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Sample records for caged mitochondrial uncouplers

  1. Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins regulate angiotensin-converting enzyme expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhamrait, Sukhbir S.; Maubaret, Cecilia; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik

    2016-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) regulate mitochondrial function, and thus cellular metabolism. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is the central component of endocrine and local tissue renin-angiotensin systems (RAS), which also regulate diverse aspects of whole-body metabolism and mitochondrial func...

  2. Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins regulate angiotensin-converting enzyme expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhamrait, Sukhbir S.; Maubaret, Cecilia; Pedersen-bjergaard, Ulrik

    2016-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) regulate mitochondrial function, and thus cellular metabolism. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) is the central component of endocrine and local tissue renin–angiotensin systems (RAS), which also regulate diverse aspects of whole-body metabolism and mitochondrial func...

  3. Role of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 4 in rat inner ear.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smorodchenko, Alina; Rupprecht, Anne; Fuchs, Julia; Gross, Johann; Pohl, Elena E

    2011-08-01

    The uncoupling protein 4 (UCP4) belongs to the mitochondrial anion transporter family. Protein tissue distribution and functions are still a matter of debate. Using an antibody we have previously shown that UCP4 appears in neurons and to a lesser extent in astrocytes of murine neuronal tissue as early as days 12-14 of embryonic development (Smorodchenko et al., 2009). Here we demonstrated for the first time that neurosensory cells such as hair cells of the inner ear and mechanosensitive Merkel cells in skin also express a significant amount of UCP4. We tested the hypothesis about whether UCP4 contributes to the regulation of oxidative stress using the model of oxygen deprivation. For this we compared the protein expression level in freshly isolated explants of organ of Corti, modiolus and stria vascularis from neonatal rats with explants cultured under hypoxia. Western blot analysis revealed that the UCP4 level was not increased under hypoxic conditions, when compared to the mitochondrial outer membrane protein VDAC or to the anti-oxidative enzyme SOD2. We moreover demonstrated that UCP4 expression is differently regulated during postnatal stages and is region-specific. We hypothesized that UCP4 may play an important role in functional maturation of the rat inner ear. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Targeted mitochondrial uncoupling beyond UCP1 - The fine line between death and metabolic health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ost, Mario; Keipert, Susanne; Klaus, Susanne

    2017-03-01

    In the early 1930s, the chemical uncoupling agent 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) was promoted for the very first time as a powerful and effective weight loss pill but quickly withdrawn from the market due to its lack of tissue-selectivity with resulting dangerous side effects, including hyperthermia and death. Today, novel mitochondria- or tissue-targeted chemical uncouplers with higher safety and therapeutic values are under investigation in order to tackle obesity, diabetes and fatty liver disease. Moreover, in the past 20 years, transgenic mouse models were generated to understand the molecular and metabolic consequences of targeted uncoupling, expressing functional uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) ectopically in white adipose tissue or skeletal muscle. Similar to the action of chemical mitochondrial uncouplers, UCP1 protein dissipates the proton gradient across the inner mitochondrial membrane, thus allowing maximum activity of the respiratory chain and compensatory increase in oxygen consumption, uncoupled from ATP synthesis. Consequently, targeted mitochondrial uncoupling in adipose tissue and skeletal muscle of UCP1-transgenic mice increased substrate metabolism and ameliorates obesity, hypertriglyceridemia and insulin resistance. Further, muscle-specific decrease in mitochondrial efficiency promotes a cell-autonomous and cell-non-autonomous adaptive metabolic remodeling with increased oxidative stress tolerance. This review provides an overview of novel chemical uncouplers as well as the metabolic consequences and adaptive processes of targeted mitochondrial uncoupling on metabolic health and survival. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  5. Certain aspects of uncoupling due to mitochondrial uncoupling proteins in vitro and in vivo

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dlasková, Andrea; Špaček, Tomáš; Škobisová, Eva; Šantorová, Jitka; Ježek, Petr

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 1757, č. 5-6 (2006), s. 467-473 ISSN 0005-2728 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1P05ME794; GA ČR(CZ) GA521/02/0183; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA5011106 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : fatty acid-induced uncoupling * uncoupling protein -1 * carnitine cycle Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 4.237, year: 2006

  6. Mild mitochondrial uncoupling and calorie restriction increase fasting eNOS, akt and mitochondrial biogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Fernanda M; Laurindo, Francisco R M; Kowaltowski, Alicia J

    2011-03-31

    Enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis promoted by eNOS activation is believed to play a central role in the beneficial effects of calorie restriction (CR). Since treatment of mice with dinitrophenol (DNP) promotes health and lifespan benefits similar to those observed in CR, we hypothesized that it could also impact biogenesis. We found that DNP and CR increase citrate synthase activity, PGC-1α, cytochrome c oxidase and mitofusin-2 expression, as well as fasting plasma levels of NO• products. In addition, eNOS and Akt phosphorylation in skeletal muscle and visceral adipose tissue was activated in fasting CR and DNP animals. Overall, our results indicate that systemic mild uncoupling activates eNOS and Akt-dependent pathways leading to mitochondrial biogenesis.

  7. Mild mitochondrial uncoupling and calorie restriction increase fasting eNOS, akt and mitochondrial biogenesis.

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    Fernanda M Cerqueira

    Full Text Available Enhanced mitochondrial biogenesis promoted by eNOS activation is believed to play a central role in the beneficial effects of calorie restriction (CR. Since treatment of mice with dinitrophenol (DNP promotes health and lifespan benefits similar to those observed in CR, we hypothesized that it could also impact biogenesis. We found that DNP and CR increase citrate synthase activity, PGC-1α, cytochrome c oxidase and mitofusin-2 expression, as well as fasting plasma levels of NO• products. In addition, eNOS and Akt phosphorylation in skeletal muscle and visceral adipose tissue was activated in fasting CR and DNP animals. Overall, our results indicate that systemic mild uncoupling activates eNOS and Akt-dependent pathways leading to mitochondrial biogenesis.

  8. Renal transplantation induces mitochondrial uncoupling, increased kidney oxygen consumption, and decreased kidney oxygen tension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Papazova, Diana A.; Friederich-Persson, Malou; Joles, Jaap A.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/070114595; Verhaar, Marianne C.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/182921840

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia is an acknowledged pathway to renal injury and ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) and is known to reduce renal oxygen tension (PO2). We hypothesized that renal I/R increases oxidative damage and induces mitochondrial uncoupling, resulting in increased oxygen consumption and hence kidney

  9. Insulin selectively reduces mitochondrial uncoupling in brown adipose tissue in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallon, Blake W; Parker, Brian A; Hodson, Aimee E; Tippetts, Trevor S; Harrison, Mitchell E; Appiah, M Marissa A; Witt, Jeffrey E; Gibbs, Jonathan L; Gray, Harrison M; Sant, Thomas M; Bikman, Benjamin T

    2018-02-09

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of prolonged hyperinsulinemia on mitochondrial respiration and uncoupling in distinct adipose tissue depots. Sixteen-week-old male mice were injected daily with placebo or insulin to induce an artificial hyperinsulinemia for 28 days. Following the treatment period, mitochondrial respiration and degree of uncoupling were determined in permeabilized perirenal, inguinal, and interscapular adipose tissue. White adipose tissue (WAT) mitochondria (inguinal and perirenal) respire at substantially lower rates compared with brown adipose tissue (BAT). Insulin treatment resulted in a significant reduction in mitochondrial respiration in inguinal WAT (iWAT) and interscapular BAT (iBAT), but not in perirenal WAT (pWAT). Furthermore, these changes were accompanied by an insulin-induced reduction in UCP-1 (uncoupling protein 1) and PGC-1α in iWAT and iBAT only, but not in pWAT or skeletal muscle. Compared with adipose tissue mitochondria in placebo conditions, adipose tissue from hyperinsulinemic mice manifested a site-specific reduction in mitochondrial respiration probably as a result of reduced uncoupling. These results may help explain weight gain so commonly seen with insulin treatment in type 2 diabetes mellitus. © 2018 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  10. Uncoupling proteins 2 and 3 alter mitochondrial membrane ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Total phospholipids were extracted and their fatty acyl composition was analysed. Expression of hUCP2 and hUCP3 significantly altered the mitochondrial phospholipid fatty acyl composition. Palmitoleoyl groups (16:1(n-7)) ...

  11. Muscle Mitochondrial Uncoupling Dismantles Neuromuscular Junction and Triggers Distal Degeneration of Motor Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Luc; Gonzalez de Aguilar, Jose-Luis; Echaniz-Laguna, Andoni; Eschbach, Judith; Rene, Frédérique; Oudart, Hugues; Halter, Benoit; Huze, Caroline; Schaeffer, Laurent; Bouillaud, Frédéric; Loeffler, Jean-Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Background Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), the most frequent adult onset motor neuron disease, is associated with hypermetabolism linked to defects in muscle mitochondrial energy metabolism such as ATP depletion and increased oxygen consumption. It remains unknown whether muscle abnormalities in energy metabolism are causally involved in the destruction of neuromuscular junction (NMJ) and subsequent motor neuron degeneration during ALS. Methodology/Principal Findings We studied transgenic mice with muscular overexpression of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), a potent mitochondrial uncoupler, as a model of muscle restricted hypermetabolism. These animals displayed age-dependent deterioration of the NMJ that correlated with progressive signs of denervation and a mild late-onset motor neuron pathology. NMJ regeneration and functional recovery were profoundly delayed following injury of the sciatic nerve and muscle mitochondrial uncoupling exacerbated the pathology of an ALS animal model. Conclusions/Significance These findings provide the proof of principle that a muscle restricted mitochondrial defect is sufficient to generate motor neuron degeneration and suggest that therapeutic strategies targeted at muscle metabolism might prove useful for motor neuron diseases. PMID:19404401

  12. Mitochondrial efficiency and exercise economy following heat stress: a potential role of uncoupling protein 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Roy M; Sheard, Ailish C; Vaughan, Roger A; Parker, Daryl L; Schneider, Suzanne M; Kenefick, Robert W; McCormick, James J; Gannon, Nicholas P; Van Dusseldorp, Trisha A; Kravitz, Len R; Mermier, Christine M

    2017-02-01

    Heat stress has been reported to reduce uncoupling proteins (UCP) expression, which in turn should improve mitochondrial efficiency. Such an improvement in efficiency may translate to the systemic level as greater exercise economy. However, neither the heat-induced improvement in mitochondrial efficiency (due to decrease in UCP), nor its potential to improve economy has been studied. Determine: (i) if heat stress in vitro lowers UCP3 thereby improving mitochondrial efficiency in C2C12 myocytes; (ii) whether heat acclimation (HA) in vivo improves exercise economy in trained individuals; and (iii) the potential improved economy during exercise at altitude. In vitro, myocytes were heat stressed for 24 h (40°C), followed by measurements of UCP3, mitochondrial uncoupling, and efficiency. In vivo, eight trained males completed: (i) pre-HA testing; (ii) 10 days of HA (40°C, 20% RH); and (iii) post-HA testing. Pre- and posttesting consisted of maximal exercise test and submaximal exercise at two intensities to assess exercise economy at 1600 m (Albuquerque, NM) and 4350 m. Heat-stressed myocytes displayed significantly reduced UCP3 mRNA expression and, mitochondrial uncoupling (77.1 ± 1.2%, P economy did not change at low and moderate exercise intensities. Our findings indicate that while heat-induced reduction in UCP3 improves mitochondrial efficiency in vitro, this is not translated to in vivo improvement of exercise economy at 1600 m or 4350 m. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological Society and the American Physiological Society.

  13. N-terminally glutamate-substituted analogue of gramicidin A as protonophore and selective mitochondrial uncoupler.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra I Sorochkina

    Full Text Available Limited uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation could be beneficial for cells by preventing excessive generation of reactive oxygen species. Typical uncouplers are weak organic acids capable of permeating across membranes with a narrow gap between efficacy and toxicity. Aimed at designing a nontoxic uncoupler, the protonatable amino acid residue Glu was substituted for Val at the N-terminus of the pentadecapeptide gramicidin A (gA. The modified peptide [Glu1]gA exhibited high uncoupling activity in isolated mitochondria, in particular, abolishing membrane potential at the inner mitochondrial membrane with the same or even larger efficacy as gA. With mitochondria in cell culture, the depolarizing activity of [Glu1]gA was observed at concentrations by an order of magnitude lower than those of gA. On the contrary, [Glu1]gA was much less potent in forming proton channels in planar lipid bilayers than gA. Remarkably, at uncoupling concentrations, [Glu1]gA did not alter cell morphology and was nontoxic in MTT test, in contrast to gA showing high toxicity. The difference in the behavior of [Glu1]gA and gA in natural and artificial membranes could be ascribed to increased capability of [Glu1]gA to permeate through membranes and/or redistribute between different membranes. Based on the protective role of mild uncoupling, [Glu1]gA and some other proton-conducting gA analogues may be considered as prototypes of prospective therapeutic agents.

  14. Mitochondrial uncoupling as a regulator of life-history trajectories in birds: an experimental study in the zebra finch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stier, Antoine; Bize, Pierre; Roussel, Damien; Schull, Quentin; Massemin, Sylvie; Criscuolo, François

    2014-10-01

    Mitochondria have a fundamental role in the transduction of energy from food into ATP. The coupling between food oxidation and ATP production is never perfect, but may nevertheless be of evolutionary significance. The 'uncoupling to survive' hypothesis suggests that 'mild' mitochondrial uncoupling evolved as a protective mechanism against the excessive production of damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS). Because resource allocation and ROS production are thought to shape animal life histories, alternative life-history trajectories might be driven by individual variation in the degree of mitochondrial uncoupling. We tested this hypothesis in a small bird species, the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata), by treating adults with the artificial mitochondrial uncoupler 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) over a 32-month period. In agreement with our expectations, the uncoupling treatment increased metabolic rate. However, we found no evidence that treated birds enjoyed lower oxidative stress levels or greater survival rates, in contrast to previous results in other taxa. In vitro experiments revealed lower sensitivity of ROS production to DNP in mitochondria isolated from skeletal muscles of zebra finch than mouse. In addition, we found significant reductions in the number of eggs laid and in the inflammatory immune response in treated birds. Altogether, our data suggest that the 'uncoupling to survive' hypothesis may not be applicable for zebra finches, presumably because of lower effects of mitochondrial uncoupling on mitochondrial ROS production in birds than in mammals. Nevertheless, mitochondrial uncoupling appeared to be a potential life-history regulator of traits such as fecundity and immunity at adulthood, even with food supplied ad libitum. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  15. Weight loss by Ppc-1, a novel small molecule mitochondrial uncoupler derived from slime mold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Suzuki

    Full Text Available Mitochondria play a key role in diverse processes including ATP synthesis and apoptosis. Mitochondrial function can be studied using inhibitors of respiration, and new agents are valuable for discovering novel mechanisms involved in mitochondrial regulation. Here, we screened small molecules derived from slime molds and other microorganisms for their effects on mitochondrial oxygen consumption. We identified Ppc-1 as a novel molecule which stimulates oxygen consumption without adverse effects on ATP production. The kinetic behavior of Ppc-1 suggests its function as a mitochondrial uncoupler. Serial administration of Ppc-1 into mice suppressed weight gain with no abnormal effects on liver or kidney tissues, and no evidence of tumor formation. Serum fatty acid levels were significantly elevated in mice treated with Ppc-1, while body fat content remained low. After a single administration, Ppc-1 distributes into various tissues of individual animals at low levels. Ppc-1 stimulates adipocytes in culture to release fatty acids, which might explain the elevated serum fatty acids in Ppc-1-treated mice. The results suggest that Ppc-1 is a unique mitochondrial regulator which will be a valuable tool for mitochondrial research as well as the development of new drugs to treat obesity.

  16. Marked over expression of uncoupling protein-2 in beta cells exerts minor effects on mitochondrial metabolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hals, Ingrid K., E-mail: ingrid.hals@ntnu.no [Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Ogata, Hirotaka; Pettersen, Elin [Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Ma, Zuheng; Bjoerklund, Anneli [Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden); Skorpen, Frank [Department of Laboratory Medicine, NTNU, Trondheim (Norway); Egeberg, Kjartan Wollo [Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Grill, Valdemar [Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Trondheim (Norway); Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The impact of UCP-2 over expression on mitochondrial function is controversial. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We tested mitochondrial functions at defined levels of overexpression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We find minor increases of fatty acid oxidation and uncoupling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects were seen only at high level (fourfold) of over expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hence it is doubtful whether these effects are of importance in diabetes. -- Abstract: Evidence is conflicting as to the impact of elevated levels of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2) on insulin-producing beta cells. Here we investigated effects of a fourfold induction of UCP-2 protein primarily on mitochondrial parameters and tested for replication of positive findings at a lower level of induction. We transfected INS-1 cells to obtain a tet-on inducible cell line. A 48 h exposure to 1 {mu}g/ml of doxycycline (dox) induced UCP-2 fourfold (424 {+-} 113%, mean {+-} SEM) and 0.1 {mu}g/ml twofold (178 {+-} 29%, n = 3). Fourfold induced cells displayed normal viability (MTT, apoptosis), normal cellular insulin contents and, glucose-induced insulin secretion (+27 {+-} 11%) as well as D-[U-{sup 14}C]-glucose oxidation (+5 {+-} 9% at 11 mM glucose). Oxidation of [1-{sup 14}C]-oleate was increased from 4088 to 5797 fmol/{mu}g prot/2 h at 3.3 mM glucose, p < 0.03. Oxidation of L-[{sup 14}C(U)]-glutamine was unaffected. Induction of UCP-2 did not significantly affect measures of mitochondrial membrane potential (Rhodamine 123) or mitochondrial mass (Mitotracker Green) and did not affect ATP levels. Oligomycin-inhibited oxygen consumption (a measure of mitochondrial uncoupling) was marginally increased, the effect being significant in comparison with dox-only treated cells, p < 0.05. Oxygen radicals, assessed by dichlorofluorescin diacetate, were decreased by 30%, p < 0.025. Testing for the lower level of UCP-2 induction did not reproduce any of the

  17. The Mitochondrial Uncoupler DNP Triggers Brain Cell mTOR Signaling Network Reprogramming and CREB Pathway Upregulation

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Dong; Zhang, Yongqing; Gharavi, Robert; Park, Hee Ra; Lee, Jaewon; Siddiqui, Sana; Telljohann, Richard; Nassar, Matthew R.; Cutler, Roy G.; Kevin G Becker; Mark P Mattson

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial metabolism is highly responsive to nutrient availability and ongoing activity in neuronal circuits. The molecular mechanisms by which brain cells respond to an increase in cellular energy expenditure are largely unknown. Mild mitochondrial uncoupling enhances cellular energy expenditure in mitochondria and can be induced with 2, 4-dinitrophenol (DNP), a proton ionophore previously used for weight loss. We found that DNP treatment reduces mitochondrial membrane potential, increas...

  18. SET overexpression in HEK293 cells regulates mitochondrial uncoupling proteins levels within a mitochondrial fission/reduced autophagic flux scenario

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Luciana O.; Goto, Renata N. [Department of Clinical Analyses, Toxicology and Food Sciences, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Neto, Marinaldo P.C. [Department of Physics and Chemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Sousa, Lucas O. [Department of Clinical Analyses, Toxicology and Food Sciences, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Curti, Carlos [Department of Physics and Chemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Leopoldino, Andréia M., E-mail: andreiaml@usp.br [Department of Clinical Analyses, Toxicology and Food Sciences, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences of Ribeirão Preto, University of São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2015-03-06

    We hypothesized that SET, a protein accumulated in some cancer types and Alzheimer disease, is involved in cell death through mitochondrial mechanisms. We addressed the mRNA and protein levels of the mitochondrial uncoupling proteins UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3 (S and L isoforms) by quantitative real-time PCR and immunofluorescence as well as other mitochondrial involvements, in HEK293 cells overexpressing the SET protein (HEK293/SET), either in the presence or absence of oxidative stress induced by the pro-oxidant t-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BHP). SET overexpression in HEK293 cells decreased UCP1 and increased UCP2 and UCP3 (S/L) mRNA and protein levels, whilst also preventing lipid peroxidation and decreasing the content of cellular ATP. SET overexpression also (i) decreased the area of mitochondria and increased the number of organelles and lysosomes, (ii) increased mitochondrial fission, as demonstrated by increased FIS1 mRNA and FIS-1 protein levels, an apparent accumulation of DRP-1 protein, and an increase in the VDAC protein level, and (iii) reduced autophagic flux, as demonstrated by a decrease in LC3B lipidation (LC3B-II) in the presence of chloroquine. Therefore, SET overexpression in HEK293 cells promotes mitochondrial fission and reduces autophagic flux in apparent association with up-regulation of UCP2 and UCP3; this implies a potential involvement in cellular processes that are deregulated such as in Alzheimer's disease and cancer. - Highlights: • SET, UCPs and autophagy prevention are correlated. • SET action has mitochondrial involvement. • UCP2/3 may reduce ROS and prevent autophagy. • SET protects cell from ROS via UCP2/3.

  19. Control of mitochondrial pH by uncoupling protein 4 in astrocytes promotes neuronal survival

    KAUST Repository

    Lambert, Hélène Perreten

    2014-09-18

    Brain activity is energetically costly and requires a steady and highly regulated flow of energy equivalents between neural cells. It is believed that a substantial share of cerebral glucose, the major source of energy of the brain, will preferentially be metabolized in astrocytes via aerobic glycolysis. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether uncoupling proteins (UCPs), located in the inner membrane of mitochondria, play a role in setting up the metabolic response pattern of astrocytes. UCPs are believed to mediate the transmembrane transfer of protons, resulting in the uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation from ATP production. UCPs are therefore potentially important regulators of energy fluxes. The main UCP isoforms expressed in the brain are UCP2, UCP4, and UCP5. We examined in particular the role of UCP4 in neuron-astrocyte metabolic coupling and measured a range of functional metabolic parameters including mitochondrial electrical potential and pH, reactive oxygen species production, NAD/NADH ratio, ATP/ADP ratio, CO2 and lactate production, and oxygen consumption rate. In brief, we found that UCP4 regulates the intramitochondrial pH of astrocytes, which acidifies as a consequence of glutamate uptake, with the main consequence of reducing efficiency of mitochondrial ATP production. The diminished ATP production is effectively compensated by enhancement of glycolysis. This nonoxidative production of energy is not associated with deleterious H2O2 production. We show that astrocytes expressing more UCP4 produced more lactate, which is used as an energy source by neurons, and had the ability to enhance neuronal survival.

  20. Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production mediates ursolic acid-induced mitochondrial uncoupling and glutathione redox cycling, with protection against oxidant injury in H9c2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jihang; Wong, Hoi Shan; Ko, Kam Ming

    2015-02-01

    Ursolic acid (UA), a natural pentacyclic triterpenoid carboxylic acid, is a ubiquitous compound widely distributed in many plants, fruits and medicinal herbs worldwide. A previous study in our laboratory has shown that UA can increase the mitochondrial ATP generation capacity (ATP-GC) and a glutathione-dependent antioxidant response, thereby protecting against oxidant injury in H9c2 cells in vitro and rat hearts ex vivo. However, the mechanism underlying the cellular protective effects induced by UA remains largely unknown. The present study has shown that pre-incubation with UA produces a transient increase in the mitochondrial membrane potential in H9c2 cells, which was accompanied by increases in mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Studies using an antioxidant (dimethylthiourea) indicated that the suppression of mitochondrial ROS completely abrogated the UA-induced enhancement of mitochondrial uncoupling and glutathione reductase (GR)-mediated glutathione redox cycling, as well as protection against menadione cytotoxicity in H9c2 cells. Co-incubation with specific inhibitors of uncoupling proteins and GR almost completely prevented the cytoprotection afforded by UA against menadione-induced cytotoxicity in H9c2 cells. The results obtained so far suggest that UA-induced mitochondrial ROS production can elicit mitochondrial uncoupling and glutathione-dependent antioxidant responses, which offer cytoprotection against oxidant injury in H9c2 cells.

  1. Activation of AMPKα2 is not crucial for mitochondrial uncoupling-induced metabolic effects but required to maintain skeletal muscle integrity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Ost

    Full Text Available Transgenic (UCP1-TG mice with ectopic expression of UCP1 in skeletal muscle (SM show a phenotype of increased energy expenditure, improved glucose tolerance and increase substrate metabolism in SM. To investigate the potential role of skeletal muscle AMPKα2 activation in the metabolic phenotype of UCP1-TG mice we generated double transgenic (DTG mice, by crossing of UCP1-TG mice with DN-AMPKα2 mice overexpressing a dominant negative α2 subunit of AMPK in SM which resulted in an impaired AMPKα2 activity by 90±9% in SM of DTG mice. Biometric analysis of young male mice showed decreased body weight, lean and fat mass for both UCP1-TG and DTG compared to WT and DN-AMPKα2 mice. Energy intake and weight-specific total energy expenditure were increased, both in UCP1-TG and DTG mice. Moreover, glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity and fatty acid oxidation were not altered in DTG compared to UCP1-TG. Also uncoupling induced induction and secretion of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21 from SM was preserved in DTG mice. However, voluntary physical cage activity as well as ad libitum running wheel access during night uncovered a severe activity intolerance of DTG mice. Histological analysis showed a progressive degenerative morphology in SM of DTG mice which was not observed in SM of UCP1-TG mice. Moreover, ATP-depletion related cellular stress response via heat shock protein 70 was highly induced, whereas capillarization regulator VEGF was suppressed in DTG muscle. In addition, AMPKα2-mediated induction of mitophagy regulator ULK1 was suppressed in DTG mice, as well as mitochondrial respiratory capacity and content. In conclusion, we demonstrate that AMPKα2 is dispensable for SM mitochondrial uncoupling induced metabolic effects on whole body energy balance, glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity. But strikingly, activation of AMPKα2 seems crucial for maintaining SM function, integrity and the ability to compensate chronic metabolic stress

  2. The optimal dosage and window of opportunity to maintain mitochondrial homeostasis following traumatic brain injury using the uncoupler FCCP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Jignesh D; Pauly, James R; Sullivan, Patrick G

    2009-08-01

    Experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to a rapid and extensive necrosis at the primary site of injury that appears to be driven in part by significant mitochondrial dysfunction. The present study is based on the hypothesis that TBI-induced, aberrant glutamate release increases mitochondrial Ca(2+) cycling/overload ultimately leading to mitochondrial damage. Previous work from our laboratory demonstrates that mitochondrial uncoupling during the acute phases of TBI-induced excitotoxicity can reduce mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake (cycling), ROS production and mitochondrial damage resulting in neuroprotection and improved behavioral outcome. The current study was designed to determine the optimal dosage and therapeutic window of opportunity for the potent mitochondrial uncoupler FCCP following moderate TBI. For this study, we used young adult male Sprague-Dawley rats (300-350 g); either sham-operated or moderately (1.5 mm) injured using the controlled cortical impactor (CCI) model of TBI. In the first set of studies animals were injected with either vehicle (100% DMSO) or different concentrations of FCCP (0.5, 1, 2.5 and 5 mg/kg in 100% DMSO) intraperitoneally at 5 min post-injury; tested behaviorally at 10 days and cortical sparing assessed at 18 days post-injury. The results demonstrate that of all the dosages tested, 2.5 mg/kg rendered the maximum improvement in behavioral outcomes and tissue spared. Using this optimal dose (2.5 mg/kg) and time point for intervention (5 min post-injury), we assessed mitochondrial bioenergetics and mitochondrial structural integrity 24 h post-injury. Furthermore, using this dosage we assessed mitochondrial bioenergetics and Ca(2+) loading at 3 and 6 h post-injury to further verify our target mechanism and establish these assessments as a valid endpoint to use as a means to determine the therapeutic window of FCCP. To begin to address the window of opportunity for maintaining mitochondrial homeostasis, the optimal dose of FCCP

  3. Age-related changes of serum mitochondrial uncoupling 1, rumen and rectal temperature in goats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arfuso, Francesca; Rizzo, Maria; Giannetto, Claudia; Giudice, Elisabetta; Fazio, Francesco; Piccione, Giuseppe

    2016-07-01

    Thermoregulatory processes are induced not only by exposure to cold or heat but also by a variety of physiological situations including age, fasting and food intake that result in changes in body temperature. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the differences in serum mitochondrial uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), rumen temperature (TRUMEN) and rectal temperature (TRECTAL) values between adult and kids goats. Ten adult male Maltese goats aged 3-5 years old (Group A) and 30 male kids, raised for meat, were enrolled in this study. The kids were equally divided into 3 groups according to their age: Group B included kids aged 3 months, Group C included kids aged 4 months and Group D included kids aged 5 months. Blood samples and measurements of TRUMEN and TRECTAL were obtained from each animal. One-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was applied to evaluate the effect of age on the studied parameters. Statistically significant higher serum UCP1 levels (Pgoats have good control of body temperature suggesting that further details about the thermogenic capacity and the function of UCP1 in kids and adult goats are worth exploring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Methionine restriction decreases endogenous oxidative molecular damage and increases mitochondrial biogenesis and uncoupling protein 4 in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudí, Alba; Caro, Pilar; Jové, Mariona; Gómez, José; Boada, Jordi; Ayala, Victoria; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Barja, Gustavo; Pamplona, Reinald

    2007-12-01

    Aging plays a central role in the occurrence of neurodegenerative diseases. Caloric restriction (CR) mitigates oxidative stress by decreasing the rate of generation of endogenous damage, a mechanism that can contribute to the slowing of the aging rate induced by this intervention. Various reports have recently linked methionine to aging, and methionine restriction (MetR) without energy restriction also increases life span. We have thus hypothesized that MetR can be responsible, at least in part, for the decrease in endogenous oxidative damage in CR. In this investigation we subjected male rats to exactly the same dietary protocol of MetR that is known to increase their life span. We have found that MetR: (1) decreases the mitochondrial complex I content and activity, as well as complex III content, while the complex II and IV, the mitochondrial flavoprotein apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) and ATP content are unchanged; (2) increases the mitochondrial biogenesis factor PGC-1alpha; (3) increases the resistance of brain to metabolic and oxidative stress by increasing mitochondrial uncoupling protein 4 uncoupling protein 4 (UCP4); and (4) decreases mitochondrial oxidative DNA damage and all five different markers of protein oxidation measured and lowers membrane unsaturation in rat brain. No changes were detected for protein amino acid composition. These beneficial MetR-induced changes likely derived from metabolic reprogramming at the cellular and tissue level can play a key role in the protection against aging-associated neurodegenerative disorders.

  5. Linoleic acid-induced activity of plant uncoupling mitochondrial protein in purified tomato fruit mitochondria during resting, phosphorylating, and progressively uncoupled respiration.

    OpenAIRE

    Jarmuszkiewicz, W.; Almeida, A.; Sluse-goffart, C.; Sluse, Francis; Vercesi, A.

    1998-01-01

    An uncoupling protein was recently discovered in plant mitochondria and demonstrated to function similarly to the uncoupling protein of brown adipose tissue. In this work, green tomato fruit mitochondria were purified on a self-generating Percoll gradient in the presence of 0.5% bovine serum albumin to deplete mitochondria of endogenous free fatty acids. The uncoupling protein activity was induced by the addition of linoleic acid during the resting state, and in the progressively uncoupled st...

  6. Mitochondrial Uncoupler Prodrug of 2,4-Dinitrophenol, MP201, Prevents Neuronal Damage and Preserves Vision in Experimental Optic Neuritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reas S. Khan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The ability of novel mitochondrial uncoupler prodrug of 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP, MP201, to prevent neuronal damage and preserve visual function in an experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE model of optic neuritis was evaluated. Optic nerve inflammation, demyelination, and axonal loss are prominent features of optic neuritis, an inflammatory optic neuropathy often associated with the central nervous system demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis. Currently, optic neuritis is frequently treated with high-dose corticosteroids, but treatment fails to prevent permanent neuronal damage and associated vision changes that occur as optic neuritis resolves, thus suggesting that additional therapies are required. MP201 administered orally, once per day, attenuated visual dysfunction, preserved retinal ganglion cells (RGCs, and reduced RGC axonal loss and demyelination in the optic nerves of EAE mice, with limited effects on inflammation. The prominent mild mitochondrial uncoupling properties of MP201, with slow elimination of DNP, may contribute to the neuroprotective effect by modulating the entire mitochondria’s physiology directly. Results suggest that MP201 is a potential novel treatment for optic neuritis.

  7. Respiratory uncoupling by increased H+ or K+ flux is beneficial for heart mitochondrial turnover of reactive oxygen species but not for permeability transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Ischemic preconditioning has been proposed to involve changes in mitochondrial H+ and K+ fluxes, in particular through activation of uncoupling proteins and ATP-sensitive K+ channels (MitoKATP). The objectives of the present study were to explore how increased H+ and K+ fluxes influence heart mitochondrial physiology with regard to production and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS), volume changes and resistance to calcium-induced mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT). Results Isolated rat heart mitochondria were exposed to a wide concentration range of the protonophore CCCP or the potassium ionophore valinomycin to induce increased H+ and K+ conductance, respectively. Simultaneous monitoring of mitochondrial respiration and calcium retention capacity (CRC) demonstrated that the relative increase in respiration caused by valinomycin or CCCP correlated with a decrease in CRC, and that no level of respiratory uncoupling was associated with enhanced resistance to mPT. Mitochondria suspended in hyperosmolar buffer demonstrated a dose-dependent reduction in CRC with increasing osmolarity. However, mitochondria in hypoosmolar buffer to increase matrix volume did not display increased CRC. ROS generation was reduced by both K+- and H+-mediated respiratory uncoupling. The ability of heart mitochondria to detoxify H2O2 was substantially greater than the production rate. The H2O2 detoxification was dependent on respiratory substrates and was dramatically decreased following calcium-induced mPT, but was unaffected by uncoupling via increased K+ and H+ conductance. Conclusion It is concluded that respiratory uncoupling is not directly beneficial to rat heart mitochondrial resistance to calcium overload irrespective of whether H+ or K+ conductance is increased. The negative effects of respiratory uncoupling thus probably outweigh the reduction in ROS generation and a potential positive effect by increased matrix volume, resulting in a net sensitization

  8. Respiratory uncoupling by increased H(+) or K(+) flux is beneficial for heart mitochondrial turnover of reactive oxygen species but not for permeability transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morota, Saori; Piel, Sarah; Hansson, Magnus J

    2013-09-22

    Ischemic preconditioning has been proposed to involve changes in mitochondrial H(+) and K(+) fluxes, in particular through activation of uncoupling proteins and ATP-sensitive K(+) channels (MitoKATP). The objectives of the present study were to explore how increased H(+) and K(+) fluxes influence heart mitochondrial physiology with regard to production and scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS), volume changes and resistance to calcium-induced mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT). Isolated rat heart mitochondria were exposed to a wide concentration range of the protonophore CCCP or the potassium ionophore valinomycin to induce increased H(+) and K(+) conductance, respectively. Simultaneous monitoring of mitochondrial respiration and calcium retention capacity (CRC) demonstrated that the relative increase in respiration caused by valinomycin or CCCP correlated with a decrease in CRC, and that no level of respiratory uncoupling was associated with enhanced resistance to mPT. Mitochondria suspended in hyperosmolar buffer demonstrated a dose-dependent reduction in CRC with increasing osmolarity. However, mitochondria in hypoosmolar buffer to increase matrix volume did not display increased CRC. ROS generation was reduced by both K(+)- and H(+)-mediated respiratory uncoupling. The ability of heart mitochondria to detoxify H2O2 was substantially greater than the production rate. The H2O2 detoxification was dependent on respiratory substrates and was dramatically decreased following calcium-induced mPT, but was unaffected by uncoupling via increased K(+) and H(+) conductance. It is concluded that respiratory uncoupling is not directly beneficial to rat heart mitochondrial resistance to calcium overload irrespective of whether H(+) or K(+) conductance is increased. The negative effects of respiratory uncoupling thus probably outweigh the reduction in ROS generation and a potential positive effect by increased matrix volume, resulting in a net sensitization of

  9. Mildronate, the inhibitor of L-carnitine transport, induces brain mitochondrial uncoupling and protects against anoxia-reoxygenation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrecka, Marina; Svalbe, Baiba; Volska, Kristine; Sevostjanovs, Eduards; Liepins, Janis; Grinberga, Solveiga; Pugovics, Osvalds; Liepinsh, Edgars; Dambrova, Maija

    2014-01-15

    The preservation of mitochondrial function is essential for normal brain function after ischaemia-reperfusion injury. l-carnitine is a cofactor involved in the regulation of cellular energy metabolism. Recently, it has been shown that mildronate, an inhibitor of l-carnitine transport, improves neurological outcome after ischaemic damage of brain tissues. The aim of the present study was to elucidate the mitochondria targeted neuroprotective action of mildronate in the model of anoxia-reoxygenation-induced injury. Wistar rats were treated daily with mildronate (per os; 100mg/kg) for 14 days. The acyl-carnitine profile was determined in the brain tissues. Mitochondrial respiration and the activities of carnitine acetyltransferase (CrAT) and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle enzymes were measured. To assess tolerance to ischaemia, isolated mitochondria were subjected to anoxia followed by reoxygenation. The mildronate treatment significantly reduced the concentrations of free l-carnitine (FC) and short-chain acyl-carnitine (AC) in brain tissue by 40-76%, without affecting the AC:FC ratio. The activities of CrAT and TCA cycle enzymes were slightly increased after mildronate treatment. Despite partially induced uncoupling, mildronate treatment did not affect mitochondrial bioenergetics function under normoxic conditions. After exposure to anoxia-reoxygenation, state 3 respiration and the respiration control ratio were higher in the mildronate-treated group. The results obtained demonstrate that mildronate treatment improves tolerance against anoxia-reoxygenation due to an uncoupling preconditioning-like effect. Regulating l-carnitine availability provides a potential novel target for the treatment of cerebral ischaemia and related complications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Augmenting energy expenditure by mitochondrial uncoupling: a role of AMP-activated protein kinase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Klaus, S.; Keipert, S.; Rossmeisl, Martin; Kopecký, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 3 (2012), s. 369-386 ISSN 1555-8932 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NS10528; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E10059; GA MŠk(CZ) OC08008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : adipose tissue * skeletal muscle * uncoupling protein * transgenic mice * insulin sensitivity Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition Impact factor: 3.329, year: 2012

  11. Linoleic acid-induced activity of plant uncoupling mitochondrial protein in purified tomato fruit mitochondria during resting, phosphorylating, and progressively uncoupled respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarmuszkiewicz, W; Almeida, A M; Sluse-Goffart, C M; Sluse, F E; Vercesi, A E

    1998-12-25

    An uncoupling protein was recently discovered in plant mitochondria and demonstrated to function similarly to the uncoupling protein of brown adipose tissue. In this work, green tomato fruit mitochondria were purified on a self-generating Percoll gradient in the presence of 0.5% bovine serum albumin to deplete mitochondria of endogenous free fatty acids. The uncoupling protein activity was induced by the addition of linoleic acid during the resting state, and in the progressively uncoupled state, as well as during phosphorylating respiration in the presence of benzohydroxamic acid, an inhibitor of the alternative oxidase and with succinate (+ rotenone) as oxidizable substrate. Linoleic acid strongly stimulated the resting respiration in fatty acid-depleted mitochondria but had no effect on phosphorylating respiration, suggesting no activity of the uncoupling protein in this respiratory state. Progressive uncoupling of state 4 respiration decreased the stimulation by linoleic acid. The similar respiratory rates in phosphorylating and fully uncoupled respiration in the presence and absence of linoleic acid suggested that a rate-limiting step on the dehydrogenase side of the respiratory chain was responsible for the insensitivity of phosphorylating respiration to linoleic acid. Indeed, the ADP/O ratio determined by ADP/O pulse method was decreased by linoleic acid, indicating that uncoupling protein was active during phosphorylating respiration and was able to divert energy from oxidative phosphorylation. Moreover, the respiration rates appeared to be determined by membrane potential independently of the presence of linoleic acid, indicating that linoleic acid-induced stimulation of respiration is due to a pure protonophoric activity without any direct effect on the electron transport chain.

  12. Activation of pattern recognition receptors in brown adipocytes induces inflammation and suppresses uncoupling protein 1 expression and mitochondrial respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Jiyoung; Ricciardi, Carolyn J; Esposito, Debora; Komarnytsky, Slavko; Hu, Pan; Curry, Benjamin J; Brown, Patricia L; Gao, Zhanguo; Biggerstaff, John P; Chen, Jiangang; Zhao, Ling

    2014-05-15

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRR), Toll-like receptors (TLR), and nucleotide-oligomerization domain-containing proteins (NOD) play critical roles in mediating inflammation and modulating functions in white adipocytes in obesity. However, the role of PRR activation in brown adipocytes, which are recently found to be present in adult humans, has not been studied. Here we report that mRNA of TLR4, TLR2, NOD1, and NOD2 is upregulated, paralleled with upregulated mRNA of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the brown adipose tissue (BAT) of the obese mice. During brown adipocyte differentiation, mRNA and protein expression of NOD1 and TLR4, but not TLR2 and NOD2, is also increased. Activation of TLR4, TLR2, or NOD1 in brown adipocytes induces activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways, leading to inflammatory cytokine/chemokine mRNA expression and/or protein secretion. Moreover, activation of TLR4, TLR2, or NOD1 attenuates both basal and isoproterenol-induced uncoupling protein 1 (UCP-1) expression without affecting mitochondrial biogenesis and lipid accumulation in brown adipocytes. Cellular bioenergetics measurements confirm that attenuation of UCP-1 expression by PRR activation is accompanied by suppression of both basal and isoproterenol-stimulated oxygen consumption rates and isoproterenol-induced uncoupled respiration from proton leak; however, maximal respiration and ATP-coupled respiration are not changed. Further, the attenuation of UCP-1 by PRR activation appears to be mediated through downregulation of the UCP-1 promoter activities. Taken together, our results demonstrate the role of selected PRR activation in inducing inflammation and downregulation of UCP-1 expression and mitochondrial respiration in brown adipocytes. Our results uncover novel targets in BAT for obesity treatment and prevention. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  13. An Arabidopsis mitochondrial uncoupling protein confers tolerance to drought and salt stress in transgenic tobacco plants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Begcy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plants are challenged by a large number of environmental stresses that reduce productivity and even cause death. Both chloroplasts and mitochondria produce reactive oxygen species under normal conditions; however, stress causes an imbalance in these species that leads to deviations from normal cellular conditions and a variety of toxic effects. Mitochondria have uncoupling proteins (UCPs that uncouple electron transport from ATP synthesis. There is evidence that UCPs play a role in alleviating stress caused by reactive oxygen species overproduction. However, direct evidence that UCPs protect plants from abiotic stress is lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Tolerances to salt and water deficit were analyzed in transgenic tobacco plants that overexpress a UCP (AtUCP1 from Arabidopsis thaliana. Seeds of AtUCP1 transgenic lines germinated faster, and adult plants showed better responses to drought and salt stress than wild-type (WT plants. These phenotypes correlated with increased water retention and higher gas exchange parameters in transgenic plants that overexpress AtUCP1. WT plants exhibited increased respiration under stress, while transgenic plants were only slightly affected. Furthermore, the transgenic plants showed reduced accumulation of hydrogen peroxide in stressed leaves compared with WT plants. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Higher levels of AtUCP1 improved tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses, and this protection was correlated with lower oxidative stress. Our data support previous assumptions that UCPs reduce the imbalance of reactive oxygen species. Our data also suggest that UCPs may play a role in stomatal closure, which agrees with other evidence of a direct relationship between these proteins and photosynthesis. Manipulation of the UCP protein expression in mitochondria is a new avenue for crop improvement and may lead to crops with greater tolerance for challenging environmental conditions.

  14. Cortical spreading depression produces a neuroprotective effect activating mitochondrial uncoupling protein-5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viggiano E

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Emanuela Viggiano,1,2 Vincenzo Monda,1 Antonietta Messina,1 Fiorenzo Moscatelli,3 Anna Valenzano,3 Domenico Tafuri,4 Giuseppe Cibelli,3 Bruno De Luca,1 Giovanni Messina,1,3 Marcellino Monda1 1Department of Experimental Medicine, Section of Human Physiology and Unit of Dietetics and Sports Medicine, Second University of Naples, Naples, 2Department of Medicine, University of Padua, Padua, 3Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Foggia, Foggia, 4Department of Motor Sciences and Wellness, University of Naples “Parthenope”, Naples, Italy Abstract: Depression of electrocorticogram propagating over the cortex surface results in cortical spreading depression (CSD, which is probably related to the pathophysiology of stroke, epilepsy, and migraine. However, preconditioning with CSD produces neuroprotection to subsequent ischemic episodes. Such effects require the expression or activation of several genes, including neuroprotective ones. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the expression of the uncoupling proteins (UCPs 2 and 5 is amplified during brain ischemia and their expression exerts a long-term effect upon neuron protection. To evaluate the neuroprotective consequence of CSD, the expression of UCP-5 in the brain cortex was measured following CSD induction. CSD was evoked in four samples of rats, which were sacrificed after 2 hours, 4 hours, 6 hours, and 24 hours. Western blot analyses were carried out to measure UCP-5 concentrations in the prefrontal cortices of both hemispheres, and immunohistochemistry was performed to determine the localization of UCP-5 in the brain cortex. The results showed a significant elevation in UCP-5 expression at 24 hours in all cortical strata. Moreover, UCP-5 was triggered by CSD, indicating that UCP-5 production can have a neuroprotective effect. Keywords: cortical spreading depression, neuroprotective effect, uncoupling protein-5

  15. An Arabidopsis Mitochondrial Uncoupling Protein Confers Tolerance to Drought and Salt Stress in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begcy, Kevin; Mariano, Eduardo D.; Mattiello, Lucia; Nunes, Alessandra V.; Mazzafera, Paulo; Maia, Ivan G.; Menossi, Marcelo

    2011-01-01

    Background Plants are challenged by a large number of environmental stresses that reduce productivity and even cause death. Both chloroplasts and mitochondria produce reactive oxygen species under normal conditions; however, stress causes an imbalance in these species that leads to deviations from normal cellular conditions and a variety of toxic effects. Mitochondria have uncoupling proteins (UCPs) that uncouple electron transport from ATP synthesis. There is evidence that UCPs play a role in alleviating stress caused by reactive oxygen species overproduction. However, direct evidence that UCPs protect plants from abiotic stress is lacking. Methodology/Principal Findings Tolerances to salt and water deficit were analyzed in transgenic tobacco plants that overexpress a UCP (AtUCP1) from Arabidopsis thaliana. Seeds of AtUCP1 transgenic lines germinated faster, and adult plants showed better responses to drought and salt stress than wild-type (WT) plants. These phenotypes correlated with increased water retention and higher gas exchange parameters in transgenic plants that overexpress AtUCP1. WT plants exhibited increased respiration under stress, while transgenic plants were only slightly affected. Furthermore, the transgenic plants showed reduced accumulation of hydrogen peroxide in stressed leaves compared with WT plants. Conclusions/Significance Higher levels of AtUCP1 improved tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses, and this protection was correlated with lower oxidative stress. Our data support previous assumptions that UCPs reduce the imbalance of reactive oxygen species. Our data also suggest that UCPs may play a role in stomatal closure, which agrees with other evidence of a direct relationship between these proteins and photosynthesis. Manipulation of the UCP protein expression in mitochondria is a new avenue for crop improvement and may lead to crops with greater tolerance for challenging environmental conditions. PMID:21912606

  16. Mitochondrial uncoupling and the reprogramming of intermediary metabolism in leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana eVélez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Nearly 60 years ago Otto Warburg proposed, in a seminal publication, that an irreparable defect in the oxidative capacity of normal cells supported the switch to glycolysis for energy generation and the appearance of the malignant phenotype (Warburg, 1956. Curiously, this phenotype was also observed by Warburg in embryonic tissues, and recent research demonstrated that normal stem cells may indeed rely on aerobic glycolysis – fermenting pyruvate to lactate in the presence of ample oxygen - rather than on the complete oxidation of pyruvate in the Krebs cycle - to generate cellular energy (Folmes et al., 2012. However, it remains to be determined whether this phenotype is causative for neoplastic development, or rather the result of malignant transformation. In addition, in light of mounting evidence demonstrating that cancer cells can carry out electron transport and oxidative phosphorylation, although in some cases predominantly using electrons from non-glucose carbon sources (Bloch-Frankenthal et al., 1965, Warburg´s hypothesis needs to be revisited. Lastly, recent evidence suggests that the leukemia bone marrow microenvironment promotes the Warburg phenotype adding another layer of complexity to the study of metabolism in hematological malignancies. In this review we will discuss some of the evidence for alterations in the intermediary metabolism of leukemia cells and present evidence for a concept put forth decades ago by lipid biochemist Feodor Lynen, and acknowledged by Warburg himself, that cancer cell mitochondria uncouple ATP synthesis from electron transport and therefore depend on glycolysis to meet their energy demands (Lynen, 1951;Warburg, 1956.

  17. Preparation and structural characterization of the Ih and the D5h isomers of the endohedral fullerenes Tm3N@C80: icosahedral C80 cage encapsulation of a trimetallic nitride magnetic cluster with three uncoupled Tm3+ ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Tianming; Olmstead, Marilyn M; Beavers, Christine M; Balch, Alan L; Wang, Guangbin; Yee, Gordon T; Shu, Chunying; Xu, Liaosa; Elliott, Bevan; Echegoyen, Luis; Duchamp, James C; Dorn, Harry C

    2008-06-16

    We report an efficient method for the preparation and purification of the Ih and the D5h isomers of Tm3N@C80. Following preparation in a Kratschmer-Huffman electric-arc generator, the Tm3N@C80 isomers were obtained by a chemical separation process followed by a one-stage isomer selective chromatographic high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation (pyrenyl, 5PYE column). The HPLC chromatographic retention behavior on a pentabromobenzyl (5PBB) column suggests a charge transfer of approximately 6 electrons; [M3N] 6+@C80(6-) and the chromatographic retention mechanisms of the Ih and the D5h isomers of Tm3N@C80 on both 5PBB and 5PYE columns are discussed. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction data demonstrate that the Tm3N cluster has a planar structure but represents a tight fit for trapping the Tm3N cluster inside the I h - and the D 5h -C 80 cages. Specifically, the Tm atoms punch out the cage carbon atoms adjacent to them. The "punched out" effect can be demonstrated by cage radii and pyramidal angles at cage carbon atoms near the Tm atoms. The magnetic susceptibility (chiT) for Tm3N@ Ih -C80 was found to exhibit Curie-Weiss behavior with C = 23.4 emu.K/mol, which is consistent with the calculated value for three uncoupled Tm3+ ions by considering the spin and orbital contributions with no quenching of the orbital angular momentum ( L = 5, S = 1, and J = 6; Ccalcd = 23.3 emu.K/mol). The electrochemical measurements demonstrate that both the Ih and the D5h isomers of Tm3N@C80 have a large electrochemical gap.

  18. TNF-α mediates mitochondrial uncoupling and enhances ROS-dependent cell migration via NF-κB activation in liver cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastl, L; Sauer, S W; Ruppert, T; Beissbarth, T; Becker, M S; Süss, D; Krammer, P H; Gülow, K

    2014-01-03

    Development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is accompanied by a continuous increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. To investigate the primary source of ROS in liver cells, we used tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) as stimulus. Applying inhibitors against the respiratory chain complexes, we identified mitochondria as primary source of ROS production. TNF-α altered mitochondrial integrity by mimicking a mild uncoupling effect in liver cells, as indicated by a 40% reduction in membrane potential and ATP depletion (35%). TNF-α-induced ROS production activated NF-κB 3.5-fold and subsequently enhanced migration up to 12.7-fold. This study identifies complex I and complex III of the mitochondrial respiratory chain as point of release of ROS upon TNF-α stimulation of liver cells, which enhances cell migration by activating NF-κB signalling. Copyright © 2013 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. The mitochondrial uncoupler DNP triggers brain cell mTOR signaling network reprogramming and CREB pathway up-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dong; Zhang, Yongqing; Gharavi, Robert; Park, Hee Ra; Lee, Jaewon; Siddiqui, Sana; Telljohann, Richard; Nassar, Matthew R; Cutler, Roy G; Becker, Kevin G; Mattson, Mark P

    2015-08-01

    Mitochondrial metabolism is highly responsive to nutrient availability and ongoing activity in neuronal circuits. The molecular mechanisms by which brain cells respond to an increase in cellular energy expenditure are largely unknown. Mild mitochondrial uncoupling enhances cellular energy expenditure in mitochondria and can be induced with 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), a proton ionophore previously used for weight loss. We found that DNP treatment reduces mitochondrial membrane potential, increases intracellular Ca(2+) levels and reduces oxidative stress in cerebral cortical neurons. Gene expression profiling of the cerebral cortex of DNP-treated mice revealed reprogramming of signaling cascades that included suppression of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and insulin--PI3K - MAPK pathways, and up-regulation of tuberous sclerosis complex 2, a negative regulator of mTOR. Genes encoding proteins involved in autophagy processes were up-regulated in response to DNP. CREB (cAMP-response element-binding protein) signaling, Arc and brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which play important roles in synaptic plasticity and adaptive cellular stress responses, were up-regulated in response to DNP, and DNP-treated mice exhibited improved performance in a test of learning and memory. Immunoblot analysis verified that key DNP-induced changes in gene expression resulted in corresponding changes at the protein level. Our findings suggest that mild mitochondrial uncoupling triggers an integrated signaling response in brain cells characterized by reprogramming of mTOR and insulin signaling, and up-regulation of pathways involved in adaptive stress responses, molecular waste disposal, and synaptic plasticity. Physiological bioenergetic challenges such as exercise and fasting can enhance neuroplasticity and protect neurons against injury and neurodegeneration. Here, we show that the mitochondrial uncoupling agent 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) elicits adaptive signaling responses in the

  20. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial uncoupling drives endocrine cross-talk through induction of FGF21 as a myokine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keipert, S.; Ost, M.; Johann, K.; Imber, F.; Jastroch, M.; Schothorst, van E.M.; Keijer, J.; Klaus, S.

    2014-01-01

    UCP1-Tg mice with ectopic expression of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in skeletal muscle (SM) are a model of improved substrate metabolism and increased longevity. Analysis of myokine expression showed an induction of fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) in SM, resulting in approximately fivefold

  1. Mitochondrial uncoupling proteins regulate angiotensin‐converting enzyme expression: crosstalk between cellular and endocrine metabolic regulators suggested by RNA interference and genetic studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maubaret, Cecilia; Pedersen‐Bjergaard, Ulrik; Brull, David J.; Gohlke, Peter; Payne, John R.; World, Michael; Thorsteinsson, Birger; Humphries, Steve E.; Montgomery, Hugh E.

    2015-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) regulate mitochondrial function, and thus cellular metabolism. Angiotensin‐converting enzyme (ACE) is the central component of endocrine and local tissue renin–angiotensin systems (RAS), which also regulate diverse aspects of whole‐body metabolism and mitochondrial function (partly through altering mitochondrial UCP expression). We show that ACE expression also appears to be regulated by mitochondrial UCPs. In genetic analysis of two unrelated populations (healthy young UK men and Scandinavian diabetic patients) serum ACE (sACE) activity was significantly higher amongst UCP3‐55C (rather than T) and UCP2 I (rather than D) allele carriers. RNA interference against UCP2 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells reduced UCP2 mRNA sixfold (P < 0·01) whilst increasing ACE expression within a physiological range (<1·8‐fold at 48 h; P < 0·01). Our findings suggest novel hypotheses. Firstly, cellular feedback regulation may occur between UCPs and ACE. Secondly, cellular UCP regulation of sACE suggests a novel means of crosstalk between (and mutual regulation of) cellular and endocrine metabolism. This might partly explain the reduced risk of developing diabetes and metabolic syndrome with RAS antagonists and offer insight into the origins of cardiovascular disease in which UCPs and ACE both play a role. PMID:27347560

  2. Mitochondrial ROS, uncoupled from ATP synthesis, determine endothelial activation for both physiological recruitment of patrolling cells and pathological recruitment of inflammatory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinyuan; Fang, Pu; Yang, William Y; Chan, Kylie; Lavallee, Muriel; Xu, Keman; Gao, Tracy; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiaofeng

    2017-03-01

    Mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (mtROS) are signaling molecules, which drive inflammatory cytokine production and T cell activation. In addition, cardiovascular diseases, cancers, and autoimmune diseases all share a common feature of increased mtROS level. Both mtROS and ATP are produced as a result of electron transport chain activity, but it remains enigmatic whether mtROS could be generated independently from ATP synthesis. A recent study shed light on this important question and found that, during endothelial cell (EC) activation, mtROS could be upregulated in a proton leak-coupled, but ATP synthesis-uncoupled manner. As a result, EC could upregulate mtROS production for physiological EC activation without compromising mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP generation, and consequently without causing mitochondrial damage and EC death. Thus, a novel pathophysiological role of proton leak in driving mtROS production was uncovered for low grade EC activation, patrolling immunosurveillance cell trans-endothelial migration and other signaling events without compromising cellular survival. This new working model explains how mtROS could be increasingly generated independently from ATP synthesis and endothelial damage or death. Mapping the connections among mitochondrial metabolism, physiological EC activation, patrolling cell migration, and pathological inflammation is significant towards the development of novel therapies for inflammatory diseases and cancers.

  3. How the mitochondrion was shaped by radical differences in substrates: what carnitine shuttles and uncoupling tell us about mitochondrial evolution in response to ROS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speijer, Dave

    2014-07-01

    As free-living organisms, alpha-proteobacteria produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) that diffuse into the surroundings; once constrained inside the archaeal ancestor of eukaryotes, however, ROS production presented evolutionary pressures - especially because the alpha-proteobacterial symbiont made more ROS, from a variety of substrates. I previously proposed that ratios of electrons coming from FADH2 and NADH (F/N ratios) correlate with ROS production levels during respiration, glucose breakdown having a much lower F/N ratio than longer fatty acid (FA) breakdown. Evidently, higher endogenous ROS formation did not hinder eukaryotic evolution, so how were its disadvantages mitigated? I propose that the resulting selection pressures favoured the evolution of a variety of eukaryotic 'innovations': peroxisomes for FA breakdown, carnitine shuttles, the linkage of beta-oxidation to antioxidant properties, uncoupling proteins (UCPs) and using mitochondrial uncoupling during beta-oxidation to reduce ROS. Recently observed relationships between peroxisomes and mitochondria further support the model. © 2014 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Measurement of technetium-99m sestamibi signals in rats administered a mitochondrial uncoupler and in a rat model of heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Kawamoto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Many methods have been used to assess mitochondrial function. Technetium-99m sestamibi ((99mTc-MIBI, a lipophilic cation, is rapidly incorporated into myocardial cells by diffusion and mainly localizes to the mitochondria. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether measurement of (99mTc-MIBI signals in animal models could be used as a tool to quantify mitochondrial membrane potential at the organ level. METHODS AND RESULTS: We analyzed (99mTc-MIBI signals in Sprague-Dawley (SD rat hearts perfused with carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP, a mitochondrial uncoupler known to reduce the mitochondrial membrane potential. (99mTc-MIBI signals could be used to detect changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential with sensitivity comparable to that obtained by two-photon laser microscopy with the cationic probe tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE. We also measured (99mTc-MIBI signals in the hearts of SD rats administered CCCP (4 mg/kg intraperitoneally or vehicle. (99mTc-MIBI signals decreased in rat hearts administered CCCP, and the ATP content, as measured by (31P magnetic resonance spectroscopy, decreased simultaneously. Next, we administered (99mTc-MIBI to Dahl salt-sensitive rats fed a high-salt diet, which leads to hypertension and heart failure. The (99mTc-MIBI signal per heart tissue weight was inversely correlated with heart weight, cardiac function, and the expression of atrial natriuretic factor, a marker of heart failure, and positively correlated with the accumulation of labeled fatty acid analog. The (99mTc-MIBI signal per liver tissue weight was lower than that per heart tissue weight. CONCLUSION: Measurement of (99mTc-MIBI signals can be an effective tool for semiquantitative investigation of cardiac mitochondrial membrane potential in the SD rat model by using a chemical to decrease the mitochondrial membrane potential. The (99mTc-MIBI signal per heart tissue weight was inversely correlated with the

  5. Measurement of technetium-99m sestamibi signals in rats administered a mitochondrial uncoupler and in a rat model of heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamoto, Akira; Kato, Takao; Shioi, Tetsuo; Okuda, Junji; Kawashima, Tsuneaki; Tamaki, Yodo; Niizuma, Shinichiro; Tanada, Yohei; Takemura, Genzou; Narazaki, Michiko; Matsuda, Tetsuya; Kimura, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    Many methods have been used to assess mitochondrial function. Technetium-99m sestamibi ((99m)Tc-MIBI), a lipophilic cation, is rapidly incorporated into myocardial cells by diffusion and mainly localizes to the mitochondria. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether measurement of (99m)Tc-MIBI signals in animal models could be used as a tool to quantify mitochondrial membrane potential at the organ level. We analyzed (99m)Tc-MIBI signals in Sprague-Dawley (SD) rat hearts perfused with carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), a mitochondrial uncoupler known to reduce the mitochondrial membrane potential. (99m)Tc-MIBI signals could be used to detect changes in the mitochondrial membrane potential with sensitivity comparable to that obtained by two-photon laser microscopy with the cationic probe tetramethylrhodamine ethyl ester (TMRE). We also measured (99m)Tc-MIBI signals in the hearts of SD rats administered CCCP (4 mg/kg intraperitoneally) or vehicle. (99m)Tc-MIBI signals decreased in rat hearts administered CCCP, and the ATP content, as measured by (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy, decreased simultaneously. Next, we administered (99m)Tc-MIBI to Dahl salt-sensitive rats fed a high-salt diet, which leads to hypertension and heart failure. The (99m)Tc-MIBI signal per heart tissue weight was inversely correlated with heart weight, cardiac function, and the expression of atrial natriuretic factor, a marker of heart failure, and positively correlated with the accumulation of labeled fatty acid analog. The (99m)Tc-MIBI signal per liver tissue weight was lower than that per heart tissue weight. Measurement of (99m)Tc-MIBI signals can be an effective tool for semiquantitative investigation of cardiac mitochondrial membrane potential in the SD rat model by using a chemical to decrease the mitochondrial membrane potential. The (99m)Tc-MIBI signal per heart tissue weight was inversely correlated with the severity of heart failure in the Dahl rat model.

  6. Role of mitochondrial uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2 in higher brain functions, neuronal plasticity and network oscillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gretchen Hermes

    2016-06-01

    Conclusions: We conclude that disruptions in mitochondrial function may play a critical role in pathophysiology of mental illness. Specifically, we have shown that NMDA driven behavioral, synaptic, and brain oscillatory functions are impaired in UCP2 knockout mice.

  7. Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Attenuate Diet Induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance, Modulating Mitochondrial Respiratory Uncoupling in Rat Skeletal Muscle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina Cavaliere

    Full Text Available Omega (ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA are dietary compounds able to attenuate insulin resistance. Anyway, the precise actions of ω-3PUFAs in skeletal muscle are overlooked. We hypothesized that PUFAs, modulating mitochondrial function and efficiency, would ameliorate pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant signs of nutritionally induced obesity.To this aim, rats were fed a control diet (CD or isocaloric high fat diets containing either ω-3 PUFA (FD or lard (LD for 6 weeks.FD rats showed lower weight, lipid gain and energy efficiency compared to LD-fed animals, showing higher energy expenditure and O2 consumption/CO2 production. Serum lipid profile and pro-inflammatory parameters in FD-fed animals were reduced compared to LD. Accordingly, FD rats exhibited a higher glucose tolerance revealed by an improved glucose and insulin tolerance tests compared to LD, accompanied by a restoration of insulin signalling in skeletal muscle. PUFAs increased lipid oxidation and reduced energy efficiency in subsarcolemmal mitochondria, and increase AMPK activation, reducing both endoplasmic reticulum and oxidative stress. Increased mitochondrial respiration was related to an increased mitochondriogenesis in FD skeletal muscle, as shown by the increase in PGC1-α and -β.our data strengthened the association of high dietary ω3-PUFA intake with reduced mitochondrial energy efficiency in the skeletal muscle.

  8. The Hydroxyl at Position C1 of Genipin Is the Active Inhibitory Group that Affects Mitochondrial Uncoupling Protein 2 in Panc-1 Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Yang

    Full Text Available Genipin (GNP effectively inhibits uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2, which regulates the leakage of protons across the inner mitochondrial membrane. UCP2 inhibition may induce pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell death by increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS levels. In this study, the hydroxyls at positions C10 (10-OH and C1 (1-OH of GNP were hypothesized to be the active groups that cause these inhibitory effects. Four GNP derivatives in which the hydroxyl at position C10 or C1 was replaced with other chemical groups were synthesized and isolated. Differences in the inhibitory effects of GNP and its four derivatives on pancreatic carcinoma cell (Panc-1 proliferation were assessed. The effects of GNP and its derivatives on apoptosis, UCP2 inhibition and ROS production were also studied to explore the relationship between GNP's activity and its structure. The derivatives with 1-OH substitutions, geniposide (1-GNP1 and 1-ethyl-genipin (1-GNP2 lacked cytotoxic effects, while the other derivatives that retained 1-OH, 10-piv-genipin (10-GNP1 and 10-acetic acid-genipin (10-GNP2 exerted biological effects similar to those of GNP, even in the absence of 10-OH. Thus, 1-OH is the key functional group in the structure of GNP that is responsible for GNP's apoptotic effects. These cytotoxic effects involve the induction of Panc-1 cell apoptosis through UCP2 inhibition and subsequent ROS production.

  9. The mitochondrial cycle of Arabidopsis shoot apical meristem and leaf primordium meristematic cells is defined by a perinuclear tentaculate/cage-like mitochondrion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguí-Simarro, José M; Coronado, María José; Staehelin, L Andrew

    2008-11-01

    Plant cells exhibit a high rate of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) recombination. This implies that before cytokinesis, the different mitochondrial compartments must fuse to allow for mtDNA intermixing. When and how the conditions for mtDNA intermixing are established are largely unknown. We have investigated the cell cycle-dependent changes in mitochondrial architecture in different Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) cell types using confocal microscopy, conventional, and three-dimensional electron microscopy techniques. Whereas mitochondria of cells from most plant organs are always small and dispersed, shoot apical and leaf primordial meristematic cells contain small, discrete mitochondria in the cell periphery and one large, mitochondrial mass in the perinuclear region. Serial thin-section reconstructions of high-pressure-frozen shoot apical meristem cells demonstrate that during G1 through S phase, the large, central mitochondrion has a tentaculate morphology and wraps around one nuclear pole. In G2, both types of mitochondria double their volume, and the large mitochondrion extends around the nucleus to establish a second sheet-like domain at the opposite nuclear pole. During mitosis, approximately 60% of the smaller mitochondria fuse with the large mitochondrion, whose volume increases to 80% of the total mitochondrial volume, and reorganizes into a cage-like structure encompassing first the mitotic spindle and then the entire cytokinetic apparatus. During cytokinesis, the cage-like mitochondrion divides into two independent tentacular mitochondria from which new, small mitochondria arise by fission. These cell cycle-dependent changes in mitochondrial architecture explain how these meristematic cells can achieve a high rate of mtDNA recombination and ensure the even partitioning of mitochondria between daughter cells.

  10. Isosteviol Sensitizes sarcKATP Channels towards Pinacidil and Potentiates Mitochondrial Uncoupling of Diazoxide in Guinea Pig Ventricular Myocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhuo Fan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available KATP channel is an important mediator or factor in physiological and pathological metabolic pathway. Activation of KATP channel has been identified to be a critical step in the cardioprotective mechanism against IR injury. On the other hand, desensitization of the channel to its opener or the metabolic ligand ATP in pathological conditions, like cardiac hypertrophy, would decrease the adaption of myocardium to metabolic stress and is a disadvantage for drug therapy. Isosteviol, obtained by acid hydrolysis of stevioside, has been demonstrated to play a cardioprotective role against diseases of cardiovascular system, like anti-IR injury, antihypertension, antihyperglycemia, and so forth. The present study investigated the effect of isosteviol (STV on sarcKATP channel current induced by pinacidil and mitochondrial flavoprotein oxidation induced by diazoxide. Our results showed that preincubating cells with STV not only increased the current amplitude and activating rate of sarcKATP channels induced by pinacidil but also potentiated diazoxide-elicited oxidation of flavoprotein in mitochondria.

  11. Role of Uncoupling Proteins in Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valle, Adamo; Oliver, Jordi; Roca, Pilar, E-mail: pilar.roca@uib.es [Grupo Multidisciplinar de Oncología Traslacional, Institut Universitari d' Investigació en Ciències de la Salut, Universitat de les Illes Balears/Cra. Valldemossa km 7.5, E-07122, Palma de Mallorca, Illes Balears (Spain)

    2010-04-16

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are a family of inner mitochondrial membrane proteins whose function is to allow the re-entry of protons to the mitochondrial matrix, by dissipating the proton gradient and, subsequently, decreasing membrane potential and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Due to their pivotal role in the intersection between energy efficiency and oxidative stress, UCPs are being investigated for a potential role in cancer. In this review we compile the latest evidence showing a link between uncoupling and the carcinogenic process, paying special attention to their involvement in cancer initiation, progression and drug chemoresistance.

  12. Role of Uncoupling Proteins in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adamo Valle

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Uncoupling proteins (UCPs are a family of inner mitochondrial membrane proteins whose function is to allow the re-entry of protons to the mitochondrial matrix, by dissipating the proton gradient and, subsequently, decreasing membrane potential and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Due to their pivotal role in the intersection between energy efficiency and oxidative stress, UCPs are being investigated for a potential role in cancer. In this review we compile the latest evidence showing a link between uncoupling and the carcinogenic process, paying special attention to their involvement in cancer initiation, progression and drug chemoresistance.

  13. Biological cages

    OpenAIRE

    Janssen, M. E.; NGUYEN, C; Beckham, R.; Larson, A.

    2000-01-01

    Restoring a stable anterior column is essential to achieve normal spinal biomechanics. A variety of mechanical spacers have been developed and advocated for both anterior and posterior approaches. The ability to radiographically assess the “biology” of bone incorporation in these mechanical (metal) spacers is an inherent limitation. The femoral ring allograft (FRA) and posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) spacers have been developed as biological cages that permit restoration of the anter...

  14. Pharmacology: uncoupling the agony from ecstasy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Edward M; Banks, Matthew L; Sprague, Jon E; Finkel, Toren

    2003-11-27

    The recreational use of amphetamine-type stimulants can produce a marked and sometimes lethal increase in body temperature. Here we show that mice deficient in a mitochondrial protein known as UCP-3 (for 'uncoupling protein-3') have a diminished thermogenic response to the drug MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine, nicknamed 'ecstasy') and so are protected against this dangerously toxic effect. Our findings indicate that UCP-3 is important in MDMA-induced hyperthermia and point to a new therapeutic direction for solving an increasing public-health problem.

