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Sample records for caffeine suppress cyclin

  1. Cyclin F suppresses B-Myb activity to promote cell cycle checkpoint control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Ditte Kjærsgaard; Hoffmann, Saskia; Ahlskog, Johanna K

    2015-01-01

    an important role in checkpoint control following ionizing radiation. Cyclin F-depleted cells initiate checkpoint signalling after ionizing radiation, but fail to maintain G2 phase arrest and progress into mitosis prematurely. Importantly, cyclin F suppresses the B-Myb-driven transcriptional programme...... that promotes accumulation of crucial mitosis-promoting proteins. Cyclin F interacts with B-Myb via the cyclin box domain. This interaction is important to suppress cyclin A-mediated phosphorylation of B-Myb, a key step in B-Myb activation. In summary, we uncover a regulatory mechanism linking the F-box protein...

  2. Berberine Suppresses Cyclin D1 Expression through Proteasomal Degradation in Human Hepatoma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ning Wang; Xuanbin Wang; Hor-Yue Tan; Sha Li; Chi Man Tsang; Sai-Wah Tsao; Yibin Feng

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to explore the underlying mechanism on berberine-induced Cyclin D1 degradation in human hepatic carcinoma. We observed that berberine could suppress both in vitro and in vivo expression of Cyclin D1 in hepatoma cells. Berberine exhibits dose- and time-dependent inhibition on Cyclin D1 expression in human hepatoma cell HepG2. Berberine increases the phosphorylation of Cyclin D1 at Thr286 site and potentiates Cyclin D1 nuclear export to cytoplasm for proteasomal degrada...

  3. Caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the jitters. Caffeine can also interfere with normal sleep. Caffeine sensitivity (the amount of caffeine that will produce an effect in someone) varies from person to person. On average, the smaller the person, the less caffeine needed ...

  4. Caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... mood. Caffeine is in tea, coffee, chocolate, many soft drinks, and pain relievers and other over-the-counter ... Teens usually get most of their caffeine from soft drinks and energy drinks. (In addition to caffeine, these ...

  5. Caffeine suppresses β-amyloid levels in plasma and brain of Alzheimer’s transgenic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Cao, Chuanhai; Cirrito, John R.; Lin, Xiaoyang; Wang, Lilly; Verges, Deborah K.; Dickson, Alexander; Mamcarz, Malgorzata; Zhang, Chi; Mori, Takashi; Arendash, Gary W.; Holtzman, David M.; Potter, Huntington

    2009-01-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies suggest that caffeine may be protective against Alzheimer’s Disease (AD). Supportive of this premise, our previous studies have shown that moderate caffeine administration protects/restores cognitive function and suppresses brain β-amyloid (Aβ) production in AD transgenic mice. In the present study, we report that acute caffeine administration to both young adult and aged AD transgenic mice rapidly reduces Aβ levels in both brain interstitial fluid and plasma with...

  6. Berberine Suppresses Cyclin D1 Expression through Proteasomal Degradation in Human Hepatoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to explore the underlying mechanism on berberine-induced Cyclin D1 degradation in human hepatic carcinoma. We observed that berberine could suppress both in vitro and in vivo expression of Cyclin D1 in hepatoma cells. Berberine exhibits dose- and time-dependent inhibition on Cyclin D1 expression in human hepatoma cell HepG2. Berberine increases the phosphorylation of Cyclin D1 at Thr286 site and potentiates Cyclin D1 nuclear export to cytoplasm for proteasomal degradation. In addition, berberine recruits the Skp, Cullin, F-box containing complex-β-Transducin Repeat Containing Protein (SCFβ-TrCP complex to facilitate Cyclin D1 ubiquitin-proteasome dependent proteolysis. Knockdown of β-TrCP blocks Cyclin D1 turnover induced by berberine; blocking the protein degradation induced by berberine in HepG2 cells increases tumor cell resistance to berberine. Our results shed light on berberine′s potential as an anti-tumor agent for clinical cancer therapy.

  7. Caffeine suppresses amyloid-beta levels in plasma and brain of Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chuanhai; Cirrito, John R; Lin, Xiaoyang; Wang, Li; Wang, Lilly; Verges, Deborah K; Dickson, Alexander; Mamcarz, Malgorzata; Zhang, Chi; Mori, Takashi; Arendash, Gary W; Holtzman, David M; Potter, Huntington

    2009-01-01

    Recent epidemiologic studies suggest that caffeine may be protective against Alzheimer's disease (AD). Supportive of this premise, our previous studies have shown that moderate caffeine administration protects/restores cognitive function and suppresses brain amyloid-beta (Abeta) production in AD transgenic mice. In the present study, we report that acute caffeine administration to both young adult and aged AD transgenic mice rapidly reduces Abeta levels in both brain interstitial fluid and plasma without affecting Abeta elimination. Long-term oral caffeine treatment to aged AD mice provided not only sustained reductions in plasma Abeta, but also decreases in both soluble and deposited Abeta in hippocampus and cortex. Irrespective of caffeine treatment, plasma Abeta levels did not correlate with brain Abeta levels or with cognitive performance in individual aged AD mice. Although higher plasma caffeine levels were strongly associated with lower plasma Abeta1-40 levels in aged AD mice, plasma caffeine levels were also not linked to cognitive performance. Plasma caffeine and theophylline levels were tightly correlated, both being associated with reduced inflammatory cytokine levels in hippocampus. Our conclusion is two-fold: first, that both plasma and brain Abeta levels are reduced by acute or chronic caffeine administration in several AD transgenic lines and ages, indicating a therapeutic value of caffeine against AD; and second, that plasma Abeta levels are not an accurate index of brain Abeta levels/deposition or cognitive performance in aged AD mice.

  8. Caffein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørager, Charlotte Buchard; Jensen, Martin Bach; Madsen, Mogens Rørbæk

    2005-01-01

    /kg) can increase the endurance of athletes engaged in running, bicycling, swimming and other endurance sports. Caffeine is used both in training and in competitions, and the International Olympic Commitée (IOC) has included caffeine as a drug used for doping. There are several theories about caffeine...

  9. miR-340 inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation by suppressing CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2

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    Li, Xuesong; Gong, Xuhai [Department of Neurology, Daqing Oilfield General Hospital, Daqing, Heilongjiang 163001 (China); Chen, Jing [Department of Neurology, Daqing Longnan Hospital, Daqing, Heilongjiang, 163001 China (China); Zhang, Jinghui [Department of Cardiology, The Fourth Hospital of Harbin City, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150026 (China); Sun, Jiahang [Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150086 (China); Guo, Mian, E-mail: guomian_hyd@163.com [Department of Neurosurgery, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150086 (China)

    2015-05-08

    Glioblastoma development is often associated with alteration in the activity and expression of cell cycle regulators, such as cyclin-dependent kinases (CKDs) and cyclins, resulting in aberrant cell proliferation. Recent studies have highlighted the pivotal roles of miRNAs in controlling the development and growth of glioblastoma. Here, we provide evidence for a function of miR-340 in the inhibition of glioblastoma cell proliferation. We found that miR-340 is downregulated in human glioblastoma tissue samples and several established glioblastoma cell lines. Proliferation and neurosphere formation assays revealed that miR-340 plays an oncosuppressive role in glioblastoma, and that its ectopic expression causes significant defect in glioblastoma cell growth. Further, using bioinformatics, luciferase assay and western blot, we found that miR-340 specifically targets the 3′UTRs of CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2, leading to the arrest of glioblastoma cells in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase. Confirming these results, we found that re-introducing CDK6, cyclin-D1 or cyclin-D2 expression partially, but significantly, rescues cells from the suppression of cell proliferation and cell cycle arrest mediated by miR-340. Collectively, our results demonstrate that miR-340 plays a tumor-suppressive role in glioblastoma and may be useful as a diagnostic biomarker and/or a therapeutic avenue for glioblastoma. - Highlights: • miR-340 is downregulated in glioblastoma samples and cell lines. • miR-340 inhibits glioblastoma cell proliferation. • miR-340 directly targets CDK6, cyclin-D1, and cyclin-D2. • miR-340 regulates glioblastoma cell proliferation via CDK6, cyclin-D1 and cyclin-D2.

  10. Cyclin G2 suppresses estrogen-mediated osteogenesis through inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

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    Jinlan Gao

    Full Text Available Estrogen plays an important role in the maintenance of bone formation, and deficiency in the production of estrogen is directly linked to postmenopausal osteoporosis. To date, the underlying mechanisms of estrogen-mediated osteogenic differentiation are not well understood. In this study, a pluripotent mesenchymal precursor cell line C2C12 was used to induce osteogenic differentiation and subjected to detection of gene expressions or to manipulation of cyclin G2 expressions. C57BL/6 mice were used to generate bilateral ovariectomized and sham-operated mice for analysis of bone mineral density and protein expression. We identified cyclin G2, an unconventional member of cyclin, is involved in osteoblast differentiation regulated by estrogen in vivo and in vitro. In addition, the data showed that ectopic expression of cyclin G2 suppressed expression of osteoblast transcription factor Runx2 and osteogenic differentiation marker genes, as well as ALP activity and in vitro extracellular matrix mineralization. Mechanistically, Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is essential for cyclin G2 to inhibit osteogenic differentiation. To the best of our knowledge, the current study presents the first evidence that cyclin G2 serves as a negative regulator of both osteogenesis and Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Most importantly, the basal and 17β-estradiol-induced osteogenic differentiation was restored by overexpression of cyclin G2. These results taken together suggest that cyclin G2 may function as an endogenous suppressor of estrogen-induced osteogenic differentiation through inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  11. Caffeine-Induced Suppression of GABAergic Inhibition and Calcium-Independent Metaplasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masako Isokawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available GABAergic inhibition plays a critical role in the regulation of neuron excitability; thus, it is subject to modulations by many factors. Recent evidence suggests the elevation of intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i and calcium-dependent signaling molecules underlie the modulations. Caffeine induces a release of calcium from intracellular stores. We tested whether caffeine modulated GABAergic transmission by increasing [Ca2+]i. A brief local puff-application of caffeine to hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells transiently suppressed GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs by 73.2 ± 6.98%. Time course of suppression and the subsequent recovery of IPSCs resembled DSI (depolarization-induced suppression of inhibition, mediated by endogenous cannabinoids that require a [Ca2+]i rise. However, unlike DSI, caffeine-induced suppression of IPSCs (CSI persisted in the absence of a [Ca2+]i rise. Intracellular applications of BAPTA and ryanodine (which blocks caffeine-induced calcium release from intracellular stores failed to prevent the generation of CSI. Surprisingly, ruthenium red, an inhibitor of multiple calcium permeable/release channels including those of stores, induced metaplasticity by amplifying the magnitude of CSI independently of calcium. This metaplasticity was accompanied with the generation of a large inward current. Although ionic basis of this inward current is undetermined, the present result demonstrates that caffeine has a robust Ca2+-independent inhibitory action on GABAergic inhibition and causes metaplasticity by opening plasma membrane channels.

  12. Placental Estrogen Suppresses Cyclin D1 Expression in the Nonhuman Primate Fetal Adrenal Cortex*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Adina; Aberdeen, Graham W.; Pepe, Gerald J.

    2014-01-01

    We have previously shown that estrogen selectively suppresses growth of the fetal zone of the baboon fetal adrenal cortex, which produces the C19-steroid precursors, eg, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, which are aromatized to estrogen within the placenta. In the present study, we determined whether fetal adrenal expression of cell cycle regulators are altered by estrogen and thus provide a mechanism by which estrogen regulates fetal adrenocortical development. Cyclin D1 mRNA levels in the whole fetal adrenal were increased 50% (P < .05), and the number of cells in the fetal adrenal definitive zone expressing cyclin D1 protein was increased 2.5-fold (P < .05), whereas the total number of cells in the fetal zone and fetal serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels were elevated 2-fold (P < .05) near term in baboons in which fetal serum estradiol levels were decreased by 95% (P < .05) after maternal administration of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and restored to normal by concomitant administration of letrozole plus estradiol throughout second half of gestation. However, fetal adrenocortical expression of cyclin D2, the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-2, Cdk4, and Cdk6, and Cdk regulatory proteins p27Kip1 and p57Kip2 were not changed by letrozole or letrozole plus estradiol administration. We suggest that estrogen controls the growth of the fetal zone of the fetal adrenal by down-regulating cyclin D1 expression and thus proliferation of progenitor cells within the definitive zone that migrate to the fetal zone. We propose that estrogen restrains growth and function of the fetal zone via cyclin D1 to maintain estrogen levels in a physiological range during primate pregnancy. PMID:25247468

  13. Placental estrogen suppresses cyclin D1 expression in the nonhuman primate fetal adrenal cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Adina; Aberdeen, Graham W; Pepe, Gerald J; Albrecht, Eugene D

    2014-12-01

    We have previously shown that estrogen selectively suppresses growth of the fetal zone of the baboon fetal adrenal cortex, which produces the C19-steroid precursors, eg, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, which are aromatized to estrogen within the placenta. In the present study, we determined whether fetal adrenal expression of cell cycle regulators are altered by estrogen and thus provide a mechanism by which estrogen regulates fetal adrenocortical development. Cyclin D1 mRNA levels in the whole fetal adrenal were increased 50% (P < .05), and the number of cells in the fetal adrenal definitive zone expressing cyclin D1 protein was increased 2.5-fold (P < .05), whereas the total number of cells in the fetal zone and fetal serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels were elevated 2-fold (P < .05) near term in baboons in which fetal serum estradiol levels were decreased by 95% (P < .05) after maternal administration of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole and restored to normal by concomitant administration of letrozole plus estradiol throughout second half of gestation. However, fetal adrenocortical expression of cyclin D2, the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk)-2, Cdk4, and Cdk6, and Cdk regulatory proteins p27(Kip1) and p57(Kip2) were not changed by letrozole or letrozole plus estradiol administration. We suggest that estrogen controls the growth of the fetal zone of the fetal adrenal by down-regulating cyclin D1 expression and thus proliferation of progenitor cells within the definitive zone that migrate to the fetal zone. We propose that estrogen restrains growth and function of the fetal zone via cyclin D1 to maintain estrogen levels in a physiological range during primate pregnancy.

  14. Caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a bitter substance found in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate, kola nuts, and certain medicines. It has many effects on the body's metabolism, including stimulating the central nervous system. This can make you more alert and give you a boost of energy. For most people, the amount of caffeine in ...

  15. Berberine inhibits cyclin D1 expression via suppressed binding of AP-1 transcription factors to CCND1 AP-1 motif

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye LUO; Yu HAO; Tai-ping SHI; Wei-wei DENG; Na LI

    2008-01-01

    Aim: To verify the suppressive effect of berberine on the proliferation of the human pulmonary giant cell carcinoma cell line PG and to demonstrate the mecha-nisms behind the antitumoral effects of berberine. Methods: The proliferative effects of PG cells were detected by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide colorimetry. The cell cycle was examined by flow cytometry. The expression level of cyclin D1 was detected by RT-PCR. The activities of the activating protein-1 (AP-1) and NF-κB signaling pathways related to cyclin D1 were examined by luciferase assay. The cytoplasmic level of c-Jun was detected by Western blot analysis. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay was used to examiae the binding of transcription factors to the cyclin D1 gene (CCNDl) AP-1 motif. Results: The results showed that the proliferation of PG cells treated with different concentrations (10, 20, and 40 μg/mL) of berberine for 24 and 48 h was suppressed significantly compared to the control group. After treatment with berberine, the proportion of PG cells at the G0/G1 phase increased, while cells at the S and G2/M phases decreased. Berberine could inhibit the expression of cyclin D1 in PG cells. Berberine inhibited the activity of the AP-1 signaling pathway, but had no significant effect on the NF-κB signaling pathway. Berberine suppressed the expression of c-Jun and decreased the binding of tran-scription factors to the CCND1 AP-1 motif. Conclusion: Berberine suppresses the activity of the AP-1 signaling pathway and decreases the binding of transcrip-tion factors to the CCND1 AP-1 motif. This is one of the important mechanisms behind the antitumoral effects of berberine as a regulator of cyclin D1.

  16. A chrysin derivative suppresses skin cancer growth by inhibiting cyclin-dependent kinases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Haidan; Liu, Kangdong; Huang, Zunnan; Park, Chan-Mi; Thimmegowda, N R; Jang, Jae-Hyuk; Ryoo, In-Ja; He, Long; Kim, Sun-Ok; Oi, Naomi; Lee, Ki Won; Soung, Nak-Kyun; Bode, Ann M; Yang, Yifeng; Zhou, Xinmin; Erikson, Raymond L; Ahn, Jong-Seog; Hwang, Joonsung; Kim, Kyoon Eon; Dong, Zigang; Kim, Bo-Yeon

    2013-09-06

    Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone), a natural flavonoid widely distributed in plants, reportedly has chemopreventive properties against various cancers. However, the anticancer activity of chrysin observed in in vivo studies has been disappointing. Here, we report that a chrysin derivative, referred to as compound 69407, more strongly inhibited EGF-induced neoplastic transformation of JB6 P(+) cells compared with chrysin. It attenuated cell cycle progression of EGF-stimulated cells at the G1 phase and inhibited the G1/S transition. It caused loss of retinoblastoma phosphorylation at both Ser-795 and Ser-807/811, the preferred sites phosphorylated by Cdk4/6 and Cdk2, respectively. It also suppressed anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of A431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells. Compound 69407 reduced tumor growth in the A431 mouse xenograft model and retinoblastoma phosphorylation at Ser-795 and Ser-807/811. Immunoprecipitation kinase assay results showed that compound 69407 attenuated endogenous Cdk4 and Cdk2 kinase activities in EGF-stimulated JB6 P(+) cells. Pulldown and in vitro kinase assay results indicated that compound 69407 directly binds with Cdk2 and Cdk4 in an ATP-independent manner and inhibited their kinase activities. A binding model between compound 69407 and a crystal structure of Cdk2 predicted that compound 69407 was located inside the Cdk2 allosteric binding site. The binding was further verified by a point mutation binding assay. Overall results indicated that compound 69407 is an ATP-noncompetitive cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor with anti-tumor effects, which acts by binding inside the Cdk2 allosteric pocket. This study provides new insights for creating a general pharmacophore model to design and develop novel ATP-noncompetitive agents with chemopreventive or chemotherapeutic potency.

  17. PAC exhibits potent anti-colon cancer properties through targeting cyclin D1 and suppressing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qasem, Abeer; Al-Howail, Huda A; Al-Swailem, Mashael; Al-Mazrou, Amer; Al-Otaibi, Basem; Al-Jammaz, Ibrahim; Al-Khalaf, Huda H; Aboussekhra, Abdelilah

    2016-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a major cause of cancer morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although response rates and overall survival have been improved in recent years, resistance to multiple drug combinations is inevitable. Therefore, the development of more efficient drugs, with fewer side effects is urgently needed. To this end, we have investigated in the present report the effect of PAC, a novel cucumin analogue, on CRC cells both in vitro and in vivo. We have shown that PAC induces apoptosis, mainly via the internal mitochondrial route, and inhibits cell proliferation through delaying the cell cycle at G2/M phase. Interestingly, the pro-apoptotic effect was mediated through STAT3-dependent down-regulation of cyclin D1 and its downstream target survivin. Indeed, change in the expression level of cyclin D1 modulated the expression of survivin and the response of CRC cells to PAC. Furthermore, using the ChIP assay, we have shown PAC-dependent reduction in the binding of STAT3 to the cyclin D1 promoter in vivo. Additionally, PAC suppressed the epithelial-to-mesenchymal process through down-regulating the mesenchymal markers (N-cadherin, vimentin and Twist1) and inhibiting the invasion/migration abilities of the CRC cells via repressing the pro-migration/invasion protein kinases AKT and ERK1/2. In addition, PAC inhibited tumor growth and repressed the JAK2/STAT3, AKT/mTOR and MEK/ERK pathways as well as their common downstream effectors cyclin D1 and survivin in humanized CRC xenografts. Collectively, these results indicate that PAC has potent anti-CRC effects, and therefore could constitute an effective alternative chemotherapeutic agent, which may consolidate the adjuvant treatment of colon cancer.

  18. Caffeine Suppresses Apoptosis of Bladder Cancer RT4 Cells in Response to Ionizing Radiation by Inhibiting Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-Chk2-p53 Axis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhe-Wei Zhang; Jing Xiao; Wei Luo; Bo-Han Wang; Ji-Min Chen

    2015-01-01

    Background:Caffeine suppresses ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3 related and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) activities;ATM is the major kinase for DNA damage detection.This study aimed to investigate the effects of caffeine on DNA damage responses in cells from the bladder cancer cell line RT4 those were exposed to ionizing radiation (IR).Methods:Immunofluorescent staining was performed to investigate changes in the proteins involved in DNA damage responses with or without caffeine.A mouse xenograft model was used to study the effects of caffeine on the DNA damage responses.Western blotting was used to investigate the effects of caffeine pretreatment on the ATM-Chk2-p53-Puma axis,while real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assessed changes in messenger RNA levels of p53 and downstream targets responding to IR.Finally,terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-dUTP nick end labeling assay.Western blotting and colony formation assay were used to measure the effects of caffeine on radiation-related apoptosis.All of the data were analyzed with a two-tailed Student's t-test.Results:Immunofluorescent staining showed that caffeine pretreatment profoundly suppressed the formation ofγH2AXand p53-binding protein 1 foci in RT4 cells in response to irradiation.Cellular and animal experiments suggested that this suppression was mediated by suppression of the ATM-Chk2-p53-Puma DNA damage-signaling axis.RT-PCR indicated caffeine also attenuated transactivation of p53 and p53-inducible genes.The colony formation assay revealed that caffeine displayed radioprotective effects on RT4 cells in response to low-dose radiation compared to the radiosensitization effects on T24 cells.Conclusion:Caffeine may inhibit IR-related apoptosis of bladder cancer RT4 cells by suppressing activation of the ATM-Chk2-p53-Puma axis.

  19. Caffeine Suppresses Apoptosis of Bladder Cancer RT4 Cells in Response to Ionizing Radiation by Inhibiting Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated-Chk2-p53 Axis

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    Zhe-Wei Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caffeine suppresses ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3 related and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM activities; ATM is the major kinase for DNA damage detection. This study aimed to investigate the effects of caffeine on DNA damage responses in cells from the bladder cancer cell line RT4 those were exposed to ionizing radiation (IR. Methods: Immunofluorescent staining was performed to investigate changes in the proteins involved in DNA damage responses with or without caffeine. A mouse xenograft model was used to study the effects of caffeine on the DNA damage responses. Western blotting was used to investigate the effects of caffeine pretreatment on the ATM-Chk2-p53-Puma axis, while real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assessed changes in messenger RNA levels of p53 and downstream targets responding to IR. Finally, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-dUTP nick end labeling assay. Western blotting and colony formation assay were used to measure the effects of caffeine on radiation-related apoptosis. All of the data were analyzed with a two-tailed Student′s t-test. Results: Immunofluorescent staining showed that caffeine pretreatment profoundly suppressed the formation of γH2AXand p53-binding protein 1 foci in RT4 cells in response to irradiation. Cellular and animal experiments suggested that this suppression was mediated by suppression of the ATM-Chk2-p53-Puma DNA damage-signaling axis. RT-PCR indicated caffeine also attenuated transactivation of p53 and p53-inducible genes. The colony formation assay revealed that caffeine displayed radioprotective effects on RT4 cells in response to low-dose radiation compared to the radiosensitization effects on T24 cells. Conclusion: Caffeine may inhibit IR-related apoptosis of bladder cancer RT4 cells by suppressing activation of the ATM-Chk2-p53-Puma axis.

  20. Ionizing Radiation–Inducible miR-27b Suppresses Leukemia Proliferation via Targeting Cyclin A2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Bo; Li, Dongping; Kovalchuk, Anna; Litvinov, Dmitry; Kovalchuk, Olga, E-mail: olga.kovalchuk@uleth.ca

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Ionizing radiation is a common carcinogen that is important for the development of leukemia. However, the underlying epigenetic mechanisms remain largely unknown. The goal of the study was to explore microRNAome alterations induced by ionizing radiation (IR) in murine thymus, and to determine the role of IR-inducible microRNA (miRNA/miR) in the development of leukemia. Methods and Materials: We used the well-established C57BL/6 mouse model and miRNA microarray profiling to identify miRNAs that are differentially expressed in murine thymus in response to irradiation. TIB152 human leukemia cell line was used to determine the role of estrogen receptor–α (ERα) in miR-27b transcription. The biological effects of ectopic miR-27b on leukemogenesis were measured by western immunoblotting, cell viability, apoptosis, and cell cycle analyses. Results: Here, we have shown that IR triggers the differential expression of miR-27b in murine thymus tissue in a dose-, time- and sex-dependent manner. miR-27b was significantly down-regulated in leukemia cell lines CCL119 and TIB152. Interestingly, ERα was overexpressed in those 2 cell lines, and it was inversely correlated with miR-27b expression. Therefore, we used TIB152 as a model system to determine the role of ERα in miR-27b expression and the contribution of miR-27b to leukemogenesis. β-Estradiol caused a rapid and transient reduction in miR-27b expression reversed by either ERα-neutralizing antibody or ERK1/2 inhibitor. Ectopic expression of miR-27b remarkably suppressed TIB152 cell proliferation, at least in part, by inducing S-phase arrest. In addition, it attenuated the expression of cyclin A2, although it had no effect on the levels of PCNA, PPARγ, CDK2, p21, p27, p-p53, and cleaved caspase-3. Conclusion: Our data reveal that β-estradiol/ERα signaling may contribute to the down-regulation of miR-27b in acute leukemia cell lines through the ERK1/2 pathway, and that miR-27b may function as a tumor

  1. Caffeine, Through Adenosine A3 Receptor-Mediated Actions, Suppresses Amyloid-β Protein Precursor Internalization and Amyloid-β Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shanshan; Geiger, Nicholas H; Soliman, Mahmoud L; Hui, Liang; Geiger, Jonathan D; Chen, Xuesong

    2015-01-01

    Intraneuronal accumulation and extracellular deposition of amyloid-β (Aβ) protein continues to be implicated in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), be it familial in origin or sporadic in nature. Aβ is generated intracellularly following endocytosis of amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP), and, consequently, factors that suppress AβPP internalization may decrease amyloidogenic processing of AβPP. Here we tested the hypothesis that caffeine decreases Aβ generation by suppressing AβPP internalization in primary cultured neurons. Caffeine concentration-dependently blocked low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol internalization and a specific adenosine A3 receptor (A3R) antagonist as well as siRNA knockdown of A3Rs mimicked the effects of caffeine on neuronal internalization of LDL cholesterol. Further implicating A3Rs were findings that a specific A3R agonist increased neuronal internalization of LDL cholesterol. In addition, caffeine as well as siRNA knockdown of A3Rs blocked the ability of LDL cholesterol to increase Aβ levels. Furthermore, caffeine blocked LDL cholesterol-induced decreases in AβPP protein levels in neuronal plasma membranes, increased surface expression of AβPP on neurons, and the A3R antagonist as well as siRNA knockdown of A3Rs mimicked the effects of caffeine on AβPP surface expression. Moreover, the A3R agonist decreased neuronal surface expression of AβPP. Our findings suggest that caffeine exerts protective effects against amyloidogenic processing of AβPP at least in part by suppressing A3R-mediated internalization of AβPP.

  2. Antitumor activity of Papua’s Myrmecodia pendans in human oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma cell line through induction of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 and suppression of cyclin E

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    Supriatno DRG

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (OTSCC is one of the most common cancers encountered in Indonesia, due to the prevalent habits of tobacco chewing, alcohol drinking and smoking. Oral tongue cancer is characterized by a high degree of local invasion and a high rate of metastasis to the cervical lymph nodes. Interestingly, treatment options for this cancer are limited. The aim of this study was to examine the antitumor activity of Papua’s Myrmecodia pendans (ant nest plant in a human oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma cell line (B88 and to explore the possible mechanism in it. In the present study, B88 cells were treated with various concentration of ethanol extract of Papua’s M. pendans. The results revealed that B88 cells treated with Papua’s M. pendans were remarkable suppressed in cell growth and cell invasion, and had a significant induction of apoptosis characterized by an increase in activation of caspase-3 and -9. Furthermore, up-regulation of p27Kip1 and down-regulation of cyclin E protein was detected in B88 cells treated with Papua’s M. pendans. These results indicated that Papua’s M. pendans exhibited a high potential antitumor activity in human oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma through induction of p27Kip1 and suppression of cycline E.

  3. The coffee diterpene kahweol suppresses the cell proliferation by inducing cyclin D1 proteasomal degradation via ERK1/2, JNK and GKS3β-dependent threonine-286 phosphorylation in human colorectal cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gwang Hun; Song, Hun Min; Jeong, Jin Boo

    2016-09-01

    Kahweol as a coffee-specific diterpene has been reported to exert anti-cancer properties. However, the mechanism responsible for the anti-cancer effects of kahweol is not fully understood. The main aim of this investigation was to determine the effect of kahweol on cell proliferation and the possible mechanisms in human colorectal cancer cells. Kahweol inhibited markedly the proliferation of human colorectal cancer cell lines such as HCT116, SW480. Kahweol decreased cyclin D1 protein level in HCT116 and SW480 cells. Contrast to protein levels, cyclin D1 mRNA level and promoter activity did not be changed by kahweol treatment. MG132 treatment attenuated kahweol-mediated cyclin D1 downregulation and the half-life of cyclin D1 was decreased in kahweol-treated cells. Kahweol increased phosphorylation of cyclin D1 at threonine-286 and a point mutation of threonine-286 to alanine attenuated cyclin D1 degradation by kahweol. Inhibition of ERK1/2 by PD98059, JNK by SP600125 or GSK3β by LiCl suppressed cyclin D1 phosphorylation and downregulation by kahweol. Furthermore, the inhibition of nuclear export by LMB attenuated cyclin D1 degradation by kahweol. In conclusion, kahweol-mediated cyclin D1 degradation may contribute to the inhibition of the proliferation in human colorectal cancer cells.

  4. Androgen suppresses the proliferation of androgen receptor-positive castration-resistant prostate cancer cells via inhibition of Cdk2, CyclinA, and Skp2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M Kokontis

    Full Text Available The majority of prostate cancer (PCa patient receiving androgen ablation therapy eventually develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC. We previously reported that androgen treatment suppresses Skp2 and c-Myc through androgen receptor (AR and induced G1 cell cycle arrest in androgen-independent LNCaP 104-R2 cells, a late stage CRPC cell line model. However, the mechanism of androgenic regulation of Skp2 in CRPC cells was not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the androgenic regulation of Skp2 in two AR-positive CRPC cell line models, the LNCaP 104-R1 and PC-3AR Cells. The former one is an early stage androgen-independent LNCaP cells, while the later one is PC-3 cells re-expressing either wild type AR or mutant LNCaP AR. Proliferation of LNCaP 104-R1 and PC-3AR cells is not dependent on but is suppressed by androgen. We observed in this study that androgen treatment reduced protein expression of Cdk2, Cdk7, Cyclin A, cyclin H, Skp2, c-Myc, and E2F-1; lessened phosphorylation of Thr14, Tyr15, and Thr160 on Cdk2; decreased activity of Cdk2; induced protein level of p27(Kip1; and caused G1 cell cycle arrest in LNCaP 104-R1 cells and PC-3AR cells. Overexpression of Skp2 protein in LNCaP 104-R1 or PC-3AR cells partially blocked accumulation of p27(Kip1 and increased Cdk2 activity under androgen treatment, which partially blocked the androgenic suppressive effects on proliferation and cell cycle. Analyzing on-line gene array data of 214 normal and PCa samples indicated that gene expression of Skp2, Cdk2, and cyclin A positively correlates to each other, while Cdk7 negatively correlates to these genes. These observations suggested that androgen suppresses the proliferation of CRPC cells partially through inhibition of Cyclin A, Cdk2, and Skp2.

  5. Androgen suppresses the proliferation of androgen receptor-positive castration-resistant prostate cancer cells via inhibition of Cdk2, CyclinA, and Skp2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokontis, John M; Lin, Hui-Ping; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Lin, Ching-Yu; Fukuchi, Junichi; Hiipakka, Richard A; Chung, Chi-Jung; Chan, Tzu-Min; Liao, Shutsung; Chang, Chung-Ho; Chuu, Chih-Pin

    2014-01-01

    The majority of prostate cancer (PCa) patient receiving androgen ablation therapy eventually develop castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). We previously reported that androgen treatment suppresses Skp2 and c-Myc through androgen receptor (AR) and induced G1 cell cycle arrest in androgen-independent LNCaP 104-R2 cells, a late stage CRPC cell line model. However, the mechanism of androgenic regulation of Skp2 in CRPC cells was not fully understood. In this study, we investigated the androgenic regulation of Skp2 in two AR-positive CRPC cell line models, the LNCaP 104-R1 and PC-3AR Cells. The former one is an early stage androgen-independent LNCaP cells, while the later one is PC-3 cells re-expressing either wild type AR or mutant LNCaP AR. Proliferation of LNCaP 104-R1 and PC-3AR cells is not dependent on but is suppressed by androgen. We observed in this study that androgen treatment reduced protein expression of Cdk2, Cdk7, Cyclin A, cyclin H, Skp2, c-Myc, and E2F-1; lessened phosphorylation of Thr14, Tyr15, and Thr160 on Cdk2; decreased activity of Cdk2; induced protein level of p27(Kip1); and caused G1 cell cycle arrest in LNCaP 104-R1 cells and PC-3AR cells. Overexpression of Skp2 protein in LNCaP 104-R1 or PC-3AR cells partially blocked accumulation of p27(Kip1) and increased Cdk2 activity under androgen treatment, which partially blocked the androgenic suppressive effects on proliferation and cell cycle. Analyzing on-line gene array data of 214 normal and PCa samples indicated that gene expression of Skp2, Cdk2, and cyclin A positively correlates to each other, while Cdk7 negatively correlates to these genes. These observations suggested that androgen suppresses the proliferation of CRPC cells partially through inhibition of Cyclin A, Cdk2, and Skp2.

  6. Caffeine suppresses exercise-enhanced long-term and location memory in middle-aged rats: Involvement of hippocampal Akt and CREB signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cechella, José L; Leite, Marlon R; da Rocha, Juliana T; Dobrachinski, Fernando; Gai, Bibiana M; Soares, Félix A A; Bresciani, Guilherme; Royes, Luiz F F; Zeni, Gilson

    2014-11-05

    The cognitive function decline is closely related with brain changes generated by age. The ability of caffeine and exercise to prevent memory impairment has been reported in animal models and humans. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether swimming exercise and caffeine administration enhance memory in middle-aged Wistar rats. Male Wistar rats (18months) received caffeine at a dose of 30mg/kg, 5days per week by a period of 4weeks. Animals were subjected to swimming training with a workload (3% of body weight, 20min per day for 4weeks). After 4weeks, the object recognition test (ORT) and the object location test (OLT) were performed. The results of this study demonstrated that caffeine suppressed exercise-enhanced long-term (ORT) and spatial (OLT) memory in middle-aged and this effect may be related to a decrease in hippocampal p-CREB signaling. This study also provided evidence that the effects of this protocol on memory were not accompanied by alterations in the levels of activated Akt. The [(3)H] glutamate uptake was reduced in hippocampus of rats administered with caffeine and submitted to swimming protocol.

  7. Citrus auraptene suppresses cyclin D1 and significantly delays N-methyl nitrosourea induced mammary carcinogenesis in female Sprague-Dawley rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grand Robert

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is a major problem in the United States leading to tens of thousands of deaths each year. Although citrus auraptene suppresses cancer in numerous rodent models, its role in breast cancer prevention previously has not been reported. Thus, our goal was to determine the anticarcinogenic effects of auraptene against breast cancer. Methods The effects of auraptene on cell proliferation of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast carcinoma cells in culture was assessed by measuring metabolism of a substrate to a formazan dye. Dietary effects of auraptene on tumor incidence, multiplicity and latency were studied in the N-methyl nitrosourea (MNU induced mammary carcinogenesis model in female Sprague Dawley rats. The concentration of auraptene in rat tissues was analyzed by reverse phase HPLC. Cyclin D1 expression in MCF-7 cells and rat tumors was measured by western blot. Results Auraptene (500 ppm significantly delayed median time to tumor by 39 days compared to the MNU only group (p Conclusion Overall, these observations suggest that the predominant effect of auraptene was to delay the development of tumors possibly through the suppression of cyclin D1 expression. These results point to the potential chemopreventive effects of auraptene in mammary carcinogenesis.

  8. Long-term stable expression of antisense cDNA of cyclin B1 profoundly inhibits the proliferation of tumor cells and suppresses tumorigenicity in implanted mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Tao; SU Xiao-mei; ZHANG Ling; LI Ji-cheng; WEI Dong; WEI Yu-quan; ZHANG Ru; CHENG Peng; CHEN Xian-cheng; LIU Huan-yi

    2008-01-01

    Background Cyclin B1 (CLB1) is necessary for mitotic initiation in mammalian cells and plays important roles in cancer development. Therefore, a potential strategy in cancer therapy is to suppress the activity of CLB1 by delivering antisense constructs of CLB1 into tumor cells. In previous CLB1 studies, antisense constructs with a short half life were often used and these constructs might not persistently inhibit CLB1.Methods We successfully created a recombinant plasmid encoding the full-length antisense cDNA of mouse cyclin B1 (AS-mCLB1) and transfected this construct to the murine Lewis lung carcinoma (LL/2) and CT-26 colon carcinoma (CT-26) cells. We isolated clones of LL/2 and CT-26 transfectants with stable expression of AS-mGLB1. Reverse transcriptional polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot were applied to detect the expression of the mRNA and protein levels of CLB1. To further test the efficacy of this strategy in vivo, AS-mCLBl-expressing LL/2 and CT-26 transfectants were implanted into mice.Results We found the expression of the mRNA and protein levels of CLB1 decrease in these trensfectants. The inhibition of CLB1 caused prominent G1 arrest, abnormal morphology, retarded cell growth and an increase in apoptosis. In AS-mCLB1-expressing LL/2 and CT-26 transfectants implanted mice, tumorigenicity was effectively suppressed compared with the controls. In addition, the expression of AS-mCLB1 also significantly increases the survival duration of implanted animals.Conclusion AS-mCLB1 is likely to be useful in future cancer therapy, which may be associated with its ability to down-regulate the expression of CLB1 and then induce G1 arrest and apoptosis in tumor cells.

  9. Caffeine Confusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that caffeine makes you feel hyper. Caffeine can boost a person's energy temporarily, but a lot of caffeine can also cause other, not-so-great effects: If you drink too much caffeine at one time, it can make you feel nervous or jumpy. Your hands may shake. Too much ...

  10. Combination of atorvastatin with sulindac or naproxen profoundly inhibits colonic adenocarcinomas by suppressing the p65/β-catenin/cyclin D1 signaling pathway in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Nanjoo; Reddy, Bandaru S; DeCastro, Andrew; Paul, Shiby; Lee, Hong Jin; Smolarek, Amanda K; So, Jae Young; Simi, Barbara; Wang, Chung Xiou; Janakiram, Naveena B; Steele, Vernon; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2011-11-01

    Evidence supports the protective role of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) and statins against colon cancer. Experiments were designed to evaluate the efficacies atorvastatin and NSAIDs administered individually and in combination against colon tumor formation. F344 rats were fed AIN-76A diet, and colon tumors were induced with azoxymethane. One week after the second azoxymethane treatment, groups of rats were fed diets containing atorvastatin (200 ppm), sulindac (100 ppm), naproxen (150 ppm), or their combinations with low-dose atorvastatin (100 ppm) for 45 weeks. Administration of atorvastatin at 200 ppm significantly suppressed both adenocarcinoma incidence (52% reduction, P = 0.005) and multiplicity (58% reduction, P = 0.008). Most importantly, colon tumor multiplicities were profoundly decreased (80%-85% reduction, P sulindac or naproxen. Also, a significant inhibition of colon tumor incidence was observed when given a low-dose atorvastatin with either sulindac (P = 0.001) or naproxen (P = 0.0005). Proliferation markers, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, cyclin D1, and β-catenin in tumors of rats exposed to sulindac, naproxen, atorvastatin, and/or combinations showed a significant suppression. Importantly, colon adenocarcinomas from atorvastatin and NSAIDs fed animals showed reduced key inflammatory markers, inducible nitric oxide synthase and COX-2, phospho-p65, as well as inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-4. Overall, this is the first report on the combination treatment using low-dose atorvastatin with either low-dose sulindac or naproxen, which greatly suppress the colon adenocarcinoma incidence and multiplicity. Our results suggest that low-dose atorvastatin with sulindac or naproxen might potentially be useful combinations for colon cancer prevention in humans.

  11. Cyclin-dependent kinase suppression by WEE1 kinase protects the genome through control of replication initiation and nucleotide consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beck, Halfdan; Nähse-Kumpf, Viola; Larsen, Marie Sofie Yoo;

    2012-01-01

    of replication. This leads to nucleotide shortage and reduces replication fork speed, which is followed by SLX4/MUS81-mediated DNA double-strand breakage. Fork speed is normalized and DNA double-strand break (DSB) formation is suppressed when CDT1, a key factor for replication initiation, is depleted...... that deregulated CDK activity, such as that occurring following inhibition of WEE1 kinase or activation of oncogenes, induces replication stress and loss of genomic integrity through increased firing of replication origins and subsequent nucleotide shortage....

  12. miR-1 suppresses the growth of esophageal squamous cell carcinoma in vivo and in vitro through the downregulation of MET, cyclin D1 and CDK4 expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    JIANG, SEN; ZHAO, CHAO; YANG, XIAODI; LI, XIANGYANG; PAN, QING; HUANG, HAIJIN; WEN, XUYANG; SHAN, HUSHENG; LI, QIANWEN; DU, YUNXIANG; ZHAO, YAPING

    2016-01-01

    Several aberrant microRNAs (miRNAs or miRs) have been implicated in esophageal cancer (EC), which is widely prevalent in China. However, their role in EC tumorigenesis has not yet been fully elucidated. In the present study, we determined that miR-1 was downregulated in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) tissues compared with adjacent non-neoplastic tissues using RT-qPCR, and confirmed this using an ESCC cell line. Using a nude mouse xenograft model, we confirmed that the re-expression of miR-1 significantly inhibited ESCC tumor growth. A tetrazolium assay and a trypan blue exclusion assay revealed that miR-1 suppressed ESCC cell proliferation and increased apoptosis, whereas the silencing of miR-1 promoted cell proliferation and decreased apoptosis, suggesting that miR-1 is a novel tumor suppressor. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of action of miR-1 in ESCC, we investigated putative targets using bioinformatics tools. MET, cyclin D1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), which are involved in the hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/MET signaling pathway, were found to be targets of miR-1. miR-1 expression inversely correlated with MET, cyclin D1 and CDK4 expression in ESCC cells. miR-1 directly targeted MET, cyclin D1 and CDK4, suppressing ESCC cell growth. The newly identified miR-1/MET/cyclin D1/CDK4 axis provides new insight into the molecular mechanisms of ESCC pathogenesis and indicates a novel strategy for the diagnosis and treatment of ESCC. PMID:27247259

  13. Cinnamon and its Components Suppress Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation by Up-Regulating Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyeeun; Lee, Jung-Jin; Lee, Ji-Hye; Cho, Won-Kyung; Gu, Min Jung; Lee, Kwang Jin; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2015-01-01

    Cinnamomum cassia bark has been used in traditional herbal medicine to treat a variety of cardiovascular diseases. However, the antiproliferative effect of cinnamon extract on vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and the corresponding restenosis has not been explored. Hence, after examining the effect of cinnamon extract on VSMC proliferation, we investigated the possible involvement of signal transduction pathways associated with early signal and cell cycle analysis, including regulatory proteins. Besides, to identify the active components, we investigated the components of cinnamon extract on VSMC proliferation. Cinnamon extract inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced VSMC proliferation and suppressed the PDGF-stimulated early signal transduction. In addition, cinnamon extract arrested the cell cycle and inhibited positive regulatory proteins. Correspondingly, the protein levels of p21 and p27 not only were increased in the presence of cinnamon extract, also the expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) was inhibited by cinnamon extract. Besides, among the components of cinnamon extract, cinnamic acid (CA), eugenol (EG) and cinnamyl alcohol significantly inhibited the VSMC proliferation. Overall, the present study demonstrates that cinnamon extract inhibited the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation of VSMCs through a G0/G1 arrest, which down-regulated the expression of cell cycle positive regulatory proteins by up-regulating p21 and p27 expression.

  14. Triphala Extract Suppresses Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in Human Colon Cancer Stem Cells via Suppressing c-Myc/Cyclin D1 and Elevation of Bax/Bcl-2 Ratio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakrishna Vadde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Colon cancer is the second leading cause of cancer related deaths in the USA. Cancer stem cells (CSCs have the ability to drive continued expansion of the population of malignant cells. Therefore, strategies that target CSCs could be effective against colon cancer and in reducing the risk of relapse and metastasis. In this study, we evaluated the antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects of triphala, a widely used formulation in Indian traditional medicine, on HCT116 colon cancer cells and human colon cancer stem cells (HCCSCs. The total phenolic content, antioxidant activity, and phytochemical composition (LC-MS-MS of methanol extract of triphala (MET were also measured. We observed that MET contains a variety of phenolics including naringin, quercetin, homoorientin, and isorhamnetin. MET suppressed proliferation independent of p53 status in HCT116 and in HCCSCs. MET also induced p53-independent apoptosis in HCCSCs as indicated by elevated levels of cleaved PARP. Western blotting data suggested that MET suppressed protein levels of c-Myc and cyclin D1, key proteins involved in proliferation, and induced apoptosis through elevation of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio. Furthermore, MET inhibited HCCSCs colony formation, a measure of CSCs self-renewal ability. Anticancer effects of triphala observed in our study warrant future studies to determine its efficacy in vivo.

  15. Bromodichloromethane induces cell proliferation in different tissues of male F344 rats by suppression of E-cadherin expression via hypermethylation or transcriptional activation of c-myc and cyclin D1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Jing; Li, Xiao-Feng; Zhou, Shun-Chang; Luo, Yan; Liu, Ai-Lin; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2013-11-25

    The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of bromodichloromethane (BDCM) - induced cell proliferation in different tissues of male F344 rats. Rats were administered at doses of 0 and 100mg/kg/day BDCM dissolved in corn oil by gavage for 5 days/week for 1, 4, 8 and 12 weeks. Then the colon, kidney and liver were collected. No histologic lesions were observed in the colon of rats exposed to BDCM, while there were mild nephrotoxicity and marginal hepatotoxicity related to BDCM treatment. Moreover, BDCM enhanced cell proliferation in the colon and kidney but not in the liver. In colons, hypermethylation in E-cadherin promoter might be associated with inhibition of mRNA and protein expression after 12 weeks of BDCM exposure. In kidneys, BDCM decreased E-cadherin mRNA expression, accompanying with transcriptional activation of c-myc and cyclin D1. However, suppression of E-cadherin mRNA and protein expression occurred in the absence of significant changes in DNA methylation. Therefore, suppression of E-cadherin expression via hypermethylation or transcriptional activation of c-myc and cyclin D1 may be involved in BDCM-induced cell proliferation in different tissues of male F344 rats.

  16. Caffeine and Your Child

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... caffeine are everywhere, but it's wise to keep caffeine consumption to a minimum, especially in younger kids. The ... Here are some other reasons to limit kids' caffeine consumption: Kids often drink caffeine contained in regular soft ...

  17. Rescue of cyclin D1 deficiency by knockin cyclin E

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geng, Y.; Whoriskey, W.; Park, M.Y.; Bronson, R.T.; Medema, R.H.; Li, T.; Weinberg, R.A.; Sicinski, P.

    1999-01-01

    D-type cyclins and cyclin E represent two very distinct classes of mammalian G1 cyclins. We have generated a mouse strain in which the coding sequences of the cyclin D1 gene (Ccnd1) have been deleted and replaced by those of human cyclin E (CCNE). In the tissues and cells of these mice, the expressi

  18. Inhibiting the cyclin-dependent kinase CDK5 blocks pancreatic cancer formation and progression through the suppression of Ras-Ral signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, Georg; Mishra, Anjali; Hong, Seung-Mo; Bisht, Savita; Strock, Christopher J; Ball, Douglas W; Goggins, Michael; Maitra, Anirban; Nelkin, Barry D

    2010-06-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), a neuronal kinase that functions in migration, has been found to be activated in some human cancers in which it has been implicated in promoting metastasis. In this study, we investigated the role of CDK5 in pancreatic cancers in which metastatic disease is most common at diagnosis. CDK5 was widely active in pancreatic cancer cells. Functional ablation significantly inhibited invasion, migration, and anchorage-independent growth in vitro, and orthotopic tumor formation and systemic metastases in vivo. CDK5 blockade resulted in the profound inhibition of Ras signaling through its critical effectors RalA and RalB. Conversely, restoring Ral function rescued the effects of CDK5 inhibition in pancreatic cancer cells. Our findings identify CDK5 as a pharmacologically tractable target to degrade Ras signaling in pancreatic cancer.

  19. Inhibiting the cyclin-dependent kinase CDK5 blocks pancreatic cancer formation and progression via suppression of Ras-Ral signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldmann, Georg; Mishra, Anjali; Hong, Seung-Mo; Bisht, Savita; Strock, Christopher J.; Ball, Douglas W.; Goggins, Michael; Maitra, Anirban; Nelkin, Barry D.

    2011-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), a neuronal kinase that functions in migration, has been found to be activated in some human cancers where it has been implicated in promoting metastasis. In this study, we investigated the role of CDK5 in pancreatic cancers where metastatic disease is most common at diagnosis. CDK5 was widely active in pancreatic cancer cells. Functional ablation significantly inhibited invasion, migration and anchorage-independent growth in vitro, and orthotopic tumor formation and systemic metastases in vivo. CDK5 blockade resulted in profound inhibition of Ras signaling through its critical effectors RalA and RalB. Conversely, restoring Ral function rescued the effects of CDK5 inhibition in pancreatic cancer cells. Our findings identify CDK5 as a pharmacologically tractable target to degrade Ras signaling in pancreatic cancer. PMID:20484029

  20. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents differ in their ability to suppress NF-kappaB activation, inhibition of expression of cyclooxygenase-2 and cyclin D1, and abrogation of tumor cell proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, Yasunari; Bhardwaj, Anjana; Potdar, Pravin; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2004-12-09

    Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as aspirin have been shown to suppress transcription factor NF-kappaB, which controls the expression of genes such as cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and cyclin D1, leading to inhibition of proliferation of tumor cells. There is no systematic study as to how these drugs differ in their ability to suppress NF-kappaB activation and NF-kappaB-regulated gene expression or cell proliferation. In the present study, we investigated the effect of almost a dozen different commonly used NSAIDs on tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced NF-kappaB activation and NF-kappaB-regulated gene products, and on cell proliferation. Dexamethasone, an anti-inflammatory steroid, was included for comparison with NSAIDs. As indicated by DNA binding, none of the drugs alone activated NF-kappaB. All compounds inhibited TNF-induced NF-kappaB activation, but with highly variable efficacy. The 50% inhibitory concentration required was 5.67, 3.49, 3.03, 1.25, 0.94, 0.60, 0.38, 0.084, 0.043, 0.027, 0.024, and 0.010 mM for aspirin, ibuprofen, sulindac, phenylbutazone, naproxen, indomethacin, diclofenac, resveratrol, curcumin, dexamethasone, celecoxib, and tamoxifen, respectively. All drugs inhibited IkappaBalpha kinase and suppressed IkappaBalpha degradation and NF-kappaB-regulated reporter gene expression. They also suppressed NF-kappaB-regulated COX-2 and cyclin D1 protein expression in a dose-dependent manner. All compounds inhibited the proliferation of tumor cells, with 50% inhibitory concentrations of 6.09, 1.12, 0.65, 0.49, 1.01, 0.19, 0.36, 0.012, 0.016, 0.047, 0.013, and 0.008 mM for aspirin, ibuprofen, sulindac, phenylbutazone, naproxen, indomethacin, diclofenac, resveratrol, curcumin, dexamethasone, celecoxib, and tamoxifen, respectively. Overall these results indicate that aspirin and ibuprofen are least potent, while resveratrol, curcumin, celecoxib, and tamoxifen are the most potent anti-inflammatory and antiproliferative agents of those we

  1. Caffeine and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Healthy Workplace Food and Beverage Toolkit Caffeine and Heart Disease Updated:Aug 17,2015 Caffeine has many metabolic ... high caffeine intake increases the risk of coronary heart disease is still under study. Many studies have been ...

  2. Caffeine induces matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9 down-regulation in human leukemia U937 cells via Ca2+/ROS-mediated suppression of ERK/c-fos pathway and activation of p38 MAPK/c-jun pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wen-Hsin; Chang, Long-Sen

    2010-09-01

    Caffeine attenuated invasion of human leukemia U937 cells with characteristic of decreased protein expression and mRNA levels of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and MMP-9. Down-regulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 in U937 cells was abrogated by abolishment of caffeine-elicited increase in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and ROS generation. Pretreatment with BAPTA-AM (Ca(2+) chelator) and N-acetylcysteine (ROS scavenger) abolished caffeine-induced ERK inactivation and p38 MPAK activation. Moreover, caffeine treatment led to MAPK phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) down-regulation and protein phosphatase 2A catalytic subunit (PP2Ac) up-regulation, which were involved in cross-talk between p38 MAPK and ERK. Transfection of constitutively active MEK1 or pretreatment with SB202190 (p38 MAPK inhibitor) restored MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein expression in caffeine-treated cells. Caffeine treatment repressed ERK-mediated c-Fos phosphorylation but evoked p38 MAPK-mediated c-Jun phosphorylation. Knock-down of c-Fos and c-Jun by siRNA reflected that c-Fos counteracted the effect of c-Jun on MMP-2/MMP-9 down-regulation. Taken together, our data indicate that MMP-2/MMP-9 down-regulation in caffeine-treated U937 cells is elicited by Ca(2+)/ROS-mediated suppression of ERK/c-Fos pathway and activation of p38 MAPK/c-Jun pathway.

  3. Caffeine and coffee as therapeutics against Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendash, Gary W; Cao, Chuanhai

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiologic studies have increasingly suggested that caffeine/coffee could be an effective therapeutic against Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have utilized a transgenic mouse model for AD in well-controlled studies to determine if caffeine and/or coffee have beneficial actions to protect against or reverse AD-like cognitive impairment and AD pathology. AD mice given caffeine in their drinking water from young adulthood into older age showed protection against memory impairment and lower brain levels of the abnormal protein (amyloid-beta; Abeta) thought to be central to AD pathogenesis. Moreover, "aged" cognitively-impaired AD mice exhibited memory restoration and lower brain Abeta levels following only 1-2 months of caffeine treatment. We believe that the cognitive benefits of chronic caffeine administration in AD mice are due to caffeine itself, and not metabolites of caffeine; this, because our long-term administration of theophylline to AD mice provided no cognitive benefits. In acute studies involving AD mice, one oral caffeine treatment quickly reduced both brain and plasma Abeta levels - similarly rapid alterations in plasma Abeta levels were seen in humans following acute caffeine administration. "Caffeinated" coffee provided to AD mice also quickly decreased plasma Abeta levels, but not "decaffeinated" coffee, suggesting that caffeine is critical to decreasing blood Abeta levels. Caffeine appears to provide its disease-modifying effects through multiple mechanisms, including a direct reduction of Abeta production through suppression of both beta- and gamma-secretase levels. These results indicate a surprising ability of moderate caffeine intake (the human equivalent of 500 mg caffeine or 5 cups of coffee per day) to protect against or treat AD in a mouse model for the disease and a therapeutic potential for caffeine against AD in humans.

  4. Aspirin, Butalbital, and Caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    The combination of aspirin, butalbital, and caffeine comes as a capsule and tablet to take by mouth. It usually is taken every 4 ... explain any part you do not understand. Take aspirin, butalbital, and caffeine exactly as directed. Do not ...

  5. Caffeine, fatigue, and cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorist, MM; Tops, M

    2003-01-01

    Effects of caffeine and fatigue are discussed with special attention to adenosine-dopamine interactions. Effects of caffeine on human cognition are diverse. Behavioural measurements indicate a general improvement in the efficiency of information processing after caffeine, while the EEG data support

  6. Caffeine Use and Extroversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landrum, R. Eric; Meliska, Charles J.

    Some research on the stimulant effect of caffeine suggests that the amount of behavioral enhancement produced by caffeine may depend on subjects' prior experience with the task and the drug. A study was undertaken to test whether prior experience with a task while under the influence of caffeine would facilitate performance of that task. Male…

  7. Caffeine: Friend or Foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doepker, Candace; Lieberman, Harris R; Smith, Andrew Paul; Peck, Jennifer D; El-Sohemy, Ahmed; Welsh, Brian T

    2016-01-01

    The debate on the safety of and regulatory approaches for caffeine continues among various stakeholders and regulatory authorities. This decision-making process comes with significant challenges, particularly when considering the complexities of the available scientific data, making the formulation of clear science-based regulatory guidance more difficult. To allow for discussions of a number of key issues, the North American Branch of the International Life Sciences Institute (ILSI) convened a panel of subject matter experts for a caffeine-focused session entitled "Caffeine: Friend or Foe?," which was held during the 2015 ILSI Annual Meeting. The panelists' expertise covered topics ranging from the natural occurrence of caffeine in plants and interindividual metabolism of caffeine in humans to specific behavioral, reproductive, and cardiovascular effects related to caffeine consumption. Each presentation highlighted the potential risks, benefits, and challenges that inform whether caffeine exposure warrants concern. This paper aims to summarize the key topics discussed during the session.

  8. Caffeine Consumption by College Undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loke, Wing Hong

    1988-01-01

    Surveyed 542 undergraduates concerning their caffeine consumption. Found that subjects consumed less caffeine than average caffeine-drinking population. Coffee was main beverage used. Subjects reported drinking more caffeine when preparing for examinations. Suggests that caffeine may have some beneficial effects on learning. (Author/NB)

  9. [Caffeine and children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'ius, P B

    1997-01-01

    Beverages containing caffeine are consumed by most people in most countries most days. Consumption is mostly in beverages such as coffee, tea and some soft drinks, and smaller amounts from other foods such as chocolate. Children also consume caffeine, though in smaller amounts even relative to their smaller size. Many questions have been asked about possible health effects of caffeine and have been answered by scientific research. Studies on pregnant women consuming caffeine show no effects on the fetus, infants, or on development followed up to school age. There have been many studies on children of school age. For example, it has been shown that a single dose of 3 mg/kg is without appreciable effect on a variety of behavioral and physiological functions, and even 10 mg/kg, had only minimal effects, within the normal range of differences between the children without caffeine. While newborn infants metabolize caffeine slowly, children from less than 1 year to adolescence metabolize caffeine about twice as fast as non-smoking adults. The numerous studies showing safety of caffeine in adults, combined with the direct studies in children showing they are similar and not more susceptible to caffeine than adults, gives assurance that lifelong consumption of caffeine in foods and beverages, starting in childhood, is without deleterious effects on health.

  10. Caffeine Consumption, Expectancies of Caffeine-Enhanced Performance, and Caffeinism Symptoms among University Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, John R.; Petree, Allen

    1990-01-01

    Gathered self-report data on college students' (n=797) expectations of caffeine-enhanced performance, level of beverage caffeine consumed daily, and caffeinism signs experienced after consumption of caffeinated beverages. Results supported extending the expectancies model of substance use motivation from alcohol to caffeine. (Author/ABL)

  11. Heritability of caffeine metabolism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matthaei, Johannes; Tzvetkov, Mladen V; Strube, Jakob;

    2016-01-01

    Heritability of caffeine pharmacokinetics and CYP1A2 activity is controversial. Here we analyzed the pharmacokinetics of caffeine, an in vivo probe drug for CYP1A2 and arylamine N-acetyltransferase 2 (NAT2) activity, in monozygotic and dizygotic twins. In the entire group, common and unique envir...

  12. Caffeine in the diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health as long as you have other good health habits. Four 8 oz. cups (1 liter) of brewed or drip coffee (about 400 mg of caffeine) or 5 servings of caffeinated soft drinks or tea (about 165 to 235 mg of ...

  13. Spectrophotometric Analysis of Caffeine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Showkat Ahmad Bhawani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The nature of caffeine reveals that it is a bitter white crystalline alkaloid. It is a common ingredient in a variety of drinks (soft and energy drinks and is also used in combination with various medicines. In order to maintain the optimum level of caffeine, various spectrophotometric methods have been developed. The monitoring of caffeine is very important aspect because of its consumption in higher doses that can lead to various physiological disorders. This paper incorporates various spectrophotometric methods used in the analysis of caffeine in various environmental samples such as pharmaceuticals, soft and energy drinks, tea, and coffee. A range of spectrophotometric methodologies including chemometric techniques and derivatization of spectra have been used to analyse the caffeine.

  14. Caffeine Positively Modulates Ferritin Heavy Chain Expression in H460 Cells: Effects on Cell Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Anna Martina; Faniello, Maria Concetta; Cuda, Giovanni; Costanzo, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Both the methylxanthine caffeine and the heavy subunit of ferritin molecule (FHC) are able to control the proliferation rate of several cancer cell lines. While caffeine acts exclusively as a negative modulator of cell proliferation, FHC might reduce or enhance cell viability depending upon the different cell type. In this work we have demonstrated that physiological concentrations of caffeine reduce the proliferation rate of H460 cells: along with the modulation of p53, pAKT and Cyclin D1, caffeine also determines a significant FHC up-regulation through the activation of its transcriptional efficiency. FHC plays a central role in the molecular pathways modulated by caffeine, ending in a reduced cell growth, since its specific silencing by siRNA almost completely abolishes caffeine effects on H460 cell proliferation. These results allow the inclusion of ferritin heavy subunits among the multiple molecular targets of caffeine and open the way for studying the relationship between caffeine and intracellular iron metabolism. PMID:27657916

  15. Caffeine intake and fecundability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tina Kold; Henriksen, T B; Hjollund, N H

    1998-01-01

    the effect of caffeine from different sources (coffee, tea, cola, and chocolate). Clearly, the relationship between caffeine and fecundability needs further research, given the high prevalence of caffeine intake among women of childbearing age. We examined the independent and combined effects of smoking....... At enrollment and in six cycles of follow-up, both partners filled out a questionnaire on different factors including smoking habits and their intake of coffee, tea, chocolate, cola beverages, and chocolate bars. In all, 1596 cycles and 423 couples were included in the analyses. The cycle-specific association...

  16. Caffeine as a Gelator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nonappa

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine (a stimulant and ethanol (a depressant may have opposite effects in our body, but under in vitro conditions they can “gel” together. Caffeine, being one of the widely used stimulants, continued to surprise the scientific community with its unprecedented biological, medicinal and physicochemical properties. Here, we disclose the supramolecular self-assembly of anhydrous caffeine in a series of alcoholic and aromatic solvents, rendering a highly entangled microcrystalline network facilitating the encapsulation of the solvents as illustrated using direct imaging, microscopy analysis and NMR studies.

  17. Caffeine, extraversion and working memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew P

    2013-01-01

    Research has shown that extraverts performing a working memory task benefit more from caffeine than do introverts. The present study aimed to replicate this and extend our knowledge by using a lower dose of caffeine (65 mg) and a range of tasks related to different components of working memory. In addition, tasks assessing psychomotor speed and the encoding of new information were included to determine whether caffeine-extraversion interactions were restricted to working memory tasks. A double-blind design was used, with 128 participants being randomly assigned to caffeinated or de-caffeinated coffee conditions. The results showed that caffeine interacted with extraversion in the predicted direction for serial recall and running memory tasks. Caffeine improved simple reaction time and the speed of encoding of new information, effects which were not modified by extraversion. These results suggest possible biological mechanisms underlying effects of caffeine on cognitive performance.

  18. Caffeine content of decaffeinated coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCusker, Rachel R; Fuehrlein, Brian; Goldberger, Bruce A; Gold, Mark S; Cone, Edward J

    2006-10-01

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed drug in the world with coffee representing a major source of intake. Despite widespread availability, various medical conditions necessitate caffeine-restricted diets. Patients on certain prescription medications are advised to discontinue caffeine intake. Such admonition has implications for certain psychiatric patients because of pharmacokinetic interactions between caffeine and certain anti-anxiety drugs. In an effort to abstain from caffeine, patients may substitute decaffeinated for caffeinated coffee. However, decaffeinated beverages are known to contain caffeine in varying amounts. The present study determined the caffeine content in a variety of decaffeinated coffee drinks. In phase 1 of the study, 10 decaffeinated samples were collected from different coffee establishments. In phase 2 of the study, Starbucks espresso decaffeinated (N=6) and Starbucks brewed decaffeinated coffee (N=6) samples were collected from the same outlet to evaluate variability of caffeine content of the same drink. The 10 decaffeinated coffee samples from different outlets contained caffeine in the range of 0-13.9 mg/16-oz serving. The caffeine content for the Starbucks espresso and the Starbucks brewed samples collected from the same outlet were 3.0-15.8 mg/shot and 12.0-13.4 mg/16-oz serving, respectively. Patients vulnerable to caffeine effects should be advised that caffeine may be present in coffees purported to be decaffeinated. Further research is warranted on the potential deleterious effects of consumption of "decaffeinated" coffee that contains caffeine on caffeine-restricted patients. Additionally, further exploration is merited for the possible physical dependence potential of low doses of caffeine such as those concentrations found in decaffeinated coffee.

  19. Is caffeine a cognitive enhancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehlig, Astrid

    2010-01-01

    The effects of caffeine on cognition were reviewed based on the large body of literature available on the topic. Caffeine does not usually affect performance in learning and memory tasks, although caffeine may occasionally have facilitatory or inhibitory effects on memory and learning. Caffeine facilitates learning in tasks in which information is presented passively; in tasks in which material is learned intentionally, caffeine has no effect. Caffeine facilitates performance in tasks involving working memory to a limited extent, but hinders performance in tasks that heavily depend on working memory, and caffeine appears to rather improve memory performance under suboptimal alertness conditions. Most studies, however, found improvements in reaction time. The ingestion of caffeine does not seem to affect long-term memory. At low doses, caffeine improves hedonic tone and reduces anxiety, while at high doses, there is an increase in tense arousal, including anxiety, nervousness, jitteriness. The larger improvement of performance in fatigued subjects confirms that caffeine is a mild stimulant. Caffeine has also been reported to prevent cognitive decline in healthy subjects but the results of the studies are heterogeneous, some finding no age-related effect while others reported effects only in one sex and mainly in the oldest population. In conclusion, it appears that caffeine cannot be considered a ;pure' cognitive enhancer. Its indirect action on arousal, mood and concentration contributes in large part to its cognitive enhancing properties.

  20. Caffeine and cognitive performance: persistent methodological challenges in caffeine research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Jack E

    2014-09-01

    Human cognitive performance is widely perceived to be enhanced by caffeine at usual dietary doses. However, the evidence for and against this belief continues to be vigorously contested. Controversy has centred on caffeine withdrawal and withdrawal reversal as potential sources of experimental confounding. In response, some researchers have enlisted "caffeine-naïve" experimental participants (persons alleged to consume little or no caffeine) assuming that they are not subject to withdrawal. This mini-review examines relevant research to illustrate general methodological challenges that have been the cause of enduring confusion in caffeine research. At issue are the processes of caffeine withdrawal and withdrawal reversal, the definition of caffeine-naïve, the population representativeness of participants deemed to be caffeine-naïve, and confounding due to caffeine tolerance. Attention to these processes is necessary if premature conclusions are to be avoided, and if caffeine's complex effects and the mechanisms responsible for those effects are to be illuminated. Strategies are described for future caffeine research aimed at minimising confounding from withdrawal and withdrawal reversal.

  1. Caffeine Reinforces Flavor Preference and Behavior in Moderate Users but Not in Low Caffeine Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dack, Charlotte; Reed, Phil

    2009-01-01

    The study examined the role of caffeine consumption in caffeine reinforcement. Previous findings have shown that caffeine reinforced flavor preference in moderate caffeine consumers who are caffeine deprived. However, most of these studies have employed rating procedures only, and have not shown the effectiveness of caffeine to reinforce behaviors…

  2. Mood, music, and caffeine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jolij, Jacob; Lorist, Monicque

    2014-01-01

    What we see is affected by how we feel: in positive moods, we are more sensitive to positive stimuli, such as happy faces, but in negative moods we are more sensitive to negative stimuli, such as sad faces. Caffeine is known to affect mood - a cup of coffee results in a more positive mood, but also

  3. Role of CyclinD1 and CDK4 in the Carcinogenesis Induced by Silica

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    KE-XIA YAN; BING-CI LIU; XIANG-LIN SHI; BAO-RONG YOU; MING XU

    2005-01-01

    Objective To study the role of cyclinD1 and CDK4 in malignant transformation of human fetal lung diploid fibroblast cell line(2BS) induced by silica. Methods Recombination vectors with sense and antisense pXJ41-cyclinD1 and pXJ41-CDK4 were constructed, and then transfected into the malignant transformed cells induced by silica, respectively. At the same time, pXJ41-neo was used as the control. Results During the progress of the malignant transformation of 2BS cells induced by silica, cyclinD1 and CDK4 were overexpressed. Antisense RNA suppressed cyclinD1 and CDK4 gene expression in the antisense pXJ41-cyclinD1 and pXJ41-CDK4 transfected cells. Antisense RNA led to cell cycle arrest, resulting in lengthened G1 phase (the percentages of cells in the G1 phase changed from 45.1% to 52.7% and 58.0% for cyclinD1 and CDK4 transfected cells, respectively), and eventually attenuated the increase of the proliferation of malignant transformed cells induced by silica. Compared with malignant transformed cells induced by silica, cells transfected with antisense pXJ41-cyclinD1 and pXJ41-CDK4 showed obviously reduced growth rates. On the 8th day, the suppression rates were 58.69 and 77.43% (the growth rate of malignant transformed cells induced by silica was 100%), doubling time changed from 21.0 h to 31.4 h and 21.0 h to 42.7 h, respectively, the growth capacities on soft agar of cells transfected by antisense pXJ41-cyclinD1 and pXJ41-CDK4 decreased obviously. Conclusion CyclinD1 and CDK4 play an important role in maintaining transformed phenotype of the cancer cells.

