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Sample records for caga gene detected

  1. Construction of prokaryotic expression system of 2 148-bp fragment from cagA gene and detection of cagA gene, CagA protein in Helicobacter pyloriisolates and its antibody in sera of patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Yan; Yuan Wang; Shi-He Shao; Ya-Fei Mao; Hua-Wen Li; Yi-Hui Luo

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To construct a prokaryotic expression system of a Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori) cagA gene fragment and establish enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for detecting CagA and its antibody, so as to understand the manner in which the infection of CagA-expressing H pylori (CagA+ H pylori) isolates cause diseases.METHODS: H pylori strains in gastric biopsy specimens from 156 patients with positive results in rapid urease test were isolated. PCR was used to detect the frequency of cagA gene in the 109 H pylori isolates and to amplify a 2 148-bp fragment (cagA1) of cagA gene from a clinical strain Y06. A prokaryotic expression system of cagA1 gene was constructed,and the expression of the target recombinant protein (rCagA1) was examined by SDS-PAGE. Western blotting and immunodiffusion assay were employed to determine the immunoreactivity and antigenicity of rCagA1, respectively.Two ELISAs were established to detect CagA expression in 109 H pylori isolates and the presence of CagA antibody in the corresponding patients′ sera, and the correlations between infection with CagA+ H pylori and gastritis as well as peptic ulcer were analyzed.RESULTS: Of all the clinical specimens obtained, 80.8%(126/156) were found to have H pylori isolates and 97.2%of the isolates (106/109) were positive for caaA gene. In comparison with the reported data, the cloned cagA1fragment possessed 94.83% and 93.30% homologies with the nucleotide and putative amino acid sequences,respectively. The output of rCagA1 produced by the constructed recombinant prokaryotic expression system was approximately 30% of the total bacterial protein, rCagA1was able to bind to the commercial antibody against the whole-cells of H pylori and to induce the immunized rabbits to produce antibody with an immunodiffusion titer of 1:4. A proportion as high as 92.6% of the H pylori isolates (101/109)expressed CagA and 88.1% of the patients′ serum samples (96/109) were CagA antibody-positive. The percentage of

  2. Comparison of three PCR methods for detection of Helicobacter pylori DNA and detection of cagA gene in gastric biopsy specimens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SI Smith; AO Coker; KS Oyedeji; AO Arigbabu; F Cantet; F Megraud; OO Ojo; AO Uwaifo; JA Otegbayo; SO Ola

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To comparatively evaluate PCR and other diagnostic methods (the rapid urease test and / or culture) in order to determine which of the three PCR methods (ureA, glmM and 26-kDa, SSA gene) was most appropriate in the diagnosis of Helicobacter pylori (Hpylori) infection and also to evaluate the detection of a putative virulence marker of H pylori, the cagA gene, by PCR in biopsy specimens.METHODS: One hundred and eighty-nine biopsy specimens were collected from 63 patients (three biopsies each)undergoing upper gastroduodenal endoscopy for various dyspeptic symptoms. The PCR methods used to detect H pylori DNA directly from biopsies were the glmM, 26-kDa,ureA and then cagA was used to compare the culture technique and CLO for urease with the culture technique being used as the gold standard.RESULTS: Thirty-five percent of the biopsies were positive for Hpylori DNA using the 3 PCR methods, while 68% of these were positive for the cagA gene. Twenty-four percent of the biopsies were negative for H pylori DNA in all PCR methods screened. The remaining 41% were either positive for ureA gene only, glmMonly, 26-kDa only, or ureA + glmM,ureA + 26-kDa, glmM + 26-kDa. Out of the 35% positive biopsies, 41% and 82% were positive by culture and CLO respectively, while all negative biopsies were also negative by culture and cagA. Cag A+ infection was also predominantly found in Hpylori DNA of the biopsies irrespective of the clinical diagnosis.CONCLUSION: This method is useful for correctly identifying infections caused by H pylori and can be easily applied in our laboratory for diagnostic purposes.

  3. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in gastric biopsies, saliva and dental plaques of dyspeptic patients from Marília, São Paulo, Brazil: presence of vacA and cagA genes

    OpenAIRE

    LT Rasmussen; RW de Labio; Neto, A. C.; LC Silva; VF Queiroz; MAC Smith; SLM Payão

    2012-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori, a gram-negative bacterium, possesses two important virulence factors: the vacuolating toxin (vacA), and the cytotoxin-associated gene product (cagA). The aim of the present study was to evaluate the presence of H. pylori in the stomach and oral cavity of humans and compare the cagA and vacA genotypes of H. pylori found in different samples (stomach, saliva and dental plaque) from the same patient. Gastric biopsies, saliva and dental plaques were obtained from 62 dyspeptic...

  4. Simultaneous Detection of Caga and Cage of Helicobacter pylori Strains Recovered from Iranian Patients with Different Gastroduodenal Diseases

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    M Douraghi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: To asses the status of two representative genes of cag PAI i.e cagA and cagE of Helicobacter pylori strains infecting Iranian patients suffered from various clinical outcomes using one-step PCR. "nMethods: A total of 120 H. pylori infected patients including non-ulcer dyspepsia, NUD (n=81, peptic ulcer disease, PUD (n=17, and gastric carcinoma, GC (n= 22 referred for endoscopy or gastric resection to AmirAlam Hospital or Cancer Institute from 2005 to 2008 were assessed. The status of cagA and cagE genes was determined by gene specific PCR."nResults: 84.2% and 90.8% of the tested strains were positive for cagA and cage, respectively. 81.7% strains were positive for both cagA and cagE genes, whereas 8 (6.7% were found double negative. The prevalence of cagA in GC patients (100% was slightly higher than PUD patients (94.1%. All of GC cases were infected with cagA-positive strains. The same distribution pattern was indicated for cagE gene in GC and PUD patients. The cagA-positive strains were significantly associated with GC as compared with NUD (P< 0.05 but this association did not gain statistical significance when cagE gene was assessed."nConclusion: The concurrent detection of cagA/cagE genes allowed rapid and specific clarification of cag PAI status. The strains with cagA/cagE genotype are predominant in Iran regardless of clinical outcome and create a distinct cluster pattern from those in the West and similar to those of East Asian countries. The current study also demonstrated that cagE gene can be explored as a better indication of cag-PAI in Iranian H. pylori strains.

  5. Detection of Helicobacter pylori in gastric biopsies, saliva and dental plaques of dyspeptic patients from Marília, São Paulo, Brazil: presence of vacA and cagA genes

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    LT Rasmussen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori, a gram-negative bacterium, possesses two important virulence factors: the vacuolating toxin (vacA, and the cytotoxin-associated gene product (cagA. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the presence of H. pylori in the stomach and oral cavity of humans and compare the cagA and vacA genotypes of H. pylori found in different samples (stomach, saliva and dental plaque from the same patient. Gastric biopsies, saliva and dental plaques were obtained from 62 dyspeptic adults. DNA was extracted and evaluated for the presence of H. pylori and the alleles cagA and vacA. Persons with gastritis had a higher frequency of H. pylori -positive samples in the stomach while positive samples from gastric biopsies were significantly correlated with those from the oral cavity. There was a high H. pylori frequency in patients while the cagA gene was associated with vacA s1 alleles in gastric biopsies. Our results suggest a reservoir of the species in the oral cavity and that, in one patient, more than one H. pylori strain may exist in the saliva, dental plaque and stomach. We found a relationship between gastric infection and the bacterium in the oral cavity, with the cytotoxin genotype varying between saliva and dental plaque.

  6. Cloning and sequencing of cagA gene fragment of Helicobacter pylori with coccoid form

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ke-Xia Wang; Xue-Feng Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To clone and sequence the cagA gene fragment of Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori) with coccoid form.METHODS: H pylori strain NCTC11637 were transformed to coccoid form by exposure to antibiotics in subinhibitory concentrations. The coccoid H pyloriwas collected. cagA gene of the coccoid H pylori strain was amplified by PCR.After purified, the target fragment was cloned into plasmid pMD-18T. The recombinant plasmid pMD-18T-cagA was transformed into E. coli JM109. Positive clones were screened and identified by PCR and digestion with restriction endonucleases. The sequence of inserted fragment was then analysed.RESULTS: cagA gene of 3 444 bp was obtained from the coccoid H pylori genome DNA. The recombinant plasmid pMD-18T-cagA was constructed, then it was digested by BamH Ⅰ+Sac Ⅰ, and the product of digestion was identical with the predicted one. Sequence analysis showed that the homology of coccoid and the reported original sequence H pylori was 99.7%.CONCLUSION: The recombinant plasmid containing cagA gene from coccoid H pylori has been constructed successfully.The coccoid H pylori contain completed cagA gene, which may be related to pathogenicity of them.

  7. Expression of cagA, virB/D Complex and/or vacA Genes in Helicobacter pylori Strains Originating from Patients with Gastric Diseases.

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    Szkaradkiewicz, Andrzej; Karpiński, Tomasz M; Linke, Krzysztof; Majewski, Przemysław; Rożkiewicz, Dorota; Goślińska-Kuźniarek, Olga

    2016-01-01

    In order to better understand pathogenicity of Helicobacter pylori, particularly in the context of its carcinogenic activity, we analysed expression of virulence genes: cagA, virB/D complex (virB4, virB7, virB8, virB9, virB10, virB11, virD4) and vacA in strains of the pathogen originating from persons with gastric diseases. The studies were conducted on 42 strains of H. pylori isolated from patients with histological diagnosis of non-atrophic gastritis-NAG (group 1, including subgroup 1 containing cagA+ isolates and subgroup 2 containing cagA- strains), multifocal atrophic gastritis-MAG (group 2) and gastric adenocarcinoma-GC (group 3). Expression of H. pylori genes was studied using microarray technology. In group 1, in all strains of H. pylori cagA+ (subgroup 1) high expression of the gene as well as of virB/D was disclosed, accompanied by moderate expression of vacA. In strains of subgroup 2 a moderate expression of vacA was detected. All strains in groups 2 and 3 carried cagA gene but they differed in its expression: a high expression was detected in isolates of group 2 and its hyperexpression in strains of group 3 (hypervirulent strains). In both groups high expression of virB/D and vacA was disclosed. Our results indicate that chronic active gastritis may be induced by both cagA+ strains of H. pylori, manifesting high expression of virB/D complex but moderate activity of vacA, and cagA- strains with moderate expression of vacA gene. On the other hand, in progression of gastric pathology and carcinogenesis linked to H. pylori a significant role was played by hypervirulent strains, manifesting a very high expression of cagA and high activity of virB/D and vacA genes. PMID:26866365

  8. Disruption of cagA, the apoprotein gene of chromoprotein antibiotic C-1027, eliminates holo-antibiotic production, but not the cytotoxic chromophore.

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    Cui, Zhihui; Wang, Lifei; Wang, Songmei; Li, Guangwei; Hong, Bin

    2009-11-01

    C-1027 is a chromoprotein of the nine-membered enediyne antitumour antibiotic family, comprising apoprotein to stabilize and transport the enediyne chromophore. The disruption of apoprotein gene cagA within the C-1027 biosynthetic gene cluster abolished C-1027 holo-antibiotic production detected by an antibacterial assay, as well as the expression of the apoprotein and C-1027 chromophore extracted following protein precipitation of the culture supernatant. Complementation of the cagA-disrupted mutant AKO with the intact cagA gene restored C-1027 production, suggesting that cagA is indispensable for holo-antibiotic production. Overexpression of cagA in the wild-type strain resulted in a significant increase in C-1027 production as expected. Surprisingly, electrospray ionization (ESI)-MS and ESI-MS/MS analyses suggested that the AKO mutant still produced the C-1027 enediyne chromophore [m/z=844 (M+H)(+)] and its aromatized product [m/z=846 (M+H)(+)]. Consistent with this, the results from gene expression analysis using real-time reverse transcriptase-PCR showed that transcripts of the positive regulator sgcR3 and the structural genes sgcA1, sgcC4, sgcD6 and sgcE were readily detected in the AKO mutant as well as in the wild-type and the complementation strain. These results provided, for the first time, evidence suggesting that the apoprotein of C-1027 is not essential in the self-resistance mechanism for the enediyne chromophore. PMID:19845765

  9. Study of the Cytoxin-Associated Gene A (CagA Gene) in Helicobacter pylori Using Gastric Biopsies of Iraqi Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kalaf, Elham A.; Zahra M Al-Khafaji; Nahi Y Yassen; AL-Abbudi, Fadel A.; Sadwen, Saad N.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims: The Helicobacter pylori CagA gene is a major virulence factor that plays an important role in gastric pathologies. The size variation of CagA gene, which is dependent on the 3′ repeat region, contains one or more Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala (EPIYA) motifs and CagA multimerization (CM) motifs. Four segments flanking the EPIYA motifs, EPIYA −A, −B, −C, or −D, were reported to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection. The aim was to determine the roles of EPIYA...

  10. Helicobacter pylori CagA induces tumor suppressor gene hypermethylation by upregulating DNMT1 via AKT-NFκB pathway in gastric cancer development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, He-xiao; Zhao, Wei; Li, Jian-fang; Su, Li-ping; Shao, Zhifeng; Zhao, Xiaodong; Zhu, Zheng-gang; Yan, Min; Liu, Bingya

    2016-01-01

    Methylation of CpG islands in tumor suppressor gene prompter is one of the most characteristic abnormalities in Helicobacter pylori (HP)-associated gastric carcinoma (GC). Here, we investigated the pathogenic and molecular mechanisms underlying hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes in HP induced GC development. We found that tumor suppressor genes hypermethylation, represented by MGMT, positively correlated with CagA in clinical specimens, gastric tissues from HP infected C57 mice and GC cell lines transfected by CagA or treated by HP infection. CagA enhanced PDK1 and AKT interaction and increased AKT phosphorylation. The P-AKT subsequent activated NFκB, which then bound to DNMT1 promoter and increased its expression. Finally, the upregulated DNMT1 promoted tumor suppressor genes hypermethylation with MGMT as a representative. In conclusion, CagA increased tumor suppressor genes hypermethylation via stimulating DNMT1 expression through the AKT-NFκB pathway. PMID:26848521

  11. Helicobacter pylori CagA induces tumor suppressor gene hypermethylation by upregulating DNMT1 via AKT-NFκB pathway in gastric cancer development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bao-Gui; Hu, Lei; Zang, Ming De; Wang, He-Xiao; Zhao, Wei; Li, Jian-Fang; Su, Li-Ping; Shao, Zhifeng; Zhao, Xiaodong; Zhu, Zheng-Gang; Yan, Min; Liu, Bingya

    2016-03-01

    Methylation of CpG islands in tumor suppressor gene prompter is one of the most characteristic abnormalities in Helicobacter pylori (HP)-associated gastric carcinoma (GC). Here, we investigated the pathogenic and molecular mechanisms underlying hypermethylation of tumor suppressor genes in HP induced GC development. We found that tumor suppressor genes hypermethylation, represented by MGMT, positively correlated with CagA in clinical specimens, gastric tissues from HP infected C57 mice and GC cell lines transfected by CagA or treated by HP infection. CagA enhanced PDK1 and AKT interaction and increased AKT phosphorylation. The P-AKT subsequent activated NFκB, which then bound to DNMT1 promoter and increased its expression. Finally, the upregulated DNMT1 promoted tumor suppressor genes hypermethylation with MGMT as a representative. In conclusion, CagA increased tumor suppressor genes hypermethylation via stimulating DNMT1 expression through the AKT-NFκB pathway. PMID:26848521

  12. Genotyping of the Helicobacter pylori cagA Gene Isolated From Gastric Biopsies in Shiraz, Southern Iran: A PCR-RFLP and Sequence Analysis Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Moaddeb, Afsaneh; Fattahi, Mohammad Reza; Firouzi, Roya; Derakhshandeh, Abdollah; Farshad, Shohreh

    2016-01-01

    Background Cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA) is an important virulence factor in the pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori. Objectives The aim of this study was to genotype the H. pylori cagA gene isolated from antral biopsies of patients with stomach symptoms, using a PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis. Patients and Methods A total of 161 gastric biopsies were collected from patients with stomach symptoms. After isolation of H. pylori from the biopsy culture, the...

  13. Interactions between CagA and smoking in gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Qin Wang; Hong Yan; Paul D Terry; Jian-Sheng Wang; Li Cheng; Wen-An Wu; Sen-Ke Hu

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To examine the interactions between cytotoxinassociated gene (CagA ) positive Helicobacter pylori infection and smoking in non-cardiac gastric cancer. METHODS: A case-control study (257 cases and 514 frequency-matched controls) was conducted from September 2008 to July 2010 in Xi'an, China. Cases were newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed non-cardiac cancer. Controls were randomly selected from similar communities to the cases and were further matched by sex and age (± 5 years). A face-to-face interview was performed by the investigators for each participant. Data were obtained using a standardized questionnaire that included questions regarding known or suspected lifestyle and environmental risk factors of gastric cancer. A 5 mL sample of fasting venous blood was taken. CagA infection was serologically detected by enzymelinked immunosorbent assays. RESULTS: Smoking and CagA infection were statistically significant risk factors of non-cardiac cancer. CagA was categorized in tertiles, and the odds ratio (OR) was 12.4 (95% CI: 6.1-20.3, P = 0.003) for CagA after being adjusted for confounding factors when the highexposure category was compared with the low-exposure category. Smokers had an OR of 5.4 compared with subjects who never smoked (95% CI: 2.3-9.0, P = 0.002). The OR of non-cardiac cancer was 3.5 (95% CI: 1.8-5.3) for non-smokers with CagA infection, 3.5 (95% CI: 1.9-5.1) for smokers without CagA infection, and 8.7 (95% CI: 5.1-11.9) for smokers with CagA infection compared with subjects without these risk factors. After adjusting for confounding factors, the corresponding ORs of non-cardiac cancer were 3.2 (95% CI: 1.5-6.8), 2.7 (95% CI: 1.3-4.9) and 19.5 (95% CI: 10.3-42.2), respectively. There was a multiplicative interaction between smoking and CagA , with a synergistic factor of 2.257 (Z = 2.315, P = 0.021). CONCLUSION: These findings support a meaningful interaction between CagA and smoking for the risk of gastric cancer which may have

  14. Evolution of cagA oncogene of Helicobacter pylori through recombination.

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    Yoshikazu Furuta

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a gastric pathogen that infects half the human population and causes gastritis, ulcers, and cancer. The cagA gene product is a major virulence factor associated with gastric cancer. It is injected into epithelial cells, undergoes phosphorylation by host cell kinases, and perturbs host signaling pathways. CagA is known for its geographical, structural, and functional diversity in the C-terminal half, where an EPIYA host-interacting motif is repeated. The Western version of CagA carries the EPIYA segment types A, B, and C, while the East Asian CagA carries types A, B, and D and shows higher virulence. Many structural variants such as duplications and deletions are reported. In this study, we gained insight into the relationships of CagA variants through various modes of recombination, by analyzing all known cagA variants at the DNA sequence level with the single nucleotide resolution. Processes that occurred were: (i homologous recombination between DNA sequences for CagA multimerization (CM sequence; (ii recombination between DNA sequences for the EPIYA motif; and (iii recombination between short similar DNA sequences. The left half of the EPIYA-D segment characteristic of East Asian CagA was derived from Western type EPIYA, with Amerind type EPIYA as the intermediate, through rearrangements of specific sequences within the gene. Adaptive amino acid changes were detected in the variable region as well as in the conserved region at sites to which no specific function has yet been assigned. Each showed a unique evolutionary distribution. These results clarify recombination-mediated routes of cagA evolution and provide a solid basis for a deeper understanding of its function in pathogenesis.

  15. Study of the cytoxin-associated gene a (CagA gene in Helicobacter pylori using gastric biopsies of Iraqi patients

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    Elham A Kalaf

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: The Helicobacter pylori CagA gene is a major virulence factor that plays an important role in gastric pathologies. The size variation of CagA gene, which is dependent on the 3′ repeat region, contains one or more Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala (EPIYA motifs and CagA multimerization (CM motifs. Four segments flanking the EPIYA motifs, EPIYA −A, −B, −C, or −D, were reported to play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of H. pylori infection. The aim was to determine the roles of EPIYA segments and CM motifs in gastroduodenal pathogenesis in an Iraqi population. Patients and Methods: Gastric biopsies were collected from 210 patients with gastritis, duodenal ulcer (DU, gastric ulcer (GU, and gastric cancer (GC. The EPIYA motif genotyping was determined by polymerase chain reaction and sequencing. The differences in age, gender, and CagA EPIYA motifs of H. pylori between GC, DU, GU and gastritis patients were analyzed using a χ 2 -test. Results : A total of 22 (45.8% strains had three copies of EPIYA (ABC type, 2 (4.16% had four copies (ABCC type, 6 (12.7% had five copies (ABCCC type, 13 (27.08% had two copies (AB type, 3 (6.25% had the BC, and 2 (4.17% had AC motif. The alignment of the deduced protein sequences confirmed that there were no East Asian type EPIYA-D sequences in Iraqi strains. A significant association was found between increase in number of EPIYA-C motifs and GU (P ≤ 0.01 compared with gastritis. Conclusions: The structure of the 3′ region of the CagA gene in Iraqi strains was Western type with a variable number of EPIYA-C and CM motifs. A significant association was found between increase in number of EPIYA-C motifs and GU compared with gastritis indicating predictive association with the severity of the disease. The GenBank accession numbers for the partial CagA nucleotide sequences determined in this study are JX164093-JX164112.

  16. Evaluation of the Pattern of EPIYA Motifs in the Helicobacter pylori cagA Gene of Patients with Gastritis and Gastric Adenocarcinoma from the Brazilian Amazon Region.

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    Vilar E Silva, Adenielson; Junior, Mario Ribeiro da Silva; Vinagre, Ruth Maria Dias Ferreira; Santos, Kemper Nunes; da Costa, Renata Aparecida Andrade; Fecury, Amanda Alves; Quaresma, Juarez Antônio Simões; Martins, Luisa Caricio

    2014-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori is associated with the development of different diseases. The clinical outcome of infection may be associated with the cagA bacterial genotype. The aim of this study was to determine the EPIYA patterns of strains isolated from patients with gastritis and gastric adenocarcinoma and correlate these patterns with the histopathological features. Gastric biopsy samples were selected from 384 patients infected with H. pylori, including 194 with chronic gastritis and 190 with gastric adenocarcinoma. The presence of the cagA gene and the EPIYA motif was determined by PCR. The cagA gene was more prevalent in patients with gastric cancer and was associated with a higher degree of inflammation, neutrophil activity, and development of intestinal metaplasia. The number of EPIYA-C repeats showed a significant association with an increased risk of gastric carcinoma (OR = 3.79, 95% CI = 1.92-7.46, and P = 0.002). A larger number of EPIYA-C motifs were also associated with intestinal metaplasia. In the present study, infection with H. pylori strains harboring more than one EPIYA-C motif in the cagA gene was associated with the development of intestinal metaplasia and gastric adenocarcinoma but not with neutrophil activity or degree of inflammation. PMID:26904732

  17. Prevalence of Helicobacter pylori cagA genotype among dyspeptic patients in Southern Thailand

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sueptrakool Wisessombat; Chatruthai Meethai

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection in dyspepsia patients and its relation to virulence factor cagA gene. Methods: In total, 110 gastric biopsies from dyspeptic patients were comparatively studied using rapid urease test and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Results: Multiplex PCR detected three genes of 16S rRNA, cagA, and ureC. H. pylori was detected in 14 gastric biopsies (13%). Significantly higher numbers of female were infected. Furthermore,cag A gene was found in all H. pylori-positive specimens. In addition, the result indicated that the multiplex PCR with annealing temperature at 57 oC was able to effectively amplify specific products. Conclusions:The results confirmed high prevalence of cagA gene in H. pylori among dyspeptic patients in Southern Thailand.

  18. Prevalence of cagA and vacA genes in isolates from patients with Helicobacter pylori-associated gastroduodenal diseases in Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil

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    Brito Carlos AA

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Geographical differences in the prevalence of Helicobacter pylori genes and their association with disease severity have been identified. This study analyzes the prevalences of the cagA gene and alleles of the vacA gene in H. pylori-associated gastroduodenal diseases in isolates from Recife, PE, Brazil. Gastric biopsy of 61 H. pylori-positive patients were submitted to DNA extraction and gene amplification by polymerase chain reaction. Among the 61 patients, 21 suffered from duodenal ulcer (DU and 40 from gastritis (GT. The prevalence of H. pylori strains harbouring the cagA gene was higher in the DU group (90.5% than in the GT group (60% (p = 0.02. The vacA gene was amplified in 56 out of 61 biopsies, of which 43 (76.8% contained bacteria carrying the s1 allele and 13 (23.2% the s2. However, the prevalence of the vacA s1 genotying was the same in either DU or GT group. The majority of the s1-typed strains, 39 (90.7% out of 43, were subtype s1b. In resume there was a strong association between the H. pylori cagA+ gene and DU. However, there were no differences between the DU and GT groups in relation to the vacA s1 and s2 alleles distribution, albeit the subtype s1b was predominat.

  19. Distinct diversity of vacA, cagA, and cagE genes of Helicobacter pylori associated with peptic ulcer in Japan.

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    Yamazaki, Shiho; Yamakawa, Akiyo; Okuda, Tomoyuki; Ohtani, Masahiro; Suto, Hiroyuki; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Yamazaki, Yukinao; Keida, Yoshihide; Higashi, Hideaki; Hatakeyama, Masanori; Azuma, Takeshi

    2005-08-01

    Colonization of the stomach mucosa by Helicobacter pylori is a major cause of acute and chronic gastric pathologies in humans. Several H. pylori virulence genes that may play a role in its pathogenicity have been identified. The most important determinants are vacA and cagA in the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) genes. In the present study, to consider the association of molecular genetics between vacA and the cagPAI regarding clinical outcome, we selected H. pylori strains with various genotypes of vacA in Japan and sequenced full-length vacA, cagA, and cagE genes. Sequencing of vacA and cagA genes revealed variable size, whereas the cagE gene was well conserved among strains. Each of the phylogenetic trees based on the deduced amino acid sequences of VacA, CagA, and CagE indicated that all three proteins were divided into two major groups, a Western group and an East Asian group, and the distributions of isolates exhibited similar patterns among the three proteins. The strains with s2 and s1a/m1a vacA genotypes and the Western-type 3' region cagA genotype were classified into the Western group, and the strains with the s1c/m1b vacA genotype and the East Asian-type 3' cagA genotype were included in the East Asian group. In addition, the prevalence of infection with the Western group strain was significantly higher in patients with peptic ulcer (90.0%, 9/10) than in patients with chronic gastritis (22.7%, 5/22) (chi2 = 12.64, P = 0.00057). These data suggest that the molecular genetics of vacA and cagPAI are associated and that the Western group with vacA and cagPAI genes is associated with peptic ulcer disease. PMID:16081930

  20. Detection of H pylori infection by ELISA and Western blot techniques and evaluation of anti CagA seropositivity in adult Turkish dyspeptic patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    (O)zlem Yilmaz; Nazime (S)en; Ahmet Ali Küpelio(g)lu; (I)lkay (S)im(s)ek

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To detect H pylori infection and to evaluate the anti CagA seropositivity in adult Turkish dyspeptic patients. METHODS: We evaluated anti-H pylori IgA, IgG and anti-CagA antibodies using commercial enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) and Western blot in dyspeptic Turkish patients. H pylori status was determined by histology and rapid urease testing.RESULTS: Fifty-six patients were entered. Forty-eight (85.7%) out of the 56 patients were positive for H pylori.H pylori IgG seropositivity was 82.1%, IgA seropositivity 48.2%. CagA ELISA showed that IgG was positive in 50% and IgA in 30.4% of those with H pylori infections.Western blot showed that IgG seropositivity was 80.4%and IgA seropositivity 33.9%. Western blot detected IgG antibodies with reactivity to CagA in 50%, VacA in 62.5%, UreB in 87.5%, UreA in 80.4%, and OMP in 57.1%. None of the tests had a sensitivity and specificity above 80%.CONCLUSION: None of these commercial tests seems clinically useful for H pylori detection in adult dyspeptic patients, while Western blot can give seropositivity and determine anti-CagA, VacA virulence factor status of Turkish dyspeptic patients in the Izmir region.

  1. Distinct Diversity of vacA, cagA, and cagE Genes of Helicobacter pylori Associated with Peptic Ulcer in Japan

    OpenAIRE

    Yamazaki, Shiho; Yamakawa, Akiyo; Okuda, Tomoyuki; Ohtani, Masahiro; Suto, Hiroyuki; Ito, Yoshiyuki; Yamazaki, Yukinao; Keida, Yoshihide; Higashi, Hideaki; Hatakeyama, Masanori; Azuma, Takeshi

    2005-01-01

    Colonization of the stomach mucosa by Helicobacter pylori is a major cause of acute and chronic gastric pathologies in humans. Several H. pylori virulence genes that may play a role in its pathogenicity have been identified. The most important determinants are vacA and cagA in the cag pathogenicity island (cagPAI) genes. In the present study, to consider the association of molecular genetics between vacA and the cagPAI regarding clinical outcome, we selected H. pylori strains with various gen...

  2. Helicobacter pylori cagA and vacA genotypes in Cuban and Venezuelan populations

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    Diana Ortiz-Princz

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the presence of Helicobacter pylori cytotoxin-associated gene (cagA/vacuolating cytotoxin gene (vacA among patients with chronic gastritis in Cuba and Venezuela. Gastric antrum biopsies were taken for culture, DNA extraction and PCR analysis. Amplification of vacA and cagA segments was performed using two regions of cagA: 349 bp were amplified with the F1/B1 primers and the remaining 335 bp were amplified with the B7629/B7628 primers. The VA1-F/VA1-R set of primers was used to amplify the 259-bp (s1 or 286-bp (s2 product and the VAG-R/VAG-F set of primers was used to amplify the 567-bp (m1 or 642-bp (m2 regions of vacA. cagA was detected in 87% of the antral samples from Cuban patients and 80.3% of those from Venezuelan patients. All possible combinations of vacA regions were found, with the exception of s2/m1. The predominant combination found in both countries was s1/m1. The percentage of cagA+ strains was increased by the use of a second set of primers and a greater number of strains was amplified with the B7629/B7628 primers in the Cuban patients (p = 0.0001. There was no significant difference between the presence of the allelic variants of vacA and cagA in both populations. The predominant genotype was cagA+/s1m1 in both countries. The results support the necessary investigation of isolates circulating among the human population in each region.

  3. Biological activity of the virulence factor cagA of Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱永良; 郑树; 钱可大; 方平楚

    2004-01-01

    Background China is one of the countries with the highest incidence of H. Pylori and more than 9090 isolates possessed the cagA gene. This study was to evaluate the biological activity of the H.pylori virulence factor cagA isolated from Chinese patients. Methods cagA DNA fragments were amplified from the genomic DNA and subsequently cloned into the mammalian expression vector for cell transfection and DNA sequencing. cagA protein, phosphorylated-tyrosine cagA and the complex of cagA precipitated with SHP-2 were identified respectively by western blot in the crude cell lysate from conditionally immortalized gastric epithelial cells at 48 hours after transfection with cagA DNA. In addition, the ability of induction of scattering phenotype was examined after transient expression of cagA in AGS cells. Results The C-terminal half of cagA contained only one repeated sequence and three tandem five-amino-acid motifs glutamic acid-proline-isoleucine-tyrosine-alanine (EPIYA). Moreover, the amino acid sequence of D2 region in repeated sequence was aspartic acid-phenylanaline-aspartic acid (D-F-D) which was significantly distinguished from the three repeated sequences and aspartic acid-aspartic adid-leucine (D-D-L) in the western standard strain NCTC11637. Western blot revealed that cagA became phosphorylated in tyrosine site and bound with SHP-2 after transient expression of cagA DNA in gastric epithelial cells. Transient expression of cagA in AGS cells showed that cagA was able to induce the elongation phenotype although to a lesser extent than western strains. Conclusions cagA perturbs cell signaling pathways by binding with SHP-2. However, significant difference exists in amino acid sequence and biological function of cagA in Chinese compared with those of western countries.

  4. Exosomes as nanocarriers for systemic delivery of the Helicobacter pylori virulence factor CagA

    OpenAIRE

    Asako Shimoda; Koji Ueda; Shin Nishiumi; Naoko Murata-Kamiya; Sada-atsu Mukai; Shin-ichi Sawada; Takeshi Azuma; Masanori Hatakeyama; Kazunari Akiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    CagA, encoded by cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA), is a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori, a gastric pathogen involved in the development of upper gastrointestinal diseases. Infection with cagA-positive H. pylori may also be associated with diseases outside the stomach, although the mechanisms through which H. pylori infection promotes extragastric diseases remain unknown. Here, we report that CagA is present in serum-derived extracellular vesicles, known as exosomes, in patient...

  5. Helicobacter pylori CagA protein polymorphisms and their lack of association with pathogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nicole; Acosta; Andrés; Quiroga; Pilar; Delgado; María; Mercedes; Bravo; Carlos; Jaramillo

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) CagA diversity and to evaluate the association between protein polymorphisms and the occurrence of gastric pathologies. METHODS: One hundred and twenty-two clinical isolates of H. pylori cultured from gastric biopsies obtained from Colombian patients with dyspepsia were included as study material. DNA extracted from isolates was used to determine cagA status, amplifying the C-terminal cagA gene region by polymerase chain reaction. One hundred and six strai...

  6. Diverse Characteristics of the cagA Gene of Helicobacter pylori Strains Collected from Patients from Southern Vietnam with Gastric Cancer and Peptic Ulcer▿

    OpenAIRE

    Truong, Bui Xuan; Mai, Vo Thi Chi; Hiroshi TANAKA; Ly, Le Thanh; Thong, Tran Minh; Hai, Hoang Hoa; Van Long, Dao; Furumatsu, Keisuke; Yoshida, Masaru; Kutsumi, Hiromu; Azuma, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    The pathogenesis of gastroduodenal diseases is related to the diversity of Helicobacter pylori strains. CagA-positive strains are more likely to cause gastric cancer than CagA-negative strains. Based on EPIYA (Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala) motifs at the carboxyl terminus corresponding to phosphorylation sites, H. pylori CagA is divided into East Asian CagA and Western CagA. The former type prevails in East Asia and is more closely associated with gastric cancer. The present study used full sequences o...

  7. High Frequency of cagA and vacA s1a/m2 Genotype among Helicobacter pylori Infected Gastric Biopsies of Pakistani Children

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    Ahmed, S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The vacuolating cytotoxin VacA and cytotoxin associated gene product CagA, encoded by vacA and cagA are major virulence determinants associated with pathogenesis of Helicobacter pylori. The presence and prevalence of two major H. pylori virulence associated genes among gastric biopsies of Pakistani children were investigated in the current study. Fifty one gastric biopsy specimens of children were analysed for 16S rRNA, vacA and cagA genes using PCR. The results showed that 21 (41.2% biopsies were positive for H. pylori as determined by 16S rRNA PCR. In the 21 H. pylori positive gastric biopsies, 19 (90.5% showed vacA s1a, 1 (4.75% was vacA s1b and 1 (4.75% was vacA s2 whereas, 5 (23.8% were vacA m1 and 16 (76.2% were vacA m2. None of the H. pylori positive biopsies carried vacA s1c subtype. The cagA gene was found in 13 (61.9% of H. pylori infected biopsies and different vacA combinations were found with or without cagA gene. H. pylori was detected with high frequency of cagA while vacA s1a and vacA m2 regions with vacA s1a/m2 genotype were predominant in H. pylori infected gastric biopsies of children.

  8. Genotyping of Helicobacter pylori Strains Isolated from Patients with Gastric Ulcer and Non Ulcer Disease using RFLP-PCR of ureAB, vacA , cagA Genes

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    Sh. Farshad

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Different studies show that the reasons for clinically diverse outcomes of infections caused by H. pylori may include host and environmental factors as well as differences in the prevalence or expression of bacterial virulence factors. The aim of this study was to study the distribution of different genotypes of major virulence factors cagA, vacA and ureAB among H. pylori strains isolated from patients with gastric ulcer (ulcerative disease and patients with gastritis (non ulcerative disease.Materials & Methods: In this cross sectional study 65 H. pylori strains, 30 from patients with gastric ulcer and 35 from patients with non ulcerative gastritis disease were investigated by RFLP-PCR.Results: The prevalence of vacA-positive strains in ulcerative patients was significantly more than that in non ulcerative patients (P0.05.Conclusion: It seems that in the patients under our study the presence of cagA gene may not necessarily be a risk factor for ulcer disease, while a homologous genotype of vacA appears to be associated with an increase risk of ulcer development. Lastly, despite the existence of a high degree of genomic variability within ureAB, conserved DNA banding profiles are distributed in our areas.

  9. Characterization of CagA variable region of Helicobacter pylori isolates from Chinese patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Liang Zhu; Shu Zheng; Qin Du; Ke-Da Qian; Ping-Chu Fang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the CagA variable region of Helicobacter pylori isolates from Chinese patients.METHODS: DNA fragments in CagA variable region were amplified and sequenced respectively from genomic DNA of 19 isolates from patients with gastric cancer and 20isolates from patients with chronic gastritis. The tendency of phosphorylation in tyrosine(s) of CagA proteins was evaluated subsequently by phosphorylation assay in vivo and in vitro respectively.RESULTS: About 97.44% (38/39) H pylori isolates possessed CagA gene. CagA+ strains contained 2-4tandem five-amino-acid motifs EPIYA but only one EPIYA had repeated sequence in CagA variable region in different isolates. There was no significant difference between the number of EPIYA motifs in H pylori from patients with different diseases. However, only tyrosine site in EPIYA within repeated sequence could be phosphorylated by AGS cells in vivo although all tyrosine sites in EPIYA could be phosphorylated in vitro.CONCLUSION: CagA in Chinese has no functional difference in perturbing cellular signal pathway among different H pylori isolates.

  10. Diagnostic value of CagA IgG in the process to eradicate Helicobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi Bang Yang; Pi Long Wang; Ming Ming Gu; Li Hao Chen; Quan Chen; Lin Zhan

    2000-01-01

    AIM To investigate the diagnostic value of CagA IgG in serum.METHODS Seventy three patients with peptic ulcer infected with HP were eradicated by antibioticstherapy. At pretreatment, wk9 and wk20 after treatment, the detection of Hp in gastric muscosa bybacteriologic method were performed, and CagA and whole-cell antigen of HP igG in serum by ELISAmethod were also performed at the same time.RESULTS The IgG titres of Hp CagA and whole-cell antigen changes in accordance with the efficacy ofHp eradicated. The former with an earlier appearance and a greater number of cases decreased to normallevel in comparison with the latter.CONCLUSION CagA IgG is a better index for observing the effectiveness of the eradication of Hp.

  11. Prevalence and Correlation with Clinical Diseases of Helicobacter pylori cagA and vacA Genotype among Gastric Patients from Northeast China

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genes have significant genetic heterogenicity, resulting in different clinical outcomes. Northeast part of China has reported high prevalence of H. pylori infections and gastric cancer. Hence, we investigated the H. pylori cagA and vacA genotypes with clinical outcomes in Northeast China. Gastric tissue samples (n = 169), chronic gastritis (GIs), gastric ulcer (GU), and gastric cancer (GC) were analysed for 16S rRNA ureA, cagA, and cagA genotypes by PCR. A to...

  12. CagA, a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori, promotes the production and underglycosylation of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Man [Department of Nephrology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu City 610500 (China); Li, Fu-gang [Department of Nephrology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou City 646000 (China); Xie, Xi-sheng [Department of Nephrology, Second Clinical Medical Institution of North Sichuan Medical College (Nanchong Central Hospital), Nanchong City 637400 (China); Wang, Shao-qing [Department of Nephrology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu City 610500 (China); Fan, Jun-ming, E-mail: junmingfan@163.com [Department of Nephrology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Chengdu Medical College, Chengdu City 610500 (China); Department of Nephrology, Affiliated Hospital of Luzhou Medical College, Luzhou City 646000 (China)

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • CagA stimulated cell proliferation and the production of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells. • CagA promoted the underglycosylation of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells. • CagA decreased the expression of C1GALT1 and its chaperone Cosmc in DAKIKI cells. • Helicobacter pylori infection may participate in the pathogenesis of IgAN via CagA. - Abstract: While Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection is closely associated with IgA nephropathy (IgAN), the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. This study was to investigate the effect of cytotoxin associated gene A protein (CagA), a major virulence factor of Hp, on the production and underglycosylation of IgA1 in the B cell line DAKIKI cells. Cells were cultured and treated with recombinant CagA protein. We found that CagA stimulated cell proliferation and the production of IgA1 in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Moreover, CagA promoted the underglycosylation of IgA1, which at least partly attributed to the downregulation of β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1GALT1) and its chaperone Cosmc. In conclusion, we demonstrated that Hp infection, at least via CagA, may participate in the pathogenesis of IgAN by influencing the production and glycosylation of IgA1 in B cells.

  13. CagA, a major virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori, promotes the production and underglycosylation of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • CagA stimulated cell proliferation and the production of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells. • CagA promoted the underglycosylation of IgA1 in DAKIKI cells. • CagA decreased the expression of C1GALT1 and its chaperone Cosmc in DAKIKI cells. • Helicobacter pylori infection may participate in the pathogenesis of IgAN via CagA. - Abstract: While Helicobacter pylori (Hp) infection is closely associated with IgA nephropathy (IgAN), the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. This study was to investigate the effect of cytotoxin associated gene A protein (CagA), a major virulence factor of Hp, on the production and underglycosylation of IgA1 in the B cell line DAKIKI cells. Cells were cultured and treated with recombinant CagA protein. We found that CagA stimulated cell proliferation and the production of IgA1 in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner. Moreover, CagA promoted the underglycosylation of IgA1, which at least partly attributed to the downregulation of β1,3-galactosyltransferase (C1GALT1) and its chaperone Cosmc. In conclusion, we demonstrated that Hp infection, at least via CagA, may participate in the pathogenesis of IgAN by influencing the production and glycosylation of IgA1 in B cells

  14. Variation in number of cagA EPIYA-C phosphorylation motifs between cultured Helicobacter pylori and biopsy strain DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Karlsson, Anneli; Ryberg, Anna; Nosouhi Dehnoei, Marjan; Borch, Kurt; Monstein, Hans-Jürg

    2012-01-01

    The Helicobacter pylori cagA gene encodes a cytotoxin which is activated by phosphorylation after entering the host epithelial cell. Phosphorylation occurs on specific tyrosine residues within EPIYA motifs in the variable 3'-region. Four different cagA EPIYA motifs have been defined according to the surrounding amino acid sequence; EPIYA-A, -B, -C and -D. Commonly, EPIYA-A and -B are followed by one or more EPIYA-C or -D motif. Due to observed discrepancies in cagA genotypes in cultured H. py...

  15. A transgenic Drosophila model demonstrates that the Helicobacter pylori CagA protein functions as a eukaryotic Gab adaptor.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crystal M Botham

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Infection with the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori is associated with a spectrum of diseases including gastritis, peptic ulcers, gastric adenocarcinoma, and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma. The cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA protein of H. pylori, which is translocated into host cells via a type IV secretion system, is a major risk factor for disease development. Experiments in gastric tissue culture cells have shown that once translocated, CagA activates the phosphatase SHP-2, which is a component of receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK pathways whose over-activation is associated with cancer formation. Based on CagA's ability to activate SHP-2, it has been proposed that CagA functions as a prokaryotic mimic of the eukaryotic Grb2-associated binder (Gab adaptor protein, which normally activates SHP-2. We have developed a transgenic Drosophila model to test this hypothesis by investigating whether CagA can function in a well-characterized Gab-dependent process: the specification of photoreceptors cells in the Drosophila eye. We demonstrate that CagA expression is sufficient to rescue photoreceptor development in the absence of the Drosophila Gab homologue, Daughter of Sevenless (DOS. Furthermore, CagA's ability to promote photoreceptor development requires the SHP-2 phosphatase Corkscrew (CSW. These results provide the first demonstration that CagA functions as a Gab protein within the tissue of an organism and provide insight into CagA's oncogenic potential. Since many translocated bacterial proteins target highly conserved eukaryotic cellular processes, such as the RTK signaling pathway, the transgenic Drosophila model should be of general use for testing the in vivo function of bacterial effector proteins and for identifying the host genes through which they function.

  16. High Prevalence of cagA- and babA2-Positive Helicobacter pylori Clinical Isolates in Taiwan

    OpenAIRE

    Lai, Chih-Ho; Kuo, Chun-Hsien; Chen, Ya-Chi; Chao, Fang-Yu; Poon, Sek-Kwong; Chang, Chi-Sen; Wang, Wen-Ching

    2002-01-01

    Two virulence markers, cagA and babA2, were characterized by PCR in 101 Helicobacter pylori isolates from a population in Taiwan. cagA was detected in 99% of the isolates, while babA2 was present in all of the isolates. Base deletions and substitutions at the forward babA2 primer annealing sites were found. Given their high prevalence, cagA and babA2 cannot be useful markers for predicting the high-risk patients of H. pylori infection in Taiwan.

  17. ABO blood groups and Helicobacter pylori cagA infection: evidence of an association

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    DE Mattos

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Diseases resulting from Helicobacter pylori infection appear to be dependent on a host of genetic traits and virulence factors possessed by this microorganism. This paper aimed to investigate the association between the ABO histo-blood groups and H. pylori cagA infections. Genomic DNA samples (n = 110 of gastric biopsies obtained from patients with endoscopic diagnosis of peptic ulcers (n = 25 and chronic active gastritis (n = 85 were analyzed by PCR using specific primers for the cagA gene. Of the samples, 66.4% (n = 73 tested positive and 33.6% (n = 37 negative for the gene. The cagA strain was predominant in peptic ulcers (n = 21; 84.0% compared with chronic active gastritis (n = 52; 61.2% (p = 0.05; OR 3.332; 95% CI: 1.050-10.576. Additionally, the cagA strain was prevalent in the type O blood (48/63; 76.2% compared with other ABO phenotypes (25/47; 53.2% (p = 0.01; OR 2.816; 95% CI: 1.246-6.364. These results suggest that H. pylori cagA infection is associated with the O blood group in Brazilian patients suffering from chronic active gastritis and peptic ulcers.

  18. Distinct repeat motifs at the C-terminal region of CagA of Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from diseased patients and asymptomatic individuals in West Bengal, India

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    Chattopadhyay Santanu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with Helicobacter pylori strains that express CagA is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric adenocarcinoma. The biological function of CagA depends on tyrosine phosphorylation by a cellular kinase. The phosphate acceptor tyrosine moiety is present within the EPIYA motif at the C-terminal region of the protein. This region is highly polymorphic due to variations in the number of EPIYA motifs and the polymorphism found in spacer regions among EPIYA motifs. The aim of this study was to analyze the polymorphism at the C-terminal end of CagA and to evaluate its association with the clinical status of the host in West Bengal, India. Results Seventy-seven H. pylori strains isolated from patients with various clinical statuses were used to characterize the C-ternimal polymorphic region of CagA. Our analysis showed that there is no correlation between the previously described CagA types and various disease outcomes in Indian context. Further analyses of different CagA structures revealed that the repeat units in the spacer sequences within the EPIYA motifs are actually more discrete than the previously proposed models of CagA variants. Conclusion Our analyses suggest that EPIYA motifs as well as the spacer sequence units are present as distinct insertions and deletions, which possibly have arisen from extensive recombination events. Moreover, we have identified several new CagA types, which could not be typed by the existing systems and therefore, we have proposed a new typing system. We hypothesize that a cagA gene encoding higher number EPIYA motifs may perhaps have arisen from cagA genes that encode lesser EPIYA motifs by acquisition of DNA segments through recombination events.

  19. Association of CagA and VacA presence with ulcer and non-ulcer dyspepsia in a Turkish population

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Kantarceken Bulent; Hilmioglu Fatih; Aladag Murat; Atik Esin; Koksal Fatih; Harputluoglu MMMurat; Harputluoglu Hakan; Karincaoglu Melih; Ates Mehmet; Yildirim Bulent

    2003-01-01

    AIM: The mostly known genotypic virulence features, of H. pyloriare cytotoxin associated gene A (ragA) and Vacuolating cytotoxin gene A (VacA). We investigated the association of these major virulence factors with ulcer and non-ulcer dyspepsia in our region.METHODS: One hundred and forty two dyspeptic patients were studied (average age 44.8±15.9 years, range 15-87years, 64 males and 78 females). Antral and corpus biopsies were taken for detecting and genotyping of H. pylori. 107patients who were H. pylori positive by histological assessment were divided into three groups according to endoscopic findings: Duodenal ulcer (DU), gastric ulcer (GU)and non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD). The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to detect CagA and VacA genes of H.pylori using specific primers.RESULTS: H.pyloriwas isolated from 75.4 % (107/142) of the patients. Of the 107 patients, 66 (61.7 %) were cagApositive and 82 (76.6 %) were Vacl-positive. CagA gene was positively associated with DU and GU (P<0.01, P<0.02),but not with NUD (P>0.05). Although VacA positivity in ulcer patients was higher than that in NUD group, the difference was not statistically significant (P>0.05).CONCLUSION: There is a significantly positive association between CagA genes and DU and GU. The presence of VacA is not a predictive marker for DU, GU, and NUD in our patients.

  20. cagA positive Helicobacter pylori in Brazilian children related to chronic gastritis

    OpenAIRE

    Luciano Lobo Gatti; Roger de Lábio; Luiz Carlos da Silva; Marília de Arruda Cardoso Smith; Spencer Luiz Marques Payão

    2006-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is a spiral-shaped Gram-negative bacterium. It colonizes the gastric mucosa of humans and persists for decades if not treated. Helicobacter pylori infection affects more than half of the world's population and invariably results in chronic gastritis. The cagA gene is present in about 60 to 70% of H. pylori strains; it encodes a high-molecular-weight protein (120 to 140 kDa) and several investigators have noted a correlation between strains that possess cagA and the severit...

  1. Significant association of cagA positive Helicobacter pylori strains with risk of premature myocardial infarction

    OpenAIRE

    Gunn, M.; Stephens, J.; Thompson, J.; Rathbone, B; Samani, N

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate whether genetic diversity of Helicobacter pylori influences its association with coronary heart disease, and specifically whether the risk is confined to infection with the more virulent strains bearing the cytotoxin associated gene-A (cagA) antigen.
DESIGN AND SETTING—Case-control study in hospital admitting unselected patients with myocardial infarction.
METHODS AND SUBJECTS—Serological status for cagA and H pylori were determined in 342 cases of acute myocardial in...

  2. Application of PCR amplicon sequencing using a single primer pair in PCR amplification to assess variations in Helicobacter pylori CagA EPIYA tyrosine phosphorylation motifs

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    Karlsson Anneli

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The presence of various EPIYA tyrosine phosphorylation motifs in the CagA protein of Helicobacter pylori has been suggested to contribute to pathogenesis in adults. In this study, a unique PCR assay and sequencing strategy was developed to establish the number and variation of cagA EPIYA motifs. Findings MDA-DNA derived from gastric biopsy specimens from eleven subjects with gastritis was used with M13- and T7-sequence-tagged primers for amplification of the cagA EPIYA motif region. Automated capillary electrophoresis using a high resolution kit and amplicon sequencing confirmed variations in the cagA EPIYA motif region. In nine cases, sequencing revealed the presence of AB, ABC, or ABCC (Western type cagA EPIYA motif, respectively. In two cases, double cagA EPIYA motifs were detected (ABC/ABCC or ABC/AB, indicating the presence of two H. pylori strains in the same biopsy. Conclusion Automated capillary electrophoresis and Amplicon sequencing using a single, M13- and T7-sequence-tagged primer pair in PCR amplification enabled a rapid molecular typing of cagA EPIYA motifs. Moreover, the techniques described allowed for a rapid detection of mixed H. pylori strains present in the same biopsy specimen.

  3. The frequency of Helicobacter pylor infection and cagA expression in the Korean patients with gastric carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helicobacter pylori infection had been approved as a group 1 carcinogen by the international agency for research on cancer. However the association between H.pylori infection and gastric carcinoma was not so definite in South Asia including Korea, and the role of cagA gene of H.pylori in gastric carcinogenesis was a controversial issue. The aims of this study were firstly to study in vivo expression frequency of 16S rRNA and cagA gene of H.pylori, secondly to study the association between H.pylori infection and gastric cancer, the association between cagA expression and gastric cancer in Korean patients. In vivo expression rate of 16S rRNA was 74 % of gastric carcinoma patients and cagA expression rate was 51 % of gastric carcinoma patients with H.pylori infection. Although 90 % of gastric carcinoma patients had H.pylori infection, the association between H.pylori infection and gastric carcinoma was not significant. And there was no significant association between cagA expression and gastric carcinoma. (author). 37 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig

  4. The frequency of Helicobacter pylor infection and cagA expression in the Korean patients with gastric carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Sook Hyang; Kim, Yoo Chul [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection had been approved as a group 1 carcinogen by the international agency for research on cancer. However the association between H.pylori infection and gastric carcinoma was not so definite in South Asia including Korea, and the role of cagA gene of H.pylori in gastric carcinogenesis was a controversial issue. The aims of this study were firstly to study in vivo expression frequency of 16S rRNA and cagA gene of H.pylori, secondly to study the association between H.pylori infection and gastric cancer, the association between cagA expression and gastric cancer in Korean patients. In vivo expression rate of 16S rRNA was 74 % of gastric carcinoma patients and cagA expression rate was 51 % of gastric carcinoma patients with H.pylori infection. Although 90 % of gastric carcinoma patients had H.pylori infection, the association between H.pylori infection and gastric carcinoma was not significant. And there was no significant association between cagA expression and gastric carcinoma. (author). 37 refs., 2 tabs., 1 fig.

  5. The EPIYA-ABCC motif pattern in CagA of Helicobacter pylori is associated with peptic ulcer and gastric cancer in Mexican population

    OpenAIRE

    Beltrán-Anaya, Fredy Omar; Poblete, Tomás Manuel; Román-Román, Adolfo; Reyes, Salomón; de Sampedro, José; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Rodríguez, Miguel Ángel; del Moral-Hernández, Oscar; ILLADES-AGUIAR, BERENICE; Fernández-Tilapa, Gloria

    2014-01-01

    Background Helicobacter pylori chronic infection is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer, and gastric cancer. Cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA)-positive H. pylori strains increase the risk of gastric pathology. The carcinogenic potential of CagA is linked to its polymorphic EPIYA motif variants. The goals of this study were to investigate the frequency of cagA-positive Helicobacter pylori in Mexican patients with gastric pathologies and to assess the association of cagA EPIYA moti...

  6. Presence of terminal EPIYA phosphorylation motifs in Helicobacter pylori CagA contributes to IL-8 secretion, irrespective of the number of repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos S Papadakos

    Full Text Available CagA protein contributes to pro-inflammatory responses during H. pylori infection, following its intracellular delivery to gastric epithelial cells. Here, we report for the first time in an isogenic background, on the subtle role of CagA phosphorylation on terminal EPIYA-C motifs in the transcriptional activation and expression of IL-8. We utilized isogenic H. pylori mutants of P12 reference strain, expressing CagA with varying number of EPIYA-C motifs and the corresponding phosphorylation defective EPIFA-C motifs while preserving intact the CM multimerization motifs. These mutants had been previously closely scrutinized in terms of type IV secretion system functionality, CagA translocation and its subsequent phosphorylation. Following infection of gastric epithelial cell lines, transcriptional activation of IL-8 gene and secreted IL-8 levels were found to be strictly dependent upon the functionality of the EPIYA-C phosphorylation motifs, as EPIFA-C phosphorylation-deficient CagA expression failed to induce full IL-8 transcriptional activity. Interestingly, levels of IL-8 gene activation and of secreted IL-8 were the same, irrespective of the number of EPIYA-C terminal repeats. We monitored IkBα phosphorylation and confirmed CagA involvement in NF-kB activation. Furthermore, we observed that presence of EPIYA-C functional phosphorylation motifs contributed to NF-kB activation. NF-kB upstream signaling events, such as early ERK1/2 and AKT activation were confirmed to be independent of EPIYA-C phosphorylation. On the contrary, use of TAK1 specific inhibitor 5Z-7-Oxozeaenol resulted in complete arrest of IL-8 secretion, in a dose-dependent manner, irrespective of CagA status. H. pylori-infected TAK1(-/- mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs failed to induce NF-kB activity, unlike the respective control MEFs. CagA and TAK1 were found to immunoprecipitate together, irrespective of CagA EPIYA-C status, thus confirming earlier reports of TAK1 and CagA

  7. 幽门螺杆菌毒素相关蛋白A的EPIYA多态性对胃上皮细胞AGS形态及IL-8表达的影响%Effects of the Patterns of Helicobacter pylori CagA EPIYA Motifs on AGF Cell Morphology and IL-8 Secretion Levels

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘鹿; 王艳春; 陶好霞; 袁盛凌; 王令春; 刘纯杰

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects of the patterns of EPIYA motifs of Helicobacter pylori cytotoxin-associated gene A(CagA) on the cell morphology and the IL-8 secretion levels of AGS cells. Methods: The differ⁃ent genotypes of EPIYA motifs of cagA were designed and the codons were humanized, then the synthetic frag⁃ments were assembled and constructed into pcDNA3.1 vector. The recombinants were transfected into AGS cells and the effects of patterns of EPIYA motifs of CagA on cell morphology and the IL-8 secretion levels were ob⁃served. Results: Cellular morphological observation was conducted every 6 h after the transfection, and the num⁃bers of hummingbird-like cells were counted at 24 and 36 h respectively. The statistical results showed that all CagA genotypes could increase the number of cells with hummingbird-like change. Compared with the mock-vehi⁃cle controls, all the six CagA types showed a remarkably significant differences; compared with CagA ABCCC, the five CagA types left showed a remarkably significant differences. In addition, IL-8 secreted by these cells 12 and 36 h after transfection was detected respectively. The statistical analysis revealed that, at 12 h after transfection, the secretion of IL-8 began to appear difference among the six CagA types; at 36 h after transfection, compared with the mock-vehicle controls, CagA ABD, CagA J-Western, CagA ABDD and CagA ABCCC showed a remark⁃ably significant differences. Although both CagA ABD and CagA ABDD belonged to East Asian type, they had sig⁃nificantly different effects on the IL-8 secretion levels of AGS cells. Meanwhile, both CagA ABC and CagA ABCCC which belonged to Western type had significantly different effects on the IL-8 secretion levels too. Con⁃clusion: CagA virulent factor of H.pylori caused cell hummingbird phenotype and increased the IL-8 secretion lev⁃els of AGS cells. The number of EPIYA-C motif was positively correlated with hummingbird-cell formation, and the

  8. [The role of CagA in H. pylori infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Yoshida, Masaru; Azuma, Takeshi

    2009-12-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) chronically colonizes human gastric epithelium and induces various diseases. But the mechanism of carcinogenesis in H. pylori infection remains to be assessed. We described that after attachment of H. pylori to gastric epithelial cells, CagA is injected directly from the bacteria into the cells and undergoes tyrosine phosphorylation. Tyrosine phosphorylated CagA can bind to SHP-2. Deregulation of SHP -2 by CagA may induce abnormal proliferation and movement of gastric epithelial cells. There are two patterns of CagA motifs between East Asian strains and Western strains. East Asian-type CagA confers stronger SHP-2 binding and transforming activities than Western-type CagA. We assessed the association between CagA diversity and clinical outcome in Asian countries, where mortalities from gastric cancer is different. As results, H. pylori infection with East Asian-type CagA was associated with gastric atrophy and cancer. Therefore, persistent active inflammation induced by the East Asian CagA-positive strain may play a role in the pathogenesis of disease. PMID:19999107

  9. Molecular mechanisms of gastric epithelial cell adhesion and injection of CagA by Helicobacter pylori

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    Backert Steffen

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Helicobacter pylori is a highly successful pathogen uniquely adapted to colonize humans. Gastric infections with this bacterium can induce pathology ranging from chronic gastritis and peptic ulcers to gastric cancer. More virulent H. pylori isolates harbour numerous well-known adhesins (BabA/B, SabA, AlpA/B, OipA and HopZ and the cag (cytotoxin-associated genes pathogenicity island encoding a type IV secretion system (T4SS. The adhesins establish tight bacterial contact with host target cells and the T4SS represents a needle-like pilus device for the delivery of effector proteins into host target cells such as CagA. BabA and SabA bind to blood group antigen and sialylated proteins respectively, and a series of T4SS components including CagI, CagL, CagY and CagA have been shown to target the integrin β1 receptor followed by injection of CagA across the host cell membrane. The interaction of CagA with membrane-anchored phosphatidylserine may also play a role in the delivery process. While substantial progress has been made in our current understanding of many of the above factors, the host cell receptors for OipA, HopZ and AlpA/B during infection are still unknown. Here we review the recent progress in characterizing the interactions of the various adhesins and structural T4SS proteins with host cell factors. The contribution of these interactions to H. pylori colonization and pathogenesis is discussed.

  10. Molecular mechanisms of gastric epithelial cell adhesion and injection of CagA by Helicobacter pylori

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Backert, Steffen

    2011-11-01

    Abstract Helicobacter pylori is a highly successful pathogen uniquely adapted to colonize humans. Gastric infections with this bacterium can induce pathology ranging from chronic gastritis and peptic ulcers to gastric cancer. More virulent H. pylori isolates harbour numerous well-known adhesins (BabA\\/B, SabA, AlpA\\/B, OipA and HopZ) and the cag (cytotoxin-associated genes) pathogenicity island encoding a type IV secretion system (T4SS). The adhesins establish tight bacterial contact with host target cells and the T4SS represents a needle-like pilus device for the delivery of effector proteins into host target cells such as CagA. BabA and SabA bind to blood group antigen and sialylated proteins respectively, and a series of T4SS components including CagI, CagL, CagY and CagA have been shown to target the integrin β1 receptor followed by injection of CagA across the host cell membrane. The interaction of CagA with membrane-anchored phosphatidylserine may also play a role in the delivery process. While substantial progress has been made in our current understanding of many of the above factors, the host cell receptors for OipA, HopZ and AlpA\\/B during infection are still unknown. Here we review the recent progress in characterizing the interactions of the various adhesins and structural T4SS proteins with host cell factors. The contribution of these interactions to H. pylori colonization and pathogenesis is discussed.

  11. An inverse relationship between CagA+ strains of Helicobacter pylori infection and risk of erosive GERD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is investigating the association of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection and its cytogenetic-associated gene A (cag A) strain with reflux esophagitis. In a case-control setting (May 2005-2006), patients with reflux esophagitis (case group) were compared with age and gender matched people suffering from symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease with normal upper gastrointestinal endoscopic findings (control group) in Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tabriz, Iran. The rates of H. pylori and its cagA positive infections were separately compared between the 2 groups and the subgroups with different severity of reflux esophagitis. Ninety-two and 93 patients were enrolled in the case and control groups. The rate of H.pylori infection was significantly lower in case group (81.5%versus 87.10%, p=0.29, odd ratio 0.654, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.293 to 1.495). The CagA positive infections were found significantly more frequent in the control group (59.1% versus 40.2%, p=0.01, odd ratio 0.465, 95% CI 0.258 to 0.836). There was no significant difference between the severity subgroups of the disease for H. pylori (p=0.30) or cagA positive infection rates (p=0.40). The cagA positive strains might have a protective effect against reflux esophagitis. (author)

  12. In Silico Profiling of the Potentiality of Curcumin and Conventional Drugs for CagA Oncoprotein Inactivation.

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    Srivastava, Akhileshwar K; Tewari, Mallika; Shukla, Hari S; Roy, Bijoy K

    2015-08-01

    The oncoprotein cytotoxic associated gene A (CagA) of Helicobacter pylori plays a pivotal role in the development of gastric cancer, so it has been an important target for anti-H. pylori drugs. Conventional drugs are currently being implemented against H. pylori. The inhibitory role of plant metabolites like curcumin against H. pylori is still a major scientific challenge. Curcumin may represent a novel promising drug against H. pylori infection without producing side effects. In the present study, a comparative analysis between curcumin and conventional drugs (clarithromycin, amoxicillin, pantoprazole, and metronidazole) was carried out using databases to investigate the potential of curcumin against H. pylori targeting the CagA oncoprotein. Curcumin was filtered using Lipinski's rule of five and the druglikeness property for evaluation of pharmacological properties. Subsequently, molecular docking was employed to determine the binding affinities of curcumin and conventional drugs to the CagA oncoprotein. According to the results obtained from FireDock, the binding energy of curcumin was higher than those of amoxicillin, pantoprazole, and metronidazole, except for clarithromycin, which had the highest binding energy. Accordingly, curcumin may become a promising lead compound against CagA+ H. pylori infection. PMID:25996140

  13. Helicobacter pylori vacA genotypes and cagA status and their relationship to associated diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peng Hou; Zhen Xing Tu; Guo Ming Xu; Yan Fang Gong; Xu Hui Ji; Zhao Shen Li

    2000-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori ) is a major causativebacterium of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and mucosaassociated lymphoid tissue lymphoma in humans, and associated with an increased risk of gastric cancer[1 -8]. An important virulant factor of H. pylori is the vacuolating cytotoxin ( VacA ) encoded by vacA that induces cytoplasmic vacuolation in target cells both in vitro and in vivo[9-11]. VacA is produced as a 140 kDa precursor which contains an N-terminal signal peptide and an approximately 33 kDa C-terminal outer membrance exporter. The precursor is cleaved at both N-terminal and C-terminal and secreted into the extracellular milieu as a 95 kDa mature protein. The mature protein futher undergoes specific cleavage to yield 37 kDa and 58 kDa subunits[12-14] Although vacA is present in all H. pylori strains, only about 50% to 60% of strains can induce vacuolation of epithelial cells as assessed by the HeLa cell assay. vacA shows considerable genetic variation in H. pylori isolated from all over the world and contains at least two variable regions. The s region exists as sl or s2 allelic types. Among type sl strains, subtypes sla and slb have been identified. The m region occurs as ml or m2 allelic types. Specific vacA genotype of H. pylori strains are associated with the production of the cytotoxin in vitro, epithelial damage in vivo, and clinical consequences[15-27]. The other virulant factor is the cytotoxin-associated protein (CagA) encoded by the cytotoxin-associated gene (cagA). The cagA gene is present in about 60% to 70% of strains and all of these strains express the cagA. The presence of cagA is also associated with the production of the cytotoxin in vitro, and clinical outcome[24-30]. The aim of this study was (i) to identify vacA genotypes and cagA status of H. pylori isolated from Chinese patients; (ii) to evaluation the relatioship beween vacA genotypes, cagA status and related gastroenterological disorders.

  14. Role of vacuolating cytotoxin VacA and cytotoxin-associated antigen CagA of Helicobacter pylori in the progression of gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ki, Mi-Ran; Hwang, Meeyul; Kim, Ah-Young; Lee, Eun-Mi; Lee, Eun-Joo; Lee, Myeong-Mi; Sung, Soo-Eun; Kim, Sang-Hyeob; Lee, Hye Seung; Jeong, Kyu-Shik

    2014-11-01

    Helicobacter (H.) pylori strains that express the cagA and s1a vacA genes are associated with an increased risk for gastric cancer. Here, we examined the association between the products of these virulence genes with the development of gastric cancer by immunohistochemical staining of gastric biopsy specimens taken from 208 routine gastroscopies and 43 gastric cancer patients. The correlation was analyzed by multivariate logistic regression. CagA and VacA expressions in gastric mucosa were significantly associated with chronic gastritis (CG) and intestinal metaplasia (IM), respectively, accompanying CG independent of age. The association of CagA expression with IM accompanying CG was increased in patients over 50-year old (p subsequent progression of IM from CG with an increasing age. PMID:25038872

  15. High diversity of vacA and cagA Helicobacter pylori genotypes in patients with and without gastric cancer.

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    Yolanda López-Vidal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori is associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcers, and gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to assess the topographical distribution of H. pylori in the stomach as well as the vacA and cagA genotypes in patients with and without gastric cancer. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Three gastric biopsies, from predetermined regions, were evaluated in 16 patients with gastric cancer and 14 patients with dyspeptic symptoms. From cancer patients, additional biopsy specimens were obtained from tumor centers and margins; among these samples, the presence of H. pylori vacA and cagA genotypes was evaluated. Positive H. pylori was 38% and 26% in biopsies obtained from the gastric cancer and non-cancer groups, respectively (p = 0.008, and 36% in tumor sites. In cancer patients, we found a preferential distribution of H. pylori in the fundus and corpus, whereas, in the non-cancer group, the distribution was uniform (p = 0.003. A majority of the biopsies were simultaneously cagA gene-positive and -negative. The fundus and corpus demonstrated a higher positivity rate for the cagA gene in the non-cancer group (p = 0.036. A mixture of cagA gene sizes was also significantly more frequent in this group (p = 0.003. Ninety-two percent of all the subjects showed more than one vacA gene genotype; s1b and m1 vacA genotypes were predominantly found in the gastric cancer group. The highest vacA-genotype signal-sequence diversity was found in the corpus and 5 cm from tumor margins. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: High H. pylori colonization diversity, along with the cagA gene, was found predominantly in the fundus and corpus of patients with gastric cancer. The genotype diversity observed across systematic whole-organ and tumor sampling was remarkable. We find that there is insufficient evidence to support the association of one isolate with a specific disease, due to the multistrain nature of H. pylori infection shown in this work.

  16. CagA and VacA Helicobacter pylori antibodies in gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Suriani, Renzo; Colozza, Maurilio; Cardesi, Enrico; Mazzucco, Dario; Marino, Maria; Grosso, Silvia; Sanseverinati, Sabina; Venturini, Ivo; Borghi, Athos; Zeneroli, Maria Luisa

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Infection with different genotypes of virulent Helicobacter pylori strains (cytotoxin-associated gene A [CagA]-and/or vacuolating cytotoxin A [VacA]-positive) can play a role in the development of atrophic gastritis, duodenal ulcer (DU) and gastric cancer (GC).OBJECTIVE: To determine whether patients with GC and H pylori-negative histological staining had previously been infected with H pylori CagA- and/or VacA-positive virulent strains.METHODS: Twenty-three GC patients with a mea...

  17. Prevalence and Correlation with Clinical Diseases of Helicobacter pylori cagA and vacA Genotype among Gastric Patients from Northeast China

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    Faisal Aziz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genes have significant genetic heterogenicity, resulting in different clinical outcomes. Northeast part of China has reported high prevalence of H. pylori infections and gastric cancer. Hence, we investigated the H. pylori cagA and vacA genotypes with clinical outcomes in Northeast China. Gastric tissue samples (n=169, chronic gastritis (GIs, gastric ulcer (GU, and gastric cancer (GC were analysed for 16S rRNA ureA, cagA, and cagA genotypes by PCR. A total of 141 (84% cases were found positive for H. pylori by 16S rRNA and ureA. GC showed high H. pylori infection (93% compared with GIs (72% and GU (84%. The vacAs1am1 was highly found in GC (40% and GU (36%, vacAs1am2 in GIs (33%, vacAs1bm1 (14% and vacAs1bm2 (8% in GU cases, and s2m1 in normal cases (33%, while vacAs1cm1 showed low frequency in GIs (2% and GU (3% and GC showed negative result. The East-Asian cagA strain was highly observed in GC (43%, as compared to GIs (41% and GU (20%. The East-Asian cagA/vacAs1am1 was significantly higher in GC (23% than in GU (22% and GIs (145 patients. The East-Asian type cagA with vacAs1a and vacAm1 is the most predominant genotype in H. pylori strains of Northeast China.

