furniture (a perch, nest, and sandbox) in cages on behavior and welfare of hens. Two hundred and sixteen Hyline Brown laying hens were divided into five groups (treatments) with four replicates per group: small furnished cages (SFC), medium furnished cages type I (MFC-I), medium furnished cages type II (MFC-II), and medium furnished cages type III (MFC-III) and conventional cages (CC). The experiment started at 18 week of age and fi...

  12. Utilizing Model Eliciting Activities (MEA's) to engage middle school teachers and students in storm water management practices to mitigate human impacts of land development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazaz, A.; Wilson, R. M.; Schoen, R.; Blumsack, S.; King, L.; Dyehouse, M.

    2013-12-01

    'The Integrating STEM Project' engaged 6-8 grade teachers through activities incorporating mathematics, science and technology incorporating both Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and Common Core State Standards-Mathematics (CCSS-Math). A group of researchers from Oceanography, Mathematics, and Education set out to provide middle school teachers with a 2 year intensive STEM integration professional development with a focus on environmental topics and to monitor the achievement outcomes in their students. Over the course of 2 years the researchers created challenging professional development sessions to expand teacher knowledge and teachers were tasked to transform the information gained during the professional development sessions for classroom use. One lesson resource kit presented to the teachers, which was directly applicable to the classroom, included Model Eliciting Activities (MEA's) to explore the positive and negative effects land development has on climate and the environment, and how land development impacts storm water management. MEA's were developed to encourage students to create models to solve complex problems and to allow teachers to investigate students thinking. MEA's are a great curriculum technique used in engineering fields to help engage students by providing hands on activities using real world data and problems. We wish to present the Storm Water Management Resource toolkit including the MEA and present the outcomes observed from student engagement in this activity.

  13. Characterization of ToxCast Phase II compounds disruption of spontaneous network activity in cortical networks grown on multi-well microelectrode array (mwMEA) plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The development of multi-well microelectrode array (mwMEA) systems has increased in vitro screening throughput making them an effective method to screen and prioritize large sets of compounds for potential neurotoxicity. In the present experiments, a multiplexed approach was used...

  14. Hexaphosphapentaprismane: a new gateway to organophosphorus cage compound chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Ktaifani, Mahmoud M; Bauer, Walter; Bergsträsser, Uwe; Breit, Bernhard; Francis, Matthew D; Heinemann, Frank W; Hitchcock, Peter B; Mack, Andreas; Nixon, John F; Pritzkow, Hans; Regitz, Manfred; Zeller, Matthias; Zenneck, Ulrich

    2002-06-01

    Several independent synthetic routes are described leading to the formation of a novel unsaturated tetracyclic phosphorus carbon cage compound tBu4C4P6 (1), which undergoes a light-induced valence isomerization to produce the first hexaphosphapentaprismane cage tBu4C4P6 (2). A second unsaturated isomer tBu4C4P6 (9) of 1 and the bis-[W(CO)5] complex 13 of 1 are stable towards similar isomerization reactions. Another starting material for the synthesis of the hexaphosphapentaprismane cage tBu4C4P6 (2) is the trimeric mercury complex [(tBu4C4P6)Hg]3 (11), which undergoes elimination of mercury to afford the title compound 2. Single-crystal X-ray structural determinations have been carried out on compounds 1, 2, 9, 11, and 13. PMID:12180342

  15. Biologically tunable reactivity of energetic nanomaterials using protein cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocik, Joseph M; Crouse, Christopher A; Spowart, Jonathan E; Naik, Rajesh R

    2013-06-12

    The performance of aluminum nanomaterial based energetic formulations is dependent on the mass transport, diffusion distance, and stability of reactive components. Here we use a biologically inspired approach to direct the assembly of oxidizer loaded protein cages onto the surface of aluminum nanoparticles to improve reaction kinetics by reducing the diffusion distance between the reactants. Ferritin protein cages were loaded with ammonium perchlorate (AP) or iron oxide and assembled with nAl to create an oxidation-reduction based energetic reaction and the first demonstration of a nanoscale biobased thermite material. Both materials showed enhanced exothermic behavior in comparison to nanothermite mixtures of bulk free AP or synthesized iron oxide nanopowders prepared without the use of ferritin. In addition, by utilizing a layer-by-layer (LbL) process to build multiple layers of protein cages containing iron oxide and iron oxide/AP on nAl, stoichiometric conditions and energetic performance can be optimized. PMID:23713514

  16. Encapsulation of cobalt nanoparticles in cross-linked-polymer cages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatamie, Shadie [Department of Electronic-Science, Fergusson College, Pune 411 004 (India); Dhole, S.D. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Ding, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 7, Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117574 (Singapore); Kale, S.N. [Department of Electronic-Science, Fergusson College, Pune 411 004 (India)], E-mail: sangeetakale2004@gmail.com

    2009-07-15

    Nanoparticles embedded in polymeric cages give rise to interesting applications ranging from nanocatalysis to drug-delivery systems. In this context, we report on synthesis of cobalt (Co) nanoparticles trapped in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) matrix to yield self-supporting magnetic films in PVA slime. A 20 nm, Co formed in FCC geometry encapsulated with a weak citrate coat when caged in PVA matrix exhibited persistence of magnetism and good radio-frequency response. Cross-linking of PVA chains to form cage-like structures to arrest Co nanoparticles therein, is believed to be the reason for oxide-free nature of Co, promising applications in biomedicine as well as in radio-frequency shielding.

  17. Mice Do Not Habituate to Metabolism Cage Housing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Otto; Jacobsen, Kirsten Rosenmaj; Darusman, Huda Shalahudin;

    2013-01-01

    abnormality were monitored. Forced swim tests were conducted to determine whether the animals experienced behavioral despair and the serotonergic integrity was tested using an 8-OH-DPAT challenge. The metabolism cage housed mice excreted approximately tenfold higher amounts of corticosterone metabolites in...... in the present setup. In conclusion, the mice were found not to acclimatize to the metabolism cages whereby concern for animal welfare would dictate that mice should be housed in this way for as short periods as possible. The elevated degree of HPA axis activity, oxidative stress, and increased......The metabolism cage is a barren, non-enriched, environment, combining a number of recognized environmental stressors. We investigated the ability of male BALB/c mice to acclimatize to this form of housing. For three weeks markers of acute and oxidative stress, as well as clinical signs of...

  18. Identification of metabolites in urine and feces from rats dosed with the heterocyclic amine, 2-amino-3-methyl-9H-pyrido[2,3-b]indole (MeA alpha C)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, H; Frandsen, H

    2004-01-01

    2-Amino-3-methyl-9H-pyrido[2,3-b]indole (MeA alpha C) is a proximate mutagenic and carcinogenic heterocyclic amine formed during ordinary cooking. In model systems, MeA alpha C can be formed by pyrolyses of either tryptophan or proteins of animal or vegetable origin. In the present study, the in...

  19. Neuronal Migration Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Neuronal Migration Disorders Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What are Neuronal Migration Disorders? Neuronal migration disorders (NMDs) are a group ...

  20. Motor Neuron Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Motor Neuron Diseases Fact Sheet See a list of all ... can I get more information? What are motor neuron diseases? The motor neuron diseases (MNDs) are a ...

  1. A Post-Functionalizable Iso-Polyoxotitanate Cage Cluster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jie; Hu, Junyi; Sun, Qing; Zhang, Guanyun; Tung, Chen-Ho; Wang, Yifeng

    2016-07-18

    During solvothermal alcoholysis of a mixture of TiI4 and Ti(O(i)Pr)4, a {I@Ti22} cage cluster encapsulating an OH and iodide guests is crystallized. The {I@Ti22} host-guest cluster surface is postfunctionalizable with catecholate and carboxylate ligands. The synthetic details, structural characterization, spectroscopic properties of the obtained cages clusters are provided. The present study provides candidates for modeling ligand exchange and electron-hole transfer at the titanate nanoparticle surface, and meanwhile offers new opportunities for understanding the TiO2 nanocrystalline formation in solvothermal processes. PMID:27351728

  2. Laboratory animal welfare: cage enrichment and mouse behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfer, David P; Litvin, Oxana; Morf, Samuel; Nitsch, Roger M; Lipp, Hans-Peter; Würbel, Hanno

    2004-12-16

    Mice housed in standard cages show impaired brain development, abnormal repetitive behaviours (stereotypies) and an anxious behavioural profile, all of which can be lessened by making the cage environment more stimulating. But concerns have been raised that enriched housing might disrupt standardization and so affect the precision and reproducibility of behavioural-test results (for example, see ref. 4). Here we show that environmental enrichment increases neither individual variability in behavioural tests nor the risk of obtaining conflicting data in replicate studies. Our findings indicate that the housing conditions of laboratory mice can be markedly improved without affecting the standardization of results. PMID:15602544

  3. Equivalence Between Squirrel Cage and Sheet Rotor Induction Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwivedi, Ankita; Singh, S. K.; Srivastava, R. K.

    2016-06-01

    Due to topological changes in dual stator induction motor and high cost of its fabrication, it is convenient to replace the squirrel cage rotor with a composite sheet rotor. For an experimental machine, the inner and outer stator stampings are normally available whereas the procurement of rotor stampings is quite cumbersome and is not always cost effective. In this paper, the equivalence between sheet/solid rotor induction motor and squirrel cage induction motor has been investigated using layer theory of electrical machines, so as to enable one to utilize sheet/solid rotor in dual port experimental machines.

  4. 14C-age tracers in global ocean circulation models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Koeve

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The natural abundance of 14C in total CO2 dissolved in seawater is a property applied to evaluate the water age structure and circulation in the ocean and in ocean models. In this study we use three different representations of the global ocean circulation augmented with a suite of idealised tracers to study the potential and limitations of using natural 14C to determine water age, the time elapsed since a body of water had contact with the atmosphere. We find that, globally, bulk 14C-age is dominated by two equally important components, one associated with aging, i.e. the time component of circulation and one associated with a "preformed 14C-age". This latter quantity exists because of the slow and incomplete atmosphere/ocean equilibration of 14C in particular in high latitudes where many water masses form. The relative contribution of the preformed component to bulk 14C-age varies regionally within a given model, but also between models. Regional variability, e.g. in the Atlantic Ocean is associated with the mixing of waters with very different end members of preformed 14C-age. In the Atlantic, variations in the preformed component over space and time mask the circulation component to an extent that its patterns are not detectable from bulk 14C-age alone. Between models the variability of age can also be considerable (factor of 2, related to the combinations of physical model parameters, which influence circulation dynamics, and gas exchange in the models. The preformed component was found to be very sensitive to gas exchange and moderately sensitive to ice cover. In our model evaluation exercise, the choice of the gas exchange constant from within the current range of uncertainty had such a strong influence on preformed and bulk 14C-age that if model evaluation would be based on bulk 14C-age it could easily impair the evaluation and tuning of a models circulation on global and regional scales. Based on the results of this study, we propose

  5. Sex effect in mutual olfactory relationships of individually caged rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandro Finzi; Paolo Negretti; Giovanna Bianconi; Pedro González-Redondo

    2015-01-01

    To assess the sex influence on sniffing behavior of rabbits, sets of three rabbits each were located for seven days in contiguous cages divided by a metal wall with holes that prevented the neighboring rabbits to see each other. A buck was located in the central cage, with a doe at each side. Rabbit behavior was video recorded to observe animals sniffing with the muzzle near the wall. The bucks displayed an olfactory preference towards one of the two does, which decreased in few days. The sig...

  6. Reproductive performance of mice in disposable and standard individually ventilated cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Danielle R; Bailey, Michele M

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed the reproductive performance of mice housed in 2 types of individually ventilated caging systems. Breeding pairs from 48 female and 24 male mice of 3 established transgenic mouse breeding colonies were placed in either a standard or disposable ventilated caging system. For 3 breeding cycles, the number of pups born, pup survival rate to weaning, time interval between litters, and pup weights were monitored for each breeding pair. Disposable and standard cages were maintained in the same location during breeding. Environmental parameters included intracage temperature, humidity, and ammonia and carbon dioxide levels and room light intensity and sound. Overall, 776 offspring were produced. Breeding performance did not differ significantly between the 2 cage types. By 11 wk of age, the weights of pups from both cage types were equivalent. The intracage temperature was 1.1 °F warmer and light intensity at the site of the nest was 34 lx dimmer in disposable cages than in standard caging. The difference in lighting likely was due to nest location; the nests in the disposable cages were at the back of the cages and away from the anterior air supply, whereas in standard caging, nests were at the front of the cages, with the air supply at the rear. Under these husbandry conditions, mice housed in disposable caging systems have comparable breeding performance to those housed in standard individually ventilated cages. PMID:23849403

  7. In Vitro Studies of Neuronal Networks and Synaptic Plasticity in Invertebrates and in Mammals Using Multielectrode Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Massobrio

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Brain functions are strictly dependent on neural connections formed during development and modified during life. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying synaptogenesis and plastic changes involved in learning and memory have been analyzed in detail in simple animals such as invertebrates and in circuits of mammalian brains mainly by intracellular recordings of neuronal activity. In the last decades, the evolution of techniques such as microelectrode arrays (MEAs that allow simultaneous, long-lasting, noninvasive, extracellular recordings from a large number of neurons has proven very useful to study long-term processes in neuronal networks in vivo and in vitro. In this work, we start off by briefly reviewing the microelectrode array technology and the optimization of the coupling between neurons and microtransducers to detect subthreshold synaptic signals. Then, we report MEA studies of circuit formation and activity in invertebrate models such as Lymnaea, Aplysia, and Helix. In the following sections, we analyze plasticity and connectivity in cultures of mammalian dissociated neurons, focusing on spontaneous activity and electrical stimulation. We conclude by discussing plasticity in closed-loop experiments.

  8. In Vitro Studies of Neuronal Networks and Synaptic Plasticity in Invertebrates and in Mammals Using Multielectrode Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessadori, Jacopo; Ghirardi, Mirella

    2015-01-01

    Brain functions are strictly dependent on neural connections formed during development and modified during life. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying synaptogenesis and plastic changes involved in learning and memory have been analyzed in detail in simple animals such as invertebrates and in circuits of mammalian brains mainly by intracellular recordings of neuronal activity. In the last decades, the evolution of techniques such as microelectrode arrays (MEAs) that allow simultaneous, long-lasting, noninvasive, extracellular recordings from a large number of neurons has proven very useful to study long-term processes in neuronal networks in vivo and in vitro. In this work, we start off by briefly reviewing the microelectrode array technology and the optimization of the coupling between neurons and microtransducers to detect subthreshold synaptic signals. Then, we report MEA studies of circuit formation and activity in invertebrate models such as Lymnaea, Aplysia, and Helix. In the following sections, we analyze plasticity and connectivity in cultures of mammalian dissociated neurons, focusing on spontaneous activity and electrical stimulation. We conclude by discussing plasticity in closed-loop experiments. PMID:25866681

  9. Play Caging Benefits the Behavior of Singly Housed Laboratory Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Griffis, Caroline M; Martin, Allison L; Perlman, Jaine E; Bloomsmith, Mollie A

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses a recommendation in The Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals to provide singly housed nonhuman primates with intermittent access to large, enriched (play) caging. Research on the potential benefits of this type of caging is limited. The present study examines the effects of play caging on behavior, activity, and enrichment use. Singly housed, adult male, rhesus macaques (n = 10) underwent a baseline phase in their home cages, a 2-wk treatment phase with housin...

  10. Rearing Laying Hens in Aviaries Reduces Fearfulness following Transfer to Furnished Cages

    OpenAIRE

    Brantsæter, Margrethe; Tahamtani, Fernanda M.; Moe, Randi O; Hansen, Tone B.; Orritt, Rachel; Nicol, Christine; Janczak, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate rearing is essential for ensuring the welfare and productivity of laying hens. Early experience has the potential to affect the development of fearfulness. This study tested whether rearing in aviaries, as opposed to cages, reduces the fearfulness of laying hens after transfer to furnished cages. Fear responses were recorded as avoidance of a novel object in the home cage. Lohmann Selected Leghorns were reared in an aviary system or conventional rearing cages and then transported ...

  11. Caged polyprenylated xanthones from the resin of Garcinia hanburyi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu; He, Shiwen; Tang, Chu; Li, Jun; Yang, Guangzhong

    2016-03-01

    Five new caged polyprenylated xanthones (1a, 2a, 3, 10a and 10b), and 12 known related compounds were isolated from the resin of Garcinia hanburyi. Their structures were elucidated by detailed spectroscopic analyses and their α-glucosidase inhibitory activities were investigated in vitro. Most of xanthones showed modest inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase. PMID:26688377

  12. Pathogen Prevalence From Traditional Cage and Free Range Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Overview: A study was conducted to determine if differences in pathogen prevalence occurred between a sister flock of conventional cage and free range laying hens. Both environmental and egg microbiology was monitored throughout 20 – 79 weeks of age. Salmonella, Campylobacter, and Listeria preval...

  13. Environmental Impact of Cage Culture on Poondi Reservoir, Tamil Nadu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Anusuya Devi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was carried out in Poondi reservoir, Tamil Nadu, for a period of 8 months from September, 2014 to April, 2015 where the cage culture has been already initiated by the state fisheries department. The water and sediment samples were collected from the reservoir at point and non- point sources of the cage culture units and were analyzed for their physico-chemical parameters. The total microbial load, E. coli and feacal streptococci population were also assessed from the reservoir. During the study period, pH, sulphate, nitrate and BOD values were found within the permissible range for drinking water quality. The alkalinity values were found optimum in the reservoir water. The sediment characteristics such as pH, electrical conductivity, total organic carbon and available phosphorus values were also found to be within the standard limit. The optimum water and sediment quality characteristics and the absence of E. coli and feacal streptococci observed in the cage culture unit clearly showed that the small cage farming in the reservoir does not have major environmental impacts on the water and sediment quality.

  14. Sex effect in mutual olfactory relationships of individually caged rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Finzi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To assess the sex influence on sniffing behavior of rabbits, sets of three rabbits each were located for seven days in contiguous cages divided by a metal wall with holes that prevented the neighboring rabbits to see each other. A buck was located in the central cage, with a doe at each side. Rabbit behavior was video recorded to observe animals sniffing with the muzzle near the wall. The bucks displayed an olfactory preference towards one of the two does, which decreased in few days. The significance was p  0.05. The interest of bucks towards the does was also characterized by a frenetic scratching of the separation wall, contemporary with intense sniffing, displayed only for the first 35 min of the first day. The sniffing behavior of does at the central cage housing the male was not so marked as in bucks, and it progressively changed across the trial (p < 0.01. In conclusion, rabbits establish a transitory sex-oriented olfactory relationship with the conspecifics housed in contiguous cages, which looks no longer necessary once the rabbits have recognized each other.

  15. EFFECTS OF CAGING DENSITY ON PITUITARY AND TESTICLE RELATED RESPONSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effects of caging density on pituitary and testicle related responses A significant negative correlation between the incidence of testicular interstitial cell tumors (ICT) and of pituitary tumors (PT) in control male F344 rats is reported associated with the number of ani...

  16. Assessment of the Usability of the Workbench Faraday Cage Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten; Franek, Ondrej; Christensen, Søren K.; Pedersen, Gert Frølund; Ebert, Hans

    The workbench Faraday Cage method (WBFC) is a time efficient module pre-compliance test regarding radiated emission. This work investigates the method’s usability and credibility and concludes that for this particular case the WBFC perform a tolerable compliance test for frequencies below 360 MHz...

  17. Photoregulation of protein plasmid expression in vitro and in vivo using BHQ caging group

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Ping Zhang; Yi Ming Li; Xiao Yun Chen; Qing Xiang Guo

    2011-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) plasmid was caged by 8-bromo-7-hydroxyquinolinyl chromophore (BHQ) for controlling its expression with exact spatiotemporal resolution. In vitro and in vivo experiments clearly verified that, comparing with Bhc caging, the expression level of caged GFP plasmid was dramatically decreased and then efficiently restored after subsequent photolysis.

  18. Social communication in mice--are there optimal cage conditions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allain-Thibeault Ferhat

    Full Text Available Social communication is heavily affected in patients with neuropsychiatric disorders. Accordingly, mouse models designed to study the mechanisms leading to these disorders are tested for this phenotypic trait. Test conditions vary between different models, and the effect of these test conditions on the quantity and quality of social interactions and ultrasonic communication is unknown. The present study examines to which extent the habituation time to the test cage as well as the shape/size of the cage influence social communication in freely interacting mice. We tested 8 pairs of male mice in free dyadic social interactions, with two habituation times (20 min and 30 min and three cage formats (rectangle, round, square. We tested the effect of these conditions on the different types of social contacts, approach-escape sequences, follow behavior, and the time each animal spent in the vision field of the other one, as well as on the emission of ultrasonic vocalizations and their contexts of emission. We provide for the first time an integrated analysis of the social interaction behavior and ultrasonic vocalizations. Surprisingly, we did not highlight any significant effect of habituation time and cage shape/size on the behavioral events examined. There was only a slight increase of social interactions with the longer habituation time in the round cage. Remarkably, we also showed that vocalizations were emitted during specific behavioral sequences especially during close contact or approach behaviors. The present study provides a protocol reliably eliciting social contacts and ultrasonic vocalizations in adult male mice. This protocol is therefore well adapted for standardized investigation of social interactions in mouse models of neuropsychiatric disorders.

  19. Cage Versus Noncage Laying-Hen Housings: Worker Respiratory Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Diane; Arteaga, Veronica; Armitage, Tracey; Mitloehner, Frank; Tancredi, Daniel; Kenyon, Nicholas; Schenker, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare respiratory health of poultry workers in conventional cage, enriched cage and aviary layer housing on a single commercial facility, motivated by changing requirements for humane housing of hens. Three workers were randomly assigned daily, one to each of conventional cage, enriched cage, and aviary housing in a crossover repeated-measures design for three observation periods (for a total of 123 worker-days, eight different workers). Workers' exposure to particles were assessed (Arteaga et al. J Agromedicine. 2015;20:this issue) and spirometry, exhaled nitric oxide, respiratory symptoms, and questionnaires were conducted pre- and post-shift. Personal exposures to particles and endotoxin were significantly higher in the aviary than the other housings (Arteaga et al., 2015). The use of respiratory protection was high; the median usage was 70% of the shift. Mixed-effects multivariate regression models of respiratory cross-shift changes were marginally significant, but the aviary system consistently posted the highest decrements for forced expiratory volume in 1 and 6 seconds (FEV1 and FEV6) compared with the enriched or conventional housing. The adjusted mean difference in FEV1 aviary - enriched cage housing was -47 mL/s, 95% confidence interval (CI): (-99 to 4.9), P = .07. Similarly, for FEV6, aviary - conventional housing adjusted mean difference was -52.9 mL/6 s, 95% CI: (-108 to 2.4), P = .06. Workers adopting greater than median use of respiratory protection were less likely to exhibit negative cross-shift pulmonary function changes. Although aviary housing exposed workers to significantly higher respiratory exposures, cross-shift pulmonary function changes did not differ significantly between houses. Higher levels of mask use were protective; poultry workers should wear respiratory protection as appropriate to avoid health decrements. PMID:26237715

  20. Complexation and aggregation of a surfactant cage molecule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For applications in selective extraction chemistry, new surfactant cage molecules have been developed and their micellar aqueous solutions studied. With the objective of separating the surfactant properties from the complexing ones, the molecules have been designed with a di-block structure. They have been synthesized by grafting one (or more) surfactant unit to an aza crown macrocycle which is able to selectively complex cations. We have changed the number of linked surfactant (1 or 2) on the aza type cage. The complexing properties of those surfactant cage molecules with Na+ and K+ ions have been shown by mass-spectroscopy. The shape and aggregation number of the micelles are determined by fitting a molecular constrained model of the small angle X-ray and neutron scattering data simultaneously. The surfactant unit displays ellipsoidal to cylindrical micelles and bilayers while increasing the alkyl chain length. On the other hand, the surfactant cage molecules form ellipsoidal micelles whose structure is quite independent of the charge of the molecule. The structure is mostly controlled by the nature and the number of linked surfactants via their steric hindrance added to the volume of the macrocycle. In the last part of this work, we have rescaled a ionic flotation apparatus to dimensions suitable with a small quantity of available product. The surfactant is foaming in the flotation column. With this technic, we can study die adsorption equilibrium at the air/water interface. It is either the adsorption of the counter-ions of a ionic surfactant or the complexation of a cation with a macrocycle ligand at the interface. We have applied this method to a surfactant cage molecule in order to evaluate its extraction properties. (author)

  1. Cage Clusters of Gold and Tin: Golden Buckyballs and Stannaspherene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lai-Sheng

    2008-03-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) yields direct electronic structure information for size-selected clusters. Combining PES with theoretical calculations has become an effective approach to obtain structural information for small and medium-sized clusters. We present recent discoveries of two classes of cage clusters in gold and tin. Negatively charged gold clusters (Aun^-) have been shown to exhibit a remarkable structural diversity from 2D structures for n = 4-12 and the pyramidal structure for n = 20. Using PES and DFT calculations, we have found that gold clusters with n = 16-18 possess unprecedented hollow cage structures. We have been able to successfully dope a variety of transition-metal atoms into the empty spaces in the golden cages, confirming their structural robustness, as well as demonstrating chemical tuning of their electronic, magnetic, and catalytic properties. Unlike carbon, the heavier congeners of the group 14 elements are not known to form hollow cage structures similar to the fullerenes. In PES studies of tin clusters, we noted that the spectrum of Sn12^- is distinctly different from that of its neighbors or its Si/Ge counterpart. This observation led to our discovery of a highly symmetric and stable icosahedral Sn12^2- cage, for which we coined a name ``stannaspherene'' to describe its high symmetry and spherical pi bonding. We have also shown that all transition metals including the f-block elements can be doped inside Sn12^2- to form a whole class of endohedral stannaspherenes, which may be used as potential building blocks for new cluster-assembled materials. In a preliminary experiment to synthesize stannaspherene in the bulk, a new cluster, Pd2@Sn18^4-, was crystallized and characterized, suggesting all stannaspherene and endohedral stannasphernes may be fabricated in the bulk under suitable conditions.

  2. Experiment and model for the surface tension of MEA-PEG400 and DEA-PEG400 aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The surface tensions of PEG400 and amine-PEG400 aqueous solutions were measured. • The experiments were modeled satisfactorily by using a thermodynamic equation. • The temperature dependence of the surface tension was illustrated. • The effects of the mass fractions of amines and PEG400 were demonstrated. -- Abstract: The surface tension (γ) of monoethanolamine (MEA)-poly(ethylene oxide) 400 (PEG400) and diethanolamine (DEA)-PEG400 aqueous solutions was measured by using the BZY-1 surface tension meter. The temperatures ranged from (298.2 to 323.2) K. The mass fraction of amines and PEG400, respectively, ranged from 0.20 to 0.30 and from 0 to 0.10. A thermodynamic equation was proposed to model the surface tension of the binary and ternary mixtures. The calculated results agreed well with the experiments. The effects of temperature, mass fraction of amines and PEG400 on the surface tension were demonstrated on the basis of experiments and calculations

  3. Intra-cage dynamics of molecular hydrogen confined in cages of two different dimensions of clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russina, Margarita; Kemner, Ewout; Mezei, Ferenc

    2016-01-01

    In porous materials the molecular confinement is often realized by means of weak Van der Waals interactions between the molecule and the pore surface. The understanding of the mechanism of such interactions is important for a number of applications. In order to establish the role of the confinement size we have studied the microscopic dynamics of molecular hydrogen stored in the nanocages of clathrate hydrates of two different dimensions. We have found that by varying the size of the pore the diffusive mobility of confined hydrogen can be modified in both directions, i.e. reduced or enhanced compared to that in the bulk solid at the same temperatures. In the small cages with a mean crystallographic radius of 3.95 Å the confinement reduces diffusive mobility by orders of magnitude. In contrast, in large cages with a mean radius of 4.75 Å hydrogen molecules displays diffusive jump motion between different equilibrium sites inside the cages, visible at temperatures where bulk H2 is solid. The localization of H2 molecules observed in small cages can promote improved functional properties valuable for hydrogen storage applications. PMID:27270444

  4. Multiplexed Analysis of Cage and Cage Free Chicken Egg Fatty Acids Using Stable Isotope Labeling and Mass Spectrometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard G. Torde

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Binary stable isotope labeling couple with LC-ESI-MS has been used as a powerful non-targeted approach for the relative quantification of lipids, amino acids, and many other important metabolite classes. A multiplexed approach using three or more isotopic labeling reagents greatly reduces analytical run-time while maintaining excellent sensitivity and reproducibility. Three isotopic cholamine labeling reagents have been developed to take advantage of the pre-ionized character of cholamine, for ESI, and the ease by which stable isotopes can be incorporated into the cholamine structure. These three cholamine labeling reagents have been used to relatively quantify three fatty acid samples simultaneously. The quantification resulted in the observation of 12 fatty acids that had an average absolute error of 0.9% and an average coefficient of variation of 6.1%. Caged versus cage-free isotope labeling experiments showed that cage-free eggs have an increased level of omega-3 fatty acids as compared to caged eggs. This multiplexed fatty acid analysis provides an inexpensive and expedited tool for broad-based lipid profiling that will further aid discoveries in the mechanisms of fatty acid action in cells.

  5. Impaired fear extinction as displayed by serotonin transporter knockout rats housed in open cages is disrupted by IVC cage housing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Shan

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders are influenced by both environmental and genetic factors. A well-known example for gene x environment interactions in psychiatry is the low activity (s allelic variant of the serotonin transporter (5-HTT promoter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR that in the context of stress increases risk for depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Previously, we observed robust anxiety-related phenotypes, such as an impairment in fear extinction, in 5-HTT knockout (5-HTT-/- versus wild-type (5-HTT+/+ rats housed in open cages. Recently, housing conditions were changed from open cages to individually ventilated cages (IVC, which are associated with a high ventilation fold and noise. This switch in housing conditions prompted an unplanned 5-HTT gene x environment interaction study in our rats. The current study shows that lifetime stress by means of IVC cage housing abolished genotype differences in fear extinction between 5-HTT-/- and 5-HTT+/+ rats. Although this effect was not attributed specifically to either the 5-HTT+/+ or the 5-HTT-/- genotype, the findings are in agreement with the modulatory role of serotonin in the processing of environmental stimuli. Our findings also underline the possibility that housing conditions confound the interpretation of anxiety-related behaviours in rodents.

  6. Intra-cage dynamics of molecular hydrogen confined in cages of two different dimensions of clathrate hydrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russina, Margarita; Kemner, Ewout; Mezei, Ferenc

    2016-06-01

    In porous materials the molecular confinement is often realized by means of weak Van der Waals interactions between the molecule and the pore surface. The understanding of the mechanism of such interactions is important for a number of applications. In order to establish the role of the confinement size we have studied the microscopic dynamics of molecular hydrogen stored in the nanocages of clathrate hydrates of two different dimensions. We have found that by varying the size of the pore the diffusive mobility of confined hydrogen can be modified in both directions, i.e. reduced or enhanced compared to that in the bulk solid at the same temperatures. In the small cages with a mean crystallographic radius of 3.95 Å the confinement reduces diffusive mobility by orders of magnitude. In contrast, in large cages with a mean radius of 4.75 Å hydrogen molecules displays diffusive jump motion between different equilibrium sites inside the cages, visible at temperatures where bulk H2 is solid. The localization of H2 molecules observed in small cages can promote improved functional properties valuable for hydrogen storage applications.

  7. Effects of cage density, sanitation frequency, and bedding type on animal wellbeing and health and cage environment in mice and rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Mandy J; Hudson, Shanice V; Bostrom, Linda A; Cooper, Dale M

    2012-11-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effects of cage density, sanitation frequency, and bedding type on animal growth and welfare. At weaning, Sprague-Dawley rats and C57BL/6 mice were allocated to treatment groups according to sex, bedding type (shredded aspen, cellulose, or a 50:50 mixture), and cage density and sanitation frequency (inhouse cage density standards and sanitation procedures measured against Guide recommendations) for an 8-wk period. Body weight, feed disappearance, cage ammonia, ATP concentrations, behavior, morbidity, and mortality were assessed weekly; fecal corticosterone, microbiology, and lung histopathology (rats only) were evaluated at the culmination of the trial. In both rats and mice, parameters indicative of animal health and welfare were not significantly affected by cage density and sanitation frequency or bedding type. Occasional effects of feed disappearance and cage ammonia concentrations due to density and sanitation guidelines were noted in rat cages, and bedding type affected cage ammonia and ATP concentrations. Periodic spikes of cage ammonia and ATP concentrations were recorded in mouse cages maintained according to inhouse compared with Guide standards and in cages containing aspen compared with cellulose or aspen-cellulose mixed bedding. Ongoing studies and historical data support the finding that deviations or exceptions from the cage density and sanitation frequency standards set forth in the Guide do not negatively affect animal health, welfare, or production parameters at our institution. These parameters appear to be credible measures of animal health and wellbeing and may be useful for evaluating performance standards for animal husbandry. PMID:23294884

  8. Effects of Cage Density, Sanitation Frequency, and Bedding Type on Animal Wellbeing and Health and Cage Environment in Mice and Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Horn, Mandy J; Hudson, Shanice V.; Bostrom, Linda A; Cooper, Dale M

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the effects of cage density, sanitation frequency, and bedding type on animal growth and welfare. At weaning, Sprague–Dawley rats and C57BL/6 mice were allocated to treatment groups according to sex, bedding type (shredded aspen, cellulose, or a 50:50 mixture), and cage density and sanitation frequency (inhouse cage density standards and sanitation procedures measured against Guide recommendations) for an 8-wk period. Body weight, feed disapp...

  9. Effects of single caging and cage size on behavior and stress level of domestic neutered cats housed in an animal shelter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uetake, Katsuji; Goto, Akihiro; Koyama, Rumi; Kikuchi, Rieko; Tanaka, Toshio

    2013-03-01

    Cats need a minimum amount of space even in animal shelters. In this study the effects of single caging and cage size on the behavior and stress level of domestic cats were investigated. Six neutered cats (2-15 years old) that had been housed in a group for at least 7 months were moved to three kinds of single cages (small, medium and large) by rotation on a Latin square design. They experienced each cage size for 6 days. Cats could use vertical dimensions when housed in a group room and the large cage. Behavioral observation was conducted for 3 h in the evening, and stress levels were assessed by urine cortisol-to-creatinine ratios. The amounts (estimated proportions) of time spent in locomotion and social/solitary play were lower even in large cages than in group housing (both P < 0.05). Conversely, the amount of time spent resting tended to increase when housed singly (P = 0.104). The urine cortisol-to-creatinine ratios of singly housed cats tended to be higher than that of group-housed cats (P = 0.086). The results indicate that cats become less active when they are housed singly in cages regardless of the cage size. Cats seem to feel no undue stress even in small cages if the stay is short. PMID:23480709

  10. Making Earth Science Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) Projects Data and Services at the GES DISC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, Bruce E.; Ostrenga, D.; Savtchenko, A.; Johnson, J.; Wei, J.; Teng, W.; Gerasimov, I.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Earth Science Program is dedicated to advancing Earth remote sensing and pioneering the scientific use of satellite measurements to improve human understanding of our home planet. Through the MEaSUREs Program, NASA is continuing its commitment to expand understanding of the Earth system using consistent data records. Emphasis is on linking together multiple data sources to form coherent time-series, and facilitating the use of extensive data in the development of comprehensive Earth system models. A primary focus of the MEaSUREs Program is the creation of Earth System Data Records (ESDRs). An ESDR is defined as a unified and coherent set of observations of a given parameter of the Earth system, which is optimized to meet specific requirements for addressing science questions. These records are critical for understanding Earth System processes; for the assessment of variability, long-term trends, and change in the Earth System; and for providing input and validation means to modeling efforts. Seven MEaSUREs projects will be archived and distributed through services at the Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC).

  11. Lanthanides caged by the organic chelates; structural properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smentek, Lidia

    2011-04-01

    The structure, in particular symmetry, geometry and morphology of organic chelates coordinated with the lanthanide ions are analyzed in the present review. This is the first part of a complete presentation of a theoretical description of the properties of systems, which are widely used in technology, but most of all, in molecular biology and medicine. The discussion is focused on the symmetry and geometry of the cages, since these features play a dominant role in the spectroscopic activity of the lanthanides caged by organic chelates. At the same time, the spectroscopic properties require more formal presentation in the language of Racah algebra, and deserve a separate analysis. In addition to the parent systems of DOTA, DOTP, EDTMP and CDTMP presented here, their modifications by various antennas are analyzed. The conclusions that have a strong impact upon the theory of the energy transfer and the sensitized luminescence of these systems are based on the results of numerical density functional theory calculations.

  12. Jamming vs Caging in Three Dimensional Jamming Percolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokef, Yair; Segall, Nimrod; Teomy, Eial

    We study a three-dimensional kinetically-constrained lattice-gas model, in which the ability of a particle to move depends on the occupation of neighboring sites in an orientational manner. The kinetic rules are constructed such that chains of permanently-frozen particles reach an infinite length at the critical density of directed percolation. Thus at this critical density the system undergoes a jamming transition, above which there is a finite fraction of jammed particles. We demonstrate that the three-dimensional mesh-like structure of the one-dimensional jammed chains enables the free particles to propagate through the holes in this mesh. This diffusive motion is terminated at a second critical density above which all particles are caged. The largest and second largest clusters of dynamically-connected sites exhibit singularities at both densities. Thus our model assists in separating between the two distinct phenomena of jamming and caging.

  13. Cages and Anomalous Diffusion in Vibrated Dense Granular Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalliet, Camille; Gnoli, Andrea; Puglisi, Andrea; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2015-05-01

    A vertically shaken granular medium hosts a blade rotating around a fixed vertical axis, which acts as a mesorheological probe. At high densities, independently of the shaking intensity, the blade's dynamics shows strong caging effects, marked by transient subdiffusion and a maximum in the velocity power density spectrum, at a resonant frequency ˜10 Hz . Interpreting the data through a diffusing harmonic cage model allows us to retrieve the elastic constant of the granular medium and its collective diffusion coefficient. For high frequencies f , a tail ˜1 /f in the velocity power density spectrum reveals nontrivial correlations in the intracage microdynamics. At very long times (larger than 10 s), a superdiffusive behavior emerges, ballistic in the most extreme cases. Consistently, the distribution of slow velocity inversion times τ displays a power-law decay, likely due to persistent collective fluctuations of the host medium.

