WorldWideScience

Sample records for caffeine

  1. Caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mood. Caffeine is in tea, coffee, chocolate, many soft drinks, and pain relievers and other over-the-counter ... Teens usually get most of their caffeine from soft drinks and energy drinks. (In addition to caffeine, these ...

  2. Caffein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørager, Charlotte Buchard; Jensen, Martin Bach; Madsen, Mogens Rørbæk

    2005-01-01

    Summary Caffeine: physiological and pharmacologic aspects Ugeskr Læger 2004;166:2138-2142 Caffeine is the most widely used stimulant in the world. This is due not only to the fact that it is found in a great number of food products and is therefore readily available, but also because caffeine...... intake results in such positive effects as elation, pleasantness and better reactivity and because abstinence from caffeine can result in a withdrawal syndrome including headache, tiredness, restlessness and heart palpitations. Caffeine is also used in sports, as caffeine in moderate doses (3-6 mg....../kg) can increase the endurance of athletes engaged in running, bicycling, swimming and other endurance sports. Caffeine is used both in training and in competitions, and the International Olympic Commitée (IOC) has included caffeine as a drug used for doping. There are several theories about caffeine...

  3. Caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffeine is a bitter substance found in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate, kola nuts, and certain medicines. ... of energy. For most people, the amount of caffeine in two to four cups of coffee a ...

  4. Caffeine Confusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Caffeine Confusion KidsHealth > For Kids > Caffeine Confusion Print A ... cup of coffee. So what is caffeine, anyway? Caffeine Is a Common Chemical Caffeine (say: KA-feen) ...

  5. Caffeine overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002579.htm Caffeine overdose To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Caffeine is a substance that exists naturally in certain ...

  6. Caffeine in the diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - caffeine ... for caffeine. It can be avoided in the diet. Caffeine stimulates, or excites, the brain and nervous ... medications such as pain relievers , over-the-counter diet pills, and cold medicines. Caffeine has no flavor. ...

  7. Caffeine in the diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diet - caffeine ... Caffeine is absorbed and passes quickly into the brain. It does not collect in the bloodstream or ... been consumed. There is no nutritional need for caffeine. It can be avoided in the diet. Caffeine ...

  8. Caffeine and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a mug of coffee, but might routinely serve soft drinks containing caffeine. Foods and drinks with caffeine are ... consumption: Kids often drink caffeine contained in regular soft drinks. Kids who consume one or more 12-ounce ( ...

  9. Caffeine and Migraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on Pinterest Follow us on Instagram DONATE TODAY Caffeine and Migraine Abuse, Maltreatment, and PTSD and Their ... and Headache Alcohol and Migraine Anxiety and Depression Caffeine and Migraine Depression and Migraine Diet Do I ...

  10. Aspirin, Butalbital, and Caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    The combination of aspirin, butalbital, and caffeine comes as a capsule and tablet to take by mouth. It usually is taken every 4 ... explain any part you do not understand. Take aspirin, butalbital, and caffeine exactly as directed. Do not ...

  11. Acetaminophen, Butalbital, and Caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    The combination of acetaminophen, Butalbital, Caffeine comes as a capsule and tablet to take by mouth. It usually is taken every 4 hours ... explain any part you do not understand. Take acetaminophen, Butalbital, Caffeine exactly as directed. Do not take ...

  12. Caffeine, fatigue, and cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorist, MM; Tops, M

    2003-01-01

    Effects of caffeine and fatigue are discussed with special attention to adenosine-dopamine interactions. Effects of caffeine on human cognition are diverse. Behavioural measurements indicate a general improvement in the efficiency of information processing after caffeine, while the EEG data support

  13. Caffeine Use and Extroversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrum, R. Eric; Meliska, Charles J.

    Some research on the stimulant effect of caffeine suggests that the amount of behavioral enhancement produced by caffeine may depend on subjects' prior experience with the task and the drug. A study was undertaken to test whether prior experience with a task while under the influence of caffeine would facilitate performance of that task. Male…

  14. Ergotamine and Caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    The combination of ergotamine and caffeine is used to prevent and treat migraine headaches. Ergotamine is in a class of medications called ergot ... The combination of ergotamine and caffeine comes as a tablet to take by mouth and as a suppository to insert rectally. It is ...

  15. Heritability of caffeine metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthaei, Johannes; Tzvetkov, Mladen V; Strube, Jakob;

    2016-01-01

    Heritability of caffeine pharmacokinetics and CYP1A2 activity is controversial. Here we analyzed the pharmacokinetics of caffeine, an in vivo probe drug for CYP1A2 and arylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) activity, in monozygotic and dizygotic twins. In the entire group, common and unique...... environmental effects explained most variation in caffeine AUC. Apparently, smoking and hormonal contraceptives masked the genetic effects on CYP1A2 activity. However, when excluding smokers and users of hormonal contraceptives, 89% of caffeine AUC variation was due to genetic effects and even in the entire...... group, 8% of caffeine AUC variation could be explained by a CYP1A1/1A2 promotor polymorphism (rs2470893). In contrast, nearly all of the variation (99%) of NAT2 activity was explained by genetic effects. This study illustrates two very different situations in pharmacogenetics, from an almost exclusively...

  16. Caffeine intake and fecundability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tina Kold; Henriksen, T B; Hjollund, N H;

    1998-01-01

    Fecundability has been defined as the ability to achieve a recognized pregnancy. Several studies on caffeine and fecundability have been conducted but have been inconclusive. This may be explained partly by lack of stratification by smoking. Furthermore, few researchers have tried to separate the...... effect of caffeine from different sources (coffee, tea, cola, and chocolate). Clearly, the relationship between caffeine and fecundability needs further research, given the high prevalence of caffeine intake among women of childbearing age. We examined the independent and combined effects of smoking and...... caffeine intake from different sources on the probability of conception. From 1992 to 1995, a total of 430 couples were recruited after a nationwide mailing of a personal letter to 52,255 trade union members who were 20 to 35 years old, lived with a partner, and had no previous reproductive experience. At...

  17. Spectrophotometric Analysis of Caffeine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Showkat Ahmad Bhawani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The nature of caffeine reveals that it is a bitter white crystalline alkaloid. It is a common ingredient in a variety of drinks (soft and energy drinks and is also used in combination with various medicines. In order to maintain the optimum level of caffeine, various spectrophotometric methods have been developed. The monitoring of caffeine is very important aspect because of its consumption in higher doses that can lead to various physiological disorders. This paper incorporates various spectrophotometric methods used in the analysis of caffeine in various environmental samples such as pharmaceuticals, soft and energy drinks, tea, and coffee. A range of spectrophotometric methodologies including chemometric techniques and derivatization of spectra have been used to analyse the caffeine.

  18. Caffeine as a Gelator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonappa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine (a stimulant and ethanol (a depressant may have opposite effects in our body, but under in vitro conditions they can “gel” together. Caffeine, being one of the widely used stimulants, continued to surprise the scientific community with its unprecedented biological, medicinal and physicochemical properties. Here, we disclose the supramolecular self-assembly of anhydrous caffeine in a series of alcoholic and aromatic solvents, rendering a highly entangled microcrystalline network facilitating the encapsulation of the solvents as illustrated using direct imaging, microscopy analysis and NMR studies.

  19. Make caffeine visible: a fluorescent caffeine "traffic light" detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wang; Kim, Tae-Hyeong; Zhai, Duanting; Er, Jun Cheng; Zhang, Liyun; Kale, Anup Atul; Agrawalla, Bikram Keshari; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung; Chang, Young-Tae

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine has attracted abundant attention due to its extensive existence in beverages and medicines. However, to detect it sensitively and conveniently remains a challenge, especially in resource-limited regions. Here we report a novel aqueous phase fluorescent caffeine sensor named Caffeine Orange which exhibits 250-fold fluorescence enhancement upon caffeine activation and high selectivity. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicate that π-stacking and hydrogen-bonding contribute to their interactions while dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy experiments demonstrate the change of Caffeine Orange ambient environment induces its fluorescence emission. To utilize this probe in real life, we developed a non-toxic caffeine detection kit and tested it for caffeine quantification in various beverages. Naked-eye sensing of various caffeine concentrations was possible based on color changes upon irradiation with a laser pointer. Lastly, we performed the whole system on a microfluidic device to make caffeine detection quick, sensitive and automated. PMID:23877095

  20. Caffeine withdrawal symptoms and self-administration following caffeine deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, S H; de Wit, H; Zacny, J P

    1995-08-01

    This study examined the effects of complete or partial caffeine deprivation on withdrawal symptomatology and self-administration of coffee in caffeine-dependent coffee drinkers. Nine habitual coffee drinkers abstained from dietary sources of caffeine for 33.5 h. Caffeine deprivation was manipulated by administering capsules containing 0%, 50%, or 100% of each subject's daily caffeine intake (complete, partial, and no deprivation conditions). Caffeine withdrawal symptomatology was measured using self-report questionnaires. Caffeine self-administration was measured using: i) the amount of coffee subjects earned on a series of concurrent random-ratio schedules that yielded coffee and money reinforcers; ii) the amount of earned coffee they consumed. Saliva samples revealed that subjects complied with the caffeine abstinence instructions. Caffeine withdrawal symptoms occurred reliably following complete caffeine deprivation, though not in the partial deprivation condition. Caffeine self-administration was not related to deprivation condition. We conclude that caffeine withdrawal symptomatology is not necessarily associated with increased caffeine consumption. PMID:7675881

  1. Caffeine content of decaffeinated coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, Rachel R; Fuehrlein, Brian; Goldberger, Bruce A; Gold, Mark S; Cone, Edward J

    2006-10-01

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed drug in the world with coffee representing a major source of intake. Despite widespread availability, various medical conditions necessitate caffeine-restricted diets. Patients on certain prescription medications are advised to discontinue caffeine intake. Such admonition has implications for certain psychiatric patients because of pharmacokinetic interactions between caffeine and certain anti-anxiety drugs. In an effort to abstain from caffeine, patients may substitute decaffeinated for caffeinated coffee. However, decaffeinated beverages are known to contain caffeine in varying amounts. The present study determined the caffeine content in a variety of decaffeinated coffee drinks. In phase 1 of the study, 10 decaffeinated samples were collected from different coffee establishments. In phase 2 of the study, Starbucks espresso decaffeinated (N=6) and Starbucks brewed decaffeinated coffee (N=6) samples were collected from the same outlet to evaluate variability of caffeine content of the same drink. The 10 decaffeinated coffee samples from different outlets contained caffeine in the range of 0-13.9 mg/16-oz serving. The caffeine content for the Starbucks espresso and the Starbucks brewed samples collected from the same outlet were 3.0-15.8 mg/shot and 12.0-13.4 mg/16-oz serving, respectively. Patients vulnerable to caffeine effects should be advised that caffeine may be present in coffees purported to be decaffeinated. Further research is warranted on the potential deleterious effects of consumption of "decaffeinated" coffee that contains caffeine on caffeine-restricted patients. Additionally, further exploration is merited for the possible physical dependence potential of low doses of caffeine such as those concentrations found in decaffeinated coffee. PMID:17132260

  2. Mood, music, and caffeine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jolij, Jacob; Lorist, Monicque

    2014-01-01

    What we see is affected by how we feel: in positive moods, we are more sensitive to positive stimuli, such as happy faces, but in negative moods we are more sensitive to negative stimuli, such as sad faces. Caffeine is known to affect mood - a cup of coffee results in a more positive mood, but also

  3. Caffeine Reinforces Flavor Preference and Behavior in Moderate Users but Not in Low Caffeine Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dack, Charlotte; Reed, Phil

    2009-01-01

    The study examined the role of caffeine consumption in caffeine reinforcement. Previous findings have shown that caffeine reinforced flavor preference in moderate caffeine consumers who are caffeine deprived. However, most of these studies have employed rating procedures only, and have not shown the effectiveness of caffeine to reinforce behaviors…

  4. Caffeine, Diabetes, Cognition, and Dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biessels, Geert Jan

    2010-01-01

    People with diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of cognitive dysfunction. This review explores the relation between caffeine intake, diabetes, cognition and dementia, focusing on type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Epidemiological studies on caffeine/coffee intake and T2DM risk are reviewed. Next, the impac

  5. Caffeine restriction: effect on mild hypertension.

    OpenAIRE

    MacDonald, T. M.; Sharpe, K; Fowler, G; Lyons, D; FREESTONE, S.; Lovell, H. G.; Webster, J.; Petrie, J C

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To determine the effects on blood pressure of modifying dietary caffeine intake in patients with mild and borderline hypertension by monitoring ambulatory and clinic blood pressure. DESIGN--Four way, randomised, crossover trial of four consecutive two week dietary regimens: normal diet, caffeine free diet alone, caffeine free diet with decaffeinated instant coffee, caffeine free diet with caffeinated instant coffee (instant coffee phases conducted double blind). SETTING--Hospital h...

  6. Caffeine, sleep and quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M. Lorist; J. Snel

    2008-01-01

    Caffeine is regarded as a mild stimulant acting on the central nervous system that is responsible for a significant portion of the behavioural and physiological effects of coffee and tea. Motives why people take caffeine are reflected in consumption patterns. Early in the morning caffeine might help

  7. 21 CFR 182.1180 - Caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Caffeine. 182.1180 Section 182.1180 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN....1180 Caffeine. (a) Product. Caffeine. (b) Tolerance. 0.02 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions,...

  8. Caffeine therapy in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Hady, Hesham; Nasef, Nehad; Shabaan, Abd Elazeez; Nour, Islam

    2015-11-01

    Caffeine is the most commonly used medication for treatment of apnea of prematurity. Its effect has been well established in reducing the frequency of apnea, intermittent hypoxemia, and extubation failure in mechanically ventilated preterm infants. Evidence for additional short-term benefits on reducing the incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia and patent ductus arteriosus has also been suggested. Controversies exist among various neonatal intensive care units in terms of drug efficacy compared to other methylxanthines, dosage regimen, time of initiation, duration of therapy, drug safety and value of therapeutic drug monitoring. In the current review, we will summarize the available evidence for the best practice in using caffeine therapy in preterm infants. PMID:26566480

  9. Make Caffeine Visible: a Fluorescent Caffeine “Traffic Light” Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wang; Kim, Tae-Hyeong; Zhai, Duanting; Er, Jun Cheng; Zhang, Liyun; Kale, Anup Atul; Agrawalla, Bikram Keshari; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung; Chang, Young-Tae

    2013-07-01

    Caffeine has attracted abundant attention due to its extensive existence in beverages and medicines. However, to detect it sensitively and conveniently remains a challenge, especially in resource-limited regions. Here we report a novel aqueous phase fluorescent caffeine sensor named Caffeine Orange which exhibits 250-fold fluorescence enhancement upon caffeine activation and high selectivity. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicate that π-stacking and hydrogen-bonding contribute to their interactions while dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy experiments demonstrate the change of Caffeine Orange ambient environment induces its fluorescence emission. To utilize this probe in real life, we developed a non-toxic caffeine detection kit and tested it for caffeine quantification in various beverages. Naked-eye sensing of various caffeine concentrations was possible based on color changes upon irradiation with a laser pointer. Lastly, we performed the whole system on a microfluidic device to make caffeine detection quick, sensitive and automated.

  10. Dissolution and absorption of caffeine from guarana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bempong, D K; Houghton, P J

    1992-09-01

    The rate of release of caffeine from capsules of guarana was compared with that from capsules containing an equivalent amount of caffeine using the British Pharmacopoeia dissolution test apparatus. Determinations were carried out in media of pH 2 and 6.8 and caffeine concentrations in the dissolution fluid were determined by HPLC. No significant differences in release rates were found between the two preparations at either pH. The rate of absorption of caffeine across rat intestine using the everted gut was also compared for a guarana suspension and a solution containing an equivalent amount of caffeine. Experiments were carried out using fluids of pH 4.0 and 7.4. No significant differences in absorption between the two preparations were observed. These results show that the release and uptake of caffeine from guarana is the same as for preparations containing free caffeine. PMID:1360532

  11. [Mechanisms of caffeine-induced diuresis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Barbara; Scuvée, Éléonore; Scuvée-Moreau, Jacqueline; Seutin, Vincent; Jouret, François

    2016-05-01

    Caffeine is an alkaloid which belongs to the family of methylxanthines and is present in beverages, food and drugs. Caffeine competitively antagonizes the adenosine receptors (AR), which are G protein-coupled receptors largely distributed throughout the body, including brain, heart, vessels and kidneys. Caffeine consumption has a well-known diuretic effect. The homeostasis of salt and water involves different segments of the nephron, in which adenosine plays complex roles depending on the differential expression of AR. Hence, caffeine increases glomerular filtration rate by opposing the vasoconstriction of renal afferent arteriole mediated by adenosine via type 1 AR during the tubuloglomerular feedback. Caffeine also inhibits Na(+) reabsorption at the level of renal proximal tubules. In addition, caffeine perturbs the hepatorenal reflex via sensory nerves in Mall's intrahepatic spaces. Here, we review the physiology of caffeine-induced natriuresis and diuresis, as well as the putative pathological implications. PMID:27225921

  12. Caffeine Use Affects Pregnancy Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego, Miguel; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Vera, Yanexy; Gil, Karla; Gonzalez-Garcia, Adolfo

    2008-01-01

    A sample of 750 women were interviewed during pregnancy on their depression and anxiety symptoms, substance use and demographic variables. A subsample was seen again at the neonatal stage (n = 152), and their infants were observed for sleep-wake behavior. Symptoms of depression and anxiety were related to caffeine use. Mothers who consumed more…

  13. Caffeine Modulates Attention Network Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunye, Tad T.; Mahoney, Caroline R.; Lieberman, Harris R.; Taylor, Holly A.

    2010-01-01

    The present work investigated the effects of caffeine (0 mg, 100 mg, 200 mg, 400 mg) on a flanker task designed to test Posner's three visual attention network functions: alerting, orienting, and executive control [Posner, M. I. (2004). "Cognitive neuroscience of attention". New York, NY: Guilford Press]. In a placebo-controlled, double-blind…

  14. Consumption of caffeinated beverages and the awareness of their caffeine content among Dutch students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackus, Marlou; van de Loo, Aurora J A E; Benson, Sarah; Scholey, Andrew; Verster, Joris C

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the knowledge of caffeine content of a variety of caffeinated beverages among Dutch university students. A pencil-and-paper survey was conducted among N = 800 Dutch students. Most participants (87.8%) reported consuming caffeinated beverages during the past 24 h. Their mean ± SD past 24-h caffeine intake from beverages was 144.2 ± 169.5 mg (2.2 ± 3.0 mg/kg bw). Most prevalent sources of caffeine were coffee beverages (50.8%) and tea (34.8%), followed by energy drink (9.2%), cola (4.7%), and chocolate milk (0.5%). Participants had poor knowledge on the relative caffeine content of caffeinated beverages. That is, they overestimated the caffeine content of energy drinks and cola, and underestimated the caffeine content of coffee beverages. If caffeine consumption is a concern, it is important to inform consumers about the caffeine content of all caffeine containing beverages, including coffee and tea. The current findings support previous research that the most effective way to reduce caffeine intake is to limit the consumption of coffee beverages and tea. PMID:27142708

  15. Caffeine tolerance: behavioral, electrophysiological and neurochemical evidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of tolerance to the stimulatory action of caffeine upon mesencephalic reticular neurons and upon spontaneous locomotor activity was evaluated in rats after two weeks of chronic exposure to low doses of caffeine (5-10 mg/kg/day via their drinking water). These doses are achievable through dietary intake of caffeine-containing beverages in man. Concomitant measurement of [3H]-CHA binding in the mesencephalic reticular formation was also carried out in order to explore the neurochemical basis of the development of tolerance. Caffeine, 2.5 mg/kg i.v., markedly increased the firing rate of reticular neurons in caffeine naive rats but failed to modify the neuronal activity in a group exposed chronically to low doses of caffeine. In addition, in spontaneous locomotor activity studies, the data show a distinct shift to the right of the caffeine dose-response curve in caffeine pretreated rats. These results clearly indicate that tolerance develops to the stimulatory action of caffeine upon the reticular formation at the single neuronal activity level as well as upon spontaneous locomotor activity. Furthermore, in chronically caffeine exposed rats, an increase in the number of binding sites for [3H]-CHA was observed in reticular formation membranes without any change in receptor affinity. 28 references, 4 figures

  16. Make Caffeine Visible: a Fluorescent Caffeine “Traffic Light” Detector

    OpenAIRE

    Wang Xu; Tae-Hyeong Kim; Duanting Zhai; Jun Cheng Er; Liyun Zhang; Anup Atul Kale; Bikram Keshari Agrawalla; Yoon-Kyoung Cho; Young-Tae Chang

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine has attracted abundant attention due to its extensive existence in beverages and medicines. However, to detect it sensitively and conveniently remains a challenge, especially in resource-limited regions. Here we report a novel aqueous phase fluorescent caffeine sensor named Caffeine Orange which exhibits 250-fold fluorescence enhancement upon caffeine activation and high selectivity. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicate that π-s...

  17. Caffeine reduces myocardial blood flow during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, John P; Babu, Kavita M

    2013-08-01

    Caffeine consumption has been receiving increased interest from both the medical and lay press, especially given the increased amounts now available in energy products. Acute ingestion of caffeine usually increases cardiac work; however, caffeine impairs the expected proportional increase in myocardial blood flow to match this increased work of the heart, most notably during exercise. This appears to be mainly due to caffeine's effect on blocking adenosine-induced vasodilatation in the coronary arteries in normal healthy subjects. This review summarizes the available medical literature specifically relating to pure caffeine tablet ingestion and reduced exercise coronary blood flow, and suggests possible mechanisms. Further studies are needed to evaluate this effect for other common caffeine-delivery systems, including coffee, energy beverages, and energy gels, which are often used for exercise performance enhancement, especially in teenagers and young athletes. PMID:23764265

  18. Assessing caffeine exposure in pregnant women.

    OpenAIRE

    Boylan, S. M.; Cade, J E; Kirk, S. F.; Greenwood, D.C.; White, K. L.; Shires, S.; Simpson, N. A.; Wild, C P; Hay, A W

    2008-01-01

    Studies on the effects of caffeine on health, while numerous, have produced inconsistent results. One of the most uncertain and controversial effects is on pregnancy outcome. Studies have produced conflicting results due to a number of methodological variations. The major challenge is the accurate assessment of caffeine intake. The aim of the present study was to explore different methods of assessing caffeine exposure in pregnant women. Twenty-four healthy pregnant women from the UK city of ...

  19. Role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffeine is a competitive antagonist at adenosine receptors. Receptor up-regulation during chronic drug treatment has been proposed to be the mechanism of tolerance to the behavioral stimulant effects of caffeine. This study reassessed the role of adenosine receptors in caffeine tolerance. Separate groups of rats were given scheduled access to drinking bottles containing plain tap water or a 0.1% solution of caffeine. Daily drug intake averaged 60-75 mg/kg and resulted in complete tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity, which could not be surmounted by increasing the dose of caffeine. 5'-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine (0.001-1.0 mg/kg) dose dependently decreased the locomotor activity of caffeine-tolerant rats and their water-treated controls but was 8-fold more potent in the latter group. Caffeine (1.0-10 mg/kg) injected concurrently with 5-N-ethylcarboxamidoadenosine antagonized the decreases in locomotor activity comparably in both groups. Apparent pA2 values for tolerant and control rats also were comparable: 5.05 and 5.11. Thus, the adenosine-antagonist activity of caffeine was undiminished in tolerant rats. The effects of chronic caffeine administration on parameters of adenosine receptor binding and function were measured in cerebral cortex. There were no differences between brain tissue from control and caffeine-treated rats in number and affinity of adenosine binding sites or in receptor-mediated increases (A2 adenosine receptor) and decreases (A1 adenosine receptor) in cAMP accumulation. These results are consistent with theoretical arguments that changes in receptor density should not affect the potency of a competitive antagonist. Experimental evidence and theoretical considerations indicate that up-regulation of adenosine receptors is not the mechanism of tolerance to caffeine-induced stimulation of locomotor activity

  20. Caffeine synthase and related methyltransferases in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misako, Kato; Kouichi, Mizuno

    2004-05-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) is a purine alkaloid present in high concentrations in tea and coffee and it is also found in a number of beverages such as coca cola. It is necessary to elucidate the caffeine biosynthetic pathway and to clone the genes related to the production of caffeine not only to determine the metabolism of the purine alkaloid but also to control the content of caffeine in tea and coffee. The available data support the operation of a xanthosine-->7-methylxanthosine-->7-methylxanthine-->theobromine-->caffeine pathway as the major route to caffeine. Since the caffeine biosynthetic pathway contains three S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) dependent methylation steps, N-methyltransferases play important roles. This review focuses on the enzymes and genes involved in the methylation of purine ring. Caffeine synthase, the SAM-dependent methyltransferase involved in the last two steps of caffeine biosynthesis, was originally purified from young tea leaves (Camellia sinensis). The isolated cDNA, termed TCS1, consists of 1,483 base pairs and encodes a protein of 369 amino acids. Subsequently, the homologous genes that encode caffeine biosynthetic enzymes from coffee (Coffea arabica) were isolated. The recombinant proteins are classified into the three types on the basis of their substrate specificity i.e. 7-methylxanthosine synthase, theobromine synthase and caffeine synthase. The predicted amino acid sequences of caffeine biosynthetic enzymes derived from C. arabica exhibit more than 80% homology with those of the clones and but show only 40% homology with TCS1 derived from C. sinensis. In addition, they share 40% homology with the amino acid sequences of salicylic carboxyl methyltransferase, benzoic acid carboxyl methyltransferase and jasmonic acid carboxyl methyltransferase which belong to a family of motif B' methyltransferases which are novel plant methyltransferases with motif B' instead of motif B as the conserved region. PMID:14977590

  1. Caffeine fostering of mycoparasitic fungi against phytopathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiyama, Akifumi; Sano, Cecile M; Yazaki, Kazufumi; Sano, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethixanthine) is a typical purine alkaloid produced in more than 80 plant species. Its biological role is considered to strengthen plant's defense capabilities, directly as a toxicant to biotic attackers (allelopathy) and indirectly as an activator of defense system (priming). Caffeine is actively secreted into rhizosphere through primary root, and possibly affects the structure of microbe community nearby. The fungal community in coffee plant rhizosphere is enriched with particular species, including Trichoderma family, a mycoparasite that attacks and kills phytopathogens by coiling and destroying their hyphae. In the present study, the caffeine response of 8 filamentous fungi, 4 mycoparasitic Trichoderma, and 4 prey phytopathogens, was examined. Results showed that allelopathic effect of caffeine on fungal growth and development was differential, being stronger on pathogens than on Trichoderma species. Upon confronting, the prey immediately ceased the growth, whereas the predator continued to grow, indicating active mycoparasitism to have occurred. Caffeine enhanced mycoparasitism up to 1.7-fold. Caffeine thus functions in a double-track manner against fungal pathogens: first by direct suppression of growth and development, and second by assisting their natural enemy. These observations suggest that caffeine is a powerful weapon in the arms race between plants and pathogens by fostering enemy's enemy, and we propose the idea of "caffeine fostering" as the third role of caffeine. PMID:26529400

  2. Caffeine and exercise: metabolism, endurance and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, T E

    2001-01-01

    Caffeine is a common substance in the diets of most athletes and it is now appearing in many new products, including energy drinks, sport gels, alcoholic beverages and diet aids. It can be a powerful ergogenic aid at levels that are considerably lower than the acceptable limit of the International Olympic Committee and could be beneficial in training and in competition. Caffeine does not improve maximal oxygen capacity directly, but could permit the athlete to train at a greater power output and/or to train longer. It has also been shown to increase speed and/or power output in simulated race conditions. These effects have been found in activities that last as little as 60 seconds or as long as 2 hours. There is less information about the effects of caffeine on strength; however, recent work suggests no effect on maximal ability, but enhanced endurance or resistance to fatigue. There is no evidence that caffeine ingestion before exercise leads to dehydration, ion imbalance, or any other adverse effects. The ingestion of caffeine as coffee appears to be ineffective compared to doping with pure caffeine. Related compounds such as theophylline are also potent ergogenic aids. Caffeine may act synergistically with other drugs including ephedrine and anti-inflammatory agents. It appears that male and female athletes have similar caffeine pharmacokinetics, i.e., for a given dose of caffeine, the time course and absolute plasma concentrations of caffeine and its metabolites are the same. In addition, exercise or dehydration does not affect caffeine pharmacokinetics. The limited information available suggests that caffeine non-users and users respond similarly and that withdrawal from caffeine may not be important. The mechanism(s) by which caffeine elicits its ergogenic effects are unknown, but the popular theory that it enhances fat oxidation and spares muscle glycogen has very little support and is an incomplete explanation at best. Caffeine may work, in part, by

  3. Caffeine withdrawal and high-intensity endurance cycling performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Christopher; Desbrow, Ben; Ellis, Aleisha; O'Keeffe, Brooke; Grant, Gary; Leveritt, Michael

    2011-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the impact of a controlled 4-day caffeine withdrawal period on the effect of an acute caffeine dose on endurance exercise performance. Twelve well-trained and familiarized male cyclists, who were caffeine consumers (from coffee and a range of other sources), were recruited for the study. A double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over design was employed, involving four experimental trials. Participants abstained from dietary caffeine sources for 4 days before the trials and ingested capsules (one in the morning and one in the afternoon) containing either placebo or caffeine (1.5 mg · kg(-1) body weight · day(-1)). On day 5, capsules containing placebo or caffeine (3 mg · kg(-1) body weight) were ingested 90 min before completing a time trial, equivalent to one hour of cycling at 75% peak sustainable power output. Hence the study was designed to incorporate placebo-placebo, placebo-caffeine, caffeine-placebo, and caffeine-caffeine conditions. Performance time was significantly improved after acute caffeine ingestion by 1:49 ± 1:41 min (3.0%, P = 0.021) following a withdrawal period (placebo-placebo vs. placebo-caffeine), and by 2:07 ± 1:28 min (3.6%, P = 0.002) following the non-withdrawal period (caffeine-placebo vs. caffeine-caffeine). No significant difference was detected between the two acute caffeine trials (placebo-caffeine vs. caffeine-caffeine). Average heart rate throughout exercise was significantly higher following acute caffeine administration compared with placebo. No differences were observed in ratings of perceived exertion between trials. A 3 mg · kg(-1) dose of caffeine significantly improves exercise performance irrespective of whether a 4-day withdrawal period is imposed on habitual caffeine users. PMID:21279864

  4. Effects of caffeine on sleep and cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snel, Jan; Lorist, Monicque M.; van Dongen, H.P.A.; Kerkhof, G.A.

    2011-01-01

    Caffeine can be used effectively to manipulate our mental state. It is beneficial in restoring low levels of wakefulness and in counteracting degraded cognitive task performance due to sleep deprivation. However, caffeine may produce detrimental effects on subsequent sleep, resulting in daytime slee

  5. Extraction of Caffeine--A Modern Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Paul Shea; Smith, Eileen Patricia

    1969-01-01

    Describes an organic chemistry experiment suitable for high school students in second year or an advanced chemistry course. The techniques for the extraction and purification of caffeine from various household materials are described. Further experimentation with the extracted caffeine is suggested. (LC)

  6. Creatine and Caffeine: Considerations for Concurrent Supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trexler, Eric T; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E

    2015-12-01

    Nutritional supplementation is a common practice among athletes, with creatine and caffeine among the most commonly used ergogenic aids. Hundreds of studies have investigated the ergogenic potential of creatine supplementation, with consistent improvements in strength and power reported for exercise bouts of short duration (≤ 30 s) and high intensity. Caffeine has been shown to improve endurance exercise performance, but results are mixed in the context of strength and sprint performance. Further, there is conflicting evidence from studies comparing the ergogenic effects of coffee and caffeine anhydrous supplementation. Previous research has identified independent mechanisms by which creatine and caffeine may improve strength and sprint performance, leading to the formulation of multi-ingredient supplements containing both ingredients. Although scarce, research has suggested that caffeine ingestion may blunt the ergogenic effect of creatine. While a pharmacokinetic interaction is unlikely, authors have suggested that this effect may be explained by opposing effects on muscle relaxation time or gastrointestinal side effects from simultaneous consumption. The current review aims to evaluate the ergogenic potential of creatine and caffeine in the context of high-intensity exercise. Research directly comparing coffee and caffeine anhydrous is discussed, along with previous studies evaluating the concurrent supplementation of creatine and caffeine. PMID:26219105

  7. Effects of Caffeine on Auditory Brainstem Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleheh Soleimanian

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Blocking of the adenosine receptor in central nervous system by caffeine can lead to increasing the level of neurotransmitters like glutamate. As the adenosine receptors are present in almost all brain areas like central auditory pathway, it seems caffeine can change conduction in this way. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of caffeine on latency and amplitude of auditory brainstem response(ABR.Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial study 43 normal 18-25 years old male students were participated. The subjects consumed 0, 2 and 3 mg/kg BW caffeine in three different sessions. Auditory brainstem responses were recorded before and 30 minute after caffeine consumption. The results were analyzed by Friedman and Wilcoxone test to assess the effects of caffeine on auditory brainstem response.Results: Compared to control group the latencies of waves III,V and I-V interpeak interval of the cases decreased significantly after 2 and 3mg/kg BW caffeine consumption. Wave I latency significantly decreased after 3mg/kg BW caffeine consumption(p<0.01. Conclusion: Increasing of the glutamate level resulted from the adenosine receptor blocking brings about changes in conduction in the central auditory pathway.

  8. Consumption of Caffeinated Products and Cardiac Ectopy

    OpenAIRE

    Dixit, Shalini; Stein, Phyllis K.; Dewland, Thomas A.; Dukes, Jonathan W.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Heckbert, Susan R.; Marcus, Gregory M

    2016-01-01

    Background Premature cardiac contractions are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Though experts associate premature atrial contractions (PACs) and premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) with caffeine, there are no data to support this relationship in the general population. As certain caffeinated products may have cardiovascular benefits, recommendations against them may be detrimental. Methods and Results We studied Cardiovascular Health Study participants with a baseline ...

  9. Caffeine reduces dipyridamole-induced myocardial ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of action of coronary vasodilation after dipyridamole may be based on inhibition of cellular uptake of circulating endogenous adenosine. Since caffeine has been reported to be a competitive antagonist of adenosine we studied the effect of caffeine on the outcome of dipiridamole-201Tl cardiac imaging in one patient. During caffeine abstinence dipyridamole induced myocardial ischemia with down-slope ST depressions on the ECG, and reversible perfusion defects on the scintigrams. When the test was repeated 1 wk later on similar conditions, but now shortly after infusion of caffeine (4 mg/kg), the ECG showed nodepressions, and the scintigrams only slight signs of ischemia. We conclude that when caffeine abstinence is not sufficient, the widespread use of coffee and related products may be responsible for false-negative findings in dipyridamole-201Tl cardiac imaging

  10. Caffeine as a Potential Quorum Sensing Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok-Gan Chan

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing enables bacteria to control the gene expression in response to the cell density. It regulates a variety of bacterial physiological functions such as biofilm formation, bioluminescence, virulence factors and swarming which has been shown contribute to bacterial pathogenesis. The use of quorum sensing inhibitor would be of particular interest in treating bacterial pathogenicity and infections. In this work, we have tested caffeine as quorum sensing inhibitor by using Chromobacterium violaceum CV026 as a biosensor. We verified that caffeine did not degrade the N-acyl homoserine lactones tested. In this work, it is shown that caffeine could inhibit N-acyl homoserine lactone production and swarming of a human opportunistic pathogen, namely Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA01. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first documentation providing evidence on the presence of anti-quorum sensing activity in caffeine. Our work will allow caffeine to be explored as anti-infective drugs.

  11. Design, formulation and evaluation of caffeine chewing gum

    OpenAIRE

    Abolfazl Aslani; Fatemeh Jalilian

    2013-01-01

    Background: Caffeine which exists in drinks such as coffee as well as in drug dosage forms in the global market is among the materials that increase alertness and decrease fatigue. Compared to other forms of caffeine, caffeine gum can create faster and more prominent effects. In this study, the main goal is to design a new formulation of caffeine gum with desirable taste and assess its physicochemical properties. Materials and Methods: Caffeine gum was prepared by softening of gum bases a...

  12. Caffeine and sports activity: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehlig, A; Debry, G

    1994-07-01

    Potential ergogenic effects of caffeine at the cellular level are mediated by three main mechanisms of action which are: intracellular mobilization of calcium from sarcoplasmic reticulum and increased sensitivity of myofibrilles to calcium; inhibition of phosphodiesterases leading to an increase in cyclic-3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) in various tissues including muscle; and the antagonism at the level of adenosine receptors, mainly in the central nervous system. The main mechanism of action of caffeine at the level usually encountered in vivo after the ingestion of a few cups of coffee is undoubtedly linked to the antagonism of caffeine at adenosine receptors. Caffeine also increases production of plasma catecholamines that allow the body to adapt to the stress created by physical exercise. Catecholamine production increases probably, in turn, the availability of free fatty acids as muscle substrates during work, thus allowing glycogen sparing. Caffeine is able to increase muscle contractility, has no ergogenic effect on intense exercise of brief duration, but can improve the time before exhaustion. Caffeine is also able to improve physical performance and endurance during prolonged activity of submaximal intensity. Glycogen sparing resulting from increased rate of lipolysis could contribute to the prolonged time to exhaustion. Finally, tolerance to the methylxanthine should be taken into account when an athlete wants to draw any benefit from caffeine absorption prior to a sports event. PMID:7960313

  13. Caffeine use and alexithymia in university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyvers, Michael; Duric, Natalija; Thorberg, Fred Arne

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Alexithymia refers to difficulties with identifying, describing, and regulating one's own emotions. This trait dimension has been linked to risky or harmful use of alcohol and illicit drugs; however, the most widely used psychoactive drug in the world, caffeine, has not been examined previously in relation to alexithymia. The present study assessed 106 male and female university students aged 18-30 years on their caffeine use in relation to several traits, including alexithymia. The 18 participants defined as alexithymic based on their Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20) scores reported consuming nearly twice as much caffeine per day as did non-alexithymic or borderline alexithymic participants. They also scored significantly higher than controls on indices of frontal lobe dysfunction as well as anxiety symptoms and sensitivity to punishment. In a hierarchical linear regression model, sensitivity to punishment negatively predicted daily caffeine intake, suggesting caffeine avoidance by trait-anxious individuals. Surprisingly, however, TAS-20 alexithymia scores positively predicted caffeine consumption. Possible reasons for the positive relationship between caffeine use and alexithymia are discussed, concluding that this outcome is tentatively consistent with the hypo-arousal model of alexithymia. PMID:25188705

  14. Caffeine Toxicity Due to Supplement Use in Caffeine--Naïve Individual: A Cautionary Tale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lystrup, Robert M; Leggit, Jeffery C

    2015-08-01

    Thousands of military members self-medicate with dietary supplements containing unknown quantities of pharmacologically active compounds. These poorly regulated substances can cause real harm to the military population, especially when they contain stimulants such as caffeine. When taken regularly, caffeine has several performance-enhancing benefits. However, when used excessively or in vulnerable populations, caffeine can cause several unwanted side effects such as nervousness, sensory disturbances, insomnia, arrhythmia, excitability, inattentiveness, restlessness, mood changes, gastrointestinal disturbances, and even psychosis. Vulnerable patients include the caffeine-naïve, physiologically stressed, young, and mentally ill patients. One such case describes a caffeine-naïve service member who suffered an adverse reaction after taking an allegedly moderate dose of caffeine from a pill he obtained from a teammate. This case highlights the importance of supplement awareness among service members, increased provider vigilance, third party verification, and enhanced regulation on the approval and marketing of dietary supplements. PMID:26226540

  15. Caffeine Enhances the Calcium-Dependent Cardiac Mitochondrial Permeability Transition: Relevance for Caffeine Toxicity

    OpenAIRE

    Sardão, Vilma A; Oliveira, Paulo J; Moreno, António J. M.

    2002-01-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine), a compound present in beverages such as tea and coffee, is known to be toxic at high concentrations. Some of the observed clinical conditions include cardiovascular disease and reproductive disorders, among others. The possible toxic effects of caffeine on heart mitochondria are still poorly understood. The influence of caffeine on the mitochondrial permeability transition has not been clarified so far. The objective of this study was to investigate whether...

  16. Caffeine induced changes in cerebral circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the caffeine induced cerebral vasoconstriction is well documented, the effects of oral ingestion of the drug in a dose range comparable to the quantities in which it is usually consumed and the intensity and duration of the associated reduction in cerebral circulation are unknown. Cerebral blood flow was measured via the 133Xenon inhalation technique before and thirty and ninety minutes after the oral administration of 250 mg of caffeine or a placebo, under double-blind conditions. Caffeine ingestion was found to be associated with significant reductions in cerebral perfusion thirty and ninety minutes later. The placebo group showed no differences between the three sets of cerebral blood flow values

  17. Compound list: caffeine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available caffeine CAF 00097 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/caf...feine.Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/caf...feine.Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/caf...-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/caffeine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/ar...chive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Kidney/Single/caffeine.Rat.in_vivo.Kidney.Single.zip ftp://ftp.bioscie

  18. Caffeine and caffeinated beverage consumption and fecundability in a preconception cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesselink, Amelia K; Wise, Lauren A; Rothman, Kenneth J; Hahn, Kristen A; Mikkelsen, Ellen M; Mahalingaiah, Shruthi; Hatch, Elizabeth E

    2016-07-01

    Caffeine is an adenosine receptor antagonist that may influence fertility by affecting ovulation, menstrual characteristics, or sperm quality. We studied the association between female and male preconception caffeine intake and fecundability in a North American prospective cohort study of 2135 pregnancy planners. Frequency of caffeinated beverage intake was self-reported at baseline. Outcome data were updated every 8 weeks until reported pregnancy; censoring occurred at 12 months. Adjusted fecundability ratios (FR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using proportional probabilities regression. Total caffeine intake among males, but not females, was associated with fecundability (FR for ≥300 vs. energy drink intake were associated with reduced fecundability among males. PMID:27112524

  19. Caffeinated alcohol beverages: a public health concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attwood, Angela S

    2012-01-01

    Consumption of alcohol mixed with caffeinated energy drinks is becoming popular, and the number of pre-mixed caffeinated alcohol products on the worldwide market is increasing. There is public health concern and even occasional legal restriction relating to these drinks, due to associations with increased intoxication and harms. The precise nature and degree of the pharmacological relationship between caffeine and alcohol is not yet elucidated, but it is proposed that caffeine attenuates the sedative effects of alcohol intoxication while leaving motor and cognitive impairment unaffected. This creates a potentially precarious scenario for users who may underestimate their level of intoxication and impairment. While legislation in some countries has restricted production or marketing of pre-mixed products, many individuals mix their own energy drink-alcohol 'cocktails'. Wider dissemination of the risks might help balance marketing strategies that over-emphasize putative positive effects. PMID:22645036

  20. Caffeine in surface and wastewaters in Barbados, West Indies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Quincy A; Kulikov, Sergei M; Garner-O'Neale, Leah D

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine, a purine alkaloid drug, has been recognized as a contaminant of water bodies in various climatic regions, however, these environmental caffeine concentrations are the first to be reported in the tropical Caribbean. The major objective of this study was to develop an improved method to extract caffeine from surface and wastewaters in the warm Caribbean environment and measure caffeine concentrations in highly populated areas in Barbados. Caffeine was extracted from water via solid phase extraction (SPE); the acidified water samples were loaded onto C-18 cartridges and eluted with pure chloroform. The extracted caffeine was quantified using gas chromatography - mass spectroscopy - multiple reaction monitoring (GC-MS/MS-MRM). Method detection limits of 0.2 ng L(-1) from 1 L water samples were achieved. Caffeine was detected in all environmental water samples investigated. The concentrations of caffeine in surface waters were detected in the range 0.1 - 6.9 μg L(-1). The two wastewater treatment plants, primary and secondary treatment systems, significantly differed in their ability to eliminate caffeine in the raw sewage (38% and 99% caffeine removal efficiencies respectively). Thus, it may be essential to employ secondary treatment to effectively remove caffeine from wastewater systems in Barbados. Caffeine in water bodies are principally attributed to anthropogenic sources as caffeine-producing plants are not commonly grown on the island of Barbados. The study also shows the recalcitrance of caffeine to hydrolytic degradation. PMID:25729634

  1. Caffeinated drinks, alcohol consumption and hangover severity

    OpenAIRE

    Penning, R.; de Haan, L.; Verster, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between consumption of caffeinated beverages and alcohol, and effects on next day hangover severity. In 2010, a survey funded by Utrecht University was conducted among N=549 Dutch students. Beverages consumed on their latest drinking session that produced a hangover were recorded. Hangover severity was scored using the Acute Hangover Scale. No significant correlation between caffeine use and hangover severity was found. Subjects who mixed alcohol with cola...

  2. Topical and transdermal delivery of caffeine.

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, L.; Lane, M. E.

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine is administered topically and transdermally for a variety of pharmaceutical and cosmetic applications and it is also used as a model hydrophilic compound in dermal risk assessment studies. This review considers the physicochemical and permeation properties of caffeine with reference to its delivery to and through the skin. Since it has been used as a model compound the findings have implications for the delivery of many hydrophilic compounds having similar properties. Various passive...

  3. Prenatal Caffeine Exposure Impairs Pregnancy in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Yadegari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent years, concerns have been raised about human reproductive disorders. Caffeine consumption is increasing by the world’s population and there is a relationship between caffeine intake and adverse reproductive outcomes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of caffeine on implantation sites, number of live births, birth weight, crown-rump length (CRL and abnormality in pregnant rats. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 40 female albino rats (170-190 g were randomly divided into two experimental and two control groups (n=10/each group. In both experimental groups, animals received caffeine intraperitoneally (IP: 150 mg/kg/day on days 1-5 of pregnancy. In experimental group 1, treated animals were euthanized on day 7of pregnancy and the number of implantation sites was counted. In experimental group 2, treated animals maintained pregnant and after delivery, the number of live births, birth weight, CRL and abnormality of neonates were investigated. In control group, animals received IP injections of distilled water. Data were analyzed by independent t test. Results: Results showed that administration of caffeine significantly decreased the number of implantation sites, number of live births and CRL as compared with control group (P<0.05. There were no significant differences regarding birth weight and abnormality of neonate rats between experimental and control groups. Conclusion: These results suggest that caffeine caused anti-fertility effect and significantly decreased CRL in neonate rats.

  4. Degradation of exogenous caffeine by Populus alba and its effects on endogenous caffeine metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierattini, Erika C; Francini, Alessandra; Raffaelli, Andrea; Sebastiani, Luca

    2016-04-01

    This is the first study reporting the presence of endogenous caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline in all organs of poplar plants. Liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) was used in order to evaluate the uptake, translocation, and metabolism of caffeine-(trimethyl-(13)C) in Populus alba L. Villafranca clone grown in hydroponic conditions. We investigated the remediation of caffeine since it is one of the most widely consumed drugs and it is frequently detected in wastewater treatment plant effluents, surface water, and groundwater worldwide. Our results demonstrated that poplar can absorb and degrade exogenous caffeine without negative effects on plant health. Data showed that concentrations of all endogenous compounds varied depending on caffeine-(trimethyl-(13)C) treatments. In particular, in control conditions, endogenous caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline were mainly distributed in roots. On the other hand, once caffeine-(trimethyl-(13)C) was provided, this compound and its dimethy-(13)C metabolites are mainly localized at leaf level. In conclusion, our results support the possible use of Villafranca clone in association with other water treatment systems in order to complete the process of caffeine remediation. PMID:26681326

  5. Caffeine intake by patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vendramini, L.C.; Nishiura, J.L.; Baxmann, A.C.; Heilberg, I.P. [Disciplina de Nefrologia, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-20

    Because caffeine may induce cyst and kidney enlargement in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), we evaluated caffeine intake and renal volume using renal ultrasound in ADPKD patients. Caffeine intake was estimated by the average of 24-h dietary recalls obtained on 3 nonconsecutive days in 102 ADPKD patients (68 females, 34 males; 39 ± 12 years) and compared to that of 102 healthy volunteers (74 females, 28 males; 38 ± 14 years). The awareness of the need for caffeine restriction was assessed. Clinical and laboratory data were obtained from the medical records of the patients. Mean caffeine intake was significantly lower in ADPKD patients versus controls (86 vs 134 mg/day), and 63% of the ADPKD patients had been previously aware of caffeine restriction. Caffeine intake did not correlate with renal volume in ADPKD patients. There were no significant differences between the renal volumes of patients in the highest and lowest tertiles of caffeine consumption. Finally, age-adjusted multiple linear regression revealed that renal volume was associated with hypertension, chronic kidney disease stage 3 and the time since diagnosis, but not with caffeine intake. The present small cross-sectional study indicated a low level of caffeine consumption by ADPKD patients when compared to healthy volunteers, which was most likely due to prior awareness of the need for caffeine restriction. Within the range of caffeine intake observed by ADPKD patients in this study (0-471 mg/day), the renal volume was not directly associated with caffeine intake.

  6. Caffeine intake by patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.C. Vendramini

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Because caffeine may induce cyst and kidney enlargement in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD, we evaluated caffeine intake and renal volume using renal ultrasound in ADPKD patients. Caffeine intake was estimated by the average of 24-h dietary recalls obtained on 3 nonconsecutive days in 102 ADPKD patients (68 females, 34 males; 39 ± 12 years and compared to that of 102 healthy volunteers (74 females, 28 males; 38 ± 14 years. The awareness of the need for caffeine restriction was assessed. Clinical and laboratory data were obtained from the medical records of the patients. Mean caffeine intake was significantly lower in ADPKD patients versus controls (86 vs 134 mg/day, and 63% of the ADPKD patients had been previously aware of caffeine restriction. Caffeine intake did not correlate with renal volume in ADPKD patients. There were no significant differences between the renal volumes of patients in the highest and lowest tertiles of caffeine consumption. Finally, age-adjusted multiple linear regression revealed that renal volume was associated with hypertension, chronic kidney disease stage 3 and the time since diagnosis, but not with caffeine intake. The present small cross-sectional study indicated a low level of caffeine consumption by ADPKD patients when compared to healthy volunteers, which was most likely due to prior awareness of the need for caffeine restriction. Within the range of caffeine intake observed by ADPKD patients in this study (0-471 mg/day, the renal volume was not directly associated with caffeine intake.

  7. Neurobehavioral hazard identification and characterization for caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Duncan; Rodricks, Joseph V; Mariano, Gregory F

    2016-02-01

    This report evaluates the scientific literature on caffeine with respect to potential central nervous system (CNS) effects, specifically effects on sleep, anxiety, and aggression/risk-taking. Caffeine has been the subject of more scientific safety studies than any other food ingredient. It is important, therefore, to evaluate new studies in the context of this large existing body of knowledge. The safety of caffeine can best be described in a narrative form, and is not usefully expressed in terms of a "bright line" numerical value like an "acceptable daily intake" (ADI). Caffeine intake has been associated with a range of reversible physiological effects, in a few studies at levels of less than 100 mg in sensitive individuals. It is also clear that many people can tolerate much greater levels - perhaps up to 600-800 mg/day or more - without experiencing such effects. The reasons for this type of variability in response are described in this report. Based on all the available evidence, there is no reason to believe that experiencing such effects from caffeine intake has any significant or lasting effect on health. The point at which caffeine intake may cause harm to the CNS is not readily identifiable, in part because data on the effects of daily intakes greater than 600 mg is limited. Effects of caffeine on risk-taking and aggressive behavior in young people have received considerable publicity, yet are the most difficult to study because of ethical concerns and limitations in the ability to design appropriate studies. At present, the weight of available evidence does not support these concerns, yet this should not preclude ongoing careful monitoring of the scientific literature. PMID:26702789

  8. Caffeine's Jolt Can Sometimes Be Short-Lived

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159413.html Caffeine's Jolt Can Sometimes Be Short-Lived Stimulant effect ... 17, 2016 THURSDAY, June 16, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Caffeine no longer improves alertness or mental performance after ...

  9. Serious Concerns Over Alcoholic Beverages with Added Caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Espanol Serious Concerns Over Alcoholic Beverages with Added Caffeine Please share copies of this printer-friendly PDF ( ... beverages, or CABs, are alcoholic beverages that contain caffeine as an additive and are packaged in combined ...

  10. Caffeine prevents protection in two human models of ischemic preconditioning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riksen, N.P.; Zhou, Z.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Jaspers, R.A.; Ramakers, B.P.; Brouwer, R.M.H.J.; Boerman, O.C.; Steinmetz, N.; Smits, P.; Rongen, G.A.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We studied whether caffeine impairs protection by ischemic preconditioning (IP) in humans. BACKGROUND: Ischemic preconditioning is critically dependent on adenosine receptor stimulation. We hypothesize that the adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine blocks the protective effect of IP. ME

  11. Determination of CaffeineIn Beverages: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Igelige Gerald; David Ebuka Arthur; Adebiyi Adedayo

    2014-01-01

    Caffeine is a well-known stimulant which is added as an ingredient to various carbonated soft drinks. Caffeine has drawn more attention due to its physiological effects beyond that of its stimulatory effect. Consumers are interested in knowing the exact amounts of caffeine existing in beverages. However, limited data exist, especially for store brand beverages. Therefore, it is pertinent to review the various methods that will effectively determine the caffeine contents in different carbonate...

  12. Reinforcing effects of caffeine in coffee and capsules.

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, R R; Bigelow, G E; Liebson, I A

    1989-01-01

    In a residential research ward the reinforcing and subjective effects of caffeine were studied under double-blind conditions in volunteer subjects with histories of heavy coffee drinking. In Experiment 1, 6 subjects had 13 opportunities each day to self-administer either a caffeine (100 mg) or a placebo capsule for periods of 14 to 61 days. All subjects developed a clear preference for caffeine, with intake of caffeine becoming relatively stable after preference had been attained. Preference ...

  13. Caffeine Taste Signaling in Drosophila Larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolopoulou, Anthi A; Köhn, Saskia; Stehle, Bernhard; Lutz, Michael; Wüst, Alexander; Mazija, Lorena; Rist, Anna; Galizia, C Giovanni; Lüdke, Alja; Thum, Andreas S

    2016-01-01

    The Drosophila larva has a simple peripheral nervous system with a comparably small number of sensory neurons located externally at the head or internally along the pharynx to assess its chemical environment. It is assumed that larval taste coding occurs mainly via external organs (the dorsal, terminal, and ventral organ). However, the contribution of the internal pharyngeal sensory organs has not been explored. Here we find that larvae require a single pharyngeal gustatory receptor neuron pair called D1, which is located in the dorsal pharyngeal sensilla, in order to avoid caffeine and to associate an odor with caffeine punishment. In contrast, caffeine-driven reduction in feeding in non-choice situations does not require D1. Hence, this work provides data on taste coding via different receptor neurons, depending on the behavioral context. Furthermore, we show that the larval pharyngeal system is involved in bitter tasting. Using ectopic expressions, we show that the caffeine receptor in neuron D1 requires the function of at least four receptor genes: the putative co-receptors Gr33a, Gr66a, the putative caffeine-specific receptor Gr93a, and yet unknown additional molecular component(s). This suggests that larval taste perception is more complex than previously assumed already at the sensory level. Taste information from different sensory organs located outside at the head or inside along the pharynx of the larva is assembled to trigger taste guided behaviors. PMID:27555807

  14. EVALUATION OF ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF CAFFEINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawar Pruthviraj

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out with water soluble portion and pure solvent of the acetone, ethanol, methanol, acetonitrile, water extracts of leaves and leaf buds of Camellia sinensis (green tea, and beans of Coffea arabica (coffee. Caffeine (3,7-dihydro-1, 3,7-trimethyl-1H-purine-2,6-dione was isolated from both plants using a liquid-liquid extraction method, detected on thin layer chromatography (TLC plates in comparison with standard caffeine, which served as a positive control. After performing the gross behavioral study, the Antibacterial activity was evaluated against Gram-negative bacteria included; Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumonia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Both compounds at a concentration of 2 mg/ml showed similar antibacterial activities against all tested bacteria, except for P. mirabilis, and the highest inhibitory effect was observed against P. aeruginosa using a modified agar diffusion method. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of caffeine was determined using a broth microdilution method in 96 multi-well microtitre plates. MIC values ranged from 65.5 to 250.0 µg/ml for the caffeine isolated from coffee and 65.5 to 500.0 µg/ml for green tea caffeine. Combination results showed additive effects against most pathogenic bacteria especially for P. aeruginosa, using both antibacterial assays.

  15. Luminescence characteristics of caffeine and theophylline1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andino, M. M.; De Lima, C. G.; Winefordner, J. D.

    The luminescence properties of solutions of caffeine and theophylline in methanol are observed. The effects of the solvent pH, the presence of a heavy atom and the matrix or substrate on the fluorescence and phosphorescence properties of the compounds are evaluated. Caffeine and theophylline fluorescence can be observed at room temperature from dilute methanolic solutions and strong phosphorescence is observed at low temperature when the matrix is in a polycrystalline state. Acidic and basic media cause spectral changes and reduce the intensity of the low temperature phosphorescence. Iodide is a good heavy-atom enhancer of both the low temperature and room temperature phosphorescence of caffeine and theophylline. The intensity of the phosphorescence at room temperature and when spotted on filter paper depends on the type of filter paper and the pH of the spotting solution and/or the pH of the wet surface at the moment of spotting. Theophylline is more sensitive than caffeine to the microenvironment. Under the appropriate experimental conditions, both low temperature and room temperature phosphorescence could be used as analytical tools for the determination of caffeine and theophylline.

  16. Caffeine Consumption Patterns and Beliefs of College Freshmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlvain, Gary E.; Noland, Melody P.; Bickel, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Background: Caffeine consumption by young people has increased dramatically over the last decade through increased coffee consumption and "energy drinks." In higher amounts, caffeine causes many adverse effects that are cause for concern. Purpose: Purposes of this study were to determine: (1) the amount of caffeine consumed by a sample of college…

  17. Associations of ambulatory blood pressure with urinary caffeine and caffeine metabolite excretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guessous, Idris; Pruijm, Menno; Ponte, Belén; Ackermann, Daniel; Ehret, Georg; Ansermot, Nicolas; Vuistiner, Philippe; Staessen, Jan; Gu, Yumei; Paccaud, Fred; Mohaupt, Markus; Vogt, Bruno; Pechère-Bertschi, Antoinette; Pechère-Berstchi, Antoinette; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Burnier, Michel; Eap, Chin B; Bochud, Murielle

    2015-03-01

    Intake of caffeinated beverages might be associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality possibly via the lowering of blood pressure. We estimated the association of ambulatory blood pressure with urinary caffeine and caffeine metabolites in a population-based sample. Families were randomly selected from the general population of Swiss cities. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was conducted using validated devices. Urinary caffeine, paraxanthine, theophylline, and theobromine excretions were measured in 24 hours urine using ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. We used mixed models to explore the associations of urinary excretions with blood pressure although adjusting for major confounders. The 836 participants (48.9% men) included in this analysis had mean age of 47.8 and mean 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure of 120.1 and 78.0 mm Hg. For each doubling of caffeine excretion, 24-hour and night-time systolic blood pressure decreased by 0.642 and 1.107 mm Hg (both P values <0.040). Similar inverse associations were observed for paraxanthine and theophylline. Adjusted night-time systolic blood pressure in the first (lowest), second, third, and fourth (highest) quartile of paraxanthine urinary excretions were 110.3, 107.3, 107.3, and 105.1 mm Hg, respectively (P trend <0.05). No associations of urinary excretions with diastolic blood pressure were generally found, and theobromine excretion was not associated with blood pressure. Anti-hypertensive therapy, diabetes mellitus, and alcohol consumption modify the association of caffeine urinary excretion with systolic blood pressure. Ambulatory systolic blood pressure was inversely associated with urinary excretions of caffeine and other caffeine metabolites. Our results are compatible with a potential protective effect of caffeine on blood pressure. PMID:25489060

  18. Caffeine Inhibits Acetylcholinesterase, But Not Butyrylcholinesterase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Dobes

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is an alkaloid with a stimulant effect in the body. It can interfere in transmissions based on acetylcholine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine and glutamate. Clinical studies indicate that it can be involved in the slowing of Alzheimer disease pathology and some other effects. The effects are not well understood. In the present work, we focused on the question whether caffeine can inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE and/or, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE, the two enzymes participating in cholinergic neurotransmission. A standard Ellman test with human AChE and BChE was done for altering concentrations of caffeine. The test was supported by an in silico examination as well. Donepezil and tacrine were used as standards. In compliance with Dixon’s plot, caffeine was proved to be a non-competitive inhibitor of AChE and BChE. However, inhibition of BChE was quite weak, as the inhibition constant, Ki, was 13.9 ± 7.4 mol/L. Inhibition of AChE was more relevant, as Ki was found to be 175 ± 9 µmol/L. The predicted free energy of binding was −6.7 kcal/mol. The proposed binding orientation of caffeine can interact with Trp86, and it can be stabilize by Tyr337 in comparison to the smaller Ala328 in the case of human BChE; thus, it can explain the lower binding affinity of caffeine for BChE with reference to AChE. The biological relevance of the findings is discussed.

  19. Potentiation of morphine analgesia by caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, A L; Pontani, R B; Vadlamani, N L

    1985-04-01

    Significant potentiation of morphine (5 mg kg-1 s.c. or 1 mg kg-1 i.v.) analgesia (tail-withdrawal reflex at 55 degrees C) was observed in caffeine-treated (100 mg kg-1 i.p.) rats as compared to the control group and lower doses of caffeine (2mg kg-1 i.p.) did not show this effect. Potentiated analgesia was reversed by naloxone. Pharmacokinetic or dispositional factors appear to be involved in part in this potentiation. PMID:4005485

  20. Potentiation of morphine analgesia by caffeine.

    OpenAIRE

    Misra, A. L.; Pontani, R. B.; Vadlamani, N. L.

    1985-01-01

    Significant potentiation of morphine (5 mg kg-1 s.c. or 1 mg kg-1 i.v.) analgesia (tail-withdrawal reflex at 55 degrees C) was observed in caffeine-treated (100 mg kg-1 i.p.) rats as compared to the control group and lower doses of caffeine (2mg kg-1 i.p.) did not show this effect. Potentiated analgesia was reversed by naloxone. Pharmacokinetic or dispositional factors appear to be involved in part in this potentiation.

  1. EVALUATION OF ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF CAFFEINE

    OpenAIRE

    Pawar Pruthviraj; Bikkad Suchita; Kurhade Shital; Kadbane Shilpa

    2011-01-01

    The present study was carried out with water soluble portion and pure solvent of the acetone, ethanol, methanol, acetonitrile, water) extracts of leaves and leaf buds of Camellia sinensis (green tea), and beans of Coffea arabica (coffee). Caffeine (3,7-dihydro-1, 3,7-trimethyl-1H-purine-2,6-dione) was isolated from both plants using a liquid-liquid extraction method, detected on thin layer chromatography (TLC) plates in comparison with standard caffeine, which served as a positive control. Af...

  2. Caffeine Expectancy Questionnaire (CaffEQ): Construction, Psychometric Properties, and Associations with Caffeine Use, Caffeine Dependence, and Other Related Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, Edward D.; Juliano, Laura M.