  18. The Helicobacter pylori cytotoxin CagA is essential for suppressing host heat shock protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J Lang, Ben; J Gorrell, Rebecca; Tafreshi, Mona; Hatakeyama, Masanori; Kwok, Terry; T Price, John

    2016-05-01

    Bacterial infections typically elicit a strong Heat Shock Response (HSR) in host cells. However, the gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori has the unique ability to repress this response, the mechanism of which has yet to be elucidated. This study sought to characterize the underlying mechanisms by which H. pylori down-modulates host HSP expression upon infection. Examination of isogenic mutant strains of H. pylori defective in components of the type IV secretion system (T4SS), identified the secretion substrate, CagA, to be essential for down-modulation of the HSPs HSPH1 (HSP105), HSPA1A (HSP72), and HSPD1 (HSP60) upon infection of the AGS gastric adenocarcinoma cell line. Ectopic expression of CagA by transient transfection was insufficient to repress HSP expression in AGS or HEK293T cells, suggesting that additional H. pylori factors are required for HSP repression. RT-qPCR analysis of HSP gene expression in AGS cells infected with wild-type H. pylori or isogenic cagA-deletion mutant found no significant change to account for reduced HSP levels. In summary, this study identified CagA to be an essential bacterial factor for H. pylori-mediated suppression of host HSP expression. The novel finding that HSPH1 is down-modulated by H. pylori further highlights the unique ability of H. pylori to repress the HSR within host cells. Elucidation of the mechanism by which H. pylori achieves HSP repression may prove to be beneficial in the identification of novel mechanisms to inhibit the HSR pathway and provide further insight into the interactions between H. pylori and the host gastric epithelium. PMID:26928021

  19. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Thailand: A Nationwide Study of the CagA Phenotype.

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    Tomohisa Uchida

    Full Text Available The risk to develop gastric cancer in Thailand is relatively low among Asian countries. In addition, the age-standardized incidence rate (ASR of gastric cancer in Thailand varies with geographical distribution; the ASR in the North region is 3.5 times higher than that in the South region. We hypothesized that the prevalence of H. pylori infection and diversity of CagA phenotype contributes to the variety of gastric cancer risk in various regions of Thailand.We conducted a nationwide survey within Thailand. We determined H. pylori infection prevalence by detecting H. pylori, using histochemical and immunohistochemical methods. The anti-CagA antibody and anti-East-Asian type CagA antibody (α-EAS Ab, which showed high accuracy in several East Asian countries, were used to determine CagA phenotype.Among 1,546 patients from four regions, including 17 provinces, the overall prevalence of H. pylori infection was 45.9% (710/1,546. Mirroring the prevalence of H. pylori infection, histological scores were the lowest in the South region. Of the 710 H. pylori-positive patients, 93.2% (662 were immunoreactive with the anti-CagA antibody. CagA-negative strain prevalence in the South region was significantly higher than that in other regions (17.9%; 5/28; p < 0.05. Overall, only 77 patients (11.6% were immunoreactive with the α-EAS Ab. There were no differences in the α-EAS Ab immunoreactive rate across geographical regions.This is the first study using immunohistochemistry to confirm H. pylori infections across different regions in Thailand. The prevalence of East-Asian type CagA H. pylori in Thailand was low. The low incidence of gastric cancer in Thailand may be attributed to the low prevalence of precancerous lesions. The low incidence of gastric cancer in the South region might be associated with the lower prevalence of H. pylori infection, precancerous lesions, and CagA-positive H. pylori strains, compared with that in the other regions.

  20. Hydrogen Metabolism in Helicobacter pylori Plays a Role in Gastric Carcinogenesis through Facilitating CagA Translocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ge; Romero-Gallo, Judith; Benoit, Stéphane L.; Piazuelo, M. Blanca; Dominguez, Ricardo L.; Morgan, Douglas R.; Peek, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A known virulence factor of Helicobacter pylori that augments gastric cancer risk is the CagA cytotoxin. A carcinogenic derivative strain, 7.13, that has a greater ability to translocate CagA exhibits much higher hydrogenase activity than its parent noncarcinogenic strain, B128. A Δhyd mutant strain with deletion of hydrogenase genes was ineffective in CagA translocation into human gastric epithelial AGS cells, while no significant attenuation of cell adhesion was observed. The quinone reductase inhibitor 2-n-heptyl-4-hydroxyquinoline-N-oxide (HQNO) was used to specifically inhibit the H2-utilizing respiratory chain of outer membrane-permeabilized bacterial cells; that level of inhibitor also greatly attenuated CagA translocation into AGS cells, indicating the H2-generated transmembrane potential is a contributor to toxin translocation. The Δhyd strain showed a decreased frequency of DNA transformation, suggesting that H. pylori hydrogenase is also involved in energizing the DNA uptake apparatus. In a gerbil model of infection, the ability of the Δhyd strain to induce inflammation was significantly attenuated (at 12 weeks postinoculation), while all of the gerbils infected with the parent strain (7.13) exhibited a high level of inflammation. Gastric cancer developed in 50% of gerbils infected with the wild-type strain 7.13 but in none of the animals infected with the Δhyd strain. By examining the hydrogenase activities from well-defined clinical H. pylori isolates, we observed that strains isolated from cancer patients (n = 6) have a significantly higher hydrogenase (H2/O2) activity than the strains isolated from gastritis patients (n = 6), further supporting an association between H. pylori hydrogenase activity and gastric carcinogenesis in humans. PMID:27531909

  1. The Genetic Diversity of Helicobacter pylori Virulence Genes Is Not Associated with Gastric Atrophy Progression

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    Kita,Masahide

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Atrophy of the gastric mucosa is a precursor of intestinal-type gastric cancer, and Helicobacter pylori infection causes atrophic gastritis. The aim of this study was to determine whether the genetic diversity of H. pylori virulence genes is associated with the development and progression of gastric atrophy in humans. We isolated and cultured H. pylori strains from patients with gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer accompanied by atrophic gastritis in background mucosa. H. pylori strains were stored at -80℃ prior to the experiments being carried out. We analyzed iceA, babA, vacA, cagA, and cagE genes by PCR. The cagA gene was analyzed through sequencing of the C-terminal region containing the EPIYA motif, which is related to tyrosine phosphorylation. Severe atrophy was observed in patients with gastric ulcer. The major phenotype of the vacA gene was s1c/m1 (93オ. The cagA gene was detected in all strains. The cagE gene was not detected in 2 and 5 strains from the mild cases and severe cases, respectively. The major cagA EPIYA motif, which is amino acids repeat in the C terminus, was the A-B-D type (44 of 58 strains. The virulence genes were not statistically associated with the severity of atrophy in the background gastric mucosa in humans. Not only identification of bacterial virulence factors but also studies of the host response will be necessary to investigate the progression of gastric atrophy and subsequent cancer development in humans.

  2. Translocation of Helicobacter pylori CagA into Gastric Epithelial Cells by Type IV Secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odenbreit, Stefan; Püls, Jürgen; Sedlmaier, Bettina; Gerland, Elke; Fischer, Wolfgang; Haas, Rainer

    2000-02-01

    The Gram-negative bacterium Helicobacter pylori is a causative agent of gastritis and peptic ulcer disease in humans. Strains producing the CagA antigen (cagA+) induce strong gastric inflammation and are strongly associated with gastric adenocarcinoma and MALT lymphoma. We show here that such strains translocate the bacterial protein CagA into gastric epithelial cells by a type IV secretion system, encoded by the cag pathogenicity island. CagA is tyrosine-phosphorylated and induces changes in the tyrosine phosphorylation state of distinct cellular proteins. Modulation of host cells by bacterial protein translocation adds a new dimension to the chronic Helicobacter infection with yet unknown consequences.

  3. Helicobacter pylori CagA Inhibits PAR1-MARK Family Kinases by Mimicking Host Substrates

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    Nesic, D.; Miller, M; Quinkert, Z; Stein, M; Chait, B; Stebbins, C

    2010-01-01

    The CagA protein of Helicobacter pylori interacts with numerous cellular factors and is associated with increased virulence and risk of gastric carcinoma. We present here the cocrystal structure of a subdomain of CagA with the human kinase PAR1b/MARK2, revealing that a CagA peptide mimics substrates of this kinase family, resembling eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitors. Mutagenesis of conserved residues central to this interaction renders CagA inactive as an inhibitor of MARK2.

  4. Role of Helicobacter pylori cagA EPIYA motif and vacA genotypes for the development of gastrointestinal diseases in Southeast Asian countries: a meta-analysis

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    Sahara Shu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with cagA-positive, cagA EPIYA motif ABD type, and vacA s1, m1, and i1 genotype strains of Helicobacter pylori is associated with an exacerbated inflammatory response and increased risk of gastroduodenal diseases. However, it is unclear whether the prevalence and virulence factor genotypes found in Southeast Asia are similar to those in Western countries. Here, we examined the cagA status and prevalence of cagA EPIYA motifs and vacA genotypes among H. pylori strains found in Southeast Asia and examined their association with gastroduodenal disease. Methods To determine the cagA status, cagA EPIYA motifs, and vacA genotypes of H. pylori, we conducted meta-analyses of 13 previous reports for 1,281 H. pylori strains detected from several Southeast Asian countries. Results The respective frequencies of cagA-positive and vacA s1, m1, and i1 genotypes among examined subjects were 93% (1,056/1,133, 98% (1,010/1,033, 58% (581/1,009, and 96% (248/259, respectively. Stratification showed significant variation in the frequencies of cagA status and vacA genotypes among countries and the individual races residing within each respective country. The frequency of the vacA m-region genotype in patients infected with East Asian-type strains differed significantly between the northern and southern areas of Vietnam (p vacA m1 type or cagA-positive strains was associated with an increased risk of peptic ulcer disease (odds ratio: 1.46, 95%CI: 1.01-2.12, p = 0.046 and 2.83, 1.50-5.34, p = 0.001, respectively in the examined Southeast Asian populations. Conclusions Both Western- and East Asian-type strains of H. pylori are found in Southeast Asia and are predominantly cagA-positive and vacA s1 type. In Southeast Asia, patients infected with vacA m1 type or cagA-positive strains have an increased risk of peptic ulcer disease. Thus, testing for this genotype and the presence of cagA may have clinical usefulness.

  5. Determination of strains of Helicobacter pylori and of polymorphism in the interleukin-8 gene in patients with stomach cancer

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    Ruth Maria Dias Ferreira Vinagre

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Gastric neoplasia is the second most common cause of death by cancer in the world and H. pylori is classified as a type I human carcinogen by the World Health Organization. However, despite the high prevalence of infection by H. pylori around the world, less than 3% of individuals carrying the bacteria develop gastric neoplasias. Such a fact indicates that evolution towards malignancy may be associated with bacterial factors in the host and the environment. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between polymorphism in the region promoting the IL-8 (-251 gene and the H. pylori genotype, based on the vacA alleles and the presence of the cagA gene, using clinical and histopathological data. METHODS: In a prospective study, a total of 102 patients with stomach cancer and 103 healthy volunteers were analysed. Polymorphism in interleukin 8 (-251 was determined by the PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism reaction and sequencing. PCR was used for genotyping the vacA alleles and the cagA in the bacterial strains PCR. Gastric biopsies were histologically assessed. RESULTS: The H. pylori serology was positive for 101 (99% of all patients analysed, and 98 (97% of them were colonized by only one strain. In patients with monoinfection, 82 (84% of the bacterial strains observed had the s1b/m1 genotype. The cagA gene was detected in 74 (73% of patients infected by H. pylori. The presence of the cagA gene was demonstrated as associated with the presence of the s1b/m1 genotype of the vacA gene (P = 0.002. As for polymorphism in the interleukin 8 (-251 gene we observed that the AA (P = 0.026 and AT (P = 0.005 genotypes were most frequent in the group of patients with gastric adenocarcinoma. By comparing the different types of isolated bacterial strains with the interleukin -8 (-251 and the histopathological data we observed that carriers of the A allele (AT and AA infected by virulent strains (m1s1 cagA+ demonstrated a greater risk of

  6. Relationship between caga-positive Helicobacter pylori infection and risk of gastric cancer: a case control study in Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil

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    Gilmara Coelho Meine

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Gastric cancer is the second most common cause of cancer related death worldwide. Although Helicobacter pylori has been classified as a class I carcinogen, the presence of infection is not a factor that alone is able to lead to gastric cancer, and one of the possible explanations for this is the existence of different strains of H. pylori with different degrees of virulence. OBJECTIVES: To investigate the association between cagA-positive H. pylori and gastric cancer, using polymerase chain reaction (PCR for the detection of this bacterial strain. METHODS: Twenty-nine patients with gastric cancer were matched by sex and age (± 5 years with 58 patients without gastric cancer, submitted to upper gastrointestinal endoscopy. All patients were evaluated for the status of infection by H. pylori (through urease test, histological analysis and PCR for the genes ureA and 16SrRNA and by cagA-positive strain (through PCR for cagA gene. RESULTS: Evaluating the presence of infection by cagA-positive H. pylori, it was verified that the rate of infection was significantly higher in the group with gastric cancer when compared with the matched controls, occurring in 62.1% and 29.3%, respectively (OR = 3.95; CI 95% 1.543-10.096. CONCLUSIONS: There is an association between cagA-positive H. pylori strain and risk of gastric cancer.

  7. Helicobacter pylori cagA and iceA genotypes status and risk of peptic ulcer in Saudi patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective was to determine the prevalence of cagA+ and iceA genotypes among Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) isolates from a group of Saudi patients with gastric complaints, and to find out any significant correlation between these strains and severe gastric clinical outcomes such as peptic ulcer and gastric cancer in Saudi population. A total of 1104 gastric biopsies from 368 patients who presented with symptoms suggestive of chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, or gastric carcinoma were taken from the main hospitals in the Western region of Saudi Arabia from July 2004 to July 2005. We cultured the samples for H. pylori and a polymerase chain reaction was carried out to check for the presence or absence of cagA gene and the status of iceA genotypes. Among the 368 suspected patients to be infected with H. pylori by means of clinical features and endoscopic findings; 103 (28%) were positive using culture technique. The relation of the presence of cagA and the development of cases to gastritis and ulcer was statistically significant (p=0.0001). Furthermore, this study revealed that 100% of ulcer cases were infected with iceA1 with a statistically significant correlation (p=0.0001), while 94.6% of gastritis and 90.9% of normal were infected with iceA2 (p=0.0001). Moreover cagA+/iceA1 combined genotypes was statistically correlated with peptic ulcer (100%) but not cagA-/iceA1 (0%; p=0.0001).Certain H. pylori genotypes were more virulent than others. Multiple clinical implications based on these finding might be studied further.(author)

  8. Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genotypes in patients from northeastern Brazil with upper gastrointestinal diseases

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    Meyssa Quezado de Figueiredo Cavalcante

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori causes chronic gastric inflammation and significantly increases the risk of duodenal and gastric ulcer disease and distal gastric carcinoma. In this study, we evaluated the Helicobacter pylori vacA and cagA genotypes in patients from a Brazilian region where there is a high prevalence of gastric cancer. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR was used to investigate vacA mosaicism and cagA status in the gastric mucosa of 134 H. pylori-positive patients, including 76 with gastritis: 28 with peptic ulcer disease and 30 with gastric cancer. The s1m1 variant was the predominant vacA genotype observed, whereas the s1 allele was more frequently observed in patients with more severe diseases associated with H. pylori infection [p = 0.03, odds ratio (OR = 5.72, 95% confidence interval (CI = 1.15-38.60]. Furthermore, all of the s1 alleles were s1b. Mixed vacA m1/m2 strains were found more frequently in patients with gastric cancer and a cagA-positive status was significantly associated with gastric cancer (p = 0.016, OR = 10.36, 95% CI = 1.35-217.31. Patients with gastric cancer (21/21, 100%, p = 0.006 or peptic ulcers (20/21, 95%, p = 0.02 were more frequently colonised by more virulent H. pylori strains compared to gastritis patients (41/61, 67.2%. In conclusion, in the northeastern of Brazil, which is one of the regions with the highest prevalence of gastric cancer in the country, infection with the most virulent H. pylori strains, carrying the cagA gene and s1m1 vacA alleles, predominates and is correlated with more severe H. pylori-associated diseases.

  9. Mutation of cytotoxin-associated gene A affects expressions of antioxidant proteins of Hellcobacter pylori

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhi-Gang Huang; Guang-Cai Duan; Qing-Tang Fan; Wei-Dong Zhang; Chun-Hua Song; Xue-Yong Huang; Rong-Guang Zhang

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To determine if disruption of the cagA gene of Helicobacter pylori ( H pylori) has an effect on the expression of other proteins at proteome level.METHODS: Construction of a cagA knock out mutant Hp27_. cagA ( cagA-) via homologous recombinat ion wi th the wi ld- type st rain Hp27 ( cagA+) as a recipient was performed. The method of sonicat ion-urea-CHAPS-DTT was employed to extract bacterial proteins from both strains. Soluble proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE). Images of 2-DE gels were digitalized and analyzed. Only spots that had a statistical significance in differential expression were selected and analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionizationtime of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Biological information was used to search protein database and identify the biological function of proteins. RESULTS: The proteome expressions between wild-type strain and isogenic mutant with the cagA gene knocked-out were compared. Five protein spots with high abundance in bacteria proteins of wild-type strains, down-regulated or absently expressed in bacteria proteins of mutants, were identified and analyzed. From a quantitative point of view, the identified proteins are related to the cagA gene and important antioxidant proteins of H pylori, including alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (Ahp), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and modulator of drug activity (Mda66), respectively, suggesting that cagA is important to maintain the normal activity of antioxidative stress and ensure H pylori persistent colonization in the host. CONCLUSION: cagA gene i s relevant to the expressions of antioxidant proteins of H pylori, which may be a novel mechanism involved in H pylori cagA pathogenesis.

  10. A Combinatorial Approach to Detecting Gene-Gene and Gene-Environment Interactions in Family Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Lou, Xiang-Yang; Chen, Guo-Bo; Yan, Lei; Ma, Jennie Z.; Mangold, Jamie E.; Zhu, Jun; Elston, Robert C.; Li, Ming D.

    2008-01-01

    Widespread multifactor interactions present a significant challenge in determining risk factors of complex diseases. Several combinatorial approaches, such as the multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) method, have emerged as a promising tool for better detecting gene-gene (G × G) and gene-environment (G × E) interactions. We recently developed a general combinatorial approach, namely the generalized multifactor dimensionality reduction (GMDR) method, which can entertain both qualitative ...

  11. Evaluation of immobilized metal affinity chromatography kits for the purification of histidine-tagged recombinant CagA protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karakus, Cebrail; Uslu, Merve; Yazici, Duygu; Salih, Barik A

    2016-05-15

    Immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) technique is used for fast and reliable purification of histidine(His)-tagged recombinant proteins. The technique provides purification under native and denaturing conditions. The aim of this study is to evaluate three commercially available IMAC kits (Thermo Scientific, GE Healthcare and Qiagen) for the purification of a 6xHis-tagged recombinant CagA (cytotoxin-associated gene A) protein from IPTG-induced Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) culture. The kits were tested according to the manufacturer instructions and the protein was purified with only GE Healthcare and Qiagen kits under denaturing conditions. 1% (w/v) SDS was used as denaturing agent in PBS instead of extraction reagent of Thermo Scientific kit to lyse bacterial cells from 100ml culture. The 6xHis-tagged recombinant protein was purified by the three kits equally. PMID:26657801

  12. CagA status & genetic characterization of metronidazole resistant strains of H. pylori from: A region at high risk of gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Yue, Jin-Yong; Yue, Jing; Wang, Ming-Yi; Song, Wen-chong; Gao, Xiao-zhong

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The aim of study was to determine relationship between cagA and genetic characterization of metronidazole (MTZ) resistant H. pylori strains from a region at high risk of gastric cancer. Methods: 172 H. pylori strains were isolated from the patients with dyspeptic symptoms, and antimicrobial susceptibility testing for MTZ was assessed by E-test. rdxA and frxA genes were amplified using PCR among the MTZ resistant isolates. The status of the plasmid and classes 1~3 integrons were inv...

  13. Detection of the common resistance genes in Gram-negative bacteria using gene chip technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Ting

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To design a resistance gene detection chip that could, in parallel, detect common clinical drug resistance genes of Gram-negative bacteria. Materials and Methods: Seventy clinically significant Gram-negative bacilli (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii were collected. According to the known resistance gene sequences, we designed and synthesized primers and probes, which were used to prepare resistance gene detection chips, and finally we hybridized and scanned the gene detection chips. Results: The results between the gene chip and polymerase chain reaction (PCR were compared. The rate was consistently 100% in the eight kinds of resistance genes tested (TEM, SHV, CTX-M, DHA, CIT, VIM, KPC, OXA-23. One strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa had the IMP, but it was not found by gene chip. Conclusion: The design of Gram-negative bacteria-resistant gene detection chip had better application value.

  14. Analysis of serum antibody profile against H pylori VacA and CagA antigens in Turkish patients with duodenal ulcer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yusuf Erzin; Sibel Altun; Ahmet Dobrucali; Mustafa Aslan; Sibel Erdamar; Ahmet Dirican; Murat Tuncer; Bekir Kocazeybek

    2006-01-01

    AIM:To investigate the frequency of seropositivity against CagA, VacA proteins and to determine their independent effects on the development of duodenal ulcer (DU) in Turkish patients.METHODS:The study was designed as a prospective one from a tertiary referral hospital. Dyspeptic patients who were referred to our endoscopy unit for upper gastrointestinal endoscopy between June 2003 and March 2004 and diagnosed to have DU or nonulcer dyspepsia (NUD) were included. Biopsies from the antrum and body of the stomach were taken in order to assess the current H pylori status by histology, rapid urease test and culture.Fasting sera were obtained from all patients and H pylori status of all sera was determined by IgG antibodies using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kit. All seropositive patients were further analysed using Western blot assays detecting IgG antibodies against CagA and VacA proteins. The x2 test was used for statistical comparison of the values and age-sex adjusted multiple regression analysis was used to determine the independent effects of CagA and VacA seropositivities on the development of DU.RESULTS:Sixty-three patients with DU and 62 patients with NUD were eligible for the final analysis. Seropositivity for anti-CagA was detected in 51 of 62 (82%), and in 55 of 63 (87%) patients with NUD and DU, respectively (P = no significance), and seropositivity for antiVacA was found in 25 of 62 (40%) and in 16 of 63 (25%) patients, with NUD and DU, respectively.CONCLUTSION: These findings suggest that none of these virulence factors is associated with the development of DU in the studied Turkish patients with dyspepsia.

  15. Quantitative analysis of CagA type IV secretion by Helicobacter pylori reveals substrate recognition and translocation requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindele, Franziska; Weiss, Evelyn; Haas, Rainer; Fischer, Wolfgang

    2016-04-01

    Bacterial type IV secretion systems are protein transporters with a remarkable diversity of substrates and substrate recognition mechanisms. Type IV-secreted proteins often contain C-terminal secretion signals, but may also require other regions for recognition as secretory substrates, or for full secretion efficiency. For example, type IV secretion of CagA, a major pathogenicity factor of the human gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori, depends on a C-terminal signal and on N-terminal protein regions. To examine the involvement of individual CagA regions for type IV secretion efficiency, we have established and evaluated a β-lactamase-dependent reporter system which allows quantitative determination of translocation into host cells. For validation, we used this reporter system to obtain quantitative data for type IV secretion of CagA variants with sequential C-terminal truncations. Alanine-scanning mutagenesis of the CagA C-terminus revealed that none of the characteristic charged residues in this region is necessary for type IV secretion. Translocation rates measured for CagA variants with N-terminal deletions show that CagA does not have an N-terminal signal sequence, but requires its N-terminal domain for efficient secretion. Finally, we provide evidence that only newly synthesized CagA protein is translocated, supporting a model in which type IV secretion is coupled to protein biosynthesis. PMID:26713727

  16. Detection of the common resistance genes in Gram-negative bacteria using gene chip technology

    OpenAIRE

    Ting, C.; A Jun; Z Shun

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To design a resistance gene detection chip that could, in parallel, detect common clinical drug resistance genes of Gram-negative bacteria. Materials and Methods: Seventy clinically significant Gram-negative bacilli (Klebsiella pneumoniae, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Acinetobacter baumannii) were collected. According to the known resistance gene sequences, we designed and synthesized primers and probes, which were used to prepare resistance gene ...

  17. Preliminary Report of Molecular Detection of Retinoblastoma Gene Mutations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1994-01-01

    To develop gene diagnosis for retinoblastoma predisposition, it is necessary to disclose the retinoblastoma gene mutations or deletions in detail. Genomic DNA from tumor and peripheral white blood cells in 33 patients with retinoblastoma was detected with 3.8kb probe derived from 3' end of retinoblastoma gene cDNA. The gene abnormalities, including deletion, partial deletion and rearrangement, were found in 18 patients. Further research will be aimed at microdeletions or mutations for those patients wti...

  18. A review for detecting gene-gene interactions using machine learning methods in genetic epidemiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Ching Lee; Liew, Mei Jing; Mohamad, Mohd Saberi; Salleh, Abdul Hakim Mohamed

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the greatest statistical computational challenge in genetic epidemiology is to identify and characterize the genes that interact with other genes and environment factors that bring the effect on complex multifactorial disease. These gene-gene interactions are also denoted as epitasis in which this phenomenon cannot be solved by traditional statistical method due to the high dimensionality of the data and the occurrence of multiple polymorphism. Hence, there are several machine learning methods to solve such problems by identifying such susceptibility gene which are neural networks (NNs), support vector machine (SVM), and random forests (RFs) in such common and multifactorial disease. This paper gives an overview on machine learning methods, describing the methodology of each machine learning methods and its application in detecting gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. Lastly, this paper discussed each machine learning method and presents the strengths and weaknesses of each machine learning method in detecting gene-gene interactions in complex human disease. PMID:24228248

  19. Capsaicin consumption, Helicobacter pylori CagA status and IL1B-31C>T genotypes: a host and environment interaction in gastric cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Carrillo, Lizbeth; Camargo, M Constanza; Schneider, Barbara G; Sicinschi, Liviu A; Hernández-Ramírez, Raúl U; Correa, Pelayo; Cebrian, Mariano E

    2012-06-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) has been associated with a complex combination of genetic and environmental factors. In contrast to most countries, available information on GC mortality trends showed a gradual increase in Mexico. Our aim was to explore potential interactions among dietary (chili pepper consumption), infectious (Helicobacter pylori) and genetic factors (IL1B-31 genotypes) on GC risk. The study was performed in three areas of Mexico, with different GC mortality rates. We included 158 GC patients and 317 clinical controls. Consumption of capsaicin (Cap), the pungent active substance of chili peppers, was estimated by food frequency questionnaire. H. pylori CagA status was assessed by ELISA, and IL1B-31 genotypes were determined by TaqMan assays and Pyrosequencing in DNA samples. Multivariate unconditional logistic regression was used to estimate potential interactions. Moderate to high Cap consumption synergistically increased GC risk in genetically susceptible individuals (IL1B-31C allele carriers) infected with the more virulent H. pylori (CagA+) strains. The combined presence of these factors might explain the absence of a decreasing trend for GC in Mexico. However, further research on gene-environment interactions is required to fully understand the factors determining GC patterns in susceptible populations, with the aim of recommending preventive measures for high risk individuals. PMID:22414649

  20. CagA+ H pylori infection is associated with polarization of T helper cell immune responses in gastric carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shu-Kui Wang; Hui-Fang Zhu; Bang-Shun He; Zhen-Yu Zhang; Zhi-Tan Chen; Zi-Zheng Wang; Guan-Ling Wu

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To characterize the immune responses including local and systemic immunity induced by infection with H pylori, especially with CagA+ H pylori strains and the underlying immunopathogenesis.METHODS: A total of 711 patients with different gastric lesions were recruited to determine the presence of H pylori infection and cytotoxin associated protein A (CagA), the presence of T helper (Th) cells and regulatory T (Treg)cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs),expression of plasma cytokines, and RNA and protein expression of IFN-γ and IL-4 in gastric biopsies and PBMCs were determined by rapid urease test, urea [14C]breath test, immunoblotting test, flow cytometry, real time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry.RESULTS: Of the patients, 629 (88.47%) were infected with H pylori; 506 (71.16%) with CagA+ and 123 (17.30%) with CagA- strains. Among patients infected with CagA+ H pylori strains, Th1-mediated cellular immunity was associated with earlier stages of gastric carcinogenesis, while Th2-mediated humoral immunity dominated the advanced stages and was negatively associated with an abundance of Treg cells. However,there was no such tendency in Th1/Th2 polarization in patients infected with CagA- H pylori strains and those without H pylori infection,CONCLUSION: Polarization of Th cell immune responses occurs in patients with CagA+ H pylori infection, which is associated with the stage and severity of gastric pathology during the progression of gastric carcinogenesis. This finding provides further evidence for a causal role of CagA+ H pylori infection in the immunopathogenesis of gastric cancer.

  1. Multiplex PCR for detection of acquired carbapenemase genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirel, Laurent; Walsh, Timothy R; Cuvillier, Vincent; Nordmann, Patrice

    2011-05-01

    A rapid and reliable PCR-based technique was developed for detection of genes encoding carbapenemases belonging to different classes. Primers were designed to amplify the following 11 genes: bla(IMP), bla(VIM), bla(NDM), bla(SPM), bla(AIM), bla(DIM), bla(GIM), bla(SIM)bla(KPC), bla(BIC), and bla(OXA-48). Three different multiplex reaction mixtures were defined and evaluated for the detection of all these 11 genes. Using optimized conditions, each reaction mixture allowed to identify the respective genes, with PCR giving distinct amplicon sizes corresponding to the different genes for each mixture. We reported here a rapid and reliable technique for screening all clinically relevant carbapenemase genes. PMID:21398074

  2. Multiplex PCR method for detection of three Aeromonas enterotoxin genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingombe, Cesar I Bin; D'Aoust, Jean-Yves; Huys, Geert; Hofmann, Lisa; Rao, Mary; Kwan, Judy

    2010-01-01

    A novel multiplex PCR method using three sets of specific primers was developed for the detection of the cytotoxic (act), heat-labile (alt), and heat-stable (ast) enterotoxin genes in Aeromonas spp. This assay was used to characterize 35 reference strains as well as 537 food-borne isolates. A total of seven gene pattern combinations were encountered, including act, alt, act/alt, act/alt/ast, act/alt/148-bp amplicon, alt/ast, and alt/148-bp amplicon. The alt gene was detected with 34 reference strains (97%) and occurred singly in 14% of these strains. The frequency of occurrence of the act/alt, act/alt/ast, and alt/ast gene patterns in reference strains was 14 (40%), 2 (6%), and 2 (6%), respectively. An unpredicted amplicon was detected in 11 reference strains (31%). Characterization of this amplicon showed that its size was 148 bp, as generated by the AHLF and AHLR primers, and that it uniquely aligned with the Aeromonas salmonicida A449 genome sequence (GenBank accession number CP000644). This amplicon was named Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida hypothetical protein amplicon (AssHPA). In the 537 food-borne isolates, the act and alt genes were most dominant and were detected in 349 (65%) and 452 (84%) isolates, respectively, either alone or in combinations. The act and alt genes occurred singly in 30 (6%) and 128 (24%) of these strains, respectively. The act/alt gene pattern occurred in 315 isolates (59%), whereas the ast gene was always linked to strains exhibiting the act/alt/ast and alt/ast gene combinations in 4 (0.7%) and 5 (0.9%) isolates, respectively. The uniplex amplification of three enterotoxin genes separately confirms the specificity of the unique selected primers. This multiplex PCR is rapid and simple and can detect the presence of three Aeromonas enterotoxin genes in a single assay. PMID:19933350

  3. Development of a Universal RNA Beacon for Exogenous Gene Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Yuanjian; Lu, Zhongju; Cohen, Ira Stephen; Scarlata, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    RNA beacon technology is a promising method to detect and separate cells expressing a particular gene, but developing a successful, specific beacon can take months and in some cases is impossible. This study reports an off-the-shelf universal beacon that decreases the time and cost of applying beacon technology to select any living cell population transfected with an exogenous gene.

  4. Soroprevalência de anticorpos contra o antígeno CagA do Helicobacter pylori em pacientes com úlcera gástrica na região Norte do Brasil Seroprevalence of antibodies against the CagA antigen the Helicobacter pylori in patients with gastric ulcer in the North region of Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Caricio Martins

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available O Helicobacter pylori é um agente patogênico largamente distribuído no mundo, estando envolvido no desenvolvimento de várias doenças gastrointestinais. Atualmente a infecção pela cepa virulenta (CagA+ do H. pylori é considerado um dos principais fatores etiológicos para o desenvolvimento de ulcerações gástricas. Baseado nessa informação, investigamos a soroprevalência das cepas virulentas entre os pacientes com úlcera gástrica da nossa região, utilizando testes sorológicos para detecção de anticorpos contra o H. pylori e a proteína CagA. Sendo observado que 82% (45/55 dos pacientes estavam infectados pela cepa virulenta, entre esses 89% (40/45 apresentaram grau de inflamação aumentado na mucosa gástrica, com denso infiltrado de leucócitos no tecido, o que provavelmente favoreceu a formação das ulcerações gástricas.Helicobacter pylori is a pathogenic agent with a worldwide distribution and is involved in the development of many gastrointestinal diseases. Nowadays infection with the virulent strain CagA+ of H. pylori is considered one of the main etiological factors in the development of gastric ulcer. Based on this information, we investigated the seroprevalence of virulent strains among patients with gastric ulcer from one region, using serologic tests to detect antibodies against H. pylori and CagA protein. Infection by the virulent strain was found in 82% (40/55 of the patients, and among these, 89% (40/45 presented an increased degree of inflammation in the gastric mucosa, with a dense infiltration of leukocytes in the tissue, which probably favored the formation of gastric ulcer. We concluded that the presence of the virulent strain is related to the development of an increased inflammation in the gastric mucosa.

  5. Detection for gene-gene co-association via kernel canonical correlation analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhongshang

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Currently, most methods for detecting gene-gene interaction (GGI in genomewide association studies (GWASs are limited in their use of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP as the unit of association. One way to address this drawback is to consider higher level units such as genes or regions in the analysis. Earlier we proposed a statistic based on canonical correlations (CCU as a gene-based method for detecting gene-gene co-association. However, it can only capture linear relationship and not nonlinear correlation between genes. We therefore proposed a counterpart (KCCU based on kernel canonical correlation analysis (KCCA. Results Through simulation the KCCU statistic was shown to be a valid test and more powerful than CCU statistic with respect to sample size and interaction odds ratio. Analysis of data from regions involving three genes on rheumatoid arthritis (RA from Genetic Analysis Workshop 16 (GAW16 indicated that only KCCU statistic was able to identify interactions reported earlier. Conclusions KCCU statistic is a valid and powerful gene-based method for detecting gene-gene co-association.

  6. Helicobacter pylori genotyping from American indigenous groups shows novel Amerindian vacA and cagA alleles and Asian, African and European admixture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margarita Camorlinga-Ponce

    Full Text Available It is valuable to extend genotyping studies of Helicobacter pylori to strains from indigenous communities across the world to better define adaption, evolution, and associated diseases. We aimed to genetically characterize both human individuals and their infecting H. pylori from indigenous communities of Mexico, and to compare them with those from other human groups. We studied individuals from three indigenous groups, Tarahumaras from the North, Huichols from the West and Nahuas from the center of Mexico. Volunteers were sampled at their community site, DNA was isolated from white blood cells and mtDNA, Y-chromosome, and STR alleles were studied. H. pylori was cultured from gastric juice, and DNA extracted for genotyping of virulence and housekeeping genes. We found Amerindian mtDNA haplogroups (A, B, C, and D, Y-chromosome DYS19T, and Amerindian STRs alleles frequent in the three groups, confirming Amerindian ancestry in these Mexican groups. Concerning H.pylori cagA phylogenetic analyses, although most isolates were of the Western type, a new Amerindian cluster neither Western nor Asian, was formed by some indigenous Mexican, Colombian, Peruvian and Venezuelan isolates. Similarly, vacA phylogenetic analyses showed the existence of a novel Amerindian type in isolates from Alaska, Mexico and Colombia. With hspA strains from Mexico and other American groups clustered within the three major groups, Asian, African or European. Genotyping of housekeeping genes confirmed that Mexican strains formed a novel Asian-related Amerindian group together with strains from remote Amazon Aborigines. This study shows that Mexican indigenous people with Amerindian markers are colonized with H. pylori showing admixture of Asian, European and African strains in genes known to interact with the gastric mucosa. We present evidence of novel Amerindian cagA and vacA alleles in indigenous groups of North and South America.

  7. Detection of Gene Interactions Based on Syntactic Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mi-Young Kim

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Interactions between proteins and genes are considered essential in the description of biomolecular phenomena, and networks of interactions are applied in a system's biology approach. Recently, many studies have sought to extract information from biomolecular text using natural language processing technology. Previous studies have asserted that linguistic information is useful for improving the detection of gene interactions. In particular, syntactic relations among linguistic information are good for detecting gene interactions. However, previous systems give a reasonably good precision but poor recall. To improve recall without sacrificing precision, this paper proposes a three-phase method for detecting gene interactions based on syntactic relations. In the first phase, we retrieve syntactic encapsulation categories for each candidate agent and target. In the second phase, we construct a verb list that indicates the nature of the interaction between pairs of genes. In the last phase, we determine direction rules to detect which of two genes is the agent or target. Even without biomolecular knowledge, our method performs reasonably well using a small training dataset. While the first phase contributes to improve recall, the second and third phases contribute to improve precision. In the experimental results using ICML 05 Workshop on Learning Language in Logic (LLL05 data, our proposed method gave an F-measure of 67.2% for the test data, significantly outperforming previous methods. We also describe the contribution of each phase to the performance.

  8. Multiple repeats of Helicobacter pylori CagA EPIYA-C phosphorylation sites predict risk of gastric ulcer in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarmand-Jahromy, Sahar; Siavoshi, Farideh; Malekzadeh, Reza; Sattari, Taher Nejad; Latifi-Navid, Saeid

    2015-12-01

    Biological activity of Helicobacter pylori oncoprotein CagA is determined by a diversity in the tyrosine phosphorylation motif sites. In the present study, the diversity and the type of the H. pylori CagA EPIYA motifs and their association with gastric ulcer (GU) and duodenal ulcer (DU) in Iranian dyspeptic patients were assessed. PCR amplification, sequencing, and bioinformatic analysis were performed to determine the pattern of CagA EPIYA motifs. Of 168 H. pylori cagA(+) strains, the frequency of ABC was 93.50%, ABCCC 5.40%, ABC + ABCCC 0.6% and ABCC 0.6%. There was no EPIYA-D segment. The ABCCC pattern of EPIYA motif was more frequent in the H. pylori isolates from GU (8/50, 16%) than in those from chronic gastritis (CG) (0/81, 0%) (P = 0). In contrast, The ABC pattern of EPIYA motif was less frequent in the H. pylori isolates from GU (41/50, 82%) than in those from CG (80/81, 98.80%) (Age-sex-adjusted odds ratio (OR) = 0.020, 95% CI = 0.002-0.259; P = 0.003). The distribution of the ABC motif was almost the same in H. pylori isolates from CG (98.80%) and DU diseases (97.30%). There was no significant association between the number of CagA EPIYA-C segment and DU (P > 0.05). We have proposed that CagA from Iranian H. pylori strains were Western type and all strains had active phosphorylation sites. The three EPIYA-C motifs of CagA were more frequently observed in the H. pylori strains from GU; thus it might be an important biomarker for predicting the GU risk in Iran. PMID:26408373

  9. DETECTION OF GENE MUTATION IN SPUTUM OF LUNG CANCER PATIENT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG He-long; WANG Wen-liang; CUI Da-xiang

    1999-01-01

    @@ Lung cancer is a common malignant tumor, which has ahigh incidence and mortality rate. Therefore, it is necessary to seek a new method for the diagnosis, especially the early diagnosis of lung cancer. The development of molecular biology makes the gene diagnosis of lung cancer possible.PCR-SSCP was applied to detect p53 gene mutation of lung cancer patients' sputum cells and we have achieved good results.

  10. Diversity and Detection of Nitrate Assimilation Genes in Marine Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Allen, Andrew E.; Booth, Melissa G.; Frischer, Marc E.; Verity, Peter G.; Zehr, Jonathan P.; Zani, Sabino

    2001-01-01

    A PCR approach was used to construct a database of nasA genes (called narB genes in cyanobacteria) and to detect the genetic potential for heterotrophic bacterial nitrate utilization in marine environments. A nasA-specific PCR primer set that could be used to selectively amplify the nasA gene from heterotrophic bacteria was designed. Using seawater DNA extracts obtained from microbial communities in the South Atlantic Bight, the Barents Sea, and the North Pacific Gyre, we PCR amplified and se...

  11. Helicobacter pylori CagA Suppresses Apoptosis through Activation of AKT in a Nontransformed Epithelial Cell Model of Glandular Acini Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo-Flores, Gabriela; Torres, Javier; Sandoval-Montes, Claudia; Arévalo-Romero, Haruki; Meza, Isaura; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Torres-Morales, Julián; Chávez-Rueda, Adriana Karina; Legorreta-Haquet, María Victoria; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2015-01-01

    H. pylori infection is the most important environmental risk to develop gastric cancer, mainly through its virulence factor CagA. In vitro models of CagA function have demonstrated a phosphoprotein activity targeting multiple cellular signaling pathways, while cagA transgenic mice develop carcinomas of the gastrointestinal tract, supporting oncogenic functions. However, it is still not completely clear how CagA alters cellular processes associated with carcinogenic events. In this study, we evaluated the capacity of H. pylori CagA positive and negative strains to alter nontransformed MCF-10A glandular acini formation. We found that CagA positive strains inhibited lumen formation arguing for an evasion of apoptosis activity of central acini cells. In agreement, CagA positive strains induced a cell survival activity that correlated with phosphorylation of AKT and of proapoptotic proteins BIM and BAD. Anoikis is a specific type of apoptosis characterized by AKT and BIM activation and it is the mechanism responsible for lumen formation of MCF-10A acini in vitro and mammary glands in vivo. Anoikis resistance is also a common mechanism of invading tumor cells. Our data support that CagA positive strains signaling function targets the AKT and BIM signaling pathway and this could contribute to its oncogenic activity through anoikis evasion. PMID:26557697

  12. Detection of Rare Beta Globin Gene Mutations in Northwestern Iran

    OpenAIRE

    M Haghi; N Pouladi; AA Hosseinpour Feizi; MA Hosseinpour Feizi; P Azarfam

    2007-01-01

    Introduction: Recent molecular studies on Iranian β-thalassemia genes revealed the presence of eight common mutations associated with thalassemia. Although these mutations are frequent, there are other rare and unknown mutations that can create large problems in designing preventive programs. We detected and explained the common mutations in north-western Iran previously and detection of the rare and unknown mutations could be useful in diagnosis and design of future preventive programs. Meth...

  13. Detecting negative selection on recurrent mutations using gene genealogy

    OpenAIRE

    Ezawa, Kiyoshi; Landan, Giddy; Graur, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Background Whether or not a mutant allele in a population is under selection is an important issue in population genetics, and various neutrality tests have been invented so far to detect selection. However, detection of negative selection has been notoriously difficult, partly because negatively selected alleles are usually rare in the population and have little impact on either population dynamics or the shape of the gene genealogy. Recently, through studies of genetic disorders and genome-...

  14. The power of phylogenetic approaches to detect horizontally transferred genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogarten J Peter

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Horizontal gene transfer plays an important role in evolution because it sometimes allows recipient lineages to adapt to new ecological niches. High genes transfer frequencies were inferred for prokaryotic and early eukaryotic evolution. Does horizontal gene transfer also impact phylogenetic reconstruction of the evolutionary history of genomes and organisms? The answer to this question depends at least in part on the actual gene transfer frequencies and on the ability to weed out transferred genes from further analyses. Are the detected transfers mainly false positives, or are they the tip of an iceberg of many transfer events most of which go undetected by current methods? Results Phylogenetic detection methods appear to be the method of choice to infer gene transfers, especially for ancient transfers and those followed by orthologous replacement. Here we explore how well some of these methods perform using in silico transfers between the terminal branches of a gamma proteobacterial, genome based phylogeny. For the experiments performed here on average the AU test at a 5% significance level detects 90.3% of the transfers and 91% of the exchanges as significant. Using the Robinson-Foulds distance only 57.7% of the exchanges and 60% of the donations were identified as significant. Analyses using bipartition spectra appeared most successful in our test case. The power of detection was on average 97% using a 70% cut-off and 94.2% with 90% cut-off for identifying conflicting bipartitions, while the rate of false positives was below 4.2% and 2.1% for the two cut-offs, respectively. For all methods the detection rates improved when more intervening branches separated donor and recipient. Conclusion Rates of detected transfers should not be mistaken for the actual transfer rates; most analyses of gene transfers remain anecdotal. The method and significance level to identify potential gene transfer events represent a trade

  15. A functional gene array for detection of bacterial virulence elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaing, C

    2007-11-01

    We report our development of the first of a series of microarrays designed to detect pathogens with known mechanisms of virulence and antibiotic resistance. By targeting virulence gene families as well as genes unique to specific biothreat agents, these arrays will provide important data about the pathogenic potential and drug resistance profiles of unknown organisms in environmental samples. To validate our approach, we developed a first generation array targeting genes from Escherichia coli strains K12 and CFT073, Enterococcus faecalis and Staphylococcus aureus. We determined optimal probe design parameters for microorganism detection and discrimination, measured the required target concentration, and assessed tolerance for mismatches between probe and target sequences. Mismatch tolerance is a priority for this application, due to DNA sequence variability among members of gene families. Arrays were created using the NimbleGen Maskless Array Synthesizer at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Purified genomic DNA from combinations of one or more of the four target organisms, pure cultures of four related organisms, and environmental aerosol samples with spiked-in genomic DNA were hybridized to the arrays. Based on the success of this prototype, we plan to design further arrays in this series, with the goal of detecting all known virulence and antibiotic resistance gene families in a greatly expanded set of organisms.

  16. The detection of HBV DNA with gold nanoparticle gene probes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong Xi; Xiaoping Luo; Qin Ning; Qianghua Lu; Kailun Yao; Zuli Liu

    2007-01-01

    Objective:Gold nanoparticle Hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA probes were prepared, and their application for HBV DNA measurement was studied. Methods:Alkanethiol modified oligonucleotide was bound with self-made Au nanoparticles to form nanoparticle HBV DNA gene probes, through covalent binding of Au-S. By using a fluorescence-based method, the number of thiol-derivatized, single-stranded oligonucleotides and their hybridization efficiency with complementary oligonucleotides in solution was determined. With the aid of Au nanoparticle-supported mercapto-modified oligonucleotides serving as detection probes, and oligonucleotides immobilized on a nylon membrane surface acting as capturing probes,HBV DNA was detected visually by sandwich hybridization based on highly sensitive aggregation and silver staining. The modified nanoparticle HBV DNA gene probes were also used to detect the HBV DNA extracted from serum in patients with hepatitis B. Results:Compared with bare Au nanoparticles, oligonucleotide modified nanoparticles had a higher stability in NaCl solution or under high temperature environment and the absorbance peak of modified Au nanoparticles shifted from 520nm to 524nm. For Au nanoparticles, the maximal oligonucleotide surface coverage of hexaethiol 30-mer oligonucleotide was (132 ± 10) oligonucleotides per nanoparticle, and the percentage of hybridization strands on nanoparticles was (22 ± 3% ). Based on a two-probe sandwich hybridization/nanoparticle amplification/silver staining enhancement method, Au nanoparticle gene probes could detect as low as 10-11 mol/L composite HBV DNA molecules on a nylon membrane and the PCR products of HBV DNA visually. As made evident by transmission electron microscopy, the nanoparticles assembled into large network aggregates when nanoparticle HBV DNA gene probes were applied to detect HBV DNA molecules in liquid. Conclusion:Our results showed that successfully prepared Au nanoparticle HBV DNA gene probes could be used to

  17. Powerful tests for detecting a gene effect in the presence of possible gene-gene interactions using garrote kernel machines

    OpenAIRE

    Maity, Arnab; Lin, Xihong

    2011-01-01

    We propose in this paper a powerful testing procedure for detecting a gene effect on a continuous outcome in the presence of possible gene-gene interactions (epistasis) in a gene set, e.g. a genetic pathway or network. Traditional tests for this purpose require a large number of degrees of freedom by testing the main effect and all the corresponding interactions under a parametric assumption, and hence suffer from low power. In this paper, we propose a powerful kernel machine based test. Spec...

  18. APPLICATION OF GENETIC DEAFNESS GENE CHIP FOR DETECTION OF GENE MUTATION OF DEAFNESS IN PREGNANT WOMEN

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG Liang; ZHONG Su; ZHAO Nan; LIU Ping; ZHAO Yangyu; QIAO Jie

    2014-01-01

    Objective The study is to identify the carrier rate of common deafness mutation in Chinese pregnant women via detecting deafness gene mutations with gene chip. Methods The pregnant women in obstetric clinic without hearing impairment and hearing disorders family history were selected. The informed consent was signed. Peripheral blood was taken to extract genom-ic DNA. Application of genetic deafness gene chip for detecting 9 mutational hot spot of the most common 4 Chinese deafness genes, namely GJB2 (35delG,176del16bp, 235delC, 299delAT), GJB3 (C538T) ,SLC26A4 ( IVS72A>G, A2168G) and mito-chondrial DNA 12S rRNA (A1555G, C1494T) . Further genetic testing were provided to the spouses and newborns of the screened carriers. Results Peripheral blood of 430 pregnant women were detected,detection of deafness gene mutation carri-ers in 24 cases(4.2%), including 13 cases of the GJB2 heterozygous mutation, 3 cases of SLC26A4 heterozygous mutation, 1 cases of GJB3 heterozygous mutation, and 1 case of mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutation. 18 spouses and 17 newborns took fur-ther genetic tests, and 6 newborns inherited the mutation from their mother. Conclusion The common deafness genes muta-tion has a high carrier rate in pregnant women group,235delC and IVS7-2A>G heterozygous mutations are common.

  19. PCR-based detection of gene transfer vectors: application to gene doping surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Irene C; Le Guiner, Caroline; Ni, Weiyi; Lyles, Jennifer; Moullier, Philippe; Snyder, Richard O

    2013-12-01

    Athletes who illicitly use drugs to enhance their athletic performance are at risk of being banned from sports competitions. Consequently, some athletes may seek new doping methods that they expect to be capable of circumventing detection. With advances in gene transfer vector design and therapeutic gene transfer, and demonstrations of safety and therapeutic benefit in humans, there is an increased probability of the pursuit of gene doping by athletes. In anticipation of the potential for gene doping, assays have been established to directly detect complementary DNA of genes that are top candidates for use in doping, as well as vector control elements. The development of molecular assays that are capable of exposing gene doping in sports can serve as a deterrent and may also identify athletes who have illicitly used gene transfer for performance enhancement. PCR-based methods to detect foreign DNA with high reliability, sensitivity, and specificity include TaqMan real-time PCR, nested PCR, and internal threshold control PCR. PMID:23912835

  20. Transgenic Expression of the Helicobacter pylori Virulence Factor CagA Promotes Apoptosis or Tumorigenesis through JNK Activation in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Wandler, Anica M.; Guillemin, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Author Summary The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori infects an estimated 50% of the world's population and is a major risk factor for the development of gastric cancer. Strains of H. pylori that can inject the CagA effector protein into host cells are known to be more virulent, but the potential contributions of host genetics to pathogenesis are not well-understood. Using transgenic Drosophila melanogaster, we show that the genetic context of both the host cells in which CagA is expressed...

  1. Helicobacter pylori Infection in Thailand: A Nationwide Study of the CagA Phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Uchida, Tomohisa; Miftahussurur, Muhammad; Pittayanon, Rapat; Vilaichone, Ratha-korn; Wisedopas, Naruemon; Ratanachu-ek, Thawee; Kishida, Tetsuko; Moriyama, Masatsugu; Yamaoka, Yoshio; Mahachai, Varocha

    2015-01-01

    Background The risk to develop gastric cancer in Thailand is relatively low among Asian countries. In addition, the age-standardized incidence rate (ASR) of gastric cancer in Thailand varies with geographical distribution; the ASR in the North region is 3.5 times higher than that in the South region. We hypothesized that the prevalence of H. pylori infection and diversity of CagA phenotype contributes to the variety of gastric cancer risk in various regions of Thailand. Methods We conducted a...

  2. Universal and specific quantitative detection of botulinum neurotoxin genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnon Stephen S

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clostridium botulinum, an obligate anaerobic spore-forming bacterium, produces seven antigenic variants of botulinum toxin that are distinguished serologically and termed "serotypes". Botulinum toxin blocks the release of acetylcholine at neuromuscular junctions resulting in flaccid paralysis. The potential lethality of the disease warrants a fast and accurate means of diagnosing suspected instances of food contamination or human intoxication. Currently, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA-accepted assay to detect and type botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs is the mouse protection bioassay. While specific and sensitive, this assay requires the use of laboratory animals, may take up to four days to achieve a diagnosis, and is unsuitable for high-throughput analysis. We report here a two-step PCR assay that identifies all toxin types, that achieves the specificity of the mouse bioassay while surpassing it in equivalent sensitivity, that has capability for high-throughput analysis, and that provides quantitative results within hours. The first step of our assay consists of a conventional PCR that detects the presence of C. botulinum regardless of the neurotoxin type. The second step uses quantitative PCR (qPCR technology to determine the specific serotype of the neurotoxin. Results We assayed purified C. botulinum DNA and crude toxin preparations, as well as food and stool from healthy individuals spiked with purified BoNT DNA, and one stool sample from a case of infant botulism for the presence of the NTNH gene, which is part of the BoNT gene cluster, and for the presence of serotype-specific BoNT genes. The PCR surpassed the mouse bioassay both in specificity and sensitivity, detecting positive signals in BoNT preparations containing well below the 1 LD50 required for detection via the mouse bioassay. These results were type-specific and we were reliably able to quantify as few as 10 genomic copies. Conclusions While other studies

  3. Detection and sequence analysis of accessory gene regulator genes of Staphylococcus pseudintermedius isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ananda Chitra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (SP is the major pathogenic species of dogs involved in a wide variety of skin and soft tissue infections. The accessory gene regulator (agr locus of Staphylococcus aureus has been extensively studied, and it influences the expression of many virulence genes. It encodes a two-component signal transduction system that leads to down-regulation of surface proteins and up-regulation of secreted proteins during in vitro growth of S. aureus. The objective of this study was to detect and sequence analyzing the AgrA, B, and D of SP isolated from canine skin infections. Materials and Methods: In this study, we have isolated and identified SP from canine pyoderma and otitis cases by polymerase chain reaction (PCR and confirmed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Primers for SP agrA and agrBD genes were designed using online primer designing software and BLAST searched for its specificity. Amplification of the agr genes was carried out for 53 isolates of SP by PCR and sequencing of agrA, B, and D were carried out for five isolates and analyzed using DNAstar and Mega5.2 software. Results: A total of 53 (59% SP isolates were obtained from 90 samples. 15 isolates (28% were confirmed to be methicillinresistant SP (MRSP with the detection of the mecA gene. Accessory gene regulator A, B, and D genes were detected in all the SP isolates. Complete nucleotide sequences of the above three genes for five isolates were submitted to GenBank, and their accession numbers are from KJ133557 to KJ133571. AgrA amino acid sequence analysis showed that it is mainly made of alpha-helices and is hydrophilic in nature. AgrB is a transmembrane protein, and AgrD encodes the precursor of the autoinducing peptide (AIP. Sequencing of the agrD gene revealed that the 5 canine SP strains tested could be divided into three Agr specificity groups (RIPTSTGFF, KIPTSTGFF, and RIPISTGFF based on the putative AIP produced by each strain

  4. Presence of terminal EPIYA phosphorylation motifs in Helicobacter pylori CagA contributes to IL-8 secretion, irrespective of the number of repeats.

    OpenAIRE

    Papadakos, Konstantinos S.; Sougleri, Ioanna S; Mentis, Andreas F; Efstathios Hatziloukas; Sgouras, Dionyssios N.

    2013-01-01

    CagA protein contributes to pro-inflammatory responses during H. pylori infection, following its intracellular delivery to gastric epithelial cells. Here, we report for the first time in an isogenic background, on the subtle role of CagA phosphorylation on terminal EPIYA-C motifs in the transcriptional activation and expression of IL-8. We utilized isogenic H. pylori mutants of P12 reference strain, expressing CagA with varying number of EPIYA-C motifs and the corresponding phosphorylation de...

  5. Role of Helicobacter pylori cagA EPIYA motif and vacA genotypes for the development of gastrointestinal diseases in Southeast Asian countries: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Sahara Shu; Sugimoto Mitsushige; Vilaichone Ratha-Korn; Mahachai Varocha; Miyajima Hiroaki; Furuta Takahisa; Yamaoka Yoshio

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Infection with cagA-positive, cagA EPIYA motif ABD type, and vacA s1, m1, and i1 genotype strains of Helicobacter pylori is associated with an exacerbated inflammatory response and increased risk of gastroduodenal diseases. However, it is unclear whether the prevalence and virulence factor genotypes found in Southeast Asia are similar to those in Western countries. Here, we examined the cagA status and prevalence of cagA EPIYA motifs and vacA genotypes among H. pylori stra...

  6. Particularities of gastroduodenal pathology in children, associated with cytotoxic CAGA-positive strains of Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerasimenko O.N.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to investigate the characteristics of inflammatory gastroduodenal diseases in children, associated with CagA-positive strains of H. pylori. We observed 283 children aged 7 to 17 years with chronic gastroduodenal pathology in exacerbation stage; endoscopic examination of the esophagus, stomach and duodenum was performed, total Ig M, A, G to Ag SagA H. pylori protein in blood serum by ELISA was determined. The study group included 156 patients infected with cytotoxic CagA (+ strains of H. pylori (H. pylori-positive status, comparison group - 59 (20,9% patients with H. pylori-negative status. It was shown that 55.1% of patients observed were infected with cytotoxic CagA (+ strains of H. pylori. The intensity of clinical symptoms and the severity of inflammatory changes in stomach and duodenum mucosa in children with H. pylori infection is associated with cytotoxic strains of CAG A H. pylori. Presence of extensive gastritis (34,6%; p<0,05, lymphoid hyperplasia (16,0%; p <0,05, turbid mucus in the gastric lumen are the special features of endoscopic changes in children with H. pylori-positive status.

  7. Sample size for detecting differentially expressed genes in microarray experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jiangning

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarray experiments are often performed with a small number of biological replicates, resulting in low statistical power for detecting differentially expressed genes and concomitant high false positive rates. While increasing sample size can increase statistical power and decrease error rates, with too many samples, valuable resources are not used efficiently. The issue of how many replicates are required in a typical experimental system needs to be addressed. Of particular interest is the difference in required sample sizes for similar experiments in inbred vs. outbred populations (e.g. mouse and rat vs. human. Results We hypothesize that if all other factors (assay protocol, microarray platform, data pre-processing were equal, fewer individuals would be needed for the same statistical power using inbred animals as opposed to unrelated human subjects, as genetic effects on gene expression will be removed in the inbred populations. We apply the same normalization algorithm and estimate the variance of gene expression for a variety of cDNA data sets (humans, inbred mice and rats comparing two conditions. Using one sample, paired sample or two independent sample t-tests, we calculate the sample sizes required to detect a 1.5-, 2-, and 4-fold changes in expression level as a function of false positive rate, power and percentage of genes that have a standard deviation below a given percentile. Conclusions Factors that affect power and sample size calculations include variability of the population, the desired detectable differences, the power to detect the differences, and an acceptable error rate. In addition, experimental design, technical variability and data pre-processing play a role in the power of the statistical tests in microarrays. We show that the number of samples required for detecting a 2-fold change with 90% probability and a p-value of 0.01 in humans is much larger than the number of samples commonly used in

  8. 21 CFR 866.5900 - Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. 866.5900 Section 866.5900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Immunological Test Systems § 866.5900 Cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutation detection system. (a) Identification. The CFTR gene mutation detection system is a...

  9. Detection of virulence genes of Clostridium difficile by multiplex PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antikainen, Jenni; Pasanen, Tanja; Mero, Sointu; Tarkka, Eveliina; Kirveskari, Juha; Kotila, Saara; Mentula, Silja; Könönen, Eija; Virolainen-Julkunen, Anni-Riitta; Vaara, Martti; Tissari, Päivi

    2009-08-01

    Clostridium difficile strains belonging to the PCR ribotype 027, pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) type NAP1, toxinotype III and restriction endonuclease analysis group BI harbouring mutations in the tcdC gene and possessing binary toxin components A and B have been described to cause epidemics with increased morbidity and mortality. In the present study we developed a conventional multiplex PCR designed to detect selected virulence associated markers of the hypervirulent C. difficile PCR ribotype 027. The multiplex PCR assay detected the major toxins A and B, binary toxin components A and B as well as a possible deletion in the tcdC gene: a characteristic pattern of amplification products for the PCR ribotype 027 strains was detected. This rather simple method was specific for the screening of this hypervirulent C. difficile strain. The correlation between the multiplex PCR and PCR ribotyping methods was excellent. The sensitivity and specificity were 100% in our epidemiological situation. In conclusion, this multiplex PCR was found useful in the preliminary screening for the hypervirulent C. difficile PCR ribotype 027. PMID:19664132

  10. Mutation detection in tumor suppressor genes using archival tissue specimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrinidis, Aristotelis; Henske, Elizabeth Petri

    2006-01-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is a neurocutaneous syndrome characterized by seizures, mental retardation, and benign tumors of many organs, including the brain, kidneys, skin, retina, and heart. TSC is caused by mutations in the TSC1 and TSC2 tumor suppressor genes. The genes follow the two-hit model for tumorigenesis, with germline mutations inactivating one allele and somatic mutations inactivating the remaining wild-type allele. Allelic loss (also called loss of heterozygosity [LOH]) in the 9q34 and 16p13 regions has been found in many tumor types from TSC patients. Cardiac rhabdomyomas are frequently found in infants with TSC. Because rhabdomyomas often spontaneously regress, access to fresh tissue is limited. In this chapter, we present methodology for detection of genetic inactivation of TSC1 and TSC2 in paraffin-embedded archival tissues. The template DNA is obtained either by direct scraping of tissue or after laser capture microdissection. LOH analysis is performed after polymerase chain reaction amplification of microsatellite markers in the 9q34 and 16p13 regions and denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Mutation detection is performed using single-strand conformation polymorphisms on mutation detection enhancement gels. Finally, variant bands are amplified and analyzed by direct sequencing. PMID:16930013

  11. Detection of Rare Beta Globin Gene Mutations in Northwestern Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Haghi

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recent molecular studies on Iranian β-thalassemia genes revealed the presence of eight common mutations associated with thalassemia. Although these mutations are frequent, there are other rare and unknown mutations that can create large problems in designing preventive programs. We detected and explained the common mutations in north-western Iran previously and detection of the rare and unknown mutations could be useful in diagnosis and design of future preventive programs. Methods: In this study, 5ml peripheral blood from 20 Azari- β-thalassemia patients whose mutation was not revealed in the previous study was collected and DNA extraction was done by isopropanol and proteinase k method. Initially, samples were examined for the rare mutations: Codon6, Codon16, Codon41/42, Codon36/37, -88 and Codon22 by ARMS – PCR techniques and then the unknown cases were directly sequenced. Results: According to our results, Codon15(TGG-TGA, Codon16(-C, Codon36/37(-T, IVSII-848(C-A, IVSII-745(C-G, -28(A-C( and Codon25/26(+T were recognized and added to the spectrom of beta globin gene mutations in Azerbaijan and Iran. Also, we detected four SNP sites: 5’UTR+20(C-T, Codon2 (CAC-CAT , IVSII-16(C-G and IVSII-666(T-C in β-thalassemia genes. Conclusion: Our results could be useful for developing molecular screening plans and help prenatal diagnosis of beta thalassemia in Azerbaijan , Iran and other neighboring countries.

  12. Association testing to detect gene-gene interactions on sex chromosomes in trio data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeonok eLee

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD occurs more often among males than females in a 4:1 ratio. Among theories used to explain the causes of ASD, the X chromosome and the Y chromosome theories attribute ASD to X-linked mutation and the male-limited gene expressions on the Y chromosome, respectively. Despite the rationale of the theory, studies have failed to attribute the sex-biased ratio to the significant linkage or association on the regions of interest on X chromosome. We further study the gender biased ratio by examining the possible interaction effects between two genes in the sex chromosomes. We propose a logistic regression model with mixed effects to detect gene-gene interactions on sex chromosomes. We investigated the power and type I error rates of the approach for a range of minor allele frequencies and varying linkage disequilibrium between markers and QTLs. We also evaluated the robustness of the model to population stratification. We applied the model to a trio-family data set with an ASD affected male child to study gene-gene interactions on sex chromosomes.

  13. Construction and Expression of Helicobacter Pylori Virulence Factor CagA Prokaryotic Expression Vector%幽门螺杆菌细胞毒素相关蛋白CagA原核表达载体的构建及诱导表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨贵珍; 王易

    2012-01-01

    目的 构建幽门螺杆菌细胞毒素相关蛋白CagA的原核表达载体并诱导表达,为进一步利用此表达载体研究中药的抗幽门螺杆菌的机制提供物质条件.方法 以幽门螺杆菌基因组为模板,通过PCR体外扩增cagA基因,将cagA基因插入带绿色荧光蛋白标签的原核表达载体PET34b,利用含氨苄青霉素的LB平皿筛选阳性克隆子,以IPTG诱导含重组子PET34b-cagA的E.coli DH5α表达CagA蛋白.结果 PCR扩增出3 400 bp的DNA片段,SDS-PAGE电泳显示出有分子量128 kD的蛋白条带.结论 成功克隆并表达了幽门螺杆菌毒力因子CagA,为后续研究中药抗幽门螺杆菌奠定了物质基础.%Objective To construct the prokaryotic expression vector PET34b-cagA of H. pylori virulence factor CagA and induce the expression in order to further study the mechanism of Chinese medicines against H. pyloriMethods cagA gene of H. pylori was amplified by PCR. the cagA gene was inserted into expression vector PET34b, and LB plate containing ampicillin was used to screen positive clones. E. coli DH5α containing the positive recombinant PET34b-cagA was induced by IPTG to express CagA protein. Results 3 400 bp DNA fragment was amplified by PCR, and a 128 kDa protein band was displayed by SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. Conclusion The H. pylori virulence factor CagA was successfully cloned and expressed, which may provide a foundation for the study on Chinese medicines against H. pylori.

  14. A specific A/T polymorphism in Western tyrosine phosphorylation B-motifs regulates Helicobacter pylori CagA epithelial cell interactions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue-Song Zhang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori persistently colonizes the human stomach, with mixed roles in human health. The CagA protein, a key host-interaction factor, is translocated by a type IV secretion system into host epithelial cells, where its EPIYA tyrosine phosphorylation motifs (TPMs are recognized by host cell kinases, leading to multiple host cell signaling cascades. The CagA TPMs have been described as type A, B, C or D, each with a specific conserved amino acid sequence surrounding EPIYA. Database searching revealed strong non-random distribution of the B-motifs (including EPIYA and EPIYT in Western H. pylori isolates. In silico analysis of Western H. pylori CagA sequences provided evidence that the EPIYT B-TPMs are significantly less associated with gastric cancer than the EPIYA B-TPMs. By generating and using a phosphorylated CagA B-TPM-specific antibody, we demonstrated the phosphorylated state of the CagA B-TPM EPIYT during H. pylori co-culture with host cells. We also showed that within host cells, CagA interaction with phosphoinositol 3-kinase (PI3-kinase was B-TPM tyrosine-phosphorylation-dependent, and the recombinant CagA with EPIYT B-TPM had higher affinity to PI3-kinase and enhanced induction of AKT than the isogenic CagA with EPIYA B-TPM. Structural modeling of the CagA B-TPM motif bound to PI3-kinase indicated that the threonine residue at the pY+1 position forms a side-chain hydrogen bond to N-417 of PI3-kinase, which cannot be formed by alanine. During co-culture with AGS cells, an H. pylori strain with a CagA EPIYT B-TPM had significantly attenuated induction of interleukin-8 and hummingbird phenotype, compared to the isogenic strain with B-TPM EPIYA. These results suggest that the A/T polymorphisms could regulate CagA activity through interfering with host signaling pathways related to carcinogenesis, thus influencing cancer risk.

  15. A Specific A/T Polymorphism in Western Tyrosine Phosphorylation B-Motifs Regulates Helicobacter pylori CagA Epithelial Cell Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xue-Song; Tegtmeyer, Nicole; Traube, Leah; Jindal, Shawn; Perez-Perez, Guillermo; Sticht, Heinrich; Backert, Steffen; Blaser, Martin J

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Helicobacter pylori persistently colonizes the human stomach, with mixed roles in human health. The CagA protein, a key host-interaction factor, is translocated by a type IV secretion system into host epithelial cells, where its EPIYA tyrosine phosphorylation motifs (TPMs) are recognized by host cell kinases, leading to multiple host cell signaling cascades. The CagA TPMs have been described as type A, B, C or D, each with a specific conserved amino acid sequence surrounding EPIYA...

  16. Powerful tests for detecting a gene effect in the presence of possible gene-gene interactions using garrote kernel machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maity, Arnab; Lin, Xihong

    2011-12-01

    We propose in this article a powerful testing procedure for detecting a gene effect on a continuous outcome in the presence of possible gene-gene interactions (epistasis) in a gene set, e.g., a genetic pathway or network. Traditional tests for this purpose require a large number of degrees of freedom by testing the main effect and all the corresponding interactions under a parametric assumption, and hence suffer from low power. In this article, we propose a powerful kernel machine based test. Specifically, our test is based on a garrote kernel method and is constructed as a score test. Here, the term garrote refers to an extra nonnegative parameter that is multiplied to the covariate of interest so that our score test can be formulated in terms of this nonnegative parameter. A key feature of the proposed test is that it is flexible and developed for both parametric and nonparametric models within a unified framework, and is more powerful than the standard test by accounting for the correlation among genes and hence often uses a much smaller degrees of freedom. We investigate the theoretical properties of the proposed test. We evaluate its finite sample performance using simulation studies, and apply the method to the Michigan prostate cancer gene expression data. PMID:21504419

  17. Gene-wide analysis detects two new susceptibility genes for Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Escott-Price

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is a common debilitating dementia with known heritability, for which 20 late onset susceptibility loci have been identified, but more remain to be discovered. This study sought to identify new susceptibility genes, using an alternative gene-wide analytical approach which tests for patterns of association within genes, in the powerful genome-wide association dataset of the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project Consortium, comprising over 7 m genotypes from 25,580 Alzheimer's cases and 48,466 controls.In addition to earlier reported genes, we detected genome-wide significant loci on chromosomes 8 (TP53INP1, p = 1.4×10-6 and 14 (IGHV1-67 p = 7.9×10-8 which indexed novel susceptibility loci.The additional genes identified in this study, have an array of functions previously implicated in Alzheimer's disease, including aspects of energy metabolism, protein degradation and the immune system and add further weight to these pathways as potential therapeutic targets in Alzheimer's disease.

  18. Detection bias in microarray and sequencing transcriptomic analysis identified by housekeeping genes

    OpenAIRE

    Yijuan Zhang; Oluwafemi S. Akintola; Liu, Ken J.A.; Bingyun Sun

    2015-01-01

    This work includes the original data used to discover the gene ontology bias in transcriptomic analysis conducted by microarray and high throughput sequencing (Zhang et al., 2015) [1]. In the analysis, housekeeping genes were used to examine the differential detection ability by microarray and sequencing because these genes are probably the most reliably detected. The genes included here were compiled from 15 human housekeeping gene studies. The provided tables here comprise of detailed chrom...