  4. Maternal gestational betaine supplementation-mediated suppression of hepatic cyclin D2 and presenilin1 gene in newborn piglets is associated with epigenetic regulation of the STAT3-dependent pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Demin; Yuan, Mengjie; Jia, Yimin; Liu, Haoyu; Hu, Yun; Zhao, Ruqian

    2015-12-01

    Betaine, which donates methyl groups through methionine metabolism for DNA and protein methylation, is critical for epigenetic gene regulation, especially during fetal development. Here we fed gestational sows with control or betaine supplemented diets (3 g/kg) throughout the pregnancy to explore the effects of maternal betaine on hepatic cell proliferation in neonatal piglets. Neonatal piglets born to betaine-supplemented sows demonstrated a reduction of cell number and DNA content in the liver, which was associated with significantly down-regulated hepatic expression of cell cycle regulatory genes, cyclin D2 (CCND2) and presenilin1 (PSEN1). Moreover, STAT3 binding to the promoter of CCND2 and PSEN1 was also lower in betaine-exposed piglets, accompanied by strong reduction of STAT3 mRNA and protein expression, along with its phosphorylation at Tyr705 and Ser727 residues. Also, prenatal betaine exposure significantly attenuated upstream kinases of STAT3 signaling pathway (phospho-ERK1/2, phospho-SRC and phospho-JAK2) in the livers of neonates. Furthermore, the repressed STAT3 expression in the liver of betaine-exposed piglets was associated with DNA hypermethylation and more enriched repression histone mark H3K27me3 on its promoter, together with significantly up-regulated expression of H3K27me3 and enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) proteins, as well as miR-124a, which targets STAT3. Taken together, our results suggest that maternal dietary betaine supplementation during gestation inhibits hepatic cell proliferation in neonatal piglets, at least partly, through epigenetic regulation of hepatic CCND2 and PSEN1 genes via a STAT3-dependent pathway. These neonatal changes in cell cycle and proliferation regulation may lead to lower liver weight and hepatic DNA content at weaning.

  5. Caffeine reverses cognitive impairment and decreases brain amyloid-beta levels in aged Alzheimer's disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendash, Gary W; Mori, Takashi; Cao, Chuanhai; Mamcarz, Malgorzata; Runfeldt, Melissa; Dickson, Alexander; Rezai-Zadeh, Kavon; Tane, Jun; Citron, Bruce A; Lin, Xiaoyang; Echeverria, Valentina; Potter, Huntington

    2009-01-01

    We have recently shown that Alzheimer's disease (AD) transgenic mice given a moderate level of caffeine intake (the human equivalent of 5 cups of coffee per day) are protected from development of otherwise certain cognitive impairment and have decreased hippocampal amyloid-beta (Abeta) levels due to suppression of both beta-secretase (BACE1) and presenilin 1 (PS1)/gamma-secretase expression. To determine if caffeine intake can have beneficial effects in "aged" APPsw mice already demonstrating cognitive impairment, we administered caffeine in the drinking water of 18-19 month old APPsw mice that were impaired in working memory. At 4-5 weeks into caffeine treatment, those impaired transgenic mice given caffeine (Tg/Caff) exhibited vastly superior working memory compared to the continuing impairment of control transgenic mice. In addition, Tg/Caff mice had substantially reduced Abeta deposition in hippocampus (decrease 40%) and entorhinal cortex (decrease 46%), as well as correlated decreases in brain soluble Abeta levels. Mechanistically, evidence is provided that caffeine suppression of BACE1 involves the cRaf-1/NFkappaB pathway. We also determined that caffeine concentrations within human physiological range effectively reduce active and total glycogen synthase kinase 3 levels in SweAPP N2a cells. Even with pre-existing and substantial Abeta burden, aged APPsw mice exhibited memory restoration and reversal of AD pathology, suggesting a treatment potential of caffeine in cases of established AD.

  6. Low Concentration of Caffeine Inhibits the Progression of the Hepatocellular Carcinoma via Akt Signaling Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shuying; Kong, Jian; Kong, Jinge; Shen, Qiang; Kong, Fandong; Sun, Wenbing; Zheng, Lemin

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidences have reported that caffeine has anticancer effects at high blood concentrations. However, whether caffeine has anticancer effects on human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells at low concentration, especially at physiologically applicable concentration (concentrations of caffeine (0, 50, 100, 200, 400 or 600 μM). MTT assay was used to investigate the proliferation ability in vitro. Migration and invasion abilities were determined by wound healing assay and transwell assay. The molecular changes were detected by western blot. An ectopic nude mice model which the mice were gavaged with caffeine was used to reveal the anticancer effects of caffeine on HepG2 cells in vivo. Results showed that caffeine could inhibit the proliferation, migration and invasion significantly at physiologically applicable concentration in vitro. Also the associated molecular changes of cancer progression were observed. In animal experiment, the mice gavaged with caffeine also performanced reduced tumor burden in vivo. Moreover, the interrelated protein expression was also observed in vivo which was coincident with the results in vitro. All in all, this observation indicated that caffeine may suppress the progression of HCC through Akt signaling pathway. This makes caffeine a potential candidate for treating HCC which will be a safer and more effective treatment by giving for a long time at physiologically applicable concentration.

  7. Caffeine: Can It Help Me Lose Weight?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gain, but there's no sound evidence that increased caffeine consumption results in significant or permanent weight loss. Caffeine ... Nutrition. 2006;84:682. Heckman M, et al. Caffeine (1, 3, ... consumption, functionality, safety, and regulatory matters. Journal of Food ...

  8. Pressor effects of caffeine and cigarette smoking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, J E; Richardson, M

    1991-09-01

    Pressor effects of caffeine and cigarette smoking were examined in 15 normotensive young men and women. A cross-over design was used in which all subjects participated in four separate conditions: placebo alone, caffeine alone, placebo plus smoking, and caffeine plus smoking. Caffeine and smoking produced independent increases in systolic and diastolic blood pressure, and these effects were additive in the caffeine-plus-smoking condition. Heart rate was significantly increased by smoking but was essentially unaffected by caffeine.

  9. Protocatechualdehyde possesses anti-cancer activity through downregulating cyclin D1 and HDAC2 in human colorectal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jin Boo [Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Lee, Seong-Ho, E-mail: slee2000@umd.edu [Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) suppressed cell proliferation and induced apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA enhanced transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PCA suppressed HDAC2 expression and activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These findings suggest that anti-cancer activity of PCA may be mediated by reducing HDAC2-derived cyclin D1 expression. -- Abstract: Protocatechualdehyde (PCA) is a naturally occurring polyphenol found in barley, green cavendish bananas, and grapevine leaves. Although a few studies reported growth-inhibitory activity of PCA in breast and leukemia cancer cells, the underlying mechanisms are still poorly understood. Thus, we performed in vitro study to investigate if treatment of PCA affects cell proliferation and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells and define potential mechanisms by which PCA mediates growth arrest and apoptosis of cancer cells. Exposure of PCA to human colorectal cancer cells (HCT116 and SW480 cells) suppressed cell growth and induced apoptosis in dose-dependent manner. PCA decreased cyclin D1 expression in protein and mRNA level and suppressed luciferase activity of cyclin D1 promoter, indicating transcriptional downregulation of cyclin D1 gene by PCA. We also observed that PCA treatment attenuated enzyme activity of histone deacetylase (HDAC) and reduced expression of HDAC2, but not HDAC1. These findings suggest that cell growth inhibition and apoptosis by PCA may be a result of HDAC2-mediated cyclin D1 suppression.

  10. Caffeine addiction? Caffeine for youth? Time to act!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budney, Alan J; Emond, Jennifer A

    2014-11-01

    While data accumulate and discussion evolves on the clinical importance of caffeine addiction and its classification, the growing practices of (i) adding increasing amounts of caffeine to drinks and other consumables, (ii) promoting these as performance enhancers and (iii) targeting youth as the consumer raise concerns that require immediate action.

  11. Crude caffeine reduces memory impairment and amyloid β(1-42) levels in an Alzheimer's mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Yi-Fang; Chang, Wen-Han; Black, Richard M; Liu, Jia-Ren; Sompol, Pradoldej; Chen, Yumin; Wei, Huilin; Zhao, Qiuyan; Cheng, Irene H

    2012-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), a chronic neurodegenerative disorder associated with the abnormal accumulations of amyloid β (Aβ) peptide and oxidative stress in the brain, is the most common form of dementia among the elderly. Crude caffeine (CC), a major by-product of the decaffeination of coffee, has potent hydrophilic antioxidant activity and may reduce inflammatory processes. Here, we showed that CC and pure caffeine intake had beneficial effects in a mouse model of AD. Administration of CC or pure caffeine for 2months partially prevented memory impairment in AD mice, with CC having greater effects than pure caffeine. Furthermore, consumption of CC, but not pure caffeine, reduced the Aβ(1-42) levels and the number of amyloid plaques in the hippocampus. Moreover, CC and caffeine protected primary neurons from Aβ-induced cell death and suppressed Aβ-induced caspase-3 activity. Our data indicate that CC may contain prophylactic agents against the cell death and the memory impairment in AD.

  12. The Janus face of caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porciúncula, Lisiane O; Sallaberry, Cássia; Mioranzza, Sabrina; Botton, Paulo Henrique S; Rosemberg, Denis B

    2013-11-01

    Caffeine is certainly the psychostimulant substance most consumed worldwide. Over the past years, chronic consumption of caffeine has been associated with prevention of cognitive decline associated to aging and mnemonic deficits of brain disorders. While its preventive effects have been reported extensively, the cognitive enhancer properties of caffeine are relatively under debate. Surprisingly, there are scarce detailed ontogenetic studies focusing on neurochemical parameters related to the effects of caffeine during prenatal and earlier postnatal periods. Furthermore, despite the large number of epidemiological studies, it remains unclear how safe is caffeine consumption during pregnancy and brain development. Thus, the purpose of this article is to review what is currently known about the actions of caffeine intake on neurobehavioral and adenosinergic system during brain development. We also reviewed other neurochemical systems affected by caffeine, but not only during brain development. Besides, some recent epidemiological studies were also outlined with the control of "pregnancy signal" as confounding variable. The idea is to tease out how studies on the impact of caffeine consumption during brain development deserve more attention and further investigation.

  13. Caffeine: sleep and daytime sleepiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roehrs, Timothy; Roth, Thomas

    2008-04-01

    Caffeine is one of the most widely consumed psychoactive substances and it has profound effects on sleep and wake function. Laboratory studies have documented its sleep-disruptive effects. It clearly enhances alertness and performance in studies with explicit sleep deprivation, restriction, or circadian sleep schedule reversals. But, under conditions of habitual sleep the evidence indicates that caffeine, rather then enhancing performance, is merely restoring performance degraded by sleepiness. The sleepiness and degraded function may be due to basal sleep insufficiency, circadian sleep schedule reversals, rebound sleepiness, and/or a withdrawal syndrome after the acute, over-night, caffeine discontinuation typical of most studies. Studies have shown that caffeine dependence develops at relatively low daily doses and after short periods of regular daily use. Large sample and population-based studies indicate that regular daily dietary caffeine intake is associated with disturbed sleep and associated daytime sleepiness. Further, children and adolescents, while reporting lower daily, weight-corrected caffeine intake, similarly experience sleep disturbance and daytime sleepiness associated with their caffeine use. The risks to sleep and alertness of regular caffeine use are greatly underestimated by both the general population and physicians.

  14. Caffeine, Diabetes, Cognition, and Dementia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biessels, Geert Jan

    2010-01-01

    People with diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of cognitive dysfunction. This review explores the relation between caffeine intake, diabetes, cognition and dementia, focusing on type 2 diabetes (T2DM). Epidemiological studies on caffeine/coffee intake and T2DM risk are reviewed. Next, the impac

  15. Cyclin B1 Vaccine Delays Spontaneous Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laura A, Vella; Min, Yu; Amy, Phillips; Olivera J, Finn

    2012-01-01

    We previously identified cyclin B1-specific T cells and antibodies in cancer patients with cyclin B1+ tumors and also in some healthy individuals. We also demonstrated that these responses may be important in cancer immunosurveillance by showing that vaccination against cyclin B1 prevents growth of transplantable cyclin B1+ tumors in mice. Constitutive overexpression of cyclin B1 was determined to correlate with the lack of p53 function. This allowed us to use p53−/− mice as a model that better approximates human disease. p53−/− mice spontaneously develop cyclin B1+ tumors. At 5–6 weeks of age, when the mice were still healthy with no evidence of tumor, they received the cyclin B1 vaccine and were then observed for tumor growth. We demonstrate that cyclin B1 vaccination can delay spontaneous cyclin B1+ tumor growth and increases median survival of tumor bearing p53−/− mice. PMID:19769738

  16. Caffeine prevents LPS-induced inflammatory responses in RAW264.7 cells and zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Ji-Hyun; Kim, Kui-Jin; Ryu, Su-Jung; Lee, Boo-Yong

    2016-03-25

    Caffeine is a white crystalline xanthine alkaloid found in the seeds of coffee plants and leaves of the tea bush. In this study, we evaluated whether caffeine exerts anti-inflammatory effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammation both in vitro and in vivo. RAW264.7 cells were treated with various concentrations of caffeine in the presence or absence of LPS. Caffeine decreased the LPS-induced inflammatory mediator, nitric oxide (NO). Caffeine treatment also reduced the expression of pro-inflammatory genes, including inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), interleukin (IL)-3, IL-6 and IL-12, and decreased both IL-6 secretion and phosphorylated p38MAPK expression in LPS-treated RAW264.7 cells. Caffeine inhibited nuclear translocation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) via IκBα phosphorylation. In addition, caffeine inhibited LPS-induced NO production in zebrafish. These results suggest that caffeine may suppress LPS-induced inflammatory responses in RAW264.7 cells by regulating NF-κB activation and MAPK phosphorylation.

  17. Caffeine synergizes with another coffee component to increase plasma GCSF: linkage to cognitive benefits in Alzheimer's mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Chuanhai; Wang, Li; Lin, Xiaoyang; Mamcarz, Malgorzata; Zhang, Chi; Bai, Ge; Nong, Jasson; Sussman, Sam; Arendash, Gary

    2011-01-01

    Retrospective and prospective epidemiologic studies suggest that enhanced coffee/caffeine intake during aging reduces risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Underscoring this premise, our studies in AD transgenic mice show that long-term caffeine administration protects against cognitive impairment and reduces brain amyloid-β levels/deposition through suppression of both β- and γ-secretase. Because coffee contains many constituents in addition to caffeine that may provide cognitive benefits against AD, we examined effects of caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee on plasma cytokines, comparing their effects to caffeine alone. In both AβPPsw+PS1 transgenic mice and non-transgenic littermates, acute i.p. treatment with caffeinated coffee greatly and specifically increased plasma levels of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (GCSF), IL-10, and IL-6. Neither caffeine solution alone (which provided high plasma caffeine levels) or decaffeinated coffee provided this effect, indicating that caffeine synergized with some as yet unidentified component of coffee to selectively elevate these three plasma cytokines. The increase in GCSF is particularly important because long-term treatment with coffee (but not decaffeinated coffee) enhanced working memory in a fashion that was associated only with increased plasma GCSF levels among all cytokines. Since we have previously reported that long-term GCSF treatment enhances cognitive performance in AD mice through three possible mechanisms (e.g., recruitment of microglia from bone marrow, synaptogenesis, and neurogenesis), the same mechanisms could be complimentary to caffeine's established ability to suppress Aβ production. We conclude that coffee may be the best source of caffeine to protect against AD because of a component in coffee that synergizes with caffeine to enhance plasma GCSF levels, resulting in multiple therapeutic actions against AD.

  18. The Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Ortholog pUL97 of Human Cytomegalovirus Interacts with Cyclins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Graf

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV-encoded protein kinase, pUL97, is considered a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK ortholog, due to shared structural and functional characteristics. The primary mechanism of CDK activation is binding to corresponding cyclins, including cyclin T1, which is the usual regulatory cofactor of CDK9. This study provides evidence of direct interaction between pUL97 and cyclin T1 using yeast two-hybrid and co-immunoprecipitation analyses. Confocal immunofluorescence revealed partial colocalization of pUL97 with cyclin T1 in subnuclear compartments, most pronounced in viral replication centres. The distribution patterns of pUL97 and cyclin T1 were independent of HCMV strain and host cell type. The sequence domain of pUL97 responsible for the interaction with cyclin T1 was between amino acids 231–280. Additional co-immunoprecipitation analyses showed cyclin B1 and cyclin A as further pUL97 interaction partners. Investigation of the pUL97-cyclin T1 interaction in an ATP consumption assay strongly suggested phosphorylation of pUL97 by the CDK9/cyclin T1 complex in a substrate concentration-dependent manner. This is the first demonstration of interaction between a herpesviral CDK ortholog and cellular cyclins.

  19. The Effects of Caffeine on Athletic Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, Larry W.; McIntire, Kyle; Streitz, Carmyn; Jackson, Allen; Gaudet, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Athletes who use caffeine before exercising or competition may be upgrading themselves more than they realize. Caffeine is classified as a stimulant and is the most commonly used drug in the world. Caffeine has the same affects that amphetamines and cocaine have, just to a lesser degree. Caffeine crosses the membranes of all the body's tissues. It…

  20. Caffeine: How Much Is Too Much?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... prevent colds or other infections, may increase the concentration of caffeine in your blood and may increase caffeine's unpleasant ... resolve after a few days. To change your caffeine habit, try these tips: Keep tabs. Start paying attention to how much caffeine you're getting from ...

  1. Cyclin D1 expression in prostate carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, R.A.; Ravinal, R.C.; Costa, R.S.; Lima, M.S. [Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Departamento de Patologia, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Tucci, S. [Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Divisão de Urologia, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Divisão de Urologia, Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Muglia, V.F. [Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Departamento de Medicina Interna (Centro de Ciência da Imagem), Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Medicina Interna (Centro de Ciência da Imagem), Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Reis, R.B. Dos [Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Divisão de Urologia, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Divisão de Urologia, Departamento de Cirurgia e Anatomia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Silva, G.E.B. [Universidade de São Paulo, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Departamento de Patologia, Ribeirão Preto, SP, Brasil, Departamento de Patologia, Faculdade de Medicina de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2014-05-09

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cyclin D1 expression and clinicopathological parameters in patients with prostate carcinoma. We assessed cyclin D1 expression by conventional immunohistochemistry in 85 patients who underwent radical prostatectomy for prostate carcinoma and 10 normal prostate tissue samples retrieved from autopsies. We measured nuclear immunostaining in the entire tumor area and based the results on the percentage of positive tumor cells. The preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was 8.68±5.16 ng/mL (mean±SD). Cyclin D1 staining was positive (cyclin D1 expression in >5% of tumor cells) in 64 cases (75.4%) and negative (cyclin D1 expression in ≤5% of tumor cells) in 21 cases (including 15 cases with no immunostaining). Normal prostate tissues were negative for cyclin D1. Among patients with a high-grade Gleason score (≥7), 86% of patients demonstrated cyclin D1 immunostaining of >5% (P<0.05). In the crude analysis of cyclin D1 expression, the high-grade Gleason score group showed a mean expression of 39.6%, compared to 26.9% in the low-grade Gleason score group (P<0.05). Perineural invasion tended to be associated with cyclin D1 expression (P=0.07), whereas cyclin D1 expression was not associated with PSA levels or other parameters. Our results suggest that high cyclin D1 expression could be a potential marker for tumor aggressiveness.

  2. MicroRNA-1 and-16 inhibit cardiomyocyte hypertrophy by targeting cyclins/Rb pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHAN Zhi-xin; ZHU Jie-ning; TANG Chun-mei; ZHU Wen-si; LIN Qiu-xiong; HU Zhi-qin; FU Yong-heng; ZHANG Meng-zhen

    2016-01-01

    AIM:MicroRNAs ( miRNAs) were recognized to play significant roles in cardiac hypertrophy .But, it remains unknown whether cyclin/Rb pathway is modulated by miRNAs during cardiac hypertrophy .This study investigates the potential roles of microRNA-1 (miR-1) and microRNA-16 (miR-16) in modulating cyclin/Rb pathway during cardiomyocyte hypertrophy .METHODS:An animal model of hypertrophy was established in a rat with abdominal aortic constriction (AAC).In addition, a cell model of hypertrophy was also achieved based on PE-promoted neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocyte .RESULTS:miR-1 and-16 expression were markedly de-creased in hypertrophic myocardium and hypertrophic cardiomyocytes in rats .Overexpression of miR-1 and -16 suppressed rat cardiac hypertrophy and hypertrophic phenotype of cultured cardiomyocytes .Expression of cyclins D1, D2 and E1, CDK6 and phosphorylated pRb was increased in hypertrophic myocardium and hypertrophic cardiomyocytes , but could be reversed by enforced expression of miR-1 and -16.CDK6 was validated to be modulated post-transcriptionally by miR-1, and cyclins D1, D2 and E1 were further validated to be modulated post-transcriptionally by miR-16.CONCLUSION: Attenuations of miR-1 and -16 provoke cardiomyocyte hypertrophy via derepressing the cyclins D1, D2, E1 and CDK6, and activating cyclin/Rb pathway.

  3. Challenging sleep in aging: the effects of 200 mg of caffeine during the evening in young and middle-aged moderate caffeine consumers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapeau, Caroline; Hamel-Hébert, Isabelle; Robillard, Rébecca; Selmaoui, Brahim; Filipini, Daniel; Carrier, Julie

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a 200-mg administration of caffeine on polysomnographic sleep variables and quantitative sleep electroencephalography (EEG) in 12 young (20-30 years) and 12 middle-aged (40-60 years) moderate caffeine consumers (one to three cups of coffee per day). All subjects were submitted to both a caffeine (200 mg) and placebo (lactose) condition in a double-blind cross-over design. The conditions were separated by 1 week. Compared with the placebo condition, the evening ingestion of caffeine lengthened sleep latency, reduced sleep efficiency, and decreased sleep duration and amount of stage 2 sleep in both age groups. Caffeine also reduced spectral power in delta frequencies in frontal, central and parietal brain areas, but not in prefrontal (PF) and occipital regions. Moreover, caffeine increased spectral power in beta frequencies in frontal and central brain areas in both age groups. A suppression of spectral power in the PF area in low delta frequencies (0.5-1.00 Hz) and a rise in spectral power in the parietal region in high alpha (10.00-12.00 Hz) and beta frequencies (17.00-21.00, 23.00-25.00, 27.00-29.00 Hz) occurred solely in middle-aged subjects. No such changes were noticeable in young subjects. Generally, caffeine produced similar effects in young and middle-aged subjects. Only a few frequency bins showed more effects of caffeine in middle-aged subjects compared with young subjects. Furthermore, sleep EEG results do not entirely support the hypothesis that caffeine fully mimics the effects of a reduction of homeostatic sleep propensity when following a normal sleep-wake cycle.

  4. Caffeine's Vascular Mechanisms of Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darío Echeverri

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is the most widely consumed stimulating substance in the world. It is found in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate, and many medications. Caffeine is a xanthine with various effects and mechanisms of action in vascular tissue. In endothelial cells, it increases intracellular calcium stimulating the production of nitric oxide through the expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase enzyme. Nitric oxide is diffused to the vascular smooth muscle cell to produce vasodilation. In vascular smooth muscle cells its effect is predominantly a competitive inhibition of phosphodiesterase, producing an accumulation of cAMP and vasodilation. In addition, it blocks the adenosine receptors present in the vascular tissue to produce vasoconstriction. In this paper the main mechanisms of action of caffeine on the vascular tissue are described, in which it is shown that caffeine has some cardiovascular properties and effects which could be considered beneficial.

  5. Crystal Structure of Human Cyclin K, A Positive Regulator of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek,K.; Brown, R.; Birrane, G.; Ladias, J.

    2007-01-01

    K and the closely related cyclins T1, T2a, and T2b interact with cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) forming multiple nuclear complexes, referred to collectively as positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb). Through phosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of the RNA polymerase II largest subunit, distinct P-TEFb species regulate the transcriptional elongation of specific genes that play central roles in human physiology and disease development, including cardiac hypertrophy and human immunodeficiency virus-1 pathogenesis. We have determined the crystal structure of human cyclin K (residues 11-267) at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution, which represents the first atomic structure of a P-TEFb subunit. The cyclin K fold comprises two typical cyclin boxes with two short helices preceding the N-terminal box. A prominent feature of cyclin K is an additional helix (H4a) in the first cyclin box that obstructs the binding pocket for the cell-cycle inhibitor p27{sup Kip1}. Modeling of CDK9 bound to cyclin K provides insights into the structural determinants underlying the formation and regulation of this complex. A homology model of human cyclin T1 generated using the cyclin K structure as a template reveals that the two proteins have similar structures, as expected from their high level of sequence identity. Nevertheless, their CDK9-interacting surfaces display significant structural differences, which could potentially be exploited for the design of cyclin-targeted inhibitors of the CDK9-cyclin K and CDK9-cyclin T1 complexes.

  6. Caffeine, exercise and the brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meeusen, Romain; Roelands, Bart; Spriet, Lawrence L

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine can improve exercise performance when it is ingested at moderate doses (3-6 mg/kg body mass). Caffeine also has an effect on the central nervous system (CNS), and it is now recognized that most of the performance-enhancing effect of caffeine is accomplished through the antagonism of the adenosine receptors, influencing the dopaminergic and other neurotransmitter systems. Adenosine and dopamine interact in the brain, and this might be one mechanism to explain how the important components of motivation (i.e. vigor, persistence and work output) and higher-order brain processes are involved in motor control. Caffeine maintains a higher dopamine concentration especially in those brain areas linked with 'attention'. Through this neurochemical interaction, caffeine improves sustained attention, vigilance, and reduces symptoms of fatigue. Other aspects that are localized in the CNS are a reduction in skeletal muscle pain and force sensation, leading to a reduction in perception of effort during exercise and therefore influencing the motivational factors to sustain effort during exercise. Because not all CNS aspects have been examined in detail, one should consider that a placebo effect may also be present. Overall, it appears that the performance-enhancing effects of caffeine reside in the brain, although more research is necessary to reveal the exact mechanisms through which the CNS effect is established.

  7. Effects of caffeine on sleep and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snel, Jan; Lorist, Monicque M

    2011-01-01

    Caffeine can be used effectively to manipulate our mental state. It is beneficial in restoring low levels of wakefulness and in counteracting degraded cognitive task performance due to sleep deprivation. However, caffeine may produce detrimental effects on subsequent sleep, resulting in daytime sleepiness. This justifies a careful consideration of risks related to sleep deprivation in combination with caffeine consumption, especially in adolescents. The efficacy of caffeine to restore detrimental effects of sleep deprivation seems to be partly due to caffeine expectancy and to placebo effects. The claim that stimulant effects of caffeine are related to withdrawal or withdrawal reversal seems to be untenable.

  8. Compound list: caffeine [Open TG-GATEs

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available caffeine CAF 00097 ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Human/in_vitro/caffeine....Human.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vitro/caffeine....Rat.in_vitro.Liver.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Single/caffeine...-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Liver/Repeat/caffeine.Rat.in_vivo.Liver.Repeat.zip ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/ar...chive/open-tggates/LATEST/Rat/in_vivo/Kidney/Single/caffeine.Rat.in_vivo.Kidney.Single.zip ftp://ftp.bioscie

  9. Exposure time to caffeine affects heartbeat and cell damage-related gene expression of zebrafish Danio rerio embryos at early developmental stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkader, Tamer Said; Chang, Seo-Na; Kim, Tae-Hyun; Song, Juha; Kim, Dong Su; Park, Jae-Hak

    2013-11-01

    Caffeine is white crystalline xanthine alkaloid that is naturally found in some plants and can be produced synthetically. It has various biological effects, especially during pregnancy and lactation. We studied the effect of caffeine on heartbeat, survival and the expression of cell damage related genes, including oxidative stress (HSP70), mitochondrial metabolism (Cyclin G1) and apoptosis (Bax and Bcl2), at early developmental stages of zebrafish embryos. We used 100 µm concentration based on the absence of locomotor effects. Neither significant mortality nor morphological changes were detected. We monitored hatching at 48 h post-fertilization (hpf) to 96 hpf. At 60 and 72 hpf, hatching decreased significantly (P caffeine treatment with no significant difference (P > 0.05). Heartbeats per minute were 110, 110 and 112 in control at 48, 72 and 96 hpf, respectively. Caffeine significantly increased heartbeat - 122 and 136 at 72 and 96 hpf, respectively. Quantitative RT-PCR showed significant up-regulation after caffeine exposure in HSP70 at 72 hpf; in Cyclin G1 at 24, 48 and 72 hpf; and in Bax at 48 and 72 hpf. Significant down-regulation was found in Bcl2 at 48 and 72 hpf. The Bax/Bcl2 ratio increased significantly at 48 and 72 hpf. We conclude that increasing exposure time to caffeine stimulates oxidative stress and may trigger apoptosis via a mitochondrial-dependent pathway. Also caffeine increases heartbeat from early phases of development without affecting the morphology and survival but delays hatching. Use of caffeine during pregnancy and lactation may harm the fetus by affecting the expression of cell-damage related genes.

  10. Caffeine as a model drug of dependence: recent developments in understanding caffeine withdrawal, the caffeine dependence syndrome, and caffeine negative reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, R R; Chausmer, A L

    2000-11-01

    Caffeine is an excellent model compound for understanding drugs of abuse/dependence. The results of self-administration and choice studies in humans clearly demonstrate the reinforcing effects of low and moderate doses of caffeine. Caffeine reinforcement has been demonstrated in about 45% of normal subjects with histories of moderate and heavy caffeine use. Recent studies provide compelling evidence that caffeine physical dependence potentiates the reinforcing effects of caffeine through the mechanism of withdrawal symptom avoidance. Tolerance to the subjective and sleep-disrupting effects of caffeine in humans has been demonstrated. Physical dependence as reflected in a withdrawal syndrome in humans has been repeatedly demonstrated in adults and recently demonstrated in children. Withdrawal severity is an increasing function of caffeine maintenance dose, with withdrawal occurring at doses as low as 100 mg per day. Increased cerebral blood flow may be the physiological mechanism for caffeine withdrawal headache. Case studies in adults and adolescents clearly demonstrate that some individuals meet DSM-IV diagnostic criteria for a substance dependence syndrome on caffeine, including feeling compelled to continue caffeine use despite desires and recommendations to the contrary. Survey data suggest that 9% to 30% percent of caffeine consumers may be caffeine dependent according to DSM-IV criteria.

  11. Cardiovascular Effects of Caffeine: Misconceptions about caffeine use and caronary heart disease

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, Martin G.

    1992-01-01

    A review of the literature on the cardiovascular effects of caffeine indicates that moderate caffeine consumption does not cause cardiac arrhythmias, hypertension, or an increased incidence of coronary heart disease. Caffeine use is often associated with atherogenic behavior, such as cigarette smoking. Failure to take into account covariables for cardiovascular disease could be responsible for commonly held misconceptions about caffeine and heart disease.

  12. Resibufogenin Induces G1-Phase Arrest through the Proteasomal Degradation of Cyclin D1 in Human Malignant Tumor Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masami Ichikawa

    Full Text Available Huachansu, a traditional Chinese medicine prepared from the dried toad skin, has been used in clinical studies for various cancers in China. Resibufogenin is a component of huachansu and classified as bufadienolides. Resibufogenin has been shown to exhibit the anti-proliferative effect against cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanism of resibufogenin remains unknown. Here we report that resibufogenin induces G1-phase arrest with hypophosphorylation of retinoblastoma (RB protein and down-regulation of cyclin D1 expression in human colon cancer HT-29 cells. Since the down-regulation of cyclin D1 was completely blocked by a proteasome inhibitor MG132, the suppression of cyclin D1 expression by resibufogenin was considered to be in a proteasome-dependent manner. It is known that glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β induces the proteasomal degradation of cyclin D1. The addition of GSK-3β inhibitor SB216763 inhibited the reduction of cyclin D1 caused by resibufogenin. These effects on cyclin D1 by resibufogenin were also observed in human lung cancer A549 cells. These findings suggest that the anti-proliferative effect of resibufogenin may be attributed to the degradation of cyclin D1 caused by the activation of GSK-3β.

  13. MicroRNA-195 inhibits the proliferation of human glioma cells by directly targeting cyclin D1 and cyclin E1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Hui

    Full Text Available Glioma proliferation is a multistep process during which a sequence of genetic and epigenetic alterations randomly occur to affect the genes controlling cell proliferation, cell death and genetic stability. microRNAs are emerging as important epigenetic modulators of multiple target genes, leading to abnormal cellular signaling involving cellular proliferation in cancers.In the present study, we found that expression of miR-195 was markedly downregulated in glioma cell lines and human primary glioma tissues, compared to normal human astrocytes and matched non-tumor associated tissues. Upregulation of miR-195 dramatically reduced the proliferation of glioma cells. Flow cytometry analysis showed that ectopic expression of miR-195 significantly decreased the percentage of S phase cells and increased the percentage of G1/G0 phase cells. Overexpression of miR-195 dramatically reduced the anchorage-independent growth ability of glioma cells. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-195 downregulated the levels of phosphorylated retinoblastoma (pRb and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA in glioma cells. Conversely, inhibition of miR-195 promoted cell proliferation, increased the percentage of S phase cells, reduced the percentage of G1/G0 phase cells, enhanced anchorage-independent growth ability, upregulated the phosphorylation of pRb and PCNA in glioma cells. Moreover, we show that miR-195 inhibited glioma cell proliferation by downregulating expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E1, via directly targeting the 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTR of cyclin D1 and cyclin E1 mRNA. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-195 plays an important role to inhibit the proliferation of glioma cells, and present a novel mechanism for direct miRNA-mediated suppression of cyclin D1 and cyclin E1 in glioma.

  14. Caffeine intake among adolescents in Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mridul Gera

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Availability and advertising of caffeinated drinks is on the rise in Indian market. Excess caffeine intake may have deleterious effects on health. Objective: To estimate the daily consumption of caffeine among urban school-going adolescents from Delhi. Materials and Methods: A school-based survey was conducted to determine the amount and pattern of caffeine consumption among students of classes 9-12, using a self-administered questionnaire. Results: Of 300 participants (median age 15 year, 174 boys, 291 (97% were consuming caffeine [mean (SD: 121.0 (98.2 mg/day]. Nineteen (6% students were consuming more than 300 mg of caffeine per day. Tea/coffee contributed to more than 50% of the caffeine intake. The rest was derived from cola beverages, chocolates, and energy drinks. Conclusion: Average caffeine consumption among school-going adolescents from Delhi is high. The findings of this preliminary survey need to be confirmed in larger data sets.

  15. EXPRESSION OF P16 AND CYCLIN D1 IN THE COURSE OF CARCINOGENESIS OF THE STOMACH

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Yu-long; XU Feng; LI Yan-jie

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To determine p16 and cyclin D1 expression in the specimen of gastric carcinoma, atypic hyperplasia, atrophic gastritis, superficial gastritis and normal gastric mucosa. Methods: Using immunohistochemical method (ABC), the samples of 58 adenocarcinomas, 22 atypic hyperplasias, 28 atrophic gastritis,27 superficial gastritis and 15 gastric epitheliums were analyzed. Results: Positive immunostaining rate for p16 protein was the highest in normal gastric mucosa and decreased with the lesions progressing from superficial gastritis to atrophic gastritis to atypital hyperplasia and to adenocarcinoma (85%, 78.6%, 31.8%,48.3% respectively); Positive immunostaining of cyclin D1 can observed in atrophic gastritis. With the lesions progressing from atrophic gastritis to atypical hyperplasia to adenocarcinoma, its expression rate increased (17.9%, 36.4%, 53.4% respectively), and there was a significant difference between adenocarcinoma and atrophic gastritis group (P<0.05). An interesting observation was that inverse expression between p16and cyclin D1, was shown in most of gastric cancer detected. Conclusion: It is indicated that p16 and cyclin D1 play an important role in the gastric carcinogenesis, the inverse expression between p16 and cyclin D1 suggested that there is a suppression trend in them.

  16. Caffeine prevents d-galactose-induced cognitive deficits, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration in the adult rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Faheem; Ali, Tahir; Ullah, Najeeb; Kim, Myeong Ok

    2015-11-01

    d-galactose has been considered a senescent model for age-related neurodegenerative disease. It induces oxidative stress which triggers memory impairment, neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration. Caffeine act as anti-oxidant and has been used in various model of neurodegenerative disease. Nevertheless, the effect of caffeine against d-galactose aging murine model of age-related neurodegenerative disease elucidated. Here, we investigated the neuroprotective effect of caffeine against d-galactose. We observed that chronic treatment of caffeine (3 mg/kg/day intraperitoneally (i.p) for 60 days) improved memory impairment and synaptic markers (Synaptophysin and PSD95) in the d-galactose treated rats. Chronic caffeine treatment reduced the oxidative stress via the reduction of 8-oxoguanine through immunofluorescence in the d-galactose-treated rats. Consequently caffeine treatment suppressed stress kinases p-JNK. Additionally, caffeine treatment significantly reduced the d-galactose-induced neuroinflammation through alleviation of COX-2, NOS-2, TNFα and IL-1β. Furthermore we also analyzed that caffeine reduced cytochrome C, Bax/Bcl2 ratio, caspase-9, caspase-3 and PARP-1 level. Moreover by evaluating the immunohistochemical results of Nissl and Fluro-Jade B staining showed that caffeine prevented the neurodegeneration in the d-galactose-treated rats. Our results showed that caffeine prevents the d-galactose-induced oxidative stress and consequently alleviated neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration; and synaptic dysfunction and memory impairment. Therefore, we could suggest that caffeine might be a dietary anti-oxidant agent and a good candidate for the age-related neurodegenerative disorders.

  17. Caffeine gum minimizes sleep inertia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Rachel A; Kamimori, Gary H; Wesensten, Nancy J; Picchioni, Dante; Balkin, Thomas J

    2013-02-01

    Naps are an effective strategy for maintaining alertness and cognitive performance; however, upon abrupt wakening from naps, sleep inertia (temporary performance degradation) may ensue. In the present study, attenuation of post-nap sleep inertia was attempted by administration of caffeine gum. Using a double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover design, 15 healthy, non-smoking adults were awakened at 1 hr. and again at 6 hr. after lights out (0100 and 0600, respectively) and were immediately administered a gum pellet containing 100 mg of caffeine or placebo. A 5-min. psychomotor vigilance task was administered at 0 min., 6 min., 12 min., and 18 min. post-awakening. At 0100, response speed with caffeine was significantly better at 12 min. and 18 min. post-awakening compared to placebo; at 0600, caffeine's effects were evident at 18 min. post-awakening. Caffeinated gum is a viable means of rapidly attenuating sleep inertia, suggesting that the adenosine receptor system is involved in sleep maintenance.

  18. Caffeine, sleep and quality of life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorist, M.M.; Snel, J.; Verster, J.C.; Pandi-Perumal, S.R.; Streiner, D.L.

    2008-01-01

    Caffeine is regarded as a mild stimulant acting on the central nervous system that is responsible for a significant portion of the behavioural and physiological effects of coffee and tea. Motives why people take caffeine are reflected in consumption patterns. Early in the morning caffeine might help

  19. 21 CFR 182.1180 - Caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Caffeine. 182.1180 Section 182.1180 Food and Drugs... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Multiple Purpose GRAS Food Substances § 182.1180 Caffeine. (a) Product. Caffeine. (b) Tolerance. 0.02 percent. (c) Limitations, restrictions,...

  20. Make Caffeine Visible: a Fluorescent Caffeine “Traffic Light” Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wang; Kim, Tae-Hyeong; Zhai, Duanting; Er, Jun Cheng; Zhang, Liyun; Kale, Anup Atul; Agrawalla, Bikram Keshari; Cho, Yoon-Kyoung; Chang, Young-Tae

    2013-07-01

    Caffeine has attracted abundant attention due to its extensive existence in beverages and medicines. However, to detect it sensitively and conveniently remains a challenge, especially in resource-limited regions. Here we report a novel aqueous phase fluorescent caffeine sensor named Caffeine Orange which exhibits 250-fold fluorescence enhancement upon caffeine activation and high selectivity. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy indicate that π-stacking and hydrogen-bonding contribute to their interactions while dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy experiments demonstrate the change of Caffeine Orange ambient environment induces its fluorescence emission. To utilize this probe in real life, we developed a non-toxic caffeine detection kit and tested it for caffeine quantification in various beverages. Naked-eye sensing of various caffeine concentrations was possible based on color changes upon irradiation with a laser pointer. Lastly, we performed the whole system on a microfluidic device to make caffeine detection quick, sensitive and automated.

  1. HIV-1 expression induces cyclin D1 expression and pRb phosphorylation in infected podocytes: cell-cycle mechanisms contributing to the proliferative phenotype in HIV-associated nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husain Mohammad

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aberrant cell-cycle progression of HIV-1-infected kidney cells plays a major role in the pathogenesis of HIV-associated nephropathy, however the mechanisms whereby HIV-1 induces infected glomerular podocytes or infected tubular epithelium to exit quiescence are largely unknown. Here, we ask whether the expression of HIV-1 genes in infected podocytes induces cyclin D1 and phospho-pRb (Ser780 expression, hallmarks of cyclin D1-mediated G1 → S phase progression. Results We assessed cyclin D1 and phospho-pRb (Ser780 expression in two well-characterized models of HIV-associated nephropathy pathogenesis: HIV-1 infection of cultured podocytes and HIV-1 transgenic mice (Tg26. Compared to controls, cultured podocytes expressing HIV-1 genes, and podocytes and tubular epithelium from hyperplastic nephrons in Tg26 kidneys, had increased levels of phospho-pRb (Ser780, a target of active cyclin D1/cyclin-dependent kinase-4/6 known to promote G1 → S phase progression. HIV-1-infected podocytes showed markedly elevated cyclin D1 mRNA and cyclin D1 protein, the latter of which did not down-regulate during cell-cell contact or differentiation, suggesting post-transcriptional stabilization of cyclin D1 protein levels by HIV-1. The selective suppression of HIV-1 transcription by the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, flavopiridol, abrogated cyclin D1 expression, underlying the requirement for HIV-1 encoded products to induce cyclin D1. Indeed, HIV-1 virus deleted of nef failed to induce cyclin D1 mRNA to the level of other single gene mutant viruses. Conclusions HIV-1 expression induces cyclin D1 and phospho-pRb (Ser780 expression in infected podocytes, suggesting that HIV-1 activates cyclin D1-dependent cell-cycle mechanisms to promote proliferation of infected renal epithelium.

  2. A Snack-based Ration Containing Caffeine Increases Caloric Intake and Improves Cognitive Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    collection, and Dr. Jennifer Rood for her assistance with the caffeine and cortisol analysis. viii INTRODUCTION During military operations Warfighters...wildland fire suppression. Med Sci Sports Exerc 38: S36, 2006b. Ely, MR, SM McGraw, BC Ruby, JS Cuddy, D Slivka, J Rood , Monlain SJ. Blood

  3. Does caffeine affect cardiovascular responses?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Bradamante; L. Barenghi (Livia); S. Versari (Silvia); A. Villa (Alessandro); J.W. de Jong (Jan Willem)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractCaffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine), a natural alkaloid present in many beverages such as coffee, tea and cola drinks, is the most widely consumed pharmacological compound. Due to its common use and frequent intake in stressful conditions, a great deal of data have been produced by epidem

  4. Caffeine Modulates Attention Network Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunye, Tad T.; Mahoney, Caroline R.; Lieberman, Harris R.; Taylor, Holly A.

    2010-01-01

    The present work investigated the effects of caffeine (0 mg, 100 mg, 200 mg, 400 mg) on a flanker task designed to test Posner's three visual attention network functions: alerting, orienting, and executive control [Posner, M. I. (2004). "Cognitive neuroscience of attention". New York, NY: Guilford Press]. In a placebo-controlled, double-blind…

  5. Caffeine, cognition, and socioeconomic status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Janet; Fox, Helen C; Whalley, Lawrence J

    2010-01-01

    There is interest in age-related cognitive decline and environmental risk factors for Alzheimer's disease (AD). This interest is focused on individual differences in exposure to agents that may harm or protect cognitive function. Caffeine is used as a short acting mental stimulant and may possess longer-term properties that protect against age-related decline and, possibly, AD. The current study aimed to: 1) examine current cognitive function in a narrow age range sample (n=351) without dementia (MMSE>25) who are, by reason of age, entering the period of increased risk of AD; and 2) link cognitive function to self-reported intake of caffeine and socioeconomic status (SES). Possible confounding by gender, childhood intelligence, education, and symptoms of anxiety and depression was introduced into the statistical model. There were significant differences between SES groups in caffeine intake (pcognitive performance (pcaffeine intake were associated with slower digit symbol speed (F =3.38, pcaffeine during cognitive testing and strong links between SES and cognitive performance. No evidence in support of cognitive enhancing effects of caffeine was found.

  6. Caffeine Use Affects Pregnancy Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego, Miguel; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Vera, Yanexy; Gil, Karla; Gonzalez-Garcia, Adolfo

    2008-01-01

    A sample of 750 women were interviewed during pregnancy on their depression and anxiety symptoms, substance use and demographic variables. A subsample was seen again at the neonatal stage (n = 152), and their infants were observed for sleep-wake behavior. Symptoms of depression and anxiety were related to caffeine use. Mothers who consumed more…

  7. Vitamin C Inhibits Benzo[a]pyrene-lnduced Cell Cycle Changes Partly via Cyclin D1/ E2F Pathway in Human Embryo Lung Fibroblasts

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AI GAO; BING-CI LIU; XIANG-LIN SHI; CHUAN-SHU HUANG; XIAO-WEI JLA; BAO-RONG YOU; MENG YE; FU-HAI SHEN; HONG-JU DU

    2006-01-01

    Objective To study the molecular mechanism of the inhibitory effects of vitamin C on benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P)-induced changes of cell cycle in human embryo lung fibroblast (HELF) cells. Methods The stable transfectants, HELF transfected with antisense cyclin D1 and antisense CDK4, were established. Cells were cultured and pretreated with vitamin C before stimulation with B[a]P for 24 h. The expression levels of cyclin D1, CDK4, E2F1, and E2F4 were determined by Western blot. Flow cytometric analysis was employed to detect the distributions of cell cycle. Results B[a]P significantly elevated the expression levels of cyclin D1, E2F1, and E2F4 in HELF cells. Vitamin C decreased the expression levels of cyclin D1, E2F1, and E2F4 in B[a]P-stimulated HELF cells. Dose-dependent relationships were not found between the different concentrations of vitamin C (10, 100, 500, 1000, and 5000 μmol/L) and the expression levels of cyclin D1, E2F1, and E2F4 in HELF cells. The expression levels of cyclin D1, E2F1, and E2F4 in B[a]P-treated transfectants were lower than those in B[a]P-treated HELF cells. The expression levels of cyclin D1 and E2F4 treated with vitamin C and antisense cyclin D1 were decreased compared with those treated with antisense cyclin D1 alone. The effects of vitamin C combined with antisense CDK4 on the expression levels of cyclin D1 and E2F1/E2F4 were similar to those of antisense CDK4 alone. B[a]P progressed HELF cells from G1 to S phase. Both vitamin C and antisense cyclin D1 suppressed the changes of cell cycle progressed by B[a]P. However, antisenseCDK4 did not attenuate the above changes. Vitamin C combined with antisense CDK4 markedly suppressed B[a]P-induced changes of cell cycle as compared with antisense CDK4. But the inhibitory effects of vitamin C combined with antisense cyclin D1 on B[a]P-induced changes of cell cycle were similar to those of vitamin C alone or antisense cyclin D1 alone. Conclusions B[a]P progressed HELF cells from G1 to S phase via

  8. Efficient Wnt mediated intestinal hyperproliferation requires the cyclin D2-CDK4/6 complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sansom Owen

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Inactivation of the gene encoding the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC tumour suppressor protein is recognized as the key early event in the development of colorectal cancers (CRC. Apc loss leads to nuclear localization of beta-catenin and constitutive activity of the beta-catenin-Tcf4 transcription complex. This complex drives the expression of genes involved in cell cycle progression such as c-Myc and cyclin D2. Acute loss of Apc in the small intestine leads to hyperproliferation within the intestinal crypt, increased levels of apoptosis, and perturbed differentiation and migration. It has been demonstrated that c-Myc is a critical mediator of the phenotypic abnormalities that follow Apc loss in the intestine. As it may be difficult to pharmacologically inhibit transcription factors such as c-Myc, investigating more druggable targets of the Wnt-c-Myc pathway within the intestine may reveal potential therapeutic targets for CRC. Recent work in our laboratory has shown that the cyclin D2-cyclin-dependent kinase 4/6 (CDK4/6 complex promotes hyperproliferation in Apc deficient intestinal tissue and ApcMin/+ adenomas. We showed that the hyperproliferative phenotype associated with Apc loss in vivo was partially dependent on the expression of cyclin D2. Most importantly, tumour growth and development in ApcMin/+ mice was strongly perturbed in mice lacking cyclin D2. Furthermore, pharmacological inhibition of CDK4/6 suppressed the proliferation of adenomatous cells. This commentary discusses the significance of this work in providing evidence for the importance of the cyclin D2-CDK4/6 complex in colorectal adenoma formation. It also argues that inhibition of this complex may be an effective chemopreventative strategy in CRC.

  9. Consumption of caffeinated beverages and the awareness of their caffeine content among Dutch students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackus, Marlou; van de Loo, Aurora J A E; Benson, Sarah; Scholey, Andrew; Verster, Joris C

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the knowledge of caffeine content of a variety of caffeinated beverages among Dutch university students. A pencil-and-paper survey was conducted among N = 800 Dutch students. Most participants (87.8%) reported consuming caffeinated beverages during the past 24 h. Their mean ± SD past 24-h caffeine intake from beverages was 144.2 ± 169.5 mg (2.2 ± 3.0 mg/kg bw). Most prevalent sources of caffeine were coffee beverages (50.8%) and tea (34.8%), followed by energy drink (9.2%), cola (4.7%), and chocolate milk (0.5%). Participants had poor knowledge on the relative caffeine content of caffeinated beverages. That is, they overestimated the caffeine content of energy drinks and cola, and underestimated the caffeine content of coffee beverages. If caffeine consumption is a concern, it is important to inform consumers about the caffeine content of all caffeine containing beverages, including coffee and tea. The current findings support previous research that the most effective way to reduce caffeine intake is to limit the consumption of coffee beverages and tea.

  10. Caffeine mediates sustained inactivation of breast cancer-associated myofibroblasts via up-regulation of tumor suppressor genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mysoon M Al-Ansari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Active cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs or myofibroblasts play important roles not only in the development and progression of breast carcinomas, but also in their prognosis and treatment. Therefore, targeting these cells through suppressing their supportive procarcinogenic paracrine effects is mandatory for improving the current therapies that are mainly targeting tumor cells. To this end, we investigated the effect of the natural and pharmacologically safe molecule, caffeine, on CAF cells and their various procarcinogenic effects. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have shown here that caffeine up-regulates the tumor suppressor proteins p16, p21, p53 and Cav-1, and reduces the expression/secretion of various cytokines (IL-6, TGF-β, SDF-1 and MMP-2, and down-regulates α-SMA. Furthermore, caffeine suppressed the migratory/invasiveness abilities of CAF cells through PTEN-dependent Akt/Erk1/2 inactivation. Moreover, caffeine reduced the paracrine pro-invasion/-migration effects of CAF cells on breast cancer cells. These results indicate that caffeine can inactivate breast stromal myofibroblasts. This has been confirmed by showing that caffeine also suppresses the paracrine pro-angiogenic effect of CAF cells through down-regulating HIF-1αand its downstream effector VEGF-A. Interestingly, these effects were sustained in absence of caffeine. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The present findings provide a proof of principle that breast cancer myofibroblasts can be inactivated, and thereby caffeine may provide a safe and effective prevention against breast tumor growth/recurrence through inhibition of the procarcinogenic effects of active stromal fibroblasts.

  11. A case of atrial tachycardia sensitive to increased caffeine intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinugawa, Toru; Kurita, Takashi; Nohara, Ryuji; Smith, Michael L

    2011-01-01

    A 33-year-old Japanese man with atrial tachycardia visited our clinic. He regularly consumed daily alcohol with cola, one cup of regular coffee, and a candy containing 0.7 mg of caffeine per tablet. After stopping his caffeine intake, his arrhythmia ameliorated. Since caffeine might be associated with his arrhythmia, a caffeine load test (equivalent to his daily intake of caffeine) was performed for 4 days. Atrial tachycardia time from a Holter recording was 44.2 minute/day before the caffeine load, compared with 215.2 minute/day during the caffeine load. Plasma caffeine concentration before and during caffeine loading was 3.1 mg/dL and 5.4 mg/dL, respectively. Caffeine use seemed to be an important factor for his atrial tachycardia, since his arrhythmia became worse during caffeine load testing and was ameliorated after the cessation of caffeine.

  12. Caffeine renal clearance and urine caffeine concentrations during steady state dosing. Implications for monitoring caffeine intake during sports events.

    OpenAIRE

    Birkett, D J; Miners, J O

    1991-01-01

    1. Relationships between the plasma and urine concentrations and clearances of caffeine over successive dosage intervals at steady-state were investigated in six healthy volunteers administered caffeine, 150 mg 8 hourly for 6 days. 2. There was marked inter-individual variability in the urine (15.9-fold range) and steady-state plasma (8.1-fold range) concentrations of caffeine. 3. Urine caffeine concentrations were similar to those in plasma, with mean ratios (plasma:urine) ranging from 1.10 ...

  13. Expectation of having consumed caffeine can improve performance and mood

    OpenAIRE

    Dawkins, Lynne; Shahzad, Fatima-Zahra; Ahmed, Suada S.; Edmonds, Caroline J.

    2011-01-01

    We explored whether caffeine, and expectation of having consumed caffeine, affects attention, reward responsivity and mood using double-blinded methodology. 88 participants were randomly allocated to ‘drink-type’ (caffeinated/decaffeinated coffee) and ‘expectancy’ (told caffeinated/told decaffeinated coffee) manipulations. Both caffeine and expectation of having consumed caffeine improved attention and psychomotor speed. Expectation enhanced self-reported vigour and reward responsivity. Self-...

  14. Consumption of caffeinated beverages and the awareness of their caffeine content among Dutch students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mackus, Marlou; van de Loo, Aurora J A E; Benson, Sarah; Scholey, Andrew; Verster, Joris C

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the knowledge of caffeine content of a variety of caffeinated beverages among Dutch university students. A pencil-and-paper survey was conducted among N = 800 Dutch students. Most participants (87.8%) reported consuming caffeinated beverages during the

  15. p21/Cyclin E pathway modulates anticlastogenic function of Bmi-1 in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Wen; Zhou, Yuan; Tiwari, Agnes F Y; Su, Hang; Yang, Jie; Zhu, Dandan; Lau, Victoria Ming Yi; Hau, Pok Man; Yip, Yim Ling; Cheung, Annie L M; Guan, Xin-Yuan; Tsao, Sai Wah

    2015-03-15

    Apart from regulating stem cell self-renewal, embryonic development and proliferation, Bmi-1 has been recently reported to be critical in the maintenance of genome integrity. In searching for novel mechanisms underlying the anticlastogenic function of Bmi-1, we observed, for the first time, that Bmi-1 positively regulates p21 expression. We extended the finding that Bmi-1 deficiency induced chromosome breaks in multiple cancer cell models. Interestingly, we further demonstrated that knockdown of cyclin E or ectopic overexpression of p21 rescued Bmi-1 deficiency-induced chromosome breaks. We therefore conclude that p21/cyclin E pathway is crucial in modulating the anticlastogenic function of Bmi-1. As it is well established that the overexpression of cyclin E potently induces genome instability and p21 suppresses the function of cyclin E, the novel and important implication from our findings is that Bmi-1 plays an important role in limiting genomic instability in cylin E-overexpressing cancer cells by positive regulation of p21.

  16. The effects of caffeine on wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojeh, Nkemcho; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Pastar, Irena; Sawaya, Andrew; Yin, Natalie; Tomic-Canic, Marjana

    2016-10-01

    The purine alkaloid caffeine is a major component of many beverages such as coffee and tea. Caffeine and its metabolites theobromine and xanthine have been shown to have antioxidant properties. Caffeine can also act as adenosine-receptor antagonist. Although it has been shown that adenosine and antioxidants promote wound healing, the effect of caffeine on wound healing is currently unknown. To investigate the effects of caffeine on processes involved in epithelialisation, we used primary human keratinocytes, HaCaT cell line and ex vivo model of human skin. First, we tested the effects of caffeine on cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion and migration, processes essential for normal wound epithelialisation and closure. We used 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) proliferation assay to test the effects of seven different caffeine doses ranging from 0·1 to 5 mM. We found that caffeine restricted cell proliferation of keratinocytes in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, scratch wound assays performed on keratinocyte monolayers indicated dose-dependent delays in cell migration. Interestingly, adhesion and differentiation remained unaffected in monolayer cultures treated with various doses of caffeine. Using a human ex vivo wound healing model, we tested topical application of caffeine and found that it impedes epithelialisation, confirming in vitro data. We conclude that caffeine, which is known to have antioxidant properties, impedes keratinocyte proliferation and migration, suggesting that it may have an inhibitory effect on wound healing and epithelialisation. Therefore, our findings are more in support of a role for caffeine as adenosine-receptor antagonist that would negate the effect of adenosine in promoting wound healing.

  17. Caffeine synthase and related methyltransferases in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misako, Kato; Kouichi, Mizuno

    2004-05-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) is a purine alkaloid present in high concentrations in tea and coffee and it is also found in a number of beverages such as coca cola. It is necessary to elucidate the caffeine biosynthetic pathway and to clone the genes related to the production of caffeine not only to determine the metabolism of the purine alkaloid but also to control the content of caffeine in tea and coffee. The available data support the operation of a xanthosine-->7-methylxanthosine-->7-methylxanthine-->theobromine-->caffeine pathway as the major route to caffeine. Since the caffeine biosynthetic pathway contains three S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) dependent methylation steps, N-methyltransferases play important roles. This review focuses on the enzymes and genes involved in the methylation of purine ring. Caffeine synthase, the SAM-dependent methyltransferase involved in the last two steps of caffeine biosynthesis, was originally purified from young tea leaves (Camellia sinensis). The isolated cDNA, termed TCS1, consists of 1,483 base pairs and encodes a protein of 369 amino acids. Subsequently, the homologous genes that encode caffeine biosynthetic enzymes from coffee (Coffea arabica) were isolated. The recombinant proteins are classified into the three types on the basis of their substrate specificity i.e. 7-methylxanthosine synthase, theobromine synthase and caffeine synthase. The predicted amino acid sequences of caffeine biosynthetic enzymes derived from C. arabica exhibit more than 80% homology with those of the clones and but show only 40% homology with TCS1 derived from C. sinensis. In addition, they share 40% homology with the amino acid sequences of salicylic carboxyl methyltransferase, benzoic acid carboxyl methyltransferase and jasmonic acid carboxyl methyltransferase which belong to a family of motif B' methyltransferases which are novel plant methyltransferases with motif B' instead of motif B as the conserved region.

  18. Caffeine Modulates Attention Network Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    stimulant in the world, found naturally in many foods and beverages, and often cited for its positive effects on vigilance and mental alertness (for...is abundantly available in both natural (e.g., coffee, tea, chocolate) and supplemented (e.g., soft drinks, energy bars) food and beverages, as well...Weiss, M. (2001). Readiness potential in different states of physical activation and after ingestion of taurine and/or caffeine containing drinks

  19. Molecular evolution of cyclin proteins in animals and fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afonnikov Dmitry A

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The passage through the cell cycle is controlled by complexes of cyclins, the regulatory units, with cyclin-dependent kinases, the catalytic units. It is also known that cyclins form several families, which differ considerably in primary structure from one eukaryotic organism to another. Despite these lines of evidence, the relationship between the evolution of cyclins and their function is an open issue. Here we present the results of our study on the molecular evolution of A-, B-, D-, E-type cyclin proteins in animals and fungi. Results We constructed phylogenetic trees for these proteins, their ancestral sequences and analyzed patterns of amino acid replacements. The analysis of infrequently fixed atypical amino acid replacements in cyclins evidenced that accelerated evolution proceeded predominantly during paralog duplication or after it in animals and fungi and that it was related to aromorphic changes in animals. It was shown also that evolutionary flexibility of cyclin function may be provided by consequential reorganization of regions on protein surface remote from CDK binding sites in animal and fungal cyclins and by functional differentiation of paralogous cyclins formed in animal evolution. Conclusions The results suggested that changes in the number and/or nature of cyclin-binding proteins may underlie the evolutionary role of the alterations in the molecular structure of cyclins and their involvement in diverse molecular-genetic events.

  20. Effect of caffeine concentration on biomass production, caffeine degradation, and morphology of Aspergillus tamarii

    OpenAIRE

    Gutierrez-Sanchez, G.; Roussos, Sevastianos; Augur, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the initial caffeine concentration (1-8 g/L) on growth and caffeine consumption by Aspergillus tamarii as well as pellet morphology, in submerged fermentation. Caffeine was used as sole nitrogen source. At 1 g/L of initial caffeine concentration, caffeine degradation was not affected, resulting in a production of 8.7 g/L of biomass. The highest biomass production (12.4-14.8 g/L) was observed within a range of 2 to 4 g/L of initial caf...

  1. An optimized and validated SPE-LC-MS/MS method for the determination of caffeine and paraxanthine in hair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Kesel, Pieter M M; Lambert, Willy E; Stove, Christophe P

    2015-11-01

    Caffeine is the probe drug of choice to assess the phenotype of the drug metabolizing enzyme CYP1A2. Typically, molar concentration ratios of paraxanthine, caffeine's major metabolite, to its precursor are determined in plasma following administration of a caffeine test dose. The aim of this study was to develop and validate an LC-MS/MS method for the determination of caffeine and paraxanthine in hair. The different steps of a hair extraction procedure were thoroughly optimized. Following a three-step decontamination procedure, caffeine and paraxanthine were extracted from 20 mg of ground hair using a solution of protease type VIII in Tris buffer (pH 7.5). Resulting hair extracts were cleaned up on Strata-X™ SPE cartridges. All samples were analyzed on a Waters Acquity UPLC® system coupled to an AB SCIEX API 4000™ triple quadrupole mass spectrometer. The final method was fully validated based on international guidelines. Linear calibration lines for caffeine and paraxanthine ranged from 20 to 500 pg/mg. Precision (%RSD) and accuracy (%bias) were below 12% and 7%, respectively. The isotopically labeled internal standards compensated for the ion suppression observed for both compounds. Relative matrix effects were below 15%RSD. The recovery of the sample preparation procedure was high (>85%) and reproducible. Caffeine and paraxanthine were stable in hair for at least 644 days. The effect of the hair decontamination procedure was evaluated as well. Finally, the applicability of the developed procedure was demonstrated by determining caffeine and paraxanthine concentrations in hair samples of ten healthy volunteers. The optimized and validated method for determination of caffeine and paraxanthine in hair proved to be reliable and may serve to evaluate the potential of hair analysis for CYP1A2 phenotyping.

  2. Caffeine and exercise: metabolism, endurance and performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, T E

    2001-01-01

    Caffeine is a common substance in the diets of most athletes and it is now appearing in many new products, including energy drinks, sport gels, alcoholic beverages and diet aids. It can be a powerful ergogenic aid at levels that are considerably lower than the acceptable limit of the International Olympic Committee and could be beneficial in training and in competition. Caffeine does not improve maximal oxygen capacity directly, but could permit the athlete to train at a greater power output and/or to train longer. It has also been shown to increase speed and/or power output in simulated race conditions. These effects have been found in activities that last as little as 60 seconds or as long as 2 hours. There is less information about the effects of caffeine on strength; however, recent work suggests no effect on maximal ability, but enhanced endurance or resistance to fatigue. There is no evidence that caffeine ingestion before exercise leads to dehydration, ion imbalance, or any other adverse effects. The ingestion of caffeine as coffee appears to be ineffective compared to doping with pure caffeine. Related compounds such as theophylline are also potent ergogenic aids. Caffeine may act synergistically with other drugs including ephedrine and anti-inflammatory agents. It appears that male and female athletes have similar caffeine pharmacokinetics, i.e., for a given dose of caffeine, the time course and absolute plasma concentrations of caffeine and its metabolites are the same. In addition, exercise or dehydration does not affect caffeine pharmacokinetics. The limited information available suggests that caffeine non-users and users respond similarly and that withdrawal from caffeine may not be important. The mechanism(s) by which caffeine elicits its ergogenic effects are unknown, but the popular theory that it enhances fat oxidation and spares muscle glycogen has very little support and is an incomplete explanation at best. Caffeine may work, in part, by

  3. Effect of caffeine concentration on biomass production, caffeine degradation, and morphology of Aspergillus tamarii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez-Sánchez, G; Roussos, S; Augur, C

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of the initial caffeine concentration (1-8 g/L) on growth and caffeine consumption by Aspergillus tamarii as well as pellet morphology, in submerged fermentation. Caffeine was used as sole nitrogen source. At 1 g/L of initial caffeine concentration, caffeine degradation was not affected, resulting in a production of 8.7 g/L of biomass. The highest biomass production (12.4-14.8 g/L) was observed within a range of 2 to 4 g/L of initial caffeine concentration. At these initial caffeine concentrations, after 96 h of fermentation, 41-51 % of the initial caffeine was degraded. Using an initial caffeine concentration of 2-3 g/L, the highest specific growth rate was observed (μ = 0.069 1/h). Biomass production decreased at 8 g/L of initial caffeine concentration. A. tamarii formed mainly pellets at all concentrations tested. The size of the pellet decreased at a caffeine concentration of 8 g/L.

  4. A fluvoxamine-caffeine interaction study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, U; Loft, S; Poulsen, H E

    1996-01-01

    fluvoxamine and caffeine. The study was carried out as a randomized, in vivo, cross-over study including eight healthy volunteers. In Period A of the study, each subject took 200 mg caffeine orally, and in Period B, the subjects took fluvoxamine 50 mg per day for 4 days and 100 mg per day for 8 days. On day 8...

  5. Creatine and Caffeine: Considerations for Concurrent Supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trexler, Eric T; Smith-Ryan, Abbie E

    2015-12-01

    Nutritional supplementation is a common practice among athletes, with creatine and caffeine among the most commonly used ergogenic aids. Hundreds of studies have investigated the ergogenic potential of creatine supplementation, with consistent improvements in strength and power reported for exercise bouts of short duration (≤ 30 s) and high intensity. Caffeine has been shown to improve endurance exercise performance, but results are mixed in the context of strength and sprint performance. Further, there is conflicting evidence from studies comparing the ergogenic effects of coffee and caffeine anhydrous supplementation. Previous research has identified independent mechanisms by which creatine and caffeine may improve strength and sprint performance, leading to the formulation of multi-ingredient supplements containing both ingredients. Although scarce, research has suggested that caffeine ingestion may blunt the ergogenic effect of creatine. While a pharmacokinetic interaction is unlikely, authors have suggested that this effect may be explained by opposing effects on muscle relaxation time or gastrointestinal side effects from simultaneous consumption. The current review aims to evaluate the ergogenic potential of creatine and caffeine in the context of high-intensity exercise. Research directly comparing coffee and caffeine anhydrous is discussed, along with previous studies evaluating the concurrent supplementation of creatine and caffeine.

  6. Effects of caffeine on sleep and cognition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snel, J.; Lorist, M.M.; Van Dongen, H.P.A.; Kerkhof, G.A.

    2011-01-01

    Caffeine can be used effectively to manipulate our mental state. It is beneficial in restoring low levels of wakefulness and in counteracting degraded cognitive task performance due to sleep deprivation. However, caffeine may produce detrimental effects on subsequent sleep, resulting in daytime slee

  7. Effects of Caffeine on Auditory Brainstem Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saleheh Soleimanian

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Blocking of the adenosine receptor in central nervous system by caffeine can lead to increasing the level of neurotransmitters like glutamate. As the adenosine receptors are present in almost all brain areas like central auditory pathway, it seems caffeine can change conduction in this way. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of caffeine on latency and amplitude of auditory brainstem response(ABR.Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial study 43 normal 18-25 years old male students were participated. The subjects consumed 0, 2 and 3 mg/kg BW caffeine in three different sessions. Auditory brainstem responses were recorded before and 30 minute after caffeine consumption. The results were analyzed by Friedman and Wilcoxone test to assess the effects of caffeine on auditory brainstem response.Results: Compared to control group the latencies of waves III,V and I-V interpeak interval of the cases decreased significantly after 2 and 3mg/kg BW caffeine consumption. Wave I latency significantly decreased after 3mg/kg BW caffeine consumption(p<0.01. Conclusion: Increasing of the glutamate level resulted from the adenosine receptor blocking brings about changes in conduction in the central auditory pathway.

  8. Phosphate-Activated Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Stabilizes G1 Cyclin To Trigger Cell Cycle Entry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menoyo, S.; Ricco, N.; Bru, S.; Hernández-Ortega, S.; Escoté, X.; Aldea, M.