  14. Cages and anomalous diffusion in vibrated dense granular media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scalliet, Camille; Gnoli, Andrea; Puglisi, Andrea; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2015-05-15

    A vertically shaken granular medium hosts a blade rotating around a fixed vertical axis, which acts as a mesorheological probe. At high densities, independently of the shaking intensity, the blade's dynamics shows strong caging effects, marked by transient subdiffusion and a maximum in the velocity power density spectrum, at a resonant frequency ~10 Hz. Interpreting the data through a diffusing harmonic cage model allows us to retrieve the elastic constant of the granular medium and its collective diffusion coefficient. For high frequencies f, a tail ~1/f in the velocity power density spectrum reveals nontrivial correlations in the intracage microdynamics. At very long times (larger than 10 s), a superdiffusive behavior emerges, ballistic in the most extreme cases. Consistently, the distribution of slow velocity inversion times τ displays a power-law decay, likely due to persistent collective fluctuations of the host medium. PMID:26024199

  15. Rotational Brownian Dynamics simulations of clathrin cage formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The self-assembly of nearly rigid proteins into ordered aggregates is well suited for modeling by the patchy particle approach. Patchy particles are traditionally simulated using Monte Carlo methods, to study the phase diagram, while Brownian Dynamics simulations would reveal insights into the assembly dynamics. However, Brownian Dynamics of rotating anisotropic particles gives rise to a number of complications not encountered in translational Brownian Dynamics. We thoroughly test the Rotational Brownian Dynamics scheme proposed by Naess and Elsgaeter [Macromol. Theory Simul. 13, 419 (2004); Naess and Elsgaeter Macromol. Theory Simul. 14, 300 (2005)], confirming its validity. We then apply the algorithm to simulate a patchy particle model of clathrin, a three-legged protein involved in vesicle production from lipid membranes during endocytosis. Using this algorithm we recover time scales for cage assembly comparable to those from experiments. We also briefly discuss the undulatory dynamics of the polyhedral cage

  16. Faraday cage angled-etching of nanostructures in bulk dielectrics

    OpenAIRE

    Latawiec, Pawel; Burek, Michael J.; Sohn, Young-Ik; Lončar, Marko

    2016-01-01

    For many emerging optoelectronic materials, heteroepitaxial growth techniques do not offer the same high material quality afforded by bulk, single-crystal growth. However, the need for optical, electrical, or mechanical isolation at the nanoscale level often necessitates the use of a dissimilar substrate, upon which the active device layer stands. Faraday cage angled-etching (FCAE) obviates the need for these planar, thin-film technologies by enabling in-situ device release and isolation thro...

  17. Environmental Enrichment Reduces Signs of Boredom in Caged Mink

    OpenAIRE

    Meagher, Rebecca K.; Mason, Georgia J

    2012-01-01

    Animals housed in impoverished cages are often labelled ‘bored’. They have also been called ‘apathetic’ or ‘depressed’, particularly when profoundly inactive. However, these terms are rarely operationally defined and validated. As a negative state caused by under-stimulation, boredom should increase interest in stimuli of all kinds. Apathy (lack of interest), by contrast, should manifest as decreased interest in all stimuli, while anhedonia (loss of pleasure, a depressive symptom) should spec...

  18. Effect of Cage-Wash Temperature on the Removal of Infectious Agents from Caging and the Detection of Infectious Agents on the Filters of Animal Bedding-Disposal Cabinets by PCR Analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Compton, Susan R; Macy, James D

    2015-01-01

    Efficient, effective cage decontamination and the detection of infection are important to sustainable biosecurity within animal facilities. This study compared the efficacy of cage washing at 110 and 180 °F on preventing pathogen transmission. Soiled cages from mice infected with mouse parvovirus (MPV) and mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) were washed at 110 or 180 °F or were not washed. Sentinels from washed cages did not seroconvert to either virus, whereas sentinels in unwashed cages seroconvert...

  19. Energy saving work of frequency controlled induction cage machine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Energy saving work, understood as lowering the supply voltage when load torque is much less than rated, is one way of reducing power losses in an induction cage machine working with a variable load. Reduction in power losses also affects the thermal properties of an induction machine because the energy saving work allows the temperature rise of the windings to decrease. Thanks to a lower temperature of the windings, the same load torque can be carried by a machine of less rated power. The ability of energy saving work to reduce the temperature of windings depends on the thermal properties of an induction machine, which are different in the case of a machine with foreign ventilation and its own ventilation. This paper deals with the thermal effect of energy saving work on a frequency controlled induction cage machine. A comparison of the properties of a machine with its own and outside ventilation is presented. The results of the investigations are shown for a 3 kW induction cage machine with the two previously mentioned ways of ventilation: one provided with a fan placed on a shaft and the other provided with a fan driven by an auxiliary motor

  20. Genotoxicity monitoring of freshwater environments using caged carp (Cyprinus carpio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klobucar, Göran I V; Stambuk, Anamaria; Pavlica, Mirjana; Sertić Perić, Mirela; Kutuzović Hackenberger, Branimir; Hylland, Ketil

    2010-01-01

    The present study deals with genotoxicity assessment of freshwaters using caged carp (Cyprinus carpio). Carps were transplanted from a fish-farm to three differently polluted sites in eastern Croatia. Two polluted sites were situated in the river Drava, downstream from the cities of Belisće and Osijek, while the reference site was in the Nature Park Kopacki rit, a preserved wetland area with limited anthropogenic influence. Exposure lasted for 3 weeks and was repeated for 3 years (2002-2004). DNA damage was assessed in erythrocytes of the exposed animals by the Comet assay and micronucleus test (MNT). In order to evaluate possible differences in stress responses to polluted water in situ and in aquaria a laboratory exposure was performed with water from the studied location in the second year of the study. Carp from the sites with high anthropogenic influence (Belisće and Osijek) had higher average DNA damage as expressed in both the MNT and Comet assay. Of the two, the Comet assay appeared to be more sensitive following both caging and aquaria exposures. The results from this study suggest that 3 weeks caging exposure of C. carpio may be a useful strategy to monitor for genotoxic agents in freshwater ecosystems. PMID:19626438

  1. Prevalence of Salmonella in flocks housed in enriched cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zongo, P; Ducrot, A; Burie, J-B; Beaumont, C

    2015-04-01

    Salmonellosis is a foodborne disease of humans and animals caused by infection with Salmonella. The aim of this paper is to improve a deterministic model (DM) and an individual-based model (IBM) with reference to Salmonella propagation in flocks of laying hens taking into account variations in hens housed in the same cage and to compare both models. The spatio-temporal evolution, the basic reproduction number, R 0, and the speed of wave propagation were computed for both models. While in most cases the DM allows summary of all the features of the model in the formula for computation of R 0, slight differences between individuals or groups may be observed with the IBM that could not be expected from the DM, especially when initial environmental contamination is very low and some cages may get rid of bacteria. Both models suggest that the cage size plays a role on the risk and speed of propagation of the bacteria, which should be considered when designing new breeding systems. PMID:25084397

  2. Making Earth Science Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) Projects Data and Services at the GES DISC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vollmer, B.; Ostrenga, D.; Savtchenko, A. K.; Johnson, J. E.; Wei, J. C.; Teng, W. L.; Gerasimov, I.

    2011-12-01

    NASA's Earth Science Program is dedicated to advancing Earth remote sensing and pioneering the scientific use of satellite measurements to improve human understanding of our home planet. Through the MEaSUREs Program, NASA is continuing its commitment to expand understanding of the Earth system using consistent data records. Emphasis is on linking together multiple data sources to form coherent time-series, and facilitating the use of extensive data in the development of comprehensive Earth system models. A primary focus of the MEaSUREs Program is the creation of Earth System Data Records (ESDRs). An ESDR is defined as a unified and coherent set of observations of a given parameter of the Earth system, which is optimized to meet specific requirements for addressing science questions. These records are critical for understanding Earth System processes; for the assessment of variability, long-term trends, and change in the Earth System; and for providing input and validation means to modeling efforts. Seven MEaSUREs projects will be archived and distributed through services at the Goddard Earth Sciences Data Information and Services Center (GES DISC). The seven projects include: 1. Reprocessing and Goddard Satellite-based Surface Turbulent Fluxes (GSSTF) Data Set for Global Water and Energy Cycle Research 2. Creating a Long Term Multi-Sensor Ozone Data Record 3. Consistent Long-Term Aerosol Data Records over Land and Ocean from SeaWIFS 4. GOZCARDS: Global Ozone Chemistry and Related trace gas Data Records for the Stratosphere 5. Earth Surface and Atmosphere Reflectivity Since 1979 from Multiple Satellites (TOMS, SBUV, SBUV-2, OMI, SeaWiFS, NPP, and NPOESS) 6. A Multi-Sensor Water Vapor Climate Data Record Using Cloud Classification 7. Developing Consistent Earth System Data Records for the global terrestrial water cycle A web portal for the MEaSUREs dataset (http://disc.sci.gsfc.nasa.gov/measures) has been made accessible to the user community to provide information

  3. Exact distinction of excitatory and inhibitory neurons in neural networks: a study with GAD67-GFP neurons optically and electrophysiologically recognized on multi-electrode arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eBecchetti

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Distinguishing excitatory from inhibitory neurons with multielectrode array (MEA recordings is a serious experimental challenge. The current methods, developed in vitro, mostly rely on spike waveform analysis. These however often display poor resolution and may produce errors caused by the variability of spike amplitudes and neuron shapes. Recent recordings in human brain suggest that the spike waveform features correlate with time-domain statistics such as spiking rate, autocorrelation and coefficient of variation. However, no precise criteria are available to exactly assign identified units to specific neuronal types, either in vivo or in vitro. To solve this problem, we combined MEA recording with fluorescence imaging of neocortical cultures from mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP in GABAergic cells. In this way, we could sort out ‘authentic excitatory neurons’ (AENs and ‘authentic inhibitory neurons’ (AINs. We thus characterized 1275 units (from 405 electrodes, n=10 experiments, based on autocorrelation, burst length, spike number, spiking rate, squared coefficient of variation and Fano factor (the ratio between spike-count variance and mean. These metrics differed by about one order of magnitude between AINs and AENs. In particular, the Fano factor turned out to provide a firing code which exactly (no overlap recognizes excitatory and inhibitory units. The difference in Fano factor between all of the identified AEN and AIN groups was highly significant (p < 10-8, ANOVA post-hoc Tukey test. Our results indicate a statistical metric-based approach to distinguish excitatory from inhibitory neurons independently from the spike width.

  4. Juvenil neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, J R; Hertz, Jens Michael

    1998-01-01

    Neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis is a group of neurodegenerative diseases which are characterized by an abnormal accumulation of lipopigment in neuronal and extraneuronal cells. The diseases can be differentiated into several subgroups according to age of onset, the clinical picture...

  5. Flow Field Characteristics of the Rotor Cage in Turbo Air Classifiers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO Lijie; LIU Jiaxiang; LIU Shengzhao

    2009-01-01

    The turbo air classifier is widely used powder classification equipment in a variety of fields. The flow field characteristics of the turbo air classifier are important basis for the improvement of the turbo air classifier's structural design. The flow field characteristics of the rotor cage in turbo air classifiers were investigated under different operating conditions by laser Doppler velocimeter(LDV), and a measure diminishing the axial velocity is proposed. The investigation results show that the tangential velocity of the air flow inside the rotor cage is different from the rotary speed of the rotor cage on the same measurement point due to the influences of both the negative pressure at the exit and the rotation of the rotor cage. The tangential velocity of the air flow likewise decreases as the radius decreases in the case of the rotor cage's low rotary speed. In contrast, the tangential velocity of the air flow increases as the radius decreases in the case of the rotor cage's high rotary speed. Meanwhile, the vortex inside the rotor cage is found to occur near the pressure side of the blade when the rotor cage's rotary speed is less than the tangential velocity of air flow. On the contrary, the vortex is found to occur near the blade suction side once the rotor cage's rotary speed is higher than the tangential velocity of air flow. Inside the rotor cage, the axial velocity could not be disregarded and is largely determined by the distances between the measurement point and the exit.

  6. Influence of 5 Different Caging Types and the Use of Cage-Changing Stations on Mouse Allergen Exposure

    OpenAIRE

    Feistenauer, Susan; Sander, Ingrid; Schmidt, Jörg; Zahradnik, Eva; Raulf, Monika; Brielmeier, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Animal allergens constitute a serious health risk in laboratory animal facilities. To assess possibilities for allergen reduction by technical and organizational measures, we studied personnel exposure to mouse urinary aeroallergens in an animal facility with a holding capacity of 30,000 cages. Short-term (2 h) and intermediate-term (12 h) stationary samples (n = 107) and short-term (2 h) personnel samples (n = 119) were collected on polytetrafluorethylene filters by using air pumps. Long-ter...

  7. New caged neurotransmitter analogs selective for glutamate receptor sub-types based on methoxynitroindoline and nitrophenylethoxycarbonyl caging groups

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palma-Cerda, F.; Auger, C.; Crawford, D.J.; Hodgson, A.C.C.; Reynolds, S.J.; Cowell, J.K.; Swift, K.A.D.; Cais, Ondřej; Vyklický ml., Ladislav; Corrie, J.E.T.; Ogden, D.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 63, č. 4 (2012), s. 624-634. ISSN 0028-3908 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/07/0271 Grant ostatní: EC(XE) LSHM-CT-2007-037765 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : photolysis * glutamate receptors * caged neurotransmitters Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 4.114, year: 2012

  8. Effects of Furnished Cage Type on Behavior and Welfare of Laying Hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Chen, Donghua; Li, Jianhong; Bao, Jun

    2016-06-01

    This study was conducted to compare the effects of layout of furniture (a perch, nest, and sandbox) in cages on behavior and welfare of hens. Two hundred and sixteen Hyline Brown laying hens were divided into five groups (treatments) with four replicates per group: small furnished cages (SFC), medium furnished cages type I (MFC-I), medium furnished cages type II (MFC-II), and medium furnished cages type III (MFC-III) and conventional cages (CC). The experiment started at 18 week of age and finished at 52 week of age. Hens' behaviors were filmed during the following periods: 8:00 to 10:00; 13:00 to 14:00; 16:00 to 17:00 on three separate days and two hens from each cage were measured for welfare parameters at 50 wk of age. The results showed that feeding and laying of all hens showed no effect by cage type (p>0.05), and the hens in the furnished cages had significantly lower standing and higher walking than CC hens (phens between the furnished cages (p>0.05). The hens in MFC-I, -II, and -III showed a significant higher socializing behavior than SFC and CC (phens in SFC and the highest perching found for the hens in MFC-III. Overall, the hens in CC showed poorer welfare conditions than the furnished cages, in which the feather condition score, gait score and tonic immobility duration of the hens in CC was significantly higher than SFC, MFC-I, MFC-II, and MFC-III (phens. Overall, MFC-III cage design was better than SFC, MFC-I, and MFC-II cage designs. PMID:26954171

  9. Refractory Neuron Circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Sarpeshkar, Rahul; Watts, Lloyd; Mead, Carver

    1992-01-01

    Neural networks typically use an abstraction of the behaviour of a biological neuron, in which the continuously varying mean firing rate of the neuron is presumed to carry information about the neuron's time-varying state of excitation. However, the detailed timing of action potentials is known to be important in many biological systems. To build electronic models of such systems, one must have well-characterized neuron circuits that capture the essential behaviour of real neur...

  10. NEURON and Python

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Hines; Davison, Andrew P.; Eilif Muller

    2009-01-01

    The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because ...

  11. Motor Neurons that Multitask

    OpenAIRE

    Goulding, Martyn

    2012-01-01

    Animals use a form of sensory feedback termed proprioception to monitor their body position and modify the motor programs that control movement. In this issue of Neuron, Wen et al. (2012) provide evidence that a subset of motor neurons function as proprioceptors in C. elegans, where B-type motor neurons sense body curvature to control the bending movements that drive forward locomotion.

  12. 直接涂膜技术用于质子交换膜燃料电池膜电极制备%MEA PREPARATION FOR POLYMER ELECTROLYTE MEMBRANE FUEL CELL BY APPLYING DIRECTLY PRINTING CATALYST ON MEMBRANE TECHNIQUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋淇忠; 马紫峰; Oumarou Savadogo

    2004-01-01

    A new membrane electrolyte assembly (MEA) preparation method for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) was developed by applying the directly printing catalyst on membrane technique. This method was simple and easy to be controlled as verified by repetition experiment. When the membrane with catalyst prepared by the new technique and the electrode with diffusion layer was only sandwiched but not hot pressed, this kind of MEA was called not-hot-press MEA (NPMEA) and its fuel cell performance was better than that of MEA which was hot pressed (HPMEA). The effects of 6 different kinds of solvents in catalyst mixture ink on the performance of fuel cell were assessed. It was discovered that iso-propanol was the best solvent in catalyst mixture ink and showed the best performance of fuel cell. Finally several MEAs prepared by different ways were tested on fuel cell station and it was reported that the performance of MEA prepared by the directly printing catalyst on membrane technique was the best in the whole voltage region.

  13. Clinical outcomes of two types of cages used in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion for the treatment of degenerative lumbar diseases: n-HA/PA66 cages versus PEEK cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Qian-Xing; Ou, Yun-Sheng; Zhu, Yong; Zhao, Zeng-Hui; Liu, Bo; Huang, Qiu; Du, Xing; Jiang, Dian-Ming

    2016-06-01

    This study reports the clinical effects of nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide66 cages (n-HA/PA66 cages) and compares the clinical outcomes between n-HA/PA66 and polyetheretherketone cages (PEEK cages) for application in transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF). A retrospective and case-control study involving 124 patients using n-HA/PA66 cages and 142 patients using PEEK cages was conducted. All patients underwent TLIF and had an average of 2-years of follow-up. The Oswestry Disability Index and Visual Analog Scale were selected to assess the pain of low back and leg, as well as neurological status. The intervertebral space height and segmental angle were also measured to estimate the radiological changes. At the 1-year and final follow-ups, the fusion and subsidence rates were evaluated. There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding clinical and radiological results. At the final follow-up, the bony fusion rate was 92.45 and 91.57 % for the n-HA/PA66 and PEEK groups, respectively, and the subsidence rate was 7.55 and 8.99 %, respectively. The study indicated that both n-HA/PA66 and PEEK cages could promote effective clinical and radiographic outcomes when used to treat degenerative lumbar diseases. The high fusion and low subsidence rates revealed that n-HA/PA66 cages could be an alternative ideal choice as the same to PEEK cages for lumbar reconstruction after TLIF. PMID:27091044

  14. Reproductive Performance of Mice in Disposable and Standard Individually Ventilated Cages

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, Danielle R; Bailey, Michele M

    2013-01-01

    This study assessed the reproductive performance of mice housed in 2 types of individually ventilated caging systems. Breeding pairs from 48 female and 24 male mice of 3 established transgenic mouse breeding colonies were placed in either a standard or disposable ventilated caging system. For 3 breeding cycles, the number of pups born, pup survival rate to weaning, time interval between litters, and pup weights were monitored for each breeding pair. Disposable and standard cages were maintain...

  15. Are assemblages of the fireworm Hermodice carunculata enhanced in sediments beneath offshore fish cages?

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rodrigo Riera; Oscar Prez; Myriam Rodrguez; Eva Ramos; scar Monterroso

    2014-01-01

    Abundances of the fireworm Hermodice carunculata were counted through a monitoring assessment study of fish cages in Barranco Hondo (NE Tenerife). Seven campaigns were conducted from November 2007 to June 2010 and temporal variations were found, as well as differences among sampling stations. The poly-chaete H. carunculata obtained its highest abundance in sediments beneath fish cages throughout the study period. Thus, the assemblages of this omnivorous species were favoured by the presence of fish cages.

  16. Healing properties of allograft from alendronate-treated animal in lumbar spine interbody cage fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Xue, Qingyun; Li, Haisheng; Zou, Xuenong; Bünger, Mathias; Egund, Niels; Lind, Martin; Christensen, Finn Bjarke; Bünger, Cody

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the healing potential of allograft from bisphosphonate-treated animals in anterior lumbar spine interbody fusion. Three levels of anterior lumbar interbody fusion with Brantigan cages were performed in two groups of five landrace pigs. Empty Brantigan cages or cages filled with either autograft or allograft were located randomly at different levels. The allograft materials for the treatment group were taken from the pigs that had been fed with alendronate, 10 mg daily ...

  17. Animal Welfare and Food Safety Aspects of Confining Broiler Chickens to Cages

    OpenAIRE

    Sara Shields; Michael Greger

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary In commercial chicken meat production, broiler chickens are usually kept on the floor in ware-house like buildings, but the use of cages is becoming more common. Confining chickens to cages is a welfare problem, as has been thoroughly demonstrated for laying hens used for egg production. Caged broiler chickens may suffer from poor bone strength due to lack of exercise, feather loss, and restriction of natural behavior. There are also potential food safety concerns associated wi...

  18. Individually Ventilated Cages Impose Cold Stress on Laboratory Mice: A Source of Systemic Experimental Variability

    OpenAIRE

    David, John M.; Knowles, Scott; Lamkin, Donald M.; Stout, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Individual ventilated cages (IVC) are increasing in popularity. Although mice avoid IVC in preference testing, they show no aversion when provided additional nesting material or the cage is not ventilated. Given the high ventilation rate in IVC, we developed 3 hypotheses: that mice housed in IVC experience more cold stress than do mice housed in static cages; that IVC-induced cold stress affects the results of experiments using mice; and that, when provided shelters, mice behaviorally thermor...

  19. Haematological and Biochemical Parameters during the Laying Period in Common Pheasant Hens Housed in Enhanced Cages

    OpenAIRE

    Petra Hrabčáková; Eva Voslářová; Iveta Bedáňová; Vladimíra Pištěková; Jan Chloupek; Vladimír Večerek

    2014-01-01

    The development of selected haematological and biochemical parameters during the laying period was monitored in common pheasant hens housed in an enhanced cage system. The cages were enhanced by the addition of two perches and a shelter formed by strips of cloth hanging in the corner of the cage. The results showed significant changes in the haematological and biochemical parameters monitored during egg laying. At the time when laying capacity approached a maximum, a decrease was observed (P ...

  20. Cage Change Influences Serum Corticosterone and Anxiety-Like Behaviors in the Mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Rasmussen, Skye; Miller, Melinda M.; Filipski, Sarah B.; Tolwani, Ravi J.

    2011-01-01

    Environmental variables and husbandry practices can influence physiology and alter behavior in mice. Our study evaluated the effects of cage change on serum corticosterone levels and anxiety-like behaviors in C57BL/6 male mice. We examined the effects of 3 different methods of performing cage transfer and of transferring mice to a clean or a dirty familiar cage microenvironment. The 3 different handling methods were forceps transfer, gentle transfer with gloved hands, and a passive transfer t...

  1. Progesterone After Estradiol Modulates Shuttle-Cage Escape by Facilitating Volition

    OpenAIRE

    Mayeaux, Darryl J.; Tandle, Sarah M.; Cilano, Sean M.; Fitzharris, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    In animal models of depression, depression is defined as performance on a learning task. That task is typically escaping a mild electric shock in a shuttle cage by moving from one side of the cage to the other. Ovarian hormones influence learning in other kinds of tasks, and these hormones are associated with depressive symptoms in humans. The role of these hormones in shuttle-cage escape learning, however, is less clear. This study manipulated estradiol and progesterone in ovariectomized fem...

  2. Stand-alone LLIF Lateral Cage Migration: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towers, Wendy S; Kurtom, Khalid H

    2015-01-01

    Lateral approaches to the lumbar disc space have become popular in recent years with very few reported complications. We report on a rare case of a stand-alone cage migration. A 77-year-old female presented with a right L2-3 radiculopathy that was refractory to maximum medical management. This was secondary to foraminal compression at L2-3 and L3-4 due to degenerative disc disease and levoscoliosis, as well as Grade 1 spondylolisthesis at both levels. A left-sided approach lateral lumbar interbody fusion was performed at L2-3 and L3-4 using a lordotic polyetheretherketone (PEEK) graft (50 mm length x 18 mm width x 9 mm height) packed with demineralized bone matrix (DBM). A contralateral release of the annulus fibrosis was performed during the decompression prior to graft insertion. Postoperative anteroposterior and lateral x-ray imaging confirmed good position of interbody grafts, correction of scoliosis as well as spondylolisthesis, and restoration of disc height achieving foraminal indirect decompression. A routine postoperative x-ray at three months demonstrated asymptomatic ipsilateral cage migration at the L2-3 level with evidence of arthrodesis in the disc space. This was managed conservatively without further surgical intervention. Placement of a lateral plate or interbody intradiscal plating system in patients with scoliosis and significant coronal deformity is an option that can be considered to prevent this rare LLIF complication. Moreover, asymptomatic cage migration may be conservatively managed without reoperation. PMID:26623202

  3. Hollow Gold Cages and Their Topological Relationship to Dual Fullerenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trombach, Lukas; Rampino, Sergio; Wang, Lai-Sheng; Schwerdtfeger, Peter

    2016-06-20

    Golden fullerenes have recently been identified by photoelectron spectra by Bulusu et al. [S. Bulusu, X. Li, L.-S. Wang, X. C. Zeng, PNAS 2006, 103, 8326-8330]. These unique triangulations of a sphere are related to fullerene duals having exactly 12 vertices of degree five, and the icosahedral hollow gold cages previously postulated are related to the Goldberg-Coxeter transforms of C20 starting from a triangulated surface (hexagonal lattice, dual of a graphene sheet). This also relates topologically the (chiral) gold nanowires observed to the (chiral) carbon nanotubes. In fact, the Mackay icosahedra well known in gold cluster chemistry are related topologically to the dual halma transforms of the smallest possible fullerene C20 . The basic building block here is the (111) fcc sheet of bulk gold which is dual to graphene. Because of this interesting one-to-one relationship through Euler's polyhedral formula, there are as many golden fullerene isomers as there are fullerene isomers, with the number of isomers Niso increasing polynomially as O(Niso9 ). For the recently observed Au16- , Au17- , and Au18- we present simulated photoelectron spectra including all isomers. We also predict the photoelectron spectrum of Au32- . The stability of the golden fullerenes is discussed in relation with the more compact structures for the neutral and negatively charged Au12 to Au20 and Au32 clusters. As for the compact gold clusters we observe a clear trend in stability of the hollow gold cages towards the (111) fcc sheet. The high stability of the (111) fcc sheet of gold compared to the bulk 3D structure explains the unusual stability of these hollow gold cages. PMID:27244703

  4. A high-precision instrument for analyzing nonlinear dynamic behavior of bearing cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z.; Chen, H.; Yu, T.; Li, B.

    2016-08-01

    The high-precision ball bearing is fundamental to the performance of complex mechanical systems. As the speed increases, the cage behavior becomes a key factor in influencing the bearing performance, especially life and reliability. This paper develops a high-precision instrument for analyzing nonlinear dynamic behavior of the bearing cage. The trajectory of the rotational center and non-repetitive run-out (NRRO) of the cage are used to evaluate the instability of cage motion. This instrument applied an aerostatic spindle to support and spin test the bearing to decrease the influence of system error. Then, a high-speed camera is used to capture images when the bearing works at high speeds. A 3D trajectory tracking software tema Motion is used to track the spot which marked the cage surface. Finally, by developing the matlab program, a Lissajous' figure was used to evaluate the nonlinear dynamic behavior of the cage with different speeds. The trajectory of rotational center and NRRO of the cage with various speeds are analyzed. The results can be used to predict the initial failure and optimize cage structural parameters. In addition, the repeatability precision of instrument is also validated. In the future, the motorized spindle will be applied to increase testing speed and image processing algorithms will be developed to analyze the trajectory of the cage.

  5. Temporal variation of the static electric field inside an animal cage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigemitsu, T; Tsuchida, Y; Nishiyama, F; Matsumoto, G; Nakamura, H; Shimizu, K

    1981-01-01

    The temporal variation of a static electric field inside an animal cage was investigated with a newly developed small, simple field meter. The field inside the cage was found to be highly dependent on the surface conductivity of the dielectric material. As the surface of the cage became dirty because of animal occupancy, the static electric field inside it became considerably smaller from the moment the field was turned on. Clean cages also modified the static electric field inside them, the field decaying from an initial to a much lower value over several hours. The mechanism of field attenuation for both cases is surface leakage. Surface leakage for a clean cage takes place much more slowly than for a dirty cage. This was confirmed by measuring DC insulation resistance. To examine this phenomenon further, the field in a metal cage width high electrical conductivity was measured. The static electric field inside the metal cage was also found to be reduced. An improved cage design that avoids these problems, is suggested for the study of the biologic effects of static electric fields. PMID:7326060

  6. A stochastic frontier analysis of technical efficiency of fish cage culture in Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Gazi Md Nurul; Tai, Shzee Yew; Kusairi, Mohd Noh

    2016-01-01

    Cage culture plays an important role in achieving higher output and generating more export earnings in Malaysia. However, the cost of fingerlings, feed and labour have increased substantially for cage culture in the coastal areas in Peninsular Malaysia. This paper uses farm level data gathered from Manjung, Perak and Kota Tinggi, Johor to investigate the technical efficiency of brackish water fish cage culture using the stochastic frontier approach. The technical efficiency was estimated and specifically the factors affecting technical inefficiencies of fish cage culture system in Malaysia was investigated. On average, 37 percent of the sampled fish cage farms are technically efficient. The results suggest very high degrees of technical inefficiency exist among the cage culturists. This implies that great potential exists to increase fish production through improved efficiency in cage culture management in Peninsular Malaysia. The results indicate that farmers obtained grouper fingerlings from other neighboring countries due to scarcity of fingerlings from wild sources. The cost of feeding for grouper (Epinephelus fuscoguttatus) requires relatively higher costs compared to seabass (Lates calcarifer) production in cage farms in the study areas. Initiatives to undertake extension programmes at the farm level are needed to help cage culturists in utilizing their resources more efficiently in order to substantially enhance their fish production. PMID:27478744

  7. Rearing Laying Hens in Aviaries Reduces Fearfulness following Transfer to Furnished Cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantsæter, Margrethe; Tahamtani, Fernanda M; Moe, Randi O; Hansen, Tone B; Orritt, Rachel; Nicol, Christine; Janczak, Andrew M

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate rearing is essential for ensuring the welfare and productivity of laying hens. Early experience has the potential to affect the development of fearfulness. This study tested whether rearing in aviaries, as opposed to cages, reduces the fearfulness of laying hens after transfer to furnished cages. Fear responses were recorded as avoidance of a novel object in the home cage. Lohmann Selected Leghorns were reared in an aviary system or conventional rearing cages and then transported to furnished cages at 16 weeks, before the onset of lay. Observations of a selection of birds were conducted at 19 (N = 50 independent cages) and 21 (N = 48 independent cages) weeks of age. At 19 and 21 weeks, cage-reared birds showed higher levels of fearfulness indicated by spending more time away from the novel object compared to aviary-reared birds. These results suggest that rearing in an enriched aviary environment reduces fearfulness up to the fifth week after transfer to a new housing system, compared to rearing in cages. PMID:26955634

  8. Size effect of fullerene cages and encaged clusters in M3N@C2n

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Based on the calculated findings that the sizes of encaged clusters determine the structures and the stability of C80-based trimetallic nitride fullerenes (TNFs), more extensive density functional theory calculations were performed on M3N@C68, M3N@C78 and M3N@C80 (M=Sc, Y and La). The calculated results demonstrated that the structures and stability undergo a transition with the increasing of the sizes of the cages and clusters. Sc3N is planar inside the three considered cages, Y3N is slightly pyramidal inside C68-6140 and C78-5 and planar inside I h C80-7, however, La3N is pyramidal inside all the three cages. Those cages with pyramidal clusters inside deformed considerably, compared with their parent cages. In these cases, the bonding of metallic atoms toward the cages does not play an impor-tant role, and the encaged cluster tends to be located inside the cages with the largest M-M and M-C distances so that the strain energy can be released mostly. These calculations revealed the size effect of fullerene cages and encaged clusters, and can explain the position priority of M3N inside fullerene cages and the differences in yield of M3N@C2n.

  9. Rearing Laying Hens in Aviaries Reduces Fearfulness following Transfer to Furnished Cages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantsæter, Margrethe; Tahamtani, Fernanda M.; Moe, Randi O.; Hansen, Tone B.; Orritt, Rachel; Nicol, Christine; Janczak, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate rearing is essential for ensuring the welfare and productivity of laying hens. Early experience has the potential to affect the development of fearfulness. This study tested whether rearing in aviaries, as opposed to cages, reduces the fearfulness of laying hens after transfer to furnished cages. Fear responses were recorded as avoidance of a novel object in the home cage. Lohmann Selected Leghorns were reared in an aviary system or conventional rearing cages and then transported to furnished cages at 16 weeks, before the onset of lay. Observations of a selection of birds were conducted at 19 (N = 50 independent cages) and 21 (N = 48 independent cages) weeks of age. At 19 and 21 weeks, cage-reared birds showed higher levels of fearfulness indicated by spending more time away from the novel object compared to aviary-reared birds. These results suggest that rearing in an enriched aviary environment reduces fearfulness up to the fifth week after transfer to a new housing system, compared to rearing in cages. PMID:26955634

  10. Effects of Cage Density on the Performance of Laying Hens During High Summer Temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    Altan, Ali; ALTAN, Özge; ÖZKAN, Sezen; ÖZKAN, Kahraman; AKBAŞ, Yavuz; Ayhan, Veysel

    2002-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of different cage densities on laying performance of white and brown hybrid layers during high summer temperatures. White layers, 68 weeks of age, were housed at a density of 3, 4 or 5 hens/cage (respectively 640, 480 and 384 cm2/hen); brown layers were housed at 3 or 4 hens/cage (respectively 640 and 480 cm2/hen). The results indicated that housing at 3 or 4 hens/cage did not affect egg production or egg quality significantly. Increasing t...

  11. Effects of Nominal Differences in Cage Height and Floor Space on the Wellbeing of Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Kay L; Suckow, Mark A

    2016-03-01

    The 8th edition of the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals recommends a cage height of 16 in. for rabbits, compared with 14 in. in the previous edition. In contrast, the Animal Welfare Act Regulations prescribes a cage height of 14 in. for rabbits. A review of the literature failed to identify published data that support an advantage to rabbits having 16 in. of cage height compared with 14 or 15 in. The study described here evaluated the effect of a 3-in. difference in cage height on the health, growth, behavior, and overall wellbeing of rabbits. Groups of 10 New Zealand white rabbits were housed in cages that provided either 15 in. of interior cage height (720 in(2) of floor space) or 18 in. of interior height (784 in(2) of floor space). The rabbits were observed during 25 periods (1 h each) over 7 wk, and various behavioral parameters were scored. In addition, rabbits were weighed weekly, and general clinical health was assessed. After 4 wk, the groups were switched to the alternate housing. No significant differences in body weight gain or behavioral parameters were detected between groups housed in cages with different heights and amounts of floor space, nor were significant behavioral differences noted in individual rabbits when moved from one cage type to the other. In addition, all rabbits remained clinically healthy throughout the study. These results demonstrate that these differences in interior cage height neither benefit nor harm rabbits. PMID:27025808

  12. The effects of climbing cages on behaviour of female mink during the lactation period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidfors, L.; Axelsson, H.; Loberg, J.;

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to investigate if there were differences in behaviour of female mink when kept in a climbing cage compared with a standard cage during the lactation period. The study was carried out on 90 mink of the colour type "black cross". Females were housed in either climbing cages (4.350 cm², n......=46) or standard cages (2.550 cm², n=44). Behavioural observations were made four weeks before birth until kits were nine weeks old with one-zero sampling during two hours before feeding. During week 1-4 after females had given birth they were mostly recorded in the nest box and there were no...... differences between cage types. Week 5-8 after giving birth females in climbing cages were less in the nest box, less active out in the cage and had fewer abnormal behaviours, but were on the platforms and more inactive out in the cage. In the bottom cage females were more often walking, grooming and inactive...

  13. Specific Neuron Placement on Gold and Silicon Nitride-Patterned Substrates through a Two-Step Functionalization Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mescola, Andrea; Canale, Claudio; Prato, Mirko; Diaspro, Alberto; Berdondini, Luca; Maccione, Alessandro; Dante, Silvia

    2016-06-28

    The control of neuron-substrate adhesion has been always a challenge for fabricating neuron-based cell chips and in particular for multielectrode array (MEA) devices, which warrants the investigation of the electrophysiological activity of neuronal networks. The recent introduction of high-density chips based on the complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology, integrating thousands of electrodes, improved the possibility to sense large networks and raised the challenge to develop newly adapted functionalization techniques to further increase neuron electrode localization to avoid the positioning of cells out of the recording area. Here, we present a simple and straightforward chemical functionalization method that leads to the precise and exclusive positioning of the neural cell bodies onto modified electrodes and inhibits, at the same time, cellular adhesion in the surrounding insulator areas. Different from other approaches, this technique does not require any adhesion molecule as well as complex patterning technique such as μ-contact printing. The functionalization was first optimized on gold (Au) and silicon nitride (Si3N4)-patterned surfaces. The procedure consisted of the introduction of a passivating layer of hydrophobic silane molecules (propyltriethoxysilane [PTES]) followed by a treatment of the Au surface using 11-amino-1-undecanethiol hydrochloride (AT). On model substrates, well-ordered neural networks and an optimal coupling between a single neuron and single micrometric functionalized Au surface were achieved. In addition, we presented the preliminary results of this functionalization method directly applied on a CMOS-MEA: the electrical spontaneous spiking and bursting activities of the network recorded for up to 4 weeks demonstrate an excellent and stable neural adhesion and functional behavior comparable with what expected using a standard adhesion factor, such as polylysine or laminin, thus demonstrating that this procedure can be

  14. Characterization of manures from fish cage farming in Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar, F J; Saldana, R C

    2007-12-01

    This study aims to characterize salmonid manures and to determine their potential use in agricultural soils. Sampling was carried out below salmon and trout cages in farms located in lakes and in the sea in the South of Chile during 2002-2003. Manure was analyzed for macronutrients, micronutrients and heavy metals. Results showed a high variability between samples and differences between sea and lake manure. Dry matter contents were low averaging c. 12-15%. Manures showed low OM contents with values heavy metal contents and a potential use in agricultural soils, which could reduce the risks of water pollution on water from fish farming. PMID:16962324

  15. DESIGN OF AUTOMATED ROTORY CAGE TYPE FIXTURE FOR CYLINDER BLOCK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.S.Kapnichor

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Project gives feasible solution to move and rotate the component with full proofing fixturing for special purpose operations like drilling, Tapping, deburring, washing, drying involve in manufacturing and assembly unit of industry. Rotary cage type fixture is made for handling the cylinder head inside the cleaning machine use for making fully ready component before assembly operation .System is useful to save time manpower and deliver perfect cleaned and dry component .system involved all the mechanical components along with the sensors used to restrict the rotating operations, stop and go operations etc.

  16. Design of Automated Rotory Cage Type Fixture for Cylinder Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.S.Kapnichor

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Project gives feasible solution to move and rotate the component with full proofing fixturing for special purpose operations like drilling, Tapping, deburring, washing, drying involve in manufacturing and assembly unit of industry. Rotary cage type fixture is made for handling the cylinder head inside the cleaning machine use for making fully ready component before assembly operation .System is useful to save time manpower and deliver perfect cleaned and dry component .system involved all the mechanical components along with the sensors used to restrict the rotating operations, stop and go operations etc.