  19. [Electrochemical detection of toxin gene in Listeria monocytogenes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ling-Wei; Liu, Quan-Jun; Wu, Zhong-Wei; Lu, Zu-Hong

    2010-05-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is a food-borne pathogen inducing listeriosis, an illness characterized by encephalitis, septicaemia, and meningitis. Listeriolysin O (LLO) is absolutely required for virulence by L. monocytogenes, and is found only in virulent strains of the species. One of the best ways to detect and confirm the pathogen is detection of one of the virulence factors, LLO, produced by the microorganism. This paper focused on the electrical method used to detect the LLO toxin gene in food products and organism without labeling the target DNA. The electrochemical sensor was obtained by immobilizing single-stranded oligonucleotides onto the gold electrode with the mercaptan activated by N-hydroxysulfosuccinimide (NHS) and N-(3-dimethylamion)propyl-N'-ethyl carbodiimidehydrochloride (EDC). The hy-bridization reaction that occurred on the electrode surface was evidenced by Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) analysis using [Co(phen)3](ClO4)3 as an indicator. The covalently immobilized single-stranded DNA could selectively hybridize to its complementary DNA in solution to form double-stranded DNA on the gold surface. A significant increase of the peak cur-rent of Cyclic Voltammetry (CV) upon hybridization of immobilized ssDNA with PCR amplification products in the solu-tion was observed. This peak current change was used to monitor the amount of PCR amplification products. Factors deter-mining the sensitivity of the electrochemical assay, such as DNA target concentration and hybridization conditions, were investigated. The coupling of DNA to the electrochemical sensors has the potential of the quantitative evaluation of gene. PMID:20466642

  20. Helicobacter pylori counteracts the apoptotic action of its VacA toxin by injecting the CagA protein into gastric epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Oldani

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Helicobacter pylori is responsible for gastritis and gastroduodenal ulcers but is also a high risk factor for the development of gastric adenocarcinoma and lymphoma. The most pathogenic H. pylori strains (i.e., the so-called type I strains associate the CagA virulence protein with an active VacA cytotoxin but the rationale for this association is unknown. CagA, directly injected by the bacterium into colonized epithelium via a type IV secretion system, leads to cellular morphological, anti-apoptotic and proinflammatory effects responsible in the long-term (years or decades for ulcer and cancer. VacA, via pinocytosis and intracellular trafficking, induces epithelial cell apoptosis and vacuolation. Using human gastric epithelial cells in culture transfected with cDNA encoding for either the wild-type 38 kDa C-terminal signaling domain of CagA or its non-tyrosine-phosphorylatable mutant form, we found that, depending on tyrosine-phosphorylation by host kinases, CagA inhibited VacA-induced apoptosis by two complementary mechanisms. Tyrosine-phosphorylated CagA prevented pinocytosed VacA to reach its target intracellular compartments. Unphosphorylated CagA triggered an anti-apoptotic activity blocking VacA-induced apoptosis at the mitochondrial level without affecting the intracellular trafficking of the toxin. Assaying the level of apoptosis of gastric epithelial cells infected with wild-type CagA(+/VacA(+H. pylori or isogenic mutants lacking of either CagA or VacA, we confirmed the results obtained in cells transfected with the CagA C-ter constructions showing that CagA antagonizes VacA-induced apoptosis. VacA toxin plays a role during H. pylori stomach colonization. However, once bacteria have colonized the gastric niche, the apoptotic action of VacA might be detrimental for the survival of H. pylori adherent to the mucosa. CagA association with VacA is thus a novel, highly ingenious microbial strategy to locally protect its

  1. From gene engineering to gene modulation and manipulation: can we prevent or detect gene doping in sports?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischetto, Giuseppe; Bermon, Stéphane

    2013-10-01

    -carboxamide 1-β-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR), GW1516], might concomitantly improve endurance exercise capacity in ischaemic conditions but also in normal conditions. Undoubtedly, some athletes will attempt to take advantage of these new molecules to increase strength or endurance. Antidoping laboratories are improving detection methods. These are based both on direct identification of new substances or their metabolites and on indirect evaluation of changes in gene, protein or metabolite patterns (genomics, proteomics or metabolomics). PMID:23832852

  2. Detecting rare gene transfer events in bacterial populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaare Magne Nielsen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Horizontal gene transfer (HGT enables bacteria to access, share, and recombine genetic variation, resulting in genetic diversity that cannot be obtained through mutational processes alone. In most cases, the observation of evolutionary successful HGT events relies on the outcome of initially rare events that lead to novel functions in the new host, and that exhibit a positive effect on host fitness. Conversely, the large majority of HGT events occurring in bacterial populations will go undetected due to lack of replication success of transformants. Moreover, other HGT events that would be highly beneficial to new hosts can fail to ensue due to lack of physical proximity to the donor organism, lack of a suitable gene transfer mechanism, genetic compatibility, and stochasticity in tempo-spatial occurrence. Experimental attempts to detect HGT events in bacterial populations have typically focused on the transformed cells or their immediate offspring. However, rare HGT events occurring in large and structured populations are unlikely to reach relative population sizes that will allow their immediate identification; the exception being the unusually strong positive selection conferred by antibiotics. Most HGT events are not expected to alter the likelihood of host survival to such an extreme extent, and will confer only minor changes in host fitness. Due to the large population sizes of bacteria and the time scales involved, the process and outcome of HGT are often not amenable to experimental investigation. Population genetic modeling of the growth dynamics of bacteria with differing HGT rates and resulting fitness changes is therefore necessary to guide sampling design and predict realistic time frames for detection of HGT, as it occurs in laboratory or natural settings. Here we review the key population genetic parameters, consider their complexity and highlight knowledge gaps for further research.

  3. Structural biology studies of CagA from Helicobacter pylori and histone chaperone CIA/ASF1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystal structures of proteins and their complexes have become critical information for molecular-based life science. Biochemical and biological analysis based on tertiary structural information is a powerful tool to unveil complex molecular processes in the cell. Here, we present two examples of the structure-based life science study, structural biology studies of CagA, an effector protein from Helicobacter pylori, and histone chaperone CIA/ASF1, which is involved in transcription initiation. (author)

  4. Reporter Gene Assay for Detection of Shellfish Toxins

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEI-DONG YANG; MIN-YI WU; JIE-SHENG LIU; XI-CHUN PENG; HONG-YE LI

    2009-01-01

    Objective To explore the potential reporter gene assay for the detection of sodium channel-specific toxins in shellfish as an alternative for screening harmful algal bloom (HAB) toxins, considering the fact that the existing methods including HPLC and bioassay are inappropriate for identifying HAB toxins which poses a serious problem on human health and shellfish industry. Methods A reporter plasmid pEGFP-c-fos containing c-fos promoter and EGFP was constructed and transfected into T24 cells using LipofectAMINE 2000. Positive transfectants were screened by G418 to produce a pEGFP-c-fos-T24 cell line. After addition of increasing neurotoxic shellfish poison (NSP) or GTX2,3, primary components of paralytic shellfish poison (PSP), changes in expression of EGFP in the cell line were observed under a laser scanning confocal microscope and quantified with Image-pro Plus software. Results Dose-dependent changes in the intensity of green fluorescence were observed for NSP in a range from 0 to 10 ng/mL and for GTX 2,3 from 0 to 16 ng/mL. Conclusion pEGFP-c-fos-T24 can be applied in detecting HAB toxins, and cell-based assay can be used as an alternative for screening sodium channel-specific HAB toxins.

  5. An efficient promoter trap for detection of patterned gene expression and subsequent functional analysis in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Larsen, Camilla; Franch-Marro, Xavier; Hartenstein, Volker; Alexandre, Cyrille; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2006-01-01

    Transposable elements have been used in Drosophila to detect gene expression, inactivate gene function, and induce ectopic expression or overexpression. We have combined all of these features in a single construct. A promoterless GAL4 cDNA is expressed when the construct inserts within a transcriptional unit, and GAL4 activates a GFP-encoding gene present in the same transposon. In a primary screen, patterned gene expression is detected as GFP fluorescence in the live progeny of dysgenic male...

  6. Detection of non-coding RNA genes by searching for transcription signals in intergenic regions. : Summary

    OpenAIRE

    2004-01-01

    Detection of non-coding RNA genes by searching for transcription signals in intergenic regions. Background Non-coding RNA (ncRNA) genes produce transcripts that exert their function without ever being a recipe for proteins. ncRNA gene sequences, unlike protein coding genes, do not have strong transcription signals. This study was conducted to investigate a special version of a previously tested and suggested method of detecting RNAs. This study is a part of a larger project where m...

  7. Fast and Accurate Large-Scale Detection of β-Lactamase Genes Conferring Antibiotic Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jae Jin; Lee, Jung Hun; Kwon, Dae Beom; Jeon, Jeong Ho; Park, Kwang Seung; Lee, Chang-Ro; Lee, Sang Hee

    2015-01-01

    Fast detection of β-lactamase (bla) genes allows improved surveillance studies and infection control measures, which can minimize the spread of antibiotic resistance. Although several molecular diagnostic methods have been developed to detect limited bla gene types, these methods have significant limitations, such as their failure to detect almost all clinically available bla genes. We developed a fast and accurate molecular method to overcome these limitations using 62 primer pairs, which we...

  8. A model for gene deregulation detection using expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picchetti, Thomas; Chiquet, Julien; Elati, Mohamed; Neuvial, Pierre; Nicolle, Rémy; Birmelé, Etienne

    2015-01-01

    In tumoral cells, gene regulation mechanisms are severely altered. Genes that do not react normally to their regulators' activity can provide explanations for the tumoral behavior, and be characteristic of cancer subtypes. We thus propose a statistical methodology to identify the misregulated genes given a reference network and gene expression data. PMID:26679516

  9. Transcriptionally targeted gene therapy to detect and treat cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Lily; Johnson, Mai; Sato, Makoto

    2003-01-01

    The greatest challenge in cancer treatment is to achieve the highest levels of specificity and efficacy. Cancer gene therapy could be designed specifically to express therapeutic genes to induce cancer cell destruction. Cancer-specific promoters are useful tools to accomplish targeted expression; however, high levels of gene expression are needed to achieve therapeutic efficacy. Incorporating an imaging reporter gene in tandem with the therapeutic gene will allow tangible proof of principle t...

  10. Applications of homemade kit in mutation detection of genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO; Chunxia

    2004-01-01

    [1]Orita, M., Iwahana, H., Kanazawa, H. et al., Detection of poly morphisms of human DNA by gel electrophoresis as single-strand conformation polymorphisms, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci., 1989, 86:2766-2770.[2]Hongyo, T., Buzard, G. S., Calvert, R. J. et al., Cold SSCP: a simple, rapid and non-radioactive method for optimized single-strand conformation polymorphism analyses, Nucleic Acids Res., 1993, 21: 3637-3642.[3]Kutach, L. S., Bolshakov, S., Ananthaswamy, H. N., Detection of mutations and polymorphisms in the p53 tumor suppressor gene by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis, Electrophoresis, 1999, 20: 1204-1210.[4]Kozlowski, P., Krzyzosiak, W. J., Combined SSCP/duplex analysis by capillary electrophoresis for more efficient mutation detection, Nucleic Acids Res., 2001, 29( 14): E71.[5]Turner, D., Choudhury, F., Reynard, M. et al., Typing of multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms in cytokine and receptor genes using SNaPshot, Human Immunology, 2002, 63: 508-513.[6]Sudor, J., Barbier, V., Thirot, S. et al., New block-copolymer thermoassociating matrices for DNA sequencing: Effect of molecular sreucture on rheology and resolution, Electrophoresis, 2001, 22: 720-728.[7]Barbier, V., Viovy, J. L., Advanced polymers for DNA separation, Curr. Opin. Biotechnol., 2003, 14: 51-57.[8]Ugaz, V. M., Lin, R., Srivastava, N. et al., A versatile microfabri cated platform for electrophoresis of double- and single-stranded DNA, Electrophoresis, 2003, 24:151-157.[9]Lassiter, S. J., Stryjewski, W., Owens, C. V. et al., Optimization of sequencing conditions using near-infrared lifetime identification methods in capillary gel electrophoresis, Electrophoresis, 2002, 23: 1480-1489.[10]Chang, H. T., Yeung, E. S., Poly(ethyleneoxide) for high-resolution and high-speed separation of DNA by capillary electrophoresis, J. Chromatogr. B, 1995, 669: 113-123.[11]Gao, Q., Yeung, E. S., A matrix for DNA separation: genotyping and sequencing using

  11. Association Between Helicobacter pylori cagA, babA2 Virulence Factors and Gastric Mucosal Interleukin-33 mRNA Expression and Clinical Outcomes in Dyspeptic Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahi, Heshmat; Reiisi, Somayeh; Bahreini, Rasol; Bagheri, Nader; Salimzadeh, Loghman; Shirzad, Hedayatollah

    2015-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection has been reported in more than half of the world human population. It is associated with gastric inflammation and noticeable infiltration of the immune cells to the stomach mucosa by several cytokines secretion. IL-1β, IL-18 have been shown to contribute to H. pylori induced gastritis, but the details of inflammation and association of virulence factors remain unclear. IL-1 cytokine family has a new additional cytokine, Interleukin-33 (IL-33), which is contemplated to have an important role for host defense against microorganisms. H. pylori virulence factors important in gastritis risk are the cag pathogenicity island (cag-PAI) and babA. This study evaluated IL-33 mucosal mRNA expression levels in infected and uninfected patients and its relationship with bacterial virulence factors cagA, babA2 and type of gastritis. Total RNA was extracted from gastric biopsies of 79 H. pylori-infected patients and 51 H. pylori-negative patients. Mucosal IL-33 mRNA expression levels in gastric biopsies were assessed using real-time PCR. Existence of virulence factors were detected by PCR. IL-33 mRNA expression was significantly higher in biopsies of H. pylori-infected patients compared to H. pylori-uninfected patients (Pchronic gastritis patients compared with patients with active gastritis (Pchronic gastritis and severity of inflammatory changes in the gastric mucosa. PMID:27014647

  12. DNA Microarray Detection of Antimicrobial Resistance Genes in Bacteria Co-Cultured from Swine Feces

    Science.gov (United States)

    One factor leading to the spread of antimicrobial resistance (AR) in bacteria is the horizontal transfer of resistance genes. To study this, a DNA microarray was recently developed to detect these genes. To maximize the capability of this microarray, probes were designed and added to detect all AR g...

  13. Detection of drought tolerant genes within seedling apple rootstocks in Syria

    Science.gov (United States)

    This investigation was conducted to detect the drought tolerant genes (four genes) within seedling apple rootstocks derived from five apple genotypes, including Syrian apple cultivars. The results showed that the gene MdPepPro (a cyclophilin) was found in all studied genotypes and their progenies e...

  14. Plasmodium Vivax MSP-3ß Gene as a Genetic Marker for the Parasite Detection in Comparison with Ssrrna Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Raeisi

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The importance of accurate diagnosis of all of major diseases cannot be underestimated and efficient laboratory testing is vital to identifying and treating life-threatening illnesses including malaria. In this study, we compared the potential of one of merozoite surface protein genes, PvMSP-3ß, for detection of Plasmodium vivax in blood samples by PCR with routinely used marker, ssrRNA gene.Methods: One hundred P. vivax microscopy-positive blood samples were simultaneously tested with two genetic markers, including PvMSP-3ß gene and ssrRNA gene by PCR and nestedPCR method, respectively, and their sensitivity and specificity in detection of P. vivax was compared.Results: An important difference was seen in sensitivity between the 2 genetic markers, 100% in case of ssrRNA gene vs. 95% of PvMSP-3ß gene. The specificity of the two markers was same (100%. Microscopic diagnoses of thick and thin blood smears was used as "golden standard" method.Conclusion: Due to critical importance of accurate detection of the parasite in malarious area, the PvMSP-3ß gene cannot be a suitable marker for detection of P. vivax in blood sample by PCR. More investigations are needed to find other valid markers.

  15. Detection of sulfonamide resistance genes via in situ PCR-FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnida, Anna; Kunda, Katarzyna; Ziembińska, Aleksandra; Luczkiewicz, Aneta; Felis, Ewa; Surmacz-Górska, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Due to the rising use of antibiotics and as a consequence of their concentration in the environment an increasing number of antibiotic resistant bacteria is observed. The phenomenon has a hazardous impact on human and animal life. Sulfamethoxazole is one of the sulfonamides commonly detected in surface waters and soil. The aim of the study was to detect sulfamethoxazole resistance genes in activated sludge biocenosis by use of in situ PCR and/or hybridization. So far no FISH probes for the detection of SMX resistance genes have been described in the literature. We have tested common PCR primers used for SMX resistance genes detection as FISH probes as well as a combination of in situ PCR and FISH. Despite the presence of SMX resistance genes in activated sludge confirmed via traditional PCR, the detection of the genes via microscopic visualization failed. PMID:25115110

  16. Detection of gene expression pattern in the early stage after spinal cord injury by gene chip

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘成龙; 靳安民; 童斌辉

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the changes of the gene expression pattern of spinal cord tissues in the early stage after injury by DNA microarray (gene chip). Methods: The contusion model of rat spinal cord was established according to Allen's falling strike method and the gene expression patterns of normal and injured spinal cord tissues were studied by gene chip. Results: The expression of 45 genes was significantly changed in the early stage after spinal cord injury, in which 22 genes up-regulated and 23 genes down-regulated. Conclusions: The expression of some genes changes significantly in the early stage after spinal cord injury, which indicates the complexity of secondary spinal cord injury.

  17. Detection of Prokaryotic Genes in the Amphimedon queenslandica Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conaco, Cecilia; Tsoulfas, Pantelis; Sakarya, Onur; Dolan, Amanda; Werren, John; Kosik, Kenneth S

    2016-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is common between prokaryotes and phagotrophic eukaryotes. In metazoans, the scale and significance of HGT remains largely unexplored but is usually linked to a close association with parasites and endosymbionts. Marine sponges (Porifera), which host many microorganisms in their tissues and lack an isolated germ line, are potential carriers of genes transferred from prokaryotes. In this study, we identified a number of potential horizontally transferred genes within the genome of the sponge, Amphimedon queenslandica. We further identified homologs of some of these genes in other sponges. The transferred genes, most of which possess catalytic activity for carbohydrate or protein metabolism, have assimilated host genome characteristics and are actively expressed. The diversity of functions contributed by the horizontally transferred genes is likely an important factor in the adaptation and evolution of A. queenslandica. These findings highlight the potential importance of HGT on the success of sponges in diverse ecological niches. PMID:26959231

  18. Detecting patterns of protein distribution and gene expression in silico

    OpenAIRE

    Geraghty, Michael T.; Bassett, Doug; James C Morrell; Gatto, Gregory J.; Bai, Jianwu; Geisbrecht, Brian V.; Hieter, Phil; Stephen J Gould

    1999-01-01

    Most biological information is contained within gene and genome sequences. However, current methods for analyzing these data are limited primarily to the prediction of coding regions and identification of sequence similarities. We have developed a computer algorithm, CoSMoS (for context sensitive motif searches), which adds context sensitivity to sequence motif searches. CoSMoS was challenged to identify genes encoding peroxisome-associated and oleate-induced genes in the yeast Saccharomyces ...

  19. Microarray-Based Detection of 90 Antibiotic Resistance Genes of Gram-Positive Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Perreten, Vincent; Vorlet-Fawer, Lorianne; Slickers, Peter; Ehricht, Ralf; Kuhnert, Peter; Frey, Joachim

    2005-01-01

    A disposable microarray was developed for detection of up to 90 antibiotic resistance genes in gram-positive bacteria by hybridization. Each antibiotic resistance gene is represented by two specific oligonucleotides chosen from consensus sequences of gene families, except for nine genes for which only one specific oligonucleotide could be developed. A total of 137 oligonucleotides (26 to 33 nucleotides in length with similar physicochemical parameters) were spotted onto the microarray. The mi...

  20. Can subtle changes in gene expression be consistently detected with different microarray platforms?

    OpenAIRE

    Kuiper Rowan; de Hollander Mattias; Ariyurek Yavuz; Vossen Rolf HAM; Schenk Geert J; Vreugdenhil Erno; 't Hoen Peter AC; Pedotti Paola; van Ommen Gertjan JB; den Dunnen Johan T; Boer Judith M; Menezes Renée X

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The comparability of gene expression data generated with different microarray platforms is still a matter of concern. Here we address the performance and the overlap in the detection of differentially expressed genes for five different microarray platforms in a challenging biological context where differences in gene expression are few and subtle. Results Gene expression profiles in the hippocampus of five wild-type and five transgenic δC-doublecortin-like kinase mice were...

  1. Robust multi-tissue gene panel for cancer detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talantov Dmitri

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have identified a set of genes whose relative mRNA expression levels in various solid tumors can be used to robustly distinguish cancer from matching normal tissue. Our current feature set consists of 113 gene probes for 104 unique genes, originally identified as differentially expressed in solid primary tumors in microarray data on Affymetrix HG-U133A platform in five tissue types: breast, colon, lung, prostate and ovary. For each dataset, we first identified a set of genes significantly differentially expressed in tumor vs. normal tissue at p-value = 0.05 using an experimentally derived error model. Our common cancer gene panel is the intersection of these sets of significantly dysregulated genes and can distinguish tumors from normal tissue on all these five tissue types. Methods Frozen tumor specimens were obtained from two commercial vendors Clinomics (Pittsfield, MA and Asterand (Detroit, MI. Biotinylated targets were prepared using published methods (Affymetrix, CA and hybridized to Affymetrix U133A GeneChips (Affymetrix, CA. Expression values for each gene were calculated using Affymetrix GeneChip analysis software MAS 5.0. We then used a software package called Genes@Work for differential expression discovery, and SVM light linear kernel for building classification models. Results We validate the predictability of this gene list on several publicly available data sets generated on the same platform. Of note, when analysing the lung cancer data set of Spira et al, using an SVM linear kernel classifier, our gene panel had 94.7% leave-one-out accuracy compared to 87.8% using the gene panel in the original paper. In addition, we performed high-throughput validation on the Dana Farber Cancer Institute GCOD database and several GEO datasets. Conclusions Our result showed the potential for this panel as a robust classification tool for multiple tumor types on the Affymetrix platform, as well as other whole genome arrays

  2. Detecting microRNA activity from gene expression data.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Madden, Stephen F

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding to the messenger RNA (mRNA) of protein coding genes. They control gene expression by either inhibiting translation or inducing mRNA degradation. A number of computational techniques have been developed to identify the targets of miRNAs. In this study we used predicted miRNA-gene interactions to analyse mRNA gene expression microarray data to predict miRNAs associated with particular diseases or conditions. RESULTS: Here we combine correspondence analysis, between group analysis and co-inertia analysis (CIA) to determine which miRNAs are associated with differences in gene expression levels in microarray data sets. Using a database of miRNA target predictions from TargetScan, TargetScanS, PicTar4way PicTar5way, and miRanda and combining these data with gene expression levels from sets of microarrays, this method produces a ranked list of miRNAs associated with a specified split in samples. We applied this to three different microarray datasets, a papillary thyroid carcinoma dataset, an in-house dataset of lipopolysaccharide treated mouse macrophages, and a multi-tissue dataset. In each case we were able to identified miRNAs of biological importance. CONCLUSIONS: We describe a technique to integrate gene expression data and miRNA target predictions from multiple sources.

  3. Detecting microRNA activity from gene expression data

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Madden, Stephen F

    2010-05-18

    Abstract Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are non-coding RNAs that regulate gene expression by binding to the messenger RNA (mRNA) of protein coding genes. They control gene expression by either inhibiting translation or inducing mRNA degradation. A number of computational techniques have been developed to identify the targets of miRNAs. In this study we used predicted miRNA-gene interactions to analyse mRNA gene expression microarray data to predict miRNAs associated with particular diseases or conditions. Results Here we combine correspondence analysis, between group analysis and co-inertia analysis (CIA) to determine which miRNAs are associated with differences in gene expression levels in microarray data sets. Using a database of miRNA target predictions from TargetScan, TargetScanS, PicTar4way PicTar5way, and miRanda and combining these data with gene expression levels from sets of microarrays, this method produces a ranked list of miRNAs associated with a specified split in samples. We applied this to three different microarray datasets, a papillary thyroid carcinoma dataset, an in-house dataset of lipopolysaccharide treated mouse macrophages, and a multi-tissue dataset. In each case we were able to identified miRNAs of biological importance. Conclusions We describe a technique to integrate gene expression data and miRNA target predictions from multiple sources.

  4. Detection of Abundantly Transcribed Genes and Gene Translocation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Non—Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Tarantul

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Several novel, differentially transcribed genes were identified in one centroblastic and one immunoblastic HIV-associated B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (BNHL by subtractive cloning. In both lymphomas, we detected an upregulated transcription of several mitochondrial genes. In the centroblastic B-NHL, we found a high level transcription of nuclear genes including the interferon-inducible gene (INF-ind, the immunoglobulin light chain gene (IgL, the set oncogene, and several unknown genes. The data obtained on upregulated expression of the genes in human B-NHL of HIV-infected patients considerably overlap with those obtained earlier for the B-NHL of simian immunodeficiency virus-infected monkeys. In the centroblastic lymphoma, one transcript revealed a fusion of the 3'-untranslated region of the set gene and the C-terminal region of the IgL gene. This chimeric sequence was confirmed by a site-directed polymerase chain reaction performed with total cDNA and genomic DNA. The expected amplification product was obtained in both cases pointing to a genomic rearrangement. The IgL-set fusion sequence was not found in cDNA preparations and genomic DNA of the immunoblastic HIV-associated B-NHL. Further studies are necessary to determine whether these genes contribute to lymphoma development or can be used as therapeutic targets.

  5. Genome-wide detection of hybrid genes with multiple components in human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Sheng-Shun

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies showed that gene hybrid is one of the principal processes for generating new genes. Although some gene hybrid events have been reported to be inter- or intra-species, there lacks a well-organized method for large scale detection of the events with multiple components. Hence in this study, we focus on building up an efficient method for exploring all candidates of gene hybrid events in human genome and provide useful results for further study. Findings We have developed a method designated Triad Comparison Algorithm (TCA to detect all potential N-hybrid events (i.e., an N-hybrid gene and its N non-overlapping component regions derived from N different genes in human genome. The results reveal that there are many convoluted N-hybrid events with multiple components (N > 2 and that the most complicated N-hybrid genes detected in human by TCA are composed of six component regions. Interestingly, our results show that most of the hybrid events belong to the 3-hybrid category. Furthermore, we observe that a single gene might participate in different events. Twelve genes were found to have dual identities contained in different N-hybrid events (i.e., they were identified as hybrid genes as well as component genes. This points out that to a certain extent the gene hybrid mechanism has generated new genes during the course of human genome evolutionary history. Conclusion An efficient method, TCA, is developed for exploring all candidates of hybrid genes in the human genome and provides useful results for the evolutionary analysis. The advantage of TCA is its power of detecting any kinds of hybrid events in any species with a large genome size.

  6. Molecular interactions between MUC1 epithelial mucin, β-catenin, and CagA proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei eGuang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL-8-driven neutrophil infiltration of the gastric mucosa is pathognomonic of persistent Helicobacter pylori infection. Our prior study showed that ectopic over-expression of MUC1 in human AGS gastric epithelial cells reduced H. pylori-stimulated IL-8 production compared with cells expressing MUC1 endogenously. Conversely, Muc1 knockout (Muc1-/- mice displayed an increased level of transcripts encoding the keratinocyte chemoattractant (KC, the murine equivalent of human IL-8, in gastric mucosa compared with Muc1(+/+ mice during experimental H. pylori infection. The current study tested the hypothesis that a decreased IL-8 level observed following MUC1 over-expression is mediated through the ability of MUC1 to associate with β-catenin, thereby inhibiting H. pylori-induced β-catenin nuclear translocation. Increased neutrophil infiltration of the gastric mucosa of H. pylori-infected Muc1(-/- mice was observed compared with Muc1(+/+ wild type littermates, thus defining the functional consequences of increased KC expression in the Muc1-null animals. Protein co-immunoprecipitation (coIP studies using lysates of untreated or H. pylori-treated AGS cells demonstrated that (a MUC1 formed a coIP complex with β-catenin and CagA, (b MUC1 over-expression reduced CagA/β-catenin coIP, and (c in the absence of MUC1 over-expression, H. pylori infection increased the nuclear level of β-catenin, (d whereas MUC1 over-expression decreased bacteria-driven β-catenin nuclear localization. These results suggest that manipulation of MUC1 expression in gastric epithelia may be an effective therapeutic strategy to inhibit H. pylori-dependent IL-8 production, neutrophil infiltration, and stomach inflammation.

  7. Color bar coding the BRCA1 gene on combed DNA: a useful strategy for detecting large gene rearrangements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gad, S; Aurias, A; Puget, N; Mairal, A; Schurra, C; Montagna, M; Pages, S; Caux, V; Mazoyer, S; Bensimon, A; Stoppa-Lyonnet, D

    2001-05-01

    Genetic linkage data have shown that alterations of the BRCA1 gene are responsible for the majority of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. BRCA1 germline mutations, however, are found less frequently than expected. Mutation detection strategies, which are generally based on the polymerase chain reaction, therefore focus on point and small gene alterations. These approaches do not allow for the detection of large gene rearrangements, which also can be involved in BRCA1 alterations. Indeed, a few of them, spread over the entire BRCA1 gene, have been detected recently by Southern blotting or transcript analysis. We have developed an alternative strategy allowing a panoramic view of the BRCA1 gene, based on dynamic molecular combing and the design of a full four-color bar code of the BRCA1 region. The strategy was tested with the study of four large BRCA1 rearrangements previously reported. In addition, when screening a series of 10 breast and ovarian cancer families negatively tested for point mutation in BRCA1/2, we found an unreported 17-kb BRCA1 duplication encompassing exons 3 to 8. The detection of rearrangements as small as 2 to 6 kb with respect to the normal size of the studied fragment is achieved when the BRCA1 region is divided into 10 fragments. In addition, as the BRCA1 bar code is a morphologic approach, the direct observation of complex and likely underreported rearrangements, such as inversions and insertions, becomes possible. PMID:11284038

  8. Detection of horizontal transfer of individual genes by anomalous oligomer frequencies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elhai Jeff

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the history of life requires that we understand the transfer of genetic material across phylogenetic boundaries. Detecting genes that were acquired by means other than vertical descent is a basic step in that process. Detection by discordant phylogenies is computationally expensive and not always definitive. Many have used easily computed compositional features as an alternative procedure. However, different compositional methods produce different predictions, and the effectiveness of any method is not well established. Results The ability of octamer frequency comparisons to detect genes artificially seeded in cyanobacterial genomes was markedly increased by using as a training set those genes that are highly conserved over all bacteria. Using a subset of octamer frequencies in such tests also increased effectiveness, but this depended on the specific target genome and the source of the contaminating genes. The presence of high frequency octamers and the GC content of the contaminating genes were important considerations. A method comprising best practices from these tests was devised, the Core Gene Similarity (CGS method, and it performed better than simple octamer frequency analysis, codon bias, or GC contrasts in detecting seeded genes or naturally occurring transposons. From a comparison of predictions with phylogenetic trees, it appears that the effectiveness of the method is confined to horizontal transfer events that have occurred recently in evolutionary time. Conclusions The CGS method may be an improvement over existing surrogate methods to detect genes of foreign origin.

  9. A Review for Detecting Gene-Gene Interactions Using Machine Learning Methods in Genetic Epidemiology

    OpenAIRE

    Ching Lee Koo; Mei Jing Liew; Mohd Saberi Mohamad; Abdul Hakim Mohamed Salleh

    2013-01-01

    Recently, the greatest statistical computational challenge in genetic epidemiology is to identify and characterize the genes that interact with other genes and environment factors that bring the effect on complex multifactorial disease. These gene-gene interactions are also denoted as epitasis in which this phenomenon cannot be solved by traditional statistical method due to the high dimensionality of the data and the occurrence of multiple polymorphism. Hence, there are several machine learn...

  10. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) detection in six genes in Portuguese indigenous sheep breed

    OpenAIRE

    Guedes-Pinto H.; Bastos E.; Cravador A.; Azevedo J

    2001-01-01

    Evaluation of the genetic diversity for six genes in forty animals of the Portuguese indigenous sheep breed (Ovis aries) ""Churra da Terra Quente"" was done. A non-radioactive method to allow single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) detection was optimised, starting from genomic DNA and PCR amplification of seven fragments: exon 1 of the alpha-lactalbumin gene; exons 10 and 11 of the alpha s1-casein gene; exon 7 of the beta-casein gene; exon 4 of the kappa-casein gene; exons 4 and 5 of ...

  11. Use of artificial genomes in assessing methods for atypical gene detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev K Azad

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Parametric methods for identifying laterally transferred genes exploit the directional mutational biases unique to each genome. Yet the development of new, more robust methods--as well as the evaluation and proper implementation of existing methods--relies on an arbitrary assessment of performance using real genomes, where the evolutionary histories of genes are not known. We have used the framework of a generalized hidden Markov model to create artificial genomes modeled after genuine genomes. To model a genome, "core" genes--those displaying patterns of mutational biases shared among large numbers of genes--are identified by a novel gene clustering approach based on the Akaike information criterion. Gene models derived from multiple "core" gene clusters are used to generate an artificial genome that models the properties of a genuine genome. Chimeric artificial genomes--representing those having experienced lateral gene transfer--were created by combining genes from multiple artificial genomes, and the performance of the parametric methods for identifying "atypical" genes was assessed directly. We found that a hidden Markov model that included multiple gene models, each trained on sets of genes representing the range of genotypic variability within a genome, could produce artificial genomes that mimicked the properties of genuine genomes. Moreover, different methods for detecting foreign genes performed differently--i.e., they had different sets of strengths and weaknesses--when identifying atypical genes within chimeric artificial genomes.

  12. Use of Artificial Genomes in Assessing Methods for Atypical Gene Detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available Parametric methods for identifying laterally transferred genes exploit the directional mutational biases unique to each genome. Yet the development of new, more robust methods-as well as the evaluation and proper implementation of existing methods-relies on an arbitrary assessment of performance using real genomes, where the evolutionary histories of genes are not known. We have used the framework of a generalized hidden Markov model to create artificial genomes modeled after genuine genomes. To model a genome, "core" genes-those displaying patterns of mutational biases shared among large numbers of genes-are identified by a novel gene clustering approach based on the Akaike information criterion. Gene models derived from multiple "core" gene clusters are used to generate an artificial genome that models the properties of a genuine genome. Chimeric artificial genomes-representing those having experienced lateral gene transfer-were created by combining genes from multiple artificial genomes, and the performance of the parametric methods for identifying "atypical" genes was assessed directly. We found that a hidden Markov model that included multiple gene models, each trained on sets of genes representing the range of genotypic variability within a genome, could produce artificial genomes that mimicked the properties of genuine genomes. Moreover, different methods for detecting foreign genes performed differently-i.e., they had different sets of strengths and weaknesses-when identifying atypical genes within chimeric artificial genomes.

  13. Detection of integron integrase genes on King George Island, Antarctica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vernica Antelo; Hctor Romero; Silvia Batista

    2015-01-01

    The presence and diversity of class 1 integrase gene (intI) sequences were evaluated by PCR using previously designed primers. Two clone libraries were constructed from DNA in sediment and microbial mat samples collected on Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, Antarctica.The libraries constructed from samples collected at Halfthree Point (HP) and Norma Cove (NC) contained 62 and 36 partial intI sequences, respectively. These sequences clustered into 10 different groups with <95% amino acid identity. Alignment of the deduced amino acid sequences with those from recognized integron-encoded integrases demonstrated the presence of highly conserved motifs characteristic of intI integrases. The HP library contained 42 nucleotide sequences identical to the class 1 intI gene found in a collection of trimethoprim-resistant (Tmpr) Antarctic Enterobacter sp. isolates, previously collected in the same area. These integrons, located on plasmids, had a genetic organization similar to that of pKOX105 from Klebsiella oxytoca. The 20 remaining HP and NC library sequences were similar to integrase sequences previously determined in a metagenomic analysis of environmental samples. We have demonstrated the presence of integron integrase genes in Antarctic sediment samples. About half these genes were very similar to the class 1 integrons found in human-associated microbiota, suggesting that they originated from human-dominated ecosystems. The remaining integrase genes were probably associated with endemic bacteria.

  14. Detection of biomarkers for Hepatocellular Carcinoma using a hybrid univariate gene selection methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdel Samee Nagwan M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Discovering new biomarkers has a great role in improving early diagnosis of Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. The experimental determination of biomarkers needs a lot of time and money. This motivates this work to use in-silico prediction of biomarkers to reduce the number of experiments required for detecting new ones. This is achieved by extracting the most representative genes in microarrays of HCC. Results In this work, we provide a method for extracting the differential expressed genes, up regulated ones, that can be considered candidate biomarkers in high throughput microarrays of HCC. We examine the power of several gene selection methods (such as Pearson’s correlation coefficient, Cosine coefficient, Euclidean distance, Mutual information and Entropy with different estimators in selecting informative genes. A biological interpretation of the highly ranked genes is done using KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways, ENTREZ and DAVID (Database for Annotation, Visualization, and Integrated Discovery databases. The top ten genes selected using Pearson’s correlation coefficient and Cosine coefficient contained six genes that have been implicated in cancer (often multiple cancers genesis in previous studies. A fewer number of genes were obtained by the other methods (4 genes using Mutual information, 3genes using Euclidean distance and only one gene using Entropy. A better result was obtained by the utilization of a hybrid approach based on intersecting the highly ranked genes in the output of all investigated methods. This hybrid combination yielded seven genes (2 genes for HCC and 5 genes in different types of cancer in the top ten genes of the list of intersected genes. Conclusions To strengthen the effectiveness of the univariate selection methods, we propose a hybrid approach by intersecting several of these methods in a cascaded manner. This approach surpasses all of univariate selection methods when

  15. Statins Attenuate Helicobacter pylori CagA Translocation and Reduce Incidence of Gastric Cancer: In Vitro and Population-Based Case-Control Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Jung Lin

    Full Text Available Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The correlation of Helicobacter pylori and the etiology of gastric cancer was substantially certain. Cholesterol-rich microdomains (also called lipid rafts, which provide platforms for signaling, are associated with H. pylori-induced pathogenesis leading to gastric cancer. Patients who have been prescribed statins, inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase, have exhibited a reduced risk of several types of cancer. However, no studies have addressed the effect of statins on H. pylori-associated gastric cancer from the antineoplastic perspective. In this study, we showed that treatment of gastric epithelial cells with simvastatin reduced the level of cellular cholesterol and led to attenuation of translocation and phosphorylation of H. pylori cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA, which is recognized as a major determinant of gastric cancer development. Additionally, a nationwide case-control study based on data from the Taiwanese National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD was conducted. A population-based case-control study revealed that patients who used simvastatin exhibited a significantly reduced risk of gastric cancer (adjusted odds ratio (OR = 0.76, 95% confidence interval (CI = 0.70-0.83. In patients exhibiting H. pylori infection who were prescribed simvastatin, the adjusted OR for gastric cancer was 0.25 (95% CI = 0.12-0.50. Our results combined an in vitro study with a nationwide population analysis reveal that statin use might be a feasible approach to prevent H. pylori-associated gastric cancer.

  16. Detecting key structural features within highly recombined genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E Wertz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Many microorganisms exhibit high levels of intragenic recombination following horizontal gene transfer events. Furthermore, many microbial genes are subject to strong diversifying selection as part of the pathogenic process. A multiple sequence alignment is an essential starting point for many of the tools that provide fundamental insights on gene structure and evolution, such as phylogenetics; however, an accurate alignment is not always possible to attain. In this study, a new analytic approach was developed in order to better quantify the genetic organization of highly diversified genes whose alleles do not align. This BLAST-based method, denoted BLAST Miner, employs an iterative process that places short segments of highly similar sequence into discrete datasets that are designated "modules." The relative positions of modules along the length of the genes, and their frequency of occurrence, are used to identify sequence duplications, insertions, and rearrangements. Partial alleles of sof from Streptococcus pyogenes, encoding a surface protein under host immune selection, were analyzed for module content. High-frequency Modules 6 and 13 were identified and examined in depth. Nucleotide sequences corresponding to both modules contain numerous duplications and inverted repeats, whereby many codons form palindromic pairs. Combined with evidence for a strong codon usage bias, data suggest that Module 6 and 13 sequences are under selection to preserve their nucleic acid secondary structure. The concentration of overlapping tandem and inverted repeats within a small region of DNA is highly suggestive of a mechanistic role for Module 6 and 13 sequences in promoting aberrant recombination. Analysis of pbp2X alleles from Streptococcus pneumoniae, encoding cell wall enzymes that confer antibiotic resistance, supports the broad applicability of this tool in deciphering the genetic organization of highly recombined genes. BLAST Miner shares with

  17. High photoluminescence stability of CaGa4O7:Eu3+ red phosphor in wide excitation intensity interval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leanenia, M. S.; Lutsenko, E. V.; Rzheutski, M. V.; Yablonskii, G. P.; Naghiyev, T. G.; Ganbarova, H. B.; Tagiev, O. B.

    2016-04-01

    The photoluminescence (PL) of CaGa4O7 compound doped with Eu3+ ions is studied. It is shown that room temperature emission spectrum of CaGa4O7 compound consists of groups of lines in the red spectral region, caused by electronic transitions 5D0 → 7Fj (j = 1, 2, 3, 4) in Eu3+ ions with the most intensive lines at 612 nm and 615 nm. It is evaluated that low local symmetry of Eu3+ ion appears in the presence of several lines for each transitions. The PL decay constants were found to be in the range of 1.1-1.3 ms. Non-exponential rise was observed in the beginning of PL kinetics and assumed with energy transfer between Eu3+ ions in different sites in host lattice. Weak thermal quenching is shown in the temperature range of 10-300 K. Extreme stability of PL spectra and efficiency in a wide excitation intensity range of 104-108 W/cm2 were achieved. A slight emission efficiency reversible droop by only 25% is found to be at the excitation intensities from 2 · 107 W/cm2 to 108 W/cm2.

  18. Detection of the pancreas-specific gene in the peripheral blood of patients with pancreatic carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Kuroki, T; Tomioka, T.; TAJIMA, Y; Inoue, K.; Ikematsu, Y; Ichinose, K.; Furui, J; Kanematsu, T

    1999-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with pancreatic carcinoma remains very poor. To improve the therapeutic results, the early detection of this cancer is needed. The present study was performed to detect the pancreas-specific gene, chymotrypsinogen, in the peripheral blood from patients with pancreatic carcinoma by using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in order to evaluate the clinical significance of this gene. Ten patients with pancreatic carcinoma, two with acute pancreatit...

  19. Profound effect of normalization on detection of differentially expressed genes in oligonucleotide microarray data analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Hoffmann, Reinhard; Seidl, Thomas; Dugas, Martin

    2002-01-01

    Background Oligonucleotide microarrays measure the relative transcript abundance of thousands of mRNAs in parallel. A large number of procedures for normalization and detection of differentially expressed genes have been proposed. However, the relative impact of these methods on the detection of differentially expressed genes remains to be determined. Results We have employed four different normalization methods and all possible combinations with three different statistical algorithms for det...

  20. Human synthetic lethal inference as potential anti-cancer target gene detection

    OpenAIRE

    Solé Ricard V; Munteanu Andreea; Conde-Pueyo Nuria; Rodríguez-Caso Carlos

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Two genes are called synthetic lethal (SL) if mutation of either alone is not lethal, but mutation of both leads to death or a significant decrease in organism's fitness. The detection of SL gene pairs constitutes a promising alternative for anti-cancer therapy. As cancer cells exhibit a large number of mutations, the identification of these mutated genes' SL partners may provide specific anti-cancer drug candidates, with minor perturbations to the healthy cells. Since exi...

  1. Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus: Molecular Detection of Cytotoxin and Enterotoxin Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza Pinheiro

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Although opportunistic pathogens, coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS, including Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus, have long been regarded as avirulent organisms. The role of toxins in the development of infections caused by CoNS is still controversial. The objective of this study was to characterize the presence of enterotoxin and cytotoxin genes in S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus isolates obtained from blood cultures. Cytotoxin genes were detected by PCR using novel species-specific primers. Among the 85 S. epidermidis and 84 S. haemolyticus isolates, 95.3% and 79.8%, respectively, carried at least one enterotoxin gene. The most frequent enterotoxin genes were sea (53.3%, seg (64.5% and sei (67.5%. The seg gene was positively associated with S. epidermidis (p = 0.02, and this species was more toxigenic than S. haemolyticus. The hla/yidD gene was detected in 92.9% of S. epidermidis and the hla gene in 91.7% of S. haemolyticus isolates; hlb was detected in 92.9% of the S. epidermidis isolates and hld in 95.3%. Nosocomial Staphylococcus epidermidis and S. haemolyticus isolates exhibited a high toxigenic potential, mainly producing the non-classical enterotoxins seg and sei. The previously unreported detection of hla/yidD and hlb in S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus using species-specific primers showed that these hemolysin genes differ between CoNS species and that they are highly frequent in blood culture isolates.

  2. Can subtle changes in gene expression be consistently detected with different microarray platforms?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. Pedotti; P.A.C. 't Hoen (Peter); E. Vreugdenhil (Erno); G.J. Schenk (Geert); R. Vossen (Rolf); Y. Ariyurek (Yavuz); M. de Hollander (Mattias); R. Kuiper (Rowan); G.J. van Ommen (Gert); J.T. den Dunnen (Johan); J.M. Boer (Judith); R.X. de Menezes (Renee)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: The comparability of gene expression data generated with different microarray platforms is still a matter of concern. Here we address the performance and the overlap in the detection of differentially expressed genes for five different microarray platforms in a challenging bi

  3. Using Linkage Analysis to Detect Gene-Gene Interactions. 2. Improved Reliability and Extension to More-Complex Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan E Hodge

    Full Text Available Detecting gene-gene interaction in complex diseases has become an important priority for common disease genetics, but most current approaches to detecting interaction start with disease-marker associations. These approaches are based on population allele frequency correlations, not genetic inheritance, and therefore cannot exploit the rich information about inheritance contained within families. They are also hampered by issues of rigorous phenotype definition, multiple test correction, and allelic and locus heterogeneity. We recently developed, tested, and published a powerful gene-gene interaction detection strategy based on conditioning family data on a known disease-causing allele or a disease-associated marker allele4. We successfully applied the method to disease data and used computer simulation to exhaustively test the method for some epistatic models. We knew that the statistic we developed to indicate interaction was less reliable when applied to more-complex interaction models. Here, we improve the statistic and expand the testing procedure. We computer-simulated multipoint linkage data for a disease caused by two interacting loci. We examined epistatic as well as additive models and compared them with heterogeneity models. In all our models, the at-risk genotypes are "major" in the sense that among affected individuals, a substantial proportion has a disease-related genotype. One of the loci (A has a known disease-related allele (as would have been determined from a previous analysis. We removed (pruned family members who did not carry this allele; the resultant dataset is referred to as "stratified." This elimination step has the effect of raising the "penetrance" and detectability at the second locus (B. We used the lod scores for the stratified and unstratified data sets to calculate a statistic that either indicated the presence of interaction or indicated that no interaction was detectable. We show that the new method is robust

  4. Using Linkage Analysis to Detect Gene-Gene Interactions. 2. Improved Reliability and Extension to More-Complex Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Susan E; Hager, Valerie R; Greenberg, David A

    2016-01-01

    Detecting gene-gene interaction in complex diseases has become an important priority for common disease genetics, but most current approaches to detecting interaction start with disease-marker associations. These approaches are based on population allele frequency correlations, not genetic inheritance, and therefore cannot exploit the rich information about inheritance contained within families. They are also hampered by issues of rigorous phenotype definition, multiple test correction, and allelic and locus heterogeneity. We recently developed, tested, and published a powerful gene-gene interaction detection strategy based on conditioning family data on a known disease-causing allele or a disease-associated marker allele4. We successfully applied the method to disease data and used computer simulation to exhaustively test the method for some epistatic models. We knew that the statistic we developed to indicate interaction was less reliable when applied to more-complex interaction models. Here, we improve the statistic and expand the testing procedure. We computer-simulated multipoint linkage data for a disease caused by two interacting loci. We examined epistatic as well as additive models and compared them with heterogeneity models. In all our models, the at-risk genotypes are "major" in the sense that among affected individuals, a substantial proportion has a disease-related genotype. One of the loci (A) has a known disease-related allele (as would have been determined from a previous analysis). We removed (pruned) family members who did not carry this allele; the resultant dataset is referred to as "stratified." This elimination step has the effect of raising the "penetrance" and detectability at the second locus (B). We used the lod scores for the stratified and unstratified data sets to calculate a statistic that either indicated the presence of interaction or indicated that no interaction was detectable. We show that the new method is robust and reliable for

  5. Gene-Wide Analysis Detects Two New Susceptibility Genes for Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Escott-Price, Valentina; Bellenguez, Celine; Wang, Li-San; Choi, Seung-Hoan; Harold, Denise; Jones, Lesley; Holmans, Peter; Gerrish, Amy; Vedernikov, Alexey; Richards, Alexander; Destefano, Anita L.; Lambert, Jean-Charles; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A; Naj, Adam C.; Sims, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Background: Alzheimer's disease is a common debilitating dementia with known heritability, for which 20 late onset susceptibility loci have been identified, but more remain to be discovered. This study sought to identify new susceptibility genes, using an alternative gene-wide analytical approach which tests for patterns of association within genes, in the powerful genome-wide association dataset of the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project Consortium, comprising over 7 m genotypes fr...

  6. Gene-Wide Analysis Detects Two New Susceptibility Genes for Alzheimer's Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Yong-Gang Yao; Valentina Escott-Price; Céline Bellenguez; Li-San Wang; Seung-Hoan Choi; Denise Harold; Lesley Jones; Peter Holmans; Amy Gerrish; Alexey Vedernikov; Alexander Richards; Destefano, Anita L.; Jean-Charles Lambert; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A; Naj, Adam C.

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is a common debilitating dementia with known heritability, for which 20 late onset susceptibility loci have been identified, but more remain to be discovered. This study sought to identify new susceptibility genes, using an alternative gene-wide analytical approach which tests for patterns of association within genes, in the powerful genome-wide association dataset of the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project Consortium, comprising over 7 m genotypes from 25,580 Al...

  7. Gene-wide analysis detects two new susceptibility genes for Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Escott-Price, Valentina; Bellenguez, Céline; Wang, Lisan; Choi, Seunghoan; Harold, Denise H.; Jones, Lesley A.; Holmans, Peter A.; Gerrish, Amy; Vedernikov, Alexey; Richards, Alexander L.; Destefano, Anita L.; Lambert, Jean Charles; Ibrahim-Verbaas, Carla A; Naj, Adam C.; Sims, Rebecca J.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Alzheimer's disease is a common debilitating dementia with known heritability, for which 20 late onset susceptibility loci have been identified, but more remain to be discovered. This study sought to identify new susceptibility genes, using an alternative gene-wide analytical approach which tests for patterns of association within genes, in the powerful genome-wide association dataset of the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project Consortium, comprising over 7 m genotypes fr...

  8. Gene-wide analysis detects two new susceptibility genes for Alzheimer's disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Escott-Price, V.; Bellenguez, C; Wang, L.; Choi, S.; Harold, D.; Jones, L.; Holmans, P.; Gerrish, A; Vedernikov, A.; Richards, A.; DeStefano, A.L.; Lambert, J.; Ibrahim-Verbaas, C.A.; Naj, A. C.; Sims, R.

    2014-01-01

    PUBLISHED BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's disease is a common debilitating dementia with known heritability, for which 20 late onset susceptibility loci have been identified, but more remain to be discovered. This study sought to identify new susceptibility genes, using an alternative gene-wide analytical approach which tests for patterns of association within genes, in the powerful genome-wide association dataset of the International Genomics of Alzheimer's Project Consortium, comprising over...

  9. A comprehensive sequence and disease correlation analyses for the C-terminal region of CagA protein of Helicobacter pylori.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youlin Xia

    Full Text Available Chronic Helicobacter pylori infection is known to be associated with the development of peptic ulcer, gastric cancer and gastric lymphoma. Currently, the bacterial factors of H. pylori are reported to be important in the development of gastroduodenal diseases. CagA protein, encoded by the cagA, is the best studied virulence factor of H. pylori. The pathogenic CagA protein contains a highly polymorphic Glu-Pro-Ile-Tyr-Ala (EPIYA repeat region in the C-terminal. This repeat region is reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of gastroduodenal diseases. The segments containing EPIYA motifs have been designated as segments A, B, C, and D; however the classification and disease relation are still unclear. This study used 560 unique CagA sequences containing 1,796 EPIYA motifs collected from public resources, including 274 Western and 286 East Asian strains with clinical data obtained from 433 entries. Fifteen types of EPIYA or EPIYA-like sequences are defined. In addition to four previously reported major segment types, several minor segment types (e.g., segment B', B'' and more than 30 sequence types (e.g., ABC, ABD were defined using our classification method. We confirm that the sequences from Western and East Asian strains contain segment C and D, respectively. We also confirm that strains with two EPIYA segment C have a greater chance of developing gastric cancer than those with one segment C. Our results shed light on the relationships between the types of CagAs, the country of origin of each sequence type, and the frequency of gastric disease.

  10. Expression of cytokeratins in Helicobacter pylori-associated chronic gastritis of adult patients infected with cagA + strains: An immunohistochemical study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Vera Todorovic; Aleksandra Sokic-Milutinovic; Neda Drndarevic; Marjan Micev; Olivera Mlitrovic; Ivan Nikolic; Thomas Wex; Tomica Milosavljevic; Peter Malfertheiner

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the expression of different cytokeratins (CKs) in gastric epithelium of adult patients with chronic gastritis infected with Helicobacter pylori(H pylori) cagA + strains.METHODS: The expression of CK 7, 8, 18, 19 and 20 was studied immunohistochemically in antral gastric biopsies of 84 patients. All the CKs were immunostained in cagA +H pylori gastritis (57 cases), non-Hpylori gastritis (17 cases) and normal gastric mucosa (10 cases).RESULTS: In cagA+ Hpylori gastritis, CK8 was expressed comparably to the normal antral mucosa from surface epithelium to deep glands. Distribution of CK18 and CK 19 was unchanged, i.e. transmucosal,but intensity of the expression was different in foveolar region in comparison to normal gastric mucosa. Cytokeratin 18 immunoreactivity was significantly higher in the foveolar epithelium of H pylori-positive gastritis compared to both Hpylori-negative gastritis and controls.On the contrary, decrease in CK19 immunoreactivity occurred in foveolar epithelium of H pylori-positive gastritis. In both normal and inflamed antral mucosa without H pylori infection, CK20 was expressed strongly/ moderately and homogenously in surface epithelium and upper foveolar region, but in H pylori-induced gastritis significant decrease of expression in foveolar region was noted. Generally, in both normal antral mucosa and H pylori-negative gastritis, expression of CK7 was not observed, while in about half cagA+ H pylori-infected patients, moderate focal CK7 immunoreactivity of the neck and coiled gland areas was registered, especially in areas with more severe inflammatory infiltrate.CONCLUSION: Alterations in expression of CK 7, 18,19 and 20 together with normal expression of CK8 occur in antral mucosa of H pylori-associated chronic gastritis in adult patients infected with cagA+ strains. Alterations in different cytokeratins expression might contribute to weakening of epithelial tight junctions observed in H pylori-infected gastric mucosa.

  11. Detection of vanC 1 gene transcription in vancomycin-susceptible Enterococcus faecalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiane Martin de Moura

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Here we report the presence and expression levels of the vanC 1 and vanC 2/3 genes in vancomycin-susceptible strains of Enterococcus faecalis. The vanC 1 and vanC 2/3 genes were located in the plasmid DNA and on the chromosome, respectively. Specific mRNA of the vanC 1 gene was detected in one of these strains. Additionally, analysis of the vanC gene sequences showed that these genes are related to the vanC genes of Enterococcus gallinarum and Enterococcus casseliflavus. The presence of vanC genes is useful for the identification of E. gallinarum and E. casseliflavus. Moreover, this is the first report of vanC mRNA in E. faecalis.

  12. Detection and preliminary screening of the human gene expression profile for Hirschsprung's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    WANG, XIN; WANG, SHIQI; JIN, XIANQING; WANG, NING; LUO, YUANYUAN; TENG, YINPING

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated a genome microarray of colorectal lesions (spasm segments) in children with Hirschsprung's disease (HSCR), and analyzed the results. In addition, the present study screened for differentially expressed genes in children with HSCR. Microarray technology was used to examine the human gene expression profiles of the colorectal lesions (spasm segments) of six children with HSCR, and three normal colon tissue samples. The data were analyzed be determining P-values of significance and absolute fold changes. Preliminary screening was performed to identify genes exhibiting significant differential expression in children with HSCR, and these target genes were analyzed in subsequent verification and analytical investigations. Of >20,000 detected human genes, the preliminary screenings demonstrated that 3,850 genes were differentially expressed and upregulated, with P2-fold absolute changes in expression. In addition, 645 differentially expressed genes with P2-fold absolute changes were downregulated. Of the upregulated genes, 118 were involved in classic signaling pathways, compared with 11 of the downregulated genes (P2-fold). HSCR etiology is complex and often involves multiple gene changes. Microarray technology can produce large quantities of gene expression data simultaneously, and analyzing this data using various techniques may provide a fast and efficient method for identifying novel gene targets and for investigating the mechanisms underlying HSCR pathogenesis. PMID:26648025

  13. A high-throughput method for the detection of homoeologous gene deletions in hexaploid wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhongyi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutational inactivation of plant genes is an essential tool in gene function studies. Plants with inactivated or deleted genes may also be exploited for crop improvement if such mutations/deletions produce a desirable agronomical and/or quality phenotype. However, the use of mutational gene inactivation/deletion has been impeded in polyploid plant species by genetic redundancy, as polyploids contain multiple copies of the same genes (homoeologous genes encoded by each of the ancestral genomes. Similar to many other crop plants, bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L. is polyploid; specifically allohexaploid possessing three progenitor genomes designated as 'A', 'B', and 'D'. Recently modified TILLING protocols have been developed specifically for mutation detection in wheat. Whilst extremely powerful in detecting single nucleotide changes and small deletions, these methods are not suitable for detecting whole gene deletions. Therefore, high-throughput methods for screening of candidate homoeologous gene deletions are needed for application to wheat populations generated by the use of certain mutagenic agents (e.g. heavy ion irradiation that frequently generate whole-gene deletions. Results To facilitate the screening for specific homoeologous gene deletions in hexaploid wheat, we have developed a TaqMan qPCR-based method that allows high-throughput detection of deletions in homoeologous copies of any gene of interest, provided that sufficient polymorphism (as little as a single nucleotide difference amongst homoeologues exists for specific probe design. We used this method to identify deletions of individual TaPFT1 homoeologues, a wheat orthologue of the disease susceptibility and flowering regulatory gene PFT1 in Arabidopsis. This method was applied to wheat nullisomic-tetrasomic lines as well as other chromosomal deletion lines to locate the TaPFT1 gene to the long arm of chromosome 5. By screening of individual DNA samples from

  14. Molecular Detection of BCR/ ABL Fusion Gene in Saudi Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Molecular cytogenetics is becoming one of the most useful tools targeting some genes which are generally considered to lead to leukemic transformation (as well as for numerical abnormalities). A fraction of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cases carry the translocation t(9;22) (q34;ql1.2) which juxtaposes the ABL proto-oncogene to the BCR gene generating a chimeric gene, BCR/ABL. This aberration is more frequent in adult ALL (20%-40%) than in pediatric ALL >)5%), and predicts poor clinical outcome. Aim of our Work: Is to study BCR/ A BL fusion gene in ALL cases using fluorescent in situ hybridization. Patients and Methods: Twenty newly diagnosed ALL patients, 16 adult and 4 paediatric cases, were included in the study, 11 cases (55%) were of precursor B phenotype, S cases (40%) belonged to T lineage, while one case was bi phenotypic expressing mainly precursor B cell markers tether with CD13, CD33, CD117, Detection of BCR/ABL fusion gene was done using interphase FISH technique and was confirmed molecularly using the RT-PCR technique. Results: BCR/ ABL fusion gene was negative in all the examined cases, yet abnormality involving 9q34, ABL gene, either by addition or deletion was detected in three cases (15%). Two of these cases were associated with BCR gene extra copies (three and four copies, respectively). Conclusion: This may reflect the frequency of association of ABL gene and BCR gene abnormality in our cases, and that absence of fusion gene BCR/ABL does not exclude their role in the leukomogenic process, yet a larger study is required to confirm and detect the prevalence of these gene disturbances in ALL and their association

  15. Detection of Genes for Superantigen Toxins in Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Clinical Isolates in Karachi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To detect genes for enterotoxins, exfoliative and toxic shock syndrome toxins in Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) strains isolated from clinical specimens. Study Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Molecular Genetics, Dr. Ziauddin Hospital, Karachi, from January to December 2010. Methodology: Two hundred and ninety eight S. aureus clinical isolates were obtained from various clinical samples received at Dr. Ziauddin Hospital, Karachi. Out of these, 115 were detected as methicillin resistant (MRSA) by cefoxitin disk diffusion test showing a prevalence rate of 38.6%. Detection of individual toxin genes was performed by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) by using only one primer pair for each tube. Uniplex primers were preferred as multiplex primers are longer in base pairs and have the potential for cross reaction due to non-specific binding and increase in optimization time. Results: The possession of a single gene or more than a single gene in MRSA isolates was found in 61.73% of clinical samples; the highest number was found in pus swab, followed by sputum, blood, urethral swab, and urine. The prevalence of toxin genes was higher in MRSA as compared to methicillin sensitive (MSSA) isolates (19.12%). Conclusion: PCR detects strains possessing toxin genes independent of their expression. The possession of genes for super-antigens seems to be a frequent and habitual trait of S. aureus more so in MRSA. (author)

  16. Detection of mutations in genes by specific LNA primers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention relates to a method of detecting variant nucleic acid whose nucleotide sequence differs from one another at a single (or more) position(s). The method uses a set of chimeric oligonucleotides containing DNA monomers and monomers of a novel class of DNA analogues, locked nucle...

  17. MetaMine – A tool to detect and analyse gene patterns in their environmental context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kottmann Renzo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Modern sequencing technologies allow rapid sequencing and bioinformatic analysis of genomes and metagenomes. With every new sequencing project a vast number of new proteins become available with many genes remaining functionally unclassified based on evidences from sequence similarities alone. Extending similarity searches with gene pattern approaches, defined as genes sharing a distinct genomic neighbourhood, have shown to significantly improve the number of functional assignments. Further functional evidences can be gained by correlating these gene patterns with prevailing environmental parameters. MetaMine was developed to approach the large pool of unclassified proteins by searching for recurrent gene patterns across habitats based on key genes. Results MetaMine is an interactive data mining tool which enables the detection of gene patterns in an environmental context. The gene pattern search starts with a user defined environmentally interesting key gene. With this gene a BLAST search is carried out against the Microbial Ecological Genomics DataBase (MEGDB containing marine genomic and metagenomic sequences. This is followed by the determination of all neighbouring genes within a given distance and a search for functionally equivalent genes. In the final step a set of common genes present in a defined number of distinct genomes is determined. The gene patterns found are associated with their individual pattern instances describing gene order and directions. They are presented together with information about the sample and the habitat. MetaMine is implemented in Java and provided as a client/server application with a user-friendly graphical user interface. The system was evaluated with environmentally relevant genes related to the methane-cycle and carbon monoxide oxidation. Conclusion MetaMine offers a targeted, semi-automatic search for gene patterns based on expert input. The graphical user interface of Meta

  18. ASPic-GeneID: A Lightweight Pipeline for Gene Prediction and Alternative Isoforms Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alioto, Tyler; Picardi, Ernesto; Guigó, Roderic

    2013-01-01

    New genomes are being sequenced at an increasingly rapid rate, far outpacing the rate at which manual gene annotation can be performed. Automated genome annotation is thus necessitated by this growth in genome projects; however, full-fledged annotation systems are usually home-grown and customized to a particular genome. There is thus a renewed need for accurate ab initio gene prediction methods. However, it is apparent that fully ab initio methods fall short of the required level of sensitivity and specificity for a quality annotation. Evidence in the form of expressed sequences gives the single biggest improvement in accuracy when used to inform gene predictions. Here, we present a lightweight pipeline for first-pass gene prediction on newly sequenced genomes. The two main components are ASPic, a program that derives highly accurate, albeit not necessarily complete, EST-based transcript annotations from EST alignments, and GeneID, a standard gene prediction program, which we have modified to take as evidence intron annotations. The introns output by ASPic CDS predictions is given to GeneID to constrain the exon-chaining process and produce predictions consistent with the underlying EST alignments. The pipeline was successfully tested on the entire C. elegans genome and the 44 ENCODE human pilot regions. PMID:24308000

  19. A novel subtyping assay for detection of Clostridium difficile virulence genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angione, Stephanie L; Sarma, Aartik A; Novikov, Aleksey; Seward, Leah; Fieber, Jennifer H; Mermel, Leonard A; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2014-03-01

    This proof-of-concept study demonstrates the application of a novel nucleic acid detection platform to detect Clostridium difficile in subjects presenting with acute diarrheal symptoms. This method amplifies three genes associated with C. difficile infection, including genes and deletions (cdtB and tcdC) associated with hypervirulence attributed to the NAP1/027/BI strain. Amplification of DNA from the tcdB, tcdC, and cdtB genes was performed using a droplet-based sandwich platform with quantitative real-time PCR in microliter droplets to detect and identify the amplified fragments of DNA. The device and identification system are simple in design and can be integrated as a point-of-care test to help rapidly detect and identify C. difficile strains that pose significant health threats in hospitals and other health-care communities. PMID:24434086

  20. DETECTION OF VIRULENCE GENES IN ENVIRONMENTAL STRAINS OF Vibrio cholerae FROM ESTUARIES IN NORTHEASTERN BRAZIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca Gleire Rodrigues de Menezes

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to detect the presence of Vibrio cholerae in tropical estuaries (Northeastern Brazil and to search for virulence factors in the environmental isolates. Water and sediment samples were inoculated onto a vibrio-selective medium (TCBS, and colonies with morphological resemblance to V. cholerae were isolated. The cultures were identified phenotypically using a dichotomous key based on biochemical characteristics. The total DNA extracted was amplified by PCR to detect ompW and by multiplex PCR to detect the virulence genes ctx, tcp, zot and rfbO1. The results of the phenotypic and genotypic identification were compared. Nine strains of V. cholerae were identified phenotypically, five of which were confirmed by detection of the species-specific gene ompW. The dichotomous key was efficient at differentiating environmental strains of V. cholerae. Strains of V. cholerae were found in all four estuaries, but none possessed virulence genes.

  1. Driver Gene Mutations in Stools of Colorectal Carcinoma Patients Detected by Targeted Next-Generation Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armengol, Gemma; Sarhadi, Virinder K; Ghanbari, Reza; Doghaei-Moghaddam, Masoud; Ansari, Reza; Sotoudeh, Masoud; Puolakkainen, Pauli; Kokkola, Arto; Malekzadeh, Reza; Knuutila, Sakari

    2016-07-01

    Detection of driver gene mutations in stool DNA represents a promising noninvasive approach for screening colorectal cancer (CRC). Amplicon-based next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a good option to study mutations in many cancer genes simultaneously and from a low amount of DNA. Our aim was to assess the feasibility of identifying mutations in 22 cancer driver genes with Ion Torrent technology in stool DNA from a series of 65 CRC patients. The assay was successful in 80% of stool DNA samples. NGS results showed 83 mutations in cancer driver genes, 29 hotspot and 54 novel mutations. One to five genes were mutated in 75% of cases. TP53, KRAS, FBXW7, and SMAD4 were the top mutated genes, consistent with previous studies. Of samples with mutations, 54% presented concomitant mutations in different genes. Phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway genes were mutated in 70% of samples, with 58% having alterations in KRAS, NRAS, or BRAF. Because mutations in these genes can compromise the efficacy of epidermal growth factor receptor blockade in CRC patients, identifying mutations that confer resistance to some targeted treatments may be useful to guide therapeutic decisions. In conclusion, the data presented herein show that NGS procedures on stool DNA represent a promising tool to detect genetic mutations that could be used in the future for diagnosis, monitoring, or treating CRC. PMID:27155048

  2. Novel gene and gene model detection using a whole genome open reading frame analysis in proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Fermin, Damian; Allen, Baxter B; Blackwell, Thomas W; Menon, Rajasree; Adamski, Marcin; Xu, Yin; Ulintz, Peter; Omenn, Gilbert S.; States, David J.

    2006-01-01

    Background Defining the location of genes and the precise nature of gene products remains a fundamental challenge in genome annotation. Interrogating tandem mass spectrometry data using genomic sequence provides an unbiased method to identify novel translation products. A six-frame translation of the entire human genome was used as the query database to search for novel blood proteins in the data from the Human Proteome Organization Plasma Proteome Project. Because this target database is ord...

  3. Detecting genes contributing to longevity using twin data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Begun Alexander

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Searching for genes contributing to longevity is a typical task in association analysis. A number of methods can be used for finding this association -- from the simplest method based on the technique of contingency tables to more complex algorithms involving demographic data, which allow us to estimate the genotype-specific hazard functions. The independence of individuals is the common assumption in all these methods. At the same time, data on related individuals such as twins are often used in genetic studies. This paper proposes an extension of the relative risk model to encompass twin data. We estimate the power and also discuss what happens if we treat the twin data using the univariate model.

  4. Detection of Clostridium perfringens alpha toxin gene in lambs by loop mediated isothermal amplification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Radhika

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP was standardized for rapid detection of Clostridium perfringens. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 fecal samples were collected from enterotoxemia suspected lambs were used for screening of C. perfringens cpa gene by LAMP. The specificity of the LAMP amplified products was tested by digesting with restriction enzyme XmnI for alpha toxin gene. Results: Out of 120 samples screened 112 (93.3% samples were positive by both LAMP and polymerase chain reaction (PCR for detection of cpa gene which indicated the equal sensitivity of both the tests. The enzyme produced single cut in 162 base pair amplified product of alpha toxin gene at 81 base pair resulting in a single band in gel electrophoresis. Conclusion: Both LAMP and PCR for detection of cpa gene indicated the equal sensitivity of both the tests. Standardization of LAMP reaction for amplification of epsilon and beta toxin genes will help to identify the C. perfringens toxin types from the clinical samples. The test could be a suitable alternative to the PCR in detection of toxin types without the help of sophisticated machinery like thermal cycler. Considering its simplicity in operation and high sensitivity, there is the potential use of this technique in clinical diagnosis and surveillance of infectious diseases.

  5. High-throughput Microarray Detection of Vomeronasal Receptor Gene Expression in Rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Zhang

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available We performed comprehensive data mining to explore the vomeronasal receptor (V1R & V2R repertoires in mouse and rat using the mm5 and rn3 genome, respectively. This bioinformatic analysis was followed by investigation of gene expression using a custom designed high-density oligonucleotide array containing all of these receptors and other selected genes of interest. This array enabled us to detect the specific expression of V1R and V2Rs which were previously identified solely based on computational prediction from gene sequence data, thereby establishing that these genes are indeed part of the vomeronasal system, especially the V2Rs. 168 V1Rs and 98 V2Rs were detected to be highly enriched in mouse vomeronasal organ (VNO, and 108 V1Rs and 87 V2Rs in rat VNO. We monitored the expression profile of mouse VR genes in other non-VNO tissues with the result that some VR genes were re-designated as VR-like genes based on their non-olfactory expression pattern. Temporal expression profiles for mouse VR genes were characterized and their patterns were classified, revealing the developmental dynamics of these so-called pheromone receptors. We found numerous patterns of temporal expression which indicate possible behavior-related functions. The uneven composition of VR genes in certain patterns suggests a functional differentiation between the two types of VR genes. We found the coherence between VR genes and transcription factors in terms of their temporal expression patterns. In situ hybridization experiments were performed to evaluate the cell number change over time for selected receptor genes.

  6. DETECTION OF p53 GENE MUTATION OF BRONCHOSCOPIC SAMPLIES IN THE PATIENTS SUSPECTED TO LUNG CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To determine the feasibility of detecting p53 gene mutations for early diagnosis of lung cancer using the samples from bronchoscopic examination. Methods: Point mutations of the exon 5-8 of p53 gene were detected in 85 bronchoscopic samples of 35 patients suspected to be lung cancer using silver staining PCR-SSCP. Results: p53 gene mutations were founded in 10 of 35 patients(28.6%). The incidence of p53 gene mutations (14.9%) was obviously higher than the cytological positive incidence(2.9%) in samples of sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage and brush, especially for the sputum(27.7%). In the bronchoscopic biopsy specimens, the incidence of p53 gene mutations (12.5%) was lower than that of pathologic positive result (50.0%). However, in view of all the bronchoscopic samples, there was no statistically difference between cytopathologic positive results (11.8%) and the incidence of p53 gene mutations (14.1%). Although the p53 mutations were most common in the samples from the patients bronchoscopically manifested as neoplasm compared with other manifestations, there was no statistical difference. It is valuable to notice that 3 patients with p53 gene mutation merely presented as bronchial inflammation in bronchoscope. Conclusion: Results indicated that the value of detecting p53 gene mutation for the diagnosis of lung cancer using the bronchoscopic samples was more superior to cytological examination and detection of p53 gene mutations in post-bronchoscopic sputum was easy and effective, may be used as a valuable method for early diagnosis of lung cancer.