    2013-01-01

    G1 cyclins, in association with a cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), are universal activators of the transcriptional G1-S machinery during entry into the cell cycle. Regulation of cyclin degradation is crucial for coordinating progression through the cell cycle, but the mechanisms that modulate cyclin stability to control cell cycle entry are still unknown. Here, we show that a lack of phosphate downregulates Cln3 cyclin and leads to G1 arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The stability of Cln3 protein is diminished in strains with low activity of Pho85, a phosphate-sensing CDK. Cln3 is an in vitro substrate of Pho85, and both proteins interact in vivo. More interestingly, cells that carry a CLN3 allele encoding aspartic acid substitutions at the sites of Pho85 phosphorylation maintain high levels of Cln3 independently of Pho85 activity. Moreover, these cells do not properly arrest in G1 in the absence of phosphate and they die prematurely. Finally, the activity of Pho85 is essential for accumulating Cln3 and for reentering the cell cycle after phosphate refeeding. Taken together, our data indicate that Cln3 is a molecular target of the Pho85 kinase that is required to modulate cell cycle entry in response to environmental changes in nutrient availability. PMID:23339867

  9. Preparation and application of polyclonal antibodiesagainst KSHV v-cyclin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Min; Guo, Yuanyuan; Yan, Qin; Qin, Di; Lu, Chun

    2013-09-01

    We prepared rabbit polyclonal antibodies against Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)-encoded v-cyclin (ORF 72) and detected the natural viral protein using these polyclonal antibodies. Three antigenic polypeptides of v-cyclin were designed and synthesized. A fragment of the v-cyclin gene was cloned into a eukaryotic expression vector pEF-MCS-Flag-IRES/Puro to construct a recombinant vector, pEF v-cyclin. Then, pEF v-cyclin was transfected into 293T and EA.hy926 cells to obtain v-cyclin-Flag fusion proteins. Six New Zealand white rabbits were immunized with KLH-conjugated peptides to generate polyclonal antibodies against v-cyclin. The polyclonal antibodies were then characterized by ELISA and Western blotting assays. Finally, the polyclonal antibodies against v-cyclin were used to detect natural viral protein expressed in BCBL-1, BC-3, and JSC-1 cells. The results showed that using the Flag antibody, v-cyclin-Flag fusion protein was detected in 293T and EA.hy926 cells transfected with pEF-v-cyclin. Furthermore, ELISA showed that the titer of the induced polyclonal rabbit anti-v-cyclin antibodies was higher than 1:8,000. In Western blotting assays, the antibodies reacted specifically with the v-cyclin-Flag fusion protein as well as the natural viral protein. The recombinant expression vector pEF-v-cyclin was constructed successfully, and the polyclonal antibodies prepared can be used for various biological tests including ELISA and Western blotting assays.

  10. Behavioral Management of Excessive Caffeine Consumption: Three Case Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Greene, Douglas; And Others

    Although caffeine is seemingly harmless in ordinary daily intake, there has been increasing concern about the possible side effects of habitual caffeine ingestion. The excessive daily ingestion of caffeine in the form of coffee, soda pop, tea, and various medications may lead to a chronic disorder known as caffeinism. This study tested the…

  11. Caffeine, mental health, and psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lara, Diogo R

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine intake is so common that its pharmacological effects on the mind are undervalued. Since it is so readily available, individuals can adjust their own dose, time of administration and dose intervals of caffeine, according to the perceived benefits and side effects of each dose. This review focuses on human studies of caffeine in subjects with and without psychiatric disorders. Besides the possibility of mild drug dependence, caffeine may bring benefits that contribute to its widespread use. These benefits seem to be related to adaptation of mental energy to the context by increasing alertness, attention, and cognitive function (more evident in longer or more difficult tasks or situations of low arousal) and by elevating mood. Accordingly, moderate caffeine intake (cognitive failures, and lower risk of suicide. However, its putative therapeutic effects on depression and ADHD have been insufficiently studied. Conversely, in rare cases high doses of caffeine can induce psychotic and manic symptoms, and more commonly, anxiety. Patients with panic disorder and performance social anxiety disorder seem to be particularly sensitive to the anxiogenic effects of caffeine, whereas preliminary data suggests that it may be effective for some patients with obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). The threshold for the anxiogenic effect of caffeine is influenced by a polymorphism of the A2A receptor. In summary, caffeine can be regarded as a pharmacological tool to increase energy and effortful behavior in daily activities. More populational (cross-sectional and prospective) and experimental studies are necessary to establish the role of caffeine intake in psychiatric disorders, especially its putative efficacy on depressive mood and cognitive/attentional disorders.

  12. AKAP95 promotes cell cycle progression via interactions with cyclin E and low molecular weight cyclin E

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xiang-Yu; Zhang, Deng-Cheng; Zhuang, Wen-Xin; Hua, Su-Hang; Dai, Yue; Yuan, Yang-Yang; Feng, Li-Li; Huang, Qian; Teng, Bo-Gang; Yu, Xiu-Yi; Liu, Wen-Zhi; Zhang, Yong-Xing

    2016-01-01

    AKAP95 in lung cancer tissues showed higher expression than in paracancerous tissues. AKAP95 can bind with cyclin D and cyclin E during G1/S cell cycle transition, but its molecular mechanisms remain unclear. To identify the mechanism of AKAP95 in cell cycle progression, we performed AKAP95 transfection and silencing in A549 cells, examined AKAP95, cyclin E1 and cyclin E2 expression, and the interactions of AKAP95 with cyclins E1 and E2. Results showed that over-expression of AKAP95 promoted cell growth and AKAP95 bound cyclin E1 and E2, low molecular weight cyclin E1 (LWM-E1) and LWM-E2. Additionally AKAP95 bound cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 in the nucleus during G1/S transition, bound LMW-E1 during G1, S and G2/M, and bound cyclin E2 mainly on the nuclear membrane during interphase. Cyclin E2 and LMW-E2 were also detected. AKAP95 over-expression increased cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 expression but decreased cyclin E2 levels. Unlike cyclin E1 and LMW-E2 that were nuclear located during the G1, S and G1/S phases, cyclin E2 and LMW-E1 were expressed in all cell cycle phases, with cyclin E2 present in the cytoplasm and nuclear membrane, with traces in the nucleus. LMW-E1 was present in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. The 20 kDa form of LMW-E1 showed only cytoplasmic expression, while the 40 kDa form was nuclear expressed. The expression of AKAP95, cyclin E1, LMW-E1 and -E2, might be regulated by cAMP. We conclude that AKAP95 might promote cell cycle progression by interacting with cyclin E1 and LMW-E2. LMW-E2, but not cyclin E2, might be involved in G1/S transition. The binding of AKAP95 and LMW-E1 was found throughout cell cycle. PMID:27158371

  13. Energy drinks and the neurophysiological impacts of caffeine

    OpenAIRE

    Leeana eBagwath Persad

    2011-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive stimulant with prevalent use across all age groups. It is a naturally occurring substance found in the coffee bean, tea leaf, the kola nut, cocoa bean. Recently there has been an increase in energy drink consumption leading to caffeine abuse, with aggressive marketing and poor awareness on the consequences of high caffeine use. With caffeine consumption being so common, it is vital to know the impact caffeine has on the body, as its effects can in...

  14. Caffeine promotes anti-tumor immune response during tumor initiation: Involvement of the adenosine A2A receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eini, Hadar; Frishman, Valeria; Yulzari, Robert; Kachko, Leonid; Lewis, Eli C; Chaimovitz, Cidio; Douvdevani, Amos

    2015-11-01

    Epidemiologic studies depict a negative correlation between caffeine consumption and incidence of tumors in humans. The main pharmacological effects of caffeine are mediated by antagonism of the adenosine receptor, A2AR. Here, we examine whether the targeting of A2AR by caffeine plays a role in anti-tumor immunity. In particular, the effects of caffeine are studied in wild-type and A2AR knockout (A2AR(-/-)) mice. Tumor induction was achieved using the carcinogen 3-methylcholanthrene (3-MCA). Alternatively, tumor cells, comprised of 3-MCA-induced transformed cells or B16 melanoma cells, were inoculated into animal footpads. Cytokine release was determined in a mixed lymphocyte tumor reaction (MLTR). According to our findings, caffeine-consuming mice (0.1% in water) developed tumors at a lower rate compared to water-consuming mice (14% vs. 53%, respectively, p=0.0286, n=15/group). Within the caffeine-consuming mice, tumor-free mice displayed signs of autoimmune alopecia and pronounced leukocyte recruitment intocarcinogen injection sites. Similarly, A2AR(-/-) mice exhibited reduced rates of 3-MCA-induced tumors. In tumor inoculation studies, caffeine treatment resulted in inhibition of tumor growth and elevation in proinflammatory cytokine release over water-consuming mice, as depicted by MLTR. Addition of the adenosine receptor agonist, NECA, to MLTR resulted in a sharp decrease in IFNγ levels; this was reversed by the highly selective A2AR antagonist, ZM241385. Thus, immune response modulation through either caffeine or genetic deletion of A2AR leads to a Th1 immune profile and suppression of carcinogen-induced tumorigenesis. Taken together, our data suggest that the use of pharmacologic A2AR antagonists may hold therapeutic potential in diminishing the rate of cancer development.

  15. Endogenous adenosine and hemorrhagic shock: effects of caffeine administration or caffeine withdrawal.

    OpenAIRE

    Conlay, L A; Evoniuk, G; Wurtman, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    Plasma adenosine concentrations doubled when rats were subjected to 90 min of profound hemorrhagic shock. Administration of caffeine (20 mg per kg of body weight), an adenosine-receptor antagonist, attenuated the hemorrhage-induced decrease in blood pressure. In contrast, chronic caffeine consumption (0.1% in drinking water), followed by a brief period of caffeine withdrawal, amplified the hypotensive response to hemorrhage. These data suggest that endogenous adenosine participates in the hyp...

  16. Active Component of Danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge, Tanshinone I, Attenuates Lung Tumorigenesis via Inhibitions of VEGF, Cyclin A, and Cyclin B Expressions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Tang Tung

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tanshinone I (T1 and tanshinone II (T2 are the major diterpenes isolated from Danshen (Salvia miltiorrhiza Bunge. Three human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines, A549, CL1-0, and CL1-5, were treated with T1 and T2 for the in vitro antitumor test. Results showed that T1 was more effective than T2 in inhibiting the growth of lung cancer cells via suppressing the expression of VEGF, Cyclin A, and Cyclin B proteins in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, a transgenic mice model of the human vascular endothelial growth factor-A165 (hVEGF-A165 gene-induced pulmonary tumor was further treated with T1 for the in vivo lung cancer therapy test. T1 significantly attenuated hVEGF-A165 overexpression to normal levels of the transgenic mice (Tg that were pretreated with human monocytic leukemia THP-1 cell-derived conditioned medium (CM. It also suppressed the formation of lung adenocarcinoma tumors (16.7% compared with two placebo groups (50% for Tg/Placebo and 83.3% for Tg/CM/Placebo; P<0.01. This antitumor effect is likely to slow the progression of cells through the S and G2/M phases of the cell cycle. Blocking of the tumor-activated cell cycle pathway may be a critical mechanism for the observed antitumorigenic effects of T1 treatment on vasculogenesis and angiogenesis.

  17. Performance effects and metabolic consequences of caffeine and caffeinated energy drink consumption on glucose disposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, Jane; Graham, Terry E

    2014-10-01

    This review documents two opposing effects of caffeine and caffeine-containing energy drinks, i.e., their positive effects on athletic performance and their negative impacts on glucose tolerance in the sedentary state. Analysis of studies examining caffeine administration prior to performance-based exercise showed caffeine improved completion time by 3.6%. Similar analyses following consumption of caffeine-containing energy drinks yielded positive, but more varied, benefits, which were likely due to the diverse nature of the studies performed, the highly variable composition of the beverages consumed, and the range of caffeine doses administered. Conversely, analyses of studies administering caffeine prior to either an oral glucose tolerance test or insulin clamp showed a decline in whole-body glucose disposal of ~30%. The consequences of this resistance are unknown, but there may be implications for the development of a number of chronic diseases. Both caffeine-induced performance enhancement and insulin resistance converge with the primary actions of caffeine on skeletal muscle.

  18. How habitual caffeine consumption and dose influence flavour preference conditioning with caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinley, Elizabeth M; Durlach, Paula J; Yeomans, Martin R

    2004-09-15

    This study investigated the effects of both habitual caffeine use and dose administered in determining the ability of caffeine to reinforce conditioned changes in flavour preference. Thirty overnight-withdrawn moderate caffeine consumers and 30 non or low-dose caffeine (non/low) consumers evaluated five novel-flavoured fruit teas. Subsequently, their median-rated tea was used in four ensuing conditioning sessions. Either placebo, 1 or 2 mg/kg of caffeine (n=10 consumers, 10 non/low consumers in each condition), was added to the target tea, and all five teas were reevaluated at a final tasting. Pleasantness ratings over the four conditioning sessions indicated that non/low consumers' liking increased for the noncaffeinated fruit tea with no change for the tea containing either 1 or 2 mg/kg of caffeine. Among consumers, pleasantness ratings tended to decrease for the noncaffeinated fruit tea but increased significantly at the 1-mg dose and showed a tendency to increase at the 2-mg dose. Similar effects were shown in the evaluations made before and after conditioning, with no change in the nonexposed drinks. These results show that 1.0 mg/kg of caffeine reinforces changes in flavour pleasantness in acutely withdrawn habitual consumers but not in nonconsumers or nondependent low-caffeine consumers, further endorsing the negative-reinforcement theory of conditioning with caffeine.

  19. Caffeine metabolites not caffeine protect against riboflavin photosensitized oxidative damage related to skin and eye health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scurachio, R S; Mattiucci, F; Santos, W G; Skibsted, L H; Cardoso, D R

    2016-10-01

    Caffeine metabolites were found to bind riboflavin with dissociation constant in the millimolar region by an exothermic process with positive entropy of reaction, which was found by (1)H NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy to occur predominantly by hydrogen bonding with water being released from riboflavin solvation shell upon caffeine metabolite binding to riboflavin. The caffeine metabolites 1-methyl uric acid and 1,7-dimethyl uric acid were shown by transient absorption laser flash photolysis to be efficient as quenchers of triplet riboflavin with second-order rate constant of 1.4 10(8)Lmol(-1)s(-1) and 1.0 10(8)Lmol(-1)s(-1), respectively, in aqueous solution of pH6.4 at 25°C and more efficient than the other caffeine metabolite 1,7-dimethyl xanthine with second-order rate constant of 4.2 10(7)Lmol(-1)s(-1). Caffeine was in contrast found to be non-reactive towards triplet riboflavin. Caffeine metabolites rather than caffeine seem accordingly important for the observed protective effect against cutaneous melanoma identified for drinkers of regular but not of decaffeinated coffee. The caffeine metabolites, but not caffeine, were by time resolved single photon counting found to quench singlet excited riboflavin through exothermic formation of ground-state precursor complexes indicating importance of hydrogen bounding through keto-enol tautomer's for protection of oxidizable substrates and sensitive structures against riboflavin photosensitization.

  20. Associations of ambulatory blood pressure with urinary caffeine and caffeine metabolite excretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guessous, Idris; Pruijm, Menno; Ponte, Belén; Ackermann, Daniel; Ehret, Georg; Ansermot, Nicolas; Vuistiner, Philippe; Staessen, Jan; Gu, Yumei; Paccaud, Fred; Mohaupt, Markus; Vogt, Bruno; Pechère-Bertschi, Antoinette; Pechère-Berstchi, Antoinette; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Burnier, Michel; Eap, Chin B; Bochud, Murielle

    2015-03-01

    Intake of caffeinated beverages might be associated with reduced cardiovascular mortality possibly via the lowering of blood pressure. We estimated the association of ambulatory blood pressure with urinary caffeine and caffeine metabolites in a population-based sample. Families were randomly selected from the general population of Swiss cities. Ambulatory blood pressure monitoring was conducted using validated devices. Urinary caffeine, paraxanthine, theophylline, and theobromine excretions were measured in 24 hours urine using ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. We used mixed models to explore the associations of urinary excretions with blood pressure although adjusting for major confounders. The 836 participants (48.9% men) included in this analysis had mean age of 47.8 and mean 24-hour systolic and diastolic blood pressure of 120.1 and 78.0 mm Hg. For each doubling of caffeine excretion, 24-hour and night-time systolic blood pressure decreased by 0.642 and 1.107 mm Hg (both P values theobromine excretion was not associated with blood pressure. Anti-hypertensive therapy, diabetes mellitus, and alcohol consumption modify the association of caffeine urinary excretion with systolic blood pressure. Ambulatory systolic blood pressure was inversely associated with urinary excretions of caffeine and other caffeine metabolites. Our results are compatible with a potential protective effect of caffeine on blood pressure.

  1. Regulation of cyclin E stability in Xenopus laevis embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt-(Webb), Yekaterina

    Cyclin-Cdk complexes positively regulate cell cycle progression. Cyclins are regulatory subunits that bind to and activate cyclin-dependent kinases or Cdks. Cyclin E associates with Cdk2 to mediate G1/S phase transition of the cell cycle. Cyclin E is overexpressed in breast, lung, skin, gastrointestinal, cervical, and ovarian cancers. Its overexpression correlates with poor patient prognosis and is involved in the etiology of breast cancer. We have been studying how this protein is downregulated during development in order to determine if these mechanisms are disrupted during tumorigenesis, leading to its overexpression. Using Xenopus laevis embryos as a model, we have shown previously that during the first 12 embryonic cell cycles Cyclin E levels remain constant yet Cdk2 activity oscillates twice per cell cycle. Cyclin E is abruptly destabilized by an undefined mechanism after the 12th cell cycle, which corresponds to the midblastula transition (MBT). Based on work our work and work by others, we have hypothesized that differential phosphorylation and a change in localization result in Cyclin E degradation by the 26S proteasome at the MBT. To test this, we generated a series of point mutations in conserved threonine/serine residues implicated in degradation of human Cyclin E. Using Western blot analysis, we show that similarly to human Cyclin E, mutation of these residues to unphosphorylatable alanine stabilizes Cyclin E past the MBT when they are expressed in vivo. Cyclin E localization was studied by immunofluorescence analysis of endogenous and exogenous protein in pre-MBT, MBT, and post-MBT embryos. In addition, we developed a novel method of conjugating recombinant His6-tagged Cyclin E to fluorescent (CdSe)ZnS nanoparticles (quantum dots) capped with dihydrolipoic acid. Confocal microscopy was used to visualize His6Cyclin E-quantum dot complexes inside embryo cells in real time. We found that re-localization at the MBT from the cytoplasm to the nucleus

  2. Sugary, Caffeinated Drinks Could Cost You Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 21 percent more sugar-sweetened, caffeinated beverages like soda and energy drinks than those who slept seven ... no link between the amount of sleep and consumption of juice, tea or diet drinks. It was ...

  3. Caffeinated alcohol beverages: a public health concern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attwood, Angela S

    2012-01-01

    Consumption of alcohol mixed with caffeinated energy drinks is becoming popular, and the number of pre-mixed caffeinated alcohol products on the worldwide market is increasing. There is public health concern and even occasional legal restriction relating to these drinks, due to associations with increased intoxication and harms. The precise nature and degree of the pharmacological relationship between caffeine and alcohol is not yet elucidated, but it is proposed that caffeine attenuates the sedative effects of alcohol intoxication while leaving motor and cognitive impairment unaffected. This creates a potentially precarious scenario for users who may underestimate their level of intoxication and impairment. While legislation in some countries has restricted production or marketing of pre-mixed products, many individuals mix their own energy drink-alcohol 'cocktails'. Wider dissemination of the risks might help balance marketing strategies that over-emphasize putative positive effects.

  4. Caffeine intake reduces sleep duration in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodato, Francesca; Araújo, Joana; Barros, Henrique; Lopes, Carla; Agodi, Antonella; Barchitta, Martina; Ramos, Elisabete

    2013-09-01

    In our study, we hypothesized that higher caffeine intake would be associated with lower sleep duration among 13-year-old adolescents. In addition, we aimed to identify food sources of caffeine intake in this sample. Eligible participants were adolescents who were born in 1990 and attended school in Porto, Portugal, in 2003/2004. Self-administered questionnaires were used, and diet was evaluated using a food frequency questionnaire. From the 2160 eligible participants, only 1522 with valid information regarding their diet were included in this study. In our sample, the median intake of caffeine was 23.1 mg/d, with soft drinks being the major source. Ice tea presented the highest median (25th-75th percentiles) contribution (33.1% [14.0-52.1]), followed by cola (21.1% [6.4-37.6]). Regarding cocoa products, chocolate bars presented a median contribution of 5.1% (1.0-14.0), and snacks containing chocolate had a contribution of 3.0% (0.5-7.2). Coffee and tea presented a negligible contribution. Adolescents who reported less sleep duration and those who spent more time watching TV during the weekend had a significantly higher caffeine intake. Overall, boys had higher intakes of caffeine from soft drinks, and private school attendees, those who had parents with more education, who reported less television viewing time and had lower body mass index presented higher intakes of caffeine from chocolate. Considering sleeping more than 9.5 hours as a reference class, for each increase of 10 mg/d in caffeine intake, we found that the odds ratio of sleeping 8.5 hours or less was 1.12 (95% confidence interval, 1.06-1.19). Our results support the hypothesis that caffeine intake was inversely associated with sleep duration in adolescents.

  5. Prenatal Caffeine Exposure Impairs Pregnancy in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Yadegari

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In recent years, concerns have been raised about human reproductive disorders. Caffeine consumption is increasing by the world’s population and there is a relationship between caffeine intake and adverse reproductive outcomes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of caffeine on implantation sites, number of live births, birth weight, crown-rump length (CRL and abnormality in pregnant rats. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, 40 female albino rats (170-190 g were randomly divided into two experimental and two control groups (n=10/each group. In both experimental groups, animals received caffeine intraperitoneally (IP: 150 mg/kg/day on days 1-5 of pregnancy. In experimental group 1, treated animals were euthanized on day 7of pregnancy and the number of implantation sites was counted. In experimental group 2, treated animals maintained pregnant and after delivery, the number of live births, birth weight, CRL and abnormality of neonates were investigated. In control group, animals received IP injections of distilled water. Data were analyzed by independent t test. Results: Results showed that administration of caffeine significantly decreased the number of implantation sites, number of live births and CRL as compared with control group (P<0.05. There were no significant differences regarding birth weight and abnormality of neonate rats between experimental and control groups. Conclusion: These results suggest that caffeine caused anti-fertility effect and significantly decreased CRL in neonate rats.

  6. [Caffeine in nutrition. Article 1. Consumption with food and regulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessonov, V V; Khanferyan, R A

    2015-01-01

    The article presents a review of the literature data on the effect of caffeine contained in a variety of foods on the functions of human, it presents the modern international legal regulatory rules in the consumption of caffeine, and caffeine consumption rules corresponding to the technical regulations of the Customs Union (Russian Federation, Kazakhstan, Belaruss). It describes the sources of caffeine in the traditional diet and its consumption, safety evaluation in connection with the acute and chronic caffeine consumption and the value of caffeine as an ingredient in soft drinks tonic.

  7. CDK-1 and two B-type cyclins promote PAR-6 stabilization during polarization of the early C. elegans embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexia Rabilotta

    Full Text Available In the C. elegans embryo, formation of an antero-posterior axis of polarity relies on signaling by the conserved PAR proteins, which localize asymmetrically in two mutually exclusive groups at the embryonic cortex. Depletion of any PAR protein causes a loss of polarity and embryonic lethality. A genome-wide RNAi screen previously identified two B-type cyclins, cyb-2.1 and cyb-2.2, as suppressors of par-2(it5ts lethality. We found that the loss of cyb-2.1 or cyb-2.2 suppressed the lethality and polarity defects of par-2(it5ts mutants and that these cyclins act in cell polarity with their cyclin-dependent kinase partner, CDK-1. Interestingly, cyb-2.1; cyb-2.2 double mutants did not show defects in cell cycle progression or timing of polarity establishment, suggesting that they regulate polarity independently of their typical role in cell cycle progression. Loss of both cyclin genes or of cdk-1 resulted in a decrease in PAR-6 levels in the embryo. Furthermore, the activity of the cullin CUL-2 was required to achieve suppression of par-2 lethality when both cyclins were absent. Our results support a model in which CYB-2.1/2/CDK-1 antagonize CUL-2 activity to promote stabilization of PAR-6 levels during polarization of the early C. elegans embryo. They also suggest that CYB-2.1 and CYB-2.2 contribute to the coupling of cell cycle progression and asymmetric segregation of cell fate determinants.

  8. Caffeine increases food intake while reducing anxiety-related behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Patrick; Levack, Russell; Watters, Jared; Xu, Zhenping; Yang, Yunlei

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of different doses of caffeine on appetite and anxiety-related behavior. Additionally, we sought to determine if withdrawal from chronic caffeine administration promotes anxiety. In this study, we utilized rodent open field testing and feeding behavior assays to determine the effects of caffeine on feeding and anxiety-related behavior (n = 8 mice; 4-8 weeks old). We also measured 2 h and 24 h food intake and body-weight during daily administration of caffeine (n = 12 mice; 4-8 weeks old). To test for caffeine withdrawal induced anxiety, anxiety-related behavior in rodents was quantified following withdrawal from four consecutive days of caffeine administration (n = 12 mice; 4-8 weeks old). We find that acute caffeine administration increases food intake in a dose-dependent manner with lower doses of caffeine more significantly increasing food intake than higher doses. Acute caffeine administration also reduced anxiety-related behaviors in mice without significantly altering locomotor activity. However, we did not observe any differences in 24 h food intake or body weight following chronic caffeine administration and there were no observable differences in anxiety-related behaviors during caffeine withdrawal. In conclusion, we find that caffeine can both increase appetite and decrease anxiety-related behaviors in a dose dependent fashion. Given the complex relationship between appetite and anxiety, the present study provides additional insights into potential caffeine-based pharmacological mechanisms governing appetite and anxiety disorders, such as bulimia nervosa.

  9. Caffeine intake by patients with autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vendramini, L.C.; Nishiura, J.L.; Baxmann, A.C.; Heilberg, I.P. [Disciplina de Nefrologia, Departamento de Medicina, Universidade Federal de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-20

    Because caffeine may induce cyst and kidney enlargement in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), we evaluated caffeine intake and renal volume using renal ultrasound in ADPKD patients. Caffeine intake was estimated by the average of 24-h dietary recalls obtained on 3 nonconsecutive days in 102 ADPKD patients (68 females, 34 males; 39 ± 12 years) and compared to that of 102 healthy volunteers (74 females, 28 males; 38 ± 14 years). The awareness of the need for caffeine restriction was assessed. Clinical and laboratory data were obtained from the medical records of the patients. Mean caffeine intake was significantly lower in ADPKD patients versus controls (86 vs 134 mg/day), and 63% of the ADPKD patients had been previously aware of caffeine restriction. Caffeine intake did not correlate with renal volume in ADPKD patients. There were no significant differences between the renal volumes of patients in the highest and lowest tertiles of caffeine consumption. Finally, age-adjusted multiple linear regression revealed that renal volume was associated with hypertension, chronic kidney disease stage 3 and the time since diagnosis, but not with caffeine intake. The present small cross-sectional study indicated a low level of caffeine consumption by ADPKD patients when compared to healthy volunteers, which was most likely due to prior awareness of the need for caffeine restriction. Within the range of caffeine intake observed by ADPKD patients in this study (0-471 mg/day), the renal volume was not directly associated with caffeine intake.

  10. Coffee Polyphenols Change the Expression of STAT5B and ATF-2 Modifying Cyclin D1 Levels in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlota Oleaga

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Epidemiological studies suggest that coffee consumption reduces the risk of cancer, but the molecular mechanisms of its chemopreventive effects remain unknown. Objective. To identify differentially expressed genes upon incubation of HT29 colon cancer cells with instant caffeinated coffee (ICC or caffeic acid (CA using whole-genome microarrays. Results. ICC incubation of HT29 cells caused the overexpression of 57 genes and the underexpression of 161, while CA incubation induced the overexpression of 12 genes and the underexpression of 32. Using Venn-Diagrams, we built a list of five overexpressed genes and twelve underexpressed genes in common between the two experimental conditions. This list was used to generate a biological association network in which STAT5B and ATF-2 appeared as highly interconnected nodes. STAT5B overexpression was confirmed at the mRNA and protein levels. For ATF-2, the changes in mRNA levels were confirmed for both ICC and CA, whereas the decrease in protein levels was only observed in CA-treated cells. The levels of cyclin D1, a target gene for both STAT5B and ATF-2, were downregulated by CA in colon cancer cells and by ICC and CA in breast cancer cells. Conclusions. Coffee polyphenols are able to affect cyclin D1 expression in cancer cells through the modulation of STAT5B and ATF-2.

  11. Neurobehavioral hazard identification and characterization for caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnbull, Duncan; Rodricks, Joseph V; Mariano, Gregory F

    2016-02-01

    This report evaluates the scientific literature on caffeine with respect to potential central nervous system (CNS) effects, specifically effects on sleep, anxiety, and aggression/risk-taking. Caffeine has been the subject of more scientific safety studies than any other food ingredient. It is important, therefore, to evaluate new studies in the context of this large existing body of knowledge. The safety of caffeine can best be described in a narrative form, and is not usefully expressed in terms of a "bright line" numerical value like an "acceptable daily intake" (ADI). Caffeine intake has been associated with a range of reversible physiological effects, in a few studies at levels of less than 100 mg in sensitive individuals. It is also clear that many people can tolerate much greater levels - perhaps up to 600-800 mg/day or more - without experiencing such effects. The reasons for this type of variability in response are described in this report. Based on all the available evidence, there is no reason to believe that experiencing such effects from caffeine intake has any significant or lasting effect on health. The point at which caffeine intake may cause harm to the CNS is not readily identifiable, in part because data on the effects of daily intakes greater than 600 mg is limited. Effects of caffeine on risk-taking and aggressive behavior in young people have received considerable publicity, yet are the most difficult to study because of ethical concerns and limitations in the ability to design appropriate studies. At present, the weight of available evidence does not support these concerns, yet this should not preclude ongoing careful monitoring of the scientific literature.

  12. Caffeine prevents protection in two human models of ischemic preconditioning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riksen, N.P.; Zhou, Z.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Jaspers, R.A.; Ramakers, B.P.; Brouwer, R.M.H.J.; Boerman, O.C.; Steinmetz, N.; Smits, P.; Rongen, G.A.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We studied whether caffeine impairs protection by ischemic preconditioning (IP) in humans. BACKGROUND: Ischemic preconditioning is critically dependent on adenosine receptor stimulation. We hypothesize that the adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine blocks the protective effect of IP. ME

  13. A roller coaster ride with the mitotic cyclins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Tsz Kan; Poon, Randy Y C

    2005-06-01

    Cyclins are discovered as proteins that accumulate progressively through interphase and disappear abruptly at mitosis during each cell cycle. In mammalian cells, cyclin A accumulates from late G1 phase and is destroyed before metaphase, and cyclin B is destroyed slightly later at anaphase. The abundance of the mitotic cyclins is mainly regulated at the levels of transcription and proteolysis. Transcription is stimulated and repressed by several transcription factors, including B-MYB, E2F, FOXM1, and NF-Y. Elements in the promoter, including CCRE/CDE and CHR, are in part responsible for the cell cycle oscillation of transcription. Destruction of the mitotic cyclins is carried out by the ubiquitin ligases APC/C(CDC20) and APC/C(CDH1). Central to our knowledge is the understanding of how APC/C is turned on from anaphase to early G1 phase, and turned off from late G1 till the spindle-assembly checkpoint is deactivated in metaphase. Reciprocal actions of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) on APC/C, as well as on the SCF complexes ensure that the mitotic cyclins are destroyed only at the proper time.

  14. Caffeine use among active duty US Army soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Harris R; Stavinoha, Trisha; McGraw, Susan; White, Alan; Hadden, Louise; Marriott, Bernadette P

    2012-06-01

    Eighty-percent of the US adult population regularly consumes caffeine, but limited information is available on the extent and patterns of use. Caffeine use is a public health issue and its risks and benefits are regularly considered in scientific literature and the lay media. Recently, new caffeine-containing products have been introduced and are widely available on Army bases and are added to rations to maintain cognitive performance. This study surveyed caffeine consumption and demographic characteristics in 990 US Army soldiers. Data were weighted by age, sex, rank, and Special Forces status. Total caffeine intake and intake from specific products were estimated. Logistic regression was used to examine relationships between caffeine use and soldier demographic and lifestyle characteristics. Eighty-two percent of soldiers consumed caffeine at least once a week. Mean daily caffeine consumption was 285 mg/day (347 mg/day among regular caffeine consumers). Male soldiers consumed, on average, 303 mg/day and females 163 mg/day (regular consumers: 365 mg/day for male soldiers, 216 mg/day for female soldiers). Coffee was the main source of caffeine intake. Among young males, energy drinks were the largest source of caffeine intake, but their intake was not greater than older males. Regression analysis indicated an association of higher caffeine intake with male sex, white race, and tobacco use (P<0.01). Most soldiers consume caffeine in levels accepted as safe, but some consume greater quantities than recommended, although definitive information on safe upper limits of caffeine intake is not available. Labels of caffeine-containing products should provide caffeine content so individuals can make informed decisions.

  15. Caffeine promotes wakefulness via dopamine signaling in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely-consumed psychoactive drug in the world, but our understanding of how caffeine affects our brains is relatively incomplete. Most studies focus on effects of caffeine on adenosine receptors, but there is evidence for other, more complex mechanisms. In the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, which shows a robust diurnal pattern of sleep/wake activity, caffeine reduces nighttime sleep behavior independently of the one known adenosine receptor. Here, we show that dopami...

  16. Rising cyclin-CDK levels order cell cycle events.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Oikonomou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Diverse mitotic events can be triggered in the correct order and time by a single cyclin-CDK. A single regulator could confer order and timing on multiple events if later events require higher cyclin-CDK than earlier events, so that gradually rising cyclin-CDK levels can sequentially trigger responsive events: the "quantitative model" of ordering. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This 'quantitative model' makes predictions for the effect of locking cyclin at fixed levels for a protracted period: at low cyclin levels, early events should occur rapidly, while late events should be slow, defective, or highly variable (depending on threshold mechanism. We titrated the budding yeast mitotic cyclin Clb2 within its endogenous expression range to a stable, fixed level and measured time to occurrence of three mitotic events: growth depolarization, spindle formation, and spindle elongation, as a function of fixed Clb2 level. These events require increasingly more Clb2 according to their normal order of occurrence. Events occur efficiently and with low variability at fixed Clb2 levels similar to those observed when the events normally occur. A second prediction of the model is that increasing the rate of cyclin accumulation should globally advance timing of all events. Moderate (<2-fold overexpression of Clb2 accelerates all events of mitosis, resulting in consistently rapid sequential cell cycles. However, this moderate overexpression also causes a significant frequency of premature mitoses leading to inviability, suggesting that Clb2 expression level is optimized to balance the fitness costs of variability and catastrophe. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that mitotic events are regulated by discrete cyclin-CDK thresholds. These thresholds are sequentially triggered as cyclin increases, yielding reliable order and timing. In many biological processes a graded input must be translated into discrete outputs. In such systems, expression of

  17. PROP (6-n-Propylthiouracil) tasting and sensory responses to caffeine,sucrose, neohesperidin dihydrochalcone and chocolate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, A; Drewnowski, A

    2001-01-01

    The genetically determined ability to taste 6-n-propylthiouracil (PROP) has been linked with lowered acceptance of some bitter foods. Fifty-four women, aged 18-30 years, tasted and rated PROP-impregnated filter paper and seven solutions of PROP. Summed bitterness intensity ratings for PROP solutions determined PROP taster status. Respondents also tasted five sucrose and seven caffeine solutions, as well as seven solutions each of caffeine and PROP that had been sweetened with 0.3 mmol/l neohesperidin dihydrochalcone (NHDC). Respondents also rated three kinds of chocolate using 9-point category scales. PROP tasters rated caffeine solutions as more bitter than did non-tasters and liked them less. PROP tasters did not rate either sucrose or NHDC as more sweet. The addition of NHDC to PROP and caffeine solutions suppressed bitterness intensity more effectively for tasters than for non-tasters and improved hedonic ratings among both groups. PROP tasters and non-tasters showed the same hedonic response to sweetened caffeine solutions and did not differ in their sensory responses to chocolate. Genetic taste markers may have only a minor impact on the consumption of such foods as sweetened coffee or chocolate.

  18. Reduced hepatic tumor incidence in cyclin G1-deficient mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Michael Rugaard; Factor, Valentina M; Fantozzi, Anna

    2003-01-01

    Cyclin G1 is a transcriptional target of the tumor suppressor p53, and its expression is increased after DNA damage. Recent data show that cyclin G1 can regulate the levels of p53 by a mechanism that involves dephosphorylation of Mdm2 by protein phosphatase 2A. To understand the biologic role......, together with Mdm2, constitute a part of a negative feedback system that attenuates the activity of p53. In conclusion, our data suggest that the decreased tumor susceptibility after loss of cyclin G1 function is caused by the increased tumor suppressor action of p53....

  19. EVALUATION OF ANTIBACTERIAL ACTIVITY OF CAFFEINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawar Pruthviraj

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out with water soluble portion and pure solvent of the acetone, ethanol, methanol, acetonitrile, water extracts of leaves and leaf buds of Camellia sinensis (green tea, and beans of Coffea arabica (coffee. Caffeine (3,7-dihydro-1, 3,7-trimethyl-1H-purine-2,6-dione was isolated from both plants using a liquid-liquid extraction method, detected on thin layer chromatography (TLC plates in comparison with standard caffeine, which served as a positive control. After performing the gross behavioral study, the Antibacterial activity was evaluated against Gram-negative bacteria included; Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Klebsiella pneumonia and Pseudomonas aeruginosa Both compounds at a concentration of 2 mg/ml showed similar antibacterial activities against all tested bacteria, except for P. mirabilis, and the highest inhibitory effect was observed against P. aeruginosa using a modified agar diffusion method. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC of caffeine was determined using a broth microdilution method in 96 multi-well microtitre plates. MIC values ranged from 65.5 to 250.0 µg/ml for the caffeine isolated from coffee and 65.5 to 500.0 µg/ml for green tea caffeine. Combination results showed additive effects against most pathogenic bacteria especially for P. aeruginosa, using both antibacterial assays.

  20. Caffeine Consumption Patterns and Beliefs of College Freshmen

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlvain, Gary E.; Noland, Melody P.; Bickel, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Background: Caffeine consumption by young people has increased dramatically over the last decade through increased coffee consumption and "energy drinks." In higher amounts, caffeine causes many adverse effects that are cause for concern. Purpose: Purposes of this study were to determine: (1) the amount of caffeine consumed by a sample…

  1. Is caffeine consumption a risk factor for osteoporosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, C; Atkinson, E J; Wahner, H W; O'Fallon, W M; Riggs, B L; Judd, H L; Melton, L J

    1992-04-01

    High caffeine consumption has been proposed as a risk factor for osteoporotic fracture, but the evidence associating high caffeine intake with low bone density is inconsistent. We therefore examined the influence of caffeine consumption on bone mineral at six skeletal sites in an age-stratified random sample of white women residing in Rochester, Minnesota. After age adjustment, there was no association between overall caffeine consumption and bone mineral at five of the six sites. In the femoral shaft, however, there was a statistically significant interaction between age and caffeine consumption so that high caffeine intake was associated with slight reductions in bone mineral among elderly subjects but with modestly increased bone mineral at younger ages. When caffeine intake was categorized by source, no consistent influence of coffee, tea, or other caffeinated beverage consumption could be detected on bone mineral. Caffeine intake was, however, positively associated with cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption. After adjusting for age, caffeine consumption was not correlated with biochemical indices of bone turnover, circulating concentrations of estradiol and estrone, or other dietary and musculoskeletal variables. These data suggest that caffeine intake in the range consumed by a representative sample of white women is not an important risk factor for osteoporosis. Among elderly women, however, in whom calcium balance performance is impaired, high caffeine intake may predispose to cortical bone loss from the proximal femur.

  2. Occurrence and concentration of caffeine in Oregon coastal waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez del Rey, Zoe; Granek, Elise F; Sylvester, Steve

    2012-07-01

    Caffeine, a biologically active drug, is recognized as a contaminant of freshwater and marine systems. We quantified caffeine concentrations in Oregon's coastal ocean to determine whether levels correlated with proximity to caffeine pollution sources. Caffeine was analyzed at 14 coastal locations, stratified between populated areas with sources of caffeine pollution and sparsely populated areas with no major caffeine pollution sources. Caffeine concentrations were measured in major water bodies discharging near sampling locations. Caffeine in seawater ranged from below the reporting limit (8.5 ng/L) to 44.7 ng/L. Caffeine occurrence and concentrations in seawater did not correspond with pollution threats from population density and point and non-point sources, but did correspond with storm event occurrence. Caffeine concentrations in rivers and estuaries draining to the coast ranged from below the reporting limit to 152.2 ng/L. This study establishes the occurrence of caffeine in Oregon's coastal waters, yet relative importance of sources, seasonal variability, and processes affecting caffeine transport into the coastal ocean require further research.

  3. Caffeine levels in beverages from Argentina's market: application to caffeine dietary intake assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olmos, V; Bardoni, N; Ridolfi, A S; Villaamil Lepori, E C

    2009-03-01

    The caffeine content of different beverages from Argentina's market was measured. Several brands of coffees, teas, mates, chocolate milks, soft and energy drinks were analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet detection. The highest concentration level was found in short coffee (1.38 mg ml(-1)) and the highest amount per serving was found in instant coffee (95 mg per serving). A consumption study was also carried out among 471 people from 2 to 93 years of age to evaluate caffeine total dietary intake by age and to identify the sources of caffeine intake. The mean caffeine intake among adults was 288 mg day(-1) and mate was the main contributor to that intake. The mean caffeine intake among children of 10 years of age and under was 35 mg day(-1) and soft drinks were the major contributors to that intake. Children between 11 and 15 years old and teenagers (between 16 and 20 years) had caffeine mean intakes of 120 and 240 mg day(-1), respectively, and mate was the major contributor to those intakes. Drinking mate is a deep-rooted habit among Argentine people and it might be the reason for their elevated caffeine mean daily intake.

  4. Caffeine Inhibits Acetylcholinesterase, But Not Butyrylcholinesterase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Dobes

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is an alkaloid with a stimulant effect in the body. It can interfere in transmissions based on acetylcholine, epinephrine, norepinephrine, serotonin, dopamine and glutamate. Clinical studies indicate that it can be involved in the slowing of Alzheimer disease pathology and some other effects. The effects are not well understood. In the present work, we focused on the question whether caffeine can inhibit acetylcholinesterase (AChE and/or, butyrylcholinesterase (BChE, the two enzymes participating in cholinergic neurotransmission. A standard Ellman test with human AChE and BChE was done for altering concentrations of caffeine. The test was supported by an in silico examination as well. Donepezil and tacrine were used as standards. In compliance with Dixon’s plot, caffeine was proved to be a non-competitive inhibitor of AChE and BChE. However, inhibition of BChE was quite weak, as the inhibition constant, Ki, was 13.9 ± 7.4 mol/L. Inhibition of AChE was more relevant, as Ki was found to be 175 ± 9 µmol/L. The predicted free energy of binding was −6.7 kcal/mol. The proposed binding orientation of caffeine can interact with Trp86, and it can be stabilize by Tyr337 in comparison to the smaller Ala328 in the case of human BChE; thus, it can explain the lower binding affinity of caffeine for BChE with reference to AChE. The biological relevance of the findings is discussed.

  5. Matrine promotes G0/G1 arrest and down-regulates cyclin D1 expression in human rhabdomyosarcoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L; Xue, T Y; Xu, W; Gao, J Z

    2013-09-01

    Matrine has a broad-spectrum of anti-cancer effects and is efficient in the inhibition of proliferation of hepatoma cells, leukemia cells and neuroblastoma cell. However, its efficacy and tentative mechanisms in rhabdomyosarcoma have not been addressed before. This study aimed to investigate the effects of Matrine on cell cycle and expression of cyclin D1 in human rhabdomyosarcoma cells (RD cell line). RD cell line was treated with different concentrations (0, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mg/mL) of Matrine, and cell proliferation and cell cycle were evaluated using, respectively, MTT assay and flow cytometry. The effect of Matrine on cyclin D1 mRNA levels was measured by RT-PCR. There was a dose-dependent inhibition of proliferation in the matrine-treated group (inhibition of proliferation rate in control cells 12.70 ± 0.35%; Matrine-treated cells [0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 mg/mL]: 31.16 ± 0.11%, 42.96 ± 0.9%, and 57.26 ± 0.8%). The G0 / G1 ratio in study groups were, respectively, 58.44 ± 3.57%, 64.79 ± 2.03%, 69.97 ± 2.89% and 75.03 ± 1.23%.Cyclin D1 mRNA levels progressively diminished (control group ratio of cyclin D1 / β-actin: 0.59 ± 0.06; Matrine: 0.35 ± 0.05, 0.27 ± 0.02 and 0.04 ± 0.03). All aforementioned changes were significant (PMatrine markedly suppresses cell proliferation in RD cells by decreasing expression of cyclin D1 mRNA and blocking the cell cycle at the G0 / G1 stage.

  6. Impact of caffeine and coffee on our health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez de Mejia, Elvira; Ramirez-Mares, Marco Vinicio

    2014-10-01

    Coffee is the most frequently consumed caffeine-containing beverage. The caffeine in coffee is a bioactive compound with stimulatory effects on the central nervous system and a positive effect on long-term memory. Although coffee consumption has been historically linked to adverse health effects, new research indicates that coffee consumption may be beneficial. Here we discuss the impact of coffee and caffeine on health and bring attention to the changing caffeine landscape that includes new caffeine-containing energy drinks and supplements, often targeting children and adolescents.

  7. Phosphorylation of mammalian CDC6 by cyclin A/CDK2 regulates its subcellular localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, B O; Lukas, J; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    1999-01-01

    by CDKs. CDC6 interacts specifically with the active Cyclin A/CDK2 complex in vitro and in vivo, but not with Cyclin E or Cyclin B kinase complexes. The cyclin binding domain of CDC6 was mapped to an N-terminal Cy-motif that is similar to the cyclin binding regions in p21(WAF1/SDI1) and E2F-1. The in vivo...

  8. Pharmacokinetics for topically applied caffeine in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronschläger, Martin; Forsman, Erik; Yu, Zhaohua; Talebizadeh, Nooshin; Löfgren, Stefan; Meyer, Linda M; Bergquist, Jonas; Söderberg, Per

    2014-05-01

    Topically applied caffeine was recently identified as a promising candidate molecule for cataract prevention. Little is known about the pharmacokinetics for topically applied caffeine. Potential toxicity of 72 mM caffeine on the ocular surface and the lens was qualitatively monitored and no toxic effects were observed. The concentration of caffeine was measured in the lens and the blood after topical application of 72 mM caffeine to groups of 10 animals sacrificed at 30, 60, 90 and 120 min after topical application. The lens concentration decreased throughout the observation period while the blood concentration increased up to 120 min. Further, the concentration of caffeine in the lens and blood was measured 30 min after topical application of caffeine, the concentration of caffeine being 0.72, 3.34, 15.51 and 72 mM depending on group belonging, in groups of 10 animals. The caffeine concentration in lens and blood, respectively, increased proportionally to the caffeine concentration topically applied. The rat blood concentrations achieved were far below the equivalent threshold dose of FDA recommended daily dose for humans. This information is important for further development of caffeine eye drops for cataract prevention.

  9. Energy Drinks and the Neurophysiological Impact of Caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persad, Leeana Aarthi Bagwath

    2011-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive stimulant with prevalent use across all age groups. It is a naturally occurring substance found in the coffee bean, tea leaf, the kola nut, cocoa bean. Recently there has been an increase in energy drink consumption leading to caffeine abuse, with aggressive marketing and poor awareness on the consequences of high caffeine use. With caffeine consumption being so common, it is vital to know the impact caffeine has on the body, as its effects can influence cardio-respiratory, endocrine, and perhaps most importantly neurological systems. Detrimental effects have being described especially since an over consumption of caffeine has being noted. This review focuses on the neurophysiological impact of caffeine and its biochemical pathways in the human body. PMID:22025909

  10. Energy drinks and the neurophysiological impacts of caffeine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leeana eBagwath Persad

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive stimulant with prevalent use across all age groups. It is a naturally occurring substance found in the coffee bean, tea leaf, the kola nut, cocoa bean. Recently there has been an increase in energy drink consumption leading to caffeine abuse, with aggressive marketing and poor awareness on the consequences of high caffeine use. With caffeine consumption being so common, it is vital to know the impact caffeine has on the body, as its effects can influence cardio-respiratory, endocrine and perhaps most importantly neurological systems. Detrimental effects have being described especially since an over consumption of caffeine has being noted. This review focuses on the neurophysiological impact of caffeine and its biochemical pathways in the human body.

  11. The pH dependent Raman spectroscopic study of caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jian; Gu, Huaimin; Zhong, Liang; Hu, Yongjun; Liu, Fang

    2011-02-01

    First of all the surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) and normal Raman spectra of caffeine aqueous solution were obtained at different pH values. In order to obtain the detailed vibrational assignments of the Raman spectroscopy, the geometry of caffeine molecule was optimized by density functional theory (DFT) calculation. By comparing the SERS of caffeine with its normal spectra at different pH values; it is concluded that pH value can dramatically affect the SERS of caffeine, but barely affect the normal Raman spectrum of caffeine aqueous solution. It can essentially affect the reorientation of caffeine molecule to the Ag colloid surface, but cannot impact the vibration of functional groups and chemical bonds in caffeine molecule.

  12. Caffeine Expectancy Questionnaire (CaffEQ): Construction, Psychometric Properties, and Associations with Caffeine Use, Caffeine Dependence, and Other Related Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntley, Edward D.; Juliano, Laura M.

    2012-01-01

    Expectancies for drug effects predict drug initiation, use, cessation, and relapse, and may play a causal role in drug effects (i.e., placebo effects). Surprisingly little is known about expectancies for caffeine even though it is the most widely used psychoactive drug in the world. In a series of independent studies, the nature and scope of…

  13. Caenorhabditis elegans cyclin B3 is required for multiple mitotic processes including alleviation of a spindle checkpoint-dependent block in anaphase chromosome segregation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary M R Deyter

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The master regulators of the cell cycle are cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks, which influence the function of a myriad of proteins via phosphorylation. Mitotic Cdk1 is activated by A-type, as well as B1- and B2-type, cyclins. However, the role of a third, conserved cyclin B family member, cyclin B3, is less well defined. Here, we show that Caenorhabditis elegans CYB-3 has essential and distinct functions from cyclin B1 and B2 in the early embryo. CYB-3 is required for the timely execution of a number of cell cycle events including completion of the MII meiotic division of the oocyte nucleus, pronuclear migration, centrosome maturation, mitotic chromosome condensation and congression, and, most strikingly, progression through the metaphase-to-anaphase transition. Our experiments reveal that the extended metaphase delay in CYB-3-depleted embryos is dependent on an intact spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC and results in salient defects in the architecture of holocentric metaphase chromosomes. Furthermore, genetically increasing or decreasing dynein activity results in the respective suppression or enhancement of CYB-3-dependent defects in cell cycle progression. Altogether, these data reveal that CYB-3 plays a unique, essential role in the cell cycle including promoting mitotic dynein functionality and alleviation of a SAC-dependent block in anaphase chromosome segregation.

  14. CyclinE在甲状腺乳头状癌组织中的表达及临床意义%TThe expression and clinical significance of CyclinE in the thyroid gland papilliform tumor organizes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范晓东; 张鹏霞; 王茉琳; 王伟群

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study the expression and clinical significance of CyclinE in the thyroid gland papilliform tumor .Methods The expression of CyclinE was tested by immunohistochemistry SP law of the thyroid gland papilliform tumor , the thyroid gland adenoma and the lump in the normal thyroid gland .Results The CyclinE expression rate was elevated gradually (P<0.01).CyclinE expression was correlated with stages, peritonsillar tissue infiltration and lymph node shift related of thyroid gland papilliform tumor (P<0.01).Conclusions CyclinE expression level is correlated with the occurrence and development of thyroid gland papilliform tumor .%目的:探讨CyclinE在甲状腺乳头状癌组织中的表达及其与临床病理特征的关系。方法用免疫组化 SP法检测CyclinE在甲状腺乳头状癌、甲状腺腺瘤及瘤旁正常甲状腺组织中的表达情况。结果 CyclinE的阳性表达率在正常甲状腺组织、甲状腺腺瘤、甲状腺乳头状癌组织中逐渐升高(P<0.01)。 CyclinE表达与甲状腺乳头状癌的临床分期、周围组织浸润及淋巴结转移有关(P<0.01)。结论 Cyclin E 的表达水平与甲状腺乳头状癌的发生、发展及预后有关,为甲状腺乳头状癌的治疗提供新的思路。

  15. Nuclear Targeting of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2 Reveals Essential Roles of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2 Localization and Cyclin E in Vitamin D-Mediated Growth Inhibition

    OpenAIRE

    Flores, Omar; Wang, Zhengying; Knudsen, Karen E; Burnstein, Kerry L.

    2010-01-01

    1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25-(OH)2D3), inhibits proliferation of a variety of cell types including adenocarcinoma of the prostate. We have previously shown that 1,25-(OH)2D3 increases the stability of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27KIP1, decreases cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) activity, and promotes G1 phase accumulation in human prostate cancer cells. These effects correlate with cytoplasmic relocalization of CDK2. In this study, we investigated the role of CDK2 cytoplasmic re...

  16. Inter- and intrachromosomal asynchrony of cell division cycle events in root meristem cells of Allium cepa: possible connection with gradient of cyclin B-like proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabka, Aneta; Polit, Justyna Teresa; Maszewski, Janusz

    2010-08-01

    Alternate treatments of Allium cepa root meristems with hydroxyurea (HU) and caffeine give rise to extremely large and highly elongated cells with atypical images of mitotic divisions, including internuclear asynchrony and an unknown type of interchromosomal asynchrony observed during metaphase-to-anaphase transition. Another type of asynchrony that cannot depend solely on the increased length of cells was observed following long-term incubation of roots with HU. This kind of treatment revealed both cell nuclei entering premature mitosis and, for the first time, an uncommon form of mitotic abnormality manifested in a gradual condensation of chromatin (spanning from interphase to prometaphase). Immunocytochemical study of polykaryotic cells using anti-beta tubulin antibodies revealed severe perturbations in the microtubular organization of preprophase bands. Quantitative immunofluorescence measurements of the control cells indicate that the level of cyclin B-like proteins reaches the maximum at the G2 to metaphase transition and then becomes reduced during later stages of mitosis. After long-term incubation with low doses of HU, the amount of cyclin B-like proteins considerably increases, and a significant number of elongated cells show gradients of these proteins spread along successive regions of the perinuclear cytoplasm. It is suggested that there may be a direct link between the effects of HU-mediated deceleration of S- and G2-phases and an enhanced concentration of cyclin B-like proteins. In consequence, the activation of cyclin B-CDK complexes gives rise to an abnormal pattern of premature mitotic chromosome condensation with biphasic nuclear structures having one part of chromatin decondensed, and the other part condensed.

  17. Altered expression of the caffeine synthase gene in a naturally caffeine-free mutant of Coffea arabica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirian Perez Maluf

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we studied the biosynthesis of caffeine by examining the expression of genes involved in this biosynthetic pathway in coffee fruits containing normal or low levels of this substance. The amplification of gene-specific transcripts during fruit development revealed that low-caffeine fruits had a lower expression of the theobromine synthase and caffeine synthase genes and also contained an extra transcript of the caffeine synthase gene. This extra transcript contained only part of exon 1 and all of exon 3. The sequence of the mutant caffeine synthase gene revealed the substitution of isoleucine for valine in the enzyme active site that probably interfered with enzymatic activity. These findings indicate that the absence of caffeine in these mutants probably resulted from a combination of transcriptional regulation and the presence of mutations in the caffeine synthase amino acid sequence.

  18. A Survey of Caffeine Use and Associated Side Effects in a College Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Greene, Douglas; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Surveyed 270 college students concerning their caffeine consumption. Results suggest there is identifiable group using excessive amounts of caffeine. Identified several deleterious effects possibly related to caffeine use. Approximately 75 percent of caffeine users surveyed rarely sought information on caffeine content of products or avoided…

  19. Caffeine does not modulate inhibitory control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Z. Tieges; J. Snel; A. Kok; K.R. Ridderinkhof

    2009-01-01

    The effects of a 3 mg/kg body weight (BW) dose of caffeine were assessed on behavioral indices of response inhibition. To meet these aims, we selected a modified AX version of the Continuous Performance Test (CPT), the stop task, and the flanker task. In three double-blind, placebo-controlled, withi

  20. Caffeinated drinks, alcohol consumption and hangover severity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Penning, R.; de Haan, L.; Verster, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between consumption of caffeinated beverages and alcohol, and effects on next day hangover severity. In 2010, a survey funded by Utrecht University was conducted among N=549 Dutch students. Beverages consumed on their latest drinking session that produced a hango

  1. Caffeine Does Not Modulate Inhibitory Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tieges, Zoe; Snel, Jan; Kok, Albert; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard

    2009-01-01

    The effects of a 3 mg/kg body weight (BW) dose of caffeine were assessed on behavioral indices of response inhibition. To meet these aims, we selected a modified AX version of the Continuous Performance Test (CPT), the stop task, and the flanker task. In three double-blind, placebo-controlled, within-subjects experiments, these tasks were…

  2. Caffeine improves anticipatory processes in task switching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieges, Zoe; Snel, Jan; Kok, Albert; Wijnen, Jasper G.; Lorist, Monicque M.; Ridderinkhof, K. Richard

    2006-01-01

    We studied the effects of moderate amounts of caffeine on task switching and task maintenance using mixed-task (AABB) blocks, in which participants alternated predictably between two tasks, and single-task (AAAA, BBBB) blocks. Switch costs refer to longer reaction times (RT) on task switch trials (e

  3. Caffeine effects on perceptual and motor processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorist, MM; Snel, J

    1997-01-01

    The effects of a single dose of caffeine on specific information processing operations were examined by using a visual selective attention task in which subjects were asked to select between a left and right hand response on the basis of two different target letters. The target was presented on a pr

  4. RhoA promotes epidermal stem cell proliferation via PKN1-cyclin D1 signaling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fan; Zhan, Rixing; Chen, Liang; Dai, Xia; Wang, Wenping; Guo, Rui; Li, Xiaoge; Li, Zhe; Wang, Liang; Huang, Shupeng; Shen, Jie

    2017-01-01

    Objective Epidermal stem cells (ESCs) play a critical role in wound healing, but the mechanism underlying ESC proliferation is not well defined. Here, we explore the effects of RhoA on ESC proliferation and the possible underlying mechanism. Methods Human ESCs were enriched by rapid adhesion to collagen IV. RhoA(+/+)(G14V), RhoA(-/-)(T19N) and pGFP control plasmids were transfected into human ESCs. The effect of RhoA on cell proliferation was detected by cell proliferation and DNA synthesis assays. Induction of PKN1 activity by RhoA was determined by immunoblot analysis, and the effects of PKN1 on RhoA in terms of inducing cell proliferation and cyclin D1 expression were detected using specific siRNA targeting PKN1. The effects of U-46619 (a RhoA agonist) and C3 transferase (a RhoA antagonist) on ESC proliferation were observed in vivo. Results RhoA had a positive effect on ESC proliferation, and PKN1 activity was up-regulated by the active RhoA mutant (G14V) and suppressed by RhoA T19N. Moreover, the ability of RhoA to promote ESC proliferation and DNA synthesis was interrupted by PKN1 siRNA. Additionally, cyclin D1 protein and mRNA expression levels were up-regulated by RhoA G14V, and these effects were inhibited by siRNA-mediated knock-down of PKN1. RhoA also promoted ESC proliferation via PKN in vivo. Conclusion This study shows that the effect of RhoA on ESC proliferation is mediated by activation of the PKN1-cyclin D1 pathway in vitro, suggesting that RhoA may serve as a new therapeutic target for wound healing. PMID:28222172

  5. Characterisation of the effects of caffeine on sleep in the rat: a potential model of sleep disruption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, L M; Wilson, S J; Nutt, D J; Hutson, P H; Ivarsson, M

    2009-07-01

    Caffeine is known to disrupt sleep and its administration to human subjects has been used to model sleep disruption. We previously showed that its effects on sleep onset latency are comparable between rats and humans. This study evaluated the potential use of caffeine as a model of sleep disruption in the rat, by assessing its effects on sleep architecture and electroencephalogram (EEG) frequency spectrum, and using sleep-promoting drugs to reverse these effects. Rats were implanted with radiotelemetry devices for body temperature, EEG, electromyogram and locomotor activity. Following recovery, animals were dosed with caffeine (10 mg/kg) alone or in combination with zolpidem (10 mg/kg) or trazodone (20 mg/kg). Sleep was scored for the subsequent 12 h using automated analysis software. Caffeine dose-dependently disrupted sleep: it increased WAKE time, decreased NREM (non-REM) sleep time and NREM bout duration (but not bout number), and decreased delta activity in NREM sleep. It also dose-dependently increased locomotor activity and body temperature. When given alone, zolpidem suppressed REM whilst trazodone increased NREM sleep time at the expense of WAKE, increased NREM bout duration, increased delta activity in NREM sleep and reduced body temperature. In combination, zolpidem attenuated caffeine's effects on WAKE, whilst trazodone attenuated its effects on NREM sleep, NREM bout duration, delta activity, body temperature and locomotor activity. Caffeine administration produced many of the signs of insomnia that were improved by two of its most successful current treatments. This model may therefore be useful in the study of new drugs for the treatment of sleep disturbance.

  6. Legitimacy of concerns about caffeine and energy drink consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesensten, Nancy J

    2014-10-01

    Whether caffeine and energy drink consumption presents a critical emerging health problem is not currently known. Available evidence suggests that energy drink consumption represents a change in the ways in which individuals in the United States consume caffeine but that the amount of caffeine consumed daily has not appreciably increased. In the present review, the question of whether Americans are sleep deprived (a potential reason for using caffeine) is briefly explored. Reported rates of daily caffeine consumption (based on beverage formulation) and data obtained from both civilian and military populations in the United States are examined, the efficacy of ingredients other than caffeine in energy drinks is discussed, and the safety and side effects of caffeine are addressed, including whether evidence supports the contention that excessive caffeine/energy drink consumption induces risky behavior. The available evidence suggests that the main legitimate concern regarding caffeine and energy drink use is the potential negative impact on sleep but that, otherwise, there is no cause for concern regarding caffeine use in the general population.

  7. Variation in caffeine concentration in single coffee beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Glen P; Wu, Alex; Yiran, Liang; Force, Lesleigh

    2013-11-13

    Twenty-eight coffee samples from around the world were tested for caffeine levels to develop near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) calibrations for whole and ground coffee. Twenty-five individual beans from five of those coffees were used to develop a NIRS calibration for caffeine concentration in single beans. An international standard high-performance liquid chromatography method was used to analyze for caffeine content. Coffee is a legal stimulant and possesses a number of heath properties. However, there is variation in the level of caffeine in brewed coffee and other caffeinated beverages. Being able to sort beans on the basis of caffeine concentration will improve quality control in the level of caffeine in those beverages. The range in caffeine concentration was from 0.01 mg/g (decaffeinated coffee) to 19.9 mg/g (Italian coffee). The majority of coffees were around 10.0-12.0 mg/g. The NIRS results showed r(2) values for bulk unground and ground coffees were >0.90 with standard errors caffeine concentration of individual coffee beans. One application of this calibration could be sorting beans on caffeine concentration to provide greater quality control for high-end markets. Furthermore, bean sorting may open new markets for novel coffee products.

  8. Effects of adolescent caffeine consumption on cocaine sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Casey E; Levis, Sophia C; Schreiner, Drew C; Amat, Jose; Maier, Steven F; Bachtell, Ryan K

    2015-03-01

    Caffeine is the most commonly used psychoactive substance, and consumption by adolescents has risen markedly in recent years. We identified the effects of adolescent caffeine consumption on cocaine sensitivity and determined neurobiological changes within the nucleus accumbens (NAc) that may underlie caffeine-induced hypersensitivity to cocaine. Male Sprague-Dawley rats consumed caffeine (0.3 g/l) or water for 28 days during adolescence (postnatal day 28-55; P28-P55) or adulthood (P67-P94). Testing occurred in the absence of caffeine during adulthood (P62-82 or P101-121). Cocaine-induced and quinpirole (D2 receptor agonist)-induced locomotion was enhanced in rats that consumed caffeine during adolescence. Adolescent consumption of caffeine also enhanced the development of a conditioned place preference at a sub-threshold dose of cocaine (7.5 mg/kg, i.p.). These behavioral changes were not observed in adults consuming caffeine for an equivalent period of time. Sucrose preferences were not altered in rats that consumed caffeine during adolescence, suggesting there are no differences in natural reward. Caffeine consumption during adolescence reduced basal dopamine levels and augmented dopamine release in the NAc in response to cocaine (5 mg/kg, i.p.). Caffeine consumption during adolescence also increased the expression of the dopamine D2 receptor, dopamine transporter, and adenosine A1 receptor and decreased adenosine A2A receptor expression in the NAc. Consumption of caffeine during adulthood increased adenosine A1 receptor expression in the NAc, but no other protein expression changes were observed. Together these findings suggest that caffeine consumption during adolescence produced changes in the NAc that are evident in adulthood and may contribute to increases in cocaine-mediated behaviors.

  9. Quantitative Analysis by Isotopic Dilution Using Mass Spectroscopy: The Determination of Caffeine by GC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Devon W.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes a laboratory technique for quantitative analysis of caffeine by an isotopic dilution method for coupled gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. Discusses caffeine analysis and experimental methodology. Lists sample caffeine concentrations found in common products. (MVL)

  10. Monoclonal antibody raised against human mitotic cyclin B1, identifies cyclin B-like mitotic proteins in synchronized onion (Allium cepa L.) root meristem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, S K; Ghosh, S

    1997-03-01

    Cyclin B-like mitotic proteins have been detected in synchronized Allium cepa L. root tip cells by using mouse monoclonal anti-cyclin B1 antibody raised against human cyclin B1. Immunoblot shows two closely placed isoforms of cyclin B-like proteins having an apparent molecular weight around 54 kDa. In vivo [35S]-methionine labelling followed by immunoprecipitation and autoradiography indicates that cyclin B-like proteins are mainly synthesized in the G2 phase of the cell cycle and destroyed in late mitosis. Immunoblotting data depict that the level of cyclin B-like proteins reaches the maximum at the late G2 to early M phase; and it becomes degraded in the late hours of mitosis. Moreover, the cyclin B isoforms are stabilized in colchicine-arrested metaphase cells as already reported in animal cells.

  11. Caffeine potentiates the enhancement by choline of striatal acetylcholine release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D. A.; Ulus, I. H.; Wurtman, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the effect of peripherally administered caffeine (50 mg/kg), choline (30, 60, or 120 mg/kg) or combinations of both drugs on the spontaneous release of acetylcholine (ACh) from the corpus striatum of anesthetized rats using in vivo microdialysis. Caffeine alone or choline in the 30 or 60 mg/kg dose failed to increase ACh in microdialysis samples; the 120 mg/kg choline dose significantly enhanced ACh during the 80 min following drug administration. Coadministration of caffeine with choline significantly increased ACh release after each of the choline doses tested. Peak microdialysate levels with the 120 mg/kg dose were increased 112% when caffeine was additionally administered, as compared with 54% without caffeine. These results indicate that choline administration can enhance spontaneous ACh release from neurons, and that caffeine, a drug known to block adenosine receptors on these neurons, can amplify the choline effect.

  12. Caffeine Use Disorder: A Review of the Evidence and Future Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Addicott, Merideth A.

    2014-01-01

    The latest edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-5) has introduced new provisions for caffeine-related disorders. Caffeine Withdrawal is now an officially recognized diagnosis, and criteria for caffeine use disorder have been proposed for additional study. caffeine use disorder is intended to be characterized by cognitive, behavioral, and physiological symptoms indicative of caffeine use despite significant caffeine-related problems, similar to other Substance Use Disorders. H...

  13. Caffeine as a cause of urticaria-angioedema

    OpenAIRE

    Linda Tognetti; Francesco Murdaca; Michele Fimiani

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a young woman presenting with recurrent urticaria. The episodes occurred both in and out of the workplace. On three occasions it presented as urticaria-angioedema, requiring emergency care on one occassion. A thorough clinical history along with serological and allergological tests allowed a diagnosis of caffeine-induced urticaria-angioedema. We advised the patient to follow a caffeine-free diet and to avoid all caffeine or methylxanthine-containing drugs. After two year...

  14. Maternal Caffeine Consumption and Infant Nighttime Waking: Prospective Cohort Study

    OpenAIRE

    Santos,Iná S; Matijasevich, Alicia; Domingues, Marlos R

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Coffee and other caffeinated beverages are commonly consumed in pregnancy. In adults, caffeine may interfere with sleep onset and have a dose-response effect similar to those seen during insomnia. In infancy, nighttime waking is a common event. With this study, we aimed to investigate if maternal caffeine consumption during pregnancy and lactation leads to frequent nocturnal awakening among infants at 3 months of age. METHODS: All children born in the city of Pelotas, Brazil, durin...

  15. Interaction between oral ciprofloxacin and caffeine in normal volunteers.

    OpenAIRE

    Healy, D P; Polk, R E; Kanawati, L; Rock, D T; Mooney, M L

    1989-01-01

    The influence of multiple doses of ciprofloxacin on the disposition of caffeine and its major metabolite, paraxanthine, was investigated in healthy volunteers. Ten xanthine-free, fasting males were given 100 mg of caffeine orally 24 h before being given ciprofloxacin and again with the third dose of ciprofloxacin (750 mg administered every 12 h). Blood samples were serially collected after both doses of caffeine and after the first and last doses of ciprofloxacin. Ciprofloxacin significantly ...

  16. (R)-roscovitine, a cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, enhances tonic GABA inhibition in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A; Tyzio, R; Zilberter, Y; Ben-Ari, Yehezkel

    2008-10-02

    Pharmacological agents that mediate a persistent GABAergic conductance are of considerable interest for treatment of epilepsy. (R)-roscovitine is a membrane permeable cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, designed to block cell division. It is currently undergoing a phase II clinical trial as an anticancer drug. We show that (R)-roscovitine increases a tonic GABA-mediated current in rat hippocampal neurons. This enhanced tonic current appears independent of synaptic GABA release and requires functional transmembrane GABA transport. The effect of (R)-roscovitine is associated with neither modification of GABAA receptors nor protein kinase activity, but is associated with a significant increase in intracellular GABA concentration in hippocampal GABAergic neurons. (R)-roscovitine-induced tonic inhibition significantly suppresses spontaneous spiking activity of hippocampal pyramidal cells. Therefore, (R)-roscovitine is a potent modulator of neuronal activity in rat hippocampus and may provide a tool for preventing paroxysmal activity.