  15. Uncoupling proteins of invertebrates: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocinska, Malgorzata; Barylski, Jakub; Jarmuszkiewicz, Wieslawa

    2016-09-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) mediate inducible proton conductance in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Herein, we summarize our knowledge regarding UCPs in invertebrates. Since 2001, the presence of UCPs has been demonstrated in nematodes, mollusks, amphioxi, and insects. We discuss the following important issues concerning invertebrate UCPs: their evolutionary relationships, molecular and functional properties, and physiological impact. Evolutionary analysis indicates that the branch of vertebrate and invertebrate UCP4-5 diverged early in the evolutionary process prior to the divergence of the animal groups. Several proposed physiological roles of invertebrate UCPs are energy control, metabolic balance, and preventive action against oxidative stress. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(9):691-699, 2016. © 2016 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology.

  16. Penetrating cations enhance uncoupling activity of anionic protonophores in mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri N Antonenko

    Full Text Available Protonophorous uncouplers causing a partial decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential are promising candidates for therapeutic applications. Here we showed that hydrophobic penetrating cations specifically targeted to mitochondria in a membrane potential-driven fashion increased proton-translocating activity of the anionic uncouplers 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP and carbonylcyanide-p-trifluorophenylhydrazone (FCCP. In planar bilayer lipid membranes (BLM separating two compartments with different pH values, DNP-mediated diffusion potential of H(+ ions was enhanced in the presence of dodecyltriphenylphosphonium cation (C12TPP. The mitochondria-targeted penetrating cations strongly increased DNP- and carbonylcyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP-mediated steady-state current through BLM when a transmembrane electrical potential difference was applied. Carboxyfluorescein efflux from liposomes initiated by the plastoquinone-containing penetrating cation SkQ1 was inhibited by both DNP and FCCP. Formation of complexes between the cation and CCCP was observed spectophotometrically. In contrast to the less hydrophobic tetraphenylphosphonium cation (TPP, SkQ1 and C12TPP promoted the uncoupling action of DNP and FCCP on isolated mitochondria. C12TPP and FCCP exhibited a synergistic effect decreasing the membrane potential of mitochondria in yeast cells. The stimulating action of penetrating cations on the protonophore-mediated uncoupling is assumed to be useful for medical applications of low (non-toxic concentrations of protonophores.

  17. Uncoupling and oxidative stress in liver mitochondria isolated from rats with acute iron overload

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardo Andreu, G.L. [Centro de Quimica Farmaceutica, Departamento de Investigaciones Biomedicas, Ciudad de La Habana (Cuba); Inada, N.M.; Vercesi, A.E. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Departamento de Patologia Clinica, Faculdade de Ciencias Medicas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Curti, C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2009-01-15

    One hypothesis for the etiology of cell damage arising from iron overload is that its excess selectively affects mitochondria. Here we tested the effects of acute iron overload on liver mitochondria isolated from rats subjected to a single dose of i.p. 500 mg/kg iron-dextran. The treatment increased the levels of iron in mitochondria (from 21{+-}4 to 130{+-}7 nmol/mg protein) and caused both lipid peroxidation and glutathione oxidation. The mitochondria of iron-treated rats showed lower respiratory control ratio in association with higher resting respiration. The mitochondrial uncoupling elicited by iron-treatment did not affect the phosphorylation efficiency or the ATP levels, suggesting that uncoupling is a mitochondrial protective mechanism against acute iron overload. Therefore, the reactive oxygen species (ROS)/H{sup +} leak couple, functioning as a mitochondrial redox homeostatic mechanism could play a protective role in the acutely iron-loaded mitochondria. (orig.)

  18. Mitochondria mediate septin cage assembly to promote autophagy of Shigella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirianni, Andrea; Krokowski, Sina; Lobato-Márquez, Damián; Buranyi, Stephen; Pfanzelter, Julia; Galea, Dieter; Willis, Alexandra; Culley, Siân; Henriques, Ricardo; Larrouy-Maumus, Gerald; Hollinshead, Michael; Sancho-Shimizu, Vanessa; Way, Michael; Mostowy, Serge

    2016-07-01

    Septins, cytoskeletal proteins with well-characterised roles in cytokinesis, form cage-like structures around cytosolic Shigella flexneri and promote their targeting to autophagosomes. However, the processes underlying septin cage assembly, and whether they influence S. flexneri proliferation, remain to be established. Using single-cell analysis, we show that the septin cages inhibit S. flexneri proliferation. To study mechanisms of septin cage assembly, we used proteomics and found mitochondrial proteins associate with septins in S. flexneri-infected cells. Strikingly, mitochondria associated with S. flexneri promote septin assembly into cages that entrap bacteria for autophagy. We demonstrate that the cytosolic GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) interacts with septins to enhance mitochondrial fission. To avoid autophagy, actin-polymerising Shigella fragment mitochondria to escape from septin caging. Our results demonstrate a role for mitochondria in anti-Shigella autophagy and uncover a fundamental link between septin assembly and mitochondria. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  19. Mechanism of uncoupling in mitochondria: uncouplers as ionophores for cycling cations and protons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, R J; Tyson, C A; Green, D E

    1976-01-01

    Classical uncouplers such as 2,4-dinitrophenol have been shown to be ionophores with the capability for transporting monovalent or divalent cations with equal efficiency. The conditions appropriate for the maximal expression of this ionophoric capability have been explored. Two critical factors are the polarity of the organic phase and the pH of the aqueous phase that is equilibrated with the organic phase. The demonstrated cationic ionophoric capability of uncouplers, taken in conjunction with the known ability of uncouplers to cycle protons across a membrane phase, provides the experimental basis for the thesis that uncoupling of electron flow from ATP synthesis via classical uncouplers involves the substitution of one coupled process by another. Uncoupling thus reduces to the replacement of one driven reaction (ATP synthesis) by the driven reaction (cyclical transport) mediated by the uncoupler. PMID:9641

  20. Octanuclear cubic coordination cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidmarsh, Ian S; Faust, Thomas B; Adams, Harry; Harding, Lindsay P; Russo, Luca; Clegg, William; Ward, Michael D

    2008-11-12

    Two new bis-bidentate bridging ligands have been prepared, L (naph) and L (anth), which contain two chelating pyrazolyl-pyridine units connected to an aromatic spacer (naphthalene-1,5-diyl and anthracene-9,10-diyl respectively) via methylene connectors. Each of these reacts with transition metal dications having a preference for octahedral coordination geometry to afford {M 8L 12} (16+) cages (for L (anth), M = Cu, Zn; for L (naph), M = Co, Ni, Cd) which have an approximately cubic arrangement of metal ions with a bridging ligand spanning each of the twelve edges, and a large central cavity containing a mixture of anions and/or solvent molecules. The cages based on L (anth) have two cyclic helical {M 4L 4} faces, of opposite chirality, connected by four additional L (anth) ligands as "pillars"; all metal centers have a meridional tris-chelate configuration. In contrast the cages based on L (naph) have (noncrystallographic) S 6 symmetry, with a diagonally opposite pair of corners having a facial tris-chelate configuration with the other six being meridional. An additional significant difference between the two types of structure is that the cubes containing L (anth) do not show significant interligand aromatic stacking interactions. However, in the cages based on L (naph), there are six five-membered stacks of aromatic ligand fragments around the periphery, each based on an alternating array of electron-rich (naphthyl) and electron-deficient (pyrazolyl-pyridine, coordinated to M (2+)) aromatic units. A consequence of this is that the cages {M 8(L (naph)) 12} (16+) retain their structural integrity in polar solvents, in contrast to the cages {M 8(L (anth)) 12} (16+) which dissociate in polar solvents. Consequently, the cages {M 8(L (naph)) 12} (16+) give NMR spectra in agreement with the symmetry observed in the solid state, and their fluorescence spectra (for M = Cd) display (in addition to the normal naphthalene-based pi-pi* fluorescence) a lower-energy exciplex

  1. Commercial cage fish culture

    OpenAIRE

    Aigbadon, B.V.

    1987-01-01

    With increasing emphasis in Nigeria on aquaculture as an alternative to dwindling artisanal fishing and scarce foreign exchange for fish import, cage fish culture, is a more profitable aquaculture practice than pond culture. It appears to be one of the most viable business ventures with minimum risks. It is a highly recommendable project

  2. John Cage Discusses Fluxus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Ellsworth

    1992-01-01

    Presents an informal discussion with composer John Cage which includes his response to George Maciunas' work, his recollections of Marcel Duchamp, the complex relationship between inelegant material and revealing works of art, neo-Dada and neo-Fluxus, Wittgenstein and the artist's ultimate responsibility to initiate a change in the viewer or…

  3. Rope Caging and Grasping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwok, T.H.; Wan, W.; Pan, J.; Wang, C.C.; Yuan, J.; Harada, K; Chen, Y.

    2016-01-01

    We present a novel method for caging grasps in this paper by stretching ropes on the surface of a 3D object. Both topology and shape of a model to be grasped has been
    considered in our approach. Our algorithm can guarantee generating local minimal rings on every topological branches of a given

  4. Relationship between expression of muscle-specific uncoupling protein 2 messenger RNA and genetic selection toward growth in channel catfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uncoupling protein 2 is a member of the mitochondrial channel proteins that regulate the flow of hydrogen ions and ATP generation. The relationship between UCP2 and nutrient metabolism has been well-defined in humans but unclear in fish. We hypothesized that increased muscle growth in channel catf...

  5. In vitro induction of rat liver mitochondrial membrane permeability ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alteration of mitochondrial functions such as permeability transition (PT), a process associated with the uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation, has been found to play a vital role in the apoptotic process induced by certain anti-cancer agents. When triggered, PT facilitates the release of mitochondrial apoptogenic proteins ...

  6. Critical Appraisal of the MTT Assay in the Presence of Rottlerin and Uncouplers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maioli Emanuela

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rottlerin is a natural product isolated from Mallotus philippinensis. This polyphenolic compound, originally described as a selective inhibitor of PKCδ, can inhibit many other PKC-unrelated kinases and has a number of biological actions, including mitochondrial uncoupling effects. We recently found that Rottlerin inhibits the transcription factor nuclear factor κB in different cell types, causing downregulation of cyclin D1 and growth arrest. The present study was carried out to clarify the surprising lack of effect of Rottlerin on MCF-7 cell viability, assessed by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT test. We found that Rottlerin causes overestimation of the MTT test, leading to inconsistent results between cell number and cell viability. Rottlerin, however, strongly differs from other antioxidant polyphenols, which directly reduce tetrazolium salts, since it does not exhibit any reactivity toward the tetrazolium salts in vitro nor does it modulate lactate dehydrogenase activity. The interference in the MTT assay occurred only in cultured cells, concomitantly with a decrease in the energy charge. Because the same MTT overestimation was observed in the presence of uncoupling agents, we conclude that the Rottlerin artifact is linked to its uncoupling action that, by accelerating oxidative chain, accidentally results in enhanced MTT reduction. These results suggest caution in the use of the MTT assay in the presence of Rottlerin and uncouplers in general.

  7. Critical Appraisal of the MTT Assay in the Presence of Rottlerin and Uncouplers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlucci Filippo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rottlerin is a natural product isolated from Mallotus philippinensis. This polyphenolic compound, originally described as a selective inhibitor of PKCδ, can inhibit many other PKC-unrelated kinases and has a number of biological actions, including mitochondrial uncoupling effects. We recently found that Rottlerin inhibits the transcription factor nuclear factor κB in different cell types, causing downregulation of cyclin D1 and growth arrest. The present study was carried out to clarify the surprising lack of effect of Rottlerin on MCF-7 cell viability, assessed by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT test. We found that Rottlerin causes overestimation of the MTT test, leading to inconsistent results between cell number and cell viability. Rottlerin, however, strongly differs from other antioxidant polyphenols, which directly reduce tetrazolium salts, since it does not exhibit any reactivity toward the tetrazolium salts in vitro nor does it modulate lactate dehydrogenase activity. The interference in the MTT assay occurred only in cultured cells, concomitantly with a decrease in the energy charge. Because the same MTT overestimation was observed in the presence of uncoupling agents, we conclude that the Rottlerin artifact is linked to its uncoupling action that, by accelerating oxidative chain, accidentally results in enhanced MTT reduction. These results suggest caution in the use of the MTT assay in the presence of Rottlerin and uncouplers in general.

  8. Uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation by curcumin: Implication of its cellular mechanism of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Han Wern; Lim, Hwee Ying [Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119260 (Singapore); Wong, Kim Ping, E-mail: bchsitkp@nus.edu.sg [Department of Biochemistry, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore 119260 (Singapore)

    2009-11-06

    Curcumin is a phytochemical isolated from the rhizome of turmeric. Recent reports have shown curcumin to have antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor properties as well as affecting the 5'-AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK), mTOR and STAT-3 signaling pathways. We provide evidence that curcumin acts as an uncoupler. Well-established biochemical techniques were performed on isolated rat liver mitochondria in measuring oxygen consumption, F{sub 0}F{sub 1}-ATPase activity and ATP biosynthesis. Curcumin displays all the characteristics typical of classical uncouplers like fccP and 2,4-dinitrophenol. In addition, at concentrations higher than 50 {mu}M, curcumin was found to inhibit mitochondrial respiration which is a characteristic feature of inhibitory uncouplers. As a protonophoric uncoupler and as an activator of F{sub 0}F{sub 1}-ATPase, curcumin causes a decrease in ATP biosynthesis in rat liver mitochondria. The resulting change in ATP:AMP could disrupt the phosphorylation status of the cell; this provides a possible mechanism for its activation of AMPK and its downstream mTOR and STAT-3 signaling.

  9. Cryogenic Caging for Science Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penanen, Konstantin; Chui, Talso C.

    2011-01-01

    A method has been developed for caging science instrumentation to protect from pyro-shock and EDL (entry, descent, and landing) acceleration damage. Caging can be achieved by immersing the instrument (or its critical parts) in a liquid and solidifying the liquid by cooling. After the launch shock and/or after the payload has landed, the solid is heated up and evaporated.

  10. Faraday Cage Protects Against Lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafferis, W.; Hasbrouck, R. T.; Johnson, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    Faraday cage protects electronic and electronically actuated equipment from lightning. Follows standard lightning-protection principles. Whether lightning strikes cage or cables running to equipment, current canceled or minimized in equipment and discharged into ground. Applicable to protection of scientific instruments, computers, radio transmitters and receivers, and power-switching equipment.

  11. Cage-based performance capture

    CERN Document Server

    Savoye, Yann

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, highly-detailed animations of live-actor performances are increasingly easier to acquire and 3D Video has reached considerable attentions in visual media production. In this book, we address the problem of extracting or acquiring and then reusing non-rigid parametrization for video-based animations. At first sight, a crucial challenge is to reproduce plausible boneless deformations while preserving global and local captured properties of dynamic surfaces with a limited number of controllable, flexible and reusable parameters. To solve this challenge, we directly rely on a skin-detached dimension reduction thanks to the well-known cage-based paradigm. First, we achieve Scalable Inverse Cage-based Modeling by transposing the inverse kinematics paradigm on surfaces. Thus, we introduce a cage inversion process with user-specified screen-space constraints. Secondly, we convert non-rigid animated surfaces into a sequence of optimal cage parameters via Cage-based Animation Conversion. Building upon this re...

  12. A long-linker conjugate of fluorescein and triphenylphosphonium as mitochondria-targeted uncoupler and fluorescent neuro- and nephroprotector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonenko, Yuri N; Denisov, Stepan S; Silachev, Denis N; Khailova, Ljudmila S; Jankauskas, Stanislovas S; Rokitskaya, Tatyana I; Danilina, Tatyana I; Kotova, Elena A; Korshunova, Galina A; Plotnikov, Egor Y; Zorov, Dmitry B

    2016-11-01

    Limited uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation is known to be beneficial in various laboratory models of diseases. Linking a triphenyl-phosphonium cation to fluorescein through a decyl (C10) spacer yields a fluorescent uncoupler, coined mitoFluo, that selectively accumulates in energized mitochondria (Denisov et al., Chem.Commun. 2014). Proton-transport activity of mitoFluo was tested in liposomes reconstituted with bacteriorhodopsin. To examine the uncoupling action on mitochondria, we monitored mitochondrial membrane potential in parallel with oxygen consumption. Neuro- and nephroprotecting activity was detected by a limb-placing test and a kidney ischemia/reperfusion protocol, respectively. We compared mitoFluo properties with those of its newly synthesized analog having a short (butyl) spacer (C4-mitoFluo). MitoFluo, but not C4-mitoFluo, caused collapse of mitochondrial membrane potential resulting in stimulation of mitochondrial respiration. The dramatic difference in the uncoupling activity of mitoFluo and C4-mitoFluo was in line with the difference in their protonophoric activity on a lipid membrane. The accumulation of mitoFluo in mitochondria was more pronounced than that of C4-mitoFluo. MitoFluo decreased the rate of ROS production in mitochondria. MitoFluo was effective in preventing consequences of brain trauma in rats: it suppressed trauma-induced brain swelling and reduced a neurological deficit. Besides, mitoFluo attenuated acute kidney injury after ischemia/reperfusion in rats. A long alkyl linker was proved mandatory for mitoFluo to be a mitochondria- targeted uncoupler. MitoFluo showed high protective efficacy in certain models of oxidative stress-related diseases. MitoFluo is a candidate for developing therapeutic and fluorescence imaging agents to treat brain and kidney pathologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Laying hens in furnished cages

    OpenAIRE

    Wall, Helena

    2003-01-01

    Concern for the welfare of laying hens housed in conventional cages has led to a change of the Animal Welfare Legislation in Sweden, implying that cages must provide possibilities for hens to lay eggs in a nest, to rest on a perch and to use litter. Such requirements are also being considered within the whole European Union. The purpose of this thesis is to contribute to the general knowledge of, and further development of, furnished cages, both as regards birds’ use of facilities and their w...

  14. The role of uncoupling protein 3 regulating calcium ion uptake into mitochondria during sarcopenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikawa, Takeshi; Choi, Inho; Haruna, Marie; Hirasaka, Katsuya; Maita Ohno, Ayako; Kondo Teshima, Shigetada

    Overloaded mitochondrial calcium concentration contributes to progression of mitochondrial dysfunction in aged muscle, leading to sarcopenia. Uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) is primarily expressed in the inner membrane of skeletal muscle mitochondria. Recently, it has been reported that UCP3 is associated with calcium uptake into mitochondria. However, the mechanisms by which UCP3 regulates mitochondrial calcium uptake are not well understood. Here we report that UCP3 interacts with HS-1 associated protein X-1 (Hax-1), an anti-apoptotic protein that is localized in mitochondria, which is involved in cellular responses to calcium ion. The hydrophilic sequences within the loop 2, matrix-localized hydrophilic domain of mouse UCP3 are necessary for binding to Hax-1 of the C-terminal domain in adjacent to mitochondrial innermembrane. Interestingly, these proteins interaction occur the calcium-dependent manner. Indeed, overexpression of UCP3 significantly enhanced calcium uptake into mitochondria on Hax-1 endogenously expressing C2C12 myoblasts. In addition, Hax-1 knock-down enhanced calcium uptake into mitochondria on both UCP3 and Hax-1 endogenously expressing C2C12 myotubes, but not myoblasts. Finally, the dissociation of UCP3 and Hax-1 enhances calcium uptake into mitochondria in aged muscle. These studies identify a novel UCP3-Hax-1 complex regulates the influx of calcium ion into mitochondria in muscle. Thus, the efficacy of UCP3-Hax-1 in mitochondrial calcium regulation may provide a novel therapeutic approach against mitochondrial dysfunction-related disease containing sarcopenia.

  15. Mitochondrial impairment induces excitotoxic death in cerebellar granule cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobba, Antonella; Atlante, Anna; Azzariti, Amalia; Sgaramella, Giuseppe; Calissano, Pietro; Marra, Ersilia

    2004-06-01

    A close relationship links mitochondria to cell death with mitochondrial function-impairment considered a major biochemical event in the process of both apoptosis and necrosis. We have used different inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation, i.e. mitochondrial respiratory chain and ATP synthesis inhibitors, and an uncoupler to investigate the mode of cell death caused by these compounds in cerebellar granule cells. This study shows that in cultured cerebellar granule cells either oxidative phosphorylation inhibitors or uncoupler induce an excitotoxic-like reaction which is mediated by activation of NMDA receptors and is likely due to the release of glutamate. Consistently, survival may occur if the toxic action of glutamate is prevented.

  16. Melatonin: A Mitochondrial Targeting Molecule Involving Mitochondrial Protection and Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dun-Xian Tan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Melatonin has been speculated to be mainly synthesized by mitochondria. This speculation is supported by the recent discovery that aralkylamine N-acetyltransferase/serotonin N-acetyltransferase (AANAT/SNAT is localized in mitochondria of oocytes and the isolated mitochondria generate melatonin. We have also speculated that melatonin is a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant. It accumulates in mitochondria with high concentration against a concentration gradient. This is probably achieved by an active transportation via mitochondrial melatonin transporter(s. Melatonin protects mitochondria by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS, inhibiting the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP, and activating uncoupling proteins (UCPs. Thus, melatonin maintains the optimal mitochondrial membrane potential and preserves mitochondrial functions. In addition, mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics is also regulated by melatonin. In most cases, melatonin reduces mitochondrial fission and elevates their fusion. Mitochondrial dynamics exhibit an oscillatory pattern which matches the melatonin circadian secretory rhythm in pinealeocytes and probably in other cells. Recently, melatonin has been found to promote mitophagy and improve homeostasis of mitochondria.

  17. Melatonin: A Mitochondrial Targeting Molecule Involving Mitochondrial Protection and Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Dun-Xian; Manchester, Lucien C; Qin, Lilan; Reiter, Russel J

    2016-12-16

    Melatonin has been speculated to be mainly synthesized by mitochondria. This speculation is supported by the recent discovery that aralkylamine N-acetyltransferase/serotonin N-acetyltransferase (AANAT/SNAT) is localized in mitochondria of oocytes and the isolated mitochondria generate melatonin. We have also speculated that melatonin is a mitochondria-targeted antioxidant. It accumulates in mitochondria with high concentration against a concentration gradient. This is probably achieved by an active transportation via mitochondrial melatonin transporter(s). Melatonin protects mitochondria by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS), inhibiting the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP), and activating uncoupling proteins (UCPs). Thus, melatonin maintains the optimal mitochondrial membrane potential and preserves mitochondrial functions. In addition, mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics is also regulated by melatonin. In most cases, melatonin reduces mitochondrial fission and elevates their fusion. Mitochondrial dynamics exhibit an oscillatory pattern which matches the melatonin circadian secretory rhythm in pinealeocytes and probably in other cells. Recently, melatonin has been found to promote mitophagy and improve homeostasis of mitochondria.

  18. Plasma Amino Acids Stimulate Uncoupled Respiration of Muscle Subsarcolemmal Mitochondria in Lean but Not Obese Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kras, Katon A; Hoffman, Nyssa; Roust, Lori R; Patel, Shivam H; Carroll, Chad C; Katsanos, Christos S

    2017-12-01

    Obesity is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in skeletal muscle. Increasing the plasma amino acid (AA) concentrations stimulates mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production in lean individuals. To determine whether acute elevation in plasma AAs enhances muscle mitochondrial respiration and ATP production in subsarcolemmal (SS) and intermyofibrillar (IMF) mitochondria in obese adults. Assessment of SS and IMF mitochondrial function during saline (i.e., control) and AA infusions. Eligible participants were healthy lean (body mass index, 30 kg/m2; age 35 ± 3 years; n = 11) subjects. Single trial of saline infusion followed by AA infusion. SS and IMF mitochondria were isolated from muscle biopsies collected at the end of the saline and AA infusions. Mitochondrial respiration and ATP production. AA infusion increased adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP)-stimulated respiration and ATP production rates of SS mitochondria in the lean (P 0.05). Increasing the plasma AA concentrations enhances the capacity for respiration and ATP production of muscle SS, but not IMF, mitochondria in lean individuals, in parallel with increases in uncoupled respiration. However, neither of these parameters increases in muscle SS or IMF mitochondria in obese individuals.

  19. A Mobile Phone Faraday Cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, M. M. J.

    2011-01-01

    A Faraday cage is an interesting physical phenomenon where an electromagnetic wave can be excluded from a volume of space by enclosure with an electrically conducting material. The practical application of this in the classroom is to block the signal to a mobile phone by enclosing it in a metal can. The background of the physics behind this is…

  20. 50 CFR 648.75 - Cage identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Cage identification. 648.75 Section 648.75... Clam and Ocean Quahog Fisheries § 648.75 Cage identification. Except as provided in § 648.76, the following cage identification requirements apply to all vessels issued a Federal fishing permit for surf...

  1. Impairments in age-dependent ubiquitin proteostasis and structural integrity of selective neurons by uncoupling Ran GTPase from the Ran-binding domain 3 of Ranbp2 and identification of novel mitochondrial isoforms of ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2I (ubc9) and Ranbp2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Hemangi; Yoon, Dosuk; Bhowmick, Reshma; Cai, Yunfei; Cho, Kyoung-In; Ferreira, Paulo A

    2017-09-06

    The Ran-binding protein 2 (Ranbp2/Nup358) is a cytoplasmic and peripheral nucleoporin comprised of 4 Ran-GTP-binding domains (RBDs) that are interspersed among diverse structural domains with multifunctional activities. Our prior studies found that the RBD2 and RBD3 of Ranbp2 control mitochondrial motility independently of Ran-GTP-binding in cultured cells, whereas loss of Ran-GTP-binding to RBD2 and RBD3 are essential to support cone photoreceptor development and the survival of mature retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in mice. Here, we uncover that loss of Ran-GTP-binding to RBD3 alone promotes the robust age-dependent increase of ubiquitylated substrates and S1 subunit (Pmsd1) of the 19S cap of the proteasome in the retina and RPE and that such loss in RBD3 also compromises the structural integrity of the outer segment compartment of cone photoreceptors only and without affecting the viability of these neurons. We also found that the E2-ligase and partner of Ranbp2, ubc9, is localized prominently in the mitochondrial-rich ellipsoid compartment of photoreceptors, where Ranbp2 is also known to localize with and modulate the activity of mitochondrial proteins. However, the natures of Ranbp2 and ubc9 isoforms to the mitochondria are heretofore elusive. Subcellular fractionation, co-immunolocalization and immunoaffinity purification of Ranbp2 complexes show that novel isoforms of Ranbp2 and ubc9 with molecular masses distinct from the large Ranbp2 and unmodified ubc9 isoforms localize specifically to the mitochondrial fraction or associate with mitochondrial components, whereas unmodified and SUMOylated Ran GTPase are excluded from the mitochondrial fraction. Further, liposome-mediated intracellular delivery of an antibody against a domain shared by the mitochondrial and nuclear pore isoforms of Ranbp2 causes the profound fragmentation of mitochondria and their delocalization from Ranbp2 and without affecting Ranbp2 localization at the nuclear pores. Collectively, the

  2. Cage model of polar fluids: Finite cage inertia generalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, W T; Zarifakis, M; Kalmykov, Y P; Titov, S V; Dowling, W J; Titov, A S

    2017-07-21

    The itinerant oscillator model describing rotation of a dipole about a fixed axis inside a cage formed by its surrounding polar molecules is revisited in the context of modeling the dielectric relaxation of a polar fluid via the Langevin equation. The dynamical properties of the model are studied by averaging the Langevin equations describing the complex orientational dynamics of two bodies (molecule-cage) over their realizations in phase space so that the problem reduces to solving a system of three index linear differential-recurrence relations for the statistical moments. These are then solved in the frequency domain using matrix continued fractions. The linear dielectric response is then evaluated for extensive ranges of damping, dipole moment ratio, and cage-dipole inertia ratio and along with the usual inertia corrected microwave Debye absorption gives rise to significant far-infrared absorption with a comb-like structure of harmonic peaks. The model may be also regarded as an extension of Budó's [J. Chem. Phys. 17, 686 (1949)] treatment of molecules containing rotating polar groups to include inertial effects.

  3. Mitochondrial coupling and capacity of oxidative phosphorylation in skeletal muscle of Inuit and Caucasians in the arctic winter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gnaiger, E; Boushel, R; Søndergaard, H

    2015-01-01

    During evolution, mitochondrial DNA haplogroups of arctic populations may have been selected for lower coupling of mitochondrial respiration to ATP production in favor of higher heat production. We show that mitochondrial coupling in skeletal muscle of traditional and westernized Inuit habituatin...... latitude and high altitude where economy of locomotion may be optimized by preservation of biochemical coupling efficiency at modest mitochondrial density, when submaximum performance is uncoupled from VO2max and maximum capacities of oxidative phosphorylation....

  4. Seismic coupling and uncoupling at subduction zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, L.; Kanamori, H.

    1983-01-01

    Some of the correlations concerning the properties of subduction zones are reviewed. A quantitative global comparison of many subduction zones reveals that the largest earthquakes occur in zones with young lithosphere and fast convergence rates. Maximum earthquake size is directly related to the asperity distribution on the fault plane. This observation can be translated into a simple model of seismic coupling where the horizontal compressive stress between two plates is proportional to the ratio of the summed asperity area to the total area of the contact surface. Plate age and rate can control asperity distribution directly through the horizontal compressive stress associated with the vertical and horizontal velocities of subducting slabs. The basalt to eclogite phase change in the down-going oceanic crust may be largely responsible for the uncoupling of subduction zones below a depth of about 40 km.

  5. Uncoupling effect of palmitate is exacerbated in skeletal muscle mitochondria of sea-acclimatized king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Benjamin; Duchamp, Claude; Roussel, Damien

    2017-09-01

    In king penguin juveniles, the environmental transition from a terrestrial to a marine habitat, occurring at fledging, drastically stimulates lipid catabolism and the remodelling of muscle mitochondria to sustain extensive swimming activity and thermoregulation in the cold circumpolar oceans. However, the exact nature of these mechanisms remains only partially resolved. Here we investigated, in vitro, the uncoupling effect of increasing doses of fatty acids in pectoralis muscle intermyofibrillar mitochondria isolated, either from terrestrial never-immersed or experimentally cold water immersed pre-fledging king penguins or from sea-acclimatized fledged penguins. Mitochondria exhibited much greater palmitate-induced uncoupling respiration and higher maximal oxidative capacity after acclimatization to marine life. Such effects were not reproduced experimentally after repeated immersions in cold water, suggesting that the plasticity of mitochondrial characteristics may not be primarily driven by cold exposure per se but by other aspects of sea acclimatization. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Development of furnished cages for laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, M C; Walker, A W; Nicol, C J; Lindberg, A C; Freire, R; Hughes, B O; Elson, H A

    2002-09-01

    1. A 3-year trial was carried out of cages for laying hens, occupying a full laying house. The main cage designs used were 5000 cm2 in area, 50 cm high at the rear and furnished with nests and perches. F cages had a front rollaway nest at the side, lined with artificial turf. FD cages also had a dust bath containing sand over the nest. H cages had two nest hollows at the side, one in front of the other. They were compared with conventional cages 2500 cm2 in area and 38 cm high at the rear. 2. Cages were stocked with from 4 to 8 ISA Brown hens per cage, resulting in varied allowances of area, feeder and perch per bird. No birds were beak trimmed. In F and FD cages two further treatments were applied: nests and dust baths were sometimes fitted with gates to exclude birds from dust baths in the morning and from both at night; elevated food troughs, with a lip 33 cm above the cage floor, were compared with standard troughs. 3. Management of the house was generally highly successful, with temperature control achieved by ventilation. Egg production was above breeders' standards and not significantly affected by cage design. More eggs per bird were collected when there were fewer birds per cage but food consumption also then tended to be higher. 4. The number of downgraded eggs was variable, with some tendency for more in furnished cages. Eggs laid in dust baths were often downgraded. Those laid at the back of the cage were frequently dirty because of accumulation of droppings. H nests were unsuccessful, with less than 50% of eggs laid in the nest hollows. However, up to 93% of eggs were laid in front rollaways, and few of these were downgraded. 5. Feather and foot damage were generally less in furnished than in conventional cages, greater where there were more birds per cage. With an elevated food trough there was less feather damage but more overgrowth of claws. In year 2, mortality was greater in cages with more birds. 6. Pre-laying behaviour was mostly settled in

  7. Polymers containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

    2013-04-23

    Polymers comprising residues of cage compound monomers having at least one polyalkoxy silyl substituent are provided. The cage compound monomers are selected from borane cage compound monomers comprising at least 7 cage atoms and/or carborane cage compound monomers comprising 7 to 11 cage compound monomers. Such polymers can further comprise one or more reactive matrices and/or co-monomers covalently bound with the cage compound monomer residues. Articles of manufacture comprising such polymers are also disclosed.

  8. Effect of temperature on oxidative stress, antioxidant levels and uncoupling protein expression in striped hamsters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Si-Si; Cao, Li-Li; Xu, Wei-Dong; Cao, Jing; Zhao, Zhi-Jun

    2015-11-01

    According to the rate of living-free radical hypothesis, higher metabolic rates should increase reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. However, the "uncoupling to survive" hypothesis postulates that uncoupling proteins (UCPs) can decrease ROS production by lowering the potential of the inner mitochondrial membrane, in which case the correlation between metabolic rate and ROS levels would be a negative rather than positive. In this study, we examined energy intake, oxidative stress levels, antioxidant activity and the expression of UCPs in brown adipose tissue (BAT), and in the liver, heart, skeletal muscle and brain, of striped hamsters (Cricetulus barabensis) acclimated to either 5 °C or 32.5 °C. The energy intake of hamsters acclimated to 5 °C increased by 70.7%, whereas the energy intake of hamsters acclimated to 32.5 °C decreased by 31.3%, relative to hamsters kept at room temperature (21 °C) (Phamsters acclimated to 5 °C. These results suggest that the relationship between ROS levels and metabolic rate was negative, rather than positive. UCP1 expression in BAT may have played a role in lowering ROS levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Reptilian uncoupling protein: functionality and expression in sub-zero temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Benjamin; Sibille, Brigitte; Romestaing, Caroline; Belouze, Maud; Letexier, Dominique; Servais, Stéphane; Barré, Hervé; Duchamp, Claude; Voituron, Yann

    2008-05-01

    Here we report the partial nucleotide sequence of a reptilian uncoupling protein (repUCP) gene from the European common lizard (Lacerta vivipara). Overlapping sequence analysis reveals that the protein shows 55%, 72% and 77% sequence homology with rat UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3, respectively, and 73% with bird and fish UCPs. RepUCP gene expression was ubiquitously detected in 4 degrees C cold-acclimated lizard tissues and upregulated in muscle tissues by a 20 h exposure to sub-zero temperatures in a supercooling state or after thawing. In parallel, we show an increase in the co-activators, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC-1alpha) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPAR), mRNA expression, suggesting that the mechanisms regulating UCP expression may be conserved between mammals (endotherms) and reptiles (ectotherms). Furthermore, mitochondria extracted from lizard skeletal muscle showed a guanosine diphosphate (GDP)-sensitive non phosphorylating respiration. This last result indicates an inhibition of extra proton leakage mediated by an uncoupling protein, providing arguments that repUCP is functional in lizard tissues. This result is associated with a remarkable GDP-dependent increase in mitochondrial endogenous H(2)O(2) production. All together, these data support a physiological role of the repUCP in superoxide limitation by lizard mitochondria in situations of stressful oxidative reperfusion following a re-warming period in winter.

  10. FATE1 antagonizes calcium- and drug-induced apoptosis by uncoupling ER and mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doghman-Bouguerra, Mabrouka; Granatiero, Veronica; Sbiera, Silviu; Sbiera, Iuliu; Lacas-Gervais, Sandra; Brau, Frédéric; Fassnacht, Martin; Rizzuto, Rosario; Lalli, Enzo

    2016-09-01

    Several stimuli induce programmed cell death by increasing Ca(2+) transfer from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to mitochondria. Perturbation of this process has a special relevance in pathologies as cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. Mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake mainly takes place in correspondence of mitochondria-associated ER membranes (MAM), specialized contact sites between the two organelles. Here, we show the important role of FATE1, a cancer-testis antigen, in the regulation of ER-mitochondria distance and Ca(2+) uptake by mitochondria. FATE1 is localized at the interface between ER and mitochondria, fractionating into MAM FATE1 expression in adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) cells under the control of the transcription factor SF-1 decreases ER-mitochondria contact and mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, while its knockdown has an opposite effect. FATE1 also decreases sensitivity to mitochondrial Ca(2+)-dependent pro-apoptotic stimuli and to the chemotherapeutic drug mitotane. In patients with ACC, FATE1 expression in their tumor is inversely correlated with their overall survival. These results show that the ER-mitochondria uncoupling activity of FATE1 is harnessed by cancer cells to escape apoptotic death and resist the action of chemotherapeutic drugs. © 2016 The Authors.

  11. (reprocessed)HeliscopeCAGE sequencing, Delve mapping and CAGE TSS aggregation - FANTOM5 | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us FANTOM5 (reprocessed)HeliscopeCAGE sequencing, Delve mapping and CAGE TSS aggregation Data d...etail Data name (reprocessed)HeliscopeCAGE sequencing, Delve mapping and CAGE TSS aggregation DOI 10.18908/l...m5_rp_exp_details#en Data acquisition method HeliScopeCAGE ( http://fantom.gsc.riken.jp/protocols/heliscop...icy | Contact Us (reprocessed)HeliscopeCAGE sequencing, Delve mapping and CAGE TSS aggregation - FANTOM5 | LSDB Archive ...

  12. Listening to Cage: Nonintentional philosophy and music

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Fleming

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Listening to Cage: Nonintentional Philosophy and Music threads together the writings of ordinary language philosophy and the music of John Cage, responding specifically to requests made by Cage and Stanley Cavell. While many texts downplay or ignore the philosophical demands in Cage’s music and other texts find grandiose spiritual and philosophical material tied to his work, this text rejects both efforts. It challenges the basic directions of the growing secondary source material on Cage, finding it largely contrary to what Cage himself and his music teaches. That secondary material constantly offers an intentional approach to the music which is to make Cage understandable or easier to understand. The present text makes him appropriately difficult and basically unapproachable, asking the reader for serious acknowledgment of what Cage says he does, namely, “I have nothing to say and I am saying it.” While there is little hope of stopping the Cage industry that academia and publishers have grown, this text wishes at least to try to slow it down. The footnotes of this text include direct conversation material with Cage from the 1980s and 1990s regarding many subjects—his own compositions, our life struggles, remarks on Wittgenstein, Thoreau, philosophy, and music—all with a new context for their hearing.

  13. Chronic alcohol consumption increases the expression of uncoupling protein-2 and -4 in the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graw, Jan A; von Haefen, Clarissa; Poyraz, Deniz; Möbius, Nadine; Sifringer, Marco; Spies, Claudia D

    2013-10-01

    Chronic alcohol consumption leads to oxidative stress in a variety of cells, especially in brain cells because they have a reduced oxidative metabolism of alcohol. Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are anion channels of the inner mitochondrial membrane, which can decouple internal respiration. "Mild uncoupling" of the mitochondrial respiratory chain leads to a reduced production of free radicals (reactive oxygen species) and a reduction in oxidative cell stress. The extent to which chronic alcohol consumption regulates UCP-2 and -4 in the brain is still unknown. We examined the effects of a 12-week 5% alcohol diet in the brain of male Wistar rats (n = 34). Cerebral gene and protein expression of UCP-2, -4, as well as Bcl-2, and the release of cytochrome c out of the mitochondria were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis. The percentage of degenerated cells was determined by Fluoro-Jade B staining of brain slices. Brains of rats with a chronic alcohol diet showed an increased gene and protein expression of UCP-2 and -4. The expression of the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2 in the brain of the alcohol-treated animals was decreased significantly, whereas cytochrome c release from mitochondria was increased. In addition increased neurodegeneration could be demonstrated in the alcohol-treated animals. Chronic alcohol consumption leads to a cerebral induction of UCP-2 and -4 with a simultaneous decrease in the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-2, cytochrome c release from mitochondria and increased neurodegeneration. This study reveals a compensatory effect of UCP-2 and -4 in the brain during chronic alcohol consumption. Copyright © 2013 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  14. A novel high-throughput assay for islet respiration reveals uncoupling of rodent and human islets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob D Wikstrom

    Full Text Available The pancreatic beta cell is unique in its response to nutrient by increased fuel oxidation. Recent studies have demonstrated that oxygen consumption rate (OCR may be a valuable predictor of islet quality and long term nutrient responsiveness. To date, high-throughput and user-friendly assays for islet respiration are lacking. The aim of this study was to develop such an assay and to examine bioenergetic efficiency of rodent and human islets.The XF24 respirometer platform was adapted to islets by the development of a 24-well plate specifically designed to confine islets. The islet plate generated data with low inter-well variability and enabled stable measurement of oxygen consumption for hours. The F1F0 ATP synthase blocker oligomycin was used to assess uncoupling while rotenone together with myxothiazol/antimycin was used to measure the level of non-mitochondrial respiration. The use of oligomycin in islets was validated by reversing its effect in the presence of the uncoupler FCCP. Respiratory leak averaged to 59% and 49% of basal OCR in islets from C57Bl6/J and FVB/N mice, respectively. In comparison, respiratory leak of INS-1 cells and C2C12 myotubes was measured to 38% and 23% respectively. Islets from a cohort of human donors showed a respiratory leak of 38%, significantly lower than mouse islets.The assay for islet respiration presented here provides a novel tool that can be used to study islet mitochondrial function in a relatively high-throughput manner. The data obtained in this study shows that rodent islets are less bioenergetically efficient than human islets as well as INS1 cells.

  15. Mitochondrial haplogroups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benn, Marianne; Schwartz, Marianne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2008-01-01

    Rare mutations in the mitochondrial genome may cause disease. Mitochondrial haplogroups defined by common polymorphisms have been associated with risk of disease and longevity. We tested the hypothesis that common haplogroups predict risk of ischemic cardiovascular disease, morbidity from other...

  16. Jules Verne's Metaphor of the Iron Cage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossewaarde, Marinus R.R.

    2010-01-01

    Max Weber's concept of the iron cage has become a byword in the scholarly world since the publication in 1930 of Talcott Parsons’ translation of The Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism. What is less well-known is that Jules Verne had earlier used the iron cage metaphor in Twenty Thousand

  17. Geomechanics of fracture caging in wellbores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijermars, Ruud; Zhang, Xi; Schultz-Ela, Dan

    2013-06-01

    This study highlights the occurrence of so-called `fracture cages' around underbalanced wellbores, where fractures cannot propagate outwards due to unfavourable principal stress orientations. The existence of such cages is demonstrated here by independent analytical and numerical methods. We explain the fracture caging mechanism and pinpoint the physical parameters and conditions for its control. This new insight has great practical relevance for the effectiveness and safety of drilling operations in general, and hydraulic fracturing in particular. Fracture caging runaway poses a hazard for drilling operations in overpressured formations. Recognition of the fracture caging mechanism also opens up new opportunities for controlled engineering of its effects by the manipulation of the Frac number in wells in order to bring more precision in the fracking process of tight formations.

  18. Acetoacetate reduces growth and ATP concentration in cancer cell lines which over-express uncoupling protein 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quadros Edward V

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent evidence suggests that several human cancers are capable of uncoupling of mitochondrial ATP generation in the presence of intact tricarboxylic acid (TCA enzymes. The goal of the current study was to test the hypothesis that ketone bodies can inhibit cell growth in aggressive cancers and that expression of uncoupling protein 2 is a contributing factor. The proposed mechanism involves inhibition of glycolytic ATP production via a Randle-like cycle while increased uncoupling renders cancers unable to produce compensatory ATP from respiration. Methods Seven aggressive human cancer cell lines, and three control fibroblast lines were grown in vitro in either 10 mM glucose medium (GM, or in glucose plus 10 mM acetoacetate [G+AcA]. The cells were assayed for cell growth, ATP production and expression of UCP2. Results There was a high correlation of cell growth with ATP concentration (r = 0.948 in a continuum across all cell lines. Controls demonstrated normal cell growth and ATP with the lowest density of mitochondrial UCP2 staining while all cancer lines demonstrated proportionally inhibited growth and ATP, and over-expression of UCP2 (p Conclusion Seven human cancer cell lines grown in glucose plus acetoacetate medium showed tightly coupled reduction of growth and ATP concentration. The findings were not observed in control fibroblasts. The observed over-expression of UCP2 in cancer lines, but not in controls, provides a plausible molecular mechanism by which acetoacetate spares normal cells but suppresses growth in cancer lines. The results bear on the hypothesized potential for ketogenic diets as therapeutic strategies.

  19. Mitochondrial dysfunction accounts for the stochastic heterogeneity in telomere-dependent senescence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João F Passos

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Aging is an inherently stochastic process, and its hallmark is heterogeneity between organisms, cell types, and clonal populations, even in identical environments. The replicative lifespan of primary human cells is telomere dependent; however, its heterogeneity is not understood. We show that mitochondrial superoxide production increases with replicative age in human fibroblasts despite an adaptive UCP-2-dependent mitochondrial uncoupling. This mitochondrial dysfunction is accompanied by compromised [Ca(2+]i homeostasis and other indicators of a retrograde response in senescent cells. Replicative senescence of human fibroblasts is delayed by mild mitochondrial uncoupling. Uncoupling reduces mitochondrial superoxide generation, slows down telomere shortening, and delays formation of telomeric gamma-H2A.X foci. This indicates mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS as one of the causes of replicative senescence. By sorting early senescent (SES cells from young proliferating fibroblast cultures, we show that SES cells have higher ROS levels, dysfunctional mitochondria, shorter telomeres, and telomeric gamma-H2A.X foci. We propose that mitochondrial ROS is a major determinant of telomere-dependent senescence at the single-cell level that is responsible for cell-to-cell variation in replicative lifespan.

  20. Distribution of mitochondrial nucleoids upon mitochondrial network fragmentation and network reintegration in HEPG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauber, Jan; Dlasková, Andrea; Šantorová, Jitka; Smolková, Katarína; Alán, Lukáš; Špaček, Tomáš; Plecitá-Hlavatá, Lydie; Jabůrek, Martin; Ježek, Petr

    2013-03-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is organized in nucleoids in complex with accessory proteins, proteins of mtDNA replication and gene expression machinery. A robust mtDNA genome is represented by hundreds to thousands of nucleoids in cell mitochondrion. Detailed information is lacking about the dynamics of nucleoid distribution within the mitochondrial network upon physiological and pathological events. Therefore, we used confocal microscopy to study mitochondrial nucleoid redistribution upon mitochondrial fission and following reintegration of the mitochondrial network. Fission was induced by oxidative stress at respiration inhibition by rotenone or upon elimination of the protonmotive force by uncoupling or upon canceling its electrical component, ΔΨ(m), by valinomycin; and by silencing of mitofusin MFN2. Agent withdrawal resulted in concomitant mitochondrial network reintegration. We found two major principal morphological states: (i) a tubular state of the mitochondrial network with equidistant nucleoid spacing, 1.10±0.2 nucleoids per μm, and (ii) a fragmented state of solitary spheroid objects in which several nucleoids were clustered. We rarely observed singular mitochondrial fragments with a single nucleoid inside and very seldom we observed empty fragments. Reintegration of fragments into the mitochondrial network re-established the tubular state with equidistant nucleoid spacing. The two major morphological states coexisted at intermediate stages. These observations suggest that both mitochondrial network fission and reconnection of the disintegrated network are nucleoid-centric, i.e., fission and new mitochondrial tubule formation are initiated around nucleoids. Analyses of combinations of these morphological icons thus provide a basis for a future mitochondrial morphology diagnostics. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Mitochondrial vasculopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Zarrouk-Mahjoub, Sinda

    2016-05-26

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) are usually multisystem disorders (mitochondrial multiorgan disorder syndrome) either on from onset or starting at a point during the disease course. Most frequently affected tissues are those with a high oxygen demand such as the central nervous system, the muscle, endocrine glands, or the myocardium. Recently, it has been shown that rarely also the arteries may be affected (mitochondrial arteriopathy). This review focuses on the type, diagnosis, and treatment of mitochondrial vasculopathy in MID patients. A literature search using appropriate search terms was carried out. Mitochondrial vasculopathy manifests as either microangiopathy or macroangiopathy. Clinical manifestations of mitochondrial microangiopathy include leukoencephalopathy, migraine-like headache, stroke-like episodes, or peripheral retinopathy. Mitochondrial macroangiopathy manifests as atherosclerosis, ectasia of arteries, aneurysm formation, dissection, or spontaneous rupture of arteries. The diagnosis relies on the documentation and confirmation of the mitochondrial metabolic defect or the genetic cause after exclusion of non-MID causes. Treatment is not at variance compared to treatment of vasculopathy due to non-MID causes. Mitochondrial vasculopathy exists and manifests as micro- or macroangiopathy. Diagnosing mitochondrial vasculopathy is crucial since appropriate treatment may prevent from severe complications.

  2. Mitochondrial ATP is required for the maintenance of membrane integrity in stallion spermatozoa, whereas motility requires both glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davila, M Plaza; Muñoz, P Martin; Bolaños, J M Gallardo; Stout, T A E|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/304828831; Gadella, B M|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/115389873; Tapia, J A; da Silva, C Balao; Ferrusola, C Ortega; Peña, F J

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the hypothesis that oxidative phosphorylation is a major source of ATP to fuel stallion sperm motility, oxidative phosphorylation was suppressed using the mitochondrial uncouplers CCCP and 2,4,-dinitrophenol (DNP) and by inhibiting mitochondrial respiration at complex IV using sodium

  3. Cell Death and Heart Failure in Obesity: Role of Uncoupling Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélica Ruiz-Ramírez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic diseases such as obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type II diabetes are often characterized by increased reactive oxygen species (ROS generation in mitochondrial respiratory complexes, associated with fat accumulation in cardiomyocytes, skeletal muscle, and hepatocytes. Several rodents studies showed that lipid accumulation in cardiac myocytes produces lipotoxicity that causes apoptosis and leads to heart failure, a dynamic pathological process. Meanwhile, several tissues including cardiac tissue develop an adaptive mechanism against oxidative stress and lipotoxicity by overexpressing uncoupling proteins (UCPs, specific mitochondrial membrane proteins. In heart from rodent and human with obesity, UCP2 and UCP3 may protect cardiomyocytes from death and from a state progressing to heart failure by downregulating programmed cell death. UCP activation may affect cytochrome c and proapoptotic protein release from mitochondria by reducing ROS generation and apoptotic cell death. Therefore the aim of this review is to discuss recent findings regarding the role that UCPs play in cardiomyocyte survival by protecting against ROS generation and maintaining bioenergetic metabolism homeostasis to promote heart protection.

  4. Design and synthesis of photolabile caged cytokinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Ken-ichiro; Kusaka, Naoyuki; Ando, Kazuki; Mitsui, Taichi; Aoyama, Takashi; Nozaki, Hiroshi

    2012-09-01

    Cytokinins are phytohormones that regulate diverse developmental processes throughout the life of a plant. trans-Zeatin, kinetin, benzyladenine and dihydrozeatin are adenine-type cytokinins that are perceived by the AHK cytokinin receptors. Endogenous cytokinin levels are critical for regulating plant development. To manipulate intracellular cytokinin levels, caged cytokinins were designed on the basis of the crystal structure of the AHK4 cytokinin receptor. The caged cytokinin was photolyzed to release the cytokinin molecule inside the cells and induce cytokinin-responsive gene expression. The uncaging of intracellular caged cytokinins demonstrated that cytokinin-induced root growth inhibition can be manipulated with photo-irradiation. This caged cytokinin system could be a powerful tool for cytokinin biology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cold-acclimation-induced non-shivering thermogenesis in birds is associated with upregulation of avian UCP but not with innate uncoupling or altered ATP efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teulier, Loïc; Rouanet, Jean-Louis; Letexier, Dominique; Romestaing, Caroline; Belouze, Maud; Rey, Benjamin; Duchamp, Claude; Roussel, Damien

    2010-07-15

    Despite their lack of brown adipose tissue, some bird species develop regulatory non-shivering thermogenesis (NST) of skeletal muscle origin in response to cold acclimation. Mechanisms involved in avian NST are still unclear but may involve reduced energetic coupling in skeletal muscle mitochondria through the expression of an avian homologue of mammalian uncoupling proteins. The aim of this work was to investigate whether the expression of avian uncoupling protein (avUCP) would correlate with the capacity for cold-induced muscle NST. Various levels of cold acclimation were obtained by rearing 1-week-old ducklings (Cairina moschata) for 4 weeks at three different ambient temperatures (25 degrees C, 11 degrees C or 4 degrees C). Muscle NST was measured by simultaneous recordings of metabolic rate and electromyographic activity (gastrocnemius muscle) at ambient temperatures (T(a)) ranging from 27 degrees C to -5 degrees C. The expression of avUCP gene and mitochondrial bioenergetics were also determined in gastrocnemius muscle. Results showed that muscle NST capacity depends on the T(a) at which ducklings were acclimated, i.e. the lower the rearing temperature, the higher the capacity for NST. This increased metabolic heat production occurred in parallel with an upregulation of avUCP, which was not associated with a change in mitochondrial membrane conductance. The intensity of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation also increased in proportion with the harshness of cold, while the efficiency of ATP generation was equally effective in all three acclimation temperatures. In the absence of mitochondrial uncoupling, these data indicate a clear link between avUCP expression and the capacity of ducklings to adjust their muscular aerobic activity to cold exposure.

  6. Mitochondrial Myopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms of mitochondrial myopathies include muscle weakness or exercise intolerance, heart failure or rhythm disturbances, dementia, movement disorders, stroke-like episodes, deafness, blindness, droopy ...

  7. Optogenetic control of mitochondrial metabolism and Ca2+ signaling by mitochondria-targeted opsins

    OpenAIRE

    Tkatch, Tatiana; Greotti, Elisa; Baranauskas, Gytis; Pendin, Diana; Roy, Soumitra; Nita, Luliaoana I.; Wettmarshausen, Jennifer; Prigge, Matthias; Yizhar, Ofer; Shirihai, Orian S.; Fishman, Daniel; Hershfinkel, Michal; Fleidervish, Ilya A; Perocchi, Fabiana; Pozzan, Tullio

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondrial functions depend on the steep H+ electrochemical gradient (??H+) across their inner membrane. The available tools for controlling this gradient are essentially limited to inhibitors of the respiratory chain or of the H+ ATPase or to uncouplers, poisons plagued by important side effects and that lack both cell and spatial specificity. We show here that, by transfecting cells with the cDNA encoding channelrhodopsins specifically targeted to the inner mitochondrial membrane, we can...

  8. Metabolically inert perfluorinated fatty acids directly activate uncoupling protein 1 in brown-fat mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabalina, Irina G; Kalinovich, Anastasia V; Cannon, Barbara; Nedergaard, Jan

    2016-05-01

    The metabolically inert perfluorinated fatty acids perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) can display fatty acid-like activity in biological systems. The uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in brown adipose tissue is physiologically (re)activated by fatty acids, including octanoate. This leads to bioenergetically uncoupled energy dissipation (heat production, thermogenesis). We have examined here the possibility that PFOA/PFOS can directly (re)activate UCP1 in isolated mouse brown-fat mitochondria. In wild-type brown-fat mitochondria, PFOS and PFOA overcame GDP-inhibited thermogenesis, leading to increased oxygen consumption and dissipated membrane potential. The absence of this effect in brown-fat mitochondria from UCP1-ablated mice indicated that it occurred through activation of UCP1. A competitive type of inhibition by increased GDP concentrations indicated interaction with the same mechanistic site as that utilized by fatty acids. No effect was observed in heart mitochondria, i.e., in mitochondria without UCP1. The stimulatory effect of PFOA/PFOS was not secondary to non-specific mitochondrial membrane permeabilization or to ROS production. Thus, metabolic effects of perfluorinated fatty acids could include direct brown adipose tissue (UCP1) activation. The possibility that this may lead to unwarranted extra heat production and thus extra utilization of food resources, leading to decreased fitness in mammalian wildlife, is discussed, as well as possible negative effects in humans. However, a possibility to utilize PFOA-/PFOS-like substances for activating UCP1 therapeutically in obesity-prone humans may also be envisaged.

  9. Sludge reduction by uncoupling metabolism: SBR tests with para-nitrophenol and a commercial uncoupler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuriaga-Agustí, E; Mendoza-Roca, J A; Bes-Piá, A; Alonso-Molina, J L; Amorós-Muñoz, I

    2016-11-01

    Nowadays cost reduction is a very important issue in wastewater treatment plants. One way, is to minimize the sludge production. Microorganisms break down the organic matter into inorganic compounds through catabolism. Uncoupling metabolism is a method which promote catabolism reactions instead of anabolism ones, where adenosine triphosphate synthesis is inhibited. In this work, the influence of the addition of para-nitrophenol and a commercial reagent to a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) on sludge production and process performance has been analyzed. Three laboratory SBRs were operated in parallel to compare the effect of the addition of both reagents with a control reactor. SBRs were fed with synthetic wastewater and were operated with the same conditions. Results showed that sludge production was slightly reduced for the tested para-nitrophenol concentrations (20 and 25 mg/L) and for a LODOred dose of 1 mL/day. Biological process performance was not influenced and high COD removals were achieved. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. HeliscopeCAGE sequencing, Delve mapping and CAGE TSS aggregation - FANTOM5 | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us FANTOM5 HeliscopeCAGE sequencing, Delve mapping and CAGE TSS aggregation Data detail Data name Heliscope...thod - Data analysis method HeliScopeCAGE ( http://fantom.gsc.riken.jp/protocols/heliscope.html ) Delve (Ali...Database Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us HeliscopeCAGE

  11. Parkin suppresses Drp1-independent mitochondrial division

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Madhuparna, E-mail: mroy17@jhmi.edu; Itoh, Kie, E-mail: kito5@jhmi.edu; Iijima, Miho, E-mail: miijima@jhmi.edu; Sesaki, Hiromi, E-mail: hsesaki@jhmi.edu

    2016-07-01

    The cycle of mitochondrial division and fusion disconnect and reconnect individual mitochondria in cells to remodel this energy-producing organelle. Although dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) plays a major role in mitochondrial division in cells, a reduced level of mitochondrial division still persists even in the absence of Drp1. It is unknown how much Drp1-mediated mitochondrial division accounts for the connectivity of mitochondria. The role of a Parkinson’s disease-associated protein—parkin, which biochemically and genetically interacts with Drp1—in mitochondrial connectivity also remains poorly understood. Here, we quantified the number and connectivity of mitochondria using mitochondria-targeted photoactivatable GFP in cells. We show that the loss of Drp1 increases the connectivity of mitochondria by 15-fold in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). While a single loss of parkin does not affect the connectivity of mitochondria, the connectivity of mitochondria significantly decreased compared with a single loss of Drp1 when parkin was lost in the absence of Drp1. Furthermore, the loss of parkin decreased the frequency of depolarization of the mitochondrial inner membrane that is caused by increased mitochondrial connectivity in Drp1-knockout MEFs. Therefore, our data suggest that parkin negatively regulates Drp1-indendent mitochondrial division. -- Highlights: •A Drp1-mediated mechanism accounts for ∼95% of mitochondrial division. •Parkin controls the connectivity of mitochondria via a mechanism that is independent of Drp1. •In the absence of Drp1, connected mitochondria transiently depolarize. •The transient depolarization is independent of calcium signaling and uncoupling protein 2.

  12. Furnished cage system and hen well-being: Comparative effects of furnished cages and battery cages on behavioral exhibitions in White Leghorn chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohle, K; Cheng, H-W

    2009-08-01

    The battery cage system is being banned in the European Union before or by 2012, and the furnished cage system will be the only cage system allowed after 2012. This study was conducted to examine the different effects of caging systems, furnished cages vs. battery cages, on bird behaviors. One hundred ninety-two 1-d-old non-beak-trimmed Hy-Line W-36 White Leghorn chicks were reared using standard management practices in raised wire cages. At 19 wk of age, the birds were randomly assigned into battery cages or furnished cages. The battery cages were commercial wire cages containing 6 birds per cage, providing 645 cm(2) of floor space per birds. The furnished cages had wire floors and solid metal walls, with perches, a dustbathing area, scratch pads, and a nestbox area with a concealment curtain. Based on the company recommendations, 10 birds were housed per cage, providing a stocking density of 610 cm(2) of floor space per bird. Behavioral observations were conducted using the Noldus Observer software package. The birds were observed at 5-min intervals for the entire light period. The birds housed in battery cages had higher posture and behavioral transitions and increased time spent walking and performing exploratory behavior (P < 0.05, 0.01, respectively), which may indicate they were stressed, resulting in restlessness, whereas the birds housed in furnished cages had higher levels of preening (P < 0.05). Preening has been considered as a comfort behavior in birds. These results may suggest that furnished cages may be a favorable alternative system for housing birds by allowing them to perform certain natural behaviors.

  13. Uncoupler resistance in E. coli Tuv and Cuv is due to the exclusion of uncoupler by the outer membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haworth, Robert S.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Michelsen, Ole

    1990-01-01

    is freely permeable to both TPP+ and hydroxymethylinulin. Tuv and Cuv are able to exclude these compounds. EDTA treatment was necessary prior to measuring membrane potentials in Tuv and Cuv. Under conditions where Δψ could be measured, uncouplers acted to dissipate Δψ with equal potency in all strains...

  14. Uncoupling in Secondary Transport Proteins. A Mechanistic Explanation for Mutants of lac Permease with an Uncoupled Phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lolkema, J.S.; Poolman, B.

    1995-01-01

    The kinetic behavior of a H+-substrate symporter has been studied in which in addition to the unloaded (E) and fully loaded states (E.S.H) of the carrier also one of the binary complexes (E.S or E.H) may reorient its binding sites. This results in two types of uncoupled mutants, the ES leak and the

  15. Efficacy of anterior cervical fusion: comparison of titanium cages, polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages and autogenous bone grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Yu-Cheng; Chen, Der-Cherng; Hsieh, Wanhua Annie; Chen, Wu-Fu; Yen, Pao-Sheng; Harnod, Tomor; Chiou, Tsung-Lang; Chang, Yuh-Lin; Su, Chain-Fa; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Chen, Shin-Yuan

    2008-11-01

    This retrospective study was designed to analyze and compare the efficacy and outcomes of anterior cervical fusion using titanium cages, polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages and autogenous tricortical bone grafts. Fifty-five patients who underwent segmental anterior discectomy with a follow-up period up to 12 months enrolled in this study. They were divided into three groups: titanium cage with biphasic calcium phosphate ceramic (Triosite; Zimmer, Berlin, Germany) in group A (n=27); PEEK cage with Triosite in group B (n=9); and autogenous tricortical iliac crest bone graft in group C (n=19). The fusion rates after 6 months were 37.21% in group A , 93.3% in group B, and 84.85% in group C. The fusion rates after 1 year in groups A, B, and C were 46.51%, 100% and 100%, respectively. The PEEK cage is a viable alternative to autogenous tricortical bone grafts in anterior cervical fusion.

  16. Development of net cage acoustic alarm system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Shih-Wei; Wei, Ruey-Chang

    2004-05-01

    In recent years, the fishery production has been drastically decreased in Taiwan, mainly due to overfishing and coast pollution; therefore, fishermen and corporations are encouraged by government to invest in ocean net cage aquaculture. However, the high-price fishes in the net cage are often coveted, so incidences of fish stealing and net cage breaking were found occasionally, which cause great economical loss. Security guards or a visual monitoring system has limited effect, especially in the night when these intrusions occur. This study is based on acoustic measure to build a net cage alarm system, which includes the sonobuoy and monitor station on land. The sonobuoy is a passive sonar that collects the sounds near the net cage and transmits the suspected signal to the monitor station. The signals are analyzed by the control program on the personal computer in the monitor station, and the alarms at different stages could be activated by the sound levels and durations of the analyzed data. To insure long hours of surveillance, a solar panel is applied to charge the battery, and a photodetector is used to activate the system.

  17. A novel amino acid and metabolomics signature in mice overexpressing muscle uncoupling protein 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguer, Céline; Piccolo, Brian D; Fiehn, Oliver; Adams, Sean H; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2017-02-01

    Uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) is highly selectively expressed in skeletal muscle and is known to lower mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and promote fatty acid oxidation; however, the global impact of UCP3 activity on skeletal muscle and whole-body metabolism have not been extensively studied. We utilized untargeted metabolomics to identify novel metabolites that distinguish mice overexpressing UCP3 in muscle, both at rest and after exercise regimens that challenged muscle metabolism, to potentially unmask subtle phenotypes. Male wild-type (WT) and muscle-specific UCP3-overexpressing transgenic (UCP3 Tg) C57BL/6J mice were compared with or without a 5 wk endurance training protocol at rest or after an acute exercise bout (EB). Skeletal muscle, liver, and plasma samples were analyzed by gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Discriminant metabolites were considered if within the top 99th percentile of variable importance measurements obtained from partial least-squares discriminant analysis models. A total of 80 metabolites accurately discriminated UCP3 Tg mice from WT when modeled within a specific exercise condition (i.e., untrained/rested, endurance trained/rested, untrained/EB, and endurance trained/EB). Results revealed that several amino acids and amino acid derivatives in skeletal muscle and plasma of UCP3 Tg mice (e.g., Asp, Glu, Lys, Tyr, Ser, Met) were significantly reduced after an EB; that metabolites associated with skeletal muscle glutathione/Met/Cys metabolism (2-hydroxybutanoic acid, oxoproline, Gly, and Glu) were altered in UCP3 Tg mice across all training and exercise conditions; and that muscle metabolite indices of dehydrogenase activity were increased in UCP3 Tg mice, suggestive of a shift in tissue NADH/NAD(+) ratio. The results indicate that mitochondrial UCP3 activity affects metabolism well beyond fatty acid oxidation, regulating biochemical pathways associated with amino acid metabolism and redox status. That select

  18. Arsenate uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation in isolated plant mitochondria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wickes, W.A.; Wiskich, J.T.

    1976-01-01

    The uncoupling by arsenate of beetroot and cauliflower bud mitochondria showed the following characteristics: arsenate stimulation of respiration above the rate found with phosphate; inhibition of arsenate-stimulated respiration by phosphate; enhancement of arsenate-stimulated respiration by ADP; only partial prevention of this ADP-enhanced respiration by atractyloside; inhibition by oligomycin of the arsenate-stimulated respiration back to the phosphate rate; and the absence of any stimulatory effect of ADP in the presence of oligomycin. These results are qualitatively analogous to those reported for arsenate uncoupling in rat liver mitochondria. Arsenate stimulated malate oxidation, presumably by stimulating malate entry, in both beetroot and cauliflower bud mitochondria; however, high rates of oxidation, and presumably entry, were only sustained with arsenate in beetroot mitochondria. NADH was oxidized rapidly in cauliflower bud mitochondria in the presence of arsenate, showing that arsenate did not inhibit electron transfer processes.

  19. Mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Russell G.; Bottino, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on mitochondrial DNA, pointing out that it may have once been a free-living organism. Includes a ready-to-duplicate exercise titled "Using Microchondrial DNA to Measure Evolutionary Distance." (JN)

  20. The effect of the water/methane interface on methane hydrate cages: the potential of mean force and cage lifetimes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastny, Ethan A; Miller, Clark A; de Pablo, Juan J

    2008-07-21

    Molecular dynamics simulations were used to determine the influence of a methane-water interface on the position and stability of methane hydrate cages. A potential of mean force was calculated as a function of the separation of a methane hydrate cage and a methane-water interface. The hydrate cages are found to be strongly repelled from the methane gas into the water phase. At low enough temperatures, however, the most favorable location for the hydrate cage is at the interface on the water side. Cage lifetime simulations were performed in bulk water and near a methane-water interface. The methane-water interface increases the cage lifetime by almost a factor of 2 compared to cage lifetimes of cages in bulk water. The potential of mean force and the cage lifetime results give additional explanations for the proposed nucleation of gas hydrates at gas-water interfaces.

  1. The Edinburgh modified cage for laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, M C; Hughes, B O

    1995-12-01

    1. Behaviour, production and welfare of ISA Brown medium hybrids were assessed in 2 trials (each from 20 to 44 weeks of age) of a novel design of cage for laying hens: the Edinburgh Modified Cage (EMC). 2. The EMC was 600 mm wide, 450 mm deep and 450 mm high at the rear; it had a softwood perch and at one side a 250 mm wide nest box (containing litter or artificial turf) with a dust bath directly above. It housed 4 birds and provided 675 cm2/bird in the main cage with an additional 281 cm2/bird in the nest box. The nest box and dust bath had automatically controlled doors which were closed at night. There were 18 EMC; in the first trial these were compared with 6 control cages with perch but without next box or dust bath. 3. Hens spent 32 to 37% of day time on the perch, 5 to 7% in the dust bath and 5 to 6% in the nest. At night 92 to 98% roosted on the perch. 4. Initially only 55 to 70% of eggs were laid in the nest box partly because some eggs were laid before dawn. Once the door was retimed to open 3h before lights-on the proportion rose to 91 to 96%. Very few eggs were laid in the dust bath. Pre-laying behaviour lasted longer in treatments with nest boxes (55 to 76min) than in control cages (48min); disturbance was slight in all treatments, but lowest in control cages. 5. Dust baths were well used, with on average 61% of hens dust bathing during a 3-h afternoon observation period compared with only 17% in control cages. Two birds could use the dust bath simultaneously. 6. It was concluded that although a number of minor design features still required attention the EMC has potential to reduce the disadvantages of conventional cages for welfare while retaining their advantages and has possible commercial application.

  2. Laboratory rodent welfare: thinking outside the cage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcombe, Jonathan

    2010-01-01

    This commentary presents the case against housing rats and mice in laboratory cages; the commentary bases its case on their sentience, natural history, and the varied detriments of laboratory conditions. The commentary gives 5 arguments to support this position: (a) rats and mice have a high degree of sentience and can suffer, (b) laboratory environments cause suffering, (c) rats and mice in the wild have discrete behavioral needs, (d) rats and mice bred for many generations in the laboratory retain these needs, and (e) these needs are not met in laboratory cages.