  17. Experimental Determination of Stray Load Losses in Cage Induction Machines

    OpenAIRE

    Aoulkadi, M´hamed

    2011-01-01

    With different purposeful measurements like for the stray load losses and the flux densities, on two low-voltage squirrel-cage rotor asynchronous generators for 1.5 MW wind turbines with different types of the stator winding (litz and round wire), the sources of the losses and the causes for the winding overheating are localized and defined. Different measures to reduce the stray load losses due the skin effect in the stator of the round wire winding generator are successfully tested and impl...

  18. Regioselective nitration of aromatic substrates in zeolite cages

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T Esakkidurai; M Kumarraja; K Pitchumani

    2003-04-01

    Phenol is nitrated regioselectively by fuming nitric acid inside the cages of faujasite zeolites (dependent on the loading level) and a remarkable orthoselectivity is observed in solid state nitration. Toluene and chlorobenzene also containing ortho-/para-orienting substituents, undergo faster nitration, though the regioselectivity is less significant in zeolite media. The results are explained on the basis of diffusion and binding of phenol inside zeolite, which facilitate regioselectivity (and which is absent in toluene and chlorobenzene). Other advantages of employing zeolites as media for mild and selective nitration are also highlighted.

  19. Preinjector for Linac 1, inside the Faraday cage

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    For a description of the Linac 1 preinjector, please see first 7403070X. Here, the view is towards the upper level of the Faraday cage. Far to the right, a technician is peering through the service door. The huge box-shaped cubicle is the electronics platform, at 520 kV potential during operation. The "bull eye" at the left back sits at the top end of the accelerating column (see 7403081X) and houses the ion source with its electronics (see 7403083X). The SAMES generator, providing the 520 kV HV (7403074) sits on the floor and is not visible here.

  20. Study of a New Neuron

    OpenAIRE

    Adler, S. L.; Bhanot, G. V.; Weckel, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    We study a modular neuron alternative to the McCulloch-Pitts neuron that arises naturally in analog devices in which the neuron inputs are represented as coherent oscillatory wave signals. Although the modular neuron can compute $XOR$ at the one neuron level, it is still characterized by the same Vapnik-Chervonenkis dimension as the standard neuron. We give the formulas needed for constructing networks using the new neuron and training them using back-propagation. A numerical study of the mod...

  1. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: Comparison of titanium and polyetheretherketone cages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cabraja Mario

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Titanium (TTN cages have a higher modulus of elasticity when compared with polyetheretherketone (PEEK cages. This suggests that TTN-cages could show more frequent cage subsidence after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF and therefore might lead to a higher loss of correction. We compared the long term results of stand-alone PEEK- and TTN-cages in a comparable patient collective that was operated under identical operative settings. Methods From 2002 to 2007 154 patients underwent single-level ACDF for degenerative disc disease (DDD. Clinical and radiological outcome were assessed in 86 eligible patients after a mean of 28.4 months. 44 patients received a TTN- and 42 patients a PEEK-cage. Results Solid arthrodesis was found in 93.2% of the TTN-group and 88.1% of the PEEK-group. Cage subsidence was observed in 20.5% of the TTN- and 14.3% of the PEEK-group. A significant segmental lordotic correction was achieved by both cage-types. Even though a loss of correction was found at the last follow-up in both groups, it did not reach the level of statistical significance. Statistical analysis of these results revealed no differences between the TTN- and PEEK-group. When assessed with the neck disability index (NDI, the visual analogue scale (VAS of neck and arm pain and Odom’s criteria the clinical data showed no significant differences between the groups. Conclusions Clinical and radiological outcomes of ACDF with TTN- or PEEK-cages do not appear to be influenced by the chosen synthetic graft. The modulus of elasticity represents only one of many physical properties of a cage. Design, shape, size, surface architecture of a cage as well as bone density, endplate preparation and applied distraction during surgery need to be considered as further important factors.

  2. Outcome of single level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion using nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide-66 cage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cages have been widely used for the anterior reconstruction and fusion of cervical spine. Nonmetal cages have become popular due to prominent stress shielding and high rate of subsidence of metallic cages. This study aims to assess fusion with n-HA/PA66 cage following one level anterior cervical discectomy. Materials and Methods: Forty seven consecutive patients with radiculopathy or myelopathy underwent single level ACDF using n-HA/PA66 cage. We measured the segmental lordosis and intervertebral disc height on preoperative radiographs and then calculated the loss of segmental lordosis correction and cage subsidence over followup. Fusion status was evaluated on CT scans. Odom criteria, Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA and Visual Analog Pain Scales (VAS scores were used to assess the clinical results. Statistically quantitative data were analyzed while Categorical data by χ2 test. Results: Mean correction of segmental lordosis from surgery was 6.9 ± 3.0° with a mean loss of correction of 1.7 ± 1.9°. Mean cage subsidence was 1.2 ± 0.6 mm and the rate of cage subsidence (>2 mm was 2%. The rate of fusion success was 100%. No significant difference was found on clinical or radiographic outcomes between the patients (n=27 who were fused by n-HA/PA66 cage with pure local bone and the ones (n=20 with hybrid bone (local bone associating with bone from iliac crest. Conclusions: The n-HA/PA66 cage is a satisfactory reconstructing implant after anterior cervical discectomy, which can effectively promote bone graft fusion and prevent cage subsidence.

  3. Diagnosis of cranial hemangioma: Comparison between logistic regression analysis and neuronal network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the utility of logistic regression and the neuronal network in the diagnosis of cranial hemangiomas. Fifteen patients presenting hemangiomas were selected form a total of 167 patients with cranial lesions. All were evaluated by plain radiography and computed tomography (CT). Nineteen variables in their medical records were reviewed. Logistic regression and neuronal network models were constructed and validated by the jackknife (leave-one-out) approach. The yields of the two models were compared by means of ROC curves, using the area under the curve as parameter. Seven men and 8 women presented hemangiomas. The mean age of these patients was 38.4 (15.4 years (mea ± standard deviation). Logistic regression identified as significant variables the shape, soft tissue mass and periosteal reaction. The neuronal network lent more importance to the existence of ossified matrix, ruptured cortical vein and the mixed calcified-blastic (trabeculated) pattern. The neuronal network showed a greater yield than logistic regression (Az, 0.9409) (0.004 versus 0.7211± 0.075; p<0.001). The neuronal network discloses hidden interactions among the variables, providing a higher yield in the characterization of cranial hemangiomas and constituting a medical diagnostic acid. (Author)29 refs

  4. Animal welfare beyond the cage...and beyond the evidence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    In "Laboratory Rodent Welfare: Thinking Outside the Cage," Balcombe (2010/this issue) suggests that laboratory cage housing is damaging to rats and mice because it does not meet their evolved needs and may damage their psychological and physical health. The article also indicates that larger and more enriched spaces reduce aggression and mortality and improve the health and friendliness of rodents in the laboratory. Remarkably, many of the studies cited as supporting these assertions fail to provide data bearing on the issues involved or may even report findings opposite to those described by Balcombe, whereas many studies that are highly relevant to these issues are not cited or described. Moreover, although the "evolved needs" of rats and mice are presented as the basis for an analysis of rodent welfare, the important and well-documented changes in needs- or motivation-related behaviors of a rodent in the laboratory (due to human selection over hundreds of generations) is ignored. This pattern of disconnections between data and conclusions is so pervasive as to demolish the scientific value of the exposition. PMID:20017049

  5. [Supplementation of swine feed rations with zeolite during cage rearing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartko, P; Chabada, J; Vrzgula, L; Solár, I; Blazovský, J

    1983-07-01

    The effect of the addition of zeolite to pig feed ration was studied in the cage rearing system under production conditions. Zeolite was mixed in the COS I and COS II feed mixtures directly in the feed plant, the mixing ratio being 100 kg feed mixture + 5 kg zeolite. The feed mixture was administered in granular form ad libitum. The test group had 648 weanlings and the control group 674 weanlings; the piglets, kept in two-story cages in four sections, were arranged so that the test group could be a mirror-like reflection of the control group. The trial lasted 45 days. The piglets given the fortified feed ration had daily weight gains higher by 0.017 kg and feed consumption lower by 0.234 kg per 1 kg of gain, as compared with the control animals. The costs of the feed ration required for producing a kilogram of gain were 8.55 Cz. crowns in the zeolite group and 9.422 crowns in the control group. PMID:6312666

  6. Optical triggered seizures using a caged 4-Aminopyridine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingrui eZhao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Animal models of epilepsy are critical not only for understanding the fundamental mechanism of epilepsy but also for testing the efficacy of new antiepileptic drugs and novel therapeutic interventions. Photorelease of caged molecules is widely used in biological research to control pharmacologic events with high spatio-temporal resolution. We developed a technique for in vivo optical triggering of neocortical seizures using a novel caged compound based on ruthenium photochemistry (RuBi-4AP. Epileptiform events were induced with blue light illumination. Multi-electrode array recording and optical techniques were used to characterize the propagation of these epileptic events. Epileptiform events including interictal spikes, polyspikes, and ictal discharges were induced with blue light illumination. This model can be induced in vivo with both whole brain and focal illumination to provide high spatio-temporal control of the site of ictal onset. These results demonstrate a novel optically-triggered seizure model that may have widespread application in the investigation of ictal onset, propagation and in novel light-based therapeutic interventions.

  7. Abnormal behavior in caged birds kept as pets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hoek, C S; ten Cate, C

    1998-01-01

    There are a limited number of studies dealing with abnormal behavior in caged birds kept as pets. However, these studies demonstrate the presence of abnormal behavior in both songbirds and parrots. Ethological studies on these birds, as well as studies on domestic and zoo birds, indicate that inappropriate rearing and housing conditions may lead to behavioral abnormalities. Together these data indicate that behavioral abnormalities occur among both wild-caught and domesticated pet birds. The severity and magnitude of these abnormalities is probably underestimated, and there is a need for systematic studies on the nature, origin, variability, species-specificity, and reversibility of behavioral problems in pet birds. Abnormal behavior in caged birds may to some extent be prevented and reduced by environmental enrichment. However, most enrichment studies are anecdotal and not based on a thorough analysis of the behavioral abnormalities, which may lead to measures resulting in a reduction of symptoms rather than the underlying causes. Although it is likely that several of these problems could be reduced by modifying rearing and housing conditions, the current insights into the causal mechanisms underlying abnormal behavior of domesticated and wild-caught pet birds are limited, as are the insights into the possibilities of preventing or curing abnormal behavior. PMID:16363987

  8. Protection characteristics of a Faraday cage compromised by lightning burnthrough.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Bystrom, Edward; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Montoya, Sandra L.; Merewether, Kimball O.; Coats, Rebecca Sue; Martinez, Leonard E.; Jojola, John M.

    2012-01-01

    A lightning flash consists of multiple, high-amplitude but short duration return strokes. Between the return strokes is a lower amplitude, continuing current which flows for longer duration. If the walls of a Faraday cage are made of thin enough metal, the continuing current can melt a hole through the metal in a process called burnthrough. A subsequent return stroke can couple energy through this newly-formed hole. This LDRD is a study of the protection provided by a Faraday cage when it has been compromised by burnthrough. We initially repeated some previous experiments and expanded on them in terms of scope and diagnostics to form a knowledge baseline of the coupling phenomena. We then used a combination of experiment, analysis and numerical modeling to study four coupling mechanisms: indirect electric field coupling, indirect magnetic field coupling, conduction through plasma and breakdown through the hole. We discovered voltages higher than those encountered in the previous set of experiments (on the order of several hundreds of volts).

  9. Cage Versus Noncage Laying-Hen Housings: Respiratory Exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, Veronica; Mitchell, Diane; Armitage, Tracey; Tancredi, Daniel; Schenker, Marc; Mitloehner, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the personal respiratory exposures of poultry workers in three different types of layer housing under commercial production conditions. Workers were randomly assigned to each of conventional cage, enriched cage, and aviary barns in a crossover repeated-measures design for three observation periods over the hens' lifetime. Inhalable and fine particulate matter (PM) and endotoxin in both size fractions were assessed by personal and area samplers over the work shift. Concentrations of inhalable PM, PM2.5 (PM with an aerodynamic diameter Geometric means (95% confidence intervals [CIs]) of inhalable PM and endotoxin for the aviary, conventional, and enriched barns were 8.9 (6.8-11.5) mg/m(3) and 7517.9 (5403.2-10,460.2) EU/m(3), 3.7 (2.8-4.8) mg/m(3) and 1655.7 (1144.6-2395.2) EU/m(3), 2.4 (1.8-3.3) mg/m(3) and 1404.8 (983.3-2007.0) EU/m(3), respectively. Area samplers recorded a lower mean inhalable PM concentration and higher PM2.5 concentration than personal samplers. Ammonia concentrations were low throughout three monitoring seasons. These findings show that the aviary barns pose higher respiratory exposures to poultry workers than either conventional or enriched barns. PMID:26237714

  10. Large-scale clustering of CAGE tag expression data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kawai Jun

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent analyses have suggested that many genes possess multiple transcription start sites (TSSs that are differentially utilized in different tissues and cell lines. We have identified a huge number of TSSs mapped onto the mouse genome using the cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE method. The standard hierarchical clustering algorithm, which gives us easily understandable graphical tree images, has difficulties in processing such huge amounts of TSS data and a better method to calculate and display the results is needed. Results We use a combination of hierarchical and non-hierarchical clustering to cluster expression profiles of TSSs based on a large amount of CAGE data to profit from the best of both methods. We processed the genome-wide expression data, including 159,075 TSSs derived from 127 RNA samples of various organs of mouse, and succeeded in categorizing them into 70–100 clusters. The clusters exhibited intriguing biological features: a cluster supergroup with a ubiquitous expression profile, tissue-specific patterns, a distinct distribution of non-coding RNA and functional TSS groups. Conclusion Our approach succeeded in greatly reducing the calculation cost, and is an appropriate solution for analyzing large-scale TSS usage data.

  11. Cage Opening of a Carborane Ligand by Metal Cluster Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Richard D; Kiprotich, Joseph; Peryshkov, Dmitry V; Wong, Yuen Onn

    2016-05-01

    The reaction of Os3 (CO)10 (NCMe)2 with closo-o-C2 B10 H10 has yielded two interconvertible isomers Os3 (CO)9 (μ3 -4,5,9-C2 B10 H8 )(μ-H)2 (1 a) and Os3 (CO)9 (μ3 -3,4,8-C2 B10 H8 )(μ-H)2 (1 b) formed by the loss of the two NCMe ligands and one CO ligand from the Os3 cluster. Two BH bonds of the o-C2 B10 H10 were activated in its addition to the osmium cluster. A second triosmium cluster was added to the 1 a/1 b mixture to yield the complex Os3 (CO)9 (μ-H)2 (μ3 -4,5,9-μ3 -7,11,12-C2 B10 H7 )Os3 (CO)9 (μ-H)3 (2) that contains two triosmium triangles attached to the same carborane cage. When heated, 2 was transformed to the complex Os3 (CO)9 (μ-H)(μ3 -3,4,8-μ3 -7,11,12-C2 B10 H8 )Os3 (CO)9 (μ-H) (3) by a novel opening of the carborane cage with loss of H2 . PMID:26971388

  12. Mesmerising mirror neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2010-06-01

    Mirror neurons have been hailed as the key to understanding social cognition. I argue that three currents of thought-relating to evolution, atomism and telepathy-have magnified the perceived importance of mirror neurons. When they are understood to be a product of associative learning, rather than an adaptation for social cognition, mirror neurons are no longer mesmerising, but they continue to raise important questions about both the psychology of science and the neural bases of social cognition. PMID:20167276

  13. Kalman Filter Neuron Training

    OpenAIRE

    Murase, Haruhiko; KOYAMA, Shuhei; HONAMI, Nobuo; Kuwabara, Takao

    1991-01-01

    An attempt of implementing Kalman filter algorithm in the procedure for training the neural network was made and evaluated. The Kalman filter neuron training program (KNT) was coded. The performance of Kalman filter in KNT was compared to commonly used neuron training algorithm. The study revealed that KNT requires much less calculation time to accomplish neuron training than commonly used other algorithms do. KNT also gave much smaller final error than any other algorithms tested in this study.

  14. Comparison study Of H2O determination in UO2 powder by using MEA (Moisture Evaluation Analysis) and KFT (Karl Fischer Titration)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To find out an analytical method to determine H2O content in UO2 powder as fuel elements of power reactors which is simple, economical, precise, and accurate, it is necessary to do comparison study of H2O content determination using MEA method which is based on electrolysis process with two helically wound electrodes which contains P2 O5 that has function to absorb water steam. The platinum electrodes have a 67 Volt potential on them. The quantity of charge required to electrolyse 0.1 μgr of H2O is a constant which is the basic of the electronic measurement. In KFT method is based on volumetric titration using the one component reagent hydronol composite contain all reactants i.e. iodine, sulfur dioxide and imidazole as the base, dissolved in a suitable alcohol. The t- (student) test show that there is no different result significantly between those method. The H2O contain obtained is 0.956±0.0095 %, for MEA method and 0.953±0.023 % for KFT method. (author)

  15. ANALISIS IT GOVERNANCE DENGAN DOMAIN MEA01 DALAM PELAKSANAAN E-HEALTH MENGGUNAKAN KERANGKA KERJA COBIT 5 PADA DINAS KESEHATAN PROVINSI JAWA TENGAH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rusyida Baniya Savira

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Teknologi Informasi memiliki peran yang sangat penting untuk mendukung tujuan pencapaian suatu kegiatan dalam organisasi mupun instansi. Apabila pemanfaatan TI sudah berjalan dan mampu berintegrasi dengan baik dengan organisasi, maka TI mampu mendorong terjadinya peningkatan kinerja organisasi. Untuk mendukungnya, dibutuhkan suatu kegiatan monitoring, evaluasi, dan penilaian kinerja suatu organisasi. Dinas Kesehatan Provinsi Jawa Tengah merupakan suatu instansi pemerintahan yang bertindak sebagai penyelenggara untuk penyediaan layanan kesehatan kepada masyarakat di daerah Jawa Tengah. Permasalahan yang pada Dinas Kesehatan Provinsi Jawa Tengah adalah dalam pelaksanaan kegiatan pengawasan dan evaluasi masih ditemukan beberapa kekurangan seperti kurang lengkapnya Standart Operational Procedure (SOP mengenai detail proses pengawasan dan penilaian kinerja, proses tata kelola TI yang belum dilakukan secara menyeluruh, serta kurangnya pengawasan dalam peningkatan kebutuhan pemakaian e-health. Dari hasil studi dokumen, wawancara dan kuesioner berdasarkan COBIT 5 dihasilkan level kapabilitas tata kelola proses monitoring, evaluasi, dan penilaian kinerja dan kesesuaian (MEA01 saat ini adalah level 1 yaitu Performed, dengan tingkat pencapaian Largely Achieved sebesar 83,33% atau setara dengan 1,83 yang menunjukkan bahwa proses monitoring kinerja dan kesesuaian yang telah diimplementasikan berhasil mencapai tujuan instansi tetapi masih belum sepenuhnya dikelola dengan baik. Untuk mencapai level kapabilitas 2, dapat dilakukan strategi perbaikan secara bertahap dari proses atribut level 1 sampai 2. Kata kunci: COBIT 5, Analisis Tata Kelola TI, E-health, Proses Monitoring Evaluate and Assess Performance and Conformance (MEA01, Dinas Kesehatan Provinsi Jawa Tengah.

  16. Burst analysis tool for developing neuronal networks exhibiting highly varying action potential dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikret Emre eKapucu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we propose a firing statistics based neuronal network burst detection algorithm for neuronal networks exhibiting highly variable action potential dynamics. Electrical activity of neuronal networks is generally analyzed by the occurrences of spikes and bursts both in time and space. Commonly accepted analysis tools employ burst detection algorithms based on predefined criteria. However, maturing neuronal networks, such as those originating from human embryonic stem cells (hESC, exhibit highly variable network structure and time-varying dynamics. To explore the developing burst/spike activities of such networks, we propose a burst detection algorithm which utilizes the firing statistics based on interspike interval (ISI histograms. Moreover, the algorithm calculates interspike interval thresholds for burst spikes as well as for pre-burst spikes and burst tails by evaluating the cumulative moving average and skewness of the ISI histogram. Because of the adaptive nature of the proposed algorithm, its analysis power is not limited by the type of neuronal cell network at hand. We demonstrate the functionality of our algorithm with two different types of microelectrode array (MEA data recorded from spontaneously active hESC-derived neuronal cell networks. The same data was also analyzed by two commonly employed burst detection algorithms and the differences in burst detection results are illustrated. The results demonstrate that our method is both adaptive to the firing statistics of the network and yields successful burst detection from the data. In conclusion, the proposed method is a potential tool for analyzing of hESC-derived neuronal cell networks and thus can be utilized in studies aiming to understand the development and functioning of human neuronal networks and as an analysis tool for in vitro drug screening and neurotoxicity assays.

  17. Is the time right for in vitro neurotoxicity testing using human iPSC-derived neurons?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukker, Anke M; de Groot, Martje W G D M; Wijnolts, Fiona M J; Kasteel, Emma E J; Hondebrink, Laura; Westerink, Remco H S

    2016-01-01

    Current neurotoxicity testing heavily relies on expensive, time consuming and ethically debated in vivo animal experiments that are unsuitable for screening large number of chemicals. Consequently, there is a clear need for (high-throughput) in vitro test strategies, preferably using human cells as this increases relevance and eliminates the need for interspecies translation. However, human stem cell-derived neurons used to date are not well characterised, require prolonged differentiation and are potentially subject to batch-to-batch variation, ethical concerns and country-specific legislations. Recently, a number of human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons became commercially available that may circumvent these concerns. We therefore used immunofluorescent stainings to demonstrate that human iPSC-derived neurons from various suppliers form mixed neuronal cultures, consisting of different types of (excitatory and inhibitory) neurons. Using multi-well microelectrode array (mwMEA) recordings, we demonstrate that these human iPSC-derived cultures develop spontaneous neuronal activity over time, which can be modulated by different physiological, toxicological and pharmacological compounds. Additional single cell calcium imaging illustrates the presence of functional GABA, glutamate, and acetylcholine receptors as well as voltage-gated calcium channels. While human iPSC-derived neuronal cultures appear not yet suitable to fully replace the rat primary cortical model, our data indicate that these rapidly differentiating, commercially available human iPSC-derived neuronal cultures are already suitable for in vitro prioritisation and effect screening studies. Further characterisation and toxicological validation is now required to facilitate acceptance and large-scale implementation of these animal-free, physiologically-relevant human iPSC-based modelsfor future neurotoxicity testing. PMID:27010910

  18. Self-Assembly, Guest Capture, and NMR Spectroscopy of a Metal-Organic Cage in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Eun Bin; Srisuknimit, Veerasak; Cheng, Stephanie L.; Vosburg, David A.

    2016-01-01

    A green organic-inorganic laboratory experiment has been developed in which students prepare a self-assembling iron cage in D[subscript 2]O at room temperature. The tetrahedral cage captures a small, neutral molecule such as cyclohexane or tetrahydrofuran. [Superscript 1]H NMR analysis distinguishes captured and free guests through diagnostic…

  19. Biomechanische Untersuchung eines biodegradierbaren Cages zur interkorporellen Spondylodese der Halswirbelsäule.

    OpenAIRE

    Gumnior, Sarah Nicole Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Biomechanical evaluation of a biodegradable cage for interbody fusion at the cervical spine Biomechanical evaluation of a biodegradable cage for interbody fusion in the cervical spine. A in vivo animal study in a sheep model.   Abstract Background Anterior interbody fusion using an intervertebral spacer is a widely accepted surgical treatment for patients with degenerative and traumatic cervical spinal-c...

  20. Healing properties of allograft from alendronate-treated animal in lumbar spine interbody cage fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qingyun; Li, Haisheng; Zou, Xuenong; Bünger, Mathias; Egund, Niels; Lind, Martin; Christensen, Finn Bjarke; Bünger, Cody

    2005-04-01

    This study investigated the healing potential of allograft from bisphosphonate-treated animals in anterior lumbar spine interbody fusion. Three levels of anterior lumbar interbody fusion with Brantigan cages were performed in two groups of five landrace pigs. Empty Brantigan cages or cages filled with either autograft or allograft were located randomly at different levels. The allograft materials for the treatment group were taken from the pigs that had been fed with alendronate, 10 mg daily for 3 months. The histological fusion rate was 2/5 in alendronate-treated allograft and 3/5 in non-treated allograft. The mean bone volume was 39% and 37.2% in alendronate-treated or non-treated allograft (NS), respectively. No statistical difference was found between the same grafted cage comparing two groups. The histological fusion rate was 7/10 in all autograft cage levels and 5/10 in combined allograft cage levels. No fusion was found at all in empty cage levels. With the numbers available, no statistically significant difference was found in histological fusion between autograft and allograft applications. There was a significant difference of mean bone volume between autograft (49.2%) and empty cage (27.5%) (P<0.01). In conclusion, this study did not demonstrate different healing properties of alendronate-treated and non-treated allograft for anterior lumbar interbody fusion in pigs. PMID:15248057

  1. Animal Welfare and Food Safety Aspects of Confining Broiler Chickens to Cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Sara; Greger, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In most areas of the world, broiler chickens are raised in floor systems, but cage confinement is becoming more common. The welfare of broiler chickens in cages is affected by movement restriction, poor bone strength due to lack of exercise, and prevention of key behavioral patterns such as dustbathing and ground scratching. Cages for broiler chickens also have a long history of causing skin and leg conditions that could further compromise welfare, but a lack of controlled studies makes it difficult to draw conclusions about newer cage designs. Cage environments are usually stocked at a higher density than open floor systems, and the limited studies available suggest that caging may lead to increased levels of fear and stress in the birds. Further, birds reared on the floor appear less likely to harbor and shed Salmonella, as litter may serve as a seeding agent for competitive exclusion by other microorganisms. Cages for laying hens used in egg production have met with substantial opposition due to welfare concerns and caging broiler chickens will likely be subject to the same kinds of social disapproval. PMID:26487409

  2. Design and synthesis of novel bis-annulated caged polycycles via ring-closing metathesis: pushpakenediol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambasivarao Kotha

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Intricate caged molecular frameworks are assembled by an atom economical process via a Diels–Alder (DA reaction, a Claisen rearrangement, a ring-closing metathesis (RCM and an alkenyl Grignard addition. The introduction of olefinic moieties in the pentacycloundecane (PCUD framework at appropriate positions followed by RCM led to the formation of novel heptacyclic cage systems.

  3. Alterations of diaphragm and rib cage morphometry in severe COPD patients by CT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salito, C; Luoni, E; Aliverti, A

    2015-08-01

    Although it is known that in patients with COPD acute hyperinflation determines shortening of the inspiratory muscles, its effects on both diaphragm and rib cage morphology are still to be investigated. In this preliminary study the relationships between hyperinflation, emphysema, diaphragm and rib cage geometry were studied in 5 severe COPD patients and 5 healthy subjects. An automatic software was developed to obtain the 3-D reconstruction of diaphragm and rib cage from CT scans taken at total lung capacity (TLC) and residual volume (RV). Dome surface area (Ado), radius of curvature, length (Ld) and position (referred to xiphoid level) of the diaphragm and antero-posterior (A-P) and transverse (T) diameters of rib cage were calculated at both volumes. Ado and Ld were similar in COPD and controls when compared at similar absolute lung volumes. Radius of curvature was significantly higher in COPD than in controls only at TLC. In COPD, the range of diaphragm position was invariantly below the xiphoid level, while in controls the top of diaphragm dome was always above it. Rib cage diameters were not different at TLC. A-P diameter was greater in COPD than in controls at RV, while T diameters were similar. In conclusion, in severe COPD diaphragm and rib cage geometry is altered at RV. The lower position of diaphragm is associated to smaller A-P but not transversal rib cage diameters, such that rib cage adopts a more circular shape. PMID:26737755

  4. Tuneable dynamics of a scandium nitride cluster inside an Ih-C80 cage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yongqiang; Wang, Taishan; Xiang, Junfeng; Gan, Lihua; Wu, Bo; Jiang, Li; Wang, Chunru

    2015-02-01

    The internal clusters in metallofullerenes usually exhibit certain motion that is potentially usable in molecular gyroscopes and nano-machines. Based on (45)Sc NMR, the motion of the scandium nitride cluster within the C80 cage was investigated via varying the temperature and modifying the cage, and by changing the cluster size. PMID:25558825

  5. Standard methods for maintaining adult Apis mellifera in cages under in vitro laboratory conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, G.R.; Alaux, C.; Costa, C.; Csaki, C.; Steen, van der J.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Adult honey bees are maintained in vitro in laboratory cages for a variety of purposes. For example, researchers may wish to perform experiments on honey bees caged individually or in groups to study aspects of parasitology, toxicology, or physiology under highly controlled conditions, or they may c

  6. Immobilization of two organometallic complexes into a single cage to construct protein-based microcompartments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Basudev; Fukumori, Kazuki; Abe, Satoshi; Ueno, Takafumi

    2016-04-01

    Natural protein-based microcompartments containing multiple enzymes promote cascade reactions within cells. We use the apo-ferritin protein cage to mimic such biocompartments by immobilizing two organometallic Ir and Pd complexes into the single protein cage. Precise locations of the metals and their accumulation mechanism were studied by X-ray crystallography. PMID:27021005

  7. Recombinant expression and purification of 'virus-like' bacterial encapsulin protein cages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rurup, W.F.; Cornelissen, J.J.L.M.; Koay, M.S.T.; Orner, Brendan P.

    2014-01-01

    Ultracentrifugation, particularly the use of sucrose or cesium chloride density gradients, is a highly reliable and efficient technique for the purification of virus-like particles and protein cages. Since virus-like particles and protein cages have a unique size compared to cellular macromolecules

  8. Modulation of aggression in male mice : influence of group size and cage size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Loo, PLP; Mol, JA; Koolhaas, JM; Van Zutphen, BFM; Baumans, [No Value; Koolhaas, Jaap M.; Zutphen, Bert F.M. van; Baumans, Vera

    2001-01-01

    Aggression in group-housed male mice is known to be influenced by both cage size and group size. However, the interdependency of these two parameters has not been studied yet. In this study, the level of aggression in groups of three, five, or eight male BALB/c mice housed in cages with a floor size

  9. A pyrrolo-tetrathiafulvalene cage: Synthesis and X-ray crystal structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kent A.; Jeppesen, Jan O.; Levillain, Eric;

    2002-01-01

    A novel type of tetrathiafulvalene-cage 4 containing three monopyrrolo-tetrathiafulvalene units has been prepared employing a general and efficient synthetic approach. X-ray crystal structure analysis revealed that the cage is able to accommodate solvent molecules within a cavity in the solid state....

  10. Solid state and aqueous behavior of uranyl peroxide cage clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellegrini, Kristi Lynn

    Uranyl peroxide cage clusters include a large family of more than 50 published clusters of a variety of sizes, which can incorporate various ligands including pyrophosphate and oxalate. Previous studies have reported that uranyl clusters can be used as a method to separate uranium from a solid matrix, with potential applications in reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuel. Because of the potential applications of these novel structures in an advanced nuclear fuel cycle and their likely presence in areas of contamination, it is important to understand their behavior in both solid state and aqueous systems, including complex environments where other ions are present. In this thesis, I examine the aqueous behavior of U24Pp 12, as well as aqueous cluster systems with added mono-, di-, and trivalent cations. The resulting solutions were analyzed using dynamic light scattering and ultra-small angle X-ray scattering to evaluate the species in solution. Precipitates of these systems were analyzed using powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, and Raman spectroscopy. The results of these analyses demonstrate the importance of cation size, charge, and concentration of added cations on the aqueous behavior of uranium macroions. Specifically, aggregates of various sizes and shapes form rapidly upon addition of cations, and in some cases these aggregates appear to precipitate into an X-ray amorphous material that still contains U24Pp12 clusters. In addition, I probe aggregation of U24Pp12 and U60, another uranyl peroxide cage cluster, in mixed solvent water-alcohol systems. The aggregation of uranyl clusters in water-alcohol systems is a result of hydrogen bonding with polar organic molecules and the reduction of the dielectric constant of the system. Studies of aggregation of uranyl clusters also allow for comparison between the newer uranyl polyoxometalate family and century-old transition metal polyoxometalates. To complement the solution studies of uranyl

  11. Environmental enrichment reduces signs of boredom in caged mink.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca K Meagher

    Full Text Available Animals housed in impoverished cages are often labelled 'bored'. They have also been called 'apathetic' or 'depressed', particularly when profoundly inactive. However, these terms are rarely operationally defined and validated. As a negative state caused by under-stimulation, boredom should increase interest in stimuli of all kinds. Apathy (lack of interest, by contrast, should manifest as decreased interest in all stimuli, while anhedonia (loss of pleasure, a depressive symptom should specifically decrease interest in normally rewarding stimuli. We tested the hypotheses that mink, a model carnivore, experience more boredom, depression-like apathy, or anhedonia in non-enriched (NE cages than in complex, enriched (E cages. We exposed 29 subjects (13 E, 16 NE to ten stimuli categorized a priori as aversive (e.g. air puffs, rewarding (e.g. evoking chasing or ambiguous/neutral (e.g. candles. Interest in stimuli was assessed via latencies to contact, contact durations, and durations oriented to stimuli. NE mink contacted all stimuli faster (P = 0.003 than E mink, and spent longer oriented to/in contact with them, albeit only significantly so for ambiguous ones (treatment*type P<0.013. With stimulus category removed from statistical models, interest in all stimuli was consistently higher among NE mink (P<0.0001 for all measures. NE mink also consumed more food rewards (P = 0.037. Finally, we investigated whether lying down while awake and stereotypic behaviour (both increased by NE housing predicted these responses. Lying awake positively co-varied with certain measures of increased exploration. In contrast, stereotypic 'scrabbling' or locomotion (e.g. pacing did not. Overall, NE mink showed no evidence of apathy or depression, but instead a heightened investigation of diverse stimuli consistent with boredom. This state was potentially indicated by spending much time lying still but awake (although this result requires replication. Boredom can

  12. Kappe neurons, a novel population of olfactory sensory neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Ahuja, Gaurav; Nia, Shahrzad Bozorg; Zapilko, Veronika; Shiriagin, Vladimir; Kowatschew, Daniel; Oka, Yuichiro; Korsching, Sigrun I.

    2014-01-01

    Perception of olfactory stimuli is mediated by distinct populations of olfactory sensory neurons, each with a characteristic set of morphological as well as functional parameters. Beyond two large populations of ciliated and microvillous neurons, a third population, crypt neurons, has been identified in teleost and cartilaginous fishes. We report here a novel, fourth olfactory sensory neuron population in zebrafish, which we named kappe neurons for their characteristic shape. Kappe neurons ar...

  13. Outcome of instrumented lumbar fusion for low grade spondylolisthesis; Evaluation of interbody fusion with & without cages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathy, Mostafa; Fahmy, Mohamed; Fakhri, Mazen; Aref, Khaled; Abdin, Khaled; Zidan, Ihab

    2010-01-01

    Object: The aim is to evalute the outcome of posterior lumbar interbody fusion with autologous bone graft versus titanium Cages, BAK system (Bagby – Kuslich, Spine Tech, Inc. Minneapolis, MN) for low grade spondyloisthesis (Grade1,11). Interbody cages have been developed to replace tricortical Interbody grafts in posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) procedures. The cages provide immediate post operative stability and facilitate bony union with cancellous bone packed in the cage itself. METHOD: We Evaluated 50 consecutive patients in whom surgery was performed between June 2000 to June 2003 in the Main Alexandria University Hospital at EGYPT. Twenty five patients were operated using autologous bone graft and 25 patients using the BAK cages. The neuro–radiologic al work up consisted of; plain X – ray lumbosacral spine including dynamic films preoperative and postoperative follow up; C.T lumbosacral spine and MRI lumbosacral spine. The surgery was performed at L4-5 level in 34 cases and at L5-S1 level in 16 cases. The median follow up was 15 months. RESULTS: Satisfactory fusion was obtained at all levels at a minimum one year follow – up. The fusion rate was 96% (24 patients) for the cage group and 80% (20 patients) for bone graft group however clinical improvement was 64% (16 patients) for those with bone graft group. CONCLUSION: A higher fusion rates and a better clinical outcome have been obtained by Instrumented PLIF with titanium cages that with bone graft. Inderbody fusion cages help to stabilize spainal segment primarily by distracting them as well as by allowing bone ingrowth and fusion. The procedure is safe and effective with 96% fusion rate and 76% overall Satisfactory rate. The use of cages help to distract the space between the vertebral bodies making the correction of the degree of spondylolisthesis easier. Long term follow up revealed better fusion rate and better realignment and less resorption with cages than with bone grafts. PMID

  14. Neuronal Response Clamp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avner Wallach

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Responses of individual neurons to ongoing input are highly variable, reflecting complex threshold dynamics. Experimental access to this threshold dynamics is required in order to fully characterize neuronal input-output relationships. The challenge is practically intractable using present day experimental paradigms due to the cumulative, nonlinear interactions involved. Here we introduce the Neuronal Response Clamp, a closed-loop technique enabling control over the instantaneous response probability of the neuron. The potential of the technique is demonstrated by showing direct access to threshold dynamics of cortical neuron in-vitro using extracellular recording and stimulation, over timescales ranging from seconds to many hours. Moreover, the method allowed us to expose the sensitivity of threshold dynamics to spontaneous input from the network in which the neuron is embedded. The Response Clamp technique follows the rationale of the voltage-clamp and dynamic-clamp approaches, extending it to the neuron's spiking behavior. The general framework offered here is applicable in the study of other neural systems, beyond the single neuron level.

  15. NEURON and Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hines

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because all existing models written in Hoc, including GUI tools, continue to work without change and are also available within the Python context. An example of the benefits of Python availability is the use of the XML module in implementing NEURON's Import3D and CellBuild tools to read MorphML and NeuroML model specifications.

  16. Resonance Spectra of Caged Stringy Black Hole and Its Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Sakalli, I

    2015-01-01

    The Maggiore's method (MM), which evaluates the transition frequency that appears in the adiabatic invariant from the highly damped quasinormal mode (QNM) frequencies, is used to investigate the entropy/area spectra of the Garfinkle--Horowitz--Strominger black hole (GHSBH). Instead of the ordinary QNMs, we compute the boxed QNMs (BQNMs) that are the characteristic resonance spectra of the confined scalar fields in the GHSBH geometry. For this purpose, we assume that the GHSBH has a confining cavity (mirror) placed in the vicinity of the event horizon. We then show how the complex resonant frequencies of the caged GHSBH are computed using the Bessel differential equation that arises when the scalar perturbations around the event horizon are considered. Although the entropy/area is characterized by the GHSBH parameters, their quantization is shown to be independent of those parameters. However, both spectra are equally spaced.