    2012-01-01

    Expectancies for drug effects predict drug initiation, use, cessation, and relapse, and may play a causal role in drug effects (i.e., placebo effects). Surprisingly little is known about expectancies for caffeine even though it is the most widely used psychoactive drug in the world. In a series of independent studies, the nature and scope of…

  3. Energy drinks and the neurophysiological impacts of caffeine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leeana Bagwath Persad

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive stimulant with prevalent use across all age groups. It is a naturally occurring substance found in the coffee bean, tea leaf, the kola nut, cocoa bean. Recently there has been an increase in energy drink consumption leading to caffeine abuse, with aggressive marketing and poor awareness on the consequences of high caffeine use. With caffeine consumption being so common, it is vital to know the impact caffeine has on the body, as its effects can influence cardio-respiratory, endocrine and perhaps most importantly neurological systems. Detrimental effects have being described especially since an over consumption of caffeine has being noted. This review focuses on the neurophysiological impact of caffeine and its biochemical pathways in the human body.

  4. Reinforcing effects of caffeine in coffee and capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, R R; Bigelow, G E; Liebson, I A

    1989-09-01

    In a residential research ward the reinforcing and subjective effects of caffeine were studied under double-blind conditions in volunteer subjects with histories of heavy coffee drinking. In Experiment 1, 6 subjects had 13 opportunities each day to self-administer either a caffeine (100 mg) or a placebo capsule for periods of 14 to 61 days. All subjects developed a clear preference for caffeine, with intake of caffeine becoming relatively stable after preference had been attained. Preference for caffeine was demonstrated whether or not preference testing was preceded by a period of 10 to 37 days of caffeine abstinence, suggesting that a recent history of heavy caffeine intake (tolerance/dependence) was not a necessary condition for caffeine to function as a reinforcer. In Experiment 2, 6 subjects had 10 opportunities each day to self-administer a cup of coffee or (on different days) a capsule, dependent upon completing a work requirement that progressively increased and then decreased over days. Each day, one of four conditions was studied: caffeinated coffee (100 mg/cup), decaffeinated coffee, caffeine capsules (100 mg/capsule), or placebo capsules. Caffeinated coffee maintained the most self-administration, significantly higher than decaffeinated coffee and placebo capsules but not different from caffeine capsules. Both decaffeinated coffee and caffeine capsules were significantly higher than placebo capsules but not different from each other. In both experiments, subject ratings of "linking" of coffee or capsules covaried with the self-administration measures. These experiments provide the clearest demonstrations to date of the reinforcing effects of caffeine in capsules and in coffee. PMID:2794839

  5. Caffeinated drinks, alcohol consumption and hangover severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penning, R.; de Haan, L.; Verster, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between consumption of caffeinated beverages and alcohol, and effects on next day hangover severity. In 2010, a survey funded by Utrecht University was conducted among N=549 Dutch students. Beverages consumed on their latest drinking session that produced a hango

  6. Caffeine Does Not Modulate Inhibitory Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieges, Zoe; Snel, Jan; Kok, Albert; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard

    2009-01-01

    The effects of a 3 mg/kg body weight (BW) dose of caffeine were assessed on behavioral indices of response inhibition. To meet these aims, we selected a modified AX version of the Continuous Performance Test (CPT), the stop task, and the flanker task. In three double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects experiments, these tasks were…

  7. Soxhlet Extraction of Caffeine from Beverage Plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, D. J.; Mainwaring, J.; Quigley, Michael N.

    1996-12-01

    A simple procedure is described for the extraction of caffeine from coffee beans or granules, tea leaves, mat leaves, etc. Since dichloromethane and several other hazardous substances are used, the procedure is best performed in a fume hood. Following extraction, melting point determination of the crystalline precipitate establishes its positive identity. Includes 33 references.

  8. A fluvoxamine-caffeine interaction study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, U; Loft, S; Poulsen, H E;

    1996-01-01

    The selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluvoxamine is a very potent inhibitor of the liver enzyme CYP1A2, which is the major P450 catalysing the biotransformation of caffeine. Thus, a pharmacokinetic study was undertaken with the purpose of documenting a drug-drug interaction between fluvoxam...

  9. Spectrophotometric determination of caffeine using polyaniline films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyaniline (PANI) films were fabricated by chemical oxidative polymerization of aniline monomers using ammonium persulfate (APS). The effects of varying oxidant concentration, oxidant solvent and washing solution in the PANI film deposition were first evaluated. 0.250 M APS in 0.200 M HCl and 0.200 M aniline in 0.200 M HCl were used to produce the emeraldine PANI (green) films which were deposited onto commercially available acctate films. The fabricated PANI film acts as an optical sensor baed on its redox-dependent switching of polyaniline from emeraldine (green) to pernigranilline (blue) form. The change in absorbance of blue PANI films immerse in caffeine-containing solution vs green fabricated PANI films were utilized in analysis of caffeine at 829 nm using a UV-VIS spectrophotometer. Repeatable results were obtained in intra-branch and inter-branch repeatability studies, with coefficient of variation (CV) values ranging rom 9.8-13.9% and 5.1-14.5%, respectively. Linear response was obtained over the concentration of 10.0-50.0 μg/mL. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantitation (LOQ) were determined to be 2.5 and 8.5μg/mL, respectively. The obtained % recovery values of caffeine spiked in aqueous solution ranged from 84.9-107%. Three pharmaceutical formulations containing 20.0 or 25.0 μg/Ml caffeine where analyzed using PANI films by external calibration method. The obtained average caffeine values were 25.2 mg/tablet, 22.4 mg/tablet and 15.4 mg/capsule for Fevadol®, Fevergan® and Alaxan®FR, respectively. These values were 77.0% to 101% of the label claims. Human urine samples spiked with caffeine were also analyzed, after sample pre-treatment. Obtained percent recovery values ranged from 79.1 to 105%. This method demonstrated the potential of laboratory-fabricated PANI films as a low-cost rapid, reliable, simple and accurate method for caffeine quantification in pharmaceutical and clinical specimens. (author)

  10. Caffeine increases food intake while reducing anxiety-related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Patrick; Levack, Russell; Watters, Jared; Xu, Zhenping; Yang, Yunlei

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of different doses of caffeine on appetite and anxiety-related behavior. Additionally, we sought to determine if withdrawal from chronic caffeine administration promotes anxiety. In this study, we utilized rodent open field testing and feeding behavior assays to determine the effects of caffeine on feeding and anxiety-related behavior (n = 8 mice; 4-8 weeks old). We also measured 2 h and 24 h food intake and body-weight during daily administration of caffeine (n = 12 mice; 4-8 weeks old). To test for caffeine withdrawal induced anxiety, anxiety-related behavior in rodents was quantified following withdrawal from four consecutive days of caffeine administration (n = 12 mice; 4-8 weeks old). We find that acute caffeine administration increases food intake in a dose-dependent manner with lower doses of caffeine more significantly increasing food intake than higher doses. Acute caffeine administration also reduced anxiety-related behaviors in mice without significantly altering locomotor activity. However, we did not observe any differences in 24 h food intake or body weight following chronic caffeine administration and there were no observable differences in anxiety-related behaviors during caffeine withdrawal. In conclusion, we find that caffeine can both increase appetite and decrease anxiety-related behaviors in a dose dependent fashion. Given the complex relationship between appetite and anxiety, the present study provides additional insights into potential caffeine-based pharmacological mechanisms governing appetite and anxiety disorders, such as bulimia nervosa. PMID:26972351

  11. Quantitative Analysis by Isotopic Dilution Using Mass Spectroscopy: The Determination of Caffeine by GC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Devon W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes a laboratory technique for quantitative analysis of caffeine by an isotopic dilution method for coupled gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Discusses caffeine analysis and experimental methodology. Lists sample caffeine concentrations found in common products. (MVL)

  12. Effect of caffeine on cocaine locomotor stimulant activity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, A L; Vadlamani, N L; Pontani, R B

    1986-03-01

    The effect of caffeine on the locomotor stimulant activity induced by intravenous cocaine in rats was investigated. Low doses of caffeine (20 mg/kg IP) potentiated the locomotor activity induced by 1, 2.5 mg/kg intravenous doses of cocaine and higher doses of caffeine (50, 100 mg/kg IP) had no significant effect. The locomotor stimulant effect of 20 mg/kg IP dose of caffeine per se in vehicle was significantly higher and that with 100 mg/kg dose significantly lower than that of the vehicle control. Thus caffeine produced dose-dependent effects on cocaine-induced locomotor stimulant activity, with low dose potentiating and higher doses having no significant effect on such activity. Pharmacokinetic or dispositional factors did not appear to play a role in potentiation of cocaine locomotor stimulant activity by caffeine. PMID:3703910

  13. Caffeine content of energy drinks, carbonated sodas, and other beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, Rachel R; Goldberger, Bruce A; Cone, Edward J

    2006-03-01

    The caffeine content of 10 energy drinks, 19 carbonated sodas, and 7 other beverages was determined. In addition, the variability of the caffeine content of Coca-Cola fountain soda was evaluated. Caffeine was isolated from the samples by liquid-liquid extraction and analyzed by gas chromatography with nitrogen-phosphorus detection. The caffeine concentration of the caffeinated energy drinks ranged from none detected to 141.1 mg/serving. The caffeine content of the carbonated sodas ranged from none detected to 48.2 mg/serving, and the content of the other beverages ranged from Coca-Cola fountain samples were 44.5, 2.95, and 6.64 mg/serving, respectively. PMID:16620542

  14. International society of sports nutrition position stand: caffeine and performance

    OpenAIRE

    Wildman Robert; Graves B Sue; Stout Jeff; Willoughby Darryn; Taylor Lem; Wilborn Colin; Campbell Bill; Kreider Richard; Kalman Doug; Ziegenfuss Tim; Goldstein Erica R; Ivy John L; Spano Marie; Smith Abbie E; Antonio Jose

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Position Statement: The position of The Society regarding caffeine supplementation and sport performance is summarized by the following seven points: 1.) Caffeine is effective for enhancing sport performance in trained athletes when consumed in low-to-moderate dosages (~3-6 mg/kg) and overall does not result in further enhancement in performance when consumed in higher dosages (≥ 9 mg/kg). 2.) Caffeine exerts a greater ergogenic effect when consumed in an anhydrous state as compared ...

  15. Ultrastructural changes in the developing chicken cornea following caffeine administration.

    OpenAIRE

    Bartel Hieronim; Tosik Dariusz; Kujawa-Hadryś Monika

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine is one of the most frequently consumed psychoactive substances. It has been known for many years that caffeine at high concentrations exerts harmful effects on both women's and laboratory animals' fertility, moreover it may impair normal development of many organs in the prenatal period. So far there have been few studies performed that demonstrate teratogenic effects of caffeine on structures of the developing eye, particularly the cornea. The aim of the study was to show ultrastruc...

  16. Caffeine Accelerates Absorption and Enhances the Analgesic Effect of Acetaminophen

    OpenAIRE

    Renner, Bertold; Clarke, Geoff; Grattan, Tim; Beisel, Angelika; Mueller, Christian; Werner, Ulrike; Kobal, Gerd; Brune, Kay

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the analgesic effect of acetaminophen compared to a combination of both caffeine and acetaminophen or caffeine alone using tonic and phasic pain stimulation. Twenty-four subjects were treated orally with 1000 mg acetaminophen, 130 mg caffeine, and a combination of both in a 4-way crossover, double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Pharmacokinetics and analgesic effects were assessed by means of an experimental pain model based on pain-related cortical pot...

  17. Antioxidant Activity of Aqueous Extracts of Different Caffeine Products

    OpenAIRE

    Abd El-Moneim M.R. AFIFY; Emad A. SHALABY; Hossam Saad EL-BELTAGI

    2011-01-01

    The antioxidant activity of water extracts (cold and hot) of six caffeine products were carried out. The extracts were screened for total polyphenol contents and antioxidant activity using DPPH, ABTS methods and reducing power method at 50 and 100 μg/ml after 15 min and 30 min using DPPH, ABTS BHA and Caffeine as standard compounds. The results indicated that, the hot water extracts for different caffeine products showed higher antioxidant activity than those of cold extracts and this activit...

  18. Alcohol, nicotine, caffeine, and mental disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Crocq, Marc-Antoine

    2003-01-01

    Alcohol, nicotine, and caffeine are the most widely consumed psychotropic drugs worldwide. They are largely consumed by normal individuals, but their use is even more frequent in psychiatric patients, Thus, patients with schizophrenia tend to abuse all three substances. The interrelationships between depression and alcohol are complex. These drugs can all create dependence, as understood in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV). Alcohol abuse is cl...

  19. Determination of CaffeineIn Beverages: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igelige Gerald

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is a well-known stimulant which is added as an ingredient to various carbonated soft drinks. Caffeine has drawn more attention due to its physiological effects beyond that of its stimulatory effect. Consumers are interested in knowing the exact amounts of caffeine existing in beverages. However, limited data exist, especially for store brand beverages. Therefore, it is pertinent to review the various methods that will effectively determine the caffeine contents in different carbonated drinks. HPLC, UV-Visible Spectrometry and Gas Chromatography are among the popular used methods.

  20. Antibacterial activity of caffeine against plant pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sledz, Wojciech; Los, Emilia; Paczek, Agnieszka; Rischka, Jacek; Motyka, Agata; Zoledowska, Sabina; Piosik, Jacek; Lojkowska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the antibacterial properties of a plant secondary metabolite - caffeine. Caffeine is present in over 100 plant species. Antibacterial activity of caffeine was examined against the following plant-pathogenic bacteria: Ralstonia solanacearum (Rsol), Clavibacter michiganesis subsp. sepedonicus (Cms), Dickeya solani (Dsol), Pectobacterium atrosepticum (Pba), Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (Pcc), Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst), and Xanthomonas campestris subsp. campestris (Xcc). MIC and MBC values ranged from 5 to 20 mM and from 43 to 100 mM, respectively. Caffeine increased the bacterial generation time of all tested species and caused changes in cell morphology. The influence of caffeine on the synthesis of DNA, RNA and proteins was investigated in cultures of plant pathogenic bacteria with labelled precursors: [(3)H]thymidine, [(3)H]uridine or (14)C leucine, respectively. RNA biosynthesis was more affected than DNA or protein biosynthesis in bacterial cells treated with caffeine. Treatment of Pba with caffeine for 336 h did not induce resistance to this compound. Caffeine application reduced disease symptoms caused by Dsol on chicory leaves, potato slices, and whole potato tubers. The data presented indicate caffeine as a potential tool for the control of diseases caused by plant-pathogenic bacteria, especially under storage conditions. PMID:26307771

  1. Caffeine Content in Popular Energy Drinks and Energy Shots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attipoe, Selasi; Leggit, Jeffrey; Deuster, Patricia A

    2016-09-01

    The use of energy beverages is high among the general population and military personnel. Previous studies have reported discrepancies between the actual amount of caffeine in products and the amount of caffeine on stated labels. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the content of caffeine listed on the labels of various energy drinks and energy shots. Top-selling energy drinks (n = 9) and energy shots (n = 5) were purchased from retail stores. Three of each of the 14 products were purchased and analyzed for caffeine content by an independent laboratory. Of the 14 products tested, 5 did not provide caffeine amounts on their facts panel-of those, 3 listed caffeine as an ingredient and 2 listed caffeine as part of a proprietary blend. The remaining 9 (of 14) products stated the amounts of caffeine on their labels, all of which were within 15% of the amount indicated on the label. In this study, although the energy beverages that indicated the amount of caffeine it contained had values within ±15% of the amount listed on the label, a potentially acceptable range, this finding is not acceptable with regard to current labeling regulations, which require added ingredients to total 100%. PMID:27612347

  2. Caffeine Consumption and Sleep Quality in Australian Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Emily J; Coates, Alison M; Kohler, Mark; Banks, Siobhan

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is commonly consumed to help offset fatigue, however, it can have several negative effects on sleep quality and quantity. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between caffeine consumption and sleep quality in adults using a newly validated caffeine food frequency questionnaire (C-FFQ). In this cross sectional study, 80 adults (M ± SD: 38.9 ± 19.3 years) attended the University of South Australia to complete a C-FFQ and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Caffeine consumption remained stable across age groups while the source of caffeine varied. Higher total caffeine consumption was associated with decreased time in bed, as an estimate of sleep time (r = -0.229, p = 0.041), but other PSQI variables were not. Participants who reported poor sleep (PSQI global score ≥ 5) consumed 192.1 ± 122.5 mg (M ± SD) of caffeine which was significantly more than those who reported good sleep quality (PSQI global score caffeine consumption data. The data suggests that shorter sleep is associated with greater caffeine consumption, and that consumption is greater in adults with reduced sleep quality. PMID:27527212

  3. Caffeine Intake May Modulate Inflammation Markers in Trained Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rômulo Pillon Barcelos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is presented in many commercial products and has been proven to induce ergogenic effects in exercise, mainly related to redox status homeostasis, inflammation and oxidative stress-related adaptation mechanisms. However, most studies have mainly focused on muscle adaptations, and the role of caffeine in different tissues during exercise training has not been fully described. The aim of this study was therefore, to analyze the effects of chronic caffeine intake and exercise training on liver mitochondria functioning and plasma inflammation markers. Rats were divided into control, control/caffeine, exercise, and exercise/caffeine groups. Exercise groups underwent four weeks of swimming training and caffeine groups were supplemented with 6 mg/kg/day. Liver mitochondrial swelling and complex I activity, and plasma myeloperoxidase (MPO and acetylcholinesterase (AChE activities were measured. An anti-inflammatory effect of exercise was evidenced by reduced plasma MPO activity. Additionally, caffeine intake alone and combined with exercise decreased the plasma AChE and MPO activities. The per se anti-inflammatory effect of caffeine intake should be highlighted considering its widespread use as an ergogenic aid. Therefore, caffeine seems to interfere on exercise-induced adaptations and could also be used in different exercise-related health treatments.

  4. Thermochemical parameters of caffeine, theophylline, and xanthine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ngo Tuan Cuong; Truong Ba Tai [Department of Chemistry, and Mathematical Modeling and Computational Science Center (LMCC), Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Vu Thi Thu Ha [Institute of Chemistry, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Minh Tho Nguyen, E-mail: minh.nguyen@chem.kuleuven.b [Department of Chemistry, and Mathematical Modeling and Computational Science Center (LMCC), Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium)

    2010-04-15

    Thermochemical parameters of caffeine 1, theophylline 2, xanthine 3, uracil, and imidazole derivatives are determined by quantum chemical calculations. Using the composite G3B3 method, the standard heat of formation of caffeine in the gaseous phase amounts to DELTA{sub f}H{sub g}{sup 0}(1)=-243+-8kJ.mol{sup -1}, which lends a support for the recent experimental value of -237.0 +- 2.5 kcal . mol{sup -1}. We also obtain DELTA{sub f}H{sub g}{sup 0}(2)=-232+-8kJ.mol{sup -1}andDELTA{sub f}H{sub g}{sup 0}(3)=-209+-8kJ.mol{sup -1}. The adiabatic ionization energies are IE{sub a}(1) = 7.9 eV, IE{sub a}(2) = 8.1 eV, and IE{sub a}(3) = 8.5 eV using B3LYP calculations. The enhanced ability of caffeine to eject electron, as compared to the parent compounds and cyclic components, is of interest with regard to its potential use as a corrosion inhibitor.

  5. Thermochemical parameters of caffeine, theophylline, and xanthine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermochemical parameters of caffeine 1, theophylline 2, xanthine 3, uracil, and imidazole derivatives are determined by quantum chemical calculations. Using the composite G3B3 method, the standard heat of formation of caffeine in the gaseous phase amounts to ΔfHg0(1)=-243±8kJ.mol-1, which lends a support for the recent experimental value of -237.0 ± 2.5 kcal . mol-1. We also obtain ΔfHg0(2)=-232±8kJ.mol-1andΔfHg0(3)=-209±8kJ.mol-1. The adiabatic ionization energies are IEa(1) = 7.9 eV, IEa(2) = 8.1 eV, and IEa(3) = 8.5 eV using B3LYP calculations. The enhanced ability of caffeine to eject electron, as compared to the parent compounds and cyclic components, is of interest with regard to its potential use as a corrosion inhibitor.

  6. Association of the anxiogenic and alerting effects of caffeine with ADORA2A and ADORA1 polymorphisms and habitual level of caffeine consumption

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, Peter John; Hohoff, Christa; Heatherley, Susan; Mullings, Emma; Maxfield, Peter; Evershed, Richard,; Deckert, Jürgen; Nutt, David

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine, a widely consumed adenosine A1 and A2A receptor antagonist, is valued as a psychostimulant, but it is also anxiogenic. An association between a variant within the ADORA2A gene (rs5751876) and caffeine-induced anxiety has been reported for individuals who habitually consume little caffeine. This study investigated whether this single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) might also affect habitual caffeine intake, and whether habitual intake might moderate the anxiogenic effect of caffeine. ...

  7. Energy drink consumption and impact on caffeine risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Barbara M; Campbell, Donald M; Cressey, Peter; Egan, Ursula; Horn, Beverley

    2014-01-01

    The impact of caffeine from energy drinks occurs against a background exposure from naturally occurring caffeine (coffee, tea, cocoa and foods containing these ingredients) and caffeinated beverages (kola-type soft drinks). Background caffeine exposure, excluding energy drinks, was assessed for six New Zealand population groups aged 15 years and over (n = 4503) by combining concentration data for 53 caffeine-containing foods with consumption information from the 2008/09 New Zealand Adult Nutrition Survey (ANS). Caffeine exposure for those who consumed energy drinks (n = 138) was similarly assessed, with inclusion of energy drinks. Forty-seven energy drink products were identified on the New Zealand market in 2010. Product volumes ranged from 30 to 600 ml per unit, resulting in exposures of 10-300 mg caffeine per retail unit consumed. A small percentage, 3.1%, of New Zealanders reported consuming energy drinks, with most energy drink consumers (110/138) drinking one serving per 24 h. The maximum number of energy drinks consumed per 24 h was 14 (total caffeine of 390 mg). A high degree of brand loyalty was evident. Since only a minor proportion of New Zealanders reported consuming energy drinks, a greater number of New Zealanders exceeded a potentially adverse effect level (AEL) of 3 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1) for caffeine from caffeine-containing foods than from energy drinks. Energy drink consumption is not a risk at a population level because of the low prevalence of consumption. At an individual level, however, teenagers, adults (20-64 years) and females (16-44 years) were more likely to exceed the AEL by consuming energy drinks in combination with caffeine-containing foods. PMID:25010189

  8. Cytochrome P450-dependent metabolism of caffeine in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Coelho

    Full Text Available Caffeine (1, 3, 7-trimethylxanthine, an alkaloid produced by plants, has antioxidant and insecticide properties that can affect metabolism and cognition. In vertebrates, the metabolites derived from caffeine have been identified, and their functions have been characterized. However, the metabolites of caffeine in insects remain unknown. Thus, using radiolabelled caffeine, we have identified some of the primary caffeine metabolites produced in the body of Drosophila melanogaster males, including theobromine, paraxanthine and theophylline. In contrast to mammals, theobromine was the predominant metabolite (paraxanthine in humans; theophylline in monkeys; 1, 3, 7-trimethyluric acid in rodents. A transcriptomic screen of Drosophila flies exposed to caffeine revealed the coordinated variation of a large set of genes that encode xenobiotic-metabolizing proteins, including several cytochromes P450s (CYPs that were highly overexpressed. Flies treated with metyrapone--an inhibitor of CYP enzymes--showed dramatically decreased caffeine metabolism, indicating that CYPs are involved in this process. Using interference RNA genetic silencing, we measured the metabolic and transcriptomic effect of three candidate CYPs. Silencing of CYP6d5 completely abolished theobromine synthesis, whereas CYP6a8 and CYP12d1 silencing induced different consequences on metabolism and gene expression. Therefore, we characterized several metabolic products and some enzymes potentially involved in the degradation of caffeine. In conclusion, this pioneer approach to caffeine metabolism in insects opens novel perspectives for the investigation of the physiological effects of caffeine metabolites. It also indicates that caffeine could be used as a biomarker to evaluate CYP phenotypes in Drosophila and other insects.

  9. Caffeine triggers behavioral and neurochemical alterations in adolescent rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardais, A P; Borges, M F; Rocha, A S; Sallaberry, C; Cunha, R A; Porciúncula, L O

    2014-06-13

    Caffeine is the psychostimulant most consumed worldwide but concerns arise about the growing intake of caffeine-containing drinks by adolescents since the effects of caffeine on cognitive functions and neurochemical aspects of late brain maturation during adolescence are poorly known. We now studied the behavioral impact in adolescent male rats of regular caffeine intake at low (0.1mg/mL), moderate (0.3mg/mL) and moderate/high (1.0mg/mL) doses only during their active period (from 7:00 P.M. to 7:00 A.M.). All tested doses of caffeine were devoid of effects on locomotor activity, but triggered anxiogenic effects. Caffeine (0.3 and 1mg/mL) improved the performance in the object recognition task, but the higher dose of caffeine (1.0mg/mL) decreased the habituation to an open-field arena, suggesting impaired non-associative memory. All tested doses of caffeine decreased the density of glial fibrillary acidic protein and synaptosomal-associated protein-25, but failed to modify neuron-specific nuclear protein immunoreactivity in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Caffeine (0.3-1mg/mL) increased the density of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and proBDNF density as well as adenosine A1 receptor density in the hippocampus, whereas the higher dose of caffeine (1mg/mL) increased the density of proBDNF and BDNF and decreased A1 receptor density in the cerebral cortex. These findings document an impact of caffeine consumption in adolescent rats with a dual impact on anxiety and recognition memory, associated with changes in BDNF levels and decreases of astrocytic and nerve terminal markers without overt neuronal damage in hippocampal and cortical regions. PMID:24726984

  10. Caffeine and human DNA metabolism: the magic and the mystery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of caffeine to reverse cell cycle checkpoint function and enhance genotoxicity after DNA damage was examined in telomerase-expressing human fibroblasts. Caffeine reversed the ATM-dependent S and G2 checkpoint responses to DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation (IR), as well as the ATR- and Chk1-dependent S checkpoint response to ultraviolet radiation (UVC). Remarkably, under conditions in which IR-induced G2 delay was reversed by caffeine, IR-induced G1 arrest was not. Incubation in caffeine did not increase the percentage of cells entering the S phase 6-8 h after irradiation; ATM-dependent phosphorylation of p53 and transactivation of p21Cip1/Waf1 post-IR were resistant to caffeine. Caffeine alone induced a concentration- and time-dependent inhibition of DNA synthesis. It inhibited the entry of human fibroblasts into S phase by 70-80% regardless of the presence or absence of wildtype ATM or p53. Caffeine also enhanced the inhibition of cell proliferation induced by UVC in XP variant fibroblasts. This effect was reversed by expression of DNA polymerase η, indicating that translesion synthesis of UVC-induced pyrimidine dimers by DNA pol η protects human fibroblasts against UVC genotoxic effects even when other DNA repair functions are compromised by caffeine

  11. Fast inhibition of glutamate-activated currents by caffeine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas P Vyleta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Caffeine stimulates calcium-induced calcium release (CICR in many cell types. In neurons, caffeine stimulates CICR presynaptically and thus modulates neurotransmitter release. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique we found that caffeine (20 mM reversibly increased the frequency and decreased the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs in neocortical neurons. The increase in mEPSC frequency is consistent with a presynaptic mechanism. Caffeine also reduced exogenously applied glutamate-activated currents, confirming a separate postsynaptic action. This inhibition developed in tens of milliseconds, consistent with block of channel currents. Caffeine (20 mM did not reduce currents activated by exogenous NMDA, indicating that caffeine block is specific to non-NMDA type glutamate receptors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Caffeine-induced inhibition of mEPSC amplitude occurs through postsynaptic block of non-NMDA type ionotropic glutamate receptors. Caffeine thus has both pre and postsynaptic sites of action at excitatory synapses.

  12. Design, formulation and evaluation of caffeine chewing gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Aslani

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: In this study, 20 and 50 mg caffeine gums with suitable and desirable properties (i.e., good taste and satisfactory release were formulated. The best flavor for caffeine gum was cinnamon. Both kinds of 20 and 50 mg gums succeeded in content uniformity test.

  13. Caffeine. Courseware Evaluation for Vocational and Technical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This courseware evaluation rates the "Caffeine" program developed by Lane Community College and sold by the Oregon Department of Education. (The program--not included in this document--is part of a computer-assisted instruction project with nursing applications.) Part A describes "Caffeine" in terms of topics (food and nutrition, allied health)…

  14. International society of sports nutrition position stand: caffeine and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Erica R; Ziegenfuss, Tim; Kalman, Doug; Kreider, Richard; Campbell, Bill; Wilborn, Colin; Taylor, Lem; Willoughby, Darryn; Stout, Jeff; Graves, B Sue; Wildman, Robert; Ivy, John L; Spano, Marie; Smith, Abbie E; Antonio, Jose

    2010-01-01

    Position Statement: The position of The Society regarding caffeine supplementation and sport performance is summarized by the following seven points: 1.) Caffeine is effective for enhancing sport performance in trained athletes when consumed in low-to-moderate dosages (~3-6 mg/kg) and overall does not result in further enhancement in performance when consumed in higher dosages (>/= 9 mg/kg). 2.) Caffeine exerts a greater ergogenic effect when consumed in an anhydrous state as compared to coffee. 3.) It has been shown that caffeine can enhance vigilance during bouts of extended exhaustive exercise, as well as periods of sustained sleep deprivation. 4.) Caffeine is ergogenic for sustained maximal endurance exercise, and has been shown to be highly effective for time-trial performance. 5.) Caffeine supplementation is beneficial for high-intensity exercise, including team sports such as soccer and rugby, both of which are categorized by intermittent activity within a period of prolonged duration. 6.) The literature is equivocal when considering the effects of caffeine supplementation on strength-power performance, and additional research in this area is warranted. 7.) The scientific literature does not support caffeine-induced diuresis during exercise, or any harmful change in fluid balance that would negatively affect performance. PMID:20205813

  15. International society of sports nutrition position stand: caffeine and performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wildman Robert

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Position Statement: The position of The Society regarding caffeine supplementation and sport performance is summarized by the following seven points: 1. Caffeine is effective for enhancing sport performance in trained athletes when consumed in low-to-moderate dosages (~3-6 mg/kg and overall does not result in further enhancement in performance when consumed in higher dosages (≥ 9 mg/kg. 2. Caffeine exerts a greater ergogenic effect when consumed in an anhydrous state as compared to coffee. 3. It has been shown that caffeine can enhance vigilance during bouts of extended exhaustive exercise, as well as periods of sustained sleep deprivation. 4. Caffeine is ergogenic for sustained maximal endurance exercise, and has been shown to be highly effective for time-trial performance. 5. Caffeine supplementation is beneficial for high-intensity exercise, including team sports such as soccer and rugby, both of which are categorized by intermittent activity within a period of prolonged duration. 6. The literature is equivocal when considering the effects of caffeine supplementation on strength-power performance, and additional research in this area is warranted. 7. The scientific literature does not support caffeine-induced diuresis during exercise, or any harmful change in fluid balance that would negatively affect performance.

  16. Structural features of DNA interaction with caffeine and theophylline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafisi, Shohreh; Manouchehri, Firouzeh; Tajmir-Riahi, Heidar-Ali; Varavipour, Maryam

    2008-03-01

    Caffeine and theophylline are strong antioxidants that prevent DNA damage. The anticancer and antiviral activities of these natural products are implicated in their mechanism of actions. However, there has been no information on the interactions of these xanthine derivatives with individual DNA at molecular level. The aim of this study was to examine the stability and structural features of calf-thymus DNA complexes with caffeine and theophylline in aqueous solution, using constant DNA concentration (6.25 mM) and various caffeine or theophylline/DNA(P) ratios of 1/80, 1/40, 1/20, 1/10, 1/5, 1/2 and 1/1. FTIR, UV-visible spectroscopic methods were used to determine the ligand external binding modes, the binding constant and the stability of caffeine, theophylline-DNA complexes in aqueous solution. Spectroscopic evidence showed that the complexation of caffeine and theophylline with DNA occurred via G-C and A-T and PO 2 group with overall binding constants of K(caffeine-DNA) = 9.7 × 10 3 M -1 and K(theophylline-DNA) = 1.7 × 10 4 M -1. The affinity of ligand-DNA binding is in the order of theophylline > caffeine. A partial B to A-DNA transition occurs upon caffeine and theophylline complexation.

  17. Low-dose caffeine physical dependence in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, R R; Evans, S M; Heishman, S J; Preston, K L; Sannerud, C A; Wolf, B; Woodson, P P

    1990-12-01

    This study investigated the effects of terminating low dose levels of caffeine (100 mg/day) in 7 normal humans. Substitution of placebo capsules for caffeine capsules occurred under double-blind conditions while subjects rated various dimensions of their mood and behavior. In the first phase of the study, substitution of placebo for 12 consecutive days resulted in an orderly withdrawal syndrome in 4 subjects which peaked on days 1 or 2 and progressively decreased toward prewithdrawal levels over about 1 week. Data from the remaining three subjects provided no evidence of withdrawal. In the second phase of the study, the generality of the withdrawal effect was examined by repeatedly substituting placebo for 100 mg/day of caffeine for 1-day periods separated by an average of 9 days. Despite differences within and across subjects with respect to the presence, nature and magnitude of symptoms, each of the seven subjects demonstrated a statistically significant withdrawal effect. Although the phenomenon of caffeine withdrawal has been described previously, the present report documents that the incidence of caffeine withdrawal is higher (100% of subjects), the daily dose level at which withdrawal occurs is lower (roughly equivalent to the amount of caffeine in a single cup of strong brewed coffee or 3 cans of caffeinated soft drink) and the range of symptoms experienced is broader (including headache, fatigue and other dysphoric mood changes, muscle pain/stiffness, flu-like feelings, nausea/vomiting and craving for caffeine) than heretofore recognized. PMID:2262896

  18. Influence of caffeine and caffeine withdrawal on headache and cerebral blood flow velocities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couturier, EGM; Laman, DM; vanDuijn, MAJ; vanDuijn, H

    1997-01-01

    Caffeine consumption may cause headache, particularly migraine. Its withdrawal also produces headaches and may be related to weekend migraine attacks. Transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) has shown changes in cerebral blood flow velocities (BFV) during and between attacks of migraine. In order to e

  19. Beverages of Daily Life: Impact of Caffeine on Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Anna Vittoria Mattioli

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, clinical and observational studies reported that caffeine consumption was associated with cardiac arrhythmias, affected heart rate variability, and subsequently increased cardiovascular risk. The analysis of these paper shows that data are controversial and strongly depends on methodology. Moderate intake of caffeine seems to have protective effects on arrhythmias, on contrary high intake of caffeine seems to be associated with increased risk of atrial fibrillation. There is a deep difference when we analysed intake of caffeine from coffee compared to other sources. In very recent time an increase in caffeinated beverages, namely energy drinks, has been reported in young people and several arrhythmic complications has been observed. A review of literature is presented

  20. Effects of caffeine or maternal repair systems in Drosophila melanogaster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drosophila melanogaster females were treated with 1% caffeine, mated with X-rayed males and the frequencies of induced sex-chromosome loss, translocations between the major autosomes and between the Y-chromosome and the major autosomes determined. In a reversal of the results obtained previously with 0.2% caffeine by Mendelson and Sobels, treatment of females with 1% caffeine led to a decrease in sex-chromosome loss, confirming preliminary data of Zimmering and Osgood and in increase in autosome-autosome translocations. It is suggested that the higher concentration of caffeine inhibits replication permitting more time available for chromosome-type restitutions by means of caffeine-insensitive repair mechanisms. In contrast with results for autosome-autosome translocation, the fequency of Y-autosome translocations was depressed below controls suggesting an isolation (by any one of several means) of Y-chromosome breaks from those in the autosomes. (Auth.)

  1. [Study on interaction of caffeine with myoglobin by fluorescence spectroscopy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He-Yong; Gu, Xiao-Tian; Ding, Yan; Zhou, Jia-Hong; Feng, Yu-Ying

    2009-10-01

    The interaction of caffein and myoglobin was investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy. The intrinsic fluorescence of myoglobin was significantly quenched by caffein under the physiological condition (pH 7.4). The results indicated that caffeine was capable of binding with myoglobin to form a 1:1 complex and the quenching mechanism of myoglobin affected by caffeine was shown to be a static quenching procedure by calculating quenching constant, binding sites and binding constant. According to the thermodynamic parameters, the main binding force of the interaction is electrostatic force and hydrophobic force. The change in the micro-circumstance of aminos of myoglobin was analyzed by synchronous fluorescence spectrometry. The result indicated that caffeine can change the conformation of the protein, leading to the change in the micro-environment of tryptophane and tyrosine residues from hydrophobic environment to hydrophilic environment to different extent. PMID:20038063

  2. Caffeinated Energy Drinks -- A Growing Problem

    OpenAIRE

    Reissig, Chad J.; Strain, Eric C.; Griffiths, Roland R.

    2008-01-01

    Since the introduction of Red Bull in Austria in 1987 and in the United States in 1997, the energy drink market has grown exponentially. Hundreds of different brands are now marketed, with caffeine content ranging from a modest 50 mg to an alarming 505 mg per can or bottle. Regulation of energy drinks, including content labeling and health warnings differs across countries, with some of the most lax regulatory requirements in the U.S. The absence of regulatory oversight has resulted in aggres...

  3. Modifying effect of caffeine on lethality and mutability of Chlamydomonas reinhardii cells following UV irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modifying effect of caffeine was studied using two standard and two UV-sensitive strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardii Dang. Cell survival and mutation frequency was microscopically evaluated on media without caffeine and on media with 1.5 mM of caffeine. The obtained results were indicative of the stimulating effect of caffeine upon survival in all strains. (author)

  4. Replicative bypass repair of ultraviolet damage to DNA of mammalian cells: caffeine sensitive and caffeine resistant mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Replicative bypass repair of UV damage to DNA was studied in a wide variaty of human, mouse and hamster cells in culture. Survival curve analysis revealed that in established cell lines (mouse L, Chinese hamster V79, HeLa S3 and SV40-transformed xeroderma pigmentosum (XP), post-UV caffeine treatment potentiated cell killing by reducing the extrapolation number and mean lethal UV fluence (Do). In the Do reduction as the result of random inactivation by caffeine of sensitive repair there were marked clonal differences among such cell lines, V79 being most sensitive to caffeine potentiation. However, other diploid cell lines (normal human, excision-defective XP and Syrian hamster) exhibited no obvious reduction in Do by caffeine. In parallel, alkaline sucrose sedimentation results showed that the conversion of initially smaller segments of DNA synthesized after irradiation with 10 J/m2 to high-molecular-weight DNA was inhibited by caffeine in transformed XP cells, but not in the diploid human cell lines. Exceptionally, diploid XP variants had a retarded ability of bypass repair which was drastically prevented by caffeine, so that caffeine enhanced the lethal effect of UV. Neutral CsCl study on the bypass repair mechanism by use of bromodeoxyuridine for DNA synthesis on damaged template suggests that the pyrimodine dimer acts as a block to replication and subsequently it is circumvented presumably by a new process involving replicative bypassing following strand displacement, rather than by gap-filling de novo. This mechanism worked similarly in normal and XP cells, whether or not caffeine was present, indicating that excision of dimer is not always necessary. However, replicative bypassing became defective in XP variant and transformed XP cells when caffeine was present. It appears, therefore, that the replicative bypass repair process is either caffeine resistant or sensitive, depending on the cell type used, but not necessarily on the excision repair capability

  5. Caffeine Content Labeling: A Missed Opportunity for Promoting Personal and Public Health

    OpenAIRE

    Kole, Jon; Barnhill, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Current regulation of caffeine-containing products is incoherent, fails to protect consumers' interests, and should be modified in multiple ways. We make the case for one of the regulatory reforms that are needed: all consumable products containing added caffeine should be required by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to include caffeine quantity on their labels. Currently, no foods or beverages that contain caffeine are required to include caffeine content on their labels. Strengthening...

  6. The Relationship of Caffeine Intake with Depression, Anxiety, Stress, and Sleep in Korean Adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Mi-Joo; Yoon, Chang-Ho; Ko, Hae-Jin; Kim, Hyo-Min; Kim, A-Sol; Moon, Ha-Na; Jung, Seung-Pi

    2016-01-01

    Background In various studies in adults, caffeine may increase wakefulness and relieve pain, but caffeine overdose can cause many adverse serious effects on health. Caffeine intake has recently been increasing in adolescents. In spite of importance of caffeine effects on Korean adolescents, there are lack of scientific and systematic studies. The purpose of our study was to identify the relationship between caffeine consumption and effects on adolescents. Methods We performed study on 234 mid...

  7. Influence of drug concentration on the diffusion parameters of caffeine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Ben Mustapha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives : In the fields of the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries and in toxicology, the study of the skin penetration of molecules is very interesting. Various studies have considered the impact of different physicochemical drug characteristics, skin thickness, and formulations, on the transition from the surface of the skin to the underlying tissues or to the systemic circulation; however, the influence of drug concentration on the permeation flux of molecules has rarely been raised. Our study aims to discover the influence of caffeine concentration in a formulation on the percutaneous penetration from gels, as a result of different dose applications to polysulfate membrane and human skin. Materials and Methods : For this purpose, three identical base gels were used at 1, 3, and 5% of caffeine, to evaluate the effect of the concentration of caffeine on in vitro release through the synthetic membrane and ex vivo permeation through the human skin, using diffusion Franz TM cells. Results : The diffusion through the epidermal tissue was significantly slower than through the synthetic membrane, which recorded an increase of flux with an increase in the concentration of caffeine. The skin permeation study showed that diffusion depended not only on the concentration, but also on the deposited amount of gel. Nevertheless, for the same amount of caffeine applied, the flux was more significant from the less concentrated gel. Conclusion : Among all the different concentrations of caffeine examined, 1% gel of caffeine applied at 5 mg / cm 2 showed the highest absorption characteristics across human skin.

  8. Radioprotective and antioxidant action of caffeine: mechanistic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffeine, a major constituent of coffee and other beverages has significant abilities to scavenge highly reactive free radicals and excited states of oxygen and to protect crucial biological molecules against these species. This is one of the possible reasons why caffeine acts as a radioprotector against oxygen-dependent (oxic) pathway of radiation damage and as an anti mutagen/anti carcinogen under certain conditions. The possible physicochemical and molecular mechanisms of caffeine action are briefly reviewed in the light of the recent finding. (author). 69 refs., 1 fig

  9. Evaluation of the central effects of alcohol and caffeine interaction.

    OpenAIRE

    Azcona, O; Barbanoj, M. J.; Torrent, J.; Jané, F

    1995-01-01

    1. The dynamic and kinetic interactions of alcohol and caffeine were studied in a double-blind, placebo controlled, cross-over trial. Treatments were administered to eight healthy subjects in four experimental sessions, leaving a 1 week wash-out period between each, as follows: 1) placebo, 2) alcohol (0.8 g kg-1), 3) caffeine (400 mg) and 4) alcohol (0.8 g kg-1) + caffeine (400 mg). 2. Evaluations were performed by means of: 1) objective measures: a) psychomotor performance (critical flicker ...

  10. Cigarette, alcohol, and caffeine consumption: risk factors for spontaneous abortion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Vibeke

    2003-01-01

    , and caffeine consumption was studied using logistic regression analyzes while controlling for confounding variables. In addition stratified analyzes of the association between caffeine consumption and spontaneous abortion on the basis of cigarette and alcohol consumption were performed. RESULTS: Women...... 375 mg or more caffeine per day were 4.84 (2.87-8.16) and 2.21 (1.53-3.18), respectively. Women who smoked 10-19 cigarettes and 20 or more cigarettes per day did not have significantly increased ORs for having spontaneous abortions, after adjusting for other risk factors. CONCLUSION: Consumption of 5...... or more units alcohol per week and 375 mg or more caffeine per day during pregnancy may increase the risk of spontaneous abortion....

  11. [Evaluation of liberation of caffeine from dermal semisolids drugs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodadová, Alexandra; Vitková, Zuzana; Herdová, Petra

    2013-10-01

    The paper deals with formulation of caffeine into dermal semisolid dosage forms - hydrogels. Caffeine was chosen as a model drug because its properties can be successfully used just in hydrogels. Protective and tranquilization effects can be used in the preparations for sunbathing, and its lipolytic and regenerative effect can be used for the treatment of androgenic alopecia or cellular bioprotection. The aim of the study was to investigate the influence of different concentrations of chitosan and caffeine on the liberation of gels. Besides, stability of the prepared samples was evaluated by means of the evaluation of their rheological parameters. Based on the obtained results, there was determined the optimal drug concentration - caffeine 0.2% (w/w) and also the gel forming substance - chitosan 2.3% (w/w). PMID:24237472

  12. On the interaction of caffeine with nucleic acids. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The DNA-caffeine interaction at high concentration of caffeine (Cf) leads to an arrangement of Cf molecules outside of the DNA double helix with an orientation parallel to the bases both in the A and B form as demonstrated by infrared linear dichroism. Addition of DNA broadens the 1H NMR lines of Cf in aqueous solution indicating a specific binding. Intercalation is not the predominant mechanism, the deuterium relaxation time T1 = (38 +- 7) ms and the estimated reorientation correlation time tausub(cb) = 0.17 ns of caffeine-8-[2H] in the Cf-DNA complex suggest an outside stacking of the ligand. According to the results a model on the DNA-Cf complex at high Cf concentration (binding process II) is suggested including the caffeine-induced reorientation of the hydration shell of DNA. (Auth.)

  13. Cigarette, alcohol, and caffeine consumption: risk factors for spontaneous abortion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Vibeke

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the association between cigarette, alcohol, and caffeine consumption and the occurrence of spontaneous abortion. METHODS: The study population consisted of 330 women with spontaneous abortion and 1168 pregnant women receiving antenatal care. A case-control design was utilized......; cases were defined as women with a spontaneous abortion in gestational week 6-16 and controls as women with a live fetus in gestational week 6-16. The variables studied comprise age, parity, occupational situation, cigarette, alcohol, and caffeine consumption. The association between cigarette, alcohol......, and caffeine consumption was studied using logistic regression analyzes while controlling for confounding variables. In addition stratified analyzes of the association between caffeine consumption and spontaneous abortion on the basis of cigarette and alcohol consumption were performed. RESULTS: Women...

  14. Does caffeine alter muscle carbohydrate and fat metabolism during exercise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graham, Terry E; Battram, Danielle S; Dela, Flemming;

    2008-01-01

    Caffeine, an adenosine receptor antagonist, has been studied for decades as a putative ergogenic aid. In the past 2 decades, the information has overwhelmingly demonstrated that it indeed is a powerful ergogenic aid, and frequently theories have been proposed that this is due to alterations in fat...... and carbohydrate metabolism. While caffeine certainly mobilizes fatty acids from adipose tissue, rarely have measures of the respiratory exchange ratio indicated an increase in fat oxidation. However, this is a difficult measure to perform accurately during exercise, and small changes could be.......05) glycogen and increased (p < 0.05) citrate, acetyl-CoA, and glucose-6-phosphate. The only effects of caffeine were to increase (p < 0.05) citrate in resting muscle and cAMP in exercise. There is very little evidence to support the hypothesis that caffeine has ergogenic effects as a result of enhanced fat...

  15. Assessing Caffeine as an Emerging Environmental Concern Using Conventional Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic wastewater contaminants, including pharmaceuticals, caffeine, and nicotine, have received increased scrutiny because of their detection in water bodies receiving wastewater discharge. Despite recent measurement in US streams, caffeine’s effect on freshwater organisms is not well documented....

  16. Caffeine and cardiovascular diseases: critical review of current research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulli, Anthony; Smith, Renee M; Kubatka, Peter; Novak, Jan; Uehara, Yoshio; Loftus, Hayley; Qaradakhi, Tawar; Pohanka, Miroslav; Kobyliak, Nazarii; Zagatina, Angela; Klimas, Jan; Hayes, Alan; La Rocca, Giampiero; Soucek, Miroslav; Kruzliak, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Caffeine is a most widely consumed physiological stimulant worldwide, which is consumed via natural sources, such as coffee and tea, and now marketed sources such as energy drinks and other dietary supplements. This wide use has led to concerns regarding the safety of caffeine and its proposed beneficial role in alertness, performance and energy expenditure and side effects in the cardiovascular system. The question remains "Which dose is safe?", as the population does not appear to adhere to the strict guidelines listed on caffeine consumption. Studies in humans and animal models yield controversial results, which can be explained by population, type and dose of caffeine and low statistical power. This review will focus on comprehensive and critical review of the current literature and provide an avenue for further study. PMID:26932503

  17. Couples' Pre-Pregnancy Caffeine Consumption Linked to Miscarriage Risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... couples or cumulative exposure to substances in the environment, which could be expected to increase as people age. Both male and female consumption of more than two caffeinated beverages a day ...

  18. The effect of caffeine on cerebral asymmetry in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voiculescu, M; Segarceanu, A; Negutu, M; Ghita, I; Fulga, I; Coman, O A

    2015-01-01

    EEG recordings reflect the gross electrical activity emanating from synaptic currents of individual neurons across large cortical areas. During periods of cortical activation, waking, and higher EEG frequencies, neurons display increased excitability and exhibit more asynchronous discharge. The activity of a number of subcortical neurotransmitter systems from several brain regions outside the thalamus can directly affect cortical activity patterns. These neurotransmitter systems are generally targets of pharmacological intervention or participate in neurological disease states. The EEG trace comprises 4 primary rhythms: alfa (α), beta (β), theta (θ) and delta (δ), which differ in frequency and amplitude. Caffeine effect on brain asymmetry will be studied in this work. The study was realized by means of Fourier spectral frequency analysis (Fast Fourier Transformation) of the EEG signal on anesthetized rats. All 3 doses of caffeine increased the global wave power of brain activity compared to the control group. All 3 doses of caffeine reduced the number of peaks for the 0.5-4 Hz frequency band, with the intermediate dose of caffeine having such an effect in the 4-7 Hz frequency band and the high dose of caffeine for the 23-33 Hz frequency band. The group that received high doses of caffeine showed an increase of the percentage of delta waves, with a concurrent decrease of the percentage of alpha1, alpha2, beta and theta 2 compared to the control group. Low-dose caffeine produced positive values of left-right difference in brain electrical activity (left predominance) for the 0.5-5 Hz and 7.8-10.3 Hz frequency intervals. The group that received high-dose caffeine exhibited a left hemisphere dominance for the 0.5-1.5 Hz; 13.9-14.1 Hz and 19-20 Hz frequency ranges while right dominance was present in the 1.7-13.9 Hz, 15-19 Hz and 21-25 Hz frequency ranges. In conclusion, all doses of caffeine modified the global power of the brain as well as the number of peaks on

  19. Influence of nicotine and caffeine on rat embryonic development

    OpenAIRE

    Nash, J. E.; Persaud, T.V.N.

    1988-01-01

    The influence on embryonic development of nicotine and caffeine at dose levels approximating human consumption was investigated in Sprague- Dawley rats. One group of animals received nicotine administered subcutaneously by an Alzet mini-osmotic pump from gestational day 6 through 12 (25 mg over 7 days; rate 149 pg/hr). Control animals received physiological saline in a similar manner. A second group received a single intravenous injection of caffeine (25 mg/ ...

  20. Skin delivery of caffeine contained in biofunctional textiles

    OpenAIRE

    Valldeperas Morell, José; Rubio, Laia; Alonso, Cristina; Coderch, Luisa; Parra, José Luis; Martí, Meritxell; Cebrián, Juan; Navarro Viciana, Juan Antonio; Lis Arias, Manuel José

    2010-01-01

    Biofunctional textiles are materials with new properties and added value. In this work, emphasis was placed on the release capacity of the active principle (caffeine) from the formulation or from the biofunctional textile. In addition, a new in vitro methodology of percutaneous absorption was designed to demonstrate the delivery of encapsulated caffeine from the biofunctional textile to the different skin layers. In the first step, permeation studies through a nylon membrane were performed an...

  1. Does acute caffeine ingestion alter brain metabolism in young adults?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Feng; Liu, Peiying; Pekar, James J; Lu, Hanzhang

    2015-04-15

    Caffeine, as the most commonly used stimulant drug, improves vigilance and, in some cases, cognition. However, the exact effect of caffeine on brain activity has not been fully elucidated. Because caffeine has a pronounced vascular effect which is independent of any neural effects, many hemodynamics-based methods such as fMRI cannot be readily applied without a proper calibration. The scope of the present work is two-fold. In Study 1, we used a recently developed MRI technique to examine the time-dependent changes in whole-brain cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO2) following the ingestion of 200mg caffeine. It was found that, despite a pronounced decrease in CBF (pextraction fraction (OEF) was significantly elevated (p=0.002) to fully compensate for the reduced blood supply. Using the whole-brain finding as a reference, we aim to investigate whether there are any regional differences in the brain's response to caffeine. Therefore, in Study 2, we examined regional heterogeneities in CBF changes following the same amount of caffeine ingestion. We found that posterior brain regions such as posterior cingulate cortex and superior temporal regions manifested a slower CBF reduction, whereas anterior brain regions including dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and medial frontal cortex showed a faster rate of decline. These findings have a few possible explanations. One is that caffeine may result in a region-dependent increase or decrease in brain activity, resulting in an unaltered average brain metabolic rate. The other is that caffeine's effect on vasculature may be region-specific. Plausibility of these explanations is discussed in the context of spatial distribution of the adenosine receptors. PMID:25644657

  2. Severe acute caffeine poisoning due to intradermal injections: Mesotherapy hazard

    OpenAIRE

    Perković-Vukčević Nataša; Babić Gordana; Šegrt Zoran; Vuković-Ercegović Gordana; Janković Snežana; Aćimović Ljubomir

    2012-01-01

    Introduction. Caffeine is indicated in the treatment of migraine headaches, as well as neonatal apnea and bradycardia syndrome. In mild poisoning, the most prevalent symptoms are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, tremor, anxiety and headache. In more severe cases, symptoms consist of heart rythym abnormalities, myocardial infarction and seizures. Due to its common lipolytic effect, caffeine is used in mesotherapy, usually in combination with drugs of similar effect. We presented a patient wit...

  3. Human coffee drinking: manipulation of concentration and caffeine dose.

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, R R; Bigelow, G E; Liebson, I A; O'Keeffe, M; O'Leary, D.; Russ, N

    1986-01-01

    In a residential research ward coffee drinking was studied in 9 volunteer human subjects with histories of heavy coffee drinking. A series of five experiments was undertaken to characterize adlibitum coffee consumption and to investigate the effects of manipulating coffee concentration, caffeine dose per cup, and caffeine preloads prior to coffee drinking. Manipulations were double-blind and scheduled in randomized sequences across days. When cups of coffee were freely available, coffee drink...

  4. Caffeine causes pulmonary hypertension syndrome (ascites) in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamely, M; Torshizi, M A Karimi; Rahimi, S; Wideman, R F

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension syndrome (PHS), or ascites, is characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance accompanied by right ventricular hypertrophy (RVH) and fluid accumulation in the abdominal cavity. Experimental models are required for triggering PHS to study the pathogenesis of this syndrome and to select resistant genetic lines. Caffeine increases vascular resistance and promotes systemic hypertension in mammals, but a similar effect of caffeine on the pulmonary circulation had not previously been demonstrated. Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the impact of caffeine alone (Exp. 1) or in combination with cold temperature (Exp. 2) on parameters associated with PHS in young broiler chicks. In Exp. 1, 288 chicks were distributed among 24 pens and brooded at standard environmental temperatures, and on d 3 through 42 caffeine was added to the water at doses of 0 (control), 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, and 100 mg/(kg BW·d). In Exp. 2, 192 chicks were distributed among 16 pens and brooded at cool environmental temperatures, and on d 3 through 42 caffeine was added to the water at doses of 0 (control), 15, 30, and 45 mg/(kg BW·d). In Exp. 1 caffeine administered at or above 12.5 mg/(kg BW·d) induced severe PHS and resulted in acute mortality and RVH ( broilers exposed to cold temperatures remarkably exhibited PHS incidences and developed RVH with right ventricular to total ventricular weight ratios of 30% or greater. Moreover, hematocrit significantly increased because of caffeine supplementation in cool ambient temperature ( = 0.002). Our data demonstrate that caffeine induces high incidences of PHS in broilers, which is exacerbated by exposure to low temperatures. PMID:27136008

  5. Multiple gustatory receptors required for the caffeine response in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Youngseok; Moon, Seok Jun; Montell, Craig

    2009-01-01

    The ability of insects to detect and avoid ingesting naturally occurring repellents and insecticides is essential for their survival. Nevertheless, the gustatory receptors enabling them to sense toxic botanical compounds are largely unknown. The only insect gustatory receptor shown to be required for avoiding noxious compounds is the Drosophila caffeine receptor, Gr66a. However, this receptor is not sufficient for the caffeine response, suggesting that Gr66a may be a subunit of a larger recep...

  6. Influence of caffeine on blood pressure and platelet aggregation

    OpenAIRE

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Studies have demonstrated that methylxanthines, such as caffeine, are A1 and A2 adenosine receptor antagonists found in the brain, heart, lungs, peripheral vessels, and platelets. Considering the high consumption of products with caffeine in their composition, in Brazil and throughout the rest of the world, the authors proposed to observe the effects of this substance on blood pressure and platelet aggregation. METHODS: Thirteen young adults, ranging from 21 to 27 years of age, par...

  7. Effect of caffeine on the vocal folds: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, S; Wood, G; Rubin, J S; O'Flynn, P E; Ratcliffe, P

    1999-04-01

    Caffeine is considered to be a dehydrating agent with detrimental effects on the quality of voice of persons ingesting it. This has led medical personnel dealing with voice disorders, especially in the case of professional voice users, to give advice against the use of caffeine. Yet this is an anecdotal truth as an extensive Medline literature search did not reveal any scientific evidence of caffeine being proven to have adverse effects on the vocal folds. We, therefore, initiated this pilot study to ascertain the connection between caffeine and voice quality on a laboratory basis. Two hundred and fifty mg of caffeine were provided to eight volunteers in tablet form, and blood levels along with laryngograph readings were recorded to document the changes produced. Analysing the irregularities of frequencies in a) free speech b) a reading passage and c) singing 'Happy Birthday', substantial changes were seen to authenticate the fact that caffeine does produce alterations in voice quality but these alterations have considerable intra-subject variability. A full study with wider parameters is to be performed on this subject as we consider it to be of importance in the management of voice disorders. PMID:10474669

  8. Effect of caffeine on information processing: Evidence from stroop task

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhinav Dixit

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caffeine is a pyschostimulant present in various beverages and known to alter alertness and performance by acting on the central nervous system. Its effects on central nervous system have been studied using EEG, evoked potentials, fMRI, and neuropsychological tests. The Stroop task is a widely used tool in psychophysiology to understand the attention processes and is based on the principle that processing of two different kinds of information (like the word or colour is parallel and at different speeds with a common response channel. Aim: To study the effect of caffeine on classical color word Stroop task. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 30 male undergraduate students by performing a test before and 40 minutes after consuming 3 mg/Kg caffeine and evaluating the effect of caffeine on Stroop interference and facilitation. Results: The results revealed that practice has no effect on the performance in a Stroop task. However, there was reduction in Stroop interference and increase in facilitation after consumption of caffeine as was evident by changes in the reaction times in response to neutral, incongruent, and congruent stimuli. Conclusion: We hypothesize that caffeine led to faster processing of relevant information.

  9. Protonation of caffeine: A theoretical and experimental study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Protonation of caffeine was examined by ion mobility spectrometry equipped with two ionization sources. ► Experimental and theoretical evidence was collected to assign the observed peaks to caffeine related ionic species. ► A new concept of “internal proton affinity”, the protonation tendency for each atom in a molecule, was defined. - Abstract: Protonation of caffeine was examined by ion mobility spectrometry equipped with two ionization sources, corona discharge (CD) and UV photoionization. Three peaks were observed in ion mobility spectrum by simultaneously running the two ionization sources. Experimental and theoretical evidence was collected to link the observed peaks to caffeine related ionic species. One peak was attributed to the M+ ion while the other two were assigned to different protonated isomers of caffeine. In the case of CD ionization source, it was observed that different sites of caffeine compete for protonation and their relative intensities, depends on the sample concentration as well as the nature of the reactant ions. The new concept of “internal proton affinity” (IPA) was defined to express the tendency of holding the added proton for each atom in a molecule

  10. Influence of caffeine on fractionated irradiation in wheat and barley

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fractionated irradiation is one of the important methods studying repair of radiation damage. Some authors reported that caffeine, a repair inhibitor, had no effects on fractionated irradiation in human cell, animal cell and Vicia faba. And they concluded that caffeine inhibited the repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD), but did not inhibit the repair of sub-lethal damage (SLD). In this study, the effect of caffeine on the repair of PLD and SLD were reexamined in wheat and barley systems. The germinating seeds of wheat of barley were pre-irradiation treated 3 h with 5 x 10-3 mol/L caffeine, then they were irradiated by single or fractionated X-ray doses. The results showed that after caffeine treatment the effect of fractionated irradiation was disappeared. In this case, caffeine not only inhibited the repair of PLD but also inhibited the repair SLD. In previous fracttionated radiation experiments, the repairs during interval were discussed in detail, but the repairs after whole irradiation were neglected. According to the resuls of this experiment and some early reported about fractionated irradiation, the repair efficiency during interval and the repair function after whole irradiation were discussed

  11. Protonation of caffeine: A theoretical and experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrami, Hamed [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tabrizchi, Mahmoud, E-mail: m-tabriz@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farrokhpour, Hossein [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► Protonation of caffeine was examined by ion mobility spectrometry equipped with two ionization sources. ► Experimental and theoretical evidence was collected to assign the observed peaks to caffeine related ionic species. ► A new concept of “internal proton affinity”, the protonation tendency for each atom in a molecule, was defined. - Abstract: Protonation of caffeine was examined by ion mobility spectrometry equipped with two ionization sources, corona discharge (CD) and UV photoionization. Three peaks were observed in ion mobility spectrum by simultaneously running the two ionization sources. Experimental and theoretical evidence was collected to link the observed peaks to caffeine related ionic species. One peak was attributed to the M{sup +} ion while the other two were assigned to different protonated isomers of caffeine. In the case of CD ionization source, it was observed that different sites of caffeine compete for protonation and their relative intensities, depends on the sample concentration as well as the nature of the reactant ions. The new concept of “internal proton affinity” (IPA) was defined to express the tendency of holding the added proton for each atom in a molecule.