  17. Effect of breastfeeding piperine on the learning of offspring mice: interaction with caffeine and diazepam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghadamnia, Ali Akbar; Zangoori, Vahid; Zargar-Nattaj, Seyed Sadegh; Tayebi, Pooya; Moghadamnia, Yasaman; Jorsaraei, Seyed Gholam Ali

    2010-01-01

    Piperine, the main alkaloid of black pepper (Piper nigrum), has been suggested to display several pharmacological properties, including pain relief, anticonvulsant, antidepressant-like, antianxiety, sedative, and anti-inflammatory effects. This study was designed to investigate the effect of piperine on learning in mice and the interaction of the effect with caffeine and diazepam. Piperine (100 mg/kg intraperitoneally) was injected into the mouse mothers or nursing dams during breastfeeding for 25 days at five-day intervals. After feeding the newborn mice, their learning was evaluated using a step-through passive avoidance task. Mouse learning was assessed 1 hr and 24 hr and 1 week after a training session. Piperine increased learning in the first (1 hr: 243.33 s vs 55.17 s, P = 0.002) and third assessments (1 week: 226 s vs 97 s, P effect of a low dose of caffeine (25 mg/kg intraperitoneally after a shock of 2 s duration) in a first assessment (295.17 s vs 149.17 s, P = 0.026) compared to a higher dose of caffeine. Piperine reversed diazepam (1 mg/kg intraperitoneally) suppression of learning 24 hours after training by a 4 s shock (298 s vs 135.67 s, P = 0.03). According to the results, piperine alone significantly increased learning 1 hour and 1 week after training assessments, and learning can be improved in the short term when followed by piperine administration. It was also shown that piperine can potentiate the effect of a low dose of caffeine and can reverse the effect of diazepam.

  18. The role of cyclin E1 in hepatocellular carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Yan-yan; 陳茵茵

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) accounts for 70-85% of liver cancer, which is the sixth most common cancer in the world. Prognosis of HCC is dismal with little chance of complete recovery after diagnosis. It is of essence to discover the key molecules involved in the tumor progression. This could help earlier detection of HCC and establish targeted molecular therapies. Cyclin E1 (CCNE1) is a cyclin molecule responsible for the transition from G1 to S phase of the cell cycle and is often dysreg...

  19. Effects of remifentanil on intracellular Ca2+ and its transients induced by electrical stimulation and caffeine in rat ventricular myocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Ye; Michael G. Irwin; LI Rui; CHEN Zhiwu; Tak-Ming Wong

    2009-01-01

    Background Preconditioning with remifentanil confers cardioprotection. Since Ca2+ overload is a precipitating factor of injury, we determined the effects of remefentanil on intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]I) and its transients induced by electrical stimulation and caffeine, which reflects Ca2+ handling by Ca2+ handling proteins, in rat ventricular myocytes. Methods Freshly isolated adult male Sprague-Dawley rat myocytes were loaded with Fura-2/AM and [Ca]I was determined by spectrofluorometry. Remifentanil at 0.1-1000 μg/L was administered. Ten minutes after administration, either 0.2 Hz electrical stimulation was applied or 10 mmol/L caffeine was added. The [Ca2+]I, and the amplitude, time resting and 50% decay (t50) of both transients induced by electrical stimulation (E[Ca2+]I) and caffeine (C[Ca2+]I) were determined.Results Remifentanil (0.1-1000.0 μg/L) decreased the [Ca2+]I in a dose-dependent manner. It also decreased the amplitude of both transients dose-dependently. Furthermore, it increased the time to peak and t50 of both transients dose-dependently.Conclusion Remifentanil reduced the [Ca2+]I and suppressed the transients induced by electrical stimulation and caffeine in rat ventricular myocytes.

  20. Caffeine Content in Popular Energy Drinks and Energy Shots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attipoe, Selasi; Leggit, Jeffrey; Deuster, Patricia A

    2016-09-01

    The use of energy beverages is high among the general population and military personnel. Previous studies have reported discrepancies between the actual amount of caffeine in products and the amount of caffeine on stated labels. Thus, the purpose of this study was to examine the content of caffeine listed on the labels of various energy drinks and energy shots. Top-selling energy drinks (n = 9) and energy shots (n = 5) were purchased from retail stores. Three of each of the 14 products were purchased and analyzed for caffeine content by an independent laboratory. Of the 14 products tested, 5 did not provide caffeine amounts on their facts panel-of those, 3 listed caffeine as an ingredient and 2 listed caffeine as part of a proprietary blend. The remaining 9 (of 14) products stated the amounts of caffeine on their labels, all of which were within 15% of the amount indicated on the label. In this study, although the energy beverages that indicated the amount of caffeine it contained had values within ±15% of the amount listed on the label, a potentially acceptable range, this finding is not acceptable with regard to current labeling regulations, which require added ingredients to total 100%.

  1. Exercise and sport performance with low doses of caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spriet, Lawrence L

    2014-11-01

    Caffeine is a popular work-enhancing supplement that has been actively researched since the 1970s. The majority of research has examined the effects of moderate to high caffeine doses (5-13 mg/kg body mass) on exercise and sport. These caffeine doses have profound effects on the responses to exercise at the whole-body level and are associated with variable results and some undesirable side effects. Low doses of caffeine (caffeine doses (1) do not alter the peripheral whole-body responses to exercise; (2) improve vigilance, alertness, and mood and cognitive processes during and after exercise; and (3) are associated with few, if any, side effects. Therefore, the ergogenic effect of low caffeine doses appears to result from alterations in the central nervous system. However, several aspects of consuming low doses of caffeine remain unresolved and suffer from a paucity of research, including the potential effects on high-intensity sprint and burst activities. The responses to low doses of caffeine are also variable and athletes need to determine whether the ingestion of ~200 mg of caffeine before and/or during training and competitions is ergogenic on an individual basis.

  2. Caffeine Intake May Modulate Inflammation Markers in Trained Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rômulo Pillon Barcelos

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is presented in many commercial products and has been proven to induce ergogenic effects in exercise, mainly related to redox status homeostasis, inflammation and oxidative stress-related adaptation mechanisms. However, most studies have mainly focused on muscle adaptations, and the role of caffeine in different tissues during exercise training has not been fully described. The aim of this study was therefore, to analyze the effects of chronic caffeine intake and exercise training on liver mitochondria functioning and plasma inflammation markers. Rats were divided into control, control/caffeine, exercise, and exercise/caffeine groups. Exercise groups underwent four weeks of swimming training and caffeine groups were supplemented with 6 mg/kg/day. Liver mitochondrial swelling and complex I activity, and plasma myeloperoxidase (MPO and acetylcholinesterase (AChE activities were measured. An anti-inflammatory effect of exercise was evidenced by reduced plasma MPO activity. Additionally, caffeine intake alone and combined with exercise decreased the plasma AChE and MPO activities. The per se anti-inflammatory effect of caffeine intake should be highlighted considering its widespread use as an ergogenic aid. Therefore, caffeine seems to interfere on exercise-induced adaptations and could also be used in different exercise-related health treatments.

  3. Caffeine Consumption and Sleep Quality in Australian Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Emily J.; Coates, Alison M.; Kohler, Mark; Banks, Siobhan

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is commonly consumed to help offset fatigue, however, it can have several negative effects on sleep quality and quantity. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between caffeine consumption and sleep quality in adults using a newly validated caffeine food frequency questionnaire (C-FFQ). In this cross sectional study, 80 adults (M ± SD: 38.9 ± 19.3 years) attended the University of South Australia to complete a C-FFQ and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Caffeine consumption remained stable across age groups while the source of caffeine varied. Higher total caffeine consumption was associated with decreased time in bed, as an estimate of sleep time (r = −0.229, p = 0.041), but other PSQI variables were not. Participants who reported poor sleep (PSQI global score ≥ 5) consumed 192.1 ± 122.5 mg (M ± SD) of caffeine which was significantly more than those who reported good sleep quality (PSQI global score < 5; 125.2 ± 62.6 mg; p = 0.008). The C-FFQ was found to be a quick but detailed way to collect population based caffeine consumption data. The data suggests that shorter sleep is associated with greater caffeine consumption, and that consumption is greater in adults with reduced sleep quality. PMID:27527212

  4. Caffeine Consumption and Sleep Quality in Australian Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Emily J; Coates, Alison M; Kohler, Mark; Banks, Siobhan

    2016-08-04

    Caffeine is commonly consumed to help offset fatigue, however, it can have several negative effects on sleep quality and quantity. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between caffeine consumption and sleep quality in adults using a newly validated caffeine food frequency questionnaire (C-FFQ). In this cross sectional study, 80 adults (M ± SD: 38.9 ± 19.3 years) attended the University of South Australia to complete a C-FFQ and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Caffeine consumption remained stable across age groups while the source of caffeine varied. Higher total caffeine consumption was associated with decreased time in bed, as an estimate of sleep time (r = -0.229, p = 0.041), but other PSQI variables were not. Participants who reported poor sleep (PSQI global score ≥ 5) consumed 192.1 ± 122.5 mg (M ± SD) of caffeine which was significantly more than those who reported good sleep quality (PSQI global score caffeine consumption data. The data suggests that shorter sleep is associated with greater caffeine consumption, and that consumption is greater in adults with reduced sleep quality.

  5. Effects of Adolescent Caffeine Consumption on Cocaine Sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    O'Neill, Casey E; Levis, Sophia C; Schreiner, Drew C; Amat, Jose; Steven F. Maier; Bachtell, Ryan K.

    2014-01-01

    Caffeine is the most commonly used psychoactive substance, and consumption by adolescents has risen markedly in recent years. We identified the effects of adolescent caffeine consumption on cocaine sensitivity and determined neurobiological changes within the nucleus accumbens (NAc) that may underlie caffeine-induced hypersensitivity to cocaine. Male Sprague-Dawley rats consumed caffeine (0.3 g/l) or water for 28 days during adolescence (postnatal day 28–55; P28–P55) or adulthood (P67–P94). T...

  6. Regulation of cerebrospinal fluid production by caffeine consumption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Sik

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caffeine is the most commonly consumed psycho-stimulant in the world. The effects of caffeine on the body have been extensively studied; however, its effect on the structure of the brain has not been investigated to date. Results In the present study we found that the long-term consumption of caffeine can induce ventriculomegaly; this was observed in 40% of the study rats. In the caffeine-treated rats with ventriculomegaly, there was increased production of CSF, associated with the increased expression of Na+, K+-ATPase and increased cerebral blood flow (CBF. In contrast to the chronic effects, acute treatment with caffeine decreased the production of CSF, suggesting 'effect inversion' associated with caffeine, which was mediated by increased expression of the A1 adenosine receptor, in the choroid plexus of rats chronically treated with caffeine. The involvement of the A1 adenosine receptor in the effect inversion of caffeine was further supported by the induction of ventriculomegaly and Na+, K+-ATPase, in A1 agonist-treated rats. Conclusion The results of this study show that long-term consumption of caffeine can induce ventriculomegaly, which is mediated in part by increased production of CSF. Moreover, we also showed that adenosine receptor signaling can regulate the production of CSF by controlling the expression of Na+, K+-ATPase and CBF.

  7. Antibacterial activity of caffeine against plant pathogenic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sledz, Wojciech; Los, Emilia; Paczek, Agnieszka; Rischka, Jacek; Motyka, Agata; Zoledowska, Sabina; Piosik, Jacek; Lojkowska, Ewa

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the antibacterial properties of a plant secondary metabolite - caffeine. Caffeine is present in over 100 plant species. Antibacterial activity of caffeine was examined against the following plant-pathogenic bacteria: Ralstonia solanacearum (Rsol), Clavibacter michiganesis subsp. sepedonicus (Cms), Dickeya solani (Dsol), Pectobacterium atrosepticum (Pba), Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (Pcc), Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato (Pst), and Xanthomonas campestris subsp. campestris (Xcc). MIC and MBC values ranged from 5 to 20 mM and from 43 to 100 mM, respectively. Caffeine increased the bacterial generation time of all tested species and caused changes in cell morphology. The influence of caffeine on the synthesis of DNA, RNA and proteins was investigated in cultures of plant pathogenic bacteria with labelled precursors: [(3)H]thymidine, [(3)H]uridine or (14)C leucine, respectively. RNA biosynthesis was more affected than DNA or protein biosynthesis in bacterial cells treated with caffeine. Treatment of Pba with caffeine for 336 h did not induce resistance to this compound. Caffeine application reduced disease symptoms caused by Dsol on chicory leaves, potato slices, and whole potato tubers. The data presented indicate caffeine as a potential tool for the control of diseases caused by plant-pathogenic bacteria, especially under storage conditions.

  8. Bisphenol A migration from cans containing coffee and caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jeong-Hun; Kondo, Fusao

    2002-09-01

    This study was conducted to reconfirm the possibility and level of bisphenol A (BPA) migration from cans containing coffee and test the relationship between caffeine concentration and BPA migration from the can coating. BPA migration from cans containing decaffeinated and non-decaffeinated instant coffee averaged 66.2 and 84.0 ng ml(-1), respectively. In our study, the possibility of BPA migration from cans containing coffee after processing was found. In addition, the more caffeine content in the water solution of caffeine increased, the more BPA migration grew. This means that caffeine can have an effect on BPA migration from the can coating.

  9. Urinary caffeine after coffee consumption and heat dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambaz, A; Meirim, I; Décombaz, J

    2001-07-01

    This study evaluated the effect of heat-induced dehydration on urinary caffeine excretion after the consumption of a strong coffee solution. Following ingestion of coffee (caffeine 4.9+/-0.1 [SE] mg/kg, 3-4 cups), ten healthy males were intermittently exposed to heat in a sauna until they had lost 2.9 % of lean mass. On a separate occasion, they consumed the same amount of coffee but remained quiet and euhydrated (control). Urine flow was reduced 7-fold in dehydration. At these low excretion rates (caffeine concentration was negatively correlated with flow. Peak urinary caffeine (Cmax) was 7.6 +/- 0.4 (SE) microg/ml in dehydration and 7.1 +/- 0.2 microg/ml in the control (p > 0.05). Compared with the control, dehydration delayed Cmax by 1 hour, maintained higher saliva caffeine concentration (6.1 vs 5.2 microg/ml, p caffeine ratio (p caffeine in urine was reduced (1.2 vs 2.8% of dose, p caffeine due to delayed metabolic clearance was partly opposed by a sizeable elimination in sweat. Therefore, heat dehydration did not lead to higher concentration of caffeine in urine after coffee ingestion.

  10. Caffeine reduction in coffee pulp through silage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porres, C; Alvarez, D; Calzada, J

    1993-01-01

    Silage tests to study reductions of antiphysiological compounds (caffeine and polyphenols) of fresh coffee pulp during the anaerobic fermentation were done. A concrete silo divided in compartments, with a total capacity of 9 tons of fresh material was utilized. The silage periods ranged between 99-224 days and the following materials were ensiled: 1) coffee pulp, 2) coffee pulp with sugar cane molasses, 3) coffee pulp with a mixture of molasses and ammonia and 4) screw pressed coffee pulp with molasses. Reductions in caffeine, total polyphenols and condensed polyphenols ranged between 13-63%, 28-70% and 51-81% respectively. It was concluded that in the case of coffee pulp, silage presents and ideal method to preserve the material and partially reduce the contents of antiphysiological compounds.

  11. Alcohol, nicotine, caffeine, and mental disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Crocq, Marc-Antoine

    2003-01-01

    Alcohol, nicotine, and caffeine are the most widely consumed psychotropic drugs worldwide. They are largely consumed by normal individuals, but their use is even more frequent in psychiatric patients, Thus, patients with schizophrenia tend to abuse all three substances. The interrelationships between depression and alcohol are complex. These drugs can all create dependence, as understood in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV). Alcohol abuse is cl...

  12. Phospholipase C-delta1 expression is linked to proliferation, DNA synthesis, and cyclin E levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stallings, Jonathan D; Zeng, Yue X; Narvaez, Francisco; Rebecchi, Mario J

    2008-05-16

    We previously reported that phospholipase C-delta1 (PLC-delta1) accumulates in the nucleus at the G1/S transition, which is largely dependent on its binding to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate ( Stallings, J. D., Tall, E. G., Pentyala, S., and Rebecchi, M. J. (2005) J. Biol. Chem. 280, 22060-22069 ). Here, using small interfering RNA (siRNA) that specifically targets rat PLC-delta1, we investigated whether this enzyme plays a role in cell cycle control. Inhibiting expression of PLC-delta1 significantly decreased proliferation of rat C6 glioma cells and altered S phase progression. [3H]Thymidine labeling and fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis indicated that the rates of G1/S transition and DNA synthesis were enhanced. On the other hand, knockdown cultures released from the G1/S boundary were slower to reach full G2/M DNA content, consistent with a delay in S phase. The levels of cyclin E, a key regulator of the G1/S transition and DNA synthesis, were elevated in asynchronous cultures as well as those blocked at the G1/S boundary. Epifluorescence imaging showed that transient expression of human phospholipase C-delta1, resistant to these siRNA, suppressed expression of cyclin E at the G1/S boundary despite treatment of cultures with rat-specific siRNA. Although whole cell levels of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate were unchanged, suppression of PLC-delta1 led to a significant rise in the nuclear levels of this phospholipid at the G1/S boundary. These results support a role for PLC-delta1 and nuclear phospholipid metabolism in regulating cell cycle progression.

  13. CKbeta8-1 alters expression of cyclin E in colony forming units-granulocyte macrophage (CFU-GM) lineage from human cord blood CD34+ cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Eui Kyu; Ra, Jae Sun; Lee, Seong Ae; Kwon, Byoung S; Han, In Seob

    2005-12-31

    A C6 beta-chemokine, CKbeta8-1, suppressed the colony formation of CD34+ cells of human cord blood (CB). Molecular mechanisms involved in CKbeta8-1-medicated suppression of colony formation of CD34+ cells are not known. To address this issue, the level of various G1/S cell cycle regulating proteins in CKbeta8-1-treated CD34+ cells were compared with those in untreated CD34+ cells. CKbeta8-1 did not significantly alter the expression of the G1/S cycle regulation proteins (cyclin D1, D3, and E), CDK inhibitor (p27and Rb), and other cell proliferation regulation protein (p53) in CB CD34+ cells. Here we describe an in vitro system in which CB CD34+ cells were committed to a multipotent progenitor lineage of colony forming units-granulocyte/macrophage (CFU-GM) by a simple combination of recombinant human (rh) GM-CSF and rhIL-3. In this culture system, we found that cyclin E protein appeared later and disappeared faster in the CKbeta8-1-treated cells than in the control cells during CFU-GM lineage development. These findings suggested that cyclin E may play a role in suppressing the colony formation of CFU-GM by CKbeta8-1.

  14. Cytochrome P450-dependent metabolism of caffeine in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Coelho

    Full Text Available Caffeine (1, 3, 7-trimethylxanthine, an alkaloid produced by plants, has antioxidant and insecticide properties that can affect metabolism and cognition. In vertebrates, the metabolites derived from caffeine have been identified, and their functions have been characterized. However, the metabolites of caffeine in insects remain unknown. Thus, using radiolabelled caffeine, we have identified some of the primary caffeine metabolites produced in the body of Drosophila melanogaster males, including theobromine, paraxanthine and theophylline. In contrast to mammals, theobromine was the predominant metabolite (paraxanthine in humans; theophylline in monkeys; 1, 3, 7-trimethyluric acid in rodents. A transcriptomic screen of Drosophila flies exposed to caffeine revealed the coordinated variation of a large set of genes that encode xenobiotic-metabolizing proteins, including several cytochromes P450s (CYPs that were highly overexpressed. Flies treated with metyrapone--an inhibitor of CYP enzymes--showed dramatically decreased caffeine metabolism, indicating that CYPs are involved in this process. Using interference RNA genetic silencing, we measured the metabolic and transcriptomic effect of three candidate CYPs. Silencing of CYP6d5 completely abolished theobromine synthesis, whereas CYP6a8 and CYP12d1 silencing induced different consequences on metabolism and gene expression. Therefore, we characterized several metabolic products and some enzymes potentially involved in the degradation of caffeine. In conclusion, this pioneer approach to caffeine metabolism in insects opens novel perspectives for the investigation of the physiological effects of caffeine metabolites. It also indicates that caffeine could be used as a biomarker to evaluate CYP phenotypes in Drosophila and other insects.

  15. Increased caffeine consumption is associated with reduced hepatic fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Apurva A; Feld, Jordan J; Park, Yoon; Kleiner, David E; Everhart, James E.; Liang, T. Jake; Hoofnagle, Jay H.

    2009-01-01

    Background Although coffee consumption has been associated with reduced frequency of liver disease, it is unclear whether the effect is from coffee or caffeine and whether there is an effect on hepatic fibrosis specifically. Aim To use a food-frequency instrument for dietary caffeine consumption to evaluate the relationship between caffeine intake and liver fibrosis. Methods Patients undergoing liver biopsy completed a detailed caffeine questionnaire on 3 occasions over a 6-month period. Caffeine intake was compared between patients with mild and advanced liver fibrosis (bridging fibrosis/cirrhosis). Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between caffeine consumption and hepatic fibrosis. Results 177 patients (99 male, 104 Caucasian, 121 with chronic hepatitis C virus [HCV] infection) undergoing liver biopsy completed the caffeine questionnaire on up to three occasions. Results from repeated questionnaires were consistent. Daily caffeine consumption above the 75th percentile for the cohort (308 mg ~2.25 cups of coffee equivalents) was associated with reduced liver fibrosis (OR 0.33, 95% CI: 0.14-0.80, p=0.015) and the protective association persisted after controlling for age, sex, race, liver disease, body mass index and alcohol intake in all patients (OR 0.25, 95% CI: 0.09-0.67, p=0.006), as well as the subset with HCV infection (OR 0.19, 95% CI: 0.05-0.66, p=0.009). Despite a modest trend, consumption of caffeine from sources other than coffee or of decaffeinated coffee was not associated with reduced liver fibrosis. Conclusion A reliable tool for measurement of caffeine consumption demonstrated that caffeine consumption, particularly from regular coffee, above a threshold of approximately 2 coffee-cup equivalents per day, was associated with less severe hepatic fibrosis. PMID:20034049

  16. Caffeine triggers behavioral and neurochemical alterations in adolescent rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardais, A P; Borges, M F; Rocha, A S; Sallaberry, C; Cunha, R A; Porciúncula, L O

    2014-06-13

    Caffeine is the psychostimulant most consumed worldwide but concerns arise about the growing intake of caffeine-containing drinks by adolescents since the effects of caffeine on cognitive functions and neurochemical aspects of late brain maturation during adolescence are poorly known. We now studied the behavioral impact in adolescent male rats of regular caffeine intake at low (0.1mg/mL), moderate (0.3mg/mL) and moderate/high (1.0mg/mL) doses only during their active period (from 7:00 P.M. to 7:00 A.M.). All tested doses of caffeine were devoid of effects on locomotor activity, but triggered anxiogenic effects. Caffeine (0.3 and 1mg/mL) improved the performance in the object recognition task, but the higher dose of caffeine (1.0mg/mL) decreased the habituation to an open-field arena, suggesting impaired non-associative memory. All tested doses of caffeine decreased the density of glial fibrillary acidic protein and synaptosomal-associated protein-25, but failed to modify neuron-specific nuclear protein immunoreactivity in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex. Caffeine (0.3-1mg/mL) increased the density of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and proBDNF density as well as adenosine A1 receptor density in the hippocampus, whereas the higher dose of caffeine (1mg/mL) increased the density of proBDNF and BDNF and decreased A1 receptor density in the cerebral cortex. These findings document an impact of caffeine consumption in adolescent rats with a dual impact on anxiety and recognition memory, associated with changes in BDNF levels and decreases of astrocytic and nerve terminal markers without overt neuronal damage in hippocampal and cortical regions.

  17. Increased caffeine consumption is associated with reduced hepatic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modi, Apurva A; Feld, Jordan J; Park, Yoon; Kleiner, David E; Everhart, James E; Liang, T Jake; Hoofnagle, Jay H

    2010-01-01

    Although coffee consumption has been associated with reduced frequency of liver disease, it is unclear whether the effect is from coffee or caffeine and whether there is an effect on hepatic fibrosis specifically. This study was undertaken to use a food-frequency instrument for dietary caffeine consumption to evaluate the relationship between caffeine intake and liver fibrosis. Patients undergoing liver biopsy completed a detailed caffeine questionnaire on three occasions over a 6-month period. Caffeine intake was compared between patients with mild and advanced liver fibrosis (bridging fibrosis/cirrhosis). Logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between caffeine consumption and hepatic fibrosis. One hundred seventy-seven patients (99 male, 104 white, 121 with chronic hepatitis C virus [HCV] infection) undergoing liver biopsy completed the caffeine questionnaire on up to three occasions. Results from repeated questionnaires were consistent. Daily caffeine consumption above the 75(th) percentile for the cohort (308 mg = approximately 2.25 cups of coffee equivalents) was associated with reduced liver fibrosis (odds ratio [OR], 0.33; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.14-0.80; P = 0.015) and the protective association persisted after controlling for age, sex, race, liver disease, body mass index, and alcohol intake in all patients (OR, 0.25; 95% CI, 0.09-0.67; P = 0.006), as well as the subset with HCV infection (OR, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.05-0.66; P = 0.009). Despite a modest trend, consumption of caffeine from sources other than coffee or of decaffeinated coffee was not associated with reduced liver fibrosis. A reliable tool for measurement of caffeine consumption demonstrated that caffeine consumption, particularly from regular coffee, above a threshold of approximately 2 coffee-cup equivalents per day, was associated with less severe hepatic fibrosis.

  18. Cytochrome P450-dependent metabolism of caffeine in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Alexandra; Fraichard, Stephane; Le Goff, Gaëlle; Faure, Philippe; Artur, Yves; Ferveur, Jean-François; Heydel, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine (1, 3, 7-trimethylxanthine), an alkaloid produced by plants, has antioxidant and insecticide properties that can affect metabolism and cognition. In vertebrates, the metabolites derived from caffeine have been identified, and their functions have been characterized. However, the metabolites of caffeine in insects remain unknown. Thus, using radiolabelled caffeine, we have identified some of the primary caffeine metabolites produced in the body of Drosophila melanogaster males, including theobromine, paraxanthine and theophylline. In contrast to mammals, theobromine was the predominant metabolite (paraxanthine in humans; theophylline in monkeys; 1, 3, 7-trimethyluric acid in rodents). A transcriptomic screen of Drosophila flies exposed to caffeine revealed the coordinated variation of a large set of genes that encode xenobiotic-metabolizing proteins, including several cytochromes P450s (CYPs) that were highly overexpressed. Flies treated with metyrapone--an inhibitor of CYP enzymes--showed dramatically decreased caffeine metabolism, indicating that CYPs are involved in this process. Using interference RNA genetic silencing, we measured the metabolic and transcriptomic effect of three candidate CYPs. Silencing of CYP6d5 completely abolished theobromine synthesis, whereas CYP6a8 and CYP12d1 silencing induced different consequences on metabolism and gene expression. Therefore, we characterized several metabolic products and some enzymes potentially involved in the degradation of caffeine. In conclusion, this pioneer approach to caffeine metabolism in insects opens novel perspectives for the investigation of the physiological effects of caffeine metabolites. It also indicates that caffeine could be used as a biomarker to evaluate CYP phenotypes in Drosophila and other insects.

  19. Energy drink consumption and impact on caffeine risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Barbara M; Campbell, Donald M; Cressey, Peter; Egan, Ursula; Horn, Beverley

    2014-01-01

    The impact of caffeine from energy drinks occurs against a background exposure from naturally occurring caffeine (coffee, tea, cocoa and foods containing these ingredients) and caffeinated beverages (kola-type soft drinks). Background caffeine exposure, excluding energy drinks, was assessed for six New Zealand population groups aged 15 years and over (n = 4503) by combining concentration data for 53 caffeine-containing foods with consumption information from the 2008/09 New Zealand Adult Nutrition Survey (ANS). Caffeine exposure for those who consumed energy drinks (n = 138) was similarly assessed, with inclusion of energy drinks. Forty-seven energy drink products were identified on the New Zealand market in 2010. Product volumes ranged from 30 to 600 ml per unit, resulting in exposures of 10-300 mg caffeine per retail unit consumed. A small percentage, 3.1%, of New Zealanders reported consuming energy drinks, with most energy drink consumers (110/138) drinking one serving per 24 h. The maximum number of energy drinks consumed per 24 h was 14 (total caffeine of 390 mg). A high degree of brand loyalty was evident. Since only a minor proportion of New Zealanders reported consuming energy drinks, a greater number of New Zealanders exceeded a potentially adverse effect level (AEL) of 3 mg kg(-1) bw day(-1) for caffeine from caffeine-containing foods than from energy drinks. Energy drink consumption is not a risk at a population level because of the low prevalence of consumption. At an individual level, however, teenagers, adults (20-64 years) and females (16-44 years) were more likely to exceed the AEL by consuming energy drinks in combination with caffeine-containing foods.

  20. Control of cyclin C levels during development of Dictyostelium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David M Greene

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cdk8 and its partner cyclin C form part of the mediator complex which links the basal transcription machinery to regulatory proteins. The pair are required for correct regulation of a subset of genes and have been implicated in control of development in a number of organisms including the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum. When feeding, Dictyostelium amoebae are unicellular but upon starvation they aggregate to form a multicellular structure which develops into a fruiting body containing spores. Cells in which the gene encoding Cdk8 has been deleted fail to enter aggregates due to a failure of early gene expression. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have monitored the expression levels of cyclin C protein during development and find levels decrease after the multicellular mound is formed. This decrease is triggered by extracellular cAMP that, in turn, is working in part through an increase in intracellular cAMP. The loss of cyclin C is coincident with a reduction in the association of Cdk8 with a high molecular weight complex in the nucleus. Overexpression of cyclin C and Cdk8 lead to an increased rate of early development, consistent with the levels being rate limiting. CONCLUSIONS: Overall these results show that both cyclin C and Cdk8 are regulated during development in response to extracellular signals and the levels of these proteins are important in controlling the timing of developmental processes. These findings have important implications for the role of these proteins in controlling development, suggesting that they are targets for developmental signals to regulate gene expression.

  1. The effects of caffeine on option generation and subsequent choice.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haüsser, Jan; Schlemmer, Alexander; Kaiser, S.; Kalis, Annemarie; Mojzisch, A.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Although the effects of caffeine on basic cognitive functions are well-known, its effects on more complex decision making, particularly on option generation, is yet to be explored. Objective We examined the effects of caffeine on option generation in decision making using everyday life dec

  2. The Effects of Caffeine on Memory for Word Lists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erikson, George; And Others

    Research has suggested that behavioral differences may account for the effects of caffeine on information processing. To investigate the effects of caffeine on memory for supraspan word lists, 107 college students (47 males, 60 females), divided into 12 groups by high and low impulsivity scores on the Eysenck Personality Inventory, participated in…

  3. Fast inhibition of glutamate-activated currents by caffeine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas P Vyleta

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Caffeine stimulates calcium-induced calcium release (CICR in many cell types. In neurons, caffeine stimulates CICR presynaptically and thus modulates neurotransmitter release. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique we found that caffeine (20 mM reversibly increased the frequency and decreased the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs in neocortical neurons. The increase in mEPSC frequency is consistent with a presynaptic mechanism. Caffeine also reduced exogenously applied glutamate-activated currents, confirming a separate postsynaptic action. This inhibition developed in tens of milliseconds, consistent with block of channel currents. Caffeine (20 mM did not reduce currents activated by exogenous NMDA, indicating that caffeine block is specific to non-NMDA type glutamate receptors. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Caffeine-induced inhibition of mEPSC amplitude occurs through postsynaptic block of non-NMDA type ionotropic glutamate receptors. Caffeine thus has both pre and postsynaptic sites of action at excitatory synapses.

  4. Design, formulation and evaluation of caffeine chewing gum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abolfazl Aslani

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: In this study, 20 and 50 mg caffeine gums with suitable and desirable properties (i.e., good taste and satisfactory release were formulated. The best flavor for caffeine gum was cinnamon. Both kinds of 20 and 50 mg gums succeeded in content uniformity test.

  5. International society of sports nutrition position stand: caffeine and performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wildman Robert

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Position Statement: The position of The Society regarding caffeine supplementation and sport performance is summarized by the following seven points: 1. Caffeine is effective for enhancing sport performance in trained athletes when consumed in low-to-moderate dosages (~3-6 mg/kg and overall does not result in further enhancement in performance when consumed in higher dosages (≥ 9 mg/kg. 2. Caffeine exerts a greater ergogenic effect when consumed in an anhydrous state as compared to coffee. 3. It has been shown that caffeine can enhance vigilance during bouts of extended exhaustive exercise, as well as periods of sustained sleep deprivation. 4. Caffeine is ergogenic for sustained maximal endurance exercise, and has been shown to be highly effective for time-trial performance. 5. Caffeine supplementation is beneficial for high-intensity exercise, including team sports such as soccer and rugby, both of which are categorized by intermittent activity within a period of prolonged duration. 6. The literature is equivocal when considering the effects of caffeine supplementation on strength-power performance, and additional research in this area is warranted. 7. The scientific literature does not support caffeine-induced diuresis during exercise, or any harmful change in fluid balance that would negatively affect performance.

  6. Subjective and objective effects of coffee consumption - caffeine or expectations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dömötör, Zs; Szemerszky, R; Köteles, F

    2015-03-01

    Impact of 5 mg/kg caffeine, chance of receiving caffeine (stimulus expectancies), and expectations of effects of caffeine (response expectancies) on objective (heart rate (HR), systolic/diastolic blood pressure (SBP/DBP), measures of heart rate variability (HRV), and reaction time (RT)) and subjective variables were investigated in a double-blind, placebo-controlled experiment with a no-treatment group. Participants were 107 undergraduate university students (mean age 22.3 ± 3.96 years). Consumption of 5 mg/kg caffeine had an impact on participants' SBP, standard deviation of normal heartbeat intervals, HR (decrease), and subjective experience 40 minutes later even after controlling for respective baseline values, stimulus and response expectancies, and habitual caffeine consumption. No effects on DBP, high frequency component of HRV, the ratio of low- and high-frequency, and RT were found. Beyond actual caffeine intake, response expectancy score was also a determinant of subjective experience which refers to a placebo component in the total effect. Actual autonomic (SBP, HR) changes and somatosensory amplification tendency, however, had no significant impact on subjective experience. Placebo reaction plays a role in the subjective changes caused by caffeine consumption but it has no impact on objective variables. Conditional vs deceptive administration of caffeine (i.e. stimulus expectancies) had no impact on any assessed variable.

  7. Letter to the editor: Caffeine and incident hypertension in women

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geleijnse, J.M.

    2006-01-01

    Dr Winkelmayer and colleagues1 found an inverse U-shaped relationship between habitual caffeine consumption and incident hypertension in a prospective cohort study of US women followed up for 12 years in the Nurses' Health Studies. However, when examining classes of caffeinated beverages, coffee con

  8. Associations between smoking and caffeine consumption in two European cohorts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Treur, J.L.; Taylor, A.E.; Ware, J.J.; McMahon, G.; Hottenga, J.J.; Baselmans, B.M.L.; Willemsen, G.; Boomsma, D.I.; Munafò, M.R.; Vink, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims To estimate associations between smoking initiation, smoking persistence and smoking heaviness and caffeine consumption, in two population-based samples from the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. Design Observational study employing data on self-reported smoking behaviour and caffeine consump

  9. Caffeine and the risk of hip fracture: the Framingham Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiel, D P; Felson, D T; Hannan, M T; Anderson, J J; Wilson, P W

    1990-10-01

    Caffeine increases urinary calcium output and has been implicated as a risk factor for osteoporosis. The authors examined the effect of caffeine on hip fracture risk in 3,170 individuals attending the 12th (1971-1973) Framingham Study examination. Coffee and tea consumption, age, Framingham examination number, weight, smoking, alcohol consumption, and estrogen use were used to evaluate hip fracture risk according to caffeine intake. Hip fractures occurred in 135 subjects during 12 years of follow-up. Fracture risk over each 2-year period increased with increasing caffeine intake (one cup of coffee = one unit of caffeine, one cup of tea = 1/2 unit of caffeine). For intake of 1.5-2.0 units per day, the adjusted relative risk (RR) of fracture was not significantly elevated compared with intake of one or less units per day. Consumption of greater than or equal to 2.5 units per day significantly increased the risk of fracture. Overall, intake of greater than two cups of coffee per day (four cups of tea) increased the risk of fracture. In summary, hip fracture risk was modestly increased with heavy caffeine use, but not for intake equivalent to one cup of coffee per day. Since caffeine use may be associated with other behaviors that are, themselves, risk factors for fracture, the association may be indirect. Further studies should be performed to confirm these findings.

  10. Caffeine Use among Active Duty Navy and Marine Corps Personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph J. Knapik

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES indicate 89% of Americans regularly consume caffeine, but these data do not include military personnel. This cross-sectional study examined caffeine use in Navy and Marine Corps personnel, including prevalence, amount of daily consumption, and factors associated with use. A random sample of Navy and Marine Corps personnel was contacted and asked to complete a detailed questionnaire describing their use of caffeine-containing substances, in addition to their demographic, military, and lifestyle characteristics. A total of 1708 service members (SMs completed the questionnaire. Overall, 87% reported using caffeinated beverages ≥1 time/week, with caffeine users consuming a mean ± standard error of 226 ± 5 mg/day (242 ± 7 mg/day for men, 183 ± 8 mg/day for women. The most commonly consumed caffeinated beverages (% users were coffee (65%, colas (54%, teas (40%, and energy drinks (28%. Multivariable logistic regression modeling indicated that characteristics independently associated with caffeine use (≥1 time/week included older age, white race/ethnicity, higher alcohol consumption, and participating in less resistance training. Prevalence of caffeine use in these SMs was similar to that reported in civilian investigations, but daily consumption (mg/day was higher.

  11. Structural features of DNA interaction with caffeine and theophylline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nafisi, Shohreh; Manouchehri, Firouzeh; Tajmir-Riahi, Heidar-Ali; Varavipour, Maryam

    2008-03-01

    Caffeine and theophylline are strong antioxidants that prevent DNA damage. The anticancer and antiviral activities of these natural products are implicated in their mechanism of actions. However, there has been no information on the interactions of these xanthine derivatives with individual DNA at molecular level. The aim of this study was to examine the stability and structural features of calf-thymus DNA complexes with caffeine and theophylline in aqueous solution, using constant DNA concentration (6.25 mM) and various caffeine or theophylline/DNA(P) ratios of 1/80, 1/40, 1/20, 1/10, 1/5, 1/2 and 1/1. FTIR, UV-visible spectroscopic methods were used to determine the ligand external binding modes, the binding constant and the stability of caffeine, theophylline-DNA complexes in aqueous solution. Spectroscopic evidence showed that the complexation of caffeine and theophylline with DNA occurred via G-C and A-T and PO 2 group with overall binding constants of K(caffeine-DNA) = 9.7 × 10 3 M -1 and K(theophylline-DNA) = 1.7 × 10 4 M -1. The affinity of ligand-DNA binding is in the order of theophylline > caffeine. A partial B to A-DNA transition occurs upon caffeine and theophylline complexation.

  12. Caffeine. Courseware Evaluation for Vocational and Technical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. National Center for Research in Vocational Education.

    This courseware evaluation rates the "Caffeine" program developed by Lane Community College and sold by the Oregon Department of Education. (The program--not included in this document--is part of a computer-assisted instruction project with nursing applications.) Part A describes "Caffeine" in terms of topics (food and nutrition, allied health)…

  13. Effect of Coffee and Caffeine Ingestion on Resistance Exercise Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Darren L; Clarke, Neil D

    2016-10-01

    Richardson, DL and Clarke, ND. Effect of coffee and caffeine ingestion on resistance exercise performance. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2892-2900, 2016-The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of ingesting caffeine dose-matched anhydrous caffeine, coffee, or decaffeinated coffee plus anhydrous caffeine during resistance exercise on performance. Nine resistance-trained men (mean ± SD: age, 24 ± 2 years; weight, 84 ± 8 kg; height, 180 ± 8 cm) completed a squat and bench press exercise protocol at 60% 1 repetition maximum until failure on 5 occasions consuming 0.15 g·kg caffeinated coffee (COF), 0.15 g·kg decaffeinated coffee (DEC), 0.15 g·kg decaffeinated coffee plus 5 mg·kg anhydrous caffeine (D + C), 5 mg·kg anhydrous caffeine (CAF), or a placebo (PLA). Felt arousal and rating of perceived exertion (RPE) were used to assess perceptual variables and heart rate (HR) to assess physiological responses between trials. There were significant differences in total weight lifted for the squat between conditions (p Coffee and decaffeinated coffee plus caffeine have the ability to improve performance during a resistance exercise protocol, although possibly not over multiple bouts.

  14. Accumulation of cyclin B1 requires E2F and cyclin-A-dependent rearrangement of the anaphase-promoting complex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, C; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard; Kramer, E;

    1999-01-01

    genes beyond the G1/S transition is required for coordinating S-phase progression with cell division, a process driven by cyclin-B-dependent kinase and anaphase-promoting complex (APC)-mediated proteolysis. How E2F-dependent events at G1/S transition are orchestrated with cyclin B and APC activity...... in the timely accumulation of cyclin B1 and the coordination of cell-cycle progression during the post-restriction point period....

  15. Expression of cell cycle regulator p57kip2, cyclinE protein and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in human pancreatic cancer: An immunohistochemical study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui Yue; Hui-Yong Jiang

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effects of p57kip2, cyclinE protein and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) on occurrence and progression of human pancreatic cancer.METHODS: The expression of p57kip2, cyclinE protein and PCNA in tumor tissues and adjacent tissues from 32patients with pancreatic cancer was detected by SP immunohistochemical technique.RESULTS: The positive expression rate of p57kip2 protein in tumor tissues was 46.9%, which was lower than that in adjacent pancreatic tissues (x2 = 5.317, P<0.05). P57kip2protein positive expression remarkably correlated with tumor cell differentiation (P<0.05), but not with lymph node metastasis (P>0.05). The positive expression rate of cyclinE protein in tumor tissues was 68.8%, which was higher than that in adjacent pancreatic tissues (x2 = 4.063,P<0.05). CyclinE protein positive expression significantly correlated with tumor cell differentiation and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05). The positive expression rate of PCNA in the tumor tissues was 71.9%, which was higher than that in adjacent pancreatic tissues (x2 = 5.189, P<0.05).PCNA positive expression remarkably correlated with tumor cell differentiation and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05).CONCLUSION: The decreased expression of p57kip2 and/or overexpression of cyclinE protein and PCNA may contribute to the occurrence and progression of pancreatic cancer.p57kip2, cyclinE protein, and PCNA play an important role in occurrence and progression of pancreatic cancer.

  16. Caffeine metabolites not caffeine protect against riboflavin photosensitized oxidative damage related to skin and eye health

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scurachio, R. S.; Mattiucci, F.; Santos, W. G.;

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine metabolites were found to bind riboflavin with dissociation constant in the millimolar region by an exothermic process with positive entropy of reaction, which was found by 1H NMR and fluorescence spectroscopy to occur predominantly by hydrogen bonding with water being released from ribo...

  17. Effect of melatonin and caffeine interaction on caffeine induced oxidative stress and sleep disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obochi, G O; Amali, O O E; Ochalefu, D O

    2010-11-24

    Effect of interaction of melatonin and caffeine on caffeine induced oxidative stress and sleep disorders was studied. Fifteen wistar rats were randomly assigned into three study groups. The animals in group 1 (the control) received a placebo of 10.0 ml distilled water via gastric intubation. The hosts in groups 2 and 3 were treated with 100 mg caffeine/ kg, or melatonin/ kg, respectively, in a total volume of 10.0 ml vehicle. The experiment lasted for 30 days. One day after the final exposure, the animals were euthanized by inhalation of overdose of chloroform. Blood was collected by cardiac puncture. Serum was obtained by centrifugation (6000 Xg, 30 mins), and used for serum total protein and serum blood urea nitrogen levels. The brain of each rat was also harvested and processed into whole homogenate, frozen in liquid nitrogen (N2), and maintained at -80oC until used for total brain cholesterol and tryptophan levels. The results showed that interaction of melatonin and caffeine enhanced protein synthesis; stimulated gonadotrophin release,  and could be used as oral contraceptive for women, and may be beneficial in the treatment of impotence (androgen depression), leading to improved reproductive and sex life; stimulated tryptophan metabolism, which prevents vitamin B6 deficiency, anemia, negative nitrogen balance, tissue wasting and accumulation of xanthurenic acid, which promotes sleep; and could be beneficial in the treatment of hyper cholesterolemia, thereby preventing coronary heart disease, and post menopausal osteoporosis.

  18. Influence of caffeine and caffeine withdrawal on headache and cerebral blood flow velocities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Couturier, EGM; Laman, DM; vanDuijn, MAJ; vanDuijn, H

    1997-01-01

    Caffeine consumption may cause headache, particularly migraine. Its withdrawal also produces headaches and may be related to weekend migraine attacks. Transcranial Doppler sonography (TCD) has shown changes in cerebral blood flow velocities (BFV) during and between attacks of migraine. In order to e

  19. Caffeine challenge test and panic disorder: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilarim, Marina Machado; Rocha Araujo, Daniele Marano; Nardi, Antonio Egidio

    2011-08-01

    This systematic review aimed to examine the results of studies that have investigated the induction of panic attacks and/or the anxiogenic effect of the caffeine challenge test in patients with panic disorder. The literature search was performed in PubMed, Biblioteca Virtual em Saúde and the ISI Web of Knowledge. The words used for the search were caffeine, caffeine challenge test, panic disorder, panic attacks and anxiety disorder. In total, we selected eight randomized, double-blind studies where caffeine was administered orally, and none of them controlled for confounding factors in the analysis. The percentage of loss during follow-up ranged between 14.3% and 73.1%. The eight studies all showed a positive association between caffeine and anxiogenic effects and/or panic disorder.

  20. Acute caffeine administration affects zebrafish response to a robotic stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladu, Fabrizio; Mwaffo, Violet; Li, Jasmine; Macrì, Simone; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-08-01

    Zebrafish has been recently proposed as a valid animal model to investigate the fundamental mechanisms regulating emotional behavior and evaluate the modulatory effects exerted by psychoactive compounds. In this study, we propose a novel methodological framework based on robotics and information theory to investigate the behavioral response of zebrafish exposed to acute caffeine treatment. In a binary preference test, we studied the response of caffeine-treated zebrafish to a replica of a shoal of conspecifics moving in the tank. A purely data-driven information theoretic approach was used to infer the influence of the replica on zebrafish behavior as a function of caffeine concentration. Our results demonstrate that acute caffeine administration modulates both the average speed and the interaction with the replica. Specifically, zebrafish exposed to elevated doses of caffeine show reduced locomotion and increased sensitivity to the motion of the replica. The methodology developed in this study may complement traditional experimental paradigms developed in the field of behavioral pharmacology.

  1. Understanding Adolescent Caffeine Use: Connecting Use Patterns with Expectancies, Reasons, and Sleep

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludden, Alison Bryant; Wolfson, Amy R.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about adolescents' caffeine use, yet caffeinated soda, and more recently coffee and energy drinks, are part of youth culture. This study examines adolescents' caffeine use and, using cluster analysis, identifies three groups of caffeine users who differed in their reasons for use, expectancies, and sleep behaviors. In this high…

  2. Caffeine induction of sulfotransferases in rat liver and intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tianyan; Chen, Yue; Huang, Chaoqun; Chen, Guangping

    2012-10-01

    Sulfotransferases (SULTs) are important phase II drug-metabolizing enzymes. Regulation of SULTs by hormones and other endogenous molecules is relatively well understood, while xenobiotic induction of SULTs is not well studied. Caffeine is one of the most widely consumed psychoactive substances. However, SULT regulation by caffeine has not been reported. In this report, male and female rats were treated with different oral doses of caffeine (2, 10, 50 mg kg⁻¹ per day) for 7 days. Western blot and real-time RT-PCR were used to investigate the changes in SULT protein and mRNA expression following the caffeine treatment. Caffeine induced both rat aryl sulfotransferase (rSULT1A1, AST-IV) and rat hydroxysteroid sulfotransferase (rSULT2A1, STa) in the liver and intestine of female rats in a dose-dependent manner. Caffeine induction of rSULT1A1 and rSULT2A1 in the female rat intestine was much stronger than that in the liver. Although caffeine induced rSULT1A1 significantly in the male rat liver, it did not significantly induce rSULT2A1. In male rat intestine, caffeine significantly induced rSULT2A1. The different SULTs induction patterns in male and female rats suggest that the regulation of rat SULTs by caffeine may be affected by different hormone secretion patterns and levels. Our results suggest that consumption of caffeine can induce drug metabolizing SULTs in drug detoxification tissues.

  3. The effect of caffeine ingestion on delayed onset muscle soreness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurley, Caitlin F; Hatfield, Disa L; Riebe, Deborah A

    2013-11-01

    The beneficial effects of caffeine on aerobic activity and resistance training performance are well documented. However, less is known concerning caffeine's potential role in reducing perception of pain and soreness during exercise. In addition, there is no information regarding the effects of caffeine on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS). The primary purpose of this study was to examine the effect of caffeine ingestion on muscle soreness, blood enzyme activity, and performance after a bout of elbow flexion/extension exercise. Nine low-caffeine-consuming males (body mass: 76.68 ± 8.13 kg; height: 179.18 ± 9.35 cm; age: 20 ± 1 year) were randomly assigned to ingest either caffeine or placebo 1 hour before completing 4 sets of 10 bicep curls on a preacher bench, followed by a fifth set in which subjects completed as many repetitions as possible. Soreness and soreness on palpation intensity were measured using three 0-10 visual analog scales before exercise, and 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 hours after exercise. After a washout period, subjects crossed over to the other treatment group. Caffeine ingestion resulted in significantly (p ≤ 0.05) lower levels of soreness on day 2 and day 3 compared with placebo. Total repetitions in the final set of exercise increased with caffeine ingestion compared with placebo. This study demonstrates that caffeine ingestion immediately before an upper-body resistance training out enhances performance. A further beneficial effect of sustained caffeine ingestion in the days after the exercise bout is an attenuation of DOMS. This decreased perception of soreness in the days after a strenuous resistance training workout may allow individuals to increase the number of training sessions in a given time period.

  4. Suppressed Belief

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Komarine Romdenh-Romluc

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Moran’s revised conception of conscious belief requires us to reconceptualise suppressed belief. The work of Merleau-Ponty offers a way to do this. His account of motor-skills allows us to understand suppressed beliefs as pre-reflective ways of dealing with the world.

  5. Caffeine content of Ethiopian Coffea arabica beans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Bernadete Silvarolla

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The coffee germplasm bank of the Instituto Agronômico de Campinas has many Coffea arabica accessions from Ethiopia, which is considered the primary center of genetic diversity in coffee plants. An evaluation of the caffeine content of beans from 99 progenies revealed intra- and inter-progeny variability. In 68 progenies from the Kaffa region we found caffeine values in the range 0.46-2.82% (mean 1.18%, and in 22 progenies from Illubabor region these values ranged from 0.42 to 2.90% (mean 1.10%. This variability could be exploited in a breeding program aimed at producing beans with low-caffeine content.O banco de germoplasma de café do Instituto Agronômico de Campinas contém grande número de introduções de Coffea arabica provenientes da Etiópia, considerada centro de diversidade genética desta espécie. A avaliação dos teores de cafeína nas sementes de 99 progênies revelou a presença de variabilidade entre e dentro das progênies, de acordo com a região de origem das introduções. Entre as 68 progênies da região de Kaffa encontraram-se valores de cafeína entre 0.46 e 2.82% (média 1.18% e entre as 22 progênies de Illubabor obtiveram-se plantas cujos teores de cafeína variaram de 0.42 a 2.90% (média 1.10%. A variabilidade aqui relatada poderá ser explorada na produção de uma variedade de café com baixos teores de cafeína nas sementes.

  6. EXPRESSION OF CYCLIN D1 AND CDK4 IN OSTEOSARCOMA OF THE JAWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    司晓辉; 刘正

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To analyze cyclin D1 and cyclin- dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) expression and their significance in osteosarcoma of the jaws. Methods: Immunohistochemical ABC method was used to detect the expression of cyclin D1 and CDK4 in 20 cases of osteosarcoma and 8 cases of osteochondroma of the jaws. Results: The positive rates of cyclin D1 and CDK4 were 65% (13/20) and 60% (12/20), respectively. There was significant positive correlation between cyclin D1 and CDK4 expression (gs=0.48, P<0.05). Both cyclin D1 and CDK4 were present in 1/8 (12.5%) osteochondroma. The positive rate was remarkably different between osteosarcoma and osteochondroma (P<0.05). Conclusion: Cyclin D1 and CDK4 are overexpressed in osteosarcoma of the jaws and closely related to its occurrence and development.

  7. Suppressive effects of 3-bromopyruvate on the proliferation and the motility of hepatocellular carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomizawa, Minoru; Shinozaki, Fuminobu; Motoyoshi, Yasufumi; Sugiyama, Takao; Yamamoto, Shigenori; Ishige, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    The compound 3-bromopyruvate (3BP) is an analogue of pyruvate, which is the final product of glycolysis that enters the citric acid cycle. The present study aimed to investigate the suppressive effects of 3BP on the proliferation and motility of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells. HLF and PLC/PRF/5 cells were cultured with 3BP and subjected to an MTS assay. Apoptosis was analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Cell motility was analyzed using a scratch assay. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed to determine the expression levels of cyclin D1 and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)9. Proliferation of both cell lines was significantly suppressed by 3BP at 100 µM (P<0.05). The expression level of cyclin D1 was decreased after 3BP treatment at 100 µM in both cell lines (P<0.05). Pyknotic nuclei were observed in the cells cultured with 3BP at 100 µM. These results revealed that 3BP suppressed cell proliferation, decreased the expression of cyclin D1, and induced apoptosis in HCC cells. 3BP significantly suppressed motility in both cell lines (P<0.05). The expression level of MMP9 was significantly decreased (P<0.05). 3BP suppressed the proliferation and motility of HCC cells by decreasing the expression of cyclin D1 and MMP9.

  8. Caffeine potentiation of calcium release in frog skeletal muscle fibres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delay, M; Ribalet, B; Vergara, J

    1986-06-01

    The effects of caffeine at concentrations up to 3 mM were studied on Ca signals obtained using the metallochromic Ca indicator dyes Arsenazo III and Antipyrylazo III in cut frog skeletal muscle fibres mounted in a triple Vaseline-gap chamber and stimulated by voltage clamp or action potential. The peak amplitude of the transient absorbance change due to Ca2+ release following action potential stimulation is potentiated by an amount dependent on caffeine concentration up to 0.5 mM, and by a concentration-independent amount between 0.5 and 2 mM. At 3 mM-caffeine, the potentiation is reduced, and the Ca signal can have a smaller amplitude than under the control condition. The time course of the rising phase of the Ca signal is preserved by the potentiating effect of caffeine; however, the decay rate of the Ca signal is increasingly slowed at caffeine concentrations greater than 0.5 mM. No substantial change was found in the resting myoplasmic Ca2+ level at caffeine concentrations near 0.5 mM. Even if the free Ca2+ concentration in the presence of this level of caffeine were to increase by 0.04 microM (the threshold of detectability), the calculated potentiation of the Ca signal due to increased partial saturation of intracellular Ca2+ buffers would amount to only about 7%. This value is significantly less than the amount of potentiation observed (up to 40%) following action potentials at caffeine levels of 0.5 mM and above. Experiments made with the impermeant potentiometric dye NK2367 show no alteration by caffeine of the electrical properties of the tubular system. Caffeine at up to moderate concentrations causes a substantial increase in the maximal Ca2+ release obtained following large depolarizations. The voltage dependence of the Ca2+ release is characterized by a caffeine concentration-dependent shift towards more negative membrane potentials. The potentiation of Ca2+ release by caffeine was found to be independent of the external free Ca2+ level. The

  9. Role of state-dependent learning in the cognitive effects of caffeine in mice

    OpenAIRE

    Sanday, Leandro [UNIFESP; Zanin, Karina Agustini [UNIFESP; Patti, Camilla de Lima [UNIFESP; Fernandes-Santos, Luciano [UNIFESP; Oliveira, Larissa C. [UNIFESP; Longo, Beatriz Monteiro; Andersen, Monica Levy [UNIFESP; Tufik, Sergio; Frussa-Filho, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive substance in the world and it is generally believed that it promotes beneficial effects on cognitive performance. However, there is also evidence suggesting that caffeine has inhibitory effects on learning and memory. Considering that caffeine may have anxiogenic effects, thus changing the emotional state of the subjects, state-dependent learning may play a role in caffeine-induced cognitive alterations. Mice were administered 20 mg/kg caffeine be...

  10. Caffeine consuming children and adolescents show altered sleep behavior and deep sleep

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine is the most commonly ingested psychoactive drug worldwide with increasing consumption rates among young individuals. While caffeine leads to decreased sleep quality in adults, studies investigating how caffeine consumption affects children's and adolescents' sleep remain scarce. We explored the effects of regular caffeine consumption on sleep behavior and the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) in children and adolescents (10-16 years). While later habitual bedtimes (Caffeine 23:14 ± 11...

  11. Caffeine Consuming Children and Adolescents Show Altered Sleep Behavior and Deep Sleep

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine is the most commonly ingested psychoactive drug worldwide with increasing consumption rates among young individuals. While caffeine leads to decreased sleep quality in adults, studies investigating how caffeine consumption affects children’s and adolescents’ sleep remain scarce. We explored the effects of regular caffeine consumption on sleep behavior and the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) in children and adolescents (10–16 years). While later habitual bedtimes (Caffeine 23:14 ± 11...

  12. Investigations of the presence of caffeine in the Rudawa River, Kraków, Poland

    OpenAIRE

    Jagoda, Agnieszka; Żukowski, Witold; Dąbrowska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine concentration in surface water (Rudawa River, Kraków, Poland) has been being investigated since 2011. The method applied for investigations was developed in 2011, and the first series of measurements of caffeine concentration in surface water began in 2011. Caffeine concentration was determined by the gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method. Solid phase extraction (SPE) was used to enrich the concentration of caffeine in water samples. As an internal standard, the caffein...

  13. Cyclin Y Is Involved in the Regulation of Adipogenesis and Lipid Production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiwei An

    Full Text Available A new member of the cyclin family cyclin Y (CCNY is involved in the regulation of various physiological processes. In this study, the role of CCNY in energy metabolism was characterized. We found that compared with wild-type (WT mice, Ccny knockout (KO mice had both lower body weight and lower fat content. The Ccny KO mice also had a higher metabolic rate, resisted the stress of a high-fat diet, and were sensitive to calorie restriction. The expression levels of UCP1 and PGC1α were significantly higher in the brown adipose tissue (BAT of the Ccny KO mice than that of the WT littermate controls, whereas there was no significant difference in BAT weight between the WT and the Ccny KO mice. In addition, the down-regulation of Ccny resulted in suppression of white adipocyte differentiation both in vivo and in vitro, while the expression of Ccny was up-regulated by C/EBPα. Furthermore, both hepatocytes and HepG2 cells that were depleted of Ccny were insensitive to insulin stimulation, consistent with the significant inhibition of insulin sensitivity in the liver of the Ccny KO mice, but no significant changes in WAT and muscle, indicating that CCNY is involved in regulating the hepatic insulin signaling pathway. The hepatic insulin resistance generated by Ccny depletion resulted in down-regulation of the sterol-regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP1 and fatty acid synthase (FASN. Together, these results provide a new link between CCNY and lipid metabolism in mice, and suggest that inhibition of CCNY may offer a therapeutic approach to obesity and diabetes.

  14. Transcriptome analysis of tetraploid cells identifies cyclin D2 as a facilitator of adaptation to genome doubling in the presence of p53.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potapova, Tamara A; Seidel, Christopher W; Box, Andrew C; Rancati, Giulia; Li, Rong

    2016-10-15

    Tetraploidization, or genome doubling, is a prominent event in tumorigenesis, primarily because cell division in polyploid cells is error-prone and produces aneuploid cells. This study investigates changes in gene expression evoked in acute and adapted tetraploid cells and their effect on cell-cycle progression. Acute polyploidy was generated by knockdown of the essential regulator of cytokinesis anillin, which resulted in cytokinesis failure and formation of binucleate cells, or by chemical inhibition of Aurora kinases, causing abnormal mitotic exit with formation of single cells with aberrant nuclear morphology. Transcriptome analysis of these acute tetraploid cells revealed common signatures of activation of the tumor-suppressor protein p53. Suppression of proliferation in these cells was dependent on p53 and its transcriptional target, CDK inhibitor p21. Rare proliferating tetraploid cells can emerge from acute polyploid populations. Gene expression analysis of single cell-derived, adapted tetraploid clones showed up-regulation of several p53 target genes and cyclin D2, the activator of CDK4/6/2. Overexpression of cyclin D2 in diploid cells strongly potentiated the ability to proliferate with increased DNA content despite the presence of functional p53. These results indicate that p53-mediated suppression of proliferation of polyploid cells can be averted by increased levels of oncogenes such as cyclin D2, elucidating a possible route for tetraploidy-mediated genomic instability in carcinogenesis.

  15. Physiology, biochemistry and possible applications of microbial caffeine degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gummadi, Sathyanarayana N; Bhavya, B; Ashok, Nandhini

    2012-01-01

    Caffeine, a purine alkaloid is a constituent of widely consumed beverages. The scientific evidence which has proved the harm of this alkaloid has paved the way for innumerable research in the area of caffeine degradation. In addition to this, the fact that the by-products of the coffee and tea industry pollute the environment has called for the need of decaffeinating coffee and tea industry's by-products. Though physical and chemical methods for decaffeination are available, the lack of specificity for removal of caffeine in these techniques and their non-eco-friendly nature has opened the area of microbial and enzymatic degradation of caffeine. Another important application of microbial caffeine degradation apart from its advantages like specificity, eco-friendliness and cost-effectiveness is the fact that this process will enable the production of industrially and medically useful components of the caffeine degradation pathway like theobromine and theophylline. This is a comprehensive review which mainly focuses on caffeine degradation, large-scale degradation of the same and its applications in the industrial world.

  16. Effects of theobromine and caffeine on mood and vigilance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judelson, Daniel A; Preston, Amy G; Miller, Debra L; Muñoz, Colleen X; Kellogg, Mark D; Lieberman, Harris R

    2013-08-01

    Like caffeine, theobromine crosses the blood-brain barrier and binds to adenosine receptors, suggesting it might share caffeine's beneficial effects on mood and vigilance. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess the effect of theobromine doses commonly found in foods on mood and vigilance parameters sensitive to caffeine. Caffeine was tested as a positive control. Twenty-four men (age, 23 [3] years) completed 6 double-blind trials during which they consumed experimental beverages, assessed their mood using standardized self-report questionnaires, and completed a 2-hour visual vigilance task. Three experimental doses (100, 200, and 400 mg theobromine) were delivered in a cocoa-based beverage; 3 matched control treatments (0 mg theobromine, 400 mg theobromine, and 100 mg caffeine) were delivered in a non-cocoa beverage. Mean salivary concentrations of theobromine exhibited significant dose-dependent differences (400 mg trials > 200 mg trial > 100 mg trial > 0 mg trials; P 0.05), but 100-mg caffeine significantly decreased lethargy/fatigue and increased vigor (P = 0.006 and 0.011, respectively). These findings indicate theobromine does not influence mood and vigilance when administered in nutritionally relevant doses, despite sharing many of caffeine's structural characteristics.

  17. Influence of drug concentration on the diffusion parameters of caffeine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Ben Mustapha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives : In the fields of the pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries and in toxicology, the study of the skin penetration of molecules is very interesting. Various studies have considered the impact of different physicochemical drug characteristics, skin thickness, and formulations, on the transition from the surface of the skin to the underlying tissues or to the systemic circulation; however, the influence of drug concentration on the permeation flux of molecules has rarely been raised. Our study aims to discover the influence of caffeine concentration in a formulation on the percutaneous penetration from gels, as a result of different dose applications to polysulfate membrane and human skin. Materials and Methods : For this purpose, three identical base gels were used at 1, 3, and 5% of caffeine, to evaluate the effect of the concentration of caffeine on in vitro release through the synthetic membrane and ex vivo permeation through the human skin, using diffusion Franz TM cells. Results : The diffusion through the epidermal tissue was significantly slower than through the synthetic membrane, which recorded an increase of flux with an increase in the concentration of caffeine. The skin permeation study showed that diffusion depended not only on the concentration, but also on the deposited amount of gel. Nevertheless, for the same amount of caffeine applied, the flux was more significant from the less concentrated gel. Conclusion : Among all the different concentrations of caffeine examined, 1% gel of caffeine applied at 5 mg / cm 2 showed the highest absorption characteristics across human skin.

  18. Caffeine as a cause of urticaria-angioedema

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Tognetti

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a young woman presenting with recurrent urticaria. The episodes occurred both in and out of the workplace. On three occasions it presented as urticaria-angioedema, requiring emergency care on one occassion. A thorough clinical history along with serological and allergological tests allowed a diagnosis of caffeine-induced urticaria-angioedema. We advised the patient to follow a caffeine-free diet and to avoid all caffeine or methylxanthine-containing drugs. After two years of caffeine abstinence, she had not experienced any further episodes of urticaria-angioedema. Only a few cases of caffeine-induced urticaria and/or anaphylaxis have been reported till date, with varying outcomes in allergologic investigations. Moreover, several cases are probably undiagnosed or misdiagnosed as idiopathic urticaria or as occupational allergy. We speculate that hypersensitivity to caffeine rather than autoimmine reaction may be the probable cause of urticaria. Caffeine should considered as a potential urticaria-inducing agent and should be included in the allergological test series.

  19. Flowcytometric evaluation of cell cycle regulators (cyclins and cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors expressed on bone marrow cells of patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia and multiple myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selami Koçak Toprak

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Etiopathology of malignancy can be demonstrated by the comparison of the quantified changes in the different phases of the cycle about cyclins and cyclin dependent kinase inhibitors (CDKI in healthy and malignant proliferated cells. The aim of this study is to analyze flow cytometric expression of cell cycle regulating elements in the malignant diseases with low and high proliferative signature. METHODS: The levels of cyclin D, E, A, B and CDKI's p16, p21 were studied by flowcytometry in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML (n=16, multiple myeloma (MM (n=13 and control subjects (n=15. RESULTS: The distributions of the cell cycle S phase were 10, 63%, 6, 72% and 3, 59%; for CML, MM and control subjects, respectively. Among all the cyclins expressed during the S phase, cyclin D expression was the lowest, in CML patients. While the distribution of cyclins and CDKI’s was similar between MM and control groups in G2/M phase; cyclins expressions were parallel in all three phases in MM and chronic myeloid leukemia groups. CONCLUSION: CML and MM are diseases presenting with variable degrees of proliferation. The increase of cyclins in cell cycle phases in patient group was not associated with the augmentation of the expression of CDKI’s. This finding may contribute the mechanisms effective in the etiopathogenesis of hematological malignancy.

  20. Total and partial sleep deprivation: Effects on plasma TNF-αRI, TNF-αRII, and IL-6, and reversal by caffeine operating through adenosine A2 receptor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, William T.; Reuben, James M.; Lee, Bang-Ning; Mullington, Janet; Price, Nicholas; Dinges, David F.

    2000-01-01

    Plasma levels of IL-6 and TNF-α are elevated in individuals who are deprived of sleep. TNF-α regulates expression of its soluble receptors, sTNF-αRI and sTNF-αRII. Sleep deprivation (SD) also increases extracellular adenosine that induces sedation and sleep. An antagonist of adenosine, caffeine, raises exogenous adenosine levels, stimulates the expression of IL-6 and inhibits the release of TNF-α. Our objective was to determine the effect of total SD (TSD) or partial SD (PSD) on the levels of these sleep regulatory molecules in volunteers who experienced SD with or without the consumption of caffeine. Plasma levels of IL-6, sTNF-αRI and sTNF-αRII were assayed by ELISA in samples collected at 90-min intervals from each subject over an 88-hour period. The results were analyzed by the repeated measures ANOVA. Whereas only TSD significantly increased sTNF-αRI over time, caffeine suppressed both sTNF-α receptors in TSD and PSD subjects. The selective increase in the expression of sTNF-αRI and not sTNF-αRII in subjects experiencing TSD with caffeine compared with others experiencing PSD with caffeine has not been previously reported. Moreover, caffeine significantly increased IL-6 in TSD subjects compared with those who did not receive caffeine. However, subjects who were permitted intermittent naps (PSD) ablated the effects of caffeine and reduced their level of IL-6 to that of the TSD group. These data further lend support to the hypothesis that the sTNF-αRI and not the sTNF-αRII plays a significant role in sleep regulation by TNF-α. .

  1. SCF(Cyclin F)-dependent degradation of CDC6 suppresses DNA re-replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walter, David; Hoffmann, Saskia; Komseli, Eirini-Stavroula;

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of genome stability requires that DNA is replicated precisely once per cell cycle. This is believed to be achieved by limiting replication origin licensing and thereby restricting the firing of each replication origin to once per cell cycle. CDC6 is essential for eukaryotic replicatio...