  17. Magnetotactic Bacterial Cages as Safe and Smart Gene Delivery Vehicles

    KAUST Repository

    Alsaiari, Shahad K.

    2016-07-27

    In spite of the huge advances in the area of synthetic carriers, their efficiency still poorly compares to natural vectors. Herein, we report the use of unmodified magnetotactic bacteria as a guidable delivery vehicle for DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). High cargo loading is established under anaerobic conditions (bacteria is alive) through endocytosis where AuNPs are employed as transmembrane proteins mimics (facilitate endocytosis) as well as imaging agents to verify and quantify loading and release. The naturally bio-mineralized magnetosomes, within the bacteria, induce heat generation inside bacteria through magnetic hyperthermia. Most importantly after exposing the system to air (bacteria is dead) the cell wall stays intact providing an efficient bacterial vessel. Upon incubation with THP-1 cells, the magnetotactic bacterial cages (MBCs) adhere to the cell wall and are directly engulfed through the phagocytic activity of these cells. Applying magnetic hyperthermia leads to the dissociation of the bacterial microcarrier and eventual release of cargo.

  18. CAGE Analysis of China’s Trade Globalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Olusegun STOBER

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Gravity model of international trade states that trade interaction between two countries is in direct proportion to their size measured by Gross Domestic Product and in inverse proportion to the geographic distance. Conley and Ligon (2001 argued that the relevant economic distance between countries is often not the geographic distance. Thus, this study uses original datasets on economic distance to structure observed variations, to decompose the multidimensional CAGE distance framework of globalization derived from the Newton’s Law of gravitation as it applies to China’s international interaction, to evaluate bilateral trade patterns in identifying and prioritizing the importance of cross-border flows and differences that accounted for the development of China’s global strategies. This study confirms that distance must be accounted for in the decision making of any country’s globalization process or any firm’s global expansion as the effects on cross-border economic activities are enormous.

  19. Electrostatic capacitance and Faraday cage behavior of carbon nanotube forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Understanding of the electrostatic properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) forests is essential to enable their integration in microelectronic and micromechanical devices. In this study, we sought to understand how the hierarchical geometry and morphology of CNT forests determines their capacitance. First, we find that at small gaps, solid micropillars have greater capacitance, yet at larger gaps the capacitance of the CNT forests is greater. The surface area of the CNT forest accessible to the electrostatic field was extracted by analysis of the measured capacitance, and, by relating the capacitance to the average density of CNTs in the forest, we find that the penetration depth of the electrostatic field is on the order of several microns. Therefore, CNT forests can behave as a miniature Faraday cage. The unique electrostatic properties of CNT forests could therefore enable their use as long-range proximity sensors and as shielding elements for miniature electronic devices

  20. Nonlinear vs. linear biasing in Trp-cage folding simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiwok, Vojtěch, E-mail: spiwokv@vscht.cz; Oborský, Pavel; Králová, Blanka [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, University of Chemistry and Technology, Prague, Technická 3, Prague 6 166 28 (Czech Republic); Pazúriková, Jana [Institute of Computer Science, Masaryk University, Botanická 554/68a, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Křenek, Aleš [Institute of Computer Science, Masaryk University, Botanická 554/68a, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic); Center CERIT-SC, Masaryk Univerzity, Šumavská 416/15, 602 00 Brno (Czech Republic)

    2015-03-21

    Biased simulations have great potential for the study of slow processes, including protein folding. Atomic motions in molecules are nonlinear, which suggests that simulations with enhanced sampling of collective motions traced by nonlinear dimensionality reduction methods may perform better than linear ones. In this study, we compare an unbiased folding simulation of the Trp-cage miniprotein with metadynamics simulations using both linear (principle component analysis) and nonlinear (Isomap) low dimensional embeddings as collective variables. Folding of the mini-protein was successfully simulated in 200 ns simulation with linear biasing and non-linear motion biasing. The folded state was correctly predicted as the free energy minimum in both simulations. We found that the advantage of linear motion biasing is that it can sample a larger conformational space, whereas the advantage of nonlinear motion biasing lies in slightly better resolution of the resulting free energy surface. In terms of sampling efficiency, both methods are comparable.

  1. Nonlinear vs. linear biasing in Trp-cage folding simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biased simulations have great potential for the study of slow processes, including protein folding. Atomic motions in molecules are nonlinear, which suggests that simulations with enhanced sampling of collective motions traced by nonlinear dimensionality reduction methods may perform better than linear ones. In this study, we compare an unbiased folding simulation of the Trp-cage miniprotein with metadynamics simulations using both linear (principle component analysis) and nonlinear (Isomap) low dimensional embeddings as collective variables. Folding of the mini-protein was successfully simulated in 200 ns simulation with linear biasing and non-linear motion biasing. The folded state was correctly predicted as the free energy minimum in both simulations. We found that the advantage of linear motion biasing is that it can sample a larger conformational space, whereas the advantage of nonlinear motion biasing lies in slightly better resolution of the resulting free energy surface. In terms of sampling efficiency, both methods are comparable

  2. Gaiola de metabolismo para equinos Metabolism cage for horses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorinha Miriam Silber Schmidt Vitti

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available A gaiola de metabolismo, modelo proposto neste trabalho, foi construida na Seção de Oficina da FCAV-Unesp, Jaboticabal-SP e utilizada no Laboratório de Ciências Animais do Cena-USP, Piracicaba-SP. Este equipamento permite alojar eqüinos machos com idade a partir do desmame. Os animais foram treinados (condicionados diariamente a permanecer na gaiola de metabolismo por um período de aproximadamente 30 dias antes do início do experimento. O material necessário e a construção de uma gaiola metabólica para eqüinos machos é descrita e ilustrada. A estrutura principal da gaiola (2,68 m de comprimento x 0,80 m de largura x 2,02 m de altura é constituida por canos de metal de duas polegadas e todas as unidades de apoio - tábuas do piso, grade de urina, bebedouro, comedouro, bandeja coletora de urina e barras de contenção - estão fixas à estrutura principal de modo a serem removidas desta, faciltando o manejo e a limpeza do equipamento. O equipamento foi projetado para alojar animais de vários tamanhos e também para ser efetiva na coleta total de fezes e urina e no fornecimento de alimento e água. Os animais permaneceram em pé durante todo o período de confinamento, sem contudo ter havido a ocorrência de edemas graves nos membros. O modelo proposto foi testado em experimentos de metabolismo de fósforo utilizando-se radioisótopos.The metabolism cage here proposed was built at FCAV-Unesp, Jaboticabal, state of São Paulo, Brazil, and used in the Animal Science Laboratory at Cena-USP, Piracicaba, state of São Paulo, Brazil. The equipment allows to host male horses from weaning to adult age. Before starting the experiment, the animals were daily conditioned for a 30-day period to remain in the cage. The necessary material and the building process of the horse metabolic cage are described and illustrated. The main structure of the cage (2.68m long x 0.80 m wide x 2.02 m high was made of 2-inch-diameter metal tube, and all the

  3. Role of cage material, working style and hearing sensitivity in perception of animal care noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voipio, H-M; Nevalainen, T; Halonen, P; Hakumäki, M; Björk, E

    2006-10-01

    During daily care, laboratory animals are exposed to a variety of sounds which may have effects on welfare and also cause physiological and behavioural changes. So far, almost no attention has been paid to individual sounds or the sound level caused by animal care or the sound level inside the animal cage. In this study, sounds from selected rat care procedures were recorded: pulling cage out of the rack, placing it onto a table and replacing the cage back into the rack; with measurements made inside the rat cage and in the adjacent cage. Diet was poured into the food hopper and sounds were recorded inside the cage and also the adjacent cage. The work was repeated in a calm and also in a hurried style, using stainless steel and polycarbonate cages. Finally, the sounds produced by running tap water were recorded. Differences between rat and human hearing were compared using novel species-specific sound level weightings: R-weighting for rats dB(R) and H-weighting for human dB(H). Hurried work with steel caused sound exposure levels exceeding 90 dB(R) when the cages were placed into the rack and about 80 dB(R) when pulling them out of the rack or placing onto a table. With polycarbonate, the levels were 10-15 dB(R) lower. Unhurried calm working produced lower sound exposure levels than hurried working in many procedures. When the procedures were repeated with measurements in the adjacent cage, the sound exposure levels were lower, but the results were similar. Pouring food pellets into a hopper above the rat's head caused 15 dB(R) higher sound exposure levels than pouring food to an adjacent cage. In general, humans hear these sounds about 10-15 dB louder than rats. In conclusion, cage material, working style and hearing sensitivity all have an impact on the sound exposure level in the rodent cage. With correct working methods, high sound levels can be efficiently avoided in most cases. PMID:17018211

  4. Digestibility and behavior of dogs housed in kennels or metabolic cages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabyta Tamara Sabchuk

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to compare the apparent digestibility coefficients of a commercial dog food, fecal consistency and behavior of dogs housed in kennels and metabolic cages. Six adult Beagle dogs were distributed in cross-over experimental design, with six replicates per treatment. Dogs were housed in two environments: metabolic cages and in masonry kennels with solarium. Dogs were fed for a five-day adaptation period, and the five following days were used for total feces collection. Dogs behavior was recorded during a 48-h period, with 10-min intervals. Apparent digestibility coefficients were not different between treatments. However, dogs housed in metabolic cages produced lower weight and more consistent feces as compared with dogs housed in kennels. Dogs spent most of the time sleeping in both housing systems; however, dogs housed in the metabolic cages slept more than those in kennels. Stress-related behaviors (barking, whimpering, stereotypies, etc were observed for no longer than 15 minutes per day, and were not different between dogs in kennels or in cages. There is no difference in food digestibility evaluated in dogs housed in metabolic cages or kennels; however, dogs kept in metabolic cages eliminate drier feces and spend more time inactive than those kept in kennels.

  5. Cage-induced stereotypies, perseveration and the effects of environmental enrichment in laboratory mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Alexandra N; Richter, S Helene; Engel, A Katarina J; Würbel, Hanno

    2012-09-01

    When kept in barren and restrictive cages, animals frequently develop stereotypic behaviour patterns that are characterized by high repetition rates, conspicuous invariance and an apparent lack of function. Although millions of animals are affected, the underlying causes and mechanisms are still unclear. Growing evidence suggests that cage-induced stereotypies may reflect pathological dysfunction within basal ganglia circuitry expressed by perseverative behaviour. In order to assess whether variation in stereotypy performance and variation in perseverative behaviour may have a common cause in ICR CD-1 mice, we assessed the effects of environmental enrichment on both phenomena. We raised 48 female ICR CD-1 mice in standard or enriched cages from three weeks to either 6 or 11 months of age and measured stereotypy level in the home cage and perseveration on an extinction task. We further examined whether enriched rearing conditions (early enrichment) protect mice from the developing stereotypies later in life and whether stereotypies developed in barren cages would persist in an enriched environment (late enrichment) by transferring standard mice to enriched cages and vice versa for 14 weeks after completion of the extinction task. We found no evidence for a causal relation between stereotypy and perseveration in mice. However, transfer to enriched cages reduced stereotypy levels significantly both at 6 and 11 months of age indicating that stereotypies had not become established yet. Finally, we found that removing enrichments at both ages did not induce higher stereotypy levels, thereby confirming earlier reports of a neuroprotective effect of early enrichment. PMID:22721674

  6. Evaluation of the 96/4 PLDLLA polymer resorbable lumbar interbody cage in a long term animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazennec, Jean Y; Madi, Abdallah; Rousseau, Marc A; Roger, Bernard; Saillant, Gérard

    2006-10-01

    Arthrodesis using interbody cages has demonstrated high fusion rates. However, permanent cages are exposed to stress-shielding, corrosion, and may require explanation when necessary. Polylactic acid (PLA) bioresorbable cages are developed for avoiding these problems, but significant tissue reaction has been reported with 70/30 PLDLLA in some preclinical animal studies. The objective was to evaluate 96/4 PLDLLA cages in a sheep model over 3 years. Sixteen sheeps underwent one level anterior lumbar interbody fusion using 96/4 PLDLLA cages, filled and surrounded with cancellous bone graft from the iliac crest. Six groups of three animals were killed after 3, 6, 9, 12, 24, and 36 months. Harvested lumbar spine had radiographic, MRI, and CT evaluation and histological analysis. Histological results: cage swelling and slight signs of fragmentation associated to fibrocartilaginous tissue apposition at 3 months; bone remodeling around the cage with direct apposition of the mineralization front at 6 months; active cage degradation and complete fusion around the cage at 9 months; cage fragmentation and partial replacement by bone tissue at 12 months; bone bridges in and around the cage at 24 months; full resorption and intervertebral fusion at 36 months. Radiological results: partial arthrodesis at 3 months; definite peripheral arthrodesis at 6 months; similar aspect at 9 months; significant cage resorption at 12 months; definite inner and outer fusion at 24 months; complete cage resorption and calcification at the location of the cage at 36 months confirmed histological observations. Radiographic, CT scan, MRI, and histological data were consistent for showing progressive resorption of 96/4 PLDLLA, interbody fusion, and bone remodeling, with no significant signs of local intolerance reaction. These results are promising and suggest further development of 96/4 PLDLLA cages. PMID:16736199

  7. How microglia kill neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Guy C; Vilalta, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Microglia are resident brain macrophages that become inflammatory activated in most brain pathologies. Microglia normally protect neurons, but may accidentally kill neurons when attempting to limit infections or damage, and this may be more common with degenerative disease as there was no significant selection pressure on the aged brain in the past. A number of mechanisms by which activated microglia kill neurons have been identified, including: (i) stimulation of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase (PHOX) to produce superoxide and derivative oxidants, (ii) expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) producing NO and derivative oxidants, (iii) release of glutamate and glutaminase, (iv) release of TNFα, (v) release of cathepsin B, (vi) phagocytosis of stressed neurons, and (vii) decreased release of nutritive BDNF and IGF-1. PHOX stimulation contributes to microglial activation, but is not directly neurotoxic unless NO is present. NO is normally neuroprotective, but can react with superoxide to produce neurotoxic peroxynitrite, or in the presence of hypoxia inhibit mitochondrial respiration. Glutamate can be released by glia or neurons, but is neurotoxic only if the neurons are depolarised, for example as a result of mitochondrial inhibition. TNFα is normally neuroprotective, but can become toxic if caspase-8 or NF-κB activation are inhibited. If the above mechanisms do not kill neurons, they may still stress the neurons sufficiently to make them susceptible to phagocytosis by activated microglia. We review here whether microglial killing of neurons is an artefact, makes evolutionary sense or contributes in common neuropathologies and by what mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroprotection. PMID:26341532

  8. Dependence of synchronized bursting activity on medium stirring and the perfusion rate in a cultured network of neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Ryoun; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Kyoung J.

    2016-05-01

    A cultured network of neurons coupled with a multi-electrode-array (MEA) recording system has been a useful platform for investigating various issues in neuroscience and engineering. The neural activity supported by the system can be sensitive to environmental fluctuations, for example, in the medium's nutrient composition, ph, and temperature, and to mechanical disturbances, yet this issue has not been the subject. Especially, a normal practice in maintaining neuronal cell cultures involves an intermittent sequence of medium exchanges, typically at a time interval of a few days, and one such sudden medium exchange is unavoidably accompanied by many unintended disturbances. Here, based on a quantitative time-series analysis of synchronized bursting events, we explicitly demonstrate that such a medium exchange can, indeed, bring a huge change in the existing neural activity. Subsequently, we develop a medium perfusion-stirring system and an ideal protocol that can be used in conjunction with a MEA recording system, providing long-term stability. Specifically, we systematically evaluate the effects of medium stirring and perfusion rates. Unexpectedly, even some vigorous mechanical agitations do not have any impacts on neural activity. On the other hand, too much replenishment ( e.g., 1.8 ml/day for a 1.8-ml dish) of neurobasal medium results in an excitotoxicity.

  9. Experiment and model for the viscosities of MEA-PEG400, DEA-PEG400 and MDEA-PEG400 aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The viscosities of the amine-PEG400 aqueous solutions were measured. • The experiments were modeled satisfactorily by using the Weiland equation. • The effect of mass fractions of amine and PEG400 on the viscosity was illustrated. • The temperature dependence of the viscosity was demonstrated. - Abstract: The viscosities (η) of poly(ethylene oxide)400 (PEG400), monoethanolamine (MEA)-PEG400, diethanolamine (DEA)-PEG400 and N-methyldiethanolamine (MDEA)-PEG400 aqueous solutions were measured by using the NDJ-5S digital rotational viscometer. A thermodynamic equation was used to model the viscosities and the calculated results are satisfactory. The effects of temperature, mass fractions of amines and PEG400 on the viscosities were demonstrated on the basis of experiments and calculations

  10. Single neuron computation

    CERN Document Server

    McKenna, Thomas M; Zornetzer, Steven F

    1992-01-01

    This book contains twenty-two original contributions that provide a comprehensive overview of computational approaches to understanding a single neuron structure. The focus on cellular-level processes is twofold. From a computational neuroscience perspective, a thorough understanding of the information processing performed by single neurons leads to an understanding of circuit- and systems-level activity. From the standpoint of artificial neural networks (ANNs), a single real neuron is as complex an operational unit as an entire ANN, and formalizing the complex computations performed by real n

  11. Straintronic spin-neuron

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Ayan K.; Atulasimha, Jayasimha; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo

    2015-01-01

    In artificial neural networks, neurons are usually implemented with highly dissipative CMOS-based operational amplifiers. A more energy-efficient implementation is a 'spin-neuron' realized with a magneto-tunneling junction (MTJ) that is switched with a spin-polarized current (representing weighted sum of input currents) that either delivers a spin transfer torque or induces domain wall motion in the soft layer of the MTJ. Here, we propose and analyze a different type of spin-neuron in which t...

  12. Substrate arrays of iridium oxide microelectrodes for in vitro neuronal interfacing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawad, Shady; Giugliano, Michele; Heuschkel, Marc; Wessling, Börge; Markram, Henry; Schnakenberg, Uwe; Renaud, Philippe; Morgan, Hywel

    2009-01-01

    The design of novel bidirectional interfaces for in vivo and in vitro nervous systems is an important step towards future functional neuroprosthetics. Small electrodes, structures and devices are necessary to achieve high-resolution and target-selectivity during stimulation and recording of neuronal networks, while significant charge transfer and large signal-to-noise ratio are required for accurate time resolution. In addition, the physical properties of the interface should remain stable across time, especially when chronic in vivo applications or in vitro long-term studies are considered, unless a procedure to actively compensate for degradation is provided. In this short report, we describe the use and fabrication of arrays of 120 planar microelectrodes (MEAs) of sputtered Iridium Oxide (IrOx). The effective surface area of individual microelectrodes is significantly increased using electrochemical activation, a procedure that may also be employed to restore the properties of the electrodes as required. The electrode activation results in a very low interface impedance, especially in the lower frequency domain, which was characterized by impedance spectroscopy. The increase in the roughness of the microelectrodes surface was imaged using digital holographic microscopy and electron microscopy. Aging of the activated electrodes was also investigated, comparing storage in saline with storage in air. Demonstration of concept was achieved by recording multiple single-unit spike activity in acute brain slice preparations of rat neocortex. Data suggests that extracellular recording of action potentials can be achieved with planar IrOx MEAs with good signal-to-noise ratios. PMID:19194527

  13. The centrifugal Jahn-Teller effect in rare-earth cage systems

    OpenAIRE

    Amara, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of the properties of rare-earth based materials relies on the Crystalline Electric Field theory. This theory has to be reconsidered in case of cage-type compounds, where the rare-earth ion can substantially depart from its, high symmetry, average position. It is shown that, in case of an orbital degeneracy at the cage center, a specific Jahn-Teller effect develops in the paramagnetic range: at low temperature, the distribution of the magnetic ion spreads inside the cage, the magn...

  14. Apoptotic activity of caged xanthones from Garcinia hanburyi in cholangiocarcinoma cell lines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chariya; Hahnvajanawong; Wongwarut; Boonyanugomol; Tapanawan; Nasomyon; Watcharin; Loilome; Nisana; Namwat; Natthinee; Anantachoke; Wichittra; Tassaneeyakul; Banchob; Sripa; Wises; Namwat; Vichai; Reutrakul

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the growth inhibitory mechanism of four caged xanthones from Garcinia hanburyi in cholangiocarcinoma(CCA) KKU-100 and KKU-M156 cells.METHODS:Four caged xanthones,selected on the basis of their anticancer potency and chemical structure diversities(i.e.isomorellin,isomorellinol,forbesione and gambogic acid) were used in this study.Growth inhibition of these caged xanthones was determined using the sulforhodamine B assay.Induction of apoptosis was assessed by observing cell morphology,ethidi...

  15. Laying Performance of Wareng Chicken under Free Choice Feeding and Different Cage Density

    OpenAIRE

    S Iskandar

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the experiment was to explore the possibility of using free choice feeding technique under different cage density for unselected native chicken. Eighty hens of laying Wareng chicken were divided into two feeding systems. Half of them were fed complete commercial diet of 17% crude protein, with 2800 kcal ME/kg and the other half were subjected to free choice diet. The diets were in mash form and placed in sufficient feed troughs in front of each cage. Each cage was occupied by four ...

  16. Spiro annulation of cage polycycles via Grignard reaction and ring-closing metathesis as key steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambasivarao Kotha

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A simple synthetic strategy to C2-symmetric bis-spiro-pyrano cage compound 7 involving ring-closing metathesis is reported. The hexacyclic dione 10 was prepared from simple and readily available starting materials such as 1,4-naphthoquinone and cyclopentadiene. The synthesis of an unprecedented octacyclic cage compound through intramolecular Diels–Alder (DA reaction as a key step is described. The structures of three new cage compounds 7, 12 and 18 were confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies.

  17. Percutaneous Vertebroplasty in a Broken Vertebral Titanium Implant (Titanium Mesh Cage)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the case of a percutaneous consolidation of a broken vertebral implant (Surgical Titanium Mesh Implants; DePuy Spine, Raynham, MA, USA) by vertebroplasty. Four years after anterior spondylectomy with cage implantation and stabilization with posterior instrumentation, the patient was admitted for excruciating back pain. Radiographs showed fracture of the cage, screw, and rod. An anterior surgical approach was deemed difficult and a percutaneous injection of polymethyl methacrylate into the cage was performed following posterior instrumentation replacement. This seems to be an interesting alternative to the classical anterior surgical approach, which is often difficult in postoperative conditions

  18. Genome-wide detection and analysis of hippocampus core promoters using DeepCAGE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valen, Eivind; Pascarella, Giovanni; Chalk, Alistair;

    2009-01-01

    given tissue. Here, we present a new method for high-throughput sequencing of 5' cDNA tags-DeepCAGE: merging the Cap Analysis of Gene Expression method with ultra-high-throughput sequence technology. We apply DeepCAGE to characterize 1.4 million sequenced TSS from mouse hippocampus and reveal a wealth...... of novel core promoters that are preferentially used in hippocampus: This is the most comprehensive promoter data set for any tissue to date. Using these data, we present evidence indicating a key role for the Arnt2 transcription factor in hippocampus gene regulation. DeepCAGE can also detect...

  19. Pet Birds. Cages and Practices of Domestication in Eighteenth-Century Paris

    OpenAIRE

    Breittruck, Julia

    2012-01-01

    This paper focuses on the genesis of the »pet making« of birds in eighteenth-century Paris. It examines the ways in which particular cages, and the corresponding imagination and practice of caretaking and domestication, construed birds as »pets.« The status of these animals in either their difference or similarity to »the human« is analyzed by looking at different kinds of bird-caging instructions. First, I found that bird caging developed as a cultural technique of domestication since it org...

  20. Recent Developments in NEURON

    OpenAIRE

    Hines, Michael L.; Carnevale, Nicholas T.

    2005-01-01

    We describe four recent additions to NEURON's suite of graphical tools that make it easier for users to create and manage models: an enhancement to the Channel Builder that facilitates the specification and efficient simulation of stochastic channel models

  1. Neuromorphic silicon neuron circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GiacomoIndiveri

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain-machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance based Hodgkin-Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive Integrate and Fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips.

  2. Noise and Neuronal Heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Barber, Michael J.; Ristig, Manfred L.

    2010-01-01

    We consider signal transaction in a simple neuronal model featuring intrinsic noise. The presence of noise limits the precision of neural responses and impacts the quality of neural signal transduction. We assess the signal transduction quality in relation to the level of noise, and show it to be maximized by a non-zero level of noise, analogous to the stochastic resonance effect. The quality enhancement occurs for a finite range of stimuli to a single neuron; we show how to construct network...

  3. Josephson junction simulation of neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Crotty, Patrick; Schult, Daniel; Segall, Ken

    2010-01-01

    With the goal of understanding the intricate behavior and dynamics of collections of neurons, we present superconducting circuits containing Josephson junctions that model biologically realistic neurons. These "Josephson junction neurons" reproduce many characteristic behaviors of biological neurons such as action potentials, refractory periods, and firing thresholds. They can be coupled together in ways that mimic electrical and chemical synapses. Using existing fabrication technologies, lar...

  4. Storage of molecular hydrogen into leaky clathrate hydrate cages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Efficient storage of hydrogen into compact media is an essential challenge to establish a hydrogen economy. A nanostructured compound made of water and gas molecules, which is called as clathrate hydrate, is one reasonable choice for this important task. Its structure consists of three-dimensional network of hydrogen-bonded water molecules (host cages) and small nonpolar molecules (guests) encaged within this network. The clathrate hydrate medium is chemically durable, environmentally benign, and also free from the necessity of expensive rare metals. Large amount of molecular hydrogen up to 3.8 wt.% was successfully stored into the structure II hydrogen clathrate hydrate (Fd3m space group, lattice constant ∼ 1.7 nm), while it is only synthesized at low temperature and/or high pressure conditions which are not suitable for industrial applications. Required pressure to put significant amount of hydrogen into the hydrate structure is much reducible by blending in additional guest species acting as a hydrate promoter. The promoter molecules added to the system occupy some of the cages to stabilize the hydrate structure at lower pressures, so that the hydrogen storage capacity is partly reduced instead. In addition to the problem of storage capacity, kinetic aspect of hydrogen clathrate hydrate synthesis is also essential for the expected application. Its conventional production scheme was by freezing promoter's solution contacting with pressurized hydrogen gas; it then takes long time for crystal growth. We have established an alternative scheme enabling much faster synthesis (Okuchi et al., Appl. Phys. Lett., 91, 171903, 2007). We found that when hydrogen-free clathrate hydrate powders including a promoter (tetrahydrofuran) was contacted with pressurized hydrogen gas, hydrogen was quickly absorbed into the hydrate medium. We observed the absorption kinetics by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a function of hydrogen pressure and temperature. In

  5. M8L12 cubic cages with all facial Δ or facial Λ configuration: effects of surface anions on the occupancy of the cage and anion exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; Chang, Xiao-Yong; Sham, Kiu-Chor; Yiu, Shek-Man; Kwong, Hoi-Lun; Che, Chi-Ming

    2016-05-21

    M8L12 cubic cages (M = Mn(II), Zn(II) or Cd(II)), with all eight metal ions having all facial Δ or facial Λ configurations and having an encapsulated anion, were prepared by the self-assembly of m-xylene-bridged imidazolyl-imine ligands and MX2 (X = PF6(-), SbF6(-), TfO(-)) salts; the encapsulated anion exchange with different anions (SbF6(-), Tf2N(-), NO3(-), TsO(-)) was studied and the results with NO3(-) and TsO(-) indicate that anions on the cage surfaces affect the encapsulated anion exchange and the occupancy of the cage. PMID:27064122

  6. Bedding disposal cabinet for containment of aerosols generated by animal cage cleaning procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, C L; Sabel, F L; Henke, C B

    1976-02-01

    Laboratory tests with aerosolized spores and animal room tests with uranine dye indicate the effectiveness of a prototype bedding disposal cabinet in reducing airborne contamination generated by cage cleaning procedures. PMID:826219

  7. Highly efficient catalysis of the Kemp elimination in the cavity of a cubic coordination cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, William; Misuraca, M. Cristina; Hunter, Christopher A.; Williams, Nicholas H.; Ward, Michael D.

    2016-03-01

    The hollow cavities of coordination cages can provide an environment for enzyme-like catalytic reactions of small-molecule guests. Here, we report a new example (catalysis of the Kemp elimination reaction of benzisoxazole with hydroxide to form 2-cyanophenolate) in the cavity of a water-soluble M8L12 coordination cage, with two features of particular interest. First, the rate enhancement is among the largest observed to date: at pD 8.5, the value of kcat/kuncat is 2 × 105, due to the accumulation of a high concentration of partially desolvated hydroxide ions around the bound guest arising from ion-pairing with the 16+ cage. Second, the catalysis is based on two orthogonal interactions: (1) hydrophobic binding of benzisoxazole in the cavity and (2) polar binding of hydroxide ions to sites on the cage surface, both of which were established by competition experiments.

  8. Cooperative Veratryle and Nitroindoline Cages for Two-Photon Uncaging in the NIR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cueto Diaz, Eduardo; Picard, Sébastien; Klausen, Maxime; Hugues, Vincent; Pagano, Paolo; Genin, Emilie; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille

    2016-07-25

    Tandem uncaging systems in which a two-photon absorbing module and a cage moiety, linked via a phosphorous clip, that act together by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been developed. A library of these compounds, using different linkers and cages (7-nitroindolinyl or nitroveratryl) has been synthesized. The investigation of their uncaging and two-photon absorption properties demonstrates the scope and versatility of the engineering strategy towards efficient two-photon cages and reveals surprising cooperative and topological effects. The interactions between the 2PA module and the caging moiety are found to promote cooperative effects on the 2PA response while additional processes that enhance the uncaging efficiency are operative in well-oriented nitroindoline-derived dyads. These synergic effects combine to lead to record two-photon uncaging cross-section values (i.e., up to 20 GM) for uncaging of carboxylic acids. PMID:27346866

  9. The design of a cervical vertebra titanium plate-interbody fusion cage

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To study the biomechanical feature of a newly designed cervical vertebra internal fixation device and its clinical applications Methods: Some functional spinal units were fixed respectively with titanium plate, fusion cage and new device designed by ourselves, then a controlled biomechanical study including flexion, extension, torsion and lateral bending was performed and the results were analyzed. Results: As to the mechanical performance, fusion cage showed poor performance in extension test and so did the titanium plate in the distortion test. However, the new device showed good performance in every test. Conclusion: Both simple titanium plate fixation and simple fusion cage fixation have biomechanical defaults, but they are complementary. The titanium plate-interbody fusion cage avoids the defaults and has specific advantages.

  10. Feasibility of the sustainable freshwater cage culture in Hungary and Romania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dénes Gál

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The intensive cage culture has an adverse effect on the quality of waters due to the highnutrient discharge of intensive fish culture. The combination of the intensive cage and the extensiveaquaculture exploits the advantages of traditional pond farming and intensive fish culture systems.Valuable predatory fish species can be produced in the intensive part of the system, whilst theintegration of an extensive pond as a treatment unit results in decreased nutrient loading to theenvironment and increased nutrient recovery in fish production. The combination of cage and pond fishfarming is a new method for predatory fish production in fishponds. By the exploiting of the traditionalfish ponds with intensive fish production in cages makes possible for the traditional carp farmers toincrease their production capacity, diversify the cultured species and recycle the nutrients within theproduction systems.

  11. Protein cages, rings and tubes: useful components of future nanodevices?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan G Heddle

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan G HeddleGlobal Edge Institute, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Nagatsuda, Midori-ku, Yokohama Kanagawa, JapanAbstract: There is a great deal of interest in the possibility that complex nanoscale devices can be designed and engineered. Such devices will lead to the development of new materials, electronics and smart drugs. Producing complex nanoscale devices, however will present many challenges and the components of such devices will require a number of special features. Devices will be engineered to incorporate desired functionalities but, because of the difficulties of controlling matter precisely at the nanoscale with current technology, the nanodevice components must self-assemble. In addition, nanocomponents that are to have wide applicability in various devices must have enough flexibility to integrate into a large number of potentially very different environments. These challenges are daunting and complex, and artificial nanodevices have not yet been constructed. However, the existence of nanomachines in nature in the form of proteins (eg, enzymes suggests that they will be possible to produce. As the material from which nature’s nanomachines are made, proteins seem ideal to form the basis of engineered components of such nanodevices. Initially, engineering projects may focus on building blocks such as rings, cages and tubes, examples of which exist in nature and may act as a useful start point for modification and further development. This review focuses on the recent research and possible future development of such protein building blocks.Keywords: bionanotechnology, protein engineering, nanomachine, building-blocks, synthetic biology

  12. Model of a generator end-winding cage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document presents some studies concerning the vibratory characterization of particular structures called: generator end-winding cages. These structures are mainly made up of the endings of armature windings. The question of their good mechanical behaviour is of prime importance, since they are submitted to high electromagnetic efforts during the different electrical ratings encountered during operation. The designer (GEC-Alsthom) and the user (EDF) have both undertaken numerical calculations in order to characterize a given machine, in this case a 600 MW bipolar generator; it appeared interesting to compare such calculations. The models realized respectively by GEC-Alsthom and EDF make use of different techniques and hypotheses. GEC-Alsthom represents the sets of rods and spacers by plates, which properties are determined by a pre-processor. The model is simplified to take into account the existing symmetries. It takes profit of previous experience and aims at a fast utilisation. The EDF model tends to allow a further comprehensive calculation, form the electromagnetic efforts to the determination of local stresses. The whole set of the constituting elements of the structure is modelled by beams, which leads to an important size for the model (21 000 degrees of freedom). The validation performed on the two models has been focused on the comparison between respective results and also with experimental results. Each model provides values for the first eigenfrequencies and the associated modes shapes. (authors). 3 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Bioresorbable polymers: heading for a new generation of spinal cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuisman, P I J M; Smit, T H

    2006-02-01

    The use of polymer-based bioresorbable materials is now expanding to the realm of spinal interbody fusion. Bioresorbable polymers have important advantages over metals, because they are temporary, much less stiff, and radiolucent. Most promising is a group of alpha-polyesters, in particular polylactide acids (PLAs). Their biocompatibility is excellent, and they have sufficient stiffness and strength to provide initial and intermediate-term stability required for bone healing. However, polylactides have characteristics that make them vulnerable to complications if not properly controlled. Degradation rate strongly depends on polymer type, impurities, manufacturing process, sterilization, device size, and the local environment. The fact that larger implants degrade faster is contra-intuitive, and should be considered in the design process. Also optimal surgical techniques, such as careful bone bed preparation, are required for a successful application of these materials. The purpose of this paper is to highlight the specific properties of these bioresorbable polymers and to discuss their potential and limitations. This is illustrated with early preclinical and clinical data.Bioresorbable cage technology is just emerging: their time-engineered degradation characteristics allow controlled dynamization in interbody applications, facilitating spinal fusion. Their radiolucency improves image assessment of fusion healing. Acceptance and use of bioresorbable implants may increase as further research and clinical studies report on their safety, efficacy, and proper usage. PMID:16292588

  14. Neurons of human nucleus accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sazdanović Maja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Nucleus accumbens is a part of the ventral striatum also known as a drug active brain region, especially related with drug addiction. The aim of the study was to investigate the Golgi morphology of the nucleus accumbens neurons. Methods. The study was performed on the frontal and sagittal sections of 15 human brains by the Golgi Kopsch method. We classified neurons in the human nucleus accumbens according to their morphology and size into four types: type I - fusiform neurons; type II - fusiform neurons with lateral dendrite, arising from a part of the cell body; type III - pyramidal-like neuron; type IV - multipolar neuron. The medium spiny neurons, which are mostly noted regarding to the drug addictive conditions of the brain, correspond to the type IV - multipolar neurons. Results. Two regions of human nucleus accumbens could be clearly recognized on Nissl and Golgi preparations each containing different predominant neuronal types. Central part of nucleus accumbens, core region, has a low density of impregnated neurons with predominant type III, pyramidal-like neurons, with spines on secondary branches and rare type IV, multipolar neurons. Contrary to the core, peripheral region, shell of nucleus, has a high density of impregnated neurons predominantly contained of type I and type IV - multipolar neurons, which all are rich in spines on secondary and tertiary dendritic branches. Conclusion. Our results indicate great morphological variability of human nucleus accumbens neurons. This requires further investigations and clarifying clinical significance of this important brain region.

  15. Diaphragm muscle shortening modulates kinematics of lower rib cage in dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Iris; Fernandez, Cristina; Rodowicz, Kathleen Allen; Lopez, Michael A.; Lu, Raymond; Hubmayr, Rolf D.; Boriek, Aladin M.

    2010-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that diaphragm muscle shortening modulates volume displacement and kinematics of the lower rib cage in dogs and that posture and mode of ventilation affect such modulation. Radiopaque markers were surgically attached to the lower three ribs of the rib cage and to the midcostal region of the diaphragm in six dogs of ∼8 kg body masses, and the locations of these markers were determined by a biplane fluoroscopy system. Three-dimensional software modeling techniques were ...

  16. Control System for Producing Electricity with Dual Stator Winding Cage-Rotor Induction Generator

    OpenAIRE

    Lucian Nicolae Tutelea; Sorin Ioan Deaconu; Gabriel Nicolae Popa

    2014-01-01

    This paper will present the key design equations and control design model of the Dual Stator Winding Cage-Rotor Induction Generator (DSWIG) to achieve wide-speed-range operation with reduced capacity of the static power controller for low power wind or hydro applications. The proposed induction generator consists of a standard squirrel-cage rotor and a stator with two separate windings wound for a similar number of poles. Moreover, the system control strategy using the stato...

  17. Focusing of high intensity ultrasound through the rib cage using a therapeutic random phased array

    OpenAIRE

    Bobkova, Svetlana; Gavrilov, Leonid; Khokhlova, Vera; Shaw, Adam; Hand, Jeffrey; ,

    2010-01-01

    A method for focusing high intensity ultrasound through a rib cage that aims to minimize heating of the ribs whilst maintaining high intensities at the focus (or foci) is proposed and tested theoretically and experimentally. Two approaches, one based on geometric acoustics and the other accounting for diffraction effects associated with propagation through the rib cage, are investigated theoretically for idealized source conditions. It is shown that for an idealized radiator the diffraction a...

  18. A practical guide to the synthesis of dinitroindolinyl-caged neurotransmitters

    OpenAIRE

    Ellis-Davies, Graham C. R.