  3. Uncoupling of Vascular Nitric Oxide Synthase Caused by Intermittent Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Badran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, characterized by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH, is often present in diabetic (DB patients. Both conditions are associated with endothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that diabetic endothelial dysfunction is further compromised by CIH. Methods. Adult male diabetic (BKS.Cg-Dock7m +/+ Leprdb/J (db/db mice (10 weeks old and their heterozygote littermates were subjected to CIH or intermittent air (IA for 8 weeks. Mice were separated into 4 groups: IA (intermittent air nondiabetic, IH (intermittent hypoxia nondiabetic, IADB (intermittent air diabetic, and IHDB (intermittent hypoxia diabetic groups. Endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent relaxation and modulation by basal nitric oxide (NO were analyzed using wire myograph. Plasma 8-isoprostane, interleukin-6 (IL-6, and asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA were measured using ELISA. Uncoupling of eNOS was measured using dihydroethidium (DHE staining. Results. Endothelium-dependent vasodilation and basal NO production were significantly impaired in the IH and IADB group compared to IA group but was more pronounced in IHDB group. Levels of 8-isoprostane, IL-6, ADMA, and eNOS uncoupling were ≈2-fold higher in IH and IADB groups and were further increased in the IHDB group. Conclusion. Endothelial dysfunction is more pronounced in diabetic mice subjected to CIH compared to diabetic or CIH mice alone. Oxidative stress, ADMA, and eNOS uncoupling were exacerbated by CIH in diabetic mice.

  4. Exhaustive Training Increases Uncoupling Protein 2 Expression and Decreases Bcl-2/Bax Ratio in Rat Skeletal Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Y. Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This work investigates the effects of oxidative stress due to exhaustive training on uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2 and Bcl-2/Bax in rat skeletal muscles. A total of 18 Sprague-Dawley female rats were randomly divided into three groups: the control group (CON, the trained control group (TC, and the exhaustive trained group (ET. Malondialdehyde (MDA, superoxide dismutase (SOD, xanthine oxidase (XOD, ATPase, UCP2, and Bcl-2/Bax ratio in red gastrocnemius muscles were measured. Exhaustive training induced ROS increase in red gastrocnemius muscles, which led to a decrease in the cell antiapoptotic ability (Bcl-2/Bax ratio. An increase in UCP2 expression can reduce ROS production and affect mitochondrial energy production. Thus, oxidative stress plays a significant role in overtraining.

  5. Mitochondrial targeted β-lapachone induces mitochondrial dysfunction and catastrophic vacuolization in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Lim, Chaemin; Sacher, Joshua R; Van Houten, Bennett; Qian, Wei; Wipf, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Mitochondria play important roles in tumor cell physiology and survival by providing energy and metabolites for proliferation and metastasis. As part of their oncogenic status, cancer cells frequently produce increased levels of mitochondrial-generated reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, extensive stimulation of ROS generation in mitochondria has been shown to be able to induce cancer cell death, and is one of the major mechanisms of action of many anticancer agents. We hypothesized that enhancing mitochondrial ROS generation through direct targeting of a ROS generator into mitochondria will exhibit tumor cell selectivity, as well as high efficacy in inducing cancer cell death. We thus synthesized a mitochondrial targeted version of β-lapachone (XJB-Lapachone) based on our XJB mitochondrial targeting platform. We found that the mitochondrial targeted β-lapachone is more efficient in inducing apoptosis compared to unconjugated β-lapachone, and the tumor cell selectivity is maintained. XJB-Lapachone also induced extensive cellular vacuolization and autophagy at a concentration not observed with unconjugated β-lapachone. Through characterization of mitochondrial function we revealed that XJB-Lapachone is indeed more capable of stimulating ROS generation in mitochondria, which led to a dramatic mitochondrial uncoupling and autophagic degradation of mitochondria. Taken together, we have demonstrated that targeting β-lapachone accomplishes higher efficacy through inducing ROS generation directly in mitochondria, resulting in extensive mitochondrial and cellular damage. XJB-Lapachone will thus help to establish a novel platform for the design of next generation mitochondrial targeted ROS generators for cancer therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. [MELAS: Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy, Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-Like Episodes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hidetomo; Ono, Kenjiro

    2017-02-01

    Mitochondrial disease is caused by a deficiency in the energy supply to cells due to mitochondrial dysfunction. Mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS) is a mitochondrial disease that presents with stroke-like episodes such as acute onset of neurological deficits and characteristic imaging findings. Stroke-like episodes in MELAS have the following features: 1) neurological deficits due to localization of lesions in the brain, 2) episodes often accompany epilepsy, 3) lesions do not follow the vascular supply area, 4) lesions are more often seen in the posterior brain than in the anterior brain, 5) lesions spread to an adjacent area in the brain, and 6) neurological symptoms often disappear together with imaging findings, but later relapse. About 80% of patients with MELAS have an A-to-G transition mutation at the nucleotide pair 3243 in the dihydrouridine loop of mitochondrial tRNALeu(UUR), which causes the absence of posttranscriptional taurine modification at the wobble nucleotide of mitochondrial tRNALeu(UUR) and disrupts protein synthesis. However, the precise pathophysiology of stroke-like episodes is under investigation, with possible hypotheses for these episodes including mitochondrial angiopathy, mitochondrial cytopathy, and neuron-astrocyte uncoupling. With regard to treatment, L-arginine and taurine have recently been suggested for relief of clinical symptoms.

  7. Pentagonal dodecahedron methane hydrate cage and methanol ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    petroleum industry as it plugs the oil flow.12 Restric- tion of hydrate plug ... Interaction energy ( E) for cluster formation has been determined using .... Interaction energies are mentioned in table 2 for all three 1CH4@512 cage, 1CH4@512-methanol clus- ter and 1CH4@512-methanol-Na. + cluster systems. Formation of ...

  8. Resonance spectra of caged black holes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hod, Shahar [The Ruppin Academic Center, Emeq Hefer (Israel); The Hadassah Institute, Jerusalem (Israel)

    2014-11-15

    Recent numerical studies of the coupled Einstein-Klein-Gordon system in a cavity have provided compelling evidence that confined scalar fields generically collapse to form black holes. Motivated by this intriguing discovery, we here use analytical tools in order to study the characteristic resonance spectra of the confined fields. These discrete resonant frequencies are expected to dominate the late-time dynamics of the coupled black-hole-field-cage system. We consider caged Reissner-Nordstroem black holes whose confining mirrors are placed in the near-horizon region x{sub m} ≡ (r{sub m} - r{sub +})/r{sub +} << τ ≡ (r{sub +} - r{sub -})/r{sub +} (here r{sub m} is the radius of the confining mirror and r{sub ±} are the radii of the black-hole horizons). We obtain a simple analytical expression for the fundamental quasinormal resonances of the coupled blackhole- field-cage system: ω{sub n} = -2πT{sub BH}.n [1 + O(x{sub m}{sup n}/τ{sup n})], where T{sub BH} is the temperature of the caged black hole and n = 1, 2, 3,.. is the resonance parameter. (orig.)

  9. Geomechanics of fracture caging in wellbores

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijermars, R.; Zhang, X.; Schultz-Ela, D.

    2013-01-01

    This study highlights the occurrence of so-called ‘fracture cages’ around underbalanced wellbores, where fractures cannot propagate outwards due to unfavourable principal stress orientations. The existence of such cages is demonstrated here by independent analytical and numerical methods. We explain

  10. High-throughput Transcriptome analysis, CAGE and beyond

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2008-11-25

    1. Current research - PhD work on discovery of new allergens - Postdoctoral work on Transcriptional Start Sites a) Tag based technologies allow higher throughput b) CAGE technology to define promoters c) CAGE data analysis to understand Transcription - Wo

  11. Uncoupling Protein 2 Regulates Palmitic Acid-Induced Hepatoma Cell Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaxin Lou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2 is suggested to have a role in the development of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH. However, the mechanism remains unclear. Autophagy is an important mediator of many pathological responses. This study aims to investigate the relationship between UCP2 and hepatoma cells autophagy in palmitic acid- (PA- induced lipotoxicity. H4IIE cells were treated with palmitic acid (PA, and cell autophagy and apoptosis were examined. UCP2 expression, in association with LC3-II and caspase-3, which are indicators of cell autophagy and apoptosis, respectively,was measured. Results demonstrated that UCP2 was associated with autophagy during PA-induced hepatic carcinoma cells injury. Tests on reactive oxygen species (ROS showed that UCP2 overexpression strongly decreases PA-induced ROS production and apoptosis. Conversely, UCP2 inhibition by genipin or UCP2 mRNA silencing enhances PA-induced ROS production and apoptosis. Autophagy partially participates in this progress. Moreover, UCP2 was associated with ATP synthesis during PA-induced autophagy. In conclusion, increasing UCP2 expression in hepatoma cells may contribute to cell autophagy and antiapoptotic as result of fatty acid injury. Our results may bring new insights for potential NASH therapies.

  12. Inhibition of Uncoupling Protein 2 Attenuates Cardiac Hypertrophy Induced by Transverse Aortic Constriction in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Bing Ji

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2 is critical in regulating energy metabolism. Due to the significant change in energy metabolism of myocardium upon pressure overload, we hypothesize that UCP2 could contribute to the etiology of cardiac hypertrophy. Methods: Adult male C57BL/6J mice were subjected to pressure overload by using transverse aortic constriction (TAC, and then received genipin (a UCP2 selective inhibitor; 25 mg/kg/d, ip or vehicle for three weeks prior to histologic assessment of myocardial hypertrophy. ATP concentration, ROS level, and myocardial apoptosis were also examined. A parallel set of experiments was also conducted in UCP2-/- mice. Results: TAC induced left ventricular hypertrophy, as reflected by increased ventricular weight/thickness and increased size of myocardial cell (vs. sham controls. ATP concentration was decreased; ROS level was increased. Apoptosis and fibrosis markers were increased. TAC increased mitochondrial UCP2 expression in the myocardium at both mRNA and protein levels. Genipin treatment attenuated cardiac hypertrophy and the histologic/biochemical changes described above. Hypertrophy and associated changes induced by TAC in UCP2-/- mice were much less pronounced than in WT mice. Conclusions: Blocking UCP2 expression attenuates cardiac hypertrophy induced by pressure overload.

  13. Difference in intracellular temperature rise between matured and precursor brown adipocytes in response to uncoupler and β-adrenergic agonist stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Toshikazu; Ikado, Kumiko; Koizumi, Hideki; Uchiyama, Seiichi; Kajimoto, Kazuaki

    2017-10-10

    Brown adipocytes function to maintain body temperature by heat production. However, direct measurement of heat production at a single cell level remains difficult. Here we developed a method to measure the temperature within primary cultured brown adipocytes using a cationic fluorescent polymeric thermometer. Placement of the thermometer within a matured brown adipocyte and a precursor cell enabled the detection of heat production following uncoupler treatment. The increase in the intracellular temperature due to stimulation with a mitochondrial uncoupler was higher in matured brown adipocytes than in precursor cells. Stimulation with a β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) agonist, norepinephrine, raised the intracellular temperature of matured brown adipocytes to a level comparable to that observed after stimulation with a β3-AR-specific agonist, CL316.243. In contrast, neither β-AR agonist induced an intracellular temperature increase in precursor cells. Further, pretreatment of brown adipocytes with a β3-AR antagonist inhibited the norepinephrine-stimulated elevation of temperature. These results demonstrate that our novel method successfully determined the difference in intracellular temperature increase between matured brown adipocytes and precursor cells in response to stimulation by an uncoupler and β-AR agonists.

  14. Mitochondrial dysfunction in blood cells from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehinger, Johannes K; Morota, Saori; Hansson, Magnus J; Paul, Gesine; Elmér, Eskil

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction is implicated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, where the progressive degeneration of motor neurons results in muscle atrophy, paralysis and death. Abnormalities in both central nervous system and muscle mitochondria have previously been demonstrated in patient samples, indicating systemic disease. In this case-control study, venous blood samples were acquired from 24 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients and 21 age-matched controls. Platelets and peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated and mitochondrial oxygen consumption measured in intact and permeabilized cells with additions of mitochondrial substrates, inhibitors and titration of an uncoupler. Respiratory values were normalized to cell count and for two markers of cellular mitochondrial content, citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial DNA, respectively. Mitochondrial function was correlated with clinical staging of disease severity. Complex IV (cytochrome c-oxidase)-activity normalized to mitochondrial content was decreased in platelets from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients both when normalized to citrate synthase activity and mitochondrial DNA copy number. In mononuclear cells, complex IV-activity was decreased when normalized to citrate synthase activity. Mitochondrial content was increased in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patient platelets. In mononuclear cells, complex I activity declined and mitochondrial content increased progressively with advancing disease stage. The findings are, however, based on small subsets of patients and need to be confirmed. We conclude that when normalized to mitochondria-specific content, complex IV-activity is reduced in blood cells from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients and that there is an apparent compensatory increase in cellular mitochondrial content. This supports systemic involvement in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and suggests further study of mitochondrial function in blood cells as a future biomarker for the

  15. Effects of acute and chronic endurance exercise on mitochondrial uncoupling in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernström, Maria; Tonkonogi, Michail; Sahlin, Kent

    2004-01-01

    respiration or state 3). Protein expression of UCP3 and ANT was measured with Western blotting. After endurance training, .VO2peak, citrate synthase activity (CS), state 3 respiration and ANT increased by 24, 47, 40 and 95%, respectively (all P

  16. Power generation and control of a self excited squirrel cage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Technology ... The wind turbine is to be tied mechanically to the rotor of a squirrel cage induction which is fed with grid powerthat the generator supplies. ... Keywords: Wind Power systems, Self-excited squirrel cage induction generator, squirrel cage induction motor, backto- back converter, simulation ...

  17. Bacterial eggshell contamination in conventional cages, furnished cages and aviary housing systems for laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Reu, K; Grijspeerdt, K; Heyndrickx, M; Zoons, J; De Baere, K; Uyttendaele, M; Debevere, J; Herman, L

    2005-04-01

    The influence of housing system on the initial bacterial contamination of the eggshell was studied. Two long-term experiments were performed. Bacterial eggshell contamination, as expressed by total count of aerobic and Gram-negative bacteria, was periodically analysed for eggs from a conventional cage, a furnished cage with nest boxes containing artificial turf or grids as nest-floor material and an aviary housing system. Results were log-transformed prior to statistical analyses. For both experiments no systematic differences were found between the conventional cage and furnished cage. The type of nest-floor material in the nest boxes of the furnished cages also did not systematically influence the bacterial contamination. A possible seasonal influence on contamination with a decrease in the winter period (up to > 0.5 log cfu/eggshell) of total count of aerobic and Gram-negative bacteria was observed in the first experiment. The contamination with total aerobic flora was higher (more than 1.0 log) on eggs from the aviary housing system compared to the conventional and the furnished cage systems. For Gram-negative bacteria this was not the case. During the entire period of both experiments, independent of housing system, shell contamination was not influenced by age of hens or period since placing the birds in the houses. For the total count of aerobic bacteria a restricted positive correlation (r2 = 0.66) was found between the concentration of total bacteria in the air of the poultry houses and initial shell contamination.

  18. Dengue virus induces mitochondrial elongation through impairment of Drp1-triggered mitochondrial fission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbier, Vincent; Lang, Diane; Valois, Sierra; Rothman, Alan L; Medin, Carey L

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are highly dynamic organelles that undergo continuous cycles of fission and fusion to maintain essential cellular functions. An imbalance between these two processes can result in many pathophysiological outcomes. Dengue virus (DENV) interacts with cellular organelles, including mitochondria, to successfully replicate in cells. This study used live-cell imaging and found an increase in mitochondrial length and respiration during DENV infection. The level of mitochondrial fission protein, Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), was decreased on mitochondria during DENV infection, as well as Drp1 phosphorylated on serine 616, which is important for mitochondrial fission. DENV proteins NS4b and NS3 were also associated with subcellular fractions of mitochondria. Induction of fission through uncoupling of mitochondria or overexpression of Drp1 wild-type and Drp1 with a phosphomimetic mutation (S616D) significantly reduced viral replication. These results demonstrate that DENV infection causes an imbalance in mitochondrial dynamics by inhibiting Drp1-triggered mitochondrial fission, which promotes viral replication. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Impaired coronary metabolic dilation in the metabolic syndrome is linked to mitochondrial dysfunction and mitochondrial DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarini, Giacinta; Kiyooka, Takahiko; Ohanyan, Vahagn; Pung, Yuh Fen; Marzilli, Mario; Chen, Yeong Renn; Chen, Chwen Lih; Kang, Patrick T; Hardwick, James P; Kolz, Christopher L; Yin, Liya; Wilson, Glenn L; Shokolenko, Inna; Dobson, James G; Fenton, Richard; Chilian, William M

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction in obesity and diabetes can be caused by excessive production of free radicals, which can damage mitochondrial DNA. Because mitochondrial DNA plays a key role in the production of ATP necessary for cardiac work, we hypothesized that mitochondrial dysfunction, induced by mitochondrial DNA damage, uncouples coronary blood flow from cardiac work. Myocardial blood flow (contrast echocardiography) was measured in Zucker lean (ZLN) and obese fatty (ZOF) rats during increased cardiac metabolism (product of heart rate and arterial pressure, i.v. norepinephrine). In ZLN increased metabolism augmented coronary blood flow, but in ZOF metabolic hyperemia was attenuated. Mitochondrial respiration was impaired and ROS production was greater in ZOF than ZLN. These were associated with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage in ZOF. To determine if coronary metabolic dilation, the hyperemic response induced by heightened cardiac metabolism, is linked to mitochondrial function we introduced recombinant proteins (intravenously or intraperitoneally) in ZLN and ZOF to fragment or repair mtDNA, respectively. Repair of mtDNA damage restored mitochondrial function and metabolic dilation, and reduced ROS production in ZOF; whereas induction of mtDNA damage in ZLN reduced mitochondrial function, increased ROS production, and attenuated metabolic dilation. Adequate metabolic dilation was also associated with the extracellular release of ADP, ATP, and H2O2 by cardiac myocytes; whereas myocytes from rats with impaired dilation released only H2O2. In conclusion, our results suggest that mitochondrial function plays a seminal role in connecting myocardial blood flow to metabolism, and integrity of mtDNA is central to this process.

  20. Up-regulation of avian uncoupling protein in cold-acclimated and hyperthyroid ducklings prevents reactive oxygen species production by skeletal muscle mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Benjamin; Roussel, Damien; Romestaing, Caroline; Belouze, Maud; Rouanet, Jean-Louis; Desplanches, Dominique; Sibille, Brigitte; Servais, Stéphane; Duchamp, Claude

    2010-04-28

    Although identified in several bird species, the biological role of the avian homolog of mammalian uncoupling proteins (avUCP) remains extensively debated. In the present study, the functional properties of isolated mitochondria were examined in physiological or pharmacological situations that induce large changes in avUCP expression in duckling skeletal muscle. The abundance of avUCP mRNA, as detected by RT-PCR in gastrocnemius muscle but not in the liver, was markedly increased by cold acclimation (CA) or pharmacological hyperthyroidism but was down-regulated by hypothyroidism. Activators of UCPs, such as superoxide with low doses of fatty acids, stimulated a GDP-sensitive proton conductance across the inner membrane of muscle mitochondria from CA or hyperthyroid ducklings. The stimulation was much weaker in controls and not observed in hypothyroid ducklings or in any liver mitochondrial preparations. The production of endogenous mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) was much lower in muscle mitochondria from CA and hyperthyroid ducklings than in the control or hypothyroid groups. The addition of GDP markedly increased the mitochondrial ROS production of CA or hyperthyroid birds up to, or above, the level of control or hypothyroid ducklings. Differences in ROS production among groups could not be attributed to changes in antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase or glutathione peroxidase). This work provides the first functional in vitro evidence that avian UCP regulates mitochondrial ROS production in situations of enhanced metabolic activity.

  1. Up-regulation of avian uncoupling protein in cold-acclimated and hyperthyroid ducklings prevents reactive oxygen species production by skeletal muscle mitochondria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servais Stéphane

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although identified in several bird species, the biological role of the avian homolog of mammalian uncoupling proteins (avUCP remains extensively debated. In the present study, the functional properties of isolated mitochondria were examined in physiological or pharmacological situations that induce large changes in avUCP expression in duckling skeletal muscle. Results The abundance of avUCP mRNA, as detected by RT-PCR in gastrocnemius muscle but not in the liver, was markedly increased by cold acclimation (CA or pharmacological hyperthyroidism but was down-regulated by hypothyroidism. Activators of UCPs, such as superoxide with low doses of fatty acids, stimulated a GDP-sensitive proton conductance across the inner membrane of muscle mitochondria from CA or hyperthyroid ducklings. The stimulation was much weaker in controls and not observed in hypothyroid ducklings or in any liver mitochondrial preparations. The production of endogenous mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS was much lower in muscle mitochondria from CA and hyperthyroid ducklings than in the control or hypothyroid groups. The addition of GDP markedly increased the mitochondrial ROS production of CA or hyperthyroid birds up to, or above, the level of control or hypothyroid ducklings. Differences in ROS production among groups could not be attributed to changes in antioxidant enzyme activities (superoxide dismutase or glutathione peroxidase. Conclusion This work provides the first functional in vitro evidence that avian UCP regulates mitochondrial ROS production in situations of enhanced metabolic activity.

  2. Parkinson disease-related DJ-1 modulates the expression of uncoupling protein 4 against oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shaoqing; Yang, Xiaodong; Qian, Yiwei; Xiao, Qin

    2018-01-08

    Loss of function mutations of DJ-1 (PARK7) have been linked to the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease (PD). Antioxidative stress is one of the multi-protective functions of DJ-1, and oxidation of cysteine 106 (Cys106) has been proposed to regulate the protective activity of DJ-1. Uncoupling protein 4 (UCP4) is located in the inner membrane of mitochondria and functions to protect against oxidative stress. In this study, we used neuronal (SH-SY5Y) cells and DJ-1 knockout (KO) mice to elucidate whether DJ-1 regulated oxidative stress via modulating the expression of UCP4, and the underlying mechanism. The downstream products of oxidative stress, mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and cell viability were also investigated. We found that UCP4 was up regulated upon 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP + ) stimulation in SH-SY5Y cells, which was enhanced by wild type DJ-1 and alleviated by DJ-1 knockdown. Expression of UCP4 in DJ-1 KO mice was lower compared with wild type mice. In addition, up-regulation of UCP4 was alleviated by inhibition of oxidized DJ-1, and enhanced by increase of oxidized DJ-1 under conditions of oxidative stress using western blot analysis. Moreover, overexpression of UCP4 in DJ-1 knockdown cells partially reversed the decrease of cell viability, ΔΨm, as well as the increase of products of oxidative stress upon MPP + stimulation. Further analysis showed that DJ-1 regulated transcriptional activity of UCP4 partially via Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway in the presence of MPP + . Together, our results suggested DJ-1 might regulate the expression of UCP4 by oxidation of DJ-1 and partially via NF-κB pathway in its protective response to oxidative stress. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Dynamic regulation of uncoupling protein 2 expression by microRNA-214 in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guangsheng; Wang, Jianlu; Xu, Kesen; Dong, Jiahong

    2016-07-01

    Gemcitabine (GEM), a commonly used chemotherapeutic agent in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients, uses oxidative stress induction as a common effector pathway. However, GEM alone or in combination with oxaliplatin hardly renders any survival benefits to HCC patients. We have recently shown that this is part due to the overexpression of the mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) that in turn mediates resistance to GEM in HCC patients. However, not much is known about regulatory mechanisms underlying UCP2 overexpression in HCC. Differential protein expression in HCC cell lines did not show a concomitant change in UCP2 transcript level, indicating post-transcriptional or post-translational regulatory mechanism. In situ analysis revealed that UCP2 is a putative target of miR-214 miR-214 expression is significantly down-regulated in HCC patient samples as compared with normal adjacent tissues and in cell line, human hepatoblastoma cells (HuH6), with high UCP2 protein expression. We demonstrated using miR-214 mimic and antagomir that the miRNA targeted UCP2 expression by directly targeting the wild-type, but not a miR-214 seed mutant, 3' UTR of UCP2 Overexpression of miR-214 significantly attenuated cell proliferation. Finally, analysis in 20 HCC patients revealed an inverse correlation in expression of UCP2 and miR-214 (Pearson's correlation coefficient, r=-0.9792). Cumulatively, our data indicate that in the context of HCC, miR-214 acts as a putative tumour suppressor by targeting UCP2 and defines a novel mechanism of regulation of UCP2. © 2016 The Author(s).

  4. Dietary Curcumin Ameliorates Aging-Related Cerebrovascular Dysfunction through the AMPK/Uncoupling Protein 2 Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunfei Pu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Age-related cerebrovascular dysfunction contributes to stroke, cerebral amyloid angiopathy, cognitive decline and neurodegenerative diseases. One pathogenic mechanism underlying this effect is increased oxidative stress. Up-regulation of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2 plays a crucial role in regulating reactive oxygen species (ROS production. Dietary patterns are widely recognized as contributors to cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that dietary curcumin, which has an antioxidant effect, can improve aging-related cerebrovascular dysfunction via UCP2 up-regulation. Methods: The 24-month-old male rodents used in this study, including male Sprague Dawley (SD rats and UCP2 knockout (UCP2-/- and matched wild type mice, were given dietary curcumin (0.2%. The young control rodents were 6-month-old. Rodent cerebral artery vasorelaxation was detected by wire myograph. The AMPK/UCP2 pathway and p-eNOS in cerebrovascular and endothelial cells were observed by immunoblotting. Results: Dietary curcumin administration for one month remarkably restored the impaired cerebrovascular endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in aging SD rats. In cerebral arteries from aging SD rats and cultured endothelial cells, curcumin promoted eNOS and AMPK phosphorylation, up-regulated UCP2 and reduced ROS production. These effects of curcumin were abolished by either AMPK or UCP2 inhibition. Chronic dietary curcumin significantly reduced ROS production and improved cerebrovascular endothelium-dependent relaxation in aging wild type mice but not in aging UCP2-/- mice. Conclusions: Curcumin improves aging-related cerebrovascular dysfunction via the AMPK/UCP2 pathway.

  5. Uncoupled Analysis of Stochastic Reaction Networks in Fluctuating Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zechner, Christoph; Koeppl, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    The dynamics of stochastic reaction networks within cells are inevitably modulated by factors considered extrinsic to the network such as, for instance, the fluctuations in ribosome copy numbers for a gene regulatory network. While several recent studies demonstrate the importance of accounting for such extrinsic components, the resulting models are typically hard to analyze. In this work we develop a general mathematical framework that allows to uncouple the network from its dynamic environment by incorporating only the environment's effect onto the network into a new model. More technically, we show how such fluctuating extrinsic components (e.g., chemical species) can be marginalized in order to obtain this decoupled model. We derive its corresponding process- and master equations and show how stochastic simulations can be performed. Using several case studies, we demonstrate the significance of the approach. PMID:25473849

  6. A Visible-Light-Sensitive Caged Serotonin

    OpenAIRE

    Cabrera, R.; Filevich, O; Garcia-Acosta, B; Athilingam, J; Bender, KJ; Poskanzer, KE; R. Etchenique

    2017-01-01

    Serotonin, or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5HT), is an important neurotransmitter in the nervous system of both vertebrates and invertebrates. Deficits in 5HT signaling are responsible for many disabling psychiatric conditions, and its molecular machinery is the target of many pharmaceuticals. We present a new 5HT phototrigger, the compound [Ru(bpy)2(PMe3)(5HT)]2+, where PMe3 is trimethylphosphine. As with other ruthenium-bipyridyl based caged compounds, [Ru(bpy)2(PMe3)(5HT)]2+ presents activity in t...

  7. Association between uncoupling protein 2, adiponectin and resting energy expenditure in obese women with normal and low resting energy expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghadomi Masoumi, Zahra; Eshraghian, Mohammad Reza; Hedayati, Mahdi; Pishva, Hamideh

    2018-02-01

    Obesity is recognized as the most prevalent metabolic disease worldwide. Decreases in energy expenditure may increase risk of obesity. One of the key regulators of energy balance is uncoupling protein2 (UCP2), a transporter protein presents in mitochondrial inner membrane. Moreover, adiponectin is the most abundant adipocytokine, it may play a role in energy metabolism and gene expression of UCP2. The aim of this study was to investigate potential associations between the level of uncoupling protein 2 and adiponectin and their relationship with REE (Resting Energy Expenditure) in obese women with normal and low resting energy expenditure. A total of 49 subjects (women, 25-50 years old), were included in current study, 16 subjects with BMI > 30 and low resting energy expenditure, 17 subjects with BMI > 30 and normal resting energy expenditure and 16 non-obese subjects as a control group. Anthropometric, body composition parameters and resting energy expenditure were measured. Plasma adiponectin, UCP2 protein and total protein in PBMC were determined. Measured resting energy expenditure in obese subjects with low REE was significantly lower than other groups. Plasma adiponectin in the obese subjects with low REE was significantly lower compared to normal weight group. There was a significant relationship between 'UCP2 protein/Total protein' ratio and plasma adiponectin in obese group with low REE and in three groups when we pooled. There was a significant association between REE and plasma adiponectin in three groups when we pooled. There was a significant association between plasma adiponectin and REE. Moreover, there was a significant relationship between UCP2 and REE.

  8. Nebivolol induces, via β3 adrenergic receptor, lipolysis, uncoupling protein 1, and reduction of lipid droplet size in human adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordicchia, Marica; Pocognoli, Antonella; D'Anzeo, Marco; Siquini, Walter; Minardi, Daniele; Muzzonigro, Giovanni; Dessì-Fulgheri, Paolo; Sarzani, Riccardo

    2014-02-01

    Most β-blockers may induce weight gain, dysglycemia, and dyslipidemia. Nebivolol is a third-generation β1-blocker with vasodilating properties mediated by β3 adrenergic receptors (β3AR). We investigated whether nebivolol is able to induce β3AR-mediated lipolysis, uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), and size-reduction in human adipocytes. Human visceral (n = 28) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (n = 26) samples were used to obtain differentiated subcutaneous and visceral preadipocytes. Adipocytes were used to verify the effects of nebivolol onlipolysis, uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) and other genes of the thermogenic program. Lipolysis was induced by isoproterenol and specific β3AR agonist, as expected,and also by nebivolol at 100 nmol/l and by its L-enantiomer at 10 nmol/l (P adipocytes. Interestingly, in human adipocytes, nebivolol activated UCP1, PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and cytochrome c (CYCS) gene expression in a p38 MAPK-dependent manner. Using propranolol (β1 and β2 antagonist) together with nebivolol we showed that the induction of these genes was still present suggesting again β3AR activation. Moreover, nebivolol significantly reduced the diameter of lipid droplets in cultured adipocytes. In summary, nebivolol, through β3AR, is able to induce lipolysis and promote thermogenic and mitochondrial genes. The induction of lipolysis and the thermogenic program could explain the reduction of lipid droplets size. In conclusion, the lower dysmetabolic effects of nebivolol in humans may depend on its β3 agonist activity and the consequent induction of thermogenic program in human adipocytes.

  9. Astrocyte uncoupling as a cause of human temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedner, Peter; Dupper, Alexander; Hüttmann, Kerstin; Müller, Julia; Herde, Michel K; Dublin, Pavel; Deshpande, Tushar; Schramm, Johannes; Häussler, Ute; Haas, Carola A; Henneberger, Christian; Theis, Martin; Steinhäuser, Christian

    2015-05-01

    Glial cells are now recognized as active communication partners in the central nervous system, and this new perspective has rekindled the question of their role in pathology. In the present study we analysed functional properties of astrocytes in hippocampal specimens from patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy without (n = 44) and with sclerosis (n = 75) combining patch clamp recording, K(+) concentration analysis, electroencephalography/video-monitoring, and fate mapping analysis. We found that the hippocampus of patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis is completely devoid of bona fide astrocytes and gap junction coupling, whereas coupled astrocytes were abundantly present in non-sclerotic specimens. To decide whether these glial changes represent cause or effect of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis, we developed a mouse model that reproduced key features of human mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis. In this model, uncoupling impaired K(+) buffering and temporally preceded apoptotic neuronal death and the generation of spontaneous seizures. Uncoupling was induced through intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide, prevented in Toll-like receptor4 knockout mice and reproduced in situ through acute cytokine or lipopolysaccharide incubation. Fate mapping confirmed that in the course of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis, astrocytes acquire an atypical functional phenotype and lose coupling. These data suggest that astrocyte dysfunction might be a prime cause of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with sclerosis and identify novel targets for anti-epileptogenic therapeutic intervention. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. What Is Mitochondrial DNA?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DNA What is mitochondrial DNA? What is mitochondrial DNA? Although most DNA is packaged in chromosomes within ... proteins. For more information about mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA: Molecular Expressions, a web site from the Florida ...

  11. Sulforaphane Inhibits Mitochondrial Permeability Transition and Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Tiffany; Shafer, Jonathan; Fiskum, Gary

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of mitochondria to oxidative stress and elevated Ca2+ promotes opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP), resulting in membrane depolarization, uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation, and potentially cell death. This study tested the hypothesis that treatment of rats with sulforaphane (SFP), an activator of the Nrf2 pathway of antioxidant gene expression, increases the resistance of liver mitochondria to redox-regulated PTP opening and elevates mitochondrial levels of antioxidants. Rats were injected with SFP or drug vehicle and liver mitochondria were isolated 40 hr later. Respiring mitochondria actively accumulated added Ca2+, which was then released through PTP opening induced by agents that either cause an oxidized shift in the mitochondrial redox state or that directly oxidize protein thiol groups. SFP treatment of rats inhibited the rate of pro-oxidant-induced mitochondrial Ca2+ release and increased expression of the glutathione peroxidase/reductase system, thioredoxin, and malic enzyme. These results are the first to demonstrate that SFP treatment of animals increases liver mitochondrial antioxidant defenses and inhibits redox-sensitive PTP opening. This novel form of preconditioning could protect against a variety of pathologies that include oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in their etiologies. PMID:21986339

  12. Oxidative capacity, lipotoxicity, and mitochondrial damage in type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrauwen, Patrick; Hesselink, Matthijs K C

    2004-06-01

    Recent evidence points toward decreased oxidative capacity and mitochondrial aberrations as a major contributor to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. In this article we will provide an integrative view on the interrelation between decreased oxidative capacity, lipotoxicity, and mitochondrial aberrations in type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is characterized by disturbances in fatty acid metabolism and is accompanied by accumulation of fatty acids in nonadipose tissues. In metabolically active tissues, such as skeletal muscle, fatty acids are prone to so-called oxidative damage. In addition to producing energy, mitochondria are also a major source of reactive oxygen species, which can lead to lipid peroxidation. In particular, the mitochondrial matrix, which contains DNA, RNA, and numerous enzymes necessary for substrate oxidation, is sensitive to peroxide-induced oxidative damage and needs to be protected against the formation and accumulation of lipids and lipid peroxides. Recent evidence reports that mitochondrial uncoupling is involved in the protection of the mitochondrial matrix against lipid-induced mitochondrial damage. Disturbances in this protection mechanism can contribute to the development of type 2 diabetes.

  13. Cellular Allometry of Mitochondrial Functionality Establishes the Optimal Cell Size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miettinen, Teemu P; Björklund, Mikael

    2016-11-07

    Eukaryotic cells attempt to maintain an optimal size, resulting in size homeostasis. While cellular content scales isometrically with cell size, allometric laws indicate that metabolism per mass unit should decline with increasing size. Here we use elutriation and single-cell flow cytometry to analyze mitochondrial scaling with cell size. While mitochondrial content increases linearly, mitochondrial membrane potential and oxidative phosphorylation are highest at intermediate cell sizes. Thus, mitochondrial content and functional scaling are uncoupled. The nonlinearity of mitochondrial functionality is cell size, not cell cycle, dependent, and it results in an optimal cell size whereby cellular fitness and proliferative capacity are maximized. While optimal cell size is controlled by growth factor signaling, its establishment and maintenance requires mitochondrial dynamics, which can be controlled by the mevalonate pathway. Thus, optimization of cellular fitness and functionality through mitochondria can explain the requirement for size control, as well as provide means for its maintenance. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Permeabilized myocardial fibers as model to detect mitochondrial dysfunction during sepsis and melatonin effects without disruption of mitochondrial network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerrier, Carolina; García, José A; Volt, Huayqui; Díaz-Casado, María E; Luna-Sánchez, Marta; Fernández-Gil, Beatriz; Escames, Germaine; López, Luis C; Acuña-Castroviejo, Darío

    2016-03-01

    Analysis of mitochondrial function is crucial to understand their involvement in a given disease. High-resolution respirometry of permeabilized myocardial fibers in septic mice allows the evaluation of the bioenergetic system, maintaining mitochondrial ultrastructure and intracellular interactions, which are critical for an adequate functionality. OXPHOS and electron transport system (ETS) capacities were assessed using different substrate combinations. Our findings show a severe septic-dependent impairment in OXPHOS and ETS capacities with mitochondrial uncoupling at early and late phases of sepsis. Moreover, sepsis triggers complex III (CIII)-linked alterations in supercomplexes structure, and loss of mitochondrial density. In these conditions, melatonin administration to septic mice prevented sepsis-dependent mitochondrial injury in mitochondrial respiration. Likewise, melatonin improved cytochrome b content and ameliorated the assembly of CIII in supercomplexes. These results support the use of permeabilized fibers to identify properly the respiratory deficits and specific melatonin effects in sepsis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  15. Calcium-induced alteration of mitochondrial morphology and mitochondrial-endoplasmic reticulum contacts in rat brown adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Golic

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are key organelles maintaining cellular bioenergetics and integrity, and their regulation of [Ca2+]i homeostasis has been investigated in many cell types. We investigated the short-term Ca-SANDOZ® treatment on brown adipocyte mitochondria, using imaging and molecular biology techniques. Two-month-old male Wistar rats were divided into two groups: Ca-SANDOZ® drinking or tap water (control drinking for three days. Alizarin Red S staining showed increased Ca2+ level in the brown adipocytes of treated rats, and potassium pyroantimonate staining localized electron-dense regions in the cytoplasm, mitochondria and around lipid droplets. Ca-SANDOZ® decreased mitochondrial number, but increased their size and mitochondrial cristae volume. Transmission electron microscopy revealed numerous enlarged and fusioned-like mitochondria in the Ca-SANDOZ® treated group compared to the control, and megamitochondria in some brown adipocytes. The Ca2+ diet affected mitochondrial fusion as mitofusin 1 (MFN1 and mitofusin 2 (MFN2 were increased, and mitochondrial fission as dynamin related protein 1 (DRP1 was decreased. Confocal microscopy showed a higher colocalization rate between functional mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum (ER. The level of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1 was elevated, which was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. These results suggest that Ca-SANDOZ® stimulates mitochondrial fusion, increases mitochondrial-ER contacts and the thermogenic capacity of brown adipocytes

  16. Bulletproof Love : Luke Cage (2016 and Religion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derry, Ken

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available There are many ways to think about religion and popular culture. One method is to ask where and when we see what might be commonly understood as “religious tradition(s” explicitly on display. Another is to think about superhero narratives themselves as “religious”, using this term as a conceptual tool for categorizing and thereby better understanding particular dimensions of human experience. This article takes a variety of approaches to understanding religion in relation to the recent television series LUKE CAGE (Netflix, US 2016. These approaches take their hermeneutical cues from a range of disciplines, including studies of the Bible; Hip Hop; gender; Black Theology; African American religion; and philosophy. The results of this analysis highlight the polysemic nature of popular culture in general, and of superhero stories in particular. Like religious traditions themselves, the show is complex and contradictory: it is both progressive and reactionary; emphasizes community and valorizes an individual; critiques and endorses Christianity; subverts and promotes violence. Depending on the questions asked, LUKE CAGE (2016 provides a range of very different answers.

  17. Preinjector for Linac 1, Faraday cage

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The 50 MeV Linac 1 started up in 1958 as injector to the 26 GeV PS, with a 520 kV Cockcroft-Walton generator as its preinjector, housed in a vast Faraday cage, visible here. When the Cockcroft-Walton broke down in 1973, it was replaced by a much smaller SAMES generator, of the kind used for electrostatic separators. From 1980 on, Linac 2 took over as injector for the 800 MeV Booster, and Linac 1 continued as injector for LEAR. In 1984, the electrostatic preinjector (i.e. the Faraday cage with its contents, SAMES generator and all) was replaced by a 520 keV RFQ. At the lower left corner we see the HV connectors to the SAMES generator, at the right edge part of the opened electronics-platform. Jean-Luc Vallet sees to it that all parts are properly grounded. See also 7403073X, 7403074X, 7403081X, 7403083X.

  18. Hybrid uranyl-carboxyphosphonate cage clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelani, Pius O; Ozga, Michael; Wallace, Christine M; Qiu, Jie; Szymanowski, Jennifer E S; Sigmon, Ginger E; Burns, Peter C

    2013-07-01

    Two new hybrid uranyl-carboxyphosphonate cage clusters built from uranyl peroxide units were crystallized from aqueous solution under ambient conditions in approximately two months. The clusters are built from uranyl hexagonal bipyramids and are connected by employing a secondary metal linker, the 2-carboxyphenylphosphonate ligand. The structure of cluster A is composed of a ten-membered uranyl polyhedral belt that is capped on either end of an elongated cage by five-membered rings of uranyl polyhedra. The structure of cluster B consists of 24 uranyl cations that are arranged into 6 four-membered rings of uranyl polyhedra. Four of the corresponding topological squares are fused together to form a sixteen-membered double uranyl pseudobelt that is capped on either end by 2 topological squares. Cluster A crystallizes over a wide pH range of 4.6-6.8, while cluster B was isolated under narrower pH range of 6.9-7.8. Studies of their fate in aqueous solution upon dissolution of crystals by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) provide evidence for their persistence in solution. The well-established characteristic fingerprint from the absorption spectra of the uranium(VI) cations disappears and becomes a nearly featureless peak; nonetheless, the two compounds fluoresce at room temperature.

  19. Computed tomography measurement of rib cage morphometry in emphysema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Sverzellati

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Factors determining the shape of the human rib cage are not completely understood. We aimed to quantify the contribution of anthropometric and COPD-related changes to rib cage variability in adult cigarette smokers. METHODS: Rib cage diameters and areas (calculated from the inner surface of the rib cage in 816 smokers with or without COPD, were evaluated at three anatomical levels using computed tomography (CT. CTs were analyzed with software, which allows quantification of total emphysema (emphysema%. The relationship between rib cage measurements and anthropometric factors, lung function indices, and %emphysema were tested using linear regression models. RESULTS: A model that included gender, age, BMI, emphysema%, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1%, and forced vital capacity (FVC% fit best with the rib cage measurements (R(2 = 64% for the rib cage area variation at the lower anatomical level. Gender had the biggest impact on rib cage diameter and area (105.3 cm(2; 95% CI: 111.7 to 98.8 for male lower area. Emphysema% was responsible for an increase in size of upper and middle CT areas (up to 5.4 cm(2; 95% CI: 3.0 to 7.8 for an emphysema increase of 5%. Lower rib cage areas decreased as FVC% decreased (5.1 cm(2; 95% CI: 2.5 to 7.6 for 10 percentage points of FVC variation. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that simple CT measurements can predict rib cage morphometric variability and also highlight relationships between rib cage morphometry and emphysema.

  20. Defects in mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 are linked to apoptotic resistance and autophagy in a lung cancer model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly Jean Thomas

    Full Text Available Evasion of apoptosis is implicated in almost all aspects of cancer progression, as well as treatment resistance. In this study, resistance to apoptosis was identified in tumorigenic lung epithelial (A549 cells as a consequence of defects in mitochondrial and autophagic function. Mitochondrial function is determined in part by mitochondrial morphology, a process regulated by mitochondrial dynamics whereby the joining of two mitochondria, fusion, inhibits apoptosis while fission, the division of a mitochondrion, initiates apoptosis. Mitochondrial morphology of A549 cells displayed an elongated phenotype-mimicking cells deficient in mitochondrial fission protein, Dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1. A549 cells had impaired Drp1 mitochondrial recruitment and decreased Drp1-dependent fission. Cytochrome c release and caspase-3 and PARP cleavage were impaired both basally and with apoptotic stimuli in A549 cells. Increased mitochondrial mass was observed in A549 cells, suggesting defects in mitophagy (mitochondrial selective autophagy. A549 cells had decreased LC3-II lipidation and lysosomal inhibition suggesting defects in autophagy occur upstream of lysosomal degradation. Immunostaining indicated mitochondrial localized LC3 punctae in A549 cells increased after mitochondrial uncoupling or with a combination of mitochondrial depolarization and ectopic Drp1 expression. Increased inhibition of apoptosis in A549 cells is correlated with impeded mitochondrial fission and mitophagy. We suggest mitochondrial fission defects contribute to apoptotic resistance in A549 cells.

  1. Mitochondrial fusion, fission, and mitochondrial toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Joel N; Leuthner, Tess C; Luz, Anthony L

    2017-08-05

    Mitochondrial dynamics are regulated by two sets of opposed processes: mitochondrial fusion and fission, and mitochondrial biogenesis and degradation (including mitophagy), as well as processes such as intracellular transport. These processes maintain mitochondrial homeostasis, regulate mitochondrial form, volume and function, and are increasingly understood to be critical components of the cellular stress response. Mitochondrial dynamics vary based on developmental stage and age, cell type, environmental factors, and genetic background. Indeed, many mitochondrial homeostasis genes are human disease genes. Emerging evidence indicates that deficiencies in these genes often sensitize to environmental exposures, yet can also be protective under certain circumstances. Inhibition of mitochondrial dynamics also affects elimination of irreparable mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) damage and transmission of mtDNA mutations. We briefly review the basic biology of mitodynamic processes with a focus on mitochondrial fusion and fission, discuss what is known and unknown regarding how these processes respond to chemical and other stressors, and review the literature on interactions between mitochondrial toxicity and genetic variation in mitochondrial fusion and fission genes. Finally, we suggest areas for future research, including elucidating the full range of mitodynamic responses from low to high-level exposures, and from acute to chronic exposures; detailed examination of the physiological consequences of mitodynamic alterations in different cell types; mechanism-based testing of mitotoxicant interactions with interindividual variability in mitodynamics processes; and incorporating other environmental variables that affect mitochondria, such as diet and exercise. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Novel caged clusters of silicon: Fullerenes, Frank–Kasper ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. We review recent findings of metal (M) encapsulated caged clusters of Si and Ge obtained from computer experiments based on an ab initio pseudopotential method. It is shown that one M atom changes drastically the properties of Si and Ge clusters and that depending upon the size of the M atom, cages of 14,.

  3. Polymers containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, III, Daniel E.; Eastwood, Eric A [Raymore, MO

    2012-06-05

    Polymers comprising residues of borane and/or carborane cage compound monomers having at least one polyalkoxy silyl substituent. Such polymers can further comprise one or more reactive matrices and/or co-monomers covalently bound with the cage compound monomer residues. Methods of making and applications for using such polymers are also disclosed.

  4. A New Vertebral Body Replacement Strategy Using Expandable Polymeric Cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xifeng; Paulsen, Alex; Giambini, Hugo; Guo, Ji; Miller, A Lee; Lin, Po-Chun; Yaszemski, Michael J; Lu, Lichun

    2017-03-01

    We have developed a novel polymeric expandable cage that can be delivered via a posterior-only surgical approach for the treatment of noncontained vertebral defects. This approach is less invasive than an anterior-only or combined approach and much more cost-effective than currently used expandable metal cages. The polymeric expandable cage is composed of oligo poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate (OPF), a hydrogel that has been previously shown to have excellent nerve and bone tissue biocompatibility. OPF hydrogel cages can expand to twice their original diameter and length within a surgical time frame following hydration. Modulation of parameters such as polymeric network crosslink density or the introduction of charge to the network allowed for precise expansion kinetics. To meet specific requirements due to size variations in patient vertebral bodies, we fabricated a series of molds with varied diameters and explored the expansion kinetics of the OPF cages. Results showed a stable expansion ratio of approximately twofold to the original size within 20 min, regardless of the absolute value of the cage size. Following implantation of a dried OPF cage into a noncontained vertebral defect and its in situ expansion with normal saline, other augmentation biomaterials, such as poly(propylene fumarate) (PPF), can be injected to the lumen of the OPF cage and allowed to crosslink in situ. The OPF/PPF composite scaffold can provide the necessary rigidity and stability to the augmented spine.

  5. 48 CFR 204.7202-1 - CAGE codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... CD ROM that contains the H-4/H-8 CAGE master file issued by DLIS (Their address is: Customer Service... assignments to DLIS Customer Service: toll-free (888) 227-2423 or (888) 352-9333; DSN 932-4725; or commercial....39-M, Federal Logistics Information System (FLIS) Procedures Manual, prescribe use of CAGE codes. (b...

  6. Influence of Clarias gariepinus (Teugels) cage cultures on water ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water quality, periphyton and phytoplankton growing as a function Clarias gariepinus (Burchell, 1822) cage cultures have rarely been investigated. Physical and chemical factors associated with cage culture of Clarias gariepinus in relation to phytoplankton and periphyton were examined fortnightly from May to June 2009 ...

  7. Object grasping by combining caging and force closure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lei, Q.; Wisse, M.

    2016-01-01

    The current research trends of object grasping can be summarized as caging grasping and force closure grasping. The motivation of this paper is to combine the advantage of caging grasping and force closure grasping to enable under-actuated grippers like the Lacquey gripper and the parallel

  8. Mitochondrial DNA Alterations and Reduced Mitochondrial Function in Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Hebert, Sadie L.; Lanza, Ian R.; Nair, K. Sreekumaran

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative damage to mitochondrial DNA increases with aging. This damage has the potential to affect mitochondrial DNA replication and transcription which could alter the abundance or functionality of mitochondrial proteins. This review describes mitochondrial DNA alterations and changes in mitochondrial function that occur with aging. Age-related alterations in mitochondrial DNA as a possible contributor to the reduction in mitochondrial function are discussed.

  9. Generation of Multicomponent Molecular Cages using Simultaneous Dynamic Covalent Reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drożdż, Wojciech; Bouillon, Camille; Kotras, Clément; Richeter, Sébastien; Barboiu, Mihail; Clément, Sébastien; Stefankiewicz, Artur R; Ulrich, Sébastien

    2017-12-19

    Cage compounds are very attractive structures for a wide range of applications and there is ongoing interest in finding effective ways to access such kinds of complex structures, particularly those possessing dynamic adaptive features. Here we report the accessible synthesis of new type of organic cage architectures, possessing two different dynamic bonds within one structure: hydrazones and disulfides. Implementation of three distinct functional groups (thiols, aldehydes and hydrazides) in the structure of two simple building blocks resulted in their spontaneous and selective self-assembly into aromatic cage-type architectures. These organic cages contain up to ten components linked together by twelve reversible covalent bonds. The advantage provided by the presented approach is that these cage structures can adaptively self-sort from a complex virtual mixture of polymers or macrocycles and that dynamic covalent chemistry enables their deliberate disassembly through controlled component exchange. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Entropic cages for trapping DNA near a nanopore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xu; Skanata, Mirna Mihovilovic; Stein, Derek

    2015-02-01

    Nanopores can probe the structure of biopolymers in solution; however, diffusion makes it difficult to study the same molecule for extended periods. Here we report devices that entropically trap single DNA molecules in a 6.2-femtolitre cage near a solid-state nanopore. We electrophoretically inject DNA molecules into the cage through the nanopore, pause for preset times and then drive the DNA back out through the nanopore. The saturating recapture time and high recapture probability after long pauses, their agreement with a convection-diffusion model and the observation of trapped DNA under fluorescence microscopy all confirm that the cage stably traps DNA. Meanwhile, the cages have 200 nm openings that make them permeable to small molecules, like the restriction endonuclease we use to sequence-specifically cut trapped DNA into fragments whose number and sizes are analysed upon exiting through the nanopore. Entropic cages thus serve as reactors for chemically modifying single DNA molecules.

  11. Mitochondrial adaptations within chronically ischemic swine myocardium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFalls, Edward O; Sluiter, Wim; Schoonderwoerd, Kees; Manintveld, Olivier C; Lamers, Jos M J; Bezstarosti, Karel; van Beusekom, Heleen M; Sikora, Joseph; Ward, Herbert B; Merkus, Daphne; Duncker, Dirk J

    2006-12-01

    Experimental evidence has emerged that myocardial ischemic preconditioning can prime the mitochondria into a "stress-resistant state", so that cell death is reduced following prolonged severe ischemia and reperfusion. Using a swine model of chronically ischemic myocardium, we tested the hypothesis that mitochondria within the ischemic territory have also acquired a protective phenotype. Eleven swine underwent a left thoracotomy with placement of an external constrictor around the proximal left anterior descending (LAD) artery. By 10 weeks, a severe stenosis of the LAD artery was documented by quantitative coronary angiography (92 +/- 2%). Animals were sacrificed and myocardium was extracted from the LAD and remote regions. Mitochondria were isolated from subendocardium and subepicardium from LAD and remote regions and state 2 (substrate alone) and state 3 (+ADP) respiration were assessed with a Clark electrode. Within the LAD subendocardium, the respiratory control index was 2.68 +/- 0.17 and was lower than the remote subendocardium (3.64 +/- 0.08; P < 0.05). When exposed to 20 min anoxia with reoxygenation, the LAD region demonstrated a more preserved state 3 respiration compared with the remote region (99 +/- 14 versus 65 +/- 9 nmol O2/mg, respectively; P < 0.05). In parallel mitochondrial experiments, chemiluminescence was detected with the probe coelenterazine and superoxide generation in the LAD region in the presence of antimycin A was 574 +/- 108 RLU/30 s/microg and was nearly 50% lower than the remote region (979 +/- 175 RLU/30 s/microg; P < 0.05). Within the mitochondria, the expression of uncoupling protein (UCP) 2 by western gels was 20% higher in the LAD region compared with the remote region (P < 0.05) with no differences noted in UCP-3. In this swine model of chronic myocardial ischemia, isolated mitochondria from the ischemic tissue demonstrate preserved state 3 respiration following anoxia/reoxygenation, consistent with a stress-resistant state

  12. Cathodic Cage Plasma Nitriding: An Innovative Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. M. de Sousa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cylindrical samples of AISI 1020, AISI 316, and AISI 420 steels, with different heights, were simultaneously treated by a new technique of ionic nitriding, entitled cathodic cage plasma nitriding (CCPN, in order to evaluate the efficiency of this technique to produce nitrided layers with better properties compared with those obtained using conventional ionic nitriding technique. This method is able to eliminate the edge effect in the samples, promoting a better uniformity of temperature, and consequently, a smaller variation of the thickness/height relation can be obtained. The compound layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and microhardness test profile. The results were compared with the properties of samples obtained with the conventional nitriding, for the three steel types. It was verified that samples treated by CCPN process presented, at the same temperature, a better uniformity in the thickness and absence of the edge effect.

  13. Photocatalyzed oxidation of hydrocarbons in zeolite cages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frei, H.; Blatter, F.; Sun, H. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    Oxidation of hydrocarbons by molecular oxygen is a key process in chemical industry. But reactions that use O{sub 2} as the primary oxidant often produce large amounts of unwanted byproducts. One major reason that selectivities are low is that the desired products (such as alcohols or carbonyls) are more easily oxidized by O{sub 2} than the parent hydrocarbon. The authors recently discovered a simple method that gives partial oxidation of small alkenes, alkanes, and alkyl-substituted benzenes by O{sub 2} at unprecedented selectivity, even at high conversion of the hydrocarbon. The approach is based on visible light-induced chemistry of hydrocarbon-O{sub 2} collisional pairs in the cages of large-pore zeolites. Reactions are conducted at ambient temperature in the absence of solvent or photosensitizer. Here the authors describe the most interesting reactions established thus far and define issues that pertain to scale-up of the method.

  14. Transcription regulatory networks analysis using CAGE

    KAUST Repository

    Tegnér, Jesper N.

    2009-10-01

    Mapping out cellular networks in general and transcriptional networks in particular has proved to be a bottle-neck hampering our understanding of biological processes. Integrative approaches fusing computational and experimental technologies for decoding transcriptional networks at a high level of resolution is therefore of uttermost importance. Yet, this is challenging since the control of gene expression in eukaryotes is a complex multi-level process influenced by several epigenetic factors and the fine interplay between regulatory proteins and the promoter structure governing the combinatorial regulation of gene expression. In this chapter we review how the CAGE data can be integrated with other measurements such as expression, physical interactions and computational prediction of regulatory motifs, which together can provide a genome-wide picture of eukaryotic transcriptional regulatory networks at a new level of resolution. © 2010 by Pan Stanford Publishing Pte. Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The effects of climbing cages on behaviour of female mink during the lactation period

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lidfors, L.; Axelsson, H.; Loberg, J.

    2012-01-01

    The aim was to investigate if there were differences in behaviour of female mink when kept in a climbing cage compared with a standard cage during the lactation period. The study was carried out on 90 mink of the colour type "black cross". Females were housed in either climbing cages (4.350 cm², n...... no differences between cage types. Week 5-8 after giving birth females in climbing cages were less in the nest box, less active out in the cage and had fewer abnormal behaviours, but were on the platforms and more inactive out in the cage. In the bottom cage females were more often walking, grooming and inactive...... out in the cage and tended to be more often on the platform compared to in the upper cage. It is concluded that the climbing cage worked well for females with kits and that the upper cage can offer a refuge for females when kits get older....

  16. Mitochondrial Aging: Is There a Mitochondrial Clock?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorov, Dmitry B; Popkov, Vasily A; Zorova, Ljubava D; Vorobjev, Ivan A; Pevzner, Irina B; Silachev, Denis N; Zorov, Savva D; Jankauskas, Stanislovas S; Babenko, Valentina A; Plotnikov, Egor Y

    2017-09-01

    Fragmentation (fission) of mitochondria, occurring in response to oxidative challenge, leads to heterogeneity in the mitochondrial population. It is assumed that fission provides a way to segregate mitochondrial content between the "young" and "old" phenotype, with the formation of mitochondrial "garbage," which later will be disposed. Fidelity of this process is the basis of mitochondrial homeostasis, which is disrupted in pathological conditions and aging. The asymmetry of the mitochondrial fission is similar to that of their evolutionary ancestors, bacteria, which also undergo an aging process. It is assumed that mitochondrial markers of aging are recognized by the mitochondrial quality control system, preventing the accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria, which normally are subjected to disposal. Possibly, oncocytoma, with its abnormal proliferation of mitochondria occupying the entire cytoplasm, represents the case when segregation of damaged mitochondria is impaired during mitochondrial division. It is plausible that mitochondria contain a "clock" which counts the degree of mitochondrial senescence as the extent of flagging (by ubiquitination) of damaged mitochondria. Mitochondrial aging captures the essence of the systemic aging which must be analyzed. We assume that the mitochondrial aging mechanism is similar to the mechanism of aging of the immune system which we discuss in detail. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Stochastic calculus for uncoupled continuous-time random walks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germano, Guido; Politi, Mauro; Scalas, Enrico; Schilling, René L

    2009-06-01

    The continuous-time random walk (CTRW) is a pure-jump stochastic process with several applications not only in physics but also in insurance, finance, and economics. A definition is given for a class of stochastic integrals driven by a CTRW, which includes the Itō and Stratonovich cases. An uncoupled CTRW with zero-mean jumps is a martingale. It is proved that, as a consequence of the martingale transform theorem, if the CTRW is a martingale, the Itō integral is a martingale too. It is shown how the definition of the stochastic integrals can be used to easily compute them by Monte Carlo simulation. The relations between a CTRW, its quadratic variation, its Stratonovich integral, and its Itō integral are highlighted by numerical calculations when the jumps in space of the CTRW have a symmetric Lévy alpha -stable distribution and its waiting times have a one-parameter Mittag-Leffler distribution. Remarkably, these distributions have fat tails and an unbounded quadratic variation. In the diffusive limit of vanishing scale parameters, the probability density of this kind of CTRW satisfies the space-time fractional diffusion equation (FDE) or more in general the fractional Fokker-Planck equation, which generalizes the standard diffusion equation, solved by the probability density of the Wiener process, and thus provides a phenomenologic model of anomalous diffusion. We also provide an analytic expression for the quadratic variation of the stochastic process described by the FDE and check it by Monte Carlo.

  18. A SNP uncoupling Mina expression from the TGFβ signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Shang L; Mihi, Belgacem; Koyanagi, Madoka; Nakayama, Toshinori; Bix, Mark

    2018-03-01

    Mina is a JmjC family 2-oxoglutarate oxygenase with pleiotropic roles in cell proliferation, cancer, T cell differentiation, pulmonary inflammation, and intestinal parasite expulsion. Although Mina expression varies according to cell-type, developmental stage and activation state, its transcriptional regulation is poorly understood. Across inbred mouse strains, Mina protein level exhibits a bimodal distribution, correlating with inheritance of a biallelic haplotype block comprising 21 promoter/intron 1-region SNPs. We previously showed that heritable differences in Mina protein level are transcriptionally regulated. Accordingly, we decided to test the hypothesis that at least one of the promoter/intron 1-region SNPs perturbs a Mina cis-regulatory element (CRE). Here, we have comprehensively scanned for CREs across a Mina locus-spanning 26-kilobase genomic interval. We discovered 8 potential CREs and functionally validated 4 of these, the strongest of which (E2), residing in intron 1, contained a SNP whose BALB/c-but not C57Bl/6 allele-abolished both Smad3 binding and transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) responsiveness. Our results demonstrate the TGFβ signaling pathway plays a critical role in regulating Mina expression and SNP rs4191790 controls heritable variation in Mina expression level, raising important questions regarding the evolution of an allele that uncouples Mina expression from the TGFβ signaling pathway. © 2017 The Authors. Immunity, Inflammation and Disease Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Effects of mutations in the human uncoupling protein 3 gene on the respiratory quotient and fat oxidation in severe obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argyropoulos, G; Brown, A M; Willi, S M; Zhu, J; He, Y; Reitman, M; Gevao, S M; Spruill, I; Garvey, W T

    1998-01-01

    Human uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) is a mitochondrial transmembrane carrier that uncouples oxidative ATP phosphorylation. With the capacity to participate in thermogenesis and energy balance, UCP3 is an important obesity candidate gene. A missense polymorphism in exon 3 (V102I) was identified in an obese and diabetic proband. A mutation introducing a stop codon in exon 4 (R143X) and a terminal polymorphism in the splice donor junction of exon 6 were also identified in a compound heterozygote that was morbidly obese and diabetic. Allele frequencies of the exon 3 and exon 6 splice junction polymorphisms were determined and found to be similar in Gullah-speaking African Americans and the Mende tribe of Sierra Leone, but absent in Caucasians. Moreover, in exon 6-splice donor heterozygotes, basal fat oxidation rates were reduced by 50%, and the respiratory quotient was markedly increased compared with wild-type individuals, implicating a role for UCP3 in metabolic fuel partitioning. PMID:9769326

  20. Uncoupling protein 2 haplotype does not affect human brain structure and function in a sample of community-dwelling older adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verena Heise

    Full Text Available Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2 is a mitochondrial membrane protein that plays a role in uncoupling electron transport from adenosine triphosphate (ATP formation. Polymorphisms of the UCP2 gene in humans affect protein expression and function and have been linked to survival into old age. Since UCP2 is expressed in several brain regions, we investigated in this study whether UCP2 polymorphisms might 1 affect occurrence of neurodegenerative or mental health disorders and 2 affect measures of brain structure and function. We used structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, diffusion-weighted MRI and resting-state functional MRI in the neuroimaging sub-study of the Whitehall II cohort. Data from 536 individuals aged 60 to 83 years were analyzed. No association of UCP2 polymorphisms with the occurrence of neurodegenerative disorders or grey and white matter structure or resting-state functional connectivity was observed. However, there was a significant effect on occurrence of mood disorders in men with the minor alleles of -866G>A (rs659366 and Ala55Val (rs660339 being associated with increasing odds of lifetime occurrence of mood disorders in a dose dependent manner. This result was not accompanied by effects of UCP2 polymorphisms on brain structure and function, which might either indicate that the sample investigated here was too small and underpowered to find any significant effects, or that potential effects of UCP2 polymorphisms on the brain are too subtle to be picked up by any of the neuroimaging measures used.

  1. Activation of PPAR{delta} up-regulates fatty acid oxidation and energy uncoupling genes of mitochondria and reduces palmitate-induced apoptosis in pancreatic {beta}-cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, Jun; Jiang, Li; Lue, Qingguo; Ke, Linqiu [Department of Endocrinology, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, 37 Guoxue Lane, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Li, Xiaoyu [State Key Laboratory of Oral Diseases, Sichuan University, No. 14, 3rd Section, Renmin South Road, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China); Tong, Nanwei, E-mail: buddyjun@hotmail.com [Department of Endocrinology, West China Hospital of Sichuan University, 37 Guoxue Lane, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041 (China)

    2010-01-15

    Recent evidence indicates that decreased oxidative capacity, lipotoxicity, and mitochondrial aberrations contribute to the development of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {delta} (PPAR{delta}) activation on lipid oxidation, mitochondrial function, and insulin secretion in pancreatic {beta}-cells. After HIT-T15 cells (a {beta}-cell line) were exposed to high concentrations of palmitate and GW501516 (GW; a selective agonist of PPAR{delta}), we found that administration of GW increased the expression of PPAR{delta} mRNA. GW-induced activation of PPAR{delta} up-regulated carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1), long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (LCAD), pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 4 (PDK4), and uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2); alleviated mitochondrial swelling; attenuated apoptosis; and reduced basal insulin secretion induced by increased palmitate in HIT cells. These results suggest that activation of PPAR{delta} plays an important role in protecting pancreatic {beta}-cells against aberrations caused by lipotoxicity in metabolic syndrome and diabetes.

  2. Physiological aspects of fruit ripening: the mitochondrial connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perotti, Valeria E; Moreno, Alejandra S; Podestá, Florencio E

    2014-07-01

    Fruit ripening is a genetically programmed process which leads to an assortment of physiological and metabolic changes that irreversibly alter its characteristics. Depending on the species, fruit maturation can be either climacteric or non-climacteric. In both cases there is a metabolic shift from normal development conditions toward the fully mature state, but climacteric fruit is characterized by a sharp increase in respiration. In non-climacteric fruit, that generally does not display this feature, respiration changes can be affected by processes related to postharvest storage. This review describes some of the many ways in which mitochondrial metabolism is implicated in this crucial reproductive stage, such as the connection between ethylene production and respiration rate, the involvement of alternative oxidase (AOX) and plant uncoupling mitochondrial protein (PUMP) during the ripening and the common alterations of this organelle in fruits affected by different stress conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and Mitochondria Research Society. All rights reserved.

  3. Effect of Remifentanil on Mitochondrial Oxygen Consumption of Cultured Human Hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djafarzadeh, Siamak; Vuda, Madhusudanarao; Takala, Jukka; Jakob, Stephan M.

    2012-01-01

    During sepsis, liver dysfunction is common, and failure of mitochondria to effectively couple oxygen consumption with energy production has been described. In addition to sepsis, pharmacological agents used to treat septic patients may contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction. This study addressed the hypothesis that remifentanil interacts with hepatic mitochondrial oxygen consumption. The human hepatoma cell line HepG2 and their isolated mitochondria were exposed to remifentanil, with or without further exposure to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Mitochondrial oxygen consumption was measured by high-resolution respirometry, Caspase-3 protein levels by Western blotting, and cytokine levels by ELISA. Inhibitory κBα (IκBα) phosphorylation, measurement of the cellular ATP content and mitochondrial membrane potential in intact cells were analysed using commercial ELISA kits. Maximal cellular respiration increased after one hour of incubation with remifentanil, and phosphorylation of IκBα occurred, denoting stimulation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB). The effect on cellular respiration was not present at 2, 4, 8 or 16 hours of incubation. Remifentanil increased the isolated mitochondrial respiratory control ratio of complex-I-dependent respiration without interfering with maximal respiration. Preincubation with the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone prevented a remifentanil-induced increase in cellular respiration. Remifentanil at 10× higher concentrations than therapeutic reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP content without uncoupling oxygen consumption and basal respiration levels. TNF-α exposure reduced respiration of complex-I, -II and -IV, an effect which was prevented by prior remifentanil incubation. Furthermore, prior remifentanil incubation prevented TNF-α-induced IL-6 release of HepG2 cells, and attenuated fragmentation of pro-caspase-3 into cleaved active caspase 3 (an early marker of apoptosis). Our data suggest that remifentanil

  4. Effect of remifentanil on mitochondrial oxygen consumption of cultured human hepatocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siamak Djafarzadeh

    Full Text Available During sepsis, liver dysfunction is common, and failure of mitochondria to effectively couple oxygen consumption with energy production has been described. In addition to sepsis, pharmacological agents used to treat septic patients may contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction. This study addressed the hypothesis that remifentanil interacts with hepatic mitochondrial oxygen consumption. The human hepatoma cell line HepG2 and their isolated mitochondria were exposed to remifentanil, with or without further exposure to tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α. Mitochondrial oxygen consumption was measured by high-resolution respirometry, Caspase-3 protein levels by Western blotting, and cytokine levels by ELISA. Inhibitory κBα (IκBα phosphorylation, measurement of the cellular ATP content and mitochondrial membrane potential in intact cells were analysed using commercial ELISA kits. Maximal cellular respiration increased after one hour of incubation with remifentanil, and phosphorylation of IκBα occurred, denoting stimulation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB. The effect on cellular respiration was not present at 2, 4, 8 or 16 hours of incubation. Remifentanil increased the isolated mitochondrial respiratory control ratio of complex-I-dependent respiration without interfering with maximal respiration. Preincubation with the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone prevented a remifentanil-induced increase in cellular respiration. Remifentanil at 10× higher concentrations than therapeutic reduced mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP content without uncoupling oxygen consumption and basal respiration levels. TNF-α exposure reduced respiration of complex-I, -II and -IV, an effect which was prevented by prior remifentanil incubation. Furthermore, prior remifentanil incubation prevented TNF-α-induced IL-6 release of HepG2 cells, and attenuated fragmentation of pro-caspase-3 into cleaved active caspase 3 (an early marker of apoptosis. Our data suggest that

  5. American Ginseng Stimulates Insulin Production and Prevents Apoptosis through Regulation of Uncoupling Protein-2 in Cultured β Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Zeqi Luo

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available American ginseng root displays the ability to achieve glucose homeostasis both experimentally and clinically but the unknown mechanism used by ginseng to achieve its therapeutic effects on diabetes limits its application. Disruption in the insulin secretion of pancreatic β cells is considered the major cause of diabetes. A mitochondrial protein, uncoupling protein-2 (UCP-2 has been found to play a critical role in insulin synthesis and β cell survival. Our preliminary studies found that the extracts of American ginseng inhibit UCP-2 expression which may contribute to the ability of ginseng protecting β cell death and improving insulin synthesis. Therefore, we hypothesized that ginseng extracts suppress UCP-2 in the mitochondria of pancreatic β cells, promoting insulin synthesis and anti-apoptosis (a programmed cell-death mechanism. To test the hypothesis, the serum-deprived quiescent β cells were cultured with or without interleukin-1β (IL-1β, (200 pg ml−1, a cytokine to induce β cell apoptosis and water extracts of American ginseng (25 μg per 5 μl administered to wells of 0.5 ml culture for 24 h. We evaluated effects of ginseng on UCP-2 expression, insulin production, anti-/pro-apoptotic factors Bcl-2/caspase-9 expression and cellular ATP levels. We found that ginseng suppresses UCP-2, down-regulates caspase-9 while increasing ATP and insulin production/secretion and up-regulates Bcl-2, reducing apoptosis. These findings suggest that stimulation of insulin production and prevention of β cell loss by American ginseng extracts can occur via the inhibition of mitochondrial UCP-2, resulting in increase in the ATP level and the anti-apoptotic factor Bcl-2, while down-regulation of pro-apoptotic factor caspase-9 occurs, lowering the occurrence of apoptosis, which support the hypothesis.