  7. Using the candidate gene approach for detecting genes underlying seed oil concentration and yield in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskandari, Mehrzad; Cober, Elroy R; Rajcan, Istvan

    2013-07-01

    Increasing the oil concentration in soybean seeds has been given more attention in recent years because of demand for both edible oil and biodiesel production. Oil concentration in soybean is a complex quantitative trait regulated by many genes as well as environmental conditions. To identify genes governing seed oil concentration in soybean, 16 putative candidate genes of three important gene families (GPAT: acyl-CoA:sn-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, DGAT: acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase, and PDAT: phospholipid:diacylglycerol acyltransferase) involved in triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis pathways were selected and their sequences retrieved from the soybean database ( http://www.phytozome.net/soybean ). Three sequence mutations were discovered in either coding or noncoding regions of three DGAT soybean isoforms when comparing the parents of a 203 recombinant inbreed line (RIL) population; OAC Wallace and OAC Glencoe. The RIL population was used to study the effects of these mutations on seed oil concentration and other important agronomic and seed composition traits, including seed yield and protein concentration across three field locations in Ontario, Canada, in 2009 and 2010. An insertion/deletion (indel) mutation in the GmDGAT2B gene in OAC Wallace was significantly associated with reduced seed oil concentration across three environments and reduced seed yield at Woodstock in 2010. A mutation in the 3' untranslated (3'UTR) region of GmDGAT2C was associated with seed yield at Woodstock in 2009. A mutation in the intronic region of GmDGAR1B was associated with seed yield and protein concentration at Ottawa in 2010. The genes identified in this study had minor effects on either seed yield or oil concentration, which was in agreement with the quantitative nature of the traits. However, the novel gene-specific markers designed in the present study can be used in soybean breeding for marker-assisted selection aimed at increasing seed yield and oil

  8. A meta-analysis of kidney microarray datasets: investigation of cytokine gene detection and correlation with rt-PCR and detection thresholds

    OpenAIRE

    Stegall Mark D; Park Walter D

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Microarrays provide a means to simultaneously examine the gene expression of the entire transcriptome in a single sample. Many studies have highlighted the need for novel software and statistical approaches to assess the measured gene expression. Less attention has been directed toward whether genes considered undetectable by microarray can be detected by other strategies or whether these genes can provide accurate gene expression determinations. In the kidney this is a co...

  9. Detection of V617F mutation of gene jak2 at patients with chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maliuta S. S.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the work was to create a protocol for detecting the V617F mutation of the gene jak2 in samples of patients with chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm which is necessary to unify the procedures of the analysis of blood samples according to WHO criteria for this group of diseases. Methods. Mutation was revealed using reverse transcriptase PCR and direct sequencing of PCR products. Results. Six samples of blood of patients with polycythemia vera were analyzed and the mutation V617F was detected in all six cases. This mutation was not detected in any of RNA samples of healthy donors. A case of simultaneous detection of mutations V617F and fused bcr/abl gene in CML patient was described. Conclusions. The proposed method for detecting the V617F mutation allows molecular genetic differential diagnosis of myeloproliferative neoplasm as well

  10. Rapid, highly sensitive and highly specific gene detection by combining enzymatic amplification and DNA chip detection simultaneously

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koji Hashimoto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a novel gene detection method based on the loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP reaction and the DNA dissociation reaction on the same DNA chip surface to achieve a lower detection limit, broader dynamic range and faster detection time than are attainable with a conventional DNA chip. Both FAM- and thiol-labeled DNA probe bound to the complementary sequence accompanying Dabcyl was immobilized on the gold surface via Au/thiol bond. The LAMP reaction was carried out on the DNA probe fixed gold surface. At first, Dabcyl molecules quenched the FAM fluorescence. According to the LAMP reaction, the complementary sequence with Dabcyl was competitively reacted with the amplified targeted sequence. As a result, the FAM fluorescence increased owing to dissociation of the complementary sequence from the DNA probe. The simultaneous reaction of LAMP and DNA chip detection was achieved, and 103 copies of the targeted gene were detected within an hour by measuring fluorescence intensity of the DNA probe.

  11. Detecting the polymorphism sites of p53 and Fas genes of Han population in Zhejiang province

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Zhuo; Xingye Zeng; Dadao Huang; Xuexue Zhou

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is of significance for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs),a difference of rank, which exists widely in biology, genetics and other fields.OBJECTIVE: To detect polymorphism sites in exon-4 of p53 gene, promotor of Fas gene and intron-7 of Fas gene of healthy people in Han nationality in Zhejiang province.DESIGN: Simple random sampling.SETTING: Department of Surgery of the 118 Hospital of Chinese PLA.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 80 healthy people in Han nationality were selected from hospitals in Zhejiang province from August 2005 to January 2006. There were 43 males and 37 females aged from 3 to 78 years with the mean age of 39.5 years, and all subjects were consent. DNA which was used in genetic analysis was selected from peripheral venous blood of all subjects and maintained at -20 ℃.METHODS: Polymorphism sites in exon-4 of p53 gene, promotor of Fas gene and intron-7 of Fas gene were detected with directly DNA sequencing technique.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Polymorphism sites in exon-4 of p53 gene, promotor of Fas gene and intron-7 of Fas gene of healthy people in Han nationality in Zhejiang province.RESULTS: A total of 80 samples were involved in the final analysis. SNPs sites were found at the 119th base of exon-4 of p53 gene (the 72nd codon of p53 gene), the 670th base of upper start codon in promotor of Fas gene (Fas-670), and the 995th base of intron-7 of Fas gene, especially SNPs in the 995th base of intron-7 pf Fas gene, I.e. C→A transversion, was a new site.CONCLUSION: One unknown SNPs site is discovered in intron-7 of Fas gene of people in Han nationality in Zhejiang province. This study also proves that the 72nd codon exists in p53 gene and the -670 polymorphism site exists in promotor of Fas gene.

  12. A meta-analysis of kidney microarray datasets: investigation of cytokine gene detection and correlation with rt-PCR and detection thresholds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stegall Mark D

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarrays provide a means to simultaneously examine the gene expression of the entire transcriptome in a single sample. Many studies have highlighted the need for novel software and statistical approaches to assess the measured gene expression. Less attention has been directed toward whether genes considered undetectable by microarray can be detected by other strategies or whether these genes can provide accurate gene expression determinations. In the kidney this is a concern for genes such as cytokines which dramatically influence the immune response but are often considered low abundance genes produced by a small number of cells. Results Using both publicly available and our own microarray datasets we analyzed the detection p-value and detection call values for 81 human kidney samples run on the U133A or U133Plus2.0 Affymetrix microarrays (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA. For the cytokine genes, the frequency of detection in each sample group (normal, transplant and renal cell carcinoma was examined and revealed that a majority of cytokine related genes are not detectable in human kidney by microarray. Using a subset of 29 Mayo transplant samples, a group of seven transplant-related cytokines and eight non-cytokine genes were evaluated by real-time PCR (rt-PCR. For these 15 genes we compared the impact of decreasing microarray detection frequency with the changes in gene expression observed by both microarray and rt-PCR. We found that as microarray detection frequency decreased the correlation between microarray and rt-PCR data also decreased. Conclusion We conclude that, when analyzing microarray data from human kidney samples, genes generally expressed at low abundance (i.e. cytokines should be evaluated with more sensitive approaches such as rt-PCR. In addition, our data suggest that the use of detection frequency cutoffs for inclusion or exclusion of microarray data may be appropriate when comparing microarray and rt

  13. Using the nucleotide substitution rate matrix to detect horizontal gene transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betterton M D

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Horizontal gene transfer (HGT has allowed bacteria to evolve many new capabilities. Because transferred genes perform many medically important functions, such as conferring antibiotic resistance, improved detection of horizontally transferred genes from sequence data would be an important advance. Existing sequence-based methods for detecting HGT focus on changes in nucleotide composition or on differences between gene and genome phylogenies; these methods have high error rates. Results First, we introduce a new class of methods for detecting HGT based on the changes in nucleotide substitution rates that occur when a gene is transferred to a new organism. Our new methods discriminate simulated HGT events with an error rate up to 10 times lower than does GC content. Use of models that are not time-reversible is crucial for detecting HGT. Second, we show that using combinations of multiple predictors of HGT offers substantial improvements over using any single predictor, yielding as much as a factor of 18 improvement in performance (a maximum reduction in error rate from 38% to about 3%. Multiple predictors were combined by using the random forests machine learning algorithm to identify optimal classifiers that separate HGT from non-HGT trees. Conclusion The new class of HGT-detection methods introduced here combines advantages of phylogenetic and compositional HGT-detection techniques. These new techniques offer order-of-magnitude improvements over compositional methods because they are better able to discriminate HGT from non-HGT trees under a wide range of simulated conditions. We also found that combining multiple measures of HGT is essential for detecting a wide range of HGT events. These novel indicators of horizontal transfer will be widely useful in detecting HGT events linked to the evolution of important bacterial traits, such as antibiotic resistance and pathogenicity.

  14. Helicobacter pylori iceA, clinical outcomes, and correlation with cagA: a meta-analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiji Shiota

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the iceA (induced by contact with epithelium allelic types of Helicobacter pylori have been reported to be associated with peptic ulcer, the importance of iceA on clinical outcomes based on subsequent studies is controversial. The aim of this study was to estimate the magnitude of the risk for clinical outcomes associated with iceA. METHODS: A literature search was performed using the PubMed and EMBASE databases for articles published through April 2011. Published case-control studies examining the relationship between iceA and clinical outcomes (gastritis, peptic ulcer, including gastric ulcer and duodenal ulcer, and gastric cancer were included. RESULTS: Fifty studies with a total of 5,357 patients were identified in the search. Infection with iceA1-positive H. pylori increased the overall risk for peptic ulcer by 1.26-fold (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.09-1.45. However, the test for heterogeneity was significant among these studies. Sensitivity analysis showed that the presence of iceA1 was significantly associated with peptic ulcer (odds ratio [OR] = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.08-1.44. The presence of iceA2 was inversely associated with peptic ulcer (OR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.65-0.89. The presence of iceA was not associated with gastric cancer. Most studies examined the cagA status; however, only 15 studies examined the correlation and only 2 showed a positive correlation between the presence of cagA and iceA1. CONCLUSION: Our meta-analysis confirmed the importance of the presence of iceA for peptic ulcer, although the significance was marginal.

  15. Specific Detection of the Gene for the Extracellular Neutral Protease of Bacillus cereus by PCR and Blot Hybridization

    OpenAIRE

    Bach, H.-J.; Errampalli, D.; Leung, K. T.; Lee, H.; Hartmann, A; Trevors, J. T.; Munch, J C

    1999-01-01

    A pair of primers and a gene probe for the amplification and detection of the Bacillus cereus neutral protease gene (NPRC) were developed. Specificity for the npr genes of the B. cereus group members B. cereus, B. mycoides, and B. thuringiensis was shown. Restriction polymorphism patterns of the PCR products confirmed the presence of the NPRC gene in all three species.

  16. Real-Time PCR: Revolutionizing Detection and Expression Analysis of Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Deepak, Sa; Kottapalli, KR; Rakwal, R.; Oros, G; Rangappa, KS; H. Iwahashi; Masuo, Y; Agrawal, GK

    2007-01-01

    Invention of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology by Kary Mullis in 1984 gave birth to real-time PCR. Real-time PCR — detection and expression analysis of gene(s) in real-time — has revolutionized the 21st century biological science due to its tremendous application in quantitative genotyping, genetic variation of inter and intra organisms, early diagnosis of disease, forensic, to name a few. We comprehensively review various aspects of real-time PCR, including technological refinement ...

  17. Detection of Clostridium perfringens alpha toxin gene in lambs by loop mediated isothermal amplification

    OpenAIRE

    B. Radhika; N. Vinod Kumar; Sreenivasulu, D.

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The loop mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) was standardized for rapid detection of Clostridium perfringens. Materials and Methods: A total of 120 fecal samples were collected from enterotoxemia suspected lambs were used for screening of C. perfringens cpa gene by LAMP. The specificity of the LAMP amplified products was tested by digesting with restriction enzyme XmnI for alpha toxin gene. Results: Out of 120 samples screened 112 (93.3%) samples were positive by both LAMP and polym...

  18. Pegasus: a comprehensive annotation and prediction tool for detection of driver gene fusions in cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Abate, Francesco; Zairis, Sakellarios; Ficarra, Elisa; Acquaviva, Andrea; Wiggins, Chris H.; Frattini, Veronique; Lasorella, Anna; Iavarone, Antonio; Inghirami, Giorgio; Rabadan, Raul

    2014-01-01

    Background The extraordinary success of imatinib in the treatment of BCR-ABL1 associated cancers underscores the need to identify novel functional gene fusions in cancer. RNA sequencing offers a genome-wide view of expressed transcripts, uncovering biologically functional gene fusions. Although several bioinformatics tools are already available for the detection of putative fusion transcripts, candidate event lists are plagued with non-functional read-through events, reverse transcriptase tem...

  19. Mutation detection in the human HSP70B′ gene by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography

    OpenAIRE

    Hecker, Karl H.; Asea, Alexzander; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Green, Stacy; Tang, Dan; Calderwood, Stuart K

    2000-01-01

    Variances, particularly single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP), in the genomic sequence of individuals are the primary key to understanding gene function as it relates to differences in the susceptibility to disease, environmental influences, and therapy. In this report, the HSP70B′ gene is the target sequence for mutation detection in biopsy samples from human prostate cancer patients undergoing combined hyperthermia and radiation therapy at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, using temperature...

  20. Detecting positive darwinian selection in brain-expressed genes during human evolution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QI XueBin; Alice A. LIN; Luca L. CAVALLI-SFORZA; WANG Jun; SU Bing; YANG Su; ZHENG HongKun; WANG YinQiu; LIAO ChengHong; LIU Ying; CHEN XiaoHua; SHI Hong; YU XiaoJing

    2007-01-01

    To understand the genetic basis that underlies the phenotypic divergence between human and nonhuman primates, we screened a total of 7176 protein-coding genes expressed in the human brain and compared them with the chimpanzee orthologs to identify genes that show evidence of rapid evolution in the human lineage. Our results showed that the nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution (Ka/Ks) ratio for genes expressed in the brain of human and chimpanzee is 0.3854, suggesting that the brain-expressed genes are under functional constraint. The X-linked human brain-expressed genes evolved more rapidly than autosomal ones. We further dissected the molecular evolutionary patterns of 34 candidate genes by sequencing representative primate species to identify lineage-specific adaptive evolution. Fifteen out of the 34 candidate genes showed evidence of positive Darwinian selection in human and/or chimpanzee lineages. These genes are predicted to play diverse functional roles in embryonic development, spermatogenesis and male fertility, signal transduction, sensory nociception, and neural function. This study together with others demonstrated the usefulness and power of phylogenetic comparison of multiple closely related species in detecting lineage-specific adaptive evolution, and the identification of the positively selected brain-expressed genes may add new knowledge to the understanding of molecular mechanism of human origin.

  1. Detection of chromosomal regions showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bortoluzzi Stefania

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhabdomyosarcoma is a relatively common tumour of the soft tissue, probably due to regulatory disruption of growth and differentiation of skeletal muscle stem cells. Identification of genes differentially expressed in normal skeletal muscle and in rhabdomyosarcoma may help in understanding mechanisms of tumour development, in discovering diagnostic and prognostic markers and in identifying novel targets for drug therapy. Results A Perl-code web client was developed to automatically obtain genome map positions of large sets of genes. The software, based on automatic search on Human Genome Browser by sequence alignment, only requires availability of a single transcribed sequence for each gene. In this way, we obtained tissue-specific chromosomal maps of genes expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma or skeletal muscle. Subsequently, Perl software was developed to calculate gene density along chromosomes, by using a sliding window. Thirty-three chromosomal regions harbouring genes mostly expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma were identified. Similarly, 48 chromosomal regions were detected including genes possibly related to function of differentiated skeletal muscle, but silenced in rhabdomyosarcoma. Conclusion In this study we developed a method and the associated software for the comparative analysis of genomic expression in tissues and we identified chromosomal segments showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, appearing as candidate regions for harbouring genes involved in origin of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma representing possible targets for drug treatment and/or development of tumor markers.

  2. Detection of chromosomal regions showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisognin, Andrea; Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Danieli, Gian Antonio

    2004-01-01

    Background Rhabdomyosarcoma is a relatively common tumour of the soft tissue, probably due to regulatory disruption of growth and differentiation of skeletal muscle stem cells. Identification of genes differentially expressed in normal skeletal muscle and in rhabdomyosarcoma may help in understanding mechanisms of tumour development, in discovering diagnostic and prognostic markers and in identifying novel targets for drug therapy. Results A Perl-code web client was developed to automatically obtain genome map positions of large sets of genes. The software, based on automatic search on Human Genome Browser by sequence alignment, only requires availability of a single transcribed sequence for each gene. In this way, we obtained tissue-specific chromosomal maps of genes expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma or skeletal muscle. Subsequently, Perl software was developed to calculate gene density along chromosomes, by using a sliding window. Thirty-three chromosomal regions harbouring genes mostly expressed in rhabdomyosarcoma were identified. Similarly, 48 chromosomal regions were detected including genes possibly related to function of differentiated skeletal muscle, but silenced in rhabdomyosarcoma. Conclusion In this study we developed a method and the associated software for the comparative analysis of genomic expression in tissues and we identified chromosomal segments showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma, appearing as candidate regions for harbouring genes involved in origin of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma representing possible targets for drug treatment and/or development of tumor markers. PMID:15176974

  3. Transcribed single nucleotide polymorphism: Ideal markers for detecting gene imprinting by 5' nuclease assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Guan-shan; WAN Mo-bin; ZHU Zhong-zheng; ZHENG Rui-ying

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To establish a novel approach for quick and highly efficient verification of human gene imprinting. Methods: A pair of dye-labelled probes, 5' nuclease assay was combined with RT-PCR to determine the genotype of a transcribed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) rs705 (C>T) of a known imprinted gene, small nuclear ribonucleotide protein N (SNRPN), on both genomic DNA and cDNA of human lymphoblast cell lines. Results: Allele discrimination showed a clear monoallelic expression pattern of SNRPN,which was confirmed by RT-PCR based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLPs). Pedigree analysis verified the paternal origin of expressed allele, which was in consistency with previous report. Conclusion: Transcribed SNP is an ideal marker for detecting gene imprinting by 5' nuclease assay. This approach also may be used to discover differential allele expression of non-imprinted genes, finding out gene cis-acting functional polymorphism.

  4. Electrochemical DNA sensor for anthrax toxin activator gene atxA-detection of PCR amplicons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ritu; Goel, Ajay K; Sharma, Mukesh K; Upadhyay, Sanjay

    2015-12-15

    We report the DNA probe functionalized electrochemical genosensor for the detection of Bacillus anthracis, specific towards the regulatory gene atxA. The DNA sensor is fabricated on electrochemically deposited gold nanoparticle on self assembled layer of (3-Mercaptopropyl) trimethoxysilane (MPTS) on GC electrode. DNA hybridization is monitored by differential pulse voltammogram (DPV). The modified GC electrode is characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM), cyclic voltammetry (CV), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) method. We also quantified the DNA probe density on electrode surface by the chronocoulometric method. The detection is specific and selective for atxA gene by DNA probe on the electrode surface. No report is available for the detection of B. anthracis by using atxA an anthrax toxin activator gene. In the light of real and complex sample, we have studied the PCR amplicons of 303, 361 and 568 base pairs by using symmetric and asymmetric PCR approaches. The DNA probe of atxA gene efficiently hybridizes with different base pairs of PCR amplicons. The detection limit is found to be 1.0 pM (S/N ratio=3). The results indicate that the DNA sensor is able to detect synthetic target as well as PCR amplicons of different base pairs. PMID:26257186

  5. Using BrdU labelling to detect the HPRT gene mutation frequencies induced by γ rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using BrdU labelling to detect the HPRT gene mutation frequencies (MFs) of a normal adult induced by γ rays of different doses and to analysis the relationship between the HPRT gene MFs and the radiation doses. Blood was drawn via the vein of a normal adult and was equally divided into five groups. The blood was exposed to γ rays with a dose range from 0.0 Gy to 4.0 Gy respectively. After having cultivated the whole blood, the authors got the HPRT gene MFs of the lymphocytes. With the increase of the doses, the MFs of the HPRT gene rose accordingly. The results also showed that there is a linear-square relationship between the doses of the γ ray and the MFs of the HPRT gene. According to the results, the authors may conclude that BrdU labelling method is a quick, simple and relatively sensitive method for detecting the HPRT gene mutations of somatic cells induced by external radiation exposure and HPRT gene mutation may be used as a radiobiological dosimeter

  6. Multiplex PCR detection of enterotoxin genes in Aeromonas spp. from suspect food samples in northern Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yu-Chang; Wang, Jan-Yi; Selvam, Ammaiyappan; Kao, Shu-Chen; Yang, Shang-Shyng; Shih, Daniel Yang-Chih

    2008-10-01

    Aeromonads possess an array of virulence factors and are causative agents of a number of human infections. Among them, genes of one cytotoxic (Act) and two cytotonic (Alt, Ast) enterotoxins are implicated in a human diarrheal disease. A rapid, specific, simultaneous detection of these enterotoxin genes in suspected food poisoning samples is not yet reported. Hence, a multiplex PCR assay was designed to amplify the cytotoxic (act), heat-labile cytotonic (alt), and heat-stable cytotonic (ast) enterotoxin genes of aeromonads. The PCR assay was tested with 133 Aeromonas spp. isolated from suspect food poisoning samples and retail samples of poultry and fish from wet markets in and around Taipei, Northern Taiwan. The Aeromonas spp. isolates were divided into six genotypes based on absence or presence of one or more enterotoxin genes. Of these 133 isolates, Aeromonas caviae (52.5%) and Aeromonas hydrophila (43.4%) were the most frequently isolated species from food poisoning samples and retail samples, respectively. Among the species, A. hydrophila had a significantly higher proportion for harboring three enterotoxin genes than had the others, whereas Aeromonas encheleia, considered a nonpathogen, was found harboring three enterotoxin genes. The multiplex PCR assays are rapid and specific, and provide a useful tool for the detection and genotyping of enterotoxin genes of aeromonads. PMID:18939759

  7. Single strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP detection in six genes in Portuguese indigenous sheep breed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guedes-Pinto H.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of the genetic diversity for six genes in forty animals of the Portuguese indigenous sheep breed (Ovis aries ""Churra da Terra Quente"" was done. A non-radioactive method to allow single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP detection was optimised, starting from genomic DNA and PCR amplification of seven fragments: exon 1 of the alpha-lactalbumin gene; exons 10 and 11 of the alpha s1-casein gene; exon 7 of the beta-casein gene; exon 4 of the kappa-casein gene; exons 4 and 5 of the growth hormone gene and exon 6 of the growth hormone receptor gene. Polymorphisms were detected in five of the seven PCR products. Only kappa-casein and growth hormone receptor were monomorphic. Alpha-lactalbumin and alpha s1-casein exons showed three conformational patterns, beta-casein and growth hormone exon 4 showed two electrophoretic patterns and growth hormone exon 5 showed five conformational patterns. These data provide evidence that ""Churra da Terra Quente"" has a high genetic variability, which opens interesting prospects for future selection programs and also for preservation strategies. Also, our data show that PCR-SSCP is an appropriate tool for evaluating genetic variability.

  8. Selection of Suitable Endogenous Reference Genes for Relative Copy Number Detection in Sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bantong Xue

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Transgene copy number has a great impact on the expression level and stability of exogenous gene in transgenic plants. Proper selection of endogenous reference genes is necessary for detection of genetic components in genetically modification (GM crops by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR or by qualitative PCR approach, especially in sugarcane with polyploid and aneuploid genomic structure. qPCR technique has been widely accepted as an accurate, time-saving method on determination of copy numbers in transgenic plants and on detection of genetically modified plants to meet the regulatory and legislative requirement. In this study, to find a suitable endogenous reference gene and its real-time PCR assay for sugarcane (Saccharum spp. hybrids DNA content quantification, we evaluated a set of potential “single copy” genes including P4H, APRT, ENOL, CYC, TST and PRR, through qualitative PCR and absolute quantitative PCR. Based on copy number comparisons among different sugarcane genotypes, including five S. officinarum, one S. spontaneum and two S. spp. hybrids, these endogenous genes fell into three groups: ENOL-3—high copy number group, TST-1 and PRR-1—medium copy number group, P4H-1, APRT-2 and CYC-2—low copy number group. Among these tested genes, P4H, APRT and CYC were the most stable, while ENOL and TST were the least stable across different sugarcane genotypes. Therefore, three primer pairs of P4H-3, APRT-2 and CYC-2 were then selected as the suitable reference gene primer pairs for sugarcane. The test of multi-target reference genes revealed that the APRT gene was a specific amplicon, suggesting this gene is the most suitable to be used as an endogenous reference target for sugarcane DNA content quantification. These results should be helpful for establishing accurate and reliable qualitative and quantitative PCR analysis of GM sugarcane.

  9. FusionQ: a novel approach for gene fusion detection and quantification from paired-end RNA-Seq

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chenglin; Ma, Jinwen; Chang, ChungChe (Jeff); Zhou, Xiaobo

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene fusions, which result from abnormal chromosome rearrangements, are a pathogenic factor in cancer development. The emerging RNA-Seq technology enables us to detect gene fusions and profile their features. Results In this paper, we proposed a novel fusion detection tool, FusionQ, based on paired-end RNA-Seq data. This tool can detect gene fusions, construct the structures of chimerical transcripts, and estimate their abundances. To confirm the read alignment on both sides of a f...

  10. Detection of Shiga toxins genes by Multiplex PCR in clinical samples

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Background: Different methods have been used for detection of shiga toxins; such as,  cell culture, ELISA, and RFPLA. However, all of these methods suffer from high cost, time-consumption and relatively low sensitivity. In this study we used Multiplex PCR method for detection of genes encoding shiga toxins. Material and Methods: In this study, 63 clinical samples were obtained from positive cultures of Shigella and E. coli O157, from Bahman 1391 until Ordibehesht 1392 in Mazandaran provin...

  11. Detection of GSTM1, GSTT1 and the Ile105Val GSTP1 gene variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchard, Anders; Sanchez, Juan J.; Dalhoff, Kim;

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a PCR multiplex method that in a fast, inexpensive and reliable manner can detect if a person has two, one or no GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes and which at the same time can detect the allelic status of the GSTP1 Ile105Val genetic variant. A total of 200 Danes, 100 Somalis and 100 Green...... Greenlanders were genotyped. This multiplex PCR assay enables future large-scale studies to investigate the role of GSTs...

  12. Associação entre cagA e alelos do vacA de Helicobacter pylori e úlcera duodenal em crianças no Brasil

    OpenAIRE

    Ashour Abdussalam Ali Ramadam; Gusmão Valquíria Ribeiro de; Magalhães Paula Prazeres; Collares Guilherme Birchal; Mendes Edilberto Nogueira; Queiroz Dulciene Maria de Magalhães; Rocha Gifone Aguiar; Rocha Andreia Maria Camargos; Carvalho Anfrisina Sales Teles

    2002-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori é o principal agente de gastrite em seres humanos e fator de risco para úlcera péptica e câncer gástrico. A evolução da infecção está relacionada a diversos fatores, inclusive bacterianos, como presença de cagA e genótipo s1-m1 do vacA, associados com o desenvolvimento de úlcera e adenocarcinoma gástrico. O objetivo deste estudo foi investigar a associação entre cagA e alelos do vacA em H. pylori isolado de crianças e relacionar os achados com a doença apresentada pelo pac...

  13. Detection of CEBPA double mutants in acute myeloid leukemia using a custom gene expression array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Vliet, Martin H; Burgmer, Pia; de Quartel, Linda; Brand, Jaap P L; de Best, Leonie C M; Viëtor, Henk; Löwenberg, Bob; Valk, Peter J M; van Beers, Erik H

    2013-05-01

    Double (bi-allelic) mutations in the gene encoding the CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein-alpha (CEBPA) transcription factor have a favorable prognostic impact in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Double mutations in CEBPA can be detected using various techniques, but it is a notoriously difficult gene to sequence due to its high GC-content. Here we developed a two-step gene expression classifier for accurate and standardized detection of CEBPA double mutations. The key feature of the two-step classifier is that it explicitly removes cases with low CEBPA expression, thereby excluding CEBPA hypermethylated cases that have similar gene expression profiles as a CEBPA double mutant, which would result in false-positive predictions. In the second step, we have developed a 55 gene signature to identity the true CEBPA double-mutation cases. This two-step classifier was tested on a cohort of 505 unselected AML cases, including 26 CEBPA double mutants, 12 CEBPA single mutants, and seven CEBPA promoter hypermethylated cases, on which its performance was estimated by a double-loop cross-validation protocol. The two-step classifier achieves a sensitivity of 96.2% (95% confidence interval [CI] 81.1 to 99.3) and specificity of 100.0% (95% CI 99.2 to 100.0). There are no false-positive detections. This two-step CEBPA double-mutation classifier has been incorporated on a microarray platform that can simultaneously detect other relevant molecular biomarkers, which allows for a standardized comprehensive diagnostic assay. In conclusion, gene expression profiling provides a reliable method for CEBPA double-mutation detection in patients with AML for clinical use. PMID:23485358

  14. H pylori infection and systemic antibodies to CagA and heat shock protein 60 in patients with coronary heart disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cristina Lenzi; Fabio Rollo; Ranuccio Nuti; Natale Figura; Alberto Palazzuoli; Nicola Giordano; Giuliano Alegente; Catia Gonnelli; Maria Stella Campagna; Annalisa Santucci; Michele Sozzi; Panagiotis Papakostas

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine the overall prevalence of H pylori and CagA positive H pylori infection and the prevalence of other bacterial and viral causes of chronic infection in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD), and the potential role of anti-heat-shock protein 60 (Hsp60) antibody response to these proteins in increasing the risk of CHD development.METHODS: Eighty patients with CHD and 160 controls were employed. We also compared the levels of antiheat-shock protein 60 (Hsp60) antibodies in the two groups. The H pylori infection and the CagA status were determined serologically, using commercially available enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), and a Western blotting method developed in our laboratory.Systemic antibodies to Hsp60 were determined by a sandwich ELISA, using a polyclonal antibody to Hsp60 to sensitise polystyrene plates and a commercially available human Hsp60 as an antigen.RESULTS: The overall prevalence of H pylori infection was 78.7% (n = 63) in patients and 76.2% (n =122) in controls (P = 0.07). Patients infected by CagApositive (CagA+) H pylori strains were 71.4% (n = 45) vs 52.4% of infected controls (P = 0.030, OR = 2.27). Systemic levels of IgG to Hsp60 were increased in H pylorinegative patients compared with uninfected controls (P< 0.001) and CagA-positive infected patients compared with CagA-positive infected controls (P = 0.007).CONCLUSION: CagA positive H pylori infection may concur to the development of CHD; high levels of antiHsp60 antibodies may constitute a marker and/or a concomitant pathogenic factor of the disease.

  15. Automated DNA mutation detection using universal conditions direct sequencing: application to ten muscular dystrophy genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Bai-Lin

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the most common and efficient methods for detecting mutations in genes is PCR amplification followed by direct sequencing. Until recently, the process of designing PCR assays has been to focus on individual assay parameters rather than concentrating on matching conditions for a set of assays. Primers for each individual assay were selected based on location and sequence concerns. The two primer sequences were then iteratively adjusted to make the individual assays work properly. This generally resulted in groups of assays with different annealing temperatures that required the use of multiple thermal cyclers or multiple passes in a single thermal cycler making diagnostic testing time-consuming, laborious and expensive. These factors have severely hampered diagnostic testing services, leaving many families without an answer for the exact cause of a familial genetic disease. A search of GeneTests for sequencing analysis of the entire coding sequence for genes that are known to cause muscular dystrophies returns only a small list of laboratories that perform comprehensive gene panels. The hypothesis for the study was that a complete set of universal assays can be designed to amplify and sequence any gene or family of genes using computer aided design tools. If true, this would allow automation and optimization of the mutation detection process resulting in reduced cost and increased throughput. Results An automated process has been developed for the detection of deletions, duplications/insertions and point mutations in any gene or family of genes and has been applied to ten genes known to bear mutations that cause muscular dystrophy: DMD; CAV3; CAPN3; FKRP; TRIM32; LMNA; SGCA; SGCB; SGCG; SGCD. Using this process, mutations have been found in five DMD patients and four LGMD patients (one in the FKRP gene, one in the CAV3 gene, and two likely causative heterozygous pairs of variations in the CAPN3 gene of two other

  16. Human synthetic lethal inference as potential anti-cancer target gene detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solé Ricard V

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two genes are called synthetic lethal (SL if mutation of either alone is not lethal, but mutation of both leads to death or a significant decrease in organism's fitness. The detection of SL gene pairs constitutes a promising alternative for anti-cancer therapy. As cancer cells exhibit a large number of mutations, the identification of these mutated genes' SL partners may provide specific anti-cancer drug candidates, with minor perturbations to the healthy cells. Since existent SL data is mainly restricted to yeast screenings, the road towards human SL candidates is limited to inference methods. Results In the present work, we use phylogenetic analysis and database manipulation (BioGRID for interactions, Ensembl and NCBI for homology, Gene Ontology for GO attributes in order to reconstruct the phylogenetically-inferred SL gene network for human. In addition, available data on cancer mutated genes (COSMIC and Cancer Gene Census databases as well as on existent approved drugs (DrugBank database supports our selection of cancer-therapy candidates. Conclusions Our work provides a complementary alternative to the current methods for drug discovering and gene target identification in anti-cancer research. Novel SL screening analysis and the use of highly curated databases would contribute to improve the results of this methodology.

  17. Detection of resistance genes and evaluation of water quality at zoo lakes in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Carolina Silva de Faria

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The investigation of the presence of antibiotic-resistance genes in aquatic environments is important to identify possible reservoirs of resistant microorganisms that could be a threat to human and animal health. The aims of this study were to analyze the presence of genes conferring resistance to antimicrobials in the aquatic environment and to assess the quality of water in zoo lakes. Results showed a pattern of genes conferring resistance to multiple antibiotics and turbidity, which was expected to be due to the presence of contaminants. The most frequent genes were sul I and sul II (sulfonamides, which were present in all the lakes, followed by genes encoding β-lactamases such as blaPSE I (77.8% and ampC (66.7%. However, tet(K, tet(M, and ermC genes were not detected. There was a positive correlation between the number of Enterobacteriaceae and resistance genes. In conclusion, the source of contamination of all lakes was probably the neighboring urban sewage or wastewater that increased the frequency of the total coliforms and resistance genes, which in turn posed a threat to the conservation of the animal life inhabiting the zoo.

  18. DETECTION OF p53 GENE MUTATION IN PLASMA OF PATIENTS WITH GASTRIC CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏鹏程; 李子禹; 张连海; 万文徽; 任晖; 张桂国; 王怡; 邓国仁; 季加孚

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To investigated p53 gene mutation in plasma of gastric cancer patients. Methods: DNA extracted from plasma and matched tumor and tumor-adjacent non-cancerous tissues of 96 gastric cancer patients, and DNA from 20 healthy volunteers were studied. Exon 5, 6, 7, and 8 of p53 were amplified by Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). The mutation status was analyzed by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC), followed by direct sequencing of cases with aberrant chromatographic patterns. Results: Heterozygous mutations of p53 gene were detected in 19.9% (19/96) of primary tumor tissues and 5.2% (5/96) of corresponding plasma. All p53 gene mutations detected in plasma DNA consisted with mutations in the matched primary tumor samples. Neither the tumor-adjacent gastric mucosa tissues nor control plasma from healthy volunteers showed p53 gene mutation. No correlation was found between p53 mutation status and clinicopathological features of gastric cancer patients. Conclusion: p53 gene mutation in plasma can be detected in tissues and plasma of gastric cancer patients, which could be applied in screening and surveillance of this disease.

  19. Detection of toxin genes and RAPD analysis of bacillus cereus isolates from different soil types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savic Dejana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to detect genes for enterotoxins (hbla, entFM and bceT and for emetic toxin (cer, to determine antibiotic resistance, and to estimate intraspecies diversity in B. cereus isolates by RAPD analysis. B. cereus was identified in 12 out of 117 indigenous Bacillus spp. using the classical microbiological methods and PCR. All isolates were resistant to penicillin and ampicillin, two to tetracyclin and four to trimethoprim-sulphamethoxazole. Also, all isolates produced inducible penicillinases and β-lactamase. Toxin genes were detected with PCR. EntFM and cer genes were present in all isolates, hbla in all, but two, and bceT in none. RAPD analysis was performed with four different primers, two of them designed for this study. The intraspecies diversity revealed 10 different patterns at the 90% similarity level. Two separate clusters were formed regardless of a soil type or utilization. The detection of genes encoding toxins in all B. cereus isolates indicated these bacteria as potentially pathogenic and seriously for human health. Regardless of a soil type or utilization, the RAPD analysis showed high intraspecies heterogeneity in B. cereus isolates. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to analyse the presence of entero- and emetic toxin genes and genetic heterogeneity in B. cereus isolates from different soil types and different soil utilization in Serbia. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR37006

  20. Colorimetric detection of gene transcript by target-induced three-way junction formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuchu; Liu, Weiwei; Yin, Binbin; Yu, Pan; Duan, Xiuzhi; Liao, Zhaoping; Liu, Chunhua; Sang, Yiwen; Zhang, Gong; Chen, Yuhua; Tao, Zhihua

    2016-09-01

    Gene transcript often varies by alternative splicing, which plays different biological role that results in diversity of gene expression. Therefore, a simple and accurate identification of targeted transcript variant is of prime importance to achieve a precise molecular diagnosis. In this work, we presented a three-way junction based system where two split G-quadruplex forming sequences were coupled into two probes. Only upon the introduction of target gene transcript that offering a specific recognizable splicing site did the two probes assembled into three way junction conformation in a devised process, thus providing a functional G-quadruplex conformation that greatly enhanced hemin peroxidation. A notable resolution for gene splicing site detection was achieved. The detection limitation by colorimetric assay was 0.063μM, and this system has been proved to discriminate even in a single base false level around splicing site (about 3 times of single mismatched analyte to gain an equal signal by perfect analyte ). Furthermore, recoveries of 78.1%, 88.1%, 104.6% were obtained with 0.75μM, 0.25μM, 0.083μM of target, respectively, showing a capacity to further exploit a simple equipped device for gene transcript detection. PMID:27343570

  1. Mutation detection of Binding Site Region of Human COLIA1 Gene

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šormová, L.; Mařík, I.; Zachová, M.; Pexa, T.; Hudáková, O.; Kuklík, M.; Nutsu-Mazura, F.; Mazura, Ivan; Zvárová, Jana

    Carlton : Genomic Disorders Research Centre, 2011. s. 79. [International Symposium on Mutation s in the Genome /11./. 06.06.2011-10.06.2011, Santorini] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : mutation detection * COLIA1 gene * genomic disorders * heredity Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  2. Gene Signatures Stratify Computed Tomography Screening Detected Lung Cancer in High-Risk Populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangting Hu

    2015-08-01

    Interpretation: The distinct pattern of “indolent” and “aggressive” tumour exists in CT-screening detected lung cancer according to the gene expression profiles. The early development of an aggressive phenotype may account for the lack of mortality reduction by screening observed in some cohorts.

  3. Rapid and sensitive reporter gene assays for detection of antiandrogenic and estrogenic effects of environmental chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne; Jørgensen, E.C.B.; Larsen, John Christian

    1999-01-01

    antiandrogenic chemicals present in our environment. Thus, there is a great need for an effective in vitro screening method for (anti)androgenic chemicals. We have developed a rapid, sensitive, and reproducible reporter gene assay for detection of antiandrogenic chemicals. Chinese Hamster Ovary cells were...

  4. Power of multifactor dimensionality reduction and penalized logistic regression for detecting gene-gene Interaction in a case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brott Marcia J

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a growing awareness that interaction between multiple genes play an important role in the risk of common, complex multi-factorial diseases. Many common diseases are affected by certain genotype combinations (associated with some genes and their interactions. The identification and characterization of these susceptibility genes and gene-gene interaction have been limited by small sample size and large number of potential interactions between genes. Several methods have been proposed to detect gene-gene interaction in a case control study. The penalized logistic regression (PLR, a variant of logistic regression with L2 regularization, is a parametric approach to detect gene-gene interaction. On the other hand, the Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction (MDR is a nonparametric and genetic model-free approach to detect genotype combinations associated with disease risk. Methods We compared the power of MDR and PLR for detecting two-way and three-way interactions in a case-control study through extensive simulations. We generated several interaction models with different magnitudes of interaction effect. For each model, we simulated 100 datasets, each with 200 cases and 200 controls and 20 SNPs. We considered a wide variety of models such as models with just main effects, models with only interaction effects or models with both main and interaction effects. We also compared the performance of MDR and PLR to detect gene-gene interaction associated with acute rejection(AR in kidney transplant patients. Results In this paper, we have studied the power of MDR and PLR for detecting gene-gene interaction in a case-control study through extensive simulation. We have compared their performances for different two-way and three-way interaction models. We have studied the effect of different allele frequencies on these methods. We have also implemented their performance on a real dataset. As expected, none of these methods were

  5. An efficient promoter trap for detection of patterned gene expression and subsequent functional analysis in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Camilla; Franch-Marro, Xavier; Hartenstein, Volker; Alexandre, Cyrille; Vincent, Jean-Paul

    2006-01-01

    Transposable elements have been used in Drosophila to detect gene expression, inactivate gene function, and induce ectopic expression or overexpression. We have combined all of these features in a single construct. A promoterless GAL4 cDNA is expressed when the construct inserts within a transcriptional unit, and GAL4 activates a GFP-encoding gene present in the same transposon. In a primary screen, patterned gene expression is detected as GFP fluorescence in the live progeny of dysgenic males. Many animals expressing GFP in distinct patterns can be recovered with relatively little effort. As expected, many insertions cause loss of function. After insertion at a genomic location, specific parts of the transposon can be excised by FLP recombinase, thus allowing it to induce conditional misexpression of the tagged gene. Therefore, both gain- and loss-of-function studies can be carried out with a single insertion in a gene identified by virtue of its expression pattern. Using this promoter trap approach, we have identified a group of cells that innervate the calyx of the mushroom body and could thus define a previously unrecognized memory circuit. PMID:17093046

  6. [The detection of legionellae in a water pipe system using gene probe technics and culture methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, R; Hahn, T; Botzenhart, K

    1990-05-01

    In a new hospital building, cold and warm water systems were examined for microbiological parameters before opening. All of the 35 sampling sites showed elevated colony counts, i.e. greater than 100 cfu/ml. 11 of these contained Legionella species at various times. While Escherichia coli, coliform bacteria and Pseudomonas aeruginosa could not be found, Legionella longbeachae serogroup 1 + 2 was identified in 13 samples. Only one sample contained Legionella pneumophila serogroup 3. Legionella species were detected using a commercial gene probe assay and culture techniques. The gene probe method proved to be superior to the culture techniques insofar as significantly positive results were obtained more frequently, and evidence for the presence of Legionella of different species and serogroups could be obtained with a single procedure. The gene probe method appears to be a suitable screening method for the detection of Legionella species. PMID:2393493

  7. Determining lower limits of detection of digital PCR assays for cancer-related gene mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Milbury, Coren A.; Qun Zhong; Jesse Lin; Miguel Williams; Jeff Olson; Link, Darren R.; Brian Hutchison

    2014-01-01

    Digital PCR offers very high sensitivity compared to many other technologies for processing molecular detection assays. Herein, a process is outlined for determining the lower limit of detection (LoD) of two droplet-based digital PCR assays for point mutations of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene. Hydrolysis probe mutation-detection assays for EGFR p.L858R and p.T790M mutations were characterized in detail. Furthermore, sixteen additional cancer-related mutation assays were exp...

  8. Detection of MTAP Protein and Gene Expression in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Shasha; Zhang, Yijun; LI, HONGLI; Ding, Baoqing

    2011-01-01

    Background and objective The abnormal expression of MTAP, a tumor suppressor gene, is found in a variety of tumor tissues. The aim of this study is to detect the expression of MTAP mRNA protein and the clinical significance for the therapy of non-small cell lung cancer tissue (NSCLC). Methods The expression of MTAP protein was detected by immunohistochemistry in 52 cases of NSCLC patients. The relative expression MTAP mRNA was detected by real-time quantitative PCR. Results The expression of ...

  9. Quantitative Multifactor Dimensionality Reduction Method for Detecting Gene-Gene Interaction

    OpenAIRE

    Gilbert-Diamond, Diane; Andrews, Peter; Moore, Jason H.; Gui, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective: The problem of identifying SNP-SNP interactions in case-control studies has been studied extensively and a number of new techniques have been developed. Little progress has been made, however in the analysis of SNP-SNP interactions in relation to continuous data. Methods: We present an extension of the two class multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) algorithm that enables detection and characterization of epistatic SNP-SNP interactions in the context of Quantita...

  10. Sensitive colorimetric detection of Listeria monocytogenes based on isothermal gene amplification and unmodified gold nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Zhongyu; Zhou, Xiaoming; Xing, Da

    2013-12-15

    Listeria monocytogenes (L. monocytogenes), one of most problematic food-borne bacteria, is mainly transmitted through the food chain and may cause listeriosis. Therefore, the development of rapid and sensitive L. monocytogenes detection technique has become an urgent task. In this study, we proposed a method using hyperbranching rolling circle amplification (HRCA) combined with gold nanoparticle (GNP) based colorimetric strategy to offer an isothermal, highly sensitive and specific assay for the detection of L. monocytogenes. First, a linear padlock probe targeting a specific sequence in the hly gene was designed and followed with a ligation by Taq DNA ligase. After ligation, further amplification by HRCA with a thiolated primer and an unlabeled primer is performed. The resulting thiolated HRCA products were then captured onto GNP surface and made GNP more salt-tolerant. Detection of the bacteria can be achieved by a facilitated GNP based colorimetric testing using naked eyes. Through this approach, as low as 100 aM synthetic hly gene targets and about 75 copies of L. monocytogenes can be detected. The specificity is evaluated by distinguishing target L. monocytogenes from other bacteria. The artificial contaminated food samples were also detected for its potential applications in real food detection. This method described here is ideal for bacteria detection due to its simplicity and high sensitivity. PMID:23948710

  11. A new method of preparing fiber-optic DNA biosensor and its array for gene detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    A new method of preparing fiber-optic DNA biosensor and its arrayfor the simultaneous detection of multiple genes is described. The optical fibers were first treated with poly-l-lysine, and then were made into fiber-optic DNA biosensors by adsorbing and immobilizing the oligonucleotide probe on its end. By assembling the fiber-optic DNA biosensors in a bundle in which each fiber carried a different DNA probe, the fiber-optic DNA biosensor array was well prepared. Hybridization of fluorescent- labeled cDNA of p53 gene, N-ras gene and Rb1 gene to the DNA array was monitored by CCD camera. A good result was achieved.

  12. Detection of DNA sequence polymorphisms in carcinogen metabolism genes by polymerase chain reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, D.A. (National Inst. of Environmental Health Sciences, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States))

    1991-01-01

    The glutathione transferase mu gene (GST1) and the debrisoquine hydroxylase gene (CYP2D6) are known to be polymorphic in the human population and have been associated with increased susceptibility to cancer. Smokers with low lymphocyte GST mu activity are at higher risk for lung cancer, while low debrisoquine hydroxylase activity has been correlated with lower risk for lung and bladder cancer. Phenotypic characterization of these polymorphisms by lymphocyte enzyme activity (GST) and urine metabolite ratios (debrisoquine) is cumbersome for population studies. Recent cloning and sequencing of the mutant alleles of these genes has allowed genotyping via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Advantages of PCR approaches are speed, technical simplicity, and minimal sample requirements. This article reviews the PCR-based methods for detection of genetic polymorphisms in human cancer susceptibility genes.

  13. Detection of DNA sequence polymorphisms in carcinogen metabolism genes by polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, D A

    1991-01-01

    The glutathione transferase mu gene (GST1) and the debrisoquine hydroxylase gene (CYP2D6) are known to be polymorphic in the human population and have been associated with increased susceptibility to cancer. Smokers with low lymphocyte GST mu activity are at higher risk for lung cancer, while low debrisoquine hydroxylase activity has been correlated with lower risk for lung and bladder cancer. Phenotypic characterization of these polymorphisms by lymphocyte enzyme activity (GST) and urine metabolite ratios (debrisoquine) is cumbersome for population studies. Recent cloning and sequencing of the mutant alleles of these genes has allowed genotyping via the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Advantages of PCR approaches are speed, technical simplicity, and minimal sample requirements. This article reviews the PCR-based methods for detection of genetic polymorphisms in human cancer susceptibility genes. PMID:1684153

  14. A Multiplex PCR Assay for the Detection of Pathogenic Genes of EPEC, ETEC and EIEC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Tienan; LI Jichang; LU Chengwu; HUO Guicheng

    2006-01-01

    A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was developed to detect three pathogenic genes of enteropathogenic, enterotocigenic and enteroinvasive Escherichia coli.. In this study three different sets of oligonucleotide primer were simultaneously used, and in this way, specific fragments of 880, 600, 150 bp for EPEC eaeA,EIEC ipaH and ETEC ST genes were amplified, respectively. The best condition of the multiplex PCR was: after an initial heat denaturation step at 95℃ for 5 min, followed by 30 cycles of denaturation at 94 ℃ for 40 s, primer annealing at 51.3 ℃ for 40 s and extension at 72 ℃ for 1 min, final extension at 72 ℃ for 10 min. The detection limit of tively. It may be a good way for the detection and identification of Diarrhea-causing E. coli..

  15. Detection of methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from recreational beach using the mecA gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkifli, Aisya; Ahmad, Asmat

    2015-09-01

    Water samples were collected in triplicates from three different locations choosen from the recreational beach of Teluk Kemang, Port Dickson as sampling station including main area of recreation activity for the public. Bacteria were isolated from the water and cultured. Out of 286 presumptive Staphylococcus aureus enumerated by using culture method, only 4 (1.4 %) confirmed as Meticillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA) based on PCR detection of mecA gene. Interestingly, all of MRSA detections were found at the main area of recreational activity. Our results suggested that public beaches may be reservoir for transmission of MRSA to beach visitors and PCR using the mecA gene is the fastest way to detect this pathogenic bacteria.

  16. RUBIC identifies driver genes by detecting recurrent DNA copy number breaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dyk, Ewald; Hoogstraat, Marlous; Ten Hoeve, Jelle; Reinders, Marcel J T; Wessels, Lodewyk F A

    2016-01-01

    The frequent recurrence of copy number aberrations across tumour samples is a reliable hallmark of certain cancer driver genes. However, state-of-the-art algorithms for detecting recurrent aberrations fail to detect several known drivers. In this study, we propose RUBIC, an approach that detects recurrent copy number breaks, rather than recurrently amplified or deleted regions. This change of perspective allows for a simplified approach as recursive peak splitting procedures and repeated re-estimation of the background model are avoided. Furthermore, we control the false discovery rate on the level of called regions, rather than at the probe level, as in competing algorithms. We benchmark RUBIC against GISTIC2 (a state-of-the-art approach) and RAIG (a recently proposed approach) on simulated copy number data and on three SNP6 and NGS copy number data sets from TCGA. We show that RUBIC calls more focal recurrent regions and identifies a much larger fraction of known cancer genes. PMID:27396759

  17. Detection of Helicobacter pylori virulence factors and interleukin-1 polymorphisms in patients with abdominal complaint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Gastric Cancer is the second leading cause of cancer related death in Mongolia (National Cancer Center, report-2006). Chronic infection with Helicobacter pylori affects approximately half the world and results in malignancy in a small subset of this population. There was sufficient evidence that the Working Group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC-1994) classified it as a class I carcinogen, the only bacterial agent on this list. The aim of the study is to detect and define the role of H.pylori virulence factors and host IL-1 polymorphisms to prevent further gastric cancer. In the future, this combined bacterial/host genotyping may provide an important opportunity to identify patients who are at high risk for the development of gastric carcinoma long before malignancy occurs. Patients and biopsy specimens. Two biopsy specimens and 5ml of blood samples were collected from each of 59 patients who had abdominal complaint, after informed consent was obtained. All patients lived in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, 100% were of Mongolian nationality. Their mean age was 40.33 years (range, 1575 years). One biopsy specimen was used to test urease, and another was stored for molecular testing. DNA isolation from blood and tissue sample was performed with ''Promega'' kit, according to the manufacturer's instruction. Tissue samples were homogenized treated with proteinase K prior to DNA extraction. H. pylori detection and genotyping. For H.pylori, detection was by UreC primer. For virulence gene typing of H.pylori cagA and vacA, gene specific primer were used. Genotyping of IL-1 polymorphisms. IL-1B polymorphisms were distinguished by 2 methods, 5-nuclease PCR assay and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (RFLP). Result. Strain characteristics of H. pylori were investigated in all 59 patients. 66,7% (40/59) and 76,3% (29/36) of the patients were infected with H. pylori by UreC PCR and by urea test, respectively. The vacAs1 genotype was

  18. Specific serum immunoglobulin G to Hpylori and CagA in healthy children and adults (south-east of Iran)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A Jafarzadeh; MT Rezayati; M Nemati

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the serologic IgG response to H pylori and CagA across age groups and in healthy children and adults.METHODS: Totally, 386 children aged 1-15 years and 200 adults aged 20-60 years, were enrolled to study. The serum samples of participant were tested for presence of anti-//pylori and anti-CagA IgG by using ELJSA method.RESULTS: The seroprevalence of H pylori in adults was significantly higher than that observed in children (67.5% vs 46.6%; P < 0.000003). In children, the seropositivity rate in males (51.9%) was significantly (P < 0.05) higher than that observed in females (41.7%). The prevalence of serum anti-CagA antibody was 72.8% and 67.4% in infected children and adults, respectively. The mean titer of serum anti-CagA antibodies was significantly higher among children in comparison to adults (64.1 Uarb/mL vs 30.7; P < 0.03). In infected children and adults the prevalence of serum anti-CagA antibody was higher in males compared to females (78.4% vs 66.3%; P = 0.07 and 75.6% vs 54.71%; P < 0.04, respectively). The age-specific prevalence of anti-H pylori and anti-CagA antibody (in infected subjects) was 37.6% and 59.57% at age 1-5 years, 46.9% and 75% at age 6-10 years, 54.9% and 79.45% at age 11-15, 59.01% and 83.33% at age 20-30 years, 66.6% and 60.52% at age 31-40 years, 73.46% and 63.88% at age 41-50 years and 75.75% and 60% at age 51-60 years with mean titer of anti-CagA antibody of 75.94, 63.32, 57.11, 52.06, 23.62, 21.52 and 21.80 Uarb/mL, respectively. There was significant difference between mean serum anti-CagA antibody in age subgroups (P < 0.001).CONCLUSION: These results showed that anti-//pylori and anti-CagA antibodies were common in the children and adults. The///7y/0//-specific antibodies influenced by age and sex of subjects. Moreover, it seems that males are more susceptible to infection with CagA+ strains compared to females. The seroprevalence of anti-CagA antibody was increased with age, up to 30 years and then decreased. It

  19. Photocatalytic electrosensor for label-free and ultrasensitive detection of BRCA1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Xiaojiao; Xu, Shuxia; Deng, Li; Huang, Rongfu; Zhang, Xinfeng

    2016-11-15

    In this work, we have developed an electrochemical sensor for label-free and ultrasensitive detection of DNA (exemplified by breast cancer 1 gene) by using a photocatalytic reaction. Upon recognition of target DNA, the ethidium bromide molecules which were embedded in the hybridized double strand DNA (dsDNA, target DNA and capture DNA) could photo-catalytically generate singlet oxygen upon green light emitting diode irradiation, leading to an efficient cleave of the dsDNA. As a result, the voltammetry for the [Fe(CN)6](3-/4-) was improved remarkably because of less blocking of electrode and weaker charge repulsion. Such a simple strategy provided an ultrasensitive detection of breast cancer 1 gene down to the attomolar level with a broad linear range (10 aM-100 nM). The sensor is by far the most sensitive electrochemical method for detection of breast cancer 1 gene without an amplification procedure. Also the sensor can discriminate mismatched DNA from perfectly matched target DNA with high selectivity. Therefore, simplicity, high sensitivity and specificity provided by this photocatalytic eletrosensor will make it a promising tool for early diagnosis of gene-related diseases. PMID:27317999

  20. PCR detection of oxytetracycline resistance genes from diverse habitats in total community DNA and in streptomycete isolates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikolakopoulou, T.L.; Egan, S.; Overbeek, van L.S.; Guillaume, G.; Heuer, H.; Wellington, E.M.H.; Elsas, van J.D.; Collard, J.M.; Smalla, K.; Karagouni, A.D.

    2005-01-01

    A range of European habitats was screened by PCR for detection of the oxytetracycline resistance genes otr(A) and otr(B), found in the oxytetracycline-producing strain Streptomyces rimosus. Primers were developed to detect these otr genes in tetracycline-resistant (TcR) streptomycete isolates from e

  1. Detection of p53 gene mutations in bronchial biopsy samples of patients with lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lung cancer is the malignant transformation and expansion of lung tissue. It is the most lethal of all cancers worldwide, responsible for 1.2 million deaths annually. The goal of this study was to detect the p53 gene mutations in lung cancer, in local population of Lahore, Pakistan. These mutations were screened in the bronchial biopsy lung cancer tissue samples. For this purpose microtomed tissue sections were collected. Following DNA extraction from tissue sections, the p53 mutations were detected by amplifying Exon 7 (145 bp) and Exon 8 (152 bp) of the p53 gene. PCR then followed by single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis for screening the p53 gene mutations. This results of SSCP were visualized of silver staining. The results showed different banding pattern indicating the presence of mutation. Majority of the mutations were found in Exon 7. Exon 7 of p53 gene may be the mutation hotspot in lung cancer. In lung cancer, the most prevalent mutations of p53 gene are G -> T transversions; other types of insertions and deletions are also expected, however, the exact nature of mutations in presented work could be confirmed by direct sequencing. (author)

  2. Development of a rapid method for direct detection of tet(M) genes in soil from Danish farmland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agersø, Yvonne; Sengeløv, Gitte; Jensen, Lars Bogø

    2004-01-01

    A method for direct detection of antibiotic resistance genes in soil samples has been developed. The tetracycline resistance gene, tet(M), was used as a model. The method was validated on Danish farmland soil that had repeatedly been treated with pig manure slurry containing resistant bacteria. T...... detection limit of 10(2)-10(3) copies of the tet(M) gene per gram of soil (in a Bacillus cereus group bacterium) was achieved. tet(M) gene was detected in soil samples with the highest prevalence on farmland treated with pig manure slurry....

  3. Detection of Shiga toxins genes by Multiplex PCR in clinical samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Different methods have been used for detection of shiga toxins; such as,  cell culture, ELISA, and RFPLA. However, all of these methods suffer from high cost, time-consumption and relatively low sensitivity. In this study we used Multiplex PCR method for detection of genes encoding shiga toxins. Material and Methods: In this study, 63 clinical samples were obtained from positive cultures of Shigella and E. coli O157, from Bahman 1391 until Ordibehesht 1392 in Mazandaran province. Initial confirmation of shiga toxins producing bacteria was performed by biochemical and serological methods. After DNA extraction, detection of stx1 and stx2 genes was accomplished by multiplex PCR.  For confirmation of the PCR amplicon, DNA sequencing was used. Antibiotic sensitivity tests were performed by disk diffusion method. Results:  Among the positive strains, 13 strains contained stx2 genes, 4 strains contained Stx/Stx1 genes and 4 strains harbored both Stx/Stx1 and Stx2. The DNA extracted from other Gram-negative bacteria was not protected by the relevant parts of these toxins. Sequencing of the amplified fragments indicated the correct toxin sequences.  The sensitivity for identification of Stx/Stx1 gene was 1.56 pg/ µl and for Stx2 was 1.08 pg/µl. The toxin positive strains were all sensitive to Cefixime, Gentamicin, Amikacin, Ceftriaxone, and Nitrofurantoin. Conclusion: This method is fast and accurate for detection of bacteria producing shiga toxin and can be used to identify different types of shiga toxin.

  4. Antibiotic resistance genes detected in the marine sponge Petromica citrina from Brazilian coast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laport, Marinella Silva; Pontes, Paula Veronesi Marinho; Dos Santos, Daniela Silva; Santos-Gandelman, Juliana de Fátima; Muricy, Guilherme; Bauwens, Mathieu; Giambiagi-deMarval, Marcia; George, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    Although antibiotic-resistant pathogens pose a significant threat to human health, the environmental reservoirs of the resistance determinants are still poorly understood. This study reports the detection of resistance genes (ermB, mecA, mupA, qnrA, qnrB and tetL) to antibiotics among certain culturable and unculturable bacteria associated with the marine sponge Petromica citrina. The antimicrobial activities elicited by P. citrina and its associated bacteria are also described. The results indicate that the marine environment could play an important role in the development of antibiotic resistance and the dissemination of resistance genes among bacteria. PMID:27287338

  5. High-throughput Microarray Detection of Vomeronasal Receptor Gene Expression in Rodents

    OpenAIRE

    FlorenciaMarcucci

    2010-01-01

    We performed comprehensive data mining to explore the vomeronasal receptor (V1R & V2R) repertoires in mouse and rat using the mm5 and rn3 genome, respectively. This bioinformatic analysis was followed by investigation of gene expression using a custom designed high-density oligonucleotide array containing all of these receptors and other selected genes of interest. This array enabled us to detect the specific expression of V1R and V2Rs which were previously identified solely based on computa...

  6. High-Throughput Microarray Detection of Vomeronasal Receptor Gene Expression in Rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Xiaohong; Marcucci, Florencia; Firestein, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    We performed comprehensive data mining to explore the vomeronasal receptor (V1R and V2R) repertoires in mouse and rat using the mm5 and rn3 genome, respectively. This bioinformatic analysis was followed by investigation of gene expression using a custom designed high-density oligonucleotide array containing all of these receptors and other selected genes of interest. This array enabled us to detect the specific expression of V1R and V2Rs which were previously identified solely based on comput...

  7. Detection of Tumor Suppressor Gene and Oncogene in SO-Rb_(50) Human Retinoblastoma Cell Line

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1993-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (Rb) is the most common malignant'cancer of eye. So-Rb_(50) is the first Rb cell line established in China in 1988. It has passed to the 387th passage now. We collected cells of the 327th passage of SO-Rb_(50), purified its genomic DNA and detected it with Rb and c-myc cDNA probes respectively (normal human white blood cells DNA was the control). We found the Rb gene was deleted while c-myc gene was amplified three times. This provides a basis for further study of the regulation of tumor ...

  8. Detection of differentially expressed genes and association with clinicopathological features in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Rong Sheng; Shen, Xiaohui; Qian, Xiaoyun; Yu, Chenjie; Wu, Haiyan; Gao, Xia

    2012-12-01

    Head and neck cancer is a significant health problem worldwide. Early detection and prediction of prognosis will improve patient survival and quality of life. The aim of this study was to identify genes differentially expressed between laryngeal cancer and the corresponding normal tissues as potential biomarkers. A total of 36 patients with laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma were recruited. Four of these cases were randomly selected for cDNA microarray analysis of the entire genome. Using semi-quantitative RT-PCR and western blot analysis, the differential expression of genes and their protein products, respectively, between laryngeal cancer tissues and corresponding adjacent normal tissues was verified in the remaining 32 cases. The expression levels of these genes and proteins were investigated for associations with clinicopathological parameters taken from patient data. The cDNA microarray analysis identified 349 differentially expressed genes between tumor and normal tissues, 112 of which were upregulated and 237 were downregulated in tumors. Seven genes and their protein products were then selected for validation using RT-PCR and western blot analysis, respectively. The data demonstrated that the expression of SENP1, CD109, CKS2, LAMA3, ITGAV and ITGB8 was increased, while LAMA2 was downregulated in laryngeal cancer compared with the corresponding normal tissues. Associations between the expression of these genes and clinicopathological data from the patients were also established, including age, tumor classification, stage, differentiation and lymph node metastasis. Our current study provides the first evidence that these seven genes may be differentially expressed in laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma and also associated with clinicopathological data. Future study is required to further confirm whether detection of their expression can be used as biomarkers for prediction of patient survival or potential treatment targets. PMID:23226807

  9. Expression detection and par-tial cloning of porcine leptin receptor (OBR) gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The product of the obesity gene, called leptin, is an important regulator of adiposity, which mainly functions via its regulation of feed intake and energy metabolism. Both obesity gene (ob gene) and leptin receptor gene (OBR gene) are thought to play a major role in controlling of body fat mass as well as body weight. The result of RT-PCR shows that levels of pig OBR mRNA are higher in hypothalamus, lung and liver, and lower expression can be detected in other tissues. Total RNA purified from 11 different organs and tissues have been hybridized with pig OBR cDNA probes. The hybridization signals are shown in 7 organs and tissues. 4.1 and 3.8 kb bands were observed from hypothalamus, whereas 3.8 and 3.5 kb bands were observed in other tissues instead. The nearly complete sequence of the extracellular domain of pig OBR gene was obtained. The homology of sequence is 89.2% between pig and human, 80.3% between pig and mouse. Alignment of the predicted amino acid se-quence of OBR in pig, human and mouse shows that the overall identity is 86.5% between pig and human, 76.6% between pig and mouse. Two WSXWS motifs were found at aa313 and aa616.

  10. Detection of Luminous Vibrio harveyi in Penaeid Shrimp Through Nested PCR Using Haemolysin Gene Primer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wawan Abdullah Setiawan

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Whiteleg shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei is one of the most important aquaculture commodity in Indonesia. However, the luminous disease primarily caused by Vibrio harveyi bacteria still becomes an obstacle in penaeid shrimp farming, especially in shrimp hatchery. This study was aimed to identify the presence of V. harveyi in L. vannamei through nested PCR using haemolysin gene primer. First, initial primers were designed using V. harveyi VIB 391 haemolysin gene sequence (accession number: DQ640264, flanking the position 133 to 756. This primer pairs were used to identify haemolysin gene in both V. harveyi MR5339 and V. harveyi 275 strain. Sequencing results from each sample showed 99% similarity with haemolysin gene sequence in Genebank. Furthermore, the sequence of V. harveyi MR5339 haemolysin gene was used to design the nested PCR primers. The first primer pairs of nested PCR have successfully amplified the haemolysin gene fragment of all V. harveyi strains samples from position 52 to 405. The second primer pairs of nested PCR have amplified position 204 to 405 where it can detect all of V. harveyi strains used as sample sources in this study. The application of nested PCR technique in this study was able to identify V. harveyi strains at serial dilution of cells density as low as 100 cfu/mL, which is equal to a single cell or at DNA concentration up to 101 fg/µL.

  11. Statistical methods in detecting differential expressed genes, analyzing insertion tolerance for genes and group selection for survival data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fangfang

    The thesis is composed of three independent projects: (i) analyzing transposon-sequencing data to infer functions of genes on bacteria growth (chapter 2), (ii) developing semi-parametric Bayesian method for differential gene expression analysis with RNA-sequencing data (chapter 3), (iii) solving group selection problem for survival data (chapter 4). All projects are motivated by statistical challenges raised in biological research. The first project is motivated by the need to develop statistical models to accommodate the transposon insertion sequencing (Tn-Seq) data, Tn-Seq data consist of sequence reads around each transposon insertion site. The detection of transposon insertion at a given site indicates that the disruption of genomic sequence at this site does not cause essential function loss and the bacteria can still grow. Hence, such measurements have been used to infer the functions of each gene on bacteria growth. We propose a zero-inflated Poisson regression method for analyzing the Tn-Seq count data, and derive an Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm to obtain parameter estimates. We also propose a multiple testing procedure that categorizes genes into each of the three states, hypo-tolerant, tolerant, and hyper-tolerant, while controlling false discovery rate. Simulation studies show our method provides good estimation of model parameters and inference on gene functions. In the second project, we model the count data from RNA-sequencing experiment for each gene using a Poisson-Gamma hierarchical model, or equivalently, a negative binomial (NB) model. We derive a full semi-parametric Bayesian approach with Dirichlet process as the prior for the fold changes between two treatment means. An inference strategy using Gibbs algorithm is developed for differential expression analysis. We evaluate our method with several simulation studies, and the results demonstrate that our method outperforms other methods including the popularly applied ones such as edge

  12. Evaluation of Four Endogenous Reference Genes and Their Real-Time PCR Assays for Common Wheat Quantification in GMOs Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Huali; Cheng, Fang; Wang, Ruoan; Zhang, Dabing; Yang, Litao

    2013-01-01

    Proper selection of endogenous reference genes and their real-time PCR assays is quite important in genetically modified organisms (GMOs) detection. To find a suitable endogenous reference gene and its real-time PCR assay for common wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.) DNA content or copy number quantification, four previously reported wheat endogenous reference genes and their real-time PCR assays were comprehensively evaluated for the target gene sequence variation and their real-time PCR performa...

  13. Sensitivity of the Pig-a assay for detecting gene mutation in rats exposed acutely to strong clastogens

    OpenAIRE

    Bhalli, Javed A.; Shaddock, Joseph G.; Pearce, Mason G.; Dobrovolsky, Vasily N.

    2013-01-01

    Clastogens are potential human carcinogens whose detection by genotoxicity assays is important for safety assessment. Although some endogenous genes are sensitive to the mutagenicity of clastogens, many genes that are used as reporters for in vivo mutation (e.g. transgenes) are not. In this study, we have compared responses in the erythrocyte Pig-a gene mutation assay with responses in a gene mutation assay that is relatively sensitive to clastogens, the lymphocyte Hprt assay, and in the reti...

  14. Rapid Detection of blaKPC Carbapenemase Genes by Real-Time PCR▿

    OpenAIRE

    Hindiyeh, Musa; Smollen, Gill; Grossman, Zehava; Ram, Daniela; Davidson, Yehudit; Mileguir, Fernando; Vax, Marina; Ben David, Debbie; Tal, Ilana; Rahav, Galia; Shamiss, Ari; Mendelson, Ella; Keller, Nathan

    2008-01-01

    Carbapenem resistance among Enterobacteriaceae is an emerging problem worldwide. Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (blaKPC) enzymes are among the most common β-lactamases described. In this study, we report the development and validation of a real-time PCR (q-PCR) assay for the detection of blaKPC genes using TaqMan chemistry. The q-PCR amplification of blaKPC DNA was linear over 7 log dilutions (r2 = 0.999; slope, 3.54), and the amplification efficiency was 91.6%. The q-PCR detection limit...

  15. Real-Time PCR for Detection of NDM-1 Carbapenemase Genes from Spiked Stool Samples▿

    OpenAIRE

    Naas, Thierry; Ergani, Ayla; Carrër, Amélie; Nordmann, Patrice

    2011-01-01

    An in-house quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay using TaqMan chemistry has been developed to detect NDM-1 carbapenemase genes from bacterial isolates and directly from stool samples. The qPCR amplification of blaNDM-1 DNA was linear over 10 log dilutions (r2 = 0.99), and the amplification efficiency was 1.03. The qPCR detection limit was reproducibly 1 CFU, or 10 plasmid molecules, and there was no cross-reaction with DNA extracted from several multidrug-resistant bacteria harboring other...

  16. A multiplex PCR for detection of genes encoding exfoliative toxins from Staphylococcus hyicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Lars Ole; Ahrens, Peter

    2004-01-01

    : A multiplex PCR employing specific primers for each of the genes encoding four different exfoliative toxins was developed and evaluated using a collection of Staph. hyicus with known toxin type and a number of other staphylococcal species. A total of 314 Staph. hyicus isolates from pigs with EE were......Aims: To develop a multiplex PCR for detection of genes encoding the exfoliative toxins ExhA, ExhB, ExhC and ExhD from Staphylococcus hyicus and to estimate the prevalence of exfoliative toxins among Staph. hyicus isolates from Danish pig herds with exudative epidermitis (EE). Methods and Results...... screened by multiplex PCR and the combined results of the present and previous investigations showed that ExhA, ExhB, ExhC and ExhD was found in 20, 33, 18 and 22%, respectively, of 60 cases of EE investigated. Conclusions: This study has provided a new tool for detection of toxigenic Staph. hyicus and a...