  12. Caffeine treatment aggravates secondary degeneration after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Cheng-Chang; Jou, I-Ming

    2016-03-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) often results in some form of paralysis. Recently, SCI therapy has been focused on preventing secondary injury to reduce both neuroinflammation and lesion size so that functional outcome after an SCI may be improved. Previous studies have shown that adenosine receptors (AR) are a major regulator of inflammation after an SCI. The current study was performed to examine the effect of caffeine, a pan-AR blocker, on spontaneous functional recovery after an SCI. Animals were assigned into 3 groups randomly, including sham, PBS and caffeine groups. The rat SCI was generated by an NYU impactor with a 10 g rod dropped from a 25 mm height at thoracic 9 spinal cord level. Caffeine and PBS were injected daily during the experiment period. Hind limb motor function was evaluated by the Basso, Beattie, Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor rating scale at 1 week and 4 weeks after the SCI. Spinal cord segments were collected after final behavior evaluation for morphological analysis. The tissue sparing was evaluated by luxol fast blue staining. Immunofluorescence stain was employed to assess astrocyte activation and neurofilament positioning, while microglia activation was examined by immunohistochemistry stain.The results showed that spontaneous functional recovery was blocked after the animals were subjected caffeine daily. Moreover, caffeine administration increased the demyelination area, promoted astrocyte and microglia activation and decreased the quantity of neurofilaments. These findings suggest that the neurotoxicity effect of caffeine may be associated with the inhibition of neural repair and the promotion of neuroinflammation. PMID:26746340

  13. Ultrastructural changes in the developing chicken cornea following caffeine administration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartel Hieronim

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is one of the most frequently consumed psychoactive substances. It has been known for many years that caffeine at high concentrations exerts harmful effects on both women's and laboratory animals' fertility, moreover it may impair normal development of many organs in the prenatal period. So far there have been few studies performed that demonstrate teratogenic effects of caffeine on structures of the developing eye, particularly the cornea. The aim of the study was to show ultrastructural changes in the developing cornea, as the effect of caffeine administration to chicken embryos. The experimental materials were 26 chicken embryos from incubated breeding eggs. Eggs were divided into two groups: control (n=30 in which Ringer liquid was administrated, and experimental (n=30 in which teratogenic dose of caffeine 3.5mg/egg was given. In 36th hour of incubation solutions were given with cannula through hole in an egg shell directly onto amniotic membrane. After closing the hole with a glass plate and paraffine, eggs were put back to incubator. In 10th and 19th day of incubation corneas were taken for morphological analysis with a use of electron microscopy. Administration of caffeine during chicken development causes changes of collagen fibers of Bowman's membrane patterns and of the corneal stroma but it also changes proportion of amount of collagen fibers and of the stromal cells.

  14. Caffeine and human cerebral blood flow: A positron emission tomography study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Positron emission tomography (PET) was used to quantify the effect of caffeine on whole brain and regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) in humans. A mean dose of 250 mg of caffeine produced approximately a 30% decrease in whole brain CBF; regional differences in caffeine effect were not observed. Pre-caffeine CBF strongly influenced the magnitude of the caffeine-induced decrease. Caffeine decreased paCO2 and increased systolic blood pressure significantly; the change in paCO2 did not account for the change in CBF. Smaller increases in diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine, and subjectively reported anxiety were also observed

  15. Caffeine and cognitive decline in elderly women at high vascular risk. : Caffeine and cognition in high-risk women

    OpenAIRE

    Vercambre, Marie-Noël; BERR, Claudine; Ritchie, Karen; Kang, Jae,

    2013-01-01

    International audience BACKGROUND: Persons with vascular disorders are at higher risk of cognitive decline. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether caffeine may be associated with cognitive decline reduction in elderly at high vascular risk. METHODS: We included 2,475 women aged 65+ years in the Women's Antioxidant Cardiovascular Study, a randomized trial of antioxidants and B vitamins for cardiovascular disease secondary prevention. We ascertained regular caffeine intake at baseline (1995-1996) u...

  16. Caffeine exposure during rat brain development causes memory impairment in a sex selective manner that is offset by caffeine consumption throughout life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardais, Ana Paula; Rocha, Andréia S; Borges, Maurício Felisberto; Fioreze, Gabriela T; Sallaberry, Cássia; Mioranzza, Sabrina; Nunes, Fernanda; Pagnussat, Natália; Botton, Paulo Henrique S; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Porciúncula, Lisiane de Oliveira

    2016-04-15

    Caffeine is the psychostimulant most consumed worldwide. In moderate doses, it affords a beneficial effect in adults and upon aging, but has a deleterious effect during brain development. We now tested if caffeine consumption by rats (0.1, 0.3, 1.0 g/L in the drinking water, only during active cycle and weekdays) during adulthood could revert the potentially negative effects of caffeine during early life. Thus, we compared caffeine intake starting 15 days before mating and lasting either up to weaning (development) or up to adulthood, on behavior and synaptic proteins in male and female rats. Recognition memory was impaired only in female rats receiving caffeine (0.3 and 1.0 g/L) during development, coincident with increased proBDNF and unchanged BDNF levels in the hippocampus. Caffeine in both treatment regimens caused hyperlocomotion only in male rats, whereas anxiety-related behavior was attenuated in both sexes by caffeine (1.0 g/L) throughout life. Both caffeine treatment regimens decreased GFAP (as an astrocyte marker) and SNAP-25 (as a nerve terminals marker) in the hippocampus from male rats. TrkB receptor was decreased in the hippocampus from both sexes and treatment regimens. These findings revealed that caffeine intake during a specific time window of brain development promotes sex-dependent behavioral outcomes related to modification in BDNF signaling. Furthermore, caffeine throughout life can overcome the deleterious effects of caffeine on recognition memory during brain development in female rats. PMID:26774980

  17. Small Beneficial Effect of Caffeinated Energy Drink Ingestion on Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Nora B; Hardy, Michelle A; Millard-Stafford, Mindy L; Warren, Gordon L

    2016-07-01

    Collier, NB, Hardy, MA, Millard-Stafford, ML, and Warren, GL. Small beneficial effect of caffeinated energy drink ingestion on strength. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1862-1870, 2016-Because caffeine ingestion has been found to increase muscle strength, our aim was to determine whether caffeine when combined with other potential ergogenic ingredients, such as those in commercial energy drinks, would have a similar effect. Fifteen young healthy subjects were used in a double-blind, repeated-measures experimental design. Each subject performed 3 trials, ingesting either a caffeinated energy drink, an uncaffeinated version of the drink, or a placebo drink. The interpolated twitch procedure was used to assess maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) strength, electrically evoked strength, and percent muscle activation during MVIC of the knee extensors both before and after drink ingestion, and after a fatiguing bout of contractions; electromyographic (EMG) amplitude of the knee extensors during MVIC was also assessed. The mean (±SE) change in MVIC strength from before to after drink ingestion was significantly greater for the caffeinated energy drink compared with placebo [+5.0 (±1.7) vs. -0.5 (±1.5)%] and the difference between the drinks remained after fatigue (p = 0.015); the strength changes for the uncaffeinated energy drink were not significantly different from those of the other 2 drinks at any time. There was no significant effect of drink type on the changes in electrically evoked strength, percent muscle activation, and EMG from before to after drink ingestion. This study indicates that a caffeinated energy drink can increase MVIC strength but the effect is modest and the strength increase cannot be attributed to increased muscle activation. Whether the efficacy of energy drinks can be attributed solely to caffeine remains unclear. PMID:26670991

  18. Caffeine toxicity in forensic practice: possible effects and under-appreciated sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musgrave, Ian F; Farrington, Rachael L; Hoban, Claire; Byard, Roger W

    2016-09-01

    Caffeine is considered a very safe stimulant and is widely consumed in a variety of forms, from pure caffeine to beverages and foods. Typically, death is only seen when gram quantities of caffeine are consumed, usually in suicide attempts. Even in this scenario, death is rare. However, there are special populations that need to be considered in forensic presentations, who may be at greater risk. These include poor metabolizers, people with liver disease, and people with cardiac conditions, who can die as a result of caffeine intake at levels well below what is ordinarily considered toxic. Also, caffeine intake may be hidden. For example, herbal medicines with substantial caffeine content may not disclose these concentrations on their product label. The role of caffeine in medicolegal deaths is yet to be defined, however, herbal medicines and herbal weight loss supplements may represent an underappreciated source of caffeine in this context. PMID:27344159

  19. Caffeine, Is it effective for prevention of postdural puncture headache in young adult patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Ragab

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: It seems that the incidence of postdural puncture headache decreases in those patients who received caffeine sodium benzoate. The article can potentially help clinicians to use caffeine as an effective drug for prevention of PDPH.

  20. Physiological and cognitive responses to caffeine during repeated, high-intensity exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowe, Melissa J; Leicht, Anthony S; Spinks, Warwick L

    2006-10-01

    This study investigated the effects of caffeine on repeated, anaerobic exercise using a double-blind, randomized, crossover design. Seventeen subjects (five female) underwent cognitive (reaction time, number recall) and blood (glucose, potassium, catecholamines, lactate) testing before and after consuming caffeine (6 mg/kg), placebo, or nothing (control). An exercise test (two 60 s maximal cycling bouts) was conducted 90 min after caffeine/placebo consumption. Plasma caffeine concentrations significantly increased after caffeine ingestion, however, there were no positive effects on cognitive or blood parameters except a significant decrease in plasma potassium concentrations at rest. Potentially negative effects of caffeine included significantly higher blood lactate compared to control and significantly slower time to peak power in exercise bout 2 compared to control and placebo. Caffeine had no significant effect on peak power, work output, RPE, or peak heart rate. In conclusion, caffeine had no ergogenic effect on repeated, maximal cycling bouts and may be detrimental to anaerobic performance. PMID:17240784

  1. Conditioned Reinforcement and Locomotor Activating Effects of Caffeine and Ethanol Combinations in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Megan L.T. Hilbert; May, Christina E.; Griffin, William C.

    2013-01-01

    A growing trend among ethanol drinkers, especially young adults, is to combine caffeinated energy drinks with ethanol during a drinking episode. The primary active ingredient of these mixers is caffeine, which may significantly interact with ethanol. We tested the two hypotheses that caffeine would enhance ethanol-conditioned place preference and also enhance ethanol-stimulated locomotor activity. The interactive pharmacology of ethanol and caffeine was examined in C57BL/6J (B6) mice in a con...

  2. Storm in a coffee cup: caffeine modifies brain activation to social signals of threat

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Jessica E.; Lawrence, Andrew D; Diukova, Ana; Wise, Richard G; Rogers, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    Caffeine, an adenosine A1 and A2A receptor antagonist, is the most popular psychostimulant drug in the world, but it is also anxiogenic. The neural correlates of caffeine-induced anxiety are currently unknown. This study investigated the effects of caffeine on brain regions implicated in social threat processing and anxiety. Participants were 14 healthy male non/infrequent caffeine consumers. In a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover design, they underwent blood oxygenation level-depende...

  3. The Metabolic and Performance Effects of Caffeine Compared to Coffee during Endurance Exercise

    OpenAIRE

    Hodgson, Adrian B.; Randell, Rebecca K.; Jeukendrup, Asker E.

    2013-01-01

    There is consistent evidence supporting the ergogenic effects of caffeine for endurance based exercise. However, whether caffeine ingested through coffee has the same effects is still subject to debate. The primary aim of the study was to investigate the performance enhancing effects of caffeine and coffee using a time trial performance test, while also investigating the metabolic effects of caffeine and coffee. In a single-blind, crossover, randomised counter-balanced study design, eight tra...

  4. Concomitant Effects of Caffeine and Gamma Irradiation in Female Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the protective potential of caffeine as an antioxidant (80 mg/kg b.w.) i.p. injected 1 hr before exposure to a dose of (7 Gy) gamma irradiation in female rats. Alterations in serum lipids, cholesterol, triacylglycerol and fatty acids as well as total proteins, urea and uric acid have been investigated 1, 3 and 7 days post irradiation and /or caffeine treatment. Histological and histochemical changes of the dorsal aorta have been studied 7 days post treatment. Results revealed elevated total lipids, cholesterol, triacylglycerol, beside distortion in fatty acids throughout the whole experimentation period by caffeine pre injection, irradiation application and by dual treatment. Protein and urea were elevated by caffeine or irradiation, while both treatments dropped their levels, whereas uric was decreased by all treatments. Histopathological changes and deposition of sudanophilic material in the dorsal aorta wall were detected by either one or both treatments, which point out a limitation in the protective potential of caffeine

  5. Graphene platforms for the detection of caffeine in real samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoo, Weslie Yu Heng; Pumera, Martin; Bonanni, Alessandra, E-mail: a.bonanni@ntu.edu.sg

    2013-12-04

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Commercial caffeine was detected on different chemically modified graphenes. •Electrochemically reduced graphene (ERGO) provided the best performance. •ERGO was then employed for the detection of caffeine in real samples. -- Abstract: The analysis of food components is of high importance due to food safety and security. Here the electrochemical detection of caffeine was performed on different chemically modified graphene (CMG) surfaces carrying diverse amount of defects and oxygen functionalities. The analytical performances of graphite oxide (GPO), graphene oxide (GO), and electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) were compared for the first time for the detection of caffeine. It was found that ERGO showed the most favourable analytical parameters, such as lower oxidation potential, sensitivity, linearity and reproducibility of the response. ERGO was then used for the analysis of real samples. Caffeine levels of soluble coffee, teas and energetic drinks were measured without the need of any sample pre-treatment. Our findings are very important to gain more insight into the applicability of different graphene materials to real samples for sense-and-act analysis.

  6. Potential Role of Caffeine in the Treatment of Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshan, Mohsin H K; Tambo, Amos; Pace, Nikolai P

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease [PD] is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer's disease, affecting 1% of the population over the age of 55. The underlying neuropathology seen in PD is characterised by progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta with the presence of Lewy bodies. The Lewy bodies are composed of aggregates of α-synuclein. The motor manifestations of PD include a resting tremor, bradykinesia, and muscle rigidity. Currently there is no cure for PD and motor symptoms are treated with a number of drugs including levodopa [L-dopa]. These drugs do not delay progression of the disease and often provide only temporary relief. Their use is often accompanied by severe adverse effects. Emerging evidence from both in vivo and in vitro studies suggests that caffeine may reduce parkinsonian motor symptoms by antagonising the adenosine A2A receptor, which is predominately expressed in the basal ganglia. It is hypothesised that caffeine may increase the excitatory activity in local areas by inhibiting the astrocytic inflammatory processes but evidence remains inconclusive. In addition, the co-administration of caffeine with currently available PD drugs helps to reduce drug tolerance, suggesting that caffeine may be used as an adjuvant in treating PD. In conclusion, caffeine may have a wide range of therapeutic effects which are yet to be explored, and therefore warrants further investigation in randomized clinical trials. PMID:27563362

  7. Pharmacokinetic Interaction of Chrysin with Caffeine in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Keumhan; Oh, Do Gyeong; Nepal, Mahesh Raj; Jeong, Ki Sun; Choi, Yongjoo; Kang, Mi Jeong; Kang, Wonku; Jeong, Hye Gwang; Jeong, Tae Cheon

    2016-07-01

    Pharmacokinetic interaction of chrysin, a flavone present in honey, propolis and herbs, with caffeine was investigated in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Because chrysin inhibited CYP1A-selective ethoxyresorufin O-deethylase and methoxyresorufin O-demethylase activities in enriched rat liver microsomes, the pharmacokinetics of caffeine, a CYP 1A substrate, was studied following an intragastric administration with 100 mg/kg chrysin. In addition to the oral bioavailability of chrysin, its phase 2 metabolites, chrysin sulfate and chrysin glucuronide, were determined in rat plasma. As results, the pharmacokinetic parameters for caffeine and its three metabolites (i.e., paraxanthine, theobromine and theophylline) were not changed following chrysin treatment in vivo, despite of its inhibitory effect on CYP 1A in vitro. The bioavailability of chrysin was found to be almost zero, because chrysin was rapidly metabolized to its sulfate and glucuronide conjugates in rats. Taken together, it was concluded that the little interaction of chrysin with caffeine might be resulted from the rapid metabolism of chrysin to its phase 2 metabolites which would not have inhibitory effects on CYP enzymes responsible for caffeine metabolism. PMID:27098862

  8. Influence of caffeine on blood pressure and platelet aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Wilson S. Cavalcante

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Studies have demonstrated that methylxanthines, such as caffeine, are A1 and A2 adenosine receptor antagonists found in the brain, heart, lungs, peripheral vessels, and platelets. Considering the high consumption of products with caffeine in their composition, in Brazil and throughout the rest of the world, the authors proposed to observe the effects of this substance on blood pressure and platelet aggregation. METHODS: Thirteen young adults, ranging from 21 to 27 years of age, participated in this study. Each individual took 750mg/day of caffeine (250mg tid, over a period of seven days. The effects on blood pressure were analyzed through the pressor test with handgrip, and platelet aggregation was analyzed using adenosine diphosphate, collagen, and adrenaline. RESULTS: Diastolic pressure showed a significant increase 24 hours after the first intake (p<0.05. This effect, however, disappeared in the subsequent days. The platelet aggregation tests did not reveal statistically significant alterations, at any time during the study. CONCLUSION: The data suggest that caffeine increases diastolic blood pressure at the beginning of caffeine intake. This hypertensive effect disappears with chronic use. The absence of alterations in platelet aggregation indicates the need for larger randomized studies.

  9. Assessing dietary exposure to caffeine from beverages in the U.S. population using brand-specific versus category-specific caffeine values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Diane C; Hockenberry, Jon; Teplansky, Robyn; Hartman, Terryl J

    2015-06-01

    Recent reports on caffeine intakes in the United States have highlighted the importance of obtaining accurate and valid measures of caffeine exposure. The objective of this study is to compare two methods of assigning caffeine values to beverages: brand-specific values versus an aggregate single value representing a broader range of products within a beverage category (i.e., category-specific). The two methods yielded some small, but statistically significant differences in the estimation of caffeine intake from coffee, tea, and carbonated soft drinks (CSDs) for all ages combined and within several of the adult age groups (i.e., 35-49, 50-64, and ≥65 years). These differences, while small, suggest that detailed brand-specific data, particularly for CSDs, commercially pre-packaged or bottled teas, coffee, and specialty coffee drinks, provide more accurate estimates of caffeine exposure for some age groups. Despite these differences, these data provide some assurance that studies using a single aggregate caffeine value provide reasonable measures of caffeine exposure, particularly for studies conducted over a decade ago when there were fewer caffeinated products and brand-specific data available. As the caffeinated beverage marketplace continues to evolve, the use of more detailed, brand-specific data will likely strengthen the assessment of caffeine exposure in the United States. PMID:25818465

  10. Lack of specific association between panicogenic properties of caffeine and HPA-axis activation. A placebo-controlled study of caffeine challenge in patients with panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masdrakis, Vasilios G; Markianos, Manolis; Oulis, Panagiotis

    2015-09-30

    A subgroup of patients with Panic Disorder (PD) exhibits increased sensitivity to caffeine administration. However, the association between caffeine-induced panic attacks and post-caffeine hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis activation in PD patients remains unclear. In a randomized, double-blind, cross-over experiment, 19 PD patients underwent a 400-mg caffeine-challenge and a placebo-challenge, both administered in the form of instant coffee. Plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) were assessed at both baseline and post-challenge. No patient panicked after placebo-challenge, while nine patients (47.3%) panicked after caffeine-challenge. Placebo administration did not result in any significant change in hormones' plasma levels. Overall, sample's patients demonstrated significant increases in ACTH, cortisol, and DHEAS plasma levels after caffeine administration. However, post-caffeine panickers and non-panickers did not differ with respect to the magnitude of the increases. Our results indicate that in PD patients, caffeine-induced panic attacks are not specifically associated with HPA-axis activation, as this is reflected in post-caffeine increases in ACTH, cortisol and DHEAS plasma levels, suggesting that caffeine-induced panic attacks in PD patients are not specifically mediated by the biological processes underlying fear or stress. More generally, our results add to the evidence that HPA-axis activation is not a specific characteristic of panic. PMID:26243374

  11. Adolescent Caffeine Consumption and Self-Reported Violence and Conduct Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjansson, Alfgeir L.; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Frost, Stephanie S.; James, Jack E.

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive substance in the world and currently the only one legally available to children and adolescents. The sale and use of caffeinated beverages has increased markedly among adolescents during the last decade. However, research on caffeine use and behaviors among adolescents is scarce. We investigate the…

  12. Acute Caffeine Consumption Enhances the Executive Control of Visual Attention in Habitual Consumers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunye, Tad T.; Mahoney, Caroline R.; Lieberman, Harris R.; Giles, Grace E.; Taylor, Holly A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent work suggests that a dose of 200-400mg caffeine can enhance both vigilance and the executive control of visual attention in individuals with low caffeine consumption profiles. The present study seeks to determine whether individuals with relatively high caffeine consumption profiles would show similar advantages. To this end, we examined…

  13. The buzz on caffeine in invertebrates: effects on behavior and molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustard, Julie A

    2014-04-01

    A number of recent studies from as diverse fields as plant-pollinator interactions, analyses of caffeine as an environmental pollutant, and the ability of caffeine to provide protection against neurodegenerative diseases have generated interest in understanding the actions of caffeine in invertebrates. This review summarizes what is currently known about the effects of caffeine on behavior and its molecular mechanisms in invertebrates. Caffeine appears to have similar effects on locomotion and sleep in both invertebrates and mammals. Furthermore, as in mammals, caffeine appears to have complex effects on learning and memory. However, the underlying mechanisms for these effects may differ between invertebrates and vertebrates. While caffeine's ability to cause release of intracellular calcium stores via ryanodine receptors and its actions as a phosphodiesterase inhibitor have been clearly established in invertebrates, its ability to interact with invertebrate adenosine receptors remains an important open question. Initial studies in insects and mollusks suggest an interaction between caffeine and the dopamine signaling pathway; more work needs to be done to understand the mechanisms by which caffeine influences signaling via biogenic amines. As of yet, little is known about whether other actions of caffeine in vertebrates, such as its effects on GABAA and glycine receptors, are conserved. Furthermore, the pharmacokinetics of caffeine remains to be elucidated. Overall behavioral responses to caffeine appear to be conserved amongst organisms; however, we are just beginning to understand the mechanisms underlying its effects across animal phyla. PMID:24162934

  14. [Self-rated Caffeine Sensitivity: Implications for Personalized Sleep Medicine?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landolt, Hans Peter

    2016-05-11

    The prevalence of the insomnia syndrome and the effects of caffeine on sleep are in part genetically determined. Pharmacogenetic studies in humans demonstrate that functional polymorphisms of the genes encoding adenosine A2A receptors and dopamine transporters contribute to individual differences in impaired sleep quality by caffeine. The A2A receptor and dopamine transporter are preferentially expressed in the striatum. Together, these observations suggest that the striatum plays an important role in sleep-wake regulation. Individual caffeine sensitivity and A2A receptor genotype should be taken into account in the development of possible novel adenosine-based pharmacotherapies of sleep-wake disorders and neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. This may permit the prediction of individual drug effects and improve the reliability of clinical trials. PMID:27167478

  15. Caffeine Markedly Enhanced Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Erkang; WU Lijun

    2009-01-01

    A bstract In this paper it is shown that incubation with 2 mM caffeine enhanced significantly the MN (micronucleus) formation in both the 1 cGy a-particle irradiated and non-irradiated by- stander regions. Moreover, caffeine treatment made the non-irradiated bystander cells more sensi- tive to damage signals. Treated by c-PTIO(2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-imidazoline- 1-oxyl-3-oxide), a nitric oxide (NO) scavenger, the MN frequencies were effectively inhibited, showing that nitric oxide might be very important in mediating the enhanced damage. These results indicated that caffeine enhanced the low dose a-particle radiation-induced damage in ir- radiated and non-irradiated bystander regions, and therefore it is important to investigate the relationship between the radiosensitizer and radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE).

  16. Spontaneous Abortion and a Diet Drug Containing Caffeine and Ephedrine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howards, Penelope P; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Bech, Bodil H;

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medications may be consumed periconceptionally before a woman knows she is pregnant. In this study, the authors evaluate the association of a prescription diet drug (Letigen) containing ephedrine (20 mg) and caffeine (200 mg) with spontaneous abortion (SAB) in the Danish National Birth...... pregnancy Letigen use on SAB. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The estimated maternal age-adjusted hazard ratio for SAB was 1.1 (95% confidence interval 0.8-1.6) for any periconceptional Letigen use compared to no periconceptional use. CONCLUSIONS: Although Letigen has high levels of caffeine (the recommended 3 pills....../day are approximately equivalent to caffeine from 6 cups of coffee), periconceptional use does not appear to be associated with an appreciably increased hazard of clinically recognized SAB....

  17. Absorption of caffeine in fermented Pu-er tea is inhibited in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ye-wei; Xu, Huan-huan; Wang, Su-min; Zhao, Yi; Huang, Yu-min; Li, Run-bo; Wang, Xuan-jun; Hao, Shu-mei; Sheng, Jun

    2014-07-25

    Caffeine is present in a number of dietary sources consumed worldwide. Although its pharmacokinetics has been intensively explored, little is known about complexed caffeine (C-CAF) in aqueous extraction of fermented Pu-er tea. The major components of C-CAF are oxidative tea polyphenols (OTP) and caffeine. Furthermore, the C-CAF can be precipitated in low pH solution. After administering the same amount of total caffeine and comparing the peak level of plasma caffeine with the coffee (contains 0.11 ± 0.01% C-CAF) group, the results showed that the caffeine/OTP (contains 66.67 ± 0.02% C-CAF) group and the instant Pu-er tea (contains 23.18 ± 0.02% C-CAF) group were 33.39% and 25.86% lower, respectively. The concentration of the metabolites of caffeine supports the idea that the absorption of the C-CAF was inhibited in mice. Congruent with this result, the amount of caffeine detected in mice excrement showed that more caffeine was eliminated in the caffeine/OTP group and the Pu-er tea group. The locomotor activity tests of mice demonstrated that the stimulating effect of caffeine in caffeine/OTP and Pu-er tea was weaker than in coffee. Our findings demonstrate that caffeine can be combined with OTP and the absorption of C-CAF is inhibited in mice, thus decreasing the irritation effect of caffeine. This may also be developed as a slow release formulation of caffeine. PMID:24836454

  18. Online Activity Levels Are Related to Caffeine Dependency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, James G; Landhuis, C Erik; Shepherd, Daniel; Ogeil, Rowan P

    2016-05-01

    Online activity could serve in the future as behavioral markers of emotional states for computer systems (i.e., affective computing). Hence, this study considered relationships between self-reported stimulant use and online study patterns. Sixty-two undergraduate psychology students estimated their daily caffeine use, and this was related to study patterns as tracked by their use of a Learning Management System (Blackboard). Caffeine dependency was associated with less time spent online, lower rates of file access, and fewer online activities completed. Reduced breadth or depth of processing during work/study could be used as a behavioral marker of stimulant use. PMID:27096737

  19. Caffeine, cyclic AMP and postreplication repair of mammalian DNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The methylxanthines, caffeine and theophylline, inhibit postreplication repair of DNA in mammalian cells. Because they also inhibit cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase, it was thought that there might be some connection between concentrations of cyclic AMP and postreplication repair. This possibility was tested by performing DNA sedimentation experiments with a cyclic AMP-resistant mouse lymphoma cell mutant and its wild-type counterpart. The results show that there is no connection between cellular cyclic AMP concentrations and the rate of postreplication repair. Therefore, it is more likely that caffeine and theophylline inhibit postreplication repair by some other means, such as by binding to DNA

  20. Effect of coffee (caffeine) against human cataract blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Shambhu D

    2016-01-01

    Previous biochemical and morphological studies with animal experiments have demonstrated that caffeine given topically or orally to certain experimental animal models has significant inhibitory effect on cataract formation. The present studies were undertaken to examine if there is a correlation between coffee drinking and incidence of cataract blindness in human beings. That has been found to be the case. Incidence of cataract blindness was found to be significantly lower in groups consuming higher amounts of coffee in comparison to the groups with lower coffee intake. Mechanistically, the caffeine effect could be multifactorial, involving its antioxidant as well as its bioenergetic effects on the lens. PMID:26869755

  1. The effects of catechin rich teas and caffeine on energy expenditure and fat oxidation: a meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Different outcomes of the effect of catechin-caffeine mixtures and caffeine-only supplementation on energy expenditure and fat oxidation have been reported in short-term studies. Therefore, a meta-analysis was conducted to elucidate whether catechin-caffeine mixtures and caffeine-only supplementatio...

  2. Action of Caffeine as an Amyloid Inhibitor in the Aggregation of Aβ16-22 Peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bhanita; Paul, Sandip

    2016-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused due to aggregation of Aβ peptides in the brain tissues. Recently, several studies on AD transgenic mice have shown the effect of caffeine in significantly reducing the Aβ amyloid level in their brains. However, the mechanism and mode of caffeine action on amyloid aggregation are not known. Therefore, in this study, we have carried out molecular dynamics simulations of five amyloid-forming Aβ16-22 peptides in pure water and in a regime of caffeine solutions, with different caffeine/peptide stoichiometric ratios. The secondary structure analyses of peptides in pure water show the formation of β-sheet conformations, whereas on addition of caffeine, these ordered conformations become negligible. The radial distribution function, contact map, nonbonding interaction energy, hydrogen bonding, potential of mean force, and hydration analyses show that there is less interpeptide interaction in the presence of caffeine, and the effect is greater with an increasing caffeine ratio. The interaction of aromatic phenylalanine residues of peptides with caffeine restricts the interpeptide interaction tendency. Upon increasing the number of caffeine molecules, interaction of caffeine with other hydrophobic residues also increases. Thus, the hydrophobic core-recognition motif of amyloid formation of peptides is physically blocked by caffeine, thereby abolishing the self-assembly formation. PMID:27487451

  3. Oxidation of caffeine by phosphate radical anion in aqueous solution under anoxic conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maram Ravi Kumar; Mundra Adinarayana

    2000-10-01

    The photooxidation of caffeine in presence of peroxydiphosphate (PDP) in aqueous solution at natural H (∼7 5) has been carried out in a quantum yield reactor using a high-pressure mercury lamp. The reactions were followed spectrophotometrically by measuring the absorbance of caffeine at max (272 nm). The rates of reaction were calculated under different experimental conditions. The quantum yields were calculated from the rates of oxidation of caffeine and the intensity of light at 254 nm which was measured by using peroxydisulphate solution as a standard chemical actinometer. The reaction rates of oxidation of caffeine by PDP increase with increase in [PDP] as well as with increase in light intensity, while they are independent of [caffeine]. The quantum yields of oxidation of caffeine by PDP are independent of [PDP] as well as light intensity. However, quantum yields of oxidation of caffeine by PDP increase with increase in caffeine concentration. On the basis of these experimental results and product analysis, a probable mechanism has been suggested in which PDP is activated to phosphate radical anions (PO$_{4}^{\\bullet 2-}$) by direct photolysis of PDP and also by the sensitizing effect of caffeine. The phosphate radical anions thus produced react with caffeine by electron transfer reaction, resulting in the formation of caffeine radical cation, which deprotonates in a fast step to produce C8OH adduct radicals. These radicals might react with PDP to give final product 1,3,7-trimethyluric acid and PO$_{4}^{\\bullet 2-}$ radicals, the latter propagates the chain reaction.

  4. Relationship of chromosomal damage induced by caffeine to growth temperature and ATP level in proliferating cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, P; Mingo, R; González-Fernández, A; López-Sáez, J F

    1986-10-01

    Caffeine is known to induce chromosomal aberrations in proliferating cells when they are incubated during G2 and mitotic prophase. In the present paper, this caffeine effect has been analyzed in Allium cepa root meristems growing at different culture temperatures under steady-state kinetics. Caffeine (1-10 mM) induces chromosomal aberrations in a dose-dependent manner, and the treatment efficiency correlates linearly with the square of caffeine concentration. The efficiency of caffeine incubations, within the range 5-25 degrees C during equivalent cycle time periods has also been studied. It has been found that the lower the culture temperature, the higher the level of chromosomal aberrations. Moreover, at different temperatures, the level of chromosomal aberrations is a simple function of caffeine concentration and the ATP level. Therefore, the efficiency of caffeine treatment appears to be determined by some interaction between caffeine concentration and cellular ATP level. Our present results demonstrate that the influence of growth temperature on the chromosome-breaking effect of caffeine can be, at least partially, explained by the ATP levels during the incubation periods. In short, under different kinetics of plant cell proliferation, the ATP level, and/or something correlating with it, could explain the efficiency of caffeine in inducing chromosomal aberrations: the lower the ATP level, the higher the caffeine efficiency. PMID:3773927

  5. Role of state-dependent learning in the cognitive effects of caffeine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanday, Leandro; Zanin, Karina A; Patti, Camilla L; Fernandes-Santos, Luciano; Oliveira, Larissa C; Longo, Beatriz M; Andersen, Monica L; Tufik, Sergio; Frussa-Filho, Roberto

    2013-08-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive substance in the world and it is generally believed that it promotes beneficial effects on cognitive performance. However, there is also evidence suggesting that caffeine has inhibitory effects on learning and memory. Considering that caffeine may have anxiogenic effects, thus changing the emotional state of the subjects, state-dependent learning may play a role in caffeine-induced cognitive alterations. Mice were administered 20 mg/kg caffeine before training and/or before testing both in the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task (an animal model that concomitantly evaluates learning, memory, anxiety-like behaviour and general activity) and in the inhibitory avoidance task, a classic paradigm for evaluating memory in rodents. Pre-training caffeine administration did not modify learning, but produced an anxiogenic effect and impaired memory retention. While pre-test administration of caffeine did not modify retrieval on its own, the pre-test administration counteracted the memory deficit induced by the pre-training caffeine injection in both the plus-maze discriminative and inhibitory avoidance tasks. Our data demonstrate that caffeine-induced memory deficits are critically related to state-dependent learning, reinforcing the importance of considering the participation of state-dependency on the interpretation of the cognitive effects of caffeine. The possible participation of caffeine-induced anxiety alterations in state-dependent memory deficits is discussed. PMID:23363704

  6. Effects of caffeine on DNA repair of UV-irradiated Dictyostelium discoideum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffeine enhances the UV-killing of amoeboid cells of NC-4, but UV-irradiated γs-13 is insensitive to caffeine. UV-irradiated NC-4 becomes insensitive to the effect of caffeine during a postirradiation incubation in buffer for about 90 min, but γs-13 remains unchanged in the sensitivity to caffeine throughout the incubation for 180 min. Amoeboid cells of γs-13 can remove pyrimidine dimers as well as NC-4 even in the presence of caffeine. Caffeine inhibits rejoining of strand-breaks of DNA in UV-irradiated NC-4, but the rejoining in γs-13 is insensitive to caffeine. (author)

  7. Caffeine as a repair inhibitor and its action on the normal cell cycle in protozoa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffeine has been demonstrated to inhibit repair of ionizing radiation damage, UV, and chemical DNA damage. The mechanism of caffeine action is not completely established at the present time but it has been clearly demonstrated that excision repair is inhibited in prokaryotes. The levels of caffeine which inhibit DNA repair are well tolerated by unirradiated organisms but radiation might impose an extra stress which would cause the irradiated organism to die from the normal caffeine sensitive function. The authors have tested synchronized protozoans at various times in the growth cycle for caffeine sensitivity. They infer sensitivity by the measured disruption of the normal growth cycle induced by a pulse treatment with lethal levels of caffeine. Some parts (G1) of the cell cycle show little sensitivity while late cycle (late S) may be quite sensitive. The relationship of cyclic caffeine sensitivity to repair inhibition is not obvious

  8. Study of Caffein - Catechin Association in Lyophilized Fresh Seeds and in Stabilized Extract of Cola nitida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maillard, C; Babadjamian, A; Balansard, G; Ollivier, B; Bamba, D

    1985-12-01

    Caffein-catechin association has been demonstrated in lyophilized fresh seeds and in stabilized extract of COLA NITIDA (Vent.) A. Chev. by using various analytical techniques which have made it possible to determine specifically the concentrations of free caffein versus associated caffein. Associated caffein varies from 0% in dried seeds to 91% in lyophilized fresh seeds and in stabilized extract of COLA. It was possible to simulate these quantitative variations of associated caffein by using an experimental model with a saturated aqueous solution of caffein and various amounts of catechin. Infrared spectrophotometric studies have shown the hydrogen bond type of the association. The differences of pharmacological effects of fresh and dried seeds may be due to the varying concentrations of associated and free caffein. PMID:17345274

  9. The influence of caffeine on sustained attention : An ERP study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorist, MM; Snel, J; De Ruiter, MB; Ruijter, J

    2000-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of caffeine on sustained attention by measuring concentration and fatigue. Event-related potentials (ERPs) and behavioral measures were recorded from 12 participants who worked continuously for approximately 10 min in a self-paced reaction task under condit

  10. The Determination of Caffeine in Coffee: Sense or Nonsense?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, Jozef L.

    2004-01-01

    The presence of caffeine in coffee is determined by the use of separation devices and UV-vis spectrophotometry. The results indicate that the use of various analytical tools helps to perceive the higher concentration values obtained through UV-vis spectrophotometry than with separation methods.

  11. Effect of caffeine on target detection and rifle marksmanship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillingham, R; Keefe, A A; Keillor, J; Tikuisis, P

    2003-12-15

    Thirteen healthy and rifle-trained male military reservists performed shooting sessions on two separate occasions 1 h following the ingestion of placebo or 300 mg of caffeine. Shooting included both friend-foe (FF) and vigilance (VIG) tasks, and were performed in the following order: two FF sequences (4 min each), four VIG sequences (30 min each), and two additional FF sequences. The shooting sessions lasted approximately 2.5 h under outdoor conditions (air temperature range from - 3 to 14 degrees C) and were held 48 h apart in a counter-balanced order. Performance measures during the shooting session included engagement time, friend-foe discrimination, and marksmanship accuracy and precision. Assessments of thermal comfort, tiredness, and debilitating symptoms preceded and followed the shooting session, while a self-assessment on performance was administered post-shooting only. Blood was sampled immediately prior to the beginning of the shooting session and was used to determine plasma caffeine, cortisol, and testosterone levels. Engagement times were faster and certain measures of accuracy and precision were impaired during the later FF and VIG sequences. However, caffeine ingestion had no affect upon any of the marksmanship measures, although it did alleviate cold stress and tiredness. That caffeine ingestion did not affect target detection and rifle marksmanship is a finding that differs from other studies, and is explained by a beneficial arousal caused by the mild level of cold stress experienced by the participants. PMID:14668172

  12. Severe acute caffeine poisoning due to intradermal injections: Mesotherapy hazard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perković-Vukčević Nataša

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Caffeine is indicated in the treatment of migraine headaches, as well as neonatal apnea and bradycardia syndrome. In mild poisoning, the most prevalent symptoms are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, tremor, anxiety and headache. In more severe cases, symptoms consist of heart rythym abnormalities, myocardial infarction and seizures. Due to its common lipolytic effect, caffeine is used in mesotherapy, usually in combination with drugs of similar effect. We presented a patient with acute iatrogenic caffeine poisoning. Case report. A 51-year-old woman, with preexisting hypertension and hypertensive cardiomyopathy was subjected to cosmetic treatment in order to remove fat by intradermal caffeine injections. During the treatment the patient felt sickness, an urge to vomit, and a pronounced deterioration of general condition. Upon examination, the patient exhibited somnolence, hypotension and nonsustained ventricular tachycardia, which was sufficient enough evidence for further hospitalization. On admission to the intensive care unit the patient was anxious with increased heart rate, normotensive, with cold, damp skin, and visible traces of injection sites with surrounding hematomas on the anterior abdominal wall. Paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT on electrocardiographic monitoring was found. The laboratory analysis determined a lowered potassium level of 2.1 mmol/L (normal range 3,5 - 5.2 mmol/L, and a toxicological analysis (liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection proved a toxic concentration of caffeine in plasma - 85.03 mg/L (toxic concentration over 25 mg/L. On application of intensive therapy, antiarrhythmics, and substitution of potassium, as well as both symptomatic and supportive therapy, there was a significant recovery. The patient was discharged without any sequele within four days. Conclusion. A presented rare iatrogenic acute caffeine poisoning occured due to massive absorption of caffeine from the

  13. Effects of caffeine ingestion on metabolism and exercise performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costill, D L; Dalsky, G P; Fink, W J

    1978-01-01

    In an effort to assess the effects of caffeine ingestion on metabolism and performance during prolonged exercise, nine competitive cyclists (two females and seven males) exercised until exhaustion on a bicycle ergometer at 80% of Vo2 max. One trial was performed an hour after ingesting decaffeinated coffee (Trial D), while a second trial (C) required that each subject consume coffee containing 330 mg of caffeine 60 min before the exercise. Following the ingestion of caffeine (Trial C), the subjects were able to perform an average of 90.2 (SE +/- 7.2) min of cycling as compared to an average of 75.5 (SE +/- 5.1) min in the D Trial. Measurements of plasma free fatty acids, glycerol and respiratory exchange ratios evidenced a greater rate of lipid metabolism during the caffeine trial as compared to the decaffeinated exercise treatment. Calculations of carbohydrate (CHO) metabolism from respiratory exchange data revealed that the subjects oxidized roughly 240 g of CHO in both trials. Fat oxidation, however, was significantly higher (P less than 0.05) during the C Trial (118 g or 1.31 g/min) than in the D Trial (57 g or 0.75 g/min). On the average the participants rated (Perceived Exertion Scale) their effort during the C Trial to be significantly (P less than 0.05) easier than the demands of the D treatment. Thus, the enhanced endurance performance observed in the C Trial was likely the combined effects of caffeine on lipolysis and its positive influence on nerve impulse transmission. PMID:723503

  14. Adolescent caffeine consumption increases adulthood anxiety-related behavior and modifies neuroendocrine signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Casey E; Newsom, Ryan J; Stafford, Jacob; Scott, Talia; Archuleta, Solana; Levis, Sophia C; Spencer, Robert L; Campeau, Serge; Bachtell, Ryan K

    2016-05-01

    Caffeine is a commonly used psychoactive substance and consumption by children and adolescents continues to rise. Here, we examine the lasting effects of adolescent caffeine consumption on anxiety-related behaviors and several neuroendocrine measures in adulthood. Adolescent male Sprague-Dawley rats consumed caffeine (0.3g/L) for 28 consecutive days from postnatal day 28 (P28) to P55. Age-matched control rats consumed water. Behavioral testing for anxiety-related behavior began in adulthood (P62) 7 days after removal of caffeine. Adolescent caffeine consumption enhanced anxiety-related behavior in an open field, social interaction test, and elevated plus maze. Similar caffeine consumption in adult rats did not alter anxiety-related behavior after caffeine removal. Characterization of neuroendocrine measures was next assessed to determine whether the changes in anxiety were associated with modifications in the HPA axis. Blood plasma levels of corticosterone (CORT) were assessed throughout the caffeine consumption procedure in adolescent rats. Adolescent caffeine consumption elevated plasma CORT 24h after initiation of caffeine consumption that normalized over the course of the 28-day consumption procedure. CORT levels were also elevated 24h after caffeine removal and remained elevated for 7 days. Despite elevated basal CORT in adult rats that consumed caffeine during adolescence, the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and CORT response to placement on an elevated pedestal (a mild stressor) was significantly blunted. Lastly, we assessed changes in basal and stress-induced c-fos and corticotropin-releasing factor (Crf) mRNA expression in brain tissue collected at 7 days withdrawal from adolescent caffeine. Adolescent caffeine consumption increased basal c-fos mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. Adolescent caffeine consumption had no other effects on the basal or stress-induced c-fos mRNA changes. Caffeine consumption during adolescence increased

  15. No effect of caffeine on exercise performance in high ambient temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelands, Bart; Buyse, Luk; Pauwels, Frank; Delbeke, Frans; Deventer, Koen; Meeusen, Romain

    2011-12-01

    Caffeine, an adenosine receptor antagonist, has shown to improve performance in normal ambient temperature, presumably via an effect on dopaminergic neurotransmission through the antagonism of adenosine receptors. However, there is very limited evidence from studies that administered caffeine and examined its effects on exercise in the heat. Therefore, we wanted to study the effects of caffeine on performance and thermoregulation in high ambient temperature. Eight healthy trained male cyclists completed two experimental trials (in 30°C) in a double-blind-randomized crossover design. Subjects ingested either placebo (6 mg/kg) or caffeine (6 mg/kg) 1 h prior to exercise. Subjects cycled for 60 min at 55% W (max), immediately followed by a time trial to measure performance. The significance level was set at p endorphin plasma concentrations at the end of the time trial (p = 0.032). The present study showed no ergogenic effect of caffeine when administered 1 h before exercise in 30°C. This confirms results from a previous study that examined the effects of caffeine administration on a short (15 min) time trial in 40°C. However, caffeine increased core temperature during exercise. Presumably, the rate of increase in core temperature may have counteracted the ergogenic effects of caffeine. However, other factors such as interindividual differences in response to caffeine and changes in neurotransmitter concentrations might also be responsible for the lack of performance improvement of caffeine in high ambient temperature. PMID:21461761

  16. Caffeine intake antagonizes salt sensitive hypertension through improvement of renal sodium handling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hao; Yang, Tao; Gao, Peng; Wei, Xing; Zhang, Hexuan; Xiong, Shiqiang; Lu, Zongshi; Li, Li; Wei, Xiao; Chen, Jing; Zhao, Yu; Arendshorst, William J; Shang, Qianhui; Liu, Daoyan; Zhu, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    High salt intake is a major risk factor for hypertension. Although acute caffeine intake produces moderate diuresis and natriuresis, caffeine increases the blood pressure (BP) through activating sympathetic activity. However, the long-term effects of caffeine on urinary sodium excretion and blood pressure are rarely investigated. Here, we investigated whether chronic caffeine administration antagonizes salt sensitive hypertension by promoting urinary sodium excretion. Dahl salt-sensitive (Dahl-S) rats were fed with high salt diet with or without 0.1% caffeine in drinking water for 15 days. The BP, heart rate and locomotor activity of rats was analyzed and urinary sodium excretion was determined. The renal epithelial Na(+) channel (ENaC) expression and function were measured by in vivo and in vitro experiments. Chronic consumption of caffeine attenuates hypertension induced by high salt without affecting sympathetic nerve activity in Dahl-S rats. The renal α-ENaC expression and ENaC activity of rats decreased after chronic caffeine administration. Caffeine increased phosphorylation of AMPK and decrease α-ENaC expression in cortical collecting duct cells. Inhibiting AMPK abolished the effect of caffeine on α-ENaC. Chronic caffeine intake prevented the development of salt-sensitive hypertension through promoting urinary sodium excretion, which was associated with activation of renal AMPK and inhibition of renal tubular ENaC. PMID:27173481

  17. Caffeine Consuming Children and Adolescents Show Altered Sleep Behavior and Deep Sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrina Aepli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is the most commonly ingested psychoactive drug worldwide with increasing consumption rates among young individuals. While caffeine leads to decreased sleep quality in adults, studies investigating how caffeine consumption affects children’s and adolescents’ sleep remain scarce. We explored the effects of regular caffeine consumption on sleep behavior and the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG in children and adolescents (10–16 years. While later habitual bedtimes (Caffeine 23:14 ± 11.4, Controls 22:17 ± 15.4 and less time in bed were found in caffeine consumers compared to the control group (Caffeine 08:10 ± 13.3, Controls 09:03 ± 16.1, morning tiredness was unaffected. Furthermore, caffeine consumers exhibited reduced sleep EEG slow-wave activity (SWA, 1–4.5 Hz at the beginning of the night compared to controls (20% ± 9% average reduction across all electrodes and subjects. Comparable reductions were found for alpha activity (8.25–9.75 Hz. These effects, however, disappeared in the morning hours. Our findings suggest that caffeine consumption in adolescents may lead to later bedtimes and reduced SWA, a well-established marker of sleep depth. Because deep sleep is involved in recovery processes during sleep, further research is needed to understand whether a caffeine-induced loss of sleep depth interacts with neuronal network refinement processes that occur during the sensitive period of adolescent development.

  18. Maternal caffeine exposure alters neuromotor development and hippocampus acetylcholinesterase activity in rat offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Ana Claudia; Souza, Andressa; Medeiros, Liciane Fernandes; De Oliveira, Carla; Scarabelot, Vanessa Leal; Da Silva, Rosane Souza; Bogo, Mauricio Reis; Capiotti, Katiucia Marques; Kist, Luiza Wilges; Bonan, Carla D; Caumo, Wolnei; Torres, Iraci L S

    2015-01-21

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of maternal caffeine intake on the neuromotor development of rat offspring and on acetylcholine degradation and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) expression in the hippocampus of 14-day-old infant rats. Rat dams were treated with caffeine (0.3g/L) throughout gestation and lactation until the pups were 14 days old. The pups were divided into three groups: (1) control, (2) caffeine, and (3) washout caffeine. The washout group received a caffeine solution until the seventh postnatal day (P7). Righting reflex (RR) and negative geotaxis (NG) were assessed to evaluate postural parameters as an index of neuromotor reflexes. An open-field (OF) test was conducted to assess locomotor and exploratory activities as well as anxiety-like behaviors. Caffeine treatment increased both RR and NG latency times. In the OF test, the caffeine group had fewer outer crossings and reduced locomotion compared to control, while the washout group showed increased inner crossings in relation to the other groups and fewer rearings only in comparison to the control group. We found decreased AChE activity in the caffeine group compared to the other groups, with no alteration in AChE transcriptional regulation. Chronic maternal exposure to caffeine promotes important alterations in neuromotor development. These results highlight the ability of maternal caffeine intake to interfere with cholinergic neurotransmission during brain development. PMID:25451122

  19. Complex interactions of caffeine and its structural analogs with ultraviolet light in cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We measured the clonogenic survival response of cultured mouse 10 Tsup(1/2) cells exposed to UV light and caffeine post-treatment. When 0.5 and 1 mM caffeine were present for 24 h immediately following UV, the D0 values of the biphasic survival curves suggest that one subpopulation was sensitized and one subpopulation was protected from killing by UV light. A cloned survivor from the radioprotected subpopulation responded to UV plus caffeine in identical manner as the parent cells. When the caffeine exposure was prolonged to 48 h, only the radiosensitizing effect was observed. Two demethylated analogs of caffeine were also tested. The response of 10 Tsup(1/2) cells to 1 mM theophylline present for 24 h after UV irradiation was approximately the same as that for the same treatment with 1 mM caffeine. However, prolonging the theophylline exposure to 48 h failed to produce the same kind of potentiation of cell killing as that observed for caffeine. Xanthine by itself was a toxic to 10 Tsup(1/2) cells as caffeine, but had no synergistic effect as caffeine when given to UV-irradiated cells for 24 or 48 h. It is therefore unlikely that all the effects of caffeine on UV-irradiated cells are mediated by its demethylated metabolites. (orig.)

  20. Sustained-release of caffeine from a polymeric tablet matrix: An in vitro and pharmacokinetic study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffeine is utilized as a stimulant to impart a desired level of alertness during certain working hours. Usually, a single dose of caffeine induces 2-3 h of alertness coupled with side effects whereas a longer effect of 8-12 h is very useful for both daily life and military action. Thus, there is a need to deliver the stimulant continuously to an individual at one time to impart an increased level of alertness for the period stated after administration. This study aimed to design a polymeric microparticle system for sustained delivery of caffeine using a polymeric matrix. Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) was used as the erodible matrix material and the caffeine polymeric tablets were fabricated by compression using a Graseby Specac hydraulic press. In vitro release profiles as well as the pharmacokinetics studies data were obtained. Caffeine tablets fabricated using various polymers showed a high initial burst release type profile as compared to the caffeine-PEO-tablet. The PK studies showed sustained delivery of caffeine resulted in two expected phenomena: a reduction in the initial high rate of caffeine release (burst release) as well as a reduction in the change in caffeine concentration in the systemic circulation. A simple two-component system for sustained-release caffeine formulation therefore has been achieved

  1. The synergistic effects of radiation and caffeine on embryonic development in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combined action of radiation with caffeine has been studied in mouse embryos. Radiation and/or caffeine were administered to ICR mice on day 7 of gestation, at which time the embryos were in the early stage of organogenesis. Intrauterine death, gross malformation, body weight and sex ratio were selected as indicators of effects. Doses of gamma irradiation were 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 Gy and those of caffeine were 0.10 and 0.25 mg/g of body weight. Intrauterine mortality increased with increasing radiation dose and this trend was more remarkable in combination with caffeine. The malformation such as parietal hernia, exencephalia, hydrocephalia and cleft palate appeared frequently in the fetuses treated with both radiation and caffeine compared to the fetuses treated with each agent separately. Fetal body weight was a sensitive indicator of the effects on growth retardation of radiation and/or caffeine. The sex ratio of live fetuses did not change by means of treatment with radiation and/or caffeine. Intrauterine mortality and frequency of malformations in mice treated with both radiation and caffeine were higher than the sum of those induced by radiation and those by caffeine separately. The results demonstrated that the combined effects of radiation and caffeine were synergistic. (author)

  2. Trends and patterns of caffeine consumption among US teenagers and young adults, NHANES 2003-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, N L; Barraj, L M; Bi, X; Jack, M M

    2016-08-01

    Caffeine consumption among US teenagers (13-17y), young adults (18-24y) and adults (25-29y) for a 10 year period was examined using NHANES 2003-12. Of the 85% who consume caffeine 84% consume caffeinated beverages. This percentage remained constant despite new caffeine sources. Less than 7.1% of the population consume energy drinks. While mean caffeine intake among teenage caffeine consumers decreased from 62 to 55 mg/day (p-value = 0.018) over the 10-year period, no discernable trend was observed for other age groups. Caffeine intake from energy drinks increased, and was only statistically significant for age 18-24y accounting for <9% of total caffeine intake. Mean caffeine intake per consumption occasion was equivalent between coffee and energy drinks for teenagers and young adults. During a 30-min period mean caffeine consumption was similar when an energy drink was the only consumption event or when it occurred with other caffeinated beverage products suggestive of a substitution effect. Linear regression models of caffeine intake from energy drinks against caffeine from coffee, tea and soda among energy drink consumers in the upper 50th percentile shows a statistically significant inverse relationship (R2 = 28%, coffee: β = -0.35, p < 0.001; tea: β = -0.44, p < 0.001; soda: β = -0.22, p = 0.036) and further supports the substitution concept. PMID:27288929

  3. Effects of caffeine on X-irradiated synchronous, asynchronous and plateau phase mouse ascites cells: the importance of progression through the cell cycle for caffeine enhancement of killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffeine potentiated the killing effect of X-rays on exponentially growing cells giving rise to exponential curves (D0=(0.8+-0.05)Gy) at 4mM and 14 hours treatment. Irradiated plateau phase cells were less sensitive. Exponentially growing cells also became less sensitive to the effects of caffeine when they were incubated in the conditioned medium of plateau phase cells(C-medium) in which cell growth was considerably inhibited. Low caffeine concentrations(2mM) enhanced X-ray induced killing of cells irradiated in G1-,G1/S- or S-phase, but more effectively G2-phase cells. High caffeine concentrations (6mM) enhanced killing of cells in all phases of the cell cycle. Incubation of synchronized populations in C-medium during treatment with caffeine (2mM and 6mM) resulted in less potentiation than in cells treated in fresh medium. The expression of X-ray induced potentially lethal damage caused by 6mM caffeine in cells irradiated in various phases resulted in an exponential survival curve with a mean lethal dose of (0.8+-0.05)Gy, but the time of caffeine treatment necessary to reach this curve was different for cells irradiated in different phases. PLD repair, measured as loss of sensitivity to 6mM caffeine (4 hours treatment) was of 1-2 hours duration. (author)

  4. Effect of the caffeine on treated and non-treated plasmid DNA with stannic chloride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffeine, a methilxantine drug is a component of coffee, tea, stimulants and other drinks. Caffeine inhibits phosphodiesterase leading to intracellular accumulation of cyclic AMP, blocks adenosine receptors, and increases the release of Ca2+. We have studied the possible effect of caffeine in DNA plasmid treated or not with stannous chloride (SnCl2). Previous evaluations of the effect of caffeine on the labeling of red blood cells and plasma proteins with technetium-99m have showed a decrease of % ATI in the insoluble fraction of plasma proteins. Samples of DNA were treated with SnCl2 (0 and 200μg/ml) in 0.8% agarose. SnCl2 has induced break on DNA and caffeine has not showed effect on the DNA. This indicates that caffeine does not eliminate the oxidant action of SnCl2 and does not promote break in isolated DNA plasmid. (author)

  5. Effect of caffeine on the ultraviolet light induction of SV40 virus from transformed hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of caffeine on the uv light induction of SV40 virus from two transformed hamster cell lines heterogeneous for the induction of infectious virus was studied. The amount of virus induced was significantly increased in both cell lines when exposure to uv light was followed by treatment with caffeine. Caffeine in the absence of uv irradiation did not stimulate virus induction, nor did it stimulate SV40 replication in a lytic infection. There was an apparent difference in the concentrations of caffeine which maximally stimulated SV40 virus induction in the two cell lines. This effect could not be explained by differences in cell survival after exposure to uv light and caffeine. Since caffeine is known to cause the accumulation of gaps formed in DNA during postreplication repair of uv-irradiated rodent cells, our results support the hypothesis that the formation of gaps or breaks in DNA is an important early step in virus induction

  6. Effect of caffeine on radiation-induced mitotic delay: delayed expression of G2 arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the presence of 5 mM caffeine, irradiated (1.5 Gy) S and G2 cells progressed to mitosis in register and without arrest in G2. Caffeine (5 mM) markedly reduced mitotic delay even after radiation doses up to 20 Gy. When caffeine was removed from irradiated (1.5 Gy) and caffeine-treated cells, a period of G2 arrest followed, similar in length to that produced by radiation alone. The arrest expressed was independent of the duration of the caffeine treatment for exposures up to 3 hr. The similarity of the response to the cited effects of caffeine on S-phase delay suggests a common basis for delay induction in S and G2 phases

  7. Caffeine elevates blood pressure response to exercise in mild hypertensive men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, B H; Lovallo, W R; Whitsett, T; Wilson, M F

    1995-12-01

    The present study examined the effects of caffeine on blood pressure (BP) regulation in hypertensive men during exercise. Twenty unmedicated, mild hypertensives (HT, BP = 140/90 to 160/105 mm Hg) and 12 age-matched, normotensives (NT, BP pressure products were significantly higher on caffeine days in HT at postdrug and during exercise. On caffeine day, 7 (39%) HT and 1 (8%) NT showed an excessive BP response (> 230 for systolic or > 120 for diastolic) during exercise. In conclusion, caffeine has significant hemodynamic effects on mild hypertensives at rest and during exercise. The increased rate-pressure products following caffeine during exercise place a greater workload on the heart, and abstinence from caffeine, especially before exercise, may be beneficial for persons with hypertension. PMID:8998252

  8. Caffeine and human cerebral blood flow: A positron emission tomography study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, O.G.; Modell, J.G.; Hariharan, M. (Univ. of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) was used to quantify the effect of caffeine on whole brain and regional cerebral blood flow (CBF) in humans. A mean dose of 250 mg of caffeine produced approximately a 30% decrease in whole brain CBF; regional differences in caffeine effect were not observed. Pre-caffeine CBF strongly influenced the magnitude of the caffeine-induced decrease. Caffeine decreased p{sub a}CO{sub 2} and increased systolic blood pressure significantly; the change in p{sub a}CO{sub 2} did not account for the change in CBF. Smaller increases in diastolic blood pressure, heart rate, plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine, and subjectively reported anxiety were also observed.

  9. Acute caffeine treatment increases extracellular nucleotide hydrolysis from rat striatal and hippocampal synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Rosane Souza; Bruno, Alessandra Nejar; Battastini, Ana Maria Oliveira; Sarkis, João José Freitas; Lara, Diogo Rizzato; Bonan, Carla Denise

    2003-08-01

    The psychostimulant caffeine promotes behavioral effects such as hyperlocomotion, anxiety, and disruption of sleep by blockade of adenosine receptors. The availability of extracellular adenosine depends on its release by transporters or by the extracellular ATP catabolism performed by the ecto-nucleotidase pathway. This study verified the effect of caffeine on NTPDase 1 (ATP diphosphohydrolase) and 5'-nucleotidase of synaptosomes from hippocampus and striatum of rats. Caffeine and theophylline tested in vitro were unable to modify nucleotide hydrolysis. Caffeine chronically administered in the drinking water at 0.3 g/L or 1 g/L for 14 days failed to affect nucleotide hydrolysis. However, acute administration of caffeine (30 mg/kg, i.p.) produced an enhancement of ATP (50%) and ADP (32%) hydrolysis in synaptosomes of hippocampus and striatum, respectively. This activation of ATP and ADP hydrolysis after acute treatment suggests a compensatory effect to increase adenosine levels and counteract the antagonist action of caffeine. PMID:12834266

  10. Effects of caffeine co-treatment with radiation on breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sensitizing effect of caffeine to carbon ion radiation was investigated and the change of BRCA1 expression was observed. The MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells were exposed to carbon ion beams with or without caffeine. The cell survival was automatically monitored by RT-CES system. Cell cycle distribution was assessed by flow cytometry. The levels of BRCA1 mRNA were analyzed by real-time RT-PCR.The expression of BRCA1 protein and its phosphorylation were examined by Western blot. The results show that caffeine increases the sensitivity of MCF-7 cells to carbon ion radiation, and abrogates the radiation-induced G2 arrest. Caffeine inhibits radiation-induced BRCA1 expression both at mRNA and protein level. At the same time, caffeine specifically abolishes BRCA1 phosphorylation of Ser-1524. The data implicate that caffeine inhibits the expression of BRCA1 protein and its phosphorylation. (authors)

  11. [Clinical research on improvement of glucose metabolic marker level by coffee drinking-validity of saliva caffeine concentration measurement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Tomoko; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kono, Suminori; Shimazoe, Takao

    2010-05-01

    We measured both serum and saliva caffeine concentration using HPLC and assessed the correlation between them in volunteers with mild obesity. Significant correlation was shown between saliva and serum caffeine concentration. It may be necessary to measure caffeine metabolite concentration because its metabolites may also have an improving effect of glucose metabolism. In summary, we found that saliva caffeine concentration measurement was useful to assess caffeine intake level. Moreover, it will be helpful to know whether caffeine has an improving effect of glucose metabolism. PMID:20460869

  12. Guarana Provides Additional Stimulation over Caffeine Alone in the Planarian Model

    OpenAIRE

    Moustakas, Dimitrios; Mezzio, Michael; Rodriguez, Branden R.; Constable, Mic Andre; Mulligan, Margaret E.; Voura, Evelyn B.

    2015-01-01

    The stimulant effect of energy drinks is primarily attributed to the caffeine they contain. Many energy drinks also contain other ingredients that might enhance the tonic effects of these caffeinated beverages. One of these additives is guarana. Guarana is a climbing plant native to the Amazon whose seeds contain approximately four times the amount of caffeine found in coffee beans. The mix of other natural chemicals contained in guarana seeds is thought to heighten the stimulant effects of g...