  6. Genipin-induced inhibition of uncoupling protein-2 sensitizes drug-resistant cancer cells to cytotoxic agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan J Mailloux

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2 is known to suppress mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS production and is employed by drug-resistant cancer cells to mitigate oxidative stress. Using the drug-sensitive HL-60 cells and the drug-resistant MX2 subline as model systems, we show that genipin, a UCP2 inhibitor, sensitizes drug-resistant cells to cytotoxic agents. Increased MX2 cell death was observed upon co-treatment with genipin and different doses of menadione, doxorubicin, and epirubicin. DCFH-DA fluorimetry revealed that the increase in MX2 cell death was accompanied by enhanced cellular ROS levels. The drug-induced increase in ROS was linked to genipin-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial proton leak. State 4 and resting cellular respiratory rates were higher in the MX2 cells in comparison to the HL-60 cells, and the increased respiration was readily suppressed by genipin in the MX2 cells. UCP2 accounted for a remarkable 37% of the resting cellular oxygen consumption indicating that the MX2 cells are functionally reliant on this protein. Higher amounts of UCP2 protein were detected in the MX2 versus the HL-60 mitochondria. The observed effects of genipin were absent in the HL-60 cells pointing to the selectivity of this natural product for drug-resistant cells. The specificity of genipin for UCP2 was confirmed using CHO cells stably expressing UCP2 in which genipin induced an ∼22% decrease in state 4 respiration. These effects were absent in empty vector CHO cells expressing no UCP2. Thus, the chemical inhibition of UCP2 with genipin sensitizes multidrug-resistant cancer cells to cytotoxic agents.

  7. Mutations in valosin-containing protein (VCP) decrease ADP/ATP translocation across the mitochondrial membrane and impair energy metabolism in human neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludtmann, Marthe H R; Arber, Charles; Bartolome, Fernando; de Vicente, Macarena; Preza, Elisavet; Carro, Eva; Houlden, Henry; Gandhi, Sonia; Wray, Selina; Abramov, Andrey Y

    2017-05-26

    Mutations in the gene encoding valosin-containing protein (VCP) lead to multisystem proteinopathies including frontotemporal dementia. We have previously shown that patient-derived VCP mutant fibroblasts exhibit lower mitochondrial membrane potential, uncoupled respiration, and reduced ATP levels. This study addresses the underlying basis for mitochondrial uncoupling using VCP knockdown neuroblastoma cell lines, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and iPSC-derived cortical neurons from patients with pathogenic mutations in VCP Using fluorescent live cell imaging and respiration analysis we demonstrate a VCP mutation/knockdown-induced dysregulation in the adenine nucleotide translocase, which results in a slower rate of ADP or ATP translocation across the mitochondrial membranes. This deregulation can explain the mitochondrial uncoupling and lower ATP levels in VCP mutation-bearing neurons via reduced ADP availability for ATP synthesis. This study provides evidence for a role of adenine nucleotide translocase in the mechanism underlying altered mitochondrial function in VCP-related degeneration, and this new insight may inform efforts to better understand and manage neurodegenerative disease and other proteinopathies. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Outcomes of interbody fusion cages used in 1 and 2-levels anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: titanium cages versus polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Chi-Chien; Liao, Jen-Chung; Chen, Wen-Jer; Chen, Lih-Huei

    2010-07-01

    A prospective study was performed in case with cervical spondylosis who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with titanium or polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages. To find out which fusion cage yielded better clinical and radiographic results. Although use of autogenous iliac-bone grafts in ACDF for cervical disc diseases remain standard surgical procedure, donor site morbidity and graft collapse or breakage are concerns. Cage technology was developed to prevent these complications. However, there is no comparison regarding the efficacy between titanium and PEEK cage. January 2005 to January 2006, 53 patients who had 1 and 2-levels ACDF with titanium or PEEK cages were evaluated. We measured the rate and amount of interspace collapse, segmental sagittal angulations, and the radiographic fusion success rate. Odom criteria were used to assess the clinical results. The fusion rate was higher in the PEEK group (100% vs. 86.5%, P=0.0335). There was no significant difference between both groups in loss of cervical lordosis (3.2 + or - 2.4 vs. 2.8 + or - 3.4, P=0.166). The mean anterior interspace collapse (1.6 + or - 1.0 mm) in the titanium group was significantly higher than the collapse of the PEEK group (0.5 + or - 0.6 mm) (PPEEK group (PPEEK group achieved an 80% rate of successful clinical outcomes, compared with 75% in the titanium group (P=0.6642). The PEEK cage is superior to the titanium cage in maintaining cervical interspace height and radiographic fusion after 1 and 2-levels anterior cervical decompression procedures.

  9. Genetic variants of uncoupling proteins-2 and -3 in relation to maximal oxygen uptake in different sports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holdys, Joanna; Gronek, Piotr; Kryściak, Jakub; Stanisławski, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins 2 and 3 (UCP2 and UCP3) as mitochondrial electron transporters are involved in regulation of ATP production and energy dissipation as heat. Energy efficiency plays an important role in physical performance, especially in aerobic fitness. The aim of this study was to examine the association between maximal oxygen uptake and genetic variants of the UCP2 and UCP3 genes. The studies were carried out in a group of 154 men and 85 women, professional athletes representing various sports and fitness levels and students of the University of Physical Education in Poznań. Physiological and molecular procedures were used, i.e. direct measurement of maximum oxygen uptake (VO₂max) and analysis of an insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism in the 3'untranslated region of exon 8 of the UCP2 gene and a C>T substitution in exon 5 (Y210Y) of the UCP3 gene. No statistically significant associations were found, only certain trends. Insertion allele (I) of the I/D UCP2 and the T allele of the UCP3 gene were favourable in obtaining higher VO₂max level and might be considered as endurance-related alleles.

  10. Relationship between expression of muscle-specific uncoupling protein 2 messenger RNA and genetic selection toward growth in channel catfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Y; Peterson, B C; Waldbieser, G C

    2015-04-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that increased growth in channel catfish is associated with expression of the genes that code for uncoupling proteins (UCP) 2 and 3, members of the mitochondrial channel proteins involved in nutrient sensing and metabolism. The specific objective was to contrast the levels of UCP2 messenger RNA (mRNA) in fast vs slow growing catfish as well as in fed vs fasted catfish. Two distinct UCP2 transcripts were identified and named UCP2a and UCP2b, respectively. Nucleotide and amino acid sequence of catfish UCP2s were highly similar to UCP2 and other UCPs from other fish and mammals (>75%). Expression of UCP2a mRNA was detectable at very low levels in various metabolically active tissues, whereas the expression of UCP2b mRNA was readily detectable in the muscle and heart. In a 21-wk feeding study, fish that grew faster had a greater percent body fat at the end of the study (P catfish UCP2b may be the analog to UCP3. Moreover, our results suggest selection toward growth and associated fat accumulation appears to be independent of muscle UCP2b mRNA expression and UCP2b-mediated mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Transcriptional regulation of the uncoupling protein-1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarroya, Francesc; Peyrou, Marion; Giralt, Marta

    2017-03-01

    Regulated transcription of the uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1) gene, and subsequent UCP1 protein synthesis, is a hallmark of the acquisition of the differentiated, thermogenically competent status of brown and beige/brite adipocytes, as well as of the responsiveness of brown and beige/brite adipocytes to adaptive regulation of thermogenic activity. The 5' non-coding region of the UCP1 gene contains regulatory elements that confer tissue specificity, differentiation dependence, and neuro-hormonal regulation to UCP1 gene transcription. Two main regions-a distal enhancer and a proximal promoter region-mediate transcriptional regulation through interactions with a plethora of transcription factors, including nuclear hormone receptors and cAMP-responsive transcription factors. Co-regulators, such as PGC-1α, play a pivotal role in the concerted regulation of UCP1 gene transcription. Multiple interactions of transcription factors and co-regulators at the promoter region of the UCP1 gene result in local chromatin remodeling, leading to activation and increased accessibility of RNA polymerase II and subsequent gene transcription. Moreover, a commonly occurring A-to-G polymorphism in close proximity to the UCP1 gene enhancer influences the extent of UCP1 gene transcription. Notably, it has been reported that specific aspects of obesity and associated metabolic diseases are associated with human population variability at this site. On another front, the unique properties of the UCP1 promoter region have been exploited to develop brown adipose tissue-specific gene delivery tools for experimental purposes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  12. Structural organization and mutational analysis of the human uncoupling protein-2 (hUCP2) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, N; Chen, H; Winnikes, U; Reinert, I; Marmann, G; Pirke, K M; Lentes, K U

    1999-01-01

    Uncoupling proteins (UCPs) are mitochondrial membrane transporters which are involved in dissipating the proton electrochemical gradient thereby releasing stored energy as heat. This implies a major role of UCPs in energy metabolism and thermogenesis which when deregulated are key risk factors for the development of obesity and other eating disorders. From the three different human UCPs identified so far by gene cloning both UCP2 and UCP3 were mapped in close proximity (75-150 kb) to regions of human chromosome 11 (11q13) that have been linked to obesity and hyperinsulinaemia. At the amino acid level hUCP2 has about 55% identity to hUCP1 while hUCP3 is 71% identical to hUCP2. In this study we have deduced the genomic structure of the human UCP2 gene by PCR and direct sequence analysis. The hUCP2 gene spans over 8.7 kb distributed on 8 exons. The localization of the exon/intron boundaries within the coding region matches precisely that of the hUCP1 gene and is almost conserved in the recently discovered hUCP3 gene as well. The high degree of homology at the nucleotide level and the conservation of the exon /intron boundaries among the three UCP genes suggests that they may have evolved from a common ancestor or are the result from gene duplication events. Mutational analysis of the hUCP2 gene in a cohort of 172 children (aged 7 - 13) of Caucasian origin revealed a polymorphism in exon 4 (C to T transition at position 164 of the cDNA resulting in the substitution of an alanine by a valine at codon 55) and an insertion polymorphism in exon 8. The insertion polymorphism consists of a 45 bp repeat located 150 bp downstream of the stop codon in the 3'-UTR. The allele frequencies were 0.63 and 0.37 for the alanine and valine encoded alleles, respectively, and 0.71 versus 0.29 for the insertion polymorphism. The allele frequencies of both polymorphisms were not significantly elevated in a subgroup of 25 children characterized by low Resting Metabolic Rates (RMR). So far a

  13. Biomechanics of Nested Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soriano-Baron, Hector; Newcomb, Anna G U S; Malhotra, Devika; de Tranaltes, Kaylee; Martinez-Del-Campo, Eduardo; Reyes, Phillip M; Crawford, Neil R; Theodore, Nicholas; Tumialán, Luis M

    2016-02-01

    Arthrodesis is optimized when the structural graft occupies most of the surface area within a disc space. The transforaminal corridor inherently limits interbody size. To evaluate the biomechanical implications of nested interbody spacers (ie, a second curved cage placed behind a first) to increase disc space coverage in transforaminal approaches. Seven lumbar human cadaveric specimens (L3-S1) underwent nondestructive flexibility and axial compression testing intact and after transforaminal instrumentation at L4-L5. Specimens were tested in 5 conditions: (1) intact, (2) interbody, (3) interbody plus bilateral pedicle screws and rods (PSR), (4) 2 nested interbodies, and (5) 2 nested interbodies plus PSR. Mean range of motion (ROM) with 1 interbody vs 2 nested interbodies, respectively, was: flexion, 101% vs 85%; extension, 97% vs 92%; lateral bending, 127% vs 132%; and axial rotation, 145% vs 154%. One interbody and 2 nested interbodies did not differ significantly by loading mode (P > .10). With PSR, ROM decreased significantly compared with intact, but not between interbody and interbody plus PSR or 2 interbodies plus PSR (P > .80). Mean vertical height during compressive loading (ie, axial compressive stiffness) was significantly different with 2 nested interbodies vs 1 interbody alone (P < .001) (compressive stiffness, 89% of intact vs 67% of intact, respectively). Inserting a second interbody using a transforaminal approach is anatomically feasible and nearly doubles the disc space covered without affecting ROM. Compressive stiffness significantly increased with 2 nested interbodies, and foraminal height increased. Evaluation of the clinical safety and efficacy of nested interbodies is underway.

  14. Linear diffusion into a Faraday cage.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Lin, Yau Tang; Merewether, Kimball O.; Chen, Kenneth C.

    2011-11-01

    Linear lightning diffusion into a Faraday cage is studied. An early-time integral valid for large ratios of enclosure size to enclosure thickness and small relative permeability ({mu}/{mu}{sub 0} {le} 10) is used for this study. Existing solutions for nearby lightning impulse responses of electrically thick-wall enclosures are refined and extended to calculate the nearby lightning magnetic field (H) and time-derivative magnetic field (HDOT) inside enclosures of varying thickness caused by a decaying exponential excitation. For a direct strike scenario, the early-time integral for a worst-case line source outside the enclosure caused by an impulse is simplified and numerically integrated to give the interior H and HDOT at the location closest to the source as well as a function of distance from the source. H and HDOT enclosure response functions for decaying exponentials are considered for an enclosure wall of any thickness. Simple formulas are derived to provide a description of enclosure interior H and HDOT as well. Direct strike voltage and current bounds for a single-turn optimally-coupled loop for all three waveforms are also given.

  15. Mitochondrial disease and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Shamima

    2012-05-01

    Mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders are relatively common inborn errors of energy metabolism, with a combined prevalence of one in 5000. These disorders typically affect tissues with high energy requirements, and cerebral involvement occurs frequently in childhood, often manifesting in seizures. Mitochondrial diseases are genetically heterogeneous; to date, mutations have been reported in all 37 mitochondrially encoded genes and more than 80 nuclear genes. The major genetic causes of mitochondrial epilepsy are mitochondrial DNA mutations (including those typically associated with the mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes [MELAS] and myoclonic epilepsy with ragged red fibres [MERRF] syndromes); mutations in POLG (classically associated with Alpers syndrome but also presenting as the mitochondrial recessive ataxia syndrome [MIRAS], spinocerebellar ataxia with epilepsy [SCAE], and myoclonus, epilepsy, myopathy, sensory ataxia [MEMSA] syndromes in older individuals) and other disorders of mitochondrial DNA maintenance; complex I deficiency; disorders of coenzyme Q(10) biosynthesis; and disorders of mitochondrial translation such as RARS2 mutations. It is not clear why some genetic defects, but not others, are particularly associated with seizures. Epilepsy may be the presenting feature of mitochondrial disease but is often part of a multisystem clinical presentation. Mitochondrial epilepsy may be very difficult to manage, and is often a poor prognostic feature. At present there are no curative treatments for mitochondrial disease. Individuals with mitochondrial epilepsy are frequently prescribed multiple anticonvulsants, and the role of vitamins and other nutritional supplements and the ketogenic diet remain unproven. © The Author. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2012 Mac Keith Press.

  16. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon pollution in native and caged mussels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccardo, M T; Coradeghini, R; Valerio, F

    2001-10-01

    During 1999, a biological monitoring study was conducted at four sites along the Ligurian coast (Cornigliano, Voltri, Vado Ligure and Sanremo). At each site the concentration and composition of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were investigated in native and caged mussels. The mussels (Mytilus galloprovincialis), sampled in the Spring and the Autumn, showed different accumulation patterns according to the source of pollution they were exposed to. The PAH concentrations were higher in the native than in the caged mussels. The coastal sites were classified according to PAH concentrations found in mussel tissue samples: Native mussels: Vado Ligure San-remo San-remo < Cornigliano. The different classification is explained by the different location of the organisms: native mussels were located near the air-water interface, while caged mussels were situated at -3 m from the water surface. The PAH concentrations in the native and caged mussels showed a similar seasonal variability, and can provide the same information about the sources of PAHs.

  17. Fish cage culture catches on in Nepal | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2010-10-25

    making has been strengthened. Women take part alongside the men in all activities, from cleaning and repairing the fish cages to participating in meetings of farmers'' associations, attending workshops, and marketing the catch.

  18. Environmental impact analysis of aquaculture in net cages in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Environmental impact analysis of aquaculture in net cages in a Brazilian water reservoir, based in zooplankton communities. Maria Cristina Crispim, Karla Patrícia Ponte Araújo, Hênio do Nascimento Melo Júnior ...

  19. CubeSat Attitude Determination and Helmholtz Cage Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Effects of Electrical and Ferromagnetic Objects . . . . . . . . 57 4.1.2 Room Survey . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 4.2...the theory and knowledge that was incorporated into the design of the cage and the implementation of the attitude determination algorithm in this...example of a 3U CubeSat. Control for Delfi-C3 is composed of hysteresis rods which were tested via a Helmholtz cage similar to the one described in this

  20. Musica come divenire. Il paesaggio sonoro secondo John cage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Aste

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available John Cage ha dedicato tutta la sua vita all’indagine delle possibilità di relazione dell’uomo con i suoni che lo circondano, allargando il campo dell’arte musicale a quello dell’etica e dell’ecologia. Cage non si è occupato di soundscape come un genere compositivo specifico, come forse oggi potremmo identificarlo, tuttavia l’ambiente occupa un ruolo centrale in relazione al suo modo di comporre.

  1. Nitrogen Rings and Cages Stabilized by Metallic Atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-18

    1 UNIVERSIDAD DE GUANAJUATO DEPARTAMENTO DE QUIMICA DIVISION DE CIENCIAS NATURALES Y EXACTAS Dr. Gabriel Merino NORIA ALTA s/n...CAGES STABILIZED BY METALLIC ATOMS Principal Investigator: Dr. Gabriel Merino Departamento de Química Universidad de Guanajuato Noria Alta...Final Report 1 Sep 06-31 Aug 09 NITROGEN RINGS AND CAGES STABILIZED BY METALLIC ATOMS FA9550-06-1-0555 Dr. Gabriel Merino Departamento de Química

  2. Mitochondrial Respiration in Insulin-Producing β-Cells: General Characteristics and Adaptive Effects of Hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hals, Ingrid K; Bruerberg, Simon Gustafson; Ma, Zuheng; Scholz, Hanne; Björklund, Anneli; Grill, Valdemar

    2015-01-01

    To provide novel insights on mitochondrial respiration in β-cells and the adaptive effects of hypoxia. Insulin-producing INS-1 832/13 cells were exposed to 18 hours of hypoxia followed by 20-22 hours re-oxygenation. Mitochondrial respiration was measured by high-resolution respirometry in both intact and permeabilized cells, in the latter after establishing three functional substrate-uncoupler-inhibitor titration (SUIT) protocols. Concomitant measurements included proteins of mitochondrial complexes (Western blotting), ATP and insulin secretion. Intact cells exhibited a high degree of intrinsic uncoupling, comprising about 50% of oxygen consumption in the basal respiratory state. Hypoxia followed by re-oxygenation increased maximal overall respiration. Exploratory experiments in peremabilized cells could not show induction of respiration by malate or pyruvate as reducing substrates, thus glutamate and succinate were used as mitochondrial substrates in SUIT protocols. Permeabilized cells displayed a high capacity for oxidative phosphorylation for both complex I- and II-linked substrates in relation to maximum capacity of electron transfer. Previous hypoxia decreased phosphorylation control of complex I-linked respiration, but not in complex II-linked respiration. Coupling control ratios showed increased coupling efficiency for both complex I- and II-linked substrates in hypoxia-exposed cells. Respiratory rates overall were increased. Also previous hypoxia increased proteins of mitochondrial complexes I and II (Western blotting) in INS-1 cells as well as in rat and human islets. Mitochondrial effects were accompanied by unchanged levels of ATP, increased basal and preserved glucose-induced insulin secretion. Exposure of INS-1 832/13 cells to hypoxia, followed by a re-oxygenation period increases substrate-stimulated respiratory capacity and coupling efficiency. Such effects are accompanied by up-regulation of mitochondrial complexes also in pancreatic islets

  3. Caged Protein Prenyltransferase Substrates: Tools for Understanding Protein Prenylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeGraw, Amanda J.; Hast, Michael A.; Xu, Juhua; Mullen, Daniel; Beese, Lorena S.; Barany, George; Distefano, Mark D. (Duke); (UMM)

    2010-11-15

    Originally designed to block the prenylation of oncogenic Ras, inhibitors of protein farnesyltransferase currently in preclinical and clinical trials are showing efficacy in cancers with normal Ras. Blocking protein prenylation has also shown promise in the treatment of malaria, Chagas disease and progeria syndrome. A better understanding of the mechanism, targets and in vivo consequences of protein prenylation are needed to elucidate the mode of action of current PFTase (Protein Farnesyltransferase) inhibitors and to create more potent and selective compounds. Caged enzyme substrates are useful tools for understanding enzyme mechanism and biological function. Reported here is the synthesis and characterization of caged substrates of PFTase. The caged isoprenoid diphosphates are poor substrates prior to photolysis. The caged CAAX peptide is a true catalytically caged substrate of PFTase in that it is to not a substrate, yet is able to bind to the enzyme as established by inhibition studies and X-ray crystallography. Irradiation of the caged molecules with 350 nm light readily releases their cognate substrate and their photolysis products are benign. These properties highlight the utility of those analogs towards a variety of in vitro and in vivo applications.

  4. CAGE peaks - FANTOM5 | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us FANTOM5 CAGE peaks Data detail Data name CAGE peaks DOI 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc01389-002.V002 Ve... of data contents Data about CAGE peak regions and RNA transcriptional initiation activities measured by CAG...E Data file File name: CAGE_peaks File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/fa...ntom5/datafiles/LATEST/extra/CAGE_peaks/ File size: 4.1 GB Simple search URL - Data acquisition method - Dat...a analysis method CAGE DPI (Decomposition-based peak identification) Number of data entries 28 files - About

  5. Multicomponent Protein Cage Architectures for Photocatalysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Arunava [Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (United States); Prevelige, Peter E [Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2016-01-04

    The primary goal of the project was to develop protein-templated approaches for the synthesis and directed assembly of semiconductor nanomaterials that are efficient for visible light absorption and hydrogen production. In general, visible-light-driven photocatalysis reactions exhibit low quantum efficiency for solar energy conversion primarily because of materials-related issues and limitations, such as the control of the band gap, band structure, photochemical stability, and available reactive surface area of the photocatalyst. Synthesis of multicomponent hierarchical nano-architectures, consisting of semiconductor nanoparticles (NPs) with desired optical properties fabricated to maximize spatial proximity for optimum electron and energy transfer represents an attractive route for addressing the problem. Virus capsids are highly symmetrical, self-assembling protein cage nanoparticles that exist in a range of sizes and symmetries. Selective deposition of inorganic, by design, at specific locations on virus capsids affords precise control over the size, spacing, and assembly of nanomaterials, resulting in uniform and reproducible nano-architectures. We utilized the self-assembling capabilities of the 420 subunit, 60 nm icosahedral, P22 virus capsid to direct the nucleation, growth, and proximity of a range of component materials. Controlled fabrication on the exterior of the temperature stable shell was achieved by genetically encoding specific binding peptides into an externally exposed loop which is displayed on each of the 420 coat protein subunits. Localization of complimentary materials to the interior of the particle was achieved through the use “scaffolding-fusion proteins. The scaffolding domain drives coat protein polymerization resulting in a coat protein shell surrounding a core of approximately 300 scaffolding/fusion molecules. The fusion domain comprises a peptide which specifically binds the semiconductor material of interest.

  6. Pore space partition and charge separation in cage-within-cage indium-organic frameworks with high CO2 uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shou-Tian; Bu, Julia T; Li, Yufei; Wu, Tao; Zuo, Fan; Feng, Pingyun; Bu, Xianhui

    2010-12-08

    The integration of negatively charged single-metal building blocks {In(CO2)4} and positively charged trimeric clusters {In3O} leads to three unique cage-within-cage-based porous materials, which exhibit not only high hydrothermal, thermal, and photochemical stability but also attractive structural features contributing to a very high CO2 uptake capacity of up to 119.8 L/L at 273 K and 1 atm.

  7. Apolipoprotein O is mitochondrial and promotes lipotoxicity in heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkieh, Annie; Caubère, Céline; Barutaut, Manon; Desmoulin, Franck; Harmancey, Romain; Galinier, Michel; Berry, Matthieu; Dambrin, Camille; Polidori, Carlo; Casteilla, Louis; Koukoui, François; Rouet, Philippe; Smih, Fatima

    2014-05-01

    Diabetic cardiomyopathy is a secondary complication of diabetes with an unclear etiology. Based on a functional genomic evaluation of obesity-associated cardiac gene expression, we previously identified and cloned the gene encoding apolipoprotein O (APOO), which is overexpressed in hearts from diabetic patients. Here, we generated APOO-Tg mice, transgenic mouse lines that expresses physiological levels of human APOO in heart tissue. APOO-Tg mice fed a high-fat diet exhibited depressed ventricular function with reduced fractional shortening and ejection fraction, and myocardial sections from APOO-Tg mice revealed mitochondrial degenerative changes. In vivo fluorescent labeling and subcellular fractionation revealed that APOO localizes with mitochondria. Furthermore, APOO enhanced mitochondrial uncoupling and respiration, both of which were reduced by deletion of the N-terminus and by targeted knockdown of APOO. Consequently, fatty acid metabolism and ROS production were enhanced, leading to increased AMPK phosphorylation and Ppara and Pgc1a expression. Finally, we demonstrated that the APOO-induced cascade of events generates a mitochondrial metabolic sink whereby accumulation of lipotoxic byproducts leads to lipoapoptosis, loss of cardiac cells, and cardiomyopathy, mimicking the diabetic heart-associated metabolic phenotypes. Our data suggest that APOO represents a link between impaired mitochondrial function and cardiomyopathy onset, and targeting APOO-dependent metabolic remodeling has potential as a strategy to adjust heart metabolism and protect the myocardium from impaired contractility.

  8. Uncoupling proteins, dietary fat and the metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warden Craig H

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There has been intense interest in defining the functions of UCP2 and UCP3 during the nine years since the cloning of these UCP1 homologues. Current data suggest that both UCP2 and UCP3 proteins share some features with UCP1, such as the ability to reduce mitochondrial membrane potential, but they also have distinctly different physiological roles. Human genetic studies consistently demonstrate the effect of UCP2 alleles on type-2 diabetes. Less clear is whether UCP2 alleles influence body weight or body mass index (BMI with many studies showing a positive effect while others do not. There is strong evidence that both UCP2 and UCP3 protect against mitochondrial oxidative damage by reducing the production of reactive oxygen species. The evidence that UCP2 protein is a negative regulator of insulin secretion by pancreatic β-cells is also strong: increased UCP2 decreases glucose stimulated insulin secretion ultimately leading to β-cell dysfunction. UCP2 is also neuroprotective, reducing oxidative stress in neurons. UCP3 may also transport fatty acids out of mitochondria thereby protecting the mitochondria from fatty acid anions or peroxides. Current data suggest that UCP2 plays a role in the metabolic syndrome through down-regulation of insulin secretion and development of type-2 diabetes. However, UCP2 may protect against atherosclerosis through reduction of oxidative stress and both UCP2 and UCP3 may protect against obesity. Thus, these UCP1 homologues may both contribute to and protect from the markers of the metabolic syndrome.

  9. CAGE BREEDING OF WARM WATER FRESHWATER FISH SPECIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman Safner

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available In the 1970s, Croatia became actively involved in the contemporary trend of breeding fish in floating cages. In addition to various species of marine fishes, breeding was attempted with trout, carp, catfish, cisco and salmon. Of the above freshwater fish species, specific standards were established only for the cage breeding of rainbow trout. Cage breeding of the remaining species remained at the level of occasional attempts, with more of an experimental than a commercial character. The regular attempts to master this technique for cage breeding of warm water freshwater fish species were aimed at achieving the known benefits of such breeding, such as simplicity of implementing technological measures, easier establishment of the breeding system, simpler manipulation, the possibility of denser colonies per unit volume with a high level of production, easier adaptations to market conditions and fewer initial structural investments. Despite the many advantages, the main reasons for the lack of greater implementation of the cage breeding technology for warm water species of freshwater fish include problems in obtaining the appropriate category and quantity of healthy fry, the specificity and applicability of physical and chemical properties of the recipients and human error. In evaluating the advantages and disadvantages, the final decision on the justification of cage breeding for individual warm water freshwater species must be based on both biological and economic factors. Based on the knowledge of cage breeding acquired to date, the rule for virtually all intensive breeding systems is that it is only recommended for those species with high market demand and a high market price. The technology that demands nutrition with highly concentrated feed and other production expenditures is costly, and is therefore not profitable with less expensive fish species. Furthermore, production must be market oriented, i.e. the appropriate market research measures

  10. Insulin resistance and the mitochondrial link. Lessons from cultured human myotubes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaster, Michael

    2007-01-01

    In order to better understand the impact of reduced mitochondrial function for the development of insulin resistance and cellular metabolism, human myotubes were established from lean, obese, and T2D subjects and exposed to mitochondrial inhibitors, either affecting the electron transport chain...... lipid uptake. The metabolic phenotype during respiratory uncoupling resembled the above picture, except for an increase in glucose and palmitate oxidation. Antimycin A and oligomycin treatment induced insulin resistance at the level of glucose and palmitate uptake in all three study groups while......, at the level of glycogen synthesis, insulin resistance was only seen in lean myotubes. Primary insulin resistance in diabetic myotubes was significantly worsened at the level of glucose and lipid uptake. The present study is the first convincing data linking functional mitochondrial impairment per se...

  11. Physiological Levels of Nitric Oxide Diminish Mitochondrial Superoxide. Potential Role of Mitochondrial Dinitrosyl Iron Complexes and Nitrosothiols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey I. Dikalov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are the major source of superoxide radicals and superoxide overproduction contributes to cardiovascular diseases and metabolic disorders. Endothelial dysfunction and diminished nitric oxide levels are early steps in the development of these pathological conditions. It is known that physiological production of nitric oxide reduces oxidative stress and inflammation, however, the precise mechanism of “antioxidant” effect of nitric oxide is not clear. In this work we tested the hypothesis that physiological levels of nitric oxide diminish mitochondrial superoxide production without inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. In order to test this hypothesis we analyzed effect of low physiological fluxes of nitric oxide (20 nM/min on superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production by ESR spin probes and Amplex Red in isolated rat brain mitochondria. Indeed, low levels of nitric oxide substantially attenuated both basal and antimycin A-stimulated production of reactive oxygen species in the presence of succinate or glutamate/malate as mitochondrial substrates. Furthermore, slow releasing NO donor DPTA-NONOate (100 μM did not change oxygen consumption in State 4 and State 3. However, the NO-donor strongly inhibited oxygen consumption in the presence of uncoupling agent CCCP, which is likely associated with inhibition of the over-reduced complex IV in uncoupled mitochondria. We have examined accumulation of dinitrosyl iron complexes and nitrosothiols in mitochondria treated with fast-releasing NO donor MAHMA NONOate (10 μM for 30 min until complete release of NO. Following treatment with NO donor, mitochondria were frozen for direct detection of dinitrosyl iron complexes using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR while accumulation of nitrosothiols was measured by ferrous-N-Methyl-D-glucamine dithiocarbamate complex, Fe(MGD2, in lysed mitochondria. Treatment of mitochondria with NO-donor gave rise to ESR signal of dinitrosyl iron complexes while ESR

  12. Physiological Levels of Nitric Oxide Diminish Mitochondrial Superoxide. Potential Role of Mitochondrial Dinitrosyl Iron Complexes and Nitrosothiols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikalov, Sergey I; Mayorov, Vladimir I; Panov, Alexander V

    2017-01-01

    Mitochondria are the major source of superoxide radicals and superoxide overproduction contributes to cardiovascular diseases and metabolic disorders. Endothelial dysfunction and diminished nitric oxide levels are early steps in the development of these pathological conditions. It is known that physiological production of nitric oxide reduces oxidative stress and inflammation, however, the precise mechanism of "antioxidant" effect of nitric oxide is not clear. In this work we tested the hypothesis that physiological levels of nitric oxide diminish mitochondrial superoxide production without inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. In order to test this hypothesis we analyzed effect of low physiological fluxes of nitric oxide (20 nM/min) on superoxide and hydrogen peroxide production by ESR spin probes and Amplex Red in isolated rat brain mitochondria. Indeed, low levels of nitric oxide substantially attenuated both basal and antimycin A-stimulated production of reactive oxygen species in the presence of succinate or glutamate/malate as mitochondrial substrates. Furthermore, slow releasing NO donor DPTA-NONOate (100 μM) did not change oxygen consumption in State 4 and State 3. However, the NO-donor strongly inhibited oxygen consumption in the presence of uncoupling agent CCCP, which is likely associated with inhibition of the over-reduced complex IV in uncoupled mitochondria. We have examined accumulation of dinitrosyl iron complexes and nitrosothiols in mitochondria treated with fast-releasing NO donor MAHMA NONOate (10 μM) for 30 min until complete release of NO. Following treatment with NO donor, mitochondria were frozen for direct detection of dinitrosyl iron complexes using Electron Spin Resonance (ESR) while accumulation of nitrosothiols was measured by ferrous-N-Methyl-D-glucamine dithiocarbamate complex, Fe(MGD)2, in lysed mitochondria. Treatment of mitochondria with NO-donor gave rise to ESR signal of dinitrosyl iron complexes while ESR spectra of Fe

  13. Adipose-specific deletion of TFAM increases mitochondrial oxidation and protects mice against obesity and insulin resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vernochet, Cecile; Mourier, Arnaud; Bezy, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    oxygen consumption and uncoupling. As a result, F-TFKO mice exhibit higher energy expenditure and are protected from age- and diet-induced obesity, insulin resistance, and hepatosteatosis, despite a greater food intake. Thus, TFAM deletion in the adipose tissue increases mitochondrial oxidation that has......Obesity and type 2 diabetes are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction in adipose tissue, but the role for adipose tissue mitochondria in the development of these disorders is currently unknown. To understand the impact of adipose tissue mitochondria on whole-body metabolism, we have generated...... a mouse model with disruption of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) specifically in fat. F-TFKO adipose tissue exhibit decreased mtDNA copy number, altered levels of proteins of the electron transport chain, and perturbed mitochondrial function with decreased complex I activity and greater...

  14. High levitation pressures with cage-cooled superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. [Energy Technology Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States); Komori, Mochimitsu [Department of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Kyushu Institute of Technology, Iizuka, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2002-05-01

    We present an analysis of and experimental results from a levitational system comprising a stationary, bulk high-temperature superconductor (HTS) and a levitated component (rotor) that consists of a cylindrical permanent magnet surrounded by an annular HTS. The rotor is cooled below the critical temperature of the HTS while surrounded by a ferromagnetic cage. When the ferromagnetic cage is removed, the flux from the permanent magnet is essentially excluded from the interior of the HTS. When brought into proximity with the HTS stator, the cage-cooled rotor experiences a levitational force. The levitational force may be calculated by applying magnetic circuit theory. Such calculations indicate that for a sufficiently high critical current density, the levitational pressure may exceed that between the permanent magnet and its mirror image. We constructed a rotor from an NdFeB permanent magnet and YBCO bulk HTS with a critical current density of {approx}5 kA cm{sup -2}. A soft ferromagnetic steel cage was constructed in segments. The critical current density of the stator HTS was also {approx}5 kA cm{sup -2}. Experimental results obtained with the cage-cooled rotor and stationary HTS show a significant increase in force over that of an equivalent PM rotor and stationary HTS. (author)

  15. Use of carbon fiber cages for treatment of cervical myeloradiculopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tancredi, Angelo; Agrillo, Antonino; Delfini, Roberto; Fiume, Dario; Frati, Alessandro; Rinaldi, Alessandro

    2004-03-01

    Different types of intersomatic fixation systems are available for use in the treatment of cervical disc pathologies. In this paper, we report our experience using carbon fiber cages (Brantigan I/F cage, De Puy Acromed, Raynham, MA; Mikai distrib.) for acute and chronic cervical disc pathologies. Between 1997 and 2001, 97 patients underwent surgical treatment for cervical disc pathologies. Follow-up ranged from 1 to 60 months. In all cases a microdiscectomy according to Caspar was performed; anterior stabilization was performed in cases with evidence of instability and in post-traumatic disc herniations. A total number of 119 carbon fiber cages, ranging in height from 4 to 8 mm, were employed as well as 10 anterior plates with screws. The type of material used to fill the cages was homologous bone (50.5%), heterologous bone (22.3%), hydroxyapatite (21.1%), and autologous bone (6%). In all cases, follow-up radiograms performed after at least 6 months demonstrated bone fusion. None of the patients had either spontaneous displacement of the implant or symptoms from nerve compression. These preliminary results suggest that anterior cervical fusion with carbon fiber cages are valid to restore intervertebral disc height and to promote bone fusion with low complications rate.

  16. Finite element analysis of the lumbar spine with a new cage using a topology optimization method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Zheng-Cheng; Wei, Shun-Hwa; Wang, Jung-Pin; Feng, Chi-Kuang; Chen, Chen-Sheng; Yu, Chung-huang

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, degenerative spinal instability has been effectively treated with a cage. However, little attention is focused on the design concept of the cage. The purpose of this study was to develop a new cage and evaluate its biomechanical function using a finite element method (FEM). This study employed topology optimization to design a new cage and analyze stress distribution of the lumbar spine from L1 to L3 with a new cage by using the commercial software ANSYS 6.0. A total of three finite element models, namely the intact lumbar spine, the spine with double RF cages, and with double new cages, were established. The loading conditions were that 10Nm flexion, extension, lateral bending, and torsion, respectively, were imposed on the superior surface of the L1 vertebral body. The bottom of the L3 vertebral body was constrained completely. The FEM estimated that the new cage not only could be reduced to 36% of the volume of the present RF cage but was also similar in biomechanical performance such as range of motion, stress of adjacent disc, and lower subsidence to the RF cage. The advantage of the new cage was that the increased space allowed more bone graft to be placed and the cage saved material. The disadvantage was that stress of the new cage was greater than that of the RF cage.

  17. Endurance training blocks uncoupling protein 1 up-regulation in brown adipose tissue while increasing uncoupling protein 3 in the muscle tissue of rats fed with a high-sugar diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Queiroz, Karina Barbosa; Rodovalho, Gisele Vieira; Guimarães, Juliana Bohnen; de Lima, Daniel Carvalho; Coimbra, Cândido Celso; Evangelista, Elísio Alberto; Guerra-Sá, Renata

    2012-09-01

    The mitochondrial uncoupling proteins (UCPs) of interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBAT) and of muscles play important roles in energy balance. For instance, the expression of UCP1 and UCP3 are modulated by free fatty acid gradients induced by high-sugar diets and acute exercise that is dependent on sympathetic stimulation. However, the effects of endurance training in animals fed with high-sugar diets are unknown. This study aims to evaluate the long-term effects of diet and exercise on UCP1 and UCP3 levels and energy balance efficiency. Rats fed with standard or high-sugar (HSD) diets were simultaneously subjected to running training over an 8-week period. After the training period, the rats were decapitated, and the iBAT and gastrocnemius muscle tissues were removed for evaluation of the β₃-receptor, Ucp1, and Ucp3 mRNA and protein expression, which were analyzed by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot, respectively. Groups fed with an HSD displayed a higher adiposity index and iBAT weight (P < .05), whereas exhibited an up-regulation of Ucp1 mRNA and protein levels (P < .05). Training increased β₃-receptor mRNA in iBAT and reduced the Ucp3 mRNA in muscle tissues. In association with an HSD, training restored the increasing β₃-receptor mRNA and greatly up-regulated the levels of Ucp3 mRNA. Therefore, training blocked the HSD-induced up-regulation of UCP1 expression in iBAT, whereas it up-regulated the expression of Ucp3 mRNA in muscle. These results suggest that training enhances the relationship between Ucp1/Ucp3 mRNA levels, which could result in higher energy efficiency, but not when HSD-induced elevated sympathetic activity is maintained. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Mice Do Not Habituate to Metabolism Cage Housing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalliokoski, Otto; Jacobsen, Kirsten Rosenmaj; Darusman, Huda Shalahudin

    2013-01-01

    in the present setup. In conclusion, the mice were found not to acclimatize to the metabolism cages whereby concern for animal welfare would dictate that mice should be housed in this way for as short periods as possible. The elevated degree of HPA axis activity, oxidative stress, and increased overall......The metabolism cage is a barren, non-enriched, environment, combining a number of recognized environmental stressors. We investigated the ability of male BALB/c mice to acclimatize to this form of housing. For three weeks markers of acute and oxidative stress, as well as clinical signs...... of abnormality were monitored. Forced swim tests were conducted to determine whether the animals experienced behavioral despair and the serotonergic integrity was tested using an 8-OH-DPAT challenge. The metabolism cage housed mice excreted approximately tenfold higher amounts of corticosterone metabolites...

  19. Encapsulation of cobalt nanoparticles in cross-linked-polymer cages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatamie, Shadie [Department of Electronic-Science, Fergusson College, Pune 411 004 (India); Dhole, S.D. [Department of Physics, University of Pune, Pune 411 007 (India); Ding, J. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National University of Singapore, 7, Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117574 (Singapore); Kale, S.N. [Department of Electronic-Science, Fergusson College, Pune 411 004 (India)], E-mail: sangeetakale2004@gmail.com

    2009-07-15

    Nanoparticles embedded in polymeric cages give rise to interesting applications ranging from nanocatalysis to drug-delivery systems. In this context, we report on synthesis of cobalt (Co) nanoparticles trapped in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) matrix to yield self-supporting magnetic films in PVA slime. A 20 nm, Co formed in FCC geometry encapsulated with a weak citrate coat when caged in PVA matrix exhibited persistence of magnetism and good radio-frequency response. Cross-linking of PVA chains to form cage-like structures to arrest Co nanoparticles therein, is believed to be the reason for oxide-free nature of Co, promising applications in biomedicine as well as in radio-frequency shielding.

  20. The rib cage stabilizes the human thoracic spine: An in vitro study using stepwise reduction of rib cage structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebsch, Christian; Graf, Nicolas; Appelt, Konrad; Wilke, Hans-Joachim

    2017-01-01

    The stabilizing effect of the rib cage on the human thoracic spine is still not sufficiently analyzed. For a better understanding of this effect as well as the calibration and validation of numerical models of the thoracic spine, experimental biomechanics data is required. This study aimed to determine (1) the stabilizing effect of the single rib cage structures on the human thoracic spine as well as the effect of the rib cage on (2) the flexibility of the single motion segments and (3) coupled motion behavior of the thoracic spine. Six human thoracic spine specimens including the entire rib cage were loaded quasi-statically with pure moments of ± 2 Nm in flexion/extension (FE), lateral bending (LB), and axial rotation (AR) using a custom-built spine tester. Motion analysis was performed using an optical motion tracking system during load application to determine range of motion (ROM) and neutral zone (NZ). Specimens were tested (1) in intact condition, (2) after removal of the intercostal muscles, (3) after median sternotomy, after removal of (4) the anterior rib cage up to the rib stumps, (5) the right sixth to eighth rib head, and (6) all rib heads. Significant (p spine rigidity, especially in axial rotation by a factor of more than two, and should therefore be considered in clinical scenarios, in vitro, and in silico.

  1. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages in cervical applications: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kersten, Roel Frederik Mark Raymond; van Gaalen, Steven M; de Gast, Arthur; Öner, F Cumhur

    2015-06-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages have been widely used during the past decade in patients with degenerative disorders of the cervical spine. Their radiolucency and low elastic modulus make them attractive attributes for spinal fusion compared with titanium and bone graft. Still, limitations are seen such as pseudoarthrosis, subsidence, and migration of the cages. Limited evidence on the clinical outcome of PEEK cages is found in the literature other than noncomparative cohort studies with only a few randomized controlled trials. To assess the clinical and radiographic outcome of PEEK cages in the treatment of degenerative disc disorders and/or spondylolisthesis in the cervical spine. Systematic review of all randomized controlled trials and prospective and retrospective nonrandomized comparative studies with a minimum follow-up of 6 months and all noncomparative cohort studies with a long-term follow-up of more than 5 years. The primary outcome variable was clinical performance. Secondary outcome variables consisted of radiographic scores. The MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases were searched according to the Preferred Reporting Items of Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses statement and Meta-analysis Of Observational Studies in Epidemiology guidelines. No conflict of interest reported. No funding received. A total of 223 studies were identified, of which 10 studies were included. These comprised two randomized controlled trials, five prospective comparative trials, and three retrospective comparative trials. Minimal evidence for better clinical and radiographic outcome is found for PEEK cages compared with bone grafts in the cervical spine. No differences were found between PEEK, titanium, and carbon fiber cages. Future studies are needed to improve methodology to minimize bias. Publication of lumbar interbody fusion studies needs to be promoted because differences in clinical and/or radiographic scores are more likely to be demonstrated in this part

  2. Modeled Increase of ice Drainage of Jacobshavn Isbrae due to ice bed Uncoupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstede, C. M.

    2007-12-01

    Increased ice drainage of major ice sheets will lead to a rise in sea level. The Greenland Ice Sheet seems to react faster to global warming than originally was thought. Three major outlet glaciers in Southern Greenland, increased their ice drainage significantly since 1997. Most of the draining takes place through fast moving calving glaciers called ice streams. A not well understood condition for ice streams to occur is the presence of basal water. We present a possible mechanism for the dynamics of ice streams by splitting up each column of ice along a flow line into a floating part and a grounded part. The floating part of the ice column is balanced by a tensile force and the grounded part is balanced by basal drag. Using this model, the center flow line of Jacobshavn Isbrae in West Greenland is monitored from 1985 to 2003. A gradual uncoupling of ice from it's bed is observed from 1993 to 2003. One observation is that the small ice shelf of Jacobshavn Isbrae was simply pushed forward by the increasingly uncoupled ice before the shelf collapsed. The uncoupling pinches off some sixty kilometers upstream from the grounding line. This uncoupling is then quantified as a force perturbation that is used in a time dependent model of ice surface lowering. The initial reaction to the perturbation is a strong increase in ice draining velocity that dies out after several years until a new steady state is accomplished.

  3. Uncoupling Protein 3 Content Is Decreased in Skeletal Muscle of Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keizer; E.E. Blaak; P. Schrauwen; G. Schaart; dr. Lars B. Borghouts; Saris; M.K.C. Hesselink

    2001-01-01

    Recently, a role for uncoupling protein-3 (UCP3) in carbohydrate metabolism and in type 2 diabetes has been suggested. Mice overexpressing UCP3 in skeletal muscle showed reduced fasting plasma glucose levels, improved glucose tolerance after an oral glucose load, and reduced fasting plasma insulin

  4. Circadian Biology: Uncoupling Human Body Clocks by Food Timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Celine; Scheer, Frank A J L

    2017-07-10

    Synchrony of circadian rhythms between tissues/organs appears critical for health. A new study reports that meal timing, a modifiable temporal cue for the circadian system, can selectively uncouple circadian rhythms in metabolic physiology from the central circadian clock in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. (reprocessed)CAGE_peaks_expression - FANTOM5 | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us FANTOM5 (reprocessed)CAGE_peaks_expression Data detail Data name (reprocessed)CAGE_peaks_exp... (hg38/mm10). Data file File name: (reprocessed)CAGE_peaks_expression (Homo sapiens) File URL: ftp://ftp.bio...sciencedbc.jp/archive/fantom5/datafiles/reprocessed/hg38_latest/extra/CAGE_peaks_expression/ File size: 3.3 GB File name: (reprocess...tp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/fantom5/datafiles/reprocessed/mm10_latest/extra/CAGE_peaks_expression/ File size...f This Database Site Policy | Contact Us (reprocessed)CAGE_peaks_expression - FANTOM5 | LSDB Archive ...

  6. (reprocessed)CAGE_peaks_annotation - FANTOM5 | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us FANTOM5 (reprocessed)CAGE_peaks_annotation Data detail Data name (reprocessed)CAGE_peaks_ann...rence sequences (hg38/mm10). Data file File name: (reprocessed)CAGE_peaks_annotation (Homo sapiens) File URL...: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/fantom5/datafiles/reprocessed/hg38_latest/extra/CAGE_peaks_annotation/ ...File size: 16 MB File name: (reprocessed)CAGE_peaks_annotation (Mus musculus) Fil...e URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/fantom5/datafiles/reprocessed/mm10_latest/extra/CAGE_peaks_annotat

  7. (reprocessed)CAGE peaks - FANTOM5 | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us FANTOM5 (reprocessed)CAGE peaks Data detail Data name (reprocessed)CAGE peaks DOI 10.18908/l...g38/mm10). Data file File name: (reprocessed)CAGE_peaks (Homo sapiens) File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/...archive/fantom5/datafiles/reprocessed/hg38_latest/extra/CAGE_peaks/ File size: 11 MB File name: (reprocessed...)CAGE_peaks (Mus musculus) File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/fantom5/datafiles/reprocess...his Database Site Policy | Contact Us (reprocessed)CAGE peaks - FANTOM5 | LSDB Archive ...

  8. eNOS Uncoupling, A Therapeutic Target For Ischemic Foot of Diabetic Rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ling; Yu, Ailin; Liu, Jingcheng; Ma, Lina; Li, Jing

    2018-02-01

    To determine the relationship between eNOS uncoupling and diabetic ischemic foot and whether reversing eNOS uncoupling by Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) transfection or folic acid (FA) supplementation can be beneficiary in diabetic ischemic foot. The bilateral common iliac artery of diabetic rats were ligated to establish the diabetic ischemic foot animal model. DHFR transfection was implemented via femoral artery and muscle injection of in vivo transfection reagent mixture (GenEscortIII) every 4 days during the 2 weeks intervention. The color doppler flow imaging (CDFI) of femoral artery for RI measurement, triceps and quadriceps structure and histology, eNOS coupling status, DHFR expression level, superoxide, peroxynitrite (ONOO- ) and nitric oxide (NO) production in the presence or absence of L-NAME (eNOS inhibitor) were examined among wild type rats (WT), diabetic sham rats (DM), rats of diabetic ischemic foot (DF) or DF with DHFR transfection (DFT) or DF with FA supplementation (DFF). Dihydroethidium (DHE) fluorescence, as an index of superoxide production was enhanced in the femoral arteries of diabetic rats and even more in those of ischemic foot from diabetic rats. However, the DHE fluorescence was diminished in the presence of L-NAME suggesting eNOS uncoupling is the source of superoxide overproduction which further led to increased peroxynitrite production and decreased NO . bioavailability. Subsequently, the hind limb muscle became atrophic and the local collateral circulation was defective due to endothelial dysfunction related to eNOS uncoupling. However, all of the above and hemodynamic index (RI) of femoral artery were resumed via restoration of DHFR protein expression by folic acid treatment or DHFR transfection. eNOS uncoupling is involved in diabetic ischemic foot due to DHFR suppression. DHFR restoration can reverse eNOS uncoupling and resume the endothelial dysfunction and pathological changes (increased vasculature resistance, hind limb muscle

  9. Genomic characterization of the European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax reveals the presence of a novel uncoupling protein (UCP) gene family member in the teleost fish lineage

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Uncoupling proteins (UCP) are evolutionary conserved mitochondrial carriers that control energy metabolism and therefore play important roles in several physiological processes such as thermogenesis, regulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), growth control, lipid metabolism and regulation of insulin secretion. Despite their importance in various physiological processes, their molecular function remains controversial. The evolution and phylogenetic distribution may assist to identify their general biological function and structure-function relationships. The exact number of uncoupling protein genes in the fish genome and their evolution is unresolved. Results Here we report the first characterisation of UCP gene family members in sea bass, Dicentrarchus labrax, and then retrace the evolution of the protein family in vertebrates. Four UCP genes that are shared by five other fish species were identified in sea bass genome. Phylogenetic reconstitution among vertebrate species and synteny analysis revealed that UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3 evolved from duplication events that occurred in the common ancestor of vertebrates, whereas the novel fourth UCP originated specifically in the teleost lineage. Functional divergence analysis among teleost species revealed specific amino acid positions that have been subjected to altered functional constraints after duplications. Conclusions This work provides the first unambiguous evidence for the presence of a fourth UCP gene in teleost fish genome and brings new insights into the evolutionary history of the gene family. Our results suggest functional divergence among paralogues which might result from long-term and differential selective pressures, and therefore, provide the indication that UCP genes may have diverse physiological functions in teleost fishes. Further experimental analysis of the critical amino acids identified here may provide valuable information on the physiological functions of UCP genes. PMID:22577775

  10. Stomatin-like protein 2 is required for in vivo mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplex formation and optimal cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsopoulos, Panagiotis; Chang, Yu-Han; Wai, Timothy; König, Tim; Dunn, Stanley D; Langer, Thomas; Madrenas, Joaquín

    2015-05-01

    Stomatin-like protein 2 (SLP-2) is a mainly mitochondrial protein that is widely expressed and is highly conserved across evolution. We have previously shown that SLP-2 binds the mitochondrial lipid cardiolipin and interacts with prohibitin-1 and -2 to form specialized membrane microdomains in the mitochondrial inner membrane, which are associated with optimal mitochondrial respiration. To determine how SLP-2 functions, we performed bioenergetic analysis of primary T cells from T cell-selective Slp-2 knockout mice under conditions that forced energy production to come almost exclusively from oxidative phosphorylation. These cells had a phenotype characterized by increased uncoupled mitochondrial respiration and decreased mitochondrial membrane potential. Since formation of mitochondrial respiratory chain supercomplexes (RCS) may correlate with more efficient electron transfer during oxidative phosphorylation, we hypothesized that the defect in mitochondrial respiration in SLP-2-deficient T cells was due to deficient RCS formation. We found that in the absence of SLP-2, T cells had decreased levels and activities of complex I-III2 and I-III2-IV(1-3) RCS but no defects in assembly of individual respiratory complexes. Impaired RCS formation in SLP-2-deficient T cells correlated with significantly delayed T cell proliferation in response to activation under conditions of limiting glycolysis. Altogether, our findings identify SLP-2 as a key regulator of the formation of RCS in vivo and show that these supercomplexes are required for optimal cell function. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. The essential oils component p-cymene induces proton leak through Fo-ATP synthase and uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration

    OpenAIRE

    Custodio, Jose; Ribeiro,Mariana V.; Silva,Filomena; Rodrigues Machado,Sonia Marisa; Sousa,M. Céu

    2011-01-01

    José BA Custódio1,2, Mariana V Ribeiro1,2, Filomena SG Silva1,2, Marisa Machado3,4, M Céu Sousa3,4 1Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, 2Laboratory of Biochemistry, Faculty of Pharmacy, 3Center of Pharmaceutical Studies, 4Laboratory of Microbiology, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra, Portugal Abstract: Essential oils can be used as antimicrobial, antioxidant, and anticarcinogenic agents or to preserve and give flavors to foods. The activity of ...

  12. Progress in mitochondrial epigenetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manev, Hari; Dzitoyeva, Svetlana

    2013-08-01

    Mitochondria, intracellular organelles with their own genome, have been shown capable of interacting with epigenetic mechanisms in at least four different ways. First, epigenetic mechanisms that regulate the expression of nuclear genome influence mitochondria by modulating the expression of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial genes. Second, a cell-specific mitochondrial DNA content (copy number) and mitochondrial activity determine the methylation pattern of nuclear genes. Third, mitochondrial DNA variants influence the nuclear gene expression patterns and the nuclear DNA (ncDNA) methylation levels. Fourth and most recent line of evidence indicates that mitochondrial DNA similar to ncDNA also is subject to epigenetic modifications, particularly by the 5-methylcytosine and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine marks. The latter interaction of mitochondria with epigenetics has been termed 'mitochondrial epigenetics'. Here we summarize recent developments in this particular area of epigenetic research. Furthermore, we propose the term 'mitoepigenetics' to include all four above-noted types of interactions between mitochondria and epigenetics, and we suggest a more restricted usage of the term 'mitochondrial epigenetics' for molecular events dealing solely with the intra-mitochondrial epigenetics and the modifications of mitochondrial genome.

  13. Mitochondrial Reprogramming Induced by CaMKIIδ Mediates Hypertrophy Decompensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westenbrink, B. Daan; Ling, Haiyun; Divakaruni, Ajit; Gray, Charles B. B.; Zambon, Alexander C.; Dalton, Nancy D.; Peterson, Kirk L.; Gu, Yusu; Matkovich, Scot J.; Murphy, Anne; Miyamoto, Shigeki; Dorn, Gerald W.; Brown, Joan Heller

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Sustained activation of Gq signaling during pressure overload causes cardiac hypertrophy that ultimately progresses to dilated cardiomyopathy. The molecular events that drive hypertrophy decompensation are incompletely understood. Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II delta (CaMKIIδ) is activated downstream of Gq and overexpression of Gq and CaMKIIδ recapitulates hypertrophy decompensation. Objective To determine whether CaMKIIδ contributes to hypertrophy decompensation provoked by Gq. Methods and Results Compared to Gαq transgenic (Gq) mice, compound Gq/CaMKIIδ knockout (KO) (Gq/KO) mice developed a similar degree of cardiac hypertrophy but exhibited significantly improved left ventricular function, less cardiac fibrosis and cardiomyocyte apoptosis, and fewer ventricular arrhythmias. Markers of oxidative stress were elevated in mitochondria from Gq vs. WT mice and respiratory rates were lower; these changes in mitochondrial function were restored by CaMKIIδ deletion. Gq-mediated increases in mitochondrial oxidative stress, compromised membrane potential and cell death were recapitulated in NRVMs infected with constitutively active Gq and attenuated by CaMKII inhibition. Deep RNA sequencing revealed altered expression of 41 mitochondrial genes in Gq hearts, with normalization of ~40% of these genes by CaMKIIδ deletion. Uncoupling protein 3 (UCP3) was markedly downregulated in Gq or by Gq expression in NRVMs and reversed by CaMKIIδ deletion or inhibition, as was Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR-α). The protective effects of CaMKIIδ inhibition on ROS generation and cell death were abrogated by knock down of UCP3. Conversely, restoration of UCP3 expression attenuated ROS generation and cell death induced by CaMKIIδ. Our in vivo studies further demonstrated that pressure overload induced decreases in PPAR-α and UCP3, increases in mitochondrial protein oxidation, and hypertrophy decompensation which were attenuated by Ca

  14. Electrophoresis simulated with the cage model for reptation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heukelum, A. van; Beljaars, H.R.W.

    2000-01-01

    The cage model for polymer reptation is extended to simulate gel electrophoresis. With increasing electric field strength E, the drift velocity v of a long polymer with length L shows three different regimes: (a) the linear regime where v~E/ L; (b) the quadratic regime where v~E^2 ,

  15. Red light activated "caged" reagents for microRNA research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, A; Schikora, M; Starkuviene, V; Mokhir, A

    2016-08-31

    "Caged" reagents for miRNA research (siRNA targeting EGFR, involved in miRNA maturation, and mimics of miR-20a, playing a key role in tumor formation and metastasis) were prepared. It was demonstrated that these reagents can be activated by non-toxic to cells red light both in cells and in cell free settings.

  16. Regioselective nitration of aromatic substrates in zeolite cages

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    (wherein polynitration is a serious handicap to selective nitration) in zeolite environment is not explored. With these goals in mind, we have reported17 recently regioselective nitration of phenol inside the cages/channels of zeolite media using fuming nitric acid. In our attempts to delineate the mechanism in detail and also to ...

  17. Assessment of the Usability of the Workbench Faraday Cage Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Morten; Franek, Ondrej; Christensen, Søren K.

    2011-01-01

    The workbench Faraday Cage method (WBFC) is a time efficient module pre-compliance test regarding radiated emission. This work investigates the method’s usability and credibility and concludes that for this particular case the WBFC perform a tolerable compliance test for frequencies below 360 MHz...

  18. Impacts of cage culture on physico-chemical and bacteriological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of cage fish farming on physico-chemical and bacteriological water quality in Lake Volta, Ghana, were investigated in 2013–2014. Farmed and unfarmed (control) areas of the lake were selected for monitoring. Nutrients, temperature, dissolved oxygen, conductivity, turbidity, pH, total coliforms, Pseudomonas and ...

  19. Thoracic cage injury imaging in rugby players | de Villiers | SA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rugby players often sustain high-impact collisions and are therefore at risk of significant traumatic thoracic injuries. Injury to the thoracic cage may be associated with potentially life-threatening sequelae. Player management is often based on the accuracy of the imaging report. The author suggests a combination of ...

  20. Multiexpandable cage for minimally invasive posterior lumbar interbody fusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coe JD

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Jeffrey D Coe,1 James F Zucherman,2 Donald W Kucharzyk,3 Kornelis A Poelstra,4 Larry E Miller,5 Sandeep Kunwar,6 1Silicon Valley Spine Institute, Campbell, 2San Francisco Orthopaedic Surgeons, San Francisco, CA, 3Orthopaedic Pediatric and Spine, Crown Point, IN, 4Department of Surgery, Sacred Heart Hospital on the Emerald Coast, Miramar Beach, FL, 5Miller Scientific Consulting, Inc., Asheville, NC, 6Bell Neuroscience Institute, Washington Hospital Healthcare System, Fremont, CA, USA Abstract: The increasing adoption of minimally invasive techniques for spine surgery in recent years has led to significant advancements in instrumentation for lumbar interbody fusion. Percutaneous pedicle screw fixation is now a mature technology, but the role of expandable cages is still evolving. The capability to deliver a multiexpandable interbody cage with a large footprint through a narrow surgical cannula represents a significant advancement in spinal surgery technology. The purpose of this report is to describe a multiexpandable lumbar interbody fusion cage, including implant characteristics, intended use, surgical technique, preclinical testing, and early clinical experience. Results to date suggest that the multiexpandable cage allows a less invasive approach to posterior/transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion surgery by minimizing iatrogenic risks associated with static or vertically expanding interbody prostheses while providing immediate vertebral height restoration, restoration of anatomic alignment, and excellent early-term clinical results. Keywords: degenerative disc disease, expandable, low back pain, Luna

  1. Regioselective nitration of aromatic substrates in zeolite cages

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Phenol is nitrated regioselectively by fuming nitric acid inside the cages of faujasite zeolites (dependent on the loading level) and a remarkable orthoselectivity is observed in solid state nitration. Toluene and chlorobenzene also containing ortho-/para-orienting substituents, undergo faster nitration, though the ...

  2. power generation and control of a self excited squirrel cage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    generator. The possibility of using a capacitor bank connected across the stator terminals of a squirrel cage induction motor to supply the reactive power requirement for power generation was discovered by. Basset and Potter in the 1930s It is more attractive than a conventional synchronous generator in micro- hydro and ...

  3. Business plan Tilapia cage farming in Tete Zambezi Valley, Mozambique

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meer, van der Magnus; Brouwer, Herman

    2015-01-01

    Tete province offers great opportunities for cage farming of tilapia in Lake Cahora Bassa. The climate and water quality are favourable for fish production, and the fast economic developments in the region will facilitate fish sales. In Tete tilapia (pende) is highly valued food. Major markets for

  4. FANTOM5 CAGE profiles of human and mouse samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noguchi, Shuhei; Arakawa, Takahiro; Fukuda, Shiro; Furuno, Masaaki; Hasegawa, Akira; Hori, Fumi; Ishikawa-Kato, Sachi; Kaida, Kaoru; Kaiho, Ai; Kanamori-Katayama, Mutsumi; Kawashima, Tsugumi; Kojima, Miki; Kubosaki, Atsutaka; Manabe, Ri-ichiroh; Murata, Mitsuyoshi; Nagao-Sato, Sayaka; Nakazato, Kenichi; Ninomiya, Noriko; Nishiyori-Sueki, Hiromi; Noma, Shohei; Saijyo, Eri; Saka, Akiko; Sakai, Mizuho; Simon, Christophe; Suzuki, Naoko; Tagami, Michihira; Watanabe, Shoko; Yoshida, Shigehiro; Arner, Peter; Axton, Richard A.; Babina, Magda; Baillie, J. Kenneth; Barnett, Timothy C.; Beckhouse, Anthony G.; Blumenthal, Antje; Bodega, Beatrice; Bonetti, Alessandro; Briggs, James; Brombacher, Frank; Carlisle, Ailsa J.; Clevers, Hans C.; Davis, Carrie A.; Detmar, Michael; Dohi, Taeko; Edge, Albert S. B.; Edinger, Matthias; Ehrlund, Anna; Ekwall, Karl; Endoh, Mitsuhiro; Enomoto, Hideki; Eslami, Afsaneh; Fagiolini, Michela; Fairbairn, Lynsey; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Ferrai, Carmelo; Fisher, Malcolm E.; Forrester, Lesley M.; Fujita, Rie; Furusawa, Jun-ichi; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B.; Gingeras, Thomas; Goldowitz, Daniel; Guhl, Sven; Guler, Reto; Gustincich, Stefano; Ha, Thomas J.; Hamaguchi, Masahide; Hara, Mitsuko; Hasegawa, Yuki; Herlyn, Meenhard; Heutink, Peter; Hitchens, Kelly J.; Hume, David A.; Ikawa, Tomokatsu; Ishizu, Yuri; Kai, Chieko; Kawamoto, Hiroshi; Kawamura, Yuki I.; Kempfle, Judith S.; Kenna, Tony J.; Kere, Juha; Khachigian, Levon M.; Kitamura, Toshio; Klein, Sarah; Klinken, S. Peter; Knox, Alan J.; Kojima, Soichi; Koseki, Haruhiko; Koyasu, Shigeo; Lee, Weonju; Lennartsson, Andreas; Mackay-sim, Alan; Mejhert, Niklas; Mizuno, Yosuke; Morikawa, Hiromasa; Morimoto, Mitsuru; Moro, Kazuyo; Morris, Kelly J.; Motohashi, Hozumi; Mummery, Christine L.; Nakachi, Yutaka; Nakahara, Fumio; Nakamura, Toshiyuki; Nakamura, Yukio; Nozaki, Tadasuke; Ogishima, Soichi; Ohkura, Naganari; Ohno, Hiroshi; Ohshima, Mitsuhiro; Okada-Hatakeyama, Mariko; Okazaki, Yasushi; Orlando, Valerio; Ovchinnikov, Dmitry A.; Passier, Robert; Patrikakis, Margaret; Pombo, Ana; Pradhan-Bhatt, Swati; Qin, Xian-Yang; Rehli, Michael; Rizzu, Patrizia; Roy, Sugata; Sajantila, Antti; Sakaguchi, Shimon; Sato, Hiroki; Satoh, Hironori; Savvi, Suzana; Saxena, Alka; Schmidl, Christian; Schneider, Claudio; Schulze-Tanzil, Gundula G.; Schwegmann, Anita; Sheng, Guojun; Shin, Jay W.; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Takaaki; Summers, Kim M.; Takahashi, Naoko; Takai, Jun; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Tatsukawa, Hideki; Tomoiu, Andru; Toyoda, Hiroo; van de Wetering, Marc; van den Berg, Linda M.; Verardo, Roberto; Vijayan, Dipti; Wells, Christine A.; Winteringham, Louise N.; Wolvetang, Ernst; Yamaguchi, Yoko; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Yanagi-Mizuochi, Chiyo; Yoneda, Misako; Yonekura, Yohei; Zhang, Peter G.; Zucchelli, Silvia; Abugessaisa, Imad; Arner, Erik; Harshbarger, Jayson; Kondo, Atsushi; Lassmann, Timo; Lizio, Marina; Sahin, Serkan; Sengstag, Thierry; Severin, Jessica; Shimoji, Hisashi; Suzuki, Masanori; Suzuki, Harukazu; Kawai, Jun; Kondo, Naoto; Itoh, Masayoshi; Daub, Carsten O.; Kasukawa, Takeya; Kawaji, Hideya; Carninci, Piero; Forrest, Alistair R. R.; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide

    2017-01-01

    In the FANTOM5 project, transcription initiation events across the human and mouse genomes were mapped at a single base-pair resolution and their frequencies were monitored by CAGE (Cap Analysis of Gene Expression) coupled with single-molecule sequencing. Approximately three thousands of samples,

  5. variations in dimensions and shape of thoracic cage with aging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ABSTRACT. The thoracic cage variations in dimensions and proportions are influenced by age, sex and race. The objective of the present review was to describe the age related changes occurring in thoracic wall and its influence on the pattern of respiration in infants, adult and elderly. We had systematically reviewed, ...

  6. Sex effect in mutual olfactory relationships of individually caged rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Finzi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available To assess the sex influence on sniffing behavior of rabbits, sets of three rabbits each were located for seven days in contiguous cages divided by a metal wall with holes that prevented the neighboring rabbits to see each other. A buck was located in the central cage, with a doe at each side. Rabbit behavior was video recorded to observe animals sniffing with the muzzle near the wall. The bucks displayed an olfactory preference towards one of the two does, which decreased in few days. The significance was p  0.05. The interest of bucks towards the does was also characterized by a frenetic scratching of the separation wall, contemporary with intense sniffing, displayed only for the first 35 min of the first day. The sniffing behavior of does at the central cage housing the male was not so marked as in bucks, and it progressively changed across the trial (p < 0.01. In conclusion, rabbits establish a transitory sex-oriented olfactory relationship with the conspecifics housed in contiguous cages, which looks no longer necessary once the rabbits have recognized each other.

  7. Whole-tree canopy enclosures: why cage a tree?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerome F. Grant; Abdul Hakeem; Paris L. Lambdin; Gregory J. Wiggins; Rusty J. Rhea

    2011-01-01

    The use of whole-tree canopy enclosures (i.e., cages) is not a typical approach to assessing biological parameters and interactions in a forest setting. However, the successful application of this technology may enable researchers to better understand certain types of tree/organismal interactions.

  8. Clathrates-An Exploration of the Chemistry of Caged Compounds

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 9; Issue 7. Clathrates – An Exploration of the Chemistry of Caged Compounds. Srivathsa Vaidya. General Article Volume 9 Issue 7 July 2004 pp 18-31. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  9. FANTOM5 CAGE profiles of human and mouse samples

    KAUST Repository

    Noguchi, Shuhei

    2017-08-29

    In the FANTOM5 project, transcription initiation events across the human and mouse genomes were mapped at a single base-pair resolution and their frequencies were monitored by CAGE (Cap Analysis of Gene Expression) coupled with single-molecule sequencing. Approximately three thousands of samples, consisting of a variety of primary cells, tissues, cell lines, and time series samples during cell activation and development, were subjected to a uniform pipeline of CAGE data production. The analysis pipeline started by measuring RNA extracts to assess their quality, and continued to CAGE library production by using a robotic or a manual workflow, single molecule sequencing, and computational processing to generate frequencies of transcription initiation. Resulting data represents the consequence of transcriptional regulation in each analyzed state of mammalian cells. Non-overlapping peaks over the CAGE profiles, approximately 200,000 and 150,000 peaks for the human and mouse genomes, were identified and annotated to provide precise location of known promoters as well as novel ones, and to quantify their activities.