    2011-01-01

    This protocol describes a method for efficient chemical synthesis of dinitroindolinyl derivatives of glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid. these caged neurotransmitters are currently the most chemically and photochemically efficient probes for two-photon photolysis in living brain slices. the protocol only requires basic organic synthesis equipment, and no silica gel column chromatography or NMR spectroscopy is needed at any stage. Hplc is used to purify the caged transmitters at the end of ...

  19. Late Results of Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion with Interbody Cages

    OpenAIRE

    Dağlı, Murat; Er, Uygur; Şimşek, Serkan; Bavbek, Murad

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis. Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of anterior cervical discectomy with fusion for degenerative cervical disc disease. Overview of Literature Anterior spinal surgery originated in the mid-1950s and graft for fusion was also employed. Currently anterior cervical microdiscectomy and fusion with an intervertebral cage is a widely accepted procedure for treatment of cervical disc hernia. Artificial grafts and cages for fusion are preferred because of their ...

  20. Synthesis of Silsesquioxane Cages from Phenyl-cis-tetrol,1,3-Divinyltetraethoxydisiloxane and Cyclopentyl Resins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Zhi-hua; Alan R. Bassindale; Peter G. Taylor

    2004-01-01

    The synthesis of Ts, T10 and T12 silsesquioxane cages from a range of starting materials: phenyl-cistetrol, 1,3-divinyltetraethoxydisiloxane and cyclopentyl T resins by using tetra n-butylammonium fluoride (TBAF) as the catalyst is described in this paper. The reaction yields obtained via the current route are better compared to those via the literature routes. Some of the cage compounds have been characterized by X-ray crystallography.

  1. Multifunctional photoreactive inorganic cages for three-dimensional holographic data storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungwoo; Jeong, Yong-Cheol; Lee, Jihye; Park, Jung-Ki

    2009-10-15

    We demonstrate a holographic photopolymer based on multifunctional photoreactive inorganic cages, polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane (POSS). It is shown that a second photopolymerizable monomer, POSS, for the photopolymer, contributes to significantly enhance photosensitivity as well as refractive index modulation (Deltan). We also found that during the formation of holographic gratings, polymerization of POSS could effectively suppress volume shrinkage of photopolymer resin, owing to its filler-strengthening effect of inorganic cages accompanied with interpenetrating effect. PMID:19838237

  2. Economic analysis of the environmental impact on marine cage lobster aquaculture in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Ly, Nguyen Thi Y

    2009-01-01

    In Vietnam, marine cage lobster aquaculture has been expanding significantly over the last years. Besides the economic contribution for locals living in the coastal areas in Central of Vietnam, this industry has created some problems that are relating to the marine environmental protection where trash fish feed is predominant. This paper investigates the environmental impact on cage marine lobster aquaculture in Vietnam by using the Change of Productivity method in which nitrogen releasing fr...

  3. Environmental impact of sea bass cage farming in the north Adriatic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Lanari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the research was to reduce the organic and nutrient load under the net pen fish farms. An exper- iment was conducted to study the effects of artificial barriers fixed under a set of sea cages in order to reduce the envi- ronmental impact. The artificial barriers were made of four submerged galvanized steel pipes coated with plastic and placed on the sea floor (10 m depth in the Trieste gulf. The experimental design was as follows: control (C, cages with barriers (B, cages without barriers (WB. Measurements were taken on the surface as well as at 4 and 8m of depth. The trial lasted from the end of June 2000 to December 2001. Water quality parameters were not significantly influenced by the fish cages. Surface samples were characterised by lower levels of salinity and higher levels of oxygen and nitrate compared to those taken at 4 and 8 m. The artificial barriers favoured the establishment of a rich epiphytic fauna that took advantage of the presence of organic matter derived from fish cages. The two species Nucula nucleusand Neanthes caudataand the total bacterial counts were identified as potential indicators of pollution under the fish cage farms.

  4. Titanium Alloy Cage Implantation for the Treatment of Ischemic Necrosis of Femoral Head in Dogs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruiying WANG; Yan GAO; Shuhua YANG; Cao YANG

    2008-01-01

    To study the effect of titanium alloy cage on the treatment of the ischemic necrosis of femoral head in dog, the model of the ischemic necrosis of femoral head was made with the liquid nitrogon in 15 hybrid adult dogs. The titanium alloy cage made of a hollow cylinder was driven into the subchondral bone of necrotic femoral head via central channel. The dogs were divided into 3 groups, each group was sacrificed 3, 6, 12 weeks after the operation respectively. No collapse of femoral head was observed after the operation. The position of the cages was good on radiograph. Microscopically, the cancellous bone of necrotic femoral head rebuilt gradually and grew into cage. After 12 weeks of creeping substitution, the cancellous bone filled up the hollow cavity and holes of the cages. It is concluded that the titanium alloy cage can provide structural support for the subchondral bone and prevent collapse and can be used for the treatment of the ischemic necrosis of femoral head.

  5. Evaluation of caged freshwater mussels as an alternative method for environmental effects monitoring (EEM) studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results from caged mussel experiments agreed with benthic invertebrate surveys, but not with trends observed for fish. - On three occasions between 1998 and 2000, freshwater mussels were collected by divers in Lake Memphremagog during the spring and transplanted to various locations in the St-Francois River (Quebec, Canada). Mussel growth was monitored by comparing total weight and length at the beginning and end of the exposure period. In 1998, mussels were caged for 60 days at 10 stations, including locations receiving treated effluents from three pulp and paper mills. Overall, there was an apparent trend of increased mussel growth from upstream to downstream along the river. However, mussels caged downstream from the effluent discharge of a bleached kraft pulp and paper mill grew more slowly than those caged immediately upstream in the river. In 1999 and 2000, we further investigated the situation in the vicinity of this bleached kraft mill. The measurements again indicated that growth of mussels in the effluent plume from this mill was reduced in comparison to sites upstream. Overall, in terms of growth, the caged mussels responded both positively and negatively to different environmental conditions. Compared with other monitoring approaches used at these sites during the same period, the caged mussel experiment results were consistent with the trends observed with the benthic invertebrate survey but not with the trends observed for fish

  6. DFT-based inhibitor and promoter selection criteria for pentagonal dodecahedron methane hydrate cage

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Snehanshu Pal; T K Kundu

    2013-09-01

    Density functional theory (DFT)-based simulations have been performed to provide electronic structure property correlation based reasoning for conceptualizing the effect of encapsulated methane molecule on the formation of methane hydrate cages, the role of methanol and ethylene glycol as inhibitor and the role of tetra-hydro-furan (THF) and cyclopentane as promoter of methane hydrate. Geometry optimization of 512 cage, 51262 cage and 51264 cage with and without encapsulated methane and the cluster of 512 cage with ethylene glycol, methanol, cyclopentane have been performed by density functional theory using B97X-D/6-31++G(d,p) method. Methane hydrate formation inhibition by methanol and ethylene glycol as well as methane hydrate stabilization by cyclopentane and tetrahydrofuran are critically analysed based on the interaction energy, free energy change, dipole moment and infrared frequency calculation. Calculation of free energy change for formation of methane hydrate with/without reagents at various temperature and pressure using optimized structure is reported here. It is observed that hydrogen bond between water molecules of clathrate 512 cages become stronger in the presence of cyclopentane and tetrahydrofuran but weaker/broken in the presence of ethylene glycol and methanol. Simulated results correspond well with experimental findings and can be useful for designing new inhibitor and promoter molecules for gas hydrate formation.

  7. Effects of Metabolic Cage Housing on Rat Behavior and Performance in the Social Interaction Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Alexandra L; Lymn, Kerry A; Howarth, Gordon S

    2016-01-01

    Although the metabolic cage is commonly used for housing nonhuman animals in the laboratory, it has been recognized as constituting a unique stressor. Such an environment would be expected to affect behavioral change in animals housed therein. However, few studies have specifically addressed the nature or magnitude of this change. The current study sought to characterize the behavioral time budget of rats in metabolic cage housing in comparison to that of individually housed animals in standard open-top cages. Rats in metabolic cages spent less time moving, manipulating enrichment, and carrying out rearing behaviors, and there was a corresponding shift toward inactivity. In an applied Social Interaction Test, behavioral scoring implied that metabolic cage housing had an anxiogenic effect. In conclusion, metabolic cage housing produces measurable effects on spontaneous and evoked behavior in rats in the laboratory. These behavioral changes may lead to a negative emotional state in these animals, which could have negative welfare consequences. Further research is needed to quantify the existence and magnitude of such an effect on rat well being. PMID:27057787

  8. Diffusive hydrogen inter-cage migration in hydrogen and hydrogen-tetrahydrofuran clathrate hydrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Huayu; English, Niall J; MacElroy, J M D

    2013-03-01

    Classical equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to investigate the diffusive properties of inter-cage hydrogen migration in both pure hydrogen and mixed hydrogen-tetrahydrofuran sII hydrates at 0.05 kbar from 200 K and up to 250-260 K. For mixed H2-THF systems in which there is single H2 occupation of the small cage (labelled "1S1L"), we found that no H2 migration occurs. However, for more densely filled H2-THF and pure-H2 systems, in which there is more than single H2 occupation in the small cage, there is an onset of inter-cage H2 migration events from the small cages to neighbouring cavities at around 200 K. The mean square displacements of the hydrogen molecules were fitted to a mathematical model consisting of an anomalous term and a Fickian component, and nonlinear regression fitting was conducted to estimate long-time (inter-cage) diffusivities. An approximate Arrhenius temperature relationship for the diffusion coefficient was examined and an estimation of the hydrogen hopping energy barrier was calculated for each system. PMID:23485313

  9. Synapse-to-neuron ratio is inversely related to neuronal density in mature neuronal cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Cullen, D. Kacy; Gilroy, Meghan; Irons, Hillary R.; LaPlaca, Michelle C.

    2010-01-01

    Synapse formation is a fundamental process in neurons that occurs throughout development, maturity, and aging. Although these stages contain disparate and fluctuating numbers of mature neurons, tactics employed by neuronal networks to modulate synapse number as a function of neuronal density are not well understood. The goal of this study was to utilize an in vitro model to assess the influence of cell density and neuronal maturity on synapse number and distribution. Specifically, cerebral co...

  10. Analysis and interpretation of the model of a Faraday cage for electromagnetic compatibility testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nenad V. Munić

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the work of the Laboratory for Electromagnetic Compatibility Testing in the Technical Test Center (TTC, we investigated the influence of the Faraday cage on measurement results. The primary goal of this study is the simulation of the fields in the cage, especially around resonant frequencies, in order to be able to predict results of measurements of devices under test in the anechoic chamber or in any other environment. We developed simulation (computer models of the cage step by step, by using the Wipl-D program and by comparing the numerical results with measurements as well as by resolving difficulties due to the complex structure and imperfections of the cage. The subject of this paper is to present these simulation models and the corresponding results of the computations and measurements. Construction of the cage The cage is made of steel plates with the dimensions 1.25 m x 2.5 m. The base of the cage is a square; the footprint interior dimensions are 3.76 m x 3.76 m, and the height is 2.5 m. The cage ceiling is lowered by plasticized aluminum strips. The strips are loosely attached to the carriers which are screwed to the ceiling. The cage has four ventilation openings (two on the ceiling and two on one wall, made of honeycomb waveguide holes. In one corner of the cage, there is a single door with springs made of beryllium bronze. For frequencies of a few tens of MHz, the skin effect is fully developed in the cage walls. By measuring the input impedance of the wire line parallel to a wall of the cage, we calculated the surface losses of the cage plates. In addition, we used a magnetic probe to detect shield discontinuities. We generated a strong current at a frequency of 106 kHz outside the cage and measured the magnetic field inside the cage at the places of cage shield discontinuities. In this paper, we showed the influence of these places on the measurement results, especially on the qualitative and quantitative

  11. Stochastic neuron models

    CERN Document Server

    Greenwood, Priscilla E

    2016-01-01

    This book describes a large number of open problems in the theory of stochastic neural systems, with the aim of enticing probabilists to work on them. This includes problems arising from stochastic models of individual neurons as well as those arising from stochastic models of the activities of small and large networks of interconnected neurons. The necessary neuroscience background to these problems is outlined within the text, so readers can grasp the context in which they arise. This book will be useful for graduate students and instructors providing material and references for applying probability to stochastic neuron modeling. Methods and results are presented, but the emphasis is on questions where additional stochastic analysis may contribute neuroscience insight. An extensive bibliography is included. Dr. Priscilla E. Greenwood is a Professor Emerita in the Department of Mathematics at the University of British Columbia. Dr. Lawrence M. Ward is a Professor in the Department of Psychology and the Brain...

  12. Biomechanical evaluation of DTRAX® posterior cervical cage stabilization with and without lateral mass fixation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronov, Leonard I; Siemionow, Krzysztof B; Havey, Robert M; Carandang, Gerard; Patwardhan, Avinash G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lateral mass screw (LMS) fixation with plates or rods is the current standard procedure for posterior cervical fusion. Recently, implants placed between the facet joints have become available as an alternative to LMS or transfacet screws for patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the biomechanical stability of the DTRAX® cervical cage for single- and two-level fusion and compare this to the stability achieved with LMS fixation with rods in a two-level construct. Methods Six cadaveric cervical spine (C3–C7) specimens were tested in flexion–extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation to ±1.5 Nm moment without preload (0 N) in the following conditions: 1) intact (C3–C7), 2) LMS and rods at C4–C5 and C5–C6, 3) removal of all rods (LMS retained) and placement of bilateral posterior cages at C5–C6, 4) bilateral posterior cages at C4–C5 and C5–C6 (without LMS and rods), and 5) C4–C5 and C5–C6 bilateral posterior cages at C4–C5 and C5–C6 with rods reinserted. Results Bilateral posterior cervical cages significantly reduced range of motion in all tested directions in both single- and multilevel constructs (P<0.05). Similar stability was achieved with bilateral posterior cages and LMS in a two-level construct: 0.6°±0.3° vs 1.2°±0.4° in flexion–extension (P=0.001), (5.0°±2.6° vs 3.1°±1.3°) in lateral bending (P=0.053), (1.3°±1.0° vs 2.2°±0.9°) in axial rotation (P=0.091) for posterior cages and LMS, respectively. Posterior cages, when placed as an adjunct to LMS, further reduced range of motion in a multilevel construct (P<0.05). Conclusion Bilateral posterior cages provide similar cervical segmental stability compared with a LMS and rod construct and may be an alternative surgical option for select patients. Furthermore, supplementation of a lateral mass construct with posterior cages increases cervical spine stability in single- and multilevel conditions. PMID

  13. Impact of sea waves on underwater fish-breeding cages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilyaev Sergey Ivanovich

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cultivation of sea objects is of great importance while solving the problems of providing the constantly growing requirements of the national economy with sea products. Cultivation of sea objects uses special hydrobiotechnical constructions. As the practice showed, cultivation of seafood is commercially impossible without solving the questions of calculating and designing such constructions. In special literature these questions are poorly covered or not considered at all. In the article the results of theoretical and pilot studies of waves influence on hydrobiotechnical constructions is provided, in particular on underwater fish-breeding cages.This article offers the theoretical solution to the problem of determining the efforts of the ropes holding the fish tank under wave influences. In order to solve this problem, the equations of hard drives movements were set up and the differential equations of free oscillations of buzz were obtained.When determining the horizontal movements, the four different configurations of connections and the system motion directions in general are possible in case of waveoscillations. Next step is the solution of the differential equations and determination of natural oscillation frequency in the direction of the vertical axis. Defining efforts in the ropes from their own weight (static calculation is self-explanatory, it should be noted that accounting for the weighing influence of water on such structures does not have significant influence.Further the authors defined loading and efforts from the regular waves’ impacts.Modeling of the waves influence on submersible fish tank was carried by Fraud method. The studies were conducted with two models with large and small mesh. The signals of strain gauge sensors were registered by electronic measuring equipment.When comparing the theoretical and experimental data, satisfactory results have been obtained. It was determined that in order to improve the calculation

  14. Field cage studies and progressive evaluation of genetically-engineered mosquitoes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Facchinelli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A genetically-engineered strain of the dengue mosquito vector Aedes aegypti, designated OX3604C, was evaluated in large outdoor cage trials for its potential to improve dengue prevention efforts by inducing population suppression. OX3604C is engineered with a repressible genetic construct that causes a female-specific flightless phenotype. Wild-type females that mate with homozygous OX3604C males will not produce reproductive female offspring. Weekly introductions of OX3604C males eliminated all three targeted Ae. aegypti populations after 10-20 weeks in a previous laboratory cage experiment. As part of the phased, progressive evaluation of this technology, we carried out an assessment in large outdoor field enclosures in dengue endemic southern Mexico. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: OX3604C males were introduced weekly into field cages containing stable target populations, initially at 10:1 ratios. Statistically significant target population decreases were detected in 4 of 5 treatment cages after 17 weeks, but none of the treatment populations were eliminated. Mating competitiveness experiments, carried out to explore the discrepancy between lab and field cage results revealed a maximum mating disadvantage of up 59.1% for OX3604C males, which accounted for a significant part of the 97% fitness cost predicted by a mathematical model to be necessary to produce the field cage results. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results indicate that OX3604C may not be effective in large-scale releases. A strain with the same transgene that is not encumbered by a large mating disadvantage, however, could have improved prospects for dengue prevention. Insights from large outdoor cage experiments may provide an important part of the progressive, stepwise evaluation of genetically-engineered mosquitoes.

  15. Characterization of the inward current induced by metabotropic glutamate receptor stimulation in rat ventromedial hypothalamic neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K; Boden, P R

    1997-11-01

    1. Whole-cell patch clamp recordings were made from rat ventromedial hypothalamic neurones in slices of brain tissue in vitro. Bath application of 50 microM (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid (1S,3R-ACPD) depolarized all neurones tested by activation of an inward current of approximately 55 pA at -60 mV. 2. The inward current elicited by 1S,3R-ACPD was unaffected by K+ channel blockade with external Cs+, Ba2+ or TEA. However, the current was significantly reduced by replacement of the external NaCl with either Tris-HCl or LiCl. 3. The 1S,3R-ACPD-induced current was reduced by the heavy metal ions Ni2+ or La3+ and also by the Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange current inhibitor 3',4'-dichlorobenzamil. 4. The effects of 1S,3R-ACPD were mimicked by the group I metabotropic agonist 3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) but not by the group III selective agonist, L-2-amino-4-phosphonobutanoate (L-AP4). Furthermore, the effects of 1S,3R-ACPD were inhibited by the metabotropic antagonists alpha-methyl-4-carboxyphenylglycine (MCPG) and 1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA) but not by the presynaptic metabotropic receptor antagonists alpha-methyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (MPPG) or alpha-methyl-4-tetrazolylphenylglycine (MTPG). 5. Photorelease of caged GDP beta S inside neurones irreversibly blocked the 1S,3R-ACPD-induced current whilst photolysis of caged GTP gamma S inside neurones irreversibly potentiated this current. 6. The PLC inhibitor U-73,122 significantly reduced the size of the inward current induced by 1S,3R-ACPD. This effect was not mimicked by the inactive analogue U-73,343. 7. Flash photolysis of the caged calcium chelator diazo-2 inside neurones diminished the response to 1S,3R-ACPD. 8. It is concluded that group I metabotropic glutamate receptors depolarize neurones in the VMH by activation of a Na(+)-Ca2+ exchange current through a G-protein coupled increase in intracellular Ca2+. PMID:9401972

  16. Avaliação do tratamento da discopatia degenerativa cervical pela artrodese via anterior utilizando placas associadas a cages ou cages em peek isoladamente Evaluación del tratamiento de la enfermedad degenerativa del disco cervical por la artrodesis anterior utilizando placas asociadas con jaulas o jaulas en peec, aisladamente Evaluation of cervical degenerative disc disease treatment by anterior arthrodesis using plates associated with cages or cages in peek alone

    OpenAIRE

    André Rafael Hübner; Marcelo Ribeiro Mendes; Jean Carlo Frigotto Queruz; Jean Marcel Dambrós; Álvaro Diego Heredia Suárez; Leandro de Freitas Spinelli

    2011-01-01

    OBJETIVOS: Avaliar comparativamente o tratamento da discopatia degenerativa cervical por discectomia e artrodese cervical via anterior utilizando placas associadas a cages ou cages em PEEK isoladamente. MÉTODOS: Foi realizado um estudo retrospectivo comparativo entre dois grupos de pacientes operados pela técnica de discectomia e artrodese cervical via anterior. Foram selecionados aleatoriamente 70 pacientes, 35 operados com o método de fixação com placas associadas a cages - denominado Grupo...

  17. Porous Biodegradable Lumbar Interbody Fusion Cage Design and Fabrication Using Integrated Global-Local Topology Optimization With Laser Sintering

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Heesuk; Hollister, Scott J; La Marca, Frank; Park, Paul; Lin, Chia-Ying

    2013-01-01

    Biodegradable cages have received increasing attention for their use in spinal procedures involving interbody fusion to resolve complications associated with the use of nondegradable cages, such as stress shielding and long-term foreign body reaction. However, the relatively weak initial material strength compared to permanent materials and subsequent reduction due to degradation may be problematic. To design a porous biodegradable interbody fusion cage for a preclinical lar...

  18. Final Report for DUSEL R&D: BetaCage: A Screener of Ultra-Low-Level Radioactive Surface Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golwala, Sunil R. [California Institute of Technology

    2013-12-20

    The eventual full-size, radiopure BetaCage will be a low-background, atmospheric-pressure neon drift chamber with unprecedented sensitivity to emitters of low-energy electrons and alpha particles. We expect that the prototype BetaCage already developed will be an excellent screener of alpha particles. Both the prototype and final BetaCage will provide new infrastructure for rare-event science.

  19. Effect of multilevel laboratory rat caging system on the well-being of the singly-housed Sprague Dawley rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, R R; Swan, M P; Hickman, D L

    2015-01-01

    Current regulations emphasize that good husbandry practices allow animals to engage in species appropriate postural adjustments without touching the enclosure walls. This study evaluated the well-being of rats housed in a commercially available multilevel rat caging system, with or without access to the upper level of the caging. The evaluation methodologies included assessment of behavioral observations in the home cage, physiological assessment of metabolism and immune function, and determination of the affective state using a spatial cognitive bias assay. The study determined that rats that were provided access to the full multilevel cage during testing after initial restriction to the lower level of the cage demonstrated behavioral changes consistent with a positive affective state, while those with no changes to their housing situation had no significant differences in their affective states. Rats that were consistently housed with access restricted to the lower level of the cage exhibited a tendency to increased neutrophil:lymphocyte ratios as compared with those provided with access to all levels of the multilevel cage. There were no differences in body weight demonstrated between the experimental groups. Overall use of the cage space, as documented through analysis of behavioral observations in the home cage, demonstrated no significant differences in preferred location in the cage during the light or dark cycles, though rats with access to both levels of the cage were significantly more active during the light cycle. The results of this study suggest that the use of a multilevel caging system may improve the well-being of rats used in research. PMID:25117586

  20. New findings on neuron development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ A mature neuron receives inputs from multiple dendrites and sends its output to other neurons via a single axon.This polarized morphology requires proper axonal/dendritic differentiation during development.

  1. Chaotic neuron clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → A chaotic model of spontaneous neuron firing. → Mapping the irregular spiking time-series into telegraph signals. → Fundamental frequency of the Rossler attractor provides periodic component. → Spiking time-series from spontaneous activity of hippocampal neurons. → Comparison shows good agreement between the model and the experiment. - Abstract: A chaotic model of spontaneous (without external stimulus) neuron firing has been analyzed by mapping the irregular spiking time-series into telegraph signals. In this model the fundamental frequency of chaotic Roessler attractor provides (with a period doubling) the strong periodic component of the generated irregular signal. The exponentially decaying broad-band part of the spectrum of the Roessler attractor has been transformed by the threshold firing mechanism into a scaling tale. These results are compared with irregular spiking time-series obtained in vitro from a spontaneous activity of hippocampal (CA3) singular neurons (rat's brain slice culture). The comparison shows good agreement between the model and experimentally obtained spectra.

  2. Neuronal nets in robotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper gives a generic idea of the solutions that the neuronal nets contribute to the robotics. The advantages and the inconveniences are exposed that have regarding the conventional techniques. It also describe the more excellent applications as the pursuit of trajectories, the positioning based on images, the force control or of the mobile robots management, among others

  3. Biomechanical evaluation of immediate stability with rectangular versus cylindrical interbody cages in stabilization of the lumbar spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Webb John K

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent cadaver studies show stability against axial rotation with a cylindrical cage is marginally superior to a rectangular cage. The purpose of this biomechanical study in cadaver spine was to evaluate the stability of a new rectangular titanium cage design, which has teeth similar to the threads of cylindrical cages to engage the endplates. Methods Ten motion segments (five L2-3, five L4-5 were tested. From each cadaver spine, one motion segment was fixed with a pair of cylindrical cages (BAK, Sulzer Medica and the other with paired rectangular cages (Rotafix, Corin Spinal. Each specimen was tested in an unconstrained state, after cage introduction and after additional posterior translaminar screw fixation. The range of motion (ROM in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and rotation was tested in a materials testing machine, with +/- 5 Nm cyclical load over 10 sec per cycle; data from the third cycle was captured for analysis. Results ROM in all directions was significantly reduced (p Conclusions There was no significant difference in immediate stability in any direction between the threaded cylindrical cage and the new design of the rectangular cage with endplate teeth.

  4. Detection of early behavioral markers of Huntington's disease in R6/2 mice employing an automated social home cage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rudenko, Olga; Tkach, Vadim; Berezin, Vladimir;

    2009-01-01

    developed behavior screening system, the IntelliCage, allows automated testing of mouse behavior in the home cage employing individual recognition of animals living in social groups. The present study validates the ability of the IntelliCage system to detect behavioral and cognitive dysfunction in R6/2 mice......, an established transgenic model of HD. The results indicate that the IntelliCage is a reliable system for recording exploratory activity, drinking behavior, circadian rhythm, spatial preference, and cognition in mice during prolonged periods of assessment. The system detected early dysfunctional...

  5. John Cage y su influencia en la obra del video artista Nam June Paik

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarriugarte Gómez, Íñigo

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available In 1958, the Korean artist Nam June Paik (*1932; †2006 meets in Germany John Cage (*1912; †1992, avant-garde musician, who was deeply interested in the Zen Buddhism. The meeting with Cage was vital, because the North American composer will convince him to orient his career towards the artistic avant-garde, giving up his facet like classic pianist. The philosophy of Cage is refl ected in compositions like “4’ 33’’, from 1952, where the spectator doesn’t listen the sound of the piano, because this isn’t played, but he listens a silence that is interrupted by the environmental sound. There are several versions of this piece, marking the silences by means of processes at random with the “I Ching”. In this sense, the silence used by John Cage is related to the vacuity of the Zen Buddhism. Also, Paik makes use of silence in numerous works, like “1963 TV Clock”, where 24 colour television sets are manipulated, feeling at the same time the silence, interrupted again by the own momentary circumstances of the spectator. This same infl uence of the Zen Buddhism in the music of Cage is observed when argues that the music composed of melodies has the same value than the sound understood by us like noises. This aspect, among others, infl uenced to Paik, whose video images are defi ned like attributes of traditional works that don’t impress to the audience, but they suggest variable conditions. Some of his works related to Cage’s philosophy have been “Hommage à John Cage” from 1959; “Study for pianoforte” from 1960; and “Global Grove” from 1973, where Paik uses as a collage the images of his avant-garde collaborators John Cage, Allen Ginsberg and Merce Cunningham.

    En 1958, el artista coreano Nam June Paik (*1932; †2006 conoce en Alemania a John Cage (*1912; †1992, músico vanguardista, quien estaba profundamente interesado en el budismo zen. Su encuentro con Cage fue vital, ya que el compositor

  6. Cultures of Cerebellar Granule Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Parizad M. Bilimoria and Azad Bonni1 Corresponding author ([]()) ### INTRODUCTION Primary cultures of granule neurons from the post-natal rat cerebellum provide an excellent model system for molecular and cell biological studies of neuronal development and function. The cerebellar cortex, with its highly organized structure and few neuronal subtypes, offers a well-characterized neural circuitry. Many fundamental insight...

  7. DNA damage in caged Gammarus fossarum amphipods: A tool for freshwater genotoxicity assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacaze, Emilie [Universite de Lyon, INRA-ENTPE, Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Environnement, rue Maurice Audin, Vaulx en Velin F-69518 (France); Cemagref, Unite de Recherche des Milieux Aquatiques, (UR MALY), 3 bis quai Chauveau, 69336 Lyon, Cedex 9 (France); Devaux, Alain [Universite de Lyon, INRA-ENTPE, Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Environnement, rue Maurice Audin, Vaulx en Velin F-69518 (France); Mons, Raphael [Cemagref, Unite de Recherche des Milieux Aquatiques, (UR MALY), 3 bis quai Chauveau, 69336 Lyon, Cedex 9 (France); Bony, Sylvie [Universite de Lyon, INRA-ENTPE, Laboratoire des Sciences de l' Environnement, rue Maurice Audin, Vaulx en Velin F-69518 (France); Garric, Jeanne [Cemagref, Unite de Recherche des Milieux Aquatiques, (UR MALY), 3 bis quai Chauveau, 69336 Lyon, Cedex 9 (France); Geffard, Alain [EA 2069 URVVC-SE, Laboratoire d' Eco-Toxicologie, UFR Sciences, Moulin de la Housse, BP 1039, 51687 Reims Cedex 2 (France); Geffard, Olivier, E-mail: olivier.geffard@cemagref.fr [Cemagref, Unite de Recherche des Milieux Aquatiques, (UR MALY), 3 bis quai Chauveau, 69336 Lyon, Cedex 9 (France)

    2011-06-15

    The aim of this study was to propose a tool for freshwater environmental genotoxicity assessment using Gammarus fossarum, a high ecologically relevant species. In a first part, gammarids were caged upstream and downstream wastewater treatment plant effluent output. The sensitivity of genotoxic responses of haemocytes, oocytes and spermatozoa was compared using the Comet assay. Spermatozoa appeared to be the most sensitive, suitable and relevant cell type for genotoxicity risk assessment. In a second part, a watershed-scale study was conducted over 2 years to evaluate the applicability of our caging procedure. The genotoxic impact of a contamination was followed, taking into account seasonal variability. DNA damage in spermatozoa exhibited low basal level and low variability in control upstream sites, providing a reliable discrimination of polluted sites. Finally, DNA damage in caged G. fossarum has been proved to be a sensitive and reproducible tool for freshwater genotoxicity assessment. - Highlights: > Two different contamination contexts: WWTP effluents and polymetallic contamination. > DNA damage in caged Gammarus fossarum is a sensitive tool for freshwater quality assessment. > Spermatozoa is the most relevant cell type for biomonitoring freshwater genotoxicity. > Combining biomarker responses with analytical chemistry provides rich ecotoxicological information. - We propose an approach to assess freshwater genotoxicity in the field based on caged Gammarus fossarum (Crustacea, amphipoda).

  8. RESULTS OF THE USE OF PEEK CAGES IN THE TREATMENT OF BASILAR INVAGINATION BY GOEL TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luís Eduardo Carelli Teixeira da Silva

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Analysis of the use of polyetheretherketone (PEEK cages for atlantoaxial facet realignment and distraction for treatment of basilar invagination by Goel technique. Method: Retrospective descriptive statistical analysis of the neurological status, pain, presence of subsidence and bone fusion with the use of PEEK cages in 8 atlantoaxial joints of 4 patients with basilar invagination. All patients were treated with atlantoaxial facet distraction and realignment and subsequent arthrodesis C1-C2 by the technique of Goel modified by the use of PEEK cage. Results: All patients showed improvement in Nurick neurological assessment scale and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS of pain. There were no cases of subsidence, migration, or damage to the vertebral artery during the insertion of the cage. All joints evolved with bone fusion, assessed by dynamic radiographs, and computed tomography. Two patients developed neuropathic pain in dermatome of C2 and one patient had unilateral vertebral artery injury during C2 instrumentation treated with insertion of pedicle screw to control the bleeding. Conclusion: The results of the treatment of basilar invagination by the Goel technique with the use of PEEK cages shown to be effective and safe although further studies are needed to confirm this use.

  9. Numerical Analysis of Hydrodynamic Behaviors of Two Net Cages with Grid Mooring System Under Wave Action

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chang-ping; ZHAO Yun-peng; LI Yu-cheng; DONG Guo-hai; ZHENG Yan-na

    2012-01-01

    Based on rigid kinematics theory and lumped mass method,a mathematical model of the two net cages of grid mooring system under waves is developed.In order to verify the numerical model,a series of physical model tests have been carried out.According to the comparisons between the simulated and the experimental results,it can be found that the simulated and the experimental results agree well in each wave condition.Then,the forces on the mooring lines and the floating collar movement are calculated under different wave conditions.Numerical results show that under the same condition,the forces on the bridle ropes are the largest,followed by forces on the main ropes and the grid ropes.The horizontal and the vertical float collar motion amplitudes increase with the increase of wave height,while the relationship of the horizontal motion amplitude and the wave period is indistinct.The vertical motion amplitude of the two cages is almost the same,while on the respect of horizontal motion amplitude,cage B (behind cage A,as shown in Fig.4) moves much farther than cage A under the same wave condition.The inclination angle of the floating system both in clockwise alongy axis and the counter one enlarges a little with the increase of wave height.

  10. Dynamic behavior and deformation analysis of the fish cage system using mass-spring model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chun Woo; Lee, Jihoon; Park, Subong

    2015-06-01

    Fish cage systems are influenced by various oceanic conditions, and the movements and deformation of the system by the external forces can affect the safety of the system itself, as well as the species of fish being cultivated. Structural durability of the system against environmental factors has been major concern for the marine aquaculture system. In this research, a mathematical model and a simulation method were presented for analyzing the performance of the large-scale fish cage system influenced by current and waves. The cage system consisted of netting, mooring ropes, floats, sinkers and floating collar. All the elements were modeled by use of the mass-spring model. The structures were divided into finite elements and mass points were placed at the mid-point of each element, and mass points were connected by springs without mass. Each mass point was applied to external and internal forces, and total force was calculated in every integration step. The computation method was applied to the dynamic simulation of the actual fish cage systems rigged with synthetic fiber and copper wire simultaneously influenced by current and waves. Here, we also tried to find a relevant ratio between buoyancy and sinking force of the fish cages. The simulation results provide improved understanding of the behavior of the structure and valuable information concerning optimum ratio of the buoyancy to sinking force according to current speeds.

  11. Growth of conformal graphene cages on micrometre-sized silicon particles as stable battery anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuzhang; Yan, Kai; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Lu, Zhenda; Liu, Nian; Cui, Yi

    2016-02-01

    Nanostructuring has been shown to be fruitful in addressing the problems of high-capacity Si anodes. However, issues with the high cost and poor Coulombic efficiencies of nanostructured Si still need to be resolved. Si microparticles are a low-cost alternative but, unlike Si nanoparticles, suffer from unavoidable particle fracture during electrochemical cycling, thus making stable cycling in a real battery impractical. Here we introduce a method to encapsulate Si microparticles (˜1-3 µm) using conformally synthesized cages of multilayered graphene. The graphene cage acts as a mechanically strong and flexible buffer during deep galvanostatic cycling, allowing the microparticles to expand and fracture within the cage while retaining electrical connectivity on both the particle and electrode level. Furthermore, the chemically inert graphene cage forms a stable solid electrolyte interface, minimizing irreversible consumption of lithium ions and rapidly increasing the Coulombic efficiency in the early cycles. We show that even in a full-cell electrochemical test, for which the requirements of stable cycling are stringent, stable cycling (100 cycles; 90% capacity retention) is achieved with the graphene-caged Si microparticles.

  12. Hydrodynamic coefficients of a simplified floating system of gravity cage in waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-wen WU; Fu-kun GUI; Yu-cheng LI; Wei-huan FANG

    2008-01-01

    Numerical simulation and experimental tests were carried out to examine the hydrodynamic behaviors of a double-column floating system of gravity cage under wave conditions. A floating system of gravity cage can be treated as a small-sized floating structure when compared with the wavelengths. The main problem in calculating the wave loads on the small-sized floating structure is to obtain the reasonable force coefficients, which may differ from a submerged structure. In this paper, the floating system of gravity cage is simplified to a 2D problem, where the floating system is set symmetrically under wave conditions. The motion equations were deduced under wave conditions and a specific method was proposed to resolve the problem of wave forces acting on a small-sized floating system of gravity cage at water surface. Results of the numerical method were compared with those from model tests and the hydrodynamic coefficients Cn and C?were studied. It is found that Cn ranges from 0.6 to 1.0 while C?is between 0.4 and 0.6 in this study. The results are useful for research on the hydrodynamic behavior of the deep-water gravity sea cages.

  13. Relative effects of nutrient emission from intensive cage aquaculture on the semiarid reservoir water quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molisani, Mauricio Mussi; do Monte, Thiago Maia; Vasconcellos, George Harrison; de Souza Barroso, Hortência; Moreira, Maria Odete Parente; Becker, Helena; de Rezende, Carlos Eduardo; Franco, Marcos Alberto Lima; de Farias, Eduardo Guilherme Gentil; de Camargo, Plínio Barbosa

    2015-11-01

    The effects of cage aquaculture on freshwater ecosystems are determined by multiple farming and environmental variables, and thus, the assessment of a wide range of abiotic and biotic variables enables better understanding of the impacts generated by this nutrient source. This study was carried out at Castanhão reservoir located in the State of Ceará, which is the largest Brazilian producer of Nile tilapia in cage systems, wherein about 8000 reservoirs provide a vast area to expand not only this important socio-economic but also pollution-prone activity. Nutrient mass budget, water quality monitoring, hydrodynamic characterization, and elemental/stable isotopic composition of end-member products were measured in cage aquaculture and other reservoir areas in order to determine the relative effects on reservoir conditions. Nutrient budgets showed that 34% of the artificial feed was lost to the water column but water quality monitoring and isotopic composition analysis suggested that the cages were not extensively impacting the water quality probably because of the physiographic and hydrodynamic features of the cage site. PMID:26502728

  14. Rhythm dynamics of complex neuronal networks with mixed bursting neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spatiotemporal order and rhythm dynamics of a complex neuronal network with mixed bursting neurons are studied in this paper. A quantitative characteristic, the width factor, is introduced to describe the rhythm dynamics of an individual neuron, and the average width factor is used to characterize the rhythm dynamics of a neuronal network. An r parameter is introduced to denote the ratio of the short bursting neurons in the network. Then we investigate the effect of the ratio on the rhythm dynamics of the neuronal network. The critical value of r is derived, and the neurons in the network always remain short bursting when the r ratio is larger than the critical value. (general)

  15. Rhythm dynamics of complex neuronal networks with mixed bursting neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü Yong-Bing; Shi Xia; Zheng Yan-Hong

    2013-01-01

    The spatiotemporal order and rhythm dynamics of a complex neuronal network with mixed bursting neurons are studied in this paper.A quantitative characteristic,the width factor,is introduced to describe the rhythm dynamics of an individual neuron,and the average width factor is used to characterize the rhythm dynamics of a neuronal network.An r parameter is introduced to denote the ratio of the short bursting neurons in the network.Then we investigate the effect of the ratio on the rhythm dynamics of the neuronal network.The critical value of r is derived,and the neurons in the network always remain short bursting when the r ratio is larger than the critical value.