  2. A distinct expression pattern of cyclin K in mammalian testes suggests a functional role in spermatogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaocong Xiang

    Full Text Available Germ cell and embryonic stem cells are inextricably linked in many aspects. Remarkably both can generate all somatic cell types in organisms. Yet the molecular regulation accounting for these similarities is not fully understood. Cyclin K was previously thought to associate with CDK9 to regulate gene expression. However, we and others have recently shown that its cognate interacting partners are CDK12 and CDK13 in mammalian cells. We further demonstrated that cyclin K is essential for embryonic stem cell maintenance. In this study, we examined the expression of cyclin K in various murine and human tissues. We found that cyclin K is highly expressed in mammalian testes in a developmentally regulated manner. During neonatal spermatogenesis, cyclin K is highly expressed in gonocytes and spermatogonial stem cells. In adult testes, cyclin K can be detected in spermatogonial stem cells but is absent in differentiating spermatogonia, spermatids and spermatozoa. Interestingly, the strongest expression of cyclin K is detected in primary spermatocytes. In addition, we found that cyclin K is highly expressed in human testicular cancers. Knockdown of cyclin K in a testicular cancer cell line markedly reduces cell proliferation. Collectively, we suggest that cyclin K may be a novel molecular link between germ cell development, cancer development and embryonic stem cell maintenance.

  3. Baicalein induces G1 arrest in oral cancer cells by enhancing the degradation of cyclin D1 and activating AhR to decrease Rb phosphorylation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Ya-Hsin, E-mail: yhcheng@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan, ROC (China); Li, Lih-Ann; Lin, Pinpin; Cheng, Li-Chuan [Division of Environmental Health and Occupational Medicine, National Health Research Institutes, Zhunan, Miaoli 35053, Taiwan, ROC (China); Hung, Chein-Hui [Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine Sciences, Chang Gung University, Puizi City, Chiayi 613, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chang, Nai Wen [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Chingju [Department of Physiology, School of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2012-09-15

    Baicalein is a flavonoid, known to have anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects. As an aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) ligand, baicalein at high concentrations blocks AhR-mediated dioxin toxicity. Because AhR had been reported to play a role in regulating the cell cycle, we suspected that the anti-cancer effect of baicalein is associated with AhR. This study investigated the molecular mechanism involved in the anti-cancer effect of baicalein in oral cancer cells HSC-3, including whether such effect would be AhR-mediated. Results revealed that baicalein inhibited cell proliferation and increased AhR activity in a dose-dependent manner. Cell cycle was arrested at the G1 phase and the expression of CDK4, cyclin D1, and phosphorylated retinoblastoma (pRb) was decreased. When the AhR was suppressed by siRNA, the reduction of pRb was partially reversed, accompanied by a decrease of cell population at G1 phase and an increase at S phase, while the reduction of cyclin D1 and CDK4 did not change. This finding suggests that the baicalein activation of AhR is indeed associated with the reduction of pRb, but is independent of the reduction of cyclin D1 and CDK4. When cells were pre-treated with LiCl, the inhibitor of GSK-3β, the decrease of cyclin D1 was blocked and the reduction of pRb was recovered. The data indicates that in HSC-3 the reduction of pRb is both mediated by baicalein through activation of AhR and facilitation of cyclin D1 degradation, which causes cell cycle arrest at the G1 phase, and results in the inhibition of cell proliferation. -- Highlights: ► Baicalein causes the G1 phase arrest by decreasing Rb phosphorylation. ► Baicalein modulates AhR-mediated cell proliferation. ► Both AhR activation and cyclin D1 degradation results in hypophosphorylation of Rb. ► Baicalein facilitates cyclin D1 degradation by signalling the GSK-3β pathway.

  4. Caffeine Consumption and Sleep Quality in Australian Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Watson, Emily J.; Alison M. Coates; Kohler, Mark; Banks, Siobhan

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine is commonly consumed to help offset fatigue, however, it can have several negative effects on sleep quality and quantity. The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between caffeine consumption and sleep quality in adults using a newly validated caffeine food frequency questionnaire (C-FFQ). In this cross sectional study, 80 adults (M ± SD: 38.9 ± 19.3 years) attended the University of South Australia to complete a C-FFQ and the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI). Caf...

  5. Cumulative neurobehavioral and physiological effects of chronic caffeine intake: individual differences and implications for the use of caffeinated energy products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaeth, Andrea M; Goel, Namni; Dinges, David F

    2014-10-01

    The use of caffeine-containing energy products has increased worldwide in recent years. All of the top-selling energy drinks contain caffeine, which is likely to be the primary psychoactive ingredient in these products. Research shows that caffeine-containing energy products can improve cognitive and physical performance. Presumably, individuals consume caffeine-containing energy products to counteract feelings of low energy in situations causing tiredness, fatigue, and/or reduced alertness. This review discusses the scientific evidence for sleep loss, circadian phase, sleep inertia, and the time-on-task effect as causes of low energy and summarizes research assessing the efficacy of caffeine to counteract decreased alertness and increased fatigue in such situations. The results of a placebo-controlled experiment in healthy adults who had 3 nights of total sleep deprivation (with or without 2-hour naps every 12 hours) are presented to illustrate the physiological and neurobehavioral effects of sustained low-dose caffeine. Individual differences, including genetic factors, in the response to caffeine and to sleep loss are discussed. The review concludes with future directions for research on this important and evolving topic.

  6. Application of RNAi to confirm theobromine as the major intermediate for caffeine biosynthesis in coffee plants with potential for construction of decaffeinated varieties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogita, Shinjiro; Uefuji, Hirotaka; Morimoto, Masayuki; Sano, Hiroshi

    2004-04-01

    The caffeine biosynthetic pathway in coffee plants has been proposed to involve three distinct N -methyltransferases, xanthosine methyltransferase (XMT), 7- N -methylxanthine methyltransferase (MXMT; theobromine synthase), and 3,7-dimethylxanthine methyltransferase (DXMT; caffeine synthase). We previously isolated all corresponding cDNAs designated as CaXMT1 , CaMXMT1 , CaMXMT2 and CaDXMT1 , respectively, and showed that caffeine was indeed synthesized in vitro by the combination of their gene products. In order to regulate caffeine biosynthesis in planta , we suppressed expression of CaMXMT1 by the double stranded RNA interference (RNAi) method. For this purpose, we first established a protocol for efficient somatic embryogenesis of Coffea arabica and C. canephora , and then Agrobacterium -mediated transformation techniques. The RNAi transgenic lines of embryogenic tissues derived from C. arabica and transgenic plantlets of C. canephora demonstrated a clear reduction in transcripts for CaMXMT1 in comparison with the control plants. Transcripts for CaXMT1 and CaDXMT1 were also reduced in the most cases. Both embryonic tissues and plantlets exhibited a concomitant reduction of theobromine and caffeine contents to a range between 30% and 50% of that of the control. These results suggest that the CaMXMT1 -RNAi sequence affected expression of not only CaMXMT1 itself, but also CaXMT1 and CaDXMT1 , and that, since the reduction in theobromine content was proportional to that for caffeine, it is involved in the major synthetic pathway in coffee plants. The results also indicate that the method can be practically applied to produce decaffeinated coffee plants.

  7. The impact of caffeine use across the lifespan on cognitive performance in elderly women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Clinton S; Thomas, Ayanna K; Taylor, Holly A; Jacques, Paul F; Kanarek, Robin B

    2016-12-01

    Habitual caffeine consumption has often been associated with decreasing age-related cognitive decline. However, whether habitual caffeine use preferentially spares different cognitive processes is unclear. Furthermore, whether basing habitual caffeine consumption patterns on current consumption or on a lifetime measure better represents an individual's use remains unclear. In the present study, we collected information from women, aged 56-83, about their current caffeine consumption patterns and history of use, including age they began consuming caffeine. Regression models assessed the relationship between caffeine consumption and performance on batteries designed to probe speed of processing, inhibition, memory, and executive function. While we found no direct associations between caffeine exposure and cognitive performance, we found that caffeine consumption and participant BMI interacted for inhibitory function and speed of processing performance. We discuss possible protective effects of long term caffeine use as well as the possibility of dose dependent effects.

  8. [Caffeine--common ingredient in a diet and its influence on human health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzejska, Regina

    2012-01-01

    Caffeine is widely consumed by people of all ages. In the last period a market of caffeine-containing products, particularly energy drinks and food supplements increased. Caffeine for years is under discussion, whether has positive whether adverse impact on health. Children are a group of special anxieties. Caffeine is a stimulant of central nervous system and therefore is probably the most commonly used psychoactive substance in the world. The physiological effect of caffeine and the lack of nutrition value causes a great interest its impact on health, especially with reference to the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Results of scientific research are not clear. The influence of caffeine on the human body is conditioned with the individual metabolism of caffeine which also depends on many endogenic and environmental factors. According to the current knowledge moderate caffeine intake by healthy adults at a dose level of 400 mg a day is not associated with adverse effects, but it also depends on other health determinants of a lifestyle. Excessive caffeine consumption can cause negative health consequences such as psychomotor agitation, insomnia, headache, gastrointestinal complaints. Adverse effect of caffeine intoxication is classified in World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Metabolism of caffeine by pregnant woman is slowed down. Caffeine and its metabolites pass freely across the placenta into a fetus. For this reason pregnant women should limit caffeine intake. Children and adolescents should also limit daily caffeine consumption. It results from the influence of caffeine on the central nervous system in the period of rapid growth and the final stage of brain development, calcium balance and sleep duration. Average daily caffeine consumption in European countries ranging from 280-490 mg. The highest caffeine intake is in Scandinavian countries what results from the great consumption of the coffee. As far as caffeine

  9. Limited prognostic value of tissue protein expression levels of cyclin E in Danish ovarian cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heeran, Mel C; Høgdall, Claus K; Kjaer, Susanne K

    2012-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the expression of cyclin E in tumour tissues from 661 patients with epithelial ovarian tumours. The second was to evaluate whether cyclin E tissue expression levels correlate with clinico-pathological parameters and prognosis of the disease. Using...... tissue arrays (TA), we analysed the cyclin E expression levels in tissues from 168 women with borderline ovarian tumours (BOT) (147 stage I, 4 stage II, 17 stage III) and 493 Ovarian cancer (OC) patients (127 stage I, 45 stage II, 276 stage III, 45 stage IV). Using a 10% cut-off level for cyclin E......-off value showed that cyclin E had no independent prognostic value. In conclusion, we found cyclin E expression in tumour tissue to be of limited prognostic value to Danish OC patients....

  10. Removal of caffeine from industrial wastewater using Trichosporon asahii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, V; Das, Nilanjana

    2013-07-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine), a natural alkaloid present mainly in tea and coffee products has been suggested as an environmental pollutant. Decaffeination is an important process for the removal of caffeine from coffee industrial wastes. In the present study, caffeine removal (through degradation) by yeast isolate, Trichosporon asahii immobilized on various conventional matrices (sodium alginate, carboxymethyl cellulose, chitosan, agar and agarose) was investigated using the method of entrapment. The biofilm forming ability of T. asahii was monitored by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Exopolysaccharide produced by T asahii biofilm was characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy and HPLC analysis. Caffeine removal from coffee processing industrial effluent was found to be 75 and 80 % by alginate immobilized yeast and yeast biofilm formed on gravels over a period of 48 hr in batch mode. Effectiveness of the process was also tested involving the continuous--flow column studies.

  11. Consumption and foraging behaviors for common stimulants (nicotine, caffeine).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, James G; Currie, Jonathan; Ogeil, Rowan P

    2016-01-01

    Models are needed to understand the emerging capability to track consumers' movements. Therefore, we examined the use of legal and readily available stimulants that vary in their addictive potential (nicotine, caffeine). One hundred sixty-six participants answered the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10), the Severity of Dependence Scale for nicotine and caffeine, and reported the number of times and locations stimulants were purchased and used. On average, nicotine dependent individuals made their purchases from 2 locations, while caffeine dependent individuals consumed caffeine at 2 locations, but some people exhibited a greater range and intensity of use. Stimulant foraging behavior could be described by power laws, and is exacerbated by dependency. The finding has implications for attempts to control substance use.

  12. Protonation of caffeine: A theoretical and experimental study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Hamed; Tabrizchi, Mahmoud; Farrokhpour, Hossein

    2013-03-01

    Protonation of caffeine was examined by ion mobility spectrometry equipped with two ionization sources, corona discharge (CD) and UV photoionization. Three peaks were observed in ion mobility spectrum by simultaneously running the two ionization sources. Experimental and theoretical evidence was collected to link the observed peaks to caffeine related ionic species. One peak was attributed to the M+ ion while the other two were assigned to different protonated isomers of caffeine. In the case of CD ionization source, it was observed that different sites of caffeine compete for protonation and their relative intensities, depends on the sample concentration as well as the nature of the reactant ions. The new concept of "internal proton affinity" (IPA) was defined to express the tendency of holding the added proton for each atom in a molecule.

  13. Assessing Caffeine as an Emerging Environmental Concern Using Conventional Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic wastewater contaminants, including pharmaceuticals, caffeine, and nicotine, have received increased scrutiny because of their detection in water bodies receiving wastewater discharge. Despite recent measurement in US streams, caffeine’s effect on freshwater organisms is not well documented....

  14. [Caffeine and adaptive changes in the circulatory system during pregnancy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendrowska-Pinkosz, Monika; Dworzański, Wojciech; Krauze, Magdalena; Burdan, Franciszek

    2017-01-23

    Adaptive physiological changes that occur in pregnant women can fluctuate with the intake of substances with proven, adverse biological effect on the body. Due to the fact that caffeine is one of the most chronically used xenobiotics, the impact of consuming caffeine on adaptive processes in the circulatory system of a pregnant women required a research. Many researchers emphasise its negative effect on the circulatory system of the mother and her offspring. However, in spite of years of observation, there is no clear answer to what extent dose or in what period of time the caffeine modulates the adaptive processes during pregnancy. Because of the potential risk the supply of caffeine during pregnancy should be subjected to considerable restrictions.

  15. Cigarette, alcohol, and caffeine consumption: risk factors for spontaneous abortion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Vibeke

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To study the association between cigarette, alcohol, and caffeine consumption and the occurrence of spontaneous abortion. METHODS: The study population consisted of 330 women with spontaneous abortion and 1168 pregnant women receiving antenatal care. A case-control design was utilized......; cases were defined as women with a spontaneous abortion in gestational week 6-16 and controls as women with a live fetus in gestational week 6-16. The variables studied comprise age, parity, occupational situation, cigarette, alcohol, and caffeine consumption. The association between cigarette, alcohol......, and caffeine consumption was studied using logistic regression analyzes while controlling for confounding variables. In addition stratified analyzes of the association between caffeine consumption and spontaneous abortion on the basis of cigarette and alcohol consumption were performed. RESULTS: Women who had...

  16. The effect of caffeine on cerebral asymmetry in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voiculescu, M; Segarceanu, A; Negutu, M; Ghita, I; Fulga, I; Coman, O A

    2015-01-01

    EEG recordings reflect the gross electrical activity emanating from synaptic currents of individual neurons across large cortical areas. During periods of cortical activation, waking, and higher EEG frequencies, neurons display increased excitability and exhibit more asynchronous discharge. The activity of a number of subcortical neurotransmitter systems from several brain regions outside the thalamus can directly affect cortical activity patterns. These neurotransmitter systems are generally targets of pharmacological intervention or participate in neurological disease states. The EEG trace comprises 4 primary rhythms: alfa (α), beta (β), theta (θ) and delta (δ), which differ in frequency and amplitude. Caffeine effect on brain asymmetry will be studied in this work. The study was realized by means of Fourier spectral frequency analysis (Fast Fourier Transformation) of the EEG signal on anesthetized rats. All 3 doses of caffeine increased the global wave power of brain activity compared to the control group. All 3 doses of caffeine reduced the number of peaks for the 0.5-4 Hz frequency band, with the intermediate dose of caffeine having such an effect in the 4-7 Hz frequency band and the high dose of caffeine for the 23-33 Hz frequency band. The group that received high doses of caffeine showed an increase of the percentage of delta waves, with a concurrent decrease of the percentage of alpha1, alpha2, beta and theta 2 compared to the control group. Low-dose caffeine produced positive values of left-right difference in brain electrical activity (left predominance) for the 0.5-5 Hz and 7.8-10.3 Hz frequency intervals. The group that received high-dose caffeine exhibited a left hemisphere dominance for the 0.5-1.5 Hz; 13.9-14.1 Hz and 19-20 Hz frequency ranges while right dominance was present in the 1.7-13.9 Hz, 15-19 Hz and 21-25 Hz frequency ranges. In conclusion, all doses of caffeine modified the global power of the brain as well as the number of peaks on

  17. Differential cognitive effects of energy drink ingredients: caffeine, taurine, and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Grace E; Mahoney, Caroline R; Brunyé, Tad T; Gardony, Aaron L; Taylor, Holly A; Kanarek, Robin B

    2012-10-01

    Energy drinks containing caffeine, taurine, and glucose may improve mood and cognitive performance. However, there are no studies assessing the individual and interactive effects of these ingredients. We evaluated the effects of caffeine, taurine, and glucose alone and in combination on cognitive performance and mood in 24-hour caffeine-abstained habitual caffeine consumers. Using a randomized, double-blind, mixed design, 48 habitual caffeine consumers (18 male, 30 female) who were 24-hour caffeine deprived received one of four treatments (200 mg caffeine/0 mg taurine, 0 mg caffeine/2000 mg taurine, 200 mg caffeine/2000 mg taurine, 0 mg caffeine/0 mg taurine), on each of four separate days, separated by a 3-day wash-out period. Between-participants treatment was a glucose drink (50 g glucose, placebo). Salivary cortisol, mood and heart rate were measured. An attention task was administered 30-minutes post-treatment, followed by a working memory and reaction time task 60-minutes post-treatment. Caffeine enhanced executive control and working memory, and reduced simple and choice reaction time. Taurine increased choice reaction time but reduced reaction time in the working memory tasks. Glucose alone slowed choice reaction time. Glucose in combination with caffeine, enhanced object working memory and in combination with taurine, enhanced orienting attention. Limited glucose effects may reflect low task difficulty relative to subjects' cognitive ability. Caffeine reduced feelings of fatigue and increased tension and vigor. Taurine reversed the effects of caffeine on vigor and caffeine-withdrawal symptoms. No effects were found for salivary cortisol or heart rate. Caffeine, not taurine or glucose, is likely responsible for reported changes in cognitive performance following consumption of energy drinks, especially in caffeine-withdrawn habitual caffeine consumers.

  18. Caffeine enhances upper body strength in resistance-trained women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penhollow Tina

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research has indicated that low-to-moderate dosages of caffeine supplementation are ergogenic for sustained endurance efforts as well as high-intensity exercise. The effects of caffeine supplementation on strength-power performance are equivocal, with some studies indicating a benefit and others demonstrating no change in performance. The majority of research that has examined the effects of caffeine supplementation on strength-power performance has been carried out in both trained and untrained men. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the acute effects of caffeine supplementation on strength and muscular endurance in resistance-trained women. Methods In a randomized manner, 15 women consumed caffeine (6 mg/kg or placebo (PL seven days apart. Sixty min following supplementation, participants performed a one-repetition maximum (1RM barbell bench press test and repetitions to failure at 60% of 1RM. Heart rate (HR and blood pressure (BP were assessed at rest, 60 minutes post-consumption, and immediately following completion of repetitions to failure. Results Repeated measures ANOVA indicated a significantly greater bench press maximum with caffeine (p ≤ 0.05 (52.9 ± 11.1 kg vs. 52.1 ± 11.7 kg with no significant differences between conditions in 60% 1RM repetitions (p = 0.81. Systolic blood pressure was significantly greater post-exercise, with caffeine (p Conclusions These findings indicate a moderate dose of caffeine may be sufficient for enhancing strength performance in resistance-trained women.

  19. Human coffee drinking: manipulation of concentration and caffeine dose.

    OpenAIRE

    Griffiths, R R; Bigelow, G E; Liebson, I A; O'Keeffe, M; O'Leary, D.; Russ, N

    1986-01-01

    In a residential research ward coffee drinking was studied in 9 volunteer human subjects with histories of heavy coffee drinking. A series of five experiments was undertaken to characterize adlibitum coffee consumption and to investigate the effects of manipulating coffee concentration, caffeine dose per cup, and caffeine preloads prior to coffee drinking. Manipulations were double-blind and scheduled in randomized sequences across days. When cups of coffee were freely available, coffee drink...

  20. [Cigarette and coffee--pharmacokinetics interaction between nicotine and caffeine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florek, Ewa; Enko, Jolanta; Piekoszewski, Wojciech

    2009-01-01

    Coffee drinking and tobacco smoking stand nicotine and caffeine the number one licit psychoactive substances. Many people inseparably combine a cup of coffee with cigarette. The two most important compounds in these products, nicotine and caffeine can influence on there concentration and pharmacodynamics activity in the body. The changes of the level of these compounds can be caused by changes of the pharmacokinetics on the way of enzyme induction by other chemical individuals content in the coffee and tobacco smoke.

  1. Neonatal caffeine exposure and seizure susceptibility in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillet, R; Dunham, L

    1995-08-01

    Early developmental exposure to caffeine in rats results in changes in brain excitability that persist to adulthood. The mechanism of these alterations is unknown. To identify potential neurotransmitter systems involved, we exposed neonatal rats to caffeine and determined seizure thresholds for chemoconvulsants active at different CNS receptors in the adult animal. Rats were unhandled (NH) or received by gavage (0.05 ml/10 g) either vehicle (water) or caffeine (15-20 mg/kg/day) for postnatal days 2-6. At age 70-90 days, each rat was infused intravenously (i.v.) with picrotoxin (PIC), bicuculline (BIC) [convulsants acting at the gamma-aminobutyric acid/benzodiazepine (GABA/BDZ) receptor], pentylenetetrazol [PTZ, possibly acting at both GABA/BDZ and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors], caffeine (acting at adenosine receptors), strychnine (STR, acting at glycine receptors), or kainic acid (KA, acting at the NMDA receptor). Seizure thresholds were analyzed as a function of neonatal treatment and sex. Thresholds for caffeine, PTZ, PIC, and KA were increased as a function of neonatal caffeine exposure (p = 0.01, 0.02, 0.02, and 0.005, respectively). The thresholds for BIC and STR were not altered. There were also gender differences in seizure susceptibility. Thresholds for seizures produced by BIC, caffeine, PIC, and STR were higher in females (p = 0.005, 0.005, 0.001, and 0.0001, respectively), but were not different for seizures caused by PTZ. These results suggest that early developmental exposure to caffeine affects later seizure susceptibility. Moreover, some of these effects are gender specific.

  2. Targeting cyclin B1 inhibits proliferation and sensitizes breast cancer cells to taxol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strebhardt Klaus

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclin B1, the regulatory subunit of cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1, is essential for the transition from G2 phase to mitosis. Cyclin B1 is very often found to be overexpressed in primary breast and cervical cancer cells as well as in cancer cell lines. Its expression is correlated with the malignancy of gynecological cancers. Methods In order to explore cyclin B1 as a potential target for gynecological cancer therapy, we studied the effect of small interfering RNA (siRNA on different gynecological cancer cell lines by monitoring their proliferation rate, cell cycle profile, protein expression and activity, apoptosis induction and colony formation. Tumor formation in vivo was examined using mouse xenograft models. Results Downregulation of cyclin B1 inhibited proliferation of several breast and cervical cancer cell lines including MCF-7, BT-474, SK-BR-3, MDA-MB-231 and HeLa. After combining cyclin B1 siRNA with taxol, we observed an increased apoptotic rate accompanied by an enhanced antiproliferative effect in breast cancer cells. Furthermore, control HeLa cells were progressively growing, whereas the tumor growth of HeLa cells pre-treated with cyclin B1 siRNA was strongly inhibited in nude mice, indicating that cyclin B1 is indispensable for tumor growth in vivo. Conclusion Our data support the notion of cyclin B1 being essential for survival and proliferation of gynecological cancer cells. Concordantly, knockdown of cyclin B1 inhibits proliferation in vitro as well as in vivo. Moreover, targeting cyclin B1 sensitizes breast cancer cells to taxol, suggesting that specific cyclin B1 targeting is an attractive strategy for the combination with conventionally used agents in gynecological cancer therapy.

  3. Expression of Cyclin E and Its Relationship with the Prognosis of Patients with Breast Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Wenshan; HUANG Tao; WANG Haijiu

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of cyclin E in breast cancer tissues and its relationship with prognosis of the patients with breast cancer. Methods: The expression of cyclin E, HER-2/neu,nm23-H1 and actin was detected in 80 breast cancer tissues and 18 benign breast tumor tissues by immunohistochemical methods. The relationship between cyclin E and the remaining genes or the clinical data of the patients with breast cancer was analyzed. Results: The over expression rate of cyclin E in malignant tissues was obviously higher than that in benign tumor tissues (P<0.01). The over expression of cyclin E in later stage of disease was higher than that in early stage of disease (P<0.05). The expression of cyclin E in ER positive tissues was lower than that in ER negative tissues (P<0.05). The expression of cyclin E in PR positive tissues and PR negative tissues had no significant difference (P>0.05). The expression of cyclin E in HER-2/neu positive tissues was higher than that in HER-2/neu negative tissues (P<0.05). And the expression of cyclin E in ER, PR and HER-2/neu all positive tissues was much higher (P<0.01). There was no significant difference in the expression of cyclin E between nm23-H1 positive tissues and nm23-H1 negative tissues (P>0.05). The expression of cyclin E in actin positive and continuous distribution tissues was lower than that in actin negative or discontinuous distribution tissues (P<0.05). Conclusion: The expression of cyclin E has a strong correlation to the prognosis of the patients with breast cancer.

  4. Coffee and caffeine ameliorate hyperglycemia, fatty liver, and inflammatory adipocytokine expression in spontaneously diabetic KK-Ay mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Rie; Kobayashi, Misato; Matsuda, Yuji; Ojika, Makoto; Shigeoka, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Yuko; Tou, Yoshie; Inoue, Takashi; Katagiri, Takao; Murai, Atsushi; Horio, Fumihiko

    2010-05-12

    Epidemiological surveys have demonstrated that habitual coffee consumption reduces the risk of type 2 diabetes. The aim of this work was to study the antidiabetic effect of coffee and caffeine in spontaneously diabetic KK-A(y) mice. KK-A(y) mice were given regular drinking water (controls) or 2-fold diluted coffee for 5 weeks. Coffee ingestion ameliorated the development of hyperglycemia and improved insulin sensitivity. White adipose tissue mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines (MCP-1, IL-6, and TNFalpha), adipose tissue MCP-1 concentration, and serum IL-6 concentration in the coffee group were lower than the control group. Moreover, coffee ingestion improved the fatty liver. Caffeine ingestion as drinking water also caused an amelioration of hyperglycemia and an improvement of fatty liver. These results suggest that coffee exerts a suppressive effect on hyperglycemia by improving insulin sensitivity, partly due to reducing inflammatory cytokine expression and improving fatty liver. Moreover, caffeine may be one of the effective antidiabetic compounds in coffee.

  5. Effects of caffeine intake and smoking on neurocognition in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Christian; Stephan-Otto, Christian; Cuevas-Esteban, Jorge; Maria Haro, Josep; Huerta-Ramos, Elena; Ochoa, Susana; Usall, Judith; Brébion, Gildas

    2015-12-30

    Although most studies support the beneficial effects of caffeine on neurocognition, its effects have never been assessed in psychiatric patients. In addition, results from studies in smokers are contradictory. Moreover, there are no data available about the neurocognitive effects of caffeine and tobacco together. We explored the concomitant effects of regular caffeine and tobacco intake on neurocognition in 52 schizophrenic patients and 61 healthy controls. Verbal fluency, processing speed, and working, visual and verbal memory were assessed. For each measurement, two tasks with two levels of complexity were administered. Our results showed that caffeine intake had beneficial effects on male schizophrenic patients only in complex tasks requiring deeper cognitive processing (semantic fluency, cognitive speed, working memory, and visual memory). Female patients and controls were unaffected. In contrast, smoking had a negative effect on male, but not on female, schizophrenic patients in semantic fluency. The effects of smoking in controls were inconsistent. In conclusion, our data showed, for the first time, beneficial effects of caffeine intake on neurocognition in male schizophrenic patients. These data suggest that further research of therapeutics based on caffeine is needed, as this could be beneficial for schizophrenic patients. In contrast, smoking appears to be detrimental.

  6. The use of caffeine versus prophylactic naps in sustained performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, M H; Gomez, S; Wirth, O; Arand, D L

    1995-02-01

    Previous studies have shown that performance during sleep loss is improved by prophylactic naps as a function of varying nap length. Based on single-dose caffeine studies, a similar dose-response effect has been hypothesized on performance, alertness and mood during sleep loss. The present study compared the effects of repeated versus single-dose administration of caffeine and varying amounts of sleep taken prior to sleep loss on performance, mood and physiological measures during 2 nights and days of sleep loss. A total of 140 normal, young adult males participated at one of two study sites. Ninety-eight subjects at one site were randomly assigned to one of four nap conditions (0, 2, 4 or 8 hours) and 42 subjects at the second site were assigned to one of four caffeine conditions. After a normal baseline night of sleep and morning baseline tests of performance, mood and nap latency, subjects in the nap groups returned to bed at noon, 1600 hours, 1800 hours or not at all. Bedtimes were varied so that all naps ended at 2000 hours. Subjects in the caffeine groups received either a single 400-mg dose of caffeine at 0130 hours each night or repeated doses of 150 or 300 mg every 6 hours starting at 0130 hours on the 1st night of sleep loss. A placebo control group (no nap and placebo administered every 6 hours on the repeated caffeine schedule) was run at both sites.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for caffeine and theobromine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Lu; Bhuiya, Mohammad Wadud; Li, Mengmeng; Liu, XiangQi; Han, Jixiang; Deng, WeiWei; Wang, Min; Yu, Oliver; Zhang, Zhengzhu

    2014-01-01

    Caffeine (1, 3, 7-trimethylxanthine) and theobromine (3, 7-dimethylxanthine) are the major purine alkaloids in plants, e.g., tea (Camellia sinensis) and coffee (Coffea arabica). Caffeine is a major component of coffee and is used widely in food and beverage industries. Most of the enzymes involved in the caffeine biosynthetic pathway have been reported previously. Here, we demonstrated the biosynthesis of caffeine (0.38 mg/L) by co-expression of Coffea arabica xanthosine methyltransferase (CaXMT) and Camellia sinensis caffeine synthase (TCS) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Furthermore, we endeavored to develop this production platform for making other purine-based alkaloids. To increase the catalytic activity of TCS in an effort to increase theobromine production, we identified four amino acid residues based on structural analyses of 3D-model of TCS. Two TCS1 mutants (Val317Met and Phe217Trp) slightly increased in theobromine accumulation and simultaneously decreased in caffeine production. The application and further optimization of this biosynthetic platform are discussed.

  8. Recent advances in caffeine and theobromine toxicities: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eteng, M U; Eyong, E U; Akpanyung, E O; Agiang, M A; Aremu, C Y

    1997-01-01

    Caffeine and theobromine are purine alkaloids widely consumed as stimulants and snacks in coffee and cocoa based foods and most often as part of ingredients in drugs. Man has enjoyed a long history of consumption of caffeine and theobromine. Recent interest in these two alkaloids, however, is centered on their potential reproductive toxicities. Caffeine and theobromine are now known to cross the placental and blood brain barrier thus potentially inducing fetal malformation by affecting the expression of genes vital in development. The developing fetus may not have developed enzymes for detoxification of these methylxanthine alkaloids via demethylation. There is a need, therefore, to protect the conceptus against 'insults' from teratogens of this nature. Apart from its reproductive toxicity, the presence of caffeine and theobromine in cocoa could limit its potentials as a nourishing food. This is an issue that needs to be addressed by nutritionists and the food industry at large. This paper discusses the natural sources, consumption and uses, toxicity and the major advances in the reproductive toxicology of caffeine and theobromine. The biosynthesis of these compounds in plants, metabolism in mammalian systems and the involvement of cytochrome P450 are reviewed and summarized. Evidence in favor of the toxicity of these compounds in experimental animals is presented with emphasis on the implications of these findings in humans. The paper concludes with a call for caution in the use of caffeine and theobromine pending further and more elaborate investigations.

  9. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for caffeine and theobromine production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Jin

    Full Text Available Caffeine (1, 3, 7-trimethylxanthine and theobromine (3, 7-dimethylxanthine are the major purine alkaloids in plants, e.g., tea (Camellia sinensis and coffee (Coffea arabica. Caffeine is a major component of coffee and is used widely in food and beverage industries. Most of the enzymes involved in the caffeine biosynthetic pathway have been reported previously. Here, we demonstrated the biosynthesis of caffeine (0.38 mg/L by co-expression of Coffea arabica xanthosine methyltransferase (CaXMT and Camellia sinensis caffeine synthase (TCS in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Furthermore, we endeavored to develop this production platform for making other purine-based alkaloids. To increase the catalytic activity of TCS in an effort to increase theobromine production, we identified four amino acid residues based on structural analyses of 3D-model of TCS. Two TCS1 mutants (Val317Met and Phe217Trp slightly increased in theobromine accumulation and simultaneously decreased in caffeine production. The application and further optimization of this biosynthetic platform are discussed.

  10. Protonation of caffeine: A theoretical and experimental study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahrami, Hamed [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Tabrizchi, Mahmoud, E-mail: m-tabriz@cc.iut.ac.ir [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Farrokhpour, Hossein [Department of Chemistry, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan 84156-83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-03-29

    Highlights: ► Protonation of caffeine was examined by ion mobility spectrometry equipped with two ionization sources. ► Experimental and theoretical evidence was collected to assign the observed peaks to caffeine related ionic species. ► A new concept of “internal proton affinity”, the protonation tendency for each atom in a molecule, was defined. - Abstract: Protonation of caffeine was examined by ion mobility spectrometry equipped with two ionization sources, corona discharge (CD) and UV photoionization. Three peaks were observed in ion mobility spectrum by simultaneously running the two ionization sources. Experimental and theoretical evidence was collected to link the observed peaks to caffeine related ionic species. One peak was attributed to the M{sup +} ion while the other two were assigned to different protonated isomers of caffeine. In the case of CD ionization source, it was observed that different sites of caffeine compete for protonation and their relative intensities, depends on the sample concentration as well as the nature of the reactant ions. The new concept of “internal proton affinity” (IPA) was defined to express the tendency of holding the added proton for each atom in a molecule.

  11. Caffeine: cognitive and physical performance enhancer or psychoactive drug?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappelletti, Simone; Piacentino, Daria; Daria, Piacentino; Sani, Gabriele; Aromatario, Mariarosaria

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine use is increasing worldwide. The underlying motivations are mainly concentration and memory enhancement and physical performance improvement. Coffee and caffeine-containing products affect the cardiovascular system, with their positive inotropic and chronotropic effects, and the central nervous system, with their locomotor activity stimulation and anxiogenic-like effects. Thus, it is of interest to examine whether these effects could be detrimental for health. Furthermore, caffeine abuse and dependence are becoming more and more common and can lead to caffeine intoxication, which puts individuals at risk for premature and unnatural death. The present review summarizes the main findings concerning caffeine's mechanisms of action (focusing on adenosine antagonism, intracellular calcium mobilization, and phosphodiesterases inhibition), use, abuse, dependence, intoxication, and lethal effects. It also suggests that the concepts of toxic and lethal doses are relative, since doses below the toxic and/or lethal range may play a causal role in intoxication or death. This could be due to caffeine's interaction with other substances or to the individuals' preexisting metabolism alterations or diseases.

  12. Performance pressure and caffeine both affect cognitive performance, but likely through independent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boere, Julia J; Fellinger, Lizz; Huizinga, Duncan J H; Wong, Sebastiaan F; Bijleveld, Erik

    2016-02-01

    A prevalent combination in daily life, performance pressure and caffeine intake have both been shown to impact people's cognitive performance. Here, we examined the possibility that pressure and caffeine affect cognitive performance via a shared pathway. In an experiment, participants performed a modular arithmetic task. Performance pressure and caffeine intake were orthogonally manipulated. Findings indicated that pressure and caffeine both negatively impacted performance. However, (a) pressure vs. caffeine affected performance on different trial types, and (b) there was no hint of an interactive effect. So, though the evidence is indirect, findings suggest that pressure and caffeine shape performance via distinct mechanisms, rather than a shared one.

  13. Caffeine induces CYP1A2 expression in rat hepatocytes but not in human hepatocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Vaynshteyn, David; Jeong, Hyunyoung

    2012-01-01

    Caffeine is the active constituent in coffee. Continual consumption of caffeine can lead to an attenuated response also known as tolerance. Results from rat studies have shown that caffeine is an inducer of CYP1A2, the enzyme responsible for caffeine’s metabolism. This suggests that CYP1A2 induction by caffeine may be in part responsible for caffeine tolerance. However, whether caffeine induces CYP1A2 expression in humans remains unknown. Our results from luciferase assays performed in HepG2 ...

  14. Chromosomal and Extrachromosomal Instability of the cyclin D2 Gene is Induced by Myc Overexpression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Mai

    1999-08-01

    Full Text Available We examined the expression of cyclins D1, D2, D3, and E in mouse B-lymphocytic tumors. Cyclin D2 mRNA was consistently elevated in plasmacytomas, which characteristically contain Myc-activating chromosome translocations and constitutive c-Myc mRNA and protein expression. We examined the nature of cyclin D2 overexpression in plasmacytomas and other tumors. Human and mouse tumor cell lines that exhibited c-Myc dysregulation displayed instability of the cyclin D2 gene, detected by Southern blot, fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH, and in extrachromosomal preparations (Hirt extracts. Cyclin D2 instability was not seen in cells with low levels of c-Myc protein. To unequivocally demonstrate a role of c-Myc in the instability of the cyclin D2 gene, a Myc-estrogen receptor chimera was activated in two mouse cell lines. After 3 to 4 days of Myc-ERTm activation, instability at the cyclin D2 locus was seen in the form of extrachromosomal elements, determined by FISH of metaphase and interphase nuclei and of purified extrachromosomal elements. At the same time points, Northern and Western blot analyses detected increased cyclin D2 mRNA and protein levels. These data suggest that Myc-induced genomic instability may contribute to neoplasia by increasing the levels of a cell cycle—regulating protein, cyclin D2, via intrachromosomal amplification of its gene or generation of extrachromosomal copies.

  15. Promoter de-methylation of cyclin D2 by sulforaphane in prostate cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsu Anna

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sulforaphane (SFN, an isothiocyanate derived from cruciferous vegetables, induces potent anti-proliferative effects in prostate cancer cells. One mechanism that may contribute to the anti-proliferative effects of SFN is the modulation of epigenetic marks, such as inhibition of histone deacetylase (HDAC enzymes. However, the effects of SFN on other common epigenetic marks such as DNA methylation are understudied. Promoter hyper-methylation of cyclin D2, a major regulator of cell cycle, is correlated with prostate cancer progression, and restoration of cyclin D2 expression exerts anti-proliferative effects on LnCap prostate cancer cells. Our study aimed to investigate the effects of SFN on DNA methylation status of cyclin D2 promoter, and how alteration in promoter methylation impacts cyclin D2 gene expression in LnCap cells. We found that SFN significantly decreased the expression of DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs, especially DNMT1 and DNMT3b. Furthermore, SFN significantly decreased methylation in cyclin D2 promoter regions containing c-Myc and multiple Sp1 binding sites. Reduced methlyation of cyclin D2 promoter corresponded to an increase in cyclin D2 transcript levels, suggesting that SFN may de-repress methylation-silenced cyclin D2 by impacting epigenetic pathways. Our results demonstrated the ability of SFN to epigenetically modulate cyclin D2 expression, and provide novel insights into the mechanisms by which SFN may regulate gene expression as a prostate cancer chemopreventive agent.

  16. Cyclin C stimulates β-cell proliferation in rat and human pancreatic β-cells

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Activation of pancreatic β-cell proliferation has been proposed as an approach to replace reduced functional β-cell mass in diabetes. Quiescent fibroblasts exit from G0 (quiescence) to G1 through pRb phosphorylation mediated by cyclin C/cdk3 complexes. Overexpression of cyclin D1, D2, D3, or cyclin E induces pancreatic β-cell proliferation. We hypothesized that cyclin C overexpression would induce β-cell proliferation through G0 exit, thus being a potential therapeutic target to recover funct...

  17. Potential gene regulatory role for cyclin D3 in muscle cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fathima Athar; Veena K Parnaik

    2015-09-01

    Cyclin D3 is important for muscle development and regeneration, and is involved in post-mitotic arrest of muscle cells. Cyclin D3 also has cell-cycle-independent functions such as regulation of specific genes in other tissues. Ectopic expression of cyclin D3 in myoblasts, where it is normally undetectable, promotes muscle gene expression and faster differentiation kinetics upon serum depletion. In the present study, we investigated the mechanistic role of cyclin D3 in muscle gene regulation. We initially showed by mutational analysis that a stable and functional cyclin D3 was required for promoting muscle differentiation. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, we demonstrated that expression of cyclin D3 in undifferentiated myoblasts altered histone epigenetic marks at promoters of muscle-specific genes like MyoD, Pax7, myogenin and muscle creatine kinase but not non-muscle genes. Cyclin D3 expression also reduced the mRNA levels of certain epigenetic modifier genes. Our data suggest that epigenetic modulation of muscle-specific genes in cyclin-D3-expressing myoblasts may be responsible for faster differentiation kinetics upon serum depletion. Our results have implications for a regulatory role for cyclin D3 in muscle-specific gene activation.

  18. Translokin (Cep57) interacts with cyclin D1 and prevents its nuclear accumulation in quiescent fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Miró, Maria; Colomina, Neus; Fernández, Rita M H; Garí, Eloi; Gallego, Carme; Aldea, Martí

    2011-05-01

    Nuclear accumulation of cyclin D1 because of altered trafficking or degradation is thought to contribute directly to neoplastic transformation and growth. Mechanisms of cyclin D1 localization in S phase have been studied in detail, but its control during exit from the cell cycle and quiescence is poorly understood. Here we report that translokin (Tlk), a microtubule-associated protein also termed Cep57, interacts with cyclin D1 and controls its nucleocytoplasmic distribution in quiescent cells. Tlk binds to regions of cyclin D1 also involved in binding to cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (Cdk4), and a fraction of cyclin D1 associates to the juxtanuclear Tlk network in the cell. Downregulation of Tlk levels results in undue nuclear accumulation of cyclin D1 and increased Cdk4-dependent phosphorylation of pRB under quiescence conditions. In turn, overexpression of Tlk prevents proper cyclin D1 accumulation in the nucleus of proliferating cells in an interaction-dependent manner, inhibits Cdk4-dependent phosphorylation of pRB and hinders cell cycle progression to S phase. We propose that the Tlk acts as a key negative regulator in the pathway that drives nuclear import of cyclin D1, thus contributing to prevent pRB inactivation and to maintain cellular quiescence.

  19. SUMO modification of Stra13 is required for repression of cyclin D1 expression and cellular growth arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaju Wang

    Full Text Available Stra13, a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor is involved in myriad biological functions including cellular growth arrest, differentiation and senescence. However, the mechanisms by which its transcriptional activity and function are regulated remain unclear. In this study, we provide evidence that post-translational modification of Stra13 by Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO dramatically potentiates its ability to transcriptionally repress cyclin D1 and mediate G(1 cell cycle arrest in fibroblast cells. Mutation of SUMO acceptor lysines 159 and 279 located in the C-terminal repression domain has no impact on nuclear localization; however, it abrogates association with the co-repressor histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1, attenuates repression of cyclin D1, and prevents Stra13-mediated growth suppression. HDAC1, which promotes cellular proliferation and cell cycle progression, antagonizes Stra13 sumoylation-dependent growth arrest. Our results uncover an unidentified regulatory axis between Stra13 and HDAC1 in progression through the G(1/S phase of the cell cycle, and provide new mechanistic insights into regulation of Stra13-mediated transcriptional repression by sumoylation.

  20. Caffeine and cognitive decline in elderly women at high vascular risk. : Caffeine and cognition in high-risk women

    OpenAIRE

    Vercambre, Marie-Noël; Berr, Claudine; Ritchie, Karen,; Kang, Jae,

    2013-01-01

    International audience; BACKGROUND: Persons with vascular disorders are at higher risk of cognitive decline. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether caffeine may be associated with cognitive decline reduction in elderly at high vascular risk. METHODS: We included 2,475 women aged 65+ years in the Women's Antioxidant Cardiovascular Study, a randomized trial of antioxidants and B vitamins for cardiovascular disease secondary prevention. We ascertained regular caffeine intake at baseline (1995-1996) usi...

  1. Quarkonium suppression

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Petreczky

    2003-04-01

    I discuss quarkonium suppression in equilibrated strongly interacting matter. After a brief review of basic features of quarkonium production I discuss the application of recent lattice data on the heavy quark potential to the problem of quarkonium dissociation as well as the problem of direct lattice determination of quarkonium properties in finite temperature lattice QCD.

  2. By using tissue chip technique to study the expression of p27 and cyclinE in breast carcinoma%采用组织芯片技术研究乳腺癌中p27和cyclinE的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    戴艳枝; 刘勇; 袁晟; 邓宇

    2003-01-01

    To study the expressions of p27 ,cyclinE and analysis its meaning in breast carcinoma. Methods By using tissue chip technique creating 80 cases breast carcinoma tissue chip. at the same time using the S-P immunohis-tochemical methods, the expressions of p27 and cyclinE in breast carcinoma tissue chip was studied.Results The positive rates of p27 and cyclinE were 38.8% and 52.5% in 80 eases breast carcinoma respectively. A significant correlation was found between the lowexpression of p27, overexpression of cyclinE and metastasis of lymph node in breast carcinoma. A simaificant correlation was found be-tween the lowexpression of p27 and overexpression of cyclinE in breast carcinoma. Conclusion The expression of p27 and cyclinE might be considered to be a reference indicator for prognosis of breast carcinoma. The lowexpression of p27 has an ability to effect the overexpression of cyclinE in breast carcinoma. It is feasible to utilize tissue chip for a rapid, economic and accurate screening of clinical tissue specimens on a large scale.

  3. Concurrent Deletion of Cyclin E1 and Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 2 in Hepatocytes Inhibits DNA Replication and Liver Regeneration in Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Hu W; Nevzorova YA; Haas U; Moro N.; Sicinski P; Geng Y; Barbacid M; Trautwein C; Liedtke C.

    2014-01-01

    The liver has a strong regenerative capacity. After injury, quiescent hepatocytes can reenter the mitotic cell cycle to restore tissue homeostasis. This G0/G1-S cell-cycle transition of primed hepatocytes is regulated by complexes of cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) with E-type cyclins (CcnE1 or CcnE2). However, single genetic ablation of either E-cyclin or Cdk2 does not affect overall liver regeneration. Here, we systematically investigated the contribution of CcnE1, CcnE2, and Cdk2 for live...

  4. Caffeine exposure during rat brain development causes memory impairment in a sex selective manner that is offset by caffeine consumption throughout life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardais, Ana Paula; Rocha, Andréia S; Borges, Maurício Felisberto; Fioreze, Gabriela T; Sallaberry, Cássia; Mioranzza, Sabrina; Nunes, Fernanda; Pagnussat, Natália; Botton, Paulo Henrique S; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Porciúncula, Lisiane de Oliveira

    2016-04-15

    Caffeine is the psychostimulant most consumed worldwide. In moderate doses, it affords a beneficial effect in adults and upon aging, but has a deleterious effect during brain development. We now tested if caffeine consumption by rats (0.1, 0.3, 1.0 g/L in the drinking water, only during active cycle and weekdays) during adulthood could revert the potentially negative effects of caffeine during early life. Thus, we compared caffeine intake starting 15 days before mating and lasting either up to weaning (development) or up to adulthood, on behavior and synaptic proteins in male and female rats. Recognition memory was impaired only in female rats receiving caffeine (0.3 and 1.0 g/L) during development, coincident with increased proBDNF and unchanged BDNF levels in the hippocampus. Caffeine in both treatment regimens caused hyperlocomotion only in male rats, whereas anxiety-related behavior was attenuated in both sexes by caffeine (1.0 g/L) throughout life. Both caffeine treatment regimens decreased GFAP (as an astrocyte marker) and SNAP-25 (as a nerve terminals marker) in the hippocampus from male rats. TrkB receptor was decreased in the hippocampus from both sexes and treatment regimens. These findings revealed that caffeine intake during a specific time window of brain development promotes sex-dependent behavioral outcomes related to modification in BDNF signaling. Furthermore, caffeine throughout life can overcome the deleterious effects of caffeine on recognition memory during brain development in female rats.

  5. Caffeine induces CYP1A2 expression in rat hepatocytes but not in human hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaynshteyn, David; Jeong, Hyunyoung

    2012-06-01

    Caffeine is the active constituent in coffee. Continual consumption of caffeine can lead to an attenuated response also known as tolerance. Results from rat studies have shown that caffeine is an inducer of CYP1A2, the enzyme responsible for caffeine's metabolism. This suggests that CYP1A2 induction by caffeine may be in part responsible for caffeine tolerance. However, whether caffeine induces CYP1A2 expression in humans remains unknown. Our results from luciferase assays performed in HepG2 cells showed that caffeine is not an activator of the aromatic hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a major transcription factor involved in upregulation of CYP1A2. Furthermore, caffeine did not induce CYP1A2 expression in primary human hepatocytes at a concentration attained by ordinary coffee drinking. On the other hand, caffeine enhanced CYP1A2 expression by 9-fold in rat hepatocytes. Our results suggest that caffeine from ordinary coffee drinking does not induce CYP1A2 expression in humans and that factors other than CYP1A2 induction by caffeine likely contribute to development of caffeine tolerance in humans.

  6. MicroRNA-520b inhibits growth of hepatoma cells by targeting MEKK2 and cyclin D1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiying Zhang

    Full Text Available Growing evidence indicates that the deregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs contributes to the tumorigenesis. We previously revealed that microRNA-520b (miR-520b was involved in the complement attack and migration of breast cancer cells. In this report, we show that miR-520b is an important miRNA in the development of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Our data showed that the expression levels of miR-520b were significantly reduced in clinical HCC tissues and hepatoma cell lines. We observed that the introduction of miR-520b dramatically suppressed the growth of hepatoma cells by colony formation assays, 5-ethynyl-2-deoxyuridine (EdU incorporation assays and 3-(4,5- dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assays. Moreover, ectopic expression of miR-520b was able to inhibit the growth of hepatoma cells in nude mice. Further studies revealed that the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 2 (MEKK2 and cyclin D1 were two of direct target genes of miR-520b. Silencing of MEKK2 or cyclin D1 was able to inhibit the growth of hepatoma cells in vitro and in vivo, which is consistent with the effect of miR-520b overexpression on the growth of hepatoma cells. In addition, miR-520b significantly decreased the phosphorylation levels of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (p-JNK, a downstream effector of MEKK2 or retinoblastoma (p-Rb, a downstream effector of cyclin D1. In conclusion, miR-520b is able to inhibit the growth of hepatoma cells by targeting MEKK2 or cyclin D1 in vitro and in vivo. Our findings provide new insights into the role of miR-520b in the development of HCC, and implicate the potential application of miR-520b in cancer therapy.

  7. Cyclin-dependent kinase 2 is an ideal target for ovary tumors with elevated cyclin E1 expression

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Liu; Fang, Dongdong; Chen, Huijun; Lu, Yiyu; Dong, Zheng; Ding, Han-Fei; Jing, Qing; Su, Shi-bing; Huang, Shuang

    2015-01-01

    CCNE1 gene amplification is present in 15-20% ovary tumor specimens. Here, we showed that Cyclin E1 (CCNE1) was overexpressed in 30% of established ovarian cancer cell lines. We also showed that CCNE1 was stained positive in over 40% of primary ovary tumor specimens regardless of their histological types while CCNE1 staining was either negative or low in normal ovary and benign ovary tumor tissues. However, the status of CCNE1 overexpression was not associated with the tumorigenic potential o...

  8. The L-type cyclin CYL-1 and the heat-shock-factor HSF-1 are required for heat-shock-induced protein expression in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajdu-Cronin, Yvonne M; Chen, Wen J; Sternberg, Paul W

    2004-12-01

    In a screen for suppressors of activated GOA-1 (Galpha(o)) under the control of the hsp-16.2 heat-shock promoter, we identified three genetic loci that affected heat-shock-induced GOA-1 expression. The cyl-1 mutants are essentially wild type in appearance, while hsf-1 and sup-45 mutants have egg-laying defects. The hsf-1 mutation also causes a temperature-sensitive developmental arrest, and hsf-1 mutants have decreased life span. Western analysis indicated that mutations in all three loci suppressed the activated GOA-1 transgene by decreasing its expression. Heat-shock-induced expression of hsp-16.2 mRNA was reduced in cyl-1 mutants and virtually eliminated in hsf-1 and sup-45 mutants, as compared to wild-type expression. The mutations could also suppress other transgenes under heat-shock control. cyl-1 and sup-45, but not hsf-1, mutations suppressed a defect caused by a transgene not under heat-shock control, suggesting a role in general transcription or a post-transcriptional aspect of gene expression. hsf-1 encodes the C. elegans homolog of the human heat-shock factor HSF1, and cyl-1 encodes a cyclin most similar to cyclin L. We believe HSF-1 acts in heat-shock-inducible transcription and CYL-1 acts more generally in gene expression.

  9. Activation of Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 Is a Consequence of Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixia Ye

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 is similar to other Cdks but is activated during cell differentiation and cell death rather than cell division. Since activation of Cdk5 has been reported in many situations leading to cell death, we attempted to determine if it was required for any form of cell death. We found that Cdk5 is activated during apoptotic deaths and that the activation can be detected even when the cells continue to secondary necrosis. This activation can occur in the absence of Bim, calpain, or neutral cathepsins. The kinase is typically activated by p25, derived from p35 by calpain-mediated cleavage, but inhibition of calpain does not affect cell death or the activation of Cdk5. Likewise, RNAi-forced suppression of the synthesis of Cdk5 does not affect the incidence or kinetics of cell death. We conclude that Cdk5 is activated as a consequence of metabolic changes that are common to many forms of cell death. Thus its activation suggests processes during cell death that will be interesting or important to understand, but activation of Cdk5 is not necessary for cells to die.

  10. Cip/Kip cyclin-dependent protein kinase inhibitors and the road to polyploidy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DePamphilis Melvin L

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs play a central role in the orderly transition from one phase of the eukaryotic mitotic cell division cycle to the next. In this context, p27Kip1 (one of the CIP/KIP family of CDK specific inhibitors in mammals or its functional analogue in other eukarya prevents a premature transition from G1 to S-phase. Recent studies have revealed that expression of a second member of this family, p57Kip2, is induced as trophoblast stem (TS cells differentiate into trophoblast giant (TG cells. p57 then inhibits CDK1 activity, an enzyme essential for initiating mitosis, thereby triggering genome endoreduplication (multiple S-phases without an intervening mitosis. Expression of p21Cip1, the third member of this family, is also induced in during differentiation of TS cells into TG cells where it appears to play a role in suppressing the DNA damage response pathway. Given the fact that p21 and p57 are unique to mammals, the question arises as to whether one or both of these proteins are responsible for the induction and maintenance of polyploidy during mammalian development.

  11. Small Beneficial Effect of Caffeinated Energy Drink Ingestion on Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Nora B; Hardy, Michelle A; Millard-Stafford, Mindy L; Warren, Gordon L

    2016-07-01

    Collier, NB, Hardy, MA, Millard-Stafford, ML, and Warren, GL. Small beneficial effect of caffeinated energy drink ingestion on strength. J Strength Cond Res 30(7): 1862-1870, 2016-Because caffeine ingestion has been found to increase muscle strength, our aim was to determine whether caffeine when combined with other potential ergogenic ingredients, such as those in commercial energy drinks, would have a similar effect. Fifteen young healthy subjects were used in a double-blind, repeated-measures experimental design. Each subject performed 3 trials, ingesting either a caffeinated energy drink, an uncaffeinated version of the drink, or a placebo drink. The interpolated twitch procedure was used to assess maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) strength, electrically evoked strength, and percent muscle activation during MVIC of the knee extensors both before and after drink ingestion, and after a fatiguing bout of contractions; electromyographic (EMG) amplitude of the knee extensors during MVIC was also assessed. The mean (±SE) change in MVIC strength from before to after drink ingestion was significantly greater for the caffeinated energy drink compared with placebo [+5.0 (±1.7) vs. -0.5 (±1.5)%] and the difference between the drinks remained after fatigue (p = 0.015); the strength changes for the uncaffeinated energy drink were not significantly different from those of the other 2 drinks at any time. There was no significant effect of drink type on the changes in electrically evoked strength, percent muscle activation, and EMG from before to after drink ingestion. This study indicates that a caffeinated energy drink can increase MVIC strength but the effect is modest and the strength increase cannot be attributed to increased muscle activation. Whether the efficacy of energy drinks can be attributed solely to caffeine remains unclear.

  12. Caffeine attenuates scopolamine-induced memory impairment in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, W; Hogervorst, E; Leboux, R; Verhey, F; van Praag, H; Jolles, J

    1995-11-01

    Caffeine consumption can be beneficial for cognitive functioning. Although caffeine is widely recognized as a mild CNS stimulant drug, the most important consequence of its adenosine antagonism is cholinergic stimulation, which might lead to improvement of higher cognitive functions, particularly memory. In this study, the scopolamine model of amnesia was used to test the cholinergic effects of caffeine, administered as three cups of coffee. Subjects were 16 healthy volunteers who received 250 mg caffeine and 2 mg nicotine separately, in a placebo-controlled double-blind cross-over design. Compared to placebo, nicotine attenuated the scopolamine-induced impairment of storage in short-term memory and attenuated the scopolamine-induced slowing of speed of short-term memory scanning. Nicotine also attenuated the scopolamine-induced slowing of reaction time in a response competition task. Caffeine attenuated the scopolamine-induced impairment of free recall from short- and long-term memory, quality and speed of retrieval from long-term memory in a word learning task, and other cognitive and non-cognitive measures, such as perceptual sensitivity in visual search, reading speed, and rate of finger-tapping. On the basis of these results it was concluded that caffeine possesses cholinergic cognition enhancing properties. Caffeine could be used as a control drug in studies using the scopolamine paradigm and possibly also in other experimental studies of cognitive enhancers, as the effects of a newly developed cognition enhancing drug should at least be superior to the effects of three cups of coffee.

  13. Caffeine, Is it effective for prevention of postdural puncture headache in young adult patients?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Ragab

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: It seems that the incidence of postdural puncture headache decreases in those patients who received caffeine sodium benzoate. The article can potentially help clinicians to use caffeine as an effective drug for prevention of PDPH.

  14. Caffeinated coffee enhances co-operative behavior in the Mixed Motive Game in healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Wai S; Chan, Chi Choi S; Shiu, Shun Yan K; Chung, Pik Yee A; Cheng, Shuk Han

    2009-02-01

    Caffeinated drinks are commonly consumed in social gatherings. However, their effects on social behavior remain unclear. The present study examined the effects of caffeinated coffee on antidepressant-related co-operative behavior. Seventy-seven low-caffeine users took part in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over study of single dose of caffeinated coffee (150 mg caffeine) and decaffeinated coffee (9 mg caffeine) with at least a 3-day washout period. In each session, participants were asked to imagine a fictitious person and play the Mixed Motive Game with that person 45 min after coffee consumption. Heart rate, blood pressure, and state moods were measured at baseline and at 45 min post-coffee consumption. After caffeinated coffee, participants exhibited significantly higher blood pressure. They also allocated significantly fewer scores to themselves and sent significantly more sadness message during the game. These results suggest that caffeinated coffee may help to improve social support and depressive symptoms.

  15. A conserved cyclin-binding domain determines functional interplay between anaphase-promoting complex-Cdh1 and cyclin A-Cdk2 during cell cycle progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lukas, C; Kramer, E R; Peters, J M;

    2001-01-01

    Periodic activity of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC) ubiquitin ligase determines progression through multiple cell cycle transitions by targeting cell cycle regulators for destruction. At the G(1)/S transition, phosphorylation-dependent dissociation of the Cdh1-activating subunit inhibits...... the APC, allowing stabilization of proteins required for subsequent cell cycle progression. Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) that initiate and maintain Cdh1 phosphorylation have been identified. However, the issue of which cyclin-CDK complexes are involved has been a matter of debate, and the mechanism...... of how cyclin-CDKs interact with APC subunits remains unresolved. Here we substantiate the evidence that mammalian cyclin A-Cdk2 prevents unscheduled APC reactivation during S phase by demonstrating its periodic interaction with Cdh1 at the level of endogenous proteins. Moreover, we identified...

  16. Regulation of the Candida albicans Hypha-Inducing Transcription Factor Ume6 by the CDK1 Cyclins Cln3 and Hgc1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendelsohn, Sigal; Pinsky, Mariel; Weissman, Ziva

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ability to switch between proliferation as yeast cells and development into hyphae is a hallmark of Candida albicans. The switch to hyphal morphogenesis depends on external inducing conditions, but its efficiency is augmented in stationary-phase cells. Ume6, a transcription factor that is itself transcriptionally induced under hypha-promoting conditions, is both necessary and sufficient for hyphal morphogenesis. We found that Ume6 is regulated posttranslationally by the cell cycle kinase Cdc28/Cdk1, which reduces Ume6 activity via different mechanisms using different cyclins. Together with the cyclin Hgc1, Cdk1 promotes degradation of Ume6 via the SCFCDC4 ubiquitin ligase. Since HGC1 is a key transcriptional target of Ume6, this results in a negative-feedback loop between Hgc1 and Ume6. In addition, we found that Cln3, a G1 cyclin that is essential for cell cycle progression and yeast proliferation, suppresses hyphal morphogenesis and that Cln3 suppresses Ume6 activity both in the heterologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae system and in C. albicans itself. This activity of Cln3 may provide the basis for the antagonistic relationship between yeast proliferation and hyphal development in C. albicans. IMPORTANCE The yeast to hypha (mold) morphogenetic switch of Candida albicans plays a role in its virulence and constitutes a diagnostic trait for this organism, the most prevalent systemic fungal pathogen in industrialized countries. It has long been known that hyphae are most efficiently induced from stationary cultures. Here, a molecular basis for this observation is provided. The G1 cyclin Cln3, an essential promoter of yeast proliferation, was found to suppress hyphal induction. Suppression of hyphal induction is achieved by inhibition of the activity of the central activator of hyphal morphogenesis, the transcription factor Ume6. Thus, levels of Cln3 control the switch between proliferation of C. albicans as individual yeast cells and development into

  17. Cyclin A-Cdk2 Phosphorylates BH3 only Protein Bad in vitro and in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Kan; CHEN Yue; LI Jing-hua; ZHAN Zhuo; WU Yong-ge; KONG Wei; JIN Ying-hua

    2007-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that Cyclin A-Cdk2 activity is required in the apoptosis process induced by various stimuli. To determine a specific substrate of Cyclin A-Cdk2 for apoptosis, in this study, we carried out anin vitro kinase assay using immunoprecipitated complex Cyclin A-Cdk2 as an enzyme source, and recombinant protein GST-Bad as a substrate. Our study showed that Bad was clearly phosphorylated by Cyclin A-Cdk2 in vitro. To examine whether protein Bad can also be phosphorylated by Cyclin A-Cdk2 kinase in vivo, we transiently overexpressed protein Bad with Cyclin A or Cdk2-dn, a dominant negative version of Cdk2, in Hela cells and determined the phosphorylation status of protein Bad. The test showed that protein Bad was clearly phosphorylated in Cyclin A overexpressed cells,but not in Cdk2-dn or mock transfectent. Moreover, etoposide also caused the phosphorylation of endogenetic Bad. In conclusion, here we provide first time evidence that protein Bad can be a substrate of Cyclin A-Cdk2 apoptosis for in vitro and in vivo.

  18. E-type cyclins modulate telomere integrity in mammalian male meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manterola, Marcia; Sicinski, Piotr; Wolgemuth, Debra J

    2016-06-01

    We have shown that E-type cyclins are key regulators of mammalian male meiosis. Depletion of cyclin E2 reduced fertility in male mice due to meiotic defects, involving abnormal pairing and synapsis, unrepaired DNA, and loss of telomere structure. These defects were exacerbated by additional loss of cyclin E1, and complete absence of both E-type cyclins produces a meiotic catastrophe. Here, we investigated the involvement of E-type cyclins in maintaining telomere integrity in male meiosis. Spermatocytes lacking cyclin E2 and one E1 allele (E1+/-E2-/-) displayed a high rate of telomere abnormalities but can progress to pachytene and diplotene stages. We show that their telomeres exhibited an aberrant DNA damage repair response during pachynema and that the shelterin complex proteins TRF2 and RAP2 were significantly decreased in the proximal telomeres. Moreover, the insufficient level of these proteins correlated with an increase of γ-H2AX foci in the affected telomeres and resulted in telomere associations involving TRF1 and telomere detachment in later prophase-I stages. These results suggest that E-type cyclins are key modulators of telomere integrity during meiosis by, at least in part, maintaining the balance of shelterin complex proteins, and uncover a novel role of E-type cyclins in regulating chromosome structure during male meiosis.

  19. Regulation of the retinoblastoma protein-related p107 by G1 cyclin complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijersbergen, R.L.; Carlée, L.; Kerkhoven, R.M.; Bernards, R.A.

    1995-01-01

    The orderly progression through the cell cycle is mediated by the sequential activation of several cyclin/cyclin-dependent kinase (cdk) complexes. These kinases phosphorylate a number of cellular substrates, among which is the product of the retinoblastoma gene, pRb. Phosphorylation of pRb in late G

  20. Elevated cyclin E level in human clear cell renal cell carcinoma: possible causes and consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nauman, Alicja; Turowska, Olga; Poplawski, Piotr; Master, Adam; Tanski, Zbigniew; Puzianowska-Kuznicka, Monika

    2007-01-01

    The expression of cyclin E gene (CCNE) in relation to the expression of its major regulatory protein, E2F1, was examined in clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCC). We show that the overexpression of E2F1 is accompanied by the significant increase of the mean amounts of cyclin E mRNA, as well as of total cyclin E protein and its low molecular weight forms in cancer tissues as compared to peritumoral controls. A significant increase of the mean amount of total cyclin E was found in peritumoral tissues compared to cancer-free kidneys, suggesting that cancer cells might secrete factors having a profound influence on the metabolism of neighbouring tissues. A significant, positive correlations between E2F1 protein and total cyclin E mRNA, as well as between E2F1 protein and full length cyclin E protein were found in cancer-free kidneys and in peritumoral tissues, but not in ccRCCs. The overexpression of cyclin E positively correlated with the decreasing degree of tumor differentiation, implicating a role for cyclin E in the promotion of tumorigenesis.

  1. The influence of a CYP1A2 polymorphism on the ergogenic effects of caffeine

    OpenAIRE

    Womack Christopher J; Saunders Michael J; Bechtel Marta K; Bolton David J; Martin Michael; Luden Nicholas D; Dunham Wade; Hancock Melyssa

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Although caffeine supplementation improves performance, the ergogenic effect is variable. The cause(s) of this variability are unknown. A (C/A) single nucleotide polymorphism at intron 1 of the cytochrome P450 (CYP1A2) gene influences caffeine metabolism and clinical outcomes from caffeine ingestion. The purpose of this study was to determine if this polymorphism influences the ergogenic effect of caffeine supplementation. Methods Thirty-five trained male cyclists (age = 2...

  2. Cyclin D1 fine-tunes the neurogenic output of embryonic retinal progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Choi Yoon

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Maintaining the correct balance of proliferation versus differentiation in retinal progenitor cells (RPCs is essential for proper development of the retina. The cell cycle regulator cyclin D1 is expressed in RPCs, and mice with a targeted null allele at the cyclin D1 locus (Ccnd1-/- have microphthalmia and hypocellular retinas, the latter phenotype attributed to reduced RPC proliferation and increased photoreceptor cell death during the postnatal period. How cyclin D1 influences RPC behavior, especially during the embryonic period, is unclear. Results In this study, we show that embryonic RPCs lacking cyclin D1 progress through the cell cycle at a slower rate and exit the cell cycle at a faster rate. Consistent with enhanced cell cycle exit, the relative proportions of cell types born in the embryonic period, such as retinal ganglion cells and photoreceptor cells, are increased. Unexpectedly, cyclin D1 deficiency decreases the proportions of other early born retinal neurons, namely horizontal cells and specific amacrine cell types. We also found that the laminar positioning of horizontal cells and other cell types is altered in the absence of cyclin D1. Genetically replacing cyclin D1 with cyclin D2 is not efficient at correcting the phenotypes due to the cyclin D1 deficiency, which suggests the D-cyclins are not fully redundant. Replacement with cyclin E or inactivation of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 restores the balance of RPCs and retinal cell types to more normal distributions, which suggests that regulation of the retinoblastoma pathway is an important function for cyclin D1 during embryonic retinal development. Conclusion Our findings show that cyclin D1 has important roles in RPC cell cycle regulation and retinal histogenesis. The reduction in the RPC population due to a longer cell cycle time and to an enhanced rate of cell cycle exit are likely to be the primary factors driving retinal hypocellularity

  3. A single fission yeast mitotic cyclin B p34cdc2 kinase promotes both S-phase and mitosis in the absence of G1 cyclins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, D L; Nurse, P

    1996-02-15

    Deletion of the fission yeast mitotic B-type cyclin gene cdc13 causes cells to undergo successive rounds of DNA replication. We have used a strain which expresses cdc13 conditionally to investigate re-replication. Activity of Start genes cdc2 and cdc10 is necessary and p34cdc2 kinase is active in re-replicating cells. We tested to see whether other cyclins were required for re-replication using cdc13delta. Further deletion of cig1 and puc1 had no effect, but deletion of cig2/cyc17 caused a severe delay in re-replication. Deletion of cig1 and cig2/cyc17 together abolished re-replication completely and cells arrested in G1. This, and analysis of the temperature sensitive cdc13-117 mutant, suggests that cdc13 can effectively substitute for the G1 cyclin activity of cig2/cyc17. We have characterized p56cdc13 activity and find evidence that in the absence of G1 cyclins, S-phase is delayed until the mitotic p34cdc2-p56cdc13 kinase is sufficiently active. These data suggest that a single oscillation of p34cdc2 kinase activity provided by a single B-type cyclin can promote ordered progression into both DNA replication and mitosis, and that the level of cyclin-dependent kinase activity may act as a master regulator dictating whether cells undergo S-phase or mitosis.