  10. Intraoperative antepulsion of a posterior lumbar interbody fusion cage

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spinal fusion surgery techniques develop together with technologic advancements. New complications are seen as the result of new techniques and these may be very severe due to spinal cord and vascular structures in the lumbar region. The posterior lumbar interbody fusion cage (PLIFC) was shown to enhance spinal ...

  11. Diet manipulation and post-moulting responses in caged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two hundred and fifty caged commercial laying hens were induced to moult through a 15-day feed and water withdrawal programme. Immediate and subsequent effects on egg production and follicular developments were monitored. Results showed that moulted hens attained over 60% egg production after 6 weeks of ...

  12. Mitochondrial membrane studies using impedance spectroscopy with parallel pH monitoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Padmaraj

    Full Text Available A biological microelectromechanical system (BioMEMS device was designed to study complementary mitochondrial parameters important in mitochondrial dysfunction studies. Mitochondrial dysfunction has been linked to many diseases, including diabetes, obesity, heart failure and aging, as these organelles play a critical role in energy generation, cell signaling and apoptosis. The synthesis of ATP is driven by the electrical potential across the inner mitochondrial membrane and by the pH difference due to proton flux across it. We have developed a tool to study the ionic activity of the mitochondria in parallel with dielectric measurements (impedance spectroscopy to gain a better understanding of the properties of the mitochondrial membrane. This BioMEMS chip includes: 1 electrodes for impedance studies of mitochondria designed as two- and four-probe structures for optimized operation over a wide frequency range and 2 ion-sensitive field effect transistors for proton studies of the electron transport chain and for possible monitoring other ions such as sodium, potassium and calcium. We have used uncouplers to depolarize the mitochondrial membrane and disrupt the ionic balance. Dielectric spectroscopy responded with a corresponding increase in impedance values pointing at changes in mitochondrial membrane potential. An electrical model was used to describe mitochondrial sample's complex impedance frequency dependencies and the contribution of the membrane to overall impedance changes. The results prove that dielectric spectroscopy can be used as a tool for membrane potential studies. It can be concluded that studies of the electrochemical parameters associated with mitochondrial bioenergetics may render significant information on various abnormalities attributable to these organelles.

  13. Sulforaphane is anticonvulsant and improves mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco-Pozo, Catalina; Tan, Kah Ni; Borges, Karin

    2015-12-01

    The nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 pathway (Nrf2) has been previously identified to protect the brain against various impacts. Here, we investigated the effect of the Nrf2 activator sulforaphane in various seizure models and hippocampal mitochondrial bioenergetics. We found that daily injections of sulforaphane for 5 days elevated the seizure thresholds to 6 Hz stimulation and fluorothyl-, but not pentylenetetrazole-induced tonic seizures and protected mice against pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE). Also, sulforaphane increased the antioxidant defences within hippocampal formations and blood plasma. In addition, sulforaphane treatment reduced the extent of hippocampal lipid peroxidation 24 h post-SE and protected hippocampal mitochondria against SE-induced reduction in state 2 and uncoupler-stimulated state 3 respiration. SE-mediated partial loss of rotenone-sensitive and complex II-driven respiration was reduced, consistent with the enhanced activities of complexes I and II in sulforaphane-treated SE mice. In mitochondria isolated from both no SE and SE mice, sulforaphane increased state 3 respiration and respiration linked to ATP synthesis, which may contribute to its anticonvulsant and antioxidant effects by providing more ATP for cellular vital and protective functions. However, sulforaphane did not prevent SE-induced hippocampal cell death. In conclusion, sulforaphane and/or Nrf2 activation are viable anticonvulsant strategies, which are antioxidant and enhance mitochondrial function, especially the ability to produce ATP. Sulforaphane was anticonvulsant in two acute mouse models of epilepsy and protected mice against pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE). We also found antioxidant effects of sulforaphane in mouse plasma and hippocampal formations, exhibited by increased catalase and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, as well as increased abilities of hippocampal mitochondria to produce ATP. These effects likely underlie

  14. The effect of Leonurus cardiaca herb extract and some of its flavonoids on mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation in the heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernatoniene, Jurga; Kopustinskiene, Dalia M; Jakstas, Valdas; Majiene, Daiva; Baniene, Rasa; Kuršvietiene, Lolita; Masteikova, Ruta; Savickas, Arunas; Toleikis, Adolfas; Trumbeckaite, Sonata

    2014-05-01

    Motherwort (Leonurus cardiaca) possesses antibacterial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and analgesic activities, and is used as a complementary remedy to improve heart function and blood circulation. Since cardiovascular diseases are often associated with an alteration of mitochondria, the main producers of ATP in cardiac muscle cells, the aim of our work was to determine bioactive constituents present in motherwort aerial parts extract in ethanol and investigate their effects on the functions of cardiac mitochondria. Quantitative determination of polyphenols in L. cardiaca herb extract was performed by HPLC. Mitochondrial respiration rates were evaluated using a Clark-type oxygen electrode. Mitochondrial ROS generation was determined fluorimetrically with Amplex Red and horseradish peroxidase. The results showed that constituents (chlorogenic acid, orientin, quercetin, hyperoside, and rutin) of L. cardiaca herb extract uncouple (by 20-90 %) mitochondrial oxidation from phosphorylation, partially inhibit (by ~ 40 %) the mitochondrial respiratory chain in cases of pyruvate and malate as well as succinate oxidation, and effectively attenuate the generation of free radicals in mitochondria. Since partial uncoupling of mitochondria, respiratory inhibition, and decreased ROS production are proposed as possible mechanisms of cardioprotection, our results imply that L. cardiaca herb extract could be a useful remedy to protect cardiac muscles from the effects of pathogenic processes. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. The mitochondrial permeability transition: a new pathophysiological mechanism for Reye's syndrome and toxic liver injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trost, L C; Lemasters, J J

    1996-09-01

    Aspirin, Neem oil, valproic, adipic, benzoic, isovaleric, 3-mercaptopropionic and 4-pentenoic acids are implicated in the pathogenesis of Reye's syndrome, Jamaican vomiting sickness, and related chemical toxicities. These disorders are characterized by hyperammonemia, hypoglycemia, microvesicular steatosis and encephalopathy. The goal of this study was to determine whether chemicals implicated in Reye's-related disorders induce the mitochondrial permeability translation (MPT). The MPT is induced by opening of a high-conductance, cyclosporin-sensitive pore in the mitochondrial inner membrane, causing swelling, depolarization and uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation. In freshly isolated rat liver mitochondria, unhydrolyzed aspirin (300 microM) did not induce the MPT in the presence of 50 microM CaCl2. Salicylate, the hydrolysis product of aspirin and its active metabolite, was much more potent causing dose-dependent onset of the MPT in a therapeutic range of concentrations (37.5-300 microM). Similarly, Neem oil and valproic, adipic, benzoic, isovaleric, 3-mercaptopropionic and 4-pentenoic acids induced onset of the MPT. In all cases, cyclosporin A (200 nM), a specific inhibitor of the permeability transition pore, blocked the MPT caused by these inducers. Induction of the MPT by these agents was not caused by mitochondrial depolarization because concentrations of valproic acid and salicylate inducing the MPT had little effect on mitochondrial delta psi. Moreover, equivalent uncoupling caused by 5 nM carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone did not induce an MPT. These data suggest that induction of the MPT is a common pathophysiological mechanism causing mitochondrial injury in Reye's syndrome and Reye's-related drug toxicities.

  16. Laser Induced C60 Cage Opening Studied by Semiclassical Dynamics Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusheng Dou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Laser induced opening of the C60 cage is studied by a semiclassical electron-radiation-ion dynamics technique. The simulation results indicate that the C60 cage is abruptly opened immediately after laser excitation. The opening of the C60 cage induces a quick increase in kinetic energy and a sharp decrease in electronic energy, suggesting that the breaking of the C60 cage efficiently heats up the cluster and enhances the thermal fragmentation of C60 fullerene.

  17. Cage Versus Noncage Laying-Hen Housings: Worker Respiratory Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Diane; Arteaga, Veronica; Armitage, Tracey; Mitloehner, Frank; Tancredi, Daniel; Kenyon, Nicholas; Schenker, Marc

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare respiratory health of poultry workers in conventional cage, enriched cage and aviary layer housing on a single commercial facility, motivated by changing requirements for humane housing of hens. Three workers were randomly assigned daily, one to each of conventional cage, enriched cage, and aviary housing in a crossover repeated-measures design for three observation periods (for a total of 123 worker-days, eight different workers). Workers' exposure to particles were assessed (Arteaga et al. J Agromedicine. 2015;20:this issue) and spirometry, exhaled nitric oxide, respiratory symptoms, and questionnaires were conducted pre- and post-shift. Personal exposures to particles and endotoxin were significantly higher in the aviary than the other housings (Arteaga et al., 2015). The use of respiratory protection was high; the median usage was 70% of the shift. Mixed-effects multivariate regression models of respiratory cross-shift changes were marginally significant, but the aviary system consistently posted the highest decrements for forced expiratory volume in 1 and 6 seconds (FEV1 and FEV6) compared with the enriched or conventional housing. The adjusted mean difference in FEV1 aviary - enriched cage housing was -47 mL/s, 95% confidence interval (CI): (-99 to 4.9), P = .07. Similarly, for FEV6, aviary - conventional housing adjusted mean difference was -52.9 mL/6 s, 95% CI: (-108 to 2.4), P = .06. Workers adopting greater than median use of respiratory protection were less likely to exhibit negative cross-shift pulmonary function changes. Although aviary housing exposed workers to significantly higher respiratory exposures, cross-shift pulmonary function changes did not differ significantly between houses. Higher levels of mask use were protective; poultry workers should wear respiratory protection as appropriate to avoid health decrements.

  18. Antimicrobial agent triclosan is a proton ionophore uncoupler of mitochondria in living rat and human mast cells and in primary human keratinocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weatherly, Lisa M; Shim, Juyoung; Hashmi, Hina N; Kennedy, Rachel H; Hess, Samuel T; Gosse, Julie A

    2016-06-01

    Triclosan (TCS) is an antimicrobial used widely in hospitals and personal care products, at ~10 mm. Human skin efficiently absorbs TCS. Mast cells are ubiquitous key players both in physiological processes and in disease, including asthma, cancer and autism. We previously showed that non-cytotoxic levels of TCS inhibit degranulation, the release of histamine and other mediators, from rat basophilic leukemia mast cells (RBL-2H3), and in this study, we replicate this finding in human mast cells (HMC-1.2). Our investigation into the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect led to the discovery that TCS disrupts adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production in RBL-2H3 cells in glucose-free, galactose-containing media (95% confidence interval EC50 = 7.5-9.7 µm), without causing cytotoxicity. Using these same glucose-free conditions, 15 µm TCS dampens RBL-2H3 degranulation by 40%. The same ATP disruption was found with human HMC-1.2 cells (EC50 4.2-13.7 µm), NIH-3 T3 mouse fibroblasts (EC50 4.8-7.4 µm) and primary human keratinocytes (EC50 3.0-4.1 µm) all with no cytotoxicity. TCS increases oxygen consumption rate in RBL-2H3 cells. Known mitochondrial uncouplers (e.g., carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone) previously were found to inhibit mast cell function. TCS-methyl, which has a methyl group in place of the TCS ionizable proton, affects neither degranulation nor ATP production at non-cytotoxic doses. Thus, the effects of TCS on mast cell function are due to its proton ionophore structure. In addition, 5 µm TCS inhibits thapsigargin-stimulated degranulation of RBL-2H3 cells: further evidence that TCS disrupts mast cell signaling. Our data indicate that TCS is a mitochondrial uncoupler, and TCS may affect numerous cell types and functions via this mechanism. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Impaired fear extinction as displayed by serotonin transporter knockout rats housed in open cages is disrupted by IVC cage housing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Shan

    Full Text Available Anxiety disorders are influenced by both environmental and genetic factors. A well-known example for gene x environment interactions in psychiatry is the low activity (s allelic variant of the serotonin transporter (5-HTT promoter polymorphism (5-HTTLPR that in the context of stress increases risk for depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD. Previously, we observed robust anxiety-related phenotypes, such as an impairment in fear extinction, in 5-HTT knockout (5-HTT-/- versus wild-type (5-HTT+/+ rats housed in open cages. Recently, housing conditions were changed from open cages to individually ventilated cages (IVC, which are associated with a high ventilation fold and noise. This switch in housing conditions prompted an unplanned 5-HTT gene x environment interaction study in our rats. The current study shows that lifetime stress by means of IVC cage housing abolished genotype differences in fear extinction between 5-HTT-/- and 5-HTT+/+ rats. Although this effect was not attributed specifically to either the 5-HTT+/+ or the 5-HTT-/- genotype, the findings are in agreement with the modulatory role of serotonin in the processing of environmental stimuli. Our findings also underline the possibility that housing conditions confound the interpretation of anxiety-related behaviours in rodents.

  20. Can forced hot air quickly dry feces on transport cage flooring and eliminate campylobacter before cage re-use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allowing feces left on transport coops to dry is an effective way to reduce numbers of viable Campylobacter left by positive flocks. The problem with this approach is that poultry processors do not have the time, space or resources to maintain several times the minimum number of transport cages that...

  1. Cage fish farming in the Volta lake and the lower Volta : Practices ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Concerns have been raised about the proliferation of cage fish farming in the Volta lake and the potential water quality impacts. The study was undertaken to determine current cage fish farming practices on the lake, and to assess their impacts on water quality of the lake. Forty cage fish farm operators were interviewed for ...

  2. the benefits of the cage as a screening tool for alcoholism in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (age, gender, literacy level, employment statu, marriage and number of people sharing a house with the re pondent) and the four-que tion CAGE interview. Re pondents who answered positively to two or more que tions of the CAGE were rated as abusing/dependent on alcohol (the 'positive' group). In addition to the CAGE, ...

  3. Selective occupancy of methane by cage symmetry in TBAB ionic clathrate hydrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muromachi, Sanehiro; Udachin, Konstantin A; Alavi, Saman; Ohmura, Ryo; Ripmeester, John A

    2016-04-25

    Methane trapped in the two distinct dodecahedral cages of the ionic clathrate hydrate of TBAB was studied by single crystal XRD and MD simulation. The relative CH4 occupancies over the cage types were opposite to those of CO2, which illustrates the interplay between the cage symmetry and guest shape and dynamics, and thus the gas selectivity.

  4. Relation of mitochondrial oxygen consumption in peripheral blood mononuclear cells to vascular function in type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, Mor-Li; Shirihai, Orian S; Holbrook, Monika; Xu, Guoquan; Kocherla, Marsha; Shah, Akash; Fetterman, Jessica L; Kluge, Matthew A; Frame, Alissa A; Hamburg, Naomi M; Vita, Joseph A

    2014-02-01

    Recent studies have shown mitochondrial dysfunction and increased production of reactive oxygen species in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and endothelial cells from patients with diabetes mellitus. Mitochondria oxygen consumption is coupled to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production and also occurs in an uncoupled fashion during formation of reactive oxygen species by components of the electron transport chain and other enzymatic sites. We therefore hypothesized that diabetes would be associated with higher total and uncoupled oxygen consumption in PBMCs that would correlate with endothelial dysfunction. We developed a method to measure oxygen consumption in freshly isolated PBMCs and applied it to 26 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 28 non-diabetic controls. Basal (192 ± 47 vs 161 ± 44 pmoles/min, p = 0.01), uncoupled (64 ± 16 vs 53 ± 13 pmoles/min, p = 0.007), and maximal (795 ± 87 vs 715 ± 128 pmoles/min, p=0.01) oxygen consumption rates were higher in diabetic patients compared to controls. There were no significant correlations between oxygen consumption rates and endothelium-dependent flow-mediated dilation measured by vascular ultrasound. Non-endothelium-dependent nitroglycerin-mediated dilation was lower in diabetics (10.1 ± 6.6 vs 15.8 ± 4.8%, p = 0.03) and correlated with maximal oxygen consumption (r = -0.64, p=0.001). In summary, we found that diabetes mellitus is associated with a pattern of mitochondrial oxygen consumption consistent with higher production of reactive oxygen species. The correlation between oxygen consumption and nitroglycerin-mediated dilation may suggest a link between mitochondrial dysfunction and vascular smooth muscle cell dysfunction that merits further study. Finally, the described method may have utility for the assessment of mitochondrial function in larger scale observational and interventional studies in humans.

  5. Comparison Between Acrylic Cage and Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) Cage in Single-level Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrokhi, Majid R; Nikoo, Zahra; Gholami, Mehrnaz; Hosseini, Khadijeh

    2017-02-01

    Prospective, single-blind randomized-controlled clinical study. To compare polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage with a novel Acrylic cage to find out which fusion cage yielded better clinical outcomes following single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). ACDF is considered a standard neurosurgical treatment for degenerative diseases of cervical intervertebral disks. There are many options, including bone grafts, bone cement, and spacers made of titanium, carbon fiber, and synthetic materials, used to restore physiological disk height and enhance spinal fusion, but the ideal device, which would provide immediate structural support and subsequent osteointegration and stability, has not been identified yet. To overcome this, we designed a new, inexpensive Acrylic cage. A total of 64 patients were eligible to participate and were randomly allocated to undergo ACDF either with Acrylic interbody fusion cage filled with bone substitute (n=32) or PEEK cage (n=32). Nurick's grading was used for quantifying the neurological deficit. Clinical and radiologic outcome was assessed preoperatively, immediately after surgery, and subsequently at 2, 6, and 12 months of follow-up using Odom's criteria and dynamic radiographs (flexion-extension) and computed tomography scans, respectively. There was a statistically significant improvement in the clinical outcomes of the Acrylic cage group compared with the PEEK cage group (mean difference: -0.438; 95% confidence interval, -0.807 to -0.068; P=0.016). There was a statistically significant difference in disk space height increase between the 2 groups at the 6- and 12-month follow-up. The Acrylic cage achieved higher fusion rate (good fusion) than the PEEK cage (96.9% vs. 93.8%). Intervertebral angle demonstrated a significant difference among the 2 treated groups throughout the follow-up period. This study suggests that the use of Acrylic cage is associated with good clinical and radiologic outcomes and it can be therefore a

  6. Avaliação do tratamento da discopatia degenerativa cervical pela artrodese via anterior utilizando placas associadas a cages ou cages em peek isoladamente

    OpenAIRE

    Hübner,André Rafael; Mendes,Marcelo Ribeiro; Queruz,Jean Carlo Frigotto; Dambrós,Jean Marcel; Suárez,Álvaro Diego Heredia; Spinelli,Leandro de Freitas

    2011-01-01

    OBJETIVOS: Avaliar comparativamente o tratamento da discopatia degenerativa cervical por discectomia e artrodese cervical via anterior utilizando placas associadas a cages ou cages em PEEK isoladamente. MÉTODOS: Foi realizado um estudo retrospectivo comparativo entre dois grupos de pacientes operados pela técnica de discectomia e artrodese cervical via anterior. Foram selecionados aleatoriamente 70 pacientes, 35 operados com o método de fixação com placas associadas a cages - denominado Grupo...

  7. Effects of anionic xenobiotics on rat kidney. I--Tissue and mitochondrial respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, J B; Krall, A R; Silverthorn, S U

    1982-01-15

    The polar 1,1,1-trichloro-2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)ethane (DDT) metabolite, 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)acetic acid (DDA), and the phenoxyacetic acid herbicides, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 2,4,5-trichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4,5-T), were previously shown to be accumulated to high levels in liver and kidney via the organic acid transport system, raising the possibility of organ-specific toxicity secondary to transport. In these studies, accumulation of DDA was shown to depress oxygen consumption by renal cortical slices at high doses (0.1 and 1mM). Isolated renal and hepatic mitochondria were uncoupled by low doses of DDA (5-10 nmoles/mg mitochondrial protein. Maximal uncoupling was seen at 50-70 nmoles/mg. 2,4-D and 2,4,5-T also produced uncoupling, but at doses of 70 nmoles/mg or higher. All agents were more effective with alpha-ketoglutarate or pyruvate-malate), all three agents also depressed State 3 (ADP-stimulated) respiration. Again, DDA was more effective than 2,4-D or 2,4,5-T. These results suggest that accumulation of these or other anionic xenobiotics may lead to toxicity in those tissues possessing the organic anion transport system.

  8. Uncoupling of reading and IQ over time: empirical evidence for a definition of dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Emilio; Shaywitz, Bennett A; Holahan, John M; Marchione, Karen; Shaywitz, Sally E

    2010-01-01

    Developmental dyslexia is defined as an unexpected difficulty in reading in individuals who otherwise possess the intelligence and motivation considered necessary for fluent reading, and who also have had reasonable reading instruction. Identifying factors associated with normative and impaired reading development has implications for diagnosis, intervention, and prevention. We show that in typical readers, reading and IQ development are dynamically linked over time. Such mutual interrelationships are not perceptible in dyslexic readers, which suggests that reading and cognition develop more independently in these individuals. To our knowledge, these findings provide the first empirical demonstration of a coupling between cognition and reading in typical readers and a developmental uncoupling between cognition and reading in dyslexic readers. This uncoupling was the core concept of the initial description of dyslexia and remains the focus of the current definitional model of this learning disability.

  9. Catfishes as a case study for discussions on general evolution: the importance of functional uncouplings in morphological macroevolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diogo, Rui; Vandewalle, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    Many evolutionary biologists have stressed that functional uncouplings play an important role in morphological macroevolution, as they facilitate diversification and speciation by increasing the number of degrees of freedom and allowing more mechanical solutions for functional problems. In the present paper, the importance of functional uncouplings in the evolution of six major catfish structural complexes is briefly discussed, namely those constituted by the mandibular barbels and associated structures, the pectoral girdle complex, the elastic spring apparatus, the suspensorium, the palatine-maxillary system, and the adductor mandibulae complex. The overview of these major structural complexes indicates that functional uncouplings did effectively play an essential role on catfish evolutionary history. The study of this cosmopolitan and particularly diverse group representing about one-third of all freshwater fishes thus supports the importance of functional uncouplings in morphological macroevolution.

  10. Oxidant stress from nitric oxide synthase–3 uncoupling stimulates cardiac pathologic remodeling from chronic pressure load

    OpenAIRE

    Takimoto, Eiki; Champion, Hunter C.; Li, Manxiang; Ren, Shuxun; Rodriguez, E. Rene; Tavazzi, Barbara; Lazzarino, Giuseppe; Paolocci, Nazareno; Gabrielson, Kathleen L.; Wang, Yibin; Kass, David A.

    2005-01-01

    Cardiac pressure load stimulates hypertrophy, often leading to chamber dilation and dysfunction. ROS contribute to this process. Here we show that uncoupling of nitric oxide synthase–3 (NOS3) plays a major role in pressure load–induced myocardial ROS and consequent chamber remodeling/hypertrophy. Chronic transverse aortic constriction (TAC; for 3 and 9 weeks) in control mice induced marked cardiac hypertrophy, dilation, and dysfunction. Mice lacking NOS3 displayed modest and concentric hypert...

  11. Dopamine-stimulated dephosphorylation of connexin 36 mediates AII amacrine cell uncoupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kothmann, W Wade; Massey, Stephen C; O'Brien, John

    2009-11-25

    Gap junction proteins form the substrate for electrical coupling between neurons. These electrical synapses are widespread in the CNS and serve a variety of important functions. In the retina, connexin 36 (Cx36) gap junctions couple AII amacrine cells and are a requisite component of the high-sensitivity rod photoreceptor pathway. AII amacrine cell coupling strength is dynamically regulated by background light intensity, and uncoupling is thought to be mediated by dopamine signaling via D(1)-like receptors. One proposed mechanism for this uncoupling involves dopamine-stimulated phosphorylation of Cx36 at regulatory sites, mediated by protein kinase A. Here we provide evidence against this hypothesis and demonstrate a direct relationship between Cx36 phosphorylation and AII amacrine cell coupling strength. Dopamine receptor-driven uncoupling of the AII network results from protein kinase A activation of protein phosphatase 2A and subsequent dephosphorylation of Cx36. Protein phosphatase 1 activity negatively regulates this pathway. We also find that Cx36 gap junctions can exist in widely different phosphorylation states within a single neuron, implying that coupling is controlled at the level of individual gap junctions by locally assembled signaling complexes. This kind of synapse-by-synapse plasticity allows for precise control of neuronal coupling, as well as cell-type-specific responses dependent on the identity of the signaling complexes assembled.

  12. Genistein ameliorated endothelial nitric oxidase synthase uncoupling by stimulating sirtuin-1 pathway in ox-LDL-injured HUVECs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua-ping; Zhao, Jia-hui; Yu, Hai-xia; Guo, Dong-xing

    2016-03-01

    Endothelial nitric oxidase synthase (eNOS) uncoupling plays a causal role in endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerosis. Genistein consumption has been associated with the prevention of atherosclerosis. However, the effect of genistein on eNOS uncoupling has not been reported. A model of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL)-induced injury on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was established to evaluate the effect of genistein on eNOS uncoupling. We investigated the effect of genistein on NADPH oxidase-dependent superoxide production, NOX4 expression, BH4 synthesis and oxidation, the expression of GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR). The results showed that genistein decreased superoxide production and NOX4 expression, enhanced the ratio of BH4/BH2, augmented the expressions of GCH1 and DHFR. Accompanied with genistein ameliorating eNOS uncoupling, genistein elevated the expression of sirtuin-1; furthermore, the effects of genistein on eNOS uncoupling were blunted with sirtuin-1 siRNA. The present study indicated that genistein ameliorated eNOS uncoupling was concerned with sirtuin-1 pathway in ox-LDL-injured HUVECs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Muscle mitochondrial stress adaptation operates independently of endogenous FGF21 action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ost, Mario; Coleman, Verena; Voigt, Anja; van Schothorst, Evert M; Keipert, Susanne; van der Stelt, Inge; Ringel, Sebastian; Graja, Antonia; Ambrosi, Thomas; Kipp, Anna P; Jastroch, Martin; Schulz, Tim J; Keijer, Jaap; Klaus, Susanne

    2016-02-01

    Fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) was recently discovered as stress-induced myokine during mitochondrial disease and proposed as key metabolic mediator of the integrated stress response (ISR) presumably causing systemic metabolic improvements. Curiously, the precise cell-non-autonomous and cell-autonomous relevance of endogenous FGF21 action remained poorly understood. We made use of the established UCP1 transgenic (TG) mouse, a model of metabolic perturbations made by a specific decrease in muscle mitochondrial efficiency through increased respiratory uncoupling and robust metabolic adaptation and muscle ISR-driven FGF21 induction. In a cross of TG with Fgf21-knockout (FGF21(-/-)) mice, we determined the functional role of FGF21 as a muscle stress-induced myokine under low and high fat feeding conditions. Here we uncovered that FGF21 signaling is dispensable for metabolic improvements evoked by compromised mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle. Strikingly, genetic ablation of FGF21 fully counteracted the cell-non-autonomous metabolic remodeling and browning of subcutaneous white adipose tissue (WAT), together with the reduction of circulating triglycerides and cholesterol. Brown adipose tissue activity was similar in all groups. Remarkably, we found that FGF21 played a negligible role in muscle mitochondrial stress-related improved obesity resistance, glycemic control and hepatic lipid homeostasis. Furthermore, the protective cell-autonomous muscle mitohormesis and metabolic stress adaptation, including an increased muscle proteostasis via mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)) and amino acid biosynthetic pathways did not require the presence of FGF21. Here we demonstrate that although FGF21 drives WAT remodeling, the adaptive pseudo-starvation response under elevated muscle mitochondrial stress conditions operates independently of both WAT browning and FGF21 action. Thus, our findings challenge FGF21 as key metabolic mediator of the mitochondrial

  14. Disruption of Endothelial Cell Mitochondrial Bioenergetics in Lambs with Increased Pulmonary Blood Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shruti; Fratz, Sohrab; Kumar, Sanjiv; Rafikov, Ruslan; Aggarwal, Saurabh; Rafikova, Olga; Lu, Qing; Burns, Tantiana; Dasarathy, Sridevi; Wright, Johnny; Schreiber, Christian; Radman, Monique; Fineman, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Aims: The mitochondrial dysfunction in our lamb model of congenital heart disease with increased pulmonary blood flow (PBF) (Shunt) is associated with disrupted carnitine metabolism. Our recent studies have also shown that asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) levels are increased in Shunt lambs and ADMA increases the nitration of mitochondrial proteins in lamb pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAEC) in a nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-dependent manner. Thus, we determined whether there was a mechanistic link between endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), ADMA, and the disruption of carnitine homeostasis in PAEC. Results: Exposure of PAEC to ADMA induced the redistribution of eNOS to the mitochondria, resulting in an increase in carnitine acetyl transferase (CrAT) nitration and decreased CrAT activity. The resulting increase in acyl-carnitine levels resulted in mitochondrial dysfunction and the disruption of mitochondrial bioenergetics. Since the addition of l-arginine prevented these pathologic changes, we examined the effect of l-arginine supplementation on carnitine homeostasis, mitochondrial function, and nitric oxide (NO) signaling in Shunt lambs. We found that the treatment of Shunt lambs with l-arginine prevented the ADMA-mediated mitochondrial redistribution of eNOS, the nitration-mediated inhibition of CrAT, and maintained carnitine homeostasis. In turn, adenosine-5′-triphosphate levels and eNOS/heat shock protein 90 interactions were preserved, and this decreased NOS uncoupling and enhanced NO generation. Innovation: Our data link alterations in cellular l-arginine metabolism with the disruption of mitochondrial bioenergetics and implicate altered carnitine homeostasis as a key player in this process. Conclusion: l-arginine supplementation may be a useful therapy to prevent the mitochondrial dysfunction involved in the pulmonary vascular alterations secondary to increased PBF. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1739–1752. PMID:23244702

  15. The BetaCage: Ultrasensitive Screener for Radioactive Backgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Michael; BetaCage Collaboration

    2017-09-01

    Rare event searches, such as dark matter detection and neutrinoless double beta decay, require screening of materials for backgrounds such as beta emission and alpha decaying isotopes. The BetaCage is a proposed ultra-sensitive time-projection chamber to screen for alpha-emitting and low energy beta-emitting (10-200 keV) contaminants. The expected sensitivity is 0.1 beta particles (perkeV -m2 - day) and 0.1 alpha particles (perm2 - day) , where the former will be limited by Compton scattering of external photons in the screening samples and the latter is expected to be signal-limited. The prototype BetaCage under commissioning at South Dakota School of Mines & Technology is filled with P10 gas (10% methane, 90% argon) in place of neon and is 40×40×20 cm in size. Details on design, construction and characterization will be presented.

  16. Batting cage performance of wood and nonwood youth baseball bats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisco, Joseph J; Rainbow, Michael J; Schwartz, Joel B; Wilcox, Bethany J

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the batting cage performance of wood and nonwood baseball bats used at the youth level. Three wood and ten nonwood bats were swung by 22 male players (13 to 18 years old) in a batting cage equipped with a 3-dimensional motion capture (300 Hz) system. Batted ball speeds were compared using a one-way ANOVA and bat swing speeds were analyzed as a function of bat moment of inertia by linear regression. Batted ball speeds were significantly faster for three nonwood bat models (PBBCOR) for all nonwood were greater than for wood, but this factor alone did not correlate with bat performance. Our findings indicate that increases in BBCOR and swing speed were not associated with faster batted ball speeds for the bats studied whose moment of inertia was substantially less than that of a wood bat of similar length.

  17. Rotational Brownian Dynamics simulations of clathrin cage formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilie, Ioana M.; Briels, Wim J. [Computational BioPhysics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Otter, Wouter K. den, E-mail: w.k.denotter@utwente.nl [Computational BioPhysics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands); Multi Scale Mechanics, Faculty of Engineering Technology, University of Twente, P.O. Box 217, 7500 AE Enschede (Netherlands)

    2014-08-14

    The self-assembly of nearly rigid proteins into ordered aggregates is well suited for modeling by the patchy particle approach. Patchy particles are traditionally simulated using Monte Carlo methods, to study the phase diagram, while Brownian Dynamics simulations would reveal insights into the assembly dynamics. However, Brownian Dynamics of rotating anisotropic particles gives rise to a number of complications not encountered in translational Brownian Dynamics. We thoroughly test the Rotational Brownian Dynamics scheme proposed by Naess and Elsgaeter [Macromol. Theory Simul. 13, 419 (2004); Naess and Elsgaeter Macromol. Theory Simul. 14, 300 (2005)], confirming its validity. We then apply the algorithm to simulate a patchy particle model of clathrin, a three-legged protein involved in vesicle production from lipid membranes during endocytosis. Using this algorithm we recover time scales for cage assembly comparable to those from experiments. We also briefly discuss the undulatory dynamics of the polyhedral cage.

  18. Cathodic cage nitriding of samples with different dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, R.R.M. de [Centro Federal de Educacao Tecnologica do Piaui, Department of Mechanical, Teresina, PI (Brazil); Araujo, F.O. de [Universidade Federal Rural do Semi-Arido, Mossoro, RN (Brazil); Ribeiro, K.J.B.; Mendes, M.W.D. [Labplasma, Departamento de Fisica-UFRN, Campus Universitario, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil); Costa, J.A.P. da [Departamento de Fisica-UFC, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Alves, C. [Labplasma, Departamento de Fisica-UFRN, Campus Universitario, 59072-970 Natal, RN (Brazil)], E-mail: alvesjr@pesquisador.cnpq.br

    2007-09-15

    A series of AISI 1020 steel cylindrical samples with different heights were simultaneously nitrided in cathodic cage plasma nitriding. In this technique, the samples are placed under a floating potential inside a cage in which the cathodic potential is applied. A systematic study of the nitriding temperature variation effects was carried out in order to evaluate the efficiency of such a technique over the uniformity of the formed layers. The samples were characterized by optical microscopy, X-ray diffraction and microhardness measurement. The results were compared with those ones obtained in the ionic nitriding, and was verified that the samples nitrided by this conventional technique presents less uniformity than the ones treated through this new technique.

  19. A chemical screen probing the relationship between mitochondrial content and cell size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshimori Kitami

    Full Text Available The cellular content of mitochondria changes dynamically during development and in response to external stimuli, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. To systematically identify molecular probes and pathways that control mitochondrial abundance, we developed a high-throughput imaging assay that tracks both the per cell mitochondrial content and the cell size in confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cells. We screened 28,786 small molecules and observed that hundreds of small molecules are capable of increasing or decreasing the cellular content of mitochondria in a manner proportionate to cell size, revealing stereotyped control of these parameters. However, only a handful of compounds dissociate this relationship. We focus on one such compound, BRD6897, and demonstrate through secondary assays that it increases the cellular content of mitochondria as evidenced by fluorescence microscopy, mitochondrial protein content, and respiration, even after rigorous correction for cell size, cell volume, or total protein content. BRD6897 increases uncoupled respiration 1.6-fold in two different, non-dividing cell types. Based on electron microscopy, BRD6897 does not alter the percent of cytoplasmic area occupied by mitochondria, but instead, induces a striking increase in the electron density of existing mitochondria. The mechanism is independent of known transcriptional programs and is likely to be related to a blockade in the turnover of mitochondrial proteins. At present the molecular target of BRD6897 remains to be elucidated, but if identified, could reveal an important additional mechanism that governs mitochondrial biogenesis and turnover.

  20. Thioredoxin-interacting protein and myocardial mitochondrial function in ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Jun; Lee, Richard T

    2014-02-01

    Cellular metabolism and reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation are interrelated processes in mitochondria and are implicated in a variety of human diseases including ischemic heart disease. During ischemia, mitochondrial respiration rates fall. Though seemingly paradoxical, reduced respiration has been observed to be cardioprotective due in part to reduced generation of ROS. Enhanced myocardial glucose uptake is considered beneficial for the myocardium under stress, as glucose is the primary substrate to support anaerobic metabolism. Thus, inhibition of mitochondrial respiration and uncoupling oxidative phosphorylation can protect the myocardium from irreversible ischemic damage. Growing evidence now positions the TXNIP/thioredoxin system at a nodal point linking pathways of antioxidant defense, cell survival, and energy metabolism. This emerging picture reveals TXNIP's function as a regulator of glucose homeostasis and may prove central to regulation of mitochondrial function during ischemia. In this review, we summarize how TXNIP and its binding partner thioredoxin act as regulators of mitochondrial metabolism. While the precise mechanism remains incompletely defined, the TXNIP-thioredoxin interaction has the potential to affect signaling that regulates mitochondrial bioenergetics and respiratory function with potential cardioprotection against ischemic injury. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Mitochondrial function is required for extracellular ATP-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadatomi, Daichi; Nakashioya, Kazutaka; Mamiya, Sayaka; Honda, Shino; Kameyama, Yuka; Yamamura, Yasuo; Tanimura, Susumu; Takeda, Kohsuke

    2017-06-01

    The NLRP3 inflammasome plays a critical role in the processing and release of inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18. Accumulating evidence suggests that mitochondria are common mediators of NLRP3 inflammasome activation induced by a wide range of inflammatory stimuli; however, the precise role of mitochondria is still not fully understood. Here, we show that mitochondrial function is required for extracellular ATP-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Extracellular ATP induced the loss of mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial fragmentation in a different manner than other stimuli in primary mouse macrophages. CCCP, an uncoupler and antimycin A, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, inhibited IL-1β release induced by ATP but not by other stimuli. CCCP did not inhibit the ATP-induced generation of reactive oxygen species and cell death, both of which are known to promote IL-1β release, but did inhibit the ATP-induced activation of caspase-1, a component of the NLRP3 inflammasome. These results suggest that mitochondrial function is required somewhat specifically for ATP-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation. In contrast to many previous reports that dysfunctional mitochondria promote NLRP3 inflammasome activation, the function of intact mitochondria appears to be required for NLRP3 inflammasome activation, depending on the stimulus. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Simultaneous high-resolution measurement of mitochondrial respiration and hydrogen peroxide production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krumschnabel, Gerhard; Fontana-Ayoub, Mona; Sumbalova, Zuzana; Heidler, Juliana; Gauper, Kathrin; Fasching, Mario; Gnaiger, Erich

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial respiration is associated with the formation of reactive oxygen species, primarily in the form of superoxide (O2 (•-)) and particularly hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Since H2O2 plays important roles in physiology and pathology, measurement of hydrogen peroxide has received considerable attention over many years. Here we describe how the well-established Amplex Red assay can be used to detect H2O2 production in combination with the simultaneous assessment of mitochondrial bioenergetics by high-resolution respirometry. Fundamental instrumental and methodological parameters were optimized for analysis of the effects of various substrate, uncoupler, and inhibitor titrations (SUIT) on respiration versus H2O2 production. The sensitivity of the H2O2 assay was strongly influenced by compounds contained in different mitochondrial respiration media, which also exerted significant effects on chemical background fluorescence changes. Near linearity of the fluorescence signal was restricted to narrow ranges of accumulating resorufin concentrations independent of the nature of mitochondrial respiration media. Finally, we show an application example using isolated mouse brain mitochondria as an experimental model for the simultaneous measurement of mitochondrial respiration and H2O2 production in SUIT protocols.

  3. Colloidal glasses and gels: The interplay of bonding and caging

    OpenAIRE

    Zaccarelli, Emanuela; Poon, Wilson C K

    2009-01-01

    We report simulations of glassy arrest in hard-core particles with short-range interparticle attraction. Previous experiments, theory, and simulations suggest that in this kind of system, two qualitatively distinct kinds of glasses exist, dominated respectively by repulsion and attraction. It is thought that in the former, particles are trapped “topologically,” by nearest-neighbor cages, whereas in the latter, nonergodicity is due to interparticle “bonds.” Subsequent experiments and simulatio...

  4. Design of Automated Rotory Cage Type Fixture for Cylinder Block

    OpenAIRE

    Y.S.Kapnichor; Patil, V. V.

    2014-01-01

    Project gives feasible solution to move and rotate the component with full proofing fixturing for special purpose operations like drilling, Tapping, deburring, washing, drying involve in manufacturing and assembly unit of industry. Rotary cage type fixture is made for handling the cylinder head inside the cleaning machine use for making fully ready component before assembly operation .System is useful to save time manpower and deliver perfect cleaned and dry component .system ...

  5. Improved damper cage design for salient-pole synchronous generators

    OpenAIRE

    Nuzzo, Stefano; Degano, Michele; Galea, Michael; Gerada, C.; Gerada, David; Brown, N.L.

    2016-01-01

    The benefits of implementing a damper winding in salient-pole, synchronous generators are widely known and well consolidated. It is also well known that such a winding incurs extra losses in the machine due to a number of reasons. In order to improve the overall efficiency and performance of classical salient-pole, wound field, synchronous generators that employ the traditional damper cage, an improved amortisseur winding topology that reduces the inherent loss is proposed and investigated in...

  6. Immortalized Parkinson's disease lymphocytes have enhanced mitochondrial respiratory activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J. Annesley

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In combination with studies of post-mortem Parkinson's disease (PD brains, pharmacological and genetic models of PD have suggested that two fundamental interacting cellular processes are impaired – proteostasis and mitochondrial respiration. We have re-examined the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in lymphoblasts isolated from individuals with idiopathic PD and an age-matched control group. As previously reported for various PD cell types, the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS by PD lymphoblasts was significantly elevated. However, this was not due to an impairment of mitochondrial respiration, as is often assumed. Instead, basal mitochondrial respiration and ATP synthesis are dramatically elevated in PD lymphoblasts. The mitochondrial mass, genome copy number and membrane potential were unaltered, but the expression of indicative respiratory complex proteins was also elevated. This explains the increased oxygen consumption rates by each of the respiratory complexes in experimentally uncoupled mitochondria of iPD cells. However, it was not attributable to increased activity of the stress- and energy-sensing protein kinase AMPK, a regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis and activity. The respiratory differences between iPD and control cells were sufficiently dramatic as to provide a potentially sensitive and reliable biomarker of the disease state, unaffected by disease duration (time since diagnosis or clinical severity. Lymphoblasts from control and PD individuals thus occupy two distinct, quasi-stable steady states; a ‘normal’ and a ‘hyperactive’ state characterized by two different metabolic rates. The apparent stability of the ‘hyperactive’ state in patient-derived lymphoblasts in the face of patient ageing, ongoing disease and mounting disease severity suggests an early, permanent switch to an alternative metabolic steady state. With its associated, elevated ROS production, the ‘hyperactive’ state might not cause

  7. United Mitochondrial Disease Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Grants Funded Projects Patient Evaluation for Professionals Energy Metabolism Review Mitochondrial Structure, Function and Diseases Review Cell ... for Life Walkathons Schedule of EFL Walks UMDF Social Media Tweets by UMDF Our Partners Affiliate Organizations ...

  8. Epilepsy and Mitochondrial Dysfunction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell P. Saneto DO, PhD

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a common manifestation of mitochondrial disease. In a large cohort of children and adolescents with mitochondrial disease (n = 180, over 48% of patients developed seizures. The majority (68% of patients were younger than 3 years and medically intractable (90%. The electroencephalographic pattern of multiregional epileptiform discharges over the left and right hemisphere with background slowing occurred in 62%. The epilepsy syndrome, infantile spasms, was seen in 17%. Polymerase γ mutations were the most common genetic etiology of seizures, representing Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome (14%. The severity of disease in those patients with epilepsy was significant, as 13% of patients experienced early death. Simply the loss of energy production cannot explain the development of seizures or all patients with mitochondrial dysfunction would have epilepsy. Until the various aspects of mitochondrial physiology that are involved in proper brain development are understood, epilepsy and its treatment will remain unsatisfactory.

  9. Segmental kyphosis after cervical interbody fusion with stand-alone polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages: a comparative study on 2 different PEEK cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chi Heon; Chung, Chun Kee; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Park, Sung Bae; Sohn, Seil; Lee, Sungjoon

    2015-02-01

    Retrospective comparative study. Two polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages of different designs were compared in terms of the postoperative segmental kyphosis after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Segmental kyphosis occasionally occurs after the use of a stand-alone cage for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Although PEEK material seems to have less risk of segmental kyphosis compared with other materials, the occurrence of segmental kyphosis for PEEK cages has been reported to be from 0% to 29%. There have been a few reports that addressed the issue of PEEK cage design. A total of 41 consecutive patients who underwent single-level anterior discectomy and fusion with a stand-alone cage were included. Either a round tube-type (Solis; 18 patients, S-group) or a trapezoidal tube-type (MC+; 23 patients, M-group) cage was used. The contact area between the cage and the vertebral body is larger in MC+ than in Solis, and anchoring pins were present in the Solis cage. The effect of the cage type on the segmental angle (SA) (lordosis vs. kyphosis) at postoperative month 24 was analyzed. Preoperatively, segmental lordosis was present in 12/18 S-group and 16/23 M-group patients (P=0.84). The SA was more lordotic than the preoperative angle in both groups just after surgery, with no difference between groups (P=0.39). At 24 months, segmental lordosis was observed in 9/18 S-group and 20/23 M-group patients (P=0.01). The patients in M-group were 7.83 times more likely than patients in S-group (P=0.04; odds ratio, 7.83; 95% confidence interval, 1.09-56.28) not to develop segmental kyphosis. The design of the PEEK cage used may influence the SA, and this association needs to be considered when using stand-alone PEEK cages.

  10. Mitochondrial and cellular mechanisms for managing lipid excess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel A Aon

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Current scientific debates center on the impact of lipids and mitochondrial function on diverse aspects of human health, nutrition and disease, among them the association of lipotoxicity with the onset of insulin resistance in skeletal muscle, and with heart dysfunction in obesity and diabetes. Mitochondria play a fundamental role in aging and in prevalent acute or chronic diseases. Lipids are main mitochondrial fuels however these molecules can also behave as uncouplers and inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation. Knowledge about the functional composition of these contradictory effects and their impact on mitochondrial-cellular energetics/redox status is incomplete.Cells store fatty acids (FAs as triacylglycerol and package them into cytoplasmic lipid droplets (LDs. New emerging data shows the LD as a highly dynamic storage pool of FAs that can be used for energy reserve. Lipid excess packaging into LDs can be seen as an adaptive response to fulfilling energy supply without hindering mitochondrial or cellular redox status and keeping low concentration of lipotoxic intermediates.Herein we review the mechanisms of action and utilization of lipids by mitochondria reported in liver, heart and skeletal muscle under relevant physiological situations, e.g. exercise. We report on perilipins, a family of proteins that associate with LDs in response to loading of cells with lipids. Evidence showing that in addition to physical contact, mitochondria and LDs exhibit metabolic interactions is presented and discussed. A hypothetical model of channeled lipid utilization by mitochondria is proposed. Direct delivery and channeled processing of lipids in mitochondria could represent a reliable and efficient way to maintain ROS within levels compatible with signaling while ensuring robust and reliable energy supply.

  11. Impaired cortical mitochondrial function following TBI precedes behavioral changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Doster Watson

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI pathophysiology can be attributed to either the immediate, primary physical injury or the delayed, secondary injury which begins minutes to hours after the initial injury and can persist for several months or longer. Because these secondary cascades are delayed and last for a significant time period post TBI, they are primary research targets for new therapeutics. To investigate changes in mitochondrial function after a brain injury, both the cortical impact site and ipsilateral hippocampus of adult male rats 7 and 17 days after a controlled cortical impact (CCI injury were examined. State 3, state 4 and uncoupler-stimulated rates of oxygen consumption, respiratory control ratios were measured and membrane potential quantified, and all were significantly decreased in 7 day post-TBI cortical mitochondria. By contrast, hippocampal mitochondria at 7 days showed only nonsignificant decreases in rates of oxygen consumption and membrane potential. NADH oxidase activities measured in disrupted mitochondria were normal in both injured cortex and hippocampus at 7 days post-CCI. Respiratory and phosphorylation capacities at 17 days post-CCI were comparable to naïve animals for both cortical and hippocampus mitochondria. However, unlike oxidative phosphorylation, membrane potential of mitochondria in the cortical lining of the impact site did not recover at 17 days, suggesting that while diminished cortical membrane potential at 17 days does not adversely affect mitochondrial capacity to synthesize ATP, it may negatively impact other membrane potential-sensitive mitochondrial functions. Memory status, as assessed by a passive avoidance paradim, was not significantly impaired until 17 days after injury. These results indicate pronounced disturbances in cortical mitochondrial function 7 days after CCI which precede the behavioral impairment observed at 17 days.

  12. Animal Welfare and Food Safety Aspects of Confining Broiler Chickens to Cages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Sara; Greger, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Simple Summary In commercial chicken meat production, broiler chickens are usually kept on the floor in ware-house like buildings, but the use of cages is becoming more common. Confining chickens to cages is a welfare problem, as has been thoroughly demonstrated for laying hens used for egg production. Caged broiler chickens may suffer from poor bone strength due to lack of exercise, feather loss, and restriction of natural behavior. There are also potential food safety concerns associated with the use of cages. While cages may provide an economic advantage in some geographical regions of the world, the severe, inherent disadvantages should also be considered before cages are more widely adopted in the global broiler chicken industry. Abstract In most areas of the world, broiler chickens are raised in floor systems, but cage confinement is becoming more common. The welfare of broiler chickens in cages is affected by movement restriction, poor bone strength due to lack of exercise, and prevention of key behavioral patterns such as dustbathing and ground scratching. Cages for broiler chickens also have a long history of causing skin and leg conditions that could further compromise welfare, but a lack of controlled studies makes it difficult to draw conclusions about newer cage designs. Cage environments are usually stocked at a higher density than open floor systems, and the limited studies available suggest that caging may lead to increased levels of fear and stress in the birds. Further, birds reared on the floor appear less likely to harbor and shed Salmonella, as litter may serve as a seeding agent for competitive exclusion by other microorganisms. Cages for laying hens used in egg production have met with substantial opposition due to welfare concerns and caging broiler chickens will likely be subject to the same kinds of social disapproval. PMID:26487409

  13. Kinetic model of mitochondrial Krebs cycle: unraveling the mechanism of salicylate hepatotoxic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mogilevskaya, Ekaterina; Demin, Oleg; Goryanin, Igor

    2006-10-01

    This paper studies the effect of salicylate on the energy metabolism of mitochondria using in silico simulations. A kinetic model of the mitochondrial Krebs cycle is constructed using information on the individual enzymes. Model parameters for the rate equations are estimated using in vitro experimental data from the literature. Enzyme concentrations are determined from data on respiration in mitochondrial suspensions containing glutamate and malate. It is shown that inhibition in succinate dehydrogenase and alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase by salicylate contributes substantially to the cumulative inhibition of the Krebs cycle by salicylates. Uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation has little effect and coenzyme A consumption in salicylates transformation processes has an insignificant effect on the rate of substrate oxidation in the Krebs cycle. It is found that the salicylate-inhibited Krebs cycle flux can be increased by flux redirection through addition of external glutamate and malate, and depletion in external alpha-ketoglutarate and glycine concentrations.

  14. Patients with type 2 diabetes have normal mitochondrial function in skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boushel, R; Gnaiger, E; Schjerling, P

    2007-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes are associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that oxidative phosphorylation and electron transport capacity are diminished in the skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic subjects...... with type 2 diabetes (n = 11; age 62 +/- 2 years; BMI 32 +/- 2 kg/m(2); fasting plasma glucose 9.0 +/- 0.8 mmol/l) was measured by high-resolution respirometry. RESULTS: O(2) flux expressed per mg of muscle (fresh weight) during ADP-stimulated state 3 respiration was lower (p type 2...... to uncoupling by FCCP, but were again lower (p type 2 diabetic patients than in healthy control subjects (86 +/- 4 vs 109 +/- 8 pmol s(-1) mg(-1)). However, when O(2) flux was normalised for mitochondrial DNA content or citrate synthase activity, there were no differences in oxidative phosphorylation...

  15. Mitochondrial cholesterol import.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elustondo, Pia; Martin, Laura A; Karten, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    All animal subcellular membranes require cholesterol, which influences membrane fluidity and permeability, fission and fusion processes, and membrane protein function. The distribution of cholesterol among subcellular membranes is highly heterogeneous and the cholesterol content of each membrane must be carefully regulated. Compared to other subcellular membranes, mitochondrial membranes are cholesterol-poor, particularly the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM). As a result, steroidogenesis can be controlled through the delivery of cholesterol to the IMM, where it is converted to pregnenolone. The low basal levels of cholesterol also make mitochondria sensitive to changes in cholesterol content, which can have a relatively large impact on the biophysical and functional characteristics of mitochondrial membranes. Increased mitochondrial cholesterol levels have been observed in diverse pathological conditions including cancer, steatohepatitis, Alzheimer disease and Niemann-Pick Type C1-deficiency, and are associated with increased oxidative stress, impaired oxidative phosphorylation, and changes in the susceptibility to apoptosis, among other alterations in mitochondrial function. Mitochondria are not included in the vesicular trafficking network; therefore, cholesterol transport to mitochondria is mostly achieved through the activity of lipid transfer proteins at membrane contact sites or by cytosolic, diffusible lipid transfer proteins. Here we will give an overview of the main mechanisms involved in mitochondrial cholesterol import, focusing on the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein StAR/STARD1 and other members of the StAR-related lipid transfer (START) domain protein family, and we will discuss how changes in mitochondrial cholesterol levels can arise and affect mitochondrial function. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Lipids of Mitochondria edited by Guenther Daum. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. MITOCHONDRIAL DNA- REVOLUTIONARY EVOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vaidhehi Narayan Nayak

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Mitochondrion, the sausage-shaped organelle residing in the cytoplasm of all eukaryotic cells, apart from being the power house, represents endosymbiotic evolution of a free living organism to intracellular structure. Anthropologically, mitochondrial DNA is the fossilised source to trace the human ancestry particularly of maternal lineage. This article attempts to highlight the various biological functions of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA with a note on its forensic application.

  17. The plant mitochondrial proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millar, A.H.; Heazlewood, J.L.; Kristensen, B.K.

    2005-01-01

    The plant mitochondrial proteome might contain as many as 2000-3000 different gene products, each of which might undergo post-translational modification. Recent studies using analytical methods, such as one-, two- and three-dimensional gel electrophoresis and one- and two-dimensional liquid...... context to be defined for them. There are indications that some of these proteins add novel activities to mitochondrial protein complexes in plants....

  18. Mitochondrial signaling in health and disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Orrenius, Sten; Packer, Lester; Cadenas, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    .... The text covers themes essential for the maintenance of mitochondrial activity, including electron transport and energy production, mitochondrial biogenesis and dynamics, mitochondrial signaling...

  19. The Environmental Pollutants Perfluorooctane Sulfonate and Perfluorooctanoic Acid Upregulate Uncoupling Protein 1 (UCP1) in Brown-Fat Mitochondria Through a UCP1-Dependent Reduction in Food Intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabalina, Irina G; Kramarova, Tatiana V; Mattsson, Charlotte L; Petrovic, Natasa; Rahman Qazi, Mousumi; Csikasz, Robert I; Chang, Shu-Ching; Butenhoff, John; DePierre, Joseph W; Cannon, Barbara; Nedergaard, Jan

    2015-08-01

    The environmental pollutants perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) cause a dramatic reduction in the size of the major adipose tissue depots and a general body weight decrease when they are added to the food of mice. We demonstrate here that this is mainly due to a reduction in food intake; this reduction was not due to food aversion. Remarkably and unexpectedly, a large part of the effect of PFOA/PFOS on food intake was dependent on the presence of the uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in the mice. Correspondingly, PFOA/PFOS treatment induced recruitment of brown adipose tissue mitochondria: increased oxidative capacity and increased UCP1-mediated oxygen consumption (thermogenesis). In mice pair-fed to the food intake during PFOA/PFOS treatment in wildtype mice, brown-fat mitochondrial recruitment was also induced. We conclude that we have uncovered the existence of a regulatory component of food intake that is dependent upon brown adipose tissue thermogenic activity. The possible environmental consequences of this novel PFOA/PFOS effect (a possible decreased fitness) are noted, as well as the perspectives of this finding on the general understanding of control of food intake control and its possible extension to combatting obesity. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Differential Association of Uncoupling Protein 2 Polymorphisms with Pattern Identification among Korean Stroke Patients: A Diagnostic System in Traditional Korean Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Hye Lim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2, a mitochondrial protein present in many organs and cell types, is known to dissipate the proton gradient formed by the electron transport chain. Its function is correlated with predictive parameters, such as obesity, diabetes, and metabolic syndromes. We analyzed the distribution of UCP2 polymorphisms in stroke patients diagnosed with one of the following four stroke subtypes based on the TKM standard pattern identification (PI: Qi-deficiency (QD, Dampness and Phlegm (D&P, Yin-deficiency (YD, and Fire and Heat (F&D. We studied a total of 1,786 stroke patients (397/QD, 645/D&P, 223/YD, and 522/F&D, 586/normal. Genotyping for the G-1957A, G-866A and A55V UCP2 polymorphisms was performed using the TaqMan. G-866A and A55V were significantly associated with the D&P and H&F subtypes. The frequency of subjects with the A allele of G-866A was significantly lower than the frequency of subjects with the GG type. The A55V polymorphism was also shown similar effect with G-866A in the dominant model. In contrast, no SNPs were shown to be associated with the QD or YD subtypes in this study. These results showed that the G-866A and A55V UCP2 polymorphisms may be genetic factors for specific PI types among Korean stroke patients.

  1. The Effect of Resveratrol and Quercetin Treatment on PPAR Mediated Uncoupling Protein (UCP- 1, 2, and 3 Expression in Visceral White Adipose Tissue from Metabolic Syndrome Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vicente Castrejón-Tellez

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Uncoupling proteins (UCPs are members of the mitochondrial anion carrier superfamily involved in the control of body temperature and energy balance regulation. They are currently proposed as therapeutic targets for treating obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS. We studied the gene expression regulation of UCP1, -2, and -3 in abdominal white adipose tissue (WAT from control and MetS rats treated with two doses of a commercial mixture of resveratrol (RSV and quercetin (QRC. We found that UCP2 was the predominantly expressed isoform, UCP3 was present at very low levels, and UCP1 was undetectable. The treatment with RSV + QRC did not modify UCP3 levels; however, it significantly increased UCP2 mRNA in control and MetS rats in association with an increase in oleic and linoleic fatty acids. WAT from MetS rats showed a significantly increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-α and PPAR-γ when compared to the control group. Furthermore, PPAR-α protein levels were increased by the highest dose of RSV + QRC in the control and MetS groups. PPAR-γ expression was only increased in the control group. We conclude that the RSV + QRC treatment leads to overexpression of UCP2, which is associated with an increase in MUFA and PUFA, which might increase PPAR-α expression.

  2. Dynamic modeling of an asynchronous squirrel-cage machine; Modelisation dynamique d'une machine asynchrone a cage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerette, D.

    2009-07-01

    This document presented a detailed mathematical explanation and validation of the steps leading to the development of an asynchronous squirrel-cage machine. The MatLab/Simulink software was used to model a wind turbine at variable high speeds. The asynchronous squirrel-cage machine is an electromechanical system coupled to a magnetic circuit. The resulting electromagnetic circuit can be represented as a set of resistances, leakage inductances and mutual inductances. Different models were used for a comparison study, including the Munteanu, Boldea, Wind Turbine Blockset, and SimPowerSystem. MatLab/Simulink modeling results were in good agreement with the results from other comparable models. Simulation results were in good agreement with analytical calculations. 6 refs, 2 tabs, 9 figs.

  3. Cage hygiene, laying location, and egg quality: the effects of linings and litter provision in furnished cages for laying hens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinebretière, M; Huneau-Salaün, A; Huonnic, D; Michel, V

    2012-04-01

    This study investigates the influence of litter provision and linings used for nests and pecking and scratching areas on cage hygiene, laying location, and egg quality. Research was carried out in furnished cages, each housing 60 beak-trimmed ISA Brown hens. Four different treatments were compared in a factorial arrangement, including 2 different nest linings (artificial turf vs. plastic mesh), either used alone or combined with the use of litter (wheat bran) spread over the rubber mat in the pecking and scratching area (PSA). An additional treatment, using artificial turf mat in the PSA and nests (as commonly used in commercial flocks), was used to compare the effect of PSA lining in the other treatments. We observed laying location, the number of dirty and broken eggs, the microbiological contamination of eggshells according to laying location, and general cage hygiene. The use of nests for laying decreased when they were lined with plastic mesh. Eggs laid outside the nest were of lower quality than those laid inside it, and this was particularly true for eggs laid in the PSA. Although hygiene was low on artificial turf mats, eggs laid on PSA covered with a rubber mat were dirtier and had a higher count of mesophilic bacteria on the eggshell than those laid on PSA covered with an artificial turf mat. Rubber mats in PSA were rapidly destroyed and proved to be unsuitable. The provision of litter had no effect on cage hygiene but substantially increased wear on mats. This study shows nest lining and litter provision methods to be key factors that need to be taken into account to encourage the use of nest boxes for laying, and hence, to ensure good egg quality. Further research into new linings for PSA is needed for the future improvement of egg-laying conditions.

  4. Ischemic preconditioning modulates mitochondrial respiration, irrespective of the employed signal transduction pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liem, David A; Manintveld, Olivier C; Schoonderwoerd, Kees; McFalls, Edward O; Heinen, Andre; Verdouw, Pieter D; Sluiter, Wim; Duncker, Dirk J

    2008-01-01

    We tested in the in vivo rat heart the hypothesis that although ischemic preconditioning can employ different signal transduction pathways, these pathways converge ultimately at the level of the mitochondrial respiratory chain. Infarct size produced by a 60-min coronary artery occlusion (69%+/-2% of the area at risk) was limited by a preceding 15-min coronary occlusion (48%+/-4%). Cardioprotection by this stimulus was triggered by adenosine receptor stimulation, which was followed by protein kinase C and tyrosine kinase activation and then mitochondrial K(+)(ATP)-channel opening. In contrast, cardioprotection by 3 cycles of 3-min coronary occlusions (infarct size 27%+/-5% of the area at risk) involved the release of reactive oxygen species, which was followed by protein kinase C and tyrosine kinase activation, but was independent of adenosine receptor stimulation and K(+)(ATP)-channel activation. However, both pathways decreased respiratory control index (RCI; state-3/state-2, using succinate as complex-II substrate) from 3.1+/-0.2 in mitochondria from sham-treated hearts to 2.4+/-0.2 and 2.5+/-0.1 in hearts subjected to a single 15-min and triple 3-min coronary occlusions, respectively (both P<0.05). The decreases in RCI were due to an increase in state-2 respiration, whereas state-3 respiration was unchanged. Abolition of cardioprotection by blockade of either signal transduction pathway was paralleled by a concomitant abolition of mitochondrial uncoupling. These observations are consistent with the concept that mild mitochondrial uncoupling contributes to infarct size limitation by various ischemic preconditioning stimuli, despite using different signal transduction pathways. In conclusion, in the in vivo rat heart, different ischemic preconditioning (IPC) stimuli can activate highly different signal transduction pathways, which seem to converge at the level of the mitochondria where they increase state-2 respiration.

  5. Effects of single caging and cage size on behavior and stress level of domestic neutered cats housed in an animal shelter

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Uetake, Katsuji; Goto, Akihiro; Koyama, Rumi; Kikuchi, Rieko; Tanaka, Toshio

    2013-01-01

    Cats need a minimum amount of space even in animal shelters. In this study the effects of single caging and cage size on the behavior and stress level of domestic cats were investigated. Six neutered cats (2–15 years old...

  6. Cage drying and the application of a dry treatment (absorbent cornstarch powder) as a means to diminish Campylobacter on transport cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broiler transport cages soiled with Campylobacter-positive feces have been shown to facilitate cross contamination of broilers. Campylobacter organisms are sensitive to dry stress. Allowing feces left on transport cage flooring to dry during extended periods of nonuse would be an effective method ...

  7. Structure and energetic characteristics of methane hydrates. From single cage to triple cage: A DFT-D study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giricheva, N. I.; Ischenko, A. A.; Yusupov, V. I.; Bagratashvili, V. N.; Girichev, G. V.

    2017-03-01

    Electronic, geometrical, vibrational and energetic characteristics of the ice I TDT fragment consisted of dodecahedron H2O[512] (D) fused with two tetrakaidecahedrons H2O[51262] (T) and of the TDT cluster with three encapsulated CH4 molecules (3CH4·TDT) were calculated using a DFT/B97-D/6-311++G(2d,2p) approach. Binding energies, hydrogen bonding energies, energies of encapsulation of methane molecules into small D- and large T-cages of the TDT fragment, energies of frontier orbitals, the translational and librational frequencies, as well as the intramolecular vibrations of methane within the cages of different sizes were studied. Similar characteristics of isolated D- and T-cages and clathrates CH4·D and CH4·T were studied as function of compression/expansion of their oxygen skeletons using DFT/B97-D, LC-B3LYP, B3LYP-D2 methods.

  8. Ocular manifestations of mitochondrial disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. D. Mathebula

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial disease caused by mutations in mitochondrial DNA is recognized as one of the most common causes of inherited neurological disease. Neuro-ophthalmic manifestations are a common feature of mitochondrial disease.  Optic atrophy causing central visual loss is the dominant feature of mitochondrial DNA diseases. Nystagmus is also encountered in mitochondrial disease.Although optometrists are not involved with the management of mitochondrial disease, they are likely to see more patients with this disease. Oph-thalmic examination forms part of the clinical assessment of mitochondrial disease. Mitochondrial disease should be suspected in any patient with unexplained optic neuropathy, ophthalmoplegia, pigmentary retinopathy or retrochiasmal visual loss. Despite considerable advances in the under-standing of mitochondrial genetics and the patho-genesis of mtDNA diseases, no effective treatment options are currently available for patients withmitochondrial dysfunction. (S Afr Optom 201271(1 46-50

  9. [On specific properties of the mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation system operating as a supercomplex].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesterov, S V; Skorobogatova, Iu A; Iaguzhinskiĭ, L S

    2014-01-01

    This paper represents the study of endogenous and exogenous fatty acids affecting the mitochondrial phosphorylation system effectiveness depending on temperature. The experiment was set up under conditions in which the oxidative phosphorylation system operates as a supercomplex. Rat liver mitochondria were isolated without purposive fatty acids removal from membranes, then studied in hypotonic medium (120 mOsm). We managed to detect a very narrow interval 19 ± 1°C where the fatty acid uncoupling effect is weak up to disappearing. At the same small temperature range, a structural rearrangement that takes place in the enzyme system is accompanied with denser packing of membrane protein complexes. Thus, at the temperatures close to 19°C the supercomplex works in the specific regime protected (or partially protected) from the uncoupling effect of fatty acids. Here we also discuss a physiological significance of the increased ATP-synthesis effectiveness at lower temperatures and the most probable character of structural rearrangement taking place at 19°C in the enzymes in the mitochondrial membrane.