  16. Response profiles of murine spiral ganglion neurons on multi-electrode arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahnewald, Stefan; Tscherter, Anne; Marconi, Emanuele; Streit, Jürg; Widmer, Hans Rudolf; Garnham, Carolyn; Benav, Heval; Mueller, Marcus; Löwenheim, Hubert; Roccio, Marta; Senn, Pascal

    2016-02-01

    Objective. Cochlear implants (CIs) have become the gold standard treatment for deafness. These neuroprosthetic devices feature a linear electrode array, surgically inserted into the cochlea, and function by directly stimulating the auditory neurons located within the spiral ganglion, bypassing lost or not-functioning hair cells. Despite their success, some limitations still remain, including poor frequency resolution and high-energy consumption. In both cases, the anatomical gap between the electrode array and the spiral ganglion neurons (SGNs) is believed to be an important limiting factor. The final goal of the study is to characterize response profiles of SGNs growing in intimate contact with an electrode array, in view of designing novel CI devices and stimulation protocols, featuring a gapless interface with auditory neurons. Approach. We have characterized SGN responses to extracellular stimulation using multi-electrode arrays (MEAs). This setup allows, in our view, to optimize in vitro many of the limiting interface aspects between CIs and SGNs. Main results. Early postnatal mouse SGN explants were analyzed after 6-18 days in culture. Different stimulation protocols were compared with the aim to lower the stimulation threshold and the energy needed to elicit a response. In the best case, a four-fold reduction of the energy was obtained by lengthening the biphasic stimulus from 40 μs to 160 μs. Similarly, quasi monophasic pulses were more effective than biphasic pulses and the insertion of an interphase gap moderately improved efficiency. Finally, the stimulation with an external electrode mounted on a micromanipulator showed that the energy needed to elicit a response could be reduced by a factor of five with decreasing its distance from 40 μm to 0 μm from the auditory neurons. Significance. This study is the first to show electrical activity of SGNs on MEAs. Our findings may help to improve stimulation by and to reduce energy consumption of CIs and

  17. Phosphoinositide signaling in somatosensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohacs, Tibor

    2016-05-01

    Somatosensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and trigeminal ganglia (TG) are responsible for detecting thermal and tactile stimuli. They are also the primary neurons mediating pain and itch. A large number of cell surface receptors in these neurons couple to phospholipase C (PLC) enzymes leading to the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and the generation of downstream signaling molecules. These neurons also express many different ion channels, several of which are regulated by phosphoinositides. This review will summarize the knowledge on phosphoinositide signaling in DRG neurons, with special focus on effects on sensory and other ion channels. PMID:26724974

  18. Sleep deprivation does not affect neuronal susceptibility to mild traumatic brain injury in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Aimee M; Stephenson, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Mild and moderate traumatic brain injuries (TBIs) (and concussion) occur frequently as a result of falls, automobile accidents, and sporting activities, and are a major cause of acute and chronic disability. Fatigue and excessive sleepiness are associated with increased risk of accidents, but it is unknown whether prior sleep debt also affects the pathophysiological outcome of concussive injury. Using the "dark neuron" (DN) as a marker of reversible neuronal damage, we tested the hypothesis that acute (48 hours) total sleep deprivation (TSD) and chronic sleep restriction (CSR; 10 days, 6-hour sleep/day) affect DN formation following mild TBI in the rat. TSD and CSR were administered using a walking wheel apparatus. Mild TBI was administered under anesthesia using a weight-drop impact model, and the acute neuronal response was observed without recovery. DNs were detected using standard bright-field microscopy with toluidine blue stain following appropriate tissue fixation. DN density was low under home cage and sleep deprivation control conditions (respective median DN densities, 0.14% and 0.22% of neurons), and this was unaffected by TSD alone (0.1%). Mild TBI caused significantly higher DN densities (0.76%), and this was unchanged by preexisting acute or chronic sleep debt (TSD, 0.23%; CSR, 0.7%). Thus, although sleep debt may be predicted to increase the incidence of concussive injury, the present data suggest that sleep debt does not exacerbate the resulting neuronal damage. PMID:26124685

  19. Cage rattling does not correlate with the local geometry in molecular liquids

    CERN Document Server

    Bernini, S; Leporini, D

    2016-01-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations of a liquid of short linear molecules have been performed to investigate the correlation between the particle dynamics in the cage of the neighbors and the local geometry. The latter is characterized in terms of the size and the asphericity of the Voronoi polyhedra. The correlation is found to be poor. In particular, in spite of the different Voronoi volume around the end and the inner monomers of a molecule, all the monomers exhibit coinciding displacement distribution when they are caged (as well as at longer times during the structural relaxation). It is concluded that the fast dynamics during the cage trapping is a non-local collective process involving monomers beyond the nearest neighbours.

  20. A quadrupole/time-of-flight mass spectrometry study of Trp-cage's conformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mingxiang; Ahmed, Zeeshan; Taormina, Christopher R; Somayajula, Kasi V

    2007-02-01

    Trp-cage is a synthetic 20-residue miniprotein that uses tertiary contacts to stabilize its native conformation. NMR, circular dichroism (CD), and UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy were used to probe its energy landscape. In this quadrupole/time-of-flight study, electrospray ionization charge state distribution (CSD) and solution-phase H/D exchange are used to probe Trp-cage's tertiary structure. The CSDs of Trp-cage and its mutant provide spectra showing a pH-dependent conformation change. Solution-phase H/D exchange in 30% deuterated trifluoroethanol solution of the wild type shows increased protection of one labile hydrogen in the native state. Together, CSDs and solution-phase H/D exchange are demonstrated to constitute a simple but effective means to follow conformation changes in a small tertiary protein. PMID:17067814

  1. Three-Dimensional Porous Metal-Metalloporphyrin Framework Consisting of Nanoscopic Polyhedral Cages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xi-Sen; Meng, Le; Cheng, Qigan; Kim, Chungsik; Wojtas, Lukasz; Chrzanowski, Matthew; Chen, Yu-Sheng; Zhang, X Peter; Ma, Shengqian [USF; (UC)

    2012-02-07

    An unprecedented nanoscopic polyhedral cage-containing metal-metalloporphyrin framework, MMPF-1, has been constructed from a custom-designed porphyrin ligand, 5,15-bis(3,5-dicarboxyphenyl)porphine, that links Cu2(carboxylate)4 moieties. A high density of 16 open copper sites confined within a nanoscopic polyhedral cage has been achieved, and the packing of the porphyrin cages via an 'ABAB' pattern affords MMPF-1 ultramicropores which render it selective toward adsorption of H2 and O2 over N2, and CO2 over CH4.

  2. Mediterranean fruit fly: interference of oviposition by radiation-sterilized females in field cages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In experiments between April and September 1984, the behaviour of nonirradiated and radiation-sterilized laboratory-adapted adults of the tephritid Ceratitis capitata was observed on apples hung on guava trees in outdoor cages in Hawaii. The numbers of nonirradiated females observed resting on fruit were reduced several times by the presence of irradiated females, either alone or with irradiated males, but not by irradiated males alone. Similarly, the number of nonirradiated females observed ovipositing and the duration of oviposition was reduced by the presence of irradiated females. In control cages (all nonirradiated flies), the duration of oviposition by females averaged 255.9±15.0 s on fruit, while most of nonirradiated and irradiated females in the mixed (treatment) cage averaged 157±19.8 s and 77.5±7.5 s on fruit, resp. Irradiated females behaved skittishly on fruit and frequently engaged in physical encounters with other flies

  3. Design Concepts of Polycarbonate-Based Intervertebral Lumbar Cages: Finite Element Analysis and Compression Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Cavazos, J Obedt; Flores-Villalba, Eduardo; Diaz-Elizondo, José A; Martínez-Romero, Oscar; Rodríguez, Ciro A; Siller, Héctor R

    2016-01-01

    This work explores the viability of 3D printed intervertebral lumbar cages based on biocompatible polycarbonate (PC-ISO® material). Several design concepts are proposed for the generation of patient-specific intervertebral lumbar cages. The 3D printed material achieved compressive yield strength of 55 MPa under a specific combination of manufacturing parameters. The literature recommends a reference load of 4,000 N for design of intervertebral lumbar cages. Under compression testing conditions, the proposed design concepts withstand between 7,500 and 10,000 N of load before showing yielding. Although some stress concentration regions were found during analysis, the overall viability of the proposed design concepts was validated. PMID:27578960

  4. Environmental enrichment and development of cage stereotypy in Orange-winged Amazon parrots (Amazona amazonica).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, C L; Garner, J P; Mench, J A

    2004-05-01

    Stereotypies are abnormal repetitive behaviors that often develop in animals housed in impoverished environments. Stereotypy represents the interaction of several complex developmental phenomena. To characterize the temporal nature of stereotypy increase (escalation) and decrease (attenuation), we monitored changes in stereotypy performance in young Orange-winged Amazon parrots reared either in barren cages or cages provided with enrichments designed to facilitate foraging and locomotion. Unenriched parrots developed significantly more stereotypy than enriched parrots, and the mean time to stereotypy onset and the rate and magnitude of stereotypy increase also differed between the two groups. We then provided enrichment to the birds that had been reared in the barren cages. Following a 4-week delay, stereotypy was significantly reduced. These results show that stereotypy can be both prevented and reversed with appropriate environmental modification and illustrate how studying this behavior at many points over time can provide insights into its ontogeny. PMID:15103731

  5. Equilibrium simulation of trp-cage in the presence of protein crowders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bille, Anna; Linse, Björn; Mohanty, Sandipan; Irbäck, Anders

    2015-11-01

    While steric crowders tend to stabilize globular proteins, it has been found that protein crowders can have an either stabilizing or destabilizing effect, where a destabilization may arise from nonspecific attractive interactions between the test protein and the crowders. Here, we use Monte Carlo replica-exchange methods to explore the equilibrium behavior of the miniprotein trp-cage in the presence of protein crowders. Our results suggest that the surrounding crowders prevent trp-cage from adopting its global native fold, while giving rise to a stabilization of its main secondary-structure element, an α-helix. With the crowding agent used (bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor), the trp-cage-crowder interactions are found to be specific, involving a few key residues, most of which are prolines. The effects of these crowders are contrasted with those of hard-sphere crowders.

  6. Self-assembly of three-legged patchy particles into polyhedral cages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The self-assembly of rigid three-legged building blocks into polyhedral cages is investigated by patchy particle simulations. A four-site anisotropic interaction potential is introduced to make pairs of overlapping legs bind in an anti-parallel fashion, thereby forming the edges of a polyhedron of pentagons and hexagons. A torsional potential, reflecting an asymmetry or polarity in the legs' binding potential, proves crucial for the successful formation of closed fullerene-like cages. Self-assembly proceeds by a nucleation-and-growth mechanism, with a high success rate of cage closure. The size distribution of the self-assembled buckyballs is largely determined by the pucker angle of the particle. Nature explores a similar building block, the clathrin triskelion, to regulate vesicle formation at the cell membrane during endocytosis.

  7. Effect of Cage Space on Behavior and Reproduction in Crl:CD(SD) and BN/Crl Laboratory Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaskill, Brianna N; Pritchett-Corning, Kathleen R

    2015-09-01

    The 2011 Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals contains recommendations regarding the amount of cage space for mothers with litters. Literature on cage-space use in breeding rats is sparse. We hypothesized that, if present, differences in behavior and reproduction would be detected between the smallest and largest cages tested. BN/Crl and Crl:CD(SD) rats were assigned to a cage treatment (580 cm(2), 758 cm(2), 903 cm(2), or 1355 cm(2)) and breeding configuration (single: male removed after birth of pups; pair: 1 male, 1 female) in a factorial design for 12 wk. All cages received 20 to 25 g of nesting material, and nests were scored weekly. Pups were weaned, sexed, and weighed between postnatal days 18 and 26. Adult behavior and location in the cage were videorecorded by scan-sampling on the litter's postnatal days 0 through 8 and 14 through 21. Press posture in adults and play behavior in pups were recorded according to a 1-0 sampling method. Differences in reproductive parameters were limited to expected differences related to rat genetic background and weaning weight in pups, which was lowest in the pair-bred CD rats in the smallest cages. Press posture in adults in the smaller cages increased as the pups became mobile. Pair-housed outbred rats in the smallest commercially available cage we tested showed behavioral changes and a lower pup weaning weight. Both laboratory animal scientists and caging manufacturers should address the challenge of providing more biologically relevant cage complexity rather than merely increasing floor space. PMID:26424247

  8. Application of carbon cage (Brantigan) to lumber vertebra diseases. The examination by MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tanaka, Masato; Nakahara, Shinnosuke; Suenaga, Atsushi; Yamauchi, Taro [Okayama National Hospital (Japan)

    1997-12-01

    Recently several kinds of interlumber spacers have been used for the posterior lumber interbody fusion (PLIF). We have used Brantigan I/F cage (carbon cage) for PLIF. Here we report the results of PLIF and the postoperative MRI. We examined 10 patients (9 men and 10 women) who underwent carbon cage-used PLIF. Patients at surgery were aged from 36 to 77 years (average 61 years). The postoperative observation periods were from 6 months to 17 months (mean 8.2 months). Diseases contained 12 of lumber degenerative sliding disease, 2 of lumber-spine separate disease and 5 of lumber spine stricture complicating the unstable lumber vertebra. We observed synostosis in all cases, and we obtained the improvement rate by JOA score of 71.4%. There was no complications during surgery, except one case of transient neuroparalysis by postoperative hematoma. The carbon cage-used PLIF was effective to minimize sampling of autologous bones and to prevent the crush of bone grafts. MRI was quite effective to evaluate the position of the carbon cage and to judge synostosis. Using MRI we could judge synostosis by the contrast of grafted bones at only 3 months after surgery. The carbon cage transmits X-ray, which makes it easy to judge synostosis. It has the open window to graft autologous bones and the elasticity almost similar to the cortical bone. On the other hand it has some disadvantages; the difficulty to determine the position by the X-ray images, the biological safety, etc. (K.H.)

  9. Agricultural wetlands as potential hotspots for mercury bioaccumulation: Experimental evidence using caged fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, J.T.; Eagles-Smith, C. A.

    2010-01-01

    Wetlands provide numerous ecosystem services, but also can be sources of methylmercury (MeHg) production and export. Rice agricultural wetlands in particular may be important sites for MeHg bioaccumulation due to their worldwide ubiquity, periodic flooding schedules, and high use by wildlife. We assessed MeHg bioaccumulation within agricultural and perennial wetlands common to California's Central Valley during summer, when the majority of wetland habitats are shallowly flooded rice fields. We introduced caged western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) within white rice (Oryza sativa), wild rice (Zizania palustris), and permanent wetlands at water inlets, centers, and outlets. Total mercury (THg) concentrations and body burdens in caged mosquitofish increased rapidly, exceeding baseline values at introduction by 135% to 1197% and 29% to 1566% among sites, respectively, after only 60 days. Mercury bioaccumulation in caged mosquitofish was greater in rice fields than in permanent wetlands, with THg concentrations at wetland outlets increasing by 12.1, 5.8, and 2.9 times over initial concentrations in white rice, wild rice, and permanent wetlands, respectively. In fact, mosquitofish caged at white rice outlets accumulated 721 ng Hg/fish in just 60 days. Mercury in wild mosquito fish and Mississippi silversides (Menidia audens) concurrently sampled at wetland outlets also were greater in white rice and wild rice than permanent wetlands. Within wetlands, THg concentrations and body burdens of both caged and wild fish increased from water inlets to outlets in white rice fields, and tended to not vary among sites in permanent wetlands. Fish THg concentrations in agricultural wetlands were high, exceeding 0.2 ??g/g ww in 82% of caged fish and 59% of wild fish. Our results indicate that shallowly flooded rice fields are potential hotspots for MeHg bioaccumulation and, due to their global prevalence, suggest that agricultural wetlands may be important contributors to Me

  10. Motor neurone disease

    OpenAIRE

    Talbot, K.

    2002-01-01

    Motor neurone disease (MND), or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), is a neurodegenerative disorder of unknown aetiology. Progressive motor weakness and bulbar dysfunction lead to premature death, usually from respiratory failure. Confirming the diagnosis may initially be difficult until the full clinical features are manifest. For all forms of the disease there is a significant differential diagnosis to consider, including treatable conditions, and therefore specialist neurological opinion ...

  11. The neuron classification problem

    OpenAIRE

    Bota, Mihail; Swanson, Larry W.

    2007-01-01

    A systematic account of neuron cell types is a basic prerequisite for determining the vertebrate nervous system global wiring diagram. With comprehensive lineage and phylogenetic information unavailable, a general ontology based on structure-function taxonomy is proposed and implemented in a knowledge management system, and a prototype analysis of select regions (including retina, cerebellum, and hypothalamus) presented. The supporting Brain Architecture Knowledge Management System (BAMS) Neu...

  12. A lightweight field cage for a large TPC prototype for the ILC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behnke, Ties; Dehmelt, Klaus; Diener, Ralf; Hallermann, Lea; Matsuda, Takeshi; Prahl, Volker; Schade, Peter

    2010-06-15

    We have developed and constructed the field cage of a prototype Time Projection Chamber for research and development studies for a detector at the International Linear Collider. This prototype has an inner diameter of 72 cm and a length of 61 cm. The design of the field cage wall was optimized for a low material budget of 1.21% of a radiation length and a drift field homogeneity of {delta}E/E

  13. A Lightweight Field Cage for a Large TPC Prototype for the ILC

    CERN Document Server

    Behnke, Ties; Diener, Ralf; Hallermann, Lea; Matsuda, Takeshi; Prahl, Volker; Schade, Peter

    2010-01-01

    We have developed and constructed the field cage of a prototype Time Projection Chamber for research and development studies for a detector at the International Linear Collider. This prototype has an inner diameter of 72 cm and a length of 61 cm. The design of the field cage wall was optimized for a low material budget of 1.21 % of a radiation length and a drift field homogeneity of Delta(E)/(E) less or equal 10^-4. Since November 2008 the prototype has been part of a comprehensive test beam setup at DESY and used as a test chamber for the development of Micro Pattern Gas Detector based readout devices.

  14. Growth of Pimelodus maculatus (Actinopterygii, Pimelodidae) in cages at different stocking densities

    OpenAIRE

    Saula Corrêa Afonso de Almeida; Alex Pires de Oliveira Nuñer

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the influence of densities 8, 32, 56 and 80 fish/m3 on the productive performance of Pimelodus maculatus in 1m3 cages installed in 0.19ha earthen ponds without water renewal, located on private property in Santo Amaro da Imperatriz, Santa Catarina. Fish were fed daily with extruded commercial ration containing 32% of crude protein, in a proportion of 5.0% of the stocked biomass. Fish were sampled monthly (30% of the stocked fish) in each cage to evaluate length, w...

  15. A lightweight field cage for a large TPC prototype for the ILC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed and constructed the field cage of a prototype Time Projection Chamber for research and development studies for a detector at the International Linear Collider. This prototype has an inner diameter of 72 cm and a length of 61 cm. The design of the field cage wall was optimized for a low material budget of 1.21% of a radiation length and a drift field homogeneity of ΔE/E -4. Since November 2008 the prototype has been part of a comprehensive test beam setup at DESY and used as a test chamber for the development of Micro Pattern Gas Detector based readout devices. (orig.)

  16. The Design and its Verification of the Double Rotor Double Cage Induction Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Sumita; Deb, Nirmal K.; Biswas, Sujit K.

    2016-06-01

    The concept of a double rotor motor presented earlier and its equivalent circuit has been developed, showing a non-linear parameter content. The two rotors (which are recommended to be double cage type for development of high starting torque) can run with equal or unequal speed independently, depending on their individual loading. This paper presents the elaborate design procedure, step-by-step, for the double rotor double cage motor and verifies the designed data with that obtained from three separate tests (compared to two for conventional motor) on a prototype, such that optimum performance can be obtained from the motor.

  17. Status of BetaCage: an Ultra-sensitive Screener for Surface Contamination

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Z.; Golwala, S. R.; Grant, D. R.; Kos, M.; Nelson, R. H.; Schnee, R. W.; Wang, B.

    2011-01-01

    BetaCage, a gaseous neon time-projection chamber, has been proposed as a viable screener for emitters of low-energy alphas and electrons to which commercial radioactivity counting techniques are insensitive. Using radiopure materials for construction, active and passive shielding from extrinsic backgrounds, large counting area and minimal detector mass, BetaCage will be able to achieve sensitivities of 10^(−5) counts keV^(−1) kg^(−1) day^(−1) in a few days of running time. We report on progre...

  18. Recombinant expression and purification of "virus-like" bacterial encapsulin protein cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rurup, W Frederik; Cornelissen, Jeroen J L M; Koay, Melissa S T

    2015-01-01

    Ultracentrifugation, particularly the use of sucrose or cesium chloride density gradients, is a highly reliable and efficient technique for the purification of virus-like particles and protein cages. Since virus-like particles and protein cages have a unique size compared to cellular macromolecules and organelles, the rate of migration can be used as a tool for purification. Here we describe a detailed protocol for the purification of recently discovered virus-like assemblies called bacterial encapsulins from Thermotoga maritima and Brevibacterium linens. PMID:25358773

  19. Diffusive hydrogen inter-cage migration in hydrogen and hydrogen-tetrahydrofuran clathrate hydrates

    OpenAIRE

    H. Cao; English, Niall J.; MacElroy, J. M. Don

    2013-01-01

    Classical equilibrium molecular dynamics (MD) simulations have been performed to investigate the diffusive properties of inter-cage hydrogen migration in both pure hydrogen and mixed hydrogen-tetrahydrofuran sII hydrates at 0.05 kbar from 200 K and up to 250-260 K. For mixed H2- THF systems in which there is single H2 occupation of the small cage (labelled ‘1SC 1LC’), we found that no H2 migration occurs. However, for more densely-filled H2-THF and pure- H2 systems, in which th...

  20. Environmental impact of sea bass cage farming in the north Adriatic Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Domenico Lanari; Edo D’Agaro

    2010-01-01

    The main objective of the research was to reduce the organic and nutrient load under the net pen fish farms. An exper- iment was conducted to study the effects of artificial barriers fixed under a set of sea cages in order to reduce the envi- ronmental impact. The artificial barriers were made of four submerged galvanized steel pipes coated with plastic and placed on the sea floor (10 m depth) in the Trieste gulf. The experimental design was as follows: control (C), cages with barriers (B), c...

  1. Palladium-Catalyzed Regioselective Diarylation of o-Carboranes By Direct Cage B-H Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Yangjian; Xie, Zuowei

    2016-01-22

    Palladium-catalyzed intermolecular coupling of o-carborane with aromatics by direct cage B-H bond activation has been achieved, leading to the synthesis of a series of cage B(4,5)-diarylated-o-carboranes in high yields with excellent regioselectivity. Traceless directing group -COOH plays a crucial role for site- and di-selectivity of such intermolecular coupling reaction. A Pd(II)-Pd(IV)-Pd(II) catalytic cycle is proposed to be responsible for the stepwise arylation. PMID:26463595

  2. Metal ion cage complexes as imaging agents for cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Cage ligands are very attractive for use in radiolabelling antibodies. Their synthesis is based around Co(III) octahedral co-ordination chemistry and they may be easily derivatised for attachment to antibodies. They are known to form kinetically inert metal complexes. Copper-64 (t1/2 = 12.7 h) has been identified as having potential value in diagnostic and therapeutic application. Its positron annihilation radiation is useful for PET imaging, while its beta (Emax 578 keV, 37.2 %) emissions may also be suitable for therapy. In the current study, the new hexa-aza-cryptand, 1 -N-(4-amino-benzyl)-3,6,10,13,16,19-hexaaza-bicyclo[6.6.6]eicosane- 1,8-diamine, or SarAr, has been synthesised specifically for radiolabelling antibodies with 64Cu and a kit formulation has been produced. The resulting radiolabelled immunoconjugate (64Cu-SarArB-72.3) was injected into nude mice bearing LS174t colorectal carcinoma. Clearance of 64CuSarAr-B72.3 from the liver and kidneys was typical of a whole IgG antibody. Tumour localisation was comparable to similar radiolabelled immunoconjugates (38± 5 % ID/g at 48 hours). Biodistribution studies of 123I- and 111In- radiolabelled B72.3 were conducted in the same animal model. MIRDOSE 3 was used to compare target to non-target dose of their analogous therapeutic counterparts (90Y and 131I respectively) with 64Cu-SarAr-B72.3. Total body dose for 64Cu-SarAr-B72.3 was significantly lower (0.09 rad/mCi) than analogous products (131I-B72.3, 2.64 rad/mCi; 90Y- B72.3, 2.387 rad/mCi) while still providing enough dose to small tumours to be potentially therapeutic. In order to assess therapeutic effect of 64Cu, a biological study was conducted over a 12 month period. Nude mice bearing tumours between 3.5 - 5.5 mm in length were injected with various doses (0, 10, 20, 30, 40 MBq) of 64Cu-SarAr-B72.3. Animals were regularly monitored for tumour size, animal mass, behavioural and physical abnormalities (e.g. movement / gait, food intake and

  3. Beak condition and cage density determine abundance and spatial distribution of northern fowl mites, Ornithonyssus sylviarum, and chicken body lice, Menacanthus stramineus, on caged laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullens, B A; Chen, B L; Owen, J P

    2010-12-01

    Adult White Leghorn hens (Hy-Line strain W-36) were inoculated with either northern fowl mites or chicken body lice, and the ectoparasite populations were monitored over periods of 9 to 16 wk. Two beak conditions (beak trimmed or beak intact) and 2 housing densities (1 or 2 hens per 25 × 31 cm suspended wire cage) were tested. Populations of both ectoparasites were at least 10 times lower on beak-intact hens compared with populations on beak-trimmed hens. Cage density did not influence mite numbers, but higher numbers of lice (2 to 3 times) developed on hens held at the higher cage density. Louse distribution on the body and louse population age structure were also influenced by host beak condition. Beak-intact hens had a higher proportion of lice under the wings, whereas beak-trimmed hens had the majority of lice on the lower abdomen. Louse populations on beak-trimmed hens also comprised relatively more immature stages than populations found on beak-intact hens. The effects are likely related to decreased grooming efficiency by beak-trimmed hens and, in the case of lice, the higher host density. The high mite and louse populations on most commercial caged laying hens are probably a direct result of beak trimming. However, selection of more docile breeds that can be held without trimming may allow the hens themselves to reduce ectoparasites below economically damaging levels. This could benefit producers, animal welfare advocates, and human health by reducing 1) costs of beak trimming, 2) pesticide treatment costs (including human and bird chemical exposure concerns), and 3) objections to beak trimming from the animal welfare community. PMID:21076093

  4. Consistent estimation of complete neuronal connectivity in large neuronal populations using sparse "shotgun" neuronal activity sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Yuriy

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the properties of recently proposed "shotgun" sampling approach for the common inputs problem in the functional estimation of neuronal connectivity. We study the asymptotic correctness, the speed of convergence, and the data size requirements of such an approach. We show that the shotgun approach can be expected to allow the inference of complete connectivity matrix in large neuronal populations under some rather general conditions. However, we find that the posterior error of the shotgun connectivity estimator grows quickly with the size of unobserved neuronal populations, the square of average connectivity strength, and the square of observation sparseness. This implies that the shotgun connectivity estimation will require significantly larger amounts of neuronal activity data whenever the number of neurons in observed neuronal populations remains small. We present a numerical approach for solving the shotgun estimation problem in general settings and use it to demonstrate the shotgun connectivity inference in the examples of simulated synfire and weakly coupled cortical neuronal networks. PMID:27515518

  5. Spray washing, absorbent cornstarch powder, and dry time to reduce bacterial numbers on soiled transport cage flooring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broiler transport cages are often used repeatedly without washing and fecal matter deposited on the floor surface can transfer Campylobacter from one flock to another. Allowing feces to dry is an effective but slow and logistically impractical means to kill Campylobacter in soiled transport cages. ...

  6. Do cage effects influence tumor incidence? An examination of laboratory animal carcinogenicity studies utilizing Fischer 344 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haseman, J K

    1988-08-01

    Approximately 125 carcinogenicity studies in Fischer 344 rats conducted by the National Toxicology Program (NTP) were examined to determine the frequency with which cage effects were associated with observed carcinogenic responses. All studies involving groups of 50 rats housed five per cage and showing evidence of chemically-related carcinogenicity were considered. For each of these experiments, two statistical analyses were carried out for each dosed and control group: (i) a test to determine whether or not the occurrence of tumors clustered within cages; and (ii) an evaluation to determine whether or not tumor incidences differed significantly between differing cage shelf levels. These analyses showed that the numbers of statistically significant (P less than 0.05 or P less than 0.01) effects were consistent with the number expected by chance alone. Thus, cage-related factors appeared to have little or no impact upon tumor incidence in these particular studies. Experimental design protocols now used by the NTP (which include random assignment of animals to cages; random assignment of columns of cages to dosed and control groups; and periodic rotation of cage location) further reduce the likelihood that factors associated with the housing of the animals could influence tumor incidence in current studies. PMID:3183292

  7. Spray washing, absorbent corn starch powder and dry time to reduce bacterial numbers on soiled boiler transport cage flooring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Most broilers in the U.S. are transported live to slaughter facilities in cages with fiberglass floors. Cages are often used repeatedly without washing and fecal matter deposited on the floor surface can transfer Campylobacter from one flock to another. Drying feces out between uses is an effectiv...

  8. Palladium-catalyzed regioselective intramolecular coupling of o-carborane with aromatics via direct cage B-H activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quan, Yangjian; Xie, Zuowei

    2015-03-18

    Palladium-catalyzed intramolecular coupling of o-carborane with aromatics via direct cage B-H bond activation has been achieved, leading to the synthesis of a series of o-carborane-functionalized aromatics in high yields with excellent regioselectivity. In addition, the site selectivity can also be tuned by the substituents on cage carbon atom. PMID:25747772

  9. Effect of Cage-Wash Temperature on the Removal of Infectious Agents from Caging and the Detection of Infectious Agents on the Filters of Animal Bedding-Disposal Cabinets by PCR Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Compton, Susan R; Macy, James D

    2015-11-01

    Efficient, effective cage decontamination and the detection of infection are important to sustainable biosecurity within animal facilities. This study compared the efficacy of cage washing at 110 and 180 °F on preventing pathogen transmission. Soiled cages from mice infected with mouse parvovirus (MPV) and mouse hepatitis virus (MHV) were washed at 110 or 180 °F or were not washed. Sentinels from washed cages did not seroconvert to either virus, whereas sentinels in unwashed cages seroconverted to both agents. Soiled cages from mice harboring MPV, Helicobacter spp., Mycoplasma pulmonis, Syphacia obvelata, and Myocoptes musculinus were washed at 110 or 180 °F or were not washed. Sentinels from washed cages remained pathogen-free, whereas most sentinels in unwashed cages became infected with MPV and S. obvelata. Therefore washing at 110 or 180 °F is sufficient to decontaminate caging and prevent pathogen transmission. We then assessed whether PCR analysis of debris from the bedding disposal cabinet detected pathogens at the facility level. Samples were collected from the prefilter before and after the disposal of bedding from cages housing mice infected with both MPV and MHV. All samples collected before bedding disposal were negative for parvovirus and MHV, and all samples collected afterward were positive for these agents. Furthermore, all samples obtained from the prefilter before the disposal of bedding from multiply infected mice were pathogen-negative, and all those collected afterward were positive for parvovirus, M. pulmonis, S. obvelata, and Myocoptes musculinus. Therefore the debris on the prefilter of bedding-disposal cabinets is useful for pathogen screening. PMID:26632784

  10. Metabolic reprogramming during neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M; Romeo, F; Inoue, S; Niklison-Chirou, M V; Elia, A J; Dinsdale, D; Morone, N; Knight, R A; Mak, T W; Melino, G

    2016-09-01

    Newly generated neurons pass through a series of well-defined developmental stages, which allow them to integrate into existing neuronal circuits. After exit from the cell cycle, postmitotic neurons undergo neuronal migration, axonal elongation, axon pruning, dendrite morphogenesis and synaptic maturation and plasticity. Lack of a global metabolic analysis during early cortical neuronal development led us to explore the role of cellular metabolism and mitochondrial biology during ex vivo differentiation of primary cortical neurons. Unexpectedly, we observed a huge increase in mitochondrial biogenesis. Changes in mitochondrial mass, morphology and function were correlated with the upregulation of the master regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, TFAM and PGC-1α. Concomitant with mitochondrial biogenesis, we observed an increase in glucose metabolism during neuronal differentiation, which was linked to an increase in glucose uptake and enhanced GLUT3 mRNA expression and platelet isoform of phosphofructokinase 1 (PFKp) protein expression. In addition, glutamate-glutamine metabolism was also increased during the differentiation of cortical neurons. We identified PI3K-Akt-mTOR signalling as a critical regulator role of energy metabolism in neurons. Selective pharmacological inhibition of these metabolic pathways indicate existence of metabolic checkpoint that need to be satisfied in order to allow neuronal differentiation. PMID:27058317

  11. Structural features of the GroEL-GroES nano-cage required for rapid folding of encapsulated protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Sheila Tuyet; Chang, HC; Roeben, A; Wischnewski, D; Wischnewski, N; Kerner, MJ; Hartl, FU; Hayer-Hartl, M

    2006-01-01

    . Additionally, interactions with the C-terminal, mildly hydrophobic Gly-Gly-Met repeat sequences of GroEL protruding into the cavity, and repulsion effects from the negatively charged cavity wall were required for rapid folding of some proteins. We suggest that by combining these features, the chaperonin cage......GroEL and GroES form a chaperonin nano-cage for proteins up to similar to 60 kDa to fold in isolation. Here we explored the structural features of the chaperonin cage critical for rapid folding of encapsulated substrates. Modulating the volume of the GroEL central cavity affected folding speed in...... accordance with confinement theory. Small proteins (similar to 30 kDa) folded more rapidly as the size of the cage was gradually reduced to a point where restriction in space slowed folding dramatically. For larger proteins (similar to 40-50 kDa), either expanding or reducing cage volume decelerated folding...

  12. Vergleich klinischer und radiologischer Parameter nach anteriorer Diskektomie und Fusion der Halswirbelsäule mit Polyetheretherketon- und Titan-Cages

    OpenAIRE

    Özdemir, Soner

    2015-01-01

    Background: Compared with polyetheretherketone (PEEK) titanium (TTN) cages have a higher modulus of elasticity and are reported to show a higher loss of correction and more frequent cage subsidence after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Direct comparison of both cage types appears to favour PEEK cages to maintain cervical interspace height and achieve better fusion in patients with a degenerative disc disease (DDD), but clinical studies on this subject are very rare. Metho...

  13. Disparities in Ammonia, Temperature, Humidity, and Airborne Particulate Matter between the Micro-and Macroenvironments of Mice in Individually Ventilated Caging

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenbaum, Matthew D.; VandeWoude, Susan; Volckens, John; Johnson, Thomas E

    2010-01-01

    Animal room environmental parameters typically are monitored with the assumption that the environment within the cage closely mirrors the room environment. This study evaluated that premise by examining macro- (room) and microenvironmental (cage) parameters in individually ventilated cages housing mice with variable amounts of bedding over a period of 17 d without cage changes. Intracage ammonia levels remained within recommended human guidelines but were higher than room levels, confirming t...

  14. Gene expression in caged fish as indicators of contaminants exposure in tropical karstic water bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Fuentes, Gabriela; Luna-Ramírez, Karen S; Soto, Mélina; Richardson, Kristine L

    2012-04-01

    Karstic areas in Yucatan are very permeable, which allows contaminants to move rapidly into the aquifer. In the present study, we evaluated gene expression of vitellogenin (VTG) and cytochrome P-450 1A (CYP1A) in caged juvenile zebrafish deployed for 15 days in 13 different water bodies, cenotes and aguadas, throughout karstic region of the Yucatan peninsula. Gene expression was evaluated using qRT-PCR. Results indicated induction of VTG in 7 water bodies with respect to reference cage. The highest relative VTG expression, about 3000 times higher than reference cage, was found in an aguada close to a cattle farm. CYP1A induction with respect to reference cage was observed in 3 water bodies, all of them located near villages or used for tourist activities. Pollutants and biomarkers of effect should be monitored in these water bodies in order to have a better understanding of the actual levels of pollutants that are present at Yucatan's aquifer and the potential risk to human and environmental health. PMID:22014761

  15. A new cytotoxic caged polyprenylated xanthone from the resin of Garcinia hanburyi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Li Wang; Zhan Lin Li; Yong Peng Xu; Xiao Qiu Liu; Yue Hu Pei; Yong Kui Jing; Hui Ming Hua

    2008-01-01

    A new caged polyprenylated xanthone,gambogic aldehyde(1),was isolated from the resin of Garcinia hanburyi.Its structure was elucidated on the basis of spectral data including 1D and 2D NMR data.In addition.the antiproliferative ability of compound 1 was determined in mouse leukemia P388 and P388/ADR ceils.

  16. Trace elements in two marine fish cultured in fish cages in Fujian province, China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onsanit, Sarayut; Ke Caihuan; Wang Xinhong; Wang Kejian [State Key Laboratory for Marine Environmental Science, College of Oceanography and Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Wang Wenxiong, E-mail: wwang@ust.h [State Key Laboratory for Marine Environmental Science, College of Oceanography and Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2010-05-15

    Two cultured marine fish, the Japanese seabass (Lateolabrax japonicus) and red seabream (Pagrus major) were collected from eight fish cage sites along the coast of Fujian province in China. The concentrations of Ag, As, Cd, Co, Cu, Fe, Mn, Se, and Zn in their muscle, stomach and liver tissue were quantified. The risk of these trace elements to humans through fish consumption was then assessed. The highest concentrations of As, Cd, Se and Zn in fish feed from fish cages were found in Dongshan Station. Moreover, the As levels in the muscles of both species at all sites were generally higher than China's national standard (>1.0 mug/g). Trace element concentrations in two marine fish followed the order of livers > stomachs > muscles. Although the As levels in two marine caged fish exceeded the permissible standards, the estimated daily intake of As did not exceed the reference dose guideline established by US EPA. For other trace elements examined in this study, their concentrations did not exceed the permissible concentrations of the international standards. - As levels in two marine caged fish from China exceeded the permissible standards, whereas the levels of others trace elements did not exceed the permissible concentrations.