  17. Array CGH improves detection of mutations in the GALC gene associated with Krabbe disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanner Alice K

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Krabbe disease is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage disorder caused by mutations in the GALC gene. The most common mutation in the Caucasian population is a 30-kb deletion of exons 11 through 17. There are few other reports of intragenic GALC deletions or duplications, due in part to difficulties detecting them. Methods and results We used gene-targeted array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH to analyze the GALC gene in individuals with Krabbe disease in whom sequence analysis with 30-kb deletion analysis identified only one mutation. In our sample of 33 cases, traditional approaches failed to identify two pathogenic mutations in five (15.2% individuals with confirmed Krabbe disease. The addition of array CGH deletion/duplication analysis to the genetic testing strategy led to the identification of a second pathogenic mutation in three (9.1% of these five individuals. In all three cases, the deletion or duplication identified through array CGH was a novel GALC mutation, including the only reported duplication in the GALC gene, which would have been missed by traditional testing methodologies. We report these three cases in detail. The second mutation remains unknown in the remaining two individuals (6.1%, despite our full battery of testing. Conclusions Analysis of the GALC gene using array CGH deletion/duplication testing increased the two-mutation detection rate from 84.8% to 93.9% in affected individuals. Better mutation detection rates are important for improving molecular diagnosis of Krabbe disease, as well as for providing prenatal and carrier testing in family members.

  18. Bioaerosol emissions and detection of airborne antibiotic resistance genes from a wastewater treatment plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zhou, Liantong; Zhang, Xiangyu; Xu, Caijia; Dong, Liming; Yao, Maosheng

    2016-01-01

    Air samples from twelve sampling sites (including seven intra-plant sites, one upwind site and four downwind sites) from a wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) in Beijing were collected using a Reuter Centrifugal Sampler High Flow (RCS); and their microbial fractions were studied using culturing and high throughput gene sequence. In addition, the viable (fluorescent) bioaerosol concentrations for 7 intra-plant sites were also monitored for 30 min each using an ultraviolet aerodynamic particle sizer (UV-APS). Both air and water samples collected from the plant were investigated for possible bacterial antibiotic resistance genes and integrons using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) coupled with gel electrophoresis. The results showed that the air near sludge thickening basin was detected to have the highest level of culturable bacterial aerosols (up to 1697 CFU/m3) and fungal aerosols (up to 930 CFU/m3). For most sampling sites, fluorescent peaks were observed at around 3-4 μm, except the office building with a peak at 1.5 μm, with a number concentration level up to 1233-6533 Particles/m3. About 300 unique bacterial species, including human opportunistic pathogens, such as Comamonas Testosteroni and Moraxella Osloensis, were detected from the air samples collected over the biological reaction basin. In addition, we have detected the sul2 gene resistant to cotrimoxazole (also known as septra, bactrim and TMP-SMX) and class 1 integrase gene from the air samples collected from the screen room and the biological reaction basin. Overall, the screen room, sludge thickening basin and biological reaction basin imposed significant microbial exposure risks, including those from airborne antibiotic resistance genes.

  19. Automated type specific ELISA probe detection of amplified NS3 gene products of dengue viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Chow, V T; Yong, R Y; Ngoh, B L; Chan, Y. C.

    1997-01-01

    AIM: To apply an automated system of nucleic acid hybridisation coupled with the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the type specific detection of amplification products of dengue viruses. METHODS: Non-structural 3 (NS3) gene targets of reference strains of all four dengue and other flaviviruses, as well as dengue patient viraemic sera, were subjected to reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction using consensus and dengue type specific primers and digoxigenin-11-dUTP labe...

  20. Detection of biomarkers for Hepatocellular Carcinoma using a hybrid univariate gene selection methods

    OpenAIRE

    Abdel Samee Nagwan M; Solouma Nahed H; Kadah Yasser M

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Discovering new biomarkers has a great role in improving early diagnosis of Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The experimental determination of biomarkers needs a lot of time and money. This motivates this work to use in-silico prediction of biomarkers to reduce the number of experiments required for detecting new ones. This is achieved by extracting the most representative genes in microarrays of HCC. Results In this work, we provide a method for extracting the differential...

  1. Rapid Detection of Positive Selection in Genes and Genomes Through Variation Clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Positive selection in genes and genomes can point to the evolutionary basis for differences among species and among races within a species. The detection of positive selection can also help identify functionally important protein regions and thus guide protein engineering. Many existing tests for positive selection are excessively conservative, vulnerable to artifacts caused by demographic population history, or computationally very intensive. I here propose a simple and rapid test that is co...

  2. Molecular identification and detection of virulence genes among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from different infectious origins

    OpenAIRE

    Vajiheh Sadat Nikbin; Mohammad Mehdi Aslani; Marjan Hashemipour; Zeinab Sharafi; Fereshteh Shahcheraghi; Gholamhossein Ebrahimipour

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Pseudomonas aeruginosa possesses a variety of virulence factors that may contribute to its pathogenicity. The aim of this study was to evaluate oprI, oprL and toxA genes for PCR identification of clinical P. aeruginosa. In order to find out any relation between special virulence factors and special manifestation of P. aeruginosa infections, we detected virulence factors among these isolates by PCR. Ribotyping was used to evaluate the clonal relationship between stra...

  3. PCR detection of retinoblastoma gene deletions in radiation-induced mouse lung adenocarcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1971--1986, Argonne National Laboratory conducted a series of large-scale studies of tumor incidence in 40,000 BCF1 mice irradiated with 60Co γ-rays or JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used to detect deletions in the mouse retinoblastoma (mRb) gene. Six mRb gene exon fragments were amplified in a 40-cycle, 3-temperature PCR protocol. Absence of any of these fragments on a Southern blot indicated a deletion of that portion of the mRb gene. Tumors chosen for analysis were lung adenocarcinomas that were judged to be the cause of death in post-mortem analyses. Spontaneous tumors as well as those from irradiated mice were analyzed for mRb deletions. In all normal mouse tissues studies all six mRb exon fragments were present on Southern blots. Tumors in six neutron-irradiated mice also had no mRb deletions. However, 1 of 6 tumors from γ-irradiated mice and 6 of 18 spontaneous tumors from unirradiated mice showed a deletion in one or both mRb alleles. All deletions detected were in the 5' region of the mRb gene

  4. GPNN: Power studies and applications of a neural network method for detecting gene-gene interactions in studies of human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mellick George

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The identification and characterization of genes that influence the risk of common, complex multifactorial disease primarily through interactions with other genes and environmental factors remains a statistical and computational challenge in genetic epidemiology. We have previously introduced a genetic programming optimized neural network (GPNN as a method for optimizing the architecture of a neural network to improve the identification of gene combinations associated with disease risk. The goal of this study was to evaluate the power of GPNN for identifying high-order gene-gene interactions. We were also interested in applying GPNN to a real data analysis in Parkinson's disease. Results We show that GPNN has high power to detect even relatively small genetic effects (2–3% heritability in simulated data models involving two and three locus interactions. The limits of detection were reached under conditions with very small heritability (DLST gene and sex. Conclusion These results indicate that GPNN may be a useful pattern recognition approach for detecting gene-gene and gene-environment interactions.

  5. Rapid detection of ermB gene in Clostridium difficile by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Minyi; Liu, Wei; Wang, Pu; Tan, Jiasheng; Zhou, Youlian; Wu, Peiqun; Zhang, Ting; Yuan, Jing; Chen, Ye

    2015-08-01

    Macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance in Clostridium difficile is mostly due to the ermB resistance determinant. Here, we describe a sensitive and rapid molecular method to detect ermB in C. difficile to contribute to the wider epidemiological study. Five sets of loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) primers were designed and optimized for rapid detection of ermB. The specificity and sensitivity of the primers for ermB were detected, and the ermB LAMP assay was compared to conventional PCR with 80 clinical isolates of C. difficile. Real-time monitoring of turbidity and chromogenic reaction were used to determine negative and positive results. A total of 26 pathogenic bacterial strains of different species were found to be negative for ermB, which indicated the high specificity of the primers. ermB was detected in 78.8 % (63/80) of the clinical isolates by both LAMP and conventional PCR. The detection limit of LAMP was 36.1  pg DNA μl- 1 and its sensitivity was 10-fold greater than that of conventional PCR. This study is the first report regarding the development and application of the LAMP assay for detection of the ermB gene in C. difficile strains. The developed LAMP method is sensitive, specific and provides a user-friendly visual approach for the rapid detection of ermB-bearing C. difficile. PMID:26272634

  6. Detection and Characterizations of Genes Resistant to Tetracycline and Sulfa among the Bacteria in Mariculture Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, L.; Li, Y.; Zhu, P.

    2013-12-01

    One hundred and thirty-five bacteria from maricultural environments were tested for sensitivity to tetracycline and sulfa. Result show that 72% of the bacteria were sulfa-resistant, 36% of the bacteria were tetracycline-resistant, and 16.5% of bacteria showed resistance to both tetracyclines and sulfa ,indicating that the proportion of sulfa and tetracycline resistance bacteria isvery large in the maricultural environments. PCR methods were used to detect if these resistant bacteria carry tetracycline and sulfa resistance genes. Out of the 33 tetracycline-resistant bacteria screened, 3 were positive for tetA, 6 were positive for tetB and no isolate wasboth positive for tetA and tetB. Of the 97 sulfa-resistant bacteria screened, 9 were positive for sul2, 6 were positive for sul1, 1 isolate was positive for bothsul1 and sul2. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of tetracycline for tetA-carrying isolates were higher than those tetB-carrying isolates.while The MIC of sulfa for sul2-carrying isolates were higher than those sul1-carrying isolates. Indicating that tetA and sul2 gene may play ubknown roles in resisting tetracycline and sulfa than tetB and sul1 genes. The results showed the 4 kinds of genes (tetA,tetB,sul1,sul2) has no host specificity. All these 16S sequence are from the isolates which are positive for the above genes, it indicated the above antibiotic resistance genes are widespread in the environment regardless of the host. While the DNA sequence of these four genes showed tetA, sul1, sul2 genes are conservative in different bacteria , etB gene conserved poorly. The research aim is to get a preliminary understanding of resistance mechanism related to the resistant bacteria and the resistance genes in marine aquaculture environment through the analysis of resistant genes, providing research base for the prevention and treatment of drug-resistant bacteria so as to reduce the threat to the ecological environment, aquaculture and human health.

  7. Development of a dot blot assay using gene probes for the detection of enteroviruses in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enteric viruses are viruses which replicate in the intestinal tract of man and animals. One mode of transmission for enteric viruses is the fecal-oral route. Drinking water which has been contaminated with sewage or sewage effluent has been implicated as a means for the spread of enteric viruses. Current methods for the detection of enteric viruses in water requires the use of animal cell culture. This technique has several drawbacks. More rapid techniques, such as fluorescent antibody or radioimmunoassay do not have the needed sensitivity to detect the low levels of virus found in contaminated water. An alternative technique for the detection of viruses in water was sought. Recent advances in recombinant DNA technology now makes it possible to detect viruses without the use of cell culture or antibodies. Gene probes that hybridize to the RNA of poliovirus and hepatitis A virus were tested for their ability to detect different enteric viruses. The probes were labeled with 32P dCTP and 32P dATP to a specific activity greater then 1.0 x 109 cpm/ug DNA. One infectious unit of poliovirus and hepatitis A virus was detected using labeled cDNA probes. Upon comparison, the dot blot assay was as sensitive as tissue culture for the detection of poliovirus in beef extract, secondary effluent, and tap water. Environmental samples, such as secondary effluent, reclaimed wastewater and unchlorinated drinking water were also assayed for poliovirus and hepatitis A virus with the use of gene probes. The results presented here offer an alternative method for screening water samples for the presence of enteric viruses

  8. Double-hairpin molecular-beacon-based amplification detection for gene diagnosis linked to cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Huo; Zhang, Rongbo; Li, Feng; Zhou, Yingying; Peng, Ting; Wang, Xuedong; Shen, Zhifa

    2016-09-01

    A powerful double-hairpin molecular beacon (DHMB) was developed for cancer-related KRAS gene detection based on the one-to-two stoichiometry. During target DNA detection, DHMB can execute signal transduction even if no any exogenous element is involved. Unlike the conventional molecular beacon based on the one-to-one interaction, one target DNA not only hybridizes with one DHMB and opens its hairpin but also promotes the interaction between two DHMBs, causing the separation of two fluorophores from quenchers. This leads to an enhanced fluorescence signal. As a result, the target KRAS gene is able to be detected within a wide dynamic range from 0.05 to 200 nM with the detection limit of 50 pM, indicating a dramatic improvement compared with traditional molecular beacons. Moreover, the point mutations existing in target DNAs can be easily screened. The potential application for target species in real samples was indicated by the analysis of PCR amplicons of DNAs from the DNA extracted from SW620 cell. Besides becoming a promising candidate probe for molecular biology research and clinical diagnosis of genetic diseases, the DHMB is expected to provide a significant insight into the design of DNA probe-based homogenous sensing systems. Graphical Abstract A powerful double-hairpin molecular beacon (DHMB) was developed for cancer-related gene KRAS detection based on the one-to-two stoichiometry. Without the help of any exogenous probe, the point mutation is easily screened, and the target DNA can be quantified down to 50 pM, indicating a dramatic improvement compared with traditional molecular beacons. PMID:27422649

  9. On the importance of developing a new generation of breath tests for Helicobacter pylori detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushch, Ievgeniia; Korenev, Nikolai; Kamarchuk, Lyudmila; Pospelov, Alexander; Kravchenko, Andrey; Bajenov, Leonid; Kabulov, Mels; Amann, Anton; Kamarchuk, Gennadii

    2015-12-01

    State-of-the-art methods for non-invasive detection of the Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection have been considered. A reported global tendency towards a non-decreasing prevalence of H. pylori worldwide could be co-influenced by the functional limitations of urea breath tests (UBTs), currently preferred for the non-invasive recognition of H. pylori in a clinical setting. Namely, the UBTs can demonstrate false-positive or false-negative results. Within this context, limitations of conventional clinically exploited H. pylori tests have been discussed to justify the existing need for the development of a new generation of breath tests for the detection of H. pylori and the differentiation of pathogenic and non-pathogenic strains of the bacterium. This paper presents the results of a pilot clinical study aimed at evaluating the development and diagnostic potential of a new method based on the detection of the non-urease products of H. pylori vital activity in exhaled gas. The characteristics of breath of adolescents with H. pylori-positive and H. pylori-negative functional dyspepsia, together with a consideration of the cytotoxin-associated gene A (CagA) status of H. pylori-positive subjects, have been determined for the first time using innovative point-contact nanosensor devices based on salts of the organic conductor tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ). The clinical and diagnostic relevance of the response curves of the point-contact sensors was assessed. It was found that the recovery time of the point-contact sensors has a diagnostic value for differentiation of the H. pylori-associated peptic ulcer disease. The diagnostically significant elongation of the recovery time was even more pronounced in patients infected with CagA-positive H. pylori strains compared to the CagA-negative patients. Taking into account the operation of the point-contact sensors in the real-time mode, the obtained results are essential prerequisites for the development of a fast and

  10. Associação entre cagA e alelos do vacA de Helicobacter pylori e úlcera duodenal em crianças no Brasil VacA alleles, cagA, and duodenal ulcer in children in Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Abdussalam Ali Ramadam Ashour; Valquíria Ribeiro de Gusmão; Paula Prazeres Magalhães; Guilherme Birchal Collares; Edilberto Nogueira Mendes; Dulciene Maria de Magalhães Queiroz; Gifone Aguiar Rocha; Andreia Maria Camargos Rocha; Anfrisina Sales Teles Carvalho

    2002-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori é o principal agente de gastrite em seres humanos e fator de risco para úlcera péptica e câncer gástrico. A evolução da infecção está relacionada a diversos fatores, inclusive bacterianos, como presença de cagA e genótipo s1-m1 do vacA, associados com o desenvolvimento de úlcera e adenocarcinoma gástrico. O objetivo deste estudo foi investigar a associação entre cagA e alelos do vacA em H. pylori isolado de crianças e relacionar os achados com a doença apresentada pelo pac...

  11. Detection of gene communities in multi-networks reveals cancer drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantini, Laura; Medico, Enzo; Fortunato, Santo; Caselle, Michele

    2015-12-01

    We propose a new multi-network-based strategy to integrate different layers of genomic information and use them in a coordinate way to identify driving cancer genes. The multi-networks that we consider combine transcription factor co-targeting, microRNA co-targeting, protein-protein interaction and gene co-expression networks. The rationale behind this choice is that gene co-expression and protein-protein interactions require a tight coregulation of the partners and that such a fine tuned regulation can be obtained only combining both the transcriptional and post-transcriptional layers of regulation. To extract the relevant biological information from the multi-network we studied its partition into communities. To this end we applied a consensus clustering algorithm based on state of art community detection methods. Even if our procedure is valid in principle for any pathology in this work we concentrate on gastric, lung, pancreas and colorectal cancer and identified from the enrichment analysis of the multi-network communities a set of candidate driver cancer genes. Some of them were already known oncogenes while a few are new. The combination of the different layers of information allowed us to extract from the multi-network indications on the regulatory pattern and functional role of both the already known and the new candidate driver genes.

  12. Detecting coordinated regulation of multi-protein complexes using logic analysis of gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeates Todd O

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many of the functional units in cells are multi-protein complexes such as RNA polymerase, the ribosome, and the proteasome. For such units to work together, one might expect a high level of regulation to enable co-appearance or repression of sets of complexes at the required time. However, this type of coordinated regulation between whole complexes is difficult to detect by existing methods for analyzing mRNA co-expression. We propose a new methodology that is able to detect such higher order relationships. Results We detect coordinated regulation of multiple protein complexes using logic analysis of gene expression data. Specifically, we identify gene triplets composed of genes whose expression profiles are found to be related by various types of logic functions. In order to focus on complexes, we associate the members of a gene triplet with the distinct protein complexes to which they belong. In this way, we identify complexes related by specific kinds of regulatory relationships. For example, we may find that the transcription of complex C is increased only if the transcription of both complex A AND complex B is repressed. We identify hundreds of examples of coordinated regulation among complexes under various stress conditions. Many of these examples involve the ribosome. Some of our examples have been previously identified in the literature, while others are novel. One notable example is the relationship between the transcription of the ribosome, RNA polymerase and mannosyltransferase II, which is involved in N-linked glycan processing in the Golgi. Conclusions The analysis proposed here focuses on relationships among triplets of genes that are not evident when genes are examined in a pairwise fashion as in typical clustering methods. By grouping gene triplets, we are able to decipher coordinated regulation among sets of three complexes. Moreover, using all triplets that involve coordinated regulation with the ribosome

  13. Molecular identification and detection of virulence genes among Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from different infectious origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vajiheh Sadat Nikbin

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Pseudomonas aeruginosa possesses a variety of virulence factors that may contribute to its pathogenicity. The aim of this study was to rapid identification of clinical P. aeruginosa based on PCR amplification oprI and oprL. In order to find out any relation between special virulence factors and special manifestation of P. aeruginosa infections we detected virulence factors among these isolates by PCR. Ribotyping was used to evaluate the clonal relationship between strains with the same genetic patterns of the genes studied.Material and Methods: In this study, 268 isolates of P. aeruginosa were recovered from burn, wound and pulmonary tract infections. PCR of oprI, oprL, toxA, lasB, exoS and nan1 genes was performed. One hundred and four isolates were selected randomly to investigate clonal diversity of the isolates using ribotyping using SmaI.Results and Conclusions: All P. aeruginosa isolates in this study carried oprI, oprL and lasB genes. Difference between exoS prevalence in isolates from pulmonary tract and burn or wound isolates was statistically significant (P<0.05. Prevalence of nan1 and toxA gene was significantly higher in burn and pulmonary tract isolates, respectively. Ribotyping showed that Most of the isolates (87% belonged to clone A and B.PCR of oprI, oprL and toxA genes is recommended for molecular identification of P. aeruginosa. Determination of different virulence genes of P. aeruginosa isolates suggests that they are associated with different levels of intrinsic virulence and pathogenicity. Ribotyping showed that strains with similar virulence genes don’t necessarily have similar ribotype patterns.

  14. Heat-transfer-based detection of SNPs in the PAH gene of PKU patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanden Bon, Natalie; van Grinsven, Bart; Murib, Mohammed Sharif; Yeap, Weng Siang; Haenen, Ken; De Ceuninck, Ward; Wagner, Patrick; Ameloot, Marcel; Vermeeren, Veronique; Michiels, Luc

    2014-01-01

    Conventional neonatal diagnosis of phenylketonuria is based on the presence of abnormal levels of phenylalanine in the blood. However, for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis, direct detection of disease-correlated mutations is needed. To speed up and simplify mutation screening in genes, new technologies are developed. In this study, a heat-transfer method is evaluated as a mutation-detection technology in entire exons of the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH) gene. This method is based on the change in heat-transfer resistance (R(th)) upon thermal denaturation of dsDNA (double-stranded DNA) on nanocrystalline diamond. First, ssDNA (single-stranded DNA) fragments that span the size range of the PAH exons were successfully immobilized on nanocrystalline diamond. Next, it was studied whether an R(th) change could be observed during the thermal denaturation of these DNA fragments after hybridization to their complementary counterpart. A clear R(th) shift during the denaturation of exon 5, exon 9, and exon 12 dsDNA was observed, corresponding to lengths of up to 123 bp. Finally, R(th) was shown to detect prevalent single-nucleotide polymorphisms, c.473G>A (R158Q), c.932T>C (p.L311P), and c.1222C>T (R408W), correlated with phenylketonuria, displaying an effect related to the different melting temperatures of homoduplexes and heteroduplexes. PMID:24741310

  15. Detection of BRAF Gene Mutation in Preoperative Diagnostic of Thyroid Gland Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Yu Semyonov

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To assess the utility of BRAFV600E mutation detection in preoperative thyroid cancer diagnostic. Material and methods: We studied 46 aspirates taken by FNA from patients with thyroid gland nodes. Thyroid tissue aspirates DNA was extracted by sorbent method. BRAF gene mutation was analyzed with primers specific for wild and mutant gen type by RT-PCR. Results: All patients were divided into three groups by cytological conclusions: colloid nodules (9, PTC (19, and suspicious for malignancy (18. In the group of patients with PTC all diagnoses were confirmed by histology, and BRAF gene mutation was detected in 15 (79% FNAB specimens. In the group with suspicious cytological diagnosis only one patient had follicular cancer by histology and positive BRAF mutation. There were detected no BRAF mutation in 16 patients with histologically proven follicular adenoma, in 9 patients with colloid nodular goiter and in one patient with follicular cancer. Thereby, we received the following criteria valuers of method’s reliability: sensitivity – 76%, specificity – 100%, diagnostic accuracy – 89%. Conclusions: Detection of the BRAFV600E mutation may be a useful adjunct marker for preoperative diagnostic of thyroid gland cancer.

  16. A resampling-based meta-analysis for detection of differential gene expression in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    proposed meta-analysis approach has the ability to detect a set of differentially expressed genes with the least amount of within-group variability, thus providing highly stable gene lists for class prediction. Increased statistical power and stringent filtering criteria used in the present study also make identification of novel candidate genes possible and may provide further insight to improve our understanding of breast cancer development

  17. A resampling-based meta-analysis for detection of differential gene expression in breast cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ergul Gulusan

    2008-12-01

    -time qRT-PCR supported the meta-analysis results. Conclusion The proposed meta-analysis approach has the ability to detect a set of differentially expressed genes with the least amount of within-group variability, thus providing highly stable gene lists for class prediction. Increased statistical power and stringent filtering criteria used in the present study also make identification of novel candidate genes possible and may provide further insight to improve our understanding of breast cancer development.

  18. Molecular analysis of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene in Spanish individuals: Deletion detection and familial diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patino, A.; Garcia-Delgado, M.; Narbona, J. [Univ. of Navarra, Pamplona (Spain)

    1995-11-06

    Deletion studies were performed in 26 Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients through amplification of nine different exons by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). DNA from paraffin-embedded muscle biopsies was analyzed in 12 of the 26 patients studied. Optimization of this technique is of great utility because it enables analysis of material stored in pathology archives. PCR deletion detection, useful in DMD-affected boys, is problematic in determining the carrier state in female relatives. For this reason, to perform familial linkage diagnosis, we made use of a dinucleotide repeat polymorphism (STRP, or short tandem repeat polymorphism) located in intron 49 of the gene. We designed a new pair of primers that enabled the detection of 22 different alleles in relatives in the 14 DMD families studied. The use of this marker allowed familial diagnosis in 11 of the 14 DMD families and detection of de novo deletions in 3 of the probands. 8 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Detection of virulence genes in Malaysian Shigella species by multiplex PCR assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puthucheary SD

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Malaysia, Shigella spp. was reported to be the third commonest bacterial agent responsible for childhood diarrhoea. Currently, isolation of the bacterium and confirmation of the disease by microbiological and biochemical methods remain as the "gold standard". This study aimed to detect the prevalence of four Shigella virulence genes present concurrently, in randomly selected Malaysian strains via a rapid multiplex PCR (mPCR assay. Methods A mPCR assay was designed for the simultaneous detection of chromosomal- and plasmid-encoded virulence genes (set1A, set1B, ial and ipaH in Shigella spp. One hundred and ten Malaysian strains (1997–2000 isolated from patients from various government hospitals were used. Reproducibility and sensitivity of the assay were also evaluated. Applicability of the mPCR in clinical settings was tested with spiked faeces following preincubation in brain heart infusion (BHI broth. Results The ipaH sequence was present in all the strains, while each of the set1A, set1B and ial gene was present in 40% of the strains tested. Reproducibility of the mPCR assay was 100% and none of the non-Shigella pathogens tested in this study were amplified. The mPCR could detect 100 colony-forming units (cfu of shigellae per reaction mixture in spiked faeces following preincubation. Conclusions The mPCR system is reproducible, sensitive and is able to identify pathogenic strains of shigellae irrespective of the locality of the virulence genes. It can be easily performed with a high throughput to give a presumptive identification of the causal pathogen.

  20. Detecting Protein Complexes in Protein Interaction Networks Modeled as Gene Expression Biclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Eileen Marie; Zaki, Nazar; Amin, Amr

    2015-01-01

    Developing suitable methods for the detection of protein complexes in protein interaction networks continues to be an intriguing area of research. The importance of this objective originates from the fact that protein complexes are key players in most cellular processes. The more complexes we identify, the better we can understand normal as well as abnormal molecular events. Up till now, various computational methods were designed for this purpose. However, despite their notable performance, questions arise regarding potential ways to improve them, in addition to ameliorative guidelines to introduce novel approaches. A close interpretation leads to the assent that the way in which protein interaction networks are initially viewed should be adjusted. These networks are dynamic in reality and it is necessary to consider this fact to enhance the detection of protein complexes. In this paper, we present "DyCluster", a framework to model the dynamic aspect of protein interaction networks by incorporating gene expression data, through biclustering techniques, prior to applying complex-detection algorithms. The experimental results show that DyCluster leads to higher numbers of correctly-detected complexes with better evaluation scores. The high accuracy achieved by DyCluster in detecting protein complexes is a valid argument in favor of the proposed method. DyCluster is also able to detect biologically meaningful protein groups. The code and datasets used in the study are downloadable from https://github.com/emhanna/DyCluster. PMID:26641660

  1. Detecting Protein Complexes in Protein Interaction Networks Modeled as Gene Expression Biclusters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eileen Marie Hanna

    Full Text Available Developing suitable methods for the detection of protein complexes in protein interaction networks continues to be an intriguing area of research. The importance of this objective originates from the fact that protein complexes are key players in most cellular processes. The more complexes we identify, the better we can understand normal as well as abnormal molecular events. Up till now, various computational methods were designed for this purpose. However, despite their notable performance, questions arise regarding potential ways to improve them, in addition to ameliorative guidelines to introduce novel approaches. A close interpretation leads to the assent that the way in which protein interaction networks are initially viewed should be adjusted. These networks are dynamic in reality and it is necessary to consider this fact to enhance the detection of protein complexes. In this paper, we present "DyCluster", a framework to model the dynamic aspect of protein interaction networks by incorporating gene expression data, through biclustering techniques, prior to applying complex-detection algorithms. The experimental results show that DyCluster leads to higher numbers of correctly-detected complexes with better evaluation scores. The high accuracy achieved by DyCluster in detecting protein complexes is a valid argument in favor of the proposed method. DyCluster is also able to detect biologically meaningful protein groups. The code and datasets used in the study are downloadable from https://github.com/emhanna/DyCluster.

  2. Detection of Amp C genes encoding for beta-lactamases in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Shanthi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Amp C beta-lactamase are Ambler class C enzymes that confer resistance to extended spectrum cephalosporins and are not inhibited by beta-lactamase inhibitors. Their detection is crucial, since the phenotypic tests are not standardised leading to ambiguity in interpretation of results. This study was done to detect the types of Amp C prevalent in Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Materials and Methods : Seventy-seven consecutive cefoxitin resistant clinical isolates of E. coli (n = 25 and K. pneumoniae (n = 52 were included in the study. Antibiotic susceptibility testing to various classes of antibiotics was performed by disc diffusion using Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI guidelines. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC to cefoxitin, imipenem and meropenem were determined by broth microdilution method. Isolates were screened for production of Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL. Multiplex PCR was performed for the detection of Amp C genes after phenotypic testing (Hodge test and inhibitor based test. Results : Cefoxitin Hodge test was positive in 40 isolates which included 20 E. coli and 20 K. pneumoniae. There was zone enhancement with boronic acid in 55 isolates, of which 36 were K. pneumoniae and 19 were E. coli. Multiplex PCR detected Amp C in 11/25 E. coli and 12/52 K. pneumoniae isolates. The Amp C genes detected were CIT (Amp C origin - Citrobacter freundii, DHA (Dhahran Hospital, Saudi Arabia, ACC (Ambler class C, EBC (Amp C origin - Enterobacter cloacae groups. ESBL was co-produced in 54 isolates. Conclusions : Amp C was detected in 29.87% of the study isolates. Majority of them co-produced ESBL. The most common Amp C was the CIT family. Screen tests for cefoxitin resistance may be falsely positive due to production of carbapenamases.

  3. The application of reporter gene assays for the detection of endocrine disruptors in sport supplements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increasing availability and use of sports supplements is of concern as highlighted by a number of studies reporting endocrine disruptor contamination in such products. The health food supplement market, including sport supplements, is growing across the Developed World. Therefore, the need to ensure the quality and safety of sport supplements for the consumer is essential. The development and validation of two reporter gene assays coupled with solid phase sample preparation enabling the detection of estrogenic and androgenic constituents in sport supplements is reported. Both assays were shown to be of high sensitivity with the estrogen and androgen reporter gene assays having an EC50 of 0.01 ng mL-1 and 0.16 ng mL-1 respectively. The developed assays were applied in a survey of 63 sport supplements samples obtained across the Island of Ireland with an additional seven reference samples previously investigated using LC-MS/MS. Androgen and estrogen bio-activity was found in 71% of the investigated samples. Bio-activity profiling was further broken down into agonists, partial agonists and antagonists. Supplements (13) with the strongest estrogenic bio-activity were chosen for further investigation. LC-MS/MS analysis of these samples determined the presence of phytoestrogens in seven of them. Supplements (38) with androgen bio-activity were also selected for further investigation. Androgen agonist bio-activity was detected in 12 supplements, antagonistic bio-activity was detected in 16 and partial antagonistic bio-activity was detected in 10. A further group of supplements (7) did not present androgenic bio-activity when tested alone but enhanced the androgenic agonist bio-activity of dihydrotestosterone when combined. The developed assays offer advantages in detection of known, unknown and low-level mixtures of endocrine disruptors over existing analytical screening techniques. For the detection and identification of constituent hormonally active compounds the

  4. Geographically weighted regression as a generalized Wombling to detect barriers to gene flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diniz-Filho, José Alexandre Felizola; Soares, Thannya Nascimento; de Campos Telles, Mariana Pires

    2016-08-01

    Barriers to gene flow play an important role in structuring populations, especially in human-modified landscapes, and several methods have been proposed to detect such barriers. However, most applications of these methods require a relative large number of individuals or populations distributed in space, connected by vertices from Delaunay or Gabriel networks. Here we show, using both simulated and empirical data, a new application of geographically weighted regression (GWR) to detect such barriers, modeling the genetic variation as a "local" linear function of geographic coordinates (latitude and longitude). In the GWR, standard regression statistics, such as R(2) and slopes, are estimated for each sampling unit and thus are mapped. Peaks in these local statistics are then expected close to the barriers if genetic discontinuities exist, capturing a higher rate of population differentiation among neighboring populations. Isolation-by-Distance simulations on a longitudinally warped lattice revealed that higher local slopes from GWR coincide with the barrier detected with Monmonier algorithm. Even with a relatively small effect of the barrier, the power of local GWR in detecting the east-west barriers was higher than 95 %. We also analyzed empirical data of genetic differentiation among tree populations of Dipteryx alata and Eugenia dysenterica Brazilian Cerrado. GWR was applied to the principal coordinate of the pairwise FST matrix based on microsatellite loci. In both simulated and empirical data, the GWR results were consistent with discontinuities detected by Monmonier algorithm, as well as with previous explanations for the spatial patterns of genetic differentiation for the two species. Our analyses reveal how this new application of GWR can viewed as a generalized Wombling in a continuous space and be a useful approach to detect barriers and discontinuities to gene flow. PMID:27353234

  5. The application of reporter gene assays for the detection of endocrine disruptors in sport supplements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotan, Monika; Elliott, Christopher T. [Institute of Agri-Food and Land Use, School of Biological Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT95AG, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Scippo, Marie Louise [Department of Food Sciences, University of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Muller, Marc [Molecular Biology and Genetic Engineering GIGA-R, University of Liege, 4000 Liege (Belgium); Antignac, Jean-Philippe [LABERCA, ENVN, USC INRA 2013, BP 50707, 44 307, Nantes (France); Malone, Edward [The State Laboratory, Young' s Cross, Celbridge, Co. Kildare (Ireland); Bovee, Toine F.H. [RIKILT Institute of Food Safety, P.O. Box 230, AE Wageningen 6700 (Netherlands); Mitchell, Samuel [Agri-Food and Biosciences Institute, Belfast BT9 5PX (United Kingdom); Connolly, Lisa, E-mail: l.connolly@qub.ac.uk [Institute of Agri-Food and Land Use, School of Biological Sciences, Queen' s University Belfast, Belfast BT95AG, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

    2011-08-26

    The increasing availability and use of sports supplements is of concern as highlighted by a number of studies reporting endocrine disruptor contamination in such products. The health food supplement market, including sport supplements, is growing across the Developed World. Therefore, the need to ensure the quality and safety of sport supplements for the consumer is essential. The development and validation of two reporter gene assays coupled with solid phase sample preparation enabling the detection of estrogenic and androgenic constituents in sport supplements is reported. Both assays were shown to be of high sensitivity with the estrogen and androgen reporter gene assays having an EC{sub 50} of 0.01 ng mL{sup -1} and 0.16 ng mL{sup -1} respectively. The developed assays were applied in a survey of 63 sport supplements samples obtained across the Island of Ireland with an additional seven reference samples previously investigated using LC-MS/MS. Androgen and estrogen bio-activity was found in 71% of the investigated samples. Bio-activity profiling was further broken down into agonists, partial agonists and antagonists. Supplements (13) with the strongest estrogenic bio-activity were chosen for further investigation. LC-MS/MS analysis of these samples determined the presence of phytoestrogens in seven of them. Supplements (38) with androgen bio-activity were also selected for further investigation. Androgen agonist bio-activity was detected in 12 supplements, antagonistic bio-activity was detected in 16 and partial antagonistic bio-activity was detected in 10. A further group of supplements (7) did not present androgenic bio-activity when tested alone but enhanced the androgenic agonist bio-activity of dihydrotestosterone when combined. The developed assays offer advantages in detection of known, unknown and low-level mixtures of endocrine disruptors over existing analytical screening techniques. For the detection and identification of constituent hormonally

  6. SERPINA1 Full-Gene Sequencing Identifies Rare Mutations Not Detected in Targeted Mutation Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Rondell P; Dina, Michelle A; Howe, Sarah C; Butz, Malinda L; Willkomm, Kurt S; Murray, David L; Snyder, Melissa R; Rumilla, Kandelaria M; Halling, Kevin C; Highsmith, W Edward

    2015-11-01

    Genetic α-1 antitrypsin (AAT) deficiency is characterized by low serum AAT levels and the identification of causal mutations or an abnormal protein. It needs to be distinguished from deficiency because of nongenetic causes, and diagnostic delay may contribute to worse patient outcome. Current routine clinical testing assesses for only the most common mutations. We wanted to determine the proportion of unexplained cases of AAT deficiency that harbor causal mutations not identified through current standard allele-specific genotyping and isoelectric focusing (IEF). All prospective cases from December 1, 2013, to October 1, 2014, with a low serum AAT level not explained by allele-specific genotyping and IEF were assessed through full-gene sequencing with a direct sequencing method for pathogenic mutations. We reviewed the results using American Council of Medical Genetics criteria. Of 3523 cases, 42 (1.2%) met study inclusion criteria. Pathogenic or likely pathogenic mutations not identified through clinical testing were detected through full-gene sequencing in 16 (38%) of the 42 cases. Rare mutations not detected with current allele-specific testing and IEF underlie a substantial proportion of genetic AAT deficiency. Full-gene sequencing, therefore, has the ability to improve accuracy in the diagnosis of AAT deficiency. PMID:26321041

  7. The probability of a gene tree topology within a phylogenetic network with applications to hybridization detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Yu

    Full Text Available Gene tree topologies have proven a powerful data source for various tasks, including species tree inference and species delimitation. Consequently, methods for computing probabilities of gene trees within species trees have been developed and widely used in probabilistic inference frameworks. All these methods assume an underlying multispecies coalescent model. However, when reticulate evolutionary events such as hybridization occur, these methods are inadequate, as they do not account for such events. Methods that account for both hybridization and deep coalescence in computing the probability of a gene tree topology currently exist for very limited cases. However, no such methods exist for general cases, owing primarily to the fact that it is currently unknown how to compute the probability of a gene tree topology within the branches of a phylogenetic network. Here we present a novel method for computing the probability of gene tree topologies on phylogenetic networks and demonstrate its application to the inference of hybridization in the presence of incomplete lineage sorting. We reanalyze a Saccharomyces species data set for which multiple analyses had converged on a species tree candidate. Using our method, though, we show that an evolutionary hypothesis involving hybridization in this group has better support than one of strict divergence. A similar reanalysis on a group of three Drosophila species shows that the data is consistent with hybridization. Further, using extensive simulation studies, we demonstrate the power of gene tree topologies at obtaining accurate estimates of branch lengths and hybridization probabilities of a given phylogenetic network. Finally, we discuss identifiability issues with detecting hybridization, particularly in cases that involve extinction or incomplete sampling of taxa.

  8. Methylation of DAPK and THBS1 genes in esophageal gastric-type columnar metaplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Goepfert, Roberto; Oñate-Ocaña, Luis F; Mosqueda-Vargas, José Luis; Herrera, Luis A; Castro, Clementina; Mendoza, Julia; González-Barrios, Rodrigo

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To explore methylation of DAPK, THBS1, CDH-1, and p14 genes, and Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) status in individuals harboring esophageal columnar metaplasia. METHODS: Distal esophageal mucosal samples obtained by endoscopy and histologically diagnosed as gastric-type (non-specialized) columnar metaplasia, were studied thoroughly. DNA was extracted from paraffin blocks, and methylation status of death-associated protein kinase (DAPK), thrombospondin-1 (THBS1), cadherin-1 (CDH1), and p14 genes, was examined using a methyl-sensitive polymerase chain reaction (MS-PCR) and sodium bisulfite modification protocol. H. pylori cagA status was determined by PCR. RESULTS: In total, 68 subjects (33 females and 35 males), with a mean age of 52 years, were included. H. pylori cagA positive was present in the esophageal gastric-type metaplastic mucosa of 18 individuals. DAPK, THSB1, CDH1, and p14 gene promoters were methylated by MS-PCR in 40 (58.8%), 33 (48.5%), 46 (67.6%), and 23 (33.8%) cases of the 68 esophageal samples. H. pylori status was associated with methylation of DAPK (P = 0.003) and THBS1 (P = 0.019). CONCLUSION: DNA methylation occurs in cases of gastric-type (non-specialized) columnar metaplasia of the esophagus, and this modification is associated with H. pylori cagA positive infection. PMID:27182166

  9. Partial antiviral activities detection of chicken Mx jointing with neuraminidase gene (NA against Newcastle disease virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yani Zhang

    Full Text Available As an attempt to increase the resistance to Newcastle Disease Virus (NDV and so further reduction of its risk on the poultry industry. This work aimed to build the eukaryotic gene co-expression plasmid of neuraminidase (NA gene and myxo-virus resistance (Mx and detect the gene expression in transfected mouse fibroblasts (NIH-3T3 cells, it is most important to investigate the influence of the recombinant plasmid on the chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEF cells. cDNA fragment of NA and mutant Mx gene were derived from pcDNA3.0-NA and pcDNA3.0-Mx plasmid via PCR, respectively, then NA and Mx cDNA fragment were inserted into the multiple cloning sites of pVITRO2 to generate the eukaryotic co-expression plasmid pVITRO2-Mx-NA. The recombinant plasmid was confirmed by restriction endonuclease treatment and sequencing, and it was transfected into the mouse fibroblasts (NIH-3T3 cells. The expression of genes in pVITRO2-Mx-NA were measured by RT-PCR and indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA. The recombinant plasmid was transfected into CEF cells then RT-PCR and the micro-cell inhibition tests were used to test the antiviral activity for NDV. Our results showed that co-expression vector pVITRO2-Mx-NA was constructed successfully; the expression of Mx and NA could be detected in both NIH-3T3 and CEF cells. The recombinant proteins of Mx and NA protect CEF cells from NDV infection until after 72 h of incubation but the individually mutagenic Mx protein or NA protein protects CEF cells from NDV infection till 48 h post-infection, and co-transfection group decreased significantly NDV infection compared with single-gene transfection group (P<0. 05, indicating that Mx-NA jointing contributed to delaying the infection of NDV in single-cell level and the co-transfection of the jointed genes was more powerful than single one due to their synergistic effects.

  10. An RGD helper sequence in CagL of Helicobacter pylori assists in interactions with integrins and injection of CagA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens eConradi

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori is a specific gastric pathogen that colonizes the stomach in more than 50% of the world’s human population. Infection with this bacterium can induce several types of gastric pathology, ranging from chronic gastritis to peptic ulcers and even adenocarcinoma. Virulent H. pylori isolates encode components of a type IV secretion system (T4SS, which form a pilus for the injection of virulence proteins such as CagA into host target cells. This is accomplished by a specialized adhesin on the pilus surface, the protein CagL, a putative VirB5 ortholog, which binds to host cell β1 integrin, triggering subsequent delivery of CagA across the host cell membrane. Like the human extracellular matrix protein fibronectin, CagL contains an RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp motif and is able to trigger intracellular signaling pathways by RGD-dependent binding to integrins. While CagL binding to host cells is mediated primarily by the RGD motif, we identified an auxiliary binding motif for CagL-integrin interaction. Here, we report on a surface-exposed FEANE (Phe-Glu-Ala-Asn-Glu interaction motif in spatial proximity to the RGD sequence, which enhances the interactions of CagL with integrins. It will be referred to as RGD helper sequence (RHS. Competitive cell adhesion assays with recombinant wild type CagL and point mutants, competition experiments with synthetic cyclic and linear peptides, and peptide array experiments revealed amino acids essential for the interaction of the RHS motif with integrins. Infection experiments indicate that the RHS motif plays a role in the early interaction of H. pylori T4SS with integrin, to trigger signaling and to inject CagA into host cells. We thus postulate that CagL is a versatile T4SS surface protein equipped with at least two motifs to promote binding to integrins, thereby causing aberrant signaling within host cells and facilitating translocation of CagA into host cells, thus contributing directly to H. pylori

  11. Detection of the apr gene in proteolytic psychrotrophic bacteria isolated from refrigerated raw milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Maurilio L; de Araújo, Elza F; Mantovani, Hilário C; Moraes, Célia A; Vanetti, Maria C D

    2005-07-15

    Bacteria of the genus Pseudomonas have been associated with the spoilage of raw milk and dairy products due to the production of thermostable proteolytic enzymes. The apr gene encodes for alkaline metalloprotease in Pseudomonas and other related bacteria. Its presence in psychrotrophic proteolytic bacteria isolated from raw milk collected from cooling tanks was verified. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used with degenerate primers. Total DNA from 112 isolates was pooled in different groups and then used as template for the amplification reactions. Controls consisted of DNA extracted from 26 cultures. An expected DNA fragment of 194 bp was detected in groups that contained bacteria identified as Pseudomonas. The PCR product was observed only when DNA from control cultures of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Pseudomonas fluorescens, Serratia marcescens and Aeromonas hydrophila were used. A detection limit assay indicated that the apr gene could be directly amplified from pasteurized milk inoculated with 10(8) CFU/ml of P. fluorescens. With this method it was possible to detect proteolytic bacteria at 10(5) CFU/ml in reconstituted skim milk powder if cells were recovered for DNA extraction before amplification. PMID:15992619

  12. Detection of MTAP Protein and Gene Expression in Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shasha LI

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective The abnormal expression of MTAP, a tumor suppressor gene, is found in a variety of tumor tissues. The aim of this study is to detect the expression of MTAP mRNA protein and the clinical significance for the therapy of non-small cell lung cancer tissue (NSCLC. Methods The expression of MTAP protein was detected by immunohistochemistry in 52 cases of NSCLC patients. The relative expression MTAP mRNA was detected by real-time quantitative PCR. Results The expression of MTAP protein in NSCLC tissue was significantly lower than that in paracarcinomous tissue and borderline lung tissue respectively (t=10.283, 10.940, P < 0.001. There was no significant difference among gender, age, smoking history, histology except differentiation (t=2.310, P=0.025. The MTAP mRNA relative expression in NSCLC tissue was significantly lower than that in paracarcinomous tissue (t=9.902, P < 0.001. Conclusion Downregulation of MTAP protein and gene expression is correlated to the oncogenesis and progression of NSCLC.

  13. Detection of Balamuthia mandrillaris DNA by real-time PCR targeting the RNase P gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewin Astrid

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The free-living amoeba Balamuthia mandrillaris may cause fatal encephalitis both in immunocompromised and in – apparently – immunocompetent humans and other mammalian species. Rapid, specific, sensitive, and reliable detection requiring little pathogen-specific expertise is an absolute prerequisite for a successful therapy and a welcome tool for both experimental and epidemiological research. Results A real-time polymerase chain reaction assay using TaqMan® probes (real-time PCR was established specifically targeting the RNase P gene of B. mandrillaris amoebae. The assay detected at least 2 (down to 0.5 genomes of B. mandrillaris grown in axenic culture. It did not react with DNA from closely related Acanthamoeba (3 species, nor with DNA from Toxoplasma gondii, Leishmania major, Pneumocystis murina, Mycobacterium bovis (BCG, human brain, various mouse organs, or from human and murine cell lines. The assay efficiently detected B. mandrillaris DNA in spiked cell cultures, spiked murine organ homogenates, B. mandrillaris-infected mice, and CNS tissue-DNA preparations from 2 patients with proven cerebral balamuthiasis. This novel primer set was successfully combined with a published set that targets the B. mandrillaris 18S rRNA gene in a duplex real-time PCR assay to ensure maximum specificity and as a precaution against false negative results. Conclusion A real-time PCR assay for B. mandrillaris amoebae is presented, that is highly specific, sensitive, and reliable and thus suited both for diagnosis and for research.

  14. Deletion of the TNFAIP3/A20 gene detected by FICTION analysis in classical Hodgkin lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The TNFAIP3 gene, which encodes a ubiquitin-modifying enzyme (A20) involved in the negative regulation of NF-κB signaling, is frequently inactivated by gene deletions/mutations in a variety of B-cell malignancies. However, the detection of this in primary Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) specimens is hampered by the scarcity of Hodgkin Reed-Sternberg (HR-S) cells even after enrichment by micro-dissection. We used anti-CD30 immunofluorescence with fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) to evaluate the relative number of TNFAIP3/CEP6 double-positive signals in CD30-positive cells. From a total of 47 primary classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) specimens, 44 were evaluable. We found that the relative numbers of TNFAIP3/CD30 cells were distributed among three groups, corresponding to those having homozygous (11%), heterozygous (32%), and no (57%) deletions in TNFAIP3. This shows that TNFAIP3 deletions could be sensitively detected using our chosen methods. Comparing the results with mutation analysis, TNFAIP3 inactivation was shown to have escaped detection in many samples with homozygous deletions. This suggests that TNFAIP3 inactivation in primary cHL specimens might be more frequent than previously reported

  15. Heat-transfer-based detection of SNPs in the PAH gene of PKU patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanden Bon N

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Natalie Vanden Bon,1 Bart van Grinsven,2 Mohammed Sharif Murib,2 Weng Siang Yeap,2 Ken Haenen,2,3 Ward De Ceuninck,2,3 Patrick Wagner,2,3 Marcel Ameloot,1 Veronique Vermeeren,1 Luc Michiels11Biomedical Research Institute, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek, Belgium; 2Institute for Materials Research, Hasselt University, Diepenbeek, Belgium; 3IMOMEC, Diepenbeek, BelgiumAbstract: Conventional neonatal diagnosis of phenylketonuria is based on the presence of abnormal levels of phenylalanine in the blood. However, for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis, direct detection of disease-correlated mutations is needed. To speed up and simplify mutation screening in genes, new technologies are developed. In this study, a heat-transfer method is evaluated as a mutation-detection technology in entire exons of the phenylalanine hydroxylase (PAH gene. This method is based on the change in heat-transfer resistance (Rth upon thermal denaturation of dsDNA (double-stranded DNA on nanocrystalline diamond. First, ssDNA (single-stranded DNA fragments that span the size range of the PAH exons were successfully immobilized on nanocrystalline diamond. Next, it was studied whether an Rth change could be observed during the thermal denaturation of these DNA fragments after hybridization to their complementary counterpart. A clear Rth shift during the denaturation of exon 5, exon 9, and exon 12 dsDNA was observed, corresponding to lengths of up to 123 bp. Finally, Rth was shown to detect prevalent single-nucleotide polymorphisms, c.473G>A (R158Q, c.932T>C (p.L311P, and c.1222C>T (R408W, correlated with phenylketonuria, displaying an effect related to the different melting temperatures of homoduplexes and heteroduplexes.Keywords: mutation detection, heat-transfer resistance, melting temperature, nanocrystalline diamond, persistence length

  16. Multi-gene detection and identification of mosquito-borne RNA viruses using an oligonucleotide microarray.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan D Grubaugh

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arthropod-borne viruses are important emerging pathogens world-wide. Viruses transmitted by mosquitoes, such as dengue, yellow fever, and Japanese encephalitis viruses, infect hundreds of millions of people and animals each year. Global surveillance of these viruses in mosquito vectors using molecular based assays is critical for prevention and control of the associated diseases. Here, we report an oligonucleotide DNA microarray design, termed ArboChip5.1, for multi-gene detection and identification of mosquito-borne RNA viruses from the genera Flavivirus (family Flaviviridae, Alphavirus (Togaviridae, Orthobunyavirus (Bunyaviridae, and Phlebovirus (Bunyaviridae. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The assay utilizes targeted PCR amplification of three genes from each virus genus for electrochemical detection on a portable, field-tested microarray platform. Fifty-two viruses propagated in cell-culture were used to evaluate the specificity of the PCR primer sets and the ArboChip5.1 microarray capture probes. The microarray detected all of the tested viruses and differentiated between many closely related viruses such as members of the dengue, Japanese encephalitis, and Semliki Forest virus clades. Laboratory infected mosquitoes were used to simulate field samples and to determine the limits of detection. Additionally, we identified dengue virus type 3, Japanese encephalitis virus, Tembusu virus, Culex flavivirus, and a Quang Binh-like virus from mosquitoes collected in Thailand in 2011 and 2012. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We demonstrated that the described assay can be utilized in a comprehensive field surveillance program by the broad-range amplification and specific identification of arboviruses from infected mosquitoes. Furthermore, the microarray platform can be deployed in the field and viral RNA extraction to data analysis can occur in as little as 12 h. The information derived from the ArboChip5.1 microarray can help to establish

  17. Improvement of Chemically-activated Luciferase Gene Expression Bioassay for Detection of Dioxin-like Chemicals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    To improve the chemically-activated luciferase expression (CALUX)bioassay for detection of dioxin-like chemicals (DLCs) based on the toxicity mechanisms of DLCs. Method A recombinant vector was constructed and used to transfect human hepatoma (HepG2). The expression of this vector was 10-100 folds higher than that of pGL2used in previous experiments. The transfected cells showed aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-meditated luciferase gene expression. The reliability of luciferase induction in this cell line as a reporter of AhR-mediated toxicity was evaluated, the optimal detection time was examined and a comparison was made by using the commonly used ethoxyresoufin-Odeethylase (EROD) activity induction assay. Result The results suggested that the luciferase activity in recombinant cells was peaked at about 4 h and then decreased to a stable activity by 14 h after TCDD treatment. The detection limit of this cell line was 0.1 lpmol/L, or 10-fold lower than in previous studies, with a linear range from 1 to 100pmol/L, related coefficient of 0.997, and the coefficient of variability (CV) of 15-30%,Conclusion The luciferase induction is 30-fold more sensitive than EROD induction, the detection time is 68 h shorter and the detection procedure is also simpler.

  18. Sensitive detection of enteropathogenic E. coli using a bfpA gene-based electrochemical sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a sensitive assay for enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) by integrating DNA extraction, specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA detection using an electrode modified with the bundle-forming pilus (bfpA) structural gene. The PCR amplified products are captured on the electrode and hybridized with biotinylated detection probes to form a sandwich hybrid containing two biotinylated detection probes. The sandwich hybridization structure significantly combined the numerous streptavidin alkaline phosphatase on the electrode by biotin-streptavidin connectors. Electrochemical readout is based on dual signal amplification by both the sandwich hybridization structure and the enzyme. The electrode can satisfactorily discriminate complementary and mismatched oligonucleotides. Under optimal conditions, synthetic target DNA can be detected in the 1 pM to 10 nM concentration range, with a detection limit of 0.3 pM. EPEC can be quantified in the 10 to 107 CFU mL−1 levels within 3.5 h. The method also is believed to present a powerful platform for the screening of pathogenic microorganisms in clinical diagnostics, food safety and environmental monitoring. (author)

  19. Detection of RAPD Markers Linked to Gene 1X1 in Soybeans

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Jun-ming; WU Shu-ming; TAO Wen-jing; DING An-lin; HAN Fen-xia; JIA Shi-rong

    2004-01-01

    Near-isogenic lines of soybean lipoxygenase, which contain genes Lox, lx1, lx2, lx3, lx1.3, lx2.3,respectively, were used for polymorphic analysis by RAPD technique.520 10-mer-oligonucleotide primers were screened, and thirteen primers showed polymorphism among near-isogenic lines.There were six primers showed special polymorphic bands among lines lx1 and lx1.3. Especially,primer S352 presented the stable results in which a 900 bp band was found in the lines lx1 and lx1.3, and primer S352900 was detected with F2 generation of cross 96P11×Century-1, indicated primer S352900 could be identified as a RAPD marker linked to gene lx1 in soybeans, the distance of linkage was 7.6 cM.

  20. Candidate gene markers for Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus for detecting citrus greening disease

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Madhugiri Nageswara-Rao; Mike Irey; Stephen M Garnsey; Siddarame Gowda

    2013-06-01

    Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB) also known as citrus greening is one of the most devastating diseases of citrus worldwide. The disease is caused by Candidatus Liberibacter bacterium, vectored by the psyllid Diaphorina citri Kuwayama and Trioza erytreae Del Guercio. Citrus plants infected by the HLB bacterium may not show visible symptoms sometimes for years following infection. The aim of this study was to develop effective gene-specific primer pairs for polymerase chain reaction based method for quick screening of HLB disease. Thirty-two different gene-specific primer pairs, across the Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus genome, were successfully developed. The possibility of these primer pairs for cross-genome amplification across `Ca. Liberibacter africanus’ and `Ca. Liberibacter americanus’ were tested. The applicability of these primer pairs for detection and differentiation of Ca Liberibacter spp. is discussed.

  1. A multiplex PCR for detection of genes encoding exfoliative toxins from Staphylococcus hyicus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Lars Ole; Ahrens, Peter

    2004-01-01

    : A multiplex PCR employing specific primers for each of the genes encoding four different exfoliative toxins was developed and evaluated using a collection of Staph. hyicus with known toxin type and a number of other staphylococcal species. A total of 314 Staph. hyicus isolates from pigs with EE were......Aims: To develop a multiplex PCR for detection of genes encoding the exfoliative toxins ExhA, ExhB, ExhC and ExhD from Staphylococcus hyicus and to estimate the prevalence of exfoliative toxins among Staph. hyicus isolates from Danish pig herds with exudative epidermitis (EE). Methods and Results...... more comprehensive picture of the prevalence of the Staph. hyicus exfoliative toxins in Danish pig herds. Significance and Impact of the Study: The multiplex PCR can be used in studies on the prevalence of toxigenic Staph. hyicus elucidating the epidemiology of EE in pigs. The multiplex PCR is...

  2. PCR detection of retinoblastoma gene deletions in radiation-induced mouse lung adenocarcinomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1971 to 1986, Argonne National Laboratory conducted a series of large-scale studies of tumor incidence in 40,000 BCF1 mice irradiated with 60Co γ rays or JANUS fission-spectrum neutrons; normal and tumor tissues from mice in these studies were preserved in paraffin blocks. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique has been developed to detect deletions in the mouse retinoblastoma (mRb) gene in the paraffin-embedded tissues. Microtomed sections were used as the DNA source in PCR reaction mixtures. Six mRb gene exon fragments were amplified in a 40-cycle, 3-temperature PCR protocol. The absence of any of these fragments (relative to control PCR products) on a Southern blot indicated a deletion of that portion of the mRb gene. The tumors chosen for analysis were lung adenocarcinomas that were judged to be the cause of death in post-mortem analyses. Spontaneous tumors as well as those from irradiated mice (569 cGy of 60Co γ rays or 60 cGy of JANUS neutrons, doses that have been found to have approximately equal biological effectiveness in the BCF, mouse) were analyzed for mRb deletions. In all normal mouse tissues studies, all six mRb exon fragments were present on Southem blots. Tumors in six neutron-irradiated mice also had no mRb deletions. However, I of 6 tumors from γ-irradiated mice and 6 of 18 spontaneous tumors from unirradiated mice had a deletion in one or both mRb alleles. All deletions detected were in the 5' region of the mRb gene

  3. Development of a Real-Time Fluorescence PCR Assay for Rapid Detection of the Diphtheria Toxin Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Mothershed, Elizabeth A.; Cassiday, Pamela K.; Pierson, Kevin; Mayer, Leonard W.; Popovic, Tanja

    2002-01-01

    We developed and evaluated a real-time fluorescence PCR assay for detecting the A and B subunits of diphtheria toxin (tox) gene. When 23 toxigenic Corynebacterium diphtheriae strains, 9 nontoxigenic C. diphtheriae strains, and 44 strains representing the diversity of pathogens and normal respiratory flora were tested, this real-time PCR assay exhibited 100% sensitivity and specificity. It allowed for the detection of both subunits of the tox gene at 750 times greater sensitivity (2 CFU) than ...

  4. Quantitative detection of perchlorate-reducing bacteria by real-time PCR targeting the perchlorate reductase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozawa-Inoue, Mamie; Jien, Mercy; Hamilton, Nicholas S; Stewart, Valley; Scow, Kate M; Hristova, Krassimira R

    2008-03-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR assay targeting the pcrA gene, encoding the catalytic subunit of perchlorate reductase, detected pcrA genes from perchlorate-reducing bacteria in three different genera and from soil microbial communities. Partial pcrA sequences indicated differences in the composition of perchlorate-reducing bacterial communities following exposure to different electron donors. PMID:18245250

  5. PCR detection of bacterial genes provides evidence of death by drowning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suto, Miwako; Kato, Naho; Abe, Sumiko; Nakamura, Masahide; Tsuchiya, Reo; Hiraiwa, Kouichi

    2009-04-01

    We have developed a sensitive and specific PCR method for detecting plankton DNA in cases of death by drowning. However, this PCR method could not be used for cases of drowning in water containing no plankton. Bacteria species are normally localized in the throat and trachea and they may invade into blood through the respiratory tract in people who have drowned as well as species localized in water. The aim of this study was to establish a novel and expedient PCR method for detecting bacterial genes in samples from drowning cases. We designed primer pairs for Streptococcus salivarius (SL1) and Streptococcus sanguinis (SN1), which are common species in the throat, and for Aeromonas hydrophila (AH1), which has been found in various water samples. With SL1, SN1, and AH1, we detected 10, 0.1, and 1 pg of target DNA, respectively. Among 19 drowned cases within 3 days postmortem, SL-DNA was detected in all of the blood samples from hearts with SL1 and AH-DNA was detected in several samples with AH1. In a case of drowning in a bathtub, use of the conventional acid digestion method for diatom analyses and the PCR method for identifying plankton DNA revealed no plankton, but our PCR method for detecting bacterial DNA showed a positive result for SL-DNA in a blood sample from the heart. In conclusion, our novel PCR method is highly specific and sensitive for detecting bacterial DNA and is useful for cases of death by drowning in water containing no plankton. PMID:19264526

  6. Development of ARMS PCR tests for detection of common CFTR gene mutations

    OpenAIRE

    Livshits L. A.; Pampukha V. M.; Soloviov O. O.

    2010-01-01

    Aim. To develop diagnostic assays, based on the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS) principle, for detection of common mutations in the CFTR gene using two approaches: standard PCR with further gel-electrophoresis and Real-Time PCR with SYBR Green. Materials. For this study we have chosen the following mutations: dF508, W1282X, R117H, 621 + 1G > T, 2143delT with the frequencies in Ukraine: dF508 – 43.3 %; 2143delT – 1.38 %; W1282X – 1.1 %; R117H, 621 + 1G > T – < 0.6 %. For the de...

  7. An hypervariable polymorphism detected in the human inter-. alpha. -trypsin inhibitor heavy chain gene ITIH2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leveillard, T.; Sesbouee, R.; Bourguignon, J.; Diarra-Mehrpour, M.; Salier, J.P.; Martin, J.P. (Inst. National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, Rouvray (France)); Sirugo, G.; Hanauer, A. (Inst. National de la Sante et de la Recherche Medicale, Strasbourg (France))

    1990-03-11

    The 112 bp BamHi/Bst YI fragment of lambda HuHITI-9 used as a probe codes for the heavy chain H2 of human inter-{alpha}-trypsin inhibitor. BstXI (CCAN{sub 5}/NTGG) identifies a 5 allele VNTR polymorphism with bands between 2.6 kb and 3.0 kb. DraI, MspI, PstI and TaqI also detect the same polymorphism. The ITH2 gene has been mapped to 10p15 by in situ hybridization.

  8. Genome-wide detection of fitness genes in uropathogenic Escherichia coli during systemic infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sargurunathan Subashchandrabose

    Full Text Available Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC is a leading etiological agent of bacteremia in humans. Virulence mechanisms of UPEC in the context of urinary tract infections have been subjected to extensive research. However, understanding of the fitness mechanisms used by UPEC during bacteremia and systemic infection is limited. A forward genetic screen was utilized to detect transposon insertion mutants with fitness defects during colonization of mouse spleens. An inoculum comprised of 360,000 transposon mutants in the UPEC strain CFT073, cultured from the blood of a patient with pyelonephritis, was used to inoculate mice intravenously. Transposon insertion sites in the inoculum (input and bacteria colonizing the spleen (output were identified using high-throughput sequencing of transposon-chromosome junctions. Using frequencies of representation of each insertion mutant in the input and output samples, 242 candidate fitness genes were identified. Co-infection experiments with each of 11 defined mutants and the wild-type strain demonstrated that 82% (9 of 11 of the tested candidate fitness genes were required for optimal fitness in a mouse model of systemic infection. Genes involved in biosynthesis of poly-N-acetyl glucosamine (pgaABCD, major and minor pilin of a type IV pilus (c2394 and c2395, oligopeptide uptake periplasmic-binding protein (oppA, sensitive to antimicrobial peptides (sapABCDF, putative outer membrane receptor (yddB, zinc metallopeptidase (pqqL, a shikimate pathway gene (c1220 and autotransporter serine proteases (pic and vat were further characterized. Here, we report the first genome-wide identification of genes that contribute to fitness in UPEC during systemic infection in a mammalian host. These fitness factors may represent targets for developing novel therapeutics against UPEC.

  9. Plasmid fingerprinting and virulence gene detection among indigenous strains of salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis is an important frequently reported zoonotic pathogen and a common cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide. The highly conserved Serospecific plasmids (SSPs) and Salmonella plasmid virulence (Spv) genes have been shown to mediate extra-intestinal colonization and systemic infection. The objective of current study was to document the presence of SSPs and SpvB/SpvC genes prevailing in the indigenous population of serovar Enteritidis. A total of 48 epidemiologically unrelated strains of Salmonella enteritidis were included in the study. Preparation of plasmids DNA suitable for endonuclease digestion and separation of respective fragments by agarose gel electrophoresis followed previously described protocols. The plasmids of Escherichia coli V517, 1-kbp ladder, and lambda DNA HindIII fragments served as DNA size standards. Transfer of DNA fragments from agarose gels to nitrocellulose membranes was achieved by capillary blot procedure. An ECL labeled 3.6 kbp HindIII fragment of plasmid PRQ 51 was used as probe for SpvB/SpvC gene detection. Plasmid DNA fingerprinting revealed the presence of two different profiles of approximately 55 kbp and 90 kbp and were identified as virulence plasmids by DNA hybridization. The SpvB/SpvC genes were located on HindIII fragments of 3.6 kbp in each of the two types of virulence plasmids. The study confirms the presence of SSPs and SpvB/SpvC genes in indigenous strains of S. enteritidis isolated from Northern Punjab area of Pakistan and substantiate the previous data on such findings from other parts of the world. (author)

  10. Detection of antibiotic resistance genes in wastewater treatment plant – molecular and classical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziembińska-Buczyńska Aleksandra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotics are a group of substances potentially harmful to the environment. They can play a role in bacterial resistance transfer among pathogenic and non-pathogenic bacteria. In this experiment three representatives of medically important chemotherapeutics, confirmed to be present in high concentrations in wastewater treatment plants with HPLC analysis were used: erythromycin, sulfamethoxazole and trimethoprim. Erythromycin concentration in activated sludge was not higher than 20 ng L−1. N-acetylo-sulfamethoxazole concentration was 3349 ± 719 in winter and 2933 ± 429 ng L−1 in summer. Trimethoprim was present in wastewater at concentrations 400 ± 22 and 364 ± 60 ng L−1, respectively in winter and summer. Due to a wide variety of PCR-detectable resistance mechanisms towards these substances, the most common found in literature was chosen. For erythromycin: erm and mef genes, for sulfamethoxazole: sul1, sul2, sul3 genes, in the case of trimethoprim resistance dhfrA1 and dhfr14 were used in this study. The presence of resistance genes were analyzed in pure strains isolated from activated sludge and in the activated sludge sample itself. The research revealed that the value of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC did not correspond with the expected presence of more than one resistance mechanisms. Most of the isolates possessed only one of the genes responsible for a particular chemotherapeutic resistance. It was confirmed that it is possible to monitor the presence of resistance genes directly in activated sludge using PCR. Due to the limited isolates number used in the experiment these results should be regarded as preliminary.

  11. Normal uniform mixture differential gene expression detection for cDNA microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raftery Adrian E

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the primary tasks in analysing gene expression data is finding genes that are differentially expressed in different samples. Multiple testing issues due to the thousands of tests run make some of the more popular methods for doing this problematic. Results We propose a simple method, Normal Uniform Differential Gene Expression (NUDGE detection for finding differentially expressed genes in cDNA microarrays. The method uses a simple univariate normal-uniform mixture model, in combination with new normalization methods for spread as well as mean that extend the lowess normalization of Dudoit, Yang, Callow and Speed (2002 1. It takes account of multiple testing, and gives probabilities of differential expression as part of its output. It can be applied to either single-slide or replicated experiments, and it is very fast. Three datasets are analyzed using NUDGE, and the results are compared to those given by other popular methods: unadjusted and Bonferroni-adjusted t tests, Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM, and Empirical Bayes for microarrays (EBarrays with both Gamma-Gamma and Lognormal-Normal models. Conclusion The method gives a high probability of differential expression to genes known/suspected a priori to be differentially expressed and a low probability to the others. In terms of known false positives and false negatives, the method outperforms all multiple-replicate methods except for the Gamma-Gamma EBarrays method to which it offers comparable results with the added advantages of greater simplicity, speed, fewer assumptions and applicability to the single replicate case. An R package called nudge to implement the methods in this paper will be made available soon at http://www.bioconductor.org.

  12. Gene probes to detect cross-culture contamination in hormone producing cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matsuba, I; Lernmark, A; Madsen, Ole Dragsbæk;

    1988-01-01

    Cross-culture contamination of cell lines propagated in continuous culture is a frequent event and particularly difficult to resolve in cells expressing similar phenotypes. We demonstrate that DNA-DNA hybridization to blotted endonuclease-digested cell DNA effectively detects cross-culture contam...... effective use of gene probes to control the origin of cell cultures.......Cross-culture contamination of cell lines propagated in continuous culture is a frequent event and particularly difficult to resolve in cells expressing similar phenotypes. We demonstrate that DNA-DNA hybridization to blotted endonuclease-digested cell DNA effectively detects cross......-culture contamination to monitor inter-species as well as intra-species cross contamination. An insulin-producing cell-line, Clone-16, originally cloned from a human fetal endocrine pancreatic cell line did not produce human c-peptide as anticipated. DNA from these cells showed no hybridization to the human ALU...