  10. Interactions of copper and thermal stress on mitochondrial bioenergetics in rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sappal, Ravinder [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE C1A 4P3 (Canada); Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE C1A 4P3 (Canada); MacDonald, Nicole [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE C1A 4P3 (Canada); Fast, Mark [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE C1A 4P3 (Canada); Stevens, Don [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE C1A 4P3 (Canada); Kibenge, Fred [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE C1A 4P3 (Canada); Siah, Ahmed [British Columbia Centre for Aquatic Health Sciences, 871A Island Highway, Campbell River, BC V9W 2C2 (Canada); Kamunde, Collins, E-mail: ckamunde@upei.ca [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE C1A 4P3 (Canada)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Interacting effects of Cu and temperature were investigated in rainbow trout liver mitochondria. • Mitochondrial functional indices are highly sensitive to temperature change. • High and low temperatures sensitize mitochondria to adverse effects of Cu. • Cu induces a highly temperature-sensitive mitochondrial permeability transition pore. • Cu-imposed mitochondrial membrane potential dissipation is mediated by reactive oxygen species. - Abstract: Thermal stress may influence how organisms respond to concurrent or subsequent chemical, physical and biotic stressors. To unveil the potential mechanisms via which thermal stress modulates metals-induced bioenergetic disturbances, the interacting effects of temperature and copper (Cu) were investigated in vitro. Mitochondria isolated from rainbow trout livers were exposed to a range of Cu concentrations at three temperatures (5, 15 and 25 °C) with measurement of mitochondrial complex I (mtCI)-driven respiratory flux indices and uncoupler-stimulated respiration. Additional studies assessed effects of temperature and Cu on mtCI enzyme activity, induction of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (MPTP), swelling kinetics and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Maximal and basal respiration rates, as well as the proton leak, increased with temperature with the Q{sub 10} effects being higher at lower temperatures. The effect of Cu depended on the mitochondrial functional state in that the maximal respiration was monotonically inhibited by Cu exposure while low and high Cu concentrations stimulated and inhibited the basal respiration/proton leak, respectively. Importantly, temperature exacerbated the effects of Cu by lowering the concentration of the metal required for toxicity and causing loss of thermal dependence of mitochondrial respiration. Mitochondrial complex I activity was inhibited by Cu but was not affected by incubation temperature. Compared with the calcium (Ca) positive control

  11. A collection of caged compounds for probing roles of local translation in neurobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadovski, Oleg; Jaikaran, Anna S I; Samanta, Subhas; Fabian, Marc R; Dowling, Ryan J O; Sonenberg, Nahum; Woolley, G Andrew

    2010-11-15

    Spatially localized translation plays a vital role in the normal functioning of neuronal systems and is widely believed to be involved in both learning and memory formation. It is of central interest to understand both the phenomenon and molecular mechanisms of local translation using new tools and approaches. Caged compounds can, in principle, be used as tools to investigate local translation since optical activation of bioactive molecules can achieve both spatial and temporal resolution on the micron scale and on the order of seconds or less, respectively. Successful caging of bioactive molecules requires the identification of key functional groups in appropriate molecules and the introduction of a suitable caging moiety. Here we present the design, synthesis and testing of a collection of three caged compounds: anisomycin caged with a diethylaminocoumarin moiety and dimethoxynitrobenzyl caged versions of 4E-BP and rapamycin. Whereas caged anisomycin can be used to control general translation, caged 4E-BP serves as a probe of cap-dependent translation initiation and caged rapamycin serves a probe of the role of mTORC1 in translation initiation. In vitro translation assays demonstrate that these caging strategies, in combination with the aforementioned compounds, are effective for optical control making it likely that such strategies can successfully employed in the study of local translation in living systems. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Coupled and uncoupled hydrogeophysical inversions using ensemble Kalman filter assimilation of ERT-monitored tracer test data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporese, Matteo; Cassiani, Giorgio; Deiana, Rita; Salandin, Paolo; Binley, Andrew

    2015-05-01

    Recent advances in geophysical methods have been increasingly exploited as inverse modeling tools in groundwater hydrology. In particular, several attempts to constrain the hydrogeophysical inverse problem to reduce inversion errors have been made using time-lapse geophysical measurements through both coupled and uncoupled (also known as sequential) inversion approaches. Despite the appeal and popularity of coupled inversion approaches, their superiority over uncoupled methods has not been proved conclusively; the goal of this work is to provide an objective comparison between the two approaches within a specific inversion modeling framework based on the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF). Using EnKF and a model of Lagrangian transport, we compare the performance of a fully coupled and uncoupled inversion method for the reconstruction of heterogeneous saturated hydraulic conductivity fields through the assimilation of ERT-monitored tracer test data. The two inversion approaches are tested in a number of different scenarios, including isotropic and anisotropic synthetic aquifers, where we change the geostatistical parameters used to generate the prior ensemble of hydraulic conductivity fields. Our results show that the coupled approach outperforms the uncoupled when the prior statistics are close to the ones used to generate the true field. Otherwise, the coupled approach is heavily affected by "filter inbreeding" (an undesired effect of variance underestimation typical of EnKF), while the uncoupled approach is more robust, being able to correct biased prior information, thanks to its capability of capturing the solute travel times even in presence of inversion artifacts such as the violation of mass balance. Furthermore, the coupled approach is more computationally intensive than the uncoupled, due to the much larger number of forward runs required by the electrical model. Overall, we conclude that the relative merit of the coupled versus the uncoupled approach cannot

  13. Mitochondrial signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae pseudohyphae formation induced by butanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starovoytova, Anna N; Sorokin, Maxim I; Sokolov, Svyatoslav S; Severin, Fedor F; Knorre, Dmitry A

    2013-06-01

    Yeasts growing limited for nitrogen source or treated with fusel alcohols form elongated cells--pseudohyphae. Absence of mitochondrial DNA or anaerobic conditions inhibits this process, but the precise role of mitochondria is not clear. We found that a significant percentage of pseudohyphal cells contained mitochondria with different levels of membrane potential within one cell. An uncoupler carbonyl cyanide p-(trifluoromethoxy) phenylhydrazone (FCCP), but not the ATP-synthase inhibitor oligomycin D, prevented pseudohyphal growth. Interestingly, repression of the MIH1 gene encoding phosphatase activator of the G2/M transition partially restores the ability of yeast to form pseudohyphal cells in the presence of FCCP or in the absence of mitochondrial DNA. At the same time, retrograde signaling (the one triggered by dysfunctional mitochondria) appeared to be a positive regulator of butanol-induced pseudohyphae formation: the deletion of any of the retrograde signaling genes (RTG1, RTG2, or RTG3) partially suppressed pseudohyphal growth. Together, our data suggest that two subpopulations of mitochondria are required for filamentous growth: one with high and another with low transmembrane potential. These mitochondria-activated signaling pathways appear to converge at Mih1p level. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of nitrosopropofol on mitochondrial energy-converting system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevanato, Roberto; Momo, Federico; Marian, Michela; Rigobello, Maria Pia; Bindoli, Alberto; Bragadin, Marcantonio; Vincenti, Ezio; Scutari, Guido

    2002-10-01

    Nitrosopropofol (NOPR) is a relatively stable compound obtained from the reaction between the general anesthetic 2,6 diisopropylphenol (propofol) and nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and bearing a more acidic phenol group than propofol. It interfered with mitochondrial energetic metabolism in a concentration-dependent manner. Concentrations as high as 100 or 200 microM disrupted both oxidative phosphorylation and electron transport. Low concentrations of NOPR (50 microM) markedly slowed down the electron transport rate which was insensitive both to ADP and uncoupler stimulation and spontaneously gradually stopped. Consequently, both the transmembrane potential production and the ATP synthesis system were affected. In the presence of 10 or 20 microM NOPR, mitochondria respired but showed a worsening of the respiratory control and produced a transmembrane potential useful to respond to a phosphorylation pulse, but were not able to restore it. These results were consistent with ATP synthesis and swelling experiments. NOPR was effective at concentrations lower than those required by the combination of propofol and GSNO, suggesting that mitochondria might be able to catalyze the reaction between GSNO and propofol and that the resulting metabolite was more active on mitochondrial membrane structure than the parent compounds. Although the details of the process are yet unknown, the mechanism presented may be of potential relevance to rationalize the pathophysiological effects of propofol.

  15. L-carnitine is essential to beta-oxidation of quarried fatty acid from mitochondrial membrane by PLA(2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yano, Hiromi; Oyanagi, Eri; Kato, Yasuko; Samejima, Yoshiyuki; Sasaki, Junzo; Utsumi, Kozo

    2010-09-01

    Mitochondrial beta-oxidation is an important system involved in the energy production of various cells. In this system, the function of L-carnitine is essential for the uptake of fatty acids to mitochondria. However, it is unclear whether or not endogenous respiration, ADP-induced O(2) consumption without substrates, is caused by L-carnitine treatment. In this study, we investigated whether L-carnitine is essential to the beta-oxidation of quarried fatty acids from the mitochondrial membrane by phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) using isolated mitochondria from the liver of rats. Intact mitochondria were incubated in a medium containing Pi, CoA and L-carnitine. The effect of L-carnitine treatment on ADP-induced mitochondrial respiration was observed without exogenous respiratory substrate. Increase in mitochondrial respiration was induced by treatment with L-carnitine in a concentration-dependent manner. Treatment with rotenone, a complex I blocker, completely inhibited ADP-induced oxygen consumption even in the presence of L-carnitine. Moreover, the L-carnitine dependent ADP-induced mitochondrial oxygen consumption did not increase when PLA(2) inhibitors were treated before ADP treatment. The L-carnitine-dependent ADP-induced oxygen consumption did contribute to ATP productions but not heat generation via an uncoupling system. These results suggest that L-carnitine might be essential to the beta-oxidation of quarried fatty acids from the mitochondrial membrane by PLA(2).

  16. Adaptation of hepatic mitochondrial function in humans with non-alcoholic fatty liver is lost in steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koliaki, Chrysi; Szendroedi, Julia; Kaul, Kirti; Jelenik, Tomas; Nowotny, Peter; Jankowiak, Frank; Herder, Christian; Carstensen, Maren; Krausch, Markus; Knoefel, Wolfram Trudo; Schlensak, Matthias; Roden, Michael

    2015-05-05

    The association of hepatic mitochondrial function with insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) or steatohepatitis (NASH) remains unclear. This study applied high-resolution respirometry to directly quantify mitochondrial respiration in liver biopsies of obese insulin-resistant humans without (n = 18) or with (n = 16) histologically proven NAFL or with NASH (n = 7) compared to lean individuals (n = 12). Despite similar mitochondrial content, obese humans with or without NAFL had 4.3- to 5.0-fold higher maximal respiration rates in isolated mitochondria than lean persons. NASH patients featured higher mitochondrial mass, but 31%-40% lower maximal respiration, which associated with greater hepatic insulin resistance, mitochondrial uncoupling, and leaking activity. In NASH, augmented hepatic oxidative stress (H2O2, lipid peroxides) and oxidative DNA damage (8-OH-deoxyguanosine) was paralleled by reduced anti-oxidant defense capacity and increased inflammatory response. These data suggest adaptation of the liver ("hepatic mitochondrial flexibility") at early stages of obesity-related insulin resistance, which is subsequently lost in NASH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mitochondrial dysfunction in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mello, Aline Haas; Costa, Ana Beatriz; Engel, Jéssica Della Giustina; Rezin, Gislaine Tezza

    2018-01-01

    Obesity leads to various changes in the body. Among them, the existing inflammatory process may lead to an increase in the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cause oxidative stress. Oxidative stress, in turn, can trigger mitochondrial changes, which is called mitochondrial dysfunction. Moreover, excess nutrients supply (as it commonly is the case with obesity) can overwhelm the Krebs cycle and the mitochondrial respiratory chain, causing a mitochondrial dysfunction, and lead to a higher ROS formation. This increase in ROS production by the respiratory chain may also cause oxidative stress, which may exacerbate the inflammatory process in obesity. All these intracellular changes can lead to cellular apoptosis. These processes have been described in obesity as occurring mainly in peripheral tissues. However, some studies have already shown that obesity is also associated with changes in the central nervous system (CNS), with alterations in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and in cerebral structures such as hypothalamus and hippocampus. In this sense, this review presents a general view about mitochondrial dysfunction in obesity, including related alterations, such as inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis, and focusing on the whole organism, covering alterations in peripheral tissues, BBB, and CNS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation alterations in heart failure, ischaemic heart disease and diabetic cardiomyopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillmore, N; Mori, J; Lopaschuk, G D

    2014-01-01

    Heart disease is a leading cause of death worldwide. In many forms of heart disease, including heart failure, ischaemic heart disease and diabetic cardiomyopathies, changes in cardiac mitochondrial energy metabolism contribute to contractile dysfunction and to a decrease in cardiac efficiency. Specific metabolic changes include a relative increase in cardiac fatty acid oxidation rates and an uncoupling of glycolysis from glucose oxidation. In heart failure, overall mitochondrial oxidative metabolism can be impaired while, in ischaemic heart disease, energy production is impaired due to a limitation of oxygen supply. In both of these conditions, residual mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation dominates over mitochondrial glucose oxidation. In diabetes, the ratio of cardiac fatty acid oxidation to glucose oxidation also increases, although primarily due to an increase in fatty acid oxidation and an inhibition of glucose oxidation. Recent evidence suggests that therapeutically regulating cardiac energy metabolism by reducing fatty acid oxidation and/or increasing glucose oxidation can improve cardiac function of the ischaemic heart, the failing heart and in diabetic cardiomyopathies. In this article, we review the cardiac mitochondrial energy metabolic changes that occur in these forms of heart disease, what role alterations in mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation have in contributing to cardiac dysfunction and the potential for targeting fatty acid oxidation to treat these forms of heart disease. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed issue on Mitochondrial Pharmacology: Energy, Injury & Beyond. To view the other articles in this issue visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-8 PMID:24147975

  19. Metabolic uncoupling of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, under the influence of excess substrate and 3, 3', 4', 5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saini, Gaurav; Wood, Brian D.

    2008-01-01

    The dissociation between catabolism and anabolism is generally termed as metabolic uncoupling. Experimentally, metabolic uncoupling is characterized by a reduction in the observed biomass yield. This condition can be brought about by: (a) excess-substrate (as measured by S0/X0), and (b) addition of chemical uncouplers such as 3, 3', 4', 5-Tetrachlorosalicylanilide (TCS). An empirical model is proposed to quantify the uncoupling effects of both excess-substrate and uncoupler addition on the microbial cultures. Metabolic uncoupling of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, under the influence of excess pyruvate and TCS, has been modeled using the proposed expression. The degree of uncoupling was measured as a fractional reduction in theoretical maximum observed yield. Excess-substrate was observed to successively reduce biomass yield as substrate concentration was increased. In the presence of TCS, conflicting trends were obtained for number yield and protein yield. This could, in part, be attributed to the observed increase in cellular protein content upon addition of TCS. Excess-substrate conditions dominated uncoupling, as compared to uncoupler addition. Finally, however, these two approaches were found to have additive effects and could, in conjunction, be employed to control biomass growth during microbial processes such as subsurface bioremediation and activated sludge treatment

  20. Increased intrinsic mitochondrial function in humans with mitochondrial haplogroup H

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Steen; Díez-Sánchez, Carmen; Rabøl, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    It has been suggested that human mitochondrial variants influence maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). Whether mitochondrial respiratory capacity per mitochondrion (intrinsic activity) in human skeletal muscle is affected by differences in mitochondrial variants is not known. We recruited 54 males...

  1. Trp-cage: Folding free energy landscape in explicit water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ruhong

    2003-01-01

    Trp-cage is a 20-residue miniprotein, which is believed to be the fastest folder known so far. In this study, the folding free energy landscape of Trp-cage has been explored in explicit solvent by using an OPLSAA force field with periodic boundary condition. A highly parallel replica exchange molecular dynamics method is used for the conformation space sampling, with the help of a recently developed efficient molecular dynamics algorithm P3ME/RESPA (particle–particle particle–mesh Ewald/reference system propagator algorithm). A two-step folding mechanism is proposed that involves an intermediate state where two correctly formed partial hydrophobic cores are separated by an essential salt-bridge between residues Asp-9 and Arg-16 near the center of the peptide. This metastable intermediate state provides an explanation for the superfast folding process. The free energy landscape is found to be rugged at low temperatures, and then becomes smooth and funnel-like above 340 K. The lowest free energy structure at 300 K is only 1.50 Å Cα-RMSD (Cα-rms deviation) from the NMR structures. The simulated nuclear Overhauser effect pair distances are in excellent agreement with the raw NMR data. The temperature dependence of the Trp-cage population, however, is found to be significantly different from experiment, with a much higher melting transition temperature above 400 K (experimental 315 K), indicating that the current force fields, parameterized at room temperature, need to be improved to correctly predict the temperature dependence. PMID:14581616

  2. Visual information underpinning skilled anticipation: The effect of blur on a coupled and uncoupled in situ anticipatory response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, David L; Abernethy, Bruce; Farrow, Damian

    2010-07-01

    Coupled interceptive actions are understood to be the result of neural processing-and visual information-which is distinct from that used for uncoupled perceptual responses. To examine the visual information used for action and perception, skilled cricket batters anticipated the direction of balls bowled toward them using a coupled movement (an interceptive action that preserved the natural coupling between perception and action) or an uncoupled (verbal) response, in each of four different visual blur conditions (plano, +1.00, +2.00, +3.00). Coupled responses were found to be better than uncoupled ones, with the blurring of vision found to result in different effects for the coupled and uncoupled response conditions. Low levels of visual blur did not affect coupled anticipation, a finding consistent with the comparatively poorer visual information on which online interceptive actions are proposed to rely. In contrast, some evidence was found to suggest that low levels of blur may enhance the uncoupled verbal perception of movement.

  3. Hepatic mitochondrial energetics during catch-up fat with high-fat diets rich in lard or safflower oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescenzo, Raffaella; Bianco, Francesca; Falcone, Italia; Tsalouhidou, Sofia; Yepuri, Gayathri; Mougios, Vassilis; Dulloo, Abdul G; Liverini, Giovanna; Iossa, Susanna

    2012-09-01

    We have investigated whether altered hepatic mitochondrial energetics could explain the differential effects of high-fat diets with low or high ω6 polyunsaturated fatty acid content (lard vs. safflower oil) on the efficiency of body fat recovery (catch-up fat) during refeeding after caloric restriction. After 2 weeks of caloric restriction, rats were isocalorically refed with a low-fat diet (LF) or high-fat diets made from either lard or safflower oil for 1 week, and energy balance and body composition changes were assessed. Hepatic mitochondrial energetics were determined from measurements of liver mitochondrial mass, respiratory capacities, and proton leak. Compared to rats refed the LF, the groups refed high-fat diets showed lower energy expenditure and increased efficiency of fat gain; these differences were less marked with high-safflower oil than with high-lard diet. The increase in efficiency of catch-up fat by the high-fat diets could not be attributed to differences in liver mitochondrial activity. By contrast, the lower fat gain with high-safflower oil than with high-lard diet is accompanied by higher mitochondrial proton leak and increased proportion of arachidonic acid in mitochondrial membranes. In conclusion, the higher efficiency for catch-up fat on high-lard diet than on LF cannot be explained by altered hepatic mitochondrial energetics. By contrast, the ability of the high-safflower oil diet to produce a less pronounced increase in the efficiency of catch-up fat may partly reside in increased incorporation of arachidonic acid in hepatic mitochondrial membranes, leading to enhanced proton leak and mitochondrial uncoupling.

  4. Crossover from reptation to Rouse dynamics in the cage model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drzewiński, A; van Leeuwen, J M J

    2006-12-01

    The two-dimensional cage model for polymer motion is discussed with an emphasis on the effect of sideways motions, which cross the barriers imposed by the lattice. Using the density matrix method as a solver of the master equation, the renewal time and the diffusion coefficient are calculated as a function of the strength of the barrier crossings. A strong crossover influence of the barrier crossings is found and it is analyzed in terms of effective exponents for a given chain length. The crossover scaling functions and the crossover scaling exponents are calculated.

  5. Preinjector for Linac 1, inside the Faraday cage

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    For a description of the Linac 1 preinjector, please see first 7403070X. Here, the view is towards the upper level of the Faraday cage. Far to the right, a technician is peering through the service door. The huge box-shaped cubicle is the electronics platform, at 520 kV potential during operation. The "bull eye" at the left back sits at the top end of the accelerating column (see 7403081X) and houses the ion source with its electronics (see 7403083X). The SAMES generator, providing the 520 kV HV (7403074) sits on the floor and is not visible here.

  6. Standard test method for using atmospheric pressure rotating cage

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2009-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers a generally accepted procedure to conduct the rotating cage (RC) experiment under atmospheric pressure. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values given in parentheses are for information only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  7. Correction of Spray Concentration and Bioassay Cage Penetration Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Tulle). Colony-reared Culex quinquefascia- tus Say and Aedes albopictus (Skuse) were used, with 1 cage of each per location. Twenty-five mosquitos...concentration (ml etofenprox/ cm2); a, b, c, d 5 0.39, 0.11, 137.7, and 0.22 for Ae. albopictus , corrected data; DECEMBER 2012 SCIENTIFIC NOTE 321 a, b, c, d...5 0.37, 0.09, 151.5, and 0.22 for Ae. albopictus , uncorrected data; a, b, c, d 5 22.1, 0.00013, 95.8, and 1.26 for Cx. quinquefasciatus, corrected

  8. Design of Automated Rotory Cage Type Fixture for Cylinder Block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y.S.Kapnichor

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Project gives feasible solution to move and rotate the component with full proofing fixturing for special purpose operations like drilling, Tapping, deburring, washing, drying involve in manufacturing and assembly unit of industry. Rotary cage type fixture is made for handling the cylinder head inside the cleaning machine use for making fully ready component before assembly operation .System is useful to save time manpower and deliver perfect cleaned and dry component .system involved all the mechanical components along with the sensors used to restrict the rotating operations, stop and go operations etc.

  9. Lumbar interbody fusion: a parametric investigation of a novel cage design with and without posterior instrumentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbusera, Fabio; Schmidt, Hendrik; Wilke, Hans-Joachim

    2012-03-01

    A finite element model of the L4-L5 human segment was employed to carry out a parametric biomechanical investigation of lumbar interbody fusion with a novel "sandwich" cage having an inner stiff core and two softer layers in the areas close to the endplates, with and without posterior fixation. Considered cage designs included: (a) cage in a homogeneous material with variable elastic modulus (19-2,000 MPa), (b) "sandwich" cage having an inner core (E=2,000 MPa) and softer layers (E=19 MPa) with variable thickness (1-2.5 mm). The latter cage was also considered in combination with posterior rods made with a material having variable elastic modulus (19-210,000 MPa). All the models were loaded with 500 N compression and moments of 7.5 Nm in flexion, extension, lateral bending and axial rotation. The homogeneous cage stabilized the segment in flexion, lateral bending and axial rotation; in extension there was a destabilization up to 60% and remarkable cage movement (1 mm). The "sandwich" cage limited this phenomenon (cage movement<0.6 mm), effectively stabilized the segment in the other directions and lowered the maximal contact pressure on the endplates, reducing the risk of subsidence. Posterior fixation reduced spinal flexibility and cage movement. The soft layers of the "sandwich" cage had the potential to limit the risk of cage subsidence and to preserve a significant loading of the structure even in combination with flexible posterior instrumentation, which may have a beneficial effect in promoting bony fusion.

  10. Hypothesis on skeletal muscle aging : mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocator decreases reactive oxygen species production while preserving coupling efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe eDIOLEZ

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial membrane potential is the major regulator of mitochondrial functions, including coupling efficiency and production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Both functions are crucial for cell bioenergetics. We previously presented evidences for a specific modulation of adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT appearing during aging that results in a decrease in membrane potential - and therefore ROS production – but surprisingly increases coupling efficiency under conditions of low ATP turnover. Careful study of the bioenergetic parameters (oxidation and phosphorylation rates, membrane potential of isolated mitochondria from skeletal muscles (gastrocnemius of aged and young rats revealed a remodeling at the level of the phosphorylation system, in the absence of alteration of the inner mitochondrial membrane (uncoupling or respiratory chain complexes regulation. We further observed a decrease in mitochondrial affinity for ADP in aged isolated mitochondria, and higher sensitivity of ANT to its specific inhibitor atractyloside. This age-induced modification of ANT results in an increase in the ADP concentration required to sustain the same ATP turnover as compared to young muscle, and therefore in a lower membrane potential under phosphorylating - in vivo - conditions. Thus, for equivalent ATP turnover (cellular ATP demand, coupling efficiency is even higher in aged muscle mitochondria, due to the down-regulation of inner membrane proton leak caused by the decrease in membrane potential. In the framework of the radical theory of aging, these modifications in ANT function may be the result of oxidative damage caused by intra mitochondrial ROS and may appear like a virtuous circle where ROS induce a mechanism that reduces their production, without causing uncoupling, and even leading in improved efficiency. Because of the importance of ROS as therapeutic targets, this new mechanism deserves further studies.

  11. Mitochondrial deficiency in Cockayne syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2013-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome is a rare inherited disorder characterized by accelerated aging, cachectic dwarfism and many other features. Recent work has implicated mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of this disease. This is particularly interesting since mitochondrial deficiencies are believed to be important in the aging process. In this review, we discuss recent findings of mitochondrial pathology in Cockayne syndrome and suggest possible mechanisms for the mitochondrial dysfunction. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  12. Mitochondrial deficiency in Cockayne syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Croteau, Deborah L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2013-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome is a rare inherited disorder characterized by accelerated aging, cachectic dwarfism and many other features. Recent work has implicated mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathogenesis of this disease. This is particularly interesting since mitochondrial deficiencies are believed to be important in the aging process. In this review, we will discuss recent findings of mitochondrial pathology in Cockayne syndrome and suggest possible mechanisms for the mitochondrial dysfunction.

  13. A stochastic frontier analysis of technical efficiency of fish cage culture in Peninsular Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Gazi Md Nurul; Tai, Shzee Yew; Kusairi, Mohd Noh

    2016-01-01

    Cage culture plays an important role in achieving higher output and generating more export earnings in Malaysia. However, the cost of fingerlings, feed and labour have increased substantially for cage culture in the coastal areas in Peninsular Malaysia. This paper uses farm level data gathered from Manjung, Perak and Kota Tinggi, Johor to investigate the technical efficiency of brackish water fish cage culture using the stochastic frontier approach. The technical efficiency was estimated and specifically the factors affecting technical inefficiencies of fish cage culture system in Malaysia was investigated. On average, 37 percent of the sampled fish cage farms are technically efficient. The results suggest very high degrees of technical inefficiency exist among the cage culturists. This implies that great potential exists to increase fish production through improved efficiency in cage culture management in Peninsular Malaysia. The results indicate that farmers obtained grouper fingerlings from other neighboring countries due to scarcity of fingerlings from wild sources. The cost of feeding for grouper (Epinephelus fuscoguttatus) requires relatively higher costs compared to seabass (Lates calcarifer) production in cage farms in the study areas. Initiatives to undertake extension programmes at the farm level are needed to help cage culturists in utilizing their resources more efficiently in order to substantially enhance their fish production.

  14. Rearing Laying Hens in Aviaries Reduces Fearfulness following Transfer to Furnished Cages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantsæter, Margrethe; Tahamtani, Fernanda M.; Moe, Randi O.; Hansen, Tone B.; Orritt, Rachel; Nicol, Christine; Janczak, Andrew M.

    2016-01-01

    Appropriate rearing is essential for ensuring the welfare and productivity of laying hens. Early experience has the potential to affect the development of fearfulness. This study tested whether rearing in aviaries, as opposed to cages, reduces the fearfulness of laying hens after transfer to furnished cages. Fear responses were recorded as avoidance of a novel object in the home cage. Lohmann Selected Leghorns were reared in an aviary system or conventional rearing cages and then transported to furnished cages at 16 weeks, before the onset of lay. Observations of a selection of birds were conducted at 19 (N = 50 independent cages) and 21 (N = 48 independent cages) weeks of age. At 19 and 21 weeks, cage-reared birds showed higher levels of fearfulness indicated by spending more time away from the novel object compared to aviary-reared birds. These results suggest that rearing in an enriched aviary environment reduces fearfulness up to the fifth week after transfer to a new housing system, compared to rearing in cages. PMID:26955634

  15. Nitriding using cathodic cage technique of martensitic stainless steel AISI 420 with addition of CH4

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    De Sousa, R.R.M; De Araújo, F.O; Da Costa, J.A.P; De Sousa, R.S; Alves JR, C

    2008-01-01

    AISI 420 martensitic stainless steel samples were nitrided by cathodic cage technique with addition of methane in the atmosphere aiming to reduce chromium nitride precipitation, to increase hardness...

  16. REINVENTING THE WHEEL: Comparison of Two Wheel Cage Styles for Assessing Mouse Voluntary Running Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seward, Tanya; Harfmann, Brianna D; Esser, Karyn A; Schroder, Elizabeth A

    2017-12-21

    Voluntary wheel cage assessment of mouse activity is commonly employed in exercise and behavioral research. Currently, no standardization for wheel cages exists resulting in an inability to compare results among data from different labs. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the distance run or average speed data differs depending on the use of two commonly used commercially available wheel cage systems. Two different wheel cages with structurally similar but functionally different wheels (electromechanical switch vs magnetic switch) were compared side-by-side to measure wheel running data differences. Other variables, including enrichment and cage location, were also tested to assess potential impacts on the running wheel data. We found that cages with the electromechanical switch had greater inherent wheel resistance and consistently led to higher greater running distance/day and higher average running speed. Mice rapidly, within 1-2 days, adapted their running behavior to the type of experimental switch used suggesting these running differences are more behavioral than due to intrinsic musculoskeletal, cardiovascular or metabolic limits. The presence of enrichment or location of the cage had no detectable impact on voluntary wheel running. These results demonstrate that mice run differing amounts depending on the type of cage and switch mechanism used and thus, investigators need to report wheel cage type/ wheel resistance and use caution when interpreting distance/speed run across studies.

  17. Effects of Nominal Differences in Cage Height and Floor Space on the Wellbeing of Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Kay L; Suckow, Mark A

    2016-03-01

    The 8th edition of the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals recommends a cage height of 16 in. for rabbits, compared with 14 in. in the previous edition. In contrast, the Animal Welfare Act Regulations prescribes a cage height of 14 in. for rabbits. A review of the literature failed to identify published data that support an advantage to rabbits having 16 in. of cage height compared with 14 or 15 in. The study described here evaluated the effect of a 3-in. difference in cage height on the health, growth, behavior, and overall wellbeing of rabbits. Groups of 10 New Zealand white rabbits were housed in cages that provided either 15 in. of interior cage height (720 in(2) of floor space) or 18 in. of interior height (784 in(2) of floor space). The rabbits were observed during 25 periods (1 h each) over 7 wk, and various behavioral parameters were scored. In addition, rabbits were weighed weekly, and general clinical health was assessed. After 4 wk, the groups were switched to the alternate housing. No significant differences in body weight gain or behavioral parameters were detected between groups housed in cages with different heights and amounts of floor space, nor were significant behavioral differences noted in individual rabbits when moved from one cage type to the other. In addition, all rabbits remained clinically healthy throughout the study. These results demonstrate that these differences in interior cage height neither benefit nor harm rabbits.

  18. Sensitivity of BN nano-cages to caffeine and nicotine molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soltani, Alireza; Baei, Mohammad T.; Tazikeh Lemeski, E.; Shahini, Malihe

    2014-12-01

    Adsorption of caffeine and nicotine molecules over B12N12 and B16N16 nano-cages were investigated by using first-principles calculations to define whether BN nano-cages are applicable for filtering or sensing caffeine and nicotine molecules. The chemisorption energy of nicotine molecule on BN nano-cages is very stronger than caffeine molecule. Upon the adsorption of caffeine and nicotine molecules, the electronic properties of the BN nano-cages can be significantly changed, being too much sensitized on the caffeine and nicotine adsorptions.

  19. Photo-dependent protein biosynthesis using a caged aminoacyl-tRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akahoshi, Akiya; Doi, Yoshio; Sisido, Masahiko; Watanabe, Kazunori; Ohtsuki, Takashi

    2014-12-01

    Translation systems with four-base codons provide a powerful strategy for protein engineering and protein studies because they enable site-specific incorporation of non-natural amino acids into proteins. In this study, a caged aminoacyl-tRNA with a four-base anticodon was synthesized. The caged aminoacyl-tRNA contains a photocleavable nitroveratryloxycarbonyl (NVOC) group. This study showed that the caged aminoacyl-tRNA was not deacylated, did not bind to EF-Tu, and was activated by light. Photo-dependent translation of an mRNA containing the four-base codon was demonstrated using the caged aminoacyl-tRNA.

  20. Pharmacologic Effects on Mitochondrial Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Bruce H.

    2010-01-01

    The vast majority of energy necessary for cellular function is produced in mitochondria. Free-radical production and apoptosis are other critical mitochondrial functions. The complex structure, electrochemical properties of the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM), and genetic control from both mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear DNA (nDNA) are…

  1. Long-term fasting decreases mitochondrial avian UCP-mediated oxygen consumption in hypometabolic king penguins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey, Benjamin; Halsey, Lewis G; Dolmazon, Virginie; Rouanet, Jean-Louis; Roussel, Damien; Handrich, Yves; Butler, Patrick J; Duchamp, Claude

    2008-07-01

    In endotherms, regulation of the degree of mitochondrial coupling affects cell metabolic efficiency. Thus it may be a key contributor to minimizing metabolic rate during long periods of fasting. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether variation in mitochondrial avian uncoupling proteins (avUCP), as putative regulators of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, may contribute to the ability of king penguins (Aptenodytes patagonicus) to withstand fasting for several weeks. After 20 days of fasting, king penguins showed a reduced rate of whole animal oxygen consumption (Vo2; -33%) at rest, together with a reduced abundance of avUCP and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha (PGC1-alpha) mRNA in pectoralis muscle (-54%, -36%, respectively). These parameters were restored after the birds had been refed for 3 days. Furthermore, in recently fed, but not in fasted penguins, isolated muscle mitochondria showed a guanosine diphosphate-inhibited, fatty acid plus superoxide-activated respiration, indicating the presence of a functional UCP. It was calculated that variation in mitochondrial UCP-dependent respiration in vitro may contribute to nearly 20% of the difference in resting Vo2 between fed or refed penguins and fasted penguins measured in vivo. These results suggest that the lowering of avUCP activity during periods of long-term energetic restriction may contribute to the reduction in metabolic rate and hence the ability of king penguins to face prolonged periods of fasting.

  2. Krill Oil Ameliorates Mitochondrial Dysfunctions in Rats Treated with High-Fat Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferramosca, Alessandra; Conte, Annalea; Zara, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several studies focused their attention on the role of dietary fats in the pathogenesis of hepatic steatosis. It has been demonstrated that a high-fat diet is able to induce hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, obesity, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. On the other hand, krill oil, a novel dietary supplement of n-3 PUFAs, has the ability to improve lipid and glucose metabolism, exerting possible protective effects against hepatic steatosis. In this study we have investigated the effects of krill oil on mitochondrial energetic metabolism in animals fed a high-fat diet. To this end, male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups and fed for 4 weeks with a standard diet (control group), a diet with 35% fat (HF group), or a high-fat diet supplemented with 2.5% krill oil (HF+KO group). The obtained results suggest that krill oil promotes the burning of fat excess introduced by the high-fat diet. This effect is obtained by stimulating mitochondrial metabolic pathways such as fatty acid oxidation, Krebs cycle, and respiratory chain complexes activity. Modulation of the expression of carrier proteins involved in mitochondrial uncoupling was also observed. Overall, krill oil counteracts the negative effects of a high-fat diet on mitochondrial energetic metabolism.

  3. Krill Oil Ameliorates Mitochondrial Dysfunctions in Rats Treated with High-Fat Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ferramosca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, several studies focused their attention on the role of dietary fats in the pathogenesis of hepatic steatosis. It has been demonstrated that a high-fat diet is able to induce hyperglycemia, hyperinsulinemia, obesity, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. On the other hand, krill oil, a novel dietary supplement of n-3 PUFAs, has the ability to improve lipid and glucose metabolism, exerting possible protective effects against hepatic steatosis. In this study we have investigated the effects of krill oil on mitochondrial energetic metabolism in animals fed a high-fat diet. To this end, male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three groups and fed for 4 weeks with a standard diet (control group, a diet with 35% fat (HF group, or a high-fat diet supplemented with 2.5% krill oil (HF+KO group. The obtained results suggest that krill oil promotes the burning of fat excess introduced by the high-fat diet. This effect is obtained by stimulating mitochondrial metabolic pathways such as fatty acid oxidation, Krebs cycle, and respiratory chain complexes activity. Modulation of the expression of carrier proteins involved in mitochondrial uncoupling was also observed. Overall, krill oil counteracts the negative effects of a high-fat diet on mitochondrial energetic metabolism.

  4. Enzyme release and mitochondrial activity in reoxygenated cardiac muscle: relationship with oxygen-induced lipid peroxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauduel, Y; Menasche, P; Duvelleroy, M

    1989-08-01

    The aim of this work was to precisely determine the sites of the peroxidative action on unsatured lipids by oxygen-derived free radicals and the lytic cell damage on reoxygenated perfused hearts. The cellular load of lipid peroxidation products (malondialdehyde) during the reoxygenation was dependent on PO2. This unfavorable biochemical response was linked to creatine kinase leakage, alteration of coronary flow and mitochondrial injury. When an enzymatic (superoxide dismutase, 290 IU/minute) or tripeptide scavenger of oxygen radicals (reduced glutathione, 0.5 mmol/l) was administered at the end of hypoxia and during reoxygenation, the abnormal intolerance of hypoxic heart to molecular oxygen was significantly weakened; the load of lipid peroxides load, enzyme release, and vascular alteration were all reduced. Moreover, mitochondrial activity was enhanced and the oxygen-induced uncoupling of mitochondrial remained limited: both the respiratory control ratio (RCR) and the ADP/O ratio were higher than in control reoxygenated hearts. The inhibition by rotenone (100 mumol/l) of reoxidation of electron chain transfer during oxygen readmission also reduced the unfavorable cardiac accumulation of lipid peroxidation products and the release of creatine kinase. These data demonstrate that in the oxygen paradox, the peroxidative attack on lipids plays an important role in inducing alterations of sarcolemmal permeability and mitochondrial activity. An uncontrolled reactivation of oxidative function of mitochondria during reoxygenation enhances the synthesis of oxygen-derived free radicals and triggers the peroxidation of cardiac lipids resulting in irreversible injury to cellular and intracellular membranes.

  5. Onset of magnetism in supported transition metal encapsulated silicon cages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, Roberto; Khanna, Shiv N.

    2009-03-01

    In the past few years, silicon based clusters have attracted a lot of attention as building blocks of nanomaterials. Some of the most promising candidates are the transition metal encapsulated silicon cages, which have been shown to be specially stable, both experimentally and theoretically. However, for the use of these materials in fields like spintronics, it is not only necessary to be semiconductor based, but also that they present a finite magnetic moment. However, it has been shown that the magnetic moment of the transition metal atom encapsulated in silicon cages is quenched due to the hybridization with silicon. By performing density functional calculations in the generalized gradient approximation, we show that the magnetic moment of these clusters can be recovered by depositing then on a surface. Using CrSi12 on Si(111) as an example, we have deposited the cluster in different orientations. The studies show that, for most of them, a finite magnetic moment is preserved in the system after a geometrical relaxation. The origin of this behavior is discussed in terms of hybridization, comparing to the unsupported situation.

  6. [Rib cage ostheosynthesis. Literature review and case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Quijano, Andrés; Varón-Cotés, Juan Carlos; García-Herreros-Hellal, Luis Gerardo; Espinosa-Moya, Beatriz; Rivero-Rapalino, Oscar; Salazar-Marulanda, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Fractures of the chest wall include sternum and rib fractures. Traditionally they are managed conservatively due to the anatomy of the rib cage that allows most of them to remain stable and to form a callus that unites the fractured segments. In spite of this management, some patients present with chronic pain or instability of the wall which makes them require some type of fixation. The present article performs a literature review based on 4 cases. The first case was a 61 year-old man with blunt chest trauma, with a great deformity of the chest wall associated with subcutaneous emphysema, and pneumothorax. The second case was a 51 year-old man with blunt chest trauma, initially managed at another institution, who despite treatment, had persistent pain and dyspnoea. The third case was a 30 year-old man that suffered a motor vehicle accident, with resulting pain and crepitation of the rib cage and with diagnostic images showing multiple rib fractures. The last case is a 62 year-old man that fell down the stairs, with blunt chest trauma with high intensity pain, dyspnoea and basal ipsilateral hypoventilation. Rib fracture fixation offers a good alternative in selected patients to decrease associated morbidity, leading to a patient's fast return to his or her working life. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  7. Regulation of a phage endolysin by disulfide caging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuty, Gabriel F; Xu, Min; Struck, Douglas K; Summer, Elizabeth J; Young, Ry

    2010-11-01

    In contrast to canonical phage endolysins, which require holin-mediated disruption of the membrane to gain access to attack the cell wall, signal anchor release (SAR) endolysins are secreted by the host sec system, where they accumulate in an inactive form tethered to the membrane by their N-terminal SAR domains. SAR endolysins become activated by various mechanisms upon release from the membrane. In its inactive form, the prototype SAR endolysin, Lyz(P1), of coliphage P1, has an active-site Cys covalently blocked by a disulfide bond; activation involves a disulfide bond isomerization driven by a thiol in the newly released SAR domain, unblocking the active-site Cys. Here, we report that Lyz(103), the endolysin of Erwinia phage ERA103, is also a SAR endolysin. Although Lyz(103) does not have a catalytic Cys, genetic evidence suggests that it also is activated by a thiol-disulfide isomerization triggered by a thiol in the SAR domain. In this case, the inhibitory disulfide in nascent Lyz(103) is formed between cysteine residues flanking a catalytic glutamate, caging the active site. Thus, Lyz(P1) and Lyz(103) define subclasses of SAR endolysins that differ in the nature of their inhibitory disulfide, and Lyz(103) is the first enzyme found to be regulated by disulfide bond caging of its active site.

  8. Electromechanical interaction in rotordynamics of cage induction motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holopainen, Timo P.; Tenhunen, Asmo; Arkkio, Antero

    2005-06-01

    Eccentric rotor motion induces an unbalanced magnetic pull between the rotor and stator of cage induction motors. Recently, a linear parametric model of this eccentricity force due to the arbitrary rotor motion was presented. The purpose of this study is to combine this electromagnetic force model with a simple mechanical rotor model, and further, to demonstrate the rotordynamic response induced by this electromechanical interaction. An electromechanical rotor model is derived on the basis of the Jeffcott rotor with two additional variables for the harmonic currents of the rotor cage. Applying this model, the rotordynamic effects of electromechanical interaction were studied. Three induction motors were used in the numerical examples. The electromechanical parameters of these motors were estimated from the numerical simulations carried out separately. The results obtained show that the electromechanical interaction may decrease the natural frequencies of the rotor, induce additional damping or cause rotordynamic instability. These interaction effects are most significant in motors operating at or near the first bending critical speed. Excluding the potential rotordynamic instability, the numerical results indicate that the electromechanical interaction reduces effectively the unbalance response close to the first bending critical speed.

  9. Protection characteristics of a Faraday cage compromised by lightning burnthrough.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warne, Larry Kevin; Bystrom, Edward; Jorgenson, Roy Eberhardt; Montoya, Sandra L.; Merewether, Kimball O.; Coats, Rebecca Sue; Martinez, Leonard E.; Jojola, John M.

    2012-01-01

    A lightning flash consists of multiple, high-amplitude but short duration return strokes. Between the return strokes is a lower amplitude, continuing current which flows for longer duration. If the walls of a Faraday cage are made of thin enough metal, the continuing current can melt a hole through the metal in a process called burnthrough. A subsequent return stroke can couple energy through this newly-formed hole. This LDRD is a study of the protection provided by a Faraday cage when it has been compromised by burnthrough. We initially repeated some previous experiments and expanded on them in terms of scope and diagnostics to form a knowledge baseline of the coupling phenomena. We then used a combination of experiment, analysis and numerical modeling to study four coupling mechanisms: indirect electric field coupling, indirect magnetic field coupling, conduction through plasma and breakdown through the hole. We discovered voltages higher than those encountered in the previous set of experiments (on the order of several hundreds of volts).

  10. Radiochemical synthesis and photochemical properites of the uncoupler 2-azido-4-nitrophenol, a versatile photoaffinity labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanstein, W.G.; Hatefi, Y.; Kiefer, H.

    1979-03-20

    2-Amino-4-nitrophenol was tritiated in an acid catalyzed hydrogen exchange reaction. Radioactive 2-azido-4-nitrophenol with a specific radioactivity up to 21 mCi/mmol was synthesized from 2-amino-4-nitrophenol by diazotization and azide coupling. The photochemical properties of the uncoupler, 2-azido-4-nitrophenol, were studied as free solute and as ligand bound to uncoupler binding sites in bovine serum albumin and mitochondria. Based on product analyses, irradiation of free or bound 2-azido-4-nitrophenolate with visible light results in the formation of nitrene intermediates with a singlet to triplet ratio of 6:1 to 9:1. 2-Azido-4-nitrophenolate and bovine serum albumin form a strong 1:1 complex (K/sub D/ = 0.7 ..mu..M) which can be converted into a photoproduct with a covalent bond between the label and the protein. The acid dissociation constant of the protein-bound 2-amino-4-nitrophenol moiely is strongly pH dependent. Photoaffinity labeling of mitochondria by 2-azido-4-nitrophenolate follows a pattern expected from equilibrium binding studies using normal and lipid-depleted particles: polypeptides were found to bear 90 to 95% of the radioactive label, and 5 to 10% of the latter was bound to phospholipids. Two polypeptides (approximately 56,000 and 31,000 daltons) were associated with 60% of the label, indicating a high degree of specific photochemical labeling.

  11. Explicit thin-lens solution for an arbitrary four by four uncoupled beam transfer matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balandin, V. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Orlov, S. [Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation). Faculty of Computational Mathematics and Cybernetics

    2011-10-15

    In the design of beam transport lines one often meets the problem of constructing a quadrupole lens system that will produce desired transfer matrices in both the horizontal and vertical planes. Nowadays this problem is typically approached with the help of computer routines, but searching for the numerical solution one has to remember that it is not proven yet that an arbitrary four by four uncoupled beam transfer matrix can be represented by using a finite number of drifts and quadrupoles (representation problem) and the answer to this questions is not known not only for more or less realistic quadrupole field models but also for the both most commonly used approximations of quadrupole focusing, namely thick and thin quadrupole lenses. In this paper we make a step forward in resolving the representation problem and, by giving an explicit solution, we prove that an arbitrary four by four uncoupled beam transfer matrix actually can be obtained as a product of a finite number of thin-lenses and drifts. (orig.)

  12. Dynamics of energy charge and adenine nucleotides during uncoupling of catabolism and anabolism in Penicillium ochrochloron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrabl, Pamela; Mutschlechner, Wolfgang; Burgstaller, Wolfgang

    2009-12-01

    Filamentous fungi are able to spill energy when exposed to energy excess by uncoupling catabolism from anabolism, e.g. via overflow metabolism. In current study we tested the hypothesis that overflow metabolism is regulated via the energetic status of the hyphae (i.e. energy charge, ATP concentration). This hypothesis was studied in Penicillium ochrochloron during the steady state of glucose- or ammonium-limited chemostat cultures as well as during three transient states ((i) glucose pulse to a glucose-limited chemostat, (ii) shift from glucose-limited to ammonium-limited conditions in a chemostat, and (iii) ammonium exhaustion in batch culture). Organic acids were excreted under all conditions, even during exponential growth in batch culture as well as under glucose-limited conditions in a chemostat. Partial uncoupling of catabolism and anabolism via overflow metabolism was thus constitutively present. Under all tested conditions, overflow metabolism was independent of the energy charge or the ATP concentration of the hyphae. There was a reciprocal correlation between glucose uptake rate and intracellular adenine nucleotide content. During all transients states a rapid decrease in energy charge and the concentrations of nucleotides was observed shortly after a change in glycolytic flux ("ATP paradoxon"). A possible connection between the change in adenine nucleotide concentrations and the purine salvage pathway is discussed.

  13. Protons Trigger Mitochondrial Flashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xianhua; Zhang, Xing; Huang, Zhanglong; Wu, Di; Liu, Beibei; Zhang, Rufeng; Yin, Rongkang; Hou, Tingting; Jian, Chongshu; Xu, Jiejia; Zhao, Yan; Wang, Yanru; Gao, Feng; Cheng, Heping

    2016-07-26

    Emerging evidence indicates that mitochondrial flashes (mitoflashes) are highly conserved elemental mitochondrial signaling events. However, which signal controls their ignition and how they are integrated with other mitochondrial signals and functions remain elusive. In this study, we aimed to further delineate the signal components of the mitoflash and determine the mitoflash trigger mechanism. Using multiple biosensors and chemical probes as well as label-free autofluorescence, we found that the mitoflash reflects chemical and electrical excitation at the single-organelle level, comprising bursting superoxide production, oxidative redox shift, and matrix alkalinization as well as transient membrane depolarization. Both electroneutral H(+)/K(+) or H(+)/Na(+) antiport and matrix proton uncaging elicited immediate and robust mitoflash responses over a broad dynamic range in cardiomyocytes and HeLa cells. However, charge-uncompensated proton transport, which depolarizes mitochondria, caused the opposite effect, and steady matrix acidification mildly inhibited mitoflashes. Based on a numerical simulation, we estimated a mean proton lifetime of 1.42 ns and diffusion distance of 2.06 nm in the matrix. We conclude that nanodomain protons act as a novel, to our knowledge, trigger of mitoflashes in energized mitochondria. This finding suggests that mitoflash genesis is functionally and mechanistically integrated with mitochondrial energy metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mitochondrial mutations in cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brandon, M; Baldi, P; Wallace, D C

    2006-01-01

    ...). The mitochondria are assembled from both nuclear DNA (nDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes. The mtDNA codes for 37 genes essential of OXPHOS, is present in thousands of copies per cell, and has a very high mutations rate...

  15. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Gliomas

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Katsetos, C.D.; Anni, H.; Dráber, Pavel

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 3 (2013), s. 216-227 ISSN 1071-9091 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12050 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : gliomas * mitochondrial dysfunction * microtubule proteins Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.883, year: 2013

  16. Mitochondrial diseases: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Jarovsky

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are organelles responsible for production of mostenergy through oxidative phosphorylation process (OXPHOS. Itcontains a double strand DNA (mitDNA of about 16,500 bp encodingtwo ribosomal RNAs and 37 mitochondrial proteins. Mutation inmitDNA may result in multisystem syndromes known asmitochondrial diseases, affecting predominantly tissues thatrequire high levels of ATP such as skeletal muscle (mitochondrialmyopathies, brain (e.g. MELAS, MERRF, LHON e NARP, liver,kidney (Fanconi syndrome, heart and endocrine glands (Pearsonsyndrome. A case of mitochondrial disease was first reported in1962 and correlation of such disease with mutations in mitDNAgained scientific importance in late 1980’s. There are 150 alterationsreported in mitDNA capable of producing metabolic dysfunctionsof clinical relevance. To date, no standard protocol for diagnosis ofmitochondrial diseases has been established, partially due to thewide amplitude of clinical manifestation generally observed. Acombined analysis of clinical data, biochemical, morphologicaland laboratory tests must be performed to evaluate mitochondrialrespiratory chain activity and integrity of nuclear and mitochondrialgenomes. Currently, there are no effective treatments availablefor mitochondrial diseases, but only palliative therapeutics usingconventional strategies to relieve symptoms. Thus, gene therapyemerges as potential therapeutic strategy for more efficienttreatment of mitochondrial diseases.

  17. PSD-95 uncoupling from NMDA receptors by Tat-N-dimer ameliorates neuronal depolarisation in cortical spreading depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kucharz, Krzysztof; Søndergaard Rasmussen, Ida; Bach, Anders

    2017-01-01

    , UCCB01-144 (Tat-N-dimer) ameliorates the persistent effects of cortical spreading depression on cortical function. Using in vivo two-photon microscopy in somatosensory cortex in mice, we show that fluorescently labelled Tat-N-dimer readily crosses blood-brain barrier and accumulates in nerve cells...... depression on cortical blood flow and CMRO2 We suggest that uncoupling of PSD-95 from NMDA receptors reduces overall neuronal excitability and the amplitude of the spreading depolarisation wave. These findings may be of interest for understanding the neuroprotective effects of the nNOS/PSD-95 uncoupling...

  18. Sulfide-inhibition of mitochondrial respiration at very low oxygen concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matallo, J; Vogt, J; McCook, O; Wachter, U; Tillmans, F; Groeger, M; Szabo, C; Georgieff, M; Radermacher, P; Calzia, E

    2014-09-15

    Our aim was to study the ability of an immortalized cell line (AMJ2-C11) to sustain aerobic cell respiration at decreasing oxygen concentrations under continuous sulfide exposure. We assumed that the rate of elimination of sulfide through the pathway linked to the mitochondrial respiratory chain and therefore operating under aerobic conditions, should decrease with limiting oxygen concentrations. Thus, sulfide's inhibition of cellular respiration would occur faster under continuous sulfide exposure when the oxygen concentration is in the very low range. The experiments were performed with an O2K-oxygraph (Oroboros Instruments) by suspending 0.5-1×10(6) cells in 2 ml of continuously stirred respiration medium at 37 °C and calculating the oxygen flux (JO2) as the negative derivative of the oxygen concentration in the medium. The cells were studied in two different metabolic states, namely under normal physiologic respiration (1) and after uncoupling of mitochondrial respiration (2). Oxygen concentration was controlled by means of a titration-injection pump, resulting in average concentration values of 0.73±0.05 μM, 3.1±0.2 μM, and 6.2±0.2 μM. Simultaneously we injected a 2 mM Na2S solution at a continuous rate of 10 μl/s in order to quantify the titration-time required to reduce the JO2 to 50% of the initial respiratory activity. Under the lowest oxygen concentration this effect was achieved after 3.5 [0.3;3.5] and 11.7 [6.2;21.2]min in the uncoupled and coupled state, respectively. This time was statistically significantly shorter when compared to the intermediate and the highest O2 concentrations tested, which yielded values of 24.6 [15.5;28.1]min (coupled) and 35.9 [27.4;59.2]min (uncoupled), as well as 42.4 [27.5;42.4]min (coupled) and 51.5 [46.4;51.7]min (uncoupled). All data are medians [25%, and 75% percentiles]. Our results confirm that the onset of inhibition of cell respiration by sulfide occurs earlier under a continuous exposure when approaching

  19. Bisphenol A is released from used polycarbonate animal cages into water at room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howdeshell, Kembra L.; Peterman, Paul H.; Judy, Barbara M.; Taylor, Julia A.; Orazio, Carl E.; Ruhlen, Rachel L.; vom Saal, Frederick S.; Welshons, Wade V.

    2003-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a monomer with estrogenic activity that is used in the production of food packaging, dental sealants, polycarbonate plastic, and many other products. The monomer has previously been reported to hydrolyze and leach from these products under high heat and alkaline conditions, and the amount of leaching increases as a function of use. We examined whether new and used polycarbonate animal cages passively release bioactive levels of BPA into water at room temperature and neutral pH. Purified water was incubated at room temperature in new polycarbonate and polysulfone cages and used (discolored) polycarbonate cages, as well as control (glass and used polypropylene) containers. The resulting water samples were characterized with gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and tested for estrogenic activity using an MCF-7 human breast cancer cell proliferation assay. Significant estrogenic activity, identifiable as BPA by GC/MS (up to 310 micro g/L), was released from used polycarbonate animal cages. Detectable levels of BPA were released from new polycarbonate cages (up to 0.3 micro g/L) as well as new polysulfone cages (1.5 micro g/L), whereas no BPA was detected in water incubated in glass and used polypropylene cages. Finally, BPA exposure as a result of being housed in used polycarbonate cages produced a 16% increase in uterine weight in prepubertal female mice relative to females housed in used polypropylene cages, although the difference was not statistically significant. Our findings suggest that laboratory animals maintained in polycarbonate and polysulfone cages are exposed to BPA via leaching, with exposure reaching the highest levels in old cages.

  20. Risk factors for cage retropulsion after posterior lumbar interbody fusion: analysis of 1070 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hiroaki; Shikata, Jitsuhiko; Odate, Seiichi; Soeda, Tsunemitsu; Yamamura, Satoru

    2012-06-01

    Single-center retrospective study. We examined the risk factors for cage retropulsion after posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) performed for patients with degenerative lumbar spinal diseases. Although PLIF is a widely accepted procedure, problems remain regarding perioperative and postoperative complications. There are few reported studies identifying specific risk factors for cage retropulsion, one of the implant-related complications after PLIF, although several case reports have been published. Between April 2006 and July 2010, 1070 patients with various degenerative lumbar spinal diseases underwent single- or multilevel PLIF combined with posterolateral fusion, using posterior pedicle screw fixation and box-type cages. Their medical records and preoperative radiographs were reviewed and the factors influencing the incidence of cage retropulsion were analyzed. There were 9 cases of cage retropulsion (7 men and 2 women; mean age, 68.2 yr), and it developed within 2 months after surgery in all cases. Five patients had low back pain or leg pain, 3 of whom required revision surgery. The mean fusion level was 3.9 (range, 2-5); in 6 of the 9 patients, the cage had migrated at L5/S, 2 at L4/5, and 1 at L3/4. All of the cages were inserted at the end disc level of multilevel fusion procedures. The disc heights and ranges of motion were significantly greater in patients with cage retropulsion, and patients with a pear-shaped disc space also showed a higher rate of cage retropulsion. These results indicate that PLIF at L5/S, a wide disc space with instability, multilevel fusion surgery, and a pear-shaped disc space on lateral radiographs are risk factors for cage retropulsion. The identification of these risk factors should allow us to avoid this complication, and the use of expandable cages is an effective option for such cases.

  1. High fat diet induces dysregulation of hepatic oxygen gradients and mitochondrial function in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantena, Sudheer K; Vaughn, Denty Paul; Andringa, Kelly K; Eccleston, Heather B; King, Adrienne L; Abrams, Gary A; Doeller, Jeannette E; Kraus, David W; Darley-Usmar, Victor M; Bailey, Shannon M

    2009-01-01

    NAFLD (non-alcoholic fatty liver disease), associated with obesity and the cardiometabolic syndrome, is an important medical problem affecting up to 20% of western populations. Evidence indicates that mitochondrial dysfunction plays a critical role in NAFLD initiation and progression to the more serious condition of NASH (non-alcoholic steatohepatitis). Herein we hypothesize that mitochondrial defects induced by exposure to a HFD (high fat diet) contribute to a hypoxic state in liver and this is associated with increased protein modification by RNS (reactive nitrogen species). To test this concept, C57BL/6 mice were pair-fed a control diet and HFD containing 35% and 71% total calories (1 cal approximately 4.184 J) from fat respectively, for 8 or 16 weeks and liver hypoxia, mitochondrial bioenergetics, NO (nitric oxide)-dependent control of respiration, and 3-NT (3-nitrotyrosine), a marker of protein modification by RNS, were examined. Feeding a HFD for 16 weeks induced NASH-like pathology accompanied by elevated triacylglycerols, increased CYP2E1 (cytochrome P450 2E1) and iNOS (inducible nitric oxide synthase) protein, and significantly enhanced hypoxia in the pericentral region of the liver. Mitochondria from the HFD group showed increased sensitivity to NO-dependent inhibition of respiration compared with controls. In addition, accumulation of 3-NT paralleled the hypoxia gradient in vivo and 3-NT levels were increased in mitochondrial proteins. Liver mitochondria from mice fed the HFD for 16 weeks exhibited depressed state 3 respiration, uncoupled respiration, cytochrome c oxidase activity, and mitochondrial membrane potential. These findings indicate that chronic exposure to a HFD negatively affects the bioenergetics of liver mitochondria and this probably contributes to hypoxic stress and deleterious NO-dependent modification of mitochondrial proteins.

  2. Structure–activity relationships for perfluoroalkane-induced in vitro interference with rat liver mitochondrial respiration✩

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, K.B.; Kissling, G.E.; Melnick, R.L.; Blystone, C.R.

    2014-01-01

    Perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs) represent a broad class of commercial products designed primarily for the coatings industry. However, detection of residues globally in a variety of species led to the discontinuation of production in the U.S. Although PFAAs cause activation of the PPARα and CAR nuclear receptors, interference with mitochondrial bioenergetics has been implicated as an alternative mechanism of cytotoxicity. Although the mechanisms by which the eight carbon chain PFAAs interfere with mitochondrial bioenergetics are fairly well described, the activities of the more highly substituted or shorter chain PFAAs are far less well characterized. The current investigation was designed to explore structure–activity relationships by which PFAAs interfere with mitochondrial respiration in vitro. Freshly isolated rat liver mitochondria were incubated with one of 16 different PFAAs, including perfluorinated carboxylic, acetic, and sulfonic acids, sulfonamides and sulfamido acetates, and alcohols. The effect on mitochondrial respiration was measured at five concentrations and dose–response curves were generated to describe the effects on state 3 and 4 respiration and respiratory control. With the exception of PFOS, all PFAAs at sufficiently high concentrations (>20 μM) stimulated state 4 and inhibited state 3 respiration. Stimulation of state 4 respiration was most pronounced for the carboxylic acids and the sulfonamides, which supports prior evidence that the perfluorinated carboxylic and acetic acids induce the mitochondrial permeability transition, whereas the sulfonamides are protonophoric uncouplers of oxidative phosphorylation. In both cases, potency increased with increasing carbon number, with a prominent inflection point between the six and eight carbon congeners. The results provide a foundation for classifying PFAAs according to specific modes of mitochondrial activity and, in combination with toxicokinetic considerations, establishing structure

  3. Propofol affinity to mitochondrial membranes does not alter mitochondrial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Félix, Luís M; Correia, Fernando; Pinto, Pedro A; Campos, Sónia P; Fernandes, Telma; Videira, Romeu; Oliveira, M M; Peixoto, Francisco P; Antunes, Luís M

    2017-05-15

    The molecular mechanisms of hepatotoxicity after propofol anaesthesia have not been fully elucidated, although there is a relation with mitochondrial dysfunction. The action of propofol on mitochondrial hepatic functions in a rat model was evaluated by infusion for 4h with 25 and 62.5mg/kg/h propofol or 3.125ml/kg/h (vehicle). Liver mitochondrial respiratory rates were evaluated as well as mitochondrial transmembrane potential (ΔΨ), calcium fluxes, mitochondrial enzymatic activities (Complex I-V) and oxidative stress biomarkers (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione reductase, glutathione S-transferase, lipid peroxidation and the oxidised/reduced glutathione ratio). Biophysical interactions with membrane models were also performed. The mitochondrial transmembrane potential was decreased and the opening time of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore was slightly reduced for the highest dose. The activity of complex II was stimulated by propofol, which also causes fluctuations on some respiratory parameters, whereas the antioxidant system was affected in a nonspecific manner. Fluorescence quenching studies suggested that propofol is preferably located in deeper regions of the bilayer and has a high affinity to mitochondrial membranes. It is suggested that propofol interacts with liver mitochondrial membranes with mild modification in mitochondrial function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Environmental enrichment reduces signs of boredom in caged mink.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca K Meagher

    Full Text Available Animals housed in impoverished cages are often labelled 'bored'. They have also been called 'apathetic' or 'depressed', particularly when profoundly inactive. However, these terms are rarely operationally defined and validated. As a negative state caused by under-stimulation, boredom should increase interest in stimuli of all kinds. Apathy (lack of interest, by contrast, should manifest as decreased interest in all stimuli, while anhedonia (loss of pleasure, a depressive symptom should specifically decrease interest in normally rewarding stimuli. We tested the hypotheses that mink, a model carnivore, experience more boredom, depression-like apathy, or anhedonia in non-enriched (NE cages than in complex, enriched (E cages. We exposed 29 subjects (13 E, 16 NE to ten stimuli categorized a priori as aversive (e.g. air puffs, rewarding (e.g. evoking chasing or ambiguous/neutral (e.g. candles. Interest in stimuli was assessed via latencies to contact, contact durations, and durations oriented to stimuli. NE mink contacted all stimuli faster (P = 0.003 than E mink, and spent longer oriented to/in contact with them, albeit only significantly so for ambiguous ones (treatment*type P<0.013. With stimulus category removed from statistical models, interest in all stimuli was consistently higher among NE mink (P<0.0001 for all measures. NE mink also consumed more food rewards (P = 0.037. Finally, we investigated whether lying down while awake and stereotypic behaviour (both increased by NE housing predicted these responses. Lying awake positively co-varied with certain measures of increased exploration. In contrast, stereotypic 'scrabbling' or locomotion (e.g. pacing did not. Overall, NE mink showed no evidence of apathy or depression, but instead a heightened investigation of diverse stimuli consistent with boredom. This state was potentially indicated by spending much time lying still but awake (although this result requires replication. Boredom can

  5. Effect of cage tier and age on performance, egg quality and stress ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of cage tier and age on performance characteristics of layer hybrids, egg quality and some stress parameters. Ninety laying hens (hybrid ATAK-S) of similar bodyweights were used in the experiment. They were housed in three-tier conventional battery cages (bottom, ...

  6. Effects of housing system (outdoor vs cages) and age of laying hens on egg characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, van den H.; Parmentier, H.K.; Kemp, B.

    2004-01-01

    1. Effects of two housing systems (cages vs outdoor) on external and internal egg characteristics were investigated. 2. In total 785 eggs from three different lines in cages and 268 eggs from outdoor-housed layers were examined for egg weight, albumen, yolk and shell content, albumen height and pH,

  7. International standardization of cage designs and feeding regimes for honey bee in vitro experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    The aim of this study was to improve and standardize cage systems for maintaining adult honey bee workers under in vitro laboratory conditions. To achieve this goal, we experimentally evaluated the impact of different cages, developed by scientists of the international research network COLOSS (Preve...

  8. Improving aeration for efficient oxygenation in sea bass sea cages. Blood, brain and gill histology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berillis Panagiotis

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available An air diffusion based system (Airx was developed to control the dissolved oxygen levels in aquaculture sea cages. The system was introduced and then tested for 37 days in a sea bass sea cage (aerated cage. A second sea bass sea cage, without the AirX, was used as a control. Oxygen levels were measured in both cages at the start of the trial, before the AirX system was introduced, and during the working period of the AirX system. Fish samples were collected 15 days after the AirX system was introduced and at the end of the experiment. Blood smears were prepared and examined microscopically. Erythrocyte major axis, minor axis and area of fish erythrocytes were measured. Leucocyte differentiation was also examined. In the control cage, the fish had significantly larger red blood cells when compared with the red blood cells of the fish in the aerated cage. Histological examination of the gills and brain revealed no morphological differences or alterations between the two groups of fish. This study demonstrated that an air diffuser system could improve the water quality of fish farmed in sea cages and enhance sea bass physiological performance, especially if DO levels fall below 60% oxygen saturation.

  9. Validity of the CAGE in Screening for Problem Drinking in College Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heck, Edward J.; Lichtenberg, James W.

    1990-01-01

    Examined the ability of CAGE, an established screening test for alcoholism, to identify accurately problem drinkers among college students (N=582). Found that the CAGE did not perform well enough to serve as a screening tool for problem drinking within the college student population. (Author/ABL)

  10. Forced Hot Air to Dry Feces and Kill Bacteria on Transport Cage Flooring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Due to fecal shedding from positive birds, broiler transport cages can be contaminated with human bacterial pathogens leading to cross contamination of previously negative broilers during live haul. Earlier work has shown that drying soiled or washed cages for 24 to 48 hours can lower or even elimi...

  11. Development of an integrated CAD-FEA system for patient-specific design of spinal cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingzheng; Pu, Fang; Xu, Liqiang; Zhang, Linlin; Liang, Hang; Li, Deyu; Wang, Yu; Fan, Yubo

    2017-03-01

    Spinal cages are used to create a suitable mechanical environment for interbody fusion in cases of degenerative spinal instability. Due to individual variations in bone structures and pathological conditions, patient-specific cages can provide optimal biomechanical conditions for fusion, strengthening patient recovery. Finite element analysis (FEA) is a valuable tool in the biomechanical evaluation of patient-specific cage designs, but the time- and labor-intensive process of modeling limits its clinical application. In an effort to facilitate the design and analysis of patient-specific spinal cages, an integrated CAD-FEA system (CASCaDeS, comprehensive analytical spinal cage design system) was developed. This system produces a biomechanical-based patient-specific design of spinal cages and is capable of rapid implementation of finite element modeling. By comparison with commercial software, this system was validated and proven to be both accurate and efficient. CASCaDeS can be used to design patient-specific cages with a superior biomechanical performance to commercial spinal cages.

  12. The Effects of Caging on the Colonization of Fouling Organisms in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of caging on the colonization and development of the fouling community in the upper Bonny estuary was studied. The experimental design was such that sets of wooden panels (20x20 cm) were screened with cages constructed with plastic netting while another set was left uncaged. Both sets of panels were ...

  13. Recombinant expression and purification of 'virus-like' bacterial encapsulin protein cages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rurup, W.F.; Cornelissen, Jeroen Johannes Lambertus Maria; Koay, M.S.T.; Orner, Brendan P.

    2014-01-01

    Ultracentrifugation, particularly the use of sucrose or cesium chloride density gradients, is a highly reliable and efficient technique for the purification of virus-like particles and protein cages. Since virus-like particles and protein cages have a unique size compared to cellular macromolecules

  14. Sterilization and strength of 70/30 polylactide cages: e-beam versus ethylene oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, Theo H.; Thomas, Kevin A.; Hoogendoorn, Roel J. W.; Strijkers, Gustav J.; Helder, Marco N.; Wuisman, Paul I. J. M.

    2007-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo studies on the degradation of 70/30 poly(L,DL-lactide) (PLDLLA) cages. To evaluate the effect of e-beam and ethylene oxide sterilization on degradation and strength. e-beam-sterilized PLDLLA cages were shown to maintain mechanical strength for at least 6 months during

  15. Design and synthesis of novel bis-annulated caged polycycles via ring-closing metathesis: pushpakenediol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambasivarao Kotha

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Intricate caged molecular frameworks are assembled by an atom economical process via a Diels–Alder (DA reaction, a Claisen rearrangement, a ring-closing metathesis (RCM and an alkenyl Grignard addition. The introduction of olefinic moieties in the pentacycloundecane (PCUD framework at appropriate positions followed by RCM led to the formation of novel heptacyclic cage systems.

  16. Genome-wide detection and analysis of hippocampus core promoters using DeepCAGE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valen, Eivind; Pascarella, Giovanni; Chalk, Alistair

    2009-01-01

    in a given tissue. Here, we present a new method for high-throughput sequencing of 5' cDNA tags-DeepCAGE: merging the Cap Analysis of Gene Expression method with ultra-high-throughput sequence technology. We apply DeepCAGE to characterize 1.4 million sequenced TSS from mouse hippocampus and reveal a wealth...

  17. Recombinant expression and purification of 'virus-like' bacterial encapsulin protein cages

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rurup, W.F.; Cornelissen, Jeroen Johannes Lambertus Maria; Koay, M.S.T.; Orner, Brendan P.

    2015-01-01

    Ultracentrifugation, particularly the use of sucrose or cesium chloride density gradients, is a highly reliable and efficient technique for the purification of virus-like particles and protein cages. Since virus-like particles and protein cages have a unique size compared to cellular macromolecules

  18. Self-Assembly, Guest Capture, and NMR Spectroscopy of a Metal-Organic Cage in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Go, Eun Bin; Srisuknimit, Veerasak; Cheng, Stephanie L.; Vosburg, David A.

    2016-01-01

    A green organic-inorganic laboratory experiment has been developed in which students prepare a self-assembling iron cage in D[subscript 2]O at room temperature. The tetrahedral cage captures a small, neutral molecule such as cyclohexane or tetrahydrofuran. [Superscript 1]H NMR analysis distinguishes captured and free guests through diagnostic…

  19. Hexokinase II acts through UCP3 to suppress mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and maintain aerobic respiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Dumouchel, Tyler; Aguer, Céline; deKemp, Rob; Beanlands, Rob; Harper, Mary-Ellen

    2011-07-15

    UCP3 (uncoupling protein-3) mitigates mitochondrial ROS (reactive oxygen species) production, but the mechanisms are poorly understood. Previous studies have also examined UCP3 effects, including decreased ROS production, during metabolic states when fatty acid oxidation is high (e.g. a fasting state). However, the role of UCP3 when carbohydrate oxidation is high (e.g. fed state) has remained largely unexplored. In the present study, we show that mitochondrial-bound HK (hexokinase) II curtails oxidative stress and enhances aerobic metabolism of glucose in the fed state in a UCP3-dependent manner. Genetic knockout or inhibition of UCP3 significantly decreased mitochondrial-bound HKII. Furthermore, UCP3 was required for the HKII-mediated decrease in mitochondrial ROS emission. Intriguingly, the UCP3-mediated modulation of mitochondria-associated HKII was only observed in cells cultured under high-glucose conditions. UCP3 was required to maintain high rates of aerobic metabolism in high-glucose-treated cells and in muscle of fed mice. Deficiency in UCP3 resulted in a metabolic shift that favoured anaerobic glycolytic metabolism, increased glucose uptake and increased sensitivity to oxidative challenge. PET (positron emission tomography) of [18F]fluoro-deoxyglucose uptake confirmed these findings in UCP3-knockout and wild-type mice. Collectively, our findings link the anti-oxidative and metabolic functions of UCP3 through a surprising molecular connection with mitochondrial-bound HKII.

  20. Increased mitochondrial mass in cells with functionally compromised mitochondria after exposure to both direct gamma radiation and bystander factors.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nugent, Sharon M E

    2007-07-01

    The bystander effect describes radiation-like damage in unirradiated cells either in the vicinity of irradiated cells or exposed to medium from irradiated cells. This study aimed to further characterize the poorly understood mitochondrial response to both direct irradiation and bystander factor(s) in human keratinocytes (HPV-G) and Chinese hamster ovarian cells (CHO-K1). Oxygen consumption rates were determined during periods of state 4, state 3 and uncoupled respiration. Mitochondrial mass was determined using MitoTracker FM. CHO-K1 cells showed significantly reduced oxygen consumption rates 4 h after exposure to 5 Gy direct radiation and irradiated cell conditioned medium (ICCM) and an apparent recovery 12-24 h later. The apparent recovery was likely due to the substantial increase in mitochondrial mass observed in these cells as soon as 4 h after exposure. HPV-G cells, on the other hand, showed a sustained increase in oxygen consumption rates after ICCM exposure and a transient increase 4 h after exposure to 5 Gy direct radiation. A significant increase in mitochondrial mass per HPV-G cell was observed after exposure to both direct radiation and ICCM. These findings are indicative of a stress response to mitochondrial dysfunction that increases the number of mitochondria per cell.