  13. Chronic caffeine exposure attenuates blast-induced memory deficit in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Lei Ning; Nan Yang; Xing Chen; Zi-Ai Zhao; Xiu-Zhu Zhang; Xing-Yun Chen; Ping Li

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effects of three different ways of chronic caffeine administration on blastinduced memory dysfunction and to explore the underlying mechanisms.Methods:Adult male C57BL/6 mice were used and randomly divided into five groups:control:without blast exposure,con-water:administrated with water continuously before and after blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI),con-caffeine:administrated with caffeine continuously for 1 month before and after bTBI,pre-caffeine:chronically administrated with caffeine for 1 month before bTBI and withdrawal after bTBI,post-caffeine:chronically administrated with caffeine after bTBI.After being subjected to moderate intensity of blast injury,mice were recorded for learning and memory performance using Morris water maze (MWM) paradigms at 1,4,and 8 weeks post-blast injury.Neurological deficit scoring,glutamate concentration,proinflammatory cytokines production,and neuropathological changes at 24 h,1,4,and 8 weeks post-bTBI were examined to evaluate the brain injury in early and prolonged stages.Adenosine A1 receptor expression was detected using qPCR.Results:All of the three ways of chronic caffeine exposure ameliorated blast-induced memory deficit,which is correlated with the neuroprotective effects against excitotoxicity,inflammation,astrogliosis and neuronal loss at different stages of injury.Continuous caffeine treatment played positive roles in both early and prolonged stages of bTBI;pre-bTBl and post-bTBl treatment of caffeine tended to exert neuroprotective effects at early and prolonged stages of bTBI respectively.Up-regulation of adenosine A1 receptor expression might contribute to the favorable effects of chronic caffeine consumption.Conclusion:Since caffeinated beverages are widely consumed in both civilian and military personnel and are convenient to get,the results may provide a promising prophylactic strategy for blast-induced neurotrauma and the consequent cognitive impairment.

  14. Consumption of dietary caffeine and coffee in physically active populations: physiological interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunnicliffe, Jasmine M; Erdman, Kelly Anne; Reimer, Raylene A; Lun, Victor; Shearer, Jane

    2008-12-01

    Caffeine is a proven ergogenic aid, increasing athletic performance, endurance, and mental chronometry at doses as low as 1-3 mg.kg-1. As coffee is a readily available and commonly ingested form of caffeine, the two are often equated. However, coffee also contains hundreds of other biologically active compounds, many of which are metabolically distinct from caffeine. The purpose of this review was to examine the prevalence of coffee and (or) caffeine consumption among elite Canadian athletes, and to delineate the effects of coffee and caffeine on physical activity, weight maintenance, performance, and metabolism. A total of 270 self-reported 3-day food records were examined for caffeine intake from athletes registered with Canadian Sport Centres in 2005 and 2006. Athletes ranged in age from 16-45 years, and competed in 38 different sports. Results showed that 30% of athletes ingested >1 mg.kg-1.day-1 from a variety of sources. Average daily intake was 0.85 +/- 13 mg.kg-1. Caffeine intake was not correlated with any 1 sport; the 10 highest caffeine users were athletes from 9 different sports, including skill, endurance, and power sports. No differences were noted for average caffeine ingestion between summer and winter sports. High caffeine intakes corresponded to coffee ingestion, with the 25 highest individual intakes (193-895 mg.day-1) from coffee drinkers. In summary, it can be concluded that the majority of high-level Canadian athletes consume dietary caffeine primarily in the form of coffee. However, levels consumed are insufficient to elicit performance enhancement. Potential detrimental effects of caffeine consumption on exercise performance include gastric upset, withdrawal, sleep disturbance, and interactions with other dietary supplements. PMID:19088792

  15. Awareness and use of caffeine by athletes competing at the 2005 Ironman Triathlon World Championships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbrow, Ben; Leveritt, Michael

    2006-10-01

    This study assessed the knowledge, prevalence, and quantity of caffeine use by athletes competing at the 2005 Ironman Triathlon World Championships. Caffeine-related questionnaires were self-administered to 140 (105 male and 35 female, 40.3 +/- 10.7 y) athletes representing 16 countries. Fifty of these athletes further consented to immediate post-race blood samples for analysis of plasma caffeine and paraxanthine using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Seventy-two percent of 70 athletes correctly identified caffeine as being an unrestricted substance in triathlon. The majority of athletes [125 (89%)] were planning on using a caffeinated substance immediately prior to or throughout the race. Cola drinks (78%), caffeinated gels (42%), coffee (usually pre-race) (37%), energy drinks (13%), and NoDoz tablets (9%) were the most popular caffeinated choices. Mean +/- standard deviation (and range) post race plasma caffeine and paraxanthine levels were 22.3 +/- 20 micromol/L (1.7 to 98.4) and 9.4 +/- 6 micromol/L (1.8 to 28.9), respectively. Seven athletes (14%) finished with plasma caffeine levels > or = 40 micromol/L. Plasma values from elite athletes did not differ from age group competitors. Despite the prevalence of its consumption and the training experience of this athletic group, over one quarter of athletes remained either confused or uninformed about caffeine's legality. Levels of plasma caffeine taken immediately post race indicated that athletes typically finish with quantities of caffeine that have been shown to improve endurance performance (i.e., approximately 20 micromol/L or a dose of > or = 3 mg/kg body weight). PMID:17240785

  16. The Extraction of Caffeine from Tea: An Old Undergraduate Experiment Revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Scott D.; Hansen, Peter J.

    1995-09-01

    The extraction of caffeine from tea leaves is a common organic chemistry experiment. A water/1-propanol/sodium chloride ternary system was found to be a suitable replacement for the more traditional water/organochlorine solvent systems. Approximately 80% of the caffeine in the tea leaves can be recovered as crude caffeine. The ternary system employs chemicals which are not only less expensive, but also less toxic.

  17. Caffeine consumption and self-assessed stress, anxiety, and depression in secondary school children

    OpenAIRE

    Richards, Gareth; Smith, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Previous research suggests that effects of caffeine on behaviour are positive unless one is investigating sensitive groups or ingestion of large amounts. Children are a potentially sensitive subgroup, and especially so considering the high levels of caffeine currently found in energy drinks. The present study used data from the Cornish Academies Project to investigate associations between caffeine (both its total consumption, and that derived separately from energy drinks, cola, tea, and coff...

  18. A benefit-risk assessment of caffeine as an analgesic adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W Y

    2001-01-01

    Caffeine has been an additive in analgesics for many years. However, the analgesic adjuvant effects of caffeine have not been seriously investigated since a pooled analysis conducted in 1984 showed that caffeine reduces the amount of paracetamol (acetaminophen) necessary for the same effect by approximately 40%. In vitro and in vivo pharmacological research has provided some evidence that caffeine can have anti-nociceptive actions through blockade of adenosine receptors, inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase-2 enzyme synthesis, or by changes in emotion state. Nevertheless, these actions are only considered in some cases. It is suggested that the actual doses of analgesics and caffeine used can influence the analgesic adjuvant effects of caffeine, and doses that are either too low or too high lead to no analgesic enhancement. Clinical trials suggest that caffeine in doses of more than 65 mg may be useful for enhancement of analgesia. However, except for in headache pain, the benefits are equivocal. While adding caffeine to analgesics increases the number of patients who become free from headache [rate ratio = 1.36, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17 to 1.58], it also leads to more patients with nervousness and dizziness (relative risk = 1.60, 95% CI 1.26 to 2.03). It is suggested that long-term use or overuse of analgesic medications is associated with rebound headache. However, there is no robust evidence that headache after use or withdrawal of caffeine-containing analgesics is more frequent than after other analgesics. Case-control studies have shown that caffeine-containing analgesics are associated with analgesic nephropathy (odds ratio = 4.9, 95% CI 2.3 to 10.3). However, no specific contribution of caffeine to analgesic nephropathy can be identified from these studies. Whether caffeine produces nephrotoxicity on its own, or increases nephrotoxicity due to analgesics, is yet to be established. PMID:11772146

  19. High-dose adenosine overcomes the attenuation of myocardial perfusion reserve caused by caffeine.

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes, E.; Loong, C Y; Harbinson, Mark; Donovan, J; Anagnostopoulos, C.; Underwood, S. R.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives:We studied whether an increase in adenosine dose overcomes caffeine antagonism on adenosine-mediated coronary vasodilation.Background:Caffeine is a competitive antagonist at the adenosine receptors, but it is unclear whether caffeine in coffee alters the actions of exogenous adenosine, and whether the antagonism can be surmounted by increasing the adenosine dose.Methods:Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (MPS) was used to assess adenosine-induced hyperemia in 30 patients before (bas...

  20. Caffeine–N-phthaloyl-β-alanine (1/1)

    OpenAIRE

    Bhatti, Moazzam H.; Uzma Yunus; Syed Raza Shah; Ulrich Flörke

    2012-01-01

    The title co-crystal [systematic name: 3-(1,3-dioxoisoindolin-2-yl)propanoic acid–1,3,7-trimethyl-1H-purine-2,6(3H,7H)-dione (1/1)], C8H10N4O2·C11H9NO4, is the combination of 1:1 adduct of N-phthaloyl-β-alanine with caffeine. The phthalimide and purine rings in the N-phthaloyl-β-alanine and caffeine molecules are essentially planar, with r.m.s. deviations of the fitted atoms of 0.0078 and 0.0118 Å, respectively. In the crystal, the two m...

  1. Molecular mechanisms of DNA repair inhibition by caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffeine potentiates the mutagenic and lethal effects of genotoxic agents. It is thought that this is due, at least in some organisms, to inhibition of DNA repair. However, direct evidence for inhibition of repair enzymes has been lacking. Using purified Escherichia coli DNA photolyase and (A)BC excinuclease, we show that the drug inhibits photoreactivation and nucleotide excision repair by two different mechanisms. Caffeine inhibits photoreactivation by interfering with the specific binding of photolyase to damaged DNA, and it inhibits nucleotide excision repair by promoting nonspecific binding of the damage-recognition subunit, UvrA, of (A)BC excinuclease. A number of other intercalators, including acriflavin and ethidium bromide, appear to inhibit the excinuclease by a similar mechanism--that is, by trapping the UvrA subunit in nonproductive complexes on undamaged DNA

  2. Caffeine for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Steinbrook

    2013-01-01

    Statistical analysis: Statistical comparisons were tested using bivariable linear and logistic regression for each outcome and then adjusted for high/low risk. Results: Nausea in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU was more common in the caffeine (16 of 62 patients than the placebo group (seven of 69; P = 0.02. There were no significant differences in the use of rescue antiemetics in the PACU, in the incidence of nausea or vomiting over 24 h postoperatively, nor in other outcomes (headache, fatigue, or overall satisfaction either in the PACU or at 24 h; time-to-discharge was similar for both groups. Conclusion: Caffeine was not effective in the prevention of PONV or headache, and did not improve time-to-discharge or patient satisfaction.

  3. The effect of caffeine on repair in chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of caffeine on repair was studied in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Treatment of UV-irradiated wild-type (UVS+) cells with a sublethal level of caffeine caused a significant increase in survival compared to untreated UV-irradiated cells. Caffeine did not affect survival in the repair-deficient strain UVSE1, which is deficient in repair of UV-induced damage carried out by enzymes associated with recombination during meiosis. A significant increase in survival in the presence of caffeine was observed in the repair-deficient strain UVSE4 in which recombination during meiosis is not affected. Treatment of zygotes homozygous for UVS+, UVSE1, or UVSE4 with sublethal levels of caffeine caused marked increases in recombination frequency in UVS+ and UVSE4 zygotes and no increase in recombination in UVSE1 zygotes. These results indicate that caffeine increases recombination in normal strains. Increased opportunity for recombination caused by caffeine would not result in increased recombination frequency in the UVSE1 strain, assuming limited-recombination enzyme activity in this strain. The observed increase in survival following UV-irradiation in the presence of caffeine in strains having normal recombination would therefore be associated with a caffeine-induced increase in opportunities for recombination repair. (orig.)

  4. Influence of caffeine on sparing effect of dose fractionation in housefly larvae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffeine, given during interfraction interval, abolishes the sparing effect of dose fractionation observed for delay of pupariation in Musca domestica larvae. When given as postirradiation treatment after single exposure, caffeine increases the delay in a synergistic manner. Pretreatment of the larvae with ascorbic acid for 3 h protects from radiation-induced delay whereas pretreatment with caffeine does not have any effect. Combination of ascorbic acid and caffeine pretreatment protects the larvae only at low concentration (0.05%) and not at high concentration (0.1%). (orig.)

  5. Influence of caffeine on chromosome lesions induced by chemical mutagens and radiation. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The modifying influence of caffeine on γ-ray induced chromosome lesions was studied by chromosome aberration anaysis. Caffeine was applied as a pre- and post-treatment agent following seed (G1) and root meristem (G2 and S) irradiation of C.capillaris. The frequency of chromosome aberrations induced in G1 was changed neither by post- nor by pre-treatment with caffeine. This fact proves the lack of caffeine modifying effect. Applied as a post-treatment agent caffeine enhances considerably the frequency of chromosome aberrations induced in root meristem cells. This is especially valid for G2 irradiated cells, while in S cells no synergistic effect was established between induced chromosome lesions and caffeine. The enhancement of chromosome aberration frequency produced in G2 shows a clearly manifested dependence on the time (moment) of caffeine application post irradiation. Most considerable enhancement was obtained following post-treatment with caffeine immediately after irradiation. In the following intervals - 15 and 30 min - it decreases progressively, while after 60, 180 and 300 min no enhancing effect is observed. The probable causes for the manifestation and the lack of synergistic effect between chromosome lesions induced in the various mitotic cycle phases and caffeine are discussed. (author)

  6. BRCA1 and its phosphorylation involved in caffeine-inhibitable event upstream of G2 checkpoint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine,which specifically inhibits ATM/ATR kinases,efficiently abrogates the ionizing radiation(IR)-induced G2 arrest and increases the sensitivity of various tumor cells to IR.Mechanisms for the effect of caffeine remain to be elucidated.As a target of ATM/ATR kinases,BRCA1 becomes activated and phosphorylated in response to IR.Thus,in this work,we investigated the possible role of BRCA1 in the effect of caffeine on G2 checkpoint and observed how BRCA1 phosphorylation was regulated in this process.For these purposes,the BRCA1 protein level and the phosphorylation states were analyzed by Western blotting by using an antibody against BRCA1 and phospho-specific antibodies against Ser-1423 and Ser-1524 residues in cells exposed to a combination of IR and caffeine.The results showed that caffeine down-regulated IR-induced BRCA1 expression and specifically abolished BRCA1 phosphorylation of Ser-1524,which was followed by an override of G2 arrest by caffeine.In addition,the ability of BRCA1 to transactivate p21 may be required for MCF-7 but not necessary for Hela response to caffeine.These data suggest that BRCA1 may be a potential target of caffeine.BRCA1 and its phosphorylation are most likely to be involved in the caffeine-inhibitable event upstream of G2 arrest.

  7. ASSOCIATION OF CAFFEINE INTAKE AND LIVER FIBROSIS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEPATITIS C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalinca da Silva OLIVEIRA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Caffeine consumption has been associated to decreased levels of liver enzymes and lower risk of fibrosis in patients with hepatitis C virus. Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the association between caffeine consumption and inflammatory activity or degree of liver fibrosis in patients with hepatitis C virus infection. Methods A cross-sectional study of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection treated in an outpatient Gastroenterology Unit of Santa Casa Hospital (Porto Alegre - Brasil. Patients were interviewed regarding the consumption of caffeine and anthropometric assessment was performed. Liver biopsy was performed in a maximum period of 36 months before inclusion in the study Results There were 113 patients, 67 (59.3% females, 48 (42.5% were aged between 52 and 62 years, and 101 (89.4% were white. The average caffeine consumption was 251.41 ± 232.32 mg/day, and 70 (62% patients consumed up to 250 mg/day of caffeine. There was no association between caffeine consumption and inflammatory activity on liver biopsy. On the other hand, when evaluating the caffeine consumption liver fibrosis an inverse association was observed. Conclusions The greater consumption of caffeine was associated with lower liver fibrosis. There was no association between caffeine consumption and inflammatory activity.

  8. Caffeine and 3-km cycling performance: Effects of mouth rinsing, genotype, and time of day.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pataky, M W; Womack, C J; Saunders, M J; Goffe, J L; D'Lugos, A C; El-Sohemy, A; Luden, N D

    2016-06-01

    We assessed the efficacy of caffeine mouth rinsing on 3-km cycling performance and determined whether caffeine mouth rinsing affects performance gains influenced by the CYP1A2 polymorphism. Thirty-eight recreational cyclists completed four simulated 3-km time trials (TT). Subjects ingested either 6 mg/kg BW of caffeine or placebo 1 h prior to each TT. Additionally, 25 mL of 1.14% caffeine or placebo solution were mouth rinsed before each TT. The treatments were Placebo, caffeine Ingestion, caffeine Rinse and Ingestion+Rinse. Subjects were genotyped and classified as AA homozygotes or AC heterozygotes for the rs762551 polymorphism of the CYP1A2 gene involved in caffeine metabolism. Magnitude-based inferences were used to evaluate treatment differences in mean power output based on a predetermined meaningful treatment effect of 1.0%. AC heterozygotes (4.1%) and AA homozygotes (3.4%) benefited from Ingestion+Rinse, but only AC performed better with Ingestion (6.0%). Additionally, Rinse and Ingestion+Rinse elicited better performance relative to Placebo among subjects that performed prior to 10:00 h (Early) compared with after 10:00 h (Late). The present study provides additional evidence of genotype and time of day factors that affect the ergogenic value of caffeine intake that may allow for more personalized caffeine intake strategies to maximize performance. PMID:26062916

  9. Enhancement of nootropic effect of duloxetine and bupropion by caffeine in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Pravin Popatrao Kale; Veeranjaneyulu Addepalli

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The existing evidence suggests an association between depression and memory impairment. The objective of present study was to assess the effect of low dose caffeine with duloxetine and bupropion on memory. Materials and Methods: Mice were divided randomly into seven groups. Intra-peritoneal treatment of normal saline (10 ml/kg), caffeine (10 mg/kg), duloxetine (10 mg/kg), bupropion alone (10 mg/kg), caffeine + duloxetine (5 mg/kg, each), caffeine + bupropion (5 mg/kg, each), an...

  10. BRCA1 and its phosphorylation involved in caffeine-inhibitable event upstream of G2 checkpoint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Yanling; Hao, Jifang

    2010-07-01

    Caffeine, which specifically inhibits ATM/ATR kinases, efficiently abrogates the ionizing radiation (IR)-induced G2 arrest and increases the sensitivity of various tumor cells to IR. Mechanisms for the effect of caffeine remain to be elucidated. As a target of ATM/ATR kinases, BRCA1 becomes activated and phosphorylated in response to IR. Thus, in this work, we investigated the possible role of BRCA1 in the effect of caffeine on G2 checkpoint and observed how BRCA1 phosphorylation was regulated in this process. For these purposes, the BRCA1 protein level and the phosphorylation states were analyzed by Western blotting by using an antibody against BRCA1 and phospho-specific antibodies against Ser-1423 and Ser-1524 residues in cells exposed to a combination of IR and caffeine. The results showed that caffeine down-regulated IR-induced BRCA1 expression and specifically abolished BRCA1 phosphorylation of Ser-1524, which was followed by an override of G2 arrest by caffeine. In addition, the ability of BRCA1 to transactivate p21 may be required for MCF-7 but not necessary for Hela response to caffeine. These data suggest that BRCA1 may be a potential target of caffeine. BRCA1 and its phosphorylation are most likely to be involved in the caffeine-inhibitable event upstream of G2 arrest.

  11. The mode of action of caffeine on catecholamine release from perfused adrenal glands of cat.

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, Y.; Nakazato, Y; Ohga, A.

    1989-01-01

    1 Adrenaline and noradrenaline secretion induced by caffeine was investigated in the perfused cat adrenal glands. 2 Caffeine (10-80 mM) caused a dose-dependent increase in both adrenaline and noradrenaline secretion when applied for 1 min and 10 min after replacing Ca2+ with 10(-5)M EGTA in the perfusion solution. The ratio of adrenaline to noradrenaline was about 1:1. Mg2+ and/or Ca2+ inhibited the response to caffeine. 3 When caffeine (40 mM) was repeatedly applied in the absence of extrace...

  12. The effect of gamma radiation and caffeine during the embrionic development of Biomphalaria glabrata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some experiments have been carried out, dealing with the interations of caffeine and gamma radiation in the embryonic development of Biomphalaria glabrata. Gamma radiation was used in a dosis of 1000r (exposure time of 1/2 hour) and caffeine concentration was 0.1% (Exposure time of 24 hours). Experiment I. The embryos were irradiated before treatment with caffeine. In this experiment we have observed a synergistic effect between caffeine and gamma radiation. Experiment II. The embryos in the caffeine solution were irradiated 8 hours after the beginning of the experiment. The synergistic effect observed in this experiment was reduced when compared with the first one. Experiment III. In this experiment we made the pre-treatment with caffeine. We have not observed any synergistic effect between the drug and gamma radiation. Experiment IV. Embryos were irradiated, and after 24 hours treated with caffeine during another 24 hours. As in the previous experiment, we have not observed any synergism between the radiation and the drug. According to the above results, we conclude that the synergistic effect between caffeine and gamma radiation in the embryos was more effective when the embryos have been treated with caffeine after irradiation. (Author)

  13. Lipid Peroxidation and Electrolytes in Irradiated Rats Treated with Caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Study was conducted to elarify the potential role of caffeine (1,3,7-trimethyl xanthine), a major component of coffee, against damages induced by gamma rays. Thirty adult female albino rats (130+10) were divided into three groups, each of ten animals. The first group acted as control animals. The second was sujected to a single dose of (7) Gy whole body gamma irradiation. The third group was injected intraperitoneally with a single dose (80mg/kg body weight) of caffeine one-hour prior irradiation. Blood samples were collected five time intervals 1,3,7,15 and 30 days post-irradiation. The content of serum lipid peroxides was measured as thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS). Electrolytes as calcium (Ca2+), sodium (Na+) and potassium (K+) and levels were estimated and Na+/K+ ratio was calculated. Also serum enzymes as alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and aminotransaminases (AST and ALT) activity levels were measured. The data revealed significant increase in TBARS, AST and ALT levels in serum due to irradiation exposure. While, radiation induced significant decrease in serum level of ALP, level of electrolytes Ca2+, Ma+, and Na+/K+ ratio. On the other hand, group injected intraperitoneally with caffeine pre-irradiation exhibited reduction in the changes produced by gamma-radiation with variable degree. The data showed that this antioxidant confers protection damage inflicted by radiation when given prior to irradiation exposure on the examined parameters

  14. Chronic caffeine produces sexually dimorphic effects on amphetamine-induced behavior, anxiety and depressive-like behavior in adolescent rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgeon, Sarah M; Townsend, Shannon E; Dixon, Rushell S; Hickman, Emma T; Lee, Sabrina M

    2016-04-01

    Caffeine consumption has been increasing rapidly in adolescents; however, most research on the behavioral effects of caffeine has been conducted in adults. Two experiments were conducted in which adolescent male and female rats were treated with a moderate dose of caffeine (0.25g/l) in their drinking water beginning on P26-28. In the first experiment, animals were maintained on caffeinated drinking water or normal tap water for 14days and were then tested for behavioral and striatal c-Fos response to amphetamine (1.5mg/kg). In the second experiment, rats were maintained on caffeinated drinking water or normal tap water beginning on P28 and were tested for novel object recognition, anxiety in the light/dark test (L/D) and elevated plus maze (EPM), and depressive like behavior in the forced swim test (FST) beginning on the 14th day of caffeine exposure. Caffeine decreased amphetamine-induced rearing in males, but had no effect in females; however, this behavioral effect was not accompanied by changes in striatal c-Fos, which was increased by amphetamine but not altered by caffeine. No effects of caffeine were observed on novel object recognition or elevated plus maze behavior. However, in the L/D test, there was a sex by caffeine interaction on time spent in the light driven by a caffeine-induced increase in light time in the males but not the females. On the pretest day of the FST, sex by caffeine interactions were observed for swimming and struggling; caffeine decreased struggling behavior and increased swimming behavior in males and caffeine-treated females demonstrated significantly more struggling and significantly less swimming than caffeine-treated males. A similar pattern was observed on the test day in which caffeine decreased immobility overall and increased swimming. These data reveal sex dependent effects of caffeine on behavior in adolescent rats. PMID:26850920

  15. Caffeinated and non-caffeinated alcohol use and indirect aggression: The impact of self-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Brynn E; Linden-Carmichael, Ashley N; Lau-Barraco, Cathy

    2016-07-01

    Research shows that heavier alcohol use is associated with physical aggression. Scant research has examined the way in which alcohol relates to other forms of aggression, such as indirect aggression (e.g., malicious humor, social exclusion). Given the possible negative consequences of indirect aggression and the limited evidence suggesting alcohol use can elicit indirectly aggressive responses, research is needed to further investigate the association between drinking behavior and indirect aggression. Additionally, specific alcoholic beverages, such as caffeinated alcoholic beverages (CABs; e.g., Red Bull and vodka), may potentiate aggression above the influence of typical use, and thus warrant examination with regard to indirect aggression. One factor that may impact the strength of the alcohol-indirect aggression and CAB-indirect aggression relationships is one's level of self-regulation. Consequently, our study examined the relationships between (1) alcohol use and indirect aggression, (2) CAB use and indirect aggression, and (3) self-regulation as a moderator. Participants were 733 (67.6% female) undergraduate students who reported their CAB and alcohol use, self-regulation, and aggressive behaviors. Results revealed that heavier alcohol use was associated with more frequent indirect aggression after controlling for dispositional aggression. Heavier CAB use was related to more frequent indirect aggression after accounting for typical use and dispositional aggression. Self-regulation moderated these associations such that for those with lower self-regulation, greater alcohol and CAB consumption was associated with greater indirect aggression. Our findings suggest that heavier alcohol and CAB consumption may be risk factors for engaging in indirect aggression and this risk is impacted by one's regulatory control. PMID:26905765

  16. Enhancement of SV40 transformation by treatment of C3H2K cells with uv light and caffeine. I. Combined effect of uv light and caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treatment of cultured mouse cells, C3H2K, with uv light and/or caffeine enhanced the frequency of SV40-induced transformation. This enhancement depends upon the doses of uv and caffeine and the mode of combination of these agents. Irradiation of cells with increasing doses of uv just before infection resulted in approximately 2-fold enhancement of the transformation frequency up to a dose of 90 ergs/mm2 and 3.3-fold at 150 ergs/mm2. Addition of 1 mM caffeine to the medium for 4 days subsequent to infection brought about a 2-fold enhancement. When cells were irradiated and treated with 1 mM caffeine, the enhancement was approximately 4-fold up to a uv dose of 90 ergs/mm2 and 5.9-fold at 150 ergs/mm2. When 0.1 to 4 mM caffeine was added for 4 days postinfection, the absolute number of transformations increased, and an enhancement ratio of 1.3 to 6.8 resulted. After the addition of the same increasing doses of caffeine to uv-irradiated cells (75 ergs/mm2), the enhancement of transformation frequency was even higher ranging 2.0 to 13.3. The transformation frequencies thus obtained by the double treatment were always higher than those predicted if uv and caffeine acted additively. The transformation frequency was little affected by the addition of dibutyrylcyclic AMP and theophylline

  17. THE TESTING OF CAFFEIN “IN VITRO” REACTION ON CYMBIDIUM HYBRIDUM PROTOCORMS SUBCULTURED ON ESPECIALLY BRIDGE OF FILTERED PAPER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.F. Blidar

    2005-08-01

    biomass of these, was registered at the variants of culture medium with caffeine in a 0,001% concentration. On the lowest or highest concentration of 0,001% caffeine, we find out a progressive decrease of the protocorms vitality.

  18. Radiation genetic studies in garden pea. Part 2. Caffeine potentiation and chromosome damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of 1.5x10-2 M caffeine post-treatments over the chromosome damage induced by 4kR X-ray 1.5x10-2 M Maleic hydrazide (MH) and N-Nitroso-N-urethane (NMU) treatments in the root top cells of a normal and trigenic leaf mutant of Pisum sativum was studied. While MH and NMU produced S-dependent effects, X-rays induced non-delayed S-independent effects. These effects got potentiated by caffeine treatments. With MH, the potentiation occurred when the cells got exposed to caffeine during S-phase and with X-rays, it occurred when the irradiated cells are treated in G2 or prophase stage. The caffeine potentiation of chromosome damage produced by MH was similar in the roots exposed to caffeine at 16 and 31degC but with NMU, the potentiation was lower at 31 than at 16degC. If the inhibitory effect of caffeine on gap filling process of the damaged DNA is the molecular mechanism responsible for caffeine potentiation of reproductive death it may be the mechanism responsible for the observed chromosome damage in MH treated cells exposed to caffeine during G1 and S phase. But the X-irradiated cells are insensitive to caffeine at such phases. In these cells caffeine probably acts as an inhibitor of the photoreactivating enzymes for binding sites or with the substrate in the irradiated cells post-treated during G2 and prophase. However, temperature independence of caffeine potentiation is not compatible with eithr of the above two views. Compared to the normal genotype, the trigenic mutant exhibited an increased chromosomal damage, but not the potentiation. Probably mutant genes reduce the resistance of a genome against mutagenic action, consequently enhance the suseptibility to chromosome damage. (author)

  19. Caffeine alters the behavioural and body temperature responses to mephedrone without causing long-term neurotoxicity in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Shortall, Sinead E.; Green, A. Richard; Fone, Kevin C.F.; King, Madeleine V.

    2016-01-01

    Administration of caffeine with 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) alters the pharmacological properties of MDMA in rats. The current study examined whether caffeine alters the behavioural and neurochemical effects of mephedrone, which has similar psychoactive effects to MDMA. Rats received either i.p. saline, mephedrone (10mg/kg), caffeine (10mg/kg) or combined caffeine and mephedrone twice weekly on consecutive days for three weeks. Locomotor activity (days 1 and 16), novel object dis...

  20. Differential contributions of theobromine and caffeine on mood, psychomotor performance and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, E S; Slettenaar, M; vd Meer, N; Transler, C; Jans, L; Quadt, F; Berry, M

    2011-10-24

    The combination of theobromine and caffeine, methylxanthines found in chocolate, has previously been shown to improve mood and cognition. However, it is unknown whether these molecules act synergistically. This study tested the hypothesis that a combination of caffeine and theobromine has synergistic effects on cognition, mood and blood pressure in 24 healthy female subjects. The effects of theobromine (700 mg), caffeine (120 mg) or the combination of both, or placebo were tested on mood (the Bond-Lader visual analog scale), psychomotor performance (the Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST)) and blood pressure before and at 1, 2 and 3 h after administration. Theobromine alone decreased self-reported calmness 3h after ingestion and lowered blood pressure relative to placebo 1 h after ingestion. Caffeine increased self-reported alertness 1, 2 and 3h after ingestion and contentedness 1 and 2 h after ingestion, and increased blood pressure relative to placebo (at 1 h). The combination of caffeine+theobromine had similar effects as caffeine alone on mood, but with no effect on blood pressure. There was no treatment effect on DSST performance. Together these results suggest that theobromine and caffeine could have differential effects on mood and blood pressure. It was tentatively concluded that caffeine may have more CNS-mediated effects on alertness, while theobromine may be acting primarily via peripheral physiological changes. PMID:21839757

  1. CHROMATOGRAPHIC DETERMINATION OF CAFFEINE CONTENTS IN SOFT AND ENERGY DRINKS AVAILABLE ON THE ROMANIAN MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Elena Ionică

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is a stimulant that is commonly found in many foods and drinks that we consume. Concerns exist about the potential adverse health effects of high consumption of dietary caffeine, especially in children and pregnant women. Recommended caffeine intakes corresponding to no adverse health effects have been suggested recently for healthy adults (400 – 450 mg/day, for women contemplating pregnancy (300 mg/day, and for young children age 4 – 6 years (45 mg/day. Different brands of soft and energy carbonated beverages available on the Romanian market were analysed for caffeine by HPLC with a diode array UV-VIS detector at 217 nm. The column was a reverse phase C18 and the mobile phase consisted of potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate buffer (0.02 mol/L, pH 4.3 and acetonitrile (88:12, v/v. The caffeine contents in energy drink samples ranged from 16.82 mg/100 mL to 39.48 mg/100 mL while the carbonated soft drink group showed caffeine content in the range of 9.79 – 14.38 mg/100 mL. In addition, the concentrations of caffeine have been converted into the daily intake doses based on beverages consumption. The mean values of caffeine daily intakes were 124 mg and 49 mg through the ingestion of energy drinks and soft drinks, respectively.

  2. The influence of a CYP1A2 polymorphism on the ergogenic effects of caffeine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Womack Christopher J

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although caffeine supplementation improves performance, the ergogenic effect is variable. The cause(s of this variability are unknown. A (C/A single nucleotide polymorphism at intron 1 of the cytochrome P450 (CYP1A2 gene influences caffeine metabolism and clinical outcomes from caffeine ingestion. The purpose of this study was to determine if this polymorphism influences the ergogenic effect of caffeine supplementation. Methods Thirty-five trained male cyclists (age = 25.0 ± 7.3 yrs, height = 178.2 ± 8.8 cm, weight = 74.3 ± 8.8 kg, VO2max = 59.35 ± 9.72 ml·kg-1·min-1 participated in two computer-simulated 40-kilometer time trials on a cycle ergometer. Each test was performed one hour following ingestion of 6 mg·kg-1 of anhydrous caffeine or a placebo administered in double-blind fashion. DNA was obtained from whole blood samples and genotyped using restriction fragment length polymorphism-polymerase chain reaction. Participants were classified as AA homozygotes (N = 16 or C allele carriers (N = 19. The effects of treatment (caffeine, placebo and the treatment × genotype interaction were assessed using Repeated Measures Analysis of Variance. Results Caffeine supplementation reduced 40 kilometer time by a greater (p Conclusions Results suggest that individuals homozygous for the A allele of this polymorphism may have a larger ergogenic effect following caffeine ingestion.

  3. Modulation of Radiation Induced Toxicity by Caffeine Pre injection in Female Rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work aims to evaluate the antioxidative role of caffeine (80 mg/kg b.w.). injected 1hour before exposure of female rats to a dose of (7 Gy) gamma irradiation. Haematological parameters, lipid peroxides, glutathione, AST and ALT were investigated 1, 3 and 7 days post irradiation and/or caffeine treatment. Exposure to ionizing radiation resulted in haematological disorders, elevated lipid peroxides, dropped glutathione levels and disturbed AST and ALT levels. Caffeine preinjection led to noticeable limitation of the drop in RBCs, Hb and Ht, improved MCV, MCHC, elevated glutathione, depressed lipid peroxide levels and moderated ALT level. Caffeine is an alkaloid (purine derivative) that contains flavonoids, which increases the antioxidative capacity of blood plasma (Hempel et al., 1999). It is an antioxidant that may help to protect against chemically-induced or radiation induced cancer in mice (Abraham, 1991 and Haung et al., 1997). Caffeine competes with oxygen for electrons and also scavenges hydroxyl radicals and reactive oxygen (Devasagayam and Kesavan, 1996). Contrary to previous investigations, conducted since 1960 reporting that caffeine potentiates DNA damage (Kihlman, 1977 and George et al., 1999) administered caffeine i.p. at a dose of 80 mg/kg body weight 1hour before irradiation of mice at 7.5 Gy. They described remarkable protection by caffeine resulting in the survival of 70% of mice at the end of 25 days and the number remained the same till 90 days

  4. Combined effects of radiation and caffeine on embryonic development in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combined effect of radiation and caffeine has been studied in mouse embryos. Radiation and/or caffeine were administered to ICR mice on Day 11 of gestation. Intrauterine death, gross malformation, and fetal body weight were selected as indicators of effects. Doses of whole-body gamma irradiation were 0.5 to 2.5 Gy and those of caffeine were 100 and 250 mg/kg maternal body wt. Intrauterine mortality increased with increasing radiation dose; this trend was more remarkable in combination with caffeine. Gross malformations such as cleft palate and defects of forelegs and hindlegs appeared frequently in the fetuses treated with both radiation and caffeine. Decreased fetal weight was observed even in mice treated with 0.5 Gy of radiation or 100 mg/kg caffeine. There was a linear relationship between dose and reduction of fetal weight. The fetal weight was a sensitive, precise, and easy-to-handle indicator for the effects of growth retardation. Intrauterine mortality and frequencies of cleft palate and defects of forelegs and hindlegs were higher than the sum of those induced by radiation and by caffeine separately. The results indicated that the combined action of radiation and caffeine on intrauterine death and malformations was synergistic

  5. Introversion/extroversion, time stress, and caffeine: effect on verbal performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revelle, W; Amaral, P; Turriff, S

    1976-04-01

    Time pressure and caffeine differentially affected the performance of introverts on verbal ability tests similar to the Graduate Record Examination. With time pressure and 200 milligrams of caffeine, the performance of introverts fell by 0.63 standard deviation, but extroverts by 0.44 standard deviation. PMID:1257762

  6. Effects of dilute aqueous NaCl solution on caffeine aggregation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Bhanita; Paul, Sandip, E-mail: sandipp@iitg.ernet.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology, Guwahati 781039, Assam (India)

    2013-11-21

    The effect of salt concentration on association properties of caffeine molecule was investigated by employing molecular dynamics simulations in isothermal-isobaric ensemble of eight caffeine molecules in pure water and three different salt (NaCl) concentrations, at 300 K temperature and 1 atm pressure. The concentration of caffeine was taken almost at the solubility limit. With increasing salt concentration, we observe enhancement of first peak height and appearance of a second peak in the caffeine-caffeine distribution function. Furthermore, our calculated solvent accessible area values and cluster structure analyses suggest formation of higher order caffeine cluster on addition of salt. The calculated hydrogen bond properties reveal that there is a modest decrease in the average number of water-caffeine hydrogen bonds on addition of NaCl salt. Also observed are: (i) decrease in probability of salt contact ion pair as well as decrease in the solvent separated ion pair formation with increasing salt concentration, (ii) a modest second shell collapse in the water structure, and (iii) dehydration of hydrophobic atomic sites of caffeine on addition of NaCl.

  7. Influence of caffeine on information processing stages in well rested and fatigued subjects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.M. Lorist; J. Snel; A. Kok

    1994-01-01

    Examined the effects of caffeine on different information processing stages using choice reaction time (RT) tasks. A 200-mg dose at the beginning and a maintenance dose of 50 mg caffeine or lactose half-way through the session were administered to 15 well-rested and 15 fatigued university students (

  8. INFLUENCE OF CAFFEINE ON SELECTIVE ATTENTION IN WELL-RESTED AND FATIGUED SUBJECTS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LORIST, MM; SNEL, J; KOK, A; MULDER, G

    1994-01-01

    Effects of caffeine were studied in a visual focused selective search task in well-rested and fatigued subjects. A dose of 200 + 50 mg caffeine or placebo, dissolved in decaffeinated coffee, was administered in a double-blind and deceptive fashion. The task was to detect a target letter on one diago

  9. CAFFEINE SPECIFICITY OF VARIOUS NON-IMPRINTED POLYMERS IN AQUEOUS MEDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limitations exist in applying the conventional microbial methods to the detection of human fecal contamination in water. Certain organic compounds such as caffeine, have been reported by the U.S. Geological Survey as a more suitable tracer. The employment of caffeine has been h...

  10. Caffeine Enhances Real-World Language Processing: Evidence from a Proofreading Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunye, Tad T.; Mahoney, Caroline R.; Rapp, David N.; Ditman, Tali; Taylor, Holly A.

    2012-01-01

    Caffeine has become the most prevalently consumed psychostimulant in the world, but its influences on daily real-world functioning are relatively unknown. The present work investigated the effects of caffeine (0 mg, 100 mg, 200 mg, 400 mg) on a commonplace language task that required readers to identify and correct 4 error types in extended…

  11. ACUTE LETHAL CONCENTRATIONS OF CAFFEINE ON NON-TARGET FRESHWATER ORGANISMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Despite the recent detection of caffeine in US streams, studies investigating caffeine's toxic effects on non-target freshwater organisms lack acute data for several standard surrogate species and chronic data for any freshwater species. The present study describes the mortality rate at different c...

  12. Investigations of the presence of caffeine in the Rudawa River, Kraków, Poland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagoda, Agnieszka; Żukowski, Witold; Dąbrowska, Barbara

    2015-09-01

    Caffeine concentration in surface water (Rudawa River, Kraków, Poland) has been being investigated since 2011. The method applied for investigations was developed in 2011, and the first series of measurements of caffeine concentration in surface water began in 2011. Caffeine concentration was determined by the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method. Solid phase extraction (SPE) was used to enrich the concentration of caffeine in water samples. As an internal standard, the caffeine isotope (13)C3 in methanol (Sigma Aldrich) was used. The values of four additional parameters (concentration of nitrates, biochemical oxygen demand after 7 days, number of Escherichia coli and number of Enterococcus faecalis) were determined for the water sample analyzed. Caffeine was detected in all studied samples. The control series of measurements during 2011-2014 confirmed that caffeine is present in Rudawa River water and that the concentration of this substance in Rudawa River ranges from 14.0 to 852.0 ng/dm(3). There is no correlation between the concentration of caffeine and the concentration of other anthropogenic contaminants determined in water. PMID:26264791

  13. The protective effect of caffeine on DNA photosensitive damage: a gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarose gel electrophoresis was performed to study interaction effect of caffeine on photosensitive injury of DNA caused by anthraquinone-2-sulphonic acid disodium (AQS), a model compound of strong photosensitizer, under 254 nm or 365nm UV irradiation Photosensitive injury of DNA induced by AQS under deoxidized condition was used as control. The results show that caffeine may resist effectively the injury effect of photosensitive damage and strong UV irradiation on DNA. The effects depend on the caffeine and AQS concentration, and irradiation time. Caffeine in concentration of 0.01-3.0 μg/μL, may prevent DNA from damage induced by UV light, but caffeine in concentration of >5.0 μg/μL accelerates the DNA damage. In particular, in the aqueous solution system of DNA, caffeine and AQS, at pH 6.25-7.35, the caffeine in concentration of 2.5-4.50 μg/μL may resist the photosensitive injury of DNA caused by AQS under the deoxidized condition and exposure by 254 nm UV for 10 min. And caffeine in concentration of 5 μg/μL would present a synergetic effect on the photosensitive injury of DNA. Possible molecular mechanism also is discussed. (authors)

  14. 1-Methylxanthine derived from caffeine as a pharmacodynamic probe of oxypurinol effect

    OpenAIRE

    Birkett, D J; Miners, J O; Valente, L. (Luísa); Lillywhite, K J; Day, R. O.

    1997-01-01

    Aims In the present study we have investigated the use of caffeine, administered in the form of instant coffee, as a prodrug for 1MX to validate the use of the 1MU:1MX ratio following caffeine administration as a pharmacodynamic measure of oxypurinol effect on xanthine oxidase.

  15. Caffeine suppresses the progression of human glioblastoma via cathepsin B and MAPK signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu-Chen; Ding, You-Ming; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan; Chen, Jang-Yi; Chen, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Glioblastoma has aggressive proliferative and invasive properties. We investigated the effect of caffeine on the invasion and the anti-cancer effect in human glioblastomas. Caffeine reduced the invasion in U-87MG, GBM8401 and LN229 cells. Caffeine decreased mRNA, protein expression, and activity of cathepsin B. Besides, mRNA and protein expression of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1) was upregulated by caffeine treatment, whereas matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) was downregulated. The expression of Ki67, p-p38, phospforylated extracellular regulated protein kinases (p-ERK), and membranous integrin β1 and β3 was decreased by caffeine. The Rho-associated protein kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, Y27632, blocked the caffeine-mediated reduction of cathepsin B, phosphorylated focal adhesion kinase (p-FAK), and p-ERK, and invasion. Moreover, caffeine decreased the tumor size, cathepsin B and Ki67 expression in animal model. Caffeine reduced the invasion of glioma cells through ROCK-cathepsin B/FAK/ERK signaling pathway and tumor growth in orthotopic xenograft animal model, supporting the anti-cancer potential in glioma therapy. PMID:27260469

  16. Effects of caffeinated chewing gum on muscle pain during submaximal isometric exercise in individuals with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeda, Masataka; Kempka, Laura; Weatherby, Amy; Greenlee, Brennan; Mansion, Kimberly

    2016-04-01

    Physical activity is important to manage symptom of fibromyalgia (FM); however, individuals with FM typically experience augmented muscle pain during exercise. This study examined the effects of caffeinated chewing gum on exercise-induced muscle pain in individuals with FM. This study was conducted with a double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over design. Twenty-three patients with FM completed a caffeine condition where they consumed a caffeinated chewing gum that contains 100mg of caffeine, and a placebo condition where they consumed a non-caffeinated chewing gum. They completed isometric handgrip exercise at 25% of their maximal strength for 3min, and muscle pain rating (MPR) was recorded every 30s during exercise. Clinical pain severity was assessed in each condition using a pain questionnaire. The order of the two conditions was randomly determined. MPR increased during exercise, but caffeinated chewing gum did not attenuate the increase in MPR compared to placebo gum. Clinical pain severity was generally associated with the average MPR and the caffeine effects on MPR, calculated as difference in the average MPR between the two conditions. The results suggest that more symptomatic individuals with FM may experience greater exercise-induced muscle pain, but benefit more from caffeinated chewing gum to reduce exercise-induced muscle pain. PMID:26855267

  17. The effect of caffeine ingestion on skill maintenance and fatigue in epee fencers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bottoms, Lindsay; Greenhalgh, Andrew; Gregory, Kim

    2013-01-01

    The ergogenic effect of caffeine on sports performance focuses predominantly on endurance sports (Doherty & Smith, 2004 ) with little research on intermittent high intensity sports. This study aimed to explore the effect of caffeine ingestion on skill maintenance following fencing simulated exercise. Eleven competitive fencers participated (four female; seven male; age 33 ± 6.5 years). Following a maximal test to exhaustion, fencers completed two trials assessing accuracy and reaction times (Stroop test) before and after a fatiguing protocol designed to simulate the demands of a fencing competition. Skill testing involved 30 lunges to hit a target. 500 ml placebo or 3 mg · kg(-1) caffeine supplemented drink was administered after the initial reaction and skill tests in a single-blind crossover design. The fatiguing protocol involved simulating six fights with 6-minute rests between each. Fencers rated their perceived exertion (arm, legs, overall) using the Borg scale. There was no overall effect of caffeine on total skill score (P = 0.40), however there was a tendency for fewer misses with caffeine (P = 0.10). Caffeine had no effect on the Stroop Test. Caffeine produced significantly lower perceived fatigue for overall (P < 0.01). These results provide some support for caffeine producing maintenance of skill and reducing perceived fatigue during fencing. PMID:23383959

  18. Irish coffee: Effects of alcohol and caffeine on object discrimination in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Luana C; Ruiz-Oliveira, Julia; Oliveira, Jéssica J; Silva, Priscila F; Luchiari, Ana C

    2016-04-01

    Many studies regarding the effects of drugs investigate the acute and chronic use of alcohol, but only a few address the effects of caffeine and alcohol combined to the performance of the zebrafish in cognitive tasks. The zebrafish is an important model for studying the effects of drugs on learning, because it has large genetic similarities to humans and the non-invasive administration of the substances favors translational bias of research. In this study, we observed the effects of alcohol and caffeine on zebrafish cognition through an object discrimination test. We noticed that animals subjected to acute alcohol dose and those under alcohol or caffeine withdrawal did not show discrimination. When fish were treated with associated alcohol and caffeine, those chronically treated with alcohol and subjected to moderate acute dose of caffeine showed learning of the task. Our results reinforce the harmful effects of the alcohol use on cognitive tasks, and suggest that continued use of high doses of caffeine cause cognitive impairment during withdrawal of the substance. However, the acute use of caffeine appears to reverse the harmful effects of alcohol withdrawal, allowing discriminative performance equivalent to control fish. Finally, we reiterate the use of zebrafish as a model for drug effects screening and search for active compounds that modulate the alcohol and caffeine effects. PMID:26850919

  19. All in the mind? Pain, placebo effect, and ergogenic effect of caffeine in sports performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Beedie

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Christopher J BeedieDepartment of Sports Science, Tourism and Leisure, Canterbury Christ Church, University, Canterbury, UKAbstract: The ergogenic effects of caffeine on performance are well documented. These effects are more evident in endurance and short-duration, sustained-effort events than in interactive or stop-go sports. Experimentally-induced placebo effects of caffeine on sports performance have also been observed in a number of recent studies. In the present paper it is argued that, given the nature of the sports in which caffeine effects are observed, the well documented hypoalgesic effects of caffeine, and the fact that pain is highly placebo-responsive, a reduction in perceived pain might be the common factor in both the biologic and placebo ergogenic effects of caffeine on sports performance. This idea is supported by evidence from medicine that suggests placebo effects are often associated with mechanisms similar or identical to those of the substance the subject believes they have ingested. Research findings from both biomedicine and sports medicine that attest to the interaction of biologic and psychologic factors in caffeine and pain responses are briefly reviewed. In conclusion, it is recommended that researchers investigate the pain hypothesis. Furthermore, researchers should consider psychosocial factors that might modulate the pain response as variables of interest in future caffeine and performance research.Keywords: caffeine hypoalgesia, nocebo effects, research methods

  20. Effects of dilute aqueous NaCl solution on caffeine aggregation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of salt concentration on association properties of caffeine molecule was investigated by employing molecular dynamics simulations in isothermal-isobaric ensemble of eight caffeine molecules in pure water and three different salt (NaCl) concentrations, at 300 K temperature and 1 atm pressure. The concentration of caffeine was taken almost at the solubility limit. With increasing salt concentration, we observe enhancement of first peak height and appearance of a second peak in the caffeine-caffeine distribution function. Furthermore, our calculated solvent accessible area values and cluster structure analyses suggest formation of higher order caffeine cluster on addition of salt. The calculated hydrogen bond properties reveal that there is a modest decrease in the average number of water-caffeine hydrogen bonds on addition of NaCl salt. Also observed are: (i) decrease in probability of salt contact ion pair as well as decrease in the solvent separated ion pair formation with increasing salt concentration, (ii) a modest second shell collapse in the water structure, and (iii) dehydration of hydrophobic atomic sites of caffeine on addition of NaCl

  1. Sensitization of rad mutants of Dictyostelium discoideum to ultraviolet light by postirradiation treatment with caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The extent of caffeine sensitization following ultraviolet light irradiation for various UV-sensitive strains and the parental resistant strain are compared. Several features of these results are to be noted. (i) With the exception of the M28 strain, the more sensitive the strain is to UV, the lesser the effect of post-irradiation treatment with caffeine. For example, the D10 with caffeine for the wt parental strain is 0.13 of that with no caffeine, whereas for the three most sensitive strains, γs-13 (radB), HPS73 (rad AradB), and HPS82 (rad AradC), this ratio is about 1.0. The slight desensitizing effect of caffeine with γs-13 is reproducible and was observed previously. (orig./AJ)

  2. Voltammetric sensor for caffeine based on a glassy carbon electrode modified with Nafion and graphene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a voltammetric sensor for caffeine that is based on a glassy carbon electrode modified with Nafion and graphene oxide (GO). It exhibits a good affinity for caffeine (resulting from the presence of Nafion), and excellent electrochemical response (resulting from the pressence of GO) for the oxidation of caffeine. The electrode enables the determination of caffeine in the range from 4.0 x 10-7 to 8.0 x 10-5 mol L-1, with a detection limit of 2.0 x 10-7 mol L-1. The sensor displays good stability, reproducibility, and high sensitivity. It was successfully applied to the quantitative determination of caffeine in beverages. (author)

  3. DNA repair in gamma-and UV-irradiated Escherichia coli treated with caffeine and acriflavine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study is made of the postradiation effect of caffeine and acriflavine on the survival rate and DNA repair in E. coli exposed to γ- and UV-radiation. When added to postradiation growth medium caffeine and acriflavine lower the survival rate of γ-irradiated radioresistant strains, B/r and Bsub(s-1)γR, and UV-irradiated UV-resistant strain B/r, and do not appreciably influence the survival of strains that are sensitive to γ- and UV-radiation. The survival rate of UV-irradiated mutant BsUb(s-1) somewhat increases in the presence of caffeine. Caffeine and acriflavine inhibit repair of single-stranded DNA breaks induced in strain B/r by γ-radiation (slow repair) and UV light. Acriflavine arrests a recombination branch of postreplication repair of DNA in E. coli Bsub(s-1)γR Whereas caffeine does not influence this process

  4. Comparative study of the binding of trypsin to caffeine and theophylline by spectrofluorimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ruiyong, E-mail: wangry@zzu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Kang, Xiaohui [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Wang, Ruiqiang [The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450052 (China); Wang, Rui; Dou, Huanjing; Wu, Jing; Song, Chuanjun [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China); Chang, Junbiao, E-mail: changjunbiao@zzu.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China)

    2013-06-15

    The interactions between trypsin and caffeine/theophylline were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, UV–visible absorption spectroscopy, resonance light scattering and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy under mimic physiological conditions. The results revealed that the fluorescence quenching of trypsin by caffeine and theophylline was the result of the formed complex of caffeine–trypsin and theophylline–trypsin. The binding constants and thermodynamic parameters at three different temperatures were obtained. The hydrophobic interaction was the predominant intermolecular forces to stabilize the complex. Results showed that caffeine was the stronger quencher and bound to trypsin with higher affinity than theophylline. -- Highlights: ► The fluorescence of trypsin can be quenched by caffeine or theophylline via hydrophobic contacts. ► Caffeine binds to trypsin with higher affinity than theophylline. ► The influence of molecular structure on the binding aspects is reported.

  5. The effect of caffeine on glucose kinetics in humans - influence of adrenaline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battram, Danielle S.; Graham, Terry E.; Richter, Erik A.;

    2005-01-01

    While caffeine impedes insulin-mediated glucose disposal in humans, its effect on endo-genous glucose production (EGP) remains unknown. In addition, the mechanism involved in these effects is unclear, but may be due to the accompanying increase in adrenaline concentration. We studied the effect of...... caffeine on EGP and glucose infusion rates (GIR), and whether or not adrenaline can account for all of caffeine's effects. Subjects completed three isoglycaemic-hyperinsulinaemic clamps (with 3-[3H]glucose infusion) 30 min after ingesting: (1) placebo capsules (n= 12); (2) caffeine capsules (5 mg kg-1) (n......= 12); and either (3) placebo plus a high-dose adrenaline infusion (HAdr; adrenaline concentration, 1.2 nM; n= 8) or (4) placebo plus a low-dose adrenaline infusion (LAdr; adrenaline concentration, 0.75 nM; n= 6). With caffeine, adrenaline increased to 0.6 nM but no effect on EGP was observed. While...

  6. Pregnancy-induced changes in the pharmacokinetics of caffeine and its metabolites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Tian; Campbell, Sarah C; Stockmann, Chris; Tak, Casey; Schoen, Katherine; Clark, Erin A S; Varner, Michael W; Spigarelli, Michael G; Sherwin, Catherine M T

    2016-05-01

    This study sought to assess the pharmacokinetic (PK) changes of caffeine and its CYP1A2 metabolites across the 3 trimesters of pregnancy. A prospective, multicenter PK study was conducted among 59 pregnant women (93.2% white) who were studied once during a trimester. One beverage with 30-95 mg caffeine was consumed, and a blood/urine sample was collected within 1 hour postingestion. Concentrations of caffeine and its primary metabolites were quantified from serum and urine by LC-MS/MS. There was a significant increase in dose-normalized caffeine serum and urine concentrations between the first and third trimesters (P theophylline concentrations also increased significantly in the third trimester in serum (P theophylline concentrations during pregnancy, especially in the third trimester, revealing evidence of the large role that pregnancy plays in influencing caffeine metabolism. PMID:26358647

  7. Comparative study of the binding of trypsin to caffeine and theophylline by spectrofluorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interactions between trypsin and caffeine/theophylline were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy, UV–visible absorption spectroscopy, resonance light scattering and synchronous fluorescence spectroscopy under mimic physiological conditions. The results revealed that the fluorescence quenching of trypsin by caffeine and theophylline was the result of the formed complex of caffeine–trypsin and theophylline–trypsin. The binding constants and thermodynamic parameters at three different temperatures were obtained. The hydrophobic interaction was the predominant intermolecular forces to stabilize the complex. Results showed that caffeine was the stronger quencher and bound to trypsin with higher affinity than theophylline. -- Highlights: ► The fluorescence of trypsin can be quenched by caffeine or theophylline via hydrophobic contacts. ► Caffeine binds to trypsin with higher affinity than theophylline. ► The influence of molecular structure on the binding aspects is reported

  8. Gut microbiota mediate caffeine detoxification in the primary insect pest of coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceja-Navarro, Javier A; Vega, Fernando E; Karaoz, Ulas; Hao, Zhao; Jenkins, Stefan; Lim, Hsiao Chien; Kosina, Petr; Infante, Francisco; Northen, Trent R; Brodie, Eoin L

    2015-01-01

    The coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei) is the most devastating insect pest of coffee worldwide with its infestations decreasing crop yield by up to 80%. Caffeine is an alkaloid that can be toxic to insects and is hypothesized to act as a defence mechanism to inhibit herbivory. Here we show that caffeine is degraded in the gut of H. hampei, and that experimental inactivation of the gut microbiota eliminates this activity. We demonstrate that gut microbiota in H. hampei specimens from seven major coffee-producing countries and laboratory-reared colonies share a core of microorganisms. Globally ubiquitous members of the gut microbiota, including prominent Pseudomonas species, subsist on caffeine as a sole source of carbon and nitrogen. Pseudomonas caffeine demethylase genes are expressed in vivo in the gut of H. hampei, and re-inoculation of antibiotic-treated insects with an isolated Pseudomonas strain reinstates caffeine-degradation ability confirming their key role. PMID:26173063

  9. Discriminative Stimulus Effects of Binary Drug Mixtures: Studies with Cocaine, MDPV, and Caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Gregory T; Abbott, Megan; Galindo, Kayla; Rush, Elise L; Rice, Kenner C; France, Charles P

    2016-10-01

    Illicit drug preparations often include more than one pharmacologically active compound. For example, cocaine and synthetic cathinones [e.g., 3,4-methylenedioxypyrovalerone (MDPV)] are often mixed with caffeine before sale. Caffeine is likely added to these preparations because it is inexpensive and legal; however, caffeine might also mimic or enhance some of the effects of cocaine or MDPV. In these studies, male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained to discriminate 10 mg/kg cocaine from saline, and the discriminative stimulus effects of cocaine, caffeine, and MDPV were evaluated alone and as binary mixtures (cocaine and caffeine, MDPV and caffeine, and cocaine and MDPV) at fixed-dose ratios of 3:1, 1:1, and 1:3 relative to the dose of each drug that produced 50% cocaine-appropriate responding. Dose-addition analyses were used to determine the nature of the drug-drug interactions for each mixture (e.g., additive, supra-additive, or subadditive). Although additive interactions were observed for most mixtures, supra-additive interactions were observed at the 50% effect level for the 1:1 mixture of cocaine and caffeine and at the 80% effect level for all three mixtures of cocaine and caffeine, as well as for the 3:1 and 1:3 mixtures of cocaine and MDPV. These results demonstrate that with respect to cocaine-like discriminative stimulus effects, caffeine can function as a substitute in drug preparations containing either cocaine or MDPV, with enhancements of cocaine-like effects possible under certain conditions. Further research is needed to determine whether similar interactions exist for other abuse-related or toxic effects of drug preparations, including cocaine, synthetic cathinones, and caffeine. PMID:27493274

  10. The Effects of Preexercise Caffeinated Coffee Ingestion on Endurance Performance: An Evidence-Based Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgins, Simon; Straight, Chad R; Lewis, Richard D

    2016-06-01

    Endurance athletes commonly ingest caffeine as a means to enhance training intensity and competitive performance. A widely-used source of caffeine is coffee, however conflicting evidence exists regarding the efficacy of coffee in improving endurance performance. In this context, the aims of this evidence-based review were threefold: 1) to evaluate the effects of preexercise coffee on endurance performance, 2) to evaluate the effects of coffee on perceived exertion during endurance performance, and 3) to translate the research into usable information for athletes to make an informed decision regarding the intake of caffeine via coffee as a potential ergogenic aid. Searches of three major databases were performed using terms caffeine and coffee, or coffee-caffeine, and endurance, or aerobic. Included studies (n = 9) evaluated the effects of caffeinated coffee on human subjects, provided the caffeine dose administered, administered caffeine ≥ 45 min before testing, and included a measure of endurance performance (e.g., time trial). Significant improvements in endurance performance were observed in five of nine studies, which were on average 24.2% over controls for time to exhaustion trials, and 3.1% for time to completion trials. Three of six studies found that coffee reduced perceived exertion during performance measures significantly more than control conditions (p coffee as an ergogenic aid to improve performance in endurance cycling and running. Coffee providing 3-8.1 mg/kg (1.36-3.68 mg/lb) of caffeine may be used as a safe alternative to anhydrous caffeine to improve endurance performance. PMID:26568580

  11. Molecular and biochemical characterization of caffeine synthase and purine alkaloid concentration in guarana fruit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimpl, Flávia Camila; Kiyota, Eduardo; Mayer, Juliana Lischka Sampaio; Gonçalves, José Francisco de Carvalho; da Silva, José Ferreira; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2014-09-01

    Guarana seeds have the highest caffeine concentration among plants accumulating purine alkaloids, but in contrast with coffee and tea, practically nothing is known about caffeine metabolism in this Amazonian plant. In this study, the levels of purine alkaloids in tissues of five guarana cultivars were determined. Theobromine was the main alkaloid that accumulated in leaves, stems, inflorescences and pericarps of fruit, while caffeine accumulated in the seeds and reached levels from 3.3% to 5.8%. In all tissues analysed, the alkaloid concentration, whether theobromine or caffeine, was higher in young/immature tissues, then decreasing with plant development/maturation. Caffeine synthase activity was highest in seeds of immature fruit. A nucleotide sequence (PcCS) was assembled with sequences retrieved from the EST database REALGENE using sequences of caffeine synthase from coffee and tea, whose expression was also highest in seeds from immature fruit. The PcCS has 1083bp and the protein sequence has greater similarity and identity with the caffeine synthase from cocoa (BTS1) and tea (TCS1). A recombinant PcCS allowed functional characterization of the enzyme as a bifunctional CS, able to catalyse the methylation of 7-methylxanthine to theobromine (3,7-dimethylxanthine), and theobromine to caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine), respectively. Among several substrates tested, PcCS showed higher affinity for theobromine, differing from all other caffeine synthases described so far, which have higher affinity for paraxanthine. When compared to previous knowledge on the protein structure of coffee caffeine synthase, the unique substrate affinity of PcCS is probably explained by the amino acid residues found in the active site of the predicted protein. PMID:24856135

  12. Action of caffeine on x-irradiated HeLa cells. VII. Evidence that caffeine enhances expression of potentially lethal radiation damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HeLa cells irradiated with 2 Gy of 220-kV X rays suffer a 60-70% loss of colony-forming ability which is increased to 90% by postirradiation treatment with 10 mM caffeine for 6 hr. The detailed postirradiation patterns of cell death and sister-cell fusion in such cultures and in cultures in which the colony-forming ability was brought to about the same level by treatment with a larger (4 Gy) X-ray dose alone or by longer (48 hr) treatment with 10 mM caffeine alone were recorded by time-lapse cinemicrography. Because the patterns of cell death and fusion differ radically in irradiated and in caffeine-treated cultures, the response of the additional cells killed by the combined treatment can be identified as X-ray induced rather than caffeine induced. The appearance of cultures after several days of incubation confirms the similarity of the post-treatment patterns of proliferation in cultures suffering enhanced killing to those occurring in cultures treated with larger doses of X rays alone. It is concluded that x rays do not sensitize cells to caffeine, but rather that caffeine enhanced the expression of potentially lethal radiation-induced damage

  13. Caffeine potentiates or protects against radiation-induced DNA and chromosomal damage in human lymphocytes depending on temperature and concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of caffeine on radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations and DNA strand breaks in unstimulated human lymphocytes was investigated. When present prior to and during the radiation exposure, caffeine treatment was found to cause either potentiation or protection against induction of chromosomal aberrations depending on the concentration and temperature. When the nucleoid sedimentation technique was applied, enhancement or reduction of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks by caffeine was also found to be dependent on temperature and caffeine concentration. It is proposed that caffeine, in addition to its suspected ability to influence DNA repair, can also influence the induction of DNA damage, leading to alterations in the yield of chromosomal aberrations

  14. Efficacy of acute caffeine ingestion for short-term high-intensity exercise performance: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astorino, Todd A; Roberson, Daniel W

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used drug in the world, commonly ingested in coffee, tea, soda, and energy drinks. Its ability to enhance muscular work has been apparent since the early 1900s. Caffeine typically increases endurance performance; however, efficacy of caffeine ingestion for short-term high-intensity exercise is equivocal, which may be explained by discrepancies in exercise protocols, dosing, and subjects' training status and habitual caffeine intake found across studies. The primary aim of this review is to critically examine studies that have tested caffeine's ability to augment performance during exercise dependent on nonoxidative metabolism such as sprinting, team sports, and resistance training. A review of the literature revealed 29 studies that measured alterations in short-term performance after caffeine ingestion. Each study was critically analyzed using the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) scale. The mean PEDro score was 7.76 +/- 0.87. Eleven of 17 studies revealed significant improvements in team sports exercise and power-based sports with caffeine ingestion, yet these effects were more common in elite athletes who do not regularly ingest caffeine. Six of 11 studies revealed significant benefits of caffeine for resistance training. Some studies show decreased performance with caffeine ingestion when repeated bouts are completed. The exact mechanism explaining the ergogenic effect of caffeine for short-term exercise is unknown. PMID:19924012

  15. A PRELIMINARY STUDY AND FIRST REPORT ON CAFFEINE DEGRADING BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM THE SOILS OF CHITTOOR AND VELLORE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharan Siddharth

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available An attempt on basic study of the caffeine degrading organism and screening of potential ‘caffeinase’ producing bacteria has been studied and reported. Caffeine is present in soft drinks, coffee plants, tea leaves, and kola nuts and is used extensively in human consumption. Various health and environmental demerits makes it significant to reduce the levels of caffeine into a much less harmful compound, which can be done biologically using specific microorganisms. The enzyme responsible for caffeine degradation plays a major role and hence needs to be studied for caffeinase isolation and improvement of available caffeine products. Isolation of such microorganisms and their study of extent of caffeine degradation would prove to be helpful in generating an economic and safer method of caffeine removal in food products and coffee left over which could be less harmful to human health and the environment.