  4. Effects of Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors in Combination with Taxol on Expression of Cyclin D1 and Ki-67 in a Xenograft Model of Ovarian Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Wan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate the effects of cyclooxygenase (COX inhibitors in combination with taxol on the expression of cyclin D1 and Ki-67 in human ovarian SKOV-3 carcinoma cells xenograft-bearing mice. The animals were treated with 100 mg/kg celecoxib (a COX-2 selective inhibitor alone, 3 mg/kg SC-560 (a COX-1 selective inhibitor alone by gavage twice a day, 20 mg/kg taxol alone by intraperitoneally (i.p. once a week, or celecoxib/taxol, SC-560/celecoxib, SC-560/taxol or SC-560/celecoxib/taxol, for three weeks. To test the mechanism of the combination treatment, the index of cell proliferation and expression of cyclin D1 in tumor tissues were determined by immunohistochemistry. The mean tumor volume in the treated groups was significantly lower than control (p < 0.05, and in the three-drug combination group, tumor volume was reduced by 58.27% (p < 0.01; downregulated cell proliferation and cyclin D1 expression were statistically significant compared with those of the control group (both p < 0.01. This study suggests that the effects of COX selective inhibitors on the growth of tumors and decreased cell proliferation in a SKOV-3 cells mouse xenograft model were similar to taxol. The three-drug combination showing a better decreasing tendency in growth-inhibitory effect during the experiment may have been caused by suppressing cyclin D1 expression.

  5. Gain of 11q/cyclin D1 overexpression is an essential early step in skin cancer development and causes abnormal tissue organization and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnworth, B; Popp, S; Stark, H-J; Steinkraus, V; Bröcker, E B; Hartschuh, W; Birek, C; Boukamp, P

    2006-07-27

    Non-melanoma skin cancers, in particular keratoacanthomas (KAs) and squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), have become highly frequent tumor types especially in immune-suppressed transplant patients. Nevertheless, little is known about essential genetic changes. As a paradigm of 'early' changes, that is, changes still compatible with tumor regression, we studied KAs by comparative genomic hybridization and show that gain of chromosome 11q is not only one of the most frequent aberration (8/18), but in four tumors also the only aberration. Furthermore, 11q gain correlated with amplification of the cyclin D1 locus (10/14), as determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization, and overexpression of cyclin D1 protein (25/31), as detected by immunohistochemistry. For unraveling the functional consequence, we overexpressed cyclin D1 in HaCaT skin keratinocytes. These cells only gained little growth advantage in conventional and in organotypic co-cultures. However, although the control vector-transfected cells formed a well-stratified and orderly differentiated epidermis-like epithelium, they showed deregulation of tissue architecture with an altered localization of proliferation and impaired differentiation. The most severe phenotype was seen in a clone that additionally upregulated cdk4 and p21. These cells lacked terminal differentiation, exhibited a more autonomous growth in vitro and in vivo and even formed tumors in two injection sites with a growth pattern resembling that of human KAs. Thus, our results identify 11q13 gain/cyclin D1 overexpression as an important step in KA formation and point to a function that exceeds its known role in proliferation by disrupting tissue organization and thereby allowing abnormal growth.

  6. D-type cyclins in adult human testis and testicular cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartkova, J; Rajpert-de Meyts, E; Skakkebaek, N E

    1999-01-01

    on immunohistochemical and immunochemical analysis of human adult testis and 32 testicular tumours to examine the differential expression and abundance of cyclins D1, D2, and D3 in relation to cell type, proliferation, differentiation, and malignancy. In normal testis, the cell type-restricted expression patterns were...... D2 but not D1 or D3, while the invasive testicular tumours showed variable positivity for cyclins D2 and D3, but rarely D1. An unexpected correlation with differentiation rather than proliferation was found particularly for cyclin D3 in teratomas, a conceptually significant observation confirmed...... by massive up-regulation of cyclin D3 in the human teratocarcinoma cell line NTera2/D1 induced to differentiate along the neuronal lineage. These results suggest a possible involvement of cyclin D2 in the early stages of testicular oncogenesis and the striking examples of proliferation-independent expression...

  7. Influence of caffeine on blood pressure and platelet aggregation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Wilson S. Cavalcante

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Studies have demonstrated that methylxanthines, such as caffeine, are A1 and A2 adenosine receptor antagonists found in the brain, heart, lungs, peripheral vessels, and platelets. Considering the high consumption of products with caffeine in their composition, in Brazil and throughout the rest of the world, the authors proposed to observe the effects of this substance on blood pressure and platelet aggregation. METHODS: Thirteen young adults, ranging from 21 to 27 years of age, participated in this study. Each individual took 750mg/day of caffeine (250mg tid, over a period of seven days. The effects on blood pressure were analyzed through the pressor test with handgrip, and platelet aggregation was analyzed using adenosine diphosphate, collagen, and adrenaline. RESULTS: Diastolic pressure showed a significant increase 24 hours after the first intake (p<0.05. This effect, however, disappeared in the subsequent days. The platelet aggregation tests did not reveal statistically significant alterations, at any time during the study. CONCLUSION: The data suggest that caffeine increases diastolic blood pressure at the beginning of caffeine intake. This hypertensive effect disappears with chronic use. The absence of alterations in platelet aggregation indicates the need for larger randomized studies.

  8. Graphene platforms for the detection of caffeine in real samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khoo, Weslie Yu Heng; Pumera, Martin; Bonanni, Alessandra, E-mail: a.bonanni@ntu.edu.sg

    2013-12-04

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Commercial caffeine was detected on different chemically modified graphenes. •Electrochemically reduced graphene (ERGO) provided the best performance. •ERGO was then employed for the detection of caffeine in real samples. -- Abstract: The analysis of food components is of high importance due to food safety and security. Here the electrochemical detection of caffeine was performed on different chemically modified graphene (CMG) surfaces carrying diverse amount of defects and oxygen functionalities. The analytical performances of graphite oxide (GPO), graphene oxide (GO), and electrochemically reduced graphene oxide (ERGO) were compared for the first time for the detection of caffeine. It was found that ERGO showed the most favourable analytical parameters, such as lower oxidation potential, sensitivity, linearity and reproducibility of the response. ERGO was then used for the analysis of real samples. Caffeine levels of soluble coffee, teas and energetic drinks were measured without the need of any sample pre-treatment. Our findings are very important to gain more insight into the applicability of different graphene materials to real samples for sense-and-act analysis.

  9. Impact of Caffeine on Weight Changes Due to Ketotifen Administration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bohlool Habibi Asl

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Prescription of ketotifen as an effective antihistamine in asthma and allergic conditions is associated with side effect of weight gain. Caffeine is an agent which increases thermogenesis and improves energy expenditure and also effective in asthma. The aim of current study was to evaluate caffeine impact in reducing weight gain side effect of ketotifen. Methods: Male mice at the weight limit of 20-30 g in 8 groups were randomly chosen and injected following drug dosages for 45 days intraperitoneally: control group (normal saline 10 ml/kg, three groups of ketotifen (4, 8, 16 mg/kg, three groups of caffeine (4, 8, 16 mg/kg and one group of ketotifen (4 mg/kg in combination with caffeine (4 mg/kg. Weight changes have been recorded and assessed every 3 days for 45 days. Results: The results showed that in all dosages of the two drugs, significant weight loss occurred in comparison with the control group. Conclusion: The effect of caffeine on weight loss according to our results, matches with human studies, while ketotifen contradictory to our assumption, resulted in weight loss which probably was related to the difference in metabolic pathways in mice and humans, or maybe the used doses of ketotifen in this study were insufficient to reduce TNF-α production or influence in serotonin release and be effective on appetite or weight gain.

  10. Do energy drinks contain active components other than caffeine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Tom M; Lieberman, Harris R

    2012-12-01

    Energy drinks (EDs) contain caffeine and are a new, popular category of beverage. It has been suggested that EDs enhance physical and cognitive performance; however, it is unclear whether the claimed benefits are attributable to components other than caffeine. A typical 235 mL ED provides between 40 and 250 mg of caffeine, equating to doses that improve cognitive and, at the higher levels, physical performance. EDs often contain taurine, guaraná, ginseng, glucuronolactone, B-vitamins, and other compounds. A literature search using PubMed, Psych Info, and Google Scholar identified 32 articles that examined the effects of ED ingredients alone and/or in combination with caffeine on physical or cognitive performance. A systematic evaluation of the evidence-based findings in these articles was then conducted. With the exception of some weak evidence for glucose and guaraná extract, there is an overwhelming lack of evidence to substantiate claims that components of EDs, other than caffeine, contribute to the enhancement of physical or cognitive performance. Additional well-designed, randomized, placebo-controlled studies replicated across laboratories are needed in order to assess claims made for these products.

  11. Caffeine increases light responsiveness of the mouse circadian pacemaker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Diepen, Hester C; Lucassen, Eliane A; Yasenkov, Roman; Groenen, Inske; Ijzerman, Adriaan P; Meijer, Johanna H; Deboer, Tom

    2014-11-01

    Caffeine is the most commonly used psychoactive stimulant worldwide. It reduces sleep and sleepiness by blocking access to the adenosine receptor. The level of adenosine increases during sleep deprivation, and is thought to induce sleepiness and initiate sleep. Light-induced phase shifts of the rest-activity circadian rhythms are mediated by light-responsive neurons of the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, where the circadian clock of mammals resides. Previous studies have shown that sleep deprivation reduces circadian clock phase-shifting capacity and decreases SCN neuronal activity. In addition, application of adenosine agonists and antagonists mimics and blocks, respectively, the effect of sleep deprivation on light-induced phase shifts in behaviour, suggesting a role for adenosine. In the present study, we examined the role of sleep deprivation in and the effect of caffeine on light responsiveness of the SCN. We performed in vivo electrical activity recordings of the SCN in freely moving mice, and showed that the sustained response to light of SCN neuronal activity was attenuated after 6 h of sleep deprivation prior to light exposure. Subsequent intraperitoneal application of caffeine was able to restore the response to light. Finally, we performed behavioural recordings in constant conditions, and found enhanced period lengthening during chronic treatment with caffeine in drinking water in constant light conditions. The data suggest that increased homeostatic sleep pressure changes circadian pacemaker functioning by reducing SCN neuronal responsiveness to light. The electrophysiological and behavioural data together provide evidence that caffeine enhances clock sensitivity to light.

  12. Determination of caffeine using oscillating chemical reaction in a CSTR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jinzhang; Ren, Jie; Yang, Wu; Liu, XiuHui; Yang, Hua

    2003-07-14

    A new analytical method for the determination of caffeine by the sequential perturbation caused by different amounts of caffeine on the oscillating chemical system involving the manganese(II)-catalyzed reaction between potassium bromate and tyrosine in acidic medium in a CSTR was proposed. The method exposed for the first time in this work. It relies on the relationship between the changes in the oscillation amplitude of the chemical system and the concentration of caffeine. The calibration curve fits a second-order polynomial equation very well when the concentration of caffeine over the range 4.0 x 10(-6) - 1.2 x 10(-4) M (r = 0.9968). The effect of influential variables, such as the concentration of reaction components, injection point, temperature, flow rate and stirring rate were studied. Some aspects of the potential mechanism of action of caffeine on the chemical oscillating system were also discussed. A real sample was determined and the result was satisfactory.

  13. Storm in a coffee cup: caffeine modifies brain activation to social signals of threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Jessica E; Lawrence, Andrew D; Diukova, Ana; Wise, Richard G; Rogers, Peter J

    2012-10-01

    Caffeine, an adenosine A₁ and A(2A) receptor antagonist, is the most popular psychostimulant drug in the world, but it is also anxiogenic. The neural correlates of caffeine-induced anxiety are currently unknown. This study investigated the effects of caffeine on brain regions implicated in social threat processing and anxiety. Participants were 14 healthy male non/infrequent caffeine consumers. In a double-blind placebo-controlled crossover design, they underwent blood oxygenation level-dependent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing an emotional face processing task 1 h after receiving caffeine (250 mg) or placebo in two fMRI sessions (counterbalanced, 1-week washout). They rated anxiety and mental alertness, and their blood pressure was measured, before and 2 h after treatment. Results showed that caffeine induced threat-related (angry/fearful faces > happy faces) midbrain-periaqueductal gray activation and abolished threat-related medial prefrontal cortex wall activation. Effects of caffeine on extent of threat-related amygdala activation correlated negatively with level of dietary caffeine intake. In concurrence with these changes in threat-related brain activation, caffeine increased self-rated anxiety and diastolic blood pressure. Caffeine did not affect primary visual cortex activation. These results are the first to demonstrate potential neural correlates of the anxiogenic effect of caffeine, and they implicate the amygdala as a key site for caffeine tolerance.

  14. Acute Caffeine Consumption Enhances the Executive Control of Visual Attention in Habitual Consumers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunye, Tad T.; Mahoney, Caroline R.; Lieberman, Harris R.; Giles, Grace E.; Taylor, Holly A.

    2010-01-01

    Recent work suggests that a dose of 200-400mg caffeine can enhance both vigilance and the executive control of visual attention in individuals with low caffeine consumption profiles. The present study seeks to determine whether individuals with relatively high caffeine consumption profiles would show similar advantages. To this end, we examined…

  15. Adolescent Caffeine Consumption and Self-Reported Violence and Conduct Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjansson, Alfgeir L.; Sigfusdottir, Inga Dora; Frost, Stephanie S.; James, Jack E.

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive substance in the world and currently the only one legally available to children and adolescents. The sale and use of caffeinated beverages has increased markedly among adolescents during the last decade. However, research on caffeine use and behaviors among adolescents is scarce. We investigate the…

  16. Exploring maternal patterns of dietary caffeine consumption before conception and during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lei; Bell, Erin M; Browne, Marilyn L; Druschel, Charlotte M; Romitti, Paul A

    2014-12-01

    We describe patterns of dietary caffeine consumption before and after pregnancy recognition in a cohort of women who recently gave birth. This study included 8,347 mothers of non-malformed liveborn control infants who participated in the National Birth Defects Prevention Study during 1997-2007. Maternal self-reported consumption of beverages (caffeinated coffee, tea, and soda) and chocolate the year before pregnancy was used to estimate caffeine intake. The proportions of prepregnancy caffeine consumption stratified by maternal characteristics are reported. In addition, patterns of reported change in consumption before and after pregnancy were examined by maternal and pregnancy characteristics. Adjusted prevalence ratios were estimated to assess factors most associated with change in consumption. About 97 % of mothers reported any caffeine consumption (average intake of 129.9 mg/day the year before pregnancy) and soda was the primary source of caffeine. The proportion of mothers reporting dietary caffeine intake of more than 300 mg/day was significantly increased among those who smoked cigarettes or drank alcohol. Most mothers stopped or decreased their caffeinated beverage consumption during pregnancy. Young maternal age and unintended pregnancy were associated with increases in consumption during pregnancy. Dietary caffeine consumption during pregnancy is still common in the US. A high level of caffeine intake was associated with known risk factors for adverse reproductive outcomes. Future studies may improve the maternal caffeine exposure assessment by acquiring additional information regarding the timing and amount of change in caffeine consumption after pregnancy recognition.

  17. Coffee versus Caffeine: Effects on Subjective and Behavioral Measures of Alertness

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-12

    complex, and includes other substances with potential actions of their own. In addition to small amounts of theobromine and theophylline, coffee...to be determined. Pharmacological actions of caffeine. Caffeine (1,3,7 trimethylxanthine) , with theophylline and theobromine , belongs to a class of...naturally occurring alkaloids known as the methylxanthines. While caffeine is the most prevalent of these substances, theophylline and theobromine

  18. 细胞周期蛋白在喉癌组织中的表达及意义%Expression and Significance of Cyclins in Laryngeal Carcinomas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘馨莲; 殷舞; 李淑蓉; 孙静

    2011-01-01

    目的 探讨喉癌组织中细胞周期蛋白(Cyclin D1、Cyclin A、Cyclin B1、Cyclin E)的表达规律及其与喉癌临床病理参数的关系.方法 采用免疫组化技术,检测Cyclin D1、Cyclin A、Cyclin B1、Cyclin E在67例喉癌组织和32例癌旁正常组织中的表达情况.结果 Cyclin D1、Cyclin A、Cyclin B1、Cyclin E在癌旁正常组织中呈低表达.随着喉癌分化程度的降低,Cyclin D1、Cyclin A、Cyclin B1、Cyclin E表达阳性率明显升高,高分化者、中分化者与低分化者比较有显著性差异(P<0.05).结论 通过免疫组织化学法分析细胞周期的数据,有利于肿瘤分级,且细胞周期数据与预后相关.%Objective To investigate the expression and significance of Cyclin Dl ,Cyclin A,Cyclin B1 and Cyclin E in laryngeal carcinomas, and study the correlation between parameters and clinicopathological features. Methods Expression of Cyclin Dl,Cyclin A,Cyclin Bl and Cyclin E were analyzed by immunohistochemistry staining in 67 cases of laryngeal carcinomas and 32 peri-cancer normal larynx tissues. Results Cyclin Dl, Cyclin A, Cyclin Bl and Cyclin E were low Expressed in pericancer normal larynx tissues. With the decreasing of pathological classification, the expression of Cyclin Dl、Cyclin A、Cyclin Bl  and Cyclin E in laryngeal carcinomas increased accordingly. The difference between group highly-differentiated、moderately-differentiated and poorly-differentiated were significant (P < 0. 05 ). Conclusion Cell cycle phase can be analyzed by immunohistochemical stain,and it is beneficial for tumor classification and helpful to predict the prognosis.

  19. Lack of specific association between panicogenic properties of caffeine and HPA-axis activation. A placebo-controlled study of caffeine challenge in patients with panic disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masdrakis, Vasilios G; Markianos, Manolis; Oulis, Panagiotis

    2015-09-30

    A subgroup of patients with Panic Disorder (PD) exhibits increased sensitivity to caffeine administration. However, the association between caffeine-induced panic attacks and post-caffeine hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis activation in PD patients remains unclear. In a randomized, double-blind, cross-over experiment, 19 PD patients underwent a 400-mg caffeine-challenge and a placebo-challenge, both administered in the form of instant coffee. Plasma levels of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) were assessed at both baseline and post-challenge. No patient panicked after placebo-challenge, while nine patients (47.3%) panicked after caffeine-challenge. Placebo administration did not result in any significant change in hormones' plasma levels. Overall, sample's patients demonstrated significant increases in ACTH, cortisol, and DHEAS plasma levels after caffeine administration. However, post-caffeine panickers and non-panickers did not differ with respect to the magnitude of the increases. Our results indicate that in PD patients, caffeine-induced panic attacks are not specifically associated with HPA-axis activation, as this is reflected in post-caffeine increases in ACTH, cortisol and DHEAS plasma levels, suggesting that caffeine-induced panic attacks in PD patients are not specifically mediated by the biological processes underlying fear or stress. More generally, our results add to the evidence that HPA-axis activation is not a specific characteristic of panic.

  20. Cyclin D1 in the Liver: Role of Noncanonical Signaling in Liver Steatosis and Hormone Regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Núñez, Kelley G.; Gonzalez-Rosario, Janet; Thevenot, Paul T.; Cohen, Ari J.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cyclin D1 is an important protein for cell cycle progression; however, functions independent of the cell cycle have been described in the liver. Cyclin D1 is also involved in DNA repair, is overexpressed in many cancers, and functions as a proto-oncogene. The lesser-known roles of Cyclin D1, specifically in hepatocytes, impact liver steatosis and hormone regulation in the liver. Methods: A comprehensive search of PubMed was conducted using the keywords Cyclin D1, steatosis, lipogenesis, and liver transplantation. In this article, we review the results from this literature search, with a focus on the role of Cyclin D1 in hepatic lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis, as well as the impact and function of this protein in hepatic steatosis. Results: Cyclin D1 represses carbohydrate response element binding protein (ChREBP) and results in a decrease in transcription of fatty acid synthase (FAS) and acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC). Cyclin D1 also inhibits peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) which is involved in hepatic lipogenesis. Cyclin D1 inhibits both hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 alpha (HNF4α) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 alpha (PGC1α) and represses transcription of lipogenic genes FAS and liver-type pyruvate kinase (Pklr), along with the gluconeogenic genes phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose-6-phosphatase (G6Pase). Conclusion: Cyclin D1 represses multiple proteins involved in both lipogenesis and gluconeogenesis in the liver. Targeting Cyclin D1 to decrease hepatic steatosis in patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease or alcoholic fatty liver disease may help improve patient health and the quality of the donor liver pool.

  1. Rictor regulates FBXW7-dependent c-Myc and cyclin E degradation in colorectal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Zheng [Markey Cancer Center, The University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Gastroenterology, Department of Gastroenterology, Nanfang Hospital, Southern Medical University, 1838 Guangzhou Dadao Bei, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Zhou, Yuning [Markey Cancer Center, The University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Evers, B. Mark [Markey Cancer Center, The University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Department of Surgery, The University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Wang, Qingding, E-mail: qingding.wang@uky.edu [Markey Cancer Center, The University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States); Department of Surgery, The University of Kentucky, 800 Rose Street, Lexington, KY 40536 (United States)

    2012-02-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rictor associates with FBXW7 to form an E3 complex. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of rictor decreases ubiquitination of c-Myc and cylin E. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of rictor increases protein levels of c-Myc and cylin E. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Overexpression of rictor induces the degradation of c-Myc and cyclin E proteins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rictor regulation of c-Myc and cyclin E requires FBXW7. -- Abstract: Rictor (Rapamycin-insensitive companion of mTOR) forms a complex with mTOR and phosphorylates and activates Akt. Activation of Akt induces expression of c-Myc and cyclin E, which are overexpressed in colorectal cancer and play an important role in colorectal cancer cell proliferation. Here, we show that rictor associates with FBXW7 to form an E3 complex participating in the regulation of c-Myc and cyclin E degradation. The Rictor-FBXW7 complex is biochemically distinct from the previously reported mTORC2 and can be immunoprecipitated independently of mTORC2. Moreover, knocking down of rictor in serum-deprived colorectal cancer cells results in the decreased ubiquitination and increased protein levels of c-Myc and cyclin E while overexpression of rictor induces the degradation of c-Myc and cyclin E proteins. Genetic knockout of FBXW7 blunts the effects of rictor, suggesting that rictor regulation of c-Myc and cyclin E requires FBXW7. Our findings identify rictor as an important component of FBXW7 E3 ligase complex participating in the regulation of c-Myc and cyclin E protein ubiquitination and degradation. Importantly, our results suggest that elevated growth factor signaling may contribute to decrease rictor/FBXW7-mediated ubiquitination of c-Myc and cyclin E, thus leading to accumulation of cyclin E and c-Myc in colorectal cancer cells.

  2. Cyclin D1 represses gluconeogenesis via inhibition of the transcriptional coactivator PGC1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Kavita; Liu, Wan-Ju; Thompson, Keyata; Anders, Lars; Devarakonda, Srikripa; Dewi, Ruby; Buckley, Stephanie; Hwang, Bor-Jang; Polster, Brian; Dorsey, Susan G; Sun, Yezhou; Sicinski, Piotr; Girnun, Geoffrey D

    2014-10-01

    Hepatic gluconeogenesis is crucial to maintain normal blood glucose during periods of nutrient deprivation. Gluconeogenesis is controlled at multiple levels by a variety of signal transduction and transcriptional pathways. However, dysregulation of these pathways leads to hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes. While the effects of various signaling pathways on gluconeogenesis are well established, the downstream signaling events repressing gluconeogenic gene expression are not as well understood. The cell-cycle regulator cyclin D1 is expressed in the liver, despite the liver being a quiescent tissue. The most well-studied function of cyclin D1 is activation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), promoting progression of the cell cycle. We show here a novel role for cyclin D1 as a regulator of gluconeogenic and oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) gene expression. In mice, fasting decreases liver cyclin D1 expression, while refeeding induces cyclin D1 expression. Inhibition of CDK4 enhances the gluconeogenic gene expression, whereas cyclin D1-mediated activation of CDK4 represses the gluconeogenic gene-expression program in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, we show that cyclin D1 represses gluconeogenesis and OxPhos in part via inhibition of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC1α) activity in a CDK4-dependent manner. Indeed, we demonstrate that PGC1α is novel cyclin D1/CDK4 substrate. These studies reveal a novel role for cyclin D1 on metabolism via PGC1α and reveal a potential link between cell-cycle regulation and metabolic control of glucose homeostasis.

  3. Inhibitor of CDK interacting with cyclin A1 (INCA1) regulates proliferation and is repressed by oncogenic signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumer, Nicole; Tickenbrock, Lara; Tschanter, Petra;

    2011-01-01

    The cell cycle is driven by the kinase activity of cyclin/CDK complexes which is negatively regulated by CDK inhibitor proteins. Recently, we identified INCA1 as interaction partner and substrate of cyclin A1 in complex with CDK2. On a functional level, we identified a novel cyclin binding site...

  4. Cyclin B1 is localized to unattached kinetochores and contributes to efficient microtubule attachment and proper chromosome alignment during mitosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qiang Chen; Xiaoyan Zhang; Qing Jiang; Paul R Clarke; Chuanmao Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Cyclin Bl is a key regulatory protein controlling cell cycle progression in vertebrates. Cyclin Bl binds CDK1, a cyclin-dependent kinase catalytic subunit, forming a complex that orchestrates mitosis through phosphorylation of key proteins. Cyclin Bl regulates both the activation of CDK1 and its subcellular localization, which may be critical for substrate selection. Here, we demonstrate that cyclin Bl is concentrated on the outer plate of the kinetochore during prometaphase. This localization requires the cyclin box region of the protein. Cyclin Bl is displaced from individual kinetochores to the spindle poles by microtubule attachment to the kinetochores, and this displacement is dependent on the dynein/dynactin complex. Depletion of cyclin Bl by vector-based siRNA causes inefficient attachment between kinetochores and microtubules, and chromosome alignment defects, and delays the onset of anaphase. We conclude that cyclin Bl accumulates at kinetochores during prometaphase, where it contributes to the correct attachment of microtubules to kinetochores and efficient alignment of the chromosomes, most likely through localized phosphorylation of specific substrates by cyclin B1-CDK1. Cyclin Bl is then transported from each kinetochore as microtubule attachment is completed, and this relocalization may redirect the activity of cyclin B1-CDK1 and contribute to inactivation of the spindle assembly checkpoint.

  5. Individual differences affecting caffeine intake. Analysis of consumption behaviours for different times of day and caffeine sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penolazzi, Barbara; Natale, Vincenzo; Leone, Luigi; Russo, Paolo Maria

    2012-06-01

    The main purpose of the present study was to investigate the individual variables contributing to determine the high variability in the consumption behaviours of caffeine, a psychoactive substance which is still poorly investigated in comparison with other drugs. The effects of a large set of specific personality traits (i.e., Impulsivity, Sensation Seeking, Anxiety, Reward Sensitivity and Circadian Preference) were compared along with some relevant socio-demographic variables (i.e., gender and age) and cigarette smoking behaviour. Analyses revealed that daily caffeine intake was significantly higher for males, older people, participants smoking more cigarettes and showing higher scores on Impulsivity, Sensation Seeking and a facet of Reward Sensitivity. However, more detailed analyses showed that different patterns of individual variables predicted caffeine consumption when the times of day and the caffeine sources were considered. The present results suggest that such detailed analyses are required to detect the critical predictive variables that could be obscured when only total caffeine intake during the entire day is considered.

  6. Molecular interactions between caffeine and catechins in green tea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon, Marta; Nerin, Cristina

    2014-07-16

    Migration of green tea components from an active packaging material containing green tea extract was performed in water and 3% acetic acid in water. The migration values for acid simulant were much higher than the values obtained in water. The influence of the acidic media in solutions of catechin standards and green tea extract was evaluated by liquid chromatography. Catechin, epicatechin, and caffeine from the green tea extract exhibited major variation in their concentrations values, with increases of 29.90, 20.75, and 15.95%, respectively, in acidic medium. The results suggested that catechins and caffeine form complexes through intermolecular interactions in neutral media and that these interactions are broken in acidic media. The continuous variation method was also performed to confirm the stoichiometry of the complexes between catechins and caffeine. Finally, a computer simulation was applied by Chem Pro 12.0, and the energies involved were calculated to confirm the experimental results obtained.

  7. Caffeine Markedly Enhanced Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Erkang; WU Lijun

    2009-01-01

    A bstract In this paper it is shown that incubation with 2 mM caffeine enhanced significantly the MN (micronucleus) formation in both the 1 cGy a-particle irradiated and non-irradiated by- stander regions. Moreover, caffeine treatment made the non-irradiated bystander cells more sensi- tive to damage signals. Treated by c-PTIO(2-(4-carboxy-phenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethyl-imidazoline- 1-oxyl-3-oxide), a nitric oxide (NO) scavenger, the MN frequencies were effectively inhibited, showing that nitric oxide might be very important in mediating the enhanced damage. These results indicated that caffeine enhanced the low dose a-particle radiation-induced damage in ir- radiated and non-irradiated bystander regions, and therefore it is important to investigate the relationship between the radiosensitizer and radiation-induced bystander effects (RIBE).

  8. [Self-rated Caffeine Sensitivity: Implications for Personalized Sleep Medicine?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landolt, Hans Peter

    2016-05-11

    The prevalence of the insomnia syndrome and the effects of caffeine on sleep are in part genetically determined. Pharmacogenetic studies in humans demonstrate that functional polymorphisms of the genes encoding adenosine A2A receptors and dopamine transporters contribute to individual differences in impaired sleep quality by caffeine. The A2A receptor and dopamine transporter are preferentially expressed in the striatum. Together, these observations suggest that the striatum plays an important role in sleep-wake regulation. Individual caffeine sensitivity and A2A receptor genotype should be taken into account in the development of possible novel adenosine-based pharmacotherapies of sleep-wake disorders and neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's disease. This may permit the prediction of individual drug effects and improve the reliability of clinical trials.

  9. Caffeine in floral nectar enhances a pollinator's memory of reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, G A; Baker, D D; Palmer, M J; Stabler, D; Mustard, J A; Power, E F; Borland, A M; Stevenson, P C

    2013-03-08

    Plant defense compounds occur in floral nectar, but their ecological role is not well understood. We provide evidence that plant compounds pharmacologically alter pollinator behavior by enhancing their memory of reward. Honeybees rewarded with caffeine, which occurs naturally in nectar of Coffea and Citrus species, were three times as likely to remember a learned floral scent as were honeybees rewarded with sucrose alone. Caffeine potentiated responses of mushroom body neurons involved in olfactory learning and memory by acting as an adenosine receptor antagonist. Caffeine concentrations in nectar did not exceed the bees' bitter taste threshold, implying that pollinators impose selection for nectar that is pharmacologically active but not repellent. By using a drug to enhance memories of reward, plants secure pollinator fidelity and improve reproductive success.

  10. Effect of coffee (caffeine against human cataract blindness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varma SD

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Shambhu D VarmaDepartment of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD, USAAbstract: Previous biochemical and morphological studies with animal experiments have demonstrated that caffeine given topically or orally to certain experimental animal models has significant inhibitory effect on cataract formation. The present studies were undertaken to examine if there is a correlation between coffee drinking and incidence of cataract blindness in human beings. That has been found to be the case. Incidence of cataract blindness was found to be significantly lower in groups consuming higher amounts of coffee in comparison to the groups with lower coffee intake. Mechanistically, the caffeine effect could be multifactorial, involving its antioxidant as well as its bioenergetic effects on the lens.Keywords: caffeine, cataract, cataract blindness, cataractogenic process, intraocular pressure, vision impairment

  11. Cyclin Dependent Kinase 9 Inhibitors for Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonawane, Yogesh A; Taylor, Margaret A; Napoleon, John Victor; Rana, Sandeep; Contreras, Jacob I; Natarajan, Amarnath

    2016-10-13

    Cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors have been the topic of intense research for nearly 2 decades due to their widely varied and critical functions within the cell. Recently CDK9 has emerged as a druggable target for the development of cancer therapeutics. CDK9 plays a crucial role in transcription regulation; specifically, CDK9 mediated transcriptional regulation of short-lived antiapoptotic proteins is critical for the survival of transformed cells. Focused chemical libraries based on a plethora of scaffolds have resulted in mixed success with regard to the development of selective CDK9 inhibitors. Here we review the regulation of CDK9, its cellular functions, and common core structures used to target CDK9, along with their selectivity profile and efficacy in vitro and in vivo.

  12. Absorption of caffeine in fermented Pu-er tea is inhibited in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ye-wei; Xu, Huan-huan; Wang, Su-min; Zhao, Yi; Huang, Yu-min; Li, Run-bo; Wang, Xuan-jun; Hao, Shu-mei; Sheng, Jun

    2014-07-25

    Caffeine is present in a number of dietary sources consumed worldwide. Although its pharmacokinetics has been intensively explored, little is known about complexed caffeine (C-CAF) in aqueous extraction of fermented Pu-er tea. The major components of C-CAF are oxidative tea polyphenols (OTP) and caffeine. Furthermore, the C-CAF can be precipitated in low pH solution. After administering the same amount of total caffeine and comparing the peak level of plasma caffeine with the coffee (contains 0.11 ± 0.01% C-CAF) group, the results showed that the caffeine/OTP (contains 66.67 ± 0.02% C-CAF) group and the instant Pu-er tea (contains 23.18 ± 0.02% C-CAF) group were 33.39% and 25.86% lower, respectively. The concentration of the metabolites of caffeine supports the idea that the absorption of the C-CAF was inhibited in mice. Congruent with this result, the amount of caffeine detected in mice excrement showed that more caffeine was eliminated in the caffeine/OTP group and the Pu-er tea group. The locomotor activity tests of mice demonstrated that the stimulating effect of caffeine in caffeine/OTP and Pu-er tea was weaker than in coffee. Our findings demonstrate that caffeine can be combined with OTP and the absorption of C-CAF is inhibited in mice, thus decreasing the irritation effect of caffeine. This may also be developed as a slow release formulation of caffeine.

  13. Cyclin-dependent kinases regulate apoptosis of intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Sujoy; Ray, Ramesh M; Johnson, Leonard R

    2014-03-01

    Homeostasis of the gastrointestinal epithelium is dependent upon a balance between cell proliferation and apoptosis. Cyclin-dependent kinases (Cdks) are well known for their role in cell proliferation. Previous studies from our group have shown that polyamine-depletion of intestinal epithelial cells (IEC-6) decreases cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (Cdk2) activity, increases p53 and p21Cip1 protein levels, induces G1 arrest, and protects cells from camptothecin (CPT)-induced apoptosis. Although emerging evidence suggests that members of the Cdk family are involved in the regulation of apoptosis, their roles directing apoptosis of IEC-6 cells are not known. In this study, we report that inhibition of Cdk1, 2, and 9 (with the broad range Cdk inhibitor, AZD5438) in proliferating IEC-6 cells triggered DNA damage, activated p53 signaling, inhibited proliferation, and induced apoptosis. By contrast, inhibition of Cdk2 (with NU6140) increased p53 protein and activity, inhibited proliferation, but had no effect on apoptosis. Notably, AZD5438 sensitized, whereas, NU6140 rescued proliferating IEC-6 cells from CPT-induced apoptosis. However, in colon carcinoma (Caco-2) cells with mutant p53, treatment with either AZD5438 or NU6140 blocked proliferation, albeit more robustly with AZD5438. Both Cdk inhibitors induced apoptosis in Caco-2 cells in a p53-independent manner. In serum starved quiescent IEC-6 cells, both AZD5438 and NU6140 decreased TNF-α/CPT-induced activation of p53 and, consequently, rescued cells from apoptosis, indicating that sustained Cdk activity is required for apoptosis of quiescent cells. Furthermore, AZD5438 partially reversed the protective effect of polyamine depletion whereas NU6140 had no effect. Together, these results demonstrate that Cdks possess opposing roles in the control of apoptosis in quiescent and proliferating cells. In addition, Cdk inhibitors uncouple proliferation from apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner.

  14. Caffeine in tea Camellia sinensis--content, absorption, benefits and risks of consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramza-Michałowska, A

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic properties of tea Camellia sinensis are of particular interest since it has been consumed for ages and was always regarded as safe beverage. Tea is most popular beverage in the world because of its attractive aroma, exceptional taste, health promoting and pharmaceutical potential. Current results showed that antioxidative, antibacterial and other health effects are attributed to its caffeine content and caffeine - polyphenols interactions. An overview is given on caffeine content in different tea leaves beverage. Special attention is drawn to caffeine physiological effect on human organism. Controversies concerning the possible caffeine influence on human physical and psychological health are briefly summarized and presented.

  15. Separating neural and vascular effects of caffeine using simultaneous EEG–FMRI: Differential effects of caffeine on cognitive and sensorimotor brain responses

    OpenAIRE

    Diukova, Ana; Ware, Jennifer; Smith, Jessica E.; Evans, C. John; Murphy, Kevin; Rogers, Peter J.; Wise, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of caffeine are mediated through its non-selective antagonistic effects on adenosine A1 and A2A adenosine receptors resulting in increased neuronal activity but also vasoconstriction in the brain. Caffeine, therefore, can modify BOLD FMRI signal responses through both its neural and its vascular effects depending on receptor distributions in different brain regions. In this study we aim to distinguish neural and vascular influences of a single dose of caffeine in measurements of t...

  16. Caffeine consumption in a long-term psychiatric hospital: Tobacco smoking may explain in large part the apparent association between schizophrenia and caffeine use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrojo-Romero, Manuel; Armas Barbazán, Carmen; López-Moriñigo, Javier D; Ramos-Ríos, Ramón; Gurpegui, Manuel; Martínez-Ortega, José M; Jurado, Dolores; Diaz, Francisco J; de Leon, Jose

    2015-05-01

    This study further explores the association between schizophrenia and caffeine use by combining two prior published Spanish samples (250 schizophrenia outpatients and 290 controls from the general population) with two Spanish long-term inpatient samples from the same hospital (145 with schizophrenia and 64 with other severe mental illnesses). The specific aims were to establish whether or not, after controlling for confounders including tobacco smoking, the association between schizophrenia and caffeine is consistent across schizophrenia samples and across different definitions of caffeine use. The frequency of caffeine use in schizophrenia inpatients was not significantly higher than that in non-schizophrenia inpatients (77%, 111/145 vs. 75%, 48/64) or controls but was significantly higher than in schizophrenia outpatients. The frequency of high caffeine users among caffeine users in schizophrenia inpatients was not significantly higher than in non-schizophrenia inpatients (45%, 50/111 vs. 52%, 25/48) or controls, but was significantly lower than in schizophrenia outpatients. Smoking was significantly associated with caffeine use across all samples and definitions. Between 2 and 3% of schizophrenia inpatients, schizophrenia outpatients and non-schizophrenia inpatients showed caffeinism (>700 mg/day in smokers). Several of these smoking patients with caffeinism were also taking other inducers, particularly omeprazole. The lack of consistent association between schizophrenia and caffeine use is surprising when compared with the very consistent association between tobacco smoking and caffeine use across all of our analyses (use and high use in users) and all our samples. The confounding effects of tobacco smoking may explain in large part the apparent association between schizophrenia and caffeine use.

  17. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of cyclin E and CDK2 from Penaeus monodon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, C; Fu, M J; Qiu, L H

    2016-09-16

    Reduced reproductive performance of the black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) has caused economic losses and hampered the fishing industry. Detailed investigation of the molecular mechanism by which the cell cycle is regulated in this organism is needed to understand the development and maturation of ovaries and oocytes, with a view to improving reproductive capacity. Cell cycle progression is mainly determined by cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) and cyclin complexes, the cyclin E/CDK2 complex playing a key role in G1/S transition. However, knowledge of the interplay between cyclin E and CDK2 in invertebrates remains limited. In this study, full-length P. monodon cyclin E (Pmcyclin E) and CDK2 (PmCDK2) sequences were cloned. The open reading frame of Pmcyclin E was 1263 bp in length and encoded a 47.9-kDa protein, while that of PmCDK2 was 921 bp, encoding a protein of 34.9 kDa. Recombinant cyclin E and CDK2 proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli and purified by Ni-chelating affinity chromatography. In addition, a pull-down assay was performed to identify any interaction between Pmcyclin E and PmCDK2. This research provides a basis for the study of the functional mechanisms of the cyclin E/CDK2 complex in shrimp, further enriching our knowledge of invertebrate cell cycle regulation.

  18. Amygdalin blocks bladder cancer cell growth in vitro by diminishing cyclin A and cdk2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarević, Jasmina; Rutz, Jochen; Juengel, Eva; Kaulfuss, Silke; Reiter, Michael; Tsaur, Igor; Bartsch, Georg; Haferkamp, Axel; Blaheta, Roman A

    2014-01-01

    Amygdalin, a natural compound, has been used by many cancer patients as an alternative approach to treat their illness. However, whether or not this substance truly exerts an anti-tumor effect has never been settled. An in vitro study was initiated to investigate the influence of amygdalin (1.25-10 mg/ml) on the growth of a panel of bladder cancer cell lines (UMUC-3, RT112 and TCCSUP). Tumor growth, proliferation, clonal growth and cell cycle progression were investigated. The cell cycle regulating proteins cdk1, cdk2, cdk4, cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin D1, p19, p27 as well as the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) related signals phosphoAkt, phosphoRaptor and phosphoRictor were examined. Amygdalin dose-dependently reduced growth and proliferation in all three bladder cancer cell lines, reflected in a significant delay in cell cycle progression and G0/G1 arrest. Molecular evaluation revealed diminished phosphoAkt, phosphoRictor and loss of Cdk and cyclin components. Since the most outstanding effects of amygdalin were observed on the cdk2-cyclin A axis, siRNA knock down studies were carried out, revealing a positive correlation between cdk2/cyclin A expression level and tumor growth. Amygdalin, therefore, may block tumor growth by down-modulating cdk2 and cyclin A. In vivo investigation must follow to assess amygdalin's practical value as an anti-tumor drug.

  19. Amygdalin blocks bladder cancer cell growth in vitro by diminishing cyclin A and cdk2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Makarević

    Full Text Available Amygdalin, a natural compound, has been used by many cancer patients as an alternative approach to treat their illness. However, whether or not this substance truly exerts an anti-tumor effect has never been settled. An in vitro study was initiated to investigate the influence of amygdalin (1.25-10 mg/ml on the growth of a panel of bladder cancer cell lines (UMUC-3, RT112 and TCCSUP. Tumor growth, proliferation, clonal growth and cell cycle progression were investigated. The cell cycle regulating proteins cdk1, cdk2, cdk4, cyclin A, cyclin B, cyclin D1, p19, p27 as well as the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR related signals phosphoAkt, phosphoRaptor and phosphoRictor were examined. Amygdalin dose-dependently reduced growth and proliferation in all three bladder cancer cell lines, reflected in a significant delay in cell cycle progression and G0/G1 arrest. Molecular evaluation revealed diminished phosphoAkt, phosphoRictor and loss of Cdk and cyclin components. Since the most outstanding effects of amygdalin were observed on the cdk2-cyclin A axis, siRNA knock down studies were carried out, revealing a positive correlation between cdk2/cyclin A expression level and tumor growth. Amygdalin, therefore, may block tumor growth by down-modulating cdk2 and cyclin A. In vivo investigation must follow to assess amygdalin's practical value as an anti-tumor drug.

  20. Plasmodium P-Type Cyclin CYC3 Modulates Endomitotic Growth during Oocyst Development in Mosquitoes

    KAUST Repository

    Roques, Magali

    2015-11-13

    Cell-cycle progression and cell division in eukaryotes are governed in part by the cyclin family and their regulation of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs). Cyclins are very well characterised in model systems such as yeast and human cells, but surprisingly little is known about their number and role in Plasmodium, the unicellular protozoan parasite that causes malaria. Malaria parasite cell division and proliferation differs from that of many eukaryotes. During its life cycle it undergoes two types of mitosis: endomitosis in asexual stages and an extremely rapid mitotic process during male gametogenesis. Both schizogony (producing merozoites) in host liver and red blood cells, and sporogony (producing sporozoites) in the mosquito vector, are endomitotic with repeated nuclear replication, without chromosome condensation, before cell division. The role of specific cyclins during Plasmodium cell proliferation was unknown. We show here that the Plasmodium genome contains only three cyclin genes, representing an unusual repertoire of cyclin classes. Expression and reverse genetic analyses of the single Plant (P)-type cyclin, CYC3, in the rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei, revealed a cytoplasmic and nuclear location of the GFP-tagged protein throughout the lifecycle. Deletion of cyc3 resulted in defects in size, number and growth of oocysts, with abnormalities in budding and sporozoite formation. Furthermore, global transcript analysis of the cyc3-deleted and wild type parasites at gametocyte and ookinete stages identified differentially expressed genes required for signalling, invasion and oocyst development. Collectively these data suggest that cyc3 modulates oocyst endomitotic development in Plasmodium berghei.

  1. Cyclin C stimulates β-cell proliferation in rat and human pancreatic β-cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Palomares, Margarita; López-Acosta, José Francisco; Villa-Pérez, Pablo; Moreno-Amador, José Luis; Muñoz-Barrera, Jennifer; Fernández-Luis, Sara; Heras-Pozas, Blanca; Perdomo, Germán; Bernal-Mizrachi, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Activation of pancreatic β-cell proliferation has been proposed as an approach to replace reduced functional β-cell mass in diabetes. Quiescent fibroblasts exit from G0 (quiescence) to G1 through pRb phosphorylation mediated by cyclin C/cdk3 complexes. Overexpression of cyclin D1, D2, D3, or cyclin E induces pancreatic β-cell proliferation. We hypothesized that cyclin C overexpression would induce β-cell proliferation through G0 exit, thus being a potential therapeutic target to recover functional β-cell mass. We used isolated rat and human islets transduced with adenovirus expressing cyclin C. We measured multiple markers of proliferation: [3H]thymidine incorporation, BrdU incorporation and staining, and Ki67 staining. Furthermore, we detected β-cell death by TUNEL, β-cell differentiation by RT-PCR, and β-cell function by glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. Interestingly, we have found that cyclin C increases rat and human β-cell proliferation. This augmented proliferation did not induce β-cell death, dedifferentiation, or dysfunction in rat or human islets. Our results indicate that cyclin C is a potential target for inducing β-cell regeneration. PMID:25564474

  2. COMBINED DETECTION OF CYCLIN D1, P27 AND DNA CONTENT IN ESOPHAGEAL CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Ping; YIN Yuan-qin; WANG Xiao-hua

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expressions of cyclin D1 and p27 and DNA content in esophageal cancer and adjacent normal tissues, and to discuss the relationship between them. Methods: The cyclinD1 and p27 were detected by immunohistochemical staining; DNA content was measured by flow cytometry. Results: The positive expression rates of cyclinD1 and p27 in cancer were 45.8% and 33.3% respectively, the DNA content in the positive group of cyclinD1 was higher than that in the negative group of cyclinD1(1.54(0.21 versus 1.08(0.43, P<0.05), while the DNA content and SPF (S-phase fraction) in the positive group of p27 were lower than those in the negative group (1.10(0.19 and 5.56%(5.18% versus 1.66(0.28 and 19.78%(6.12%, P<0.05). Conclusion: The data show that the expression of cyclinD1 and p27 are related to the ontogenesis and progression of esophageal cancer. The combined detection of cyclinD1, p27 and DNA content may be indicators of diagnosis and assessment of esophageal cancer.

  3. Altered expression of cyclin A 1 in muscle of patients with facioscapulohumeral muscle dystrophy (FSHD-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Pakula

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Cyclin A1 regulates cell cycle activity and proliferation in somatic and germ-line cells. Its expression increases in G1/S phase and reaches a maximum in G2 and M phases. Altered cyclin A1 expression might contribute to clinical symptoms in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD. METHODS: Muscle biopsies were taken from the Vastus lateralis muscle for cDNA microarray, RT-PCR, immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses to assess RNA and protein expression of cyclin A1 in human muscle cell lines and muscle tissue. Muscle fibers diameter was calculated on cryosections to test for hypertrophy. RESULTS: cDNA microarray data showed specifically elevated cyclin A1 levels in FSHD vs. other muscular disorders such as caveolinopathy, dysferlinopathy, four and a half LIM domains protein 1 deficiency and healthy controls. Data could be confirmed with RT-PCR and Western blot analysis showing up-regulated cyclin A1 levels also at protein level. We found also clear signs of hypertrophy within the Vastus lateralis muscle in FSHD-1 patients. CONCLUSIONS: In most somatic human cell lines, cyclin A1 levels are low. Overexpression of cyclin A1 in FSHD indicates cell cycle dysregulation in FSHD and might contribute to clinical symptoms of this disease.

  4. Oxidation of caffeine by phosphate radical anion in aqueous solution under anoxic conditions

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Maram Ravi Kumar; Mundra Adinarayana

    2000-10-01

    The photooxidation of caffeine in presence of peroxydiphosphate (PDP) in aqueous solution at natural H (∼7 5) has been carried out in a quantum yield reactor using a high-pressure mercury lamp. The reactions were followed spectrophotometrically by measuring the absorbance of caffeine at max (272 nm). The rates of reaction were calculated under different experimental conditions. The quantum yields were calculated from the rates of oxidation of caffeine and the intensity of light at 254 nm which was measured by using peroxydisulphate solution as a standard chemical actinometer. The reaction rates of oxidation of caffeine by PDP increase with increase in [PDP] as well as with increase in light intensity, while they are independent of [caffeine]. The quantum yields of oxidation of caffeine by PDP are independent of [PDP] as well as light intensity. However, quantum yields of oxidation of caffeine by PDP increase with increase in caffeine concentration. On the basis of these experimental results and product analysis, a probable mechanism has been suggested in which PDP is activated to phosphate radical anions (PO$_{4}^{\\bullet 2-}$) by direct photolysis of PDP and also by the sensitizing effect of caffeine. The phosphate radical anions thus produced react with caffeine by electron transfer reaction, resulting in the formation of caffeine radical cation, which deprotonates in a fast step to produce C8OH adduct radicals. These radicals might react with PDP to give final product 1,3,7-trimethyluric acid and PO$_{4}^{\\bullet 2-}$ radicals, the latter propagates the chain reaction.

  5. Role of state-dependent learning in the cognitive effects of caffeine in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanday, Leandro; Zanin, Karina A; Patti, Camilla L; Fernandes-Santos, Luciano; Oliveira, Larissa C; Longo, Beatriz M; Andersen, Monica L; Tufik, Sergio; Frussa-Filho, Roberto

    2013-08-01

    Caffeine is the most widely used psychoactive substance in the world and it is generally believed that it promotes beneficial effects on cognitive performance. However, there is also evidence suggesting that caffeine has inhibitory effects on learning and memory. Considering that caffeine may have anxiogenic effects, thus changing the emotional state of the subjects, state-dependent learning may play a role in caffeine-induced cognitive alterations. Mice were administered 20 mg/kg caffeine before training and/or before testing both in the plus-maze discriminative avoidance task (an animal model that concomitantly evaluates learning, memory, anxiety-like behaviour and general activity) and in the inhibitory avoidance task, a classic paradigm for evaluating memory in rodents. Pre-training caffeine administration did not modify learning, but produced an anxiogenic effect and impaired memory retention. While pre-test administration of caffeine did not modify retrieval on its own, the pre-test administration counteracted the memory deficit induced by the pre-training caffeine injection in both the plus-maze discriminative and inhibitory avoidance tasks. Our data demonstrate that caffeine-induced memory deficits are critically related to state-dependent learning, reinforcing the importance of considering the participation of state-dependency on the interpretation of the cognitive effects of caffeine. The possible participation of caffeine-induced anxiety alterations in state-dependent memory deficits is discussed.

  6. Enhanced caffeine degradation by immobilised cells of Leifsonia sp. strain SIU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Salihu; Shukor, Mohd Y; Syed, Mohd A; Johari, Wan L W; Shamaan, Nor A; Sabullah, Mohd K; Ahmad, Siti A

    2016-01-01

    In a previous study, we isolated Leifsonia sp. strain SIU, a new bacterium from agricultured soil. The bacterium was tested for its ability to degrade caffeine. The isolate was encapsulated in gellan gum and its ability to degrade caffeine was compared with the free cells. The optimal caffeine degradation was attained at a gellan gum concentration of 0.75% (w/v), a bead size of 4 mm diameter, and 250 beads per 100 mL of medium. At a caffeine concentration of 0.1 g/L, immobilised cells of the strain SIU degraded caffeine within 9 h, which is faster when compared to the case of free cells, in which it took 12 h to degrade. The immobilised cells degraded caffeine completely within 39 and 78 h at 0.5 and 1.0 g/L, while the free cells took 72 and 148 h at 0.5 and 1.0 g/L, respectively. At higher caffeine concentrations, immobilised cells exhibited a higher caffeine degradation rate. At concentrations of 1.5 and 2.0 g/L, caffeine-degrading activities of both immobilised and free cells were inhibited. The immobilised cells showed no loss in caffeine-degrading activity after being used repeatedly for nine 24-h cycles. The effect of heavy metals on immobilised cells was also tested. This study showed an increase in caffeine degradation efficiency when the cells were encapsulated in gellan gum.

  7. Inhibitory effects of caffeine on gustatory plasticity in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urushihata, Takuya; Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Higuchi, Yukako; Sakata, Kazumi; Wakabayashi, Tokumitsu; Nishino, Asuka; Matsuura, Tetsuya

    2016-10-01

    The effects of caffeine on salt chemotaxis learning were investigated using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. To estimate the degree of salt chemotaxis learning, nematodes were placed in a mixed solution of NaCl and caffeine, and then the chemotaxis index of NaCl was obtained from the nematodes placed on agar medium after pre-exposure to caffeine concentrations of 0.01, 0.1, 0.3, and 1.0%. Locomotor activity and preference behavior for caffeine were also estimated under these caffeine conditions. Nematodes pre-exposed to 0.3% caffeine showed inhibition of salt chemotaxis learning. Additional experiments indicated that nematodes showed a preference response to the middle concentration of caffeine (0.1%), with preference behavior declining in the 0.3% caffeine condition. Stable locomotor activity was observed under 0.01-0.3% caffeine conditions. These results suggest that salt chemotaxis learning with 0.3% caffeine is useful for investigating the effects of caffeine on learning in nematodes.

  8. Dysregulation of CDK8 and Cyclin C in tumorigenesis %Dysregulation of CDK8 and Cyclin C in tumorigenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Xu; Jun-Yuan Ji

    2011-01-01

    Appropriately controlled gene expression is fundamental for normal growth and survival of all living organisms.In eukaryotes,the transcription of protein-coding mRNAs is dependent on RNA polymerase Ⅱ (Pol Ⅱ).The multi-subunit transcription cofactor Mediator complex is proposed to regulate most,if not all,of the Pol Ⅱ-dependent transcription.Here we focus our discussion on two subunits of the Mediator complex,cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8) and its regulatory partner Cyclin C (CycC),because they are either mutated or amplified in a variety of human cancers.CDK8 functions as an oncoprotein in melanoma and colorectal cancers,thus there are considerable interests in developing drugs specifically targeting the CDK8 kinase activity.However,to evaluate the feasibility of targeting CDK8 for cancer therapy and to understand how their dysregulation contributes to tumorigenesis,it is essential to elucidate the in vivo function and regulation of CDK8-CycC,which are still poorly understood in multi-cellular organisms.We summarize the evidence linking their dysregulation to various cancers and present our bioinformatics and computational analyses on the structure and evolution of CDK8.We also discuss the implications of these observations in tumorigenesis.Because most of the Mediator subunits,including CDK8 and CycC,are highly conserved during eukaryotic evolution,we expect that investigations using model organisms such as Drosophila will provide important insights into the function and regulation of CDK8 and CycC in different cellular and developmental contexts.

  9. Cyclin D3 expression in non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Correlation with other cell cycle regulators and clinical features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Michael Boe; Nielsen, O; Pedersen, Niels Tinggaard

    2001-01-01

    analyzed immunohistochemically for cyclin D3 expression. In 43 lymphomas (21.7%), cyclin D3 was overexpressed. T-cell lymphomas more frequently overexpressed cyclin D3 than B-cell lymphomas. Furthermore, cyclin D3-overexpressing indolent lymphomas were associated with higher proliferation rate, higher p21......Waf1 expression, lower p27Kip1 expression, and altered p53. Cyclin D3 overexpression identified a subgroup of patients with indolent B-cell lymphoma with adverse clinical features: patients were older, more frequently had "B" symptoms and extranodal involvement, and were more frequently in the high...

  10. Cyclin F/FBXO1 interacts with HIV-1 Vif and restricts progeny virion infectivity by ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of Vif through SCF (Cyclin F) E3 ligase machinery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, Tracy; Chaudhary, Priyanka; Gupta, Kailash; Islam, Sehbanul; Ghosh, Payel; Santra, Manas Kumar; Mitra, Debashis

    2017-02-09

    Cyclin F, also known as FBXO1, is the largest among all cyclins which oscillates in the cell cycle like other cyclins. Apart from being a G2/M cyclin, Cyclin F functions as the substrate binding subunit of SCFCyclin F E3 ubiquitin ligase. In a gene expression analysis performed to identify novel gene modulations associated with cell cycle dysregulation during HIV-1 infection in CD4+ T cells, we observed down-regulation of Cyclin F (CCNF) gene. Later, using gene over expression and knockdown studies, we identified that Cyclin F negatively influences HIV-1 viral infectivity without any significant impact on virus production. Subsequently, we found that Cyclin F negatively regulates the expression of viral protein, Vif (Viral infectivity factor), at the protein level. We also identified a novel host-pathogen interaction between Cyclin F and Vif protein in T cells during HIV-1 infection. Mutational analysis of a Cyclin F-specific amino acid motif in the C-terminal region of Vif shows rescue of the protein from Cyclin F-mediated down-regulation. Subsequently, we have shown that Vif is a novel substrate of the SCFCyclin F E3 ligase, where Cyclin F mediates ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of Vif through physical interaction. Finally, we have shown that Cyclin F augments APOBEC3G expression through degradation of Vif to regulate infectivity of progeny virions. Taken together, our results demonstrate Cyclin F as a novel F-box protein which functions as an intrinsic cellular regulator of HIV-1 Vif and imparts a negative regulatory effect on maintenance of viral infectivity by restoring APOBEC3G expression.

  11. Molecular cloning and chromosomal localization of the human cyclin C (CCNC) and cyclin E (CCNE) genes: Deletion of the CCNC gene in human tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Haimin; Lahti, J.M.; Kidd, V.J. [St. Jude Children`s Research Hospital, Memphis, TN (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    The human G1-phase cyclins are important regulators of cell cycle progression that interact with various cyclin-dependent kinases and facilitate entry into S-phase. We have confirmed the localization of the human cyclin C (CCNC) gene to chromosome 6q21 and of human cyclin E (CCNE to 19q12). The CCNC gene structure was also determined, and we have shown that it is deleted in a subset of acute lymphoblastic leukemias, including a patient sample containing a t(2;6)(p21;q15), with no apparent cytogenetic deletion. Single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis of the remaining CCNC allele from patients with a deletion of one allele established that there were no further mutations within the exons or the flanking intronic sequences. These results suggest either that haploinsufficiency of the cyclin C protein is sufficient to promote tumorigenesis or that the important tumor suppressor gene is linked to the CCNC locus. 48 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. The acute physiological and mood effects of tea and coffee: the role of caffeine level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinlan, P T; Lane, J; Moore, K L; Aspen, J; Rycroft, J A; O'Brien, D C

    2000-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of caffeine level in tea and coffee on acute physiological responses and mood. Randomised full crossover design in subjects after overnight caffeine abstention was studied. In study 1 (n = 17) the caffeine level was manipulated naturalistically by preparing tea and coffee at different strengths (1 or 2 cups equivalent). Caffeine levels were 37.5 and 75 mg in tea, 75 and 150 mg in coffee, with water and no-drink controls. In study 2 (n = 15) caffeine level alone was manipulated (water, decaffeinated tea, plus 0, 25, 50, 100, and 200 mg caffeine). Beverage volume and temperature (55 degrees C) were constant. SBP, DBP, heart rate, skin temperature, skin conductance, and mood were monitored over each 3-h study session. In study 1, tea and coffee produced mild autonomic stimulation and an elevation in mood. There were no effects of tea vs. coffee or caffeine dose, despite a fourfold variation in the latter. Increasing beverage strength was associated with greater increases in DBP and energetic arousal. In study 2, caffeinated beverages increased SBP, DBP, and skin conductance and lowered heart rate and skin temperature compared to water. Significant dose-response relationships to caffeine were seen only for SBP, heart rate, and skin temperature. There were significant effects of caffeine on energetic arousal but no consistent dose-response effects. Caffeinated beverages acutely stimulate the autonomic nervous system and increase alertness. Although caffeine can exert dose-dependent effects on a number of acute autonomic responses, caffeine level is not an important factor. Factors besides caffeine may contribute to these acute effects.

  13. Implications of caspase-dependent proteolytic cleavage of cyclin A1 in DNA damage-induced cell death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woo, Sang Hyeok; Seo, Sung-Keum [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 215-4 Gongneung-dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); An, Sungkwan; Choe, Tae-Boo [Department of Microbiological Engineering, Kon-Kuk University, Gwangjin-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Seok-Il [Department of Laboratory Medicine, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 215-4 Gongneung-dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yun-Han, E-mail: yhlee87@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, College of Medicine, Yonsei University, 250 Seongsan-no, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, In-Chul, E-mail: parkic@kcch.re.kr [Division of Radiation Cancer Research, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, 215-4 Gongneung-dong, Nowon-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • Caspase-1 mediates doxorubicin-induced downregulation of cyclin A1. • Active caspase-1 effectively cleaved cyclin A1 at D165. • Cyclin A1 expression is involved in DNA damage-induced cell death. - Abstract: Cyclin A1 is an A-type cyclin that directly binds to CDK2 to regulate cell-cycle progression. In the present study, we found that doxorubicin decreased the expression of cyclin A1 at the protein level in A549 lung cancer cells, while markedly downregulating its mRNA levels. Interestingly, doxorubicin upregulated caspase-1 in a concentration-dependent manner, and z-YAVD-fmk, a specific inhibitor of caspase-1, reversed the doxorubicin-induced decrease in cyclin A1 in A549 lung cancer and MCF7 breast cancer cells. Active caspase-1 effectively cleaved cyclin A1 at D165 into two fragments, which in vitro cleavage assays showed were further cleaved by caspase-3. Finally, we found that overexpression of cyclin A1 significantly reduced the cytotoxicity of doxorubicin, and knockdown of cyclin A1 by RNA interference enhanced the sensitivity of cells to ionizing radiation. Our data suggest a new mechanism for the downregulation of cyclin A1 by DNA-damaging stimuli that could be intimately involved in the cell death induced by DNA damage-inducing stimuli, including doxorubicin and ionizing radiation.

  14. Cyclin A2 is required for sister chromatid segregation, but not separase control, in mouse oocyte meiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touati, Sandra A; Cladière, Damien; Lister, Lisa M; Leontiou, Ioanna; Chambon, Jean-Philippe; Rattani, Ahmed; Böttger, Franziska; Stemmann, Olaf; Nasmyth, Kim; Herbert, Mary; Wassmann, Katja

    2012-11-29

    In meiosis, two specialized cell divisions allow the separation of paired chromosomes first, then of sister chromatids. Separase removes the cohesin complex holding sister chromatids together in a stepwise manner from chromosome arms in meiosis I, then from the centromere region in meiosis II. Using mouse oocytes, our study reveals that cyclin A2 promotes entry into meiosis, as well as an additional unexpected role; namely, its requirement for separase-dependent sister chromatid separation in meiosis II. Untimely cyclin A2-associated kinase activity in meiosis I leads to precocious sister separation, whereas inhibition of cyclin A2 in meiosis II prevents it. Accordingly, endogenous cyclin A is localized to kinetochores throughout meiosis II, but not in anaphase I. Additionally, we found that cyclin B1, but not cyclin A2, inhibits separase in meiosis I. These findings indicate that separase-dependent cohesin removal is differentially regulated by cyclin B1 and A2 in mammalian meiosis.

  15. Regulation of GATA-binding protein 2 levels via ubiquitin-dependent degradation by Fbw7: involvement of cyclin B-cyclin-dependent kinase 1-mediated phosphorylation of THR176 in GATA-binding protein 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Tomomi; Kitagawa, Kyoko; Ohhata, Tatsuya; Sakai, Satoshi; Uchida, Chiharu; Shibata, Kiyoshi; Minegishi, Naoko; Yumimoto, Kanae; Nakayama, Keiichi I; Masumoto, Kazuma; Katou, Fuminori; Niida, Hiroyuki; Kitagawa, Masatoshi

    2015-04-17

    A GATA family transcription factor, GATA-binding protein 2 (GATA2), participates in cell growth and differentiation of various cells, such as hematopoietic stem cells. Although its expression level is controlled by transcriptional induction and proteolytic degradation, the responsible E3 ligase has not been identified. Here, we demonstrate that F-box/WD repeat-containing protein 7 (Fbw7/Fbxw7), a component of Skp1, Cullin 1, F-box-containing complex (SCF)-type E3 ligase, is an E3 ligase for GATA2. GATA2 contains a cell division control protein 4 (Cdc4) phosphodegron (CPD), a consensus motif for ubiquitylation by Fbw7, which includes Thr(176). Ectopic expression of Fbw7 destabilized GATA2 and promoted its proteasomal degradation. Substitution of threonine 176 to alanine in GATA2 inhibited binding with Fbw7, and the ubiquitylation and degradation of GATA2 by Fbw7 was suppressed. The CPD kinase, which mediates the phosphorylation of Thr(176), was cyclin B-cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1). Moreover, depletion of endogenous Fbw7 stabilized endogenous GATA2 in K562 cells. Conditional Fbw7 depletion in mice increased GATA2 levels in hematopoietic stem cells and myeloid progenitors at the early stage. Increased GATA2 levels in Fbw7-conditional knock-out mice were correlated with a decrease in a c-Kit high expressing population of myeloid progenitor cells. Our results suggest that Fbw7 is a bona fide E3 ubiquitin ligase for GATA2 in vivo.

  16. Determination of Caffeine in Beverages by High Performance Liquid Chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiNunzio, James E.

    1985-01-01

    Describes the equipment, procedures, and results for the determination of caffeine in beverages by high performance liquid chromatography. The method is simple, fast, accurate, and, because sample preparation is minimal, it is well suited for use in a teaching laboratory. (JN)

  17. Caffeine supplementation and reactive agility in elite youth soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, J Bradley; Korgaokar, Ajit; Farley, Richard S; Coons, John M; Caputo, Jennifer L

    2014-05-01

    This study examined the effects of caffeine supplementation (6 mg·kg-1) on performance of a reactive agility test (RAT) in 17 elite, male, youth (M = 14 y) soccer players. Using a double-blind, repeated-measures design, players completed 4 days of testing on the RAT after a standardized warm-up. On day 1, anthropometric measurements were taken and players were accommodated to the RAT. On day 2, baseline performance was established. Caffeine or placebo conditions were randomly assigned on day 3 and the condition was reversed on day 4. Players completed 3 randomized trials of the RAT on days 2, 3, and 4 with at least 1 trial to the players' dominant and nondominant sides. There were no significant differences among conditions in reaction time (RT) to the dominant side, heart rates at any point of measurement, or ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) after completion of the warm-up. Caffeine produced faster RT to the nondominant side (P = .041) and higher RPE at the conclusion of the RAT (P = .013). The effect on the total time (TT) to complete the agility test to the nondominant side approached significance (P = .051). Sprint time and TT to either side did not differ. Caffeine supplementation may provide ergogenic benefit to elite, male, youth soccer players.

  18. EFFECTS OF CAFFEINE ON EXERCISE PERFORMANCE IN SEDENTARY FEMALES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen E. Wallman

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of caffeine ingestion on total work, average power, oxygen consumption (VO2, respiratory exchange ratio (RER, ratings of perceived exertion (RPE, heart rate (HR and energy expenditure (kJ during stationary cycling at a standardised power output, as well as during a set time period where participants were required to cycle as fast as they could. Ten healthy, sedentary, female, non- regular caffeine users completed 15 min of stationary cycling at a standardised power output equating to 65% HRmax (Phase A, followed by 10 min of stationary cycling where they were required to cycled as fast as they could (Phase B after ingesting 6.0 mg·kg-1 of caffeine or placebo 60 min prior to exercise. VO2 and energy expenditure were significantly higher at the end of Phase A (p = 0.008 and p = 0.011, respectively. All other variables examined in Phase A were similar between trials. In Phase B, there were no significant differences found for any variable assessed. While caffeine ingestion resulted in significant increases in VO2 and energy expenditure during steady-state exercise, it did not improve cycling performance during a 10 min trial where participants were required to cycle as fast as they could

  19. Caffeine and theobromine levels in selected Nigerian beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eteng, M U; Eyong, E U; Eka, O U; Umoh, I B; Ebong, P E; Ettarh, R R

    1999-01-01

    Caffeine and theobromine contents (mg/g) were determined in samples of selected Nigerian beverage products. The beverages were cocoa (Milo, Bournvita, Rosevita and Enervita), coffee (Nescafe, Bongo, and Maxwell House decaffeinated) and tea (Lipton). The theobromine contents of samples of Milo, Bournvita, Rosevita, Enervita, Nescafe, Bongo, Maxwell House decaffeinated coffee and Lipton were 62.10+/-5.21, 64.80+/-6.72, 82.80+/-4.43, 80.37+/-6.80, 27.00+/-4.31, 14.67+/-2.90, 23.46+/-3.13 and 12.60+/-1.52, respectively. The corresponding caffeine contents of these samples were 2.78+/-0.43 (Milo), 3.17+/-0.36 (Bournvita), 0.92+/-0.51 (Rosevita), 1.05+/-0.68 (Enervita), 93.66+/-8.91 (Nescafe), 6.47+/-2.42 (Bongo), 37.22+/-5.34 (Lipton), and 0.21+/-0.11 (Maxwell House decaffeinated coffee). Semi-processed cocoa beverages (Rosevita and Enervita) had significantly (p theobromine compared with the finished cocoas (Milo and Bournvita). Similarly, Nescafe contained significantly (p < 0.05) higher levels of caffeine compared to Maxwell House (decaffeinated coffee) and Bongo. Levels of caffeine in Lipton tea were moderate.