  17. Synthesis of photoactivatable azido-acyl caged oxazine fluorophores for live-cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anzalone, Andrew V; Chen, Zhixing; Cornish, Virginia W

    2016-07-19

    We report the design and synthesis of a photoactivatable azido-acyl oxazine fluorophore. Photoactivation is achieved cleanly and rapidly with UV light, producing a single fluorescent oxazine photoproduct. We demonstrate the utility of azido-acyl caged oxazines for protein specific labeling in living mammalian cells using the TMP-tag technology. PMID:27377037

  18. Stereoselective recognition of the Ac-Glu-Tyr-OH dipeptide by pseudopeptidic cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faggi, Enrico; Vicent, Cristian; Luis, Santiago V; Alfonso, Ignacio

    2015-12-28

    Pseudopeptidic molecular cages are appealing receptors since they can display different polar and non-polar interaction sites in a modular framework and a controlled disposition. Inspired by previous host-guest knowledge, two pseudopeptidic molecular cages based on serine and threonine (CySer and CyThr, respectively) were designed and synthesized as hosts for the binding of the four possible stereoisomers of the Ac-Glu-Tyr-OH dipeptide, a target sequence of tyrosine kinases. The careful NMR titration experiments in aqueous acetonitrile allowed the determination of the binding constants and reflected a difference in the stability of the corresponding diastereomeric host-guest complexes. The CySer cage proved to be slightly more efficient than the CyThr counterpart, although both showed similar stereoselectivity trends: LL > DD ≥ LD > DL. This stereoselective binding was retained in the gas phase, as shown by ESI-MS competition experiments using the enantiomer-labelled method (EL), as well as CID experiments. Thus, the MS-determined discriminations follow the same trends observed by NMR, suggesting that the stereoselectivity observed for these systems must be mainly dictated by the polar host-guest interactions. Despite the stereoselective binding of short peptide sequences in competitive media being a challenging issue in supramolecular chemistry, our results demonstrate the power of pseudopeptidic cages in molecular recognition with foreseen implications in chemical biology. PMID:26481115

  19. Photo-control of nitric oxide synthase activity using a caged isoform specific inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Heather J; Perdicakis, Basil; Fishlock, Dan; Lajoie, Gilles A; Jervis, Eric; Guy Guillemette, J

    2002-06-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) plays a critical role in a number of physiological processes and is produced in mammalian cells by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) isozymes. Because of the diverse functions of NO, pharmaceutical interventions which seek to abrogate adverse effects of excess NOS activity must not interfere with the normal regulation of NO levels in the body. A method has been developed for the control of NOS enzyme activity using the localized photochemical release of a caged isoform-specific NOS inhibitor. The caged form of an iNOS inhibitor has been synthesized and tested for photosensitivity and potency. UV and multiphoton uncaging were verified using a hemoglobin-based assay. IC(50) values were determined for the inhibitor (70+/-11 nM), the caged inhibitor (1098+/-172 nM), the UV uncaged inhibitor (67+/-26 nM) and the multiphoton uncaged inhibitor (73+/-11 nM). UV irradiation of the caged inhibitor resulted in a 86% reduction in iNOS activity after 5 min. Multiphoton uncaging had an apparent first order time constant of 0.007+/-0.001 min(-1). A therapeutic range exists, with molar excess of inhibitor to enzyme from 3- to 7-fold, over which the full dynamic range of the inhibition can be exploited. PMID:11937350

  20. Protein Nanocontainers from Nonviral Origin: Testing the Mechanics of Artificial and Natural Protein Cages by AFM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, K; Sasaki, E; King, N P; Baker, D; Hilvert, D; Wuite, G J L; Roos, W H

    2016-07-01

    Self-assembling protein nanocontainers are promising candidates for an increasingly wide scope of purposes. Their applications range from drug delivery vehicles and imaging agents to nanocompartments for controlled enzymatic activity. In order to exploit their full potential in these different fields, characterization of their properties is vital. For example, their mechanical properties give insight into the stability of a particle as a function of their internal content. The mechanics can be probed by atomic force microscopy nanoindentation, and while this single particle method is increasingly used to probe material properties of viral nanocages, it has hardly been used to characterize nonviral nanocages. Here we report nanoindentation studies on two types of nonviral nanocontainers: (i) lumazine synthase from Aquifex aeolicus (AaLS), which naturally self-assembles into icosahedral cages, and (ii) the artificial protein cage O3-33 originating from a computational design approach. In addition, we tested particles that had been engineered toward improved cargo loading capacity and compared these nanocages in empty and loaded states. We found that the thermostable AaLS cages are stiffer and resist higher forces before breaking than the O3-33 particles, but that mutations affecting the size of AaLS particles have a dramatic effect on their structural stability. Furthermore, we show that cargo packaging can occur while maintaining the cage's mechanical properties. PMID:27187612

  1. Photoactivatable Drug-Caged Fluorophore Conjugate Allows Direct Quantification of Intracellular Drug Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Agasti, Sarit S.; Laughney, Ashley M.; Kohler, Rainer H.; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    We report here a method that utilizes photoactivatable drug-caged fluorophore conjugate to quantify intracellular drug trafficking processes at single cell resolution. Photoactivation is performed in labeled cellular compartments to visualize intracellular drug exchange at physiologic conditions, without the need for washing, facilitating its translation to in vivo cancer models.

  2. That Entertainment Called a Discussion: The Critical Arts Pedagogy of John Cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Otto

    2015-01-01

    Just as John Cage used chance techniques to relinquish control in his practice as a composer, he used pedagogical techniques that facilitated shared learning and experimentation. The tenets of Critical Pedagogy, as laid out by Paulo Freire in "The Pedagogy of the Oppressed," offer insights into the structures and strategies implicit in…

  3. Friction moment analysis of space gyroscope bearing with ribbon cage under ultra-low oscillatory motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiang Shaona

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the model of calculating the total friction moment of space gyroscope ball bearings which usually work under ultra-low oscillatory motion and are very sensitive to the friction moment. The aim is to know the proportion of the friction moment caused by each frictional source in the bearing’s total friction moment, which is helpful to optimize the bearing design to deduce the friction moment. In the model, the cage dynamic equations considering six degree-of-freedom and the balls dynamic equations considering two degree-of-freedom were solved. The good trends with different loads between the measured friction moments and computational results prove that the model under constant rate was validated. The computational results show that when the speed was set at 5 r/min, the bearing’s maximum total friction moment when oscillation occurred was obviously larger than that occurred at a constant rate. At the onset of each oscillatory motion, the proportion of the friction moment caused by cage in the bearing’s total friction moment was very high, and it increased with the increasing speed. The analyses of different cage thicknesses and different clearances between cage pocket and ball show that smaller thickness and clearance were preferred.

  4. PRODUCTIVITY OF LAYERS AND EGG QUALITY IN FREE RANGE AND CAGE SYSTEM OF HOUSING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đ. Senčić

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available The research was conducted with two groups of Lohmann Brown hybrid layers. Production of eggs lasted for 52 weeks. A control group of layers was kept in the conventional housing system, that is, in cages, while experimental group was kept in the free range system. Layers from the free range system, compared to those kept in cages, laid fewer eggs, (266:295, they consumed more feed on daily basis (129 g : 115 g, more feed per kilogram of egg weight (2.83 kg : 2.35 kg, they had higher mortality rate (6.80 % : 5.50 % and lower end of lay body weight (1.95 kg : 2.10 kg. Eggs from free range layers, compared to those from the cages system, had significantly (P0.05 were determined between the free range and the cages system of housing hens. Considering somewhat lower productivity and higher mortality rate of hens, higher feed consumption per kilogram of egg mass, but also better quality of eggs, profitability of egg production in the free range system will depend, to the maximum extent, on market evaluation of the production.

  5. Examination of Free Choice of Rabbits among Different Cage-floors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Matics

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Rabbits were placed in a block of cages with a floor-area of 2 m2. The animals could move freely among the cages, through swing doors. All the four cages were totally equal, they only differed in the floor (planked by OSB panel, plastic-slat, plastic-mesh or wire-mesh. 24 or 32 rabbits, weaned at 21 days of age were placed into the block. During the experiment (until 10 weeks of age the free choice of rabbits among the cage-floors was studied weekly with the help of 24-hour video recordings. The soiled and wet (by urine planked-floor was chosen by fewer and fewer rearing rabbits after the first week. Placing both 24 or 32 rabbits into the block, the plastic mesh floor was preferred. With the increase of age the choice of plastic-mesh, wire-mesh and plastic-slat floor became similar. The increase of both number and weight of rabbits in 1 m2 influenced the acceptance of different floors. Rearing 32 rabbits together, the choice of the 3 preferred floor types became similar at 7.5 weeks of age, while rearing 24 rabbits in a group, it became similar only at 9.5 weeks of age.

  6. Examination of Free Choice of Rabbits among Different Cage-floors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Matics

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Rabbits were placed in a block of cages with a floor-area of 2 m2. The animals could move freely among the cages, through swing doors. All the four cages were totally equal, they only differed in the floor (planked by OSB panel, plastic-slat, plastic-mesh or wire-mesh. 24 or 32 rabbits, weaned at 21 days of age were placed into the block. During the experiment (until 10 weeks of age the free choice of rabbits among the cage-floors was studied weekly with the help of 24-hour video recordings. The soiled and wet (by urine planked-floor was chosen by fewer and fewer rearing rabbits after the first week. Placing both 24 or 32 rabbits into the block, the plastic mesh floor was preferred. With the increase of age the choice ofplastic-mesh, wire-mesh and plastic-slat floor became similar. The increase of both number and weight of rabbits in 1 m2 influenced the acceptance of different floors. Rearing 32 rabbits together, the choice of the 3 preferred floor types became similar at 7.5 weeks of age, while rearing 24 rabbits in a group, it became similar only at 9.5 weeks of age.

  7. Laying Performance of Wareng Chicken under Free Choice Feeding and Different Cage Density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Iskandar

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the experiment was to explore the possibility of using free choice feeding technique under different cage density for unselected native chicken. Eighty hens of laying Wareng chicken were divided into two feeding systems. Half of them were fed complete commercial diet of 17% crude protein, with 2800 kcal ME/kg and the other half were subjected to free choice diet. The diets were in mash form and placed in sufficient feed troughs in front of each cage. Each cage was occupied by four or six hens. Free choice feeding hens were served with commercial concentrate (30% crude protein, ground corn and oyster shell, placed separately in feed troughs. Observation was carried out during 24 weeks laying period, starting from 20 to 44 weeks of age. The results showed that egg production (9.35% hen day, and the intake of feed (42.74 g/day, protein (7.01 g/day, energy (116.6 kcal ME/day, calcium (1.99 g/day and phosphorus (0.22 g/day were not affected (P>0.05 by feeding system nor by cage density. The results however indicated that free choice feeding technique provided sufficient nutrients in supporting maximum egg production of unselected native chicken.

  8. Effect of rib cage and abdominal restriction on total respiratory resistance and reactance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Noord, J A; Demedts, M; Clément, J; Cauberghs, M; Van de Woestijne, K P

    1986-11-01

    In 14 healthy male subjects we studied the effects of rib cage and abdominal strapping on lung volumes, airway resistance (Raw), and total respiratory resistance (Rrs) and reactance (Xrs). Rib cage, as well as abdominal, strapping caused a significant decrease in vital capacity (respectively, -36 and -34%), total lung capacity (TLC) (-31 and -27%), functional residual capacity (FRC) (-28 and -28%), and expiratory reserve volume (-40 and -48%) and an increase in specific airway conductance (+24 and +30%) and in maximal expiratory flow at 50% of control TLC (+47 and +42%). The decrease of residual volume (RV) was significant (-12%) with rib cage strapping only. Abdominal strapping resulted in a minor overall increase in Rrs, whereas rib cage strapping produced a more marked increase at low frequencies; thus a frequency dependence of Rrs was induced. A similar pattern, but with lower absolute values, of Rrs was obtained by thoracic strapping when the subject was breathing at control FRC. Xrs was decreased, especially at low frequencies, with abdominal strapping and even more with thoracic strapping; thus the resonant frequency of the respiratory system was shifted toward higher frequencies. Partitioning Rrs and Xrs into resistance and reactance of lungs and chest wall demonstrated that the different effects of chest wall and abdominal strapping on Rrs and Xrs reflect changes mainly of chest wall mechanics. PMID:3781983

  9. The split cube in a cage: bulk negative-index material for infrared applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andryieuski, Andrei; Menzel, C.; Rockstuhl, C.;

    2009-01-01

    We propose the split cube in a cage (SCiC) design for application in producing a bulk metamaterial. Applying realistic material data for thin silver films, we observe an immediate convergence of the effective parameters obtained with a number of layers towards the bulk properties. Results are obt...

  10. Use, fate and ecological risks of antibiotics applied in tilapia cage farming in Thailand

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rico, A.; Oliveira, R.; McDonough, S.; Matser, A.; Khatikarn, J.; Satapornvanit, K.; Nogueira, A.J.A.; Soares, A.M.V.M.; Domingues, I.; Brink, van den P.J.

    2014-01-01

    The use, environmental fate and ecological risks of antibiotics applied in tilapia cage farming were investigated in the Tha Chin and Mun rivers in Thailand. Information on antibiotic use was collected through interviewing 29 farmers, and the concentrations of the most commonly used antibiotics, oxy

  11. Different denaturation pathways of TrpCage minipeptide triggered by urea and guanidinium

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heyda, J.; Jungwirth, Pavel; Dzubiella, J.

    Praha : Ústav organické chemie a biochemie AV ČR, v. v. i, 2012. s. 34-34. ISBN 978-80-86241-47-0. [Prague Protein Spring Meeting 2012. 03.05.2012-06.05.2012, Praha] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : TrpCage * denaturation * urea * guanidinium Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  12. Urea and Guanidinium Induced Denaturation of a Trp-Cage Miniprotein

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Heyda, Jan; Kožíšek, Milan; Bednárová, Lucie; Thompson, G.; Konvalinka, Jan; Vondrášek, Jiří; Jungwirth, Pavel

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 28 (2011), s. 8910-8924. ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LC512; GA ČR GA203/08/0114 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : trp-cage denaturation * urea * guanidinium * molecular dynamics Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 3.696, year: 2011

  13. Maternal Obesity, Cage Density, and Age Contribute to Prostate Hyperplasia in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benesh, Emily C; Gill, Jeff; Lamb, Laura E; Moley, Kelle H

    2016-02-01

    Identification of modifiable risk factors is gravely needed to prevent adverse prostate health outcomes. We previously developed a murine precancer model in which exposure to maternal obesity stimulated prostate hyperplasia in offspring. Here, we used generalized linear modeling to evaluate the influence of additional environmental covariates on prostate hyperplasia. As expected from our previous work, the model revealed that aging and maternal diet-induced obesity (DIO) each correlated with prostate hyperplasia. However, prostate hyperplasia was not correlated with the length of maternal DIO. Cage density positively associated with both prostate hyperplasia and offspring body weight. Expression of the glucocorticoid receptor in prostates also positively correlated with cage density and negatively correlated with age of the animal. Together, these findings suggest that prostate tissue was adversely patterned during early life by maternal overnutrition and was susceptible to alteration by environmental factors such as cage density. Additionally, prostate hyperplasia may be acutely influenced by exposure to DIO, rather than occurring as a response to worsening obesity and comorbidities experienced by the mother. Finally, cage density correlated with both corticosteroid receptor abundance and prostate hyperplasia, suggesting that overcrowding influenced offspring prostate hyperplasia. These results emphasize the need for multivariate regression models to evaluate the influence of coordinated variables in complicated animal systems. PMID:26243546

  14. Solid-state NMR spectroscopy of molecular hydrogen trapped inside an open-cage fullerene

    OpenAIRE

    Carravetta, M.; Murata, Y; Murata, M.; Heinmaa, I.; Stern, R.; Tontcheva, A.; Samoson, A.; Y. Rubin; Komatsu, K.; Levitt, M.H.

    2004-01-01

    Solid-state 1H experiments were performed an open-cage fullerene hosting molecular hydrogen. The anisotropy of the molecular hydrogen rotation was studied by double-quantum magic-angle-spinning NMR. The time scale of the molecular hydrogen rotation was estimated by spin-lattice relaxation measurements as a function of temperature.

  15. Parameters identification of the compound cage rotor induction machine based on linearized Kalman filtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王铁成; 李伟力; 孙建伟

    2003-01-01

    A mathematical model has been built up for compound cage rotor induction machine with the rotor re-sistance and leakage inductance in the model identified through Kalman filtering method. Using the identifiedparameters, simulation studies are performed, and simulation results are compared with testing results.

  16. Disorder of Hydrofluorocarbon Molecules Entrapped in the Water Cages of Structure I Clathrate Hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeya, Satoshi; Udachin, Konstantin A; Moudrakovski, Igor L; Ohmura, Ryo; Ripmeester, John A

    2016-05-23

    Water versus fluorine: Clathrate hydrates encaging hydrofluorocarbons as guests show both isotropic and anisotropic distributions within host water cages, depending on the number of fluorine atoms in the guest molecule; this is caused by changes in intermolecular interactions to host water molecules in the hydrates. PMID:27105807

  17. 25 CFR 542.14 - What are the minimum internal control standards for the cage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... balance of all customer cash deposits that are in the cage/vault inventory or accountability; and (iii... shall comply with procedures for the receipt, inventory, storage, and destruction of gaming chips and... reconciled to the general ledger each month. The reconciliation and any follow-up performed shall...

  18. INTERACTIVE EFFECT OF CAGE DENSITY AND DIETARY BLACK CUMIN LEVEL ON PRODUCTIVE EFFICIENCY IN BROILER CHICKENS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. D. Mahfudz

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The present research was aimed to evaluate an interactive effect of cage density and level ofdietary black cumin (BC on productive efficiency of broiler chickens. A total of 270 broiler chickens(initial body weight of 163.12 ± 8.10g were allocated into a completely randomized design with a 3 x 3factorial pattern. The first factor was the cage density (bird/m2 namely, D1 = 8; D2 = 10, and D3 = 12.The second factor was BC level (%, namely, B1 = 1; B2 = 2, and B3 = 3. Feed consumption, bodyweight gain (BWG, feed conversion ratio (FCR, protein digestibility, and income over feed cost(IOFC were the parameters measured. Data were subjected to ANOVA and continued to Duncan test.No interaction between cage density and black cumin on all parameters was observed. Feedconsumption and FCR were increased, but BWG was lowered significantly (P<0.05 due to the cagedensities of 10 and 12 birds/m2 on weeks 2 and 3. Protein digestibility was significantly increased byfeeding 2 and 3% BC. IOFC decreased significantly (P<0.05 when cage densities were 10 and 12birds/m2. In conclusion, the improvement of productive efficiency of broiler chicken reared at the cagedensity of 12 birds /m2 can be sufficiently achieved by feeding 1% black cumin.

  19. Novel approach to the behavioural characterization of inbred mice : automated home cage observations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Visser, L; van den Bos, R; Kuurman, W W; Kas, M J H; Spruijt, B M

    2006-01-01

    Here we present a newly developed tool for continuous recordings and analysis of novelty-induced and baseline behaviour of mice in a home cage-like environment. Aim of this study was to demonstrate the strength of this method by characterizing four inbred strains of mice, C57BL/6, DBA/2, C3H and 129

  20. Nicolas Cage otsib kadunud tütart naistesaarelt / Triin Tael

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Tael, Triin

    2006-01-01

    Õudusfilm "Ohvripidu" : režissöör Neil LaBute : peaosas Nicholas Cage : Ameerika Ühendriigid - Saksamaa 2006. Film on uusversioon briti 1973.a. filmist, mille režissöör oli Robin Hardy ja ühes peaosadest Christopher Lee

  1. Alternatives for the battery cage system: a comparison of economic, environmental and societal performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijpp, van der A.J.; Mollenhorst, H.; Berentsen, P.B.M.; Boer, de I.J.M.

    2006-01-01

    The ban on the battery cage system in the European Union after 2012, mainly due to impaired hen welfare, forces farmers to change to alternative housing systems for laying hens. Large-scale introduction of more hen-friendly systems, however, requires a comparison of these systems on their economic,

  2. Energy loss caused by shielding effect of steel cage outside source tube

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The energy loss, produced by shielding effect of steel cage outside the source tube, is quite considerable.With PENELOPE software package, MC results have been obtained based on the simulation of different source conformations. The result illustrates that the naked source tubes can improve the utilization ratio of the cobalt facilities. It demonstrates the applied value of the naked source tube in engineering.

  3. FUZZY LOGIC BASED INTELLIGENT CONTROL OF A VARIABLE SPEED CAGE MACHINE WIND GENERATION SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The paper describes a variable-speed wind generation system where fuzzy logic principles are used to optimize efficiency and enhance performance control. A squirrel cage induction generator feeds the power to a double-sided pulse width modulated converter system which either pump...

  4. Friction moment analysis of space gyroscope bearing with ribbon cage under ultra-low oscillatory motion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Shaona; Chen Xiaoyang; Gu Jiaming; Shen Xuejin

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the model of calculating the total friction moment of space gyro-scope ball bearings which usually work under ultra-low oscillatory motion and are very sensitive to the friction moment. The aim is to know the proportion of the friction moment caused by each frictional source in the bearing’s total friction moment, which is helpful to optimize the bearing design to deduce the friction moment. In the model, the cage dynamic equations considering six degree-of-freedom and the balls dynamic equations considering two degree-of-freedom were solved. The good trends with different loads between the measured friction moments and computational results prove that the model under constant rate was validated. The computational results show that when the speed was set at 5 r/min, the bearing’s maximum total friction moment when oscillation occurred was obviously larger than that occurred at a constant rate. At the onset of each oscillatory motion, the proportion of the friction moment caused by cage in the bearing’s total friction moment was very high, and it increased with the increasing speed. The analyses of different cage thicknesses and different clearances between cage pocket and ball show that smaller thickness and clearance were preferred.

  5. The origin of cortical neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Parnavelas J.G.

    2002-01-01

    Neurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex comprise two broad classes: pyramidal neurons, which project to distant targets, and the inhibitory nonpyramidal cells, the cortical interneurons. Pyramidal neurons are generated in the germinal ventricular zone, which lines the lateral ventricles, and migrate along the processes of radial glial cells to their positions in the developing cortex in an `inside-out' sequence. The GABA-containing nonpyramidal cells originate for the most part in the gangli...

  6. Microglial control of neuronal activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eBéchade

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Fine-tuning of neuronal activity was thought to be a neuron-autonomous mechanism until the discovery that astrocytes are active players of synaptic transmission. The involvement of astrocytes has changed our understanding of the roles of non-neuronal cells and shed new light on the regulation of neuronal activity. Microglial cells are the macrophages of the brain and they have been mostly investigated as immune cells. However recent data discussed in this review support the notion that, similarly to astrocytes, microglia are involved in the regulation of neuronal activity. For instance, in most, if not all, brain pathologies a strong temporal correlation has long been known to exist between the pathological activation of microglia and dysfunction of neuronal activity. Recent studies have convincingly shown that alteration of microglial function is responsible for pathological neuronal activity. This causal relationship has also been demonstrated in mice bearing loss-of-function mutations in genes specifically expressed by microglia. In addition to these long-term regulations of neuronal activity, recent data show that microglia can also rapidly regulate neuronal activity, thereby acting as partners of neurotransmission.

  7. The biophysics of neuronal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franze, Kristian; Guck, Jochen

    2010-09-01

    For a long time, neuroscience has focused on biochemical, molecular biological and electrophysiological aspects of neuronal physiology and pathology. However, there is a growing body of evidence indicating the importance of physical stimuli for neuronal growth and development. In this review we briefly summarize the historical background of neurobiophysics and give an overview over the current understanding of neuronal growth from a physics perspective. We show how biophysics has so far contributed to a better understanding of neuronal growth and discuss current inconsistencies. Finally, we speculate how biophysics may contribute to the successful treatment of lesions to the central nervous system, which have been considered incurable until very recently.

  8. The straintronic spin-neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Ayan K; Atulasimha, Jayasimha; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo

    2015-07-17

    In artificial neural networks, neurons are usually implemented with highly dissipative CMOS-based operational amplifiers. A more energy-efficient implementation is a 'spin-neuron' realized with a magneto-tunneling junction (MTJ) that is switched with a spin-polarized current (representing weighted sum of input currents) that either delivers a spin transfer torque or induces domain wall motion in the soft layer of the MTJ to mimic neuron firing. Here, we propose and analyze a different type of spin-neuron in which the soft layer of the MTJ is switched with mechanical strain generated by a voltage (representing weighted sum of input voltages) and term it straintronic spin-neuron. It dissipates orders of magnitude less energy in threshold operations than the traditional current-driven spin neuron at 0 K temperature and may even be faster. We have also studied the room-temperature firing behaviors of both types of spin neurons and find that thermal noise degrades the performance of both types, but the current-driven type is degraded much more than the straintronic type if both are optimized for maximum energy-efficiency. On the other hand, if both are designed to have the same level of thermal degradation, then the current-driven version will dissipate orders of magnitude more energy than the straintronic version. Thus, the straintronic spin-neuron is superior to current-driven spin neurons. PMID:26112081

  9. STDP in recurrent neuronal networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Gilson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent results about spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP in recurrently connected neurons are reviewed, with a focus on the relationship between the weight dynamics and the emergence of network structure. In particular, the evolution of synaptic weights in the two cases of incoming connections for a single neuron and recurrent connections are compared and contrasted. A theoretical framework is used that is based upon Poisson neurons with a temporally inhomogeneous firing rate and the asymptotic distribution of weights generated by the learning dynamics. Different network configurations examined in recent studies are discussed and an overview of the current understanding of STDP in recurrently connected neuronal networks is presented.

  10. Substrate arrays of iridium oxide microelectrodes for in vitro neuronal interfacing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shady Gawad

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of novel bidirectional interfaces for in vivo and in vitro nervous systems is an important step towards future functional neuroprosthetics. Small electrodes, structures and devices are necessary to achieve high-resolution and target-selectivity during stimulation and recording of neuronal networks, while significant charge transfer and large signal-to-noise ratio are required for accurate time resolution. In addition, the physical properties of the interface should remain stable across time, especially when chronic in vivo applications or in vitro long-term studies are considered, unless a procedure to actively compensate for degradation is provided. In this short report, we describe the use and fabrication of arrays of 120 planar microelectrodes (MEAs of sputtered Iridium Oxide (IrOx. The effective surface area of individual microelectrodes is significantly increased using electrochemical activation, a procedure that may also be employed to restore the properties of the electrodes as required. The electrode activation results in a very low interface impedance, especially in the lower frequency domain, which was characterized by impedance spectroscopy. The increase in the roughness of the microelectrodes surface was imaged using digital holographic microscopy and electron microscopy. Aging of the activated electrodes was also investigated, comparing storage in saline with storage in air. Demonstration of concept was achieved by recording multiple single-unit spike activity in acute brain slice preparations of rat neocortex. Data suggests that extracellular recording of action potentials can be achieved with planar IrOx MEAs with good signal-to-noise ratios.

  11. Use, fate and ecological risks of antibiotics applied in tilapia cage farming in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use, environmental fate and ecological risks of antibiotics applied in tilapia cage farming were investigated in the Tha Chin and Mun rivers in Thailand. Information on antibiotic use was collected through interviewing 29 farmers, and the concentrations of the most commonly used antibiotics, oxytetracycline (OTC) and enrofloxacin (ENR), were monitored in river water and sediment samples. Moreover, we assessed the toxicity of OTC and ENR on tropical freshwater invertebrates and performed a risk assessment for aquatic ecosystems. All interviewed tilapia farmers reported to routinely use antibiotics. Peak water concentrations for OTC and ENR were 49 and 1.6 μg/L, respectively. Antibiotics were most frequently detected in sediments with concentrations up to 6908 μg/kg d.w. for OTC, and 2339 μg/kg d.w. for ENR. The results of this study indicate insignificant short-term risks for primary producers and invertebrates, but suggest that the studied aquaculture farms constitute an important source of antibiotic pollution. - Highlights: • First study assessing the risks of antibiotics applied in freshwater tilapia cages. • Ten antibiotics were reported to be used by tilapia cage farmers in two Thai rivers. • Peak oxytetracycline and enrofloxacin concentrations were in the order of μg/L. • Antibiotic concentrations in river sediments next to cages were up to several mg/kg. • Antibiotics are not posing a short-term risk for pelagic aquatic organisms. - Antibiotics applied in tilapia cage farming in Thailand are released into surrounding aquatic ecosystems and constitute an important source of environmental pollution

  12. Molecular Cage Impregnated Palladium Nanoparticles: Efficient, Additive-Free Heterogeneous Catalysts for Cyanation of Aryl Halides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Bijnaneswar; Acharyya, Koushik; Howlader, Prodip; Mukherjee, Partha Sarathi

    2016-02-10

    Two shape-persistent covalent cages (CC1(r) and CC2(r)) have been devised from triphenyl amine-based trialdehydes and cyclohexane diamine building blocks utilizing the dynamic imine chemistry followed by imine bond reduction. The cage compounds have been characterized by several spectroscopic techniques which suggest that CC1(r) and CC2(r) are [2+3] and [8+12] self-assembled architectures, respectively. These state-of-the-art molecules have a porous interior and stable aromatic backbone with multiple palladium binding sites to engineer the controlled synthesis and stabilization of ultrafine palladium nanoparticles (PdNPs). As-synthesized cage-embedded PdNPs have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). Inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry reveals that Pd@CC1(r) and Pd@CC2(r) have 40 and 25 wt% palladium loading, respectively. On the basis of TEM analysis, it has been estimated that as small as ∼1.8 nm PdNPs could be stabilized inside the CC1(r), while larger CC2(r) could stabilize ∼3.7 nm NPs. In contrast, reduction of palladium salts in the absence of the cages form structure less agglomerates. The well-dispersed cage-embedded NPs exhibit efficient catalytic performance in the cyanation of aryl halides under heterogeneous, additive-free condition. Moreover, these materials have excellent stability and recyclability without any agglomeration of PdNPs after several cycles. PMID:26771385

  13. High-temperature in situ crystallographic observation of reversible gas sorption in impermeable organic cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seung Bin; Moon, Dohyun; Graf, Robert; Cho, Woo Jong; Park, Sung Woo; Yoon, Tae-Ung; Cho, Seung Joo; Hwang, In-Chul; Bae, Youn-Sang; Spiess, Hans W; Lee, Hee Cheon; Kim, Kwang S

    2015-11-17

    Crystallographic observation of adsorbed gas molecules is a highly difficult task due to their rapid motion. Here, we report the in situ single-crystal and synchrotron powder X-ray observations of reversible CO2 sorption processes in an apparently nonporous organic crystal under varying pressures at high temperatures. The host material is formed by hydrogen bond network between 1,3,5-tris-(4-carboxyphenyl)benzene (H3BTB) and N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) and by π-π stacking between the H3BTB moieties. The material can be viewed as a well-ordered array of cages, which are tight packed with each other so that the cages are inaccessible from outside. Thus, the host is practically nonporous. Despite the absence of permanent pathways connecting the empty cages, they are permeable to CO2 at high temperatures due to thermally activated molecular gating, and the weakly confined CO2 molecules in the cages allow direct detection by in situ single-crystal X-ray diffraction at 323 K. Variable-temperature in situ synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction studies also show that the CO2 sorption is reversible and driven by temperature increase. Solid-state magic angle spinning NMR defines the interactions of CO2 with the organic framework and dynamic motion of CO2 in cages. The reversible sorption is attributed to the dynamic motion of the DMF molecules combined with the axial motions/angular fluctuations of CO2 (a series of transient opening/closing of compartments enabling CO2 molecule passage), as revealed from NMR and simulations. This temperature-driven transient molecular gating can store gaseous molecules in ordered arrays toward unique collective properties and release them for ready use. PMID:26578758

  14. Modular neuronal assemblies embodied in a closed-loop environment: towards future integration of brains and machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacopo eTessadori

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Behaviors, from simple to most complex, require a two-way interaction with the environment and the contribution of different brain areas depending on the orchestrated activation of neuronal assemblies. In this work we present a new hybrid neuro-robotic architecture based on a neural controller bi-directionally connected to a virtual robot implementing a Braitenberg vehicle aimed at avoiding obstacles. The robot is characterized by proximity sensors and wheels, allowing it to navigate into a circular arena with obstacles of different sizes. As neural controller, we used hippocampal cultures dissociated from embryonic rats and kept alive over Micro Electrode Arrays (MEAs for 3-8 weeks. The developed software architecture guarantees a bi-directional exchange of information between the natural and the artificial part by means of simple linear coding/decoding schemes. We used two different kinds of experimental preparation: ‘random’ and ‘modular’ populations. In the second case, the confinement was assured by a PDMS (polydimethylsiloxane mask placed over the surface of the MEA device, thus defining two populations interconnected via specific microchannels. The main results of our study are: (i neuronal cultures can be successfully interfaced to an artificial agent; (ii modular networks show a different dynamics with respect to random culture, both in terms of spontaneous and evoked electrophysiological patterns; (iii the robot performs better if a reinforcement learning paradigm (i.e. a tetanic stimulation delivered to the network following each collision is activated, regardless of the modularity of the culture; (iv the robot controlled by the modular network further enhances its capabilities in avoiding obstacles during the short-term plasticity trial. The developed paradigm offers a new framework for studying, in simplified model systems, neuro-artificial bi-directional interfaces for the development of new strategies for brain

  15. Connecting Neurons to a Mobile Robot: An In Vitro Bidirectional Neural Interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Novellino

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the key properties of intelligent behaviors is the capability to learn and adapt to changing environmental conditions. These features are the result of the continuous and intense interaction of the brain with the external world, mediated by the body. For this reason x201C;embodiment” represents an innovative and very suitable experimental paradigm when studying the neural processes underlying learning new behaviors and adapting to unpredicted situations. To this purpose, we developed a novel bidirectional neural interface. We interconnected in vitro neurons, extracted from rat embryos and plated on a microelectrode array (MEA, to external devices, thus allowing real-time closed-loop interaction. The novelty of this experimental approach entails the necessity to explore different computational schemes and experimental hypotheses. In this paper, we present an open, scalable architecture, which allows fast prototyping of different modules and where coding and decoding schemes and different experimental configurations can be tested. This hybrid system can be used for studying the computational properties and information coding in biological neuronal networks with far-reaching implications for the future development of advanced neuroprostheses.

  16. Cytomorphometric changes in the dorsal raphe neurons after rapid eye movement sleep deprivation are mediated by noradrenalin in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswas Sudipta

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives This study was carried out to investigate the effect of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS deprivation (REMSD on the cytomorphology of the dorsal raphe (DR neurons and to evaluate the possible role of REMSD-induced increased noradrenalin (NA in mediating such effects. Methods Rats were REMS deprived by the flowerpot method; free moving normal home cage rats, large platform and post REMS-deprived recovered rats were used as controls. Further, to evaluate if the effects were induced by NA, separate sets of experimental rats were treated (i.p. with α1-adrenoceptor antagonist, prazosin (PRZ. Histomorphometric analysis of DR neurons in stained brain sections were performed in experimental and control rats; neurons in inferior colliculus (IC served as anatomical control. Results The mean size of DR neurons was larger in REMSD group compared to controls, whereas, neurons in the recovered group of rats did not significantly differ than those in the control animals. Further, mean cell size in the post-REMSD PRZ-treated animals was comparable to those in the control groups. IC neurons were not affected by REMSD. Conclusions REMS loss has been reported to impair several physiological, behavioral and cellular processes. The mean size of the DR neurons was larger in the REMS deprived group of rats than those in the control groups; however, in the REMS deprived and prazosin treated rats the size was comparable to the normal rats. These results showed that REMSD induced increase in DR neuronal size was mediated by NA acting on α1-adrenoceptor. The findings suggest that the sizes of DR neurons are sensitive to REMSD, which if not compensated could lead to neurodegeneration and associated disorders including memory loss and Alzheimer's disease.

  17. Population size, cage area, and dominance rank effects on productivity and well-being of laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, D L; van Tienhoven, A; Gvaryahu, G

    1988-03-01

    The effect of two cage population sizes (four vs. six/cage) and two cage area treatments (316 cm2 vs. 406 cm2/bird) were compared in a nonconfounded design while maintaining feeder space constant (8.9 cm/bird) for egg production performances and behavioral and physiological indicators of well-being of laying hens. Egg production rates were determined for all members of each cage group (palpations at 48 to 50 wk) and on a cage group basis (20 to 60 wk). Heart weights, plasma corticosterone levels, durations of tonic immobility (TI), and plumage conditions were compared for top and bottom birds in the dominance ranks. Significant reductions in egg production were observed for low ranking hens in the high density (4 and 6/316-cm2) treatments. In addition, high ranking hens of the 6/316-cm2 treatment produced fewer eggs than high ranking hens in the 4/316-cm2 treatment. When high and low ranking individuals were housed in single-hen cages, egg production was improved relative to performances in the social environments. Heart weights of hens, as a percentage of body weight, were increased in the low ranking hens and for hens in the smaller cage size. Plasma corticosterone did not prove to be a useful indicator of well-being. Low ranking individuals had greater durations of TI but differences in feather condition were not detected. The results support the contention that appropriate population sizes and cage space allocations can be determined that will optimize the performance and welfare of layers in cage environments. PMID:3405919

  18. Synchronization by elastic neuronal latencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardi, Roni; Timor, Reut; Marom, Shimon; Abeles, Moshe; Kanter, Ido

    2013-01-01

    Psychological and physiological considerations entail that formation and functionality of neuronal cell assemblies depend upon synchronized repeated activation such as zero-lag synchronization. Several mechanisms for the emergence of this phenomenon have been suggested, including the global network quantity, the greatest common divisor of neuronal circuit delay loops. However, they require strict biological prerequisites such as precisely matched delays and connectivity, and synchronization is represented as a stationary mode of activity instead of a transient phenomenon. Here we show that the unavoidable increase in neuronal response latency to ongoing stimulation serves as a nonuniform gradual stretching of neuronal circuit delay loops. This apparent nuisance is revealed to be an essential mechanism in various types of neuronal time controllers, where synchronization emerges as a transient phenomenon and without predefined precisely matched synaptic delays. These findings are described in an experimental procedure where conditioned stimulations were enforced on a circuit of neurons embedded within a large-scale network of cortical cells in vitro, and are corroborated and extended by simulations of circuits composed of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with time-dependent latencies. These findings announce a cortical time scale for time controllers based on tens of microseconds stretching of neuronal circuit delay loops per spike. They call for a reexamination of the role of the temporal periodic mode in brain functionality using advanced in vitro and in vivo experiments.