  16. Investigation of pharmaceutical drugs and caffeine-containing foods using Fourier and terahertz time-domain spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    KaraliÅ«nas, Mindaugas; Venckevičius, Rimvydas; Kašalynas, Irmantas; Puc, Uroš; Abina, Andreja; Jeglič, Anton; Zidanšek, Aleksander; Valušis, Gintaras

    2015-08-01

    Several pharmaceutical drugs, such as alprazolam, ibuprofen, acetaminophen, activated carbon and others, and caffeine-containing foods were tested using terahertz (THz) time domain spectroscopy in the range from 0.3 to 2 THz. The dry powder of pharmaceutical drugs was mixed with HDPE and pressed into the pellets using hydraulic press. The coffee grounds were also pressed into the pellets after ball-milling and mixing with HDPE. The caffeine containing liquid foods were dried out on the paper strips of various stacking. Experiments allow one to determine characteristic spectral signatures of the investigated substances within THz range caused by active pharmaceutical ingredients, like in the case of caffeine, as well as supporting pharmaceutical ingredients. Spectroscopic THz imaging approach is considered as a possible option to identify packaged pharmaceutical drugs. The caffeine spectral features in the tested caffeine containing foods are difficult to observed due to the low caffeine concentration and complex caffeine chemical surrounding.

  17. X-ray-related potentially lethal damage expressed by chromosome condensation and the influence of caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffeine has been reported to induce premature chromosome condensation (PCC) in S-phase cells in the presence of an inhibitor of DNA synthesis. We found that when S-phase cells are treated with caffeine and hydroxyurea after X irradiation, substantially more potentially lethal damage (PLD) is expressed, but the addition of cycloheximide, which inhibits PCC induction in S-phase cells, in the presence of caffeine and hydroxyurea reduces the expression of PLD to the same level as seen with caffeine alone. This can be interpreted to mean that the expression of PLD seen with caffeine in the absence of an inhibitor of DNA synthesis is not associated with chromosome condensation. Evidence that PCC induction in S-phase cells and the influence of caffeine on PLD expression were suppressed by incubation at 40 degrees C of tsBN75 cells with a ts defect in ubiquitin-activating enzyme indicates the involvement of ubiquitin in these two processes. These observations as well as previous findings on ubiquitin suggest to us that caffeine induces changes in DNA-chromatin conformation, which are caused by induction of PCC or ubiquitination of chromosomal protein. Such changes occurring postirradiation would favor expression of PLD

  18. Repair in schizosaccharomyces pombe as measured by recovery from caffeine enhancement of radiation-induced lethality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inhibition of DNA repair by caffeine is manifested in Schizosaccharomyces pombe wild-type cells as an enhancement of UV- or γ-irradiation-induced lethality. The progress of DNA repair processes involving one or more caffeine-sensitive steps may be conveniently followed by measuring the concomitant decrease of this lethal enhancement effect. By measuring, during post-irradiation incubation, the ability of cells to overcome susceptibility to repair inhibition by caffeine, we have determined the time course and requirements for repair in S. pombe. Recovery began immediately and took 150-200 min after γ-irradiation and more than 500 min after UV-irradiation, for exposures which gave about 10% survival in the absence of caffeine. An incubation medium capable of supporting growth was required for caffeine-sensitive repair; no recovery occurred under liquid holding conditions. Survival curves after various recovery times indicated that a logarithmic phase cell population was homogeneous with respect to caffeine-sensitive repair of both UV- and γ-ray-induced damage. Recovery from caffeine inhibition was compared for cells of different physiological states (logarithmic and stationary phase); although the importance of the physiological state was not the same for the two types of radiation, recovery was found to occur more rapidly in the more radiation-resistant state, in each case. (orig.)

  19. False-negative dipyridamole-thallium-201 myocardial imaging after caffeine infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vasodilator effect of intravenously administered dipyridamole may be caused by an increase in endogenous plasma adenosine levels. The authors evaluated the effect of caffeine, an adenosine receptor antagonist, on the diagnostic results of dipyridamole-201Tl myocardial imaging in eight patients with coronary artery disease. Caffeine infusion significantly attenuated the dipyridamole-induced fall in blood pressure and the accompanied increase in heart rate. The infusion of dipyridamole alone resulted in chest pain and ST-segment depressions on the electrocardiogram in four patients, whereas none of these problems occurred when the tests were repeated after caffeine. In six of eight patients, caffeine was responsible for false-negative dipyridamole-201Tl tests. Semiquantitive scores of the dipyridamole-induced 201Tl perfusion defects were decreased by caffeine from 9.0 ± 0.9 to 2.0 ± 1.1 points (p less than 0.05). Computerized analysis revealed a caffeine-mediated reduction in the percent reversibility of the images from 46% ± 16% to 6% ± 10% (p less than 0.05). They conclude that the use of caffeinated products prior to dipyridamole-201Tl testing may be responsible for false-negative findings

  20. Protein synthetic requirements for caffeine amelioration of radiation-induced G/sub 2/-arrest

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiated cells are arrested in G/sub 2/ (transition point [TP] = 32 min before cell selection in mitosis). Irradiated cells do not recover from G/sub 2/ arrest in the presence of cycloheximide (CHM) indicating dependence of recovery on protein synthesis. Irradiated cells in the presence of caffeine progress to mitosis without arrest. The authors investigate whether irradiated cells in the presence of caffeine require protein synthesis to progress to mitosis. Mitotic cell selection was used to monitor the progression of irradiated CHO cells (150 rad) during exposure to 5 mM caffeine and/or 50 μg/ml CHM. Protein synthesis inhibition was confirmed using /sup 3/H-leucine incorporation. Cells exposed to CHM alone are arrested in G/sub 2/ (TP=49 min), thus cells beyond this point have synthesized all proteins necessary for entry into mitosis. In the presence of caffeine, unirradiated cells exposed to CHM are not arrested at all in G/sub 2/, instead arrest occurs near the S/G/sub 2/ boundary (TP=95 min) indicating that caffeine alleviates the dependence of G/sub 2/ cell progression on protein synthesis. However, irradiated cells exposed to both caffeine and CHM are only able to progress to mitosis if beyond the CHM-TP. Irradiated cells in the presence of caffeine thus behave as untreated cells and require protein synthesis for progression to mitosis when prior to the CHM-TP

  1. What can isolated skeletal muscle experiments tell us about the effects of caffeine on exercise performance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallis, Jason; Duncan, Michael J; James, Rob S

    2015-08-01

    Caffeine is an increasingly popular nutritional supplement due to the legal, significant improvements in sporting performance that it has been documented to elicit, with minimal side effects. Therefore, the effects of caffeine on human performance continue to be a popular area of research as we strive to improve our understanding of this drug and make more precise recommendations for its use in sport. Although variations in exercise intensity seems to affect its ergogenic benefits, it is largely thought that caffeine can induce significant improvements in endurance, power and strength-based activities. There are a number of limitations to testing caffeine-induced effects on human performance that can be better controlled when investigating its effects on isolated muscles under in vitro conditions. The hydrophobic nature of caffeine results in a post-digestion distribution to all tissues of the body making it difficult to accurately quantify its key mechanism of action. This review considers the contribution of evidence from isolated muscle studies to our understating of the direct effects of caffeine on muscle during human performance. The body of in vitro evidence presented suggests that caffeine can directly potentiate skeletal muscle force, work and power, which may be important contributors to the performance-enhancing effects seen in humans. PMID:25988508

  2. Non specific drug distribution in an autopsy case report of fatal caffeine intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Takaki; Yuasa, Isao; Endoh, Minoru

    2015-11-01

    Caffeine has long been recognized as an addictive substance that causes autonomic nerve effect, and is known to increase catecholamine secretion from the adrenal glands. In recent years, the risk of ingesting toxic levels of caffeine has increased because of the easy availability of analgesics, CNS (Central Nervous System) stimulant medicine and dietary supplements at shops, health stores and through online purchases. We report the death of a young female resulting from the ingestion for suicide of an online purchased sleepiness-preventing medicine containing caffeine. The autopsy findings included pulmonary edema and congestion plus cutaneous emphysema. The stomach contents included a dark-brown viscous fluid without tablet or food residue. Toxicological examination revealed the presence of caffeine in the right heart blood (154.2 μg/mL) and stomach contents (197.5 μg/mL) (lethal blood level, >80 μg/mL). The highest caffeine content was in the bile (852.3 μg/mL). Biochemical findings showed that catecholamine concentration in the peripheral blood in the iliac vein was elevated. Immunostaining of catecholamine was weak in the adrenal medulla. We recommend highlighting the toxicity risk of ingesting substances with a high caffeine concentration, and we propose that caffeine concentrations should be included in the comprehensive routine forensic toxicological tests for all cases. PMID:26594005

  3. Variations in caffeine and chlorogenic acid contents of coffees: what are we drinking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, Iziar A; Mena, Pedro; Calani, Luca; Cid, Concepción; Del Rio, Daniele; Lean, Michael E J; Crozier, Alan

    2014-08-01

    The effect of roasting of coffee beans and the extraction of ground coffee with different volumes of hot pressurised water on the caffeine and the total caffeoylquinic acids (CQAs) content of the resultant beverages was investigated. While caffeine was stable higher roasting temperatures resulted in a loss of CQAs so that the caffeine/CQA ratio was a good marker of the degree of roasting. The caffeine and CQA content and volume was determined for 104 espresso coffees obtained from coffee shops in Scotland, Italy and Spain, limited numbers of cappuccino coffees from commercial outlets and several instant coffees. The caffeine content ranged from 48-317 mg per serving and CQAs from 6-188 mg. It is evident that the ingestion of 200 mg of caffeine per day can be readily and unwittingly exceeded by regular coffee drinkers. This is the upper limit of caffeine intake from all sources recommended by US and UK health agencies for pregnant women. In view of the variable volume of serving sizes, it is also clear that the term "one cup of coffee" is not a reproducible measurement for consumption, yet it is the prevailing unit used in epidemiology to assess coffee consumption and to link the potential effects of the beverage and its components on the outcome of diseases. More accurate measurement of the intake of coffee and its potentially bioactive components are required if epidemiological studies are to produce more reliable information. PMID:25014672

  4. Effects of caffeine on the electrophysiological, cognitive and motor responses of the central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deslandes A.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is the most consumed psychoactive substance in the world. The effects of caffeine have been studied using cognitive and motor measures, quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG and event-related potentials. However, these methods are not usually employed in combination, a fact that impairs the interpretation of the results. The objective of the present study was to analyze changes in electrophysiological, cognitive and motor variables with the ingestion of caffeine, and to relate central to peripheral responses. For this purpose we recorded event-related potentials and eyes-closed, resting EEG, applied the Stroop test, and measured reaction time. Fifteen volunteers took caffeine (400 mg or placebo in a randomized, crossover, double-blind design. A significant reduction of alpha absolute power over the entire scalp and of P300 latency at the Fz electrode were observed after caffeine ingestion. These results are consistent with a stimulatory effect of caffeine, although there was no change in the attention (Stroop test or in reaction time. The qEEG seems to be the most sensitive index of the changes produced by caffeine in the central nervous system since it proved to be capable of detecting changes that were not evident in the tests of cognitive or motor performance.

  5. Computational study of the binding modes of caffeine to the adenosine A2A receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuli; Burger, Steven K; Ayers, Paul W; Vöhringer-Martinez, Esteban

    2011-12-01

    Using the recently solved crystal structure of the human adenosine A(2A) receptor, we applied MM/PBSA to compare the binding modes of caffeine with those of the high-affinity selective antagonist ZM241385. MD simulations were performed in the environment of the lipid membrane bilayer. Four low-energy binding modes of caffeine-A(2A) were found, all of which had similar energies. Assuming an equal contribution of each binding mode of caffeine, the computed binding free energy difference between caffeine and ZM241385 is -2.4 kcal/mol, which compares favorably with the experimental value, -3.6 kcal/mol. The configurational entropy contribution of -0.9 kcal/mol from multiple binding modes of caffeine helps explain how a small molecule like caffeine can compete with a significantly larger molecule, ZM241385, which can form many more interactions with the receptor. We also performed residue-wise energy decomposition and found that Phe168, Leu249, and Ile274 contribute most significantly to the binding modes of caffeine and ZM241385. PMID:21970461

  6. Effects of coffee/caffeine on brain health and disease: What should I tell my patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehlig, Astrid

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decade, Food Regulation Authorities have concluded that coffee/caffeine consumption is not harmful if consumed at levels of 200 mg in one sitting (around 2½ cups of coffee) or 400 mg daily (around 5 cups of coffee). In addition, caffeine has many positive actions on the brain. It can increase alertness and well-being, help concentration, improve mood and limit depression. Caffeine may disturb sleep, but only in sensitive individuals. It may raise anxiety in a small subset of particularly sensitive people. Caffeine does not seem to lead to dependence, although a minority of people experience withdrawal symptoms. Caffeine can potentiate the effect of regular analgesic drugs in headache and migraine. Lifelong coffee/caffeine consumption has been associated with prevention of cognitive decline, and reduced risk of developing stroke, Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. Its consumption does not seem to influence seizure occurrence. Thus, daily coffee and caffeine intake can be part of a healthy balanced diet; its consumption does not need to be stopped in elderly people. PMID:26677204

  7. Caffeine consumption and self-assessed stress, anxiety, and depression in secondary school children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Gareth; Smith, Andrew

    2015-12-01

    Previous research suggests that effects of caffeine on behaviour are positive unless one is investigating sensitive groups or ingestion of large amounts. Children are a potentially sensitive subgroup, and especially so considering the high levels of caffeine currently found in energy drinks. The present study used data from the Cornish Academies Project to investigate associations between caffeine (both its total consumption, and that derived separately from energy drinks, cola, tea, and coffee) and single-item measures of stress, anxiety, and depression, in a large cohort of secondary school children from the South West of England. After adjusting for additional dietary, demographic, and lifestyle covariates, positive associations between total weekly caffeine intake and anxiety and depression remained significant, and the effects differed between males and females. Initially, effects were also observed in relation to caffeine consumed specifically from coffee. However, coffee was found to be the major contributor to high overall caffeine intake, providing explanation as to why effects relating to this source were also apparent. Findings from the current study increase our knowledge regarding associations between caffeine intake and stress, anxiety, and depression in secondary school children, though the cross-sectional nature of the research made it impossible to infer causality. PMID:26508718

  8. Effects of coffee and caffeine on bladder dysfunction in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chao-ran YI; Zhong-qing WEI; Xiang-lei DENG; Ze-yu SUN; Xing-rang LI; Cheng-gong TIAN

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To explore the effects and mechanisms of caffeine and coffee on bladder dysfunction in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Methods: Sprague-Dawley male rats were divided randomly into 4 groups: control, diabetes mellitus (DM), DM with coffee treatment, and DM with caffeine treatment. The diabetic rat was induced by intraperitoneal injection of streptozotocin (60 mg/kg). After 7 weeks of treatment with coffee and caffeine, cystometrogram, contractile responses to electrical field stimulation (EFS) and acetylcholine (ACh), and cyclic AMP (cAMP) concentration of the bladder body and base were measured. Results: The bladder weight, volume threshold for micturition and post-void residual volume (PVR) in the diabetic rats were significantly higher compared to those in the control animals. Coffee or caffeine treatment significantly reduced the bladder weight, bladder capacity and PVR in the diabetic rats. DM caused significant decreases in cAMP concentration of the bladder and coffee and caffeine caused upregulation of cAMP content in the diabetic bladder. In addition, coffee and caffeine tended to normalize the altered detrusor contractile responses to EFS and ACh in the diabetic rats. Conclusion: These results indicate that caffeine and coffee may have beneficial effects on bladder dysfunction in the early stage of diabetes by increasing cAMP content in the lower urinary tract, recovering the micturition reflex and improving the detrusor contractility.

  9. Caffeine inheritance in interspecific hybrids of Coffea arabica x Coffea canephora (Gentianales, Rubiaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina H.G. Priolli

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine inheritance was investigated in F2 and BC1F1 generations between Coffea arabica var. Bourbon Vermelho (BV and Coffea canephora var. Robusta 4x (R4x. The caffeine content of seeds and leaves was determined during 2004 and 2005. Microsatellite loci-markers were used to deduce the meiotic pattern of chromosome pairing of tetraploid interspecific hybrids. Genetic analysis indicated that caffeine content in seeds was quantitatively inherited and controlled by genes with additive effects. The estimates of broad-sense heritability of caffeine content in seeds were high for both generations. In coffee leaves, the caffeine content (BSH from the same populations showed transgressive segregants with enhanced levels and high BSH. Segregation of loci-markers in BC1F1 populations showed that the ratios of the gametes genotype did not differ significantly from those expected assuming random associations and tetrasomic inheritance. The results confirm the existence of distinct mechanisms controlling the caffeine content in seeds and leaves, the gene exchange between the C. arabica BV and C. canephora R4x genomes and favorable conditions for improving caffeine content in this coffee population.

  10. Caffeine content of prepackaged national-brand and private-label carbonated beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, K-H; Bell, L N

    2007-08-01

    Caffeine is a well-known stimulant that is added as an ingredient to various carbonated soft drinks. Due to its stimulatory and other physiological effects, individuals desire to know the exact amount of caffeine consumed from these beverages. This study analyzed the caffeine contents of 56 national-brand and 75 private-label store-brand carbonated beverages using high-performance liquid chromatography. Caffeine contents ranged from 4.9 mg/12 oz (IGA Cola) to 74 mg/12 oz (Vault Zero). Some of the more common national-brand carbonated beverages analyzed in this study with their caffeine contents were Coca-Cola (33.9 mg/12 oz), Diet Coke (46.3 mg/12 oz), Pepsi (38.9 mg/12 oz), Diet Pepsi (36.7 mg/12 oz), Dr Pepper (42.6 mg/12 oz), Diet Dr Pepper (44.1 mg/12 oz), Mountain Dew (54.8 mg/12 oz), and Diet Mountain Dew (55.2 mg/12 oz). The Wal-Mart store-brand beverages with their caffeine contents were Sam's Cola (12.7 mg/12 oz), Sam's Diet Cola (13.3 mg/12 oz), Dr Thunder (30.6 mg/12 oz), Diet Dr Thunder (29.9 mg/12 oz), and Mountain Lightning (46.5 mg/12 oz). Beverages from 14 other stores were also analyzed. Most store-brand carbonated beverages were found to contain less caffeine than their national-brand counterparts. The wide range of caffeine contents in carbonated beverages indicates that consumers would benefit from the placement of caffeine values on food labels. PMID:17995675

  11. Effects of caffeine on locomotor activity of horses: determination of the no-effect threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz-Neto, A; Zamur, G; Carregaro, A B; Mataqueiro, M I; Salvadori, M C; Azevedo, C P; Harkins, J D; Tobin, T

    2001-01-01

    Caffeine is the legal stimulant consumed most extensively by the human world population and may be found eventually in the urine and/or blood of race horses. The fact that caffeine is in foods led us to determine the highest no-effect dose (HNED) of caffeine on the spontaneous locomotor activity of horses and then to quantify this substance in urine until it disappeared. We built two behavioural stalls equipped with juxtaposed photoelectric sensors that emit infrared beams that divide the stall into nine sectors in a 'tic-tac-toe' fashion. Each time a beam was interrupted by a leg of the horse, a pulse was generated; the pulses were counted at 5-min intervals and stored by a microcomputer. Environmental effects were minimized by installing exhaust fans producing white noise that obscured outside sounds. One-way observation windows prevented the animals from seeing outside. The sensors were turned on 45 min before drug administration (saline control or caffeine). The animals were observed for up to 8 h after i.v. administration of 2.0, 2.5, 3.0 or 5.0 mg caffeine kg(-1). The HNED of caffeine for stimulation of the spontaneous locomotor activity of horses was 2.0 mg kg(-1). The quantification of caffeine in urine and plasma samples was done by gradient HPLC with UV detection. The no-effect threshold should not be greater than 2.0 microg caffeine ml(-1) plasma or 5.0 microg caffeine ml(-1) urine. PMID:11404835

  12. Clastogenic interactions of #betta# radiation and caffeine in human peripheral blood cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to determine whether the micronucleus test could be used as a rapid assay for mutagenic interactions, we studied the effect of 50-800 R of #betta# radiation in combination with 10-6-10-3 M caffeine in cultured human lymphocytes, with two treatment protocols. In one protocol (T0), whole blood was irradiated with 50-800 R of #betta# radiation, then stimulated with PHA and cultured for 72, 96 or 120 h in the presence or absence of caffeine. Under these conditions, #betta# radiation produced micronuclei in proportion to dose but post-treatment with 1 mM caffein significantly decreased the number of micronuclei observed. The effect of caffeine was greater with the higher radiation doses and at earlier fixation times. Caffeine also decreased the mitotic index which, in turn, decreased the number of micronuclei observed; but caffeine post-treatment still had a significant effect even after mitotic activity was taken into account. In a second protocol (T48), PHA-stimulated (actively cycling) cultures were irradiated 48 h after innoculation, then treated with caffeine, and fixed at 72 h post-innoculation (PI). With this protocol #betta# radiation produced more micronuclei than at T0; this suggests that many of the cells damaged at T0 are either lost or repaired. At T48 1 mM caffeine significantly increased the number of micronuclei observed after #betta# radiation at all doses except 50 and 200 R. The mitotic index increased after 400-600 R, but only in the absence of caffeine. (orig./AJ)

  13. The Effects of Caffeine on Vertical Jump Height and Execution in Collegiate Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloms, Lucas P; Fitzgerald, John S; Short, Martin W; Whitehead, James R

    2016-07-01

    Bloms, LP, Fitzgerald, JS, Short, MW, and Whitehead, JR. The effects of caffeine on vertical jump height and execution in collegiate athletes. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1855-1861, 2016-Caffeine ingestion elicits a variety of physiological effects that may be beneficial to maximal-intensity exercise performance, although its effectiveness and physical mechanism of action enhancing ballistic task performance are unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of caffeine ingestion on vertical jump height and jump execution in Division I collegiate athletes. The study used a single-blind, randomized, crossover design. Athletes (n = 25) consumed either caffeine (5 mg·kg) or placebo. After a 60-minute waiting period, athletes performed 3 squat jumps (SJ) and 3 countermovement jumps (CMJ) while standing on a force platform. Jump height and execution variables were calculated from mechanography data. In comparison with placebo, caffeine increased SJ height (32.8 ± 6.2 vs. 34.5 ± 6.7 cm; p = 0.001) and CMJ height (36.4 ± 6.9 vs. 37.9 ± 7.4 cm; p = 0.001). Peak force (p = 0.032) and average rate of force development (p = 0.037) were increased during the CMJ in the caffeine trail compared with the control. Time to half peak force was the only execution variable improved with caffeine (p = 0.019) during the SJ. It seems that caffeine affects both height and execution of jumping. Our data indicate that the physical mechanism of jump enhancement is increased peak force production or rate of force development during jumping depending on technique. The physical mechanism of jump enhancement suggests that the ergogenic effects of caffeine may transfer to other ballistic tasks involving the lower-body musculature in collegiate athletes. PMID:26626028

  14. Prenatal caffeine ingestion induces transgenerational neuroendocrine metabolic programming alteration in second generation rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that prenatal caffeine ingestion induces an increased susceptibility to metabolic syndrome with alterations of glucose and lipid metabolic phenotypes in adult first generation (F1) of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) rats, and the underlying mechanism is originated from a hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis-associated neuroendocrine metabolic programming alteration in utero. This study aims to investigate the transgenerational effects of this programming alteration in adult second generation (F2). Pregnant Wistar rats were administered with caffeine (120 mg/kg·d) from gestational day 11 until delivery. Four groups in F2 were set according to the cross-mating between control and caffeine-induced IUGR rats. F2 were subjected to a fortnight ice water swimming stimulus on postnatal month 4, and blood samples were collected before and after stress. Results showed that the majority of the activities of HPA axis and phenotypes of glucose and lipid metabolism were altered in F2. Particularly, comparing with the control group, caffeine groups had an enhanced corticosterone levels after chronic stress. Compared with before stress, the serum glucose levels were increased in some groups whereas the triglyceride levels were decreased. Furthermore, total cholesterol gain rates were enhanced but the high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol gain rates were decreased in most caffeine groups after stress. These transgenerational effects were characterized partially with gender and parental differences. Taken together, these results indicate that the reproductive and developmental toxicities and the neuroendocrine metabolic programming mechanism by prenatal caffeine ingestion have transgenerational effects in rats, which may help to explain the susceptibility to metabolic syndrome and associated diseases in F2. - Highlights: • Caffeine-induced neuroendocrine metabolic programming of HPA has hereditary effect. • Caffeine

  15. Prenatal caffeine ingestion induces transgenerational neuroendocrine metabolic programming alteration in second generation rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Hanwen [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Deng, Zixin; Liu, Lian; Shen, Lang; Kou, Hao; He, Zheng [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Ping, Jie; Xu, Dan [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Ma, Lu [Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, Public Health School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Chen, Liaobin, E-mail: lbchen@whu.edu.cn [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Wang, Hui, E-mail: wanghui19@whu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Basic Medical School of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2014-02-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that prenatal caffeine ingestion induces an increased susceptibility to metabolic syndrome with alterations of glucose and lipid metabolic phenotypes in adult first generation (F1) of intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) rats, and the underlying mechanism is originated from a hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis-associated neuroendocrine metabolic programming alteration in utero. This study aims to investigate the transgenerational effects of this programming alteration in adult second generation (F2). Pregnant Wistar rats were administered with caffeine (120 mg/kg·d) from gestational day 11 until delivery. Four groups in F2 were set according to the cross-mating between control and caffeine-induced IUGR rats. F2 were subjected to a fortnight ice water swimming stimulus on postnatal month 4, and blood samples were collected before and after stress. Results showed that the majority of the activities of HPA axis and phenotypes of glucose and lipid metabolism were altered in F2. Particularly, comparing with the control group, caffeine groups had an enhanced corticosterone levels after chronic stress. Compared with before stress, the serum glucose levels were increased in some groups whereas the triglyceride levels were decreased. Furthermore, total cholesterol gain rates were enhanced but the high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol gain rates were decreased in most caffeine groups after stress. These transgenerational effects were characterized partially with gender and parental differences. Taken together, these results indicate that the reproductive and developmental toxicities and the neuroendocrine metabolic programming mechanism by prenatal caffeine ingestion have transgenerational effects in rats, which may help to explain the susceptibility to metabolic syndrome and associated diseases in F2. - Highlights: • Caffeine-induced neuroendocrine metabolic programming of HPA has hereditary effect. • Caffeine

  16. Metabolic and hormonal effects of caffeine: randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Todd; Comi, Richard; Sluss, Patrick; Keisari, Ronit; Manwar, Simone; Kim, Janice; Larson, Robin; Baron, John A

    2007-12-01

    In short-term studies, caffeine has been shown to increase insulin levels, reduce insulin sensitivity, and increase cortisol levels. However, epidemiological studies have indicated that long-term consumption of beverages containing caffeine such as coffee and green tea is associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus. There is a paucity of randomized studies addressing the metabolic and hormonal effects of consuming caffeine over periods of more than 1 day. We evaluated the effect of oral intake of 200 mg of caffeine taken twice a day for 7 days on glucose metabolism, as well as on serum cortisol, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and androstenedione, and on nighttime salivary melatonin. A double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study with periods of 7 days and washouts of 5 days comparing caffeine with placebo capsules was conducted. Participants were 16 healthy adults aged 18 to 22 years with a history of caffeine consumption. Blood samples from each subject were assayed for glucose, insulin, serum cortisol, DHEA, and androstenedione on the eighth day of each period after an overnight fast. Nighttime salivary melatonin was also measured. Insulin levels were significantly higher (by 1.80 microU/mL; 95% confidence interval, 0.33-3.28) after caffeine intake than after placebo. The homeostasis model assessment index of insulin sensitivity was reduced by 35% (95% confidence interval, 7%-62%) by caffeine. There were no differences in glucose, DHEA, androstenedione, and melatonin between treatment periods. This study provides evidence that daily caffeine intake reduces insulin sensitivity; the effect persists for at least a week and is evident up to 12 hours after administration. PMID:17998023

  17. Serum caffeine levels after 24 hours of caffeine abstention: observations on clinical patients undergoing myocardial perfusion imaging with dipyridamole or adenosine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although caffeine attenuates the vasodilatation produced by dipyridamole and adenosine, and is therefore contraindicated when these agents are used for myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, caffeine levels in clinical patients undergoing standard imaging protocols have not been studied. Eighty-six patients undergoing clinically indicated intravenous dipyridamole (n=75) or adenosine (n=11) thallium-201 myocardial perfusion scintigraphy, all of whom reported abstention from products containing caffeine for 24 h, were studied prospectively. Blood samples were drawn prior to initiation of the pharmacologic infusion, and serum caffeine levels were determined using an enzyme immunoassay technique. Results of these determinations were correlated with maximum pulse and blood pressure changes measured during and immediately after the stressor infusion, and thallium imaging findings. Detectable caffeine levels were found in 34 patients (40%), ranging from 0.1 to 5.0 mg/l. There was no significant difference in mean systolic blood pressure decrease or mean pulse increase between patients with caffeine levels > 1.0 mg/l (20.4 ± 18.2 mmHg, 11.0 ± 8.9 BPM; n=5) and those with lower (0.1 to 0.9 mg/l) (15.4 ± 9.5 mmHg, 14.4 ± 8.2 BPM; n=29) or no detectable caffeine levels (18.0 ± 11.5 mmHg, 16.6 ± 10.1 BPM; n=52). Redistribution on thallium imaging was also identified with a similar frequency in these three groups (2/5, 40%; 8/29, 28%; 22/52, 42% respectively). (orig.)

  18. Ultra-violet Spectrophotometric Determination of Caffeine in Soft and Energy Drinks Available in Yenagoa, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Amos-Tautua; W. Bamidele Martin; E.R.E. Diepreye

    2014-01-01

    This study was carried out to determine the pH and levels of caffeine in eight brands of carbonated and energy drinks available in local market in Yenagoa, Nigeria. Quantitative analysis of caffeine was performed by a simple and fast standard UV spectrophotometric method, using carbon tetrachloride as the extracting solvent. Results showed that the pH of the beverages were slightly acidic ranging from 5.92-6.44. The minimum caffeine level was observed in the carbonated soft drink Coca Cola (4...

  19. CHROMATOGRAPHIC DETERMINATION OF CAFFEINE CONTENTS IN SOFT AND ENERGY DRINKS AVAILABLE ON THE ROMANIAN MARKET

    OpenAIRE

    Mira Elena Ionică; Ion Trandafir; Violeta Nour

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine is a stimulant that is commonly found in many foods and drinks that we consume. Concerns exist about the potential adverse health effects of high consumption of dietary caffeine, especially in children and pregnant women. Recommended caffeine intakes corresponding to no adverse health effects have been suggested recently for healthy adults (400 – 450 mg/day), for women contemplating pregnancy (300 mg/day), and for young children age 4 – 6 years (45 mg/day). Different brands of soft a...

  20. Likely Additive Ergogenic Effects of Combined Preexercise Dietary Nitrate and Caffeine Ingestion in Trained Cyclists

    OpenAIRE

    Handzlik, Michal K.; Gleeson, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Aims. To evaluate the possible additive effects of beetroot juice plus caffeine on exercise performance. Methods. In a randomized, double-blinded study design, fourteen healthy well-trained men aged 22 ± 3 years performed four trials on different occasions following preexercise ingestion of placebo (PLA), PLA plus 5 mg/kg caffeine (PLA+C), beetroot juice providing 8 mmol of nitrate (BR), and beetroot juice plus caffeine (BR+C). Participants cycled at 60% maximal oxygen uptake ( V ˙ O 2 max) f...

  1. Placental passage of benzoic acid, caffeine, and glyphosate in an ex vivo human perfusion system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mose, Tina; Kjaerstad, Mia Birkhoej; Mathiesen, Line;

    2008-01-01

    given group of compounds. Benzoic acid, caffeine, and glyphosate were chosen as model compounds because they are small molecules with large differences in physiochemical properties. Caffeine crossed the placenta by passive diffusion. The initial transfer rate of benzoic acid was more limited in the...... first part of the perfusion compared to caffeine, but reached the same steady-state level by the end of perfusion. The transfer of glyphosate was restricted throughout perfusion, with a lower permeation rate, and only around 15% glyphosate in maternal circulation crossed to the fetal circulation during...

  2. Electrospun polyvinyl-alcohol nanofibers as oral fast-dissolving delivery system of caffeine and riboflavin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Xiaoqiang; Kanjwal, Muzafar Ahmed; Lin, Lin;

    2013-01-01

    Fast-dissolving drug delivery systems were prepared by electrospinning using polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as the filament-forming polymer and drug carrier. Caffeine and riboflavin were used as the model drugs. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction...... PVA/caffeine and PVA/riboflavin nanofibrous mats had almost the same dissolution time (about 1.5 s) and wetting time (about 4.5 s). The release measurements indicated that drugs can be released in a burst manner (caffeine to an extent of 100% and riboflavin to an extent of 40% within 60 s) from the...

  3. Caffeine intake improves intense intermittent exercise performance and reduces muscle interstitial potassium accumulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Magni; Nielsen, Jens Jung; Bangsbo, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The effect of oral caffeine ingestion on intense intermittent exercise performance and muscle interstitial ion concentrations was examined. The study consists of two studies (S1 and S2). In S1 twelve subjects completed the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery level 2 (Yo-Yo IR2) test with prior caffeine (6...... mg/kg b.w.; CAF) or placebo (PLA) intake. In S2 six subjects performed one low intense (20 W) and three intense (50 W) 3-min (separated by 5 min) one-legged knee-extension exercise bouts with (CAF) and without (CON) prior caffeine supplementation for determination of muscle interstitial K(+) and Na...

  4. HPLC determination of caffeine and theophylline in Paullinia cupana Kunth (guarana) and Cola spp. samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belliardo, F; Martelli, A; Valle, M G

    1985-05-01

    A reversed-phase high-performance liquid-chromatographic method for the determination of caffeine and theophylline in commercial guarana samples (drug obtained from the seeds of Paulinia cupana Kunth, Sapindaceae of the Amazon Region) and in Cola spp. samples is described and discussed. The methodology developed is simple and rapid with a minimum of samples preparation required. A comparison of five different techniques for the extraction of caffeine and theophylline is discussed. Furthermore the quantitative determination of caffeine and theophylline in five samples of Brasilian guarana, in two samples of dietetic products containing guarana, in two samples of Cola extract and in three of Cola seed powder are reported. PMID:4013524

  5. Caffeine potentiates the lethality of tumour necrosis factor in cancer cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Belizario, J. E.; Tilly, J L; Sherwood, S W

    1993-01-01

    In this study we have investigated the interaction of caffeine, a prototypic methylxanthine, and TNF on the induction of cell death in mouse and human cell lines during progression from G1 to successive phases of the cell cycle. Exposure of cells to TNF (0.1-100 ng ml-1) as single agent for 48 h caused low or no lethality. The rates of cell death increased significantly when cells cultured with TNF for 24 h were exposed to caffeine (2.5-20 mM). The magnitude of the enhancement by caffeine was...

  6. Analysis of caffeine and heavy metal contents in branded and unbranded tea available in Pakistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the investigation of caffeine and heavy metal contents in four branded and six unbranded tea samples collected from local markets of Lahore, Faisalabad and Peshawar, the amount of caffeine and heavy metals in all the branded tea samples were in agreement with the international standards. In unbranded tea samples, though the amount of caffeine was within standard limits but two of the samples collected from Peshawar had high concentrations of lead being, 13.69 and 15.78 mg/kg, consumption of which can lead to serious problems. (author)

  7. Novel, Highly Specific N-Demethylases Enable Bacteria To Live on Caffeine and Related Purine Alkaloids

    OpenAIRE

    Summers, Ryan M.; Louie, Tai Man; Yu, Chi-Li; Gakhar, Lokesh; Louie, Kailin C.; Subramanian, Mani

    2012-01-01

    The molecular basis for the ability of bacteria to live on caffeine as a sole carbon and nitrogen source is unknown. Pseudomonas putida CBB5, which grows on several purine alkaloids, metabolizes caffeine and related methylxanthines via sequential N-demethylation to xanthine. Metabolism of caffeine by CBB5 was previously attributed to one broad-specificity methylxanthine N-demethylase composed of two subunits, NdmA and NdmB. Here, we report that NdmA and NdmB are actually two independent Riesk...

  8. Low doses of caffeine reduce heart rate during submaximal cycle ergometry

    OpenAIRE

    Wetter Thomas J; McClaran Steven R

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to examine the cardiovascular effects of two low-levels of caffeine ingestion in non habitual caffeine users at various submaximal and maximal exercise intensities. Methods Nine male subjects (19–25 yr; 83.3 ± 3.1 kg; 184 ± 2 cm), underwent three testing sessions administered in a randomized and double-blind fashion. During each session, subjects were provided 4 oz of water and a gelatin capsule containing a placebo, 1.5 mg/kg caffeine, or 3.0...

  9. Action of caffeine on x-irradiated HeLa cells. IV. Progression delays and enhanced cell killing at high caffeine concentrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The response of x-irradiated and unirradiated HeLa S3 cells to treatment with caffeine at concentrations between 1 and 10 nM has been examined with respect to both delay in progression through the cell generation cycle and enhancement of the expression of potentially lethal x-ray damage. Progression is delayed in a concentration-dependent fashion: the generation time is doubled at about 4 mM. The duration of G1 is lengthened, and the rate of DNA synthesis is reduced, although the kinetics are different in the two phases; the rate of DNA synthesis is usually unaffected at 1 or 2 mM, while there is no concentration threshold for the slowing of progression through G1. Progression through G2 appears to be unaffected by concentrations up to at least 10 mM. Killing of irradiated cells in G2 is somewhat greater after treatment with the higher caffeine concentrations than reported previously for 1 mM. Moreover, an additional mode of killing is observed in irradiated G1 cells which had been found previously to be only slightly affected by 1 mM caffeine; they suffer extensive killing at concentrations above 5 mM. The time-survival curves for irradiated, caffeine-treated G1 and G2 cells have characteristically different shapes. The dose-survival curves for cells treated with the higher caffeine concentrations display steeper terminal slopes and narrower shoulders

  10. Antioxidant properties of thio-caffeine derivatives: Identification of the newly synthesized 8-[(pyrrolidin-1-ylcarbonothioyl)sulfanyl]caffeine as antioxidant and highly potent cytoprotective agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasiewicz, Beata; Sierakowska, Arleta; Wandyszewska, Natalia; Warżajtis, Beata; Rychlewska, Urszula; Wawrzyniak, Rafał; Mrówczyńska, Lucyna

    2016-08-15

    A series of nine thio-caffeine analogues were synthesized and characterised by NMR, FT-IR and MS spectroscopic methods. Molecular structures of four of them were determined using single crystal X-ray diffraction methods. The antioxidant properties of all compounds, at concentration ranges from 0.025 to 0.1mg/mL, were evaluated by various chemical- and cell-based antioxidant assays. Human erythrocytes were used to examine in vitro haemolytic activity of all compounds and their protective effect against oxidative haemolysis induced by AAPH, one of the commonly used free radical generator. All compounds studied showed no effect on the human erythrocytes membrane structure and permeability with the exception of 8-(phenylsulfanyl)caffeine. Among the nine caffeine thio-analogues tested, the newly synthesized 8-[(pyrrolidin-1-ylcarbonothioyl)sulfanyl]caffeine possessed exceptionally high antioxidant properties. Moreover, it protects human erythrocytes against AAPH-induced oxidative damage as efficiently as the standard antioxidant Trolox. Therefore, 8-[(pyrrolidin-1-ylcarbonothioyl)sulfanyl]caffeine may have a significant cytoprotective potential caused by its antioxidant activity. PMID:27400888

  11. Caffeine provokes adverse interactions with 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'ecstasy') and related psychostimulants: mechanisms and mediators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanattou-Saïfoudine, N; McNamara, R; Harkin, A

    2012-11-01

    Concomitant consumption of caffeine with recreational psychostimulant drugs of abuse can provoke severe acute adverse reactions in addition to longer term consequences. The mechanisms by which caffeine increases the toxicity of psychostimulants include changes in body temperature regulation, cardiotoxicity and lowering of the seizure threshold. Caffeine also influences the stimulatory, discriminative and reinforcing effects of psychostimulant drugs. In this review, we consider our current understanding of such caffeine-related drug interactions, placing a particular emphasis on an adverse interaction between caffeine and the substituted amphetamine, 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, 'ecstasy'), which has been most recently described and characterized. Co-administration of caffeine profoundly enhances the acute toxicity of MDMA in rats, as manifested by high core body temperature, tachycardia and increased mortality. In addition, co-administration of caffeine enhances the long-term serotonergic neurotoxicity induced by MDMA. Observations to date support an interactive model of drug-induced toxicity comprising MDMA-related enhancement of dopamine release coupled to a caffeine-mediated antagonism of adenosine receptors in addition to inhibition of PDE. These experiments are reviewed together with reports of caffeine-related drug interactions with cocaine, d-amphetamine and ephedrine where similar mechanisms are implicated. Understanding the underlying mechanisms will guide appropriate intervention strategies for the management of severe reactions and potential for increased drug-related toxicity, resulting from concomitant caffeine consumption. PMID:22671762

  12. Modification of the radiosensitivity of barley seed by post-treatment with caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barley seeds of a hull-less variety (IB 65) were γ-irradiated (40 and 45 krad, 100 rad/sec) at 250C, and the seeds were post-hydrated for 12 hours at approximately 30C in oxygenated and oxygen-free water or caffeine solutions (3.8 x 10-4 to 3.8 x 10-2M). Measurements of 8-day seedling growth showed that the different caffeine concentrations applied during oxygenated or oxygen-free hydrations produced no observable effects on the growth of unirradiated seeds. All caffeine concentrations afforded protection for the irradiated seeds under oxygenated conditions, and potentiated the damage under oxygen-free conditions. A maximum radio-protection occurred at a caffeine concentration of 3.8 x 10-3M, whereas radiosensitization under oxygen-free conditions was concentration-dependent. Possible mechanisms are discussed. (U.K.)

  13. Modification of the radiosensitivity of barley seed by post-treatment with caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In dry barley seeds (3.1 per cent moisture content), the maximal level of oxic damage (class III damage) was reached within the first 40 min a post-hydration in oxygenated water at 5 +- 10C. The decay of the gamma-ray-induced oxygensensitive sites required however, about 120 min. The mechanism leading to partial protection against the class III damage were initiated when caffeine was present during the dirst 30 min of oxygenated post-hydration. If added after 30 min of oxygenated hydration, caffeine had no protective action. For the potentiation of an oxygen-independent component of damage, caffeine had to be present during the first 240 min of oxygen-free hydration. These observations involving a physiologically inert system raised questions regarding physico-chemical vis-a-vis biochemical mechanisms of caffeine effect on irradiated systems and these have been briefly discussed. (author)

  14. Effects of caffeine on purine metabolism and ultraviolet light-induced lethality in cultured mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffeine, at doses which enhance the killing action of ultraviolet light, inhibits both de novo synthesis and the utilization of exogenous purines in cultured CHO-K1, a Chinese hamster ovary cell line. The effect is dose dependent, with a caffeine concentration of 7.5 mM producing a 90% reduction in 15 min. Interference with utilization of exogenous purines was seen as a substantial decrease in the conversion of [14C]hypoxanthine, [14C]adenine, or [14C]guanine into their respective di- and triphosphates in the presence of caffeine. Thus, one of the ways by which antimetabolites and caffeine act to enhance ultraviolet light killing may be by interference with the supply of purine nucleotides needed for repair

  15. Determination of Aspartame, Caffeine, Saccharin, and Benzoic Acid in Beverages by High Performance Liquid Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaney, Michael F.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Describes a simple and reliable new quantitative analysis experiment using liquid chromatography for the determinaiton of caffeine, saccharin, and sodium benzoate in beverages. Background information, procedures used, and typical results obtained are provided. (JN)

  16. Caffeine degradation in water by gamma irradiation, ozonation and ozonation/gamma irradiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torun Murat

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Aqueous solutions of caffeine were treated with ozone and gamma irradiation. The amounts of remaining caffeine were determined after solid phase extraction as a function of absorbed dose and ozonation time. In addition to this, some important parameters such as inorganic ions, chemical oxygen demand (COD dissolved oxygen and total acidity changes were followed. Caffeine (50 ppm is found to be completely decomposed at 3.0 kGy and 1.2 kGy doses in the absence of H2O2 and in 1.20 mM H2O2 solutions, respectively. In the case of gamma irradiation after ozonation, 50 ppm caffeine was removed at 0.2 kGy when the solution was ozonized for 100 s at a rate of 10 g O3 h-1 in 400 mL 50 ppm paracetamol solution.

  17. Intake of Caffeinated Soft Drinks before and during Pregnancy, but Not Total Caffeine Intake, Is Associated with Increased Cerebral Palsy Risk in the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tollånes, Mette C; Strandberg-Larsen, Katrine; Eichelberger, Kacey Y;

    2016-01-01

    caffeine intake before and during pregnancy was not associated with CP risk. High consumption (≥6 servings/d) of caffeinated soft drinks before pregnancy was associated with an increased CP risk (HR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.2, 3.1), and children of women consuming 3-5 daily servings of caffeinated soft drinks...... during pregnancy weeks 13-30 also had an increased CP risk (HR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.1, 2.8). A mean daily consumption of 51-100 mg caffeine from soft drinks during the first half of pregnancy was associated with a 1.9-fold increased risk of CP in children (HR: 1.9; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.6). CONCLUSIONS: Maternal...... total daily caffeine consumption before and during pregnancy was not associated with CP risk in children. The observed increased risk with caffeinated soft drinks warrants further investigation....

  18. Caffeine Intake, Smoking, and Risk of Parkinson Disease in Men and Women

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Rui; Guo, Xuguang; Park, Yikyung; Huang, Xuemei; Sinha, Rashmi; Freedman, Neal D; Hollenbeck, Albert R.; Blair, Aaron; Chen, Honglei

    2012-01-01

    The authors prospectively examined whether caffeine intake was associated with lower risk of Parkinson disease (PD) in both men and women among 304,980 participants in the National Institutes of Health-AARP Diet and Health Study and whether smoking affected this relation. Multivariate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were derived from logistic regression models. Higher caffeine intake as assessed in 1995–1996 was monotonically associated with lower PD risk (diagnosed in 2000–2006) in ...

  19. Calcium and caffeine interaction in increased calcium balance in ovariectomized rats

    OpenAIRE

    Sandra Tavares da Silva; Neuza Maria Brunoro Costa; Frederico Souzalima Caldoncelli Franco; Antônio José Natali

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the effects of caffeine intake associated with inadequate or adequate calcium intake in laparotomized or ovariectomized rats by means of the calcium balance. Forty adults Wistar rats were ovariectomized or laparotomized. METHODS: The animals (n=40) were randomly placed in eight groups receiving the AIN-93 diet with 100% or 50% of the recommended calcium intake with or without added caffeine (6mg/kg/day). The animals were kept in individuals metabolic cages a...

  20. Driver’s Attitudes about the Impact of Caffeine and Energy Drinks on Road Traffic Safety

    OpenAIRE

    Pešić, Dalibor; Antić, Boris; Brčić, Davor; Davidović, Jelica

    2015-01-01

    Large amounts of energy drinks and caffeine, which is the main ingredient of energy drinks, produce a negative effect on the drivers, and therefore affect traffic safety.In order to determine the attitudes of drivers toward the impact of energy drinks and caffeine, a research was conducted using a questionnaire form and the targeted group of the survey were drivers. The research was conducted in the City of Belgrade in December 2012. There were 420 survey papers distributed to drivers of diff...

  1. A Combination of Amino Acids and Caffeine Enhances Sprint Running Capacity in a Hot, Hypoxic Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Tom R; Potter, Aaron; Billaut, François; Panchuk, Derek; Pyne, David B; Gore, Christopher J; Chen, Ting-Ting; McQuade, Leon; Stepto, Nigel K

    2016-02-01

    Heat and hypoxia exacerbate central nervous system (CNS) fatigue. We therefore investigated whether essential amino acid (EAA) and caffeine ingestion attenuates CNS fatigue in a simulated team sport-specific running protocol in a hot, hypoxic environment. Subelite male team sport athletes (n = 8) performed a repeat sprint running protocol on a nonmotorized treadmill in an extreme environment on 4 separate occasions. Participants ingested one of four supplements: a double placebo, 3 mg.kg-1 body mass of caffeine + placebo, 2 x 7 g EAA (Musashi Create)+placebo, or caffeine + EAA before each exercise session using a randomized, double-blind crossover design. Electromyography (EMG) activity and quadriceps evoked responses to magnetic stimulation were assessed from the dominant leg at preexercise, halftime, and postexercise. Central activation ratio (CAR) was used to quantify completeness of quadriceps activation. Oxygenation of the prefrontal cortex was measured via near-infrared spectroscopy. Mean sprint work was higher (M = 174 J, 95% CI [23, 324], p effect size, likely beneficial) in the caffeine + EAA condition versus EAAs alone. The decline in EMG activity was less (M = 13%, 95% CI [0, 26]; p < .01, d = 0.58, likely beneficial) in caffeine + EAA versus EAA alone. Similarly, the pre- to postexercise decrement in CAR was significantly less (M = -2.7%, 95% CI [0.4, 5.4]; p < .05, d = 0.50, likely beneficial) when caffeine + EAA were ingested compared with placebo. Cerebral oxygenation was lower (M = -5.6%, 95% CI [1.0, 10.1]; p < .01, d = 0.60, very likely beneficial) in the caffeine + EAA condition compared with LNAA alone. Co-ingestion of caffeine and EAA appears to maintain muscle activation and central drive, with a small improvement in running performance. PMID:26248498

  2. Randomized double-blind placebo-controlled crossover study of caffeine in patients with intermittent claudication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Momsen, A H; Jensen, M B; Norager, C B;

    2010-01-01

    Intermittent claudication is a disabling symptom of peripheral arterial disease for which few medical treatments are available. This study investigated the effect of caffeine on physical capacity in patients with intermittent claudication.......Intermittent claudication is a disabling symptom of peripheral arterial disease for which few medical treatments are available. This study investigated the effect of caffeine on physical capacity in patients with intermittent claudication....

  3. Regulation of aggregate size and pattern by adenosine and caffeine in cellular slime molds

    OpenAIRE

    Jaiswal Pundrik; Soldati Thierry; Thewes Sascha; Baskar Ramamurthy

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Multicellularity in cellular slime molds is achieved by aggregation of several hundreds to thousands of cells. In the model slime mold Dictyostelium discoideum, adenosine is known to increase the aggregate size and its antagonist caffeine reduces the aggregate size. However, it is not clear if the actions of adenosine and caffeine are evolutionarily conserved among other slime molds known to use structurally unrelated chemoattractants. We have examined how the known factor...

  4. Determination of Caffeine in Beverages by Capillary Zone Electrophoresis: An Experiment for the Undergraduate Analytical Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Eric D.; Barry, Eugene F.; Rubinstein, Harry

    1996-12-01

    Certain individuals may be sensitive to specific compounds in comsumer products. It is important to quantify these analytes in food products in order to monitor their intake. Caffeine is one such compound. Determination of caffeine in beverages by spectrophotometric procedures requires an extraction procedure, which can prove time-consuming. Although the corresponding determination by HPLC allows for a direct injection, capillary zone electrophoresis provides several advantages such as extremely low solvent consumption, smaller sample volume requirements, and improved sensitivity.

  5. Coefficients of caffeine distribution in aliphatic alcohol-ammonium sulfate-water systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korenman, Ya. I.; Krivosheeva, O. A.; Mokshina, N. Ya.

    2012-11-01

    The extraction of caffeine with aliphatic alcohols C3-C9 from aqueous solutions in the presence of a salting-out agent (ammonium sulfate) is studied. Quantitative characteristics of extraction are calculated: the distribution coefficients ( D) and the degree of recovery ( R, %). Relations are found between log D of caffeine and the length of the hydrocarbon radical in the alcohol molecule, along with certain physicochemical properties of the extragents.

  6. Protein Profile Changes during Porcine Oocyte Aging and Effects of Caffeine on Protein Expression Patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Guang-Jian; Wang, Ke; Miao, De-Qiang; Guo, Lei; Hou, Yi; Schatten, Heide; Sun, Qing-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    It has been shown that oocyte aging critically affects reproduction and development. By using proteomic tools, in the present study, changes in protein profiles during porcine oocyte aging and effects of caffeine on oocyte aging were investigated. By comparing control MII oocytes with aging MII oocytes, we identified 23 proteins that were up-regulated and 3 proteins that were down-regulated during the aging process. In caffeine-treated oocytes, 6 proteins were identified as up-regulated and 1...

  7. Caffeine dose effect on activation-induced BOLD and CBF responses

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Yufen; Parrish, Todd B.

    2009-01-01

    Caffeine is a popular psychostimulant, typically found in beverages. While low to intermediate doses of caffeine are associated with positive feelings and increased mental performance and alertness, high doses induce negative feelings such as insomnia, anxiety and nervousness. We investigate if this nonlinear dose response is present for caffeine’s effects on functional activation. Twenty-seven healthy subjects were assigned randomly to four different groups: saline, 1mg/kg, 2.5mg/kg and 5mg/...

  8. SPECT assessment of brain activation induced by caffeine: no effect on areas involved in dependence

    OpenAIRE

    Nehlig, Astrid; Armspach, Jean-Paul; Namer, Izzie J.

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine is not considered addictive, and in animals it does not trigger metabolic increases or dopamine release in brain areas involved in reinforcement and reward. Our objective was to measure caffeine effects on cerebral perfusion in humans using single photon emission computed tomography, with a specific focus on areas of reinforcement and reward. Two groups of nonsmoking subjects were studied, one with a low (8 subjects) and one with a high (6 subjects) daily coffee consumption. The subj...

  9. Association between ADORA2A and DRD2 Polymorphisms and Caffeine-Induced Anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Childs, Emma; Hohoff, Christa; Deckert, Jürgen; Xu, Ke; Badner, Judith,; de Wit, Harriet

    2008-01-01

    Caffeine produces mild psychostimulant and sometimes anxiogenic effects by antagonizing adenosine at A1 and A2A receptors, and perhaps through interactions with other transmitter systems. Adenosine receptors are colocalized and functionally interact with dopamine receptors in the brain. Thus, functional polymorphisms in the genes for either adenosine or dopamine receptors may affect responses to caffeine. In this study, we examined associations between self-reported anxiogenic effects of caff...

  10. Wake up and smell the coffee. Caffeine, coffee, and the medical consequences.

    OpenAIRE

    Chou, T.

    1992-01-01

    Caffeine is a methylxanthine whose primary biologic effect is antagonism of the adenosine receptor. Its presence in coffee, tea, soda beverages, chocolate, and many prescription and over-the-counter drugs makes it the most commonly consumed stimulant drug. Initially caffeine increases blood pressure, plasma catecholamine levels, plasma renin activity, serum free fatty acid levels, urine production, and gastric acid secretion. Its long-term effects have been more difficult to substantiate. Mos...

  11. Effect of taurine and caffeine on sleep–wake activity in Drosophila melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, Fang Ju; Pierce, Michael M; Sehgal, Amita; Wu, Tianyi; Skipper, Daniel C; Chabba, Radhika

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine and taurine are two major neuromodulators present in large quantities in many popular energy drinks. We investigated their effects on sleep-wake control in constant darkness using the fruit fly Drosophila as a model system. It has been shown that caffeine, as the most widely used psychostimulant, can boost arousal through the dopamine pathway in the mushroom bodies of flies. Taurine is a GABA receptor agonist, which is inhibitory to neuronal firing. We show here that flies receiving ...

  12. Combination ergotamine and caffeine improves seated blood pressure and presyncopal symptoms in autonomic failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Amy C; Ramirez, Claudia E; Choi, Leena; Okamoto, Luis E; Gamboa, Alfredo; Diedrich, André; Raj, Satish R; Robertson, David; Biaggioni, Italo; Shibao, Cyndya A

    2014-01-01

    Severely affected patients with autonomic failure require pressor agents to counteract the blood pressure fall and improve presyncopal symptoms upon standing. Previous studies suggest that combination ergotamine and caffeine may be effective in the treatment of autonomic failure, but the efficacy of this drug has not been evaluated in controlled trials. Therefore, we compared the effects of ergotamine/caffeine on seated blood pressure and orthostatic tolerance and symptoms in 12 primary autonomic failure patients without history of coronary artery disease. Patients were randomized to receive a single oral dose of placebo, midodrine (5-10 mg), or ergotamine and caffeine (1 and 100 mg, respectively) in a single-blind, crossover study. Blood pressure was measured while patients were seated and after standing for up to 10 min, at baseline and at 1 h post-drug. Ergotamine/caffeine increased seated systolic blood pressure (SBP), the primary outcome, compared with placebo (131 ± 19 and 95 ± 12 mmHg, respectively, at 1 h post-drug; p = 0.003 for time effect). Midodrine also significantly increased seated SBP (121 ± 19 mmHg at 1 h post-drug; p = 0.015 for time effect vs. placebo), but this effect was not different from ergotamine/caffeine (p = 0.621). There was no significant effect of either medication on orthostatic tolerance; however, ergotamine/caffeine improved presyncopal symptoms (p = 0.034). These findings suggest that combination ergotamine and caffeine elicits a seated pressor response that is similar in magnitude to midodrine, and improves symptoms in autonomic failure. Thus, ergotamine/caffeine could be used as an alternate treatment for autonomic failure, in carefully selected patients without comorbid coronary artery disease. PMID:25104940

  13. Combination ergotamine and caffeine improves seated blood pressure and presyncopal symptoms in autonomic failure

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Amy C.; Ramirez, Claudia E.; Leena eChoi; Okamoto, Luis E.; Alfredo eGamboa; André eDiedrich; Raj, Satish R; David eRobertson; Italo eBiaggioni; Cyndya Adriana Shibao

    2014-01-01

    Severely affected patients with autonomic failure require pressor agents to counteract the blood pressure fall and improve presyncopal symptoms upon standing. Previous studies suggest that combination ergotamine and caffeine may be effective in the treatment of autonomic failure, but the efficacy of this drug has not been evaluated in controlled trials. Therefore, we compared the effects of ergotamine/caffeine on seated blood pressure and orthostatic tolerance and symptoms in 12 primary auto...

  14. Combination ergotamine and caffeine improves seated blood pressure and presyncopal symptoms in autonomic failure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy C Arnold

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Severely affected patients with autonomic failure require pressor agents to counteract the blood pressure fall and improve presyncopal symptoms upon standing. Previous studies suggest that combination ergotamine and caffeine may be effective in the treatment of autonomic failure, but the efficacy of this drug has not been evaluated in controlled trials. Therefore, we compared the effects of ergotamine/caffeine on seated blood pressure and orthostatic tolerance and symptoms in 12 primary autonomic failure patients without history of coronary artery disease. Patients were randomized to receive a single oral dose of placebo, midodrine (5-10 mg, or ergotamine and caffeine (1 mg and 100 mg, respectively in a single-blind, crossover study. Blood pressure was measured while patients were seated and after standing for up to 10 minutes, at baseline and at 1 hour post-drug. Ergotamine/caffeine increased seated systolic blood pressure, the primary outcome, compared with placebo (131±19 and 95±12 mmHg, respectively, at 1 hour post-drug; p=0.003 for time effect. Midodrine also significantly increased seated systolic blood pressure (121±19 mmHg at 1 hour post-drug; p=0.015 for time effect versus placebo, but this effect was not different from ergotamine/caffeine (p=0.621. There was no significant effect of either medication on orthostatic tolerance; however, ergotamine/caffeine improved presyncopal symptoms (p=0.034. These findings suggest that combination ergotamine and caffeine elicits a seated pressor response that is similar in magnitude to midodrine, and improves symptoms in autonomic failure. Thus, ergotamine/caffeine could be used as an alternate treatment for autonomic failure, in carefully selected patients without comorbid coronary artery disease.

  15. Combination ergotamine and caffeine improves seated blood pressure and presyncopal symptoms in autonomic failure

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Amy C.; Ramirez, Claudia E.; Choi, Leena; Okamoto, Luis E.; Gamboa, Alfredo; Diedrich, André; Raj, Satish R; Robertson, David; Biaggioni, Italo; Shibao, Cyndya A

    2014-01-01

    Severely affected patients with autonomic failure require pressor agents to counteract the blood pressure fall and improve presyncopal symptoms upon standing. Previous studies suggest that combination ergotamine and caffeine may be effective in the treatment of autonomic failure, but the efficacy of this drug has not been evaluated in controlled trials. Therefore, we compared the effects of ergotamine/caffeine on seated blood pressure and orthostatic tolerance and symptoms in 12 primary auton...