  20. The influence of caffeine on sustained attention : An ERP study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorist, MM; Snel, J; De Ruiter, MB; Ruijter, J

    2000-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of caffeine on sustained attention by measuring concentration and fatigue. Event-related potentials (ERPs) and behavioral measures were recorded from 12 participants who worked continuously for approximately 10 min in a self-paced reaction task under condit

  1. The Influence of Caffeine on Sustained Attention: An ERP study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorist, MM; Snel, J; De Ruiter, MB; Ruijter, J

    2000-01-01

    The present study investigated the effects of caffeine on sustained attention by measuring concentration and fatigue. Event-related potentials (ERPs) and behavioral measures were recorded from 12 participants who worked continuously for approximately 10 min in a self-paced reaction task under condit

  2. The Determination of Caffeine in Coffee: Sense or Nonsense?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckers, Jozef L.

    2004-01-01

    The presence of caffeine in coffee is determined by the use of separation devices and UV-vis spectrophotometry. The results indicate that the use of various analytical tools helps to perceive the higher concentration values obtained through UV-vis spectrophotometry than with separation methods.

  3. Caffeine as a protective factor in dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eskelinen, Marjo H; Kivipelto, Miia

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine has well-known short-term stimulating effects on central nervous system, but the long-term impacts on cognition have been less clear. Dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are rapidly increasing public health problems in ageing populations and at the moment curative treatment is lacking. Thus, the putative protective effects of caffeine against dementia/AD are of great interest. Here, we discuss findings from the longitudinal epidemiological studies about caffeine/coffee/tea and dementia/AD/cognitive functioning with a special emphasis on our recent results from the Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging and Dementia (CAIDE) study. The findings of the previous studies are somewhat inconsistent, but most studies (3 out of 5) support coffee's favorable effects against cognitive decline, dementia or AD. In addition, two studies had combined coffee and tea drinking and indicated some positive effects on cognitive functioning. For tea drinking, protective effects against cognitive decline/dementia are still less evident. In the CAIDE study, coffee drinking of 3-5 cups per day at midlife was associated with a decreased risk of dementia/AD by about 65% at late-life. In conclusion, coffee drinking may be associated with a decreased risk of dementia/AD. This may be mediated by caffeine and/or other mechanisms like antioxidant capacity and increased insulin sensitivity. This finding might open possibilities for prevention or postponing the onset of dementia/AD.

  4. Spontaneous Abortion and a Diet Drug Containing Caffeine and Ephedrine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Howards, Penelope P; Hertz-Picciotto, Irva; Bech, Bodil H

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medications may be consumed periconceptionally before a woman knows she is pregnant. In this study, the authors evaluate the association of a prescription diet drug (Letigen) containing ephedrine (20 mg) and caffeine (200 mg) with spontaneous abortion (SAB) in the Danish National Birth...

  5. Histone deacetylase inhibitor, Trichostatin A induces ubiquitin-dependent cyclin D1 degradation in MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Coombes R

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cyclin D1 is an important regulator of G1-S phase cell cycle transition and has been shown to be important for breast cancer development. GSK3β phosphorylates cyclin D1 on Thr-286, resulting in enhanced ubiquitylation, nuclear export and degradation of the cyclin in the cytoplasm. Recent findings suggest that the development of small-molecule cyclin D1 ablative agents is of clinical relevance. We have previously shown that the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA induces the rapid ubiquitin-dependent degradation of cyclin D1 in MCF-7 breast cancer cells prior to repression of cyclin D1 gene (CCND1 transcription. TSA treatment also resulted in accumulation of polyubiquitylated GFP-cyclin D1 species and reduced levels of the recombinant protein within the nucleus. Results Here we provide further evidence for TSA-induced ubiquitin-dependent degradation of cyclin D1 and demonstrate that GSK3β-mediated nuclear export facilitates this activity. Our observations suggest that TSA treatment results in enhanced cyclin D1 degradation via the GSK3β/CRM1-dependent nuclear export/26S proteasomal degradation pathway in MCF-7 cells. Conclusion We have demonstrated that rapid TSA-induced cyclin D1 degradation in MCF-7 cells requires GSK3β-mediated Thr-286 phosphorylation and the ubiquitin-dependent 26S proteasome pathway. Drug induced cyclin D1 repression contributes to the inhibition of breast cancer cell proliferation and can sensitize cells to CDK and Akt inhibitors. In addition, anti-cyclin D1 therapy may be highly specific for treating human breast cancer. The development of potent and effective cyclin D1 ablative agents is therefore of clinical relevance. Our findings suggest that HDAC inhibitors may have therapeutic potential as small-molecule cyclin D1 ablative agents.

  6. Rb and FZR1/Cdh1 determine CDK4/6-cyclin D requirement in C. elegans and human cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    The, Inge; Ruijtenberg, Suzan; Bouchet, Benjamin P; Cristobal Gonzalez de Durana, Alba; Prinsen, Martine B W; van Mourik, Tim; Koreth, John; Xu, Huihong; Heck, Albert J R; Akhmanova, Anna; Cuppen, Edwin; Boxem, Mike; Munoz Murillo, Ara; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6 (CDK4/6) in complex with D-type cyclins promote cell cycle entry. Most human cancers contain overactive CDK4/6-cyclin D, and CDK4/6-specific inhibitors are promising anti-cancer therapeutics. Here, we investigate the critical functions of CDK4/6-cyclin D kinases, sta

  7. Associations between smoking and caffeine consumption in two European cohorts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Amy E.; Ware, Jennifer J.; McMahon, George; Hottenga, Jouke‐Jan; Baselmans, Bart M. L.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Munafò, Marcus R.; Vink, Jacqueline M.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims To estimate associations between smoking initiation, smoking persistence and smoking heaviness and caffeine consumption in two population‐based samples from the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. Design Observational study employing data on self‐reported smoking behaviour and caffeine consumption. Setting Adults from the general population in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. Participants Participants from the Netherlands Twin Register [NTR: n = 21 939, mean age 40.8, standard deviation (SD) = 16.9, 62.6% female] and the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC: n = 9086, mean age 33.2, SD = 4.7, 100% female). Measurements Smoking initiation (ever versus never smoking), smoking persistence (current versus former smoking), smoking heaviness (number of cigarettes smoked) and caffeine consumption in mg per day through coffee, tea, cola and energy drinks. Findings After correction for age, gender (NTR), education and social class (ALSPAC), smoking initiation was associated with consuming on average 52.8 [95% confidence interval (CI) = 45.6–60.0; NTR] and 59.5 (95% CI = 51.8–67.2; ALSPAC) mg more caffeine per day. Smoking persistence was also associated with consuming more caffeine [+57.9 (95% CI = 45.2–70.5) and +83.2 (95% CI = 70.2–96.3) mg, respectively]. Each additional cigarette smoked per day was associated with 3.7 (95% CI = 1.9–5.5; NTR) and 8.4 (95% CI = 6.9–10.0; ALSPAC) mg higher daily caffeine consumption in current smokers. Smoking was associated positively with coffee consumption and less strongly with cola and energy drinks. For tea, associations were positive in ALSPAC and negative in NTR. Conclusions There appears to be a positive association between smoking and caffeine consumption in the Netherlands and the United Kingdom. PMID:26750569

  8. Severe acute caffeine poisoning due to intradermal injections: Mesotherapy hazard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perković-Vukčević Nataša

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Caffeine is indicated in the treatment of migraine headaches, as well as neonatal apnea and bradycardia syndrome. In mild poisoning, the most prevalent symptoms are nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, tremor, anxiety and headache. In more severe cases, symptoms consist of heart rythym abnormalities, myocardial infarction and seizures. Due to its common lipolytic effect, caffeine is used in mesotherapy, usually in combination with drugs of similar effect. We presented a patient with acute iatrogenic caffeine poisoning. Case report. A 51-year-old woman, with preexisting hypertension and hypertensive cardiomyopathy was subjected to cosmetic treatment in order to remove fat by intradermal caffeine injections. During the treatment the patient felt sickness, an urge to vomit, and a pronounced deterioration of general condition. Upon examination, the patient exhibited somnolence, hypotension and nonsustained ventricular tachycardia, which was sufficient enough evidence for further hospitalization. On admission to the intensive care unit the patient was anxious with increased heart rate, normotensive, with cold, damp skin, and visible traces of injection sites with surrounding hematomas on the anterior abdominal wall. Paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT on electrocardiographic monitoring was found. The laboratory analysis determined a lowered potassium level of 2.1 mmol/L (normal range 3,5 - 5.2 mmol/L, and a toxicological analysis (liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection proved a toxic concentration of caffeine in plasma - 85.03 mg/L (toxic concentration over 25 mg/L. On application of intensive therapy, antiarrhythmics, and substitution of potassium, as well as both symptomatic and supportive therapy, there was a significant recovery. The patient was discharged without any sequele within four days. Conclusion. A presented rare iatrogenic acute caffeine poisoning occured due to massive absorption of caffeine from the

  9. Caffeine Ingestion Improves Repeated Freestyle Sprints in Elite Male Swimmers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goods, Paul S.R.; Landers, Grant; Fulton, Sacha

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the efficacy of a moderate dose of caffeine to improve repeat-sprint performance in elite freestyle sprinters. Nine highly trained male swimmers performed 6 x 75 m freestyle sprints on two occasions 1-h after consuming either 3 mg·kg-1 caffeine (CAF), or placebo, in a cross-over manner. Capillary blood samples for the analysis of blood lactate concentration and pH were collected after the 1st, 3rd, and 5th sprint, while heart rate and perceived exertion (RPE) were collected after every sprint. There was a moderate effect for improved mean sprint time in the CAF condition (0.52 s; 1.3%; d = 0.50). When assessed individually, there was a large effect for improved performance in sprints 3 (1.00 s; 2.5%; d = 1.02) and 4 (0.84 s; 2.1%; d = 0.84) in CAF compared to placebo, with worthwhile performance improvement found for each of the first 5 sprints. There was a significant treatment effect for higher blood lactate concentration for CAF (p = 0.029), and a significant treatment*time effect for reduced pH in the CAF condition (p = 0.004). Mean heart rate (167 ± 9 bpm vs 169 ± 7 bpm) and RPE (17 ± 1 vs 17 ± 1) were not different between placebo and CAF trials, respectively. This investigation is the first to demonstrate enhanced repeat-sprint ability in swimmers following acute caffeine ingestion. It appears likely that the combination of a moderate dose of caffeine (3-6 mg·kg-1) with trained athletes is most likely to enhance repeat-sprint ability in various athletic populations; however, the exact mechanism(s) for an improved repeat-sprint ability following acute caffeine ingestion remain unknown. Key points A moderate dose of caffeine (3 mg·kg-1) ingested 1 h before a repeat-sprint freestyle set significantly improves mean sprint time in elite swimmers. The combination of at least a moderate dose of caffeine (>3 mg·kg-1) with trained athletes appears the most likely to result in ergogenic benefit to anaerobic

  10. Growth dynamics and cyclin expression in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Biskup

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated cell growth dynamics and cyclins B1 and E expression in cell lines derived from mycosis fungoides (MyLa, Sézary syndrome (SeAx, and CD30+ lympho-proliferative diseases (Mac1, Mac2a, JK. Mac1 and Mac2a had the highest growth rate (doubling time 18-28 h, >90% cycling cells whereas SeAx was proliferating slowly (doub-ling time 55 h, approximately 35% cycling cells. Expression of cyclin B1 correlated positively with doubling time whereas expression of cyclin E was unscheduled and constant across the investigated cell lines. All cell lines exhibited high expression of PCNA. Thus, we concluded that cyclin B1 could be used for rapid screening of cell proliferation in malignant lymphocytes derived from cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

  11. Cyclin A2:At the crossroads of cell cycle and cell invasion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdelhalim; Loukil; Caroline; T; Cheung; Nawal; Bendris; Bénédicte; Lemmers; Marion; Peter; Jean; Marie; Blanchard

    2015-01-01

    Cyclin A2 is an essential regulator of the cell division cycle through the activation of kinases that participate to the regulation of S phase as well as the mitotic entry. However,whereas its degradation by the proteasome in mid mitosis was thought to be essential for mitosis to proceed,recent observations show that a small fraction of cyclin A2 persists beyond metaphase and is degraded by autophagy. Its implication in the control of cytoskeletal dynamics and cell movement has unveiled its role in the modulation of Rho A activity. Since this GTPase is involved in both cell rounding early in mitosis and later,in the formation of the cleavage furrow,this suggests that cyclin A2 is a novel actor in cytokinesis. Taken together,these data point to this cyclin as a potential mediator of cell-niche interactions whose dysregulation could be taken as a hallmark of metastasis.

  12. Caffeine Ingestion Improves Repeated Freestyle Sprints in Elite Male Swimmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S.R. Goods, Grant Landers, Sacha Fulton

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this investigation was to determine the efficacy of a moderate dose of caffeine to improve repeat-sprint performance in elite freestyle sprinters. Nine highly trained male swimmers performed 6 x 75 m freestyle sprints on two occasions 1-h after consuming either 3 mg·kg-1 caffeine (CAF, or placebo, in a cross-over manner. Capillary blood samples for the analysis of blood lactate concentration and pH were collected after the 1st, 3rd, and 5th sprint, while heart rate and perceived exertion (RPE were collected after every sprint. There was a moderate effect for improved mean sprint time in the CAF condition (0.52 s; 1.3%; d = 0.50. When assessed individually, there was a large effect for improved performance in sprints 3 (1.00 s; 2.5%; d = 1.02 and 4 (0.84 s; 2.1%; d = 0.84 in CAF compared to placebo, with worthwhile performance improvement found for each of the first 5 sprints. There was a significant treatment effect for higher blood lactate concentration for CAF (p = 0.029, and a significant treatment*time effect for reduced pH in the CAF condition (p = 0.004. Mean heart rate (167 ± 9 bpm vs 169 ± 7 bpm and RPE (17 ± 1 vs 17 ± 1 were not different between placebo and CAF trials, respectively. This investigation is the first to demonstrate enhanced repeat-sprint ability in swimmers following acute caffeine ingestion. It appears likely that the combination of a moderate dose of caffeine (3-6 mg·kg-1 with trained athletes is most likely to enhance repeat-sprint ability in various athletic populations; however, the exact mechanism(s for an improved repeat-sprint ability following acute caffeine ingestion remain unknown.

  13. Adolescent caffeine consumption increases adulthood anxiety-related behavior and modifies neuroendocrine signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Casey E; Newsom, Ryan J; Stafford, Jacob; Scott, Talia; Archuleta, Solana; Levis, Sophia C; Spencer, Robert L; Campeau, Serge; Bachtell, Ryan K

    2016-05-01

    Caffeine is a commonly used psychoactive substance and consumption by children and adolescents continues to rise. Here, we examine the lasting effects of adolescent caffeine consumption on anxiety-related behaviors and several neuroendocrine measures in adulthood. Adolescent male Sprague-Dawley rats consumed caffeine (0.3g/L) for 28 consecutive days from postnatal day 28 (P28) to P55. Age-matched control rats consumed water. Behavioral testing for anxiety-related behavior began in adulthood (P62) 7 days after removal of caffeine. Adolescent caffeine consumption enhanced anxiety-related behavior in an open field, social interaction test, and elevated plus maze. Similar caffeine consumption in adult rats did not alter anxiety-related behavior after caffeine removal. Characterization of neuroendocrine measures was next assessed to determine whether the changes in anxiety were associated with modifications in the HPA axis. Blood plasma levels of corticosterone (CORT) were assessed throughout the caffeine consumption procedure in adolescent rats. Adolescent caffeine consumption elevated plasma CORT 24h after initiation of caffeine consumption that normalized over the course of the 28-day consumption procedure. CORT levels were also elevated 24h after caffeine removal and remained elevated for 7 days. Despite elevated basal CORT in adult rats that consumed caffeine during adolescence, the adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and CORT response to placement on an elevated pedestal (a mild stressor) was significantly blunted. Lastly, we assessed changes in basal and stress-induced c-fos and corticotropin-releasing factor (Crf) mRNA expression in brain tissue collected at 7 days withdrawal from adolescent caffeine. Adolescent caffeine consumption increased basal c-fos mRNA in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus. Adolescent caffeine consumption had no other effects on the basal or stress-induced c-fos mRNA changes. Caffeine consumption during adolescence increased

  14. p21Cip1 Protection against Hyperoxia Requires Bcl-XL and Is Uncoupled from Its Ability to Suppress Growth

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21Cip1/Waf1/Sdi1 protects the lung against hyperoxia, but the mechanism of protection remains unclear because loss of p21 does not lead to aberrant cell proliferation. Because some members of the Bcl-2 gene family have been implicated in hyperoxia-induced cell death, the current study investigated their expression as well as p21-dependent growth suppression and cytoprotection. Conditional overexpression of full-length p21, its amino-terminal cyclin-bindi...

  15. A single fission yeast mitotic cyclin B p34cdc2 kinase promotes both S-phase and mitosis in the absence of G1 cyclins.

    OpenAIRE

    Fisher, D. L.; Nurse, P

    1996-01-01

    Deletion of the fission yeast mitotic B-type cyclin gene cdc13 causes cells to undergo successive rounds of DNA replication. We have used a strain which expresses cdc13 conditionally to investigate re-replication. Activity of Start genes cdc2 and cdc10 is necessary and p34cdc2 kinase is active in re-replicating cells. We tested to see whether other cyclins were required for re-replication using cdc13delta. Further deletion of cig1 and puc1 had no effect, but deletion of cig2/cyc17 caused a se...

  16. Role of Cyclin E as an Early Event in Ovarian Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    chicken fibroblastic cell line was used for RCAS-cyclin E FL and RCAS-cyclin E trunc 2 transfection and subsequent virus production. DF-1 cells...viruses with different oncogenes were grown in 10-cm tissue culture dishes in DMEM with 10% FBS, and 1% antibiotics . Once cells were completely confluent...Model: We have crossed transgenic mice that express Keratin5-TVA ( chicken retroviral keratin receptor that is expressed on the ovary) with conditional

  17. Involvement of cyclin K posttranscriptional regulation in the formation of Artemia diapause cysts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Artemia eggs tend to develop ovoviviparously to yield nauplius larvae in good rearing conditions; while under adverse situations, they tend to develop oviparously and encysted diapause embryos are formed instead. However, the intrinsic mechanisms regulating this process are not well understood. PRINCIPAL FINDING: This study has characterized the function of cyclin K, a regulatory subunit of the positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb in the two different developmental pathways of Artemia. In the diapause-destined embryo, Western blots showed that the cyclin K protein was down-regulated as the embryo entered dormancy and reverted to relatively high levels of expression once development resumed, consistent with the fluctuations in phosphorylation of position 2 serines (Ser2 in the C-terminal domain (CTD of the largest subunit (Rpb1 of RNA polymerase II (RNAP II. Interestingly, the cyclin K transcript levels remained constant during this process. In vitro translation data indicated that the template activity of cyclin K mRNA stored in the postdiapause cyst was repressed. In addition, in vivo knockdown of cyclin K in developing embryos by RNA interference eliminated phosphorylation of the CTD Ser2 of RNAP II and induced apoptosis by inhibiting the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK survival signaling pathway. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, these findings reveal a role for cyclin K in regulating RNAP II activity during diapause embryo development, which involves the post-transcriptional regulation of cyclin K. In addition, a further role was identified for cyclin K in regulating the control of cell survival during embryogenesis through ERK signaling pathways.

  18. Expression of Cyclin D1 and P16 in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Biswajit; Raphael, Vandana; Khonglah, Yookarin; GiriLynrah, Kyrshanlang

    2015-10-01

    BACKGROUND Esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) is one of the lethal cancers with a high incidence rate in Asia. Many genes including cyclin D1 and p16 play important role in its carcinogenesis. We aimed to analyze the expressions of cyclin D1 and p16 with the various clinicopathological characteristics of ESCC. METHODS We examined 30 biopsy samples of ESCC for cyclin D1 and p16 protein expressions using immunohistochemistry. Immunointensity was classified as no immunostaining (-), weakly immunostaining (+), weak immunostaining (++) and strongly positive immunostaining (+++). RESULTS Out of the 30 cases, positive expression of cyclin D1 was detected in 26 cases (86.7%). The percentage of tumors with invasion to the adventitia (88.2%), lymph node metastasis (87.5%), and tumors which were poorly differentiated (92.9%) were higher in cyclin D1 positive tumors than in the cyclin D1 negative tumors. However no significant association was found between cyclin D1 expression and the different clinicopathological parameters.There were 22 cases of ESCC (73.3 %) which showed negativity for p16. The percentage of tumors with invasion to the adventitia (82.4%) and poorly differentiated tumors (92.9%) were higher in the p16 negative tumors than in the p16 positive tumors. There was significant association between the histological grade and p16 expression (p=0.012). However, there were no significant association with regard to site, size and lymph node status of the tumors and p16 expression. CONCLUSION The study shows that alterations of cyclin D1 and p16 play an important role in ESCC. Loss of p16 expression was associated with poor differentiation.

  19. Kinetics of growth and caffeine demethylase production of Pseudomonas sp. in bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gummadi, Sathyanarayana N; Santhosh, Devarai

    2010-09-01

    The effect of various initial caffeine concentrations on growth and caffeine demethylase production by Pseudomonas sp. was studied in bioreactor. At initial concentration of 6.5 g l(-1) caffeine, Pseudomonas sp. showed a maximum specific growth rate of 0.2 h(-1), maximum degradation rate of 1.1 g h(-1), and caffeine demethylase activity of 18,762 U g CDW(-1) (CDW: cell dry weight). Caffeine degradation rate was 25 times higher in bioreactor than in shake flask. For the first time, we show highest degradation of 75 g caffeine (initial concentration 20 g l(-1)) in 120 h, suggesting that the tested strain has potential for successful bioprocess for caffeine degradation. Growth kinetics showed substrate inhibition phenomenon. Various substrate inhibition models were fitted to the kinetic data, amongst which the double-exponential (R(2) = 0.94), Luong (R(2) = 0.92), and Yano and Koga 2 (R(2) = 0.94) models were found to be the best. The Luedeking-Piret model showed that caffeine demethylase production kinetics was growth related. This is the first report on production of high levels of caffeine demethylase in batch bioreactor with faster degradation rate and high tolerance to caffeine, hence clearly suggesting that Pseudomonas sp. used in this study is a potential biocatalyst for industrial decaffeination.

  20. Caffeine Consuming Children and Adolescents Show Altered Sleep Behavior and Deep Sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aepli, Andrina; Kurth, Salome; Tesler, Noemi; Jenni, Oskar G; Huber, Reto

    2015-10-15

    Caffeine is the most commonly ingested psychoactive drug worldwide with increasing consumption rates among young individuals. While caffeine leads to decreased sleep quality in adults, studies investigating how caffeine consumption affects children's and adolescents' sleep remain scarce. We explored the effects of regular caffeine consumption on sleep behavior and the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG) in children and adolescents (10-16 years). While later habitual bedtimes (Caffeine 23:14 ± 11.4, Controls 22:17 ± 15.4) and less time in bed were found in caffeine consumers compared to the control group (Caffeine 08:10 ± 13.3, Controls 09:03 ± 16.1), morning tiredness was unaffected. Furthermore, caffeine consumers exhibited reduced sleep EEG slow-wave activity (SWA, 1-4.5 Hz) at the beginning of the night compared to controls (20% ± 9% average reduction across all electrodes and subjects). Comparable reductions were found for alpha activity (8.25-9.75 Hz). These effects, however, disappeared in the morning hours. Our findings suggest that caffeine consumption in adolescents may lead to later bedtimes and reduced SWA, a well-established marker of sleep depth. Because deep sleep is involved in recovery processes during sleep, further research is needed to understand whether a caffeine-induced loss of sleep depth interacts with neuronal network refinement processes that occur during the sensitive period of adolescent development.

  1. Caffeine Consuming Children and Adolescents Show Altered Sleep Behavior and Deep Sleep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrina Aepli

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is the most commonly ingested psychoactive drug worldwide with increasing consumption rates among young individuals. While caffeine leads to decreased sleep quality in adults, studies investigating how caffeine consumption affects children’s and adolescents’ sleep remain scarce. We explored the effects of regular caffeine consumption on sleep behavior and the sleep electroencephalogram (EEG in children and adolescents (10–16 years. While later habitual bedtimes (Caffeine 23:14 ± 11.4, Controls 22:17 ± 15.4 and less time in bed were found in caffeine consumers compared to the control group (Caffeine 08:10 ± 13.3, Controls 09:03 ± 16.1, morning tiredness was unaffected. Furthermore, caffeine consumers exhibited reduced sleep EEG slow-wave activity (SWA, 1–4.5 Hz at the beginning of the night compared to controls (20% ± 9% average reduction across all electrodes and subjects. Comparable reductions were found for alpha activity (8.25–9.75 Hz. These effects, however, disappeared in the morning hours. Our findings suggest that caffeine consumption in adolescents may lead to later bedtimes and reduced SWA, a well-established marker of sleep depth. Because deep sleep is involved in recovery processes during sleep, further research is needed to understand whether a caffeine-induced loss of sleep depth interacts with neuronal network refinement processes that occur during the sensitive period of adolescent development.

  2. Consumption of an acute dose of caffeine reduces acquisition but not memory in the honey bee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustard, Julie A; Dews, Lauren; Brugato, Arlana; Dey, Kevin; Wright, Geraldine A

    2012-06-15

    Caffeine affects several molecules that are also involved in the processes underlying learning and memory such as cAMP and calcium. However, studies of caffeine's influence on learning and memory in mammals are often contradictory. Invertebrate model systems have provided valuable insight into the actions of many neuroactive compounds including ethanol and cocaine. We use the honey bee (Apis mellifera) to investigate how the ingestion of acute doses of caffeine before, during, and after conditioning influences performance in an appetitive olfactory learning and memory task. Consumption of caffeine doses of 0.01 M or greater during or prior to conditioning causes a significant reduction in response levels during acquisition. Although bees find the taste of caffeine to be aversive at high concentrations, the bitter taste does not explain the reduction in acquisition observed for bees fed caffeine before conditioning. While high doses of caffeine reduced performance during acquisition, the response levels of bees given caffeine were the same as those of the sucrose only control group in a recall test 24h after conditioning. In addition, caffeine administered after conditioning had no affect on recall. These results suggest that caffeine specifically affects performance during acquisition and not the processes involved in the formation of early long term memory.

  3. Sustained-release of caffeine from a polymeric tablet matrix: An in vitro and pharmacokinetic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, Donna [Defence Medical and Environmental Research Institute, DSO National Laboratories (Kent Ridge), 27 Medical Drive, 12-00, Singapore 117597 (Singapore); Zhao Bin [Defence Medical and Environmental Research Institute, DSO National Laboratories (Kent Ridge), 27 Medical Drive, 12-00, Singapore 117597 (Singapore); Moochhala, Shabbir [Defence Medical and Environmental Research Institute, DSO National Laboratories (Kent Ridge), 27 Medical Drive, 12-00, Singapore 117597 (Singapore)]. E-mail: mshabbir@dso.org.sg; Yang Yiyan [Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology, 31 Biopolis Way, 04-01, The Nanos, Singapore 138669 (Singapore)

    2006-07-25

    Caffeine is utilized as a stimulant to impart a desired level of alertness during certain working hours. Usually, a single dose of caffeine induces 2-3 h of alertness coupled with side effects whereas a longer effect of 8-12 h is very useful for both daily life and military action. Thus, there is a need to deliver the stimulant continuously to an individual at one time to impart an increased level of alertness for the period stated after administration. This study aimed to design a polymeric microparticle system for sustained delivery of caffeine using a polymeric matrix. Poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) was used as the erodible matrix material and the caffeine polymeric tablets were fabricated by compression using a Graseby Specac hydraulic press. In vitro release profiles as well as the pharmacokinetics studies data were obtained. Caffeine tablets fabricated using various polymers showed a high initial burst release type profile as compared to the caffeine-PEO-tablet. The PK studies showed sustained delivery of caffeine resulted in two expected phenomena: a reduction in the initial high rate of caffeine release (burst release) as well as a reduction in the change in caffeine concentration in the systemic circulation. A simple two-component system for sustained-release caffeine formulation therefore has been achieved.

  4. Caffeine consumption among adults on benzodiazepine therapy: United States 1988-1994.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Michael; Safran, Marc; Eberhardt, Mark

    2004-08-01

    The concomitant use of benzodiazepines and caffeine was studied to learn if caffeine consumption varied as a function of benzodiazepine use. Caffeine may antagonize the effects of benzodiazepine and even relatively small amounts can aggravate symptoms associated with anxiety disorders. In addition, caffeine can cause or aggravate insomnia, one of the main reasons cited for use by the subjects in this analysis. Given this, there would seem to be sufficient reason for at least some users of benzodiazepines to consider, with their physicians, avoiding or limiting caffeine consumption. Data from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were analyzed to obtain a nationally representative sample of benzodiazepine users. Subjects included 253 individuals (64% women) whose median age was 54 yr. Approximately 88% of benzodiazepine users reported caffeine consumption in the 24-hr. Dietary Recall. 26% of benzodiazepine users and 23% of nonusers reported consuming greater than 250 mg of caffeine during the 24-hr. reference period. In regression analyses, no significant relationships were found between reported caffeine consumption and benzodiazepine use. This study suggests that users and nonusers of benzodiazepines ingest similar amounts of caffeine even though some users should probably avoid or limit caffeine use.

  5. Behavioural effects of compounds co-consumed in dietary forms of caffeinated plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskell, C F; Dodd, F L; Wightman, E L; Kennedy, D O

    2013-06-01

    Research into the cognitive and mood effects of caffeine in human subjects has highlighted some fairly robust and well-accepted effects. However, the majority of these studies have focused on caffeine in isolation; whilst caffeine is normally consumed in the form of plant-derived products and extracts that invariably contain other potentially bioactive phytochemicals. The aim of the present review is to consider the possible mechanisms of action of co-occurring phytochemicals, and any epidemiological evidence suggesting that they contribute to potential health benefits ascribed to caffeine. Intervention studies to date that have been conducted to explore the effects on brain function of the non-caffeine components in caffeine-bearing plants (coffee, tea, cocoa, guaraná), either alone or in combination with caffeine, will also be summarised. Research is beginning to accumulate showing independent effects for several of the phytochemicals that co-occur with caffeine, and/or a modulation of the effects of caffeine when it is co-consumed with these naturally concomitant phytochemicals. The present review highlights that more research aimed at understanding the effects of these compounds is needed and, more importantly, the synergistic relationship that they may have with caffeine.

  6. Effects of caffeine, tea polyphenol and daidzein on the pharmacokinetics of lansoprazole and its metabolites in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of caffeine, tea polyphenol and daidzein on the pharmacokinetics of lansoprazole and its metabolites. Rats were intragastrically administered caffeine (30 mg·kg-1, once per day, tea polyphenol (400 mg·kg-1, once per day or daidzein (13.5 mg·kg-1, once per day for 14 days, followed by an intragastric administration of lansoprazole (8 mg·kg-1 on the 15th day. The plasma concentrations of lansoprazole and its two primary metabolites, 5-hydroxylansoprazole and lansoprazole sulfone, were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS. Tea polyphenol significantly elevated the Area Under the Curve (AUC of lansoprazole from 680.29 ± 285.99 to 949.76 ± 155.18 μg/L.h and reduced that of lansoprazole sulfone from 268.82 ± 82.37 to 177.72 ± 29.73 μg/L.h. Daidzein increased the AUC of lansoprazole from 680.29 ± 285.99 to 1130.44 ± 97.6 μg/L.h and decreased that of lansoprazole sulfone from 268.82 ± 82.37 to 116.23 ± 40.14 μg/L.h. The pharmacokinetics of 5-hydroxylansoprazole remained intact in the presence of tea polyphenol or daidzein. Caffeine did not affect the pharmacokinetics of lansoprazole and its metabolites. The results imply that tea polyphenol and daidzein may inhibit the in vivo metabolism of lansoprazole by suppressing CYP3A.

  7. Trends and patterns of caffeine consumption among US teenagers and young adults, NHANES 2003-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, N L; Barraj, L M; Bi, X; Jack, M M

    2016-08-01

    Caffeine consumption among US teenagers (13-17y), young adults (18-24y) and adults (25-29y) for a 10 year period was examined using NHANES 2003-12. Of the 85% who consume caffeine 84% consume caffeinated beverages. This percentage remained constant despite new caffeine sources. Less than 7.1% of the population consume energy drinks. While mean caffeine intake among teenage caffeine consumers decreased from 62 to 55 mg/day (p-value = 0.018) over the 10-year period, no discernable trend was observed for other age groups. Caffeine intake from energy drinks increased, and was only statistically significant for age 18-24y accounting for caffeine intake. Mean caffeine intake per consumption occasion was equivalent between coffee and energy drinks for teenagers and young adults. During a 30-min period mean caffeine consumption was similar when an energy drink was the only consumption event or when it occurred with other caffeinated beverage products suggestive of a substitution effect. Linear regression models of caffeine intake from energy drinks against caffeine from coffee, tea and soda among energy drink consumers in the upper 50th percentile shows a statistically significant inverse relationship (R2 = 28%, coffee: β = -0.35, p < 0.001; tea: β = -0.44, p < 0.001; soda: β = -0.22, p = 0.036) and further supports the substitution concept.

  8. Expression and significance of cyclin D1, p27kipl protein in bronchioloalveolar carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁键群; 许敬尧; 张静; 何启才; 祝佳; 盛彩霞

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between expression of cell cycle-related protein cyclin D1, p27kipl and the pathogenesis of bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) and the value of prediction of prognosis. Methods: Cyclin D1 and p27kipl protein were detected by immunohistochemical En Vision method in 43 BACs. Results: The positivity of cyclin D1 in BAC was 65.1% (28/43), which was significantly higher than that in normal pulmonary tissue (0/13), P0.05), while cyclin D1 expression was found to be negatively correlated with tumor size (P0.05), but was negatively correlated with stromal fibrosis, lymph node metastasis and clinical stage (P<0.05); and positively associated with postoperative survival period (P<0.01). The survival rate of p27kipl positive group was significantly higher than that of p27kipl negative group (P<0.01). No statistically significant correlation was found between cyclin D1 and p27kipl expression. Conclusions: Increased cyclin D1 expression and decreased p27kipl expression are related to the pathogenesis of BAC; decreased p27kipl expression is associated with metastasis progression; immunodetection ofp27kipl is useful for assessment of prognosis.

  9. Cyclin D1 Expression and Its Correlation with Histopathological Differentiation in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Saawarn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Cyclin D1 regulates the G1 to S transition of cell cycle. Its deregulation or overexpression may lead to disturbance in the normal cell cycle control and tumour formation. Overexpression of cyclin D1 has been reported in various tumors of diverse histogenesis. This case control retrospective study was carried out to study the immunohistochemical reactivity and expression of cyclin D1 and its association with site, clinical staging, and histopathological differentiation of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. Methods. Forty formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks of biopsy specimens of oral squamous cell carcinoma were immunohistochemically evaluated for expression of cyclin D1. Results. Cyclin D1 expression was seen in 45% cases of OSCC. It did not correlate with site and clinical staging. Highest expression was seen in well-differentiated, followed by moderately differentiated, and poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinomas, with a statistically significant correlation. Conclusion. Cyclin D1 expression significantly increases with increase in differentiation.

  10. Temperature dependent expression of cdc2 and cyclin B1 in spermatogenic cells during spermatogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    p34cdc2 and Cyclin Bi are key components of cell cycle controlling machine and are believed to play a fundamental role in gametogenesis. It is also well known that, in scrotal mammals, spermatogenesis depends greatly on the maintenance of comparatively low temperature in the scrotum. To investigate whether the expression of cdc2 and cyclin B1 in spermatogenic cells during spermatogenesis is actually a temperature dependent event, in situ hybridization, Western blotting and immunohistochemistry analysis were used to study the expression of cdc2 and cyclin B1 in normal and cryptorchid testis. Results showed that the abdominal temperature had no significant influence on the transcription of cdc2 and cyclin B1 in the spermatogonia and pachytene/diplotene primary spermatocytes, but it blocked the translation of them. Due to the deficiency of p34cdc2 and Cyclin B1, the spermatogonia and pachytene/diplotene primary spermatocytes were unable to form MPF, hence, they couldn't undergo karyokinesis. The development of primary spermato cytes was arrested at the G2 to M phase transition. We also found that testosterone could regulate the Cyclin B1 expression in spermatogenic cells. Muscular injection of testosterone could recover spermatogenesis in the unilateral scrotal testis which was influenced by the contralateral cryptorchid testis, but it could not salvage the spermatogenesis block in the cryptorchid testis.

  11. Stage-specific requirement for cyclin D1 in glial progenitor cells of the cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobs, Lionel; Baranek, Constanze; Nestel, Sigrun; Kulik, Akos; Kapfhammer, Josef; Nitsch, Cordula; Atanasoski, Suzana

    2014-05-01

    Despite the vast abundance of glial progenitor cells in the mouse brain parenchyma, little is known about the molecular mechanisms driving their proliferation in the adult. Here we unravel a critical role of the G1 cell cycle regulator cyclin D1 in controlling cell division of glial cells in the cortical grey matter. We detect cyclin D1 expression in Olig2-immunopositive (Olig2+) oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, as well as in Iba1+ microglia and S100β+ astrocytes in cortices of 3-month-old mice. Analysis of cyclin D1-deficient mice reveals a cell and stage-specific molecular control of cell cycle progression in the various glial lineages. While proliferation of fast dividing Olig2+ cells at early postnatal stages becomes gradually dependent on cyclin D1, this particular G1 regulator is strictly required for the slow divisions of Olig2+/NG2+ oligodendrocyte progenitors in the adult cerebral cortex. Further, we find that the population of mature oligodendrocytes is markedly reduced in the absence of cyclin D1, leading to a significant decrease in the number of myelinated axons in both the prefrontal cortex and the corpus callosum of 8-month-old mutant mice. In contrast, the pool of Iba1+ cells is diminished already at postnatal day 3 in the absence of cyclin D1, while the number of S100β+ astrocytes remains unchanged in the mutant.

  12. Revised sequence and expression of cyclin B cDNA from the starfish Asterina pectinifera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Y; Deshimaru, S; Toraya, T

    2001-05-01

    Cyclin B cDNA was cloned from the ovary of the starfish Asterina pectinifera and analyzed by RT-PCR and 3'- and 5'-RACE techniques. The cDNA consists of a 0.13-kb upstream untranslated region, a 1.22-kb coding region, and a 0.86-kb downstream untranslated region. The open reading frame encoded a polypeptide of 404 amino acid residues with a calculated molecular weight of 45,692. All the characteristic sequences, such as destruction and cyclin boxes, cyclin B motif, and cytoplasmic retention and nuclear export signals, were found in the newly cloned cyclin B cDNA. The deduced amino acid sequence of the cyclin B cDNA was highly homologous in the middle and carboxy terminal regions to that from mature eggs of the same organism, but quite different in the amino terminal region. Evidence was obtained which suggested that this cyclin B is expressed in immature and maturing oocytes and is the same as that cloned from mature eggs.

  13. Effect of berberine on Cdk9 and cyclin T1 expressions in myocardium of diabetic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhou Jiyin; Zhou Shiwen; Tang Jianlin; Xu Ying; Ying Yi

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of berberine, one of the main alkaloids of Rhizoma coptidis, on myocardial orphology and the expressions of cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (Cdk9) and cyclin T1 protein in the myocardium of type diabetic rats. Methods: Type 2 diabetes mellitus rats were induced by an injection of 35 mg/kg streptozotocin (STZ) nd a high-carbohydrate/high-fat diet for 16 weeks. Diabetic rats were given low-, middle-, high-dose berberine (75,150, 300 mg/kg), fenofibrate (100 mg/kg) and rosiglitazone (4 mg/kg) for another 16 weeks, respectively. The myocardium structure was observed with hematoxylin & eosin (H&E) staining and Cdk9 and cyclin T1 protein expressions were detected by immunohistochemistry. Results: Middle-dose, high-dose berberine improved myocardial hypertrophy and interstitial fibrosis of diabetic rats. Cdk9 and cyclin T1 protein were significantly lower in diabetic myocardium than in control one (P<0.01), and middle-dose, high-dose berberine and fenofibrate obviously increased oth Cdk9 and cyclin T1 expression to near control level (P<0.01). Conclusion: Berberine modulates Cdk9 and cyclin I protein expression in diabetic myocardium which may contribute to ameliorate myocardium damage.

  14. Expressions of cyclin D1 and p27kip1 in carcinogenesis of stomach mucosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Qunqing Liu; Guiying Zhang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship between the expressions of cyclin D1 and p27kipl in the canceration course of the stomach.Methods: The immunohistochemical staining technique (SP method) was used to detect the expressions of cyclin D1, p27kip1 in chronic superficial gastritis (CSG), chronic atrophic gastritis (CAG), intestinal metaplasia (IM), dysplasia (DYS), gastric carcinoma (GCA) biopsy specimens.Results: The positive cyclin D1 expression rates increased with the progressing from CAG→IM→DYS→GCA respectively, and those in IM, DYS and GCA were different from those in CSG, P<0.05, while DYS group was indifferent from GCA group, P>0.05.The positive p27k'pl expression rates decreased with the mucosa progressing from CAG→IM→DYS→GCA.There was a negative correlation between the expression cyclin D1 and p27kip1 (y=-0.53, P=0.000).Conclusion: Expression rates of cyclin D1 in the canceration course of the stomach mucosa trend were increased and those of p27kip1 were decreased; the abnormal expressions of them were found in the early term of the canceration course of the stomach mucosa, and the inverse expression suggests there may be a negative feedback regulatory loop between cyclin D1 and p27kip1.

  15. Determination of the caffeine contents of various food items within the Austrian market and validation of a caffeine assessment tool (CAT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, E; Färbinger, A; König, J

    2012-01-01

    The caffeine content of 124 products, including coffee, coffee-based beverages, energy drinks, tea, colas, yoghurt and chocolate, were determined using RP-HPLC with UV detection after solid-phase extraction. Highest concentrations of caffeine were found for coffee prepared from pads (755 mg l⁻¹) and regular filtered coffee (659 mg l⁻¹). The total caffeine content of coffee and chocolate-based beverages was between 15 mg l⁻¹ in chocolate milk and 448 mg l⁻¹ in canned ice coffee. For energy drinks the caffeine content varied in a range from 266 to 340 mg l⁻¹. Caffeine concentrations in tea and ice teas were between 13 and 183 mg l⁻¹. Coffee-flavoured yoghurts ranged from 33 to 48 mg kg⁻¹. The caffeine concentration in chocolate and chocolate bars was between 17 mg kg⁻¹ in whole milk chocolate and 551 mg kg⁻¹ in a chocolate with coffee filling. A caffeine assessment tool was developed and validated by a 3-day dietary record (r²= 0.817, p caffeine saliva concentrations (r²= 0.427, p < 0.01).

  16. A critical role for FBXW8 and MAPK in cyclin D1 degradation and cancer cell proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Okabe

    Full Text Available Cyclin D1 regulates G1 progression. Its transcriptional regulation is well understood. However, the mechanism underlying cyclin D1 ubiquitination and its subsequent degradation is not yet clear. We report that cyclin D1 undergoes increased degradation in the cytoplasm during S phase in a variety of cancer cells. This is mediated by phosphorylation at Thr286 through the activity of the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK cascade and the F-box protein FBXW8, which is an E3 ligase. The majority of FBXW8 is expressed in the cytoplasm during G1 and S phase. In contrast, cyclin D1 accumulates in the nucleus during G1 phase and exits into the cytoplasm in S phase. Increased cyclin D1 degradation is linked to association with FBXW8 in the cytoplasm, and enhanced phosphorylation of cyclin D1 through sustained ERK1/2 signaling. Depletion of FBXW8 caused a significant accumulation of cyclin D1, as well as sequestration of CDK1 in the cytoplasm. This resulted in a severe reduction of cell proliferation. These effects could be rescued by constitutive nuclear expression of cyclin D1-T286A. Thus, FBXW8 plays an essential role in cancer cell proliferation through proteolysis of cyclin D1. It may present new opportunities to develop therapies targeting destruction of cyclin D1 or its regulator E3 ligase selectively.

  17. Separating neural and vascular effects of caffeine using simultaneous EEG-FMRI: differential effects of caffeine on cognitive and sensorimotor brain responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diukova, Ana; Ware, Jennifer; Smith, Jessica E; Evans, C John; Murphy, Kevin; Rogers, Peter J; Wise, Richard G

    2012-08-01

    The effects of caffeine are mediated through its non-selective antagonistic effects on adenosine A(1) and A(2A) adenosine receptors resulting in increased neuronal activity but also vasoconstriction in the brain. Caffeine, therefore, can modify BOLD FMRI signal responses through both its neural and its vascular effects depending on receptor distributions in different brain regions. In this study we aim to distinguish neural and vascular influences of a single dose of caffeine in measurements of task-related brain activity using simultaneous EEG-FMRI. We chose to compare low-level visual and motor (paced finger tapping) tasks with a cognitive (auditory oddball) task, with the expectation that caffeine would differentially affect brain responses in relation to these tasks. To avoid the influence of chronic caffeine intake, we examined the effect of 250 mg of oral caffeine on 14 non and infrequent caffeine consumers in a double-blind placebo-controlled cross-over study. Our results show that the task-related BOLD signal change in visual and primary motor cortex was significantly reduced by caffeine, while the amplitude and latency of visual evoked potentials over occipital cortex remained unaltered. However, during the auditory oddball task (target versus non-target stimuli) caffeine significantly increased the BOLD signal in frontal cortex. Correspondingly, there was also a significant effect of caffeine in reducing the target evoked response potential (P300) latency in the oddball task and this was associated with a positive potential over frontal cortex. Behavioural data showed that caffeine also improved performance in the oddball task with a significantly reduced number of missed responses. Our results are consistent with earlier studies demonstrating altered flow-metabolism coupling after caffeine administration in the context of our observation of a generalised caffeine-induced reduction in cerebral blood flow demonstrated by arterial spin labelling (19

  18. Cyclin E gene (CCNE) amplification and hCDC4 mutations in endometrial carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassia, Raúl; Moreno-Bueno, Gema; Rodríguez-Perales, Sandra; Hardisson, David; Cigudosa, Juan C; Palacios, José

    2003-12-01

    Cyclin E overexpression occurs in a subset of endometrial carcinomas (ECs), but the molecular mechanisms underlying this alteration remain to be established. The present study has analysed amplification of the cyclin E gene (CCNE) and mutation in hCDC4, the gene coding for the F-box protein, which tags phosphorylated cyclin E for proteosomal degradation, to ascertain whether these alterations might be responsible for cyclin E overexpression in ECs. Cyclin E and p53 expression was studied by immunohistochemistry in eight atypical endometrial hyperplasias (AEHs), 51 endometrioid endometrial carcinomas (EECs), and 22 non-endometrioid endometrial carcinomas (NEECs). CCNE amplification was analysed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Mutations in exons 2-11 of the hCDC4 gene were screened by PCR-SSCP-sequencing. Finally, the polymorphic marker D4S1610 was used to assess loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the hCDC4 gene. Cyclin E overexpression was found in 26/81 (32%) cases and was associated with the histological type of the lesion, since it was not found in any AEHs but was present in 27% of EECs and 54.5% of NEECs (p=0.035). Cyclin E overexpression was associated with histological grade (p=0.011) and p53 immunostaining in EECs (p=0.033). CCNE amplification was found in 6 of 37 (16%) ECs examined. There was a significant association between CCNE amplification and the histological type of the lesion, since five (83%) of the six cases with amplification were NEECs (p=0.008). One EEC harboured an hCDC4 mutation: a CGA to CAA (Arg/Gln) change at codon 479. In addition, D4S1610 LOH was found in 7 of 23 (30%) informative cases analysed, but no correlation with cyclin E overexpression was found. However, the tumour with hCDC4 mutation also showed LOH. This is the first study demonstrating that cyclin E overexpression is associated with gene amplification in ECs, these alterations being more frequent in NEECs. Although hCDC4 exhibits a low mutation frequency in ECs

  19. Evaluation of cognitive brain functions in caffeine users: a P3 evoked potential study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Abhinav; Vaney, Neelam; Tandon, O P

    2006-01-01

    Caffeine is one of the most widely consumed stimulant drugs of the modern world. It brings about a feeling of well-being, relaxation, increased alertness and concentration. Its effects have been studied on brain function and behavior using mood questionnaires, reaction time tests, memory tests, EEG and of late Event Related Potentials (ERPs). This study evaluates the response of caffeine on ERPs and Reaction Time (RT) using auditory "oddball" paradigm. Forty undergraduate medical students volunteered for the study and their ERPs and RT were recorded before and after 40 minutes of ingestion of caffeine. There was a non-significant decrease in latency of N1, P2, N2 and P3 and a significant decrease in Reaction Time after caffeine consumption. The amplitude of P3 showed a significant increase after intake of caffeine. The results of this study indicate that caffeine leads to facilitation of information processing and motor output response of the brain.

  20. Therapeutic Opportunities for Caffeine and A2A Receptor Antagonists in Retinal Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boia, Raquel; Ambrósio, António Francisco; Santiago, Ana Raquel

    2016-01-01

    Caffeine, the major component of coffee, is the most consumed psychostimulant in the world. Caffeine is an adenosine analog and acts as a nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist. The majority of the effects of caffeine are mainly mediated by the blockade of adenosine receptors, and the proved neuroprotective effects of caffeine in brain disorders have been mimicked by the blockade of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR). A growing body of evidence demonstrates that microglia-mediated neuroinflammation plays a key role in the pathophysiology of brain and retinal diseases. Moreover, the control of microglia reactivity by blocking A2AR has been proposed to be the mechanism underlying the observed protective effects of caffeine. Hence, it is conceivable that caffeine and A2AR antagonists offer therapeutic value for the treatment of retinal diseases, mainly those involving microglia-mediated neuroinflammation.

  1. DETERMINATION OF CAFFEINE CONTENTS OF COFFEE BRANDS IN THE VIETNAMESE MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Kráčmar

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the caffeine contents in five certain Vietnamese coffee (Dak Tin, Di Linh, Nam Nguyen, Origin and Vinacafe found in the Vietnamese market were determined using UV/vis spectrophotometry. The quantification of caffeine sample was calculated by standard addition method. Our results showed that the caffeine contents in coffee brewing were influenced by temperature of water used to brew, time of brewing, and independent on the volume of water, respectively. In general, higher concentrations of caffeine were found in all samples prepared at temperature 100°C for 5 minutes. The order of caffeine contents in coffee samples was Dak Tin, Di Linh, Nam Nguyen, Origin and Vinacafe, respectively. This study can contribute to a better knowledge of caffeine contents in Vietnamese coffee of Vietnamese consumers.

  2. [Clinical research on improvement of glucose metabolic marker level by coffee drinking-validity of saliva caffeine concentration measurement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Tomoko; Kobayashi, Daisuke; Kono, Suminori; Shimazoe, Takao

    2010-05-01

    We measured both serum and saliva caffeine concentration using HPLC and assessed the correlation between them in volunteers with mild obesity. Significant correlation was shown between saliva and serum caffeine concentration. It may be necessary to measure caffeine metabolite concentration because its metabolites may also have an improving effect of glucose metabolism. In summary, we found that saliva caffeine concentration measurement was useful to assess caffeine intake level. Moreover, it will be helpful to know whether caffeine has an improving effect of glucose metabolism.

  3. Circadian variation in expression of G1 phase cyclins D1 and E and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors p16 and p21 in human bowel mucosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John Griniatsos; George Marinos; John Bramis; Panayiotis O Michail; Othon P Michail; Stamatios Theocharis; Antonios Arvelakis; Ioannis Papaconstantinou; Evangelos Felekouras; Emmanouel Pikoulis; Ioannis Karavokyros; Chris Bakoyiannis

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate whether the cellular proliferation rate in the large bowel epithelial cells is characterized by circadian rhythm.METHODS: Between January 2003 and December 2004,twenty patients who were diagnosed as suffering from primary, resectable, non-metastatic adenocarcinoma of the lower rectum, infiltrating the sphincter mechanism,underwent abdominoperineal resection, total mesorectal excision and permanent left iliac colostomy. In formalinfixed and paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens obtained from the colostomy mucosa every six hours (00:00,06:00, 12:00, 18:00 and 24:00), we studied the expression of G1 phase cydins (D1 and E) as well as the expression of the G1 phase cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK)inhibitors p16 and p21 as indicators of cell cycle progression in colonic epithelial cells using immunohistochemical methods.RESULTS: The expression of both cyclins showed a similar circadian fashion obtaining their lowest and highest values at 00:00 and 18:00, respectively (P< 0.001).A circadian rhythm in the expression of CDK inhibitor proteins p16 and p21 was also observed, with the lowest levels obtained at 12:00 and 18:00 (P<0.001), respectively. When the complexes cyclins D1-p21 and E-p21were examined, the expression of the cyclins was adversely correlated to the p21 expression throughout the day. When the complexes the cyclins D1-p16 and E-p16were examined, high levels of p16 expression were correlated to low levels of cyclin expression at 00:00, 06:00and 24:00. Meanwhile, the highest expression levels of both cyclins were correlated to high levels of p16 expression at 18:00.CONCLUSION: Colonic epithelial cells seem to enter the G1 phase of the cell cycle during afternoon (between 12:00 and 18:00) with the highest rates obtained at 18:00. From a clinical point of view, the present results suggest that G1-phase specific anticancer therapies in afternoon might maximize their anti-tumor effect while minimizing toxicity.

  4. Caffeine-induced diuresis and natriuresis is independent of renal tubular NHE3

    OpenAIRE

    Fenton, Robert A.; Poulsen, Søren B.; de la Mora Chavez, Samantha; Soleimani, Manoocher; Busslinger, Meinrad; Dominguez Rieg, Jessica A.; Rieg, Timo

    2015-01-01

    Caffeine is one of the most widely consumed behavioral substances. We have previously shown that caffeine- and theophylline-induced inhibition of renal reabsorption causes diuresis and natriuresis, an effect that requires functional adenosine A1 receptors. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that blocking the Gi protein-coupled adenosine A1 receptor via the nonselective adenosine receptor antagonist caffeine changes Na+/H+ exchanger isoform 3 (NHE3) localization and phosphorylation, resul...

  5. Effects of caffeine on the electrophysiological, cognitive and motor responses of the central nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Deslandes A.C.; Veiga H.; Cagy M; Piedade R; Pompeu F.; Ribeiro P

    2005-01-01

    Caffeine is the most consumed psychoactive substance in the world. The effects of caffeine have been studied using cognitive and motor measures, quantitative electroencephalography (qEEG) and event-related potentials. However, these methods are not usually employed in combination, a fact that impairs the interpretation of the results. The objective of the present study was to analyze changes in electrophysiological, cognitive and motor variables with the ingestion of caffeine, and to relate c...

  6. Effects of caffeine are more marked on daytime recovery sleep than on nocturnal sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Julie; Fernandez-Bolanos, Marta; Robillard, Rébecca; Dumont, Marie; Paquet, Jean; Selmaoui, Brahim; Filipini, Daniel

    2007-04-01

    Caffeine is often used to counteract sleepiness generated by sleep deprivation, jet lag, and shift-work, and is consumed at different times of day. Caffeine also has effects on sleep. However, little is known about the interaction between sleep deprivation, circadian timing, and caffeine consumption on sleep. In this study, we compared the effects of caffeine on nocturnal sleep initiated at habitual circadian time and on daytime recovery sleep. Thirty-four moderate caffeine consumers participated in both caffeine (200 mg) and placebo (lactose) conditions in a double-blind crossover design. Seventeen subjects followed their habitual sleep-wake cycle and slept in the laboratory during the night (Night), while 17 subjects were sleep deprived for one night and recovery sleep started in the morning (DayRec). All subjects received a capsule of 100 mg of caffeine (or placebo) 3 h before bedtime, and the remaining dose 1 h before bedtime. Compared to placebo, caffeine lengthened sleep latency, increased stage 1, and reduced stage 2 and slow-wave sleep (SWS) in both groups. However, caffeine reduced sleep efficiency more strongly in the DayRec group, and decreased sleep duration and REM sleep only in that group. The stronger effects of caffeine on daytime recovery sleep compared to nocturnal sleep are probably the consequence of the combined influence of increasing circadian wake propensity drive and the dissipation of homeostatic sleep pressure. We propose that the reduction of SWS by caffeine during daytime sleep increases the impact of the circadian wake signal on sleep. These results have implications for individuals using caffeine during night time.

  7. A benefit-risk assessment of caffeine as an analgesic adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W Y

    2001-01-01

    Caffeine has been an additive in analgesics for many years. However, the analgesic adjuvant effects of caffeine have not been seriously investigated since a pooled analysis conducted in 1984 showed that caffeine reduces the amount of paracetamol (acetaminophen) necessary for the same effect by approximately 40%. In vitro and in vivo pharmacological research has provided some evidence that caffeine can have anti-nociceptive actions through blockade of adenosine receptors, inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase-2 enzyme synthesis, or by changes in emotion state. Nevertheless, these actions are only considered in some cases. It is suggested that the actual doses of analgesics and caffeine used can influence the analgesic adjuvant effects of caffeine, and doses that are either too low or too high lead to no analgesic enhancement. Clinical trials suggest that caffeine in doses of more than 65 mg may be useful for enhancement of analgesia. However, except for in headache pain, the benefits are equivocal. While adding caffeine to analgesics increases the number of patients who become free from headache [rate ratio = 1.36, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.17 to 1.58], it also leads to more patients with nervousness and dizziness (relative risk = 1.60, 95% CI 1.26 to 2.03). It is suggested that long-term use or overuse of analgesic medications is associated with rebound headache. However, there is no robust evidence that headache after use or withdrawal of caffeine-containing analgesics is more frequent than after other analgesics. Case-control studies have shown that caffeine-containing analgesics are associated with analgesic nephropathy (odds ratio = 4.9, 95% CI 2.3 to 10.3). However, no specific contribution of caffeine to analgesic nephropathy can be identified from these studies. Whether caffeine produces nephrotoxicity on its own, or increases nephrotoxicity due to analgesics, is yet to be established.

  8. Effect of caffeine on the risk of coronary heart disease— A re-evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Adebayo, J. O.; Akinyinka, A. O.; Odewole, G. A.; Okwusidi, J.I.

    2007-01-01

    The effect of caffeine intake on the risk of coronary heart disease was studied. Twenty-one rats used were randomly divided into three experimental groups, the first group served as the control while the second and third groups were administered caffeine orally at doses of 10mg/kg body weight and 20mg/kg body weight respectively for fourteen days. Caffeine, at 10mg/kg body weight, significantly increased (P

  9. Caffeine and central noradrenaline: effects on mood, cognitive performance, eye movements and cardiovascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Andrew; Brice, Carolyn; Nash, Jon; Rich, Neil; Nutt, David J

    2003-09-01

    There have been numerous studies on the effects of caffeine on behaviour and cardiovascular function. It is now important to clarify the mechanisms that underlie such effects, and the main objective of the present study was to investigate whether changes in central noradrenaline underlie some of the behavioural and cardiovascular effects of caffeine. This was examined using a clonidine challenge paradigm. Twenty-four healthy volunteers were assigned to one of four conditions: (i) clonidine/caffeine; (ii) clonidine/placebo; (iii) placebo/caffeine: (iv) placebo/placebo. Baseline measurements of mood, cognitive performance, saccadic eye movements and cardiovascular function were recorded. Subsequently, volunteers were given either clonidine (200 microg) or placebo and consumed coffee containing caffeine (1.5 mg/kg) or placebo. The test battery was then repeated 30 min, 150 min and 270 min later. A second cup of coffee (with the same amount of caffeine as the first) was consumed 120 min after the first cup. The results showed that clonidine reduced alertness, impaired many aspects of performance and slowed saccadic eye movements; caffeine removed many of these impairments. Both clonidine and caffeine influenced blood pressure (clonidine reduced it, caffeine raised it) but the effects appeared to be independent, suggesting that separate mechanisms were involved. In addition, there were some behavioural effects of caffeine that were independent of the clonidine effect (e.g. effects on speed of encoding of new information) and these may reflect other neurotransmitter systems (e.g cholinergic effects). Overall, the results suggest that caffeine counteracts reductions in the turnover of central noradrenaline. This mechanism may underlie the beneficial effects of caffeine seen in low alertness states.

  10. Caffeine intake is independently associated with neuropsychological performance in patients with obstructive sleep apnea

    OpenAIRE

    Norman, Daniel; Bardwell, Wayne A; Loredo, Jose S.; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Heaton, Robert K; Dimsdale, Joel E.

    2008-01-01

    In healthy individuals, caffeine intake may improve performance on cognitive tests. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a disorder that has been associated with impaired cognitive function. In this study, we investigated whether increased caffeine intake in untreated patients with OSA is linked to better cognitive performance. Forty-five untreated OSA patients underwent baseline polysomnography after completing a survey of 24-h caffeine intake. Participants completed a battery of neuropsychologi...

  11. Autopsy report for a caffeine intoxication case and review of the current literature

    OpenAIRE

    Yamamoto, Takuma; Yoshizawa, Katsuhiko; Kubo, Shin-ichi; EMOTO, Yuko; Hara, Kenji; Waters, Brian; Umehara, Takahiro; Murase, Takehiko; Ikematsu, Kazuya

    2014-01-01

    Caffeine (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) is a popular mild central nervous system stimulant found in the leaves, seeds and fruits of various plants and in foodstuffs such as coffee, tea, and chocolate, among others. Caffeine is widely used and is not associated with severe side effects when consumed at relatively low doses. Although rarely observed, overdoses can occur. However, only a few fatal caffeine intoxication cases have been reported in the literature. Herein, we report the pathological exa...

  12. Guarana Provides Additional Stimulation over Caffeine Alone in the Planarian Model

    OpenAIRE

    Dimitrios Moustakas; Michael Mezzio; Branden R Rodriguez; Mic Andre Constable; Mulligan, Margaret E.; Voura, Evelyn B.

    2015-01-01

    The stimulant effect of energy drinks is primarily attributed to the caffeine they contain. Many energy drinks also contain other ingredients that might enhance the tonic effects of these caffeinated beverages. One of these additives is guarana. Guarana is a climbing plant native to the Amazon whose seeds contain approximately four times the amount of caffeine found in coffee beans. The mix of other natural chemicals contained in guarana seeds is thought to heighten the stimulant effects of g...

  13. The relationship between daily caffeine consumption and withdrawal symptoms: a questionnaire-based study

    OpenAIRE

    Küçer, Nermin

    2010-01-01

    To estimate daily caffeine intake among a group of university students at the Kocaeli Vocational School of Health Services in Turkey, and to determine the relationship between daily caffeine consumption and withdrawal symptoms. Materials and methods: This survey study was conducted using a questionnaire that was administered to 156 university students (129 females, 27 males) at the Kocaeli Vocational School of Health Services in Kocaeli, Turkey. The quantity of caffeine-containing products ...

  14. Chronic caffeine exposure attenuates blast-induced memory deficit in mice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Lei Ning; Nan Yang; Xing Chen; Zi-Ai Zhao; Xiu-Zhu Zhang; Xing-Yun Chen; Ping Li

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effects of three different ways of chronic caffeine administration on blastinduced memory dysfunction and to explore the underlying mechanisms.Methods:Adult male C57BL/6 mice were used and randomly divided into five groups:control:without blast exposure,con-water:administrated with water continuously before and after blast-induced traumatic brain injury (bTBI),con-caffeine:administrated with caffeine continuously for 1 month before and after bTBI,pre-caffeine:chronically administrated with caffeine for 1 month before bTBI and withdrawal after bTBI,post-caffeine:chronically administrated with caffeine after bTBI.After being subjected to moderate intensity of blast injury,mice were recorded for learning and memory performance using Morris water maze (MWM) paradigms at 1,4,and 8 weeks post-blast injury.Neurological deficit scoring,glutamate concentration,proinflammatory cytokines production,and neuropathological changes at 24 h,1,4,and 8 weeks post-bTBI were examined to evaluate the brain injury in early and prolonged stages.Adenosine A1 receptor expression was detected using qPCR.Results:All of the three ways of chronic caffeine exposure ameliorated blast-induced memory deficit,which is correlated with the neuroprotective effects against excitotoxicity,inflammation,astrogliosis and neuronal loss at different stages of injury.Continuous caffeine treatment played positive roles in both early and prolonged stages of bTBI;pre-bTBl and post-bTBl treatment of caffeine tended to exert neuroprotective effects at early and prolonged stages of bTBI respectively.Up-regulation of adenosine A1 receptor expression might contribute to the favorable effects of chronic caffeine consumption.Conclusion:Since caffeinated beverages are widely consumed in both civilian and military personnel and are convenient to get,the results may provide a promising prophylactic strategy for blast-induced neurotrauma and the consequent cognitive impairment.

  15. Caffeine differentially alters cortical hemodynamic activity during working memory: a near infrared spectroscopy study

    OpenAIRE

    Heilbronner, Urs; Hinrichs, Hermann; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Zaehle, Tino

    2015-01-01

    Background Caffeine is a widely used stimulant with potentially beneficial effects on cognition as well as vasoconstrictive properties. In functional magnetic imaging research, caffeine has gained attention as a potential enhancer of the blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) response. In order to clarify changes of oxy- and deoxyhemoglobin (HbO and HbR) induced by caffeine during a cognitive task, we investigated a working memory (WM) paradigm (visual 2-back) using near-infrared spectrosco...

  16. Metronomic Ceramide Analogs Inhibit Angiogenesis in Pancreatic Cancer through Up-regulation of Caveolin-1 and Thrombospondin-1 and Down-regulation of Cyclin D1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Bocci

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: To evaluate the antitumor and antiangiogenic activity of metronomic ceramide analogs and their relevant molecular mechanisms. METHODS: Human endothelial cells [human dermal microvascular endothelial cells and human umbilical vascular endothelial cell (HUVEC] and pancreatic cancer cells (Capan-1 and MIA PaCa-2 were treated with the ceramide analogs (C2, AL6, C6, and C8, at low concentrations for 144 hours to evaluate any antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects and inhibition of migration and to measure the expression of caveolin-1 (CAV-1 and thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1 mRNAs by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Assessment of extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 (ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation and of CAV-1 and cyclin D1 protein expression was performed by ELISA. Maximum tolerated dose (MTD gemcitabine was compared against metronomic doses of the ceramide analogs by evaluating the inhibition of MIA PaCa-2 subcutaneous tumor growth in nude mice. RESULTS: Metronomic ceramide analogs preferentially inhibited cell proliferation and enhanced apoptosis in endothelial cells. Low concentrations of AL6 and C2 caused a significant inhibition of HUVEC migration. ERK1/2 and Akt phosphorylation were significantly decreased after metronomic ceramide analog treatment. Such treatment caused the overexpression of CAV-1 and TSP-1 mRNAs and proteins in endothelial cells, whereas cyclin D1 protein levels were reduced. The antiangiogenic and antitumor impact in vivo of metronomic C2 and AL6 regimens was similar to that caused by MTD gemcitabine. CONCLUSIONS: Metronomic C2 and AL6 analogs have antitumor and antiangiogenic activity, determining the up-regulation of CAV-1 and TSP-1 and the suppression of cyclin D1.

  17. THE EXPRESSION AND CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE OF P21 (WAF1/CIP1)AND CYCLIN D1 PROTEIN IN COLORECTAL CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To study the effect of P21 (WAF1/CIP1) and cyclin D1 and their relationship in colorec- tal carcinoma. Methods The expression of P21 and cyclin D1 was studied in 40 colorectal carcinoma and 10 normal tissues using S-P immunohistochemical technique. Results Decreased expression of P12 and overexpression of cyclin D1 were revealed in colorectal carcinoma. Decreased expression of P21 was related to lymph node metastasis. No cor- relation was found between cyclin D1 and clinicopathological parameters. Conclusion Decreased expression of P21 and overexpression of cyclin D1 may be involved in colorectal tumorigenesis,and were associated with poor prognosis. No correlation was found between P21 and cyclin D1 in colorectai carcinoma.

  18. Expression and significance of cyclin D1, p27kip1 protein in bronchioloalveolar carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    袁键群; 许敬尧; 张静; 何启才; 祝佳; 盛彩霞

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between expression of cell cycle-related protein cyclin D1, p27kipl and the pathogenesis of bronchioloalveolar carcinoma (BAC) and the value of prediction of prognosis. Methods: Cyclin D 1 and p27kip 1 protein were detected by immunohistochemical En Vision method in 43 BACs. Results: The positivity of cyclin D 1 in BAC was 65.1% (28/43), which was significantly higher than that in normal pulmonary tissue (0/13), P<0.01. No statistically significant association was found between cyclin D1 expression data and sex, age, tobacco-use history, histologic subtype (mucinous vs nonmucinous), stromal fibrosis, lymph node metastasis, clinical stage or postoperative survival period (P>0.05), while cyclin D1 expression was found to be negatively correlated with tumor size (P<0.05). The positivity of p27kipl in BACs was 51.2% (22/43), significantly lower than that in normal pulmonary tissue (12/13), P<0.01. p27kipl expression level was not associated with sex, age, tobacco-use history, tumor size or histologic subtype (P>0.05), but was negatively correlated with stromal fibrosis, lymph node metastasis and clinical stage (P<0.05); and positively associated with postoperative survival period (P<0.01). The survival rate of p27kipl positive group was significantly higher than that of p27kipl negative group (P<0.01). No statistically significant correlation was found between cyclin D 1 and p27kipl expression. Conclusions: Increased cyclin D1 expression and decreased p27kip 1 expression are related to the pathogenesis of BAC;decreased p27kipl expression is associated with metastasis progression; immunodetection ofp27kip 1 is useful for assessment of prognosis.