  1. Preventing mitochondrial fission impairs mitochondrial function and leads to loss of mitochondrial DNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe A Parone

    Full Text Available Mitochondria form a highly dynamic tubular network, the morphology of which is regulated by frequent fission and fusion events. However, the role of mitochondrial fission in homeostasis of the organelle is still unknown. Here we report that preventing mitochondrial fission, by down-regulating expression of Drp1 in mammalian cells leads to a loss of mitochondrial DNA and a decrease of mitochondrial respiration coupled to an increase in the levels of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS. At the cellular level, mitochondrial dysfunction resulting from the lack of fission leads to a drop in the levels of cellular ATP, an inhibition of cell proliferation and an increase in autophagy. In conclusion, we propose that mitochondrial fission is required for preservation of mitochondrial function and thereby for maintenance of cellular homeostasis.

  2. Oxidase uncoupling in heme monooxygenases: Human cytochrome P450 CYP3A4 in Nanodiscs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grinkova, Yelena V.; Denisov, Ilia G.; McLean, Mark A. [Departments of Biochemistry and Chemistry, University of Illinois, 505 South Goodwin Avenue (United States); Sligar, Stephen G., E-mail: s-sligar@illinois.edu [Departments of Biochemistry and Chemistry, University of Illinois, 505 South Goodwin Avenue (United States)

    2013-01-25

    Highlights: ► Substantial reducing equivalents are lost in human P450 CYP3A4 via an oxidase channel. ► Substrate binding has a pronounced effect on uncoupling in cytochrome P450. ► Anionic phospholipids improve the overall coupling in CYP3A4 Nanodiscs. -- Abstract: The normal reaction mechanism of cytochrome P450 operates by utilizing two reducing equivalents to reduce atmospheric dioxygen, producing one molecule of water and an oxygenated product in an overall stoichiometry of 2 electrons:1 dioxygen:1 product. However, three alternate unproductive pathways exist where the intermediate iron–oxygen states in the catalytic cycle can yield reduced oxygen products without substrate metabolism. The first involves release of superoxide from the oxygenated intermediate while the second occurs after input of the second reducing equivalent. Superoxide rapidly dismutates and hence both processes produce hydrogen peroxide that can be cytotoxic to the organism. In both cases, the formation of hydrogen peroxide involves the same overall stoichiometry as oxygenases catalysis. The key step in the catalytic cycle of cytochrome P450 involves scission of the oxygen–oxygen bond of atmospheric dioxygen to produce a higher valent iron-oxo state termed “Compound I”. This intermediate initiates a radical reaction in the oxygenase pathway but also can uptake two additional reducing equivalents from reduced pyridine nucleotide (NADPH) and the flavoprotein reductase to produce a second molecule of water. This non-productive decay of Compound I thus yields an overall oxygen to NADPH ratio of 1:2 and does not produce hydrocarbon oxidation. This water uncoupling reaction provides one of a limited means to study the reactivity of the critical Compound I intermediate in P450 catalysis. We measured simultaneously the rates of NADPH and oxygen consumption as a function of substrate concentration during the steady-state hydroxylation of testosterone catalyzed by human P450 CYP3A4

  3. Effects of manual rib cage compressions on expiratory flow and mucus clearance during mechanical ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí, Joan Daniel; Li Bassi, Gianluigi; Rigol, Montserrat; Saucedo, Lina; Ranzani, Otavio Tavares; Esperatti, Mariano; Luque, Nestor; Ferrer, Miquel; Vilaro, Jordi; Kolobow, Theodor; Torres, Antoni

    2013-03-01

    We investigated the effects of two different types of manual rib cage compression on expiratory flow and mucus clearance during prolonged mechanical ventilation in pigs. Prospective randomized animal study. Animal research facility, University of Barcelona, Spain. Nine healthy pigs. Pigs were tracheally intubated, sedated, paralyzed, and mechanically ventilated. The animals were prone on a surgical bed in the anti-Trendelenburg position. The experiments were carried out at approximately 60 and 80 hrs from the beginning of mechanical ventilation. Two types of manual rib cage compressions were tested: Hard and brief rib cage compressions synchronized with early expiratory phase (hard manual rib cage compression) and soft and gradual rib cage compressions applied during the late expiratory phase (soft manual rib cage compression). The interventions were randomly applied for 15min with a 15-min interval between treatments. Respiratory flow and mucus movement were assessed during the interventions. Respiratory mechanics and hemodynamics were assessed prior to and after the interventions. Peak expiratory flow increased to 60.1±7.1L/min in comparison to 51.2±4.6L/min without treatment (p < 0.0015) and 48.7±4.3L/min with soft manual rib cage compression (p = 0.0002). Similarly, mean expiratory flow increased to 28.4±5.2L/min during hard manual rib cage compression vs. 15.9±2.2 and 16.6±2.8L/min without treatment and soft manual rib cage compression, respectively (p = 0.0006). During hard manual rib cage compression, mucus moved toward the glottis (1.01 ± 2.37mm/min); conversely, mucus moved toward the lungs during no treatment and soft manual rib cage compression, -0.28 ± 0.61 and -0.15±0.95mm/min, respectively (p = 0.0283). Soft manual rib cage compression slightly worsened static lung elastance and cardiac output (p = 0.0391). Hard manual rib cage compression improved mucus clearance in animals positioned in the anti-Trendelenburg position. The technique

  4. Interleukin-15 modulates adipose tissue by altering mitochondrial mass and activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole G Barra

    Full Text Available Interleukin-15 (IL-15 is an immunomodulatory cytokine that affects body mass regulation independent of lymphocytes; however, the underlying mechanism(s involved remains unknown. In an effort to investigate these mechanisms, we performed metabolic cage studies, assessed intestinal bacterial diversity and macronutrient absorption, and examined adipose mitochondrial activity in cultured adipocytes and in lean IL-15 transgenic (IL-15tg, overweight IL-15 deficient (IL-15-/-, and control C57Bl/6 (B6 mice. Here we show that differences in body weight are not the result of differential activity level, food intake, or respiratory exchange ratio. Although intestinal microbiota differences between obese and lean individuals are known to impact macronutrient absorption, differing gut bacteria profiles in these murine strains does not translate to differences in body weight in colonized germ free animals and macronutrient absorption. Due to its contribution to body weight variation, we examined mitochondrial factors and found that IL-15 treatment in cultured adipocytes resulted in increased mitochondrial membrane potential and decreased lipid deposition. Lastly, IL-15tg mice have significantly elevated mitochondrial activity and mass in adipose tissue compared to B6 and IL-15-/- mice. Altogether, these results suggest that IL-15 is involved in adipose tissue regulation and linked to altered mitochondrial function.

  5. Antioxidant treatment normalizes mitochondrial energetics and myocardial insulin sensitivity independently of changes in systemic metabolic homeostasis in a mouse model of the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilkun, Olesya; Wilde, Nicole; Tuinei, Joseph; Pires, Karla M P; Zhu, Yi; Bugger, Heiko; Soto, Jamie; Wayment, Benjamin; Olsen, Curtis; Litwin, Sheldon E; Abel, E Dale

    2015-08-01

    Cardiac dysfunction in obesity is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress and altered insulin sensitivity. Whether oxidative stress directly contributes to myocardial insulin resistance remains to be determined. This study tested the hypothesis that ROS scavenging will improve mitochondrial function and insulin sensitivity in the hearts of rodent models with varying degrees of insulin resistance and hyperglycemia. The catalytic antioxidant MnTBAP was administered to the uncoupling protein-diphtheria toxin A (UCP-DTA) mouse model of insulin resistance (IR) and obesity, at early and late time points in the evolution of IR, and to db/db mice with severe obesity and type-two diabetes. Mitochondrial function was measured in saponin-permeabilized cardiac fibers. Aconitase activity and hydrogen peroxide emission were measured in isolated mitochondria. Insulin-stimulated glucose oxidation, glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation rates were measured in isolated working hearts, and 2-deoxyglucose uptake was measured in isolated cardiomyocytes. Four weeks of MnTBAP attenuated glucose intolerance in 13-week-old UCP-DTA mice but was without effect in 24-week-old UCP-DTA mice and in db/db mice. Despite the absence of improvement in the systemic metabolic milieu, MnTBAP reversed cardiac mitochondrial oxidative stress and improved mitochondrial bioenergetics by increasing ATP generation and reducing mitochondrial uncoupling in all models. MnTBAP also improved myocardial insulin mediated glucose metabolism in 13 and 24-week-old UCP-DTA mice. Pharmacological ROS scavenging improves myocardial energy metabolism and insulin responsiveness in obesity and type 2 diabetes via direct effects that might be independent of changes in systemic metabolism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The effect of cage size on play and aggression between dogs in purpose-bred beagles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bebak, J; Beck, A M

    1993-10-01

    One intent of the proposed changes to USDA 9, CFR Part 3 was to give kennel dogs an opportunity for exercise and play (socialization). Increasing cage size was proposed as a means to encourage exercise and play, thus enhancing the well-being of kennel dogs. Eleven-month-old, female, purpose-bred Beagles, housed four to a cage, were videotaped for 15 hours on 10 different dates, resulting in five videotapes recorded for a smaller cage size and five videotapes recorded for a larger cage size. A total of 40 dogs were videotaped. For each videotape, aggression, play, and distance between dogs were recorded and analyzed. There were no differences in aggression or play, but the dogs did put significantly more distance between themselves in the larger cage.

  7. Parameters estimation of squirrel-cage induction motors using ANN and ANFIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ahmadi Jirdehi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the transient behavior analysis of a squirrel-cage induction motor, the parameters of the single-cage and double-cage models are studied. These parameters are usually hard to obtain. This paper presents two new methods to predict the induction motor parameters in the single-cage and double-cage models based on artificial neural network (ANN and adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS. For this purpose, the experimental data (manufacturer data of 20 induction motors with the different power are used. The experimental data are including of the starting torque and current, maximum torque, full load sleep, efficiency, rated active power and reactive power. The obtained results from the proposed ANN and ANFIS models are compared with each other and with the experimental data, which show a good agreement between the predicted values and the experimental data. But the proposed ANFIS model is more accurate than the proposed ANN model.

  8. Magnetotactic Bacterial Cages as Safe and Smart Gene Delivery Vehicles

    KAUST Repository

    Alsaiari, Shahad K.

    2016-07-27

    In spite of the huge advances in the area of synthetic carriers, their efficiency still poorly compares to natural vectors. Herein, we report the use of unmodified magnetotactic bacteria as a guidable delivery vehicle for DNA functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). High cargo loading is established under anaerobic conditions (bacteria is alive) through endocytosis where AuNPs are employed as transmembrane proteins mimics (facilitate endocytosis) as well as imaging agents to verify and quantify loading and release. The naturally bio-mineralized magnetosomes, within the bacteria, induce heat generation inside bacteria through magnetic hyperthermia. Most importantly after exposing the system to air (bacteria is dead) the cell wall stays intact providing an efficient bacterial vessel. Upon incubation with THP-1 cells, the magnetotactic bacterial cages (MBCs) adhere to the cell wall and are directly engulfed through the phagocytic activity of these cells. Applying magnetic hyperthermia leads to the dissociation of the bacterial microcarrier and eventual release of cargo.

  9. Chemistry and Biology of the Caged Garcinia Xanthones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chantarasriwong, Oraphin; Batova, Ayse; Chavasiri, Warinthorn

    2011-01-01

    Natural products have been a great source of many small molecule drugs for various diseases. In spite of recent advances in biochemical engineering and fermentation technologies that allow us to explore microorganisms and the marine environment as alternative sources of drugs, more than 70% of the current small molecule therapeutics derive their structures from plants used in traditional medicine. Natural-product-based drug discovery relies heavily on advances made in the sciences of biology and chemistry. Whereas biology aims to investigate the mode of action of a natural product, chemistry aims to overcome challenges related to its supply, bioactivity, and target selectivity. This review summarizes the explorations of the caged Garcinia xanthones, a family of plant metabolites that possess a unique chemical structure, potent bioactivities, and a promising pharmacology for drug design and development. PMID:20648491

  10. Performance Analysis of a Brushless Double Fed Cage Induction Generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruencos, F. [WEG S.A., Jaragua do Sul (Brazil); Carlson, R.; Oliveira, A.M.; Kuo-Peng, P.; Sadowski, N. [GRUCAD-UFSC, Florianopolis (Brazil)

    2004-07-01

    This paper analyses design and performance aspects of a brushless double fed cage induction generator as an economic and technical alternative to the classical wound rotor induction generator used in wind power generation. It focuses firstly on the machine operational characteristics and main design criteria and secondly on steady state and dynamic analytical and numerical models for efficient prediction of machine behavior. The analytical dynamic model is obtained by transforming the equations written in machine variables into equations written in an arbitrary reference frame. In the finite element approach the electrical machine is modeled in a 2D domain, using the Maxwell equations to formulate the field behavior and the FE method to discretize the domain of study. A prototype was built and tested to validate the simulation models and to verify the design criteria.

  11. Cage Versus Noncage Laying-Hen Housings: Respiratory Exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arteaga, Veronica; Mitchell, Diane; Armitage, Tracey; Tancredi, Daniel; Schenker, Marc; Mitloehner, Frank

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the personal respiratory exposures of poultry workers in three different types of layer housing under commercial production conditions. Workers were randomly assigned to each of conventional cage, enriched cage, and aviary barns in a crossover repeated-measures design for three observation periods over the hens' lifetime. Inhalable and fine particulate matter (PM) and endotoxin in both size fractions were assessed by personal and area samplers over the work shift. Concentrations of inhalable PM, PM2.5 (PM with an aerodynamic diameter <2.5 μm), and endotoxin in both size fractions were higher in aviary than either the conventional or enriched barns. Geometric means (95% confidence intervals [CIs]) of inhalable PM and endotoxin for the aviary, conventional, and enriched barns were 8.9 (6.8-11.5) mg/m(3) and 7517.9 (5403.2-10,460.2) EU/m(3), 3.7 (2.8-4.8) mg/m(3) and 1655.7 (1144.6-2395.2) EU/m(3), 2.4 (1.8-3.3) mg/m(3) and 1404.8 (983.3-2007.0) EU/m(3), respectively. Area samplers recorded a lower mean inhalable PM concentration and higher PM2.5 concentration than personal samplers. Ammonia concentrations were low throughout three monitoring seasons. These findings show that the aviary barns pose higher respiratory exposures to poultry workers than either conventional or enriched barns.

  12. Cationic P-S-X cages (X=Br, I).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonsior, Marcin; Krossing, Ingo; Matern, Eberhard

    2006-02-08

    The first condensed-phase preparation of ternary P-Ch-X cations (Ch=O-Te, X=F-I) is reported: [P5S3X2]+, [P5S2X2]+, and [P4S4X]+ (X=Br, I). [P5S3X2]+ is formed from the reaction of the Ag+/PX3 reagent with P4S3. The [P5S3X2]+ ions have a structure that is related to P4S5 by replacing P=S by P+--X and S in the four-membered ring by P(X). We provide evidence that the active ingredient of the Ag+/PX3 reagent is the (H2CCl2)Ag-X-PX2+ cation. The latter likely reacts with the HOMO of P4S3 in a concerted HOMO-LUMO addition to give the P5S3X2+ ion as the first species visible in situ in the low-temperature 31P NMR spectrum. The [P5S3X2]+ ions are metastable at -78 degrees C and disproportionate at slightly higher temperatures to give [P5S2X2]+ and [P4S4X]+, probably with the extrusion of 1/n (PX)n (X=Br, I). All six new cage compounds have been characterized by multinuclear NMR spectroscopy and, in part, by IR or Raman spectroscopy. The [P5S2X2]+ salts have a nortricyclane skeleton and were also characterized by X-ray crystallography. The structure of the [P4S4X]+ ion is related to that of P4S5 in that the exo-cage P=S bond is replaced by an isoelectronic P+--X moiety.

  13. Platyzoan mitochondrial genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wey-Fabrizius, Alexandra R; Podsiadlowski, Lars; Herlyn, Holger; Hankeln, Thomas

    2013-11-01

    Platyzoa is a putative lophotrochozoan (spiralian) subtaxon within the protostome clade of Metazoa, comprising a range of biologically diverse, mostly small worm-shaped animals. The monophyly of Platyzoa, the relationships between the putative subgroups Platyhelminthes, Gastrotricha and Gnathifera (the latter comprising at least Gnathostomulida, "Rotifera" and Acanthocephala) as well as some aspects of the internal phylogenies of these subgroups are highly debated. Here we review how complete mitochondrial (mt) genome data contribute to these debates. We highlight special features of the mt genomes and discuss problems in mtDNA phylogenies of the clade. Mitochondrial genome data seem to be insufficient to resolve the position of the platyzoan clade within the Spiralia but can help to address internal phylogenetic questions. The present review includes a tabular survey of all published platyzoan mt genomes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. MITOCHONDRIAL NEUROGASTROINTESTINAL ENCEPHALOMYOPATHY (MNGIE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ayatollahi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalo-myopathy (MNGIE is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by thymidine phosphorylase (TP gene mutation. Here we report a patient with MNGIE in whom sensorimotor polyneuropathy was the first presenting symptom and had a fluctuating course. This 26-year-old female patient developed acute-onset demyelinating polyneuropathy from the age of 6 with two relapses later on. In addition, she had gastrointestinal symptoms (diarrhea, recurrent abdominal pain, progressive weight loss and ophthalmoparesis. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed white matter abnormalities, and muscle biopsy showed ragged red fibers. This constellation of clinical and laboratory findings raised the diagnosis of mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE. This report highlights the uncommon clinical characteristics of this rare disease.

  15. Specific Internalisation of Gold Nanoparticles into Engineered Porous Protein Cages via Affinity Binding.

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    David Paramelle

    Full Text Available Porous protein cages are supramolecular protein self-assemblies presenting pores that allow the access of surrounding molecules and ions into their core in order to store and transport them in biological environments. Protein cages' pores are attractive channels for the internalisation of inorganic nanoparticles and an alternative for the preparation of hybrid bioinspired nanoparticles. However, strategies based on nanoparticle transport through the pores are largely unexplored, due to the difficulty of tailoring nanoparticles that have diameters commensurate with the pores size and simultaneously displaying specific affinity to the cages' core and low non-specific binding to the cages' outer surface. We evaluated the specific internalisation of single small gold nanoparticles, 3.9 nm in diameter, into porous protein cages via affinity binding. The E2 protein cage derived from the Geobacillus stearothermophilus presents 12 pores, 6 nm in diameter, and an empty core of 13 nm in diameter. We engineered the E2 protein by site-directed mutagenesis with oligohistidine sequences exposing them into the cage's core. Dynamic light scattering and electron microscopy analysis show that the structures of E2 protein cages mutated with bis- or penta-histidine sequences are well conserved. The surface of the gold nanoparticles was passivated with a self-assembled monolayer made of a mixture of short peptidols and thiolated alkane ethylene glycol ligands. Such monolayers are found to provide thin coatings preventing non-specific binding to proteins. Further functionalisation of the peptide coated gold nanoparticles with Ni2+ nitrilotriacetic moieties enabled the specific binding to oligohistidine tagged cages. The internalisation via affinity binding was evaluated by electron microscopy analysis. From the various mutations tested, only the penta-histidine mutated E2 protein cage showed repeatable and stable internalisation. The present work overcomes the

  16. Sterilization and strength of 70/30 polylactide cages: e-beam versus ethylene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, Theo H; Thomas, Kevin A; Hoogendoorn, Roel J W; Strijkers, Gustav J; Helder, Marco N; Wuisman, Paul I J M

    2007-04-01

    In vitro and in vivo studies on the degradation of 70/30 poly(L,DL-lactide) (PLDLLA) cages. To evaluate the effect of e-beam and ethylene oxide sterilization on degradation and strength. e-beam-sterilized PLDLLA cages were shown to maintain mechanical strength for at least 6 months during degradation studies in vitro. Yet failure of the cages was observed after only 3 months in vivo. We hypothesized that degradation characteristics and mechanical strength could be improved by sterilizing the cages through ethylene oxide (EtO) instead of e-beam. PLDLLA cages were sterilized either by e-beam or EtO, and degraded in phosphate-buffered saline. Each month, cages were compressed until failure. Inherent viscosity was determined as a measure of degradation. For the in vivo evaluation, e-beam- or EtO-sterilized cages were implanted at L3-L4 in a standardized goat model. After 3 or 6 months, retrieved segments were scanned by high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging. Also, inherent viscosity of the polymer was measured. e-beam sterilization strongly decreased inherent viscosity of PLDLLA compared with EtO sterilization, but initial strength was only affected marginally. After 6 months, the strength of the e-beam-sterilized cages dropped, while that of EtO-sterilized cages was maintained. Degradation in vivo was slightly faster than in vitro. In both groups, however, mechanical failure occurred at 3 months after implantation. Inherent viscosity decreases with degradation time, but strength only decreases when inherent viscosity is below a certain threshold. Above this threshold, mechanical strength is a property of the polymer and independent of inherent viscosity. e-beam sterilization strongly decreases inherent viscosity and thus advances mechanical degradation. EtO sterilization delays degradation but does not increase initial strength. Early failure of PLDLLA cages in the goat model thus is unrelated to sterilization method and requires further study.

  17. Endosymbionts and mitochondrial origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woese, C. R.

    1977-01-01

    The possibility is put forth that the mitochondrion did not originate from an endosymbiosis 1-2 billion years ago involving an aerobic bacterium. Rather, it arose by endosymbiosis in a much earlier anaerobic period and was initially a photosynthetic organelle analogous to the modern chloroplast. This suggestion arises from a reconsideration of the nature of endosymbiosis. It explains the remarkable diversity in mitochondrial information storage and processing systems.

  18. Early Decrease in Respiration and Uncoupling Event Independent of Cytochrome c Release in PC12 Cells Undergoing Apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berghella, Libera; Ferraro, Elisabetta

    2012-01-01

    Cytochrome c is a key molecule in mitochondria-mediated apoptosis. It also plays a pivotal role in cell respiration. The switch between these two functions occurs at the moment of its release from mitochondria. This process is therefore extremely relevant for the fate of the cell. Since cytochrome c mediates respiration, we studied the changes in respiratory chain activity during the early stages of apoptosis in order to contribute to unravel the mechanisms of cytochrome c release. We found that, during staurosporine (STS)- induced apoptosis in PC12 cells, respiration is affected before the release of cytochrome c, as shown by a decrease in the endogenous uncoupled respiration and an uncoupling event, both occurring independently of cytochrome c release. The decline in the uncoupled respiration occurs also upon Bcl-2 overexpression (which inhibits cytochrome c release), while the uncoupling event is inhibited by Bcl-2. We also observed that the first stage of nuclear condensation during STS-induced apoptosis does not depend on the release of cytochrome c into the cytosol and is a reversibile event. These findings may contribute to understand the mechanisms affecting mitochondria during the early stages of apoptosis and priming them for the release of apoptogenic factors. PMID:22666257

  19. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase is required for berberine-induced reduction of atherosclerosis in mice: the role of uncoupling protein 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qilong Wang

    Full Text Available Berberine, a botanical alkaloid purified from Coptidis rhizoma, is reported to activate the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK. Whether AMPK is required for the protective effects of berberine in cardiovascular diseases remains unknown. This study was designed to determine whether AMPK is required for berberine-induced reduction of oxidative stress and atherosclerosis in vivo.ApoE (ApoE⁻/⁻ mice and ApoE⁻/⁻/AMPK alpha 2⁻/⁻ mice that were fed Western diets were treated with berberine for 8 weeks. Atherosclerotic aortic lesions, expression of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2, and markers of oxidative stress were evaluated in isolated aortas.In ApoE⁻/⁻ mice, chronic administration of berberine significantly reduced aortic lesions, markedly reduced oxidative stress and expression of adhesion molecules in aorta, and significantly increased UCP2 levels. In contrast, in ApoE⁻/⁻/AMPK alpha 2⁻/⁻ mice, berberine had little effect on those endpoints. In cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs, berberine significantly increased UCP2 mRNA and protein expression in an AMPK-dependent manner. Transfection of HUVECs with nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF1-specific siRNA attenuated berberine-induced expression of UCP2, whereas transfection with control siRNA did not. Finally, berberine promoted mitochondrial biogenesis that contributed to up-regulation of UCP2 expression.We conclude that berberine reduces oxidative stress and vascular inflammation, and suppresses atherogenesis via a mechanism that includes stimulation of AMPK-dependent UCP2 expression.

  20. Replicating animal mitochondrial DNA

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    Emily A. McKinney

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The field of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA replication has been experiencing incredible progress in recent years, and yet little is certain about the mechanism(s used by animal cells to replicate this plasmid-like genome. The long-standing strand-displacement model of mammalian mtDNA replication (for which single-stranded DNA intermediates are a hallmark has been intensively challenged by a new set of data, which suggests that replication proceeds via coupled leading-and lagging-strand synthesis (resembling bacterial genome replication and/or via long stretches of RNA intermediates laid on the mtDNA lagging-strand (the so called RITOLS. The set of proteins required for mtDNA replication is small and includes the catalytic and accessory subunits of DNA polymerase y, the mtDNA helicase Twinkle, the mitochondrial single-stranded DNA-binding protein, and the mitochondrial RNA polymerase (which most likely functions as the mtDNA primase. Mutations in the genes coding for the first three proteins are associated with human diseases and premature aging, justifying the research interest in the genetic, biochemical and structural properties of the mtDNA replication machinery. Here we summarize these properties and discuss the current models of mtDNA replication in animal cells.

  1. MITOCHONDRIAL BKCa CHANNEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique eBalderas

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Since its discovery in a glioma cell line 15 years ago, mitochondrial BKCa channel (mitoBKCa has been studied in brain cells and cardiomyocytes sharing general biophysical properties such as high K+ conductance (~300 pS, voltage-dependency and Ca2+-sensitivity. Main advances in deciphering the molecular composition of mitoBKCa have included establishing that it is encoded by the Kcnma1 gene, that a C-terminal splice insert confers mitoBKCa ability to be targeted to cardiac mitochondria, and evidence for its potential coassembly with β subunits. Notoriously, β1 subunit directly interacts with cytochrome c oxidase and mitoBKCa can be modulated by substrates of the respiratory chain. mitoBKCa channel has a central role in protecting the heart from ischemia, where pharmacological activation of the channel impacts the generation of reactive oxygen species and mitochondrial Ca2+ preventing cell death likely by impeding uncontrolled opening of the mitochondrial transition pore. Supporting this view, inhibition of mitoBKCa with Iberiotoxin, enhances cytochrome c release from glioma mitochondria. Many tantalizing questions remain. Some of them are: how is mitoBKCa coupled to the respiratory chain? Does mitoBKCa play non-conduction roles in mitochondria physiology? Which are the functional partners of mitoBKCa? What are the roles of mitoBKCa in other cell types? Answers to these questions are essential to define the impact of mitoBKCa channel in mitochondria biology and disease.

  2. Mitochondrial Subversion in Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Aditi; Dasgupta, Santanu; Sidransky, David

    2012-01-01

    Mitochondria control essential cellular activities including generation of ATP via oxidative phosphorylation. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations in the regulatory D-loop region and somatic mtDNA mutations are common in primary human cancers. The biological impact of a given mutation may vary, depending on the nature of the mutation and the proportion of mutant mtDNAs carried by the cell. Identification of mtDNA mutations in precancerous lesions supports their early contribution to cell transformation and cancer progression. Introduction of mtDNA mutations in transformed cells has been associated with increased ROS production and tumor growth. Studies reveal that increased and altered mtDNA plays a role in the development of cancer but further work is required to establish the functional significance of specific mitochondrial mutations in cancer and disease progression. This review offers some insight into the extent of mtDNA mutations, their functional consequences in tumorigenesis, mitochondrial therapeutics, and future clinical application. PMID:21543342

  3. Identification and characterization of uncoupling protein in heart and muscle mitochondria of canary birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocinska, Malgorzata B; Almsherqi, Zakaria Ali Moh; Sluse, Francis E; Navet, Rachel; Deng, Yuru

    2010-08-01

    An uncoupling protein (cUCP) was identified in heart and skeletal muscle mitochondria of canary birds. cUCP was immunodetected using polyclonal antibodies raised against murine UCP2. Its molecular mass was similar to those of mammalian UCPs (32 kDa). The activity of cUCP was stimulated by palmitic acid (PA) and inhibited by GTP mainly in state 3 respiration. Additions of PA augmented state 4 respiration and lowered the ADP/O ratio. Thus, the activity of cUCP diverted energy from oxidative phosphorylation in state 3 respiration. cUCP in heart and skeletal muscles of canary birds might have implications in thermogenesis as well as protection against free radical production.

  4. Sequence-dependent nucleosome sliding in rotation-coupled and uncoupled modes revealed by molecular simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niina, Toru; Brandani, Giovanni B; Tan, Cheng; Takada, Shoji

    2017-12-01

    While nucleosome positioning on eukaryotic genome play important roles for genetic regulation, molecular mechanisms of nucleosome positioning and sliding along DNA are not well understood. Here we investigated thermally-activated spontaneous nucleosome sliding mechanisms developing and applying a coarse-grained molecular simulation method that incorporates both long-range electrostatic and short-range hydrogen-bond interactions between histone octamer and DNA. The simulations revealed two distinct sliding modes depending on the nucleosomal DNA sequence. A uniform DNA sequence showed frequent sliding with one base pair step in a rotation-coupled manner, akin to screw-like motions. On the contrary, a strong positioning sequence, the so-called 601 sequence, exhibits rare, abrupt transitions of five and ten base pair steps without rotation. Moreover, we evaluated the importance of hydrogen bond interactions on the sliding mode, finding that strong and weak bonds favor respectively the rotation-coupled and -uncoupled sliding movements.

  5. Uncoupling of Metabolic Health from Longevity through Genetic Alteration of Adipose Tissue Lipid-Binding Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khanichi N. Charles

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Deterioration of metabolic health is a hallmark of aging and generally assumed to be detrimental to longevity. Exposure to a high-calorie diet impairs metabolism and accelerates aging; conversely, calorie restriction (CR prevents age-related metabolic diseases and extends lifespan. However, it is unclear whether preservation of metabolic health is sufficient to extend lifespan. We utilized a genetic mouse model lacking Fabp4/5 that confers protection against metabolic diseases and shares molecular and lipidomic features with CR to address this question. Fabp-deficient mice exhibit extended metabolic healthspan, with protection against insulin resistance and glucose intolerance, inflammation, deterioration of adipose tissue integrity, and fatty liver disease. Surprisingly, however, Fabp-deficient mice did not exhibit any extension of lifespan. These data indicate that extension of metabolic healthspan in the absence of CR can be uncoupled from lifespan, indicating the potential for independent drivers of these pathways, at least in laboratory mice.

  6. Modelling of the protonophoric uncoupling by phenoxyacetic acid of the plasma membrane of Penicillium chrysogenum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Claus Maxel; Nielsen, Jens Bredal; Villadsen, John

    1998-01-01

    on the growth energetics in terms of ATP spent in maintenance- and growth-related processes, i.e. m(ATP) and Y-xATP. The increased maintenance-related ATP consumption when adding phenoxyacetic acid at pH 5.00 agrees with the theoretical calculations on the uncoupling effect of phenoxyacetic acid. When Y-xATP...... is compared with earlier reported values for the theoretical ATP requirement for biosynthesis of P. chrysogenum, i.e. Y-xATP,Y-growth, it is found that Y-xATP,Y-growth is only 40-50% of Y-xATP, which stresses that a large amount of ATP is wasted in turnover of macromolecules, leaks, and futile cycles. (C...

  7. An uncoupling protein homologue putatively involved in facultative muscle thermogenesis in birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raimbault, S; Dridi, S; Denjean, F; Lachuer, J; Couplan, E; Bouillaud, F; Bordas, A; Duchamp, C; Taouis, M; Ricquier, D

    2001-01-01

    The cDNA of an uncoupling protein (UCP) homologue was obtained by screening a chicken skeletal-muscle library. The predicted 307-amino-acid sequence of avian UCP (avUCP) is 55, 70, 70 and 46% identical with mammalian UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3 and plant UCP respectively. avUCP mRNA expression is restricted to skeletal muscle and its abundance was increased 1.3-fold in a chicken line showing diet-induced thermogenesis, and 3.6- and 2.6-fold in cold-acclimated and glucagon-treated ducklings developing muscle non-shivering thermogenesis respectively. The present data support the implication of avUCP in avian energy expenditure. PMID:11171038

  8. Expression of Uncoupling Protein 2 in Breast Cancer Tissue and Drug-resistant Cells

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    Yan Sun

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the expression of uncoupling protein-2 (UCP2 in clinical breast cancer tissue and drug-resistant cells. Methods: The expression of UCP2 in breast cancer tissue and normal tissue adjacent to carcinoma as well as breast cancer cell MCF-7 and paclitaxel-resistant cell MX-1/T were respectively detected by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Results: The expression of UCP2 in breast cancer tissue was significantly higher than in normal tissue adjacent to carcinoma, and that in paclitaxel-resistant cell MX-1/T obviously higher than in breast cancer cell MCF-7. Conclusion: UCP2 is highly expressed in breast cancer tissue and drug-resistant cells.

  9. Cellobiose Consumption Uncouples Extracellular Glucose Sensing and Glucose Metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

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    Kulika Chomvong

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Glycolysis is central to energy metabolism in most organisms and is highly regulated to enable optimal growth. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, feedback mechanisms that control flux through glycolysis span transcriptional control to metabolite levels in the cell. Using a cellobiose consumption pathway, we decoupled glucose sensing from carbon utilization, revealing new modular layers of control that induce ATP consumption to drive rapid carbon fermentation. Alterations of the beta subunit of phosphofructokinase-1 (PFK2, H+-plasma membrane ATPase (PMA1, and glucose sensors (SNF3 and RGT2 revealed the importance of coupling extracellular glucose sensing to manage ATP levels in the cell. Controlling the upper bound of cellular ATP levels may be a general mechanism used to regulate energy levels in cells, via a regulatory network that can be uncoupled from ATP concentrations under perceived starvation conditions.

  10. The effect of respiration buffer composition on mitochondrial metabolism and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollenman, Lucas C; Vander Ploeg, Matthew R; Miller, Mackinzie L; Zhang, Yizhu; Bazil, Jason N

    2017-01-01

    Functional studies on isolated mitochondria critically rely on the right choice of respiration buffer. Differences in buffer composition can lead to dramatically different respiration rates leading to difficulties in comparing prior studies. The ideal buffer facilities high ADP-stimulated respiratory rates and minimizes substrate transport effects so that the ability to distinguish between various treatments and conditions is maximal. In this study, we analyzed a variety of respiration buffers and substrate combinations to determine the optimal conditions to support mitochondrial function through ADP-stimulated respiration and uncoupled respiration using FCCP. The buffers consisted of a standard KCl based buffer (B1) and three modified buffers with chloride replaced by the K-lactobionate, sucrose, and the antioxidant taurine (B2) or K-gluconate (B3). The fourth buffer (B4) was identical to B2 except that K-lactobionate was replaced with K-gluconate. The substrate combinations consisted of metabolites that utilize different pathways of mitochondrial metabolism. To test mitochondrial function, we used isolated cardiac guinea pig mitochondria and measured oxygen consumption for three respiratory states using an Oroboros Oxygraph-2k. These states were the leak state (energized mitochondria in the absence of adenylates), ADP-stimulated state (energized mitochondria in the presence of saturating ADP concentrations), and uncoupled state (energized mitochondria in the presence of FCCP). On average across all substrate combinations, buffers B2, B3, and B4 had an increase of 16%, 26%, and 35% for the leak state, ADP-simulated state, and uncoupled state, respectively, relative to rates using B1. The common feature distinguishing these buffers from B1 is the notable lack of high chloride concentrations. Based on the respiratory rate metrics obtained with the substrate combinations, we conclude that the adenine nucleotide translocase, the dicarboxylate carrier, and the alpha

  11. Dietary methionine restriction enhances metabolic flexibility and increases uncoupled respiration in both fed and fasted states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasek, Barbara E; Stewart, Laura K; Henagan, Tara M; Boudreau, Anik; Lenard, Natalie R; Black, Corey; Shin, Jeho; Huypens, Peter; Malloy, Virginia L; Plaisance, Eric P; Krajcik, Rozlyn A; Orentreich, Norman; Gettys, Thomas W

    2010-09-01

    Dietary methionine restriction (MR) is a mimetic of chronic dietary restriction (DR) in the sense that MR increases rodent longevity, but without food restriction. We report here that MR also persistently increases total energy expenditure (EE) and limits fat deposition despite increasing weight-specific food consumption. In Fischer 344 (F344) rats consuming control or MR diets for 3, 9, and 20 mo, mean EE was 1.5-fold higher in MR vs. control rats, primarily due to higher EE during the night at all ages. The day-to-night transition produced a twofold higher heat increment of feeding (3.0 degrees C vs. 1.5 degrees C) in MR vs. controls and an exaggerated increase in respiratory quotient (RQ) to values greater than 1, indicative of the interconversion of glucose to lipid by de novo lipogenesis. The simultaneous inhibition of glucose utilization and shift to fat oxidation during the day was also more complete in MR (RQ approximately 0.75) vs. controls (RQ approximately 0.85). Dietary MR produced a rapid and persistent increase in uncoupling protein 1 expression in brown (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT) in conjunction with decreased leptin and increased adiponectin levels in serum, suggesting that remodeling of the metabolic and endocrine function of adipose tissue may have an important role in the overall increase in EE. We conclude that the hyperphagic response to dietary MR is matched to a coordinated increase in uncoupled respiration, suggesting the engagement of a nutrient-sensing mechanism, which compensates for limited methionine through integrated effects on energy homeostasis.

  12. Signaling Can Be Uncoupled from Imaging of the Somatostatin Receptor Type 2

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    Lin Han

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Endogenous and exogenous somatostatin receptors are commonly targeted for imaging using radiopharmaceutical analogues of somatostatin. Ligand binding activates receptor-mediated signaling. We assessed whether somatostatin receptor type 2A (SSTR2A imaging can be uncoupled from signal transduction. In both human fibrosarcoma (HT1080 and human embryonic kidney (HEK293 cells, reverse transcriptase–polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay found similar levels of expression of hemagglutinin A tagged SSTR2A (HA-SSTR2A or the same fusion protein with a deletion of the C-terminus beyond amino acid 314 (HA-SSTR2Δ314. Scatchard analysis demonstrated similar degrees of ligand binding by the wild-type or mutant receptor to 111In-octreotide in both cell pairs. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP production and inhibition of forskolin-induced cylic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP production were evaluated at the signaling level, and growth inhibition was evaluated at the cellular level before and after stimulation. Unlike wild-type receptor, HA-SSTR2Δ314 was deficient in inhibiting forskolin-induced cAMP production (p < .05 and in inciting cGMP (p < .05 production; furthermore, at the cellular level, HA-SSTR2Δ314 was deficient in inhibiting cell proliferation (p < .05. Yet tumors expressing HA-SSTR2Δ314 could be imaged in vivo. Thus, in vivo imaging of SSTR2 can be uncoupled from cAMP and cGMP signaling as well as growth inhibition.

  13. Uncoupled embryonic and extra-embryonic tissues compromise blastocyst development after somatic cell nuclear transfer.

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    Séverine A Degrelle

    Full Text Available Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT is the most efficient cell reprogramming technique available, especially when working with bovine species. Although SCNT blastocysts performed equally well or better than controls in the weeks following embryo transfer at Day 7, elongation and gastrulation defects were observed prior to implantation. To understand the developmental implications of embryonic/extra-embryonic interactions, the morphological and molecular features of elongating and gastrulating tissues were analysed. At Day 18, 30 SCNT conceptuses were compared to 20 controls (AI and IVP: 10 conceptuses each; one-half of the SCNT conceptuses appeared normal while the other half showed signs of atypical elongation and gastrulation. SCNT was also associated with a high incidence of discordance in embryonic and extra-embryonic patterns, as evidenced by morphological and molecular "uncoupling". Elongation appeared to be secondarily affected; only 3 of 30 conceptuses had abnormally elongated shapes and there were very few differences in gene expression when they were compared to the controls. However, some of these differences could be linked to defects in microvilli formation or extracellular matrix composition and could thus impact extra-embryonic functions. In contrast to elongation, gastrulation stages included embryonic defects that likely affected the hypoblast, the epiblast, or the early stages of their differentiation. When taking into account SCNT conceptus somatic origin, i.e. the reprogramming efficiency of each bovine ear fibroblast (Low: 0029, Med: 7711, High: 5538, we found that embryonic abnormalities or severe embryonic/extra-embryonic uncoupling were more tightly correlated to embryo loss at implantation than were elongation defects. Alternatively, extra-embryonic differences between SCNT and control conceptuses at Day 18 were related to molecular plasticity (high efficiency/high plasticity and subsequent pregnancy loss. Finally

  14. Apoptosis-associated uncoupling of bone formation and resorption in osteomyelitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marriott, Ian

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying the destruction of bone tissue in osteomyelitis are only now being elucidated. While some of the tissue damage associated with osteomyelitis likely results from the direct actions of bacteria and infiltrating leukocytes, perhaps exacerbated by bacterial manipulation of leukocyte survival pathways, infection-induced bone loss predominantly results from an uncoupling of the activities of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Bacteria or their products can directly increase osteoclast formation and activity, and the inflammatory milieu at sites of infection can further promote bone resorption. In addition, osteoclast activity is critically regulated by osteoblasts that can respond to bacterial pathogens and foster both inflammation and osteoclastogenesis. Importantly, bone loss during osteomyelitis is also brought about by a decline in new bone deposition due to decreased bone matrix synthesis and by increased rates of osteoblast apoptosis. Extracellular bacterial components may be sufficient to reduce osteoblast viability, but the causative agents of osteomyelitis are also capable of inducing continuous apoptosis of these cells by activating intrinsic and extrinsic cell death pathways to further uncouple bone formation and resorption. Interestingly, bacterial internalization appears to be required for maximal osteoblast apoptosis, and cytosolic inflammasome activation may act in concert with autocrine/paracrine death receptor-ligand signaling to induce cell death. The manipulation of apoptotic pathways in infected bone cells could be an attractive new means to limit inflammatory damage in osteomyelitis. However, the mechanism that is the most important in bacterium-induced bone loss has not yet been identified. Furthermore, it remains to be determined whether the host would be best served by preventing osteoblast cell death or by promoting apoptosis in infected cells. PMID:24392356

  15. Chimera states in a multilayer network of coupled and uncoupled neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majhi, Soumen; Perc, Matjaž; Ghosh, Dibakar

    2017-07-01

    We study the emergence of chimera states in a multilayer neuronal network, where one layer is composed of coupled and the other layer of uncoupled neurons. Through the multilayer structure, the layer with coupled neurons acts as the medium by means of which neurons in the uncoupled layer share information in spite of the absence of physical connections among them. Neurons in the coupled layer are connected with electrical synapses, while across the two layers, neurons are connected through chemical synapses. In both layers, the dynamics of each neuron is described by the Hindmarsh-Rose square wave bursting dynamics. We show that the presence of two different types of connecting synapses within and between the two layers, together with the multilayer network structure, plays a key role in the emergence of between-layer synchronous chimera states and patterns of synchronous clusters. In particular, we find that these chimera states can emerge in the coupled layer regardless of the range of electrical synapses. Even in all-to-all and nearest-neighbor coupling within the coupled layer, we observe qualitatively identical between-layer chimera states. Moreover, we show that the role of information transmission delay between the two layers must not be neglected, and we obtain precise parameter bounds at which chimera states can be observed. The expansion of the chimera region and annihilation of cluster and fully coherent states in the parameter plane for increasing values of inter-layer chemical synaptic time delay are illustrated using effective range measurements. These results are discussed in the light of neuronal evolution, where the coexistence of coherent and incoherent dynamics during the developmental stage is particularly likely.

  16. Molecular basis for mitochondrial signaling

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book covers recent advances in the study of structure, function, and regulation of metabolite, protein and ion translocating channels, and transporters in mitochondria. A wide array of cutting-edge methods are covered, ranging from electrophysiology and cell biology to bioinformatics, as well as structural, systems, and computational biology. At last, the molecular identity of two important channels in the mitochondrial inner membrane, the mitochondrial calcium uniporter and the mitochondrial permeability transition pore have been established. After years of work on the physiology and structure of VDAC channels in the mitochondrial outer membrane, there have been multiple discoveries on VDAC permeation and regulation by cytosolic proteins. Recent breakthroughs in structural studies of the mitochondrial cholesterol translocator reveal a set of novel unexpected features and provide essential clues for defining therapeutic strategies. Molecular Basis for Mitochondrial Signaling covers these and many more re...

  17. Mitochondrial mutations in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, M; Baldi, P; Wallace, D C

    2006-08-07

    The metabolism of solid tumors is associated with high lactate production while growing in oxygen (aerobic glycolysis) suggesting that tumors may have defects in mitochondrial function. The mitochondria produce cellular energy by oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) as a by-product, and regulate apoptosis via the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mtPTP). The mitochondria are assembled from both nuclear DNA (nDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genes. The mtDNA codes for 37 genes essential of OXPHOS, is present in thousands of copies per cell, and has a very high mutations rate. In humans, severe mtDNA mutations result in multisystem disease, while some functional population-specific polymorphisms appear to have permitted humans to adapt to new environments. Mutations in the nDNA-encoded mitochondrial genes for fumarate hydratase and succinate dehydrogenase have been linked to uterine leiomyomas and paragangliomas, and cancer cells have been shown to induce hexokinase II which harnesses OXPHOS adenosine triphosphate (ATP) production to drive glycolysis. Germline mtDNA mutations at nucleotides 10398 and 16189 have been associated with breast cancer and endometrial cancer. Tumor mtDNA somatic mutations range from severe insertion-deletion and chain termination mutations to mild missense mutations. Surprisingly, of the 190 tumor-specific somatic mtDNA mutations reported, 72% are also mtDNA sequence variants found in the general population. These include 52% of the tumor somatic mRNA missense mutations, 83% of the tRNA mutations, 38% of the rRNA mutations, and 85% of the control region mutations. Some associations might reflect mtDNA sequencing errors, but analysis of several of the tumor-specific somatic missense mutations with population counterparts appear legitimate. Therefore, mtDNA mutations in tumors may fall into two main classes: (1) severe mutations that inhibit OXPHOS, increase ROS production and promote tumor

  18. Protein cages and synthetic polymers: a fruitful symbiosis for drug delivery applications, bionanotechnology and materials science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rother, Martin; Nussbaumer, Martin G; Renggli, Kasper; Bruns, Nico

    2016-11-07

    Protein cages are hollow protein nanoparticles, such as viral capsids, virus-like particles, ferritin, heat-shock proteins and chaperonins. They have well-defined capsule-like structures with a monodisperse size. Their protein subunits can be modified by genetic engineering at predetermined positions, allowing for example site-selective introduction of attachment points for functional groups, catalysts or targeting ligands on their outer surface, in their interior and between subunits. Therefore, protein cages have been extensively explored as functional entities in bionanotechnology, as drug-delivery or gene-delivery vehicles, as nanoreactors or as templates for the synthesis of organic and inorganic nanomaterials. The scope of functionalities and applications of protein cages can be significantly broadened if they are combined with synthetic polymers on their surface or within their interior. For example, PEGylation reduces the immunogenicity of protein cage-based delivery systems and active targeting ligands can be attached via polymer chains to favour their accumulation in diseased tissue. Polymers within protein cages offer the possibility of increasing the loading density of drug molecules, nucleic acids, magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents or catalysts. Moreover, the interaction of protein cages and polymers can be used to modulate the size and shape of some viral capsids to generate structures that do not occur with native viruses. Another possibility is to use the interior of polymer cages as a confined reaction space for polymerization reactions such as atom transfer radical polymerization or rhodium-catalysed polymerization of phenylacetylene. The protein nanoreactors facilitate a higher degree of control over polymer synthesis. This review will summarize the hybrid structures that have been synthesized by polymerizing from protein cage-bound initiators, by conjugating polymers to protein cages, by embedding protein cages into bulk polymeric

  19. Modulation of cadmium-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and volume changes by temperature in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onukwufor, John O. [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Kibenge, Fred [Department of Pathology and Microbiology, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Stevens, Don [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada); Kamunde, Collins, E-mail: ckamunde@upei.ca [Department of Biomedical Sciences, Atlantic Veterinary College, University of Prince Edward Island, Charlottetown, PE, Canada C1A 4P3 (Canada)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Interactions of Cd and temperature exacerbate mitochondrial dysfunction and enhance Cd accumulation. • Cd uptake by mitochondria occurs through the Ca uniporter. • Temperature exacerbates Cd-induced mitochondrial volume changes. • Low concentrations of Cd inhibit mitochondrial swelling. - Abstract: We investigated how temperature modulates cadmium (Cd)-induced mitochondrial bioenergetic disturbances, metal accumulation and volume changes in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In the first set of experiments, rainbow trout liver mitochondrial function and Cd content were measured in the presence of complex I substrates, malate and glutamate, following exposure to Cd (0–100 μM) at three (5, 13 and 25 °C) temperatures. The second set of experiments assessed the effect of temperature on Cd-induced mitochondrial volume changes, including the underlying mechanisms, at 15 and 25 °C. Although temperature stimulated both state 3 and 4 rates of respiration, the coupling efficiency was reduced at temperature extremes due to greater inhibition of state 3 at low temperature and greater stimulation of state 4 at the high temperature. Cadmium exposure reduced the stimulatory effect of temperature on state 3 respiration but increased that on state 4, consequently exacerbating mitochondrial uncoupling. The interaction of Cd and temperature yielded different responses on thermal sensitivity of state 3 and 4 respiration; the Q{sub 10} values for state 3 respiration increased at low temperature (5–13 °C) while those for state 4 increased at high temperature (13–25 °C). Importantly, the mitochondria accumulated more Cd at high temperature suggesting that the observed greater impairment of oxidative phosphorylation with temperature was due, at least in part, to a higher metal burden. Cadmium-induced mitochondrial volume changes were characterized by an early phase of contraction followed by swelling, with temperature changing the kinetics and

  20. Muscle regeneration in mitochondrial myopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krag, T O; Hauerslev, S; Jeppesen, T D

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial myopathies cover a diverse group of disorders in which ragged red and COX-negative fibers are common findings on muscle morphology. In contrast, muscle degeneration and regeneration, typically found in muscular dystrophies, are not considered characteristic features of mitochondrial...... by a dystrophic morphology. The results add to the complexity of the pathogenesis underlying mitochondrial myopathies, and expand the knowledge about the impact of energy deficiency on another aspect of muscle structure and function....

  1. Individually ventilated cages cause chronic low-grade hypoxia impacting mice hematologically and behaviorally

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Jason M.; McDaniel, Allison W.; Blevins, Neil A.; Guillet, Riley R.; Allison, Sarah O.; Cengel, Keith A.; Freund, Gregory G.

    2012-01-01

    Use of individually ventilated caging (IVC) systems for mouse-based laboratory investigation has dramatically increased. We found that without mice present, intra-cage oxygen concentration was comparable (21%) between IVC housing and ambient environment caging (AEC) that used wire top lids. However, when mice were housed 4-to-a-cage for 1 week, intra-cage oxygen dropped to 20.5% in IVC housing as compared to 21% for AEC housing. IVC intra-cage humidity was also elevated relative to AEC housing. Mice raised in IVC housing as compared to mice raised in AEC housing had higher RBC mass, hematocrit and hemoglobin concentrations. They also had elevated platelet counts but lower white blood cell counts. IVC mice relative to AEC mice had increased saccharin preference and increased fluid consumption but similar locomotion, food intake, social exploration and novel object recognition when tested in an AEC environment. Taken together, these data indicate that ventilated caging systems can have a 0.5% reduction from ambient oxygen concentration that is coupled to mouse red blood cell indices indicative of chronic exposure to a hypoxia. Importantly, IVC housing can impact behavioral testing for depressive-like behavior. PMID:22561683

  2. Suitability of carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone cages for use as anterior struts following corpectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heary, Robert F; Parvathreddy, Naresh K; Qayumi, Zainab S; Ali, Naiim S; Agarwal, Nitin

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Fibular allograft remains a widely used strut for corpectomy surgeries. The amount of graft material that can be packed into an allograft strut has not been quantified. Cages are an alternative to fibular allograft for fusion surgeries. The authors of this study assessed the suitability of carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone (CFRP) cages for anterior corpectomy surgeries. They further explored the parameters known to affect fusion rates in clinical practice. METHODS Six fibular allografts were tested at standard lengths. Three sets of carbon fiber cages (Bengal, DePuy Spine), each with a different footprint size but the same lengths, were tested. The allografts and cages were wrapped in adhesive, fluid-tight transparent barriers and filled with oil. The volume and weight of the oil instilled as well as the implant footprints were measured. The fibular allografts and cages were tested at 20-, 40-, and 50-mm lengths. Two investigators independently performed all measurements 5 times. Five CFRP cubes (1 × 1 × 1 cm) were tested under pure compression, and load versus displacement curves were plotted to determine the modulus of elasticity. RESULTS Significantly more oil fit in the CFRP cages than in the fibular allografts (p Carbon fiber-reinforced polyetheretherketone cages can accommodate much more graft material than can fibular allografts. In clinical practice, the ability to deliver greater amounts of graft material following a corpectomy may improve fusion rates.

  3. Computational design and fabrication of a novel bioresorbable cage for tibial tuberosity advancement application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilho, Miguel; Rodrigues, Jorge; Vorndran, Elke; Gbureck, Uwe; Quental, Carlos; Folgado, João; Fernandes, Paulo R

    2017-01-01

    Tibial tuberosity advancement (TTA) is a promising method for the treatment of cruciate ligament rupture in dogs that usually implies the implantation of a titanium cage as bone implant. This cage is non-biodegradable and fails in providing adequate implant-bone tissue integration. The objective of this work is to propose a new process chain for designing and manufacturing an alternative biodegradable cage that can fulfill specific patient requirements. A three-dimensional finite element model (3D FEM) of the TTA system was first created to evaluate the mechanical environment at cage domain during different stages of the dog walk. The cage microstructure was then optimized using a topology optimization tool, which addresses the accessed local mechanical requirements, and at same time ensures the maximum permeability to allow nutrient and oxygen supply to the implant core. The designed cage was then biofabricated by a 3D powder printing of tricalcium phosphate cement. This work demonstrates that the combination of a 3D FEM with a topology optimization approach enabled the design of a novel cage for TTA application with tailored permeability and mechanical properties, that can be successfully 3D printed in a biodegradable bioceramic material. These results support the potential of the design optimization strategy and fabrication method to the development of customized and bioresorbable implants for bone repair. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Caging, but not air deprivation, slows tadpole growth and development in the amphibian Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Christopher S

    2014-08-01

    Xenopus laevis tadpoles raised in submerged cages in normoxic water develop more slowly than tadpoles raised with access to air. This study distinguishes between the effects of being caged and being deprived access to air on development and growth. Tadpoles were raised in high and low density control tanks and in cages in the same tank that were either completely submerged or with the top exposed to air. Experiments were repeated with the cages in different positions relative to the air stones and with and without the water flow from air stones supplemented with a pump. Whereas caging tadpoles has a large effect on their development and growth, additionally depriving them of air has a small effect and this effect can be removed by optimizing water flow through the cage. The effect of caging, though significant in this study, is small compared to the variation in growth and developmental rates that is commonly encountered within and among controls in lab studies. Caging effects can also be diminished by optimizing rearing conditions and/or having exceptionally vigorous tadpoles. The effects of air deprivation and caging thus pose less of a problem for experimenting on air-deprived (AD) and air-restored Xenopus tadpoles than their inherent variability in growth and developmental rates and their susceptibility to growth and developmental arrest. Further, the effect of air deprivation in this air-breathing amphibian does not pose a conflict with evolutionary hypotheses for lung loss involving lengthening of the larval period and delay in the onset of air breathing. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. The effects of design and positioning of carbon fiber lumbar interbody cages and their subsidence in vertebral bodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Fred C; Alkalay, Ron; Groff, Michael W

    2012-04-01

    A biomechanical study using human cadaveric lumbar spines. To determine the strength and stiffness of 3 carbon fiber cage designs in axial compression. To assess the effects of bone mineral density (BMD) on vertebral endplate failure with respect to the different cage patterns. Unilateral transforaminal approaches are gaining popularity compared with posterolateral lumbar interbody fusion. With differences in the inherent strengths of each quadrant of the endplate, the effect of different cage designs and their location on the endplate may affect subsidence and fusion success. BMD measurements were obtained from 30 human spinal segments from L3 to L5. Discectomies were performed and cages were placed on the cephalad endplate of each vertebra in 3 configurations: 2 small posterolateral rectangular cages; 1 small anterior banana cage; and 1 small central rectangular cage. Each segment was tested under compression until endplate failure was recorded. Two-way analysis of variance was used to test for the effects of cage design on cage subsidence and endplate failure. Analysis of covariance was conducted to test for the effects of age, BMD, and vertebral levels on the failure load and stiffness for each cage design. Cage design was not significant in affecting failure force across the endplate. There were insignificant differences comparing stiffness in compression for the 3 different cage placements patterns. Low BMD adversely affected failure force and construct stiffness across all 3 cage patterns. Cage design and position do not significantly affect failure of the construct or stiffness in compression across the endplate. BMD significantly affects both failure forces and stiffness but is not dependent on the positioning or design of the cage.

  6. Interaction of fullerene nanoparticles with biomembranes: from the partition in lipid membranes to effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Sandra M; Dinis, Augusto M; Peixoto, Francisco; Ferreira, Lino; Jurado, Amália S; Videira, Romeu A

    2014-03-01

    Partition and localization of C60 and its derivative C60(OH)18-22 in lipid membranes and their impact on mitochondrial activity were studied, attempting to correlate those events with fullerene characteristics (size, surface chemistry, and surface charge). Fluorescence quenching studies suggested that C60(OH)18-22 preferentially populated the outer regions of the bilayer, whereas C60 preferred to localize in deeper regions of the bilayer. Partition coefficient values indicated that C60 exhibited higher affinity for dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine and mitochondrial membranes than C60(OH)18-22. Both fullerenes affected the mitochondrial function, but the inhibitory effects promoted by C60 were more pronounced than those induced by C60(OH)18-22 (up to 20 nmol/mg of mitochondrial protein). State 3 and p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone-uncoupled respirations are inhibited by both fullerenes when glutamate/malate or succinate was used as substrate. Phosphorylation system and electron transport chain of mitochondria are affected by both fullerenes, but only C60 increased the inner mitochondrial membrane permeability to protons, suggesting perturbations in the structure and dynamics of that membrane. At concentrations of C60(OH)18-22 above 20 nmol/mg of mitochondrial protein, the activity of FoF1-ATP synthase was also decreased. The evaluation of transmembrane potential showed that the mitochondria phosphorylation cycle decreased upon adenosine diphosphate addition with increasing fullerenes concentration and the time of the repolarization phase increased as a function of C60(OH)18-22 concentration. Our results suggest that the balance between hydrophilicity and hydrophobicity resulting from the surface chemistry of fullerene nanoparticles, rather than the cluster size or the surface charge acquired by fullerenes in water, influences their membrane interactions and consequently their effects on mitochondrial bioenergetics.

  7. Role of charge screening and delocalization for lipophilic cation permeability of model and mitochondrial membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trendeleva, Tatiana A; Sukhanova, Evgenia I; Rogov, Anton G; Zvyagilskaya, Renata A; Seveina, Inna I; Ilyasova, Tatiana M; Cherepanov, Dmitry A; Skulachev, Vladimir P

    2013-09-01

    The effects of the mitochondria-targeted lipophilic cation dodecyltriphenylphosphonium (C12TPP, the charge is delocalized and screened by bulky hydrophobic residues) and those of lipophilic cations decyltriethylammonium bromide and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (C10TEA and C16TMA, the charges are localized and screened by less bulky residues) on bilayer planar phospholipid membranes and tightly-coupled mitochondria from the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica have been compared. In planar membranes, C12TPP was found to generate a diffusion potential as if it easily penetrates these membranes. In the presence of palmitate, C12TPP induced H(+) permeability like plastoquinonyl decyltriphenilphosphonium that facilitates transfer of fatty acid anions (Severin et al., PNAS, 2010, 107, 663-668). C12TPP was shown to stimulate State 4 respiration of mitochondria and caused a mitochondrial membrane depolarization with a half-maximal effect at 6μM. Besides, C12TPP profoundly potentiated the uncoupling effect of endogenous or added fatty acids. C10TEA and C16TMA inhibited State 4 respiration and decreased the membrane potential, though at much higher concentrations than C12TPP, and they did not promote the uncoupling action of fatty acids. These relationships were modeled by molecular dynamics. They can be explained by different membrane permeabilities for studied cations, which in turn are due to different availabilities of the positive charge in these cations to water dipoles. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Interbody fusion cage design using integrated global layout and local microstructure topology optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chia-Ying; Hsiao, Chun-Ching; Chen, Po-Quan; Hollister, Scott J

    2004-08-15

    An approach combining global layout and local microstructure topology optimization was used to create a new interbody fusion cage design that concurrently enhanced stability, biofactor delivery, and mechanical tissue stimulation for improved arthrodesis. To develop a new interbody fusion cage design by topology optimization with porous internal architecture. To compare the performance of this new design to conventional threaded cage designs regarding early stability and long-term stress shielding effects on ingrown bone. Conventional interbody cage designs mainly fall into categories of cylindrical or rectangular shell shapes. The designs contribute to rigid stability and maintain disc height for successful arthrodesis but may also suffer mechanically mediated failures of dislocation or subsidence, as well as the possibility of bone resorption. The new optimization approach created a cage having designed microstructure that achieved desired mechanical performance while providing interconnected channels for biofactor delivery. The topology optimization algorithm determines the material layout under desirable volume fraction (50%) and displacement constraints favorable to bone formation. A local microstructural topology optimization method was used to generate periodic microstructures for porous isotropic materials. Final topology was generated by the integration of the two-scaled structures according to segmented regions and the corresponding material density. Image-base finite element analysis was used to compare the mechanical performance of the topology-optimized cage and conventional threaded cage. The final design can be fabricated by a variety of Solid Free-Form systems directly from the image output. The new design exhibited a narrower, more uniform displacement range than the threaded cage design and lower stress at the cage-vertebra interface, suggesting a reduced risk of subsidence. Strain energy density analysis also indicated that a higher portion of

  9. Reproductive potential of Chrysoperla externa maintained in different cage sizes in laboratory conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Magalhães Borges Battel

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: This study investigated the influence of cage sizes on the survival and reproductive potential of Chrysoperla externa (Hagen. Size of breeding cages significantly affected the reproductive potential of C. externa . Our results indicated that in cages smaller (7.5cm of diameter than those usually recommended for the rearing of this insect (10cm diameter, females showed higher rates of oviposition. Reduction of space for rearing natural enemies in the laboratory is very important for developing biological control programs.

  10. Guest-cage atomic interactions in a clathrate-based phase-change material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loke, Desmond; Skelton, Jonathan M; Law, Leong-Tat; Wang, Wei-Jie; Li, Ming-Hua; Song, Wen-Dong; Lee, Tae-Hoon; Elliott, Stephen R

    2014-03-19

    New clathrate-based phase-change materials with cage-like structures incorporating Cs and Ba guest atoms, are reported as a means of altering crystallization and amorphization behavior by controlling 'guest-cage' interactions via intra-complex guest vibrational effects. Both a high resistance to spontaneous crystallization, and long retention of the amorphous phase are achieved, as well as a low melting energy. This approach provides a route for achieving cage-controlled semiconductor devices. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Chiral Organic Cages with a Triple-Stranded Helical Structure Derived from Helicene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Abaid Ullah; Gan, Fuwei; Shen, Chengshuo; Yu, Na; Wang, Ruibin; Crassous, Jeanne; Shu, Mouhai; Qiu, Huibin

    2018-02-28

    We report the use of helicene with an intrinsic helical molecular structure to prepare covalent organic cages via imine condensation. The organic cages revealed a [3+2]-type architecture containing a triple-stranded helical structure with three helicene units arranged in a propeller-like fashion with the framework integrally twisted. Such structural chirality was retained upon dissolution in organic solvents, as indicated by a strong diastereotopy effect in proton NMR and unique Cotton effects in circular dichroism spectra. Further study on chiral adsorption showed that the chiral organic cages possess considerable enantioselectivity toward a series of aromatic racemates.

  12. Effects of declawing and cage shape on productivity, feathering, and fearfulness of egg-type chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanskike, K P; Adams, A W

    1983-04-01

    Declawing day-old egg-type chicks did not significantly (P less than .05) alter 20-week body weight. However, declawed hens tended to mature earlier and lay more eggs than the intact hens. Hens housed in shallow cages tended to be better feathered than those housed in deep cages. Neither declawing nor cage shape had a significant effect on the time required for birds to return to feeding after exposure to a noise stimulus, which was used as an indicator of fearfulness.

  13. Spiro annulation of cage polycycles via Grignard reaction and ring-closing metathesis as key steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sambasivarao Kotha

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A simple synthetic strategy to C2-symmetric bis-spiro-pyrano cage compound 7 involving ring-closing metathesis is reported. The hexacyclic dione 10 was prepared from simple and readily available starting materials such as 1,4-naphthoquinone and cyclopentadiene. The synthesis of an unprecedented octacyclic cage compound through intramolecular Diels–Alder (DA reaction as a key step is described. The structures of three new cage compounds 7, 12 and 18 were confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction studies.

  14. Punicalagin, an active component in pomegranate, ameliorates cardiac mitochondrial impairment in obese rats via AMPK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ke; Xu, Jie; Pu, Wenjun; Dong, Zhizhong; Sun, Lei; Zang, Weijin; Gao, Feng; Zhang, Yong; Feng, Zhihui; Liu, Jiankang

    2015-09-15

    Obesity is associated with an increasing prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and metabolic syndrome. It is of paramount importance to reduce obesity-associated cardiac dysfunction and impaired energy metabolism. In this study, the activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) pathway by punicalagin (PU), a major ellagitannin in pomegranate was investigated in the heart of a rat obesity model. In male SD rats, eight-week administration of 150 mg/kg pomegranate extract (PE) containing 40% punicalagin sufficiently prevented high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity associated accumulation of cardiac triglyceride and cholesterol as well as myocardial damage. Concomitantly, the AMPK pathway was activated, which may account for prevention of mitochondrial loss via upregulating mitochondrial biogenesis and amelioration of oxidative stress via enhancing phase II enzymes in the hearts of HFD rats. Together with the normalized expression of uncoupling proteins and mitochondrial dynamic regulators, PE significantly prevented HFD-induced cardiac ATP loss. Through in vitro cultures, we showed that punicalagin was the predominant component that activated AMPK by quickly decreasing the cellular ATP/ADP ratio specifically in cardiomyocytes. Our findings demonstrated that punicalagin, the major active component in PE, could modulate mitochondria and phase II enzymes through AMPK pathway to prevent HFD-induced cardiac metabolic disorders.

  15. Mitochondrial protein quality control: the mechanisms guarding mitochondrial health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohovych, Iryna; Chan, Sherine S L; Khalimonchuk, Oleh

    2015-04-20

    Mitochondria are complex dynamic organelles pivotal for cellular physiology and human health. Failure to maintain mitochondrial health leads to numerous maladies that include late-onset neurodegenerative diseases and cardiovascular disorders. Furthermore, a decline in mitochondrial health is prevalent with aging. A set of evolutionary conserved mechanisms known as mitochondrial quality control (MQC) is involved in recognition and correction of the mitochondrial proteome. Here, we review current knowledge and latest developments in MQC. We particularly focus on the proteolytic aspect of MQC and its impact on health and aging. While our knowledge about MQC is steadily growing, critical gaps remain in the mechanistic understanding of how MQC modules sense damage and preserve mitochondrial welfare, particularly in higher organisms. Delineating how coordinated action of the MQC modules orchestrates physiological responses on both organellar and cellular levels will further elucidate the current picture of MQC's role and function in health, cellular stress, and degenerative diseases.

  16. MITOCHONDRIAL BKCa CHANNEL

    OpenAIRE

    Enrique eBalderas; Jin eZhang; Enrico eStefani; Ligia eToro

    2015-01-01

    Since its discovery in a glioma cell line 15 years ago, mitochondrial BKCa channel (mitoBKCa) has been studied in brain cells and cardiomyocytes sharing general biophysical properties such as high K+ conductance (~300 pS), voltage-dependency and Ca2+-sensitivity. Main advances in deciphering the molecular composition of mitoBKCa have included establishing that it is encoded by the Kcnma1 gene, that a C-terminal splice insert confers mitoBKCa ability to be targeted to cardiac mitochondria, an...

  17. CAGE peaks identified as true TSS by TSS classifier - FANTOM5 | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available List Contact us FANTOM5 CAGE peaks identified as true TSS by TSS classifier Data detail Data name CAGE peaks...dc01389-007.V002 No Update V1 10.18908/lsdba.nbdc01389-007.V001 - Description of data contents Evaluation of CAGE peak...s It shows that the sequence close to CAGE peak has TSS-like or not. TS...ase Description Download License Update History of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us CAGE peaks identified as true TSS by TSS classifier - FANTOM5 | LSDB Archive ...

  18. Inheritance of the yeast mitochondrial genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure

    1994-01-01

    Mitochondrion, extrachromosomal genetics, intergenic sequences, genome size, mitochondrial DNA, petite mutation, yeast......Mitochondrion, extrachromosomal genetics, intergenic sequences, genome size, mitochondrial DNA, petite mutation, yeast...

  19. Mitochondrial disorders and the eye

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O’Neill EC

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Nicole J Van Bergen, Rahul Chakrabarti, Evelyn C O'Neill, Jonathan G Crowston, Ian A TrounceCentre for Eye Research Australia, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Melbourne, Victoria, AustraliaAbstract: The clinical significance of disturbed mitochondrial function in the eye has emerged since mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA mutation was described in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy. The spectrum of mitochondrial dysfunction has become apparent through increased understanding of the contribution of nuclear and somatic mtDNA mutations to mitochondrial dynamics and function. Common ophthalmic manifestations of mitochondrial dysfunction include optic atrophy, pigmentary retinopathy, and ophthalmoplegia. The majority of patients with ocular manifestations of mitochondrial disease also have variable central and peripheral nervous system involvement. Mitochondrial dysfunction has recently been associated with age-related retinal disease including macular degeneration and glaucoma. Therefore, therapeutic targets directed at promoting mitochondrial biogenesis and function offer a potential to both preserve retinal function and attenuate neurodegenerative processes.Keywords: mitochondria, disease, retina, eye, aging, neuroprotection

  20. The potato tuber mitochondrial proteome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Ian Max; Salvato, Fernanda; Havelund, Jesper

    ) and in silico-predicted mitochondrial proteins (2000-3000). Thus, before starting to look for oxidized peptides, we wanted to expand the current compendium of plant mitochondrial proteins while obtaining what could be termed the "baseline proteome" from our model organelle, the potato tuber mitochondrion. Its...