  16. Fluid bed drying of guarana (Paullinia cupana HBK) extract: Effect of process factors on caffeine content

    OpenAIRE

    Pagliarussi, Renata S.; Bastos, Jairo K.; Luis A. P. Freitas

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to study the convective drying of the hydroalcoholic extracts obtained from powdered guarana seeds in a spouted bed dryer. The influence of process variables, such as the convective airflow rate, extract feed rate, and air inlet temperature, on the quality of the dry extract was determined using the caffeine and moisture content for the process evaluation. The caffeine content in the alcoholic and dried extracts was determined by capillary gas chromatography. The exp...

  17. Estimating caffeine intake from energy drinks and dietary supplements in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Bailey, Regan L; Saldanha, Leila G.; Gahche, Jaime J; Dwyer, Johanna T

    2014-01-01

    No consistent definition exists for energy products in the United States. These products have been marketed and sold as beverages (conventional foods), energy shots (dietary supplements), and in pill or tablet form. Recently, the number of available products has surged, and formulations have changed to include caffeine. To help characterize the use of caffeine-containing energy products in the United States, three sources of data were analyzed: sales data, data from federal sources, and repor...

  18. A new green approach for the reduction of graphene oxide nanosheets using caffeine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Thu Ha Thi Vu; Thanh Thuy Thi Tran; Hong Ngan Thi Le; Phuong Hoa Thi Nguyen; Ngoc Quynh Bui; Nadine Essayem

    2015-06-01

    A simple and green chemistry approach for the preparation of reduced graphene oxide nanosheets was successfully demonstrated through the reduction of graphene oxide (GO) using caffeine as the reductant. Without using toxic and harmful chemicals, this method is environmentally friendly and suitable for the large-scale production of graphene. The samples of GO, before and after reduction with caffeine have been characterized by X-ray diffraction, Raman, Fourier transform infrared, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and transmission electron microscopy.

  19. Gut microbiota mediate caffeine detoxification in the primary insect pest of coffee

    OpenAIRE

    Javier A. Ceja-Navarro; Fernando E. Vega; Karaoz, Ulas; Hao, Zhao; Jenkins, Stefan; Lim, Hsiao Chien; Kosina, Petr; Infante, Francisco; Northen, Trent R.; Eoin L. Brodie

    2015-01-01

    The coffee berry borer (Hypothenemus hampei) is the most devastating insect pest of coffee worldwide with its infestations decreasing crop yield by up to 80%. Caffeine is an alkaloid that can be toxic to insects and is hypothesized to act as a defence mechanism to inhibit herbivory. Here we show that caffeine is degraded in the gut of H. hampei, and that experimental inactivation of the gut microbiota eliminates this activity. We demonstrate that gut microbiota in H. hampei specimens from sev...

  20. Caffeine/sleep-deprivation interaction in mice produces complex memory effects

    OpenAIRE

    Onaolapo, Olakunle J; Onaolapo, Adejoke Y; Akanmu, Moses A; Olayiwola, Gbola

    2015-01-01

    Background Sleep deprivation negatively impacts memory, causing deficits in memory processes. Of interest is any agent that can offset such deficits. Mice were given varying doses of caffeine for 14 days and then deprived of sleep for 6 hours by the ‘gentle handling’ method. Memory was assessed using the Novel Object Recognition Test and Y maze alternation. Purpose The study was designed to ascertain the impact of varying doses of caffeine combined with total sleep-deprivation on spatial and ...

  1. Caffeine intake in pregnancy: Relationship between internal intake and effect on birth weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partosch, F; Mielke, H; Stahlmann, R; Gundert-Remy, U

    2015-12-01

    We used a physiologically based kinetic model to simulate caffeine blood concentration-time profiles in non-pregnant and pregnant women. The model predicted concentration-time profile was in good accordance with experimental values. With 200 mg, the safe dose per occasion in non-pregnant women, AUC and peak concentration in pregnant women were nearly twice that of non-pregnant women. In order to derive a safe dose for the pregnant women we estimated the dose in the pregnant women model taken at once which would not exceed AUC and peak concentration in the non-pregnant women of 200 mg as single dose. The resulting dose is 100 mg caffeine per occasion which we recommend as safe. The caffeine dose of 200 mg per day is declared as safe for pregnant women with respect to the foetus by EFSA based on results on reduced birth weight in epidemiological studies. We modelled AUC and peak concentration for different caffeine doses to investigate the relationship between internal caffeine exposure and risk measures of reduced birth weight from epidemiological studies. The graphical analysis revealed that the reduction in birth weight was related to AUC and peak concentration up to a dose of 250 mg caffeine. PMID:26549379

  2. Ultra-violet Spectrophotometric Determination of Caffeine in Soft and Energy Drinks Available in Yenagoa, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amos-Tautua

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to determine the pH and levels of caffeine in eight brands of carbonated and energy drinks available in local market in Yenagoa, Nigeria. Quantitative analysis of caffeine was performed by a simple and fast standard UV spectrophotometric method, using carbon tetrachloride as the extracting solvent. Results showed that the pH of the beverages were slightly acidic ranging from 5.92-6.44. The minimum caffeine level was observed in the carbonated soft drink Coca Cola (43.71±0.55 ppm, while the energy drink, Red Bull sample showed the highest caffeine content (58.31±0.35 ppm. The carbonated soft drinks showed caffeine levels in the range of 43.71 and 45.83 ppm with average concentration of 44.52 ppm, whereas in the energy drinks it ranged from 47.56 to 58.31 ppm with a mean concentration of 52.24 ppm. The caffeine content in all the beverage samples analyzed in this study are well below the maximum allowable limits set by the US Food and Drugs Administration.

  3. The effects of caffeine in women during aerobic-dance bench stepping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Jennifer N; Lloyd, Lisa K; Crixell, Sylvia H; Walker, John L

    2007-02-01

    People of all ages and fitness levels participate regularly in aerobic-dance bench stepping (ADBS) to increase fitness and control body weight. Any reasonable method for enhancing the experience or effectiveness of ADBS would be beneficial. This study examined the acute effects of a single dose of caffeine on physiological responses during ADBS in women. When compared with a placebo, neither a 3- nor a 6-mg/kg dose of caffeine altered physiological responses or rating of perceived exertion (RPE) in 20 women (age 19-28 y) of average fitness level, not habituated to caffeine, while they performed an ADBS routine. Since neither dose of caffeine had any effect on VO2, VCO2, minute ventilation, respiratory-exchange ratio, rate of energy expenditure, heart rate, or RPE during ADBS exercise, it would not be prudent for a group exercise leader to recommend caffeine to increase energy cost or decrease perception of effort in an ADBS session. Furthermore, caffeine ingestion should not interfere with monitoring intensity using heart rate or RPE during ADBS. PMID:17460331

  4. Atrial fibrillation in healthy adolescents after highly caffeinated beverage consumption: two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heyden Marybeth

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Energy drinks and highly caffeinated drinks comprise some of the fastest growing products of the beverage industry, often targeting teenagers and young adults. Cardiac arrhythmias in children related to high caffeine consumption have not been well described in the literature. This case series describes the possible association between the consumption of highly caffeinated drinks and the subsequent development of atrial fibrillation in the adolescent population. Case presentations We report the cases of two Caucasian adolescent boys of 14 and 16 years of age at the time of presentation, each without a significant cardiac history, who presented with palpitations or vague chest discomfort or both after a recent history of excessive caffeine consumption. Both were found to have atrial fibrillation on electrocardiogram; one patient required digoxin to restore a normal sinus rhythm, and the other self-converted after intravenous fluid administration. Conclusion With the increasing popularity of energy drinks in the pediatric and adolescent population, physicians should be aware of the arrhythmogenic potential associated with highly caffeinated beverage consumption. It is important for pediatricians to understand the lack of regulation in the caffeine content and other ingredients of these high-energy beverages and their complications so that parents and children can be educated about the risk of cardiac arrhythmias with excessive energy drink consumption.

  5. Does Caffeine Consumption Modify Cerebrospinal Fluid Amyloid-β Levels in Patients with Alzheimer's Disease?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Travassos, Maria; Santana, Isabel; Baldeiras, Inês;

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine may be protective against Alzheimer's disease (AD) by modulating amyloid-β (Aβ) metabolic pathways. The present work aimed to study a possible association of caffeine consumption with the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers, particularly Aβ. The study included 88 patients with AD or mild...... cognitive impairment. The consumption of caffeine and theobromine was evaluated using a validated food questionnaire. Quantification of caffeine and main active metabolites was performed with liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. The levels of A(1-42), total tau, and phosphorylated tau...... in the CSF were determined using sandwich ELISA methods and other Aβ species, Aβ(X-38), Aβ(X-40), and Aβ(X-42), with the MSD Aβ Triplex assay. The concentration of caffeine was 0.79±1.15 μg/mL in the CSF and 1.20±1.88 μg/mL in the plasma. No correlation was found between caffeine consumption and Aβ42...

  6. Caffeine Mitigates Lung Inflammation Induced by Ischemia-Reperfusion of Lower Limbs in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Chi Chou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Reperfusion of ischemic limbs can induce inflammation and subsequently cause acute lung injury. Caffeine, a widely used psychostimulant, possesses potent anti-inflammatory capacity. We elucidated whether caffeine can mitigate lung inflammation caused by ischemia-reperfusion (IR of the lower limbs. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly allocated to receive IR, IR plus caffeine (IR + Caf group, sham-operation (Sham, or sham plus caffeine (n=12 in each group. To induce IR, lower limbs were bilaterally tied by rubber bands high around each thigh for 3 hours followed by reperfusion for 3 hours. Caffeine (50 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection was administered immediately after reperfusion. Our histological assay data revealed characteristics of severe lung inflammation in the IR group and mild to moderate characteristic of lung inflammation in the IR + Caf group. Total cells number and protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of the IR group were significantly higher than those of the IR + Caf group (P<0.001 and P=0.008, resp.. Similarly, pulmonary concentrations of inflammatory mediators (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β, and macrophage inflammatory protein-2 and pulmonary myeloperoxidase activity of the IR group were significantly higher than those of the IR + Caf group (all P<0.05. These data clearly demonstrate that caffeine could mitigate lung inflammation induced by ischemia-reperfusion of the lower limbs.

  7. Alcohol and caffeine use by social phobics: an initial inquiry into drinking patterns and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holle, C; Heimberg, R G; Sweet, R A; Holt, C S

    1995-06-01

    Social phobics are often fearful that their anxiety symptoms will cause them embarrassment and lead to negative evaluation from others. Thus, it was hypothesized that they might attempt to control the intake of substances such as alcohol and caffeine that may affect their anxiety in social situations. The current investigation sought to determine, via a self-report questionnaire, whether the alcohol and caffeine consumption patterns of social phobics differ from those of community controls in terms of typical and greatest weekly quantities and how social phobics differ from controls in alcohol and caffeine use in a variety of socially threatening and nonthreatening situations. Social phobics reported less typical weekly beverage consumption than community subjects. Specifically, social phobics reported less consumption of wine and liqueur than community subjects but did not differ from community subjects in typical weekly consumption of caffeinated beverages. Further, social phobics reported a significantly greater intent to drink alcohol while in social situations involving strangers and significantly less intent to drink caffeinated coffee in meetings than did community subjects. Finally, a number of gender differences were found for both alcohol and caffeine consumption in specific situations, and the implications of these findings are discussed. PMID:7598678

  8. The effect of ephedra and caffeine on maximal strength and power in resistance-trained athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Andrew D; Cribb, Paul J; Cooke, Matthew B; Hayes, Alan

    2008-03-01

    Caffeine and ephedrine-related alkaloids recently have been removed from International Olympic Committee banned substances lists, whereas ephedrine itself is now permissible at urinary concentrations less than 10 mug.mL. The changes to the list may contribute to an increased use of caffeine and ephedra as ergogenic aids by athletes. Consequently, we sought to investigate the effects of ingesting caffeine (C) or a combination of ephedra and caffeine (C + E) on muscular strength and anaerobic power using a double-blind, crossover design. Forty-five minutes after ingesting a glucose placebo (P: 300 mg), C (300 mg) or C + E (300 mg + 60 mg), 9 resistance-trained male participants were tested for maximal strength by bench press [BP; 1 repetition maximum (1RM)] and latissimus dorsi pull down (LP; 1RM). Subjects also performed repeated repetitions at 80% of 1RM on both BP and LP until exhaustion. After this test, subjects underwent a 30-second Wingate test to determine peak anaerobic cycling power, mean power, and fatigue index. Although subjects reported increased alertness and enhanced mood after supplementation with caffeine and ephedra, there were no significant differences between any of the treatments in muscle strength, muscle endurance, or peak anaerobic power. Our results do not support the contention that supplementation with ephedra or caffeine will enhance either muscle strength or anaerobic exercise performance. PMID:18550961

  9. An unexpected caffeine-enhanced survival in x-ray-sensitive variant cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sensitivity of normal Chinese hamster cell lines, V79 and CHO, mouse cell lines, L5178Y and L, and human HeLa cells to the killing effect of x-ray is enhanced with addition of caffeine following x-ray irradiation in a dose-dependent fashion. However, the survival rate of variant cell (V79-AL162/S-10) increased with addition of low concentration of caffeine (caffeine-enhanced survival phenomenon). Therefore, the effects of protein synthesis-inhibiting agents, such as cycloheximide and puromycin, on caffeine-enhanced survival phenomenon were examined. This phenomenon was completely abolished by the inhibitory agents, but not abolished by DNA synthesis-damaging agents, such as excess thymidine and aphidicolin. DNA-damaging physiochemical factors, such as neutrons, U.V., methyl methanesulfonate and mitomycin C, were examined in relation to variant cells' sensitivity and caffeine-enhanced survival phenomenon. V79-AL162/S-10 cells showed high sensitivity to the killing effect of mitomycin C, but their survival rate returned to the rate of normal V79-B310H cells with addition of caffeine. (Namekawa, K.)

  10. Potential link between caffeine consumption and pediatric depression: A case-control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farias Lucilene G

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early-onset depressive disorders can have severe consequences both from developmental and functional aspects. The etiology of depressive disorders is complex and multi-factorial, with an intricate interaction among environmental factors and genetic predisposition. While data from studies on adults suggest that caffeine is fairly safe, effects of caffeine in children, who are in period of rapid brain development, are currently unknown. Furthermore, systematic research addressing the relationship between depressive symptoms in children and caffeine consumption is lacking. The present study examined the effects of caffeine consumption on depressed mood in children with depression and non-depressed participants. Methods Children and adolescents (n = 51 already enrolled in an ongoing longitudinal study, aged 9-12 years, were assessed for depressive symptoms with the Children Depressive Inventory (CDI. Psychopathological symptoms were assessed with the Child Behavioral Checklist (CBCL and eating habits were assessed with the Nutrition-Behavior Inventory (NBI 1. The children were compared to control children without psychopathology attending public schools in a Southern Brazilian city. Results Participants with CDI scores ≥ 15 (mean = 19; S.D. = 4 also had high NBI scores (mean = 52; S.D. = 19, p Conclusions These findings indicate that depressed children consume more caffeinated drinks than non-depressed children. Nonetheless while a strong association between depressive symptoms and caffeine consumption among children was found, further research should investigate whether or not this association is due to a cause and effect relationship.

  11. Caffeine consumption amongst British athletes following changes to the 2004 WADA prohibited list.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, N; Wojek, N

    2008-06-01

    This study was undertaken to examine self-reported caffeine consumption and reasons for its use, amongst UK athletes, following its removal from the 2004 World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) Prohibited List. A convenience sample of track and field athletes (n = 193) and cyclists (n = 287) completed a postal or Web-based questionnaire. Messages were posted on athletics and cycling club Web sites and mailing lists to direct athletes to the Web-based questionnaire. Postal questionnaires were distributed at domestic sporting events. A higher proportion of cyclists (59.9 %) compared with track and field athletes (32.6 %) consumed caffeine to enhance performance (p sub-elite athletes representing cycling (p = 0.031) and athletics (p = 0.010) used caffeine to enhance performance. Of all caffeine containing products used, coffee, energy drinks, pharmaceutical preparations and caffeinated sports supplements were most prevalent. Results revealed that amongst UK athletes, the intention to use caffeine as an ergogenic aid was high, and that use was more widespread and accepted in competitive sport, especially at elite level, when compared to recreational sport. PMID:18027309

  12. Caffeine and glucose homeostasis during rest and exercise in diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaharieva, Dessi P; Riddell, Michael C

    2013-08-01

    Caffeine is a substance that has been used in our society for generations, primarily for its effects on the central nervous system that causes wakefulness. Caffeine supplementation has become increasingly more popular as an ergogenic aid for athletes and considerable scientific evidence supports its effectiveness. Because of their potential to alter energy metabolism, the effects of coffee and caffeine on glucose metabolism in diabetes have also been studied both epidemiologically and experimentally. Predominantly targeting the adenosine receptors, caffeine causes alterations in glucose homeostasis by decreasing glucose uptake into skeletal muscle, thereby causing elevations in blood glucose concentration. Caffeine intake has also been proposed to increase symptomatic warning signs of hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes and elevate blood glucose levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. Other effects include potential increases in glucose counterregulatory hormones such as epinephrine, which can also decrease peripheral glucose disposal. Despite these established physiological effects, increased coffee intake has been associated with reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes in large-scale epidemiological studies. This review paper highlights the known effects of caffeine on glucose homeostasis and diabetes metabolism during rest and exercise. PMID:23855268

  13. Guarana provides additional stimulation over caffeine alone in the planarian model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrios Moustakas

    Full Text Available The stimulant effect of energy drinks is primarily attributed to the caffeine they contain. Many energy drinks also contain other ingredients that might enhance the tonic effects of these caffeinated beverages. One of these additives is guarana. Guarana is a climbing plant native to the Amazon whose seeds contain approximately four times the amount of caffeine found in coffee beans. The mix of other natural chemicals contained in guarana seeds is thought to heighten the stimulant effects of guarana over caffeine alone. Yet, despite the growing use of guarana as an additive in energy drinks, and a burgeoning market for it as a nutritional supplement, the science examining guarana and how it affects other dietary ingredients is lacking. To appreciate the stimulant effects of guarana and other natural products, a straightforward model to investigate their physiological properties is needed. The planarian provides such a system. The locomotor activity and convulsive response of planarians with substance exposure has been shown to provide an excellent system to measure the effects of drug stimulation, addiction and withdrawal. To gauge the stimulant effects of guarana we studied how it altered the locomotor activity of the planarian species Dugesia tigrina. We report evidence that guarana seeds provide additional stimulation over caffeine alone, and document the changes to this stimulation in the context of both caffeine and glucose.

  14. Guarana provides additional stimulation over caffeine alone in the planarian model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustakas, Dimitrios; Mezzio, Michael; Rodriguez, Branden R; Constable, Mic Andre; Mulligan, Margaret E; Voura, Evelyn B

    2015-01-01

    The stimulant effect of energy drinks is primarily attributed to the caffeine they contain. Many energy drinks also contain other ingredients that might enhance the tonic effects of these caffeinated beverages. One of these additives is guarana. Guarana is a climbing plant native to the Amazon whose seeds contain approximately four times the amount of caffeine found in coffee beans. The mix of other natural chemicals contained in guarana seeds is thought to heighten the stimulant effects of guarana over caffeine alone. Yet, despite the growing use of guarana as an additive in energy drinks, and a burgeoning market for it as a nutritional supplement, the science examining guarana and how it affects other dietary ingredients is lacking. To appreciate the stimulant effects of guarana and other natural products, a straightforward model to investigate their physiological properties is needed. The planarian provides such a system. The locomotor activity and convulsive response of planarians with substance exposure has been shown to provide an excellent system to measure the effects of drug stimulation, addiction and withdrawal. To gauge the stimulant effects of guarana we studied how it altered the locomotor activity of the planarian species Dugesia tigrina. We report evidence that guarana seeds provide additional stimulation over caffeine alone, and document the changes to this stimulation in the context of both caffeine and glucose. PMID:25880065

  15. Production of Recombinant Caffeine Synthase from Guarana (Paullinia cupana var. sorbilis) in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimpl, Flávia Camila; Kiyota, Eduardo; Mazzafera, Paulo

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine synthase (CS) is a methyltransferase responsible for the last two steps of the caffeine biosynthesis pathway in plants. CS is able to convert 7-methylxanthine to theobromine (3,7-dimethylxanthine) and theobromine to caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) using S-adenosyl-L-methionine as the methyl donor in both reactions. The production of a recombinant protein is an important tool for the characterization of enzymes, particularly when the enzyme has affinity for different substrates. Guarana has the highest caffeine content among more than a hundred plant species that contain this alkaloid. Different from other plants, in which CS has a higher affinity for paraxanthine (1,7-dimethylxanthine), caffeine synthase from guarana (PcCS) has a higher affinity for theobromine. Here, we describe a method to produce a recombinant caffeine synthase from guarana in Escherichia coli and its purification by affinity chromatography. The recombinant protein retains activity and can be used in enzymatic assays and other biochemical characterization studies. PMID:26843165

  16. Treatment of GABA from Fermented Rice Germ Ameliorates Caffeine-Induced Sleep Disturbance in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabunga, Darine Froy N; Gonzales, Edson Luck T; Kim, Hee Jin; Choung, Se Young

    2015-05-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system, is involved in sleep physiology. Caffeine is widely used psychoactive substance known to induce wakefulness and insomnia to its consumers. This study was performed to examine whether GABA extracts from fermented rice germ ameliorates caffeine-induced sleep disturbance in mice, without affecting spontaneous locomotor activity and motor coordination. Indeed, caffeine (10 mg/kg, i.p.) delayed sleep onset and reduced sleep duration of mice. Conversely, rice germ ferment extracts-GABA treatment (10, 30, or 100 mg/kg, p.o.), especially at 100 mg/kg, normalized the sleep disturbance induced by caffeine. In locomotor tests, rice germ ferment extracts-GABA slightly but not significantly reduced the caffeine-induced increase in locomotor activity without affecting motor coordination. Additionally, rice germ ferment extracts-GABA per se did not affect the spontaneous locomotor activity and motor coordination of mice. In conclusion, rice germ ferment extracts-GABA supplementation can counter the sleep disturbance induced by caffeine, without affecting the general locomotor activities of mice. PMID:25995826

  17. Study of caffeine as corrosion inhibitors of carbon steel in chloride solution containing hydrogen sulfide using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solehudin, Agus; Berman, Ega Taqwali; Nurdin, Isdiriayani

    2015-09-01

    The corrosion behaviour of steel surface in the absence and presence of caffeine in 3.5% NaCl solution containing dissolved H2S gas is studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The experimental results of carbon steel corrosion in 3.5% NaCl solution containing 500 mg/l H2S at different caffeine concentrations showed that corrosion rate of carbon steel decreases with increasing of caffeine concentrations from 0 to 0,1 mmol/l. Whereas, the corrosion rate increase with increasing of caffeine concentrations from 1 to 10 mmol/l. It is clear that no inhibition efficiency increases with increasing inhibitor concentration. The optimum value of inhibition efficiency was 90% at a caffeine concentration of 0.1 mmol/l. This suggests that caffeine's performance as a corrosion inhibitor is more effective at a concentration of 0.1 mmol/l.

  18. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2015. Scientific Opinion on the safety of caffeine

    OpenAIRE

    Tetens, Inge

    2015-01-01

    Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to deliver a scientific opinion on the safety of caffeine, providing advice on caffeine intakes, from all dietary sources that do not give rise to concerns about adverse health effects for the general healthy population and subgroups thereof. Possible interactions between caffeine and other constituents of so-called “energy drinks”, alcohol, p-synephrine and physical exerci...

  19. Sources of Caffeine in Diets of US Children and Adults: Trends by Beverage Type and Purchase Location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewnowski, Adam; Rehm, Colin D

    2016-01-01

    New sources of caffeine, besides coffee and tea, have been introduced into the US food supply. Data on caffeine consumption age and purchase location can help guide public health policy. National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) were used to estimate population-level caffeine intakes, using data from 24-h dietary recall. First, caffeine intakes by age-group and beverage type were estimated using the most recent 2011-2012 data (n = 7456). Second, fourteen years trends in caffeine consumption, overall and by beverage type, were evaluated for adults and children. Trend analyses were conducted by age groups. Last, trends in caffeine intakes by purchase location and beverage type were estimated. In 2011-2012, children aged four to eight years consumed the least caffeine (15 mg/day), and adults aged 51-70 years consumed the most (213 mg/day). The population mean (age ≥ four years) was 135 mg/day, driven largely by coffee (90 mg/day), tea (25 mg/day), and soda (21 mg/day). For the 14-19 years and 20-34 years age-groups, energy drinks contributed 6 mg/day (9.9%) and 5 mg/day (4.5%), respectively. The bulk of caffeine came from store-bought coffee and tea. Among both children and adults combined, caffeine intakes declined from 175 mg/day (1999-2000) to 142 mg/day (2011-2012), largely driven by a drop in caffeine from soda (41 mg/day to 21 mg/day). Store-bought coffee and tea remain principal drivers of caffeine intake in the US. Sodas and energy drinks make minor contributions to overall caffeine intakes. PMID:26978391

  20. Sources of Caffeine in Diets of US Children and Adults: Trends by Beverage Type and Purchase Location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Drewnowski

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available New sources of caffeine, besides coffee and tea, have been introduced into the US food supply. Data on caffeine consumption age and purchase location can help guide public health policy. National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES were used to estimate population-level caffeine intakes, using data from 24-h dietary recall. First, caffeine intakes by age-group and beverage type were estimated using the most recent 2011–2012 data (n = 7456. Second, fourteen years trends in caffeine consumption, overall and by beverage type, were evaluated for adults and children. Trend analyses were conducted by age groups. Last, trends in caffeine intakes by purchase location and beverage type were estimated. In 2011–2012, children aged four to eight years consumed the least caffeine (15 mg/day, and adults aged 51–70 years consumed the most (213 mg/day. The population mean (age ≥ four years was 135 mg/day, driven largely by coffee (90 mg/day, tea (25 mg/day, and soda (21 mg/day. For the 14–19 years and 20–34 years age-groups, energy drinks contributed 6 mg/day (9.9% and 5 mg/day (4.5%, respectively. The bulk of caffeine came from store-bought coffee and tea. Among both children and adults combined, caffeine intakes declined from 175 mg/day (1999–2000 to 142 mg/day (2011–2012, largely driven by a drop in caffeine from soda (41 mg/day to 21 mg/day. Store-bought coffee and tea remain principal drivers of caffeine intake in the US. Sodas and energy drinks make minor contributions to overall caffeine intakes.

  1. Effects of concurrent caffeine and mobile phone exposure on local target probability processing in the human brain

    OpenAIRE

    Trunk, Attila; Stefanics, Gábor; Zentai, Norbert; Bacskay, Ivett; Felinger, Attila; Thuróczy, György; Hernádi, István

    2015-01-01

    Millions of people use mobile phones (MP) while drinking coffee or other caffeine containing beverages. Little is known about the potential combined effects of MP irradiation and caffeine on cognitive functions. Here we investigated whether caffeine intake and concurrent exposure to Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) MP-like irradiation may interactively influence neuro-cognitive function in an active visual oddball paradigm. In a full factorial experimental design, 25 particip...

  2. A PRELIMINARY STUDY AND FIRST REPORT ON CAFFEINE DEGRADING BACTERIA ISOLATED FROM THE SOILS OF CHITTOOR AND VELLORE

    OpenAIRE

    Sharan Siddharth; Joseph Renuka Elizabeth; A Abhiroop Anja; Nayak Rounaq S; Gambhir Vrinda; Mishra Bishwambhar; Vuppu Suneetha

    2012-01-01

    An attempt on basic study of the caffeine degrading organism and screening of potential ‘caffeinase’ producing bacteria has been studied and reported. Caffeine is present in soft drinks, coffee plants, tea leaves, and kola nuts and is used extensively in human consumption. Various health and environmental demerits makes it significant to reduce the levels of caffeine into a much less harmful compound, which can be done biologically using specific microorganisms. The enzyme responsible for caf...

  3. A fast and efficient method for the study of caffeine levels in energy drinks using micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC)

    OpenAIRE

    Cristiano Augusto Ballus; Adriana Dillenburg Meinhart; Carolina Schaper Bizzotto; José Teixeira Filho; Helena Teixeira Godoy

    2012-01-01

    Energy drinks are becoming popular in Brazil and in the world due to their stimulant properties. Caffeine is present in energy drinks with the aim of stimulating the central nervous system and intensifying brain activity. On the other hand, the ingestion of high doses of caffeine can cause undesirable symptoms such as anxiety and tachycardia. Therefore, it is necessary to monitor the caffeine content added to energy drinks to guarantee that the levels in the final product are in accordance wi...

  4. Caffeine-induced activated glucocorticoid metabolism in the hippocampus causes hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis inhibition in fetal rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Xu

    Full Text Available Epidemiological investigations have shown that fetuses with intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR are susceptible to adult metabolic syndrome. Clinical investigations and experiments have demonstrated that caffeine is a definite inducer of IUGR, as children who ingest caffeine-containing food or drinks are highly susceptible to adult obesity and hypertension. Our goals for this study were to investigate the effect of prenatal caffeine ingestion on the functional development of the fetal hippocampus and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis and to clarify an intrauterine HPA axis-associated neuroendocrine alteration induced by caffeine. Pregnant Wistar rats were intragastrically administered 20, 60, and 180 mg/kg · d caffeine from gestational days 11-20. The results show that prenatal caffeine ingestion significantly decreased the expression of fetal hypothalamus corticotrophin-releasing hormone. The fetal adrenal cortex changed into slight and the expression of fetal adrenal steroid acute regulatory protein (StAR and cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme (P450scc, as well as the level of fetal adrenal endogenous corticosterone (CORT, were all significantly decreased after caffeine treatment. Moreover, caffeine ingestion significantly increased the levels of maternal and fetal blood CORT and decreased the expression of placental 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase-2 (11β-HSD-2. Additionally, both in vivo and in vitro studies show that caffeine can downregulate the expression of fetal hippocampal 11β-HSD-2, promote the expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1 and glucocorticoid receptor (GR, and enhance DNA methylation within the hippocampal 11β-HSD-2 promoter. These results suggest that prenatal caffeine ingestion inhibits the development of the fetal HPA axis, which may be associated with the fetal overexposure to maternal glucocorticoid and activated glucocorticoid metabolism in the fetal hippocampus. These results will be

  5. The effect of caffeine posttreatment on X-ray-induced chromosomal aberrations in human blood lymphocytes in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potentiating effect of caffeine on X-ray-induced chromosomal aberrations in human blood lymphocytes has been investigated, with special reference to cell cycle stages (G0 and G2). Both quantitative and qualitative differences in the yield of chromosomal aberrations were detected in caffeine-posttreated cells, depending on the cell stage irradiated. The studies on caffeine potentiating effects on X-irradiated G0 lymphocytes from normal adults, newborns, Down syndrome patients, and an ataxia telangiectasia patient pointed to interindividual variations in the response to caffeine potentiation among normal probands and a very profound effect in ataxia cells. (orig.)

  6. Influence of pre- and post-treatment with caffeine on UV-induced effects in Oedogonium gunnii Wittr

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zoospores and mature filaments of O.gunnii were treated with 0.05 and 0.25% of caffeine 2 hr prior and immediately after exposure to UV. While the caffeine treatment given 2 hr prior to UV-exposure lowered the percentage of chromosomal aberrations, the same concentrations of caffeine, when employed immediately after UV-exposure, resulted in an increased frequency of chromosomal aberrations. Caffeine appears to act as protective as well as potentiating agent in relation to UV-induced effects both with respect to survival of zoospores and chromosomal aberrations in mature filaments. (author)

  7. The Role of Clomipramine in Potentiating the Teratogenic Effects of Caffeine in Pregnant Rats: A Histopathological Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Nikoui

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Since little is known about the teratogenic effects of clomipramine used concurrently with caffeine during the organogenesis period, the aim of this study was to test the teratogenic effects of a coadministration of caffeine and clomipramine on rat fetuses. We divided 42 pregnant rats into seven groups, randomly. The first group (control received 0.5 mL of normal saline. Clomipramine was injected at 40 mg/kg and 80 mg/kg to the second and third groups, respectively. The fourth and fifth groups received caffeine in doses of 60 mg/kg and 120 mg/kg, respectively. The sixth group received a combination of 40 mg/kg clomipramine and 60 mg/kg caffeine, and the seventh group was given clomipramine and caffeine at 80 mg/kg and 120 mg/kg, respectively. The fetuses were removed on the 17th day of pregnancy and studied in terms of microscopic and macroscopic morphological features. Fetuses of rats receiving high doses of caffeine or combinations of caffeine and clomipramine showed a significant rate of cleft palate development, open eyelids, mortality, torsion anomalies, shrinkage of skin, and subcutaneous haemorrhage (P≤0.001. This study concludes that caffeine in high doses or the simultaneous administration of caffeine and clomipramine leads to teratogenicity.

  8. A novel strategy for selection of allosteric ribozymes yields RiboReporter™ sensors for caffeine and aspartame

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, Alicia; Boomer, Ryan M.; Kurz, Markus; Keene, Sara C.; Diener, John L.; Keefe, Anthony D.; Wilson, Charles; Cload, Sharon T.

    2004-01-01

    We have utilized in vitro selection technology to develop allosteric ribozyme sensors that are specific for the small molecule analytes caffeine or aspartame. Caffeine- or aspartame-responsive ribozymes were converted into fluorescence-based RiboReporter™ sensor systems that were able to detect caffeine or aspartame in solution over a concentration range from 0.5 to 5 mM. With read-times as short as 5 min, these caffeine- or aspartame-dependent ribozymes function as highly specific and facile...

  9. Effects of Coffee and Caffeine Anhydrous Intake During Creatine Loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trexler, Eric T; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Roelofs, Erica J; Hirsch, Katie R; Persky, Adam M; Mock, Meredith G

    2016-05-01

    Trexler, ET, Smith-Ryan, AE, Roelofs, EJ, Hirsch, KR, Persky, AM, and Mock, MG. Effects of coffee and caffeine anhydrous intake during creatine loading. J Strength Cond Res 30(5): 1438-1446, 2016-The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of 5 days of creatine (CRE) loading alone or in combination with caffeine anhydrous (CAF) or coffee (COF) on upper-body and lower-body strength and sprint performance. Physically active males (n = 54; mean ± SD; age = 20.1 ± 2.1 years; weight = 78.8 ± 8.8 kg) completed baseline testing, consisting of 1 repetition maximum (1RM) and repetitions to fatigue with 80% 1RM for bench press and leg press, followed by a repeated sprint test of five, 10-second sprints separated by 60-second rest on a cycle ergometer to determine peak power (PP) and total power (TP). At least 72 hours later, subjects were randomly assigned to supplement with CRE (5 g of CRE monohydrate, 4 times per day; n = 14), CRE + CAF (CRE +300 mg·d of CAF; n = 13), CRE + COF (CRE +8.9 g of COF, yielding 303 mg of CAF; n = 13), or placebo (PLA; n = 14) for 5 days. Serum creatinine (CRN) was measured before and after supplementation, and on day 6, participants repeated pretesting procedures. Strength measures were improved in all groups (p ≤ 0.05), with no significant time × treatment interactions. No significant interaction or main effects were observed for PP. For TP, a time × sprint interaction was observed (p ≤ 0.05), with no significant interactions among treatment groups. A time × treatment interaction was observed for serum CRN values (p ≤ 0.05) that showed increases in all groups except PLA. Four subjects reported mild gastrointestinal discomfort with CRE + CAF, with no side effects reported in other groups. These findings suggest that neither CRE alone nor in combination with CAF or COF significantly affected performance compared with PLA. PMID:26439785

  10. Caffeine Alters Skeletal Muscle Contraction by Opening of Calcium Ion Channels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolawole Victor Olorunshola

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of caffeine on the amplitude and rate of skeletal muscle contraction using frog sciatic nerve-gastrocnemius muscle model. Caffeine is a xanthine alkaloid whose use is widely unregulated. It is taken as a central nervous system stimulant in various foods and drinks. The effect of caffeine on skeletal muscle contraction and a possible elucidation of its mechanism of action were investigated. The sciatic nerve-gastrocnemius muscle preparation of the frog mounted on a kymograph was utilized. Varying doses of caffeine was added to the organ bath at 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 mg/mL and its effect on skeletal muscle contraction was studied. The effects of caffeine preceded by administration of acetylcholine, atropine, nifedipine, magnesium chloride and calcium gluconate at 25 mg/mL were also studied. A dose dependent increase in skeletal muscle contraction (25.25±0.48, 49.00±1.23, 52.38±2.58, 59.25±1.11 and 68.50±0.87 mV; p<0.05 was observed on administration of increasing doses (5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 mg/mL, respectively of caffeine respectively. While a significant reduction (0.90±0.04 mV and increase (77.50±1.56 mV in strength of contraction was observed on administration of nifedipine and calcium gluconate respectively. Administration of magnesium chloride caused a significant decrease in the strength of contraction (28.25±5.01 as compared to control. However, there was no significant difference in the contraction period and relaxation period between the treatment groups. The findings imply that caffeine increases skeletal muscle contraction and suggests it exerts the effect through increasing calcium ion release.

  11. Caffeinated Energy Drinks Improve High-Speed Running in Elite Field Hockey Players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Coso, Juan; Portillo, Javier; Salinero, Juan José; Lara, Beatriz; Abian-Vicen, Javier; Areces, Francisco

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the efficacy of a caffeine-containing energy drink to improve physical performance of elite field hockey players during a game. On 2 days separated by a week, 13 elite field hockey players (age and body mass = 23.2 ± 3.9 years and 76.1 ± 6.1 kg) ingested 3 mg of caffeine per kg of body mass in the form of an energy drink or the same drink without caffeine (placebo drink). After 60 min for caffeine absorption, participants played a simulated field hockey game (2 × 25 min). Individual running pace and instantaneous speed during the game were assessed using GPS devices. The total number of accelerations and decelerations was determined by accelerometry. Compared with the placebo drink, the caffeinated energy drink did not modify the total distance covered during the game (6,035 ± 451 m and 6,055 ± 499 m, respectively; p = .87), average heart rate (155 ± 13 beats per min and 158 ± 18 beats per min, respectively; p = .46), or the number of accelerations and decelerations (697 ± 285 and 618 ± 221, respectively; p = .15). However, the caffeinated energy drink reduced the distance covered at moderate-intensity running (793 ± 135 and 712 ± 116, respectively; p = .03) and increased the distance covered at high-intensity running (303 ± 67 m and 358 ± 117 m; p = .05) and sprinting (85 ± 41 m and 117 ± 55 m, respectively; p = .02). Elite field hockey players can benefit from ingesting caffeinated energy drinks because they increase the running distance covered at high-intensity running and sprinting. Increased running distance at high speed might represent a meaningful advantage for field hockey performance. PMID:26251550

  12. Effects of a combination of X-rays and caffeine on preimplantation mouse embryos in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of a combination of caffeine (0.1 mM, 1 mM, or 2 mM) and X-rays (0.24 Gy, 0.94 Gy, or 1.88 Gy) on preimplantation mouse embryos in vitro was studied under different conditions. The agents were applied either singly or in combination. The embryos were irradiated in the G2-phase of the two-cell stage (28 h p.c. or 32 h p.c.) either 1 h after or immediately before application of caffeine. Caffeine was present during the whole incubation period (until 144 h p.c.). The effects on the microscopic visible development (formation of blastocysts 96 h p.c., hatching of blastocysts 144 h p.c.) and on the cell numbers of embryos at different times (48 h p.c., 56 h p.c., 96 h p.c., 144 h p.c.) were determined. We found conditions under which caffeine markedly enhanced radiation risk, i.e., under which the combination effect exceeded the sum of the single effects. This is true, in particular, for the embryonal development, for which the risk may almost be doubled, whereas the enhancement of risk is not so great for the proliferation of cells. In some cases the combination results lie even outside the envelope of additivity in the range of supra-additivity. The amount of caffeine necessary for such marked effects, however, is so high (at least 1 mM caffeine for rather long times), that it is almost impossible to reach them in vivo by consumption of caffeine-containing beverages. (orig.)

  13. Content of 4(5-methylimidazole, caffeine and chlorogenic acid in commercial coffee brands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi Thanh Dieu Phan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Content of 4(5-methylimidazole (4-MeI, caffeine and chlorogenic acid in commercial coffee brands were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC with UV DAD and MS detectors. Positive ion ESI mass spectra of the 4-MeI standard yielded intense signals corresponding to [M+H]+ (83.0604 and [2M+H]+ ions (165.1115. Also, adducts of 4-MeI with acetonitrile from mobile were detected - [M+ACN]+ ions (124.0849. The LOD of 2.5 ng mL-1 and LOQ of 8.4 ng.mL-1 were calculated according to the following formulas: LOD = 3.SD/S, and LOQ = 10.SD/S, where S is the slope of the calibration curve and SD is the standard deviation of the noise. The caffeine content was compared to the results of the standard addition, 1st derivative and liquid-liquid extraction spectrophotometry. 4-MeI was in tens µg g-1 in the Vietnamese coffees while in units µg.g-1 in all Czech and Brazilian coffees (<2.4 µg.g-1 and <4.9 µg.g-1, respectively. The results for caffeine were within the documented range (0.31 - 2.20% in all coffee samples. The lower content of caffeine and chlorogenic acid was observed in Vietnamese coffees. All the methods used for determination of caffeine in the Czech and Brazilian coffees gave acceptable precision and accuracy. However, there were significant differences in the results in Vietnamese coffees. The caffeine extractability (100 °C, 3 min brewing almost reached 100% in Czech and Brazilian coffees, while it was less than 90% in Vietnamese coffees. The Czech and Brazilian coffees tend to produce more caffeine in brews than the Vietnamese coffee because of the different composition of blends and the particle size degree.  

  14. Adsorption behavior of caffeine as a green corrosion inhibitor for copper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrochemical and impedance experiments were carried out to evaluate the corrosion behavior of copper in aerated 0.1 mol L−1 H2SO4 solutions in the presence of three xanthine derivatives with similar chemical structures. The corrosion rate of copper was found to increase in the presence of theophylline and theobromine and decrease in the presence of caffeine. The adsorption and inhibitory effect of caffeine on copper surfaces in aerated 0.1 mol L−1 H2SO4 solutions were then investigated in detail by potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), contact angle measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and fluorescence experiments. The data obtained indicate that caffeine behaves as a cathodic-type inhibitor adsorbing onto the copper surface according to the Temkin isotherm, with the negative ∆G°ads value of − 31.1 kJ mol−1 signifying a spontaneous adsorption process. The corrosion inhibition efficiency increased with caffeine concentration in the range of 1.0–10.0 mmol L−1. Furthermore, the EIS results obtained at the open-circuit potential and surface analysis (SEM, EDS and fluorescence) clearly demonstrated the adsorption of the organic compound onto the copper electrode. The contact angle measurements revealed the formation of a hydrophobic protective film. This film covers up to 72% of the total active surface, acts as a protective barrier and prevents interaction between the metal, water and oxygen molecules. - Highlights: ► We have investigated the adsorption and corrosion inhibition of caffeine on copper surfaces. ► Caffeine behaves as a cathodic-type inhibitor. ► Caffeine adsorbs onto copper surface according to Temkin isotherm. ► There exists the formation of a hydrophobic film that acts as a protective barrier. ► This corrosion inhibitor covers up to 72% of the total active surface of copper.

  15. Role of Caffeine Intake on Erectile Dysfunction in US Men: Results from NHANES 2001-2004.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David S Lopez

    Full Text Available Caffeine is consumed by more than 85% of adults and little is known about its role on erectile dysfunction (ED in population-based studies. We investigated the association of caffeine intake and caffeinated beverages with ED, and whether these associations vary among comorbidities for ED.Data were analyzed for 3724 men (≥20 years old who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES. ED was assessed by a single question during a self-paced, computer-assisted self-interview. We analyzed 24-h dietary recall data to estimate caffeine intake (mg/day. Multivariable logistic regression analyses using appropriate sampling weights were conducted.We found that men in the 3rd (85-170 mg/day and 4th (171-303 mg/day quintiles of caffeine intake were less likely to report ED compared to men in the lowest 1st quintile (0-7 mg/day [OR: 0.58; 95% CI, 0.37-0.89; and OR: 0.61; 95% CI, 0.38-0.97, respectively], but no evidence for a trend. Similarly, among overweight/obese and hypertensive men, there was an inverse association between higher quintiles of caffeine intake and ED compared to men in the lowest 1st quintile, P≤0.05 for each quintile. However, only among men without diabetes we found a similar inverse association (Ptrend = 0.01.Caffeine intake reduced the odds of prevalent ED, especially an intake equivalent to approximately 2-3 daily cups of coffee (170-375 mg/day. This reduction was also observed among overweight/obese and hypertensive, but not among diabetic men. Yet, these associations are warranted to be investigated in prospective studies.

  16. Stacking of purines in water: the role of dipolar interactions in caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavagnacco, L; Di Fonzo, S; D'Amico, F; Masciovecchio, C; Brady, J W; Cesàro, A

    2016-05-11

    During the last few decades it has been ascertained that base stacking is one of the major contributions stabilizing nucleic acid conformations. However, the understanding of the nature of the interactions involved in the stacking process remains under debate and it is a subject of theoretical and experimental studies. Structural similarity between purine bases (guanine and adenine) in DNA and the caffeine molecule makes caffeine an excellent model for the purine bases. The present study clearly shows that dipolar interactions play a fundamental role in determining stacking of purine molecules in solution. In order to reach this achievement, polarized ultraviolet Raman resonant scattering experiments have been carried out on caffeine aqueous solutions as a function of concentration and temperature. The investigation pointed out at the aggregation and solvation properties, particularly at elevated temperatures. Kubo-Anderson theory was used as a framework to investigate the non-coincidence effect (NCE) occurring in the totally symmetric breathing modes of the purine rings, and in the bending modes of the methyl groups of caffeine. The NCE concentration dependence shows that caffeine aggregation at 80 °C occurs by planar stacking of the hydrophobic faces. The data clearly indicate that dipolar interactions determine the reorientational motion of the molecules in solution and are the driving force for the stacking of caffeine. In parallel, the observed dephasing times imply a change in caffeine interactions as a function of temperature and concentration. A decrease, at low water content, of the dephasing time for the ring breathing vibration mode indicates that self-association alters the solvation structure that is detectable at low concentration. These results are in agreement with simulation predictions and serve as an important validation of the models used in those calculations. PMID:27127808

  17. The metabolic and performance effects of caffeine compared to coffee during endurance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Adrian B; Randell, Rebecca K; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2013-01-01

    There is consistent evidence supporting the ergogenic effects of caffeine for endurance based exercise. However, whether caffeine ingested through coffee has the same effects is still subject to debate. The primary aim of the study was to investigate the performance enhancing effects of caffeine and coffee using a time trial performance test, while also investigating the metabolic effects of caffeine and coffee. In a single-blind, crossover, randomised counter-balanced study design, eight trained male cyclists/triathletes (Mean ± SD: Age 41 ± 7 y, Height 1.80 ± 0.04 m, Weight 78.9 ± 4.1 kg, VO2 max 58 ± 3 ml • kg(-1) • min(-1)) completed 30 min of steady-state (SS) cycling at approximately 55% VO2max followed by a 45 min energy based target time trial (TT). One hour prior to exercise each athlete consumed drinks consisting of caffeine (5 mg CAF/kg BW), instant coffee (5 mg CAF/kg BW), instant decaffeinated coffee or placebo. The set workloads produced similar relative exercise intensities during the SS for all drinks, with no observed difference in carbohydrate or fat oxidation. Performance times during the TT were significantly faster (~5.0%) for both caffeine and coffee when compared to placebo and decaf (38.35 ± 1.53, 38.27 ± 1.80, 40.23 ± 1.98, 40.31 ± 1.22 min respectively, pcoffee. Average power for caffeine and coffee during the TT was significantly greater when compared to placebo and decaf (294 ± 21 W, 291 ± 22 W, 277 ± 14 W, 276 ± 23 W respectively, pcoffee (5 mg/kg/BW) consumed 1 h prior to exercise can improve endurance exercise performance. PMID:23573201

  18. Comparison of radioprotective effects of caffeine and ascorbic acid in male mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxygen effect in radiation biology is well known. Since oxygen enhances radiation-induced biological damage, antioxidants should be radioprotectors. Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) or caffeine is an essential component in the diet of humans and a small range of other mammals. Radioprotective effects of vitamin C have been demonstrated in certain cells and animals, which would result from scavenging free radicals. Caffeine is the main psychoactive ingredient of coffee, tea, even coke with a high frequency of concurrent use in humans. Caffeine has been recently reported as a scavenger of hydroxyl radical in millimolar levels and a potently radioprotector in a chronically exposed rodent. This study investigates functional radioprotection of caffeine and ascorbic acid against gamma irradiation in male mice. Eight-week-old male C57BL/6N mice were irradiated with 6.5 Gy. A caffeine treated group was administered with 80 mg/kg body weight by i.p injection, a single exposure 1 hour before irradiation. Ascorbic acid was administered 330 mg/liter in drinking water through all the experimental period. The remaining mice were kept as sham controls. After collecting a serum from the experimental mice 6 hr after irradiation, qualitative analysis of testosterone was performed by means of radioimmunoassay (RIA). For histological investigation, testes were removed 1 week after irradiation and fixed in NBF. Fixed testes were processed for paraffin sections and stained by H-E. The circulating testosterone significantly decreased in all irradiated groups. The harmful effect of radiation on the body and organ weight and the appearance of semiferous tubules were significantly improved in the caffeine - or ascorbic acid-treated group. In conclusion, caffeine and ascorbic acid protected spermatogenesis from impairment against gamma radiation, acting as a radioprotector

  19. The Caffeine Content of Dietary Supplements Commonly Purchased in the U.S.: Analysis of 53 Products Having Caffeine-containing Ingredients

    Science.gov (United States)

    As part of a study initiating the development of an analytically validated Dietary Supplement Ingredient Database (DSID) in the United States (U.S.), a selection of dietary supplement products were analyzed for their caffeine content. Products sold as tablets, caplets, or capsules and listing at l...

  20. Naturalistic Effects of Five Days of Bedtime Caffeine Use on Sleep, Next-Day Cognitive Performance, and Mood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keenan, Emma K; Tiplady, Brian; Priestley, Caroline M; Rogers, Peter J

    2014-03-01

    Background: Disruptive effects of caffeine on sleep have previously been reported, although measures of next-day mood and performance have rarely been included. The present study aims to evaluate the effects of caffeine on sleep and associated next-day effects in a naturalistic field setting. Methods: Nineteen participants (daily caffeine intake 0-141 mg), assessed as good sleepers, took part in a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, 2-week crossover study to assess the effects of bedtime caffeine use (250 mg) on sleep and next-day cognitive performance and mood, which were assessed on a mobile phone in the morning and afternoon. Sleep was assessed objectively (actiwatch) and subjectively (sleep diary). Results: Caffeine's effects on sleep were largely restricted to the first day of administration, with actigraphically measured reduced sleep efficiency, increased activity score and fragmentation index, decreased self-rated sleep quality, and an increased occurrence of participants waking early; only decreased sleep efficiency remained over the week. Effects on next-day performance and mood were evident over the whole week, although despite disrupting sleep, accuracy on a working memory task was higher after caffeine than placebo administration. Conclusions: Caffeine disrupted sleep, although when assessing next-day performance, which may have been affected by the presence of residual caffeine, performance appeared better after caffeine compared to placebo, although this was most likely due to prevention of the effects of overnight withdrawal from caffeine rather than representing a net benefit. Furthermore, partial tolerance developed to the effects of caffeine on sleep. PMID:24868491

  1. Quercetin, not caffeine, is a major neuroprotective component in coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Moonhee; McGeer, Edith G; McGeer, Patrick L

    2016-10-01

    Epidemiologic studies indicate that coffee consumption reduces the risk of Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. To determine the factors involved, we examined the protective effects of coffee components. The test involved prevention of neurotoxicity to SH-SY5Y cells that was induced by lipopolysaccharide plus interferon-γ or interferon-γ released from activated microglia and astrocytes. We found that quercetin, flavones, chlorogenic acid, and caffeine protected SH-SY5Y cells from these toxins. They also reduced the release of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-6 from the activated microglia and astrocytes and attenuated the activation of proteins from P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and nuclear factor kappa light chain enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB). After exposure to toxin containing glial-stimulated conditioned medium, we also found that quercetin reduced oxidative/nitrative damage to DNA, as well as to the lipids and proteins of SH-SY5Y cells. There was a resultant increase in [GSH]i in SH-SY5Y cells. The data indicate that quercetin is the major neuroprotective component in coffee against Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease. PMID:27479153

  2. Metabolic and exercise endurance effects of coffee and caffeine ingestion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, T E; Hibbert, E; Sathasivam, P

    1998-09-01

    Caffeine (Caf) ingestion increases plasma epinephrine (Epi) and exercise endurance; these results are frequently transferred to coffee (Cof) consumption. We examined the impact of ingestion of the same dose of Caf in Cof or in water. Nine healthy, fit, young adults performed five trials after ingesting (double blind) either a capsule (Caf or placebo) with water or Cof (decaffeinated Cof, decaffeinated with Caf added, or regular Cof). In all three Caf trials, the Caf dose was 4.45 mg/kg body wt and the volume of liquid was 7.15 ml/kg. After 1 h of rest, the subject ran at 85% of maximal O2 consumption until voluntary exhaustion (approximately 32 min in the placebo and decaffeinated Cof tests). In the three Caf trials, the plasma Caf and paraxanthine concentrations were very similar. After 1 h of rest, the plasma Epi was increased (P capsules than with Cof. During the exercise there were no differences in Epi among the three Caf trials, and the Epi values were all greater (P capsule trial; there were no differences among the other four tests. One cannot extrapolate the effects of Caf to Cof; there must be a component(s) of Cof that moderates the actions of Caf. PMID:9729561

  3. The metabolic and performance effects of caffeine compared to coffee during endurance exercise.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian B Hodgson

    Full Text Available There is consistent evidence supporting the ergogenic effects of caffeine for endurance based exercise. However, whether caffeine ingested through coffee has the same effects is still subject to debate. The primary aim of the study was to investigate the performance enhancing effects of caffeine and coffee using a time trial performance test, while also investigating the metabolic effects of caffeine and coffee. In a single-blind, crossover, randomised counter-balanced study design, eight trained male cyclists/triathletes (Mean ± SD: Age 41 ± 7 y, Height 1.80 ± 0.04 m, Weight 78.9 ± 4.1 kg, VO2 max 58 ± 3 ml • kg(-1 • min(-1 completed 30 min of steady-state (SS cycling at approximately 55% VO2max followed by a 45 min energy based target time trial (TT. One hour prior to exercise each athlete consumed drinks consisting of caffeine (5 mg CAF/kg BW, instant coffee (5 mg CAF/kg BW, instant decaffeinated coffee or placebo. The set workloads produced similar relative exercise intensities during the SS for all drinks, with no observed difference in carbohydrate or fat oxidation. Performance times during the TT were significantly faster (~5.0% for both caffeine and coffee when compared to placebo and decaf (38.35 ± 1.53, 38.27 ± 1.80, 40.23 ± 1.98, 40.31 ± 1.22 min respectively, p<0.05. The significantly faster performance times were similar for both caffeine and coffee. Average power for caffeine and coffee during the TT was significantly greater when compared to placebo and decaf (294 ± 21 W, 291 ± 22 W, 277 ± 14 W, 276 ± 23 W respectively, p<0.05. No significant differences were observed between placebo and decaf during the TT. The present study illustrates that both caffeine (5 mg/kg/BW and coffee (5 mg/kg/BW consumed 1 h prior to exercise can improve endurance exercise performance.

  4. Differential concentration-specific effects of caffeine on cell viability, oxidative stress, and cell cycle in pulmonary oxygen toxicity in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Tiwari, Kirti Kumar; Chu, Chun; Couroucli, Xanthi; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Lingappan, Krithika

    2014-01-01

    Caffeine is used to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature neonates. Hyperoxia contributes to the development of BPD, inhibits cell proliferation and decreases cell survival. The mechanisms responsible for the protective effect of caffeine in pulmonary oxygen toxicity remain largely unknown. A549 and MLE 12 pulmonary epithelial cells were exposed to hyperoxia or maintained in room air, in the presence of different concentrations (0, 0.05, 0.1 and 1 mM) of caffeine. Caffeine had...

  5. Effect of caffeine and reduced temperature (20 degrees C) on the organization of the pre-Golgi and the Golgi stack membranes

    OpenAIRE

    1993-01-01

    In the present study we have dissected the transport pathways between the ER and the Golgi complex using a recently introduced (Kuismanen, E., J. Jantti, V. Makiranta, and M. Sariola. 1992. J. Cell Sci. 102:505- 513) inhibition of transport by caffeine at 20 degrees C. Recovery of the Golgi complex from brefeldin A (BFA) treatment was inhibited by caffeine at reduced temperature (20 degrees C) suggesting that caffeine inhibits the membrane traffic between the ER and the Golgi complex. Caffein...

  6. Effects of caffeine on muscle glycogen utilization and the neuroendocrine axis during exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent, D; Schneider, K E; Prusaczyk, W K; Franklin, C; Vogel, S M; Krssak, M; Petersen, K F; Goforth, H W; Shulman, G I

    2000-06-01

    To examine the effect of caffeine ingestion on muscle glycogen utilization and the neuroendocrine axis during exercise, we studied 20 muscle glycogen-loaded subjects who were given placebo or caffeine (6 mg/kg) in a double blinded fashion 90 min before cycling for 2 h at 65% of their maximal oxygen consumption. Exercise-induced glycogen depletion in the thigh muscle was noninvasively measured by means of 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) spectroscopy, and plasma concentrations of substrates and neuroendocrine hormones, including beta-endorphins, were also assessed. Muscle glycogen content was increased 140% above normal values on the caffeine trial day (P endorphin levels almost doubled (from 30 +/- 5 to 53 +/- 13 pg/mL; P exercise does not exert a muscle glycogen-sparing effect in athletes with high muscle glycogen content. However, these data suggest that caffeine lowers the threshold for exercise-induced beta-endorphin and cortisol release, which may contribute to the reported benefits of caffeine on exercise endurance. PMID:10852448

  7. Caffeine's effect on intermittent sprint cycling performance with different rest intervals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chia-Lun; Cheng, Ching-Feng; Lin, Jung-Charng; Huang, Hsin-Wei

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of caffeine ingestion on the performance of an intermittent sprint cycling test (ISCT) with different rest intervals. Fourteen males with team sport experience consumed 6 mg kg(-1) of caffeine or a placebo 60 min prior to completing two sets of an ISCT with 4-min rest intervals. Each set consisted of 12 × 4-s sprints with 20- or 90-s active recovery intervals at 60-70 rpm. Blood lactate was collected at baseline and immediately following the completion of six sprints in each set. At 20-s recovery intervals, peak power and total work were not significantly different between conditions during the ISCT (P > 0.05); but caffeine reduced 6.31% effort for mean power in Sprint 10 of the later stage, as well as an increased fatigue index and elevated blood lactate levels during the ISCT (P ISCT (P 0.05). In conclusion, caffeine ingestion may be ergolytic, affecting performance and fatigue development in the later stage during a prolonged and intermittent sprint test with a short recovery interval. However, caffeine produces an ergogenic effect in the initial stage of an intermittent sprint performance with a longer recovery interval. PMID:21960086

  8. Potential Role of Caffeine in the Treatment of Parkinson’s Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshan, Mohsin H.K.; Tambo, Amos; Pace, Nikolai P.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease [PD] is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder after Alzheimer’s disease, affecting 1% of the population over the age of 55. The underlying neuropathology seen in PD is characterised by progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta with the presence of Lewy bodies. The Lewy bodies are composed of aggregates of α-synuclein. The motor manifestations of PD include a resting tremor, bradykinesia, and muscle rigidity. Currently there is no cure for PD and motor symptoms are treated with a number of drugs including levodopa [L-dopa]. These drugs do not delay progression of the disease and often provide only temporary relief. Their use is often accompanied by severe adverse effects. Emerging evidence from both in vivo and in vitro studies suggests that caffeine may reduce parkinsonian motor symptoms by antagonising the adenosine A2A receptor, which is predominately expressed in the basal ganglia. It is hypothesised that caffeine may increase the excitatory activity in local areas by inhibiting the astrocytic inflammatory processes but evidence remains inconclusive. In addition, the co-administration of caffeine with currently available PD drugs helps to reduce drug tolerance, suggesting that caffeine may be used as an adjuvant in treating PD. In conclusion, caffeine may have a wide range of therapeutic effects which are yet to be explored, and therefore warrants further investigation in randomized clinical trials.