  13. A method to detect transfected chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene expression in intact animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rapid procedure is described for assaying chloramphenicol acetyltransferase enzyme activity in intact animals following transfection of the RSV CAT plasmid into mouse bone marrow cells by electroporation. The reconstituted mice were injected with [14C]chloramphenicol and ethyl acetate extracts of 24-h urine samples were analyzed by TLC autoradiography for the excretion of 14C-labeled metabolites. CAT expression in vivo can be detected by the presence of acetylated 14C-labeled metabolites in the urine within 1 week after bone marrow transplantation and, under the conditions described, these metabolites can be detected for at least 3 months. CAT expression in intact mice as monitored by the urine assay correlates with the CAT expression in the hematopoietic tissues assayed in vitro. This method offers a quick mode of screening for introduced CAT gene expression in vivo without sacrificing the mice

  14. DNA hybridization in nanostructural molecular assemblies enables detection of gene mutations without a fluorescent probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Tatsuo; Park, Lian-Chun; Shinohara, Toshimitsu; Goto, Masahiro

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a simple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) analysis utilizing DNA hybridization in nanostructural molecular assemblies. The novel technique enables the detection of a single-base mismatch in a DNA sequence without a fluorescent probe. This report describes for the first time that DNA hybridization occurs in the nanostructural molecular assemblies (termed reverse micelles) formed in an organic medium. The restricted nanospace in the reverse micelles amplifies the differences in the hybridization rate between mismatched and perfectly matched DNA probes. For a model system, we hybridized a 20-mer based on the p53 gene sequence to 20-mer complementary oligonucleotides with various types of mismatches. Without any DNA labeling or electrochemical apparatus, we successfully detected the various oligonucleotide mismatches by simply measuring the UV absorbance at 260 nm. PMID:14715007

  15. Detection of glucocorticoid bioactivity in bovine urine samples using a reporter gene assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Lisa; Cai, Kai; Van der Heiden, Edwige; Scippo, Marie-Louise; Muller, Marc; Tarbin, Jonathan; Elliott, Chris

    2009-04-01

    The illegal use of anabolic substances in the meat producing industry is an ongoing problem due to the continual production of new synthetic compounds and/or the practice of low-level cocktail administration to avoid detection by the surveillance schemes of EU member states National Plan surveillance systems. We present a highly sensitive reporter gene assay and sample extraction procedure based on a two step solid phase extraction and high performance liquid chromatography, developed for the detection of glucocorticoid abuse in bovine urine. The assay is capable of detecting compounds with glucocorticoid bioactivity and is extremely sensitive with an EC(50) of 0.79 ngmL(-1) for dexamethasone. New or unknown compounds with glucocorticoid bioactivity and low-level cocktail mixtures are detectable by this assay. Cross-reactivity data for a range of 11beta-hydroxyglucocorticoids has been provided. This assay shows low interference from the 11-keto prohormones and other steroidal hormones. The assay may be suitable for application in other matrices such as hair. In conclusion this screening assay offers advantages over existing analytical techniques. PMID:19286046

  16. Primer effect in the detection of mtDNA heteroplasmy: insights from horse Cytochrome b gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qianjun; Kang, Ye; Pu, Yabin; Niu, Lili; Guan, Weijun; He, Xiaohong; Zhang, Hongping; Lim, Hyuntae; Ma, Yuehui; Zhong, Tao

    2015-04-01

    Heteroplasmy, the presence of bi-allelic mtDNA types within an individual, has been previously detected in the D-loop region and Cytochrome b gene (Cytb) of mitochondrial DNA using PCR-RFLP. However, heteroplasmy was absent in thousands of equine mtDNA sequences deposited in GenBank. To address whether heteroplasmy widely exists in mitochondria of Chinese indigenous horses, we generated the data set of the target sites in Cytb region with Sanger sequencing and PCR-RFLP method as well. In this study, 23 heteroplasmic individuals were detected in 430 Chinese local horses. Both site and length heteroplasmy were identified in horse Cytb, especially in Xinihe and Ujumqin breeds. Our data provide evidence that the forward and reverse primers seem to produce a similar approximation to the proportion of mutation base call. However, locations of primers affected the proper detection of mtDNA heteroplasmy. The data obtained in this study highlight the importance of the primers in the accurate detection of heteroplasmy. PMID:24409928

  17. Construction of a multicolor GeneScan analytical system to detect clonal rearrangements of immunoglobulin and T cell receptor genes in canine lymphoid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto-Koshino, Yuko; Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Sato, Masahiko; Nakashima, Ko; Hiyoshi, Saaya; Fujiwara-Igarashi, Aki; Maeda, Shingo; Nakamura, Kenji; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Fujino, Yasuhito; Ohno, Koichi; Tsujimoto, Hajime

    2015-05-15

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification to detect immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH) and T cell receptor γ-chain (TCRγ) gene rearrangements has recently become widely used as part of the diagnostic strategy for lymphoid tumors in dogs. In this study, we constructed a multicolor GeneScan analytical system to improve the sensitivity and resolution of the clonality analysis of antigen receptor gene rearrangements in dogs. We used 7 reactions per sample, with 2 PCR conditions, to amplify IgH/TCRγ and control genes. By using multicolor-labeled primers, these 7 PCR products could be combined into 3 tubes before capillary electrophoresis. Clonal rearrangement of the IgH/TCRγ genes was detected in 93.3% of dogs with multicentric lymphoma and 84.6% of dogs with gastrointestinal lymphoma. Detection sensitivity of the clonally expanded cells in the background of normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells was 1-10%. The multicolor GeneScan analytical system developed here may prove to be helpful for the diagnosis of lymphoid tumors in dogs. PMID:25840823

  18. Characterization of Antimicrobial Resistance Patterns and Detection of Virulence Genes in Campylobacter Isolates in Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Di Giannatale

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Campylobacter has developed resistance to several antimicrobial agents over the years, including macrolides, quinolones and fluoroquinolones, becoming a significant public health hazard. A total of 145 strains derived from raw milk, chicken faeces, chicken carcasses, cattle faeces and human faeces collected from various Italian regions, were screened for antimicrobial susceptibility, molecular characterization (SmaI pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and detection of virulence genes (sequencing and DNA microarray analysis. The prevalence of C. jejuni and C. coli was 62.75% and 37.24% respectively. Antimicrobial susceptibility revealed a high level of resistance for ciprofloxacin (62.76%, tetracycline (55.86% and nalidixic acid (55.17%. Genotyping of Campylobacter isolates using PFGE revealed a total of 86 unique SmaI patterns. Virulence gene profiles were determined using a new microbial diagnostic microarray composed of 70-mer oligonucleotide probes targeting genes implicated in Campylobacter pathogenicity. Correspondence between PFGE and microarray clusters was observed. Comparisons of PFGE and virulence profiles reflected the high genetic diversity of the strains examined, leading us to speculate different degrees of pathogenicity inside Campylobacter populations.

  19. Detection of Chloramphenicol Resistance Genes (cat in Clinical Isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with Polymerase Chain Reaction Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiana Milanda

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic Gram negative bacteria, which may cause infection in eyes, ears, skin, bones, central nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, circulatory system, heart, respiratory system, and urinary tract. Recently, chloramphenicol is no longer used as the main option of the therapy due of its resistance case. The aim of this research was to detect the presence of gene which is responsible to chloramphenicol resistance in clinical isolates of P.aeruginosa. These bacteria isolated from pus of external otitis patients in Hasan Sadikin Hospital in Bandung City. Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR method (colony-PCR and DNA-PCR were performed to detect this resistance gene. Electropherogram from PCR products showed that the chloramphenicol resistance in clinical isolates of P. aeruginosa was caused by cat gene (317 bp. Based on this research, cat gene may be used to detect the chloramphenicol resistance in patients with external ostitis.

  20. Detection of type III secretion system genes in Aeromonas hydrophila and their relationship with virulence in Nile tilapia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho-Castro, G A; Lopes, C O; Leal, C A G; Cardoso, P G; Leite, R C; Figueiredo, H C P

    2010-08-26

    The goals of this study were to develop a PCR technique to detect ascV and aopB genes from the type III secretion system (T3SS), to evaluate the frequency of these genes in Aeromonas hydrophila strains isolated from diseased fish and from aquaculture environments, and to determine the relationship between the presence of these genes and virulence of A. hydrophila in Nile tilapia. The PCR assay developed here successfully detected the target genes, showing three different profiles for the strains ascV+/aopB+, ascV+/aopB-, and ascV-/aopB-. A higher frequency of ascV+/aopB+ was verified in isolates from diseased fish compared to those from aquaculture environments (PPCR technique was shown to be a specific and efficient tool for detection of T3SS, and this technique can be used for virulence typing of A. hydrophila isolates. PMID:20185253

  1. Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Bordetella bronchiseptica Isolates from Swine and Companion Animals and Detection of Resistance Genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Prüller

    Full Text Available Bordetella bronchiseptica causes infections of the respiratory tract in swine and other mammals and is a precursor for secondary infections with Pasteurella multocida. Treatment of B. bronchiseptica infections is conducted primarily with antimicrobial agents. Therefore it is essential to get an overview of the susceptibility status of these bacteria. The aim of this study was to comparatively analyse broth microdilution susceptibility testing according to CLSI recommendations with an incubation time of 16 to 20 hours and a longer incubation time of 24 hours, as recently proposed to obtain more homogenous MICs. Susceptibility testing against a panel of 22 antimicrobial agents and two fixed combinations was performed with 107 porcine isolates from different farms and regions in Germany and 43 isolates obtained from companion animals in Germany and other European countries. Isolates with increased MICs were investigated by PCR assays for the presence of resistance genes. For ampicillin, all 107 porcine isolates were classified as resistant, whereas only a single isolate was resistant to florfenicol. All isolates obtained from companion animals showed elevated MICs for β-lactam antibiotics and demonstrated an overall low susceptibility to cephalosporines. Extension of the incubation time resulted in 1-2 dilution steps higher MIC50 values of porcine isolates for seven antimicrobial agents tested, while isolates from companion animals exhibited twofold higher MIC50/90 values only for tetracycline and cefotaxime. For three antimicrobial agents, lower MIC50 and MIC90 values were detected for both, porcine and companion animal isolates. Among the 150 isolates tested, the resistance genes blaBOR-1 (n = 147, blaOXA-2, (n = 4, strA and strB (n = 17, sul1 (n = 10, sul2 (n = 73, dfrA7 (n = 3 and tet(A (n = 8 were detected and a plasmid localisation was identified for several of the resistance genes.

  2. Development of a caseinase assay for PCR independent detection of esp gene carriage among enterococci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dada, Ayokunle Christopher; Asmat, Ahmad; Lee, Yook Heng; Usup, Gires

    2013-11-01

    Currently, there is no known relationship between caseinase and carriage of esp gene. Also, no breakpoints exist for phenotypic assays that are used to infer virulence characteristics among Enterococci. In the present study, caseinase activity was measured by a radial diffusion assay for 113 enterococci isolates. A standard curve with predictive r2 value of 0.939 was produced by dispensing several doubling dilutions of proteinase K into 3% skimmed milk agar wells. Caseinase activity for all tested enterococci was subsequently converted into proteinase K activity, using the obtained chart. Caseinase activity ranged from 1.74 × 10-8 to 4.47 × 10-7ug/ml and 6.37 × 10-8 to 8.82 × 10-8 ug/ml per colony of environmental and clinical enterocococci tested, proportionate to proteinase K activity. Caseinase activity among environmental strains was five-fold higher than was observed among clinical strains. Fishers exact test revealed significant associations between esp gene carriage and caseinase activity (diameter on skimmed milk, z=8 to 13mm) at p<0.1. However, the probability of association was strongest at z=13 mm (p=0.033) suggesting a range of diameter cut-offs that was exclusive to and may be used to predict the presence of environmental enterococci strains harbouring esp gene. Results obtained from sensitivity analysis showed increasing assay sensitivity from cut-off of 9 mm (61.54%) up to 84.62% (13 mm). Specificity of the caseinase assay slightly decreased from 50% to 42.86% as cut-off increased from 9 to 13 mm. The caseinase assay described here potentially proves useful in preliminary PCR independent screening of environmental enterococci isolates for the detection of strains which carry the esp gene known to increase the severity of enterococcal infections.

  3. Detection of copy number variants reveals association of cilia genes with neural tube defects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neural tube defects (NTDs are one of the most common birth defects caused by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Currently, little is known about the genetic basis of NTDs although up to 70% of human NTDs were reported to be attributed to genetic factors. Here we performed genome-wide copy number variants (CNVs detection in a cohort of Chinese NTD patients in order to exam the potential role of CNVs in the pathogenesis of NTDs. METHODS: The genomic DNA from eighty-five NTD cases and seventy-five matched normal controls were subjected for whole genome CNVs analysis. Non-DGV (the Database of Genomic Variants CNVs from each group were further analyzed for their associations with NTDs. Gene content in non-DGV CNVs as well as participating pathways were examined. RESULTS: Fifty-five and twenty-six non-DGV CNVs were detected in cases and controls respectively. Among them, forty and nineteen CNVs involve genes (genic CNV. Significantly more non-DGV CNVs and non-DGV genic CNVs were detected in NTD patients than in control (41.2% vs. 25.3%, p<0.05 and 37.6% vs. 20%, p<0.05. Non-DGV genic CNVs are associated with a 2.65-fold increased risk for NTDs (95% CI: 1.24-5.87. Interestingly, there are 41 cilia genes involved in non-DGV CNVs from NTD patients which is significantly enriched in cases compared with that in controls (24.7% vs. 9.3%, p<0.05, corresponding with a 3.19-fold increased risk for NTDs (95% CI: 1.27-8.01. Pathway analyses further suggested that two ciliogenesis pathways, tight junction and protein kinase A signaling, are top canonical pathways implicated in NTD-specific CNVs, and these two novel pathways interact with known NTD pathways. CONCLUSIONS: Evidence from the genome-wide CNV study suggests that genic CNVs, particularly ciliogenic CNVs are associated with NTDs and two ciliogenesis pathways, tight junction and protein kinase A signaling, are potential pathways involved in NTD pathogenesis.

  4. Molecular ecology of tetracycline resistance: development and validation of primers for detection of tetracycline resistance genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminov, R I; Garrigues-Jeanjean, N; Mackie, R I

    2001-01-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of tetracycline resistance genes encoding the ribosomal protection proteins (RPPs) revealed the monophyletic origin of these genes. The most deeply branching class, exemplified by tet and otrA, consisted of genes from the antibiotic-producing organisms Streptomyces rimosus and Streptomyces lividans. With a high degree of confidence, the corresponding genes of the other seven classes (Tet M, Tet S, Tet O, Tet W, Tet Q, Tet T, and TetB P) formed phylogenetically distinct separate clusters. Based on this phylogenetic analysis, a set of PCR primers for detection, retrieval, and sequence analysis of the corresponding gene fragments from a variety of bacterial and environmental sources was developed and characterized. A pair of degenerate primers targeted all tetracycline resistance genes encoding RPPs except otrA and tet, and seven other primer pairs were designed to target the specific classes. The primers were used to detect the circulation of these genes in the rumina of cows, in swine feed and feces, and in swine fecal streptococci. Classes Tet O and Tet W were found in the intestinal contents of both animals, while Tet M was confined to pigs and Tet Q was confined to the rumen. The tet(O) and tet(W) genes circulating in the microbiota of the rumen and the gastrointestinal tract of pigs were identical despite the differences in animal hosts and antibiotic use regimens. Swine fecal streptococci uniformly possessed the tet(O) gene, and 22% of them also carried tet(M). This population could be considered one of the main reservoirs of these two resistance genes in the pig gastrointestinal tract. All classes of RPPs except Tet T and TetB P were found in the commercial components of swine feed. This is the first demonstration of the applicability of molecular ecology techniques to estimation of the gene pool and the flux of antibiotic resistance genes in production animals. PMID:11133424

  5. Sensitive detection of novel Indian isolate of BTV 21 using ns1 gene based real-time PCR assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaya Prasad

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The study was conducted to develop ns1 gene based sensitive real-time RT-PCR assay for diagnosis of India isolates of bluetongue virus (BTV. Materials and Methods: The BTV serotype 21 isolate (KMNO7 was isolated from Andhra Pradesh and propagated in BHK-21 cell line in our laboratory. The Nucleic acid (dsRNA of virus was extracted using Trizol method and cDNA was prepared using a standard protocol. The cDNA was allowed to ns1 gene based group specific PCR to confirm the isolate as BTV. The viral RNA was diluted 10 folds and the detection limit of ns1 gene based RT-PCR was determined. Finally the tenfold diluted viral RNA was subjected to real-time RT-PCR using ns1 gene primer and Taq man probe to standardized the reaction and determine the detection limit. Results: The ns1 gene based group specific PCR showed a single 366bp amplicon in agarose gel electrophoresis confirmed the sample as BTV. The ns1 gene RT-PCR using tenfold diluted viral RNA showed the detection limit of 70.0 fg in 1%agarose gel electrophoresis. The ns1 gene based real time RT-PCR was successfully standardized and the detection limit was found to be 7.0 fg. Conclusion: The ns1 gene based real-time RT-PCR was successfully standardized and it was found to be 10 times more sensitive than conventional RT-PCR. Key words: bluetongue, BTV21, RT-PCR, Real time RT-PCR, ns1 gene [Vet World 2013; 6(8.000: 554-557

  6. DNA hybridization and phosphinothricin acetyltransferase gene sequence detection based on zirconia/nanogold film modified electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Yang, Tao; Jiang, Chen; Jiao, Kui

    2008-05-01

    This study reports a novel electrochemical DNA biosensor based on zirconia (ZrO 2) and gold nanoparticles (NG) film modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). NG was electrodeposited onto the glassy carbon electrode at 1.5 V, and then zirconia thin film on the NG/GCE was fabricated by cyclic voltammetric method (CV) in an aqueous electrolyte of ZrOCl 2 and KCl at a scan rate of 20 mV/s. DNA probes were attached onto the ZrO 2/NG/GCE due to the strong binding of the phosphate group of DNA with the zirconia film and the excellent biocompatibility of nanogold with DNA. CV and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) were used to characterize the modification of the electrode and the probe DNA immobilization. The electrochemical response of the DNA hybridization was measured by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) using methylene blue (MB) as the electroactive indicator. After the hybridization of DNA probe (ssDNA) with the complementary DNA (cDNA), the cathodic peak current of MB decreased obviously. The difference of the cathodic peak currents of MB between before and after the hybridization of the probe DNA was used as the signal for the detection of the target DNA. The sequence-specific DNA of phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (PAT) gene in the transgenic plants was detected with a detection range from 1.0 × 10 -10 to 1.0 × 10 -6 mol/L, and a detection limit of 3.1 × 10 -11 mol/L.

  7. Coagulase gene polymorphisms detected by PCR in Staphylococcus aureus isolated from subclinical bovine mastitis in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karahan, Murat; Cetinkaya, Burhan

    2007-09-01

    The genetic relatedness of coagulase (coa) positive Staphylococcus aureus isolated from cows with subclinical mastitis in Turkey was investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Among 700 milk samples positive in the California Mastitis Test (CMT), species specific PCR identified 200 (28.6%) isolates as S. aureus and 161 (80.5%) of these isolates were positive for the 3' end of the coa gene by PCR. Most isolates (n=135, 83.9%) produced a single band on coa PCR, with molecular sizes ranging from 500 to 1400bp, whereas a small number of isolates (n=26, 16.1%) yielded two amplification products. Coa RFLP analysis using AluI and Hin6I revealed 23 and 22 band patterns, respectively. The detection of double bands by coa PCR, previously reported in human isolates, suggests that milking personnel can play a role in the transmission of S. aureus. PMID:16901735

  8. The application of asymmetric PCR-SSCP in gene mutation detecting

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohui ZHANG; Shangzhong XU; Xue GAO; Lupei ZHANG; Hongyan REN; Jinbao CHEN

    2008-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of asymmetric PCR-SSCP and the traditional PCR-SSCP were compared in this study.The mutations in 3'UTR of Smad4 gene of Luxi cattle and the Holstein cow were analyzed by asymmetric PCR-SSCP and one insert "T" mutation and one G/A mutation in this region were found.The G/A mutation created a HhaI restriction enzyme digestion position and the frequencies studied by asymmetric PCR-SSCP and HhaI-RFLP in 116 Luxi cattle and 75 Holstein cows were all the same.The asymmetric PCR-SSCP had fewer,clearer and more stabile bands than traditional PCR-SSCP.This indicates that the asymmetric PCR-SSCP is suited for mutation detection.

  9. A Pair of Novel Primers for Universal Detection of the NS1 Gene from Various Bluetongue Virus Serotypes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui-qiong YIN; Gai-ping ZHANG; Hong ZHANG; Jin-gang ZHANG

    2008-01-01

    Twenty five serotypes of Bluetongue virus (BTV) have been identified worldwide. Rapid and reliable methods of virus universal detection are essential for fighting against bluetongue (BT). We have therefore developed and evaluated a pair of primers which can detect various serotypes of BTV by RT-PCR. Analysis of the viral protein 7 (VP7) and the non-structural protein (NS1) gene from different serotypes of BTV by DNAstar showed that the 5' end of the NS1 gene is the most conserved region. The primer pairs (P1 and P2) were designed based on the highly conserved region of NS1. The novel primers were evaluated by detecting BTV serotypes 1, 3, 5, 8, 10, 11, 21 and 22. The specificity of the primers was estimated by comparing to gene sequences of viruses published in GenBank, and further assessed by detecting BTV serotype 1-12 and Epizootic hemorrhagic disease virus (EHDV) serotype 1-4. The sensitivity and repeatability of PCR with the novel primers were evaluated by successfully detecting the recombinant plasmid pGEM-T121 containing the diagnosed nucleotide sequence. Our results suggest that these unique primers can be used in high throughout and universal detection of the NS1 gene from various BTV serotypes.

  10. Oxidative stress/reactive metabolite gene expression signature in rat liver detects idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leone, Angelique; Nie, Alex; Brandon Parker, J.; Sawant, Sharmilee; Piechta, Leigh-Anne; Kelley, Michael F., E-mail: mkelley2@its.jnj.com; Mark Kao, L.; Jim Proctor, S.; Verheyen, Geert; Johnson, Mark D.; Lord, Peter G.; McMillian, Michael K.

    2014-03-15

    Previously we reported a gene expression signature in rat liver for detecting a specific type of oxidative stress (OS) related to reactive metabolites (RM). High doses of the drugs disulfiram, ethinyl estradiol and nimesulide were used with another dozen paradigm OS/RM compounds, and three other drugs flutamide, phenacetin and sulindac were identified by this signature. In a second study, antiepileptic drugs were compared for covalent binding and their effects on OS/RM; felbamate, carbamazepine, and phenobarbital produced robust OS/RM gene expression. In the present study, liver RNA samples from drug-treated rats from more recent experiments were examined for statistical fit to the OS/RM signature. Of all 97 drugs examined, in addition to the nine drugs noted above, 19 more were identified as OS/RM-producing compounds—chlorpromazine, clozapine, cyproterone acetate, dantrolene, dipyridamole, glibenclamide, isoniazid, ketoconazole, methapyrilene, naltrexone, nifedipine, sulfamethoxazole, tamoxifen, coumarin, ritonavir, amitriptyline, valproic acid, enalapril, and chloramphenicol. Importantly, all of the OS/RM drugs listed above have been linked to idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity, excepting chloramphenicol, which does not have a package label for hepatotoxicity, but does have a black box warning for idiosyncratic bone marrow suppression. Most of these drugs are not acutely toxic in the rat. The OS/RM signature should be useful to avoid idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity of drug candidates. - Highlights: • 28 of 97 drugs gave a positive OS/RM gene expression signature in rat liver. • The specificity of the signature for human idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants was 98%. • The sensitivity of the signature for human idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants was 75%. • The signature can help eliminate hepatotoxicants from drug development.

  11. Oxidative stress/reactive metabolite gene expression signature in rat liver detects idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previously we reported a gene expression signature in rat liver for detecting a specific type of oxidative stress (OS) related to reactive metabolites (RM). High doses of the drugs disulfiram, ethinyl estradiol and nimesulide were used with another dozen paradigm OS/RM compounds, and three other drugs flutamide, phenacetin and sulindac were identified by this signature. In a second study, antiepileptic drugs were compared for covalent binding and their effects on OS/RM; felbamate, carbamazepine, and phenobarbital produced robust OS/RM gene expression. In the present study, liver RNA samples from drug-treated rats from more recent experiments were examined for statistical fit to the OS/RM signature. Of all 97 drugs examined, in addition to the nine drugs noted above, 19 more were identified as OS/RM-producing compounds—chlorpromazine, clozapine, cyproterone acetate, dantrolene, dipyridamole, glibenclamide, isoniazid, ketoconazole, methapyrilene, naltrexone, nifedipine, sulfamethoxazole, tamoxifen, coumarin, ritonavir, amitriptyline, valproic acid, enalapril, and chloramphenicol. Importantly, all of the OS/RM drugs listed above have been linked to idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity, excepting chloramphenicol, which does not have a package label for hepatotoxicity, but does have a black box warning for idiosyncratic bone marrow suppression. Most of these drugs are not acutely toxic in the rat. The OS/RM signature should be useful to avoid idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity of drug candidates. - Highlights: • 28 of 97 drugs gave a positive OS/RM gene expression signature in rat liver. • The specificity of the signature for human idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants was 98%. • The sensitivity of the signature for human idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants was 75%. • The signature can help eliminate hepatotoxicants from drug development

  12. Detection of Critical Genes Associated with Overall Survival (OS) and Progression-Free Survival (PFS) in Reconstructed Canine B-Cell Lymphoma Gene Regulatory Network (GRN).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani-Ahmadmahmudi, Mohamad; Najafi, Ali; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Canine B-cell lymphoma GRN was reconstructed from gene expression data in the STRING and MiMI databases. Critical genes of networks were identified and correlations of critical genes with overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) were evaluated. Significant changes were detected in the expressions of GLUL, CD44, CD79A, ARF3, FOS, BLOC1S1, FYN, GZMB, GALNT3, IFI44, CD3G, GNG2, ESRP1, and CCND1 in the STRING network and of PECAM1, GLUL, CD44, GDI1, E2F4, TLE1, CD79A, UCP2, CCND1, FYN, RHOQ, BIN1, and A2M in the MiMI network. Final survival analysis highlighted CCND1 and FOS as genes with significant correlations with OS and PFS. PMID:26818715

  13. Impairment of novelty detection in mice targeted for the Chl1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratte, Michel; Jamon, Marc

    2009-06-22

    A deficit in cell adhesion molecules including the human Chl1 (close homologue of the L1 cell adhesion molecule) gene may cause impairment of cognitive processes. Aberrant connectivity in the CA3 region of the hippocampus has been reported in mice lacking the CHL1 protein after Chl1 gene targeting. Previous studies have observed a deficit in the processing of novel information by CHL1-deficient mice. We investigated deficits in spatial discrimination and object discrimination in three groups of mice--Chl1(+/+), Chl1(+/-) and Chl1(-/-)--performing spatial and object novelty tasks. The results indicated that wild-type mice easily recognized objects that were either "displaced" or "substituted". Chl1(-/-) mice showed severe impairment of the capacity to react to both spatial and non-spatial novelty. Chl1(+/-) mice were severely restricted in their ability to detect spatial changes, but succeeded in novel object discrimination. A dose-dependent sensitivity of the organization of the CA3 layer to the CHL1 protein may explain this result. However, the observations suggest that a dysfunction of parts of the brain other than the hippocampus may be involved in the impairment. PMID:19303029

  14. RT-PCR detection of exotoxin genes expression in multidrug resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartor, Y H; El-Naenaeey, E Y

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA) is an opportunistic pathogen responsible for causing a wide variety of acute and chronic infections with significant levels of morbidity and mortality. These infections are very hard to eradicate because of the expression of numerous virulence factors and the intrinsic resistance against antibiotics. Herein, this study analyzed antimicrobial susceptibility of PA isolated from broiler chickens and cattle as well as expression of five significant exotoxin genes (exoU, exoS, toxA, lasB, and phzM) and ecfX as internal control. Genomic DNA was amplified employing oprL gene for species specific detection of PA. The highest resistance was found to ampicillin, erythromycin, followed by, chloramphenicol, trimethoprim/ sulfamethoxazole and tetracycline, intermediately sensitive to ceftazidime, cefoperazone, and highly sensitive to gentamicin, levofloxacin, imipenem, ciprofloxacin and colistin. It appears that exoU+ and increased resistance to SXT may be co-selected traits. Vast majority of PA isolates expressed exoS (78.6%), exoU (71.4%) and both in more virulent strains. The ubiquity of toxA, lasB, exoU and exoS among PA clinical isolates is consistent with an important role for these virulence factors in chicken respiratory diseases and cattle mastitis that can be highlighted as potential therapeutic targets for treatment of infections caused by heterogeneous and resistant PA strains. PMID:26828988

  15. Detection of Intracellular Adhesion (ica Gene and Biofilm Formation Staphylococcus aureus Isolates from Clinical Blood Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohsen Mirzaee

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: In fact the biofilms are composed of bacterial cells living inmulticellular structures such as tissues and organs embedded within a self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS. Ability to attach and biofilm formation are the most important virulence factors Staphylococcus aureus isolates. The aims of this study were to detect intracellular adhesion (ica locus and its relation to the biofilm formation phenotype in clinical isolates of S. aureus isolated from bloodcultures.Methods: A total of 31 clinical S. aureus isolates were collected from Loghman Hospital of Tehran, Iran. In vitro biofilm formation ability was determined by microliter tissue culture plates. All clinical isolates were examined for determination the ica locus by using PCR method.Results: Twelve (38.7% of the isolates were strong biofilm producers. The results showed that 18(80.6% of the isolates carried icaD gene, whereas the prevalence of icaA, icaB and icaC were 51.6%, 45.1% and 77.4% respectively.Conclusions: S. aureus clinical isolates have different ability to form biofilm. This may be caused by the differences in the expression of biofilm related genes, genetic make-up and physiological conditions.

  16. Oxidative stress/reactive metabolite gene expression signature in rat liver detects idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Angelique; Nie, Alex; Brandon Parker, J; Sawant, Sharmilee; Piechta, Leigh-Anne; Kelley, Michael F; Mark Kao, L; Jim Proctor, S; Verheyen, Geert; Johnson, Mark D; Lord, Peter G; McMillian, Michael K

    2014-03-15

    Previously we reported a gene expression signature in rat liver for detecting a specific type of oxidative stress (OS) related to reactive metabolites (RM). High doses of the drugs disulfiram, ethinyl estradiol and nimesulide were used with another dozen paradigm OS/RM compounds, and three other drugs flutamide, phenacetin and sulindac were identified by this signature. In a second study, antiepileptic drugs were compared for covalent binding and their effects on OS/RM; felbamate, carbamazepine, and phenobarbital produced robust OS/RM gene expression. In the present study, liver RNA samples from drug-treated rats from more recent experiments were examined for statistical fit to the OS/RM signature. Of all 97 drugs examined, in addition to the nine drugs noted above, 19 more were identified as OS/RM-producing compounds-chlorpromazine, clozapine, cyproterone acetate, dantrolene, dipyridamole, glibenclamide, isoniazid, ketoconazole, methapyrilene, naltrexone, nifedipine, sulfamethoxazole, tamoxifen, coumarin, ritonavir, amitriptyline, valproic acid, enalapril, and chloramphenicol. Importantly, all of the OS/RM drugs listed above have been linked to idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity, excepting chloramphenicol, which does not have a package label for hepatotoxicity, but does have a black box warning for idiosyncratic bone marrow suppression. Most of these drugs are not acutely toxic in the rat. The OS/RM signature should be useful to avoid idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity of drug candidates. PMID:24486436

  17. Multiplex PCR detection of GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTP1 gene variants: simultaneously detecting GSTM1 and GSTT1 gene copy number and the allelic status of the GSTP1 Ile105Val genetic variant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchard, Anders; Sanchez Sanchez, Juan Jose; Dalhoff, Kim;

    2007-01-01

    The glutathione S-transferase (GST) genes GSTM1, GSTT1, and GSTP1 are involved in the detoxification of a broad range of toxic substances. Genetic polymorphisms in these genes have been studied intensively for their potential role in cancer susceptibility and drug response. In Caucasians, the...... none, one, or two copies of the GSTM1 and GSTT1 genes and simultaneously detects the allelic status of the GSTP1 Ile105Val genetic variant. A total of 200 Danes, 100 Somalis, and 100 Greenlanders were genotyped. This multiplex PCR assay enables future large-scale studies to investigate the role of GSTs....

  18. Detection and linkage to mobile genetic elements of tetracycline resistance gene tet(M) in Escherichia coli isolates from pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurado-Rabadan, Sonia; de la Fuente, Ricardo; Ruiz-Santa-Quiteria, Jose A.;

    2014-01-01

    (M) has been identified in E. coli, to our knowledge, there are no previous reports studying the linkage of the tet(M) gene in E. coli to different mobile genetic elements. The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of tet(A), tet(B), and tet(M) genes in doxycycline-resistant E. coli isolates...... from pigs, as well as the detection of mobile genetic elements linked to tet(M) in E. coli and its possible transfer from enterococci. Results: tet(A) was the most frequently detected gene (87.9%) in doxycycline-resistant isolates. tet(M) was found in 13.1% E. coli isolates. The tet(M) gene...

  19. Detection and linkage to mobile genetic elements of tetracycline resistance gene tet(M) in Escherichia coli isolates from pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jurado-Rabadán, Sonia; de la Fuente, Ricardo; A Ruiz-Santa-Quiteria, José;

    2014-01-01

    (M) has been identified in E. coli, to our knowledge, there are no previous reports studying the linkage of the tet(M) gene in E. coli to different mobile genetic elements. The aim of this study was to determine the occurrence of tet(A), tet(B), and tet(M) genes in doxycycline-resistant E. coli isolates...... from pigs, as well as the detection of mobile genetic elements linked to tet(M) in E. coli and its possible transfer from enterococci. RESULTS: tet(A) was the most frequently detected gene (87.9%) in doxycycline-resistant isolates. tet(M) was found in 13.1% E. coli isolates. The tet(M) gene...

  20. Genetic study of autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia and familial myasthenia gravis : linkage analysis, candidate gene cloning and mutation detection

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Fang-Yuan

    2001-01-01

    Identification of genes responsible for familial human diseases is a major task of medical genetics. In this process, linkage analysis, candidate gene screening and mutation detection are the three major steps (Paper I-VI). The purpose of this study was to elucidate the genetic backgrounds of autosomal dominant progressive external ophthalmoplegia (adPEO) and familial inyasthenia gravis (FMG). The methods applied in this study for linkage analysis and repeat expansion we...

  1. Detection of mcr-1 colistin resistance gene in polyclonal Escherichia coli isolates in Barcelona, Spain, 2012 to 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prim, Núria; Rivera, Alba; Rodríguez-Navarro, Judith; Español, Montserrat; Turbau, Miquel; Coll, Pere; Mirelis, Beatriz

    2016-03-31

    Colistin resistance was detected in 53 of 10,011 Escherichia coli (0.5%) by prospective phenotypic testing of consecutive clinical isolates in a single hospital in Barcelona, Spain (2012-15). The mcr-1 gene was retrospectively identified by PCR and sequencing in 15 of 50 available isolates. Each isolate had a unique PFGE pattern except for two. This clonal diversity supports the hypothesis of horizontal dissemination of the mcr-1 gene in the local study population. PMID:27055477

  2. Detection and Quantification of Mosaic Mutations in Disease Genes by Next-Generation Sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lan; Wang, Jing; Tian, Xia; Yu, Hui; Truong, Cavatina; Mitchell, John J; Wierenga, Klaas J; Craigen, William J; Zhang, Victor Wei; Wong, Lee-Jun C

    2016-05-01

    The identification of mosaicism is important in establishing a disease diagnosis, assessing recurrence risk, and genetic counseling. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) with deep sequence coverage enhances sensitivity and allows for accurate quantification of the level of mosaicism. NGS identifies low-level mosaicism that would be undetectable by conventional Sanger sequencing. A customized DNA probe library was used for capturing targeted genes, followed by deep NGS analysis. The mean coverage depth per base was approximately 800×. The NGS sequence data were analyzed for single-nucleotide variants and copy number variations. Mosaic mutations in 10 cases/families were detected and confirmed by NGS analysis. Mosaicism was identified for autosomal dominant (JAG1, COL3A1), autosomal recessive (PYGM), and X-linked (PHKA2, PDHA1, OTC, and SLC6A8) disorders. The mosaicism was identified either in one or more tissues from the probands or in a parent of an affected child. When analyzing data from patients with unusual testing results or inheritance patterns, it is important to further evaluate the possibility of mosaicism. Deep NGS analysis not only provides insights into the spectrum of mosaic mutations but also underlines the importance of the detection of mosaicism as an integral part of clinical molecular diagnosis and genetic counseling. PMID:26944031

  3. Detection and Diversity evaluation of tetracycline resistance genes in grassland-based production systems in Colombia, South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanna eSantamaría

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Grassland-based production systems use approximately 26 percent of land surface on earth. However, there are no evaluations of these systems as a source of antibiotic pollution. This study was conducted to evaluate the presence, diversity, and distribution of tetracycline resistance genes in the grasslands of the Colombian Andes, where administration of antibiotics to animals is limited to treat disease and growth promoters are not included in animals’ diet. Animal (ruminal fluid and feces and environmental (soil and water samples were collected from six different dairy cattle farms and evaluated by PCR for the genes encoding ribosomal protection proteins (RPPs tet(M, tet(O, tetB(P, tet(Q tet(W, tet(S, tet(T, tet(A, and tetracycline efflux pumps tet(A, tet(B, tet(D, tet(H, tet(J, tet(Z, and tet(D. A wide distribution and high frequency for genes tet(W and tet(Q were found in both sample types. Other genes encoding RPPs ( tetB(P, tet(O, tet(M, tet(S and tet(T were detected at lower frequencies and more restricted distributions. Genes encoding efflux pumps were not common in this region, and only two of them, tet(B and tet(Z, were detected. DGGE-PCR followed by comparative sequence analysis of tet(W and tet(Q showed that the sequences detected in animals did not differ from those coming from soil and water, suggesting the transmission of tet genes from animal reservoirs to the environment. Additionally, there seems to be a differential flow of tet genes from one reservoir to the other because gene tet(O and tetB(P, detected in high frequencies in feces, were detected in low frequencies or not detected at all in the environment. Finally, the farms sampled in this study showed more than 50% similarity in relation to the tet genes detected and their frequencies. However, farms closer in space and under the influence of the same hydrographic network were significantly more similar to each other.

  4. Sequence diversity within the HA-1 gene as detected by melting temperature assay without oligonucleotide probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattiuz Pier

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The minor histocompatibility antigens (mHags are self-peptides derived from common cellular proteins and presented by MHC class I and II molecules. Disparities in mHags are a potential risk for the development of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD in the recipients of bone marrow from HLA-identical donors. Two alleles have been identified in the mHag HA-1. The correlation between mismatches of the mHag HA-1 and GvHD has been suggested and methods to facilitate large-scale testing were afterwards developed. Methods We used sequence specific primer (SSP PCR and direct sequencing to detect HA-1 gene polymorphisms in a sample of 131 unrelated Italian subjects. We then set up a novel melting temperature (Tm assay that may help identification of HA-1 alleles without oligonucleotide probes. Results We report the frequencies of HA-1 alleles in the Italian population and the presence of an intronic 5 base-pair deletion associated with the immunogeneic allele HA-1H. We also detected novel variable sites with respect to the consensus sequence of HA-1 locus. Even though recombination/gene conversion events are documented, there is considerable linkage disequilibrium in the data. The gametic associations between HA-1R/H alleles and the intronic 5-bp ins/del polymorphism prompted us to try the Tm analysis with SYBR® Green I. We show that the addition of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO during the assay yields distinct patterns when amplicons from HA-1H homozygotes, HA-1R homozygotes, and heterozygotes are analysed. Conclusion The possibility to use SYBR® Green I to detect Tm differences between allelic variants is attractive but requires great caution. We succeeded in allele discrimination of the HA-1 locus using a relatively short (101 bp amplicon, only in the presence of DMSO. We believe that, at least in certain assets, Tm assays may benefit by the addition of DMSO or other agents affecting DNA strand conformation and stability.

  5. Evaluation of four endogenous reference genes and their real-time PCR assays for common wheat quantification in GMOs detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huali Huang

    Full Text Available Proper selection of endogenous reference genes and their real-time PCR assays is quite important in genetically modified organisms (GMOs detection. To find a suitable endogenous reference gene and its real-time PCR assay for common wheat (Triticum aestivum L. DNA content or copy number quantification, four previously reported wheat endogenous reference genes and their real-time PCR assays were comprehensively evaluated for the target gene sequence variation and their real-time PCR performance among 37 common wheat lines. Three SNPs were observed in the PKABA1 and ALMT1 genes, and these SNPs significantly decreased the efficiency of real-time PCR amplification. GeNorm analysis of the real-time PCR performance of each gene among common wheat lines showed that the Waxy-D1 assay had the lowest M values with the best stability among all tested lines. All results indicated that the Waxy-D1 gene and its real-time PCR assay were most suitable to be used as an endogenous reference gene for common wheat DNA content quantification. The validated Waxy-D1 gene assay will be useful in establishing accurate and creditable qualitative and quantitative PCR analysis of GM wheat.

  6. Proteomic Detection of Non-Annotated Protein-Coding Genes in Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Wook; Silby, Mark W.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Nicoll, Julie S.; Hixson, Kim K.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Lipton, Mary S.; Levy, Stuart B.

    2009-12-24

    Genome sequences are annotated by computational prediction of coding sequences, followed by similarity searches such as BLAST, which provide a layer of (possible) functional information. While the existence of processes such as alternative splicing complicates matters for eukaryote genomes, the view of bacterial genomes as a linear series of closely spaced genes leads to the assumption that computational annotations which predict such arrangements completely describe the coding capacity of bacterial genomes. We undertook a proteomic study to identify proteins expressed by Pseudomonas fluorescens Pf0-1 from genes which were not predicted during the genome annotation. Mapping peptides to the Pf0-1 genome sequence identified sixteen non-annotated protein-coding regions, of which nine were antisense to predicted genes, six were intergenic, and one read in the same direction as an annotated gene but in a different frame. The expression of all but one of the newly discovered genes was verified by RT-PCR. Few clues as to the function of the new genes were gleaned from informatic analyses, but potential orthologues in other Pseudomonas genomes were identified for eight of the new genes. The 16 newly identified genes improve the quality of the Pf0-1 genome annotation, and the detection of antisense protein-coding genes indicates the under-appreciated complexity of bacterial genome organization.

  7. Detecting lineage-specific adaptive evolution of brain-expressed genes in human using rhesus macaque as outgroup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xiao-Jing; Zheng, Hong-Kun; Wang, Jun;

    2006-01-01

    Comparative genetic analysis between human and chimpanzee may detect genetic divergences responsible for human-specific characteristics. Previous studies have identified a series of genes that potentially underwent Darwinian positive selection during human evolution. However, without a closely...... related species as outgroup, it is difficult to identify human-lineage-specific changes, which is critical in delineating the biological uniqueness of humans. In this study, we conducted phylogeny-based analyses of 2633 human brain-expressed genes using rhesus macaque as the outgroup. We identified 47...... candidate genes showing strong evidence of positive selection in the human lineage. Genes with maximal expression in the brain showed a higher evolutionary rate in human than in chimpanzee. We observed that many immune-defense-related genes were under strong positive selection, and this trend was more...

  8. DETECTED OF AERO GENE IN AEROMONAS HYDROPHILA ISOLATES FROM SHRIMP AND PEELED SHRIMP SAMPLES IN LOCAL MARKETS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa Kareem Niamah

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available A 62 isolates were isolated from 33 samples of shrimp and peeled shrimp in three local markets in Basrah city. A 36 isolates were identified to be Aeromonas hydrophila bacteria depending on morphological, microscopic examinations and ten biochemical tests. 83.33% (30 isolates from isolates produced ß-haemolysis on tryptone soy agar with 5% sheep blood. Aero gene detection by polymerase chain reaction technique, Theband appearance in the amplified gene of bacteria shows the molecular weight of aerolysin (424 bp. A 100% (36 isolates of Aeromonas hydrophila isolates were contained Aero gene.

  9. Use of a chiA probe for detection of chitinase genes in bacteria from the Chesapeake Bay

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramaiah, N.; Hill, R.T.; Chun, J.; Ravel, J.; Matte, M.H.; Straube, W.L.; Colwell, R.R.

    from several distantly re- lated bacteria facilitated selection of highly conserved re- gions of the chiA gene for design of PCR primers expected to have broad speci¢city for detection of chiA in a wide range of bacteria. Our aims were to construct a...,34]. In the present study, chiA gene-speci¢c PCR primers and a chiA gene probe were developed and their speci¢city veri¢ed using a large assemblage of reference strains. The chiA frag- ments ampli¢ed by PCR from representative strains were sequenced to con...

  10. Development of ARMS PCR tests for detection of common CFTR gene mutations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Livshits L. A.

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To develop diagnostic assays, based on the amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS principle, for detection of common mutations in the CFTR gene using two approaches: standard PCR with further gel-electrophoresis and Real-Time PCR with SYBR Green. Materials. For this study we have chosen the following mutations: dF508, W1282X, R117H, 621 + 1G > T, 2143delT with the frequencies in Ukraine: dF508 – 43.3 %; 2143delT – 1.38 %; W1282X – 1.1 %; R117H, 621 + 1G > T – T, 2143delT mutations. To validate the developed assays we have analyzed control DNA samples with the following mutations: W1282X (n = 3, R117H (n = 2, 621 + 1G > T (n = 1, 2143delT (n = = 1. For validation of the dF508 assay we have analyzed 100 heterozygous carriers and 50 homozygous carriers. We have analyzed 48 patients with cystic fibrosis, in which only one mutation was previously detected in combination with unknown mutant variant, using the developed ARMS assay for the 2143delT mutation, and detected 4 heterozygous carriers. No differences were observed in comparison with the standard protocols. Conclusions. It was shown that ARMS is a reliable, rapid and inexpensive method, and the developed assays can be applied in the standard PCR protocol with further gel-electrophoresis as well as using Real-Time PCR with SYBR Green for the molecular genetic diagnostics of cystic fibrosis.

  11. An alternative nested-PCR assay for the detection of Toxoplasma gondii strains based on GRA7 gene sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Maria Eduarda S M; Oliveira, Claudio Bruno S; Andrade, Joelma Maria de A; Medeiros, Thatiany A; Neto, Valter F Andrade; Lanza, Daniel C F

    2016-07-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a widespread parasite able to infect virtually any nucleated cells of warm-blooded hosts. In some cases, T. gondii detection using already developed PCR primers can be inefficient in routine laboratory tests, especially to detect atypical strains. Here we report a new nested-PCR protocol able to detect virtually all T. gondii isolates. Analyzing 685 sequences available in GenBank, we determine that GRA7 is one of the most conserved genes of T. gondii genome. Based on an alignment of 85 GRA7 sequences new primer sets that anneal in the highly conserved regions of this gene were designed. The new GRA7 nested-PCR assay providing sensitivity and specificity equal to or greater than the gold standard PCR assays for T. gondii detection, that amplify the B1 sequence or the repetitive 529bp element. PMID:27036222

  12. PCR amplification of a multi-copy mitochondrial gene (cox3) improves detection of Cytauxzoon felis infection as compared to a ribosomal gene (18S).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreeg, Megan E; Marr, Henry S; Griffith, Emily H; Tarigo, Jaime L; Bird, David M; Reichard, Mason V; Cohn, Leah A; Levy, Michael G; Birkenheuer, Adam J

    2016-07-30

    Cytauxzoon felis is a tick-transmitted protozoan parasite that infects felids. Clinical disease caused by acute C. felis infection rapidly progresses in domestic cats, leading to high morbidity and mortality. Accurately diagnosing cytauxzoonosis as soon as possible during acute infection would allow for earlier initiation of antiprotozoal therapy which could lead to higher survival rates. Molecular detection of parasite rRNA genes (18S) by PCR has previously been shown to be a sensitive method of diagnosing C. felis infections. Based on evidence from related apicomplexan species, we hypothesized that C. felis mitochondrial genes would exist at higher copy numbers than 18S and would be a more sensitive diagnostic target. In this study we have designed a PCR assay targeting the C. felis mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase subunit III (cox3). Herein we demonstrate that (1) the cox3 PCR can detect as low as 1 copy of DNA target and can detect C. felis in samples with known mitochondrial sequence heterogeneity, (2) cox3 copy number is increased relative to 18S in blood and tissue samples from acutely infected cats, and (3) the cox3 PCR is more sensitive than 18S PCR for detection of C. felis during early infections. PMID:27369587

  13. A powerful method for detecting differentially expressed genes from GeneChip arrays that does not require replicates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hein Anne-Mette K

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies of differential expression that use Affymetrix GeneChip arrays are often carried out with a limited number of replicates. Reasons for this include financial considerations and limits on the available amount of RNA for sample preparation. In addition, failed hybridizations are not uncommon leading to a further reduction in the number of replicates available for analysis. Most existing methods for studying differential expression rely on the availability of replicates and the demand for alternative methods that require few or no replicates is high. Results We describe a statistical procedure for performing differential expression analysis without replicates. The procedure relies on a Bayesian integrated approach (BGX to the analysis of Affymetrix GeneChips. The BGX method estimates a posterior distribution of expression for each gene and condition, from a simultaneous consideration of the available probe intensities representing the gene in a condition. Importantly, posterior distributions of expression are obtained regardless of the number of replicates available. We exploit these posterior distributions to create ranked gene lists that take into account the estimated expression difference as well as its associated uncertainty. We estimate the proportion of non-differentially expressed genes empirically, allowing an informed choice of cut-off for the ranked gene list, adapting an approach proposed by Efron. We assess the performance of the method, and compare it to those of other methods, on publicly available spike-in data sets, as well as in a proper biological setting. Conclusion The method presented is a powerful tool for extracting information on differential expression from GeneChip expression studies with limited or no replicates.

  14. Novel Mutations Detected in Avirulence Genes Overcoming Tomato Cf Resistance Genes in Isolates of a Japanese Population of Cladosporium fulvum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichiro Iida

    Full Text Available Leaf mold of tomato is caused by the biotrophic fungus Cladosporium fulvum which complies with the gene-for-gene system. The disease was first reported in Japan in the 1920s and has since been frequently observed. Initially only race 0 isolates were reported, but since the consecutive introduction of resistance genes Cf-2, Cf-4, Cf-5 and Cf-9 new races have evolved. Here we first determined the virulence spectrum of 133 C. fulvum isolates collected from 22 prefectures in Japan, and subsequently sequenced the avirulence (Avr genes Avr2, Avr4, Avr4E, Avr5 and Avr9 to determine the molecular basis of overcoming Cf genes. Twelve races of C. fulvum with a different virulence spectrum were identified, of which races 9, 2.9, 4.9, 4.5.9 and 4.9.11 occur only in Japan. The Avr genes in many of these races contain unique mutations not observed in races identified elsewhere in the world including (i frameshift mutations and (ii transposon insertions in Avr2, (iii point mutations in Avr4 and Avr4E, and (iv deletions of Avr4E, Avr5 and Avr9. New races have developed by selection pressure imposed by consecutive introductions of Cf-2, Cf-4, Cf-5 and Cf-9 genes in commercially grown tomato cultivars. Our study shows that molecular variations to adapt to different Cf genes in an isolated C. fulvum population in Japan are novel but overall follow similar patterns as those observed in populations from other parts of the world. Implications for breeding of more durable C. fulvum resistant varieties are discussed.

  15. ModuleMiner - improved computational detection of cis-regulatory modules: are there different modes of gene regulation in embryonic development and adult tissues?

    OpenAIRE

    Van Loo, Peter; Aerts, Stein; Thienpont, Bernard; De Moor, Bart; Moreau, Yves; Marynen, Peter

    2008-01-01

    We present ModuleMiner, a novel algorithm for computationally detecting cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) in a set of co-expressed genes. ModuleMiner outperforms other methods for CRM detection on benchmark data, and successfully detects CRMs in tissue-specific microarray clusters and in embryonic development gene sets. Interestingly, CRM predictions for differentiated tissues exhibit strong enrichment close to the transcription start site, whereas CRM predictions for embryonic development gene s...

  16. Direct Detection and Differentiation of Pathogenic Leptospira Species Using a Multi-Gene Targeted Real Time PCR Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Ana Sofia Ferreira; Pedro Costa; Teresa Rocha; Ana Amaro; Maria Luísa Vieira; Ahmed Ahmed; Gertrude Thompson; Hartskeerl, Rudy A.; João Inácio

    2014-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a growing public and veterinary health concern caused by pathogenic species of Leptospira. Rapid and reliable laboratory tests for the direct detection of leptospiral infections in animals are in high demand not only to improve diagnosis but also for understanding the epidemiology of the disease. In this work we describe a novel and simple TaqMan-based multi-gene targeted real-time PCR approach able to detect and differentiate Leptospira interrogans, L. kirschneri, L. borgpet...

  17. Detection of Brazilian hantavirus by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction amplification of N gene in patients with hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Lázaro Moreli; Ricardo Luiz Moro de Sousa; Luiz Tadeu Moraes Figueiredo

    2004-01-01

    We report a nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for hantavirus using primers selected to match high homology regions of hantavirus genomes detected from the whole blood of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) patients from Brazil, also including the N gene nucleotide sequence of Araraquara virus. Hantavirus genomes were detected in eight out of nine blood samples from the HCPS patients by RT-PCR (88.9% positivity) and in all 9 blood samples (100% positi...

  18. GENE XPERT MTB/RIF-A NOVEL DIAGNOSTIC TOOL FOR RAPID AND SPECIFIC DETECTION OF MYCOBACTERIUM TUBERCULOSIS IN PULMONARY SAMPLES

    OpenAIRE

    Praveen; Ramana Reddy; Subramanyam Hari; Sowjanya; Prithvi; Ramya; Bharadwaj; Mohan

    2014-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains one of the most significant causes of death from an infectious agent. The rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis and detection of rifampin (RIF) resistance are essential for early disease management. The Gene Xpert MTB/RIF assay is a novel integrated diagnostic device for the diagnosis of tuberculosis and rapid detection of RIF resistance in clinical specimens. We determined the performance of the MTB/RIF assay for rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis ...

  19. Infección por Helicobacter pylori en la Ciudad de La Habana, Cuba.Prevalencia de las cepas cagA positivas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Gutiérrez

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Existe una gran falta de información acerca de la infección por Helicobacter pylori en los países de la región del Caribe. Nuestros objetivos en este estudio fueron determinar la prevalencia, la resistencia a los antibióticos y los factores de virulencia de la bacteria. La medida de la prevalencia de la infección por H. pylori se determinó en un grupo de pacientes a los que se les practicó una endoscopia en tres centros hospitalarios de La Ciudad de La Habana, lo que nos permitió evaluar la resistencia a la claritromicina y la presencia de cagA + en las cepas obtenidas. De las endoscopias realizadas se obtuvieron 117 biopsias gástricas, procedentes de tres centros hospitalarios de La Ciudad de La Habana, Cuba: Instituto de Oncología, Instituto de Gastroenterología y el Hospital Calixto García. Las biopsias fueron mantenidas a –70 ºC para posterior cultivo en tres medios diferentes (dos selectivos y uno no selectivo y su posterior incubación por 7 días a 37 ºC en una atmósfera de microaerofilia. La presencia de H. pylori fue identificada por la presencia de diferentes enzimas (oxidasa, catalasa, ureasa. Se realizó la extracción del DNA y la PCR, donde se utilizó el primer H2761676 y se amplificó con 397 fragmentos del gen cagA. La susceptibilidad a la claritromicina fue medida por el método de difusión en gel. Diagnóstico endoscópico: (1 cáncer gástrico; (19 úlcera duodenal; (8 úlcera gástrica; (89 dispepsias no ulcerosas, incluyendo (62 gastritis; (9 hernia hiatal; (2 reflujo biliar; (1 pólipo gástrico; (15 panendoscopias normales. Del total de 117 biopsias realizadas, 83 fueron positivas a la infección por H.pylori (70,9% . De las 35 cepas a las que se les realizó presencia de cagA+ resultaron positivas 31 (88,5%. Solo el 3% de las cepas fueron resistentes a la claritromicina. La prevalencia de la infección por H. pylori en la población sintomática de La Ciudad de La Habana es la misma que la reportada en

  20. Comparison of different phenotypic methods of detection of methicillin resistance in staphylococcus aureus with the molecular detection of mec-a gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate accuracy, cost-effectiveness and ease to perform different phenotypic methods i.e. Cefoxitin 30 micro g disc, Oxacillin 1micro g disc and Oxacillin agar screening plate (6 micro g/ml) for early and accurate identification of MRSA by comparing with the detection of mec-A gene in our clinical isolates. Out of 200 clinical samples, conventional Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) was done on 62 pure biochemically identified S. aureus isolates for mec-A gene detection. Phenotypic methods for detecting methicillin sensitivity (Cefoxitin 30 microg disc, Oxacillin 1 micro g disc and Oxacillin agar screening plate) were also used according to the recommended incubation time, duration and temperature on the same isolates. Out of 62 isolates of S. aureus, mec-A gene were detected (MRSA) in 32, whereas 30 were mec-A gene negative (MSSA). Cefoxitin disc and agar screening plate correctly identify all MRSA isolates with the sensitivity and specificity of 100%. Single isolate was false, positively detected as sensitive with Oxacillin 1g disc, due to which, the sensitivity and negative predictive value of this method were reduced to 96.9% and 96.8% respectively, while positive predictive value and specificity remained 100%. Comparing different phenotypic methods for MRSA screening in routine microbiology laboratory, Cefoxitin disc and Oxacillin agar screening has better sensitivity and specificity comparative to Oxacillin disc. However, Cefoxitin disc can be preferred especially for small laboratories because it is easy to perform, do not require special technique and media preparation is consequently more cost-effective. (author)

  1. Ultrafiltration and Microarray for Detection of Microbial Source Tracking Marker and Pathogen Genes in Riverine and Marine Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Harwood, Valerie J; Nayak, Bina; Weidhaas, Jennifer L

    2016-03-01

    Pathogen identification and microbial source tracking (MST) to identify sources of fecal pollution improve evaluation of water quality. They contribute to improved assessment of human health risks and remediation of pollution sources. An MST microarray was used to simultaneously detect genes for multiple pathogens and indicators of fecal pollution in freshwater, marine water, sewage-contaminated freshwater and marine water, and treated wastewater. Dead-end ultrafiltration (DEUF) was used to concentrate organisms from water samples, yielding a recovery efficiency of >95% for Escherichia coli and human polyomavirus. Whole-genome amplification (WGA) increased gene copies from ultrafiltered samples and increased the sensitivity of the microarray. Viruses (adenovirus, bocavirus, hepatitis A virus, and human polyomaviruses) were detected in sewage-contaminated samples. Pathogens such as Legionella pneumophila, Shigella flexneri, and Campylobacter fetus were detected along with genes conferring resistance to aminoglycosides, beta-lactams, and tetracycline. Nonmetric dimensional analysis of MST marker genes grouped sewage-spiked freshwater and marine samples with sewage and apart from other fecal sources. The sensitivity (percent true positives) of the microarray probes for gene targets anticipated in sewage was 51 to 57% and was lower than the specificity (percent true negatives; 79 to 81%). A linear relationship between gene copies determined by quantitative PCR and microarray fluorescence was found, indicating the semiquantitative nature of the MST microarray. These results indicate that ultrafiltration coupled with WGA provides sufficient nucleic acids for detection of viruses, bacteria, protozoa, and antibiotic resistance genes by the microarray in applications ranging from beach monitoring to risk assessment. PMID:26729716

  2. Presymptomatic breast cancer in Egypt: role of BRCA1 and BRCA2 tumor suppressor genes mutations detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashishe Mervat M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is one of the most common diseases affecting women. Inherited susceptibility genes, BRCA1 and BRCA2, are considered in breast, ovarian and other common cancers etiology. BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes have been identified that confer a high degree of breast cancer risk. Objective Our study was performed to identify germline mutations in some exons of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes for the early detection of presymptomatic breast cancer in females. Methods This study was applied on Egyptian healthy females who first degree relatives to those, with or without a family history, infected with breast cancer. Sixty breast cancer patients, derived from 60 families, were selected for molecular genetic testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. The study also included 120 healthy first degree female relatives of the patients, either sisters and/or daughters, for early detection of presymptomatic breast cancer mutation carriers. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood lymphocytes of all the studied subjects. Universal primers were used to amplify four regions of the BRCA1 gene (exons 2,8,13 and 22 and one region (exon 9 of BRCA2 gene using specific PCR. The polymerase chain reaction was carried out. Single strand conformation polymorphism assay and heteroduplex analysis were used to screen for mutations in the studied exons. In addition, DNA sequencing of the normal and mutated exons were performed. Results Mutations in both BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes were detected in 86.7% of the families. Current study indicates that 60% of these families were attributable to BRCA1 mutations, while 26.7% of them were attributable to BRCA2 mutations. Results showed that four mutations were detected in the BRCA1 gene, while one mutation was detected in the BRCA2 gene. Asymptomatic relatives, 80(67% out of total 120, were mutation carriers. Conclusions BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes mutations are responsible for a significant proportion of breast cancer. BRCA mutations

  3. Detection of lytA, pspC, and rrgA genes in Streptococcus pneumoniae isolated from healthy children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholamhosseini-Moghaddam, Tahereh; Rad, Mehrnaz; Mousavi, Seyed Fazlollah; Ghazvini, Kiarash

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Many surface proteins are implicated in nasopharyngeal colonization and pathogenesis of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Some of these factors are candidate antigens for protein based vaccines. New vaccine designs focus on the surface proteins (e. g., pspA and pspC) and also cytolysin, and pneumolysin. In this study, 3 key virulence genes, lytA, pspC, and rrgA, which encoded surface proteins, were detected among S. pneumoniae isolates. Materials and Methods: A total of 260 nasopharyngeal swabs were collected from healthy children under 6 years old attending day care centers in Mashhad, Iran. Isolates of S. pneumoniae were confirmed by optochin susceptibility and colony appearance and also by PCR for cpsA gene. The presence of lytA, pspC, and rrgA genes were also detected by PCR. Results: A total of 59 isolates were confirmed as S. pneumoniae. Among these isolates, 50 (84.74%), 19 (32.20%), and 2 (3.38%) were positive for lytA, rrgA, and pspC genes respectively. The presence of these genes among S.pneumoniae isolates were as follows: 1) rrgA, lytA, pspC (1 isolate), 2) rrgA, lytA(17isolates), 3) pspC (2 isolate), 4) lytA (50 isolates). Conclusion: cpsA gene was specific for detection of S. pneumoniae isolates which were colonized in nasopharynx. The lytA gene was the most frequent gene among the S. pneumoniae isolates, and combination of rrgA, lytA was the most observed pattern. Thus, it is important for future monitoring of vaccine formulation in our country. PMID:26668703

  4. Detection of non-genotoxic hepatocarcinogens and prediction of their mechanism of action in rats using gene marker sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanki, Masayuki; Gi, Min; Fujioka, Masaki; Wanibuchi, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have successfully detected hepatocarcinogenicity in rats based on gene expression data. However, prediction of hepatocarcinogens with certain mechanisms of action (MOAs), such as enzyme inducers and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonists, can prove difficult using a single model and requires a highly toxic dose. Here, we constructed a model for detecting non-genotoxic (NGTX) hepatocarcinogens and predicted their MOAs in rats. Gene expression data deposited in the Open Toxicogenomics Project-Genomics Assisted Toxicity Evaluation System (TG-GATEs) was used to investigate gene marker sets. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to discriminate different MOAs, and a support vector machine algorithm was applied to construct the prediction model. This approach identified 106 probe sets as gene marker sets for PCA and enabled the prediction model to be constructed. In PCA, NGTX hepatocarcinogens were classified as follows based on their MOAs: cytotoxicants, PPARα agonists, or enzyme inducers. The prediction model detected hepatocarcinogenicity with an accuracy of more than 90% in 14- and 28-day repeated-dose studies. In addition, the doses capable of predicting NGTX hepatocarcinogenicity were close to those required in rat carcinogenicity assays. In conclusion, our PCA and prediction model using gene marker sets will help assess the risk of hepatocarcinogenicity in humans based on MOAs and reduce the number of two-year rodent bioassays. PMID:26961613

  5. SYBR® Green qPCR Screening Methods for Detection of Anti-herbicide Genes in Genetically Modiifed Processed Products

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen Zhen; Lv Wei; Tang Zhi-fen; Liu Ying; Ao Jin-xia; Yuan Xiao-han; Zhang Ming-hui; Qiu You-wen; Gao Xue-jun

    2016-01-01

    The use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) as food products becomes more and more widespread. The European Union has implemented a set of very strict procedures for the approval to grow, import and/or utilize GMOs as food or food ingredients. Thus, analytical methods for detection of GMOs are necessary in order to verify compliance with labelling requirements. There are few effective screening methods for processed GM (genetically modified) products. Three anti-herbicide genes (CP4-EPSPS,BAR andPAT) are common exogenous genes used in commercialized transgenic soybean, maize and rice. In the present study, a new SYBR® Green qPCR screening method was developed to simultaneously detect the three exogenous anti-herbicide genes and one endogenous gene in a run. We tested seven samples of representative processed products (soya lecithin, soya protein powder, chocolate beverage, infant rice cereal, maize protein powder, maize starch, and maize jam) using the developed method, and amplicons of endogenous gene and transgenic fragments were obtained from all the processed products, and the sensitivity was 0.1%. These results indicated that SYBR® Green qPCR screening method was appropriate for qualitative detection of transgenic soybean, maize and rice in processed products.

  6. Detection of mismatch repair gene germline mutation carrier among Chinese population with colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) is an autosomal dominant syndrome. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has recommended the Revised Bethesda guidelines for screening HNPCC. There has been a great deal of research on the value of these tests in other countries. However, literature about the Chinese population is scarce. Our objective is to detect and study microsatellite instability (MSI) and mismatch repair (MMR) gene germline mutation carriers among a Chinese population with colorectal cancer. In 146 prospectively recruited consecutive patients with clinically proven colorectal cancer, MSI carriers were identified by analysis of tumor tissue using multiplex fluorescence polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using the NCI recommended panel and classified into microsatellite instability-low (MSI-L), microsatellite instability-high (MSI-H) and microsatellite stable (MSS) groups. Immunohistochemical staining for MSH2, MSH6 and MLH1 on tissue microarrays (TMAs) was performed, and methylation of the MLH1 promoter was analyzed by quantitative methylation specific PCR (MSP). Germline mutation analysis of blood samples was performed for MSH2, MSH6 and MLH1 genes. Thirty-four out of the 146 colorectal cancers (CRCs, 23.2%) were MSI, including 19 MSI-H CRCs and 15 MSI-L CRCS. Negative staining for MSH2 was found in 8 CRCs, negative staining for MSH6 was found in 6 CRCs. One MSI-H CRC was negative for both MSH6 and MSH2. Seventeen CRCs stained negatively for MLH1. MLH1 promoter methylation was determined in 34 MSI CRCs. Hypermethylation of the MLH1 promoter occurred in 14 (73.7%) out of 19 MSI-H CRCs and 5 (33.3%) out of 15 MSI-L CRCs. Among the 34 MSI carriers and one MSS CRC with MLH1 negative staining, 8 had a MMR gene germline mutation, which accounted for 23.5% of all MSI colorectal cancers and 5.5% of all the colorectal cancers. Five patients harbored MSH2 germline mutations, and three patients harbored MSH6 germline mutations. None of the patients had an MLH

  7. Detection of antibiotic resistance and tetracycline resistance genes in Enterobacteriaceae isolated from the Pearl rivers in South China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao Ran [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 511 Kehua Street, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Ying Guangguo, E-mail: guangguo.ying@gmail.co [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 511 Kehua Street, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Su Haochang [State Key Laboratory of Organic Geochemistry, Guangzhou Institute of Geochemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 511 Kehua Street, Tianhe District, Guangzhou 510640 (China); Zhou Hongwei [Department of Environmental Health, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Southern Medical University, 1838 North Guangzhou Street, Baiyun District, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Sidhu, Jatinder P.S. [CSIRO Land and Water, Queensland Bioscience Precinct, 306 Carmody Road, St Lucia QLD 4067 (Australia)

    2010-06-15

    This study investigated antibiotic resistance profiles and tetracycline resistance genes in Enterobacteriaceae family isolates from the Pearl rivers. The Enterobacteriaceae isolates were tested for susceptibility to seven antibiotics ampicillin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim, tetracycline and trimethoprim. In Liuxi reservoir, with an exception to ampicillin resistant strains (11%) no other antibiotic resistance bacterial strains were detected. However, multiple drug resistance in bacterial isolates from the other sites of Pearl rivers was observed which is possibly due to sewage discharge and input from other anthropogenic sources along the rivers. Four tetracycline resistance genes tet A, tet B, tet C and tet D were detected in the isolates from the rivers. The genes tet A and tet B were widely detected with the detection frequencies of 43% and 40% respectively. Ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin resistant enteric bacteria were also isolated from the pig and duck manures which suggest a wider distribution of human specific drugs in the environment. This investigation provided a baseline data on antibiotic resistance profiles and tetracycline resistance genes in the Pearl rivers delta. - High rates of antibiotic resistance in Enterobacteriaceae from river water are attributed to wastewater contamination.

  8. Detection of antibiotic resistance and tetracycline resistance genes in Enterobacteriaceae isolated from the Pearl rivers in South China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated antibiotic resistance profiles and tetracycline resistance genes in Enterobacteriaceae family isolates from the Pearl rivers. The Enterobacteriaceae isolates were tested for susceptibility to seven antibiotics ampicillin, chloramphenicol, ciprofloxacin, levofloxacin, sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim, tetracycline and trimethoprim. In Liuxi reservoir, with an exception to ampicillin resistant strains (11%) no other antibiotic resistance bacterial strains were detected. However, multiple drug resistance in bacterial isolates from the other sites of Pearl rivers was observed which is possibly due to sewage discharge and input from other anthropogenic sources along the rivers. Four tetracycline resistance genes tet A, tet B, tet C and tet D were detected in the isolates from the rivers. The genes tet A and tet B were widely detected with the detection frequencies of 43% and 40% respectively. Ciprofloxacin and levofloxacin resistant enteric bacteria were also isolated from the pig and duck manures which suggest a wider distribution of human specific drugs in the environment. This investigation provided a baseline data on antibiotic resistance profiles and tetracycline resistance genes in the Pearl rivers delta. - High rates of antibiotic resistance in Enterobacteriaceae from river water are attributed to wastewater contamination.

  9. PCR-RFLP to Detect Codon 248 Mutation in Exon 7 of "p53" Tumor Suppressor Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Liming; Ge, Chongtao; Wu, Haizhen; Li, Suxia; Zhang, Huizhan

    2009-01-01

    Individual genome DNA was extracted fast from oral swab and followed up with PCR specific for codon 248 of "p53" tumor suppressor gene. "Msp"I restriction mapping showed the G-C mutation in codon 248, which closely relates to cancer susceptibility. Students learn the concepts, detection techniques, and research significance of point mutations or…

  10. Quantitative detection of selenate-reducing bacteria by real-time PCR targeting the selenate reductase gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Li-Lian; Lai, Chun-Yu; Yang, Qiang; Chen, Jia-Xian; Zhang, Yin; Ontiveros-Valencia, Aura; Zhao, He-Ping

    2016-04-01

    We designed a primer set to target selenate reductase (SerA) for detecting selenate reducing bacteria (SeRB). Our serA gene-based PCR primer set has high specificity in that it and positively amplified some SeRB, but not denitrifying bacteria (DB). Phylogenetic analysis of serA clone sequences of environmental samples from selenate-reducing membrane biofilm reactor (MBfR) biofilms showed that these sequences were closely grouped and had high similarity to selenate reductase gene sequences from SeRB Thauera selenatis and DB Dechloromonas; however, they were distant to other genes from dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) enzyme family. Constructing a standard curve targeting the serA gene, we found that the good linearity for the qPCR assay when applied it to quantify SeRB in MBfR biofilms, and the gene copies of SeRB correlated well to the selenate removal percentages. Our results demonstrated the feasibility of using the serA gene-based PCR primer set to detect and quantify SeRB in environmental samples. PMID:26920476

  11. No detectable reiteration of genes coding for mouse MOPC 41 immunoglobulin light-chain mRNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farace, M G; Aellen, M F; Briand, P A; Faust, C H; Vassalli, P; Mach, B

    1976-01-01

    RNA fractions rich in immunoglobulin light (L)-chain mRNA were isolated from mouse myeloma MOPC 41 by procedures previously described, and chemically labeled with 125I. These RNA fractions were hybridized with MOPC 41 DNA under conditions of DNA excess. Hybridization conditions were chosen under which the entire sequence of the L-chain mRNA probe, thus including the variable region, remains available for hybridization throughout the reaction. The hybridization (C0t) curve showed double transition kinetics, with one component corresponding to about 250 gene copies and the other to about two to four copies. In contrast, when MOPC 41 L-chain mRNA was further purified as a single band by gel elecptrophoresis in 99% formamide, the hybridization curve showed only a single transition, corresponding to about two to four genes, with the disappearance of the "reiterated" component. That component resulted therefore from contaminating RNA species. The data indicate that no reiteration can be detected by RNase or by hydroxylapatite for the genes corresponding to the entire sequence of MOPC 41 L-chain mRNA, including the untranslated segments, within the limits of detectability of short reiterated segments. It thus appears that there is only one or very few genes corresponding to the 41 L-chain variable region "subgroup" in MOPC 41 DNA. The possibility that the variable genes of plasmocytes might result frm a combination of several nonreiterated germline genes is discussed. Images PMID:815907

  12. Detection and distribution of putative virulence associated genes in Aeromonas species from freshwater and wastewater treatment plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igbinosa, Isoken H; Okoh, Anthony I

    2013-11-01

    The detection of genes responsible for Aeromonas virulence is a vital tool in establishing the potential pathogenicity of the bacteria, as these virulence genes may act alone or in synergy in the establishment of infections. Freshwater and wastewater mixed liquor samples were collected from Kat river and Fort Beaufort wastewater treatment plant in the Eastern Cape Province of South Africa. Polymerase chain reaction was utilized for the amplification of the different genes coding for virulence. All virulence associated genes screened (alt, lip, fla, aer, ast, hlyA) were detected in at least one Aeromonas isolates. In fresh water sample, virulence genes were distributed as follows: lip (67%), aer (43%), alt (33%), fla (62%), ast (10%), and hlyA (86%), while in wastewater samples the occurrence were as follows: lip (92%), aer (21%), alt (54%), fla (83%), ast (29%), and hlyA (88%). The presence of these virulence genes in environmental Aeromonas isolates is of concern to public health as these organisms are potential pathogens in the environment and the virulence determinants could be transferred to aquatic organisms and humans by one mechanism or the other. PMID:23322604

  13. Optimal two-stage strategy for detecting interacting genes in complex diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Man Michael

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mapping of complex diseases is one of the most important problems in human genetics today. The rapid development of technology for genetic research has led to the discovery of millions of polymorphisms across the human genome, making it possible to conduct genome-wide association studies with hundreds of thousands of markers. Given the large number of markers to be tested in such studies, a two-stage strategy may be a reasonable and powerful approach: in the first stage, a small subset of promising loci is identified using single-locus testing, and, in the second stage, multi-locus methods are used while taking into account the loci selected in the first stage. In this report, we investigate and compare two possible two-stage strategies for genome-wide association studies: a conditional approach and a simultaneous approach. Results We investigate the power of both the conditional and the simultaneous approach to detect the disease loci for a range of two-locus disease models in a case-control study design. Our results suggest that, overall, the conditional approach is more robust and more powerful than the simultaneous approach; the conditional approach can greatly outperform the simultaneous approach when one of the two disease loci has weak marginal effect, but interacts strongly with the other, stronger locus (easily detectable using single-locus methods in the first stage. Conclusion Genome-wide association studies hold the promise of finding new genes implicated in complex diseases. Two-stage strategies are likely to be employed in these large-scale studies. Therefore we compared two natural two-stage approaches: the conditional approach and the simultaneous approach. Our power studies suggest that, when doing genome-wide association studies, a two-stage conditional approach is likely to be more powerful than a two-stage simultaneous approach.