  1. Biochemical diagnosis of mitochondrial disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rodenburg, R.J.T.

    2011-01-01

    Establishing a diagnosis in patients with a suspected mitochondrial disorder is often a challenge. Both knowledge of the clinical spectrum of mitochondrial disorders and the number of identified disease-causing molecular genetic defects are continuously expanding. The diagnostic examination of

  2. Mitochondrial respiration is decreased in skeletal muscle of patients with type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Sahlin, Kent; Fernström, Maria

    2007-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis of a lower respiratory capacity per mitochondrion in skeletal muscle of type 2 diabetic patients compared with obese subjects. Muscle biopsies obtained from 10 obese type 2 diabetic and 8 obese nondiabetic male subjects were used for assessment of 3-hydroxy......-Acyl-CoA-dehydrogenase (HAD) and citrate synthase activity, uncoupling protein (UCP)3 content, oxidative stress measured as 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), fiber type distribution, and respiration in isolated mitochondria. Respiration was normalized to citrate synthase activity (mitochondrial content) in isolated mitochondria....... Maximal ADP-stimulated respiration (state 3) with pyruvate plus malate and respiration through the electron transport chain (ETC) were reduced in type 2 diabetic patients, and the proportion of type 2X fibers were higher in type 2 diabetic patients compared with obese subjects (all P

  3. Colloidal glasses and gels: The interplay of bonding and caging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccarelli, Emanuela; Poon, Wilson C K

    2009-09-08

    We report simulations of glassy arrest in hard-core particles with short-range interparticle attraction. Previous experiments, theory, and simulations suggest that in this kind of system, two qualitatively distinct kinds of glasses exist, dominated respectively by repulsion and attraction. It is thought that in the former, particles are trapped "topologically," by nearest-neighbor cages, whereas in the latter, nonergodicity is due to interparticle "bonds." Subsequent experiments and simulations have suggested that bond breaking destabilizes attractive glasses, but the long-term fate of these arrested states remains unknown. By running simulations to times a few orders of magnitude longer than those reached by previous experiments or simulations, we show that arrest in an attractive glass is, in the long run, also topological. Nevertheless, it is still possible to distinguish between "nonbonded" and "bonded" repulsive glassy states. We study the melting of bonded repulsive glasses into a hitherto unknown "dense gel" state, which is distinct from dense, ergodic fluids. We propose a "modified state diagram" for concentrated attractive particles, and discuss the relevance of our results in the light of recent rheological measurements in colloid-polymer mixtures.

  4. Speed Control of Multiphase Cage Induction Motors Incorporating Supply Sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drozdowski Piotr

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The subject of this paper is the control possibility of the multiphase cage induction motors having number of phases greater than 3. These motors have additional properties for speed control that distinguish them from the standard 3 phase motors: operation at various sequences of supplying voltages due to the inverter control and possible operation with few open-circuited phases. For each supply sequence different no load speeds at the same frequency can be obtained. This feature extends the motor application for miscellaneous drive demands including vector or scalar control. This depends mainly on the type of the stator winding for a given number of phases, since the principle of motor operation is based on co-operation of higher harmonics of magnetic field. Examples of operation are presented for a 9-phase motor, though general approach has been discussed. This motor was fed by a voltage source inverter at field oriented control with forced currents. The mathematical model of the motor was reduced to the form incorporating all most important physical features and appropriate for the control law formulation. The operation was illustrated for various supply sequences for “healthy” motor and for the motor operating at one phase broken. The obtained results have shown that parasitic influence of harmonic fields interaction has negligible influence on motor operation with respect to the useful coupling for properly designed stator winding.

  5. Structure and assembly of scalable porous protein cages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Eita; Böhringer, Daniel; van de Waterbeemd, Michiel; Leibundgut, Marc; Zschoche, Reinhard; Heck, Albert J. R.; Ban, Nenad; Hilvert, Donald

    2017-03-01

    Proteins that self-assemble into regular shell-like polyhedra are useful, both in nature and in the laboratory, as molecular containers. Here we describe cryo-electron microscopy (EM) structures of two versatile encapsulation systems that exploit engineered electrostatic interactions for cargo loading. We show that increasing the number of negative charges on the lumenal surface of lumazine synthase, a protein that naturally assembles into a ~1-MDa dodecahedron composed of 12 pentamers, induces stepwise expansion of the native protein shell, giving rise to thermostable ~3-MDa and ~6-MDa assemblies containing 180 and 360 subunits, respectively. Remarkably, these expanded particles assume unprecedented tetrahedrally and icosahedrally symmetric structures constructed entirely from pentameric units. Large keyhole-shaped pores in the shell, not present in the wild-type capsid, enable diffusion-limited encapsulation of complementarily charged guests. The structures of these supercharged assemblies demonstrate how programmed electrostatic effects can be effectively harnessed to tailor the architecture and properties of protein cages.

  6. Porous organic cage membranes for water desalination: a simulation exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xian; Jiang, Jianwen

    2017-07-19

    Porous organic cages (POCs) have emerged as a new class of porous materials and received considerable interest for their potential applications. Herein we report the first proof-of-concept simulation study on POC membranes for water desalination. Five [4+6] POCs (CC1, CC2, CC3, CC16, and CC17) are considered with similar crystal structures, but different periphery groups and pore morphologies. CC1 is found to be impermeable to water due to disconnected pores. With an interconnected tetrahedral pore network, CC3 and CC16 have an intermediate water permeability of 1-5 × 10-7 kg m (m2 h bar)-1. CC2 and CC17 contain straight pores and a widely open pore network, respectively, thus exhibit a high water permeability of 2-3 × 10-6 kg m (m2 h bar)-1; nevertheless, salt rejection in CC17 is only 89%. Among the five POC membranes, CC2 is the best for water desalination with performance superior to other membranes reported in the literature. The membrane flexibility is revealed to have a weak effect on water permeation. To provide further microscopic understanding, the permeation duration, diffusion and hydrogen bonding of water in the POC membranes are quantitatively analyzed. From this simulation study, the key factors governing water permeation in the POC membranes are unraveled and CC2 is identified to be an interesting candidate for water desalination.

  7. [Use of the PEEK cage in cervical spondylosis treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joachin-Hernández, Pedro; Alpízar-Aguirre, Armando; Zárate-Kalfópulus, Barón; Rosales-Olivares, Luis Miguel; Sánchez-Bringas, Guadalupe; Reyes-Sánchez, Alejandro Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Decompression and fusion with autograft is the gold standard technique in the treatment of cervical canal strait. Using PEEK cages or boxes of non-absorbable polymer with elasticity similar to bone, radiolucent, reduces morbidity and same degree of fusion. A case series, prospective, longitudinal, deliberate intervention, evaluation panel before and after 2 years follow-up. Discectomy and PEEK housing placement with autologous graft. Arthrodesis were evaluated, cervical lordosis, intervertebral space height, pain evaluated with Visual Analogue Scale, Neck Disability Index, operative time, intraoperative bleeding, hospital stay and complications. Statistical analysis with t Sudent, Wilcoxon and Fisher's exact text. Of 17 patients studied, 9 (53%) were female. Average age 62 years. The most affected level was C5-6, C6-7 with 5 patients. Melting was found at 100%. There was no sag or migration of the box, space height was conserved, but segmental lordosis was not retained. Clinical improvement in all patients as well as disability index was seen. Bleeding was on average 187 mL. With regard to symptom improvement, conservation of interspace height and back, no segmental lordosis conservation and fusion using PEEK box is consistent with the literature. We suggest using anterior plate to maintain cervical lordosis. We found a melt index of 100%. We found clinical improvement of symptoms, pain and disability, and a global loss of cervical lordosis.

  8. Chlamydophila psittaci DNA detection in the faeces of cage birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sareyyupoglu, B; Cantekin, Z; Bas, B

    2007-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the shedding of Chlamydophila psittaci in faecal samples from cage birds using PCR testing. A total of 47 faeces samples were collected from four different aviaries. Main symptoms determined after clinical investigation and owner histories of the birds showed that the birds had respiratory system problems changing from mild to severe. They also showed conjunctivitis, diarrhoea or no symptoms at all. DNA extractions from faeces were performed with the QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit. Following PCR with Cp. psittaci specific primers, 43 (91.5%) samples were determined to harbour-specific DNA. Only one bird from each aviary was found to be negative by PCR. As all the samples from birds showing clinical signs were PCR positive, these signs could be correlated to psittacosis in these birds. Cp. psittaci shedding in faeces was detected in all the aviaries. After restriction analysis of PCR amplicons with AluI enzyme, all the isolates showed the same RFLP (Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism) patterns with the control Cp. psittaci DNA. PCR following QIAamp DNA stool mini kit extraction of faecal samples was found to be a rapid, specific, sensitive, reproducible test, which did not need additional nested PCR of samples.

  9. Uranyl peroxide pyrophosphate cage clusters with oxalate and nitrate bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jie; Ozga, Michael; Stoffer, Megan; Burns, Peter C

    2012-06-28

    Two complex cage clusters built from uranyl hexagonal bipyramids and multiple types of bridges between uranyl ions, U(30)Py(10)Ox(5) and U(38)Py(10)Nt(4), were crystallized from aqueous solution under ambient conditions. These are built from 30 uranyl hexagonal bipyramids, 10 pyrophosphate groups, and five oxalate bridges in one case, and 38 uranyl hexagonal bipyramids, 10 pyrophosphate groups, and four nitrate groups in the other. The crystal compositions are (H(3)O)(10)Li(18)K(22)[(UO(2))(30)(O(2))(30)(P(2)O(7))(10)(C(2)O(4))(5)](H(2)O)(22) and Li(24)K(36)[(UO(2))(38)(O(2))(40)(OH)(8)(P(2)O(7))(10)(NO(3))(4)](NO(3))(4)(H(2)O)(n) for U(30)Py(10)Ox(5) and U(38)Py(10)Nt(4), respectively. Cluster U(30)Py(10)Ox(5) crystallizes over a narrow range of solution pH that encourages incorporation of both oxalate and pyrophosphate, with incorporation of oxalate only being favored under more acidic conditions, and pyrophosphate only under more alkaline conditions. Cluster U(38)Py(10)Nt(4) contains two identical lobes consisting of uranyl polyhedra and pyrophosphate groups, with these lobes linked into the larger cluster through four nitrate groups. The synthesis conditions appear to have prevented closure of these lobes, and a relatively high nitrate concentration in solution favored formation of the larger cluster.

  10. John Cage's Aria viewed through the prism of contextual determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radovanović Bojana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analysis the three contextual layers of creating John Cage's Aria for solo voice performed by Cathy Berberia at the 'big stage' of musical neo-avant-garde in Darmstadt. The layers in question are: (1 the socio-political context of Germany after World War II, where the denazification process was started at the time, (2 the artistic context of neo-avant-garde musical milieu which was being formed in Darmstadt in that period, and (3 the context of a new epoch in the history of vocal art. The thesis presented here is that an encounter occurred between American experimental and European avant-garde musical practice during the accelerated denazification and liberalisation of German society and the establishment of the Cold War relationship between the East and the West. The piece Aria represents an example of a collaborative work between American and European artists, which turned to be an important step in the history of extended vocal techniques in musical performing and composing.

  11. Stabilization of Small Boron Cage by Transition Metal Encapsulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lijun; Lv, Jian; Wang, Yanchao; Ma, Yanming

    2015-03-01

    The discovery of chemically stable fullerene-like structures formed by elements other than carbon has been long-standing desired. On this aspect significant efforts have centered around boron, only one electron deficient compared with carbon. However, during the past decade a large number of experimental and theoretical studies have established that small boron clusters are either planar/quasi-planar or forming double-ring tubular structures. Until recently, two all-boron fullerenes have been independently discovered: B38 proposed by our structure searching calculations and B40 observed in a joint experimental and theoretical study. Here we extend our work to the even smaller boron clusters and propose an effective routine to stabilize them by transition metal encapsulation. By combining swarm-intelligence structure searching and first-principles calculations, we have systematically investigated the energy landscapes of transition-metal-doped MB24 clusters (M = Ti, Zr, Hf, Cr, Mo, W, Fe, Ru and Os). Two stable symmetric endohedral boron cages, MoB24 and WB24 are identified. The stability of them can be rationalized in terms of their unique 18-electron closed-shell electronic structures. Funded by Recruitment Program of Global Experts of China and China Postdoctoral Science Foundation.

  12. Mitochondrial inactivation by Anopheles albimanus cecropin 3: molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavón, Natalia; Buelna-Chontal, Mabel; Hernández-Esquivel, Luz; Hernández, Sauri; Chávez, Edmundo; Condé, Renaud; Lanz-Mendoza, Humberto

    2014-03-01

    Cecropin 3 (Ccrp3) is an antimicrobial peptide from Anopheles albimanus, which is expressed during Plasmodium berghei infection. Here, we report that synthetic Ccrp3, aside from antibacterial activity, also shows cardio regulatory functions. In rats, Ccrp3 significantly diminishes blood pressure as well as the heartbeat frequency at nanomolar concentration. Ccrp3 affect the rat cardiac muscle mitochondria, inducing uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation, oxygen consumption and transport of Ca(2). Ccrp3 treatment of the mitochondria causes mitochondrial damage promoting oxidative stress, causing overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and inhibition of superoxide dismutase. At nM concentration, Ccrp3 inhibits superoxide dismutase activity through direct interaction, diminishing by its enzymatic activity. Ccrp3 induces the release of the pro-apoptotic marker Bax from the mitochondria. Altogether, these results suggest that Ccrp3 pro-oxidative activity on cardiac muscle mitochondria could be responsible for triggering the heartbeat frequency and blood pressure lowering observed the Ccrp3 injected rats. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Recent Advances in Mitochondrial Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craven, Lyndsey; Alston, Charlotte L; Taylor, Robert W; Turnbull, Doug M

    2017-08-31

    Mitochondrial disease is a challenging area of genetics because two distinct genomes can contribute to disease pathogenesis. It is also challenging clinically because of the myriad of different symptoms and, until recently, a lack of a genetic diagnosis in many patients. The last five years has brought remarkable progress in this area. We provide a brief overview of mitochondrial origin, function, and biology, which are key to understanding the genetic basis of mitochondrial disease. However, the primary purpose of this review is to describe the recent advances related to the diagnosis, genetic basis, and prevention of mitochondrial disease, highlighting the newly described disease genes and the evolving methodologies aimed at preventing mitochondrial DNA disease transmission.

  14. Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Keane

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson's disease (PD is a progressive, neurodegenerative condition that has increasingly been linked with mitochondrial dysfunction and inhibition of the electron transport chain. This inhibition leads to the generation of reactive oxygen species and depletion of cellular energy levels, which can consequently cause cellular damage and death mediated by oxidative stress and excitotoxicity. A number of genes that have been shown to have links with inherited forms of PD encode mitochondrial proteins or proteins implicated in mitochondrial dysfunction, supporting the central involvement of mitochondria in PD. This involvement is corroborated by reports that environmental toxins that inhibit the mitochondrial respiratory chain have been shown to be associated with PD. This paper aims to illustrate the considerable body of evidence linking mitochondrial dysfunction with neuronal cell death in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc of PD patients and to highlight the important need for further research in this area.

  15. Mitochondrial transcription in mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shokolenko, Inna N; Alexeyev, Mikhail F

    2017-01-01

    As a consequence of recent discoveries of intimate involvement of mitochondria with key cellular processes, there has been a resurgence of interest in all aspects of mitochondrial biology, including the intricate mechanisms of mitochondrial DNA maintenance and expression. Despite four decades of research, there remains a lot to be learned about the processes that enable transcription of genetic information from mitochondrial DNA to RNA, as well as their regulation. These processes are vitally important, as evidenced by the lethality of inactivating the central components of mitochondrial transcription machinery. Here, we review the current understanding of mitochondrial transcription and its regulation in mammalian cells. We also discuss key theories in the field and highlight controversial subjects and future directions as we see them.

  16. Presentation of adult mitochondrial epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finsterer, Josef; Mahjoub, Sinda Zarrouk

    2013-03-01

    Mitochondrial disorders (MIDs) frequently manifest phenotypically as epilepsy (mitochondrial epilepsy). Mitochondrial epilepsy occurs in early-onset as well as late-onset syndromic and non-syndromic MIDs. We were interested in the types of epilepsy, the prevalence of mitochondrial epilepsy, the type and effectiveness of treatment, and in the outcome of adult MID patients with epilepsy. We retrospectively evaluated adult patients with syndromic or non-syndromic MIDs and epilepsy. MIDs were classified according to the modified Walker criteria as definite, probable, and possible. Epilepsy in adult patients with a MID was classified as "structural/metabolic" in two-thirds of the cases and as "genetic" in one-third of the cases. Although all types of seizures may occur in mitochondrial epilepsy, adult patients most frequently presented with generalised tonic-clonic seizures, partial seizures, convulsive status epilepticus, or non-convulsive status epilepticus. Cerebral imaging was normal in one-third of the patients. Two-thirds of the adult patients with mitochondrial epilepsy who took antiepileptic drugs received monotherapy, one-third combination treatment. The antiepileptic drugs most frequently administered included levetiracetam, lamotrigine, valproic acid, and gabapentin. Antiepileptic drugs were usually well tolerated and the outcome favourable. Adult mitochondrial epilepsy appears to be less frequent than previously believed but the prevalence strongly depends on patient selection. Mitochondrial epilepsy is most frequently "structural/metabolic". AEDs recommended for mitochondrial epilepsy include levetiracetam, lamotrigine, gabapentin and lacosamide. The outcome of mitochondrial epilepsy may be more favourable if mitochondrion-toxic AEDs are avoided. Only if non-mitochondrion-toxic AEDs are ineffective, mitochondrion-toxic AEDs may be used. Copyright © 2012 British Epilepsy Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of cage fish culture on water quality and selected biological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of cage fish culture on water quality and selected biological communities in northern Lake Victoria, Uganda. L Mwebaza-Ndawula, V Kiggundu, G Magezi, J Naluwayiro, W Gandhi-Pabire, H Ocaya ...

  18. Reducing organic contamination of shallow areas in brackish lagoons during rearing fish in cages in polyculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Shekk

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The development of the technology of the controlled rearing of marine fish remains one of the priority strategic trends of development of national mariculture. A study of the possibility of using polyculture for cage culture has a particular interest. Joint cultivation of several species of fish in the same cage, as practice of fish farming has demonstrated, does not have a tangible positive effect. At the same time, the use of cages of special design can provide significant additional fish products through the use of additional aquaculture objects. The ecological state of water areas, where the cages are located, is of great importance. High fish stocking density and the use of artificial feeds can serve as a source of powerful biogenic and organic pollution, which is especially important for shallow water areas with weak water exchange. The purpose of the study is to develop the methods for joint fish production in cage mariculture capable to provide high fish production and to weaken organic pollution of shallow water areas where cage farms are located. Methodology. The studies were conducted in 1999 and 2004. Cages of special design (internal 10 m3 and external 18.75 m3 installed in the brackish Shabolat Lagoon were used for rearing, steelhead trout, haarder, grass goby and round goby in polyculture. The standard aquaculture research methods were used. For express-analysis of environment hydrochemical parameters in cage location area the following devices were used: "ECOTEST-2000 T" (О2, NO2, NO3, NH4, CO2, phosphates, pH; termooksimetr "АJА-101М" (Т; О2; "pH meter-150 M; Refractometer "ATAGO-100" (salinity and water density. Findings. The results of marine fish cultivation in cages in polyculture in the shallow Shabolat lagoon are presented. It has been shown that joint cultivation of salmon, mullet and gobies in specially designed cages in shallow marine lagoons allows using artificial and natural feeds more fully and

  19. Direct gravimetric sensing of GBL by a molecular recognition process in organic cage compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brutschy, Malte; Schneider, Markus W; Mastalerz, Michael; Waldvogel, Siegfried R

    2013-09-28

    Organic cages were identified as highly potent affinity materials for the tracing of γ-butyrolactone. The selectivity over ethanol and water is based on the interior functional groups which allow preferential hydrogen bonding to the target analyte.

  20. The influence of fish culture in floating net cages on microbial indicators of water quality

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gorlach-Lira, K; Pacheco, C; Carvalho, L C T; Melo Júnior, H N; Crispim, M C

    2013-01-01

    ... (Oreochromis niloticus) in floating net cages. The physico-chemical parameters, counts of mesophilic total aerobic bacteria, total and thermotolerant coliforms and fecal streptococci, and the presence of Escherichia coli in samples of water...

  1. Hydrodynamic characteristics of plane netting used for aquaculture net cages in uniform current

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    DONG, SHUCHUANG; HU, FUXIANG; KUMAZAWA, TAISEI; SIODE, DAISUKE; TOKAI, TADASHI

    2016-01-01

      The hydrodynamic characteristics of polyethylene (PE) netting and chain link wire netting with different types of twine diameter and mesh size for aquaculture net cages were examined by experiments in a flume tank...

  2. Principles of Designing Extra-Large Pore Openings and Cages in Zeolitic Imidazolate Frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jingjing; Zhang, Yue-Biao; Liu, Qi; Trickett, Christopher A; Gutiérrez-Puebla, Enrique; Monge, M Ángeles; Cong, Hengjiang; Aldossary, Abdulrahman; Deng, Hexiang; Yaghi, Omar M

    2017-05-10

    We report three design principles for obtaining extra-large pore openings and cages in the metal-organic analogues of inorganic zeolites, zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs). Accordingly, we prepared a series of 15 ZIFs, members of which have the largest pore opening (22.5 Å) and the largest cage size (45.8 Å) known for all porous tetrahedral structures. The key parameter allowing us to access these exceptional ZIFs is what we define as the steric index (δ), which is related to the size and shape of the imidazolate linkers employed in the synthesis. The three principles are based on using multiple linkers with specific range and ratios of δ to control the size of rings and cages from small to large, and therefore are universally applicable to all existing ZIFs. The ZIF with the largest cage size (ZIF-412) shows the best selectivity of porous materials tested toward removal of octane and p-xylene from humid air.

  3. ZnO cages with tunable shell thickness and photoluminescence properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou Jie; Wu Dapeng; Guo Huajie; Liu Ning; Xiao Ying [Chemistry and Environmental College, Henan Normal University, Jianshe Road No. 47, Xinxiang 453007 (China); Jiang Kai, E-mail: jiangkai6898@126.com [Chemistry and Environmental College, Henan Normal University, Jianshe Road No. 47, Xinxiang 453007 (China)

    2010-08-15

    Uniform ZnO cages were fabricated via using colloidal carbon spheres as sacrificing template. ZnO precursor could be easily coated on the carbon spheres by soaking the template into Zn(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2} aqueous solution. After calcination, the average diameter of the cages was 200 nm which experienced a large shrinkage from the initial carbon template (600 nm). The shell thickness of the cages could be manipulated from 20 nm to 40 nm by adjusting the concentration of Zn(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 2.} The correlation between the shell thickness and photoluminescence (PL) performances of these cages was also investigated. Moreover, this facile method could be potentially adopted as a general way to fabricate hollow structures of other metal oxides.

  4. Structure of Coatomer Cage Proteins and the Relationship among COPI, COPII, and Clathrin Vesicle Coats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Changwook; Goldberg, Jonathan (MSKCC)

    2010-09-13

    COPI-coated vesicles form at the Golgi apparatus from two cytosolic components, ARF G protein and coatomer, a heptameric complex that can polymerize into a cage to deform the membrane into a bud. Although coatomer shares a common evolutionary origin with COPII and clathrin vesicle coat proteins, the architectural relationship among the three cages is unclear. Strikingly, the {alpha}{beta}-COP core of coatomer crystallizes as a triskelion in which three copies of a {beta}-COP {beta}-propeller domain converge through their axial ends. We infer that the trimer constitutes the vertex of the COPI cage. Our model proposes that the COPI cage is intermediate in design between COPII and clathrin: COPI shares with clathrin an arrangement of three curved {alpha}-solenoid legs radiating from a common center, and COPI shares with COPII highly similar vertex interactions involving the axial ends of {beta}-propeller domains.

  5. Validation of a self-administered modified CAGE test (CAGE-C) in a somatic hospital ward: Comparison with biochemical markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zierau, Finn; Hardt, Finn; Henriksen, Jens Henrik

    2005-01-01

    Objective. The time frame for the original CAGE questionnaire is lifetime and it does not quantify drinking frequency and may be less suitable in a population with very few teetotalers. The purpose of this study was to validate a variant of the CAGE questionnaire and compare it with the outcome...... of a thorough interview according to DSM-III and ICD-10 criteria and to the outcome of biochemical markers in inpatients in a somatic hospital setting. Material and methods. The questionnaire and biochemical markers were tested on a random sample of 130 patients admitted to a department of orthopedic surgery...

  6. Mitochondrial Respiration Is Decreased in Rat Kidney Following Fetal Exposure to a Maternal Low-Protein Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Engeham

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Maternal protein restriction in rat pregnancy is associated with impaired renal development and age-related loss of renal function in the resulting offspring. Pregnant rats were fed either control or low-protein (LP diets, and kidneys from their male offspring were collected at 4, 13, or 16 weeks of age. Mitochondrial state 3 and state 4 respiratory rates were decreased by a third in the LP exposed adults. The reduction in mitochondrial function was not explained by complex IV deficiency or altered expression of the complex I subunits that are typically associated with mitochondrial dysfunction. Similarly, there was no evidence that LP-exposure resulted in greater oxidative damage to the kidney, differential expression of ATP synthetase β-subunit, and ATP-ADP translocase 1. mRNA expression of uncoupling protein 2 was increased in adult rats exposed to LP in utero, but there was no evidence of differential expression at the protein level. Exposure to maternal undernutrition is associated with a decrease in mitochondrial respiration in kidneys of adult rats. In the absence of gross disturbances in respiratory chain protein expression, programming of coupling efficiency may explain the long-term impact of the maternal diet.

  7. The effect of high-fat--high-fructose diet on skeletal muscle mitochondrial energetics in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescenzo, Raffaella; Bianco, Francesca; Coppola, Paola; Mazzoli, Arianna; Cigliano, Luisa; Liverini, Giovanna; Iossa, Susanna

    2015-03-01

    To study the effect of isoenergetic administration to adult rats of high-fat or high-fat--high-fructose diet for 2 weeks on skeletal muscle mitochondrial energetic. Body and skeletal muscle composition, energy balance, plasma lipid profile and glucose tolerance were measured, together with mitochondrial functionality, oxidative stress and antioxidant defense. Rats fed high-fat--high-fructose diet exhibited significantly higher plasma triglycerides and non-esterified fatty acids, together with significantly higher plasma glucose and insulin response to glucose load. Skeletal muscle triglycerides and ceramide were significantly higher in rats fed high-fat--high-fructose diet. Skeletal muscle mitochondrial energetic efficiency and uncoupling protein 3 content were significantly higher, while adenine nucleotide translocase content was significantly lower, in rats fed high-fat or high-fat--high-fructose diet. The results suggest that a high-fat--high-fructose diet even without hyperphagia is able to increase lipid flow to skeletal muscle and mitochondrial energetic efficiency, with two detrimental effects: (a) energy sparing that contributes to the early onset of obesity and (b) reduced oxidation of fatty acids and lipid accumulation in skeletal muscle, which could generate insulin resistance.

  8. Food consumption and food exchange of caged honey bees using a radioactive labelled sugar solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libor, Anika; Kupelwieser, Vera; Crailsheim, Karl

    2017-01-01

    We measured the distribution of sugar solution within groups of caged honey bees (Apis mellifera) under standard in vitro laboratory conditions using 14C polyethylene glycol as a radioactive marker to analyze ingestion by individual bees after group feeding. We studied the impact of different experimental setups by varying the number of bees, age of bees, origin of bees, duration of experiment, the amount of available diet, and the influence of the neurotoxic pesticide imidacloprid in the diet on the feeding and food sharing behavior (trophallaxis). Sugar solution was non-uniformly distributed in bees in 36 out of 135 cages. As a measure of the extent to which the sugar diet was equally distributed between caged bees, we calculated the (inner 80%) intake ratio by dividing the intake of the 90th percentile bee by the intake of the 10th percentile bee. This intake ratio ranged from 1.3 to 94.8 in 133 individual cages, further supporting a non-uniform distribution of food among caged bees. We can expect a cage with 10 or 30 bees containing one bee that ingests, on average, the 8.8-fold of the bee in the same cage ingesting the smallest quantity of food. Inner 80% intake ratios were lower in experiments with a permanent or chronic offering of labelled sugar solution compared to temporary or acute feedings. After pooling the data of replicates to achieve a higher statistical power we compared different experimental setups. We found that uniform food distribution is best approached with 10 newly emerged bees per cage, which originate from a brood comb from a single colony. We also investigated the trophallaxis between caged honey bees which originally consumed the diet and newly added bees. Color marked bees were starved and added to the cages in a ratio of 10:5 or 20:20 after the initial set of bees consumed all the labelled sugar solution. The distribution of the labelled sugar solution by trophallaxis within 48 hours to added bees was 25% (10:5) or 45% (20:20) of the

  9. Food consumption and food exchange of caged honey bees using a radioactive labelled sugar solution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Brodschneider

    Full Text Available We measured the distribution of sugar solution within groups of caged honey bees (Apis mellifera under standard in vitro laboratory conditions using 14C polyethylene glycol as a radioactive marker to analyze ingestion by individual bees after group feeding. We studied the impact of different experimental setups by varying the number of bees, age of bees, origin of bees, duration of experiment, the amount of available diet, and the influence of the neurotoxic pesticide imidacloprid in the diet on the feeding and food sharing behavior (trophallaxis. Sugar solution was non-uniformly distributed in bees in 36 out of 135 cages. As a measure of the extent to which the sugar diet was equally distributed between caged bees, we calculated the (inner 80% intake ratio by dividing the intake of the 90th percentile bee by the intake of the 10th percentile bee. This intake ratio ranged from 1.3 to 94.8 in 133 individual cages, further supporting a non-uniform distribution of food among caged bees. We can expect a cage with 10 or 30 bees containing one bee that ingests, on average, the 8.8-fold of the bee in the same cage ingesting the smallest quantity of food. Inner 80% intake ratios were lower in experiments with a permanent or chronic offering of labelled sugar solution compared to temporary or acute feedings. After pooling the data of replicates to achieve a higher statistical power we compared different experimental setups. We found that uniform food distribution is best approached with 10 newly emerged bees per cage, which originate from a brood comb from a single colony. We also investigated the trophallaxis between caged honey bees which originally consumed the diet and newly added bees. Color marked bees were starved and added to the cages in a ratio of 10:5 or 20:20 after the initial set of bees consumed all the labelled sugar solution. The distribution of the labelled sugar solution by trophallaxis within 48 hours to added bees was 25% (10:5 or 45

  10. Food consumption and food exchange of caged honey bees using a radioactive labelled sugar solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodschneider, Robert; Libor, Anika; Kupelwieser, Vera; Crailsheim, Karl

    2017-01-01

    We measured the distribution of sugar solution within groups of caged honey bees (Apis mellifera) under standard in vitro laboratory conditions using 14C polyethylene glycol as a radioactive marker to analyze ingestion by individual bees after group feeding. We studied the impact of different experimental setups by varying the number of bees, age of bees, origin of bees, duration of experiment, the amount of available diet, and the influence of the neurotoxic pesticide imidacloprid in the diet on the feeding and food sharing behavior (trophallaxis). Sugar solution was non-uniformly distributed in bees in 36 out of 135 cages. As a measure of the extent to which the sugar diet was equally distributed between caged bees, we calculated the (inner 80%) intake ratio by dividing the intake of the 90th percentile bee by the intake of the 10th percentile bee. This intake ratio ranged from 1.3 to 94.8 in 133 individual cages, further supporting a non-uniform distribution of food among caged bees. We can expect a cage with 10 or 30 bees containing one bee that ingests, on average, the 8.8-fold of the bee in the same cage ingesting the smallest quantity of food. Inner 80% intake ratios were lower in experiments with a permanent or chronic offering of labelled sugar solution compared to temporary or acute feedings. After pooling the data of replicates to achieve a higher statistical power we compared different experimental setups. We found that uniform food distribution is best approached with 10 newly emerged bees per cage, which originate from a brood comb from a single colony. We also investigated the trophallaxis between caged honey bees which originally consumed the diet and newly added bees. Color marked bees were starved and added to the cages in a ratio of 10:5 or 20:20 after the initial set of bees consumed all the labelled sugar solution. The distribution of the labelled sugar solution by trophallaxis within 48 hours to added bees was 25% (10:5) or 45% (20:20) of the

  11. Characteristics Of Smoked Catfish (Hemibagrus Nemurus) Prepared Frompond Culture, Cage And Wild Fish

    OpenAIRE

    Maskilin, Jippo; Hasan, Bustari; Leksono, Tjipto

    2017-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the sensory quality, proximate composition, amino acids and fatty acids profiles of smoked catfish prepared from pond, cage culture and wild fish. Catfish samples 300-350 grams in weight wastaken respectualy from wild (Kampar river), pond and cage culture in Sungai Paku, Kampar. The fish was smoked using hot smoking method, and the smoked fish was evaluated for smoking yield, sensory quality, proximate composition, amino acid and fatty acid profile.The smoking...

  12. Caged vanilloid ligands for activation of TRPV1 receptors by 1- and 2-photon excitation†

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Jun; Gover, Tony D; Muralidharan, Sukumaran; Auston, Darryl A.; Weinreich, Daniel; Kao, Joseph?P.Y.

    2006-01-01

    Nociceptive neurons in the peripheral nervous system detect noxious stimuli and report the information to the central nervous system. Most nociceptive neurons express the vanilloid receptor, TRPV1, a non-selective cation channel gated by vanilloid ligands such as capsaicin, the pungent essence of chili peppers. Here, we report the synthesis and biological application of two caged vanilloids—biologically inert precursors that, when photolyzed, release bioactive vanilloid ligands. The two caged...

  13. Exterior egg quality as affected by enrichment resources layout in furnished laying-hen cages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Chen, Donghua; Meng, Fanyu; Su, Yingying; Wang, Lisha; Zhang, Runxiang; Li, Jianhong; Bao, Jun

    2017-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of enrichment resources (a perch, dustbath, and nest) layout in furnished laying-hen cages (FC) on exterior quality of eggs. One hundred and sixty-eight (168) Hy-Line Brown laying hens at 16 weeks of age were randomly distributed to four treatments: small furnished cages (SFC), medium furnished cages type I (MFC-I), medium furnished cages type II (MFC-II), and medium furnished cages type III (MFC-III). Each treatment had 4 replicates or cages with 6 hens for SFC (24 birds for each SFC) and 12 hen/cage for MFC-I, -II, and -III (48 birds for each MFC-I, -II and -III). Following a 2-week acclimation, data collection started at 18 weeks of age and continued till 52 weeks of age. Dirtiness of egg surface or cracked shell as indicators of the exterior egg quality were recorded each week. The results showed that the proportion of cracked or dirty eggs was significantly affected by the FC type (p<0.01) in that the highest proportion of cracked or dirty eggs was found in MFC-I and the lowest proportion of dirty eggs in SFC. The results of this showed that furnished cage types affected both dirty eggs and cracked eggs (p<0.01). The results also indicated that not nest but dustbath lead to more dirty eggs. Only MFC-I had higher dirty eggs at nest than other FC (p< 0.01). The results of dirty eggs in MFC-I and MFC-II compared with SFC and MFC-III seemed suggest that a low position of dustbath led to more dirty eggs. SFC design affected exterior egg quality and the low position of dustbath in FC resulted in higher proportion of dirty eggs.

  14. Exterior egg quality as affected by enrichment resources layout in furnished laying-hen cages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective This study aimed to investigate the effects of enrichment resources (a perch, dustbath, and nest layout in furnished laying-hen cages (FC on exterior quality of eggs. Methods One hundred and sixty-eight (168 Hy-Line Brown laying hens at 16 weeks of age were randomly distributed to four treatments: small furnished cages (SFC, medium furnished cages type I (MFC-I, medium furnished cages type II (MFC-II, and medium furnished cages type III (MFC-III. Each treatment had 4 replicates or cages with 6 hens for SFC (24 birds for each SFC and 12 hen/cage for MFC-I, -II, and -III (48 birds for each MFC-I, -II and -III. Following a 2-week acclimation, data collection started at 18 weeks of age and continued till 52 weeks of age. Dirtiness of egg surface or cracked shell as indicators of the exterior egg quality were recorded each week. Results The results showed that the proportion of cracked or dirty eggs was significantly affected by the FC type (p<0.01 in that the highest proportion of cracked or dirty eggs was found in MFC-I and the lowest proportion of dirty eggs in SFC. The results of this showed that furnished cage types affected both dirty eggs and cracked eggs (p<0.01. The results also indicated that not nest but dustbath lead to more dirty eggs. Only MFC-I had higher dirty eggs at nest than other FC (p< 0.01. The results of dirty eggs in MFC-I and MFC-II compared with SFC and MFC-III seemed suggest that a low position of dustbath led to more dirty eggs. Conclusion SFC design affected exterior egg quality and the low position of dustbath in FC resulted in higher proportion of dirty eggs.

  15. Exterior egg quality as affected by enrichment resources layout in furnished laying-hen cages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Chen, Donghua; Meng, Fanyu; Su, Yingying; Wang, Lisha; Zhang, Runxiang; Li, Jianhong; Bao, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to investigate the effects of enrichment resources (a perch, dustbath, and nest) layout in furnished laying-hen cages (FC) on exterior quality of eggs. Methods One hundred and sixty-eight (168) Hy-Line Brown laying hens at 16 weeks of age were randomly distributed to four treatments: small furnished cages (SFC), medium furnished cages type I (MFC-I), medium furnished cages type II (MFC-II), and medium furnished cages type III (MFC-III). Each treatment had 4 replicates or cages with 6 hens for SFC (24 birds for each SFC) and 12 hen/cage for MFC-I, -II, and -III (48 birds for each MFC-I, -II and -III). Following a 2-week acclimation, data collection started at 18 weeks of age and continued till 52 weeks of age. Dirtiness of egg surface or cracked shell as indicators of the exterior egg quality were recorded each week. Results The results showed that the proportion of cracked or dirty eggs was significantly affected by the FC type (p<0.01) in that the highest proportion of cracked or dirty eggs was found in MFC-I and the lowest proportion of dirty eggs in SFC. The results of this showed that furnished cage types affected both dirty eggs and cracked eggs (p<0.01). The results also indicated that not nest but dustbath lead to more dirty eggs. Only MFC-I had higher dirty eggs at nest than other FC (p< 0.01). The results of dirty eggs in MFC-I and MFC-II compared with SFC and MFC-III seemed suggest that a low position of dustbath led to more dirty eggs. Conclusion SFC design affected exterior egg quality and the low position of dustbath in FC resulted in higher proportion of dirty eggs. PMID:28231694

  16. RESULTS OF TREATMENT OF CERVICAL DISCOPATHY WITH PEEK INTERBODY CAGES AT THREE LEVELS WITHOUT PLATE FIXATION

    OpenAIRE

    González Moga, Amado; Guzmán Carranza, Enrique; Álvarez Vázquez, Leonardo; Huerta Hernández, Gabriel; Galicia Luna, Víctor; Anaya Contreras, Víctor Hugo; Isais Gómez, Abraham

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To present the results of treatment of patients with cervical discopathy by anterior cervical approach, discectomy and placement of a PEEK interbody cage without anterior plate fixation. Methods: Retrospective, cross-sectional study from March 2013 to March 2015. Sixteen patients with radiculopathy or clinical signs of myelopathy were included; all patients underwent cervical surgery through anterior approach, discectomy, and placement of PEEK cages on three levels. Deco...

  17. Morphological analysis of interbody fusion following posterior lumbar interbody fusion with cages using computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong Kwang; Kim, Myeong Jong; Roh, Sung Woo; Jeon, Sang Ryong

    2017-08-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using cages in conjunction with pedicle screw fixation is considered the gold standard for surgical treatment of degenerative lumbar spine disorders due to its biomechanical stability and high fusion rate. However, research regarding patterns of fusion in the interbody space during the early postoperative period is lacking.Sixty consecutive patients were recruited from May 2013 to June 2015. All patients underwent PLIF using 2 titanium cages filled with local bone chips from decompressed lamina and facet bone in conjunction with pedicle screw fixation. Computed tomography scans were obtained 3 to 6 months following surgery in order to evaluate the partial fusion state. Computed tomography (CT) classification of fusion morphology was divided into 8 groups and then into compartments according to fusion space, and the rate of fusion for each was calculated. Further follow-up was conducted to confirm fusion state and assess outcomes.The most frequent pattern of interbody fusion was bilateral intra-cage fusion with unilateral lateral bridging of extra-cage areas (N = 36, 43.4%); the least frequent was interspace bridging of the 2 cages alone (N = 0, 0%). The fusion rate for the intra-cage area (Compartment 1) reached 100%. However, the fusion in the lateral space outside of cages (Compartment 2) was not satisfactory, though reasonable (72.3%). All patients were confirmed as achieving adequate fusion at the final follow-up, with improved clinical outcomes.Widening of the contact area between the vertebral body and cages is recommended to promote increased interbody fusion during the early postoperative period.

  18. Economic analysis of the environmental impact on marine cage lobster aquaculture in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Ly, Nguyen Thi Y

    2009-01-01

    In Vietnam, marine cage lobster aquaculture has been expanding significantly over the last years. Besides the economic contribution for locals living in the coastal areas in Central of Vietnam, this industry has created some problems that are relating to the marine environmental protection where trash fish feed is predominant. This paper investigates the environmental impact on cage marine lobster aquaculture in Vietnam by using the Change of Productivity method in which nitrogen releasing fr...

  19. [The finite element analysis of polyetheretherketone/hydroxyapatite/carbon fiber cage].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xueyong; Zhu, Hongxin; Jing, Yanfeng; Sui, Guoxin; Zhang, Zongfu

    2013-08-01

    To compare the bio-mechanical characteristics of cages of two types, i. e., polyetheretherketone/ hydroxyapatite/carbon fiber (PEEK/HA/CF) and titanium combined with internal pedicle screw fixation in lumbar model, and to provide experimental evidences for clinical application, we constructed a three-dimensional finite element model of an intact L2-L4 segment by using computer tomography scans of a healthy male. The three-dimensional finite element models of an intact L2-L4 segment and single cage plus bilateral vertebral pedicle screw fixation were established. The angular motion of fused segment and stress distribution in the bone graft and cage and L3 inferior endplate under different loads were recorded. The result showed that the peak Von Mises stresses of the bone graft of PEEK/HA/CF group were at least 2.2 time as that of titanium group. The peak Von Mises stresses of L3 inferior endplate of the titanium group were at least 2. 3 times as that of PEEK/HA/CF group. These stresses were concentrated at places where the cage interfaced with the endplate. The angular variation of the titanium group showed similarity to PEEK/HA/CF group. The PEEK/HA/CF cage could provide stability similar to that of titanium cage in the presence of posterior instrumentation. It could increase the load transfer through the bone graft and promote the bone fusion. It could also reduce the stresses in endplates adjacent to the cage and reduce the subsidence of the cage.

  20. Model of a generator end-winding cage; Modelisation d`une cage de developpantes d`alternateur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leger, A.C.; Fanton, J.P.; Davies, C.

    1994-09-01

    This document presents some studies concerning the vibratory characterization of particular structures called: generator end-winding cages. These structures are mainly made up of the endings of armature windings. The question of their good mechanical behaviour is of prime importance, since they are submitted to high electromagnetic efforts during the different electrical ratings encountered during operation. The designer (GEC-Alsthom) and the user (EDF) have both undertaken numerical calculations in order to characterize a given machine, in this case a 600 MW bipolar generator; it appeared interesting to compare such calculations. The models realized respectively by GEC-Alsthom and EDF make use of different techniques and hypotheses. GEC-Alsthom represents the sets of rods and spacers by plates, which properties are determined by a pre-processor. The model is simplified to take into account the existing symmetries. It takes profit of previous experience and aims at a fast utilisation. The EDF model tends to allow a further comprehensive calculation, form the electromagnetic efforts to the determination of local stresses. The whole set of the constituting elements of the structure is modelled by beams, which leads to an important size for the model (21 000 degrees of freedom). The validation performed on the two models has been focused on the comparison between respective results and also with experimental results. Each model provides values for the first eigenfrequencies and the associated modes shapes. (authors). 3 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Constitutive NOS uncoupling and NADPH oxidase upregulation in the penis of type 2 diabetic men with erectile dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musicki, B; Burnett, A L

    2017-03-01

    Erectile dysfunction (ED) associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) involves dysfunctional nitric oxide (NO) signaling and increased oxidative stress in the penis. However, the mechanisms of endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) and neuronal NO synthase (nNOS) dysregulation, and the sources of oxidative stress, are not well defined, particularly at the human level. The objective of this study was to define whether uncoupled eNOS and nNOS, and NADPH oxidase upregulation, contribute to the pathogenesis of ED in T2DM men. Penile erectile tissue was obtained from 9 T2DM patients with ED who underwent penile prosthesis surgery for ED, and from six control patients without T2DM or ED who underwent penectomy for penile cancer. The dimer-to-monomer protein expression ratio, an indicator of uncoupling for both eNOS and nNOS, total protein expressions of eNOS and nNOS, as well as protein expressions of NADPH oxidase catalytic subunit gp91phox (an enzymatic source of oxidative stress) and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal [4-HNE] and nitrotyrosine (markers of oxidative stress) were measured by western blot in this tissue. In the erectile tissue of T2DM men, eNOS and nNOS uncoupling and protein expressions of NADPH oxidase subunit gp91phox, 4-HNE- and nitrotyrosine-modified proteins were significantly (p penis may involve uncoupled eNOS and nNOS and NADPH oxidase upregulation. Our description of molecular factors contributing to the pathogenesis of T2DM-associated ED at the human level is relevant to advancing clinically therapeutic approaches to restore erectile function in T2DM patients. © 2017 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  2. Coupled vs. uncoupled hydrogeophysical inversion via ensemble Kalman filter assimilation of ERT-monitored tracer test data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camporese, Matteo; Binley, Andrew; Cassiani, Giorgio; Deiana, Rita; Salandin, Paolo

    2013-04-01

    Recent advances in geophysical methods have been increasingly exploited as inverse modeling tools in groundwater hydrology. In particular, several attempts to constrain the hydrogeophysical inverse problem to reduce inversion error have been made using time-lapse geophysical measurements through both coupled and uncoupled inversion approaches. The main advantage of coupled approaches is that the numerical models for the geophysical and hydrological processes are linked together such that the geophysical data are inverted directly for the hydrological properties of interest. On the other hand, uncoupled approaches allow assessing in advance the reliability of the data, thanks to the geophysical inversion that is carried out before estimating the hydrological variable of interest. In spite of the recent popularity of fully coupled inversion approaches, we argue that their superiority over uncoupled methods still needs to be proven. The objective of this work is to shed some light on this debate. An approach based on the Lagrangian formulation of transport and the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) is here applied to assess the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity (K) by assimilating ERT data generated for a synthetic tracer test in a heterogeneous aquifer. In the coupled version of our inverse modeling tool, the K distribution is retrieved by assimilating raw ERT voltage data without the need for a preliminary electrical inversion. In the uncoupled version, K is estimated by assimilating time-lapse cross-hole electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) images derived by an electrical inversion. We compare the performance of the two approaches in a number of simulation scenarios and assess the impact on the inversions of the choice of the prior statistics of K.

  3. Uncoupling of eNOS contributes to redox-sensitive leukocyte recruitment and microvascular leakage elicited by methylglyoxal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yang; Qadri, Syed M; Hossain, Mokarram; Wu, Lingyun; Liu, Lixin

    2013-12-15

    Elevated levels of the glycolysis metabolite methylglyoxal (MG) have been implicated in impaired leukocyte-endothelial interactions and vascular complications in diabetes, putative mechanisms of which remain elusive. Uncoupling of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) was shown to be involved in endothelial dysfunction in diabetes. Whether MG contributes to these effects has not been elucidated. By using intravital microscopy in vivo, we demonstrate that MG-triggered reduction in leukocyte rolling velocity and increases in rolling flux, adhesion, emigration and microvascular permeability were significantly abated by scavenging reactive oxygen species (ROS). In murine cremaster muscle, MG treatment reduced tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4)/total biopterin ratio, increased arginase expression and stimulated ROS and superoxide production. The latter was significantly blunted by ROS scavengers Tempol (300μM) or MnTBAP (300μM), by BH4 supplementation (100μM) or by NOS inhibitor N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 20μM). In these tissues and cultured murine and human primary endothelial cells, MG increased eNOS monomerization and decreased BH4/total biopterin ratio, effects that were significantly mitigated by supplementation of BH4 or its precursor sepiapterin but not by L-NAME or tetrahydroneopterin, indicative of MG-triggered eNOS uncoupling. MG treatment further decreased the expression of guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase I in murine primary endothelial cells. MG-induced leukocyte recruitment was significantly attenuated by supplementation of BH4 or sepiapterin or suppression of superoxide by L-NAME confirming the role of eNOS uncoupling in MG-elicited leukocyte recruitment. Together, our study uncovers eNOS uncoupling as a pivotal mechanism in MG-induced oxidative stress, microvascular hyperpermeability and leukocyte recruitment in vivo. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Environmental impact of sea bass cage farming in the north Adriatic Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Domenico Lanari

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of the research was to reduce the organic and nutrient load under the net pen fish farms. An exper- iment was conducted to study the effects of artificial barriers fixed under a set of sea cages in order to reduce the envi- ronmental impact. The artificial barriers were made of four submerged galvanized steel pipes coated with plastic and placed on the sea floor (10 m depth in the Trieste gulf. The experimental design was as follows: control (C, cages with barriers (B, cages without barriers (WB. Measurements were taken on the surface as well as at 4 and 8m of depth. The trial lasted from the end of June 2000 to December 2001. Water quality parameters were not significantly influenced by the fish cages. Surface samples were characterised by lower levels of salinity and higher levels of oxygen and nitrate compared to those taken at 4 and 8 m. The artificial barriers favoured the establishment of a rich epiphytic fauna that took advantage of the presence of organic matter derived from fish cages. The two species Nucula nucleusand Neanthes caudataand the total bacterial counts were identified as potential indicators of pollution under the fish cage farms.

  5. Provision Of Carbon Nanotube Bucky Paper Cages For Immune Shielding Of Cells, Tissues, and Medical Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, David J. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    System and method for enclosing cells and/or tissue, for purposes of growth, cell differentiation, suppression of cell differentiation, biological processing and/or transplantation of cells and tissues (biological inserts), and for secretion, sensing and monitoring of selected chemical substances and activation of gene expression of biological inserts implanted into a human body. Selected cells and/or tissue are enveloped in a "cage" that is primarily carbon nanotube Bucky paper, with a selected thickness and porosity. Optionally, selected functional groups, proteins and/or peptides are attached to the carbon nanotube cage, or included within the cage, to enhance the growth and/or differentiation of the cells and/or tissue, to select for certain cellular sub-populations, to optimize certain functions of the cells and/or tissue and/or to optimize the passage of chemicals across the cage surface(s). A cage system is also used as an immuns shield and to control operation of a nano-device or macroscopic device, located within the cage, to provide or transform a selected chemical and/or a selected signal.

  6. Evaluation of cage designs and feeding regimes for honey bee (Hymenoptera: Apidae) laboratory experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shao Kang; Csaki, Tamas; Doublet, Vincent; Dussaubat, Claudia; Evans, Jay D; Gajda, Anna M; Gregorc, Alex; Hamilton, Michele C; Kamler, Martin; Lecocq, Antoine; Muz, Mustafa N; Neumann, Peter; Ozkirim, Asli; Schiesser, Aygün; Sohr, Alex R; Tanner, Gina; Tozkar, Cansu Ozge; Williams, Geoffrey R; Wu, Lyman; Zheng, Huoqing; Chen, Yan Ping

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to improve cage systems for maintaining adult honey bee (Apis mellifera L.) workers under in vitro laboratory conditions. To achieve this goal, we experimentally evaluated the impact of different cages, developed by scientists of the international research network COLOSS (Prevention of honey bee COlony LOSSes), on the physiology and survival of honey bees. We identified three cages that promoted good survival of honey bees. The bees from cages that exhibited greater survival had relatively lower titers of deformed wing virus, suggesting that deformed wing virus is a significant marker reflecting stress level and health status of the host. We also determined that a leak- and drip-proof feeder was an integral part of a cage system and a feeder modified from a 20-ml plastic syringe displayed the best result in providing steady food supply to bees. Finally, we also demonstrated that the addition of protein to the bees' diet could significantly increase the level ofvitellogenin gene expression and improve bees' survival. This international collaborative study represents a critical step toward improvement of cage designs and feeding regimes for honey bee laboratory experiments.

  7. A carbon fiber reinforced polymer cage for vertebral body replacement: technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciappetta, P; Boriani, S; Fava, G P

    1997-11-01

    We analyzed the surgical technique used for the replacement of damaged vertebral bodies of the thoracolumbar spine and the carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) cages that are used to replace the pathological vertebral bodies. We also evaluated the biomechanical properties of carbon composite materials used in spinal surgery. The surgical technique of CFRP implants may be divided into two distinct steps, i.e., assembling the components that will replace the pathological vertebral bodies and connecting the cage to an osteosynthetic system to immobilize the cage. The CFRP cages, made of Ultrapek polymer and AS-4 pyrolytic carbon fiber (AcroMed, Rotterdam, The Netherlands), are of different sizes and may be placed one on top of the other and fixed together with a titanium rod. These components are hollow to allow fragments of bone to be pressed manually into them and present threaded holes at 15, 30, and 90 degrees on the external surface, permitting the insertion of screws to connect the cage to an anterior or posterior osteosynthetic system. To date, we have used CFRP cages in 13 patients undergoing corporectomies and 10 patients undergoing spondylectomies. None of our patients have reported complications. CFRP implants offer several advantages compared with titanium or surgical grade stainless steel implants, demonstrating high versatility and outstanding biological and mechanical properties. Furthermore, CFRP implants are radiolucent and do not hinder radiographic evaluation of bone fusion, allowing for better follow-up studies.

  8. Effects of Metabolic Cage Housing on Rat Behavior and Performance in the Social Interaction Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whittaker, Alexandra L; Lymn, Kerry A; Howarth, Gordon S

    2016-01-01

    Although the metabolic cage is commonly used for housing nonhuman animals in the laboratory, it has been recognized as constituting a unique stressor. Such an environment would be expected to affect behavioral change in animals housed therein. However, few studies have specifically addressed the nature or magnitude of this change. The current study sought to characterize the behavioral time budget of rats in metabolic cage housing in comparison to that of individually housed animals in standard open-top cages. Rats in metabolic cages spent less time moving, manipulating enrichment, and carrying out rearing behaviors, and there was a corresponding shift toward inactivity. In an applied Social Interaction Test, behavioral scoring implied that metabolic cage housing had an anxiogenic effect. In conclusion, metabolic cage housing produces measurable effects on spontaneous and evoked behavior in rats in the laboratory. These behavioral changes may lead to a negative emotional state in these animals, which could have negative welfare consequences. Further research is needed to quantify the existence and magnitude of such an effect on rat well being.

  9. Atomistic simulations of CO2 and N2 within cage-type silica zeolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, Lindsey; Heitzer, Henry; Russell, Colin; Kohen, Daniela

    2011-03-01

    The behavior of CO(2) and N(2), both as single components and as binary mixtures, in two cage-type silica zeolites was studied using atomistic simulations. The zeolites considered, ITQ-3 and paradigm cage-type zeolite ZK4 (the all-silica analog of LTA), were chosen so that the principles illustrated can be generalized to other adsorbent/adsorbate systems with similar topology and types of interactions. N(2) was chosen both because of the potential uses of N(2)/CO(2) separations and because it differs from CO(2) most significantly in the magnitude of its Coulombic interactions with zeolites. Despite similarities between N(2) and CO(2) diffusion in other materials, we show here that the diffusion of CO(2) within cage-type zeolites is dominated by an energy barrier to diffusion located at the entrance to the narrow channels connecting larger cages. This barrier originates in Coulombic interactions between zeolites and CO(2)'s quadrupole and results in well-defined orientations for the diffusing molecules. Furthermore, CO(2)'s favorable electrostatic interactions with the zeolite framework result in preferential binding in the windows between cages. N(2)'s behavior, in contrast, is more consistent with that of molecules previously studied. Our analysis suggests that CO(2)'s behavior might be common for adsorbates with quadrupoles that interact strongly with a material that has narrow windows between cages.

  10. Comparison growth of Kappaphycus alvarezii (Rhodophyta, Solieriaceae cultivation in floating cage and longline in Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma’ruf Kasim

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Currently, cultivation using cages for Kappaphycus alvarezii was limited reported before. This study aims to reveal growth of K. alvarezii cultivated in floating cages and longline. The study was conducted in one of cultivation areas in Southeast Sulawesi, Indonesia. Total gross weight, propagule growth rate and specific growth rate were performing in this study. During our field experiment, total gross weight of K. alvarezii after 40 days, from 5 kg was growth to 22.5 ± 1.40 kg and 38.8 ± 1.6 kg on longline and floating cages, respectively. Propagule growth rate after 40 days, from 50 g was 107.8 ± 7.0 g and 152.5 ± 7.9 g during April, and 132.0 ± 8.0 g and 218.8 ± 8.6 g during August, on longline and floating cage, respectively. Specific growth rate of K. alvarezii was high during August, 2.43% day−1 and 3.69% day−1 cultivated in longline and floating cage, respectively. Propagule morphology was white and damage in 40% cultivated by longline and no damage by using floating cage particular in August and September while high dense of herbivorous fish surrounding the experimental sites.

  11. Bone Morphogenic Protein 4 Mediates NOX1-Dependent eNOS Uncoupling, Endothelial Dysfunction, and COX2 Induction in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youn, Ji-Youn; Zhou, Jun; Cai, Hua

    2015-08-01

    We have recently shown that angiotensin II-mediated uncoupling of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) contributes to endothelial dysfunction in streptozotocin-induced type 1 diabetes mellitus. However, it has remained unclear whether and how eNOS uncoupling occurs in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and the consequences of such in regulating vascular function. Here we investigated a role of bone morphogenic protein (BMP)-4 in mediating eNOS uncoupling, endothelial dysfunction, and inflammation in db/db mice. Circulating levels of BMP4 were markedly elevated in db/db mice but not in mice with type 1 diabetes mellitus, in which angiotensin II levels were significantly increased. Infusion of BMP4 antagonist noggin into db/db mice (15 μg/kg/day, 4 weeks) abolished eNOS uncoupling activity while restoring tetrahydrobiopterin (H(4)B) bioavailability. The impaired endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in db/db aortas was significantly improved by noggin infusion. Exposure of aortic endothelial cells to BMP4 (50 ng/mL, 24 hours) resulted in eNOS uncoupling, which was attenuated by H(4)B precursor sepiapterin or small interfering RNA silencing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase isoform 1 (NOX1). Interestingly, BMP4-dependent NOX1 up-regulation was abrogated by sepiapterin, implicating a NOX1-uncoupled eNOS-NOX1 feed-forward loop. BMP4 induction of cyclooxygenase 2 (COX2) expression and vascular cell adhesion protein 1 was found in db/db mice. Consistently, COX2 was up-regulated by BMP4 in endothelial cells, which was attenuated by sepiapterin, implicating an upstream role of eNOS uncoupling in COX2-mediated inflammatory activation. Taken together, our data for the first time reveal a novel role of BMP4 in inducing NOX1-dependent eNOS uncoupling in T2DM, which may promote development of novel therapeutics restoring endothelial function in T2DM.

  12. Uncoupling the functions of CALM in VAMP sorting and clathrin-coated pit formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahlender, Daniela A; Kozik, Patrycja; Miller, Sharon E; Peden, Andrew A; Robinson, Margaret S

    2013-01-01

    CALM (clathrin assembly lymphoid myeloid leukemia protein) is a cargo-selective adaptor for the post-Golgi R-SNAREs VAMPs 2, 3, and 8, and it also regulates the size of clathrin-coated pits and vesicles at the plasma membrane. The present study has two objectives: to determine whether CALM can sort additional VAMPs, and to investigate whether VAMP sorting contributes to CALM-dependent vesicle size regulation. Using a flow cytometry-based endocytosis efficiency assay, we demonstrate that CALM is also able to sort VAMPs 4 and 7, even though they have sorting signals for other clathrin adaptors. CALM homologues are present in nearly every eukaryote, suggesting that the CALM family may have evolved as adaptors for retrieving all post-Golgi VAMPs from the plasma membrane. Using a knockdown/rescue system, we show that wild-type CALM restores normal VAMP sorting in CALM-depleted cells, but that two non-VAMP-binding mutants do not. However, when we assayed the effect of CALM depletion on coated pit morphology, using a fluorescence microscopy-based assay, we found that the two mutants were as effective as wild-type CALM. Thus, we can uncouple the sorting function of CALM from its structural role.

  13. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of the promoter region of the human uncoupling protein-2 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, N; Chen, H; Winnikes, U; Reinert, I; Marmann, G; Pirke, K M; Lentes, K U

    1999-11-19

    As a member of the uncoupling protein family, UCP2 is ubiquitously expressed in rodents and humans, implicating a major role in thermogenesis. To analyze promoter function and regulatory motifs involved in the transcriptional regulation of UCP2 gene expression, 3.3 kb of 5'-flanking region of the human UCP2 (hUCP2) gene have been cloned. Sequence analysis showed that the promoter region of hUCP2 lacks a classical TATA or CAAT box, however, appeared GC-rich resulting in the presence of several Sp-1 motifs and Ap-1/-2 binding sites near the transcription initiation site. Functional characterization of human UCP2 promoter-CAT fusion constructs in transient expression assays showed that minimal promoter activity was observed within 65 bp upstream of the transcriptional start site (+1). 75 bp further upstream (from nt -141 to -66) a strong cis-acting regulatory element (or enhancer) was identified, which significantly enhanced basal promoter activity. The regulation of human UCP2 gene expression involves complex interactions among positive and negative regulatory elements distributed over a minimum of 3.3 kb of the promoter region. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  14. Implications of neurovascular uncoupling in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) of brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Rebecca W; Hadjiabadi, Darian H; Senarathna, Janaka; Agarwal, Shruti; Thakor, Nitish V; Pillai, Jay J; Pathak, Arvind P

    2017-11-01

    Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) serves as a critical tool for presurgical mapping of eloquent cortex and changes in neurological function in patients diagnosed with brain tumors. However, the blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) contrast mechanism underlying fMRI assumes that neurovascular coupling remains intact during brain tumor progression, and that measured changes in cerebral blood flow (CBF) are correlated with neuronal function. Recent preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated that even low-grade brain tumors can exhibit neurovascular uncoupling (NVU), which can confound interpretation of fMRI data. Therefore, to avoid neurosurgical complications, it is crucial to understand the biophysical basis of NVU and its impact on fMRI. Here we review the physiology of the neurovascular unit, how it is remodeled, and functionally altered by brain cancer cells. We first discuss the latest findings about the components of the neurovascular unit. Next, we synthesize results from preclinical and clinical studies to illustrate how brain tumor induced NVU affects fMRI data interpretation. We examine advances in functional imaging methods that permit the clinical evaluation of brain tumors with NVU. Finally, we discuss how the suppression of anomalous tumor blood vessel formation with antiangiogenic therapies can "normalize" the brain tumor vasculature, and potentially restore neurovascular coupling.

  15. Activity and functional interaction of alternative oxidase and uncoupling protein in mitochondria from tomato fruit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.E. Sluse

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyanide-resistant alternative oxidase (AOX is not limited to plant mitochondria and is widespread among several types of protists. The uncoupling protein (UCP is much more widespread than previously believed, not only in tissues of higher animals but also in plants and in an amoeboid protozoan. The redox energy-dissipating pathway (AOX and the proton electrochemical gradient energy-dissipating pathway (UCP lead to the same final effect, i.e., a decrease in ATP synthesis and an increase in heat production. Studies with green tomato fruit mitochondria show that both proteins are present simultaneously in the membrane. This raises the question of a specific physiological role for each energy-dissipating system and of a possible functional connection between them (shared regulation. Linoleic acid, an abundant free fatty acid in plants which activates UCP, strongly inhibits cyanide-resistant respiration mediated by AOX. Moreover, studies of the evolution of AOX and UCP protein expression and of their activities during post-harvest ripening of tomato fruit show that AOX and plant UCP work sequentially: AOX activity decreases in early post-growing stages and UCP activity is decreased in late ripening stages. Electron partitioning between the alternative oxidase and the cytochrome pathway as well as H+ gradient partitioning between ATP synthase and UCP can be evaluated by the ADP/O method. This method facilitates description of the kinetics of energy-dissipating pathways and of ATP synthase when state 3 respiration is decreased by limitation of oxidizable substrate.

  16. The Role of Uncoupling Protein 2 During Myocardial Dysfunction in a Canine Model of Endotoxin Shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoting; Liu, Dawei; Chai, Wenzhao; Long, Yun; Su, Longxiang; Yang, Rongli

    2015-03-01

    To explore the role of uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) during myocardial dysfunction in a canine model of endotoxin shock, 26 mongrel canines were randomly divided into the following four groups: A (control group; n = 6), B2 (shock after 2 h; n = 7), B4 (shock after 4 h; n = 7), and B6 (shock after 6 h; n = 6). Escherichia coli endotoxin was injected into the canines via the central vein, and hemodynamics were monitored. Energy metabolism, UCP2 mRNA and protein expression, and UCP2 localization were analyzed, and the correlation between energy metabolism changes, and UCP2 expression was determined. After the canine endotoxin shock model was successfully established, the expression of UCP2 mRNA and protein was found to increase, with later time points showing significant increases (P shock (P shock, and UCP2 may play an important role in this process. The negative correlation between UCP2 expression and energy metabolism requires further study, as the results might contribute to the treatment of sepsis with heart failure.

  17. Isoproterenol Increases Uncoupling, Glycolysis, and Markers of Beiging in Mature 3T3-L1 Adipocytes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colette N Miller

    Full Text Available Beta-adrenergic activation stimulates uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1, enhancing metabolic rate. In vitro, most work has studied brown adipocytes, however, few have investigated more established adipocyte lines such as the murine 3T3-L1 line. To assess the effect of beta-adrenergic activation, mature 3T3-L1s were treated for 6 or 48 hours with or without isoproterenol (10 and 100 μM following standard differentiation supplemented with thyroid hormone (T3; 1 nM. The highest dose of isoproterenol increased lipid content following 48 hours of treatment. This concentration enhanced UCP1 mRNA and protein expression. The increase in UCP1 following 48 hours of isoproterenol increased oxygen consumption rate. Further, coupling efficiency of the electron transport chain was disturbed and an enhancement of glycolytic rate was measured alongside this, indicating an attempt to meet the energy demands of the cell. Lastly, markers of beige adipocytes (protein content of CD137 and gene transcript of CITED1 were also found to be upregulated at 48 hours of isoproterenol treatment. This data indicates that mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes are responsive to isoproterenol and induce UCP1 expression and activity. Further, this finding provides a model for further pharmaceutical and nutraceutical investigation of UCP1 in 3T3-L1s.

  18. Leptin's metabolic and immune functions can be uncoupled at the ligand/receptor interaction level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabeau, Lennart; Jensen, Cathy J; Seeuws, Sylvie; Venken, Koen; Verhee, Annick; Catteeuw, Dominiek; van Loo, Geert; Chen, Hui; Walder, Ken; Hollis, Jacob; Foote, Simon; Morris, Margaret J; Van der Heyden, José; Peelman, Frank; Oldfield, Brian J; Rubio, Justin P; Elewaut, Dirk; Tavernier, Jan

    2015-02-01

    The adipocyte-derived cytokine leptin acts as a metabolic switch, connecting the body's metabolism to high-energy consuming processes such as reproduction and immune responses. We here provide genetic and biochemical evidence that the metabolic and immune functions of leptin can be uncoupled at the receptor level. First, homozygous mutant fatt/fatt mice carry a spontaneous splice mutation causing deletion of the leptin receptor (LR) immunoglobulin-like domain (IGD) in all LR isoforms. These mice are hyperphagic and morbidly obese, but display only minimal changes in size and cellularity of the thymus, and cellular immune responses are unaffected. These animals also displayed liver damage in response to concavalin A comparable to wild-type and heterozygous littermates. Second, treatment of healthy mice with a neutralizing nanobody targeting IGD induced weight gain and hyperinsulinaemia, but completely failed to block development of experimentally induced autoimmune diseases. These data indicate that leptin receptor deficiency or antagonism profoundly affects metabolism, with little concomitant effects on immune functions.

  19. Uncoupled continuous-time random walk model: analytical and numerical solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fa, Kwok Sau

    2014-05-01

    Solutions for the continuous-time random walk (CTRW) model are known in few cases. In this work, the uncoupled CTRW model is investigated analytically and numerically. In particular, the probability density function (PDF) and n-moment are obtained and analyzed. Exponential and Gaussian functions are used for the jump length PDF, whereas the Mittag-Leffler function and a combination of exponential and power-laws function is used for the waiting time PDF. The exponential and Gaussian jump length PDFs have finite jump length variances and they give the same second moment; however, their distribution functions present different behaviors near the origin. The combination of exponential and power-law function for the waiting time PDF can generate a crossover from anomalous regime to normal regime. Moreover, the parameter of the exponential jump length PDF does not change the behavior of the n-moment for all time intervals, and for the Gaussian jump length PDF the n-moment also indicates a similar behavior.

  20. Uncoupled continuous-time random walk model: Analytical and numerical solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fa, Kwok Sau

    2014-05-01

    Solutions for the continuous-time random walk (CTRW) model are known in few cases. In this work, the uncoupled CTRW model is investigated analytically and numerically. In particular, the probability density function (PDF) and n-moment are obtained and analyzed. Exponential and Gaussian functions are used for the jump length PDF, whereas the Mittag-Leffler function and a combination of exponential and power-laws function is used for the waiting time PDF. The exponential and Gaussian jump length PDFs have finite jump length variances and they give the same second moment; however, their distribution functions present different behaviors near the origin. The combination of exponential and power-law function for the waiting time PDF can generate a crossover from anomalous regime to normal regime. Moreover, the parameter of the exponential jump length PDF does not change the behavior of the n-moment for all time intervals, and for the Gaussian jump length PDF the n-moment also indicates a similar behavior.