  19. Neuronal avalanches and coherence potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plenz, D.

    2012-05-01

    The mammalian cortex consists of a vast network of weakly interacting excitable cells called neurons. Neurons must synchronize their activities in order to trigger activity in neighboring neurons. Moreover, interactions must be carefully regulated to remain weak (but not too weak) such that cascades of active neuronal groups avoid explosive growth yet allow for activity propagation over long-distances. Such a balance is robustly realized for neuronal avalanches, which are defined as cortical activity cascades that follow precise power laws. In experiments, scale-invariant neuronal avalanche dynamics have been observed during spontaneous cortical activity in isolated preparations in vitro as well as in the ongoing cortical activity of awake animals and in humans. Theory, models, and experiments suggest that neuronal avalanches are the signature of brain function near criticality at which the cortex optimally responds to inputs and maximizes its information capacity. Importantly, avalanche dynamics allow for the emergence of a subset of avalanches, the coherence potentials. They emerge when the synchronization of a local neuronal group exceeds a local threshold, at which the system spawns replicas of the local group activity at distant network sites. The functional importance of coherence potentials will be discussed in the context of propagating structures, such as gliders in balanced cellular automata. Gliders constitute local population dynamics that replicate in space after a finite number of generations and are thought to provide cellular automata with universal computation. Avalanches and coherence potentials are proposed to constitute a modern framework of cortical synchronization dynamics that underlies brain function.

  20. The Neuronal Ceroid-Lipofuscinoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Michael J.; Rakheja, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCL's, Batten disease) represent a group of severe neurodegenerative diseases, which mostly present in childhood. The phenotypes are similar and include visual loss, seizures, loss of motor and cognitive function, and early death. At autopsy, there is massive neuronal loss with characteristic storage in…

  1. 基于全球专利分析的单元醇胺研发机构竞争力比较%Comparing competitiveness of MEA R & D institutions based on analysis of global patents

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    魏凤; 周洪; 张贤; 李小春

    2015-01-01

    s:The mono-ethanolamine (MEA) absorption method is considered to be one of the more viable CO2 capture technologies. In view of technological competition and market application,based on patent analysis the competitiveness of the global MEA technology research and development institutions are compared through patent application quantity,defend regions,citations frequency, collaborating relations among patent holders,core patents and so on. The USA,China and Europe are important areas of patent protection,while the institutions from the USA,Japan and Europe have stronger competitiveness. French Petroleum Institute (IFP) has the most MEA patents,followed by Japan’s Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and Kansai Electric Power Co. and Dutch Shell,while the USA has the most institutions for MEA patents. The technologies of MEA patents include MEA absorptive capacity,energy consumption,water consumption,corrosion and degradation. Compared with domestic institutions,foreign institutions pay more emphasis on patent applying protection over many countries and the cited protection of core patents.%单乙醇胺(MEA)吸收法被认为是较具可行性的 CO2捕集技术之一。从技术竞争与市场应用的角度,本文基于全球专利数据,从专利申请数量、专利覆盖地区、专利引用频次、专利权人合作关系、核心专利等方面分析全球MEA技术研发机构的竞争实力。研究结果发现,美、日、欧的研发机构实力较强;美国、欧洲和中国是MEA专利保护的重点国家和地区;从专利数量来看,法国石油研究院申请的专利最多,日本三菱重工和关西电力、荷兰壳牌公司紧追其后;总体上,美国申请MEA专利的公司与专利数量最多;从MEA专利关注的技术方向看,依次为吸收能力、能耗、水消耗、腐蚀和降解;从专利战略来看,国外机构更为注重专利在多国的申请保护和核心专利的引用保护。

  2. Biomechanical effects of polyaxial pedicle screw fixation on the lumbosacral segments with an anterior interbody cage support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Hsiang-Ho

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lumbosacral fusion is a relatively common procedure that is used in the management of an unstable spine. The anterior interbody cage has been involved to enhance the stability of a pedicle screw construct used at the lumbosacral junction. Biomechanical differences between polyaxial and monoaxial pedicle screws linked with various rod contours were investigated to analyze the respective effects on overall construct stiffness, cage strain, rod strain, and contact ratios at the vertebra-cage junction. Methods A synthetic model composed of two ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene blocks was used with four titanium pedicle screws (two in each block and two rods fixation to build the spinal construct along with an anterior interbody cage support. For each pair of the construct fixed with polyaxial or monoaxial screws, the linked rods were set at four configurations to simulate 0°, 7°, 14°, and 21° lordosis on the sagittal plane, and a compressive load of 300 N was applied. Strain gauges were attached to the posterior surface of the cage and to the central area of the left connecting rod. Also, the contact area between the block and the cage was measured using prescale Fuji super low pressure film for compression, flexion, lateral bending and torsion tests. Results Our main findings in the experiments with an anterior interbody cage support are as follows: 1 large segmental lordosis can decrease the stiffness of monoaxial pedicle screws constructs; 2 polyaxial screws rather than monoaxial screws combined with the cage fixation provide higher compression and flexion stiffness in 21° segmental lordosis; 3 polyaxial screws enhance the contact surface of the cage in 21° segmental lordosis. Conclusion Polyaxial screws system used in conjunction with anterior cage support yields higher contact ratio, compression and flexion stiffness of spinal constructs than monoaxial screws system does in the same model when the spinal segment

  3. Ethanol and neuronal metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, P; Ledig, M; M'Paria, J R

    1980-01-01

    The effect of ethanol on membrane enzymes (Na+, K+ and Mg2+ ATPases, 5'-nucleotidase, adenylate cyclase) alcohol dehydrogenase, aldehyde dehydrogenase and superoxide dismutase were studied in nerve cells (established cell lines, primary cultures of chick and rat brain) cultured in the presence of 100 mM ethanol, and in total rat brain, following various ethanol treatments of the rats (20% ethanol as the sole liquid source, intraperitoneal injection). The results show a difference between neuronal and glial cells. Most of the observed changes in enzymatic activities returned rapidly to control values when ethanol was withdrawn from the culture medium or from the diet. Alcohol dehydrogenase was more stimulated by ethanol than aldehyde dehydrogenase; therefore acetaldehyde may be accumulated. The inhibition of superoxide dismutase activity may allow an accumulation of cytotoxic O2- radicals in nervous tissue and may explain the polymorphism of lesions brought about by alcohol intoxication. PMID:6264495

  4. Orexin neurons receive glycinergic innervations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Hondo

    Full Text Available Glycine, a nonessential amino-acid that acts as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, is currently used as a dietary supplement to improve the quality of sleep, but its mechanism of action is poorly understood. We confirmed the effects of glycine on sleep/wakefulness behavior in mice when administered peripherally. Glycine administration increased non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep time and decreased the amount and mean episode duration of wakefulness when administered in the dark period. Since peripheral administration of glycine induced fragmentation of sleep/wakefulness states, which is a characteristic of orexin deficiency, we examined the effects of glycine on orexin neurons. The number of Fos-positive orexin neurons markedly decreased after intraperitoneal administration of glycine to mice. To examine whether glycine acts directly on orexin neurons, we examined the effects of glycine on orexin neurons by patch-clamp electrophysiology. Glycine directly induced hyperpolarization and cessation of firing of orexin neurons. These responses were inhibited by a specific glycine receptor antagonist, strychnine. Triple-labeling immunofluorescent analysis showed close apposition of glycine transporter 2 (GlyT2-immunoreactive glycinergic fibers onto orexin-immunoreactive neurons. Immunoelectron microscopic analysis revealed that GlyT2-immunoreactive terminals made symmetrical synaptic contacts with somata and dendrites of orexin neurons. Double-labeling immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that glycine receptor alpha subunits were localized in the postsynaptic membrane of symmetrical inhibitory synapses on orexin neurons. Considering the importance of glycinergic regulation during REM sleep, our observations suggest that glycine injection might affect the activity of orexin neurons, and that glycinergic inhibition of orexin neurons might play a role in physiological sleep regulation.

  5. Disinhibition Bursting of Dopaminergic Neurons

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    Collin J Lobb

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc dopaminergic neurons receive strong tonic inputs from GABAergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr and globus pallidus (GP, and glutamatergic neurons in the subthalamic nucleus. The presence of these tonic inputs raises the possibility that phasic disinhibition may trigger phasic bursts in dopaminergic neurons. We first applied constant NMDA and GABAA conductances onto a two-compartment single cell model of the dopaminergic neuron (Kuznetsov et al., 2006. The model exhibited disinhibition bursting upon stepwise removal of inhibition. A further bifurcation analysis suggests that disinhibition may be more robust than excitation alone in that for most levels of NMDA conductance, the cell remains capable of bursting even after a complete removal of inhibition, whereas too much excitatory input will drive the cell into depolarization block. To investigate the network dynamics of disinhibition, we used a modified version of an integrate-and-fire based model of the basal ganglia (Humphries et al., 2006. Synaptic activity generated in the network was delivered to the two-compartment single cell dopaminergic neuron. Phasic activation of the D1-expressing medium spiny neurons in the striatum (D1STR produced disinhibition bursts in dopaminergic neurons through the direct pathway (D1STR to SNpr to SNpc. Anatomical studies have shown that D1STR neurons have collaterals that terminate in GP. Adding these collaterals to the model, we found that striatal activation increased the intra-burst firing frequency of the disinhibition burst as the weight of this connection was increased. Our studies suggest that striatal activation is a robust means by which disinhibition bursts can be generated by SNpc dopaminergic neurons, and that recruitment of the indirect pathway via collaterals may enhance disinhibition bursting.

  6. Mercury and stable isotope signatures in caged marine fish and fish feeds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onsanit, Sarayut; Chen, Min; Ke, Caihuan [State Key Laboratory for Marine Environmental Science, College of Oceanography and Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Wang, Wen-Xiong, E-mail: wwang@ust.hk [State Key Laboratory for Marine Environmental Science, College of Oceanography and Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mercury concentrations in caged fish were closely related to Hg concentrations in fish feeds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The trophic transfer factor of methylmercury was dependent on fish feeds, and was the highest for fish fed on pellet feeds. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fish farming may be a good way of reducing the human exposure to Hg because Hg levels can be carefully controlled. - Abstract: Total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) concentrations were determined in four species of marine caged carnivorous fish, one species of herbivorous fish and three types of fish feeds (dried pellet feed, forage fish and fish viscera), collected from five cage sites in the rural areas along Fujian coastline, China. For the carnivorous fish, the concentrations of THg and MeHg ranged from 0.03 to 0.31 {mu}g/g and from 0.02 to 0.30 {mu}g/g on wet weight basis, respectively. The concentrations were lower for the herbivorous fish with both within the range of 0.01-0.03 {mu}g/g. Out of the three tested fish feeds, tuna viscera contained the highest level of mercury (0.20 {mu}g/g THg and 0.13 {mu}g/g MeHg), with pellet feed containing the lowest level (0.05 {mu}g/g THg and 0.01 {mu}g/g MeHg). The calculated trophic transfer factor of MeHg was the highest (12-64) for fish fed on pellet feeds, and was the lowest for fish fed on tuna viscera. A significant relationship was found between Hg concentrations in caged fish and in fish feeds, thus Hg was primarily accumulated from the diet. Furthermore, the stable isotope {delta}{sup 15}N was positively correlated with the Hg concentration in two caged sites, indicating that {delta}{sup 15}N may be a suitable tool for tracking mercury in caged fish. We conclude that fish farming may be a good way of reducing the human exposure to Hg because mercury levels can be carefully controlled in such farming systems.

  7. Parallel Algorithms for Neuronal Spike Sorting

    OpenAIRE

    Bergheim, Thomas Stian; Skogvold, Arve Aleksander Nymo

    2011-01-01

    Neurons communicate through electrophysiological signals, which may be recorded using electrodes inserted into living tissue.When a neuron emits a signal, it is referred to as a spike, and an electrode can detect these from multiple neurons.Neuronal spike sorting is the process of classifying the spike activity based on which neuron each spike signal is emitted from.Advances in technology have introduced better recording equipment, which allows the recording of many neurons at the same time.H...

  8. Postmitotic specification of Drosophila insulinergic neurons from pioneer neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Miguel-Aliaga

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Insulin and related peptides play important and conserved functions in growth and metabolism. Although Drosophila has proved useful for the genetic analysis of insulin functions, little is known about the transcription factors and cell lineages involved in insulin production. Within the embryonic central nervous system, the MP2 neuroblast divides once to generate a dMP2 neuron that initially functions as a pioneer, guiding the axons of other later-born embryonic neurons. Later during development, dMP2 neurons in anterior segments undergo apoptosis but their posterior counterparts persist. We show here that surviving posterior dMP2 neurons no longer function in axonal scaffolding but differentiate into neuroendocrine cells that express insulin-like peptide 7 (Ilp7 and innervate the hindgut. We find that the postmitotic transition from pioneer to insulin-producing neuron is a multistep process requiring retrograde bone morphogenetic protein (BMP signalling and four transcription factors: Abdominal-B, Hb9, Fork Head, and Dimmed. These five inputs contribute in a partially overlapping manner to combinatorial codes for dMP2 apoptosis, survival, and insulinergic differentiation. Ectopic reconstitution of this code is sufficient to activate Ilp7 expression in other postmitotic neurons. These studies reveal striking similarities between the transcription factors regulating insulin expression in insect neurons and mammalian pancreatic beta-cells.

  9. Production performance, use of nest box, and external appearance of two strains of laying hens kept in conventional and enriched cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onbaşılar, E E; Ünal, N; Erdem, E; Kocakaya, A; Yaranoğlu, B

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in production performance, use of nest box, and external appearance of 2 strains of laying hens kept in conventional and enriched cages. Lohmann Brown Classic (LB, n=532) and Lohmann LSL Classic (LW, n=532) hens were housed from 16 to 73 wk in either conventional cages or enriched cages. Enriched cages had a nesting area, scratch pad, perch, and nail shortener. Body weight (BW), hen-day egg production, egg weight, feed intake, feed conversion ratio (FCR), cracked and dirty eggs, use of nest box for lay, and external appearance were determined. Laying period influenced the hen-day egg production, egg weight, feed intake, and feed conversion ratio. Cage type affected the hen-day egg production and feed conversion ratio, while strain affected the egg weight, feed intake, and feed conversion ratio. Laying period×cage type and laying period×strain interactions affected egg production, egg weight, and feed conversion ratio. Both strains preferred to lay in the nest box. Percentages of cracked and dirty eggs of LW hens in enriched cages were higher than that in conventional cages. Most of the dirty eggs laid by both strains were found outside of the nest box. The LW hens laid more dirty eggs than the LB hens. Cage type and cage type×strain interaction were important for total feather score. Final claw length was affected by cage type, strain, and cage type×strain interaction. This study suggests that cage type, strain, and also cage type×strain and period×strain interactions should be considered when alternative housing systems are used. PMID:25667426

  10. Pathogenesis of motor neuron disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuefei Wang

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize and analyze the factors and theories related to the attack of motor neuron disease, and comprehensively investigate the pathogenesis of motor neuron disease.DATA SOURCES: A search of Pubmed database was undertaken to identify articles about motor neuron disease published in English from January 1994 to June 2006 by using the keywords of "neurodegenerative diseases". Other literatures were collected by retrieving specific journals and articles.STUDY SELECTION: The data were checked primarily, articles related to the pathogenesis of motor neuron disease were involved, and those obviously irrelated to the articles were excluded.DATA EXTRACTION: Totally 54 articles were collected, 30 of them were involved, and the other 24 were excluded.DATA SYNTHESIS: The pathogenesis of motor neuron disease has multiple factors, and the present related theories included free radical oxidation, excitotoxicity, genetic and immune factors, lack of neurotrophic factor,injury of neurofilament, etc. The studies mainly come from transgenic animal models, cell culture in vitro and patients with familial motor neuron disease, but there are still many restrictions and disadvantages.CONCLUSION: It is necessary to try to find whether there is internal association among different mechanisms,comprehensively investigate the pathogenesis of motor neuron diseases, in order to provide reliable evidence for the clinical treatment.

  11. Separation of rare gases and chiral molecules by selective binding in porous organic cages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Linjiang; Reiss, Paul S.; Chong, Samantha Y.; Holden, Daniel; Jelfs, Kim E.; Hasell, Tom; Little, Marc A.; Kewley, Adam; Briggs, Michael E.; Stephenson, Andrew; Thomas, K. Mark; Armstrong, Jayne A.; Bell, Jon; Busto, Jose; Noel, Raymond; Liu, Jian; Strachan, Denis M.; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Cooper, Andrew I.

    2014-10-01

    The separation of molecules with similar size and shape is an important technological challenge. For example, rare gases can pose either an economic opportunity or an environmental hazard and there is a need to separate these spherical molecules selectively at low concentrations in air. Likewise, chiral molecules are important building blocks for pharmaceuticals, but chiral enantiomers, by definition, have identical size and shape, and their separation can be challenging. Here we show that a porous organic cage molecule has unprecedented performance in the solid state for the separation of rare gases, such as krypton and xenon. The selectivity arises from a precise size match between the rare gas and the organic cage cavity, as predicted by molecular simulations. Breakthrough experiments demonstrate real practical potential for the separation of krypton, xenon and radon from air at concentrations of only a few parts per million. We also demonstrate selective binding of chiral organic molecules such as 1-phenylethanol, suggesting applications in enantioselective separation.

  12. Trapping of atomic hydrogen in octasilsesquioxane cages by glow discharge treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrogen atoms are trapped in octasilsesquioxane ((RSiO3/2)8, R = H, CH3, i-butyl, etc.) cages by electric discharge treatment. The yield of the trapped hydrogen was evaluated to be 1.3 x 10-4 of cage unit by using ESR spectroscopy for (CH3SiO3/2)8 discharged for 4 minutes at room temperature. To obtain a comparable yield of the trapped hydrogen by γ-rays (60Co) irradiation, an absorbed dose of ca. 300 kGy is required, taking two days or more in general. The discharge technique is simple and extremely efficient compared to the conventional method of γ-ray radiolysis. (author)

  13. Validation of an automated mite counter for Dermanyssus gallinae in experimental laying hen cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mul, Monique F; van Riel, Johan W; Meerburg, Bastiaan G; Dicke, Marcel; George, David R; Groot Koerkamp, Peter W G

    2015-08-01

    For integrated pest management (IPM) programs to be maximally effective, monitoring of the growth and decline of the pest populations is essential. Here, we present the validation results of a new automated monitoring device for the poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae), a serious pest in laying hen facilities world-wide. This monitoring device (called an "automated mite counter") was validated in experimental laying hen cages with live birds and a growing population of D. gallinae. This validation study resulted in 17 data points of 'number of mites counted' by the automated mite counter and the 'number of mites present' in the experimental laying hen cages. The study demonstrated that the automated mite counter was able to track the D. gallinae population effectively. A wider evaluation showed that this automated mite counter can become a useful tool in IPM of D. gallinae in laying hen facilities. PMID:26002308

  14. Cyclic Water Clusters in Tape-Like and Cage-Like Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuhou Lei

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Controlling the ratio of 2,2′-bpy to benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid produces two interesting complexes, namely [Co(2,2′-bpy3] (SO4 8.5H2O (1 and [Cu2(BTCA (2,2′-bpy4] (OH (2,2′-bpy0.5·14H2O (2 (H3BTCA = benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid, 2,2′-bpy = 2,2′-bipyridine. We report the structural evidence in the solid state of discrete lamellar water cluster conformations. These units are found to act as supramolecular glue in the aggregation of cobalt (II or copper (II complexes to give three dimensional cage-like networks through hydrogen-bonding. It is interesting that the structure of complex 1 contains a 3D negatively charged cage.

  15. Performance of Tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum) in Cages, under Different Percentage of Feeding

    OpenAIRE

    A. A. B. Pereira; P. R. Moeller; N. T. Vanderline; L. C. Q. Moura; P.S.A. Moreira

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of different rate in percentage feeding of the productivity (Body weight (BW) and feed conversion (FC)) of juvenile tambaqui (Colossoma macropomum), with a total of 13500 animals, distributed in nine cages, with n = 1500 fish/cage, with three replicates in a period of four weeks. The animals were feed with   three treatments: treatment 1 (2% BW); treatment 2 ( 3% BW) and treatment 3 (4% BW), divided in two meals,  and feed  with commercial...

  16. Control System for Producing Electricity with Dual Stator Winding Cage-Rotor Induction Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucian Nicolae Tutelea

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper will present the key design equations and control design model of the Dual Stator Winding Cage-Rotor Induction Generator (DSWIG to achieve wide-speed-range operation with reduced capacity of the static power controller for low power wind or hydro applications. The proposed induction generator consists of a standard squirrel-cage rotor and a stator with two separate windings wound for a similar number of poles. Moreover, the system control strategy using the stator flux orientation is consequently proposed. The aim of the paper is to emphasize that the low speed induction generators with power electronic converters represent a realistic and useful solution for direct drive power applications.

  17. Pentagonal dodecahedron methane hydrate cage and methanol system—An ab initio study

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Snehanshu Pal; T K Kundu

    2013-03-01

    Density functional theory based studies have been performed to elucidate the role of methanol as an methane hydrate inhibitor. A methane hydrate pentagonal dodecahedron cage’s geometry optimization, natural bond orbital (NBO) analysis, Mullikan charge determination, electrostatic potential evaluation and vibrational frequency calculation with and without the presence of methanol using WB97XD/6-31++G(d,p) have been carried out. Calculated geometrical parameters and interaction energies indicate that methanol destabilizes pentagonal dodecahedron methane hydrate cage (1CH4@512) with and without the presence of sodium ion. NBO analysis and red shift of vibrational frequency reveal that hydrogen bond formation between methanol and water molecules of 1CH4@512 cage is favourable subsequently after breaking its original hydrogen bonded network.

  18. Introduced, Captive, Caged and Escaped Exotic and Native Bird Species in the Littoral Area of Lebanon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some introduced exotic bird species may cause damages to the ecosystem they are introduced to; others may have no effect or can be beneficial to humans and ecosystems.Whatever the case is, the exotic bird species remain an issue in Lebanon, especially that they are not given the appropriate priority at the national level. With the recent intentional or accidental introduction of exotic species,the problem is increasing and therefore necessitating comprehensive evaluation of the status and origin of these species in Lebanon.Since many of the introduced species are escapes from cages, it was necessary to also evaluate both status and origin of all caged birds in order to see whether they are introduced or native to the country. (author)

  19. Numerical Simulation of Dynamic Response of A Net Cage for Flatfish in Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    桂福坤; 赵云鹏; 许条建; 关长涛

    2014-01-01

    A numerical model of flatfish cage is built based on the lumped mass method and the principle of rigid body kinematics. To validate the numerical model, a series of physical model tests are conducted in the wave flume. The numerical results correspond well with the data sets from physical model test. The effect of weight of bottom frame, height of fish net and net shape on motion responses of fish cage and tension force on mooring lines is then analyzed. The results indicate that the vertical displacements of float collar and bottom frame decrease with the increase in the weight of bottom frame; the maximum tension force on mooring lines increases with the increasing weight of bottom frame. The inclination angles of float collar and bottom frame decrease with the increasing net height; the maximum tension force increases obviously with the increase of net height.

  20. Effect of Caging and Swimmer Bars on Flexural Response of RC Deep Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Revathy S

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Beams with shear span to depth ratio (a/d less than or equal to 2 are considered as deep beams. They have wide applications in pile caps, water tanks, shear walls, corbels etc. Their strength is controlled by shear. Swimmer bars are small inclined bars, whose both ends are bent horizontally and welded to both top and bottom flexural reinforcement. Swimmer bars forming a plane crack interceptor system is effective in carrying shear. Also, a reinforcement caging provided at the centre of a simply supported beam is supposed to enhance its flexural capacity. In this study, an experimental investigation on the flexural response of deep beams reinforced with caging and swimmer bars is done. Various parameters like ultimate load, deflection and failure modes of different reinforcement patterns are studied.

  1. Fabrication of CuO nanoparticle interlinked microsphere cages by solution method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian HuYong

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available AbstractHere we report a very simple method to convert conventional CuO powders to nanoparticle interlinked microsphere cages by solution method. CuO is dissolved into aqueous ammonia, and the solution is diluted by alcohol and dip coating onto a glass substrate. Drying at 80 °C, the nanostructures with bunchy nanoparticles of Cu(OH2can be formed. After the substrate immerges into the solution and we vaporize the solution, hollow microspheres can be formed onto the substrate. There are three phases in the as-prepared samples, monoclinic tenorite CuO, orthorhombic Cu(OH2, and monoclinic carbonatodiamminecopper(II (Cu(NH32CO3. After annealing at 150 °C, the products convert to CuO completely. At annealing temperature above 350 °C, the hollow microspheres became nanoparticle interlinked cages.

  2. Parasitic diseases in marine cage culture--an example of experimental evolution of parasites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Barbara F

    2007-05-01

    Rapid development of fish culture in marine cages has been associated with an emergence of parasitic diseases. There is a general trend to an increase in infections with ectoparasites with direct life cycles and a reduced diversity of parasites in aquaculture. Some mariculture creates conditions that are similar to serial passage experiments, which are used to study adaptation during experimental evolution of pathogens. In particular, increased density of fish, repeated introduction of naive hosts, homogenous host populations, fast growth and a potential decrease in genetic diversity are attributes of both aquaculture and serial passage experiments. Some free-living organisms, for example Neoparamoeba spp. and Uronema spp. parasitise fish in culture, but have not been reported from wild populations. Farming fish in marine cages can increase the risk of outbreaks of parasitic diseases, including those caused by opportunistic parasites. However, aquaculture has the potential to control parasitic diseases through selective breeding, vaccination and general fish health management. PMID:17316650

  3. Stability of gold cages (Au16 and Au17) at finite temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prachi Chandrachud; Kavita Joshi; Sailaja Krishnamurty; D G Kanhere

    2009-05-01

    We have employed ab initio molecular dynamics to investigate the stability of the smallest gold cages, namely Au16 and Au17, at finite temperatures. First, we obtain the ground state structure along with at least 50 distinct isomers for both the clusters. This is followed by the finite temperature simulations of these clusters. Each cluster is maintained at 12 different temperatures for a time period of at least 150 ps. Thus, the total simulation time is of the order of 2.4 ns for each cluster. We observe that the cages are stable at least up to 850 K. Although both clusters melt around the same temperature, i.e. around 900 K, Au17 shows a peak in the heat capacity curve in contrast to the broad peak seen for Au16.

  4. Novel rotating characteristics of a squirrel-cage-type HTS induction/synchronous motor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, T; Ogama, Y; Miyake, H; Nagao, K; Nishimura, T [Department of Electrical Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto-Daigaku Katsura 1, Nishikyo-Ku, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

    2007-10-15

    This paper describes the rotating characteristics of a high-T{sub c} superconducting induction/synchronous motor, which possesses both asynchronous and synchronous torques even though its structure is exactly the same as the squirrel-cage-type induction motor. Two kinds of Bi-2223/Ag multifilamentary tapes were utilized for the secondary windings. A commercialized motor (1.5 kW) was subjected to this study. A conventional (normal conducting) stator (three-phase, four-pole) was directly utilized, and only the squirrel-cage windings were replaced with the superconducting tapes. The tests were performed after the fabricated motor was immersed in liquid nitrogen. The operating temperature was also varied by pumping out the liquid nitrogen. It is shown that the motor is successfully synchronized for the temperature range from 65 to 77 K. Detailed discussions for such novel rotating characteristics are reported based on the electrical equivalent circuit.

  5. Theoretical prediction for the (AlN)12 fullerene-like cage-based nanomaterials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have performed ab initio calculations on the stability and structural and electronic properties of the fullerene-like cage (AlN)n (n = 12) and the polymerized dimers and nanowires obtained from it. We found that the (AlN)12-(AlN)12 dimers and aluminum nitride (AlN)12-based nanowires polymerized from the (AlN)12 cage are more stable than (AlN)12. The optimized configurations of the nanowires are especially regular and exhibit an interesting dumbbell-shaped chain structure. We also calculated the electronic structures of all the constructed nanostructures. The two novel (AlN)12-based aluminum nitride nanowires have band gaps of 2.844 and 3.085 eV, respectively, implying that they are both wide-gap semiconductors and may be promising candidates for nanotechnology

  6. Novel rotating characteristics of a squirrel-cage-type HTS induction/synchronous motor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the rotating characteristics of a high-Tc superconducting induction/synchronous motor, which possesses both asynchronous and synchronous torques even though its structure is exactly the same as the squirrel-cage-type induction motor. Two kinds of Bi-2223/Ag multifilamentary tapes were utilized for the secondary windings. A commercialized motor (1.5 kW) was subjected to this study. A conventional (normal conducting) stator (three-phase, four-pole) was directly utilized, and only the squirrel-cage windings were replaced with the superconducting tapes. The tests were performed after the fabricated motor was immersed in liquid nitrogen. The operating temperature was also varied by pumping out the liquid nitrogen. It is shown that the motor is successfully synchronized for the temperature range from 65 to 77 K. Detailed discussions for such novel rotating characteristics are reported based on the electrical equivalent circuit

  7. Theoretical study of methanol as inhibitor and cyclopentane as stabilizer of dodecahedron methane hydrate cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Snehanshu; Kundu, T. K.

    2015-02-01

    Density Functional Theory (DFT) based simulations have been performed to explain the role of methanol as an inhibitor and the role of cyclopentane as a promoter for methane hydrate. Interaction energy, Mullikan charges and electrostatic potential parameters for combined system of methanol and dodecahedron methane hydrate as well as cyclopentane and dodecahedron (512) methane hydrate cage are calculated using B3LYP functional (with and without dispersion function) and 6-31G(d) basis set. Methane hydrate formation inhibition by methanol and methane hydrate stabilization by cyclopentane is critically analyzed based on electrostatic potential and Mullikan charge. It is observed that hydrogen bond between water molecules of clathrate 512 cages become stronger in presence of cyclopentane and weaker in presence of methanol. It is also found that methanol breaks some hydrogen bonds of water molecules.

  8. Exposure of the superior gluteal neurovascular bundle for the safe application of acetabular reinforcement cages in complex revisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smitham, Peter J; Kosuge, Dennis; Howie, Donald W; Solomon, Lucian B

    2016-05-16

    The posterior approach to the hip is the most common extensile approach used, however exposure is limited superiorly by the superior gluteal neurovascular bundle (SGNB). The extra-pelvic course of the SGNB demonstrates variability between individuals, occasionally located only 1 cm from the acetabular rim. In complex acetabular reconstructions where the application of a reinforcement cage maybe required protecting the SGNB is challenging. The flanges of these cages are designed to sit on the ilium superior to the acetabular rim and to receive screws for fixation. The application of such cages may result in iatrogenic injury to the SGNB by way of forceful retraction or entrapment. We describe a technique that involves exposure and release of the SGNB such that the flanges of cage constructs may be safely applied. PMID:27079287

  9. Flash and smash: rapid freezing of muscle fibers activated by photolysis of caged ATP.

    OpenAIRE

    Hirose, K.; Lenart, T D; Murray, J.M.; Franzini-Armstrong, C; Goldman, Y E

    1993-01-01

    A new approach was used to study transient structural states of cross-bridges during activation of muscle fibers. Rabbit skinned muscle fibers were rapidly and synchronously activated from the rigor state by photolysis of caged ATP in the presence of Ca2+. At several different times during the switch from rigor to fully active tension development, the fibers were rapidly frozen on a liquid helium-cooled metal block, freeze-substituted, and examined in an electron microscope. The limits of str...

  10. Small Cages with Insect Couples Provide a Simple Method for a Preliminary Assessment of Mating Disruption

    OpenAIRE

    Françoise Briand; Guerin, Patrick M.; Pierre-Joseph Charmillot; Patrik Kehrli

    2012-01-01

    Mating disruption by sex pheromones is a sustainable, effective and widely used pest management scheme. A drawback of this technique is its challenging assessment of effectiveness in the field (e.g., spatial scale, pest density). The aim of this work was to facilitate the evaluation of field-deployed pheromone dispensers. We tested the suitability of small insect field cages for a pre-evaluation of the impact of sex pheromones on mating using the grape moths Eupoecilia ambiguella and Lobesia ...

  11. Cathodic cage nitriding of AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel with the addition of CH4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rômulo Ribeiro Magalhães de Sousa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel samples were nitrided using the cathodic cage plasma nitriding technique (CCPN, with the addition of methane to reduce chromium precipitation, increase hardness and wear resistance and reduce the presence of nitrides when compared to plasma carbonitriding. Microhardness profiles and X-Ray analysis confirm the formation of a very hard layer containing mainly ε-Fe3N and expanded ferrite phases.

  12. Cathodic cage nitriding of AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel with the addition of CH4

    OpenAIRE

    Rômulo Ribeiro Magalhães de Sousa; Francisco Odolberto de Araújo; José Alzamir Pereira da Costa; Antonio Maia de Oliveira; Mineia Sampaio Melo; Clodomiro Alves Junior

    2012-01-01

    AISI 409 ferritic stainless steel samples were nitrided using the cathodic cage plasma nitriding technique (CCPN), with the addition of methane to reduce chromium precipitation, increase hardness and wear resistance and reduce the presence of nitrides when compared to plasma carbonitriding. Microhardness profiles and X-Ray analysis confirm the formation of a very hard layer containing mainly ε-Fe3N and expanded ferrite phases.

  13. Template-directed synthesis of nets based upon octahemioctahedral cages that encapsulate catalytically active metalloporphyrins

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, ZhenJie

    2012-01-18

    meso-Tetra(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphine tetratosylate (TMPyP) templates the synthesis of six new metal-organic materials by the reaction of benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylate with transition metals, five of which exhibit HKUST-1 or tbo topology (M = Fe, Mn, Co, Ni, Mg). The resulting materials, porph@MOMs, selectively encapsulate the corresponding metalloporphyrins in octahemioctahedral cages and can serve as size-selective heterogeneous catalysts for oxidation of olefins. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  14. ‘Clickable’ Polymer-Caged Nanobins as a Modular Drug Delivery Platform

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sang-Min; Chen, Haimei; O'Halloran, Thomas V.; Nguyen, SonBinh T.

    2009-01-01

    Modularly clickable polymer-caged nanobins (PCNs) were prepared from liposome templates using a drop-in cholesterol-modified poly(acrylic acid) reagent followed by crosslinking with alkyne-functionalized diamine linker that can allow for the conjugation of azido-modified targeting ligands via click ligation. These PCNs possess pH-responsive characteristics that can be used to trigger the release of encapsulated doxorubicin (DXR) payload inside the liposomal core under mild acidic conditions. ...

  15. Endotoxin concentration in poultry houses for laying hens kept in cages or in alternative housing systems

    OpenAIRE

    Huneau-Salaün, Adeline; Le Bouquin, Sophie; Bex-Capelle, Valérie; Huonnic, Didier; Balaine, Loïc; Guillam, Marie-Thérèse; Squizani, Fabrice; Ségala, Claire; Michel, Virginie

    2011-01-01

    Abstract 1. Endotoxins as components of organic dust may have adverse effects on the respiratory health of workers in poultry buildings. The move towards more welfare-friendly housing systems for layers may increase worker exposure to air contaminants due to the use of litter. 2. The endotoxin concentrations in the inhalable fraction of airborne dust (below 100 ?m) from cage and alternative system henhouses (on-floor, free range and aviaries) were compared under both experiment...

  16. Cage rattling does not correlate with the local geometry in molecular liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Bernini, S.; Puosi, F.; Leporini, D.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular-dynamics simulations of a liquid of short linear molecules have been performed to investigate the correlation between the particle dynamics in the cage of the neighbors and the local geometry. The latter is characterized in terms of the size and the asphericity of the Voronoi polyhedra. The correlation is found to be poor. In particular, in spite of the different Voronoi volume around the end and the inner monomers of a molecule, all the monomers exhibit coinciding displacement dist...

  17. Validation of an automated mite counter for Dermanyssus gallinae in experimental laying hen cages

    OpenAIRE

    Mul, Monique; van Riel, Johan; Meerburg, Bastiaan; Dicke, Marcel; George, David; Groot Koerkamp, Peter

    2015-01-01

    For integrated pest management (IPM) programs to be maximally effective, monitoring of the growth and decline of the pest populations is essential. Here, we present the validation results of a new automated monitoring device for the poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae), a serious pest in laying hen facilities world-wide. This monitoring device (called an “automated mite counter”) was validated in experimental laying hen cages with live birds and a growing population of D. gallinae. This va...

  18. Foraging and nesting behavior of Osmia lignaria (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) in the presence of fungicides: cage studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladurner, E; Bosch, J; Kemp, W P; Maini, S

    2008-06-01

    During orchard pollination studies in California, we observed dramatic changes in nesting and foraging behavior of Osmia lignaria Say (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae) after sprays with tank mixtures containing fungicides. A characteristic pattern of postspray events observed includes erratic behavior and interrupted foraging and nesting activity for several days. In an effort to determine whether fungicidal sprays were disruptive to bee foraging and thus to pollination, we exposed O. lignaria females nesting in field cages planted with lacy scorpionweed, Phacelia tanacetifolia Benth (Hydrophyllaceae), to selected spray mixtures normally encountered in California orchard production systems: iprodione (Rovral), propiconazole (Orbit), benomyl (Benlate), and captan (Captan 50 WP); the surfactant Dyne-Amic, alone and mixed with Rovral; and the tank mixture IDB (Rovral + Dyne-Amic + the foliar fertilizer Bayfolan Plus). An additional cage sprayed with an equal volume of water acted as control, and a cage sprayed with the insecticide dimethoate as a toxic standard. For each female O. lignaria, we recorded time spent inside the nest depositing pollen-nectar loads, foraging time, cell production rate, and survival. All females in the dimethoate treatment died postspray + 1 d. Before death, some of these females behaved similarly to our previous orchard observations. A high proportion of females in the IDB cage were inactive for a few hours before resuming normal foraging and nesting activity. No lethal or behavioral effects were found for any of the other compounds or mixtures tested. Our results indicate that the fungicide applications that we tested are compatible with the use of O. lignaria as an orchard pollinator. PMID:18613561

  19. Aharonov-Bohm photonic cages in waveguide and coupled resonator lattices by synthetic magnetic fields

    OpenAIRE

    Longhi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    We suggest a method for trapping photons in quasi one-dimensional waveguide or coupled-resonator lattices, which is based on an optical analogue of the Aharonov-Bohm cages for charged particles. Light trapping results from a destructive interference of Aharonov-Bohm type induced by a synthetic magnetic field, which is realized by periodic modulation of the waveguide/resonator propagation constants/resonances.

  20. Aharonov-Bohm photonic cages in waveguide and coupled resonator lattices by synthetic magnetic fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longhi, Stefano

    2014-10-15

    We suggest a method for trapping photons in quasi-one-dimensional waveguide or coupled-resonator lattices, which is based on an optical analogue of the Aharonov-Bohm cages for charged particles. Light trapping results from a destructive interference of Aharonov-Bohm type induced by a synthetic magnetic field, which is realized by periodic modulation of the waveguide/resonator propagation constants/resonances. PMID:25361112