  9. Caffeine protects mice against whole-body lethal dose of γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Administration of caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine), a major component of coffee, to Swiss mice at doses of 80 or 100 mg/kg body weight 60 min prior to whole-body lethal dose of γ-irradiation (7.5 Gy) resulted in the survival of 70 and 63% of animals, respectively, at the above doses in contrast to absolutely no survivors (LD-100/25 days) in the group exposed to radiation alone. Pre-treatment with a lower concentration of caffeine (50 mg/kg) did not confer any radioprotection. The protection exerted by caffeine (80 mg/kg), however, was reduced from 70 to 50% if administered 30 min prior to irradiation. The trend statistics reveal that a dose of 80 mg/kg administered 60 min before whole-body exposure to 7.5 Gy is optimal for maximal radioprotection. However, caffeine (80 mg/kg) administered within 3 min after irradiation offered no protection. While there is documentation in the literature that caffeine is an antioxidant and radioprotector against the toxic pathway of radiation damage in a wide range of cells and organisms, this is the first report demonstrating unequivocally its potent radioprotective action in terms of survival of lethally whole-body irradiated mice. (author)

  10. Effect of caffeine on induction of endogenous type C virus in mouse cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of caffeine on the expression of murine endogenous virus in mouse cells induced by radiation and chemicals was studied. Postirradiation treatment of K-BALB cells with caffeine enhanced cell killing as well as the induction of xenotropic virus after ultraviolet light irradiation. The degree of enhancement for the virus induction was comparable to that for cell killing. On the other hand, colony-forming ability and the expression of xenotropic virus of K-BALB cells after X-irradiation were unaffected by caffeine. These data suggest a linear relationship between the degree of endogenous virus expression and the amount of lethal damages after irradiation. For induction by halogenated pyrimidines, a 24-hr incubation of AKR2B cells with caffeine after 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine treatment resulted in marked suppression of the expression of ecotropic virus. On the contrary, in K-BALB cells, caffeine exerted only a small effect on 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine-induced expression of ecotropic and xenotropic viruses. These results indicate that, although using the same inducing agent, the pathway of endogenous virus induction may be different for AKR2B cells and for K-BALB cells

  11. Effect of caffeine on γ-ray induced G2 delay in ataxia telangiectasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure of normal control and ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T) lymphoblastoid cell lines to ionizing radiation gives rise to an increase in the proportion of G2 phase cells. The size and extent of the G2 phase block is greater in A-T cells than in normal cells. Caffeine has a similar overall effect in control and A-T cell lines in reducing the G2 arrest observed after ionizing radiation. While the proportion of cells accumulated in G2 in A-T cells is considerably greater than in controls, addition of caffeine at the time of maximal G2 block brings about a return of G2 phase cell numbers to unirradiated values in 3 hours in both cell types. In normal control cells the caffeine-mediated decrease in G2 cells is reflected by an increase in mitotic cells. These mitotic cells have a higher frequency of chromosome aberrations compared to cells harvested in the absence of caffeine. Similarly in A-T cells addition of caffeine to irradiated cultures, delayed in G2 phase, increased the number of mitotic cells and the frequency of chromosome aberrations. (author)

  12. Action of caffeine on the survival of x-irradiated cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Post-irradiation treatment of HeLa S3 cells with 1 mM caffeine results in a marked diminution of the surviving fraction as scored by colony formation. The decrease is dose-dependent; the effect of a 24-h post-irradiation treatment of a non-synchronous population with caffeine is to change the terminal slope of the survival curve and its intercept. Do is reduced from 130 to 60 rad; the extrapolation number is increased about twofold. The amount of post-irradiation killing is maximal if cells are exposed to caffeine at a concentration of at least 1 mM for 8 hours; less than 10% of unirradiated cells are killed under these conditions. Dose-response curves were also obtained for synchronous cells at various phases of the cell cycle. Similar results were obtained at all cell ages, but the magnitude of the effect is age-dependent. This age dependence was further explored in experiments in which mitotically collected cells were exposed to 300 or 500 rad doses at 2-hour intervals throughout the cell cycle. Treatment with caffeine for 24 hours after irradiation enhances the killing of cells late in the cycle more than in G1. The sensitivities of two other cell lines, CHO and EMT6, also were examined; both are substantially less sensitive to caffeine. The smaller cell-cycle dependence of CHO cells is qualitatively the same as that of HeLa cells

  13. Caffeine intake and semen quality in a population of 2,554 young Danish men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tina Kold; Swan, Shanna H; Skakkebaek, Niels E;

    2010-01-01

    The authors examined the association between semen quality and caffeine intake among 2,554 young Danish men recruited when they were examined to determine their fitness for military service in 2001-2005. The men delivered a semen sample and answered a questionnaire including information about...... caffeine intake from various sources, from which total caffeine intake was calculated. Moderate caffeine and cola intakes (101-800 mg/day and 14 0.5-L bottles....../week) and/or caffeine (>800 mg/day) intake was associated with reduced sperm concentration and total sperm count, although only significant for cola. High-intake cola drinkers had an adjusted sperm concentration and total sperm count of 40 mill/mL (95% confidence interval (CI): 32, 51) and 121 mill (95% CI...

  14. Extraction of catechins and caffeine from different tealeaves and comparison with micellar electrokinetic chromatography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Guanqun; LIN Jinming; Qu Feng; C.W.Huie

    2003-01-01

    This work describes the simultaneous deter- mination of catechins and caffeine in green, black tealeaves and canned tea-drink using micellar electrokinetic chromatography. The catechins analyzed include (+)-catechin, (-)- epicatechin, (-)-epigallocatechin, (-)-epicatechin gallate and (-)-epigallocatechin gallate. Using UV absorption method at 280 nm, the limits of detections of catechins and caffeine are 10-6 mol/L, which is suitable for the real sample determination. Using this analytical method, the extraction of these compounds from the tealeaves with hot water is compared under different temperatures. The effects of temperature on the amount of catechins and caffeine extracted are evident, showing that (-)-epigallocatechin gallate is the most easiest to be extracted at 100℃. The stability of catechins and caffeine in stocking solution of tea-drink at 4℃ is also compared on five consecutive days. The contents of catechins and caffeine in green and black teas are discussed and the difference of the content between different tealeaves can provide a reference for the assessment of tea quality.

  15. Caffeine and pharmaceuticals as indicators of waste water contamination in wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, R.L.; Zaugg, S.D.; Thomas, J.M.; Howcroft, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    The presence of caffeine or human pharmaceuticals in ground water with elevated nitrate concentrations can provide a clear, unambiguous indication that domestic waste water is a source of some of the nitrate. Water from domestic, public supply, and monitoring wells in three communities near Reno, Nevada, was sampled to test if caffeine or pharmaceuticals are common, persistent, and mobile enough in the environment that they can be detected in nitrate-contaminated ground water and, thus, can be useful indicators of recharge from domestic waste water. Results of this study indicate that these compounds can be used as indicators of recharge from domestic waste water, although their usefulness is limited because caffeine is apparently nonconservative and the presence of prescription pharmaceuticals is unpredictable. The absence of caffeine or pharmaceuticals in ground water with elevated nitrate concentrations does not demonstrate that the aquifer is free of waste water contamination. Caffeine was detected in ground water samples at concentrations up to 0.23 ??g/L. The human pharmaceuticals chlorpropamide, phensuximide, and carbamazepine also were detected in some samples.

  16. Failure of caffeine to affect metabolism during 60 min submaximal exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titlow, L W; Ishee, J H; Riggs, C E

    1991-01-01

    Caffeine consumption prior to athletic performance has become commonplace. The usual dosage is approximately 200 mg, a level of caffeine ingestion equivalent to two cups of brewed coffee. This study was designed to examine the effects of a common level of caffeine ingestion, specifically 200 mg, on metabolism during submaximal exercise performance in five males. The subjects performed two 60-min monitored treadmill workouts at 60% maximal heart rate during a 2-week period. The subjects were randomly assigned, double-blind to receive a caffeine or placebo capsule 60 min prior to exercise. Testing was performed in the afternoon following a midnight fast. Venous blood was withdrawn pre-exercise, every 15 min during the workout, and 10 min after recovery. Blood was analysed for free fatty acid, triglycerides, glucose, lactic acid, haemoglobin and haematocrit. The respiratory exchange ratio (R), perceived exertion (RPE) and oxygen uptake were measured every 4 min during exercise. An examination of the data with repeated-measures ANOVA revealed no significant differences between the two groups. Within the limitations of the study, it was concluded that 200 mg caffeine failed to affect metabolism during 60 min submaximal exercise. PMID:1856908

  17. The effect of caffeine and adenine on radiation induced suppression of DNA synthesis, and cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure of cultured mammalian cells to ionizing radiation or UV light results in a transient decrease in the rate of DNA synthesis. This depression in synthetic rate may be attenuated or deferred via a post-irradiation treatment with caffeine or adenine. It has been suggested that this attenuation may increase the fixation of damage and, therefore, increase radiation sensitivity. However, it has been previously reported that, for V79 cells treated with caffeine or adenine, no correlation exists between the extent of depression and cell survival. The present investigation expands upon these findings by examining the effect of caffeine or adenine post-irradiation treatment on two cell lines with normal UV sensitivity, mouse 3T3 and CHO AA8 cells, and one UV sensitive cell line, CHO UV5 cells. Both caffeine and adenine have been found to reduce, or delay, the suppression in DNA synthesis in all three cell lines. Surprisingly, caffeine appeared to induced even the UV5 cells to recover DNA synthetic ability. The amount of reduction in suppression of DNA synthesis, however, varies between the different cell lines and no consistent relationship with cell survival has emerged

  18. Effects of caffeine on ischemia-reperfusion injury in isolated rat hearts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamahara, Y; Asayama, J; Matsumoto, T; Miyazaki, H; Tatsumi, T; Ohta, B; Sakai, R; Inoue, M; Inoue, D; Nakagawa, M

    1993-07-01

    Cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) plays an important role in regulation of the intracellular Ca2+ concentration. It is well known that intracellular Ca2+ overload is one cause of reperfusion injury. Thus, it is predicted that reperfusion injury of myocardium can be prevented by eliminating the Ca2+ overload. This study examined the effects of caffeine, a SR blocker, on reperfusion injury in isolated perfused rat hearts. Working hearts were reperfused for 25 min after 30 or 50 min of ischemia. Caffeine (10(-4) M) was administered during the period of ischemia or the initial 5 min of reperfusion. The left ventricular pressure and the electrocardiogram were recorded. Rate-pressure products were calculated as an index of cardiac function. Adenine nucleotides were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography to assess energy charge. The administration of caffeine for a short period during the initial reperfusion significantly improved cardiac function in the hearts. Caffeine pretreatment during 50 min of ischemia, though, resulted in deterioration of both energy charge and cardiac function. Caffeine did not affect the incidence of either ventricular fibrillation or reversion to sinus rhythm. The energy charges were lower in the preparations with sustained ventricular fibrillation. PMID:8246349

  19. EFFECT OF SHORT-TERM CAFFEINE SUPPLEMENTATION ON STRESS RESPONSE AND IMMUNE SYSTEM OF MALE ATHLETES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asghar Tofighi

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Vigorous exercise stress might be leading cause of immune system disorders and appearance of acute and chronic inflammation in human body. Caffeine supplementation prior to exercise can be effective on body immune response. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of short-term caffeine supplementation on immune response and stress index in male athletes after an exhaustive aerobic exercise. Materials and methods : In a double-blind study 24 male athletes (endurance runner and triathlon randomly divided in Caffeine supplementation (CAF and Placebo (CON groups. One hour prior to main exhaustive treadmill test (Bruce test CAF group consumed caffeine (6 Mg/BW and CON group received placebo. Blood samples were collected before and immediately after exercise test from anticubital vein. After supplying serum; Cortisol, leukocyte and serum Heat shock protein 72 (Hsp72 concentrations were determined using ELISA method. Paired and independent t student test was used for analysis of inter and intra group differences respectively. Results: serum cortisol and Hsp72 concentrations in CON group was significantly higher than CAF group (P0.05. In addition Mean of variation in CON group was significantly higher than CAF group (P<0.05. Conclusions: Based on study results caffeine supplementation prior to short-term exhaustive aerobic exercise has positive effect on innate immunity and body defensive system.

  20. The effects of mono- and divalent metal cations on the solution structure of caffeine and theophylline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafisi, Shohreh; Monajemi, Majid; Ebrahimi, Saeedeh

    2004-11-01

    The interactions of caffeine and theophylline with potassium +, cobalt 2+ and nickel 2+ ions were studied in aqueous solution at physiological pH with constant ligand concentration and various metal ion contents. Fourier Transform infrared spectroscopy and absorption spectra were used to determine the cation binding mode and association constants. Spectroscopic results showed direct and indirect cation interactions for Co 2+, Ni 2+ and K + through O6 and N9 atoms (caffeine) and O6, N9 and N7 atoms (theophylline). The overall binding constants were, K(Co-caffeine)=6.92×10 4 M -1, K(Ni-caffeine)=2.22×10 4 M -1, K(K-caffeine)=5.08×10 3 M -1, K(Co-theophylline)=5.06×10 4 M -1, K(Ni-theophylline)=4.84×10 4 M -1 and K(K-theophylline)=2.13×10 3 M -1. The association constants showed weaker interaction for monovalent cation than divalent metal ions.

  1. Caffeine-containing energy drink improves physical performance in female soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Beatriz; Gonzalez-Millán, Cristina; Salinero, Juan Jose; Abian-Vicen, Javier; Areces, Francisco; Barbero-Alvarez, Jose Carlos; Muñoz, Víctor; Portillo, Luis Javier; Gonzalez-Rave, Jose Maria; Del Coso, Juan

    2014-05-01

    There is little information about the effects of caffeine intake on female team-sport performance. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of a caffeine-containing energy drink to improve physical performance in female soccer players during a simulated game. A double-blind, placebo controlled and randomized experimental design was used in this investigation. In two different sessions, 18 women soccer players ingested 3 mg of caffeine/kg in the form of an energy drink or an identical drink with no caffeine content (placebo). After 60 min, they performed a countermovement jump (CMJ) and a 7 × 30 m sprint test followed by a simulated soccer match (2 × 40 min). Individual running distance and speed were measured using GPS devices. In comparison to the placebo drink, the ingestion of the caffeinated energy drink increased the CMJ height (26.6 ± 4.0 vs 27.4 ± 3.8 cm; P running speed during the sprint test (24.2 ± 1.6 vs 24.5 ± 1.7 km/h; P running distance (6,631 ± 1,618 vs 7,087 ± 1,501 m; P running distance covered at >18 km/h (161 ± 99 vs 216 ± 103 m; P soccer players. PMID:24615239

  2. Caffeine enhances astroglia and microglia reactivity induced by 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine ('ecstasy') in mouse brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairnar, Amit; Plumitallo, Antonio; Frau, Lucia; Schintu, Nicoletta; Morelli, Micaela

    2010-05-01

    Several reports suggest that 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) induces neurotoxic effects and gliosis. Since recreational use of MDMA is often associated with caffeinated beverages, we investigated whether caffeine interferes with MDMA-induced astroglia and microglia activation, thus facilitating its neurotoxicity. MDMA (4 x 20 mg/kg) was acutely administered to mice alone or in combination with caffeine (10 mg/kg). CD11b and GFAP immunoreactivity were evaluated as markers of microglia and astroglia activation in the substantia nigra pars-compacta (SNc) and striatum. MDMA was associated with significantly higher CD11b and GFAP immunoreactivity in striatum, whereas only CD11b was significantly higher than vehicle in SNc. Caffeine potentiated the increase in CD11b and GFAP in the striatum but not in the SNc of MDMA-treated mice. The abuse of MDMA is a growing worldwide problem; the results of this study suggest that combination of MDMA plus caffeine by increasing glial activation might have harmful health consequences. PMID:19882200

  3. The interindividual differences in the 3-demthylation of caffeine alias CYP1A2 is determined by both genetic and environmental factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Birgitte B; Brix, Thomas H; Kyvik, Kirsten O;

    2002-01-01

    This study investigated the role of genetic factors (CYP1A2) in caffeine metabolism. The CYP1A2 activity was determined in 378 Danish twins following oral intake of a single dose of 200 mg caffeine and subsequent determination of the caffeine ratio (AFMU+1MU+1MX)/17DMU in a 6-h urine sample. The ...

  4. Naturalistic Effects of Five Days of Bedtime Caffeine Use on Sleep, Next-Day Cognitive Performance, and Mood

    OpenAIRE

    Keenan, Emma K; Tiplady, Brian; Priestley, Caroline M.; Rogers, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Disruptive effects of caffeine on sleep have previously been reported, although measures of next-day mood and performance have rarely been included. The present study aims to evaluate the effects of caffeine on sleep and associated next-day effects in a naturalistic field setting.

  5. Caffeine in Boston Harbor past and present, assessing its utility as a tracer of wastewater contamination in an urban estuary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sites throughout Boston Harbor were analyzed for caffeine to assess its utility as a tracer in identifying sources of sanitary wastewater. Caffeine ranged from 15 ng/L in the outer harbor to a high of 185 ng/L in the inner harbor. Inner harbor concentrations were a result of comb...

  6. Caffeine improves attention deficit in neonatal 6-OHDA lesioned rats, an animal model of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Miguel; Núñez, Fabiana; Ahern, Siobhán; Cuffí, Maria L; Carbonell, Lourdes; Sánchez, Silvia; Fernández-Dueñas, Víctor; Ciruela, Francisco

    2011-04-20

    Nowadays the pharmacological treatment of the attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is based on amphetamine derivatives (i.e. methylphenidate). However, these drugs induce a large array of adverse side effects, thus less aggressive psychostimulant drugs (i.e. caffeine) are being proposed in the management of ADHD. Following this tendency, we decided to study the possible therapeutic use of caffeine in an animal model of ADHD, namely the neonatal 6-hydroxy-dopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat. Therefore, at postnatal day 7 rats were lesioned at the left striatum with 6-OHDA or with saline. Thereafter, at postnatal day 25 their activity and attention were measured with the Olton maze before caffeine was administered ad libitum in the drinking water. Next, after 14 days of caffeine treatment, we repeated these measurements to assess the effect of caffeine on motor activity and attention deficit. Interestingly, while no changes in the motor activity measurements were observed before and after caffeine administration, a significant improvement in the attention deficit of the 6-OHDA lesioned rats was achieved after caffeine treatment. Thus, our results led us to hypothesize that caffeine might be useful to manage the attention deficit during the prepubertal period of ADHD. PMID:21362462

  7. Improving the controlled delivery formulations of caffeine in alginate hydrogel beads combined with pectin, carrageenan, chitosan and psyllium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belščak-Cvitanović, Ana; Komes, Draženka; Karlović, Sven; Djaković, Senka; Spoljarić, Igor; Mršić, Gordan; Ježek, Damir

    2015-01-15

    Alginate-based blends consisting of carrageenan, pectin, chitosan or psyllium husk powder were prepared for assessment of the best formulation aimed at encapsulation of caffeine. Alginate-pectin blend exhibited the lowest viscosity and provided the smallest beads. Alginate-psyllium husk blend was characterised with higher viscosity, yielding the largest bead size and the highest caffeine encapsulation efficiency (83.6%). The release kinetics of caffeine indicated that the porosity of alginate hydrogel was not reduced sufficiently to retard the diffusion of caffeine from the beads. Chitosan coated alginate beads provided the most retarded release of caffeine in water. Morphological characteristics of beads encapsulating caffeine were adversely affected by freeze drying. Bitterness intensity of caffeine-containing beads in water was the lowest for alginate-psyllium beads and chitosan coated alginate beads. Higher sodium alginate concentration (3%) for production of hydrogel beads in combination with psyllium or chitosan coating would present the most favourable carrier systems for immobilization of caffeine. PMID:25149001

  8. Effect of energy drink and caffeinated beverage consumption on sleep, mood, and performance in children and adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owens, Judith A; Mindell, Jodi; Baylor, Allison

    2014-10-01

    The increasing availability of highly caffeinated beverages, including energy drinks, in the United States has resulted in a rise in consumption by children and adolescents. In addition, there is mounting evidence that these products are often consumed by youth for their perceived fatigue-mitigating and mood- or performance-enhancing effects. Although such perceptions by children and adolescents about the potential consequences of caffeine consumption are highly likely to influence decision making regarding the use of such products, there is still a relative paucity of studies that focus on the effect of caffeinated beverages on sleep, mood, and performance in the pediatric population. This review summarizes the following aspects of this topic, as derived from the information currently available: 1) the perception, among youth, of caffeine's risks and benefits and the sources of information about caffeine, particularly with regard to sleep, mood, and performance; 2) the bidirectional effect of caffeine on sleep in children and adolescents and the association of caffeine with other sleep-related practices, and 3) the evidence that supports caffeine as a performance and mood enhancer as well as a countermeasure to sleepiness in the pediatric population. Finally, gaps in knowledge are identified, and a direction for future research is outlined. PMID:25293545

  9. Effects of oral administration of caffeine on some physiological parameters and maternal behaviour of sows at farrowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Superchi, Paola; Saleri, Roberta; Farina, Elena; Cavalli, Valeria; Riccardi, Enzo; Sabbioni, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Caffeine has been demonstrated to have a protective effect on neonatal viability of piglets. In order to assess whether caffeine, administered to parturient sows, also affects maternal behaviour, respiratory rate, and dopamine, nitric oxide and serotonin plasma levels, 20 sows, with induced parturition, received orally 27mg/kg of body weight of caffeine (T group; n=10) or not (NT group; n=10), on day 113 of gestation. Treatment did not affect the farrowing length. There were less stillborn piglets in T group than NT group (0.67 vs 2.44; Pbirth was observed. Caffeine did not affect physiological parameters of sows, as the behaviour score of sows laying on belly was reduced (P<0.05). In conclusion, although the present study was carried out with a limited number of sows, administration of caffeine to parturient sows has the potential for reducing the number of stillborn. PMID:27033919

  10. Caffeine improves endurance in 75-year old citizens. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchard Nørager, Charlotte; Jensen, Martin Bach; Madsen, Mogens Rørbæk;

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of caffeine on physical performance in healthy citizens aged ≥70 yr. The randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study was conducted in 15 men and 15 women recruited by their general practitioner. Participants abstained from caffeine for 48 h and...... were randomized to receive one capsule of placebo and then caffeine (6 mg/kg) or caffeine and then placebo with 1 wk in between. One hour after intervention, we measured reaction and movement times, postural stability, walking speed, cycling at 65% of expected maximal heart rate, perceived effort...... during cycling, maximal isometric arm flexion strength, and endurance. Analysis was by intention to treat, and P < 0.05 was regarded as significant. Caffeine increased cycling endurance by 25% [95% confidence interval (CI): 13–38; P = 0.0001] and isometric arm flexion endurance by 54% (95% CI: 29–83; P...

  11. Effect of moderate intakes of different tea catechins and caffeine on acute measures of energy metabolism under sedentary conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gregersen, N.T.; Bitz, C.; Krog-Mikkelsen, I.;

    2009-01-01

    Green tea may stimulate energy metabolism; however, it is unclear if acute effects are caused by specific catechins, caffeine or their combination. The objective of the present study was to examine the separate and combined effects of different catechins and caffeine on energy expenditure (EE) and...... fat oxidation over a single day. Fifteen healthy, normal-weight males received capsules containing placebo, caffeine alone (150mg), or caffeine plus a catechin mixture (600 mg) enriched in either epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), epigallocatechin or a mix of catechins, in a randomised cross......-over double-blinded design. On each test day EE, respiratory quotient (RQ) and substrate oxidation were measured under sedentary conditions in a respiratory chamber for 13.5h. We found no significant treatment effect on EE (P=0.20) or RQ (P=0.68). EGCG with caffeine insignificantly raised EE and fat oxidation...

  12. Effects of the consumption of caffeinated and decaffeinated instant coffee beverages on oxidative stress induced by strenuous exercise in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, André Luiz Machado; Fonseca, Miriam das Dores Mendes; Meireles, Elisson Lamin Jerônimo; Duarte, Stella Maris da Silveira; Rodrigues, Maria Rita; Paula, Fernanda Borges de Araujo

    2012-03-01

    Many authors attribute the antioxidant activity of brewed coffee to its caffeine content. In addition, caffeine intake has been associated with increased performance during physical exercise. This study analyzed the in vivo effects of drinking caffeinated and decaffeinated instant coffee (8%, w/v) on oxidative stress and antioxidant enzyme activity in the anterior tibialis muscles of rats subjected to intense exercise. It was observed that exercise induced lipid peroxidation (estimated using malondialdehyde) and protein oxidation (evaluated by determining the formation of carbonyl groups) in the muscle (P coffee and caffeine solution did not exhibit antioxidant activity in vivo. Caffeinated instant coffee beverage intake did not induce changes in superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase activities but was able to diminish lipid and protein oxidation in the anterior tibialis muscles of rats after exercise (P exercise. PMID:22173821

  13. Caffeine, but not bicarbonate, improves 6 min maximal performance in elite rowers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Peter Møller; Petersen, Mads H; Friis, Signe N;

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the ergogenic effects in a 6 min maximal performance test (PT) on 12 elite rowers: 6 open-weight (mean ± SD; 25 ± 1 years, and 92 ± 3 kg) and 6 light-weight (25 ± 3 years, and 73 ± 6 kg), following supplementation with caffeine (CAF), sodium bicarbonate (SB), and the combination...... distance; P < 0.05) than in open-weight rowers (0.3% ± 0.8%; P > 0.05). No difference between interventions was observed for readiness and stomach comfort before PT and perceived exertion during PT. This study demonstrates that caffeine ingestion does improve performance in elite rowing. In contrast sodium...... bicarbonate does not appear to be ergogenic, but it does not abolish the ergogenic effect of caffeine....

  14. Coffee, tea, and caffeine consumption and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer and borderline ovarian tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gosvig, Camilla F; Kjaer, Susanne K; Blaakær, Jan;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies that have investigated the association between coffee, tea and caffeine consumption and ovarian cancer risk have produced conflicting results. Furthermore, only few studies have examined the role of coffee and tea consumption separately for borderline ovarian...... tumors. By use of data from a large Danish population-based case-control study, we examined the risk of ovarian tumors associated with coffee, tea, and caffeine consumption with a particular focus on characterizing risks by tumor behavior and histology. MATERIAL AND METHODS: From 1995 through 1999, we....... RESULTS: Both coffee (OR = 0.90; 95% CI 0.84-0.97 per cup/day) and total caffeine consumption from coffee and tea combined (OR = 0.93; 95% CI 0.88-0.98 per 100 mg/day) decreased the risk of ovarian cancer. These associations were significant only for the serous and "other" subtypes of ovarian cancer. No...

  15. A new method for studying caffeine's antioxygenic property: Peroxidase-Oxidase biochemical reaction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jun; CAI Ruxiu; LIN Zhixin; LIU Zhihong

    2003-01-01

    The effect of Caffeine on Peroxidase-Oxidase (PO) reaction was studied systematically in this paper. We proved that the valley of PO oscillation is the best phase angle which was used to research antioxygenic property by the Analyte Pulse Perturbation Technique (APP), based on investigating the mechanism. Area integral calculus was proposed to use in quantitative analysis for the first time. There is a good linear relationship (R = 0.9950) between the ratio of amplitude changes of PO oscillation and the concentration of caffeine in the range 4.61×10-7 mol/L-1.84×10-5 mol/L. A new method for analysis by PO oscillation was set up. We also investigated two-dimensional projections and Fourier spectrum of nonlinear complicate system--PO reaction which was perturbed by caffeine, in order to provide a theoretical basis for studying effects of kinds of antioxidants on life system.

  16. Study of caffeine binding to human serum albumin using optical spectroscopic methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The binding of caffeine to human serum albumin (HSA) under physiological conditions has been stud-ied by the methods of fluorescence,UV-vis absorbance and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The mechanism of quenching of HSA fluorescence by caffeine was shown to involve a dynamic quenching procedure. The number of binding sites n and apparent binding constant Kb were measured by the fluorescence quenching method and the thermodynamic parameters △H,△G,△S were calculated. The results indicate that the binding is mainly enthalpy-driven,with van der Waals interactions and hydrogen bonding playing major roles in the reaction. The distance r between donor (HSA) and acceptor (caffeine) was obtained according to the Frster theory of non-radiative energy transfer. Synchronous fluorescence,CD and three-dimensional fluorescence spectroscopy showed that the microenvironment and conformation of HSA were altered during the reaction.

  17. APPLICATION OF ULTRASOUND THERMAL PROCESS ON EXTRACTING FLAVOR AND CAFFEINE OF COFFEE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chi Wang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, our focus is the use of ultrasound thermal process to extract flavor and caffeine from coffee. The different operating conditions for extraction experiments are executed and the results are also compared. The results show that coffee flavor is not enhanced with the increase of temperature because the volatile degree of coffee flavor components is quick and easy to be reached at high temperatures. From the experimental results, it can be found that using low vibration frequency is better than using high vibration frequency. Also, caffeine will be reached into the saturated state at the 15th second of the extracting time and the quantity of caffeine augments with the increase of temperature.

  18. Chronic caffeine or theophylline exposure reduces gamma-aminobutyric acid/benzodiazepine receptor site interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, D J; Schiller, G D; Farb, D H

    1988-05-01

    Methylxanthines, such as caffeine and theophylline, are adenosine receptor antagonists that exert dramatic effects upon the behavior of vertebrate animals by increasing attentiveness, anxiety, and convulsive activity. Benzodiazepines, such as flunitrazepam, generally exert behavioral effects that are opposite to those of methylxanthines. We report the finding that chronic exposure of embryonic brain neurons to caffeine or theophylline reduces the ability of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) to potentiate the binding of [3H]flunitrazepam to the GABA/benzodiazepine receptor. This theophylline-induced "uncoupling" of GABA- and benzodiazepine-binding site allosteric interactions is blocked by chloroadenosine, an adenosine receptor agonist, indicating that the chronic effects of theophylline are mediated by a site that resembles an adenosine receptor. We speculate that adverse central nervous system effects of long-term exposure to methylxanthines such as in caffeine-containing beverages or theophylline-containing medications may be exerted by a cell-mediated modification of the GABAA receptor. PMID:2835648

  19. Dichotomous Effect of Caffeine, Curcumin, and Naringenin on Genomic DNA of Normal and Diabetic Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debarati Chattopadhyay

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nutraceutical compounds show antioxidant and prooxidant properties under stress conditions like cancer, diabetes, and other diseases. The objective of this study is to find the dichotomic behavior of caffeine, curcumin, and naringenin on DNA of diabetic and normal subjects in the presence and absence of copper, hydrogen peroxide, and complex of copper-hydrogen peroxide. Hydrogen peroxide releases hydroxyl free radicals (•OH on oxidation of Cu (I to Cu (II through Fenton-type reaction to cause DNA damage. In the results, agarose gel electrophoretic pattern speculates the prooxidant effect of caffeine and antioxidant effect of curcumin on DNA in the presence of copper and hydrogen peroxide. UV-Vis spectral analysis shows hyperchromism on addition of DNA to caffeine, hypochromism with curcumin, and subtle changes with naringenin. The chosen nutraceuticals act as inducers and quenchers of oxidative free radicals arising from diabetes.

  20. ADSORPTION OF CAFFEINE BY HYDROGEN DONATING ADSORBENTS BASED ON HYDROGEN BONDING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUMancai; SHIZuoqing; 等

    2000-01-01

    The adsorption isotherms of caffeine from aqueous solution onto three hydrogen donating adsorbents-hydroxypolystyrene,polystryene-azo-pyrogallol,and D72 resin-were measured.The adsorption enthalpies calculated from the isotherms according to the Clausisu-Clapeyron equation were -24-36kJ/mol,-32-37kJ/mol,and -19-24kJ/mol respectively.These values implied that the adsorption processes were based on hydrogen bonding.Furthermore.the mechanism of the adsorption of caffeine onto D72 resin was studied by IR spectra and the small molecular model experiments,and the results showed that the adsorption of caffeine onto hydrogen donating adsorbents was based on hydrogen bonding.

  1. Combined Effects of Simultaneous Exposure to Caffeine and Cocaine in the Mouse Striatum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñiz, Javier A; Gomez, Gimena; González, Betina; Rivero-Echeto, María Celeste; Cadet, Jean Lud; García-Rill, Edgar; Urbano, Francisco J; Bisagno, Veronica

    2016-05-01

    Caffeine is the world's most popular psychoactive drug and is also an active adulterant found in many drugs of abuse, including seized cocaine samples. Despite several studies which examine the effects of caffeine or cocaine administered as single agents, little data are available for these agents when given in combination. The purpose of the present study was to determine if combined intake of both psychostimulants can lead to maladaptive changes in striatal function. Mice were injected with a binge regimen (intermittent treatment for 13 days) of caffeine (3 × 5 mg/kg), cocaine (3 × 10 mg/kg), or combined administration. We found that chronic caffeine potentiated locomotion induced by cocaine and that both caffeine-treated groups showed sensitization. Striatal tissue was obtained 24 h and 7 days after last injection (withdrawal) for immunohistochemistry and mRNA expression. Our results show that combined intake of both psychostimulants can increase GFAP immunoreactivity in the striatum at both times post treatment. Gene expression analysis, targeted at dopamine, adenosine, and glutamate receptor subunit genes, revealed significant transcript down-regulation in the dorsal striatum of AMPA, NMDA, D1 and D2 receptor subunit mRNA expression in the group that received combined treatment, but not after individual administration. At withdrawal, we found increased D1 receptor mRNA expression along with increased A1, AMPA, NMDA, and metabotropic subunit expression. A2A mRNA showed decreased expression after both times in all experimental groups. Our study provides evidence that there are striatal alterations mediated by combined caffeine and cocaine administration, and highlights negative outcomes of chronic intake of both psychostimulants. PMID:26858178

  2. Differential modification of oxic and anoxic components of radiation damage in Bacillus megaterium spores by caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies were carried out on the effect of caffeine on the X-irradiation sensitivity of B. megaterium spores with the following results: Caffeine exerts a concentration-dependent modifying action on oxygen-dependent components of X-ray-induced damage in B. megaterium spore suspensions causing an 'over-O2 effect' at about 1 x 10-4 mol dm-3, and as the concentration is increased to 1 10-3 mol dm-3 or above, a small but consistent protection is seen. In the absence of O2, at a wide range of concentrations (8.5 x 10-5 to 1 x 10-1 mol dm-3), caffeine enhances the inactivation constant, k, from 1.17 to about 1.50 kGy-1. Both ethanol and t-butanol (5 x 10-2 mol dm-3) remove the 'over O2-effect' produced by 1 x 10-4 mol dm-3 caffeine in O2; such an effect, however, is not accompanied by reduction in the H2O2 concentrations in the spore suspensions. Ethanol prevents caffeine-induced anoxic sensitization, as well as H2O2 buildup. t-BuOH has no influence on either the low dose part of the log fraction survival curve or on the H2O2 yield in the spore suspensions. Caffeine reacts with radiation-induced e-sub(aq) and radicalOH with rate constants of 1.5 x 1010 and 6.9 x 109 dm3 mol-1 s-1, respectively. (author)

  3. Variation in sensitizing effect of caffeine in human tumour cell lines after γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have investigated whether the protective role of the G2 checkpoint has increasing importance when the p53-dependent G1 checkpoint is inactivated. We have studied the differential effect of caffeine by clonogenic assays and flow cytometry in three human tumour cell lines with different functionality of p53 protein. The radiosensitizing effect of caffeine (2 mM) expressed itself as a significant decrease in surviving fraction at 2 Gy and a significant increase in α-values in RT112 and TE671, both with non-functional p53. However, no radiosensitizing effect was seen in cells with a normal p53 function (MCF-7 BUS). Two millimoles of caffeine also caused important changes in the cell cycle progression after irradiation. MCF-7 BUS showed a G1 arrest after irradiation and an early G2 arrest but those cells that reached the second G2 did not arrest significantly. In contrast, TE671 exhibited radiosensitization by caffeine, no G1 arrest, a G2 arrest in those cells irradiated in G2, no significant accumulation in the second G2 but an overall delay in release from the first cell cycle, which could be abrogated by caffeine. RT112 was similar to TE671 except that the emphasis in a G2 arrest was shifted from the block in cells irradiated in G2 to those irradiated at other cell cycle phases. The data presented confirm that p53 status can be a significant determinant of the efficacy of caffeine as radiosensitizer in these tumour cell lines, and document the importance of the G2 checkpoint in this effect. (author)

  4. Regulation of multiple tip formation by caffeine in cellular slime molds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaiswal Pundrik

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The multicellular slug in Dictyostelium has a single tip that acts as an organising centre patterning the rest of the slug. High adenosine levels at the tip are believed to be responsible for this tip dominance and the adenosine antagonist, caffeine overrides this dominance promoting multiple tip formation. Results Caffeine induced multiple tip effect is conserved in all the Dictyostelids tested. Two key components of cAMP relay namely, cAMP phosphodiesterase (Pde4 and adenyl cyclase-A (AcaA levels get reduced during secondary tip formation in Dictyostelium discoideum. Pharmacological inhibition of cAMP phosphodiesterase also resulted in multiple tips. Caffeine reduces cAMP levels by 16.4, 2.34, 4.71 and 6.30 folds, respectively in D. discoideum, D. aureostipes, D. minutum and Polysphondylium pallidum. We propose that altered cAMP levels, perturbed cAMP gradient and impaired signalling may be the critical factors for the origin of multiple tips in other Dictyostelids as well. In the presence of caffeine, slug cell movement gets impaired and restricted. The cell type specific markers, ecmA (prestalk and pspA (prespore cells are not equally contributing during additional tip formation. During additional tip emergence, prespore cells transdifferentiate to compensate the loss of prestalk cells. Conclusion Caffeine decreases adenyl cyclase–A (AcaA levels and as a consequence low cAMP is synthesised altering the gradient. Further if cAMP phosphodiesterase (Pde4 levels go down in the presence of caffeine, the cAMP gradient breaks down. When there is no cAMP gradient, directional movement is inhibited and might favour re-differentiation of prespore to prestalk cells.

  5. Absorption and subjective effects of caffeine from coffee, cola and capsules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liguori, A; Hughes, J R; Grass, J A

    1997-11-01

    Coffee is often perceived as producing greater pharmacological effects than cola. The present study compared the magnitude and rapidity of peak caffeine levels and subjective effects between coffee and cola. Thirteen users of both coffee and cola (mean daily caffeine consumption = 456 mg) ingested 400 mg caffeine via 12 oz unsweetened coffee, 24 oz sugar-free cola or 2 capsules in a random, double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects design. Subjects provided a saliva sample and completed subjective effect scales 15 min before and 30, 60, 90, 120, 180 and 240 min after ingestion. Mean peak saliva caffeine levels did not differ between coffee (9.7 +/- 1.2 micrograms/ml) and cola (9.8 +/- 0.9 micrograms/ml) and appeared to be greater with these beverages than with the capsule (7.8 +/- 0.6 micrograms/ml; p = NS). Saliva caffeine levels peaked at similar times for coffee (42 +/- 5 min) and cola (39 +/- 5 min) but later for capsule (67 +/- 7 min; p = 0.004). There was no main effect of vehicle or interaction of vehicle and drug on magnitude of peak effect or time to peak increase on self-report scales. In summary, peak caffeine absorption, time to peak absorption, and subjective effects do not appear to be influenced by cola vs. coffee vehicle. Perceived differences in the effects of coffee vs. cola may be due to differences in dose, time of day, added sweetener, environmental setting or contingencies. PMID:9329065

  6. Identification of the attenuation potential of a karst aquifer by an artificial dualtracer experiment with caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillebrand, Olav; Nödler, Karsten; Licha, Tobias; Sauter, Martin; Geyer, Tobias

    2012-10-15

    Little is known with respect to the attenuation capacity of karst aquifers. Even less is known about the risk posed by emerging micropollutants in these systems. In order to identify the attenuation potential of karst aquifers in-situ and to estimate the risk posed by micropollutants, a dualtracer test was conducted in this study in order to investigate differential transport in the subsurface: The reactive compound caffeine was used as a tracer to indicate the attenuation capacity within the aquifer in-situ. Due to the low limit of quantification, only small amounts of caffeine needed to be injected. To calibrate a model and to visualize the attenuation of caffeine a conservative reference tracer (uranine) is injected simultaneously. The methodology is tested in a well-characterised karst system in southwest Germany. The results indicate a significantly higher attenuation rate than was expected for karst aquifers. The attenuation is decribed as a first-order process. The corresponding half-life is 104 h. This low half-life suggests that a generally assumed low natural attenuation capacity of karst aquifers is unjustified. The observed mass loss of caffeine illustrates the potential of caffeine to be used as reactive tracer for indicating in-situ attenuation capacity within highly hydraulically conductive systems, such as karst aquifers. Due to the high attenuation rate of caffeine it does not pose a threat as a long-time contaminant. In combination with a conservative reference tracer an economical and environmentally benign method is presented in this manuscript for the in-situ determination of the attenuation capacity of highly conductive aquifer systems. PMID:22877878

  7. Use of Taguchi methodology to enhance the yield of caffeine removal with growing cultures of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morahem Ashengroph

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Microbial caffeine removal is a green solution for treatment of caffeinated products and agro-industrial effluents. We directed this investigation to optimizing a bio-decaffeination process with growing cultures of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes through Taguchi methodology which is a structured statistical approach that can be lowered variations in a process through Design of Experiments (DOE.Five parameters, i.e. initial fructose, tryptone, Zn(+2 ion and caffeine concentrations and also incubation time selected and an L16 orthogonal array was applied to design experiments with four 4-level factors and one 3-level factor (4(4 × 1(3. Data analysis was performed using the statistical analysis of variance (ANOVA method. Furthermore, the optimal conditions were determined by combining the optimal levels of the significant factors and verified by a confirming experiment. Measurement of residual caffeine concentration in the reaction mixture was performed using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC.Use of Taguchi methodology for optimization of design parameters resulted in about 86.14% reduction of caffeine in 48 h incubation when 5g/l fructose, 3 mM Zn(+2 ion and 4.5 g/l of caffeine are present in the designed media. Under the optimized conditions, the yield of degradation of caffeine (4.5 g/l by the native strain of Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes TPS8 has been increased from 15.8% to 86.14% which is 5.4 fold higher than the normal yield.According to the experimental results, Taguchi methodology provides a powerful methodology for identifying the favorable parameters on caffeine removal using strain TPS8 which suggests that the approach also has potential application with similar strains to improve the yield of caffeine removal from caffeine containing solutions.

  8. Influence of caffeine on 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine-induced dopaminergic neuron degeneration and neuroinflammation is age-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frau, Lucia; Costa, Giulia; Porceddu, Pier Francesca; Khairnar, Amit; Castelli, Maria Paola; Ennas, Maria Grazia; Madeddu, Camilla; Wardas, Jadwiga; Morelli, Micaela

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that caffeine administration to adult mice potentiates glial activation induced by 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA). As neuroinflammatory response seems to correlate with neurodegeneration, and the young brain is particularly vulnerable to neurotoxicity, we evaluated dopamine neuron degeneration and glial activation in the caudate-putamen (CPu) and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc) of adolescent and adult mice. Mice were treated with MDMA (4 × 20 mg/kg), alone or with caffeine (10 mg/kg). Interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) were evaluated in CPu, whereas tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), glial fibrillary acidic protein, and CD11b were evaluated in CPu and SNc by immunohistochemistry. MDMA decreased TH in SNc of both adolescent and adult mice, whereas TH-positive fibers in CPu were only decreased in adults. In CPu of adolescent mice, caffeine potentiated MDMA-induced glial fibrillary acidic protein without altering CD11b, whereas in SNc caffeine did not influence MDMA-induced glial activation. nNOS, IL-1β, and TNF-α were increased by MDMA in CPu of adults, whereas in adolescents, levels were only elevated after combined MDMA plus caffeine. Caffeine alone modified only nNOS. Results suggest that the use of MDMA in association with caffeine during adolescence may exacerbate the neurotoxicity and neuroinflammation elicited by MDMA. Previous studies have demonstrated that caffeine potentiated glial activation induced by 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) in adult mice. In this study, caffeine was shown to potentiate MDMA-induced dopamine neuron degeneration in substantia nigra pars compacta, astrogliosis, and TNF-α levels in caudate-putamen of adolescent mice. Results suggest that combined use of MDMA plus caffeine during adolescence may worsen the neurotoxicity and neuroinflammation elicited by MDMA. PMID:26442661

  9. Autophagic flux data in differentiated C2C12 myotubes following exposure to acetylcholine and caffeine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darin Bloemberg

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The C2C12 line of mouse myoblasts is a useful cell culture model in which to conduct in vitro analyses related to skeletal muscle. Here we present data regarding the autophagic response induced by two chemicals known to influence calcium release and contraction in skeletal muscles and C2C12 cells: acetylcholine and caffeine. More specifically, by concurrently administering acetylcholine or caffeine along with chloroquine to differentiated myotubes for various amounts of time and assessing the protein expression of LC3 and p62, we report data on the relative level of autophagic flux induced by these two calcium- and contraction-regulating chemicals.

  10. Caffeine-Containing Energy Drinks: Beginning to Address the Gaps in What We Know1234

    OpenAIRE

    Sorkin, Barbara C; Coates, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Energy drinks are relatively new to the United States but are the fastest growing segment of the beverage market. Humans have a long history of consuming caffeine in traditional beverages, such as cocoa, coffee, tea, and yerba maté, but 2 workshops held at the Institute of Medicine (http://www.iom.edu/Activities/Nutrition/PotentialHazardsCaffeineSupplements/2013-AUG-05.aspx) and the NIH (http://ods.od.nih.gov/News/EnergyDrinksWorkshop2013.aspx) in 2013 highlighted many critical gaps in unders...

  11. Caffeine Treatment Prevented from Weight Regain after Calorie Shifting Diet Induced Weight Loss

    OpenAIRE

    Davoodi, Sayed Hossein; Hajimiresmaiel, Seyed Javad; Ajami, Marjan; Mohseni-Bandpei, Anoushiravan; Ayatollahi, Seyyed Abdulmajid; Dowlatshahi, Kamran; Javedan, Gholamali; Pazoki-Toroudi, Hamidreza

    2014-01-01

    Low calorie diets are always difficult for obese subjects to follow and lead to metabolic and behavioral adaptation. Therefore, we evaluated the effect of caffeine treatment with calorie shifting diet (CSD) on weight loss. Female subjects (n=60; BMI≥25) completed 4-weeks control diet, 6-weeks CSD (3 repeated phases; each 2-weeks) and 4-weeks follow-up diet, with or without caffeine treatment (5 mg/Kg/day). The first 11 days of each phase included calorie restriction with four meals every day ...

  12. Gold(III) Complex of Caffeine: Synthesis, Isolation and Spectroscopic Characterization

    OpenAIRE

    IVANOVA, Bojidarka

    2007-01-01

    Au(III)-caffeine complex was synthesized and characterized by means of solid-state linear-dichroic infrared spectral analysis (IRLD), 1H-NMR, MS, DSC and TGA methods. The caffeine (I) is monodentate and coordinated with metal ion through its N9 atom at molar ratio metal to ligand 1:1. The other 3 positions in the Au(III) coordination sphere are occupied by Cl-, thus forming [Au3+(C8H10N4O2)Cl3] complex. IR-characteristic band assignment in the 4000-400 cm-1 IR region of pure ligand ...

  13. Respiratory stimulant effects of adenosine in man after caffeine and enprofylline.

    OpenAIRE

    Smits, P; Schouten, J; Thien, T.

    1987-01-01

    In a double-blind and randomized study the respiratory stimulant effect of continuous intravenous adenosine infusion was studied after previous administration of caffeine, placebo and enprofylline in 10 healthy young volunteers. After placebo, adenosine induced an increase of minute ventilation (from 6.3 to 12.5 l min-1), tidal volume (from 0.60 to 0.96 l), and breathing rate (from 11.0 to 14.8 min-1). Venous pCO2 fell and pH rose after adenosine. Caffeine significantly reduced the adenosine-...

  14. Dynamic Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction of Catechins and Caffeine in Some Tea Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel dynamic ultrasound-assisted extraction (DUAE) device has been constructed for extraction of five catechins and caffeine in solid sample. The accurate, simple, reproducible and sensitive method for the determination of five catechins and caffeine has been developed and validated. A comparison has been made of the efficiencies by employing DUAE and conventionally static ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE). The proposed method can not only improve extraction efficiency but also decrease time and solvent consumption. The commercial Chinese tea samples, involving green and black teas, are rapidly analyzed by the proposed DUAE method. The linearity, range, selectivity, precision, accuracy, and robustness also showed acceptable values

  15. [Caffeine-induced contraction of guinea pig taenia coli (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, S; Chujyo, N

    1978-01-01

    Caffeine (10 or 20 mM)-induced isometric contraction of guinea pig taenia coli showed two successively occurring phasic contractions (I and II) followed by a low sustained tension. Half-time of tension decay in II was 4 approximately 6 times longer than in I. The contraction occasionally showed only a single phasic contraction, of which tension, however, decayed showing two half-times as in two phasic contractions. In the presence of procaine 0.1 approximately 0.5 mM, DNP 0.03 approximately 0.1 mM or Mn2+ 0.5 approximately 1.0 mM, II was entirely abolished whereas I was partially inhibited and such were confirmed by analyzing the time course of tension decay. Maximal tension of I decreased in parallel with lowering the external Na while II was enhanced with 50 approximately 100 mM Na and inhibited by further withdrawal of Na. I and II showed the same Ca-dependecy with respect to the inhibition by Ca deficiency and to the time course of recovery from Ca-free state. Refractoriness to caffeine after preceding caffeine-contraction also showed little difference between I and II. Sustained tension by caffeine was dependent on Ca in the same manner as tonic K-contracture. Increase in 45Ca uptake with 40 mM K was completely inhibited by 10 mM caffeine while cellular Ca content in the presence of high K markedly increased with caffeine indicating the decrease in Ca exchangeability. The above results indicate that caffeine induced contraction consists of two phasic contractions of which EC-coupling Ca is released from two different cellular sites, and that the phasic contractions are followed by a sustained low tension caused by an increased Ca influx. In the presence of high K, caffeine abolishes the increase in Ca influx by high K and sequesters the sarcoplasmic free Ca resulting in the relaxation of K-contracture. PMID:640536

  16. Low doses of caffeine reduce heart rate during submaximal cycle ergometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wetter Thomas J

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of this study was to examine the cardiovascular effects of two low-levels of caffeine ingestion in non habitual caffeine users at various submaximal and maximal exercise intensities. Methods Nine male subjects (19–25 yr; 83.3 ± 3.1 kg; 184 ± 2 cm, underwent three testing sessions administered in a randomized and double-blind fashion. During each session, subjects were provided 4 oz of water and a gelatin capsule containing a placebo, 1.5 mg/kg caffeine, or 3.0 mg/kg caffeine. After thirty minutes of rest, a warm-up (30 Watts for 2 min the pedal rate of 60 rpm was maintained at a steady-state output of 60 watts for five minutes; increased to 120 watts for five minutes and to 180 watts for five minutes. After a 2 min rest the workload was 180 watts for one minute and increased by 30 watts every minute until exhaustion. Heart rate (HR was measured during the last 15-seconds of each minute of submaximal exercise. Systolic blood pressure (BP was measured at rest and during each of the three sub-maximal steady state power outputs. Minute ventilation (VE, Tidal volume (VT, Breathing frequency (Bf, Rating of perceived exertion (RPE, Respiratory exchange ratio (RER, and Oxygen consumption (VO2 were measured at rest and during each minute of exercise. Results Caffeine at 1.5 and 3.0 mg/kg body weight significantly lowered (p E, VT, VO2, RPE, maximal power output or time to exhaustion. Conclusion In non habitual caffeine users it appears that consuming a caffeine pill (1.5 & 3.0 mg/kg at a dose comparable to 1–3 cups of coffee lowers heart rate during submaximal exercise but not at near maximal and maximal exercise. In addition, this caffeine dose also only appears to affect systolic blood pressure at rest but not during cycling exercise.

  17. Changes in thickness of each layer of developing chicken cornea after administration of caffeine.

    OpenAIRE

    Hieronim Bartel; Dariusz Tosik; Monika Kujawa-Hadryś

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the study was the presentation of changes in thickness of each layer of a developing cornea, that came into being under an influence of caffeine which was administered to chicken embryos. Research materials were 26 chicken embryos from breeding eggs that had been incubated. Breeding eggs were divided into two groups: control (n=30) in which Ringer liquid was given, and experimental (n=30) in which teratogenic dose of caffeine was administrated - 3.5 mg/egg. In 36th hour of incubati...

  18. Autophagic flux data in differentiated C2C12 myotubes following exposure to acetylcholine and caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemberg, Darin; Quadrilatero, Joe

    2016-06-01

    The C2C12 line of mouse myoblasts is a useful cell culture model in which to conduct in vitro analyses related to skeletal muscle. Here we present data regarding the autophagic response induced by two chemicals known to influence calcium release and contraction in skeletal muscles and C2C12 cells: acetylcholine and caffeine. More specifically, by concurrently administering acetylcholine or caffeine along with chloroquine to differentiated myotubes for various amounts of time and assessing the protein expression of LC3 and p62, we report data on the relative level of autophagic flux induced by these two calcium- and contraction-regulating chemicals. PMID:27054179

  19. Caffeine enhances the antidepressant-like activity of common antidepressant drugs in the forced swim test in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szopa, Aleksandra; Poleszak, Ewa; Wyska, Elżbieta; Serefko, Anna; Wośko, Sylwia; Wlaź, Aleksandra; Pieróg, Mateusz; Wróbel, Andrzej; Wlaź, Piotr

    2016-02-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used behaviorally active drug in the world which exerts its activity on central nervous system through adenosine receptors. Worrying data indicate that excessive caffeine intake applies to patients suffering from mental disorders, including depression. The main goal of the present study was to evaluate the influence of caffeine on animals' behavior in forced swim test (FST) as well as the effect of caffeine (5 mg/kg) on the activity of six typical antidepressants, such as imipramine (15 mg/kg), desipramine (10 mg/kg), fluoxetine (5 mg/kg), paroxetine (0.5 mg/kg), escitalopram (2 mg/kg), and reboxetine (2.5 mg/kg). Locomotor activity was estimated to verify and exclude false-positive/negative results. In order to assess the influence of caffeine on the levels of antidepressant drugs studied, their concentrations were determined in murine serum and brains using high-performance liquid chromatography. The results showed that caffeine at a dose of 10, 20, and 50 mg/kg exhibited antidepressant activity in the FST, and it was not related to changes in locomotor activity in the animals. Caffeine at a dose of 5 mg/kg potentiated the activity of all antidepressants, and the observed effects were not due to the increase in locomotor activity in the animals. The interactions between caffeine and desipramine, fluoxetine, escitalopram, and reboxetine were exclusively of pharmacodynamic character, because caffeine did not cause any changes in the concentrations of these drugs neither in blood serum nor in brain tissue. As a result of joint administration of caffeine and paroxetine, an increase in the antidepressant drug concentrations in serum was observed. No such change was noticed in the brain tissue. A decrease in the antidepressant drug concentrations in brain was observed in the case of imipramine administered together with caffeine. Therefore, it can be assumed that the interactions caffeine-paroxetine and caffeine-imipramine occur at least in

  20. Caffeine alters the behavioural and body temperature responses to mephedrone without causing long-term neurotoxicity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortall, Sinead E; Green, A Richard; Fone, Kevin Cf; King, Madeleine V

    2016-07-01

    Administration of caffeine with 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) alters the pharmacological properties of MDMA in rats. The current study examined whether caffeine alters the behavioural and neurochemical effects of mephedrone, which has similar psychoactive effects to MDMA. Rats received either saline, mephedrone (10 mg/kg), caffeine (10 mg/kg) or combined caffeine and mephedrone intraperitoneally twice weekly on consecutive days for three weeks. Locomotor activity (days 1 and 16), novel object discrimination (NOD, day 2), elevated plus maze (EPM) exploration (day 8), rectal temperature changes (day 9) and pre-pulse inhibition (PPI) of acoustic startle response (day 15) were assessed. Seven days after the final injection, brain regions were collected for the measurement of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), dopamine and their metabolites. Combined caffeine and mephedrone further enhanced the locomotor response observed following either drug administered alone, and converted mephedrone-induced hypothermia to hyperthermia. Co-administration also abolished mephedrone-induced anxiogenic response on the EPM, but had no effect on NOD or PPI. Importantly, no long-term neurotoxicity was detected following repeated mephedrone alone or when co-administered with caffeine. In conclusion, the study suggests a potentially dangerous effect of concomitant caffeine and mephedrone, and highlights the importance of taking polydrug use into consideration when investigating the acute adverse effect profile of popular recreational drugs. PMID:27257032

  1. Caffeine-induced nuclear translocation of FoxO1 triggers Bim-mediated apoptosis in human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fei; Han, Dong-Feng; Cao, Bo-Qiang; Wang, Bo; Dong, Nan; Jiang, De-Hua

    2016-03-01

    Caffeine is one of the most commonly ingested neuroactive compounds and exhibits anticancer effects through induction of apoptosis and suppression of cell proliferation. However, the mechanisms underlying these effects are currently unknown. In this study, we investigated the mechanisms of caffeine-induced apoptosis in U251 cells (human glioma cell line). We analyzed the inhibitory effects of caffeine on cell proliferation by performing WST-8 and colony formation assays; in addition, cell survival was assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and flow cytometric analysis. Western blotting was used to investigate the role played by FoxO1 in the proapoptotic effects of caffeine on glioma cells. Results showed that caffeine inhibited proliferation and survival of human glioma cells, induced apoptosis, and increased the expression of FoxO1 and its proapoptotic target Bim. In addition, we found that FoxO1 enhanced the transcription of its proapoptotic target Bim. In summary, our data indicates that FoxO1-Bim mediates caffeine-induced regression of glioma growth by activating cell apoptosis, thereby providing new mechanistic insight into the possible use of caffeine in treating human cancer. PMID:26449824

  2. Caffeine administration prevents retinal neuroinflammation and loss of retinal ganglion cells in an animal model of glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Maria H.; Ortin-Martinez, Arturo; Nadal-Nícolas, Francisco; Ambrósio, António F.; Vidal-Sanz, Manuel; Agudo-Barriuso, Marta; Santiago, Ana Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is the second leading cause of blindness worldwide, being characterized by progressive optic nerve damage and loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), accompanied by increased inflammatory response involving retinal microglial cells. The etiology of glaucoma is still unknown, and despite elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) being a major risk factor, the exact mechanisms responsible for RGC degeneration remain unknown. Caffeine, which is an antagonist of adenosine receptors, is the most widely consumed psychoactive drug in the world. Several evidences suggest that caffeine can attenuate the neuroinflammatory responses and afford protection upon central nervous system (CNS) injury. We took advantage of a well characterized animal model of glaucoma to investigate whether caffeine administration controls neuroinflammation and elicits neuroprotection. Caffeine or water were administered ad libitum and ocular hypertension (OHT) was induced by laser photocoagulation of the limbal veins in Sprague Dawley rats. Herein, we show that caffeine is able to partially decrease the IOP in ocular hypertensive animals. More importantly, we found that drinking caffeine prevented retinal microglia-mediated neuroinflammatory response and attenuated the loss of RGCs in animals with ocular hypertension (OHT). This study opens the possibility that caffeine or adenosine receptor antagonists might be a therapeutic option to manage RGC loss in glaucoma. PMID:27270337

  3. Effects of concurrent caffeine and mobile phone exposure on local target probability processing in the human brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trunk, Attila; Stefanics, Gábor; Zentai, Norbert; Bacskay, Ivett; Felinger, Attila; Thuróczy, György; Hernádi, István

    2015-01-01

    Millions of people use mobile phones (MP) while drinking coffee or other caffeine containing beverages. Little is known about the potential combined effects of MP irradiation and caffeine on cognitive functions. Here we investigated whether caffeine intake and concurrent exposure to Universal Mobile Telecommunications System (UMTS) MP-like irradiation may interactively influence neuro-cognitive function in an active visual oddball paradigm. In a full factorial experimental design, 25 participants performed a simple visual target detection task while reaction time (RT) and electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded. Target trials were divided into Low and High probability sets based on target-to-target distance. We analyzed single trial RT and alpha-band power (amplitude) in the pre-target interval. We found that RT was shorter in High vs. Low local probability trials, and caffeine further shortened RT in High probability trials relative to the baseline condition suggesting that caffeine improves the efficiency of implicit short-term memory. Caffeine also decreased pre-target alpha amplitude resulting in higher arousal level. Furthermore, pre-target gamma power positively correlated with RT, which may have facilitated target detection. However, in the present pharmacologically validated study UMTS exposure either alone or in combination with caffeine did not alter RT or pre-stimulus oscillatory brain activity. PMID:26395526

  4. A sensitization effect of hematoporphyrin oligomer (HpO) and caffeine for X-ray radiation of skin cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human malignant melanoma cells (G-361) were irradiated with X-ray for different irradiation times. The amount of DNA damage was much increased by the treatment of the cells with hematoporphyrin oligomer (HpO) before X-ray irradiation. Furthermore, it was found that the caffeine inhibited effectively the repair of the damaged DNA. Furthermore, HpO was administered before X-ray irradiation of transplantable skin tumor in C3H mice and/or caffeine was to be given the mouse after X-ray irradiation. The growth of the irradiated tumor combined with HpO and/or caffeine was more inhibited, and the necrotic area was more expanded than that of the tumor irradiated with X-ray only. Labeling Index utilizing bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) in the viable area of the treated tumor decreased when HpO and/or caffeine were administered. The amount of DNA damage more increased in the irradiated tumor cells given HpO than the only irradiated cells. And, the repair of the damaged DNA was more delayed in the irradiated tumor cells combined with HpO and caffeine than those with other treatments. In conclusion, it was considered that HpO might be a radioactive sensitizer and caffeine enhanced the inhibition of the repair of DNA damaged. We hope that the treatment of X-ray radiation combined with HpO and caffeine is useful for clinical treatment of human malignant tumor. (author) 54 refs

  5. A fast and efficient method for the study of caffeine levels in energy drinks using micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Augusto Ballus

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Energy drinks are becoming popular in Brazil and in the world due to their stimulant properties. Caffeine is present in energy drinks with the aim of stimulating the central nervous system and intensifying brain activity. On the other hand, the ingestion of high doses of caffeine can cause undesirable symptoms such as anxiety and tachycardia. Therefore, it is necessary to monitor the caffeine content added to energy drinks to guarantee that the levels in the final product are in accordance with the labeling and within the legislation limits. The goal of this work was to validate a fast, efficient, and low-cost method for the determination of caffeine in energy drinks by micellar electrokinetic chromatography (MEKC. A total of seven brands were analyzed, each in three lots. The electrolyte was prepared with 50 mmol.L-1 of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS and 10 mmol.L-1 of sodium carbonate (pH 11.0. The mean concentration of caffeine ranged from 122.8 to 318.6 mg.L-1. None of the brands had caffeine levels above the maximum limit. Considering the interval of confidence (95%, 72% of the samples had less caffeine than the amount informed on the product label.

  6. EFSA NDA Panel (EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies), 2015. Scientific Opinion on the safety of caffeine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetens, Inge

    Following a request from the European Commission, the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition and Allergies was asked to deliver a scientific opinion on the safety of caffeine, providing advice on caffeine intakes, from all dietary sources that do not give rise to concerns about adverse health...... effects for the general healthy population and subgroups thereof. Possible interactions between caffeine and other constituents of so-called “energy drinks”, alcohol, p-synephrine and physical exercise should also be addressed. Single doses of caffeine up to 200 mg (about 3 mg/kg bw for a 70-kg adult) do....../L of caffeine, taurine and d-glucurono-γ-lactone, respectively), as well as alcohol at doses up to about 0.65 g/kg bw, would not affect the safety of single doses of caffeine up to 200 mg. Habitual caffeine consumption up to 400 mg per day does not give rise to safety concerns for non-pregnant adults...

  7. High performance liquid chromatography determination of theobromine and caffeine in cocoa beans gamma irradiated

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiation is a processing technology that has been shown to be a wholesome process by many scientific studies conducted worldwide during the past 40 years, which has been approved by 37 countries. Irradiated foods have been studied so extensively, that the effects on foods are better understood than any other preservation process, including food freezing and dehydration. Cocoa beans has been commercially irradiated in countries such as Ivory Coast and Argentina. The alkaloids theobromine and caffeine are responsible for the mildly stimulating properties and bitter taste of cocoa and chocolate products. Previously fermented dried and nonfumigated cocoa beans were irradiated at doses of 0, 5.0, 10.0 and 20.0 kGy using Co-60 gamma rays. The samples were analysed for determining theobromine and caffeine contents in the cocoa beans by TIMBIE et al. (1978) high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method. Boiling water extracts were cooled, centrifuged and injected into the chromatograph. Theobromine and caffeine were quantitated at 273 nm and showed the tendency of decreasing as the dose of radiation increases. Theobromine and caffeine ranged from 42.3 to 37.1 mg/g and from 7.60 to 6.13 mg/g. respectively from 0 to 20.0 kGy. These results were discussed in relation to the possible acceptance of radiosterization of cocoa beans commercially up to the dose of 20.0 kGy. (author). 10 refs., 1 tab

  8. The effect of caffeine on repair in chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Survival following UV-irradiation of the two repair-deficient strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, UVSE5 and UVSE6, was not affected by caffeine. Since caffeine causes increased survival in strains of this organism having normal recombination, these two mutant strains are considered to be recombination-deficient. The double-mutant strains UVSE1-UVSE4, UVSE1-UVSE5, UVSE1-UVSE6, UVSE4-UVSE5, UVSE4, UVSE6 and UVSE5-UVSE6 were isolated. These strains were exposed to UV-irradiation and in all but UVSE4-UVSE5, survival of the double-mutant strain was much lower than for any single-mutant strain. These results indicate that the altered gene products in UVSE1, UVSE5 and UVSE6 mutant strains are associated with different recombination-repair mechanisms. All double-mutant strains were treated with caffeine following UV-irradiation. In all double-mutant strains containing a mutant USVE4 gene product, recombination repair was increased by caffeine. On the basis of the data obtained, a scheme is proposed for the involvement of multiple repair systems in repair following UV-irradiation in C. reinhardtii. (orig.)