  14. Characterization of RPO B gene for detection of rifampicin drug resistance by SSCP and sequence analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negi S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Because of the emergence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis in recent times, the rapid detection of resistance to the first-line anti-tuberculosis drug rifampicin was felt worldwide. Accordingly, this study was conducted to evaluate the diagnostic potential of polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP for checking its utility as a rapid screening test for determination of rifampicin drug resistance. Materials and Methods: A total of 34 isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( M. tuberculosis (22 rifampicin resistant, 11 rifampicin sensitive and one control H37Rv strains were analysed by PCR-SSCP and DNA sequencing within the 157-bp region of the rpo B gene (Ala 500 -Val 550 . Results: Rifampicin resistance was detected successfully by PCR-SSCP in 20/22(90.90% of rifampicin-resistant strains showing a total of nine different mutations in seven codon positions: codon 513 (CAA→CCA, 516 (GAC→GTC, 507 (GGC→GAC, 526 (CAC→GAC, TAC, 531 (TCG→TTG, TGG, 522 (TCG→TGG and 533 (GTG→CCG. Two rifampicin-resistant strains showed an identical PCR-SSCP pattern with the wild type H37Rv; 77.27% rifampicin-resistant strains showed a single point mutation and 9.09% had no mutation. Three rifampicin-resistant strains showed characteristic double mutations at codon positions 526 and 531. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated as 90.90% and 100%. Conclusions: Rifampicin-resistant genotypes were mainly found in codon positions 516, 526 and 531. PCR-SSCP seems to be an efficacious method of predicting rifampicin resistance and substantially reduces the time required for susceptibility testing from 4 to 6 weeks to a few weeks.

  15. OrgConv: detection of gene conversion using consensus sequences and its application in plant mitochondrial and chloroplast homologs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Weilong

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ancestry of mitochondria and chloroplasts traces back to separate endosymbioses of once free-living bacteria. The highly reduced genomes of these two organelles therefore contain very distant homologs that only recently have been shown to recombine inside the mitochondrial genome. Detection of gene conversion between mitochondrial and chloroplast homologs was previously impossible due to the lack of suitable computer programs. Recently, I developed a novel method and have, for the first time, discovered recurrent gene conversion between chloroplast mitochondrial genes. The method will further our understanding of plant organellar genome evolution and help identify and remove gene regions with incongruent phylogenetic signals for several genes widely used in plant systematics. Here, I implement such a method that is available in a user friendly web interface. Results OrgConv (Organellar Conversion is a computer package developed for detection of gene conversion between mitochondrial and chloroplast homologous genes. OrgConv is available in two forms; source code can be installed and run on a Linux platform and a web interface is available on multiple operating systems. The input files of the feature program are two multiple sequence alignments from different organellar compartments in FASTA format. The program compares every examined sequence against the consensus sequence of each sequence alignment rather than exhaustively examining every possible combination. Making use of consensus sequences significantly reduces the number of comparisons and therefore reduces overall computational time, which allows for analysis of very large datasets. Most importantly, with the significantly reduced number of comparisons, the statistical power remains high in the face of correction for multiple tests. Conclusions Both the source code and the web interface of OrgConv are available for free from the OrgConv website http

  16. Diagnosis of mantle cell lymphoma and detection of bcl-1 gene rearrangement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reclassified a large series of non-Hogkin's lymphoma diagnosed at Korea Cancer Center Hospital from 1991 to 1995, according to REAL classification, and compared the efficacy of immunohistochemical study for cyclin D1 protein and PCR for bcl-1 gene rearrangement to diagnose mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). By REAL classification, 7 %, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was the most common type (51.8%) and was followed by peripheral T-cell lymphoma-unspecified (10%) and angiocentric lymphoma (7.5%). The most reliable histologic finding was mitosis to make a differential diagnosis. Mitoses of MCL were 17/10 HPF in average and all the cases showed more than 10/10 HPF. Immunophenotypic study alone cannot lead to a differential diagnosis between MCL and SLL, and the overexpression of cyclin D1 was the most important for diagnosis of MCL . Both immunohistochemistry for cyclin D1 and PCR for bcl-1 were specific for MCL and immunohistochemistry was more sensitive than PCR. Statistical analysis showed a different survival rate between MCL and the other low-grade B-cell lymphomas (SLL + MALT + LPL) and a difference between MCL and SLL. Immunohistochemical detection of cyclin D1 has a practical usefulness in making routine diagnosis of MCL. The initial accurate diagnosis of MCL will help clinicians make a proper management. (author). 27 refs., 6 tabs., 4 figs

  17. Diagnosis of mantle cell lymphoma and detection of bcl-1 gene rearrangement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Sook; Cho, Kyung Ja; Lee, Sun Joo [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-12-01

    We reclassified a large series of non-Hogkin`s lymphoma diagnosed at Korea Cancer Center Hospital from 1991 to 1995, according to REAL classification, and compared the efficacy of immunohistochemical study for cyclin D1 protein and PCR for bcl-1 gene rearrangement to diagnose mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). By REAL classification, 7 %, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma was the most common type (51.8%) and was followed by peripheral T-cell lymphoma-unspecified (10%) and angiocentric lymphoma (7.5%). The most reliable histologic finding was mitosis to make a differential diagnosis. Mitoses of MCL were 17/10 HPF in average and all the cases showed more than 10/10 HPF. Immunophenotypic study alone cannot lead to a differential diagnosis between MCL and SLL, and the overexpression of cyclin D1 was the most important for diagnosis of MCL . Both immunohistochemistry for cyclin D1 and PCR for bcl-1 were specific for MCL and immunohistochemistry was more sensitive than PCR. Statistical analysis showed a different survival rate between MCL and the other low-grade B-cell lymphomas (SLL + MALT + LPL) and a difference between MCL and SLL. Immunohistochemical detection of cyclin D1 has a practical usefulness in making routine diagnosis of MCL. The initial accurate diagnosis of MCL will help clinicians make a proper management. (author). 27 refs., 6 tabs., 4 figs.

  18. Detection of genetic diversity and selective gene introgression in coffee using RAPD markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Castillo, C; Chalmers, K J; Waugh, R; Powell, W

    1994-03-01

    RAPD (randomly amplified polymorphic DNA) markers generated by arbitary decamers have been successfully employed to detect genetic polymorphisms between coffee species and between Coffea arabica genotypes. The RAPD profiles were used to construct dendrograms and these were consistent with the known history and evolution of Coffea arabica. Material originating from Ethiopia and the arabica sub-groups - C. arabica var. typica and C. arabica var. bourbon - were clearly distinguished. RAPD analysis therefore reflects morphological differences between the sub-groups and the geographical origin of the coffee material. Species-specific amplification products were also identified, but, more importantly, amplification products specific to C. canephora were identified in two C. arabica genotypes, Rume Sudan and Catimor 5175. This diagnostic product is therefore indicative of interspecific gene flow in coffee and has biological implications for selective introgressive hybridisation in coffee. Our study demonstrates the power of the polymerase chain reaction technology for the generation of genetic markers for long-lived perennial tree and bush crops. PMID:24190527

  19. Detecting and weighting the true corridors of species kinetics and gene flows: Linkage Flow Connectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Ferrarini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Flow connectivity (FC is a methodology, alternative and in opposition to both circuit theory and least-cost modelling, first introduced in 2013 to realistically forecast biotic flows over real landscapes. FC turns a static frictional map into a dynamical simulation of biotic flows from any source points indicated by the user. In this work, FC is further developed to find a solution to the problem of detecting the true corridors of species dispersals and gene flows. The output of this method is the realistic map of biotic corridors, determined in a bottom-up way by considering the interaction between landscape properties and species requirements, and not in a top-down approach based on the supposed expert knowledge of some researcher. Not only true corridors are mapped, but they are also automatically weighted based on their importance to support biotic flows. The same corridor can bear different levels of importance in different portions of its length. This outcome is pivotal from both conservation and management viewpoints. An applicative example is provided.

  20. Detection of sequences homologous to human retroviral DNA in multiple sclerosis by gene amplification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty-one patients with multiple sclerosis, chronic progressive type, were examined for DNA sequences homologous to a human retrovirus. Genomic DNA from peripheral blood mononuclear cells was analyzed for the presence of homologous sequences to the human T-cell leukemia/lymphoma virus type I (HTLV-I) long terminal repeat, 3' gag, pol, and env domains by the enzymatic in vitro gene amplification technique, polymerase chain reaction. Positive identification of homologous pol sequences was made in the amplified DNA from six of these patients (29%). Three of these six patients (14%) also tested positive for the env region, but not for the other regions tested. In contrast, none of the samples from 35 normal individuals studied was positive when amplified and tested with the same primers and probes. Comparison of patterns obtained from controls and from patients with adult T-cell leukemia or tropical spastic paraparesis suggests that the DNA sequences identified are exogenous to the human genome and may correspond to a human retroviral species. The data support the detection of a human retroviral agent in some patients with multiple sclerosis

  1. New Analytical Tool for the Detection of Ractopamine Abuse in Goat Skeletal Muscle by Potential Gene Expression Biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Luyao; Yang, Shuming; Zhang, Yanhua; Zhang, Ying; Hou, Can; Cheng, Yongyou; You, Xinyong; Gu, Xu; Zhao, Zhen; Muhammad Tarique, Tunio

    2016-03-01

    In this study, quantification of mRNA gene expression was examined as biomarkers to detect ractopamaine abuse and ractopamaine residues in cashmere goats. It was focused on the identification of potential gene expression biomarkers and describing the coreletionship between gene expression and residue level by 58 animals for 49 days. The results showed that administration periods and residue levels significantly influenced mRNA expressions of the β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), the enzymes PRKACB, ADCY3, ATP1A3, ATP2A3, PTH, and MYLK, and the immune factors IL-1β and TNF-α. Statistical analysis like principal components analysis (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA), and discriminant analysis (DA) showed that these genes can serve as potential biomarkers for ractopamine in skeletal muscle and that they are also suitable for describing different residue levels separately. PMID:26886866

  2. Development, validation, and application of PCR primers for detection of tetracycline efflux genes of gram-negative bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aminov, R I; Chee-Sanford, J C; Garrigues, N; Teferedegne, B; Krapac, I J; White, B A; Mackie, R I

    2002-04-01

    Phylogenetic analysis of tetracycline resistance genes, which confer resistance due to the efflux of tetracycline from the cell catalyzed by drug:H(+) antiport and share a common structure with 12 transmembrane segments (12-TMS), suggested the monophyletic origin of these genes. With a high degree of confidence, this tet subcluster unifies 11 genes encoding tet efflux pumps and includes tet(A), tet(B), tet(C), tet(D), tet(E), tet(G), tet(H), tet(J), tet(Y), tet(Z), and tet(30). Phylogeny-aided alignments were used to design a set of PCR primers for detection, retrieval, and sequence analysis of the corresponding gene fragments from a variety of bacterial and environmental sources. After rigorous validation with the characterized control tet templates, this primer set was used to determine the genotype of the corresponding tetracycline resistance genes in total DNA of swine feed and feces and in the lagoons and groundwater underlying two large swine production facilities known to be impacted by waste seepage. The compounded tet fingerprint of animal feed was found to be tetCDEHZ, while the corresponding fingerprint of total intestinal microbiota was tetBCGHYZ. Interestingly, the tet fingerprints in geographically distant waste lagoons were identical (tetBCEHYZ) and were similar to the fecal fingerprint at the third location mentioned above. Despite the sporadic detection of chlortetracycline in waste lagoons, no auxiliary diversity of tet genes in comparison with the fecal diversity could be detected, suggesting that the tet pool is generated mainly in the gut of tetracycline-fed animals, with a negligible contribution from selection imposed by tetracycline that is released into the environment. The tet efflux genes were found to be percolating into the underlying groundwater and could be detected as far as 250 m downstream from the lagoons. With yet another family of tet genes, this study confirmed our earlier findings that the antibiotic resistance gene pool

  3. A new gene co-expression network analysis based on Core Structure Detection (CSD)

    OpenAIRE

    Brunet, A-C; Azais, J-M; Loubes, J-M; Amar, J; Burcelin, R

    2016-01-01

    We propose a novel method to cluster gene networks. Based on a dissimilarity built using correlation structures, we consider networks that connect all the genes based on the strength of their dissimilarity. The large number of genes require the use of the threshold to find sparse structures in the graph. in this work, using the notion of graph coreness, we identify clusters of genes which are central in the network. Then we estimate a network that has these genes as main hubs. We use this new...

  4. Detection of Gene Alteration for Color Vision Defects by Polymerase Chain Reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1992-01-01

    According to the fact that the abnormalities of visual pigment genes were always involved in the changing of the exon 5, two oligonucleotide primers were designed to amplify the exon 5 of red pigment gene and green pigment gene. After electrophoresis of the PCR products digested with Rsal or Sau3A, the DNA fragments from the exon 5 of red pigment gene (RPG) and green pigment gene (GPG) were separated since there are different restriction endonuclease sites. On the other hand, we analyzed the exon 5 rela...

  5. Detecting variable (V, diversity (D and joining (J gene segment recombination using a two-colour fluorescence system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott Gina B

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diversity of immunoglobulins and the T cell antigen receptors is achieved via the recombination activating gene (RAG-mediated rearrangement of variable (V, diversity (D and joining (J gene segments, and this underpins the efficient recognition of a seemingly limitless array of antigens. Analysis of V(DJ recombination activity is typically performed using extrachromosomal recombination substrates that are recovered from transfected cells and selected using bacterial transformation. We have developed a two-colour fluorescence-based system that simplifies detection of both deletion and inversion joining events mediated by RAG proteins. Results This system employs two fluorescent reporter genes that differentially mark unrearranged substrates and those that have undergone RAG-mediated deletion or inversion events. The recombination products bear the hallmarks of true V(DJ recombination and activity can be detected using fluorescence microscopy or flow cytometry. Recombination events can be detected without the need for cytotoxic selection of recombination products and the system allows analysis of recombination activity using substrates integrated into the genome. Conclusions This system will be useful in the analysis and exploitation of the V(DJ recombination machinery and suggests that similar approaches could be used to replace expression of one gene with another during lymphocyte development.

  6. PCR detection of oxytetracycline resistance genes otr(A) and otr(B) in tetracycline-resistant streptomycete isolates from diverse habitats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nikolakopoulou, T; Egan, S; van Overbeek, L; Guillaume, G; Heuer, H; Wellington, EMH; van Elsas, JD; Collard, JM; Smalla, K; Karagouni, A

    2005-01-01

    A range of European habitats was screened by PCR for detection of the oxytetracycline resistance genes otr(A) and otr(B), found in the oxytetracycline-producing strain Streptomyces rimosus. Primers were developed to detect these otr genes in tetracycline-resistant (Tc-R) streptomycete isolates from

  7. Study on drug resistance of mycobacterium tuberculosis in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis by drug resistance gene detecting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate drug resistance of mycobacterium tuberculosis in different age group, compare detecting effect of two methods and evaluate their the clinical application value, all of the strains of mycobacterium tuberculosis were tested for resistance to RFP, INH SM PZA and EMB by the absolute concentration method on Lowenstein-Jensen medium and the mutation of the rpoB, katG, rpsL, pncA and embB resistance genes in M. tuberculosis was tested by PCR-SSCP. In youth, middle and old age group, the rate of acquired drug resistance was 89.2%, 85.3% and 67.6% respectively, the gene mutation rate was 76.2%, 81.3% and 63.2% respectively. The rate of acquired drug resistance and multiple drug resistance in youth group was much higher than those in other groups. The gene mutation was correlated with drug resistance level of mycobacterium tuberculosis. The gene mutation rate was higher in strains isolated from high concentration resistance than those in strains isolated from low concentration resistance. The more irregular treatment was longer, the rate of drug resistance was higher. Acquired drug resistance varies in different age group. It suggested that surveillance of drug resistence in different age group should be taken seriously, especially in youth group. PCR - SSCP is a sensitive and specific method for rapid detecting rpoB, katG, rpsL, pncA and embB genes mutations of MTB. (authors)

  8. Sensitivity and Frequencies of Dystrophin Gene Mutations in Thai DMD/BMD Patients As Detected by Multiplex PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thanyachai Sura

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, a lethal X-linked disease affecting 1 in 3500 male births, and its more benign variant, Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD, are caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Because of its large size, analysing the whole gene is impractical. Methods have been developed to detect the commonest mutations i.e. the deletions of the exons. Although these tests are highly specific, their sensitivity is inherently limited by the prevalence of deletions, which differs among different populations.

  9. Diagnostic value of post-heparin lipase testing in detecting common genetic variants in the LPL and LIPC genes

    OpenAIRE

    van Hoek, Mandy; Dallinga-Thie, Geesje M.; Ewout W Steyerberg; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.

    2009-01-01

    Post-heparin lipoprotein lipase and hepatic lipase activities are used to identify primary disorders of triglyceride and HDL-cholesterol metabolism. Their ability to identify common variants in the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) and hepatic lipase (LIPC) genes is unclear. To investigate the ability of lipase testing to detect common lipase gene variants, we included 183 patients who had undergone post-heparin lipase testing and genotyped the LPL D9N, N291S, PvuII, HindIII, and S447X and the LIPC-51...

  10. DETECTING PRESENCE OF C/T POLYMORPHISM AT POSITION 34 SECOND INTRON OF THE MYOSTATIN GENE IN RABBITS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka MARKOWSKA

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Myostatin gene is a negative regulator of skeletal muscles growth. It is responsible for normal development of skeletal muscles. The objective of the research was to detect variation of C/T at position 34 of the second intron of the MNST gene in rabbits. The research included 114 rabbits: 54 of them Polish Rabbits, and 60 of them White Flemish Giants, examined by means of the PCR-RFLP method using AluI restriction enzyme. We found allele C with a frequency of 0.6184 of the examined rabbit population, and allele T with a frequency of 0.3816 of the examined rabbits.

  11. Effects of aspirin on metastasis-associated gene expression detected by cDNA microarray

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xue-qin GAO; Jin-xiang HAN; Hai-yan HUANG; Shi YAN; Chang-zheng SONG; Hai-nan HUANG

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of aspirin on the metastasis-associated gene expression in 3AO ovarian cancer cells.METHODS: 3AO cells were treated with aspirin at the concentration of 1.2 mmol/L for 16 and 48 h, respectively.The total RNA was extracted with Trizol reagents and reverse transcribed with Superscript II and hybridized with cDNA microarray (containing oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, signal transduction pathway molecules, adhesive molecules, growth factors and ESTs) fabricated in our lab. After normalization, the ratio of gene expression of aspirin treated to untreated 3AO cells being either 2 fold up higher or 0.5 fold down (lower) were defined as differential expression. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR was used to validate the microarray results. RESULTS: Among the 447 metastasis-associated genes, 4 genes were up-regulated and 14 genes were down-regulated in 3AO cells treated with aspirin for 16 h compared with untreated cells. While 24 genes were up-regulated and 10 genes were down-regulated in cells treated with aspirin for 48 h. Several up or down-regulated gene expression changes continued from 16 h to 48 h. CONCLUSION: Aspirin might exert its anti-metastasis effects on ovarian cancer by affecting metastasis-associated gene expression.

  12. Detection of genes encoding multidrug resistance and biofilm virulence factor in uterine pathogenic bacteria in postpartum dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasimanickam, V R; Owen, K; Kasimanickam, R K

    2016-01-15

    Reckless use of antibiotics and/or development of biofilm are the rationale for the development of multidrug resistance (MDR) of pathogenic bacteria. The objective of the present study was to detect MDR genes in Trueperella pyogenes and to detect biofilm virulence factor (VF) genes in Escherichia coli isolated from the uterus of postpartum dairy cows. Uterine secretions from different parity postpartum Holstein cows (n = 40) were collected using cytobrush technique after a sterile procedure from cows with varying degree of uterine inflammatory conditions. The cytobrush was stored in a specimen collector, placed in a cooler with ice, and transported to the laboratory within 2 hours. The pathogens were isolated and were identified initially by their colony morphology and biochemical characteristics. To further identify and classify the single species, and to determine the presence of MDR and VF genes, the genes fragments were amplified using the respective primers by either singleplex or multiplex polymerase chain reaction protocol, and amplicons were detected by electrophoresis method. T pyogenes was isolated in 17 of 40 (42.5%) cows in the study population as recognized by the 16S rRNA gene. Of the positive T pyogenes samples, 8 of 17 (42.1%) were positive for integron type 1 (intI I), and none were positive for integron type 2 (intI II). Of those 8 positive for intI I, six of eight (66.7%) were positive for amplicons aadA5 and aadA24-ORF1 at 1048 and 1608 bp, respectively, associated with specific drug resistance. Presence of addA5 indicated resistance to sulfadiazine, bacitracin, florfenicol, and ceftiofur. Presence of addA24-ORF1 indicated resistant to sulfadiazine, bacitracin, penicillin, clindamycin, and erythromycin. E coli was isolated in 18 of 40 (45.0%) cows in the study population. The genes for VF, Agn43a, and Agn43 b, associated with biofilm production, were found in 6 of 18 (33.3%) of the positive isolates. Both T pyogenes MDR gene and E coli

  13. Detection of Virulence Genes and Growth Potential in Listeria monocytogenes Strains Isolated from Ricotta Salata Cheese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coroneo, Valentina; Carraro, Valentina; Aissani, Nadhem; Sanna, Adriana; Ruggeri, Alessandra; Succa, Sara; Meloni, Barbara; Pinna, Antonella; Sanna, Clara

    2016-01-01

    Ricotta Salata is a traditional ripened and salted whey cheese made in Sardinia (Italy) from sheep's milk. This product is catalogued as ready-to-eat food (RTE) since it is not submitted to any further treatment before consumption. Thus, foodborne pathogens, such as Listeria monocytogenes, can represent a health risk for consumers. In September 2012, the FDA ordered the recall of several batches of Ricotta Salata imported from Italy linked to 22 cases of Listeriosis in the United States. This study was aimed at evaluating the presence and virulence properties of L. monocytogenes in 87 samples of Ricotta Salata produced in Sardinia. The ability of this product to support its growth under foreseen packing and storing conditions was also evaluated in 252 samples. Of the 87 samples 17.2% were positive for the presence of L. monocytogenes with an average concentration of 2.2 log10 cfu/g. All virulence-associated genes (prfA, rrn, hlyA, actA, inlA, inlB, iap, plcA, and plcB) were detected in only one isolated strain. The Ricotta Salata samples were artificially inoculated and growth potential (δ) was assessed over a period of 3 mo. The value of the growth potential was always >0.5 log10 cfu/g under foreseen packing and storing conditions. This study indicates that Ricotta Salata supports the L. monocytogenes growth to levels that may present a serious risk to public health, even while stored at refrigeration temperatures. PMID:26666835

  14. Using the Generalized Index of Dissimilarity to Detect Gene-Gene Interactions in Multi-Class Phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yee, Jaeyong; Kim, Yongkang; Park, Taesung; Park, Mira

    2016-01-01

    To find genetic association between complex diseases and phenotypic traits, one important procedure is conducting a joint analysis. Multifactor dimensionality reduction (MDR) is an efficient method of examining the interactions between genes in genetic association studies. It commonly assumes a dichotomous classification of the binary phenotypes. Its usual approach to determining the genomic association is to construct a confusion matrix to estimate a classification error, where a binary risk status is determined and assigned to each genotypic multifactor class. While multi-class phenotypes are commonly observed, the current MDR approach does not handle these phenotypes appropriately because the thresholds for the risk statuses may not be clear. In this study, we suggest a new method for estimating gene-gene interactions for multi-class phenotypes. Our approach adopts the index of dissimilarity (IDS) as an evaluation measure. This is analytically equivalent to the common association measure of balanced accuracy (BA) for the binary traits, while it is not required to determine the risk status for the estimation. Moreover, it is easily expandable to the generalized index of dissimilarity (GIDS), which has an explicit form that can handle any number of categories. The performance of the proposed method was compared with those of other approaches via simulation studies in which fifteen genetic models were generated with three class outcomes. A consistently better performance was observed using the proposed method. The effect of a varying number of categories was examined. The proposed method was also illustrated using real genome-wide association studies (GWAS) data from the Korean Association Resource (KARE) project. PMID:27556585

  15. Detection of catabolic genes in indigenous microbial consortia isolated from a diesel-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bioremediation is often used for in situ remediation of petroleum-contaminated sites. The primary focus of this study was on understanding the indigenous microbial community which can survive in contaminated environment and is responsible for the degradation. Diesel, toluene and naphthalene-degrading microbial consortia were isolated from diesel-contaminated soil by growing on selective hydrocarbon substrates. The presence and frequency of the catabolic genes responsible for aromatic hydrocarbon biodegradation (xylE, ndoB) within the isolated consortia were screened using polymerase chain reaction PCR and DNA-DNA colony hybridization. The diesel DNA-extract possessed both the xylE catabolic gene for toluene, and the nah catabolic gene for polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon degradation. The toluene DNA-extract possessed only the xylE catabolic gene, while the naphthalene DNA-extract only the ndoB gene. Restriction enzyme analysis with HaeIII indicated similar restriction patterns for the xylE gene fragment between toluene DNA-extract and a type strain, Pseudomonas putida ATCC 23973. A substantial proportion (74%) of the colonies from the diesel-consortium possessed the xylE gene, and the ndoB gene (78%), while a minority (29%) of the toluene-consortium harbored the xylE gene. 59% of the colonies from the naphthalene-consortium had the ndoB gene, and did not have the xylE gene. These results indicate that the microbial population has been naturally enriched in organisms carrying genes for aromatic hydrocarbon degradation and that significant aromatic biodegradative potential exists at the site. Characterization of the population genotype constitutes a molecular diagnosis which permits the determination of the catabolic potential of the site to degrade the contaminant present. (author)

  16. Gene arrangement at the Rhesus blood group locus of chimpanzees detected by fiber-FISH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suto, Y; Ishikawa, Y; Hyodo, H; Ishida, T; Kasai, F; Tanoue, T; Hayasaka, I; Uchikawa, M; Juji, T; Hirai, M

    2003-01-01

    The Rhesus (Rh) blood group system in humans is encoded by two genes with high sequence homology. These two genes, namely, RHCE and RHD, have been implied to be duplicated during evolution. However, the genomic organization of Rh genes in chimpanzees and other nonhuman primates has not been precisely studied. We analyzed the arrangement of the Rh genes of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) by two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization on chromatin DNA fibers (fiber-FISH) using two genomic DNA probes that respectively contain introns 3 and 7 of human RH genes. Among the five chimpanzees studied, three were found to be homozygous for the two-Rh-gene type, in an arrangement of Rh (5'-->3') - Rh (3'chimpanzees was about 50 kb longer than that in humans. The remaining two chimpanzees were homozygous for a four-Rh-gene type, in an arrangement of Rh (5'-->3') - Rh (3'interspecific genomic variations in the Rh gene locus in Hominoids would shed further light on reconstructing the genomic pathways of Rh gene duplication during evolution. PMID:14610358

  17. Molecular cloning, SNP detection and association analysis of 5' flanking region of the goat IGF1 gene with prolificacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Naicy; Venkatachalapathy, Thirupathy; Aravindakshan, Thazhathuveettil; Raghavan, K C

    2016-04-01

    The insulin-like growth factor 1 has an important role in reproduction, foetal development and growth. It regulates the secretion of gonadotrophin releasing hormone, stimulates ovarian function and steroidogenesis. The present study was conducted to characterise the 5' flanking region of goat IGF 1 gene, ascertain ovarian expression of the IGF1 gene, detect SNPs and assess the association with prolificacy in the two indigenous goat breeds of South India viz., low prolific Attappady Black and high prolific Malabari. The 5' flanking region of IGF1 gene was PCR amplified, cloned and sequenced from both breeds. Genotyping was performed in 277 goats from the two genetic groups using the PCR-Single Strand Conformational Polymorphism (SSCP) and the expression of the IGF1 gene in the ovary was analysed by quantitative real time PCR. The 5' flanking region of the IGF1 gene was 601 bp long and located at 450 bp upstream of the start codon. Sequence exhibited 97-99% similarity with that of the sheep, cattle and sika deer IGF1 genes. Three genotypes, PP, PQ and QR were observed at this locus with the frequency of 0.62, 0.30 and 0.08, respectively. Sequencing of the representative PCR products from each genotype revealed two SNPs, g.224A>G and g.227C>T. The population was found to be in Hardy-Weinberg disequilibrium at both loci. Statistical results indicated that these loci were associated with litter size (P ≤ 0.05). However, no significant difference was found in the expression of the IGF1 gene in the ovaries of the two goat breeds. These results suggest the significant influence of the IGF1 gene on prolificacy in goats and identified SNPs would benefit the selection of prolific animals in future breeding programs. PMID:26852275

  18. Application of real time polymerase chain reaction targeting kex 1 gene & its comparison with the conventional methods for rapid detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii in clinical specimens

    OpenAIRE

    Mani Revathy; Kulandai Lily Therese; Radhakishnan Bagyalakshmi; Chokaliingam Chandrasekar; Suria Kumar; Madhavan, Hajib N.

    2014-01-01

    Background & objectives: As there are no standard laboratory techniques for the rapid detection of Pneumocystis jirovecii in India, this study was undertaken to evaluate and establish an optimal and rapid technique for the detection of P. jirovecii by comparing three different techniques - staining technique, application of a real time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) targeting kex 1 gene and application of nested PCR targeting mitochondrial large subunit (mtLSU) gene for rapid detection of...

  19. Transfer and Detection of barstar Gene to Maize Inbred Line 18-599 (White) by Particle Bombardment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SUN Qing-quan; ZHANG Ying; RONG Ting-zhao; DONG Shu-ting; ZUO Zhen-peng

    2007-01-01

    In China, the purity of maize hybrid strain is discomforting to the development of seed industrialization. Finding a new method for reproduction of maize hybrid strain is necessary. In this study, using particle bombardment, barstar gene was transferred into maize inbred line 18-599 (White), which is an antiviral and high quality maize inbred line. By molecular detection of the anther of transgenic maize, two plants transferred with barstar gene were gained in this study, which are two restorer lines. The two plants showed normal male spike, and lively microspores. But the capacity of the two restorer lines should be studied in the future. The aim of this study is to find a new method of reproduction of maize hybrid strain using engineering restorer lines and engineering sterility lines by gene engineering technology.

  20. Positive relationship detected between soil bioaccessible organic pollutants and antibiotic resistance genes at dairy farms in Nanjing, Eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Mingming; Ye, Mao; Wu, Jun; Feng, Yanfang; Wan, Jinzhong; Tian, Da; Shen, Fangyuan; Liu, Kuan; Hu, Feng; Li, Huixin; Jiang, Xin; Yang, Linzhang; Kengara, Fredrick Orori

    2015-11-01

    Co-contaminated soils by organic pollutants (OPs), antibiotics and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs) have been becoming an emerging problem. However, it is unclear if an interaction exists between mixed pollutants and ARG abundance. Therefore, the potential relationship between OP contents and ARG and class 1 integron-integrase gene (intI1) abundance was investigated from seven dairy farms in Nanjing, Eastern China. Phenanthrene, pentachlorophenol, sulfadiazine, roxithromycin, associated ARG genes, and intI1 had the highest detection frequencies. Correlation analysis suggested a stronger positive relationship between the ARG abundance and the bioaccessible OP content than the total OP content. Additionally, the significant correlation between the bioaccessible mixed pollutant contents and ARG/intI1 abundance suggested a direct/indirect impact of the bioaccessible mixed pollutants on soil ARG dissemination. This study provided a preliminary understanding of the interaction between mixed pollutants and ARGs in co-contaminated soils. PMID:26256145

  1. Diversity of Archaea and detection of crenarchaeotal amoA genes in the rivers Rhine and Têt

    OpenAIRE

    Herfort, L.; Kim, J.H.; M J L Coolen; Abbas, B.; Schouten, S; Herndl, G. J.; Sinninghe Damste, J.S.

    2009-01-01

    Pelagic archaeal phylogenetic diversity and the potential for crenarchaeotal nitrification of Group 1.1a were determined in the rivers Rhine and Têt by 16S rRNA sequencing, catalyzed reported deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization (CARD–FISH) and quantification of 16S rRNA and functional genes. Euryarchaeota were, for the first time, detected in temperate river water even though a net predominance of crenarchaeotal phylotypes was found. Differences in phylogenic distribution were obser...

  2. Construction of a gene bank and use of the chromosome walking technique for the detection of new putative agrocin genes in Agrobacterium tumefaciens strain D286

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A gene bank of Agrobacterium tumefaciens D286 wt has been constructed by cloning D286 wt DNA partially digested with EcoRI in the cosmid vector pLAFRI. The library; composed of 1750 members with a 27.7 kb average insert size was probed with pCDTn5-3, a cosmid vector carrying a D286:: Tn5 insert from the strain D286:: Tn5 Ag-. One recombinant cosmid of the library, pCDO932, was detected. The insert DNA of pCDO932 has sequences homologous to the D286:: Tn5 insert of pCDTn5-3, therefore it carries putative wt agrocin D286 genes. The insert DNA of pCDO932 was isolated and used to probe the D286 wt gene library. Chromosome walking resulted in the detection of pCD2375. EcoRI restriction digestions and DNA homology studies of pCDO932 and pCD2375 showed that their D286 wt inserts are both composed of 4 EcoRI DNA sub-fragments totalling 21.8 and 24.8 kb respectively, with an overlapping sequence extending 3.5 kb. In order to overcome the failure to detect A. tumefaciens cells transformed with pCDO932. Vectors pSUP204-1 was constructed. Such vector has been derived from pSUP204 which were slightly altered by cloning into it a 700 bp λ DNA SalI fragmet. This resulted in insertion inactivation of the Tcr gene, allows the use of pSUP204-1 as a subcloning vector in conjugations and transformations involving pCDO932 or pCD2375 and strains D286:: Tn5 Ag- and C58 C1G. Two recombinant cosmids bearing D286 wt DNA inserts, at least one of which (pCDO932) contains DNA sequences putatively affecting agrocin D286 production, are now available for further genetic manipulations. pSUP204-1 should prove useful as a subcloning vector for transformations and conjugations involving recombinant cosmids from the D286 wt gene bank and Agrobacterium strains. Future work on the molecular biology of agrocin D286 production is discussed. The DNA probe used in this study was labelled with phosphorus 32

  3. Age-Specific Gene Expression Profiles of Rhesus Monkey Ovaries Detected by Microarray Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hengxi; Liu, Xiangjie; Yuan, Jihong; Li, Li; Zhang, Dongdong; Guo, Xinzheng; Liu, Lin; Zhang, Shouquan

    2015-01-01

    The biological function of human ovaries declines with age. To identify the potential molecular changes in ovarian aging, we performed genome-wide gene expression analysis by microarray of ovaries from young, middle-aged, and old rhesus monkeys. Microarray data was validated by quantitative real-time PCR. Results showed that a total of 503 (60 upregulated, 443 downregulated) and 84 (downregulated) genes were differentially expressed in old ovaries compared to young and middle-aged groups, respectively. No difference in gene expression was found between middle-aged and young groups. Differentially expressed genes were mainly enriched in cell and organelle, cellular and physiological process, binding, and catalytic activity. These genes were primarily associated with KEGG pathways of cell cycle, DNA replication and repair, oocyte meiosis and maturation, MAPK, TGF-beta, and p53 signaling pathway. Genes upregulated were involved in aging, defense response, oxidation reduction, and negative regulation of cellular process; genes downregulated have functions in reproduction, cell cycle, DNA and RNA process, macromolecular complex assembly, and positive regulation of macromolecule metabolic process. These findings show that monkey ovary undergoes substantial change in global transcription with age. Gene expression profiles are useful in understanding the mechanisms underlying ovarian aging and age-associated infertility in primates. PMID:26421297

  4. Candidate Genes Detected in Transcriptome Studies are Strongly Dependent on Genetic Background

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarup, Pernille Merete; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov; Kristensen, Torsten Nygård; Hoffmann, Ary Anthony; Loeschcke, Volker; Paige, Ken N; Sørensen, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Whole genome transcriptomic studies can point to potential candidate genes for organismal traits. However, the importance of potential candidates is rarely followed up through functional studies and/or by comparing results across independent studies. We have analysed the overlap of candidate gene...

  5. A duplicated PLP gene causing Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease detected by comparative multiplex PCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inoue, K.; Sugiyama, N.; Kawanishi, C. [Yokohama City Univ., Yokohama (Japan)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is an X-linked dysmyelinating disorder caused by abnormalities in the proteolipid protein (PLP) gene, which is essential for oligodendrocyte differentiation and CNS myelin formation. Although linkage analysis has shown the homogeneity at the PLP locus in patients with PMD, exonic mutations in the PLP gene have been identified in only 10% - 25% of all cases, which suggests the presence of other genetic aberrations, including gene duplication. In this study, we examined five families with PMD not carrying exonic mutations in PLP gene, using comparative multiplex PCR (CM-PCR) as a semiquantitative assay of gene dosage. PLP gene duplications were identified in four families by CM-PCR and confirmed in three families by densitometric RFLP analysis. Because a homologous myelin protein gene, PMP22, is duplicated in the majority of patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A, PLP gene overdosage may be an important genetic abnormality in PMD and affect myelin formation. 38 ref., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Multicentre evaluation of a real-time PCR assay to detect genes encoding clinically relevant carbapenemases in cultured bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Matthew J; Findlay, Jacqueline; Hopkins, Katie L; Meunier, Danièle; Alvarez-Buylla, Adela; Horner, Carolyne; McEwan, Ashley; Guiver, Malcolm; McCrae, Li-Xu; Woodford, Neil; Hawkey, Peter

    2016-02-01

    The performance and portability of a multiplex real-time PCR assay to detect KPC, NDM, OXA-48-like and VIM carbapenemase gene families from bacterial isolates was assessed using Rotor-Gene Q and ABI 7500 instruments. Gram-negative bacterial isolates (n=502) were comprised of 100 isolates each with KPC, NDM, VIM or OXA-48-like carbapenemases (including 17 with OXA-181) and 2 isolates with NDM+OXA-48-like enzymes (including 1 with OXA-181) as well as 100 assay-negative isolates comprised of 24 IMP-producers, 24 carbapenem-resistant isolates with no known carbapenemase gene and 52 extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing carbapenem-susceptible isolates. A multicentre evaluation was carried out in five laboratories using a subset of 100 isolates comprised of 22 isolates each with KPC, NDM, OXA-48-like or VIM alleles and 12 isolates that were negative for the assay targets. Initial validation of the assay on both the Rotor-Gene Q and ABI 7500 instruments demonstrated 100% sensitivity amongst the 402 isolates that were positive for KPC, NDM, OXA-48-like (including OXA-181) and VIM carbapenemase genes, whilst the 100 assay-negative samples were correctly identified indicating 100% specificity. During the multicentre evaluation the same 100% level of sensitivity and specificity was observed in each of the five centres that participated. Neither invalid nor false-positive results were observed. In conclusion, the assay offers a portable and reliable option for the detection of bacteria carrying clinically significant carbapenemases encoded by KPC, NDM, VIM and OXA-48-like carbapenemase genes using either of the two most common real-time PCR instrument platforms. PMID:26795023

  7. The thermostable direct hemolysin-related hemolysin (trh) gene of Vibrio parahaemolyticus: Sequence variation and implications for detection and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, William B; Turner, Jeffrey W

    2016-07-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a leading cause of bacterial food-related illness associated with the consumption of undercooked seafood. Only a small subset of strains is pathogenic. Most clinical strains encode for the thermostable direct hemolysin (TDH) and/or the TDH-related hemolysin (TRH). In this work, we amplify and sequence the trh gene from over 80 trh+strains of this bacterium and identify thirteen genetically distinct alleles, most of which have not been deposited in GenBank previously. Sequence data was used to design new primers for more reliable detection of trh by endpoint PCR. We also designed a new quantitative PCR assay to target a more conserved gene that is genetically-linked to trh. This gene, ureR, encodes the transcriptional regulator for the urease gene cluster immediately upstream of trh. We propose that this ureR assay can be a useful screening tool as a surrogate for direct detection of trh that circumvents challenges associated with trh sequence variation. PMID:27094247

  8. Accuracy of cDNA microarray methods to detect small gene expression changes induced by neuregulin on breast epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Sharlin

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background cDNA microarrays are a powerful means to screen for biologically relevant gene expression changes, but are often limited by their ability to detect small changes accurately due to "noise" from random and systematic errors. While experimental designs and statistical analysis methods have been proposed to reduce these errors, few studies have tested their accuracy and ability to identify small, but biologically important, changes. Here, we have compared two cDNA microarray experimental design methods with northern blot confirmation to reveal changes in gene expression that could contribute to the early antiproliferative effects of neuregulin on MCF10AT human breast epithelial cells. Results We performed parallel experiments on identical samples using a dye-swap design with ANOVA and an experimental design that excludes systematic biases by "correcting" experimental/control hybridization ratios with control/control hybridizations on a spot-by-spot basis. We refer to this approach as the "control correction method" (CCM. Using replicate arrays, we identified a decrease in proliferation genes and an increase in differentiation genes. Using an arbitrary cut-off of 1.7-fold and p values Conclusions We validated two experimental design paradigms for cDNA microarray experiments capable of detecting small (

  9. Direct detection and differentiation of pathogenic Leptospira species using a multi-gene targeted real time PCR approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Ana Sofia; Costa, Pedro; Rocha, Teresa; Amaro, Ana; Vieira, Maria Luísa; Ahmed, Ahmed; Thompson, Gertrude; Hartskeerl, Rudy A; Inácio, João

    2014-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a growing public and veterinary health concern caused by pathogenic species of Leptospira. Rapid and reliable laboratory tests for the direct detection of leptospiral infections in animals are in high demand not only to improve diagnosis but also for understanding the epidemiology of the disease. In this work we describe a novel and simple TaqMan-based multi-gene targeted real-time PCR approach able to detect and differentiate Leptospira interrogans, L. kirschneri, L. borgpeteresenii and L. noguchii, which constitute the veterinary most relevant pathogenic species of Leptospira. The method uses sets of species-specific probes, and respective flanking primers, designed from ompL1 and secY gene sequences. To monitor the presence of inhibitors, a duplex amplification assay targeting both the mammal β-actin and the leptospiral lipL32 genes was implemented. The analytical sensitivity of all primer and probe sets was estimated to be Dolichotis patagonum and Sus domesticus). Two samples were infected with L. borgpetersenii, two with L. interrogans and one with L. kirschneri. The possibility to detect and identify these pathogenic agents to the species level in domestic and wildlife animals reinforces the diagnostic information and will enhance our understanding of the epidemiology of leptopirosis. PMID:25398140

  10. A validated gene expression profile for detecting clinical outcome in breast cancer using artificial neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancashire, L J; Powe, D G; Reis-Filho, J S; Rakha, E; Lemetre, C; Weigelt, B; Abdel-Fatah, T M; Green, A R; Mukta, R; Blamey, R; Paish, E C; Rees, R C; Ellis, I O; Ball, G R

    2010-02-01

    Gene expression microarrays allow for the high throughput analysis of huge numbers of gene transcripts and this technology has been widely applied to the molecular and biological classification of cancer patients and in predicting clinical outcome. A potential handicap of such data intensive molecular technologies is the translation to clinical application in routine practice. In using an artificial neural network bioinformatic approach, we have reduced a 70 gene signature to just 9 genes capable of accurately predicting distant metastases in the original dataset. Upon validation in a follow-up cohort, this signature was an independent predictor of metastases free and overall survival in the presence of the 70 gene signature and other factors. Interestingly, the ANN signature and CA9 expression also split the groups defined by the 70 gene signature into prognostically distinct groups. Subsequently, the presence of protein for the principal prognosticator gene was categorically assessed in breast cancer tissue of an experimental and independent validation patient cohort, using immunohistochemistry. Importantly our principal prognosticator, CA9, showed that it is capable of selecting an aggressive subgroup of patients who are known to have poor prognosis. PMID:19347577

  11. Comparison of five endogenous reference genes for specific PCR detection and quantification of Brassica napus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Gang; Zhang, Li; Wu, Yuhua; Cao, Yinglong; Lu, Changming

    2010-03-10

    Five previously reported Brassica napus endogenous reference genes, including acetyl-CoA carboxylase gene (BnACCg8), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEP), oleoyl hydrolase gene (FatA), high-mobility-group protein I/Y gene (HMG-I/Y) and cruciferin A gene (CruA), were analyzed for their PCR specificity between B. napus and other species and the quantification stability among different B. napus cultivars. PCR and sequencing results indicated that none of these systems was species-specific as required by the genetically modified organism labeling policy. When these genes were employed in real-time PCR, BnACCg8 and HMG-I/Y systems showed relatively greater heterogeneity among 10 different cultivars. The sequencing results showed that the single nucleotide polymorphism in the primer binding sites was the potential source of the instability in the HMG-I/Y system. The bias of BnACCg8 was thought to be associated with the inconsistent copy number of this gene. PMID:20143854

  12. Gene

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Gene integrates information from a wide range of species. A record may include nomenclature, Reference Sequences (RefSeqs), maps, pathways, variations, phenotypes,...

  13. Detection of sequence variants in the gene encoding the beta 3 chain of laminin 5 (LAMB3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulkkinen, L; McGrath, J A; Christiano, A M; Uitto, J

    1995-01-01

    Laminin 5, a candidate gene/protein system for mutations in the junctional forms of epidermolysis bullosa (JEB), consists of three polypeptides encoded by the LAMA3, LAMB3, and LAMC2 genes. In this study, primer pairs for the amplification of the complete cDNA as well as 22 exons of the LAMB3 gene encoding the entire beta 3 chain of laminin 5, were established. The primers for amplification of individual exons from genomic DNA were placed at least 50 bp away from the exon-intron borders in the flanking intronic sequences. For amplification of cDNA generated by RT-PCR, eight primer pairs covering overlapping segments of mRNA were used. The amplified sequences were used to study sequence variations of the LAMB3 gene in patients with JEB and unrelated individuals using heteroduplex analysis. Nine out of 13 JEB patients examined showed heteroduplexes in at least one of the PCR products, indicating the existence of two variable alleles in their DNA. Sequence analyses revealed putative pathogenetic mutations in seven of the JEB patients, while four of the heteroduplexes resulted from polymorphisms, reflecting a single basepair substitution. The results demonstrate that this method is useful in the detection of JEB mutations, as well as polymorphisms in the LAMB3 gene. PMID:7550237

  14. Comparison of Chromogenic Media to BD GeneOhm Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) PCR for Detection of MRSA in Nasal Swabs▿

    OpenAIRE

    Bischof, Larry J.; Lapsley, Linda; Fontecchio, Karen; Jacosalem, Dollie; Young, Carol; Hankerd, Rosemary; Newton, Duane W.

    2009-01-01

    To select a method for detecting methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in nasal swabs, we compared BD GeneOhm MRSA PCR and various culture media (mannitol salt agar with cefoxitin, MRSASelect, CHROMagar MRSA, and Spectra MRSA). While PCR detection of MRSA was more rapid, MRSASelect and Spectra MRSA demonstrated performance equivalent to that of PCR with maximal detection at 24 h.

  15. Detection and characterization of virulence genes and integrons in Aeromonas veronii isolated from catfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawaz, Mohamed; Khan, Saeed A; Khan, Ashraf A; Sung, Kidon; Tran, Quynhtien; Kerdahi, Khalil; Steele, Roger

    2010-05-01

    The presence of virulence genes and integrons was determined in 81 strains of Aeromonas veronii isolated from farm-raised catfish. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocols were used to determine the presence of genes for cytotoxic enterotoxin (act), aerolysin (aerA), two cytotonic enterotoxins (ast, alt), lipase (lip), glycerophospholipid:cholesterol acyltransferase (gcaT), serine protease (ser), DNases (exu), elastase (ahyB) and the structural gene flagellin (fla) in the template DNA. Oligonucleotide primers amplified a 231-bp region of the act gene from the template DNA of 97.0% of the isolates. Primers specific for the amplification of the aerA gene amplified a 431-bp region of the aerA gene from the template DNA of 96.0% of the isolates. None of the isolates contained ast or alt genes. Oligonucleotide primers specific for the amplification of lip, gcaT, ser and fla genes, amplified their respective amplicons from 85.0, 78.0, 82.0 and 80.0% of the isolates. None of the isolates contained exu or the elastase genes. Several of the isolates (48.0%) contained class I integrons that confer resistance to multiple antibiotics; various sizes between 0.6 and 3.1 kb were found. None of the isolates contained Class II integrons. Our results indicate that farm-raised catfish may be a source of pathogenic A. veronii and that the potential health risks posed by virulent strains of A. veronii should not be underestimated. PMID:20227596

  16. Detection of fusion genes and fusion proteins in sarcoma : methodological and clinical aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Gunnar

    1999-01-01

    Ewing's sarcoma/PNET and synovial sarcoma, all regarded as high-grade tumours, have their peak incidence during the second decade of life, thus affecting children and adolescents. Both tumour types have specific chromosomal translocations, i.e. t(11;22) and t(X;18), respectively, resulting in fusion genes coding for chimeric proteins. The t(11;22) translocation, present in 85% of Ewing's sarcoma/PNET, results in the fusion of the EWS gene to the FLI- 1 gene forming EWS-FLI- ...

  17. Detection of oestrogenic chemicals by assaying the expression level of oestrogen regulated genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, M; Hummel, R; Bévort, M;

    1998-01-01

    the yeast E-screen, with methods that are based on mammalian cells or whole animals. An alternative is to assay gene expression directly by methods such as differential display, where the expression of both genes known to be regulated directly by the receptor and genes regulated by other pathways can...... pathways and its intrinsic transcriptional activity is highly influenced by phosphorylation and by its interaction with other proteins. This is clearly observed when the oestrogenicity of antioestrogens is tested since some compounds activate the receptor in yeast, but not in mammalian cells. However, when...

  18. Quantum-dot biosensor for hybridization and detection of R3500Q mutation of apolipoprotein B-100 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazloum-Ardakani, Mohammad; Aghaei, Roghayyeh; Heidari, Mohammad Mehdi

    2015-10-15

    A quantum-dot electrode system was developed as a transducer surface for covalent immobilization of a designed synthetic ApoB-100 specific probe, DNA hybridization and monitoring of DNA synthesis for the sensitive detection of R3500Q mutation of apolipoprotein B-100 (ApoB-100) gene. CdS-QDs cause an improvement in the fundamental characteristics of the electrode interface, such as its electroactive surface area, diffusion coefficient and electron transfer kinetics. The sensing characteristics of this biosensor offer a suitable potential for detection of target oligonucleotide with a detection limit of 3.4 × 10(-17)M. Also, the electrochemical responses of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), DNA hybridization and DNA synthesis were investigated using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The extracted genomic DNA was detected based on changes in the charge transfer resistance (RCT) with [Fe(CN)6](3-/4-) as a redox probe. The proposed biosensor can distinguish between the normal sequence and the mutant sequence of ApoB-100 gene, promising a possibility to apply the QD-based biosensor for clinical investigations. PMID:26022781

  19. Colorimetric method for rapid detection of Oxacillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus and its comparison with PCR for mec A gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanwate, Niraj; Thakare, Prashant; Bhise, P R; Gawande, Sonali

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and accurate detection of Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important role of clinical microbiology laboratories to avoid treatment failure. The detection of MRSA is based on phenotypic assays which require at least 24 h to perform. Detection of the mecA gene or of PBP 2a is the "gold standard", but not always available. The aim of this study was to evaluate a rapid method for detection of MRSA by using 3 (4, 5 dimethyl thiazole -2-yl) -2, 5 diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT). Total 126 isolates of MRSA were collected from tertiary healthcare center and were confirmed by oxacillin screening agar test as per CLSI guidelines. Amplification of mecA gene was performed by using PCR. MTT assay was carried out for all the isolates in 96 well Microtitre plate and compared with standard methods of CLSI. Out of 126 isolates, 98 were found to be mecA positive. MTT method was found to be 98.98% sensitive and 96.43% specific. The MTT based colorimetric method is rapid and simple test for screening of oxacillin resistance in Staphylococcus aureus. It significantly shortens the time to just 7 h required to obtained a drug susceptibility test and could be useful to screen MRSA. PMID:26960268

  20. Detection of denitrification genes by in situ rolling circle amplification - fluorescence in situ hybridization (in situ RCA-FISH) to link metabolic potential with identity inside bacterial cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoshino, Tatsuhiko; Schramm, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    A target-primed in situ rolling circle amplification (in situ RCA) protocol was developed for detection of single-copy genes inside bacterial cells and optimized with Pseudomonas stutzeri, targeting nitrite and nitrous oxide reductase genes (nirS and nosZ). Two padlock probes were designed per gene...... identified as Candidatus Accumulibacter phosphatis by combining in situ RCA-FISH with 16S rRNA-targeted FISH. While not suitable for quantification because of its low detection frequency, in situ RCA-FISH will allow to link metabolic potential with 16S rRNA (gene)-based identification of single microbial...

  1. Detection and expression of enterotoxin genes in endophytic strains of Bacillus cereus

    OpenAIRE

    Melnick, Rachel L; Testen, Anna L.; Poleatewich, A.M.; Backman, Paul A.; Bailey, B. A.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether endophytic Bacillus cereus isolates from agronomic crops possessed genes for the nonhaemolytic enterotoxin (Nhe) and haemolysin BL (HBL) and, therefore, have the potential to cause diarrheal illness in humans.

  2. Delineation of the species Haemophilus influenzae by phenotype, multilocus sequence phylogeny, and detection of marker genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov-Lauritsen, Niels; Overballe, MD; Kilian, Mogens

    2009-01-01

    encoded hemin biosynthesis genes were identified, and sequence analysis showed these genes to represent an ancestral genotype rather than recent transfers from, e.g., Haemophilus parainfluenzae. Strains previously assigned to H. haemolyticus formed several separate lineages within a distinct but deeply......To obtain more information on the much-debated definition of prokaryotic species, we investigated the borders of Haemophilus influenzae by comparative analysis of H. influenzae reference strains with closely related bacteria including strains assigned to Haemophilus haemolyticus, cryptic...... genospecies biotype IV, and the never formally validated species "Haemophilus intermedius". Multilocus sequence phylogeny based on six housekeeping genes separated a cluster encompassing the type and the reference strains of H. influenzae from 31 more distantly related strains. Comparison of 16S rRNA gene...

  3. Survey and rapid detection of Klebsiella pneumoniae in clinical samples targeting the rcsA gene in Beijing, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derong eDong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Klebsiella pneumoniae is a wide-spread nosocomial pathogen. A rapid and sensitive molecular method for the detection of K. pneumoniae in clinical samples is needed to guide therapeutic treatment. In this study, we first described a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP method for the rapid detection of capsular polysaccharide synthesis regulating gene rcsA from K. pneumoniae in clinical samples by using two methods including real-time turbidity monitoring and fluorescence detection to assess the reaction. Then dissemination of K. pneumoniae strains was investigated from ICU patients in three top hospitals in Beijing, China. The results showed that the detection limit of the LAMP method was 0.115 pg/µl DNA within 60 min under isothermal conditions (61°C, a 100-fold increase in sensitivity compared with conventional PCR. All 30 non- K. pneumoniae strains tested were negative for LAMP detection, indicating the high specificity of the LAMP reaction. To evaluate the application of the LAMP assay to clinical diagnosis, of 110 clinical sputum samples collected from ICU patients with clinically suspected multi-resistant infections in China, a total of 32 K. pneumoniae isolates were identified for LAMP-based surveillance of rcsA. All isolates belonged to nine different K. pneumoniae multilocus sequence typing (MLST groups. Strikingly, of the 32 K. pneumoniae strains, 18 contained the Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase (KPC-encoding gene blaKPC-2 and had high resistance to β-lactam antibiotics. Moreover, K. pneumoniae WJ-64 was discovered to contain blaKPC-2 and blaNDM-1 genes simultaneously in the isolate. Our data showed the high prevalence of blaKPC-2 among K. pneumoniae and co-occurrence of many resistant genes in the clinical strains signal a rapid and continuing evolution of K. pneumoniae. In conclusion, we have developed a rapid and sensitive visual K. pneumoniae detection LAMP assay, which could be a useful tool for clinical screening

  4. High Resolution Melting Analysis for Detecting p53 Gene Mutations in Patients with Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhihong CHEN

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that p53 gene was related to many human cancers. The mutations in p53 gene play an important role in carcinogensis and mostly happened in exon 5-8. The aim of this study is to establish a high resolution melting (HRM assay to detect p53 mutations from patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, to investigate the characteristics of p53 gene mutations, and to analyze the relationship between p53 mutations and evolution regularity of pathogenesis. Methods p53 mutations in exon 5-8 were detected by HRM assay on DNA insolated from 264 NSCLC samples derived from tumor tissues and 54 control samples from pericancerous pulmonary tissues. The mutation samples by the HRM assay were confirmed by sequencing technique. Samples which were positive by HRM but wild type by sequencing were further confirmed by sub-clone and sequencing. Results No mutation was found in 54 pericancerous pulmonary samples by HRM assay. 104 of the 264 tumor tissues demonstrated mutation curves by HRM assay, 102 samples were confirmed by sequencing, including 95 point mutations and 7 frame shift mutations by insertion or deletion. The mutation rate of p53 gene was 39.4%. The mutation rate from exon 5-8 were 11.7%, 8%, 12.5% and 10.6%, respectively and there was no statistically significant difference between them (P=0.35. p53 mutations were significantly more frequent in males than that in females, but not related to the other clinicopathologic characteristics. Conclusion The results indicate that HRM is a sensitive in-tube methodology to detect for mutations in clinical samples. The results suggest that the arising p53 mutations in NSCLC may be due to spontaneous error in DNA synthesis and repair.

  5. Mediterranean river buffalo oxytocin-neurophysin I (OXT) gene: structure, promoter analysis and allele detection

    OpenAIRE

    Ramunno, L.; D. Di Berardino; L. Zicarelli; R. Di Palo; NICODEMO, D.; MANCUSI, A.; A. Pauciullo; G. Cosenza

    2010-01-01

    Oxytocin (OXT) is a very abundant nonapeptide neurohypophysial hormone implicated in several aspects of reproduction, including social, sexual and maternal behaviour, induction of labour and milk ejection. The nucleotide sequence of the whole OXTneurophysin I encoding gene (OXT) in Mediterranean river buffalo was determined, plus 993 nucleotides at the 5’ flanking region. Buffalo oxytocin gene sequence analysis showed two transitions in the promoter region (C→T in position – ...

  6. A resampling-based meta-analysis for detection of differential gene expression in breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Ergul Gulusan; Bozkurt Betul; Ozturk Ahmet; Kir Serkan; Konu Ozlen; Gur-Dedeoglu Bala; Yulug Isik G

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Accuracy in the diagnosis of breast cancer and classification of cancer subtypes has improved over the years with the development of well-established immunohistopathological criteria. More recently, diagnostic gene-sets at the mRNA expression level have been tested as better predictors of disease state. However, breast cancer is heterogeneous in nature; thus extraction of differentially expressed gene-sets that stably distinguish normal tissue from various pathologies pose...

  7. Differential gene expression in liver and small intestine from lactating rats compared to age-matched virgin controls detects increased mRNA of cholesterol biosynthetic genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungsuwadee Paiboon

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lactation increases energy demands four- to five-fold, leading to a two- to three-fold increase in food consumption, requiring a proportional adjustment in the ability of the lactating dam to absorb nutrients and to synthesize critical biomolecules, such as cholesterol, to meet the dietary needs of both the offspring and the dam. The size and hydrophobicity of the bile acid pool increases during lactation, implying an increased absorption and disposition of lipids, sterols, nutrients, and xenobiotics. In order to investigate changes at the transcriptomics level, we utilized an exon array and calculated expression levels to investigate changes in gene expression in the liver, duodenum, jejunum, and ileum of lactating dams when compared against age-matched virgin controls. Results A two-way mixed models ANOVA was applied to detect differentially expressed genes. Significance calls were defined as a p Cyp7a1, which catalyzes the rate limiting step in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway, was also significantly increased in liver. In addition, decreased levels of mRNA associated with T-cell signaling were found in the jejunum and ileum. Several members of the Solute Carrier (SLC and Adenosine Triphosphate Binding Cassette (ABC superfamilies of membrane transporters were found to be differentially expressed; these genes may play a role in differences in nutrient and xenobiotic absorption and disposition. mRNA expression of SLC39a4_predicted, a zinc transporter, was increased in all tissues, suggesting that it is involved in increased zinc uptake during lactation. Microarray data are available through GEO under GSE19175. Conclusions We detected differential expression of mRNA from several pathways in lactating dams, including upregulation of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway in liver and intestine, consistent with Srebp activation. Differential T-Cell signaling in the two most distal regions of the small intestine (ileum and

  8. Direct detection and differentiation of pathogenic Leptospira species using a multi-gene targeted real time PCR approach.

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    Ana Sofia Ferreira

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis is a growing public and veterinary health concern caused by pathogenic species of Leptospira. Rapid and reliable laboratory tests for the direct detection of leptospiral infections in animals are in high demand not only to improve diagnosis but also for understanding the epidemiology of the disease. In this work we describe a novel and simple TaqMan-based multi-gene targeted real-time PCR approach able to detect and differentiate Leptospira interrogans, L. kirschneri, L. borgpeteresenii and L. noguchii, which constitute the veterinary most relevant pathogenic species of Leptospira. The method uses sets of species-specific probes, and respective flanking primers, designed from ompL1 and secY gene sequences. To monitor the presence of inhibitors, a duplex amplification assay targeting both the mammal β-actin and the leptospiral lipL32 genes was implemented. The analytical sensitivity of all primer and probe sets was estimated to be <10 genome equivalents (GE in the reaction mixture. Application of the amplification reactions on genomic DNA from a variety of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Leptospira strains and other non-related bacteria revealed a 100% analytical specificity. Additionally, pathogenic leptospires were successfully detected in five out of 29 tissue samples from animals (Mus spp., Rattus spp., Dolichotis patagonum and Sus domesticus. Two samples were infected with L. borgpetersenii, two with L. interrogans and one with L. kirschneri. The possibility to detect and identify these pathogenic agents to the species level in domestic and wildlife animals reinforces the diagnostic information and will enhance our understanding of the epidemiology of leptopirosis.

  9. [Detection of the first QnrS gene positivity in aquatic Aeromonas spp. isolates in Turkey].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onuk, Ertan Emek; Tanrıverdi Çaycı, Yeliz; Çoban, Ahmet Yılmaz; Çiftci, Alper; Balta, Fikri; Didinen, Behire Işıl; Pekmezci, Gökmen Zafer; Altun, Soner; Söğüt Ünlü, Mehtap; Deveci, Aydın

    2015-01-01

    Aeromonas spp. are oxidase positive, gram-negative, facultative anaerobic bacilli that are widely distributed in aquatic environments. A.hydrophila, A.sobria and A.bestiarum may cause severe infections in both human and cold-blooded animals. Environmental persistance of quinolones that are widely used in both human and veterinary medicine plays an important role in the selection of resistant mutants. Plasmid-mediated resistance is one of the main mechanisms involved in quinolone resistance, and qnr, qepA, aac(6')-Ib-cr, oqxAB genes are identified as resistance determinants. Determination of various types of qnr gene in different bacteria mainly in Enterobacteriaceae, suggests that they are widely distributed in nature. Recently, plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance was defined among Aeromonas species isolated from water. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of qnr genes among aquatic Aeromonas spp. in Turkey. A total of 45 Aeromonas strains isolated from water and fishes collected from three different geographical regions (Aegean, Mediterranean and Blacksea) in Turkey, were included in the study. The isolates were identified at species level by the use of 16S rDNA-RFLP (Restriction fragment length polymorphism) analysis and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (M-PCR). Among the isolates, 20 were identified as A.sobria, 10 as A.hydrophila, nine as A.salmonicida, four as A.bestiarum and two as A.veronii. The plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants, qnrA, qnrB, qnrC and qnrS genes, were investigated by M-PCR, and sequence analysis was performed for nine qnr-positive isolates. According to the sequence analysis of the genes, qnr genes were characterized in six A.sobria, in two A.bestiarum and in one A.hydrophila isolate (9/45; 20%). When the sequence was compared with GenBank database, this gene was found as qnrS2. All qnrS-positive Aeromonas spp. isolates were ciprofloxacin-susceptible, while five of them were resistant to nalidixic acid

  10. Serum concentrations of Helicobacter pylori IgG and the virulence factor CagA in patients with ischaemic heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jafarzadeh, A; Esmaeeli-Nadimi, A; Nemati, M; Tahmasbi, M; Ahmadi, P

    2010-10-01

    To compare the serum concentrations of IgG to Helicobacter pylori and its virulence factor CagA in patients with ischaemic heart disease (IHD), we recruited 120 patients with IHD [acute myocardial infarction (AMI) (n = 60); unstable angina (UA) (n = 60)] and 60 sex- and age-matched healthy controls in this study. The seroprevalence of anti-H. pylori IgG was 86.7% in AMI, 91.7% in UA patients and 58.3% in the control group with mean titres of 33.2 U/ml [standard error (SE) 4.76], 57.96 U/ml (SE 7.54) and 25.72 U/ml (SE 4.01) respectively. The seroprevalence of anti-H. pylori in the patient groups was significantly higher than the control group. The mean levels of anti-H. pylori in the AMI and UA groups were also significantly higher than in the control group. The seroprevalence and mean titre of anti-CagA IgG did not differ significantly between patient and control groups. PMID:21222419

  11. The gene-reduction effect of chromosomal losses detected in gastric cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Sang-Wook

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The level of loss of heterozygosity (LOH that reduces a gene dose and exerts a cell-adverse effect is known to be a parameter for the genetic staging of gastric cancers. This study investigated if the cell-adverse effect induced with the gene reduction was a rate-limiting factor for the LOH events in two distinct histologic types of gastric cancers, the diffuse- and intestinal-types. Methods The pathologic specimens obtained from 145 gastric cancer patients were examined for the level of LOH using 40 microsatellite markers on eight cancer-associated chromosomes (3p, 4p, 5q, 8p, 9p, 13q, 17p and 18q. Results Most of the cancer-associated chromosomes were found to belong to the gene-poor chromosomes and to contain a few stomach-specific genes that were highly expressed. A baseline-level LOH involving one or no chromosome was frequent in diffuse-type gastric cancers. The chromosome 17 containing a relatively high density of genes was commonly lost in intestinal-type cancers but not in diffuse-type cancers. A high-level LOH involving four or more chromosomes tended to be frequent in the gastric cancers with intestinal and mixed differentiation. Disease relapse was common for gastric cancers with high-level LOH through both the hematogenous (38% and non-hematogenous (36% routes, and for the baseline-level LOH cases through the non-hematogenous route (67%. Conclusions The cell-adverse effect of gene reduction is more tolerated in intestinal-type gastric cancers than in diffuse-type cancers, and the loss of high-dose genes is associated with hematogenous metastasis.

  12. Detection of cell surface hydrophobicity, biofilm and fimbirae genes in salmonella isolated from tunisian clinical and poultry meat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fethi Ben Abdallah

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of 15 serotypes of Salmonella to form biofilm on polystyrene, polyvinyl chloride (PVC and glass surfaces. .Initially slime production was assessed on CRA agar and hydrophobicity of 20 Salmonella strains isolated from poultry and human and two Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium references strains was achieved by microbial adhesion to n-hexadecane. In addition, biofilm formation on polystyrene, PVC and glass surfaces was also investigated by using MTT and XTT colorimetric assay. Further, distribution of Salmonella enterotoxin (stn, Salmonella Enteritidis fimbrial (sef and plasmid encoded fimbrial (pef genes among tested strains was achieved by PCR.Salmonella strains developed red and white colonies on CRA and they are considered as hydrophilic with affinity values to n-hexadecane ranged between 0.29% and 29.55%. Quantitative biofilm assays showed that bacteria are able to form biofilm on polystyrene with different degrees and 54.54% of strains produce a strong biofilm on glass. In addition, all the strains form only a moderate (54.54% and weak (40.91% biofilm on PVC. PCR detection showed that only S. Enteritidis harbour Sef gene, whereas Pef and stn genes were detected in S. Kentucky, S. Amsterdam, S. Hadar, S. Enteritidis and S. Typhimurium.Salmonella serotypes are able to form biofilm on hydrophobic and hydrophilic industrial surfaces. Biofilm formation of Salmonella on these surfaces has an increased potential to compromise food safety and potentiate public health risk.

  13. In situ detection of alkB2 gene involved in Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2(T) hydrocarbon biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matturro, Bruna; Frascadore, Emanuela; Cappello, Simone; Genovese, Mariella; Rossetti, Simona

    2016-09-15

    This study aimed to develop a new assay based on the whole cell hybridization in order to monitor alkane hydroxylase genes (alkB system) of the marine bacterium Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2(T) commonly reported as the predominant microorganism responsible for the biodegradation of n-alkanes which are the major fraction of petroleum hydrocarbons. The assay based on the whole cell hybridization targeting alkB2 gene was successfully developed and calibrated on a pure culture of Alcanivorax borkumensis SK2(T) with a detection efficiency up to 80%. The approach was further successfully validated on hydrocarbon-contaminated seawater and provided cells abundance (6.74E+04alkB2-carryingcellsmL(-1)) higher of about one order of magnitude than those obtained by qPCR (4.96E+03alkB2genecopiesmL(-1)). This study highlights the validity of the assay for the detection at single cell level of key-functional genes involved in the biodegradation of n-alkanes. PMID:27315756

  14. Multicenter Evaluation of a New DNA Microarray for Rapid Detection of Clinically Relevant bla Genes from ? -Lactam-Resistant Gram-Negative Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Bogaerts, P.; Hujer, A.M.; Naas, T.; de Castro, R. R.; A. Endimiani; Nordmann, P.; Glupczynski, Y.; Bonomo, R.A.