  9. Effect of caffeine on radiation-induced apoptosis in TK6 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apoptosis has been measured in cells of the human TK6 lymphoblastoid cell line by recording the release of endonuclease-digested DNA from affected cells using flow cytometry. In asynchronously dividing cells, DNA degradation characteristic of apoptosis was first seen 12 h after irradiation as a defined DNA fluorescent peak of sub-G1-phase content, reaching a maximum of 30-50% of the population by 24-72 h. Treating cells with 2 mM caffeine either before or up to 3 h after irradiation eliminated the degradation of DNA entirely. In addition, the percentage of cells in which apoptosis could be detected microscopically decreased from 62.4 ± 0.95% to 16.7 ± 1.5% 72 h after caffeine treatment. Delaying caffeine treatment for 12 h after irradiation reduced DNA degradation by approximately 50% compared to cells receiving radiation alone. DNA degradation induced by serum deprivation was unaffected by caffeine treatment. These data support the contention that irradiation of TK6 cells produces a long-lived cellular signal which triggers apoptosis. Apoptosis produced by serum deprivation does not operate through the same pathway. 36 refs., 5 figs

  10. Caffeine Affects Time to Exhaustion and Substrate Oxidation during Cycling at Maximal Lactate Steady State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogério Santos de Oliveira Cruz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the effects of caffeine intake on whole-body substrate metabolism and exercise tolerance during cycling by using a more individualized intensity for merging the subjects into homogeneous metabolic responses (the workload associated with the maximal lactate steady state—MLSS. MLSS was firstly determined in eight active males (25 ± 4 years, 176 ± 7 cm, 77 ± 11 kg using from two to four constant-load tests of 30 min. On two following occasions, participants performed a test until exhaustion at the MLSS workload 1 h after taking either 6 mg/kg of body mass of caffeine or placebo (dextrose, in a randomized, double-blinded manner. Respiratory exchange ratio was calculated from gas exchange measurements. There was an improvement of 22.7% in time to exhaustion at MLSS workload following caffeine ingestion (95% confidence limits of ±10.3%, p = 0.002, which was accompanied by decrease in respiratory exchange ratio (p = 0.001. These results reinforce findings indicating that sparing of the endogenous carbohydrate stores could be one of the several physiological effects of caffeine during submaximal performance around 1 h.

  11. AGING, CAFFEINE, AND INFORMATION-PROCESSING - AN EVENT-RELATED POTENTIAL ANALYSIS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    LORIST, MM; SNEL, J; MULDER, G; KOK, A

    1995-01-01

    Structural and energetic processes in information processing were studied in young and elderly subjects. A visually focussed selective search task was used, in which subjects had to select relevant information, followed by controlled memory search processes to locate a target item. Caffeine was used

  12. Caffeine's impairment of insulin-mediated glucose disposal cannot be solely attributed to adrenaline in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Battram, D S; Graham, T E; Dela, F

    2007-01-01

    Caffeine (CAF) impedes insulin-mediated glucose disposal (IMGD) and increases plasma adrenaline concentrations ([ADR]; 0.6 nm). While the antagonism of ADR abolishes the CAF effect, infusion of ADR (0.75 nm) has no effect on IMGD. We have now examined CAF and ADR in concert to determine whether or...

  13. Acute effects of caffeine on selective attention and visual search processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorist, M.M.; Snel, J.; Kok, A; Mulder, G.

    1996-01-01

    The influence of a single dose of caffeine was evaluated in focused and divided attention conditions of a visual selective search task in which subjects had to perform controlled search processes to locate a target item. Search processes were manipulated by varying display load. A dose of 3 mg/kg bo

  14. Does caffeine consumption during pregnancy increase the risk of fetal mortality? A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicia Matijasevich

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the available epidemiological evidence of the effect of caffeine consumption during pregnancy on fetal mortality. A systematic qualitative review of observational studies that referred to any source of exposure to caffeine from food in pregnancy and to fetal mortality as the outcome was conducted in the databases MEDLINE and LILACS. Studies published between January 1966 and September 2004 were searched. The following descriptors were used: "caffeine", "coffee", "tea", "cola", and "cacao" to define the exposure and "fetal death", "stillbirth", "fetal demise", and "fetal loss" to define the outcome. The search strategy retrieved 32 publications, but only six met the inclusion criteria and three were included. One more article was found using "see related articles" feature in PubMed. A total of four publications were included in the review. The small number of publications addressing this subject, methodological limitations, inaccurate exposure assessment in all the studies, overall risks only marginally significant in most cases, and the possibility of publication bias preclude stating with certainty that caffeine consumption is actually associated with fetal death.

  15. Making the Most of the "Daphnia" Heart Rate Lab: Optimizing the Use of Ethanol, Nicotine & Caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corotto, Frank; Ceballos, Darrel; Lee, Adam; Vinson, Lindsey

    2010-01-01

    Students commonly test the effects of chemical agents on the heart rate of the crustacean "Daphnia" magna, but the procedure has never been optimized. We determined the effects of three concentrations of ethanol, nicotine, and caffeine and of a control solution on heart rate in "Daphnia." Ethanol at 5% and 10% (v/v) reduced mean heart rate to…

  16. Adolescent Substance Use, Sleep, and Academic Achievement: Evidence of Harm Due to Caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Jack E.; Kristjansson, Alfgeir Logi; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora

    2011-01-01

    Using academic achievement as the key outcome variable, 7377 Icelandic adolescents were surveyed for cigarette smoking, alcohol use, daytime sleepiness, caffeine use, and potential confounders. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to examine direct and indirect effects of measured and latent variables in two models: the first with caffeine…

  17. Coffee, but not caffeine, has positive effects on cognition and psychomotor behavior in aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    The complex mixture of phytochemicals in fruits and vegetables provides protective health benefits, mainly through additive and/or synergistic effects. The presence of several bioactive compounds, such as polyphenols and caffeine, implicates coffee as a potential nutritional therapeutic in aging. ...

  18. The effect of caffeine on cognitive task performance and motor fatigue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Duinen, Hiske; Lorist, Monicque M.; Zijdewind, Inge

    2005-01-01

    Rationale: In everyday life, people are usually capable of performing two tasks simultaneously. However, in a previous study we showed that during a fatiguing motor task, cognitive performance declined progressively. There is extensive literature on the ( positive) effects of caffeine on cognitive a

  19. Early caffeine exposure: Transient and long-term consequences on brain excitability

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tchekalarova, J.D.; Kubová, Hana; Mareš, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 104, MAY (2014), s. 27-35. ISSN 0361-9230 R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NR9184; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : caffeine * rat * postnatal development * epileptic seizures Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.718, year: 2014

  20. The effects of caffeine, nicotine, ethanol, and tetrahydrocannabinol on exercise performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesta, Dominik H; Angadi, Siddhartha S; Burtscher, Martin; Roberts, Christian K

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine, nicotine, ethanol and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) are among the most prevalent and culturally accepted drugs in western society. For example, in Europe and North America up to 90% of the adult population drinks coffee daily and, although less prevalent, the other drugs are also used extensively by the population. Smoked tobacco, excessive alcohol consumption and marijuana (cannabis) smoking are addictive and exhibit adverse health effects. These drugs are not only common in the general population, but have also made their way into elite sports because of their purported performance-altering potential. Only one of the drugs (i.e., caffeine) has enough scientific evidence indicating an ergogenic effect. There is some preliminary evidence for nicotine as an ergogenic aid, but further study is required; cannabis and alcohol can exhibit ergogenic potential under specific circumstances but are in general believed to be ergolytic for sports performance. These drugs are currently (THC, ethanol) or have been (caffeine) on the prohibited list of the World Anti-Doping Agency or are being monitored (nicotine) due to their potential ergogenic or ergolytic effects. The aim of this brief review is to evaluate the effects of caffeine, nicotine, ethanol and THC by: 1) examining evidence supporting the ergogenic or ergolytic effects; 2) providing an overview of the mechanism(s) of action and physiological effects; and 3) where appropriate, reviewing their impact as performance-altering aids used in recreational and elite sports. PMID:24330705

  1. The Effects of Caffeine Supplements on Exercise-Induced Oxidative Damages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeraatpishe, Akbar; Malekirad, Ali Akbar; Nik-Kherad, Javad; Jafari, Afshar; Yousefi Babadi, Saeed; Tanwir, Farzeen; Espanani, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background: There is an interaction between oxidative equilibrium and anti-oxidants in oxidative stress. Therefore, oxidative stress has an effect on intercellular oxidation and causes atrophy and is an underlying factor in many diseases. Objectives: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of running downhill and the short-term effect of caffeine supplementation on oxidative stress in non-athletic men. Patients and Methods: Twenty men, aged 25 - 28 years, from Tabriz, Iran were been selected and divided in two homogeneous groups of 10 men: the supplementation group and the placebo group. In the next stage, groups received caffeine supplementation (caffeine capsules at a dose of 5 mg/kg of body weight daily for 14 days) or placebo (5 mg/kg of dextrose during supplementation) and ran downhill (30 minutes of treadmill running with a slope of −10 degrees with 65% maximal oxygen consumption); blood sampling was also performed. Results: Anti-oxidant capacity by the ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) techniques and serum malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured by the thiobarbituric acid (TBA) method, while the total number of thiol molecules (TTM) with Hu and DNA damage was evaluated using ELISA. Conclusions: The results of this study indicated that running downhill caused significant changes in all measured parameters, but the short-term caffeine supplementation did not have a significant effect on the indices of oxidative stress or DNA damage measured. PMID:26715963

  2. Novel zinc(II) benzoate complex compounds with caffeine and urea

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Findoráková, L.; Gyoryova, K.; Kovářová, Jana; Balek, V.; Nour El-Dien, F. A.; Halás, L.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 3 (2009), s. 923-928. ISSN 1388-6150 Grant ostatní: Slovak Ministry of Education(SK) 1/0122/08 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40500505 Keywords : caffeine * IR spectroscopy * thermal stability Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry Impact factor: 1.587, year: 2009

  3. THE INFLUENCE OF CAFFEINE ON MITOTIC DIVISION AT CAPSICUM ANNUUM L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Rosu

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents, the caffeine effects in mitotic division at Capsicum annuum L.. The treatment has determined the lessening of the mitotic index (comparative with the control variant, until mitotic division total inhibition, as well as an growth frequency of division aberation in anaphase and telophase.

  4. Delay and probability discounting: Examining the relationship between caffeine withdrawal and impulsivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-09-01

    Conclusions: Validating previous research for other stimulants, conditional support was found for a correlation between caffeine withdrawal and impulsivity. However, these results could also be explained by other well-documented symptoms of stimulant withdrawal such as confusion or anxiety. Further efforts should be devoted to determining the effect anxiety has on impulsivity as measured by the delay discounting procedure.

  5. A molecular imprint-coated stirrer bar for selective extraction of caffeine, theobromine and theophylline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have prepared a novel caffeine imprinted polymer on a stir bar that can be used for selective extraction of caffeine, theobromine and theophylline from beverages. The polymerization time and quantities of reagents (template, cross-linker, porogenic solvent) were optimized. The morphology of the molecularly imprinted polymer-coating was studied by scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform IR spectroscopy. A rapid and sensitive method was worked out for the extraction of caffeine, theobromine and theophylline from beverages by using the molecularly imprinted stir bar followed by HPLC analysis. The effects of extraction solvent, stirring speed, desorption solvent, adsorption and desorption time were optimized. The method displays a linear response in the 5–150 μg L−1 caffeine concentration range, with a correlation coefficient of >0.9904. The recoveries for three analytes in tea, carbonated and functional beverages were 91–108 %, 90–110 % and 93–109 %, with relative standard deviations ranging from 3.6–5.7 %, 3.5–7.9 % and 3.2–7.9 %, respectively. (author)

  6. Clozapine disposition covaries with CYP1A2 activity determined by a caffeine test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertilsson, L; Carrillo, J A; Dahl, M L; Llerena, A; Alm, C; Bondesson, U; Lindström, L; Rodriguez de la Rubia, I; Ramos, S; Benitez, J

    1994-01-01

    In a previous study we showed that the disposition of clozapine after a single oral dose is unrelated to either debrisoquine or S-mephenytoin hydroxylation polymorphism. The same 14 healthy subjects studied in that investigation were given 150 mg of caffeine. The reciprocal of plasma clozapine AUC (0,24), was correlated with an index of the N3-demethylation of caffeine (rs = 0.84; P = 0.0024), used as a measure of cytochrome P4501A2 (CYP1A2) activity. N1- and N7-demethylation indices of caffeine also reflect CYP1A2 activity and were also correlated with clozapine clearance (rs = 0.89 and 0.85; P = 0.0013 and 0.0023; respectively). No significant relationships with xanthine oxidase and N-acetyl transferase activity, also assessed by a caffeine test, were found. This study suggests that clozapine is metabolised by CYP1A2 to a major extent. PMID:7893591

  7. Brown adipose tissue. III. Effect of ethanol, nicotine and caffeine exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidlo, J; Zaviacic, M; Trutzová, H

    1996-05-01

    Brown adipose tissue is known to be the most important organ for generating heat in non-shivering thermogenesis. Process of thermogenesis and thermoregulation may be affected by many drugs. The paper deals with actual literary data of effect of ethanol, nicotine and caffeine on brown adipose tissue, heat production and its regulation in experimental animals and in human. PMID:9560910

  8. Rapid analysis of caffeine in "smart drugs" and "energy drinks" by microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liotta, Eloisa; Gottardo, Rossella; Seri, Catia; Rimondo, Claudia; Miksik, Ivan; Serpelloni, Giovanni; Tagliaro, Franco

    2012-07-10

    A novel method based on microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC) with diode array detection (DAD) for rapid determination of caffeine in commercial and clandestine stimulants, known as "energy drinks" and "smart drugs", is described. Separations were carried out in 50 cm × 50 μm (ID) uncoated fused silica capillaries. The optimized buffer electrolyte was composed of 8.85 mM sodium tetraborate pH 9.5, SDS 3.3% (w/v), n-hexane 1.5% (v/v) and 1-butanol 6.6% (v/v). Separations were performed at a voltage of 20 kV. Sample injection conditions were 0.5 psi, 3 s. Diprofilline was used as internal standard. The determination of the analytes was based on the UV signal recorded at 275 nm, corresponding to the maximum wavelength of absorbance of caffeine, whereas peak identification and purity check was performed on the basis of the acquisition of UV radiation between 200 and 400 nm wavelengths. Under the described conditions, the separation of the compounds was achieved in 6 min without any interference from the matrix. Linearity was assessed within a caffeine concentration range from 5 to 100 μg/mL. The intra-day and inter-day precision values were below 0.37% for migration times and below 9.86% for peak areas. The present MEEKC method was successfully applied to the direct determination of caffeine in smart drugs and energy drinks. PMID:22497701

  9. Fluid bed drying of guarana (Paullinia cupana HBK) extract: effect of process factors on caffeine content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagliarussi, Renata S; Bastos, Jairo K; Freitas, Luis A P

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study was to study the convective drying of the hydroalcoholic extracts obtained from powdered guarana seeds in a spouted bed dryer. The influence of process variables, such as the convective airflow rate, extract feed rate, and air inlet temperature, on the quality of the dry extract was determined using the caffeine and moisture content for the process evaluation. The caffeine content in the alcoholic and dried extracts was determined by capillary gas chromatography. The experiments were performed following a 3(3) factorial design and the data analyzed by response surface. The analysis of dry extract showed that the air and extract feed rates did not significantly affect (25% level) the caffeine content, but that drying temperature is a major factor to consider when the extract is submitted to fluid bed drying. Caffeine losses were significant (1% level) for drying temperatures above 120 degrees C, while moisture content was lower than 3% for temperatures above 120 degrees C. The data showed that there is an optimum temperature for the drying of guarana extracts in spouted beds, and under the conditions used in this study it was 120 degrees C. PMID:16796371

  10. Postnatal caffeine treatment affects differently two pentylenetetrazol seizure models in rats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tchekalarova, Jana; Kubová, Hana; Mareš, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 7 (2009), s. 463-469. ISSN 1059-1311 R&D Projects: GA MZd NR9184 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : epileptic seizures * caffeine * development Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.233, year: 2009

  11. Comparison of capillary electrophoresis and high performance liquid chromatography methods for caffeine determination in decaffeinated coffee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Schaper Bizzotto

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Decaffeinated coffee accounts for 10 percent of coffee sales in the world; it is preferred by consumers that do not wish or are sensitive to caffeine effects. This article presents an analytical comparison of capillary electrophoresis (CE and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC methods for residual caffeine quantification in decaffeinated coffee in terms of validation parameters, costs, analysis time, composition and treatment of the residues generated, and caffeine quantification in 20 commercial samples. Both methods showed suitable validation parameters. Caffeine content did not differ statistically in the two different methods of analysis. The main advantage of the high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC method was the 42-fold lower detection limit. Nevertheless, the capillary electrophoresis (CE detection limit was 115-fold lower than the allowable limit by the Brazilian law. The capillary electrophoresis (CE analyses were 30% faster, the reagent costs were 76.5-fold, and the volume of the residues generated was 33-fold lower. Therefore, the capillary electrophoresis (CE method proved to be a valuable analytical tool for this type of analysis.

  12. An optimized and validated SPE-LC-MS/MS method for the determination of caffeine and paraxanthine in hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kesel, Pieter M M; Lambert, Willy E; Stove, Christophe P

    2015-11-01

    Caffeine is the probe drug of choice to assess the phenotype of the drug metabolizing enzyme CYP1A2. Typically, molar concentration ratios of paraxanthine, caffeine's major metabolite, to its precursor are determined in plasma following administration of a caffeine test dose. The aim of this study was to develop and validate an LC-MS/MS method for the determination of caffeine and paraxanthine in hair. The different steps of a hair extraction procedure were thoroughly optimized. Following a three-step decontamination procedure, caffeine and paraxanthine were extracted from 20 mg of ground hair using a solution of protease type VIII in Tris buffer (pH 7.5). Resulting hair extracts were cleaned up on Strata-X™ SPE cartridges. All samples were analyzed on a Waters Acquity UPLC® system coupled to an AB SCIEX API 4000™ triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The final method was fully validated based on international guidelines. Linear calibration lines for caffeine and paraxanthine ranged from 20 to 500 pg/mg. Precision (%RSD) and accuracy (%bias) were below 12% and 7%, respectively. The isotopically labeled internal standards compensated for the ion suppression observed for both compounds. Relative matrix effects were below 15%RSD. The recovery of the sample preparation procedure was high (>85%) and reproducible. Caffeine and paraxanthine were stable in hair for at least 644 days. The effect of the hair decontamination procedure was evaluated as well. Finally, the applicability of the developed procedure was demonstrated by determining caffeine and paraxanthine concentrations in hair samples of ten healthy volunteers. The optimized and validated method for determination of caffeine and paraxanthine in hair proved to be reliable and may serve to evaluate the potential of hair analysis for CYP1A2 phenotyping. PMID:26452792

  13. Neuroprotection by caffeine in the MPTP model of parkinson's disease and its dependence on adenosine A2A receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, K; Di Luca, D G; Orrú, M; Xu, Y; Chen, J-F; Schwarzschild, M A

    2016-05-13

    Considerable epidemiological and laboratory data have suggested that caffeine, a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist, may protect against the underlying neurodegeneration of parkinson's disease (PD). Although both caffeine and more specific antagonists of the A2A subtype of adenosine receptor (A2AR) have been found to confer protection in animal models of PD, the dependence of caffeine's neuroprotective effects on the A2AR is not known. To definitively determine its A2AR dependence, the effect of caffeine on 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6 tetra-hydropyridine (MPTP) neurotoxicity was compared in wild-type (WT) and A2AR gene global knockout (A2A KO) mice, as well as in central nervous system (CNS) cell type-specific (conditional) A2AR knockout (cKO) mice that lack the receptor either in postnatal forebrain neurons or in astrocytes. In WT and in heterozygous A2AR KO mice caffeine pretreatment (25mg/kgip) significantly attenuated MPTP-induced depletion of striatal dopamine. By contrast in homozygous A2AR global KO mice caffeine had no effect on MPTP toxicity. In forebrain neuron A2AR cKO mice, caffeine lost its locomotor stimulant effect, whereas its neuroprotective effect was mostly preserved. In astrocytic A2AR cKO mice, both caffeine's locomotor stimulant and protective properties were undiminished. Taken together, these results indicate that neuroprotection by caffeine in the MPTP model of PD relies on the A2AR, although the specific cellular localization of these receptors remains to be determined. PMID:26905951

  14. Effect of Casilan® on 13 C-caffeine metabolism in overnight-fasted healthy Nigerian children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazeem A Oshikoya

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To determine the effect of Casilan® on 13 C-caffeine metabolism in healthy Nigerian children. Materials and Methods: Twelve healthy Nigerian children (male: six, female: six aged 3-8 years were studied on three occasions. After an overnight fast, the children were studied after ingesting Casilan® only (Week 1. They were restudied after ingesting 3 mg/kg of labeled caffeine only (Week 2, and further re-studied after ingesting both Casilan® and labeled caffeine (Week 3. Breath samples were collected by blowing via a straw into an exentainer bottle. The cumulative percentage of 13 C-caffeine exhaled as 13 CO 2 was measured over 2 h. Results: The time courses of 13 C-enrichments in exhaled CO 2 for all the children, after they had ingested labeled caffeine only and after they had ingested both Casilan® and labeled caffeine, were identical. There was a gradual rise and peak of the enrichments at about 60-75 min, followed by a gradual fall (II or a plateau (III. Contrarily, the time course of 13 C-enrichments for all the children was consistently low and stable after they had ingested Casilan® only (I. The mean values of cumulative percent 13 C-doses recovered in the CO 2 exhaled over a 2-h period, after ingesting labeled caffeine only (8.59 ± 1.10 δ%/mg and after ingesting both Casilan® and labeled caffeine (8.58 ± 1.33 δ%/mg, were identical, with no statistically significant difference (P = 0.972. This suggests that Casilan® did not affect the CYP1A2 metabolic pathway. Conclusions: Casilan® is a safe, reliable and quantitative food supplement for overnight-fasted children undergoing caffeine breath test.

  15. Qualitative differences in the discriminative stimulus effects of low and high doses of caffeine in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumford, G K; Holtzman, S G

    1991-09-01

    Caffeine engenders qualitatively different subjective effects in humans at low and high doses. Low doses of caffeine are mildly reinforcing and produce psychomotor stimulation. High doses of caffeine can produce subjective feelings of anxiety, dysphoria and depression. The present study was designed to model these different subjective states in rats using a discrete trial shock avoidance/escape drug discrimination paradigm. Rats were trained to discriminate between i.p. injections of saline and either 10 or 56 mg/kg of caffeine. Rats trained at 10 mg/kg of caffeine acquired the discrimination in an average of 93 sessions and generalized completely to a variety of xanthine and nonxanthine behavioral stimulants including: d-amphetamine, apomorphine, 7-(beta-chloroethyl)theophylline, 9-chloro-2-(2-furanyl)-5,6-dihydro-1, 2,4-triazolo[1,5-c]quinazolin-5-imine (CGS 15943), cocaine, 1,7-dimethylxanthine, diethylpropion, beta-hydroxyethyltheophylline, methylphenidate, phenidimetrazine and theophylline. Rats trained at 56 mg/kg of caffeine acquired the discrimination in an average of 43 sessions and generalized completely only to theophylline. A variety of drugs representing diverse pharmacologic classifications including: benzodiazepine inverse agonists, pentylenetetrazol, yohimbine, ethylketocyclazocine and phencyclidine, were not generalized from either training dose, demonstrating the pharmacologic specificity of the discrimination. The discriminative effects of 10 mg/kg of caffeine appear to derive from a state of behavioral arousal, possibly mediated by catecholamines, and parallel the subjective effects produced by low doses of caffeine in humans. The discriminative effects of 56 mg/kg of caffeine are qualitatively different from those of 10 mg/kg but cannot be defined further at this time. PMID:1890622

  16. Embryonic caffeine exposure acts via A1 adenosine receptors to alter adult cardiac function and DNA methylation in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela L Buscariollo

    Full Text Available Evidence indicates that disruption of normal prenatal development influences an individual's risk of developing obesity and cardiovascular disease as an adult. Thus, understanding how in utero exposure to chemical agents leads to increased susceptibility to adult diseases is a critical health related issue. Our aim was to determine whether adenosine A1 receptors (A1ARs mediate the long-term effects of in utero caffeine exposure on cardiac function and whether these long-term effects are the result of changes in DNA methylation patterns in adult hearts. Pregnant A1AR knockout mice were treated with caffeine (20 mg/kg or vehicle (0.09% NaCl i.p. at embryonic day 8.5. This caffeine treatment results in serum levels equivalent to the consumption of 2-4 cups of coffee in humans. After dams gave birth, offspring were examined at 8-10 weeks of age. A1AR+/+ offspring treated in utero with caffeine were 10% heavier than vehicle controls. Using echocardiography, we observed altered cardiac function and morphology in adult mice exposed to caffeine in utero. Caffeine treatment decreased cardiac output by 11% and increased left ventricular wall thickness by 29% during diastole. Using DNA methylation arrays, we identified altered DNA methylation patterns in A1AR+/+ caffeine treated hearts, including 7719 differentially methylated regions (DMRs within the genome and an overall decrease in DNA methylation of 26%. Analysis of genes associated with DMRs revealed that many are associated with cardiac hypertrophy. These data demonstrate that A1ARs mediate in utero caffeine effects on cardiac function and growth and that caffeine exposure leads to changes in DNA methylation.

  17. Caffeine administration at night during extended wakefulness effectively mitigates performance impairment but not subjective assessments of fatigue and sleepiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paech, Gemma M; Banks, Siobhan; Pajcin, Maja; Grant, Crystal; Johnson, Kayla; Kamimori, Gary H; Vedova, Chris B Della

    2016-06-01

    The current study investigated the effects of repeated caffeine administration on performance and subjective reports of sleepiness and fatigue during 50h extended wakefulness. Twenty-four, non-smokers aged 22.5±2.9y (mean±SD) remained awake for two nights (50h) in a controlled laboratory environment. During this period, 200mg of caffeine or placebo gum was administered at 01:00, 03:00, 05:00 and 07:00 on both nights (total of 800mg/night). Neurobehavioral performance and subjective reports were assessed throughout the wake period. Caffeine improved performance compared to placebo, but did not affect overall ratings of subjective sleepiness and fatigue. Performance and sleepiness worsened with increasing time awake for both conditions. However, caffeine slowed performance impairments such that after 50h of wakefulness performance was better following caffeine administration compared to placebo. Caffeine also slowed the increase in subjective sleepiness and performance ratings, but only during the first night of wakefulness. After two nights of sleep deprivation, there was no difference in sleepiness ratings between the two conditions. These results demonstrate that strategic administration of caffeine effectively mitigates performance impairments associated with 50h wakefulness but does not improve overall subjective assessments of sleepiness, fatigue and performance. Results indicate that while performance impairment is alleviated, individuals may continue to report feelings of sleepiness. Individuals who use caffeine as a countermeasure in sustained operations may feel as though caffeine is not effective despite impairments in objective performance being largely mitigated. PMID:27061779

  18. Caffeine increases Nr1i3 expression and potentiates the effects of its ligand, TCPOBOP, in mice liver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidge Fukumasu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is one of the world's most consumed substances. It is present in coffee, green tea and guarana, among others. The xenobiotic-sensing nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group I, member 3 (Nr1i3, also known as the Constitutive Androstane Receptor (Car is a key regulator of drug metabolism and excretion. No consistent description of caffeine effects on this receptor has been described. Thus, to unravel the effects of caffeine on this receptor, we performed experiments in mice. First, C57Bl/6 mice that were treated daily with caffeine (50 mg/kg for 15 days presented a slight but significant increase in Nr1i3 and Cyp2b10 gene expression. A second experiment was then performed to verify the effects of caffeine on TCPOBOP (1,4-bis-[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy]benzene, 3,3′,5,5′-tetrachloro-1,4-bis(pyridyloxybenzene, the most potent agonist known for mice Nr1i3. Interestingly, caffeine potentiated TCPOBOP pleiotropic effects in mice liver, such as hepatomegaly, hepatotoxicity, hepatocyte proliferation and loss of cell-to-cell communication through gap junctions. In addition, caffeine plus TCPOBOP treatment increased liver gene expression of Nr1i3 and Cyp2b10 comparing with only caffeine or TCPOBOP treatments. Together, these results indicate that caffeine increases the expression of Nr1i3 in mice liver, although at this point it is not possible to determine if Nr1i3 directly or indirectly mediates this effect.

  19. Adsorption behavior of caffeine as a green corrosion inhibitor for copper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Fernando Silvio de [Grupo de Estudos de Processos Eletroquimicos e Eletroanaliticos, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Giacomelli, Cristiano [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, Av. Roraima 1000, 97119-900, Santa Maria, RS (Brazil); Goncalves, Reinaldo Simoes [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Bento Goncalves 9500, 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Spinelli, Almir, E-mail: almir.spinelli@ufsc.br [Grupo de Estudos de Processos Eletroquimicos e Eletroanaliticos, Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2012-12-01

    Electrochemical and impedance experiments were carried out to evaluate the corrosion behavior of copper in aerated 0.1 mol L{sup -1} H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions in the presence of three xanthine derivatives with similar chemical structures. The corrosion rate of copper was found to increase in the presence of theophylline and theobromine and decrease in the presence of caffeine. The adsorption and inhibitory effect of caffeine on copper surfaces in aerated 0.1 mol L{sup -1} H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solutions were then investigated in detail by potentiodynamic polarization, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), contact angle measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and fluorescence experiments. The data obtained indicate that caffeine behaves as a cathodic-type inhibitor adsorbing onto the copper surface according to the Temkin isotherm, with the negative Increment G Degree-Sign {sub ads} value of - 31.1 kJ mol{sup -1} signifying a spontaneous adsorption process. The corrosion inhibition efficiency increased with caffeine concentration in the range of 1.0-10.0 mmol L{sup -1}. Furthermore, the EIS results obtained at the open-circuit potential and surface analysis (SEM, EDS and fluorescence) clearly demonstrated the adsorption of the organic compound onto the copper electrode. The contact angle measurements revealed the formation of a hydrophobic protective film. This film covers up to 72% of the total active surface, acts as a protective barrier and prevents interaction between the metal, water and oxygen molecules. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We have investigated the adsorption and corrosion inhibition of caffeine on copper surfaces. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caffeine behaves as a cathodic-type inhibitor. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Caffeine adsorbs onto copper surface according to Temkin isotherm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There exists the formation of a hydrophobic film that acts as a

  20. Influence of caffeine pretreatment on biphasic in vitro maturation of dog oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salavati, Mazdak; Ghafari, Fataneh; Zhang, Tiantian; Fouladi-Nashta, Ali A

    2013-10-15

    Phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitors have been utilized for in vitro maturation (IVM) of oocytes to manipulate the meiotic resumption and progression. Premature chromatin condensation and DNA replication of the oocytes, immediately after the decrease in the cAMP level, are the difficulties in canine IVM. Caffeine, a nonselective competitive PDE inhibitor, due to its structural similarity to adenosine molecule maintains the cAMP level by occupying PDE enzymes such as PDE-3A inside the oocyte and PDE-4 and PDE-5 in the cumulus cells. In this study, the effects of 12-hour caffeine pretreatment in a biphasic IVM protocol were assessed on maturation rates of canine oocytes. Sixty hours of culture after a 12-hour of 10 mM caffeine pretreatment resulted in 16.9% ± 2.4 of the oocytes reaching metaphase II stage (MII) and 25.9% ± 5.2 degeneration rate compared with the control group with 2.2% ± 2.2 MII and 37.6% ± 4.3 degeneration rates (P < 0.05). Caffeine pretreatment induced higher mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK1 and MAPK3) phosphorylation and maturation-promoting factor activity at 12 hours and activated MAPK1 and maturation-promoting factor at 48 hours after culture in cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) compared with the control group (P < 0.05). Fresh canine COCs were also analyzed before IVM using brilliant cresyl blue (BCB) staining. Oocytes showed difference in meiotic resumption (MI-MII) (BCB+ = 16.11% ± 5.5, BCB- = 9.86% ± 5.0; P < 0.05) after 60 hours of culture following 12-hour caffeine pretreatment. The BCB+ canine oocytes had higher MII rate than the BCB- group under caffeine pretreatment (10.2% ± 2.9 vs. 1.1% ± 1.1, respectively; P < 0.05). Results indicated that 12-hour caffeine pretreatment of canine COCs improves the MII maturation rates at 72 hours and BCB+ oocytes have higher competency in vitro for nuclear maturation. PMID:23921184

  1. Deuterium, carbon and nitrogen isotopic analysis of natural and synthetic caffeines. Authentication of coffees and coffee extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) was used to determine the δ(13C) and δ(15N) values of a series of caffeine samples extracted from coffee beans or obtained by synthesis, 2H NMR spectra were recorded in order to compute the site-specific isotope ratios of caffeine. The set of the five isotope ratios measured for the 26 different samples was studied by multi-variate analysis (principal component and discriminant analyse) and it is shown that the synthetic samples are clearly distinguishable from the natural caffeines which in turn can be classified with complete accuracy as of either American or African origin

  2. The influence of caffeine and EDTA post-treatment on biological effect of soybean and rape seedling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biological effect of Caffeine and EDTA post-treatment on soybean and rape seedling was studied. The results showed that the seed germinating rates of the two crops were obviously affected by radiation, caffeine and EDTA post treatment. The seedling growth of the two crops were promoted by lower radiation dose (soybean 2O-treatment. The accumulative effects on the seedling root length, seedling height and dry weight of the two plants were observed with the post-treatment with combining of caffeine and EDTA

  3. Caffeine and Aspirin Protecting Albino Rats A gainst Biochemical and Histological Disorders Induced by Whole Body Gamma Irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caffeine is an alkaloid (purine derivative) that contains flavonoids, where as aspirin, natural component of mammalian tissue ( acetylsalicylic acid) is one of the most commonly used non steroidal anti - inflammatory , and it is a necessary factor in the utilization of long - chain fatty acids to produce energy. Furthermore, it has been shown to protect cells from per oxidative stress. Th e objective of the present study is to evaluate the efficacy of caffeine (1,3,7 - trimethyl xanthine) 80 mg/kg b.wt. a nd aspirin ( acetylsalicylic acid) in the amelioration of the physiological and histological changes in stomach and intestine of rats exposed to gamma irradiation . Male albino rats were divided into 8 groups. 1 - Control group: rats not subject to any treatment, 2 - Caffeine group: rats received caffeine ( 80 ml/Kg body weight )via intraperitoneal injection for 21 days, 3 - Aspirin group: rats received aspirin (150 mg / kg body) via intraperitoneal injection for 21 days , 4 - Caffeine + Aspirin group: rats received caffeine a nd aspirin treatment, 5 - Radiation groups: rats were whole body gamma irradiated at 8 Gy , 6 - Caffeine + Radiation group: rats received caffeine for 21 days before whole body gamma irradiation at 8 Gy, 7 - Aspirin + Radiation group: rats received aspirin during 21 days before w hole body gamma irradiation , 8 - Caffeine + Aspirin + Radiation group: rats received caffeine parallel to aspirin for 21 days before whole body gamma irradiation. Animals were sacrificed 24 hrs post irradiation. The results demonstrated that rats exposed to whole body gamma irradiation showed a significant increase in alanine amino transferase (AL ) , aspartate amino transferase ( AST), and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities, and a significant decrease in total protein indicating liver injury. A significant increase in urea, creatinine, Na+,and K+ were recorded indicating kidney damage. Alteration of liver and kidney functions was accompanied by a significant

  4. Influence of caffeine administered at 45 °C on bone tissue development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Tomaszewski

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available [b]introduction and objective[/b]. Caffeine is one of the world’s most commonly ingested alkaloids which easily permeates the placenta. The teratogenic and embryotoxic influence of large doses of caffeine has been established in many experimental studies on animals. The objective of this work was to assess the influence of caffeine, administered at 45 °C, on the development of the bone tissue of rats, with particular reference to elemental bone composition using an X-ray microprobe. [b]materials and methods[/b]. The research was conducted on white rats of the Wistar strain. The fertilized females were divided into two groups: an Experimental Group (Group E and a Control Group (Group C. The females in Group E were given caffeine orally (at 45 °C in 30 mg/day doses from the 8 [sup]th [/sup] to the 21 [sup]st[/sup] day of pregnancy. The females in Group C were given water at the same temperature. The fetuses were used to assess the growth and mineralization of the skeleton. A qualitative analysis of the morphology and mineralization of bones was conducted using the alcian-alizarin method. For calcium and potassium analysis, an X-ray microprobe was used. [b]results.[/b] By staining the skeleton using the alcian-alizarin method, changes in 52 of Group E fetuses were observed. The frequency of the development variants in the Group E rats was statistically higher, compared with Group C. [b]conclusions[/b]. Receiving caffeine at a higher temperature may result in different pharmacodynamics and significantly change tolerance to it. In Group E, a significant decrease in the calcium level, as well as an increase in the potassium level, was observed. The X-ray microprobe can be a perfect complement to the methods which enable determination of the mineralization of osseous tissue.

  5. Effects of Time-Release Caffeine Containing Supplement on Metabolic Rate, Glycerol Concentration and Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam M. Gonzalez, Jay R. Hoffman, Adam J. Wells, Gerald T. Mangine, Jeremy R. Townsend, Adam R. Jajtner, Ran Wang, Amelia A. Miramonti, Gabriel J. Pruna, Michael B. LaMonica, Jonathan D. Bohner, Mattan W. Hoffman, Leonardo P. Oliveira, David H. Fukuda, Maren S. Fragala, Jeffrey R. Stout

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This study compared caffeine pharmacokinetics, glycerol concentrations, metabolic rate, and performance measures following ingestion of a time-release caffeine containing supplement (TR-CAF versus a regular caffeine capsule (CAF and a placebo (PL. Following a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized, cross-over design, ten males (25.9 ± 3.2 y who regularly consume caffeine ingested capsules containing either TR-CAF, CAF, or PL. Blood draws and performance measures occurred at every hour over an 8-hour period. Plasma caffeine concentrations were significantly greater (p < 0.05 in CAF compared to TR-CAF during hours 2-5 and significantly greater (p = 0.042 in TR-CAF compared to CAF at hour 8. There were no significant differences between trials in glycerol concentrations (p = 0.86 or metabolic measures (p = 0.17-0.91. Physical reaction time was significantly improved for CAF at hour 5 (p=0.01 compared to PL. Average upper body reaction time was significantly improved for CAF and TR-CAF during hours 1-4 (p = 0.04 and p = 0.01, respectively and over the 8-hour period (p = 0.04 and p = 0.001, respectively compared to PL. Average upper body reaction time was also significantly improved for TR-CAF compared to PL during hours 5-8 (p = 0.004. TR-CAF and CAF showed distinct pharmacokinetics yielding modest effects on reaction time, yet did not alter glycerol concentration, metabolic measures, or other performance measures.

  6. CAFFEINE ATTENUATES ACUTE GROWTH HORMONE RESPONSE TO A SINGLE BOUT OF RESISTANCE EXERCISE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo-Hun Wu

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of caffeine consume on substrate metabolism and acute hormonal responses to a single bout of resistance exercise (RE. Ten resistance-trained men participated in this study. All subjects performed one repetition maximum (1RM test and then performed two protocols: caffeine (CAF, 6 mg·kg-1 and control (CON in counter balanced order. Subjects performed RE (8 exercises, 3 sets of 10 repetitions at 75% of 1RM after caffeine or placebo ingestion one hour prior to RE. Blood samples collected prior to treatment ingestion (pre-60, immediately prior to RE (pre-exe, and 0, 15, 30 min post to RE (P0, P15, P30 for analysis of insulin, testosterone, cortisol, growth hormone, glucose, free fatty acid and lactic acid. Each experiment was separated by seven days. In this study, statistical analysis of a two-way analysis of variance (treatment by time with repeated measures was applied. After ingesting caffeine, the concentrations of free fatty acid (pre- exe, P0, P15, P30 in CAF were significantly higher than CON (p < 0.05. Additionally, the responses of GH (P0, P15, P30 in CAF were significantly lower than CON (p < 0.05, whereas the concentrations of insulin, testosterone and cortisol were not different between CAF and CON (p < 0.05 after RE. The results of this study indicated that caffeine ingestion prior to RE might attenuate the response of GH. This effect might be caused by the elevation in blood FFA concentration at the beginning of RE

  7. Caffeine consumption during pregnancy and risk of preterm birth: a meta-analysis1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslova, Ekaterina; Bhattacharya, Sayanti; Lin, Shih-Wen; Michels, Karin B

    2010-01-01

    Background: The effect of caffeine intake during pregnancy on the risk of preterm delivery has been studied for the past 3 decades with inconsistent results. Objective: We performed a meta-analysis examining the association between caffeine consumption during pregnancy and risk of preterm birth. Design: We searched MEDLINE and EMBASE articles published between 1966 and July 2010, cross-referenced reference lists of the retrieved articles, and identified 15 cohort and 7 case-control studies that met inclusion criteria for this meta-analysis. Results: The combined odds ratios (ORs) obtained by using fixed-effects models for cohort studies were 1.11 (95% CI: 0.96, 1.28), 1.10 (95% CI: 1.01, 1.19), and 1.08 (95% CI: 0.93, 1.27) for risk of preterm birth comparing the highest with the lowest level of caffeine intake (or no intake) (mg/d) during the first, second, and third trimesters, respectively. Results for the case-control studies yielded no associations for the first (OR: 1.07; 95% CI: 0.84, 1.37), second (OR: 1.17; 95% CI: 0.94, 1.45), or third (OR: 0.94; 95% CI: 0.79, 1.12) trimesters. No overall heterogeneity was found by region, publication decade, exposure and outcome assessment, caffeine sources, or adjustment for confounding, which was largely driven by individual studies. Conclusion: In this meta-analysis, we observed no important association between caffeine intake during pregnancy and the risk of preterm birth for cohort and case-control studies. PMID:20844077

  8. The impact of caffeine on connexin expression in the embryonic chick cardiomyocyte micromass culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahir, Bhavesh K; Pratten, Margaret K

    2016-07-01

    Cardiomyocytes are electrically coupled by gap junctions, defined as clusters of low-resistance multisubunit transmembrane channels composed of connexins (Cxs). The expression of Cx40, Cx43 and Cx45, which are present in cardiomyocytes, is known to be developmentally regulated. This study investigates the premise that alterations in gap junction proteins are one of the mechanisms by which teratogens may act. Specifically, those molecules known to be teratogenic in humans could cause their effects via disruption of cell-to-cell communication pathways, resulting in an inability to co-ordinate tissue development. Caffeine significantly inhibited contractile activity at concentrations above and including 1500 μm (P < 0.05), while not affecting cell viability and total protein, in the embryonic chick cardiomyocyte micromass culture system. The effects of caffeine on key cardiac gap junction protein (Cx40, Cx43 and Cx45) expression were analysed using immunocytochemistry and in-cell Western blotting. The results indicated that caffeine altered the expression pattern of Cx40, Cx43 and Cx45 at non-cytotoxic concentrations (≥2000 μm), i.e., at concentrations that did not affect total cell protein and cell viability. In addition the effects of caffeine on cardiomyocyte formation and function (contractile activity score) were correlated with modulation of Cxs (Cx40, Cx43 and Cx45) expression, at above and including 2000 μm caffeine concentrations (P < 0.05). These experiments provide evidence that embryonic chick cardiomyocyte micromass culture may be a useful in vitro method for mechanistic studies of perturbation of embryonic heart development. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26304238

  9. Caffeine neuroprotects against dexamethasone-induced anxiety-like behaviour in the Zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khor, Yee Min; Soga, Tomoko; Parhar, Ishwar S

    2013-01-15

    The early-life stress has critical impact on brain development which can lead to long-term effects on brain functions during adulthood. It has been reported that caffeine possesses a protective effect in neurodegenerative diseases. Thus, this study investigates the potential of caffeine to protect brain functions from adverse effects due to stress exposure during early-life development in the male zebrafish. In the first part of this study, synthetic glucocorticoid, dexamethasone (DEX) (2-200 mg/L for 24 h) was used to induce stress effects in the zebrafish larvae from 4 to 5 days post-fertilisation (dpf) and the effect of DEX administration on zebrafish larvae on anxiety-like behaviour during adulthood in novel tank test was investigated. Next, the possible protective effect of caffeine pre-treatment (5-50 mg/L for 24 h from 3 to 4dpf) before DEX administration was studied. DEX-treated adult male zebrafish showed higher anxiety levels in behavioural tests, as seen in longer latency to enter the top part of the tank, lower transition numbers between the top and bottom parts with more time spent at the bottom and lesser time spent at the top and lower distance travelled at top part. The effect of DEX on anxiety-like behaviour was dose-dependent. Importantly, adult male zebrafish pre-treated with caffeine before DEX treatment did not show any anxiety-like behaviour. These results show that exposure to stress during early-life leads to anxiety-like behaviour in the adult male zebrafish but pre-treatment with caffeine protects from stress-induced anxiety. PMID:23044054

  10. Physical properties and caffeine release from creams prepared with different oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojciechowska Katarzyna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is a methylxanthine typically found in the Coffee Arabica L plant. Generally, caffeine is well-known as a orally administered mild stimulant of the central nervous system. However, for cosmetic purpose, caffeine is an active compound ingredient, at 7% concentration, in several anticellulite products. The efficiency of this mode of delivery is not fully understood. Hence, the aim of the study was to ascertain the effectiveness of particular carriers to release this ingredient. In so doing, we prepared six creams based upon different oils (Sesame oil, Rice oil, Walnut oil, Coconut oil, Sweet almond oil and Jojoba oil, containing 5% of caffeine, and compared the release of the substance from the obtained preparations. Initially, all of the creams were subjected to a variety of physical tests, among these being for slippage and spreadability. Furthermore, their rheological properties were evaluated. Subsequently, the creams were tested for caffeine release. In the slippage and spreadability tests, the coconut oil-based cream was revealed as having the best parameters. However, the rheological tests showed that all of the preparations had the pseudoplastic character of flowing according to the Ostwald de Waele power law model. The power low index (n for all the preparations was from 0.2467-0.3179 at 20°C and 0.2821-0.3754 at 32°C. At 20°C, the Sesame oil-, Walnut oil-, Sweet almond oil- and Jojoba oil-based creams were thixotropic, but at 32°C, thixotropy appeared only in the Walnut oil-based creams.

  11. Effects of coffee and caffeine anhydrous on strength and sprint performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trexler, Eric T; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E; Roelofs, Erica J; Hirsch, Katie R; Mock, Meredith G

    2016-09-01

    Caffeine and coffee are widely used among active individuals to enhance performance. The purpose of the current study was to compare the effects of acute coffee (COF) and caffeine anhydrous (CAF) intake on strength and sprint performance. Fifty-four resistance-trained males completed strength testing, consisting of one-rep max (1RM) and repetitions to fatigue (RTF) at 80% of 1RM for leg press (LP) and bench press (BP). Participants then completed five, 10-second cycle ergometer sprints separated by one minute of rest. Peak power (PP) and total work (TW) were recorded for each sprint. At least 48 hours later, participants returned and ingested a beverage containing CAF (300 mg flat dose; yielding 3-5 mg/kg bodyweight), COF (8.9 g; 303 mg caffeine), or placebo (PLA; 3.8 g non-caloric flavouring) 30 minutes before testing. LP 1RM was improved more by COF than CAF (p = .04), but not PLA (p = .99). Significant interactions were not observed for BP 1RM, BP RTF, or LP RTF (p > .05). There were no sprint × treatment interactions for PP or TW (p > .05). 95% confidence intervals revealed a significant improvement in sprint 1 TW for CAF, but not COF or PLA. For PLA, significant reductions were observed in sprint 4 PP, sprint 2 TW, sprint 4 TW, and average TW; significant reductions were not observed with CAF or COF. Neither COF nor CAF improved strength outcomes more than PLA, while both groups attenuated sprint power reductions to a similar degree. Coffee and caffeine anhydrous may be considered suitable pre-exercise caffeine sources for high-intensity exercise. PMID:26394649

  12. Caffeine ingestion enhances perceptual responses during intermittent exercise in female team-game players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ajmol; O'Donnell, Jemma; Von Hurst, Pamela; Foskett, Andrew; Holland, Sherina; Starck, Carlene; Rutherfurd-Markwick, Kay

    2016-01-01

    We examined the influence of caffeine supplementation on cognitive performance and perceptual responses in female team-game players taking low-dose monophasic oral contraceptives of the same hormonal composition. Ten females (24 ± 4 years; 59.7 ± 3.5 kg body mass; 2-6 training sessions per week) took part in a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover-design trial. A 90-min intermittent treadmill-running protocol was completed 60 min following ingestion of a capsule containing either 6 mg • kg(-1) anhydrous caffeine or artificial sweetener (placebo). Perceptual responses (ratings of perceived exertion (RPE), feeling scale (FS), felt arousal scale (FAS)), mood (profile of mood states (POMS)) and cognitive performance (Stroop test, choice reaction time (CRT)) were completed before, during and after the exercise protocol, as well as after ~12 h post exercise. Caffeine ingestion significantly enhanced the ratings of pleasure (P = 0.008) and arousal (P = 0.002) during the exercise protocol, as well as increased vigour (POMS; P = 0.007), while there was a tendency for reduced fatigue (POMS; P = 0.068). Caffeine ingestion showed a tendency to decrease RPE (P = 0.068) and improve reaction times in the Stroop (P = 0.072) and CRT (P = 0.087) tests. Caffeine supplementation showed a positive effect on perceptual parameters by increasing vigour and a tendency to decrease fatigue during intermittent running activity in female games players taking low-dose monophasic oral contraceptive steroids (OCS). PMID:26045170

  13. Differential concentration-specific effects of caffeine on cell viability, oxidative stress, and cell cycle in pulmonary oxygen toxicity in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Caffeine at 0.05 mM decreases oxidative stress in hyperoxia. • Caffeine at 1 mM decreases cell viability, increases oxidative stress in hyperoxia. • Caffeine at 1 but not 0.05 mM, abrogates hyperoxia-induced G2/M arrest. - Abstract: Caffeine is used to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature neonates. Hyperoxia contributes to the development of BPD, inhibits cell proliferation and decreases cell survival. The mechanisms responsible for the protective effect of caffeine in pulmonary oxygen toxicity remain largely unknown. A549 and MLE 12 pulmonary epithelial cells were exposed to hyperoxia or maintained in room air, in the presence of different concentrations (0, 0.05, 0.1 and 1 mM) of caffeine. Caffeine had a differential concentration-specific effect on cell cycle progression, oxidative stress and viability, with 1 mM concentration being deleterious and 0.05 mM being protective. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation during hyperoxia was modulated by caffeine in a similar concentration-specific manner. Caffeine at 1 mM, but not at the 0.05 mM concentration decreased the G2 arrest in these cells. Taken together this study shows the novel funding that caffeine has a concentration-specific effect on cell cycle regulation, ROS generation, and cell survival in hyperoxic conditions

  14. Differential concentration-specific effects of caffeine on cell viability, oxidative stress, and cell cycle in pulmonary oxygen toxicity in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiwari, Kirti Kumar; Chu, Chun; Couroucli, Xanthi; Moorthy, Bhagavatula; Lingappan, Krithika, E-mail: lingappa@bcm.edu

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Caffeine at 0.05 mM decreases oxidative stress in hyperoxia. • Caffeine at 1 mM decreases cell viability, increases oxidative stress in hyperoxia. • Caffeine at 1 but not 0.05 mM, abrogates hyperoxia-induced G2/M arrest. - Abstract: Caffeine is used to prevent bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) in premature neonates. Hyperoxia contributes to the development of BPD, inhibits cell proliferation and decreases cell survival. The mechanisms responsible for the protective effect of caffeine in pulmonary oxygen toxicity remain largely unknown. A549 and MLE 12 pulmonary epithelial cells were exposed to hyperoxia or maintained in room air, in the presence of different concentrations (0, 0.05, 0.1 and 1 mM) of caffeine. Caffeine had a differential concentration-specific effect on cell cycle progression, oxidative stress and viability, with 1 mM concentration being deleterious and 0.05 mM being protective. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation during hyperoxia was modulated by caffeine in a similar concentration-specific manner. Caffeine at 1 mM, but not at the 0.05 mM concentration decreased the G2 arrest in these cells. Taken together this study shows the novel funding that caffeine has a concentration-specific effect on cell cycle regulation, ROS generation, and cell survival in hyperoxic conditions.

  15. Caffeine intake from food and beverage sources and trends among children and adolescents in the United States: review of national quantitative studies from 1999 to 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Namanjeet; Herrick, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing concern about potential adverse effects of caffeine in children. Our understanding of caffeine intake relies on studies dating to the late 1990s. This article synthesizes information from national studies since then to describe caffeine consumption, its association with sociodemographic factors, key dietary sources including caffeine-containing energy drinks (CCEDs), and trends in caffeine intake and sources among US children. Findings from the Kanter Worldpanel (KWP) Beverage Consumption Panel and the NHANES showed that caffeine consumption prevalence was generally consistent across studies and over time; more than one-half of 2- to 5-y-olds and ∼75% of older children (>5 y) consumed caffeine. The usual intakes of caffeine were 25 and 50 mg/d for children and adolescents aged 2-11 and 12-17 y, respectively (NHANES 2007-2010). Caffeine consumption correlated with age and was higher in non-Hispanic white children. The key sources of caffeine were soda and tea as well as flavored dairy (for children aged <12 y) and coffee (for those aged ≥12 y). The frequency of CCED use varied (2-30%) depending on study setting, methods, and demographic characteristics. A statistically significant but small decline in caffeine intake was noted in children overall during the 10- to 12-y period examined; intakes remained stable among older children (≥12 y). A significant increasing trend in CCED and coffee consumption and a decline in soda intake were noted (1999-2010). In 2009-2010, 10% of 12- to 19-y-olds and 10-25% of caffeine consumers (aged 12-19 y) had intakes exceeding Canadian maximal guidelines. Continued monitoring can help better understand changes in caffeine consumption patterns of youth. PMID:25593149

  16. Caffeine Intake from Food and Beverage Sources and Trends among Children and Adolescents in the United States: Review of National Quantitative Studies from 1999 to 201112345

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahluwalia, Namanjeet; Herrick, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing concern about potential adverse effects of caffeine in children. Our understanding of caffeine intake relies on studies dating to the late 1990s. This article synthesizes information from national studies since then to describe caffeine consumption, its association with sociodemographic factors, key dietary sources including caffeine-containing energy drinks (CCEDs), and trends in caffeine intake and sources among US children. Findings from the Kanter Worldpanel (KWP) Beverage Consumption Panel and the NHANES showed that caffeine consumption prevalence was generally consistent across studies and over time; more than one-half of 2- to 5-y-olds and ∼75% of older children (>5 y) consumed caffeine. The usual intakes of caffeine were 25 and 50 mg/d for children and adolescents aged 2–11 and 12–17 y, respectively (NHANES 2007–2010). Caffeine consumption correlated with age and was higher in non-Hispanic white children. The key sources of caffeine were soda and tea as well as flavored dairy (for children aged <12 y) and coffee (for those aged ≥12 y). The frequency of CCED use varied (2–30%) depending on study setting, methods, and demographic characteristics. A statistically significant but small decline in caffeine intake was noted in children overall during the 10- to 12-y period examined; intakes remained stable among older children (≥12 y). A significant increasing trend in CCED and coffee consumption and a decline in soda intake were noted (1999–2010). In 2009–2010, 10% of 12- to 19-y-olds and 10–25% of caffeine consumers (aged 12–19 y) had intakes exceeding Canadian maximal guidelines. Continued monitoring can help better understand changes in caffeine consumption patterns of youth. PMID:25593149

  17. Increased DNA methylation of scavenger receptor class B type I contributes to inhibitory effects of prenatal caffeine ingestion on cholesterol uptake and steroidogenesis in fetal adrenals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Dong-Mei; He, Zheng; Ma, Liang-Peng; Wang, Lin-Long [Department of Pharmacology, Wuhan University School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Ping, Jie, E-mail: pingjie@whu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, Wuhan University School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory of Developmentally Originated Diseases, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China); Wang, Hui [Department of Pharmacology, Wuhan University School of Basic Medical Sciences, Wuhan 430071 (China); Hubei Provincial Key Laboratory of Developmentally Originated Diseases, Wuhan 430071 (China); Research Center of Food and Drug Evaluation, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430071 (China)

    2015-06-01

    Steroid hormones synthesized from cholesterol in the fetal adrenal are crucial for fetal development. We have observed the inhibited fetal adrenal corticosterone synthesis and increased intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) rate in rats under prenatal caffeine ingestion. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of prenatal caffeine ingestion on cholesterol supply in fetal adrenal steroidogenesis in rats and explore the underlying epigenetic mechanisms. Pregnant Wistar rats were treated with 60 mg/kg·d caffeine from gestational day (GD) 7 to GD17. Histological changes of fetal adrenals and increased IUGR rates were observed in the caffeine group. There were significantly decreased steroid hormone contents and cholesterol supply in caffeine-treated fetal adrenals. Data from the gene expression array suggested that prenatal caffeine ingestion caused increased expression of genes related to DNA methylation and decreased expression of genes related to cholesterol uptake. The following conjoint analysis of DNA methylation array with these differentially expressed genes suggested that scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) may play an important role in caffeine-induced cholesterol supply deficiency. Moreover, real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemical detection certified the inhibitory effects of caffeine on both mRNA expression and protein expression of SR-BI in the fetal adrenal. And the increased DNA methylation frequency in the proximal promoter of SR-BI was confirmed by bisulfite-sequencing PCR. In conclusion, prenatal caffeine ingestion can induce DNA hypermethylation of the SR-BI promoter in the rat fetal adrenal. These effects may lead to decreased SR-BI expression and cholesterol uptake, which inhibits steroidogenesis in the fetal adrenal. - Highlights: • Prenatal caffeine ingestion inhibits steroid hormone production in the fetal adrenal. • Prenatal caffeine ingestion inhibits cholesterol uptake in the fetal adrenal. • Prenatal caffeine

  18. Increased DNA methylation of scavenger receptor class B type I contributes to inhibitory effects of prenatal caffeine ingestion on cholesterol uptake and steroidogenesis in fetal adrenals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steroid hormones synthesized from cholesterol in the fetal adrenal are crucial for fetal development. We have observed the inhibited fetal adrenal corticosterone synthesis and increased intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) rate in rats under prenatal caffeine ingestion. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of prenatal caffeine ingestion on cholesterol supply in fetal adrenal steroidogenesis in rats and explore the underlying epigenetic mechanisms. Pregnant Wistar rats were treated with 60 mg/kg·d caffeine from gestational day (GD) 7 to GD17. Histological changes of fetal adrenals and increased IUGR rates were observed in the caffeine group. There were significantly decreased steroid hormone contents and cholesterol supply in caffeine-treated fetal adrenals. Data from the gene expression array suggested that prenatal caffeine ingestion caused increased expression of genes related to DNA methylation and decreased expression of genes related to cholesterol uptake. The following conjoint analysis of DNA methylation array with these differentially expressed genes suggested that scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) may play an important role in caffeine-induced cholesterol supply deficiency. Moreover, real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemical detection certified the inhibitory effects of caffeine on both mRNA expression and protein expression of SR-BI in the fetal adrenal. And the increased DNA methylation frequency in the proximal promoter of SR-BI was confirmed by bisulfite-sequencing PCR. In conclusion, prenatal caffeine ingestion can induce DNA hypermethylation of the SR-BI promoter in the rat fetal adrenal. These effects may lead to decreased SR-BI expression and cholesterol uptake, which inhibits steroidogenesis in the fetal adrenal. - Highlights: • Prenatal caffeine ingestion inhibits steroid hormone production in the fetal adrenal. • Prenatal caffeine ingestion inhibits cholesterol uptake in the fetal adrenal. • Prenatal caffeine

  19. Consumo de cafeína e prematuridade Caffeine intake and prematurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Adriana Gomes de Souza

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available A cafeína (1, 3, 7-trimetilxantina é uma metilxantina que facilmente atravessa a barreira placentária, com quantidades substanciais passando para o líquido amniótico, sangue do cordão umbilical, plasma e urina dos neonatos. As maiores fontes de cafeína são café, chá, chocolate e refrigerantes do tipo cola. Além disso, cerca de mil drogas prescritas e 2 mil drogas não prescritas contêm cafeína, e 25 dessas drogas podem ser usadas na gravidez. Embora estudos em animais indiquem que a cafeína leve à diminuição no crescimento intrauterino fetal, redução do peso ao nascer, reabsorção fetal e teratogênese, nos estudos epidemiológicos os achados são, ainda, inconclusivos. Pelo fato de os alimentos com cafeína serem amplamente consumidos na gravidez, é importante avaliar se o uso dessa substância está associado com a redução da idade gestacional. Este artigo examina o conhecimento atual do consumo de cafeína durante a gravidez, abordando os estudos epidemiológicos sobre a associação entre consumo de cafeína e prematuridade, as fontes de cafeína e seu consumo na gravidez, a bioquímica, a fisiopatologia e a plausibilidade biológica da associação e as principais limitações dos estudos sobre cafeína e prematuridade.Caffeine (1, 3, 7-trimethylxanthine is a methylxanthine that easily crosses the placental barrier, substantial amounts passing into the amniotic fluid, umbilical cord blood, and the plasma and urine of the neonates. The main sources of caffeine are coffee, tea, chocolate and cola soft drinks. Moreover, about 1000 prescribed drugs and 2000 non-prescribed drugs contain caffeine, and 25 of these drugs can be used during pregnancy. Although animal studies indicate that caffeine leads to a decrease in fetal intrauterine growth, low birth weight, fetal re-absorption and teratogenesis, these findings are still inconclusive in the epidemiological studies. Since foods containing caffeine are widely consumed

  20. Supraadditive formation of micronuclei in preimplantation mouse embryos in vitro after combined treatment with X-rays and caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The influence of caffeine (0.1 or 2 mM), X-rays (0.24 Gy or 0.94 Gy, or of a combination of both on the formation of micronuclei in early stages of preimplantation mouse embryos in vitro was studied. X-rays as well as caffeine induced micronuclei. The dose-effect curve after irradiation was linear for the dose range measured. Caffeine did not induce micronuclei if the concentration was 1 mM or less; between 1 mM and 7 mM, however, there was a linear increase in the number of micronuclei. A considerable enhancement of the number of radiation-induced micronuclei was observed when irradiation of the embryos was followed by a treatment with caffeine. Not only was the sum of the single effects exceeded by the combination effects, but the combination results even lay in the range of supraadditivity of the envelope of additivity