    2011-01-01

    A new commercial low-density microarray which identifies common extended-spectrum β-lactamase plasmid-mediated cephalosporinase genes, as well as carbapenemase (blaKPC and blaNDM) genes, was evaluated. We tested 207 clinical and reference/collection isolates of the Enterobacteriaceae possessing different bla genes. Overall, the sensitivity and specificity of the microarray were 100% for the detection of the plasmid-mediated blaAmpC, blaKPC, and blaNDM genes using bla gene sequencing as the re...

  15. Expression patterns, mutation detection and RNA interference of Rhopalosiphum padi voltage-gated sodium channel genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yayun; Peng, Xiong; Wang, Kang; Lin, Fangfei; Li, Yuting; Chen, Maohua

    2016-07-01

    The voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) is the target of sodium-channel-blocking insecticides. Traditionally, animals were thought to have only one VGSC gene comprising a α-subunit with four homologous domains (DI–DIV). The present study showed that Rhopalosiphum padi, an economically important crop pest, owned a unique heterodimeric VGSC (H1 and H2 subunits) encoded by two genes (Rpvgsc1 and Rpvgsc2), which is unusual in insects and other animals. The open reading frame (ORF) of Rpvgsc1 consisted 1150 amino acids, and the ORF of Rpvgsc2 had 957 amino acids. Rpvgsc1 showed 64.1% amino acid identity to DI–DII of Drosophila melanogaster VGSC and Rpvgsc2 showed 64.0% amino acid identity to DIII–DIV of D. melanogaster VGSC. A M918L mutation previously reported in pyrethroids-resistant strains of other insects was found in the IIS4-S6 region of R. padi field sample. The two R. padi VGSC genes were expressed at all developmental stages and showed similar expression patterns after treatment with beta-cypermethrin. Knockdown of Rpvgsc1 or Rpvgsc2 caused significant reduction in mortality rate of R. padi after exposure to beta-cypermethrin. These findings suggest that the two R. padi VGSC genes are both functional genes.

  16. FUNC: a package for detecting significant associations between gene sets and ontological annotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahm Erhard

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome-wide expression, sequence and association studies typically yield large sets of gene candidates, which must then be further analysed and interpreted. Information about these genes is increasingly being captured and organized in ontologies, such as the Gene Ontology. Relationships between the gene sets identified by experimental methods and biological knowledge can be made explicit and used in the interpretation of results. However, it is often difficult to assess the statistical significance of such analyses since many inter-dependent categories are tested simultaneously. Results We developed the program package FUNC that includes and expands on currently available methods to identify significant associations between gene sets and ontological annotations. Implemented are several tests in particular well suited for genome wide sequence comparisons, estimates of the family-wise error rate, the false discovery rate, a sensitive estimator of the global significance of the results and an algorithm to reduce the complexity of the results. Conclusion FUNC is a versatile and useful tool for the analysis of genome-wide data. It is freely available under the GPL license and also accessible via a web service.

  17. Introduction of a PCR-RFLP method for the detection of two mutations in VHL gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Alejandro Esperón

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Von Hippel-Lindau disease is an inherited neoplastic disorder caused by germline mutations in the VHL gene. In Cuba, molecular diagnosis is performed by the method of single-strand conformation polymorphism of DNA of the three exons of the gene followed by sequencing. This method is expensive, complicated and time-consuming. Objective: to describe the introduction of the molecular diagnosis of mutations c.362A>G and c.481C> in the VHL gene by PCR-RFLP. Methods: computer software CLC Sequence viewer 6.5.1 was used to identify restriction enzymes with cleavage sites modified by mutation c.362A>G in the exon 2 and c.481C>T in exon 3 in the VHL gene. DNA samples of patients already diagnosed through SSCP-sequencing were used. Such samples were amplified by PCR method followed by the enzymatic digestion with SfaNI and BtgZI restriction enzymes. Amplified fragments were analyzed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Results obtained using both methods were compared. Results: effectiveness of the PRC-RFLP method for the diagnosis of c.362A>G and c.481C>T mutations in the VHL gene was standardized and proved. Conclusions: PCR-RFLP method has advantages over SSCP-sequencing strategy for establishing a fast, reproducible and reliable diagnosis of VHL disease in family cases molecularly characterized.

  18. Mutation screen in the GWAS derived obesity gene SH2B1 including functional analyses of detected variants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volckmar Anna-Lena

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The SH2B1 gene (Src-homology 2B adaptor protein 1 gene is a solid candidate gene for obesity. Large scale GWAS studies depicted markers in the vicinity of the gene; animal models suggest a potential relevance for human body weight regulation. Methods We performed a mutation screen for variants in the SH2B1 coding sequence in 95 extremely obese children and adolescents. Detected variants were genotyped in independent childhood and adult study groups (up to 11,406 obese or overweight individuals and 4,568 controls. Functional implications on STAT3 mediated leptin signalling of the detected variants were analyzed in vitro. Results We identified two new rare mutations and five known SNPs (rs147094247, rs7498665, rs60604881, rs62037368 and rs62037369 in SH2B1. Mutation g.9483C/T leads to a non-synonymous, non-conservative exchange in the beta (βThr656Ile and gamma (γPro674Ser splice variants of SH2B1. It was additionally detected in two of 11,206 (extremely obese or overweight children, adolescents and adults, but not in 4,506 population-based normal-weight or lean controls. The non-coding mutation g.10182C/A at the 3’ end of SH2B1 was only detected in three obese individuals. For the non-synonymous SNP rs7498665 (Thr484Ala we observed nominal over-transmission of the previously described risk allele in 705 obesity trios (nominal p = 0.009, OR = 1.23 and an increased frequency of the same allele in 359 cases compared to 429 controls (nominal p = 0.042, OR = 1.23. The obesity risk-alleles at Thr484Ala and βThr656Ile/γPro674Ser had no effect on STAT3 mediated leptin receptor signalling in splice variants β and γ. Conclusion The rare coding mutation βThr656Ile/γPro674Ser (g.9483C/T in SH2B1 was exclusively detected in overweight or obese individuals. Functional analyzes did not reveal impairments in leptin signalling for the mutated SH2B1.

  19. Detection of planarian Antennapedia-like homeobox genes expressed during regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarabykin, V S; Lukyanov, K A; Potapov, V K; Lukyanov, S A

    1995-06-01

    Using the polymerase chain reaction with degenerate oligo primers we identified six new Antennapedia-like homeobox sequences expressed in a regenerating planarian. cDNA fragments containing the entire homeobox sequences for four of these genes were obtained. Two of them, Dutarh-3 and Dutarh-4, belong to the classical Antennapedia type and display extensive identity with Antennapedia- and Deformed-type homeodomains respectively. The third homeodomain, Dutarh-1, exhibits some similarity to the Hox1.5-, AbdB- and Dfd-type homeodomains and a fourth gene, Dutarh-6, is very similar to Mox2 in the mouse. Our results suggest that, in spite of their simple body plan, planarians contain a number of Antennapedia-like homeobox genes, probably enough to fill a cluster such as found in higher animals. PMID:7607541

  20. PAX3 gene deletion detected by microarray analysis in a girl with hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Drozniewska, Malgorzata; Haus, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Deletions of the PAX3 gene have been rarely reported in the literature. Mutations of this gene are a common cause of Waardenburg syndrome type 1 and 3. We report a 16 year old female presenting hearing loss and normal intellectual development, without major features of Waardenburg syndrome type 1, and without family history of the syndrome. Her phenotype, however, overlaps with features of craniofacial-deafness-hand syndrome. Microarray analysis showed ~862 kb de novo deletion at 2q36.1 inclu...

  1. Detection of Connexion 26 GENE (GJB2) Mutations in Cases of Congenital Non Syndromic Deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banjara, Hansa; Mungutwar, Varsha; Swarnkar, Neha; Patra, Pradeep

    2016-06-01

    Hearing loss is most common form of genetic hearing disorder. Non-syndromic sensory neural autosomal recessive deafness (NSRD) is the most common form of genetic hearing loss. Mutations in GJB2 gene, which encodes the connexin 26 protein, are major cause of NSRD. The aim of this study is directed towards the mutations caused along the connexin 26 gene using blood samples from nonsyndromic deaf children. The study was conducted on 36 congenitally hearing impaired children who visited to our department with complains of hearing loss and reduced speech and whose age was strategies for diagnosis and treatment of these common genetic disorders. PMID:27340645

  2. Survey and visual detection of Zaire ebolavirus in clinical samples targeting the nucleoprotein gene in Sierra Leone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing eYuan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV can lead to severe hemorrhagic fever with a high risk of death in humans and other primates. To guide treatment and prevent spread of the viral infection, a rapid and sensitive detection method is required for clinical samples. Here, we described and evaluated a reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP method to detect Zaire ebolavirus using the nucleoprotein gene (NP as a target sequence. Two different techniques were used, a calcein/Mn2+ complex chromogenic method and real-time turbidity monitoring. The RT-LAMP assay detected the NP target sequence with a limit of 4.56 copies/μL within 45 min under 61°C, a similar even or increase in sensitivity than that of real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Additionally, all pseudoviral particles or non- Zaire EBOV genomes were negative for LAMP detection, indicating that the assay was highly specific for EBOV. To appraise the availability of the RT-LAMP method for use in clinical diagnosis of EBOV, of 417 blood or swab samples collected from patients with clinically suspected infections in Sierra Leone, 307 were identified for RT-LAMP-based surveillance of EBOV. Therefore, the highly specific and sensitive RT-LAMP method allows the rapid detection of EBOV, and is a suitable tool for clinical screening, diagnosis, and primary quarantine purposes.

  3. Metabolic profiling of Parkinson's disease: evidence of biomarker from gene expression analysis and rapid neural network detection

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    Kumar Suresh

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parkinson's disease (PD is a neurodegenerative disorder. The diagnosis of Parkinsonism is challenging because currently none of the clinical tests have been proven to help in diagnosis. PD may produce characteristic perturbations in the metabolome and such variations can be used as the marker for detection of disease. To test this hypothesis, we used proton NMR and multivariate analysis followed by neural network pattern detection. Methods & Results 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy analysis was carried out on plasma samples of 37 healthy controls and 43 drug-naive patients with PD. Focus on 22 targeted metabolites, 17 were decreased and 5 were elevated in PD patients (p PDHB and NPFF genes leading to increased pyruvate concentration in blood plasma. Moreover, the implementation of 1H- NMR spectral pattern in neural network algorithm shows 97.14% accuracy in the detection of disease progression. Conclusion The results increase the prospect of a robust molecular definition in detection of PD through the early symptomatic phase of the disease. This is an ultimate opening for therapeutic intervention. If validated in a genuinely prospective fashion in larger samples, the biomarker trajectories described here will go a long way to facilitate the development of useful therapies. Moreover, implementation of neural network will be a breakthrough in clinical screening and rapid detection of PD.

  4. Rapid detection of most frequent Slovenian germ-line mutations in BRCA1 gene using real-time PCR and melting curve analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background. Detection of inherited mutations in cancer susceptibility genes is of great importance in some types of cancers including the colorectal cancer (mutations of APC gene in familial adenomatous polyposis - FAP, mutations in mismatch repair genes in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer - HNPCC), malignant melanoma (mutations in CDKN2A and CDK4 genes) and breast cancer (mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes). Methods. This article presents the technical data for the detection of five mutations in BRCA1 gene in breast cancer patients and their relatives. The mutations - 1806C>T, 300T>G, 300T>A, 310G>A, 5382insC - were determined by the real-time PCR and the melting curve analysis. Results and conclusion. In comparison to direct sequencing, this method proved to be sensitive and rapid enough for the routine daily determination of mutations in DNA isolated from the peripheral blood. (author)

  5. Single-cell multiple gene expression analysis based on single-molecule-detection microarray assay for multi-DNA determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lu [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Wang, Xianwei [School of Life Sciences, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Zhang, Xiaoli [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Wang, Jinxing [School of Life Sciences, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Jin, Wenrui, E-mail: jwr@sdu.edu.cn [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2015-01-07

    Highlights: • A single-molecule-detection (SMD) microarray for 10 samples is fabricated. • The based-SMD microarray assay (SMA) can determine 8 DNAs for each sample. • The limit of detection of SMA is as low as 1.3 × 10{sup −16} mol L{sup −1}. • The SMA can be applied in single-cell multiple gene expression analysis. - Abstract: We report a novel ultra-sensitive and high-selective single-molecule-detection microarray assay (SMA) for multiple DNA determination. In the SMA, a capture DNA (DNAc) microarray consisting of 10 subarrays with 9 spots for each subarray is fabricated on a silanized glass coverslip as the substrate. On the subarrays, the spot-to-spot spacing is 500 μm and each spot has a diameter of ∼300 μm. The sequence of the DNAcs on the 9 spots of a subarray is different, to determine 8 types of target DNAs (DNAts). Thus, 8 types of DNAts are captured to their complementary DNAcs at 8 spots of a subarray, respectively, and then labeled with quantum dots (QDs) attached to 8 types of detection DNAs (DNAds) with different sequences. The ninth spot is used to detect the blank value. In order to determine the same 8 types of DNAts in 10 samples, the 10 DNAc-modified subarrays on the microarray are identical. Fluorescence single-molecule images of the QD-labeled DNAts on each spot of the subarray are acquired using a home-made single-molecule microarray reader. The amounts of the DNAts are quantified by counting the bright dots from the QDs. For a microarray, 8 types of DNAts in 10 samples can be quantified in parallel. The limit of detection of the SMA for DNA determination is as low as 1.3 × 10{sup −16} mol L{sup −1}. The SMA for multi-DNA determination can also be applied in single-cell multiple gene expression analysis through quantification of complementary DNAs (cDNAs) corresponding to multiple messenger RNAs (mRNAs) in single cells. To do so, total RNA in single cells is extracted and reversely transcribed into their cDNAs. Three

  6. Single-cell multiple gene expression analysis based on single-molecule-detection microarray assay for multi-DNA determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A single-molecule-detection (SMD) microarray for 10 samples is fabricated. • The based-SMD microarray assay (SMA) can determine 8 DNAs for each sample. • The limit of detection of SMA is as low as 1.3 × 10−16 mol L−1. • The SMA can be applied in single-cell multiple gene expression analysis. - Abstract: We report a novel ultra-sensitive and high-selective single-molecule-detection microarray assay (SMA) for multiple DNA determination. In the SMA, a capture DNA (DNAc) microarray consisting of 10 subarrays with 9 spots for each subarray is fabricated on a silanized glass coverslip as the substrate. On the subarrays, the spot-to-spot spacing is 500 μm and each spot has a diameter of ∼300 μm. The sequence of the DNAcs on the 9 spots of a subarray is different, to determine 8 types of target DNAs (DNAts). Thus, 8 types of DNAts are captured to their complementary DNAcs at 8 spots of a subarray, respectively, and then labeled with quantum dots (QDs) attached to 8 types of detection DNAs (DNAds) with different sequences. The ninth spot is used to detect the blank value. In order to determine the same 8 types of DNAts in 10 samples, the 10 DNAc-modified subarrays on the microarray are identical. Fluorescence single-molecule images of the QD-labeled DNAts on each spot of the subarray are acquired using a home-made single-molecule microarray reader. The amounts of the DNAts are quantified by counting the bright dots from the QDs. For a microarray, 8 types of DNAts in 10 samples can be quantified in parallel. The limit of detection of the SMA for DNA determination is as low as 1.3 × 10−16 mol L−1. The SMA for multi-DNA determination can also be applied in single-cell multiple gene expression analysis through quantification of complementary DNAs (cDNAs) corresponding to multiple messenger RNAs (mRNAs) in single cells. To do so, total RNA in single cells is extracted and reversely transcribed into their cDNAs. Three types of c

  7. Detection of Extended-Spectrum β-Lactamase and Klebsiella pneumoniae Carbapenemase Genes Directly from Blood Cultures by Use of a Nucleic Acid Microarray

    OpenAIRE

    Fishbain, Joel T.; Sinyavskiy, Oleg; Riederer, Kathleen; Hujer, Andrea M.; Robert A Bonomo

    2012-01-01

    The growing crisis of multidrug-resistant (MDR) Gram-negative bacteria requires that current technologies permit the rapid detection of extended-spectrum β-lactamase (blaESBL) and Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (blaKPC) genes. In the present study, we assessed the performance characteristics of a commercially available nucleic acid microarray system for the detection of blaESBL and blaKPC genes directly from positive blood cultures. Using blood cultures (BCs) that contained Gram-negative...

  8. Sonic Hedgehog: A Good Gene Gone Bad? Detection and Treatment of Genetic Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaich, Lauren E.

    2001-01-01

    Presents a case of a baby born with the genetic condition holoprosencephaly in which students explore the "Sonic hedgehog" gene, signal transduction, and the ethics of body and tissue donation. Presents a two-part assignment that features students writing an informed consent document that explains the science behind this congenital abnormality,…

  9. Chromosomal alterations detected by comparative genomic hybridization in subgroups of gene expression-defined Burkitt's lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salaverria, Itziar; Zettl, Andreas; Bea, Silvia; Hartmann, Elena M.; Dave, Sandeep S.; Wright, George W.; Boerma, Evert-Jan; Kluin, Philip M.; Ott, German; Chan, Wing C.; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Lopez-Guillermo, Armando; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Delabie, Jan; Rimsza, Lisa M.; Braziel, Rita M.; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Staudt, Louis M.; Mueller-Hermelink, Hans Konrad; Campo, Elias; Rosenwald, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Background Burkitt's lymphoma is an aggressive B-cell lymphoma characterized by typical morph 0 logical, immunophenotypic and molecular features. Gene expression profiling provided a molecular signature of Burkitt's lymphoma, but also demonstrated that a subset of aggressive B-cell lymphomas not ful

  10. Detection of thyroid hormone receptor disruptors by a novel stable in vitro reporter gene assay

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Freitas, de J.; Cano, P.; Craig-Veit, C.; Goodson, M.L.; Furlow, J.D.; Murk, A.J.

    2011-01-01

    A stable luciferase reporter gene assay was developed based on the thyroid hormone responsive rat pituitary tumor GH3 cell line that constitutively expresses both thyroid hormone receptor isoforms. Stable transfection of the pGL4CP-SV40-2xtaDR4 construct into the GH3 cells resulted in a highly sensi

  11. Detection of genes regulated by Lmx1b during limb dorsalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feenstra, Jennifer M; Kanaya, Kohei; Pira, Charmaine U; Hoffman, Sarah E; Eppey, Richard J; Oberg, Kerby C

    2012-05-01

    Lmx1b is a homeodomain transcription factor that regulates dorsal identity during limb development. Lmx1b knockout (KO) mice develop distal ventral-ventral limbs. Although induction of Lmx1b is linked to Wnt7a expression in the dorsal limb ectoderm, the downstream targets of Lmx1b that accomplish limb dorsalization are unknown. To identify genes targeted by Lmx1b, we compared gene arrays from Lmx1b KO and wild type mouse limbs during limb dorsalization, i.e., 11.5, 12.5, and 13.5 days post coitum. We identified 54 target genes that were differentially expressed in all three stages. Several skeletal targets, including Emx2, Matrilin1 and Matrilin4, demonstrated a loss of scapular expression in the Lmx1b KO mice, supporting a role for Lmx1b in scapula development. Furthermore, the relative abundance of extracellular matrix-related soft tissue targets regulated by Lmx1b, such as collagens and proteoglycans, suggests a mechanism that includes changes in the extracellular matrix composition to accomplish limb dorsalization. Our study provides the most comprehensive characterization of genes regulated by Lmx1b during limb development to-date and provides targets for further investigation. PMID:22417325

  12. Development and validation of real-time PCR screening methods for detection of cry1a.105 and cry2ab2 genes in genetically modified organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dinon, A.Z.; Prins, T.W.; Dijk, van J.P.; Arisi, C.M.; Scholtens-Toma, I.M.J.; Kok, E.J.

    2011-01-01

    Primers and probes were developed for the element-specific detection of cry1A.105 and cry2Ab2 genes, based on their DNA sequence as present in GM maize MON89034. Cry genes are present in many genetically modified (GM) plants and they are important targets for developing GMO element-specific detectio

  13. Development of a Multiplex PCR Method for Detection of the Genes Encoding 16S rRNA, Coagulase, Methicillin Resistance and Enterotoxins in Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    A multiplex PCR method was developed for simultaneous detection of the genes encoding methicillin resistance (mecA), staphylococcal enterotoxins A, B and C (sea, seb and sec), coagulase (coa) and 16S rRNA. The primers for amplification of the 16S rRNA gene were specific for Staphylococcus spp., and ...

  14. Detection of multiple virulence-associated genes in Listeria monocytogenes isolated from bovine mastitis cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawool, D B; Malik, S V S; Shakuntala, I; Sahare, A M; Barbuddhe, S B

    2007-01-25

    Clinical samples (n=725) were collected from bovines (n=243) which were positive for mastitis using the California mastitis test (CMT) and somatic cell count (SCC). The clinical samples comprising blood (n=239), milk (n=243), and faecal swabs (n=243) were examined for the presence of pathogenic Listeria spp. Isolation of the pathogen was done using selective enrichment in University of Vermont Medium and plating onto Dominguez-Rodriguez isolation agar. Confirmation of the isolates was based on biochemical tests and Christie, Atkins, Munch-Petersen (CAMP) test followed by pathogenicity testing. Pathogenicity of the isolates was tested by phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) assay as well as in vivo tests namely, chick embryo and mice inoculation tests. The isolates were subjected to PCR assay for five virulence-associated genes, plcA, prfA, hlyA, actA and iap. Listeria spp. were isolated from 12 (1.66%) samples. Of these 4 (0.55%) and 1 (0.14%) were confirmed as Listeria monocytogenes and Listeria ivanovii, respectively. L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii were recovered from milk samples (2) and faecal (3) of mastitic cattle (3) and buffaloes (2). L. monocytogenes recovered from the milk of mastitic cattle and L. ivanovii from the faecal swab of buffalo turned out to be pathogenic. However, the remaining three hemolytic isolates exhibiting positive CAMP test turned out to be negative in PI-PLC assay, chick embryo and mice inoculation. L. monocytogenes and L. ivanovii isolates characterized as pathogenic by PI-PLC assay and in vivo pathogenicity tests were found to possess all the five virulence-associated genes and three genes, plcA, prfA and actA respectively. The remaining three hemolytic but non-pathogenic L. monocytogenes isolates were negative for plcA by PCR. It seems that the plcA gene and its expression (in the PI-PLC assay) have an important role as virulence determinants in pathogenic Listeria spp. In conclusion, the PI-PLC assay and

  15. Synovial Sarcoma Microvesicles Harbor the SYT-SSX Fusion Gene Transcript: Comparison of Different Methods of Detection and Implications in Biomarker Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fricke, A; Ullrich, P V; Cimniak, A F V; Follo, M; Nestel, S; Heimrich, B; Nazarenko, I; Stark, G B; Bannasch, H; Braig, D; Eisenhardt, S U

    2016-01-01

    Background. Synovial sarcoma is an aggressive soft-tissue malignancy. This study examines the presence of the SYT-SSX fusion transcript in synovial sarcoma microvesicles as well as its potential role as a biomarker for synovial sarcoma. Patients and Methods. Microvesicle release of synovial sarcoma cells was examined by transmission electron microscopy. RNA-content was analyzed by qPCR, nested PCR, nested qPCR, and droplet digital PCR to compare their sensitivity for detection of the SYT-SSX fusion gene transcript. Whole blood RNA, RNA of mononuclear cells, and microvesicle RNA of synovial sarcoma patients were analyzed for the presence of the fusion gene transcripts. Results. Electron microscopic analysis revealed synovial sarcoma cells releasing membrane-enclosed microvesicles. In vitro, the SYT-SSX fusion gene transcript was detected in both synovial sarcoma cells and microvesicles. Nested qPCR proved to be the most sensitive in detecting the SYT-SSX fusion gene mRNA. In contrast, the fusion gene transcript was not detected in peripheral blood cells and microvesicles of synovial sarcoma patients. Conclusion. Synovial sarcoma cells release microvesicles harboring the SYT-SSX fusion transcript. Nested qPCR proved to be the most sensitive in detecting the SYT-SSX fusion gene mRNA; however, more sensitive assays are needed to detect cancer-specific microvesicles in the peripheral blood of cancer patients. PMID:27069481

  16. Point-of-care and visual detection of P. aeruginosa and its toxin genes by multiple LAMP and lateral flow nucleic acid biosensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuting; Cheng, Nan; Xu, Yuancong; Huang, Kunlun; Luo, Yunbo; Xu, Wentao

    2016-07-15

    This study describes a simple and sensitive approach for visual and point-of-care detection of P. aeruginosa and its toxin genes based on multiple loop-mediated isothermal amplification (mLAMP) and lateral flow nucleic acid biosensor (LFNAB). Differentiation of the internal standard gene ecfX and toxin genes (ExoS and ExoU) in P. aeruginosa was determined using FITC-, hex-and digoxin-modified primers in the mLAMP process. In the presence of biotin-and FITC- (hex-, digoxin-) modified primers and Bst DNA polymerase large fragments, the mLAMP produced numerous biotin- and FITC- (hex-, digoxin-) attached duplex DNA products. The products were detected by LFNAB through dual immunoreactions (anti-biotin antibodies on the gold nanoparticle (Au-NP) and biotin on the duplex, anti-FITC (hex, digoxin) antibodies on the LFNAB test line and FITC (hex, digoxin) on the duplex). The accumulation of Au-NPs produced a characteristic red band, enabling visual detection of P. aeruginosa and its toxin genes without instrumentation. After systematic optimization of LFNAB preparation and detecting conditions, the current approach was capable of detecting concentrations as low as 20 CFU/mL P. aeruginosa or its toxin genes within 50min without complicated instrument, which is more sensitive than PCR. Therefore, this approach provides a simple, pollution free, sensitive, and low-cost point-of-care test for the detection of P. aeruginosa and its toxin genes. PMID:26985584

  17. Quail FMO3 gene cloning, tissue expression profiling, polymorphism detection and association analysis with fishy taint in eggs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fengtao Mo

    Full Text Available Quail eggs comprise a significant and favourable part of table eggs in certain countries. Some quail eggs, however, present fishy off-flavor which directly influences their quality. It is reported that flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3 is associated with fish-odour trait in human and animal products. FMO3 is responsible for the degradation of trimethylamine (TMA in vivo. Loss-of-function mutations in FMO3 gene can result in defective TMA N-oxygenation, giving rise to disorder known as "fish-odour syndrome" in human, as well as the fishy off-flavor in cow milk and chicken eggs. In order to reveal the genetic factor of fishy taint in quail eggs, we cloned the cDNA sequence of quail FMO3 gene, investigated FMO3 mRNA expression level in various tissues, detected SNPs in the coding region of the gene and conducted association analysis between a mutation and the TMA content in quail egg yolks. The 1888 bp cDNA sequence of quail FMO3 gene encoding 532 amino acids was obtained and characterized. The phylogenetic analysis revealed quail FMO3 had a closer relationship with chicken FMO3. The FMO3 mRNA was highly expressed in liver and kidney of quail. Nine SNPs were detected in the coding sequence of quail FMO3 gene, including a nonsense mutation (Q319X which was significantly associated with the elevated TMA content in quail egg yolks. Genotype TT at Q319X mutation loci was sensitive to choline. With addition of choline in the feed, the quails with homozygote TT at the Q319X mutation loci laid fish-odour eggs, indicating an interaction between genotype and diet. The results indicated that Q319X mutation was associated with the fishy off-flavor in quail eggs. Identification of the unfavorable allele T of quail FMO3 gene can be applied in future quail breeding to eliminate fishy off-flavor trait in quail eggs.

  18. Electrochemical biosensor for detection of PML/RARα fusion gene based on eriochrome cyanine R film modified glassy carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This communication reports on a novel biosensor to study the hybridization specificity based on eriochrome cyanine R (ECR) monolayer film modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). Differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was used to monitor the hybridization reaction on the ECR-modified electrode. The decrease of the peak current of methylene blue (MB), an electroactive indicator, was observed upon hybridization of the probe with the target DNA. Electrochemical investigations indicated that ECR modified biosensor displayed a wide linear range of 5.0–200 pM with a detection limit of 0.982 pM. This new biosensor exhibited good selectivity for one-base mismatch and complementary sequence after hybridization in detecting promyelocytic leukemia/retinoic acid receptor α (PML/RARα) fusion gene in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL).

  19. Detection of monoclonal immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangement (FR3 in Thai malignant lymphoma by High Resolution Melting curve analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pongpruttipan Tawatchai

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Malignant lymphoma, especially non-Hodgkin lymphoma, is one of the most common hematologic malignancies in Thailand. The diagnosis of malignant lymphoma is often problematic, especially in early stages of the disease. Detection of antigen receptor gene rearrangement including T cell receptor (TCR and immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH by polymerase chain reaction followed by heteroduplex has currently become standard whereas fluorescent fragment analysis (GeneScan has been used for confirmation test. In this study, three techniques had been compared: thermocycler polymerase chain reaction (PCR followed by heteroduplex and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, GeneScan analysis, and real time PCR with High Resolution Melting curve analysis (HRM. The comparison was carried out with DNA extracted from paraffin embedded tissues diagnosed as B- cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Specific PCR primers sequences for IgH gene variable region 3, including fluorescence labeled IgH primers were used and results were compared with HRM. In conclusion, the detection IgH gene rearrangement by HRM in the LightCycler System showed potential for distinguishing monoclonality from polyclonality in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Introduction Malignant lymphoma, especially non-Hodgkin lymphoma, is one of the most common hematologic malignancies in Thailand. The incidence rate as reported by Ministry of Public Health is 3.1 per 100,000 population in female whereas the rate in male is 4.5 per 100,000 population 1. At Siriraj Hospital, the new cases diagnosed as malignant lymphoma were 214.6 cases/year 2. The diagnosis of malignant lymphoma is often problematic, especially in early stages of the disease. Therefore, detection of antigen receptor gene rearrangement including T cell receptor (TCR and immunoglobulin heavy chain (IgH by polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay has recently become a standard laboratory test for discrimination of reactive from malignant clonal

  20. Band structure of superconducting MgB sub 2 and isostructural CaGa sub 2 , AgB sub 2 , AuB sub 2 , ZrBe sub 2 and HfBe sub 2

    CERN Document Server

    Shein, I R; Ivanovskij, A L

    2001-01-01

    The analysis of the zonal structure of the MgB sub 2 mean-temperature superconductor is carried out. The MgB sub 2 quasi-two-dimensional structure is one of its important features. The comparison of the MgB sub 2 zonal structure and the ZrBe sub 2 , HfBe sub 2 and CaGa sub 2 isostructural hexagonal phases is carried out. The zonal structure calculations are accomplished through the Muffin-Tin self-coordinated full-potential linear method. The factors, responsible for the MgB sub 2 superconducting properties, are analyzed. The Ag and Au hypothetical diborides are considered

  1. PAX3 gene deletion detected by microarray analysis in a girl with hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drozniewska, Malgorzata; Haus, Olga

    2014-01-01

    Deletions of the PAX3 gene have been rarely reported in the literature. Mutations of this gene are a common cause of Waardenburg syndrome type 1 and 3. We report a 16 year old female presenting hearing loss and normal intellectual development, without major features of Waardenburg syndrome type 1, and without family history of the syndrome. Her phenotype, however, overlaps with features of craniofacial-deafness-hand syndrome. Microarray analysis showed ~862 kb de novo deletion at 2q36.1 including PAX3. The above findings suggest that the rearrangement found in our patient appeared de novo and with high probability is a cause of her phenotype. PMID:24839464

  2. Mediterranean river buffalo oxytocin-neurophysin I (OXT gene: structure, promoter analysis and allele detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ramunno

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Oxytocin (OXT is a very abundant nonapeptide neurohypophysial hormone implicated in several aspects of reproduction, including social, sexual and maternal behaviour, induction of labour and milk ejection. The nucleotide sequence of the whole OXTneurophysin I encoding gene (OXT in Mediterranean river buffalo was determined, plus 993 nucleotides at the 5’ flanking region. Buffalo oxytocin gene sequence analysis showed two transitions in the promoter region (C→T in position – 966 and G→A in position – 790 and one transversion G→T at the 170th nucleotide of the second exon, responsible for the Arg97→Leu aa substitution which identifies an allele named OXT B. A PCR-RFLP based method for a rapid identification of carriers of these alleles has been developed.

  3. Rapid and Sensitive Reporter Gene Assays for Detection of Antiandrogenic and Estrogenic Effects of Environmental Chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinggaard, Anne Marie; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie; Larsen, John Christian

    1999-01-01

    Reports on increasing incidences in developmental abnormalities of the human male reproductive tract and the recent identifications of environmental chemicals with antiandrogenic activity necessitate the screening of a larger number of compounds in order to get an overview of potential antiandrog......Reports on increasing incidences in developmental abnormalities of the human male reproductive tract and the recent identifications of environmental chemicals with antiandrogenic activity necessitate the screening of a larger number of compounds in order to get an overview of potential...... cancer cells with an estrogen response element–luciferase vector. Thus, FuGene may prove to be valuable in diverse reporter gene assays involving transient transfections for screening of potential endocrine disruptors for (anti)androgenic and (anti)estrogenic properties....

  4. Detection of gene expression signatures related to underlying disease and treatment in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serikawa, Kyle A; Jacobsen, Søren; Lundsgaard, Dorthe;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Gene expression signatures can provide an unbiased view into the molecular changes underlying biologically and medically interesting phenotypes. We therefore initiated this study to identify signatures that would be of utility in studying rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: We used...... microarray profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in 30 RA patients to assess the effect of different biologic agent (biologics) treatments and to quantify the degree of a type-I interferon (IFN) signature in these patients. A numeric score was derived for the quantification step and applied...... showing RA to be heterogeneous for an IFN component. A comparison of individuals currently untreated with a biologic with those treated with infliximab, tocilizumab, or abatacept suggested that each biologic induces a specific gene signature in PBMCs. CONCLUSIONS: It is possible to observe signs of type...

  5. Application of polymerase chain reaction to detect rearrangement of immunoglobulin heavy chain genes in lymphoproliferative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, S H; Siegrist, K; Akhtar, M

    1997-07-01

    As part of our routine work-up in the diagnosis of lymphoproliferative disease, we used a rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay to amplify the DNA fragments of the framework 3 (FR3) region of the immunoglobulin heavy (IgH) chain genes. The assay does not involve hybridization, nested priming, or sequencing of the amplified PCR product. It was performed on 66 specimens of B-cell lymphoproliferative disease, including acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, multiple myeloma, hairy cell leukemia and follicular lymphoma. Twenty-six specimens of negative controls, including acute myeloid leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia in myeloid transformation and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, were also analyzed. The assay was performed with 77% sensitivity and 100% specificity. The standard IgH chain gene rearrangement by Southern blot analysis is reserved for the remaining negative cases if clinically indicated. PMID:17353588

  6. Detection of differentially expressed candidate genes for a fatty liver QTL on mouse chromosome 12

    OpenAIRE

    Kobayashi, Misato; Suzuki, Miyako; Ohno, Tamio; Tsuzuki, Kana; Taguchi, Chie; Tateishi, Soushi; Kawada, Teruo; Kim, Young-Il; Murai, Atsushi; Horio, Fumihiko

    2016-01-01

    Background The SMXA-5 mouse is an animal model of high-fat diet-induced fatty liver. The major QTL for fatty liver, Fl1sa on chromosome 12, was identified in a SM/J × SMXA-5 intercross. The SMXA-5 genome consists of the SM/J and A/J genomes, and the A/J allele of Fl1sa is a fatty liver-susceptibility allele. The existence of the responsible genes for fatty liver within Fl1sa was confirmed in A/J-12SM consomic mice. The aim of this study was to identify candidate genes for Fl1sa, and to invest...

  7. Detection of transgenic cp4 epsps genes in the soil food web

    OpenAIRE

    Hart, Miranda M.; Powell, Jeff R.; Gulden, Robert H.; Levy-Booth, David J.; Dunfield, Kari E.; K Peter Pauls; Swanton, Clarence J.; John N Klironomos; Trevors, Jack T.

    2009-01-01

    The persistence and movement of transgenic DNA in agricultural and natural systems is largely unknown. This movement poses a threat of horizontal gene transfer and possible proliferation of genetically modified DNA into the general environment. To assess the persistence of transgenic DNA in a field of Roundup Ready® corn, we quantified the presence of the transgene for glyphosate tolerance within a soil food web. Using quantitative real-time PCR, we identified the cp4 epsps transgene in bulk ...

  8. Detection of chromosomal regions showing differential gene expression in human skeletal muscle and in alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma

    OpenAIRE

    Bortoluzzi Stefania; Bisognin Andrea; Danieli Gian

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Rhabdomyosarcoma is a relatively common tumour of the soft tissue, probably due to regulatory disruption of growth and differentiation of skeletal muscle stem cells. Identification of genes differentially expressed in normal skeletal muscle and in rhabdomyosarcoma may help in understanding mechanisms of tumour development, in discovering diagnostic and prognostic markers and in identifying novel targets for drug therapy. Results A Perl-code web client was developed to auto...

  9. Heterogeneity within the hemagglutinin genes of canine distemper virus (CDV) strains detected in Italy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martella, V.; Cirone, F.; Elia, G.;

    2006-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) is a highly contagious viral pathogen causing lethal disease in dogs and other mammalians. A high degree of genetic variation is found between recent CDV strains and the old CDV isolates used in the vaccines and such genetic variation is regarded as a possible cause of...... lineage. These results suggest that at least three different CDV lineages are present in Italy. Keywords: Canine distemper virus; Dogs; Lineages; H gene...

  10. Rapid and sensitive detection of Plesiomonas shigelloides by loop-mediated isothermal amplification of the hugA gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuang Meng

    Full Text Available Plesiomonas shigelloides is one of the causative agents of human gastroenteritis, with increasing number of reports describing such infections in recent years. In this study, the hugA gene was chosen as the target to design loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP assays for the rapid, specific, and sensitive detection of P. shigelloides. The performance of the assay with reference plasmids and spiked human stools as samples was evaluated and compared with those of quantitative PCR (qPCR. No false-positive results were observed for the 32 non-P. shigelloides strains used to evaluate assay specificity. The limit of detection for P. shigelloides was approximately 20 copies per reaction in reference plasmids and 5×10(3 CFU per gram in spiked human stool, which were more sensitive than the results of qPCR. When applied in human stool samples spiked with 2 low levels of P. shigelloides, the LAMP assays achieved accurate detection after 6-h enrichment. In conclusion, the LAMP assay developed in this study is a valuable method for rapid, cost-effective, and simple detection of P. shigelloides in basic clinical and field laboratories in the rural areas of China.

  11. Quantitative fucK gene polymerase chain reaction on sputum and nasopharyngeal secretions to detect Haemophilus influenzae pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeldaim, Guma M K; Strålin, Kristoffer; Olcén, Per; Blomberg, Jonas; Mölling, Paula; Herrmann, Björn

    2013-06-01

    A quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the fucK gene was developed for specific detection of Haemophilus influenzae. The method was tested on sputum and nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) from 78 patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). With a reference standard of sputum culture and/or serology against the patient's own nasopharyngeal isolate, H. influenzae etiology was detected in 20 patients. Compared with the reference standard, fucK PCR (using the detection limit 10(5) DNA copies/mL) on sputum and NPA showed a sensitivity of 95.0% (19/20) in both cases, and specificities of 87.9% (51/58) and 89.5% (52/58), respectively. In a receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, sputum fucK PCR was found to be significantly superior to sputum P6 PCR for detection of H. influenzae CAP. NPA fucK PCR was positive in 3 of 54 adult controls without respiratory symptoms. In conclusion, quantitative fucK real-time PCR provides a sensitive and specific identification of H. influenzae in respiratory secretions. PMID:23541117

  12. Parallelized evolutionary learning for detection of biclusters in gene expression data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qinghua; Tao, Dacheng; Li, Xuelong; Liew, Alan Wee-Chung

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of gene expression data obtained from microarray experiments is important for discovering the biological process of genes. Biclustering algorithms have been proven to be able to group the genes with similar expression patterns under a number of experimental conditions. In this paper, we propose a new biclustering algorithm based on evolutionary learning. By converting the biclustering problem into a common clustering problem, the algorithm can be applied in a search space constructed by the conditions. To further reduce the size of the search space, we randomly separate the full conditions into a number of condition subsets (subspaces), each of which has a smaller number of conditions. The algorithm is applied to each subspace and is able to discover bicluster seeds within a limited computing time. Finally, an expanding and merging procedure is employed to combine the bicluster seeds into larger biclusters according to a homogeneity criterion. We test the performance of the proposed algorithm using synthetic and real microarray data sets. Compared with several previously developed biclustering algorithms, our algorithm demonstrates a significant improvement in discovering additive biclusters. PMID:21383419

  13. A Joint Location-Scale Test Improves Power to Detect Associated SNPs, Gene Sets, and Pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soave, David; Corvol, Harriet; Panjwani, Naim; Gong, Jiafen; Li, Weili; Boëlle, Pierre-Yves; Durie, Peter R; Paterson, Andrew D; Rommens, Johanna M; Strug, Lisa J; Sun, Lei

    2015-07-01

    Gene-based, pathway, and other multivariate association methods are motivated by the possibility of GxG and GxE interactions; however, accounting for such interactions is limited by the challenges associated with adequate modeling information. Here we propose an easy-to-implement joint location-scale (JLS) association testing framework for single-variant and multivariate analysis that accounts for interactions without explicitly modeling them. We apply the JLS method to a gene-set analysis of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease, which is influenced by multiple environmental and genetic factors. We identify and replicate an association between the constituents of the apical plasma membrane and CF lung disease (p = 0.0099 and p = 0.0180, respectively) and highlight a role for the SLC9A3-SLC9A3R1/2-EZR complex in contributing to CF lung disease. Many association studies could benefit from re-analysis with the JLS method that leverages complex genetic architecture for SNP, gene, and pathway identification. Analytical verification, simulation, and additional proof-of-principle applications support our approach. PMID:26140448

  14. Functional Analysis of Thyroid Peroxidase Gene Mutations Detected in Patients with Thyroid Dyshormonogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srikanta Guria

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thyroid peroxidase (TPO is the key enzyme in the biosynthesis of thyroid hormones. We aimed to identify the spectrum of mutations in the TPO gene leading to hypothyroidism in the population of West Bengal to establish the genetic etiology of the disease. 200 hypothyroid patients (case and their corresponding sex and age matched 200 normal individuals (control were screened depending on their clinical manifestations. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral blood samples and TPO gene (Exon 7 to Exon 14 was amplified by PCR. The PCR products were subjected to sequencing to identify mutations. Single nucleotide changes such as Glu 641 Lys, Asp 668 Asn, Thr 725 Pro, Asp 620 Asn, Ser 398 Thr, and Ala 373 Ser were found. Changes in the TPO were assayed in vitro to compare mutant and wild-type activities. Five mutants were enzymatically inactive in the guaiacol and iodide assays. This is a strong indication that the mutations are present at crucial positions of the TPO gene, resulting in inactivated TPO. The results of this study may help to develop a genetic screening protocol for goiter and hypothyroidism in the population of West Bengal.

  15. Molecular analysis of the rRNA genes of Babesia spp and Ehrlichia canis detected in dogs from RibeirÃo Preto, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    de Oliveira, L. P.; Cardozo, G.P.; E.V. Santos; Mansur, M.A.B.; I.A.N. Donini; Zissou, V.G.; P.G. Roberto; M. Marins

    2009-01-01

    The partial DNA sequences of the 18S rRNA gene of Babesia canis and the 16S rRNA gene of Ehrlichia canis detected in dogs from Ribeirão Preto, Brazil, were compared to sequences from other strains deposited in GenBank. The E. canis strain circulating in Ribeirão Preto is identical to other strains previously detected in the region, whereas the subspecies Babesia canis vogeli is the main Babesia strain circulating in dogs from Ribeirão Preto.As sequências parciais dos genes RNAr 18S de Babesia...

  16. Multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification for rapid detection of deletions and duplications in the dystrophin gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective:Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD) are X-linked disorders caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. The majority of recognized mutations are copy number changes of individual exons. The objective of the present study was to assess the multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) effects of detection of gene mutations. Methods: Samples of 20 control males and 80 males and their mothers referred to our diagnostic facility on the clinical suspicion of DMD or BMD were tested by MLPA and multiplex PCR. Results: The mean DQs for all peak of 20 control male samples was 1.02 (range from 0.83 to 1.21) by MLPA. Deletions or duplications were identified in 6 out of 31 families that had been previously tested as negative by multiplex PCR. One case of complex rearrangement involving a duplication of two regions: dupEX3-9 and dupEX 17-41 were found by MLPA. Conclusions: MLPA is a highly sensitive method and rapid alternative to multiplex PCR for detection of DMD and BMD.

  17. Mtp-40 and alpha antigen gene fragment amplification for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Colombian clinical specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso Rosalba

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the use of Mtp-40 and alpha antigen polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification fragments for the precise tuberculosis (TB diagnosis was evaluated. One hundred and ninety two different samples were obtained from 113 patients with suspected TB. Mtp-40 and alpha antigen protein genes were amplified by the PCR technique and compared to both the "gold standard" (culture test, as well as the clinical parameters (including a clinical record and X-ray film exam in 113 patients. Thirty-eight of the 113 patients had a presumptive clinical diagnosis of TB; 74% being detected by PCR technique, 58% by culture and 44% by direct microscopic visualization. Weconclude that it is possible to use PCR as a suitable technique for the detection of any mycobacteria by means of the alpha antigen product, or the specific infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by means of the mtp-40 gene. This might be a good supporting tool in difficult clinical TB diagnosis and pauci-bacillary cases.

  18. Detection of EBV Infection and Gene Expression in Oral Cancer from Patients in Taiwan by Microarray Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ching-Yu Yen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Epstein-Barr virus is known to cause nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Although oral cavity is located close to the nasal pharynx, the pathogenetic role of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV in oral cancers is unclear. This molecular epidemiology study uses EBV genomic microarray (EBV-chip to simultaneously detect the prevalent rate and viral gene expression patterns in 57 oral squamous cell carcinoma biopsies (OSCC collected from patients in Taiwan. The majority of the specimens (82.5% were EBV-positive that probably expressed coincidently the genes for EBNAs, LMP2A and 2B, and certain structural proteins. Importantly, the genes fabricated at the spots 61 (BBRF1, BBRF2, and BBRF3 and 68 (BDLF4 and BDRF1 on EBV-chip were actively expressed in a significantly greater number of OSCC exhibiting exophytic morphology or ulceration than those tissues with deep invasive lesions (P=.0265 and .0141, resp.. The results may thus provide the lead information for understanding the role of EBV in oral cancer pathogenesis.

  19. Development and evaluation of multiplex PCR assays for rapid detection of virulence-associated genes in Arcobacter species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteduck-Léveillée, Jenni; Cloutier, Michel; Topp, Edward; Lapen, David R; Talbot, Guylaine; Villemur, Richard; Khan, Izhar U H

    2016-02-01

    As the pathogenicity of Arcobacter species might be associated with various virulence factors, this study was aimed to develop and optimize three single-tube multiplex PCR (mPCR) assays that can efficiently detect multiple virulence-associated genes (VAGs) in Arcobacter spp. including the Arcobacter butzleri, Arcobacter cryaerophilus and Arcobacter skirrowii, respectively. The recognized target virulence factors used in the study were fibronectin binding protein (cj1349), filamentous hemagglutinin (hecA), hemolysin activation protein (hecB), hemolysin (tlyA), integral membrane protein virulence factor (mviN), invasin (ciaB), outer membrane protein (irgA) and phospholipase (pldA). Identical results were obtained between singleplex PCR and mPCR assays and no cross- and/or non-specific amplification products were obtained when tested against other closely related bacterial species. The sensitivities of these three mPCR assays were ranging from 1ngμL(-1) to 100ngμL(-1) DNA. The developed assays with combinations of duplex or triplex PCR primer pairs of VAGs were further evaluated and validated by applying them to isolates of the A. butzleri, A. cryaerophilus and A. skirrowii recovered from fecal samples of human and animal origins. The findings revealed that the distribution of the ciaB (90%), mviN (70%), tlyA (50%) and pldA (45%) genes among these target species was significantly higher than the hecA (16%), hecB (10%) and each of irgA and cj1349 (6%) genes, respectively. The newly developed mPCR assays can be used as rapid technique and useful markers for the detection, prevalence and profiling of VAGs in the Arcobacter spp. Moreover, these assays can easily be performed with a high throughput to give a presumptive identification of the causal pathogen in epidemiological investigation of human infections. PMID:26769558

  20. Detection of Gene Deletions in Children with Chondrodysplasia Punctata, Ichthyosis, Kallmann Syndrome, and Ocular Albinism by FISH Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Woei Hou

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Contiguous gene syndrome (CGS is characterized by a series of clinical featuresresulting from interstitial or terminal deletions of various adjacentgenes. Several important genes have been identified in the Xp22.3 region tobe responsible for genetically heterogeneous diseases. In this study, fluorescencein situ hybridization (FISH methods were used to detect the extent ofgene deletion related to the phenotypes of patients with Xp-CGS.Methods: The molecular cytogenetic statuses of 23 boys with at least 1 apparent featureof chondrodysplasia punctata (CDP, ichthyosis, Kallmann syndrome, ortype 1 ocular albinism and those of their family members were investigated.High-resolution banding and FISH studies were performed using the probesof steroid sulfatase (STS, KAL1 and OA1, to detect the deleted status onXp22.3 in these patients along with their mothers and/or sisters or maternalgrandmothers.Results: All of these boys had normal karyotypes. FISH study showed nullisomy in 9of the 23 male patients and hemizygosity in all female carriers in the geneson Xp22.3. The existence of 2 or more diseases in the same individual indicatesa CGS. In addition, a putative mental retardation-related gene onXp22.3 locus was considered to be located between X-linked CDP and STS.Conclusions: The use of FISH probes for the Xp22.3 region allowed us to identify XlinkedCGSs, especially in those patients with 2 or more distinct clinical entitiesor an obvious X-linked disorder.

  1. Exon deletions of the EP300 and CREBBP genes in two children with Rubinstein–Taybi syndrome detected by aCGH

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Anne Chun-Hui; J Dossett, Cherilyn; Walton, Carol S; E Cramer, Andrea; Eng, Patti A; Nowakowska, Beata A; Pursley, Amber N.; Stankiewicz, Pawel; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Cheung, Sau Wai

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the utility of an exon coverage microarray platform in detecting intragenic deletions: one in exons 24–27 of the EP300 gene and another in exons 27 and 28 of the CREBBP gene in two patients with Rubinstein–Taybi syndrome (RSTS). RSTS is a heterogeneous disorder in which ∼45–55% of cases result from deletion or mutations in the CREBBP gene and an unknown portion of cases result from gene changes in EP300. The first case is a 3-year-old female with an exonic deletion of the EP300...

  2. The occurrence of antibiotic resistance genes in Taq polymerases and a decontamination method applied to the detection of genetically modified crops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perron, André; Raymond, Philippe; Simard, Robin

    2006-03-01

    Different antibiotic resistance (AR) genes, such as Bla, Tet and NPTII, contaminate commercially available Taq polymerases. The specificity of the AR gene PCR can be increased when using a restriction enzyme-based decontamination of polymerase. The elimination of Taq polymerase contamination allows the use of PCR tests to screen seeds (corn) and processed food for the presence of genetically modified organisms (GMO) based on the detection of AR genes. Without a decontamination procedure for AR genes, PCR screening tests should be interpreted with caution. PMID:16614919

  3. Detection of Aflr Gene and Toxigenicity of Aspergillus flavus Group Isolated from Patients with Fungal Sinusitis

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    P Dehghan

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Aspergillus flavus is the second most important Aspergillus species causing human infections particu­larly fun­gal sinusitis. Since little is known about aflatoxin producing ability of clinical isolates, this study was under­taken to de­tect the aflatoxigenic isolates amongst these isolates."nMethods: A total of 23 isolates of A. spp. which were recovered from patients proved to have fungal sinusitis by morpho­logi­cal and histological methods and also 5 additional aflatoxigenic and non-aflatoxigenic reference of A. fla­vus group strains were studied. The isolates were identified morphologically using Czapek Yeast Agar and A. flavus and parasiticus Agar (AFPA. Aflatoxin producing ability of the isolates was confirmed by Thin Layer Chromatogra­phy. Existing of aflR gene the regulatory gene in aflatoxin biosynthesis, were studied in all isolates by PCR method."nResults: All twenty three Aspergillus isolates confirmed as A. flavus group by their macroscopic and microscopic fea­tures. One clinical isolate confirmed as A. oryzae by mycological methods. A. oryzae as well as A. flavus JCM2061 and NCPF2008 and 3 clinical isolates were not able to produce orange pigment on AFPA. From total of 23 iso­lates 4 (17.4% con­firmed to be aflatoxigenic by TLC method. A banding pattern which matched to aflR primers was amplified with approxi­mate size of 800 bp in all 23 clinical A. flavus isolates. A larger banding pattern 1050 bp was revealed in clinical iso­late; strain no.20 as well."nConclusion:  Some clinical sinus isolates are able to produce aflatoxin and all of studied isolates including; A. oryzae, A. parasiti­cus and A. sojae were able to amplify aflR gene under our laboratory conditions.  

  4. PCR-SSCP-DNA sequencing method in detecting PTEN gene mutation and its significance in human gastric cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan-Yong Guo; Xuan-Fu Xu; Jian-Ye Wu; Shu-Fang Liu

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To discuss the possible effect of PTEN gene mutations on occurrence and development of gastric cancer.METHODS: Fifty-three gastric cancer specimens were selected to probe PTEN gene mutations in genome of gastric cancer and paracancerous tissues using PCR-SSCP-DNA sequencing method based on microdissection and to observe the protein expression by immunohistochemistry technique.RESULTS: PCR-SSCP-DNA sequencing indicated that 4 kinds of mutation sites were found in 5 of 53 gastric cancer specimens.One kind of mutation was found in exons.AA-TCC mutation was located at 40bp upstream of 3' lateral exert 7 (115946 AA-TCC).Such mutations led to terminator formation in the 297th codon of the PTEN gene.The other 3 kinds of mutation were found in introns,including a G-C point mutation at 91 bp upstream of 5' lateral exon 5(90896 G-C),a T-G point mutation at 24 bp upstream of 5' lateral exon 5 (90963 T-G),and a single base A mutation at 7 bp upstream of 5' lateral exon 5 (90980 A del).The PTEN protein expression in gastric cancer and paracancerous tissues detected using immunohistochemistry technique indicated that the total positive rate of PTEN protein expression was 66% in gastric cancer tissue,which was significantly lower than that (100%) in paracancerous tissues (P<0.005).CONCLUSION: PTEN gene mutation and expression may play an important role in the occurrence and development of gastric cancer.(C)2008 The WJG Press.All rights reserved.

  5. Detection of PBP2a (penicillin-binding protein 2a) and mecA gene in methicillin resistant staphylococci originated from animals

    OpenAIRE

    Ašanin Jelena; Aksentijević Ksenija; Zdravković N.; Ašanin Ružica; Mišić D.

    2012-01-01

    For the purpose of detecting methicillin (oxacillin) resistance in staphylococcal strains, in a number of microbiological laboratories only disc diffusion method with cefoxitin and/or oxacillin discs is used. Besides this method, it is desirable to determine MIC values for cefoxitin and/or oxacillin. After examination by disc diffusion and dilution methods, latex agglutination is used for the detection of PBP2a and PCR is used for the detection of mecA gene...

  6. Real-Time Fluorescence PCR Assays for Detection and Characterization of Shiga Toxin, Intimin, and Enterohemolysin Genes from Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Reischl, Udo; Youssef, Mohammad T.; Kilwinski, Jochen; Lehn, Norbert; Zhang, Wen Lan; Karch, Helge; Strockbine, Nancy A.

    2002-01-01

    PCR assays have proved useful for detecting and characterizing Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC). Recent advances in PCR technology have facilitated the development of real-time fluorescence PCR assays with greatly reduced amplification times and improved methods for the detection of amplified target sequences. We developed and evaluated two such assays for the LightCycler instrument: one that simultaneously detects the genes for Shiga toxins 1 and 2 (stx1 and stx2) and another th...

  7. Application of DETECTER, an evolutionary genomic tool to analyze genetic variation, to the cystic fibrosis gene family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Kee Danny W

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The medical community requires computational tools that distinguish missense genetic differences having phenotypic impact within the vast number of sense mutations that do not. Tools that do this will become increasingly important for those seeking to use human genome sequence data to predict disease, make prognoses, and customize therapy to individual patients. Results An approach, termed DETECTER, is proposed to identify sites in a protein sequence where amino acid replacements are likely to have a significant effect on phenotype, including causing genetic disease. This approach uses a model-dependent tool to estimate the normalized replacement rate at individual sites in a protein sequence, based on a history of those sites extracted from an evolutionary analysis of the corresponding protein family. This tool identifies sites that have higher-than-average, average, or lower-than-average rates of change in the lineage leading to the sequence in the population of interest. The rates are then combined with sequence data to determine the likelihoods that particular amino acids were present at individual sites in the evolutionary history of the gene family. These likelihoods are used to predict whether any specific amino acid replacements, if introduced at the site in a modern human population, would have a significant impact on fitness. The DETECTER tool is used to analyze the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR gene family. Conclusion In this system, DETECTER retrodicts amino acid replacements associated with the cystic fibrosis disease with greater accuracy than alternative approaches. While this result validates this approach for this particular family of proteins only, the approach may be applicable to the analysis of polymorphisms generally, including SNPs in a human population.

  8. Genomic organisation of the chicken ghrelin gene and its single nucleotide polymorphisms detected by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Q; Zeng, H; Lei, M; Ishag, N A; Fang, M; Sun, B; Yang, G; Zhang, X

    2004-10-01

    (1) Ghrelin is a novel endogenous ligand for the growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHS-R) and is expressed primarily in the stomach and hypothalamus with the probable function of stimulating GH secretion and food intake both in mammals and poultry. The complete sequences of ghrelin gene have been reported in humans and mice; however, that of chickens remains unclear. (2) Here, we report the complete sequence of chicken ghrelin gene (submitted to Genbank; accession number AY303688), which consists of 5 exons and 4 introns. As in mice, the first exon of chicken ghrelin gene does not encode any amino acid. (3) Scanning point mutations with denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) using WAVE DNA Fragment Analysis Systems and confirmed with direct sequencing for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products, we analysed the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the entire gene of chicken ghrelin. (4) Results showed that there were 19 SNPs in chicken ghrelin gene, and most of these SNPs were scattered in the 4 introns. In these SNPs, one mutation in exon 5 (A2355G) led to the change of amino acid from glutamine to arginine (Gln 113 Arg): as a result a different ghrelin precursor instead of a mature peptide was produced. In addition, one SNP in 5'UTR (C223G) determined the presence or absence of a potential binding site of transcription factor serum response factor (SRF), which might affect the expression of chicken ghrelin gene. Some of the SNPs detected in the present study could be used in quantitative trait loci (QTL) mapping for growth characters in chickens. (5) Because one SNP is located in a polymorphic site of restriction enzyme PagI of intron 4, it was possible to design a PCR-RFLP procedure and analyse the diversity of 10 chicken populations. Results showed the allelic frequencies of C2100T differ among these breeds, however, no significant difference was observed between imported breeds and Chinese native ones, nor between egg layers and

  9. A multistep bioinformatic approach detects putative regulatory elements in gene promoters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pizzi Cinzia

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Searching for approximate patterns in large promoter sequences frequently produces an exceedingly high numbers of results. Our aim was to exploit biological knowledge for definition of a sheltered search space and of appropriate search parameters, in order to develop a method for identification of a tractable number of sequence motifs. Results Novel software (COOP was developed for extraction of sequence motifs, based on clustering of exact or approximate patterns according to the frequency of their overlapping occurrences. Genomic sequences of 1 Kb upstream of 91 genes differentially expressed and/or encoding proteins with relevant function in adult human retina were analyzed. Methodology and results were tested by analysing 1,000 groups of putatively unrelated sequences, randomly selected among 17,156 human gene promoters. When applied to a sample of human promoters, the method identified 279 putative motifs frequently occurring in retina promoters sequences. Most of them are localized in the proximal portion of promoters, less variable in central region than in lateral regions and similar to known regulatory sequences. COOP software and reference manual are freely available upon request to the Authors. Conclusion The approach described in this paper seems effective for identifying a tractable number of sequence motifs with putative regulatory role.

  10. A multistep bioinformatic approach detects putative regulatory elements in gene promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bortoluzzi, Stefania; Coppe, Alessandro; Bisognin, Andrea; Pizzi, Cinzia; Danieli, Gian Antonio

    2005-01-01

    Background Searching for approximate patterns in large promoter sequences frequently produces an exceedingly high numbers of results. Our aim was to exploit biological knowledge for definition of a sheltered search space and of appropriate search parameters, in order to develop a method for identification of a tractable number of sequence motifs. Results Novel software (COOP) was developed for extraction of sequence motifs, based on clustering of exact or approximate patterns according to the frequency of their overlapping occurrences. Genomic sequences of 1 Kb upstream of 91 genes differentially expressed and/or encoding proteins with relevant function in adult human retina were analyzed. Methodology and results were tested by analysing 1,000 groups of putatively unrelated sequences, randomly selected among 17,156 human gene promoters. When applied to a sample of human promoters, the method identified 279 putative motifs frequently occurring in retina promoters sequences. Most of them are localized in the proximal portion of promoters, less variable in central region than in lateral regions and similar to known regulatory sequences. COOP software and reference manual are freely available upon request to the Authors. Conclusion The approach described in this paper seems effective for identifying a tractable number of sequence motifs with putative regulatory role. PMID:15904489

  11. Conserved Senescence Associated Genes and Pathways in Primary Human Fibroblasts Detected by RNA-Seq.

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    S Marthandan

    Full Text Available Cellular senescence correlates with changes in the transcriptome. To obtain a complete view on senescence-associated transcription networks and pathways, we assessed by deep RNA sequencing the transcriptomes of five of the most commonly used laboratory strains of human fibroblasts during their transition into senescence. In a number of cases, we verified the RNA-seq data by real-time PCR. By determining cellular protein levels we observed that the age-related expression of most but not all genes is regulated at the transcriptional level. We found that 78% of the age-affected differentially expressed genes were commonly regulated in the same direction (either up- or down-regulated in all five fibroblast strains, indicating a strong conservation of age-associated changes in the transcriptome. KEGG pathway analyses confirmed up-regulation of the senescence-associated secretory phenotype and down-regulation of DNA synthesis/repair and most cell cycle pathways common in all five cell strains. Newly identified senescence-induced pathways include up-regulation of endocytotic/phagocytic pathways and down-regulation of the mRNA metabolism and the mRNA splicing pathways. Our results provide an unprecedented comprehensive and deep view into the individual and common transcriptome and pathway changes during the transition into of senescence of five human fibroblast cell strains.

  12. Using maximum likelihood method to detect adaptive evolution of HCV envelope protein-coding genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wenjuan; ZHANG Yuan; ZHONG Yang

    2006-01-01

    Nonsynonymous-synonymous substitution rate ratio (dN/dS) is an important measure for evaluating selective pressure based on the protein-coding sequences. Maximum likelihood (ML) method with codon-substitution models is a powerful statistic tool for detecting amino acid sites under positive selection and adaptive evolution. We analyzed the hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope protein-coding sequences from 18 general geno/ subtypes worldwide, and found 4 amino acid sites under positive selection. Since these sites are located in different immune epitopes, it is reasonable to anticipate that our study would have potential values in biomedicine. It also suggests that the ML method is an effective way to detect adaptive evolution in virus proteins with relatively high genetic diversity.

  13. Mutation detection in the drug-resistant hepatitis B virus polymerase gene using nanostructured reverse micelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Lian-Chun; Maruyama, Tatsuo; Kamiya, Noriho; Goto, Masahiro; Kuma, Hiroyuki; Hamasaki, Naotaka

    2004-11-01

    The emergence of drug-resistant hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been reported in patients with prolonged administration of lamivudine, which is a potent drug for the prevention of HBV infection. Lamivudine-resistant HBV has several types of mutations at the YMDD motif of its DNA polymerase. We successfully demonstrated that monitoring the hybridization behavior in nanostructured reverse micelles enables us to detect single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). With the aid of reverse micelles, a model 40-mer oligonucleotide containing a single-base substitution was clearly distinguished from the normal, complementary oligonucleotide. In addition, we extended this technique to a high-throughput analysis. The results obtained with a 96-well micro-plate reader indicated the possibility of SNPs detection toward multiple samples of patients. PMID:15566158

  14. Detecting Protein Complexes in Protein Interaction Networks Modeled as Gene Expression Biclusters

    OpenAIRE

    Eileen Marie Hanna; Nazar Zaki; Amr Amin

    2015-01-01

    Developing suitable methods for the detection of protein complexes in protein interaction networks continues to be an intriguing area of research. The importance of this objective originates from the fact that protein complexes are key players in most cellular processes. The more complexes we identify, the better we can understand normal as well as abnormal molecular events. Up till now, various computational methods were designed for this purpose. However, despite their notable performance, ...

  15. Detection of Disease Genes by Use of Family Data. II. Application to Nuclear Families

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, I-Ping; Balise, Raymond R.; Whittemore, Alice S

    2000-01-01

    Two likelihood-based score statistics are used to detect association between a disease and a single diallelic polymorphism, on the basis of data from arbitrary types of nuclear families. The first statistic, the nonfounder statistic, extends the transmission/disequilibrium test to accommodate affected and unaffected offspring and missing parental genotypes. The second statistic, the founder statistic, compares observed or inferred parental genotypes with those of some reference population. In...

  16. Rapid detection of specific genes from human genomic DNA using the microbead-quantum dot complexes in microfluidic chip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jeong Ha; Kim, Jong Sung

    2013-08-01

    In the clinic, it is important to prepare for single stranded DNA from genomic DNA to detect the target gene. In this study, we have investigated the detection of single stranded DNA (ssDNA) obtained by ultrasonication of human genomic DNA via fluorescence quenching on microfluidic chip with pillars at the channel to entrap the microbead-QD complexes (MQCs). The QDs with carboxyl group bind to microbeads with amine group by EDC/NHS coupling reaction. The thiolated probe DNA conjugates strongly with the metal ions on the surface of QDs. The MQCs were packed into a chamber on the channel blocked by pillars. ssDNA and TOTO-3 (intercalating dye) were introduced into the microchannel. After hybridization of probe DNA and target DNA, fluorescence quenching was observed at the surface of the MQDs by FRET between QD and TOTO-3. This experiment shows the possibility of rapid detection of genomic DNA from clinical samples via microbead-QD complexs on microfluidic chip. PMID:23882750

  17. Intergenomic arms races: detection of a nuclear rescue gene of male-killing in a ladybird.

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    Tamsin M O Majerus

    Full Text Available Many species of arthropod are infected by deleterious inherited micro-organisms. Typically these micro-organisms are inherited maternally. Consequently, some, particularly bacteria of the genus Wolbachia, employ a variety of strategies that favour female over male hosts. These strategies include feminisation, induction of parthenogenesis and male-killing. These strategies result in female biased sex ratios in host populations, which lead to selection for host factors that promote male production. In addition, the intra-genomic conflict produced by the difference in transmission of these cytoplasmic endosymbionts and nuclear factors will impose a pressure favouring nuclear factors that suppress the effects of the symbiont. During investigations of the diversity of male-killing bacteria in ladybirds (Coccinellidae, unexpected patterns of vertical transmission of a newly discovered male-killing taxon were observed in the ladybird Cheilomenes sexmaculata. Initial analysis suggested that the expression of the bacterial male-killing trait varies according to the male(s a female has mated with. By swapping males between females, a male influence on the expression of the male-killing trait was confirmed. Experiments were then performed to determine the nature of the interaction. These studies showed that a single dominant allele, which rescues male progeny of infected females from the pathological effect of the male-killer, exists in this species. The gene shows typical Mendelian autosomal inheritance and is expressed irrespective of the parent from which it is inherited. Presence of the rescue gene in either parent does not significantly affect the inheritance of the symbiont. We conclude that C. sexmaculata is host to a male-killing gamma-proteobacterium. Further, this beetle is polymorphic for a nuclear gene, the dominant allele of which rescues infected males from the pathogenic effects of the male-killing agent. These findings represent the first

  18. Molecular detection of interleukin-1A +4845 G→T gene in aggresive periodontitis patients

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    Chiquita Prahasanti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Abundant researches had been conducted based on the clinical and histopathological pathogenesis of aggresive periodontitis. Nevertheless, there were still few researches which based on molecular biology, and especially related to gene polymorphism. This study was done based on IL-1A +4845G→T gene polymorphism in aggressive periodontitis patients. Purpose: The purpose of this tudy was to characterized the generic variation of IL-1A +4845G→T as a risk factor aggressive periodontitis and chronic periodontitis. Methods: DNA from patients with aggressive periodontitis and chronic periodontitis was taken determination of IL-1A +4845 G→T polimorphism was conducted with PCR-RFLP technique. Results: Homozygous allele TT polymorphism was not found in all samples, only allele GG (wild type and allele GT (heterozygous mutant were not affect aggressive periodontitis and chronic periodontitis. Conclusion: The study showed there was no significant association between IL-1A +4845G→T gene polymorphism and aggressive periodontitis and chronic periodontitis. Latar belakang: Penelitian tentang patogenesa periodontitis agresif berdasar klinis dan histopatologi telah banyak dilakukan, akan tetapi penelitian berdasar biologimolekuler terutama polimorfisme gen masih sangat jarang dilakukan. Penelitian ini dilakukan berdasarkan pada polimorfisme gen IL-1A +4845G→T pada penderita periodontitis agresif. Tujuan: Tujuan dari penelitian ini adalah untuk mengetahui variasi genetik dari IL-1A +4845G→T yang merupakan faktor risiko periodontitis agresif dan periodontitis kronis. Metode: DNA dari penderita periodontitis agresif dan periodontitis kronis diisolasi, selanjutnya dilakukan determinasi dari polimorfisme gen IL-1A +4845G→T dengan menggunakan teknik PCR-RFLP. Hasil: Pada seluruh sampel penelitian ini tidak dijumpai polimorfisme allel TT (homosigot mutan, yang didapat adalah jenis allel GG (wild type dan allel GT (heterosigot mutan yang tidak

  19. A model system for assessing and comparing the ability of exon microarray and tag sequencing to detect genes specific for malignant B-cells

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    Kloster Maria

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malignant cells in tumours of B-cell origin account for 0.1% to 98% of the total cell content, depending on disease entity. Recently, gene expression profiles (GEPs of B-cell lymphomas based on microarray technologies have contributed significantly to improved sub-classification and diagnostics. However, the varying degrees of malignant B-cell frequencies in analysed samples influence the interpretation of the GEPs. Based on emerging next-generation sequencing technologies (NGS like tag sequencing (tag-seq for GEP, it is expected that the detection of mRNA transcripts from malignant B-cells can be supplemented. This study provides a quantitative assessment and comparison of the ability of microarrays and tag-seq to detect mRNA transcripts from malignant B-cells. A model system was established by eight serial dilutions of the malignant B-cell lymphoma cell line, OCI-Ly8, into the embryonic kidney cell line, HEK293, prior to parallel analysis by exon microarrays and tag-seq. Results We identified 123 and 117 differentially expressed genes between pure OCI-Ly8 and HEK293 cells by exon microarray and tag-seq, respectively. There were thirty genes in common, and of those, most were B-cell specific. Hierarchical clustering from all dilutions based on the differentially expressed genes showed that neither technology could distinguish between samples with less than 1% malignant B-cells from non-B-cells. A novel statistical concept was developed to assess the ability to detect single genes for both technologies, and used to demonstrate an inverse proportional relationship with the sample purity. Of the 30 common genes, the detection capability of a representative set of three B-cell specific genes - CD74, HLA-DRA, and BCL6 - was analysed. It was noticed that at least 5%, 13% and 22% sample purity respectively was required for detection of the three genes by exon microarray whereas at least 2%, 4% and 51% percent sample purity of