  19. Cyclin E in centrosome duplication and reduplication in sea urchin zygotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnackenberg, Bradley J; Marzluff, William F; Sluder, Greenfield

    2008-12-01

    When protein synthesis is completely blocked from before fertilization, the sea urchin zygote arrests in first S phase and the paternal centrosome reduplicates multiple times. However, when protein synthesis is blocked starting in prophase of first mitosis, the zygote divides and the blastomeres arrest in a G1-like state. The centrosome inherited from this mitosis duplicates only once in each blastomere for reasons that are not understood. The late G1 rise in cyclin E/cdk2 kinase activity initiates centrosome duplication in mammalian cells and its activity is needed for centrosome duplication in Xenopus egg extracts. Since the half-time for cyclin E turnover is normally approximately 1 h in sea urchin zygotes, the different behaviors of centrosomes during G1 and S phase arrests could be due to differential losses of cyclin E and its associated kinase activities at these two arrest points. To better understand the mechanisms that limit centrosome duplication, we characterize the levels of cyclin E and its associated kinase activity at the S phase and G1 arrest points. We first demonstrate that cyclin E/cdk2 kinase activity is required for centrosome duplication and reduplication in sea urchin zygotes. Next we find that cyclin E levels and cyclin E/cdk2 kinase activities are both constitutively and equivalently elevated during both the S phase and G1 arrests. This indicates that centrosome duplication during the G1 arrest is limited by a block to reduplication under conditions permissive for duplication. The cytoplasmic conditions of S phase, however, abrogate this block to reduplication.

  20. L-theanine partially counteracts caffeine-induced sleep disturbances in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Hwan-Soo; Jung, Ji Young; Jang, Il-Sung; Jang, Kwang-Ho; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Ha, Jeoung-Hee; Suk, Kyoungho; Lee, Maan-Gee

    2012-04-01

    L-theanine has been reported to inhibit the excitatory effects of caffeine. The present study examined the effects of L-theanine on caffeine-induced sleep disturbances in rats. Rats received the following drug pairings: saline and saline (Control), 7.5 mg/kg caffeine and saline, or 7.5 mg/kg of caffeine followed by various doses of L-theanine (22.5, 37.5, 75, or 150 mg/kg). Vigilance states were divided into: wakefulness (W), transition to slow-wave sleep (tSWS), slow-wave sleep (SWS), and rapid-eye-movement sleep (REMS). Caffeine significantly increased the duration of W and decreased the duration of SWS and REMS compared to the Control. Although L-theanine failed to reverse the caffeine-induced W increase, at 22.5 and 37.5 mg/kg (but not at 75 and 150 mg/kg), it significantly reversed caffeine-induced decreases in SWS. In conclusion, low doses of L-theanine can partially reverse caffeine-induced reductions in SWS; however, effects of L-theanine on caffeine-induced insomnia do not appear to increase dose-dependently.

  1. Caffeine intake is independently associated with neuropsychological performance in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Daniel; Bardwell, Wayne A; Loredo, Jose S; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia; Heaton, Robert K; Dimsdale, Joel E

    2008-08-01

    In healthy individuals, caffeine intake may improve performance on cognitive tests. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a disorder that has been associated with impaired cognitive function. In this study, we investigated whether increased caffeine intake in untreated patients with OSA is linked to better cognitive performance. Forty-five untreated OSA patients underwent baseline polysomnography after completing a survey of 24-h caffeine intake. Participants completed a battery of neuropsychological tests, then demographically corrected T scores and a global deficit score (GDS) were calculated on these tests. Partial correlation analysis was performed to compare daily caffeine intake with GDS, after controlling for body mass index (BMI) and sleep apnea severity. Analysis of covariance was done to examine differences in daily caffeine intake between cognitively impaired (GDS >or= 0.5) and non-impaired (GDS or= 0.5) for cognitive impairment. There was a significant inverse association between caffeine intake and the GDS, both when controlling for BMI (r =or -0.331, p = 0.04) and when controlling for BMI and apnea severity (r =or-0.500, p = 0.002); those with less impairment consumed more caffeine. Analysis of covariance demonstrated that cognitively impaired individuals consumed one-sixth as much caffeine as non-impaired individuals (p caffeine intake was associated with less cognitive impairment.

  2. ASSOCIATION OF CAFFEINE INTAKE AND LIVER FIBROSIS IN PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC HEPATITIS C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalinca da Silva OLIVEIRA

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background Caffeine consumption has been associated to decreased levels of liver enzymes and lower risk of fibrosis in patients with hepatitis C virus. Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the association between caffeine consumption and inflammatory activity or degree of liver fibrosis in patients with hepatitis C virus infection. Methods A cross-sectional study of patients with chronic hepatitis C virus infection treated in an outpatient Gastroenterology Unit of Santa Casa Hospital (Porto Alegre - Brasil. Patients were interviewed regarding the consumption of caffeine and anthropometric assessment was performed. Liver biopsy was performed in a maximum period of 36 months before inclusion in the study Results There were 113 patients, 67 (59.3% females, 48 (42.5% were aged between 52 and 62 years, and 101 (89.4% were white. The average caffeine consumption was 251.41 ± 232.32 mg/day, and 70 (62% patients consumed up to 250 mg/day of caffeine. There was no association between caffeine consumption and inflammatory activity on liver biopsy. On the other hand, when evaluating the caffeine consumption liver fibrosis an inverse association was observed. Conclusions The greater consumption of caffeine was associated with lower liver fibrosis. There was no association between caffeine consumption and inflammatory activity.

  3. Estimating caffeine intake from energy drinks and dietary supplements in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Regan L; Saldanha, Leila G; Gahche, Jaime J; Dwyer, Johanna T

    2014-10-01

    No consistent definition exists for energy products in the United States. These products have been marketed and sold as beverages (conventional foods), energy shots (dietary supplements), and in pill or tablet form. Recently, the number of available products has surged, and formulations have changed to include caffeine. To help characterize the use of caffeine-containing energy products in the United States, three sources of data were analyzed: sales data, data from federal sources, and reports from the Drug Abuse Warning Network. These data indicate that sales of caffeine-containing energy products and emergency room visits involving their consumption appear to be increasing over time. Data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) 2007-2010 indicate that 2.7% [standard error (SE) 0.2%] of the US population ≥1 year of age used a caffeine-containing energy product, providing approximately 150-200 mg/day of caffeine per day in addition to caffeine from traditional sources like coffee, tea, and colas. The highest usage of these products was among males between the ages of 19 and 30 years (7.6%, SE 1.0). Although the prevalence of caffeine-containing energy product use remains low overall in the US population, certain subgroups appear to be using these products in larger amounts. Several challenges remain in determining the level of caffeine exposure from and accurate usage patterns of caffeine-containing energy products.

  4. Effects of mental workload and caffeine on catecholamines and blood pressure compared to performance variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadelis, Christos; Kourtidou-Papadeli, Chrysoula; Vlachogiannis, Emmanouil; Skepastianos, Petros; Bamidis, Panayiotis; Maglaveras, Nikos; Pappas, Kostantinos

    2003-02-01

    Caffeine is characterised as a central nervous system stimulant, also affecting metabolic and cardiovascular functions. A number of studies have demonstrated an effect of caffeine on the excretion of catecholamines and their metabolites. Urinary epinephrine and norepinephrine have been shown to increase after caffeine administration. Similar trends were observed in our study in adrenaline (ADR) and noradrenaline (NORADR) levels and additionally a dose dependent effect of caffeine. The effect of caffeine on cognitive performance, blood pressure, and catecholamines was tested under resting conditions and under mental workload. Each subject performed the test after oral administration of 1 cup and then 3 cups of coffee. Root mean square error (RMSE) for the tracking task was continuously monitored. Blood pressure was also recorded before and after each stage of the experiment. Catecholamines were collected and measured for three different conditions as: at rest, after mental stress alone, after one dose of caffeine under stress, and after triple dose of caffeine under stress. Comparison of the performance of each stage with the resting conditions revealed statistically significant differences between group of smokers/coffee drinkers compared with the other two groups of non-coffee drinkers/non-smokers and non-smokers/coffee drinkers. There was no statistically significant difference between the last two groups. There was an increase of urine adrenaline with 1 cup of coffee and statistically significant increase of urine noradrenaline. Both catecholamines were significantly increased with triple dose of caffeine. Mental workload increased catecholamines. There was a dose dependent effect of caffeine on catecholamines.

  5. BRCA1 and its phosphorylation involved in caffeine-inhibitable event upstream of G2 checkpoint

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine,which specifically inhibits ATM/ATR kinases,efficiently abrogates the ionizing radiation(IR)-induced G2 arrest and increases the sensitivity of various tumor cells to IR.Mechanisms for the effect of caffeine remain to be elucidated.As a target of ATM/ATR kinases,BRCA1 becomes activated and phosphorylated in response to IR.Thus,in this work,we investigated the possible role of BRCA1 in the effect of caffeine on G2 checkpoint and observed how BRCA1 phosphorylation was regulated in this process.For these purposes,the BRCA1 protein level and the phosphorylation states were analyzed by Western blotting by using an antibody against BRCA1 and phospho-specific antibodies against Ser-1423 and Ser-1524 residues in cells exposed to a combination of IR and caffeine.The results showed that caffeine down-regulated IR-induced BRCA1 expression and specifically abolished BRCA1 phosphorylation of Ser-1524,which was followed by an override of G2 arrest by caffeine.In addition,the ability of BRCA1 to transactivate p21 may be required for MCF-7 but not necessary for Hela response to caffeine.These data suggest that BRCA1 may be a potential target of caffeine.BRCA1 and its phosphorylation are most likely to be involved in the caffeine-inhibitable event upstream of G2 arrest.

  6. Caffeine improves left hemisphere processing of positive words.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars Kuchinke

    Full Text Available A positivity advantage is known in emotional word recognition in that positive words are consistently processed faster and with fewer errors compared to emotionally neutral words. A similar advantage is not evident for negative words. Results of divided visual field studies, where stimuli are presented in either the left or right visual field and are initially processed by the contra-lateral brain hemisphere, point to a specificity of the language-dominant left hemisphere. The present study examined this effect by showing that the intake of caffeine further enhanced the recognition performance of positive, but not negative or neutral stimuli compared to a placebo control group. Because this effect was only present in the right visual field/left hemisphere condition, and based on the close link between caffeine intake and dopaminergic transmission, this result points to a dopaminergic explanation of the positivity advantage in emotional word recognition.

  7. Does caffeine alter muscle carbohydrate and fat metabolism during exercise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graham, Terry E; Battram, Danielle S; Dela, Flemming

    2008-01-01

    and carbohydrate metabolism. While caffeine certainly mobilizes fatty acids from adipose tissue, rarely have measures of the respiratory exchange ratio indicated an increase in fat oxidation. However, this is a difficult measure to perform accurately during exercise, and small changes could be physiologically......Caffeine, an adenosine receptor antagonist, has been studied for decades as a putative ergogenic aid. In the past 2 decades, the information has overwhelmingly demonstrated that it indeed is a powerful ergogenic aid, and frequently theories have been proposed that this is due to alterations in fat...... important. The few studies examining human muscle metabolism directly have also supported the fact that there is no change in fat or carbohydrate metabolism, but these usually have had a small sample size. We combined the data from muscle biopsy analyses of several similar studies to generate a sample size...

  8. Caffeine in coffee: its removal. Why and how?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalakshmi, K; Raghavan, B

    1999-09-01

    The popularity of coffee as a beverage is ever increasing despite the fact that there are reports antagonized to its consumption. Of the several factors cited, the alkaloid caffeine present in coffee can cause addiction and stimulate the central nervous system. It has an effect on the cardiovascular system with a slight increase in blood pressure and heart output. It undergoes biotransformation in the human body to form methylated derivatives of uric acid. In recent times, much effort has gone into the research on the removal of caffeine in coffee, resulting in a specialty product called decaffeinated coffee. Decaffeination methods mainly employ organic solvents or water or supercritical carbon dioxide. These methods with their attendant advantages and disadvantages are reviewed in this article.

  9. Molecular mechanisms of DNA repair inhibition by caffeine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selby, C.P.; Sancar, A. (Univ. of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Caffeine potentiates the mutagenic and lethal effects of genotoxic agents. It is thought that this is due, at least in some organisms, to inhibition of DNA repair. However, direct evidence for inhibition of repair enzymes has been lacking. Using purified Escherichia coli DNA photolyase and (A)BC excinuclease, we show that the drug inhibits photoreactivation and nucleotide excision repair by two different mechanisms. Caffeine inhibits photoreactivation by interfering with the specific binding of photolyase to damaged DNA, and it inhibits nucleotide excision repair by promoting nonspecific binding of the damage-recognition subunit, UvrA, of (A)BC excinuclease. A number of other intercalators, including acriflavin and ethidium bromide, appear to inhibit the excinuclease by a similar mechanism--that is, by trapping the UvrA subunit in nonproductive complexes on undamaged DNA.

  10. Effect of caffeine on rat offspring from treated dams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeschbacher, H U; Milon, H; Poot, A; Würzner, H P

    1980-11-01

    Pregnant Sprague-Dawley rats were given caffeine at 1.0, 0.5 and 0.25 g/kg diet during gestation and lactation. At birth, half of the pups from control and treated rats at each dose level were exchanged and cross fostered. Two litters were produced by each animal from each of the experimental groups. Caffeine at dietary concentrations of 0.5 and 0.25 g/kg throughout gestation and lactation had no significant effect on birth weight, litter size or development. There was also no effect at these doses following treatment during either gestation alone, or lactation alone. At 1.0 g/kg there was a slight reduction of birth weight, as well as a trend towards lower weight gain in litters from dams fed the test diet throughout gestation and lactation.

  11. Effects of some polymeric additives on the cocrystallization of caffeine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jihae; Kim, Il Won

    2011-11-01

    Effects of polymeric additives on the model cocrystallization were examined. The model cocrystal was made from caffeine and oxalic acid, and poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), poly( L-lactide) (PLLA), poly(ɛ-caprolactone) (PCL), and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) were the additives. The cocrystals were formed as millimeter-sized crystals without additives, and they became microcrystals with PLLA and PCL, and nanocrystals with PAA. XRD and IR revealed that the cocrystal structure was unchanged despite the strong effects of the additives on the crystal morphology, although some decrease in crystallinity was observed with PAA as confirmed by DSC. The DSC study also showed that the cocrystal melted and recrystallized to form α-caffeine upon heating. The present study verified that the polymeric additives can be utilized to modulate the size and morphology of the cocrystals without interfering the intermolecular interactions essential to the integrity of the cocrystal structures.

  12. Expression of cyclins A and E in melanocytic skin lesions and its correlation with some clinicopathologic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Alekseenko

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Cyclins play a fundamental role in the cell cycle. Recent studies have focused on their role in the development of various malignancies. The objective of this study was to evaluate and compare the expression of cyclins A and E in common nevi, dysplastic nevi and malignant melanomas, and to investigate the relationship between cyclin expression and some pathological parameters such as tumor thickness, ulceration, regression, and mitotic rate, as well as several clinical and phenotypic parameters such as skin phototype, hair and eye color, number of nevi, personal or family melanoma history, and personal history of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC. A total of 102 melanocytic skin lesions, including 30 common nevi, 38 dysplastic nevi and 34 melanomas, were examined. Expression of cyclins was detected by immunohistochemistry and quantified as a percentage of immunostained cell nuclei in each sample. Significant differences in expression of both cyclins were found between all lesion types: the median percentage of cyclin A-positive nuclei was 8.2% in melanomas, 3.4% in dysplastic nevi, and 0.95% in common nevi (p < 0.001. The corresponding percentages for cyclin E were 9.5%, 4.25% and 1.44% (p < 0.001. Expression of both cyclins was significantly higher among patients with a personal history of NMSC. Cyclin A was also significantly overexpressed in patients with a high total nevus count (TNC compared to moderate and low TNC. Expression of cyclins did not significantly correlate with the other clinicopathologic features investigated. These findings indicate the possible involvement of cyclins A and E in the pathogenesis of malignant melanoma. Our results also show a potential diagnostic significance of these cyclins as markers allowing discrimination between dysplastic nevi and melanoma.

  13. Caffeine Attenuates Decreases in Leg Power Without Increased Muscle Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Beatriz G; Morales, Anderson P; Sampaio-Jorge, Felipe; Barth, Thiago; de Oliveira, Marcio B C; Coelho, Gabriela M D O; Leite, Tiago C

    2016-08-01

    Ribeiro, BG, Morales, AP, Sampaio-Jorge, F, Barth, T, de Oliveira, MBC, Coelho, GMdO, and Leite, TC. Caffeine attenuates decreases in leg power without increased muscle damage. J Strength Cond Res 30(8): 2354-2360, 2016-Caffeine ingestion has been shown to be an effective ergogenic aid in several sports. Caffeine administration may increase exercise capacity, which could lead to a greater degree of muscle damage after exercise. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover study. Six male handball athletes ingested placebo (PLA) or caffeine (CAF) (6 mg·kg body mass) capsules on 2 different occasions. Sixty minutes after ingestion of the capsules, serum CAF levels were evaluated. Thereafter, all participants performed a protocol of vertical jumps (VJs). The protocol consisted of 4 sets of 30 seconds of continuous VJs with 60 seconds of recovery between sets. Blood lactate (LAC) and creatine kinase (CK) levels were determined before and after the protocol. We found significant differences in serum CAF levels between PLA (0.09 ± 0.18 µg·ml) vs. CAF (6.59 ± 4.44 µg·ml) (p 0.05). These results indicate that immediate ingestion of CAF (6 mg·kg body weight) can reduce the level of muscle fatigue and preserve leg power during the test, possibly resulting in increase in LAC. There was no increase in muscle damage, which indicates that immediate administration of (6 mg·kg body weight) CAF is safe. Thus, nutritional interventions with CAF could help athletes withstand a greater physiological overload during high-intensity training sessions. The results of this study would be applicable to sports and activities that require repetitive leg power.

  14. Commercial Caffeinated Products for Military Use: Customer Acceptability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    November 2010). The MCMWTC participants primarily performed day and night rock climbing tasks, while those in STTS were performing dismounted movements ...and candy bars (25%); the remaining top ten included gum; beverage, powdered; sunflower 9 seeds; chocolate covered espresso beans; and chewy candies...caffeinated forms of beef jerky, chewy candies, energy concentrates, sunflower seeds or candy bars, respectively. However, 59% and 48% of the respondents

  15. Cigarette, alcohol, and caffeine consumption: risk factors for spontaneous abortion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasch, Vibeke

    2003-01-01

    given birth twice or more previously had increased odds ratio (OR), 1.78 (1.27-2.49), whereas women who were students had decreased OR, 0.55 (0.34-0.91) for having spontaneous abortions. Regarding lifestyle factors, the adjusted ORs among women who consumed 5 units or more alcohol per week or 375 mg...... units alcohol per week and 375 mg or more caffeine per day during pregnancy may increase the risk of spontaneous abortion....

  16. Blood pressure in relation to coffee and caffeine consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guessous, Idris; Eap, Chin B; Bochud, Murielle

    2014-09-01

    The relationship between blood pressure (BP) and coffee is of major interest given its widespread consumption and the public health burden of high BP. Yet, there is no specific recommendation regarding coffee intake in existing hypertension guidelines. The lack of a definitive understanding of the BP-coffee relationship is partially attributable to issues that we discuss in this review, issues such as acute vs. chronic effects, genetic and smoking effect modifications, and coffee vs. caffeine effects. We also present evidence from meta-analyses of studies on the association of BP with coffee intake. The scope of this review is limited to the latest advances published with a specific focus on caffeine, acknowledging that caffeine is only one among numerous components in coffee that may influence BP. Finally, considering the state of the research, we propose a mechanism by which the CYP1A2 gene and enzyme influence BP via inhibition of the adenosine receptor differentially in smokers and non-smokers.

  17. THE EXPRESSION OF p16 AND CYCLIN D1 IN PROLIFERATIVE ENDOMETRIUM AND ENDOMETRIAL CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Objective To studythe role of p16 and cyclin in the genesis and development of endometrial car-cinoma. Methods 12 cases of normal endometrium, 22 cases of proliferative endometrium and 41 cases of endome- trial carcinoma were detected for the expression of p16 and cyclin D1 by means of immunohistochemical S-P. Results In normal endometrium p16 was expressed while cyclm D1was almost negative in the proliferative phase, but both of them were negative in the secretory phase. Among the groups of the simple and compound hyperplasia, the atypical hyperplasia and the endometrial carcinoma,the expression of p16 showed a descending tendency, while the expression of cyclin showed an ascending tendency. In endometrial carcinomas the expression of p16 was significantly lower than that of normal endometrium and proliferative endometrium (P<0. 01 ,P<0.05). However, the expression of cy- clin in proliferate endometrium and endometrial carcinoma was significantly higher than that in normal endometri- un (P<0. 05,P<0. 01). The overexpression of cyclin D1 in the atypical hyperplasia group was obviously different from that in the simple and compound hyperplasia group (P<0.01). In endometrial carcinoma,the expression of p16 was decreasing with the descending of cell differentiate degree, on the opposite, the expression of cyclin was in-creased and there existed a negative correlation between them. It was also observed that the overexpression of cyclin was significant different between and ( P <0. 01 ). Conclusion p1 6 is a negative regulating factor of cell cycle in endometrial carcinoma, while cyclin is a positive one. Both of them are important in the genesis and devel-opment of endometrial carcinoma. The Iow expression of p1 6 and the overexpression of cyclin are related with the malicious biological behaviors of endometrial carcinoma and maybe play an important role in the judgement of prog- nosis. Overexpression of cyclin may be an earlier molecular event in the genesis of

  18. Induction of cell cycle arrest via the p21, p27–cyclin E,A/Cdk2 pathway in SMMC-7721 hepatoma cells by clioquinol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Zhiwei

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Clioquinol has been shown to have anticancer activity in several carcinoma cells. In this study, we preliminarily examined the effect of clioquinol in human SMMC-7721 hepatoma and QSG-7701 normal hepatic cells. Our results indicated that clioquinol did not significantly affect survival of QSG-7701 cells, whereas it reduced cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner in SMMC-7721 cells. Clioquinol did not trigger autophagy and apoptosis, while it induced cell cycle arrest in the S-phase in SMMC- 7721 cells. Additionally, down-regulation of cyclin D1, A2, E1, Cdk2 and up-regulation of p21, p27 were detected after the treatment with clioquinol. The results demonstrated for the first time that clioquinol suppressed cell cycle progression in the S-phase in SMMC-7721 cells via the p21, p27-cyclin E,A/Cdk2 pathway. This suggests that clioquinol may have a therapeutic potential as an anticancer drug for certain malignances.

  19. Cyclin B1 and p21cipl在急性白血病中的表达及其相关性研究%Expressions of Cyclin B1 and p21cipl in Adult Acute Leukemia and Their Correlation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    马卫东; 徐世荣; 阎蕴力; 郭晓楠; 乔淑凯; 薛芳; 高晓丽

    2005-01-01

    细胞周期蛋白(cyclin)B1作为调节细胞进行有丝分裂的正性调节因子,在细胞增殖中起到重要作用.本研究旨在评价cyclin B1在急性白血病(AL)发生、发展中的作用及其对AL患者预后判断的价值.采用流式细胞术对136例初治AL成人患者、10例持续完全缓解(CCR)患者及17例正常人进行cyclin B1、p21cipl蛋白表达水平检测和细胞周期分布分析;采用RT-PCR测定Cyclin B1、p21 cipl和增殖细胞核抗原(PCNA)mRNA水平.结果显示:136例初治AL患者cyclin B1蛋白表达水平明显高于正常对照组;复发AL患者的cyclin B1表达水平明显高于正常对照组,但低于初治AL患者;缓解AL患者及CCR的AL患者cyclin B1蛋白表达水平与正常对照比较均无显著性差异;所有cyclin B1高表达的AL患者出现非顺序表达(cyclin B1在G1期出现,有些甚至G2期高表达),cyclin B1与p21cipl的蛋白表达呈负相关;cyclin B1蛋白表达与其mRNA水平呈正相关;cyclin B1表达与PCNA及细胞增殖指数(PI)表达水平呈正相关;cyclin B1表达水平高的AL患者有较高的缓解率和生存率,但有较高的复发率.结论:本研究首次发现cyclin B1在成人AL患者有过度表达和异常分布,认为cyclin B1与AL发生、发展有关,是影响AL患者预后的因素之一.%Cyclin B1, a positive regulator, controls mitosis occurrence, plays an important role in cell proliferation.To investigate the clinical significance of cyclin B1, the expression of cyclin B1 in acute leukemia (AL) patients was measured; the expression of cyclin B1 and p21 cipl, and their cell cycle distribution were assayed by flow cytometry in 136 adult patients with newly diagnosed AL, 10 continuous complete remission (CCR) AL and 17 normal controls; the mRNA of cyclin B 1 and p21 cipl, and the proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in patients and normal controls were detected with semi-quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The

  20. THE OVEREXPRESSION AND SIGNIFICANCE OF CYCLIN D1 AND P53 IN CERVICAL SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMAS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓丽; 王梅; 李明众; 宋天保; 任娟; 尚菊战

    2002-01-01

    Objective To investigate the significance of ov erexpresson of cyclin D1 and P53 protein in cervical squamous cell carcinomas.Methods Fifty cases of in vasive cervical squamous cell carcinomas and 10 cases of normal cervical squamou s epithelia were investigated with immunihistochemical technique. Results The overexpression of cyclin D1 and P53 in invasive cer vical carcinomas was 70% and 50 %, respectively. There was no overexpression of them in the control group. The o verexpression of cyclin D1 in grade Ⅱ and Ⅲ was much higher than that in grad eⅠ(P<0.05). The overexpresson of cyclin D1 in stage Ⅲ of cervical carcinom a was significantly higher than that in stage Ⅱ (P<0.05). The overexpress ion of P53 in grade Ⅱ and grade Ⅲ of cervical carcinoma was remarkably higher than that in grade Ⅰ (P<0.05).Conclusion The action point of both cyclin D1 and P53 may be at G1/S transition. The overexpression of them was associated with development and progression of cervical carcinoma probably in different mechanisms and differen t pathways.

  1. The Expression of Cyclins in Neurons of Rats after Focal Cerebral Ischelma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bin CHEN; WANG Wei

    2008-01-01

    The change of the expression of Cyclins in neurons of rats after focal cerebral ischemia was investigated. Ischemia was induced by temporary middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). The experimental rats induced by MCAO were sacrificed on 7th and 14th day after reperfusion. The brain was taken out at 7th and 14th day after injury, and the expression of Cyclin D1>, E, A and B1> in neu- rons of cerebral cortex or hippocampal Cal region was detected by immunofluorescence and confo- cai microscope. The results showed that after MCAO, in the ipsilateral CAI subfield of hippocampus the expression of Cyclin D1, E, A and B1 in neurons was significantly gradually up-regulated at 7th and 14th day after reperfusion (P<0.05) as compared with that in control group. In the ipsilateral cerebral cortex the expression of Cyclin D1 and B1 in neurons was notably gradually down-regulated at 7th and 14th day, and that of Cyclin E and A was significantly up-regulated at 14th day after reper- fusion as compared with that in control group (all P<0.05). It was concluded that there was a differ- ential sensitivity among neurons from different brain regions to ischemic injury. But all of them re-enter into cell cycle after MCAO.

  2. EXPRESSION AND SIGNIFICANCE OF CYCLIN D1 IN HUMAN HEPATOCELLULAR CARCINOMA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨连君; 司晓辉

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To elucidate the expression and significance of cell cycle protein cyclin D1 in human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods: The expression of cyclin D1 protein in 29 cases of HCC tissues was detected by immunohistochemical ABC method, and the relationship between its positive rate and pathological grades of HCC tissues was analyzed. Results: The positive rate of cyclin D1 in HCC tissues was 58.6%(17 in 29 cases), whereas only 18.2% (2 cases of 11 cases) in the non-tumor liver tissues immediately adjacent to HCC tissues (LAH). There was significant difference between grade II and LAH tissues (P<0.05), and between grade I and grade III on the positive rate of cyclin D1 (P<0.05), respectively. Conclusion: Cyclin D1 may be regarded as an oncogenic marker during the genesis and development of HCC, and its role in the transforming process from G1 phase to S phase of HCC cells needs further studies.

  3. DDX3 regulates cell growth through translational control of cyclin E1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ming-Chih; Chang, Wen-Cheng; Shieh, Sheau-Yann; Tarn, Woan-Yuh

    2010-11-01

    DDX3 belongs to the DEAD box family of RNA helicases, but the details of its biological function remain largely unclear. Here we show that knockdown of DDX3 expression impedes G(1)/S-phase transition of the cell cycle. To know how DDX3 may act in cell cycle control, we screened for cellular mRNA targets of DDX3. Many of the identified DDX3 targets encoded cell cycle regulators, including G(1)/S-specific cyclin E1. DDX3 depletion specifically downregulates translation of cyclin E1 mRNA. Moreover, our data suggest that DDX3 participates in translation initiation of targeted mRNAs as well as in cell growth control via its RNA helicase activity. Consistent with these findings, we show that in the temperature-sensitive DDX3 mutant hamster cell line tsET24, cyclin E1 expression is downregulated at a nonpermissive temperature that inactivates mutant DDX3. Taken together, our results indicate that DDX3 is critical for translation of cyclin E1 mRNA, which provides an alternative mechanism for regulating cyclin E1 expression during the cell cycle.

  4. NFAT1 transcription factor regulates cell cycle progression and cyclin E expression in B lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Leonardo K; Carrossini, Nina; Sécca, Cristiane; Kroll, José E; DaCunha, Déborah C; Faget, Douglas V; Carvalho, Lilian D S; de Souza, Sandro J; Viola, João P B

    2016-09-01

    The NFAT family of transcription factors has been primarily related to T cell development, activation, and differentiation. Further studies have shown that these ubiquitous proteins are observed in many cell types inside and outside the immune system, and are involved in several biological processes, including tumor growth, angiogenesis, and invasiveness. However, the specific role of the NFAT1 family member in naive B cell proliferation remains elusive. Here, we demonstrate that NFAT1 transcription factor controls Cyclin E expression, cell proliferation, and tumor growth in vivo. Specifically, we show that inducible expression of NFAT1 inhibits cell cycle progression, reduces colony formation, and controls tumor growth in nude mice. We also demonstrate that NFAT1-deficient naive B lymphocytes show a hyperproliferative phenotype and high levels of Cyclin E1 and E2 upon BCR stimulation when compared to wild-type B lymphocytes. NFAT1 transcription factor directly regulates Cyclin E expression in B cells, inhibiting the G1/S cell cycle phase transition. Bioinformatics analysis indicates that low levels of NFAT1 correlate with high expression of Cyclin E1 in different human cancers, including Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphomas (DLBCL). Together, our results demonstrate a repressor role for NFAT1 in cell cycle progression and Cyclin E expression in B lymphocytes, and suggest a potential function for NFAT1 protein in B cell malignancies.

  5. THE TESTING OF CAFFEIN “IN VITRO” REACTION ON CYMBIDIUM HYBRIDUM PROTOCORMS SUBCULTURED ON ESPECIALLY BRIDGE OF FILTERED PAPER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.F. Blidar

    2005-08-01

    biomass of these, was registered at the variants of culture medium with caffeine in a 0,001% concentration. On the lowest or highest concentration of 0,001% caffeine, we find out a progressive decrease of the protocorms vitality.

  6. Improving the controlled delivery formulations of caffeine in alginate hydrogel beads combined with pectin, carrageenan, chitosan and psyllium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belščak-Cvitanović, Ana; Komes, Draženka; Karlović, Sven; Djaković, Senka; Spoljarić, Igor; Mršić, Gordan; Ježek, Damir

    2015-01-15

    Alginate-based blends consisting of carrageenan, pectin, chitosan or psyllium husk powder were prepared for assessment of the best formulation aimed at encapsulation of caffeine. Alginate-pectin blend exhibited the lowest viscosity and provided the smallest beads. Alginate-psyllium husk blend was characterised with higher viscosity, yielding the largest bead size and the highest caffeine encapsulation efficiency (83.6%). The release kinetics of caffeine indicated that the porosity of alginate hydrogel was not reduced sufficiently to retard the diffusion of caffeine from the beads. Chitosan coated alginate beads provided the most retarded release of caffeine in water. Morphological characteristics of beads encapsulating caffeine were adversely affected by freeze drying. Bitterness intensity of caffeine-containing beads in water was the lowest for alginate-psyllium beads and chitosan coated alginate beads. Higher sodium alginate concentration (3%) for production of hydrogel beads in combination with psyllium or chitosan coating would present the most favourable carrier systems for immobilization of caffeine.

  7. The effect of a physiological concentration of caffeine on the endurance of maximally and submaximally stimulated mouse soleus muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tallis, Jason; James, Rob S; Cox, Val M; Duncan, Michael J

    2013-03-01

    The use of caffeine as an ergogenic aid to promote endurance has been widely studied, with human literature showing the greatest benefit during submaximal muscle activities. Recent evidence suggests that the acute treatment of skeletal muscle with physiological concentrations of caffeine (70 μM maximum) will directly potentiate force production. The aims of the present study are: firstly, to assess the effects of a physiological concentration (70 μM) of caffeine on endurance in maximally activated mouse soleus (relatively slow) muscle; and secondly, to examine whether endurance changes when muscle is activated submaximally during caffeine treatment. Maximally stimulated soleus muscle treated with 70 μM caffeine resulted in a significant (17.6 %) decrease in endurance. In contrast, at a submaximal stimulation frequency, caffeine treatment significantly prolonged endurance (by 19.2 %). Findings are activation-dependent such that, during high frequency stimulation, caffeine accelerates fatigue, whereas, during low frequency stimulation, caffeine delays fatigue.

  8. Caffeinated and non-caffeinated alcohol use and indirect aggression: The impact of self-regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Brynn E; Linden-Carmichael, Ashley N; Lau-Barraco, Cathy

    2016-07-01

    Research shows that heavier alcohol use is associated with physical aggression. Scant research has examined the way in which alcohol relates to other forms of aggression, such as indirect aggression (e.g., malicious humor, social exclusion). Given the possible negative consequences of indirect aggression and the limited evidence suggesting alcohol use can elicit indirectly aggressive responses, research is needed to further investigate the association between drinking behavior and indirect aggression. Additionally, specific alcoholic beverages, such as caffeinated alcoholic beverages (CABs; e.g., Red Bull and vodka), may potentiate aggression above the influence of typical use, and thus warrant examination with regard to indirect aggression. One factor that may impact the strength of the alcohol-indirect aggression and CAB-indirect aggression relationships is one's level of self-regulation. Consequently, our study examined the relationships between (1) alcohol use and indirect aggression, (2) CAB use and indirect aggression, and (3) self-regulation as a moderator. Participants were 733 (67.6% female) undergraduate students who reported their CAB and alcohol use, self-regulation, and aggressive behaviors. Results revealed that heavier alcohol use was associated with more frequent indirect aggression after controlling for dispositional aggression. Heavier CAB use was related to more frequent indirect aggression after accounting for typical use and dispositional aggression. Self-regulation moderated these associations such that for those with lower self-regulation, greater alcohol and CAB consumption was associated with greater indirect aggression. Our findings suggest that heavier alcohol and CAB consumption may be risk factors for engaging in indirect aggression and this risk is impacted by one's regulatory control.

  9. Review of Caffeine-Related Fatalities along with Postmortem Blood Concentrations in 51 Poisoning Deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alan Wayne

    2017-02-18

    Publications reporting concentrations of caffeine in postmortem blood were reviewed if the cause of death was attributed to overdosing (poisoning) with drugs. Age and gender of the deceased, the manner of death (accident, suicide or undetermined) and types of co-ingested drugs were evaluated in relation to the concentrations of caffeine in blood (N = 51). The mean age (±SD) of the victims was 39 ± 17.8 years (range 18-84 years) and most were female (N = 31 or 61%). The difference in mean age of males (42 ± 17.2 years) and females (37 ± 18.3 years) was not statistically significant (t = 0.811, P = 0.421). The mean (±SD), median and range of caffeine concentrations in postmortem blood were 187 ± 96 mg/L (180 mg/L) and 33-567 mg/L, respectively. The median concentration of caffeine in males (161 mg/L) was not significantly different from that of females (182 mg/L), z = 1.18, P = 0.235. There was no correlation between the age of the deceased and the concentration of caffeine in postmortem blood (R2 = 0.026, P > 0.05). Manner of death was classified as suicide in 51% of cases (median blood-caffeine 185 mg/L), accidental in 16% (median 183 mg/L) or undetermined in 33% (median 113 mg/L). The median concentration of caffeine in blood was lower when manner of death was undetermined compared with suicide or accidental (P = 0.023). Although other drugs, including ethanol, antidepressants, antipsychotics, benzodiazepines and/or ephedrine, were often identified in postmortem blood, the predominant psychoactive substance was caffeine. The deceased had ingested caffeine in tablet or powder form and it does not seem likely that toxic concentrations of caffeine can be achieved from over-consumption of caffeinated beverages alone.

  10. Crossover comparison of efficacy and preference for rizatriptan 10 mg versus ergotamine/caffeine in migraine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Suzanne; Göbel, Hartmut; Mateos, Valentin; Allen, Christopher; Vrijens, France; Shivaprakash, Malathi

    2003-01-01

    Rizatriptan is a selective 5-HT(1B/1D) receptor agonist with rapid oral absorption and early onset of action in the acute treatment of migraine. This randomized double- blind crossover outpatient study assessed the preference for 1 rizatriptan 10 mg tablet to 2 ergotamine 1 mg/caffeine 100 mg tablets in 439 patients treating a single migraine attack with each therapy. Of patients expressing a preference (89.1%), more than twice as many preferred rizatriptan to ergotamine/caffeine (69.9 vs. 30.1%, p rizatriptan and 54.2% of patients who preferred ergotamine/caffeine. The co-primary endpoint of being pain free at 2 h was also in favor of rizatriptan. Forty-nine percent of patients were pain free 2 h after rizatriptan, compared with 24.3% treated with ergotamine/caffeine (p rizatriptan being superior within 1 h of treatment. Headache relief at 2 h was 75.9% for rizatriptan and 47.3% for ergotamine/caffeine (p rizatriptan being superior to ergotamine/caffeine within 30 min of dosing. Almost 36% of patients taking rizatriptan were pain free at 2 h and had no recurrence or need for additional medication within 24 h, compared to 20% of patients on ergotamine/caffeine (p Rizatriptan was also superior to ergotamine/caffeine in the proportions of patients with no nausea, vomiting, phonophobia or photophobia and for patients with normal function 2 h after drug intake (p rizatriptan (69.8%) than at 2 h after treatment with ergotamine/caffeine (38.6%, p rizatriptan and 15.3% with ergotamine/caffeine. Both active treatments were well tolerated. The most common adverse events (incidence > or = 5% in one group) after rizatriptan and ergotamine/caffeine, respectively, were dizziness (6.7 and 5.3%), nausea (4.2 and 8.5%) and somnolence (5.5 and 2.3%).

  11. Incorporation of caffeine into a quantitative model of fatigue and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puckeridge, M; Fulcher, B D; Phillips, A J K; Robinson, P A

    2011-03-21

    A recent physiologically based model of human sleep is extended to incorporate the effects of caffeine on sleep-wake timing and fatigue. The model includes the sleep-active neurons of the hypothalamic ventrolateral preoptic area (VLPO), the wake-active monoaminergic brainstem populations (MA), their interactions with cholinergic/orexinergic (ACh/Orx) input to MA, and circadian and homeostatic drives. We model two effects of caffeine on the brain due to competitive antagonism of adenosine (Ad): (i) a reduction in the homeostatic drive and (ii) an increase in cholinergic activity. By comparing the model output to experimental data, constraints are determined on the parameters that describe the action of caffeine on the brain. In accord with experiment, the ranges of these parameters imply significant variability in caffeine sensitivity between individuals, with caffeine's effectiveness in reducing fatigue being highly dependent on an individual's tolerance, and past caffeine and sleep history. Although there are wide individual differences in caffeine sensitivity and thus in parameter values, once the model is calibrated for an individual it can be used to make quantitative predictions for that individual. A number of applications of the model are examined, using exemplar parameter values, including: (i) quantitative estimation of the sleep loss and the delay to sleep onset after taking caffeine for various doses and times; (ii) an analysis of the system's stable states showing that the wake state during sleep deprivation is stabilized after taking caffeine; and (iii) comparing model output successfully to experimental values of subjective fatigue reported in a total sleep deprivation study examining the reduction of fatigue with caffeine. This model provides a framework for quantitatively assessing optimal strategies for using caffeine, on an individual basis, to maintain performance during sleep deprivation.

  12. Protein-energy malnutrition during pregnancy alters caffeine's effect on brain tissue of neonate rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, M; Wilber, J F; Nakamoto, T

    1984-12-17

    We studied whether protein-energy malnutrition changed brain susceptibility to a small dose of caffeine in newborn rats. Since we had demonstrated previously that caffeine intake during lactation increased the brain neuropeptide on newborns, we investigated further the effects of the prenatal administration of caffeine on TRH and cyclo (His-Pro). From day 13 of gestation to delivery day, pregnant rats in one group were fed either a 20% or a 6% protein diet ad libitum, and those in the other group were pair-fed with each protein diet supplemented with caffeine at an effective dose of 2 mg/100 g body weight. Upon delivery, brain weight, brain protein, RNA, DNA and the neuropeptides thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) and cyclo (His-Pro) were measured in the newborn rats. A 6% protein without caffeine diet caused reductions in brain weights and brain protein, RNA and DNA contents, but did not alter brain TRH and cyclo (His-Pro) concentrations in the newborn animals. In the offspring from dams fed a 6% protein diet, caffeine administration significantly elevated brain weights and brain contents of protein, RNA and DNA. In contrast, these values were similar between noncaffeine and caffeine-supplemented animals in a 20% protein diet group. Brain TRH and cyclo (His-Pro) concentrations were not changed by caffeine administration. These data suggest that caffeine augments protein synthesis in the newborn rat brain when malnourished, but that the same dose of caffeine did not affect protein synthesis in brains of newborn rats from normally nourished dams. Therefore, the present findings indicate that the nutritional status of mothers during pregnancy has important implication in the impact of caffeine on their offspring's brains.

  13. Endothelial Nitric Oxide Mediates Caffeine Antagonism of Alcohol-Induced Cerebral Artery Constriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jennifer; Fedinec, Alexander L; Kuntamallappanavar, Guruprasad; Leffler, Charles W; Bukiya, Anna N; Dopico, Alex M

    2016-01-01

    Despite preventive education, the combined consumption of alcohol and caffeine (particularly from "energy drinks") continues to rise. Physiologic perturbations by separate intake of ethanol and caffeine have been widely documented. However, the biologic actions of the alcohol-caffeine combination and their underlying subcellular mechanisms have been scarcely studied. Using intravital microscopy on a closed-cranial window and isolated, pressurized vessels, we investigated the in vivo and in vitro action of ethanol-caffeine mixtures on cerebral arteries from rats and mice, widely recognized models to address cerebrovascular pathophysiology and pharmacology. Caffeine at concentrations found in human circulation after ingestion of one to two cups of coffee (10 µM) antagonized the endothelium-independent constriction of cerebral arteries evoked by ethanol concentrations found in blood during moderate-heavy alcohol intoxication (40-70 mM). Caffeine antagonism against alcohol was similar whether evaluated in vivo or in vitro, suggesting independence of systemic factors and drug metabolism, but required a functional endothelium. Moreover, caffeine protection against alcohol increased nitric oxide (NO•) levels over those found in the presence of ethanol alone, disappeared upon blocking NO• synthase, and could not be detected in pressurized cerebral arteries from endothelial nitric-oxide synthase knockout (eNOS(-/-)) mice. Finally, incubation of de-endothelialized cerebral arteries with the NO• donor sodium nitroprusside (10 µM) fully restored the protective effect of caffeine. This study demonstrates for the first time that caffeine antagonizes ethanol-induced cerebral artery constriction and identifies endothelial NO• as the critical caffeine effector on smooth muscle targets. Conceivably, situations that perturb endothelial function and/or NO• availability will critically alter caffeine antagonism of alcohol-induced cerebrovascular constriction without

  14. CyclinD1 and Survivin expression in parotid gland tumors%CyclinD1和Survivin在腮腺肿瘤中的表达

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李云杉

    2014-01-01

    ObjectiveTo explore the cell cycle protein (CyclinD1) and apoptosis inhibiting factor (Survivin) expression in parotid gland tumors in the relationship.MethodsSelect from October 19, 2012 to 2012 on July 19 days the hospital for treatment of 54 patients with parotid gland tumor pathological section. ResultsCyclinD1 in the normal group, benign tumor and malignant tumor group, the positive rate of 5.0%, 25.0% and 70.6%, respectively, expression increased obviously, the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05), Survivin in the normal group, benign tumor and malignant tumor group were 0.0%, 30.0% and 67.6%, respectively, to express obviously increased, the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). ConclusionCyclinD1 and Survivin in parotid gland tumor development played a synergy, can be used as important reference for diagnosis and treatment of parotid gland.%目的:探究细胞周期蛋白(CyclinD1)和凋亡抑制因子(Survivin)在腮腺肿瘤中的表达关系。方法选取自2012年10月19日~2014年7月19日来我院进行治疗的54例腮腺肿瘤患者的病理切片。结果 CyclinD1在常人组、良性肿瘤组和恶性肿瘤组的阳性率分别为5.0%、25.0%和70.6%,表现明显增高,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05),Survivin在常人组、良性肿瘤组和恶性肿瘤组的阳性率分别为0.0%、30.0%和67.6%,表达明显增高,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05)。结论 CyclinD1与Survivin在腮腺肿瘤的发展中起到了协同作用,可作为腮腺诊治的重要参考依据。

  15. Prediction of recurrence risk in early breast cancer using human epidermal growth factor 2 and cyclin A2

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Hui-ping; XIAO Yu; WANG You-fan; L(U) You-yong; SUN Yan; JI Jia-fu; HOU Kuan-yong; LEI Yu-tao; ZHAO Hong-mei; WANG Jing; ZHENG Jie; LIU Jian-ying; WANG Mo-pei

    2010-01-01

    Background Human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) is one of the most important prediction factors, but only 25%-30% of breast cancer patients HER2 are positive. It is unknown whether there are other molecular markers that could be used to predict prognosis and recurrence in HER2 negative patients.This study investigated correlations of cyclin A2 and HER2 levels with clinical outcomes in 281 patients with invasive breast cancer in order to identify whether cyclin A2 can serve as a prognostic factor in HER2 negative patients.Methods Immunohistochemical staining was used to detect cyclin A2 and HER2 expression in 281 patients. Cyclin A2. and HER2 gene amplifications were analyzed using gene analysis and RT-PCR in 12 patients. Risk and survival estimates were analyzed using Log-rank, Kaplan-Meier, and Cox regression analysis; cyclin A2 and HER2 consistency with survival were analyzed using Kappa analysis.Results Patients with higher cyclin A2 and HER2 expressions had significantly shorter disease-free survival periods (P=0.047 and P=0.05, respectively). Kappa analysis performed that cyclin A2 and HER2 showed a low Kappa index (kappa=0.37), allowing us to conclude that cyclin A2 and HER2 detect different pathologies. Gene analysis and RT-PCR showed that cyclin A2 was upregulated in patients with early relapse; the average increase was 3.69-2.74 fold.Conclusions Cyclin A2 and HER2 are associated with proliferation and high recurrence, particularly when combined. Cyclin A2 is easily detected by nuclear staining and might be a useful biomarker for recurrence risk in HER2 negative patients.

  16. Cyclin D1 in ASM Cells from Asthmatics Is Insensitive to Corticosteroid Inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jodi C; Seidel, Petra; Schlosser, Tobias; Ramsay, Emma E; Ge, Qi; Ammit, Alaina J

    2012-01-01

    Hyperplasia of airway smooth muscle (ASM) is a feature of the remodelled airway in asthmatics. We examined the antiproliferative effectiveness of the corticosteroid dexamethasone on expression of the key regulator of G(1) cell cycle progression-cyclin D1-in ASM cells from nonasthmatics and asthmatics stimulated with the mitogen platelet-derived growth factor BB. While cyclin D1 mRNA and protein expression were repressed in cells from nonasthmatics in contrast, cyclin D1 expression in asthmatics was resistant to inhibition by dexamethasone. This was independent of a repressive effect on glucocorticoid receptor translocation. Our results corroborate evidence demonstrating that corticosteroids inhibit mitogen-induced proliferation only in ASM cells from subjects without asthma and suggest that there are corticosteroid-insensitive proliferative pathways in asthmatics.

  17. Uncovering growth-suppressive MicroRNAs in lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Xi; Sempere, Lorenzo F; Galimberti, Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE: MicroRNA (miRNA) expression profiles improve classification, diagnosis, and prognostic information of malignancies, including lung cancer. This study uncovered unique growth-suppressive miRNAs in lung cancer. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: miRNA arrays were done on normal lung tissues...... and adenocarcinomas from wild-type and proteasome degradation-resistant cyclin E transgenic mice to reveal repressed miRNAs in lung cancer. Real-time and semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR as well as in situ hybridization assays validated these findings. Lung cancer cell lines were derived from each...... transgenic line (designated as ED-1 and ED-2 cells, respectively). Each highlighted miRNA was independently transfected into these cells. Growth-suppressive mechanisms were explored. Expression of a computationally predicted miRNA target was examined. These miRNAs were studied in a paired normal...

  18. Maternal caffeine intake from coffee and tea, fetal growth, and the risks of adverse birth outcomes: The Generation R Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Bakker (Rachel); R.P.M. Steegers-Theunissen (Régine); A. Obradov (Aleksandra); H. Raat (Hein); A. Hofman (Albert); V.W.V. Jaddoe (Vincent)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Caffeine is a widely used and accepted pharmacologically active substance. The effect of caffeine intake during pregnancy on fetal growth and development is still unclear. Objective: We examined the associations of maternal caffeine intake, on the basis of coffee and tea cons

  19. The effect of caffeine on working memory load-related brain activation in middle-aged males

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.B. Klaassen; R.H.M. de Groot; E.A.T. Evers; J. Snel; E.C.I. Veerman; A.J.M. Ligtenberg; J. Jolles; D.J. Veltman

    2012-01-01

    Caffeine is commonly consumed in an effort to enhance cognitive performance. However, little is known about the usefulness of caffeine with regard to memory enhancement, with previous studies showing inconsistent effects on memory performance. We aimed to determine the effect of caffeine on working

  20. The effect of caffeine on working memory load-related brain activation in middle-aged males

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, E.B.; de Groot, R.H.M.; Evers, E.A.T.; Snel, J.; Veerman, E.C.I.; Ligtenberg, A.J.M.; Jolles, J.; Veltman, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    Caffeine is commonly consumed in an effort to enhance cognitive performance. However, little is known about the usefulness of caffeine with regard to memory enhancement, with previous studies showing inconsistent effects on memory performance. We aimed to determine the effect of caffeine on working

  1. Cyclin B1和survivin在非小细胞肺癌中的表达和意义%The expression and significance of cyclin B1 and survivin in human non-small cell lung cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guosheng Li; Xuhan Liu; Daorong Zhang; Dong Liu; Zhiyong Li

    2011-01-01

    Objective: We studied the expression of cyclin B1 and survivin in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and the relationship between such expression and clinicopathological features of NSCLC. Methods: One hundred cases of tissue specimen including NSCLC, neighboring noncancerous tissue and normal lung tissue were collected at random. These specimens were detected by immunohistochemical methods. Results: The expression of cyclin B1 and survivin showed significant difference (P 0.05) in NSCLC. Statistical significance was marked between different clinical stages of NSCLC and the expression of cyclin B1 and survivin (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The overexpression of cyclin B1 and survivin was found in NSCLC. The expression of cyclin B1 and survivin might be up-regulated during an early step of tumorigenesis and during the development of NSCLC. The progression of cell cycle could be efficiently connected with the control of apoptosis by the interrelations between the overexpression of cyclin B1 and that of survivin in NSCLC during the G2/M phase. The overexpression of cyclin B1 and survivin might be used as marker in showing the dividing and proliferating ability, and the inhibiting apoptosis ability (lengthening cell lifespan) of NSCLC. Moreover, the overexpression of cyclin B1 and survivin was associated with the clinic stages of NSCLC.

  2. Cdc2/cyclin B1 regulates centrosomal Nlp proteolysis and subcellular localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuelian; Jin, Shunqian; Song, Yongmei; Zhan, Qimin

    2010-11-01

    The formation of proper mitotic spindles is required for appropriate chromosome segregation during cell division. Aberrant spindle formation often causes aneuploidy and results in tumorigenesis. However, the underlying mechanism of regulating spindle formation and chromosome separation remains to be further defined. Centrosomal Nlp (ninein-like protein) is a recently characterized BRCA1-regulated centrosomal protein and plays an important role in centrosome maturation and spindle formation. In this study, we show that Nlp can be phosphorylated by cell cycle protein kinase Cdc2/cyclin B1. The phosphorylation sites of Nlp are mapped at Ser185 and Ser589. Interestingly, the Cdc2/cyclin B1 phosphorylation site Ser185 of Nlp is required for its recognition by PLK1, which enable Nlp depart from centrosomes to allow the establishment of a mitotic scaffold at the onset of mitosis . PLK1 fails to dissociate the Nlp mutant lacking Ser185 from centrosome, suggesting that Cdc2/cyclin B1 might serve as a primary kinase of PLK1 in regulating Nlp subcellular localization. However, the phosphorylation at the site Ser589 by Cdc2/cyclin B1 plays an important role in Nlp protein stability probably due to its effect on protein degradation. Furthermore, we show that deregulated expression or subcellular localization of Nlp lead to multinuclei in cells, indicating that scheduled levels of Nlp and proper subcellular localization of Nlp are critical for successful completion of normal cell mitosis, These findings demonstrate that Cdc2/cyclin B1 is a key regulator in maintaining appropriate degradation and subcellular localization of Nlp, providing novel insights into understanding on the role of Cdc2/cyclin B1 in mitotic progression.

  3. Somatic inactivation of ATM in hematopoietic cells predisposes mice to cyclin D3 dependent T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Lori A; Yang-Iott, Katherine; DeMicco, Amy; Bassing, Craig H

    2015-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a cancer of immature T cells that exhibits heterogeneity of oncogenic lesions, providing an obstacle for development of more effective and less toxic therapies. Inherited deficiency of ATM, a regulator of the cellular DNA damage response, predisposes young humans and mice to T-ALLs with clonal chromosome translocations. While acquired ATM mutation or deletion occurs in pediatric T-ALLs, the role of somatic ATM alterations in T-ALL pathogenesis remains unknown. We demonstrate here that somatic Atm inactivation in haematopoietic cells starting as these cells differentiate in utero predisposes mice to T-ALL at similar young ages and harboring analogous translocations as germline Atm-deficient mice. However, some T-ALLs from haematopoietic cell specific deletion of Atm were of more mature thymocytes, revealing that the developmental timing and celluar origin of Atm inactivation influences the phenotype of ATM-deficient T-ALLs. Although it has been hypothesized that ATM suppresses cancer by preventing deletion and inactivation of TP53, we find that Atm inhibits T-ALL independent of Tp53 deletion. Finally, we demonstrate that the Cyclin D3 protein that drives immature T cell proliferation is essential for transformation of Atm-deficient thymocytes. Our study establishes a pre-clinical model for pediatric T-ALLs with acquired ATM inactivation and identifies the cell cycle machinery as a therapeutic target for this aggressive childhood T-ALL subtype.

  4. Restoration of cyclin D2 has an inhibitory potential on the proliferation of LNCaP cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Takashi [Department of Urology, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) Research Fellow (Japan); Nakamura, Eijiro; Shimizu, Yosuke; Terada, Naoki; Maeno, Atsushi; Kobori, Go; Kamba, Tomomi; Kamoto, Toshiyuki [Department of Urology, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Ogawa, Osamu, E-mail: ogawao@kuhp.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Urology, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine (Japan); Inoue, Takahiro [Department of Urology, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine (Japan)

    2009-09-11

    Despite well known oncogenic function of G1-S cell-cycle progression, cyclin D2 (CCND2) is often silenced epigenetically in prostate cancers. Here we show that CCND2 has an inhibitory potential on the proliferation of androgen receptor (AR)-dependent prostate cancer LNCaP cells. Forced expression of CCND2 suppressed the proliferative ability and induced cell death in LNCaP cells in a cdk-independent manner. Knocking down CCND2 restored the proliferation of LNCaP subclones with relatively high CCND2 expression and low proliferative profiles. Immunoprecipitation using deletion mutants of CCND2 indicated that a central domain of CCND2 is required for binding to AR. A deletion mutant lacking the central domain failed to hinder LNCaP cells. Collectively, our results indicated that CCND2 inhibits cell proliferation of AR-dependent prostate cancer through the interaction with AR. Our study suggests that restoration of CCND2 expression potentially prevents the carcinogenesis of prostate cancer, which is mostly AR-dependent in the initial settings.

  5. The RNA-binding protein Spo5 promotes meiosis II by regulating cyclin Cdc13 in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arata, Mayumi; Sato, Masamitsu; Yamashita, Akira; Yamamoto, Masayuki

    2014-03-01

    Meiosis comprises two consecutive nuclear divisions, meiosis I and II. Despite this unique progression through the cell cycle, little is known about the mechanisms controlling the sequential divisions. In this study, we carried out a genetic screen to identify factors that regulate the initiation of meiosis II in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We identified mutants deficient in meiosis II progression and repeatedly isolated mutants defective in spo5, which encodes an RNA-binding protein. Using fluorescence microscopy to visualize YFP-tagged protein, we found that spo5 mutant cells precociously lost Cdc13, the major B-type cyclin in fission yeast, before meiosis II. Importantly, the defect in meiosis II was rescued by increasing CDK activity. In wild-type cells, cdc13 transcripts increased during meiosis II, but this increase in cdc13 expression was weaker in spo5 mutants. Thus, Spo5 is a novel regulator of meiosis II that controls the level of cdc13 expression and promotes de novo synthesis of Cdc13. We previously reported that inhibition of Cdc13 degradation is necessary to initiate meiosis II; together with the previous information, the current findings indicate that the dual control of Cdc13 by de novo synthesis and suppression of proteolysis ensures the progression of meiosis II.

  6. Illustrating Caffeine's Pharmacological and Expectancy Effects Utilizing a Balanced Placebo Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotshaw, Sandra C.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Hypothesizes that pharmacological and expectancy effects may be two principles that govern caffeine consumption in the same way they affect other drug use. Tests this theory through a balanced placebo design on 100 male undergraduate students. Expectancy set and caffeine content appeared equally powerful, and worked additionally, to affect…

  7. Caffeine blocks disruption of blood brain barrier in a rabbit model of Alzheimer's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghribi Othman

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract High levels of serum cholesterol and disruptions of the blood brain barrier (BBB have all been implicated as underlying mechanisms in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Results from studies conducted in animals and humans suggest that caffeine might be protective against Alzheimer's disease but by poorly understood mechanisms. Using rabbits fed a cholesterol-enriched diet, we tested our hypothesis that chronic ingestion of caffeine protects against high cholesterol diet-induced disruptions of the BBB. New Zealand rabbits were fed a 2% cholesterol-enriched diet, and 3 mg caffeine was administered daily in drinking water for 12 weeks. Total cholesterol and caffeine concentrations from blood were measured. Olfactory bulbs (and for some studies hippocampus and cerebral cortex as well were evaluated for BBB leakage, BBB tight junction protein expression levels, activation of astrocytes, and microglia density using histological, immunostaining and immunoblotting techniques. We found that caffeine blocked high cholesterol diet-induced increases in extravasation of IgG and fibrinogen, increases in leakage of Evan's blue dye, decreases in levels of the tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1, increases in astrocytes activation and microglia density where IgG extravasation was present. Chronic ingestion of caffeine protects against high cholesterol diet-induced increases in disruptions of the BBB, and caffeine and drugs similar to caffeine might be useful in the treatment of Alzheimer's disease.

  8. Performance pressure and caffeine both affect cognitive performance, but likely through independent mechanisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boere, J.J.; Fellinger, L.; Huizinga, D.J.H.; Wong, S.F.; Bijleveld, E.H.

    2016-01-01

    A prevalent combination in daily life, performance pressure and caffeine intake have both been shown to impact people's cognitive performance. Here, we examined the possibility that pressure and caffeine affect cognitive performance via a shared pathway. In an experiment, participants performed a mo

  9. Breakfast cereal and caffeinated coffee: effects on working memory, attention, mood, and cardiovascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A P; Clark, R; Gallagher, J

    1999-08-01

    This study examined the effects of breakfast cereal and caffeinated coffee on working memory, attention, mood, and cardiovascular function. One hundred and forty-four volunteers (72 male, 72 female, mean age 21 years) were assigned to one of the groups formed by combining breakfast (cereal versus no breakfast) and caffeine (caffeinated versus decaffeinated coffee) conditions. The volunteers completed a baseline session between 0800 and 0845 h. The breakfast/caffeine administration took place between 0845 and 0915 h. They then completed another test session (starting at 0945) and had a coffee break at 1045, followed by a final session starting at 1145. The results showed that those who consumed breakfast cereal had a more positive mood at the start of the test sessions, performed better on a spatial memory task, and felt calmer at the end of the test session than those in the no breakfast condition. Ingestion of caffeine had no effect on initial mood or working memory, but it did improve encoding of new information and counteracted the fatigue that developed over the test session. Caffeine increased blood pressure and pulse rate, whereas breakfast cereal consumption only had an effect on pulse. Overall, these results confirm previous findings on the effects of breakfast and caffeine, and demonstrate distinct profiles for two common examples of early-morning food and drink, breakfast cereal and caffeinated coffee.

  10. The effects of caffeine on sleep in Drosophila require PKA activity, but not the adenosine receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mark N; Ho, Karen; Crocker, Amanda; Yue, Zhifeng; Koh, Kyunghee; Sehgal, Amita

    2009-09-02

    Caffeine is one of the most widely consumed stimulants in the world and has been proposed to promote wakefulness by antagonizing function of the adenosine A2A receptor. Here, we show that chronic administration of caffeine reduces and fragments sleep in Drosophila and also lengthens circadian period. To identify the mechanisms underlying these effects of caffeine, we first generated mutants of the only known adenosine receptor in flies (dAdoR), which by sequence is most similar to the mammalian A2A receptor. Mutants lacking dAdoR have normal amounts of baseline sleep, as well as normal homeostatic responses to sleep deprivation. Surprisingly, these mutants respond normally to caffeine. On the other hand, the effects of caffeine on sleep and circadian rhythms are mimicked by a potent phosphodiesterase inhibitor, IBMX (3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine). Using in vivo fluorescence resonance energy transfer imaging, we find that caffeine induces widespread increase in cAMP levels throughout the brain. Finally, the effects of caffeine on sleep are blocked in flies that have reduced neuronal PKA activity. We suggest that chronic administration of caffeine promotes wakefulness in Drosophila, at least in part, by inhibiting cAMP phosphodiesterase activity.

  11. The influence of caffeine on spatial-selective attention : an event-related potential study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Ruiter, MB; Snel, J; Lorist, MM; Ruijter, J

    2000-01-01

    Objectives: Following the indications of previous studies that caffeine might have a specific effect on the processing of spatial information compared with other types of information, the present study investigated the influence of caffeine on an often used spatial-selective attention task. Methods:

  12. Effects of caffeine on anticipatory control processes : Evidence from a cued task-switch paradigm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tieges, Zoe; Snel, Jan; Kok, Albert; Plat, Niels; Ridderinkhof, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Effects of caffeine on task switching were studied using ERPs in a cued task-switch paradigm. The need for advance preparation was manipulated by varying the number of task-set aspects that required switching. In a double-blind, within-subjects experiment, caffeine reduced shift costs compared to pl

  13. Exploring the caffeine-induced teratogenicity on neurodevelopment using early chick embryo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng-lai Ma

    Full Text Available Caffeine consumption is worldwide. It has been part of our diet for many centuries; indwelled in our foods, drinks, and medicines. It is often perceived as a "legal drug", and though it is known to have detrimental effects on our health, more specifically, disrupt the normal fetal development following excessive maternal intake, much ambiguity still surrounds the precise mechanisms and consequences of caffeine-induced toxicity. Here, we employed early chick embryos as a developmental model to assess the effects of caffeine on the development of the fetal nervous system. We found that administration of caffeine led to defective neural tube closures and expression of several abnormal morphological phenotypes, which included thickening of the cephalic mesenchymal tissues and scattering of somites. Immunocytochemistry of caffeine-treated embryos using neural crest cell markers also demonstrated uncharacteristic features; HNK1 labeled migratory crest cells exhibited an incontinuous dorsal-ventral migration trajectory, though Pax7 positive cells of the caffeine-treated groups were comparatively similar to the control. Furthermore, the number of neurons expressing neurofilament and the degree of neuronal branching were both significantly reduced following caffeine administration. The extent of these effects was dose-dependent. In conclusion, caffeine exposure can result in malformations of the neural tube and induce other teratogenic effects on neurodevelopment, although the exact mechanism of these effects requires further investigation.

  14. Relations Among Caffeine Consumption, Smoking, Smoking Urge, and Subjective Smoking Reinforcement in Daily Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treloar, Hayley R; Piasecki, Thomas M; McCarthy, Danielle E; Baker, Timothy B

    2014-09-01

    Caffeine consumption and cigarette smoking tend to occur within the same individuals and at the same time. One potential explanation for this co-use is that caffeine consumption increases subjective smoking reinforcement. Electronic diaries were used to collect momentary reports of smoking, caffeine consumption, temptation/urge to smoke, and subjective smoking reinforcement in 74 prequit smokers. Momentary reports of caffeine consumption and smoking were associated, replicating previous findings. These results remained significant when contextual factors (time of day, weekday/weekend, presence of others, presence of others smoking, location, and past hour alcohol consumption) were covaried. Caffeine consumption was also associated with positive cigarette appraisals and reports of strong temptation/urge to smoke and urge reduction from the prior cigarette. Under the conditions of caffeine consumption versus at other times, smokers were significantly more likely to report their last cigarette as producing a rush/buzz, being pleasant, relaxing, and tasting good. The effects for temptation/urge to smoke and rush/buzz varied as a function of latency since smoking. Caffeine consumption increased reports of urge to smoke and rush/buzz only when smoking occurred more than 15 minutes prior to the diary entry. Findings suggest that caffeine consumption influences some aspects of smoking motivation or affects memorial processing of smoking reinforcement.

  15. CHROMATOGRAPHIC DETERMINATION OF CAFFEINE CONTENTS IN SOFT AND ENERGY DRINKS AVAILABLE ON THE ROMANIAN MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mira Elena Ionică

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Caffeine is a stimulant that is commonly found in many foods and drinks that we consume. Concerns exist about the potential adverse health effects of high consumption of dietary caffeine, especially in children and pregnant women. Recommended caffeine intakes corresponding to no adverse health effects have been suggested recently for healthy adults (400 – 450 mg/day, for women contemplating pregnancy (300 mg/day, and for young children age 4 – 6 years (45 mg/day. Different brands of soft and energy carbonated beverages available on the Romanian market were analysed for caffeine by HPLC with a diode array UV-VIS detector at 217 nm. The column was a reverse phase C18 and the mobile phase consisted of potassium dihydrogen orthophosphate buffer (0.02 mol/L, pH 4.3 and acetonitrile (88:12, v/v. The caffeine contents in energy drink samples ranged from 16.82 mg/100 mL to 39.48 mg/100 mL while the carbonated soft drink group showed caffeine content in the range of 9.79 – 14.38 mg/100 mL. In addition, the concentrations of caffeine have been converted into the daily intake doses based on beverages consumption. The mean values of caffeine daily intakes were 124 mg and 49 mg through the ingestion of energy drinks and soft drinks, respectively.

  16. Foetal response to maternal coffee intake : role of habitual versus non-habitual caffeine consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, E. J. H.; Tegaldo, L.; Bruschettini, P.; Visser, G. H. A.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the effect on the human foetus of long-term and acute exposure to caffeine. We studied the organisation of foetal sleep-wake states in 13 healthy near-term foetuses over a wide range of maternal plasma caffeine concentrations (0-13 mu g/mL) reflecting normal lifestyle condition

  17. Caffeine ingestion impairs insulin sensitivity in a dose-dependent manner in both men and women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudoin, Marie-Soleil; Allen, Brian; Mazzetti, Gillian; Sullivan, Peter J; Graham, Terry E

    2013-02-01

    The effects of alkaloid caffeine on insulin sensitivity have been investigated primarily in men, and with a single caffeine dose most commonly of 5-6 mg·kg(-1) of body weight (BW). It is unknown if the effects of caffeine on glucose homeostasis are sex-specific and (or) dose-dependent. This study examined whether caffeine ingestion would disrupt glucose homeostasis in a dose-dependent or threshold manner. It also examined whether sex-specific responses to caffeine exist. It was hypothesized that women would have an exaggerated response to caffeine, and that caffeine would only impair glucose metabolism once a threshold was reached. Twenty-four healthy volunteers (12 males, 12 females) participated in 4 trials, in a crossover, randomized, and double-blind fashion. They ingested caffeine (1, 3, or 5 mg·kg(-1) of BW) or placebo followed, 1 h later, by a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test. Glucose, insulin, C-peptide area under the curve (AUC), and insulin sensitivity index data were fitted to a segmented linear model to determine dose-responses. There were no differences between sexes for any endpoints. Regression slopes were significantly different from zero (p fashion beginning at very low doses (0-1 mg·kg(-1) BW) in both healthy men and women.

  18. Differential contributions of theobromine and caffeine on mood, psychomotor performance and blood pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, E S; Slettenaar, M; vd Meer, N; Transler, C; Jans, L; Quadt, F; Berry, M

    2011-10-24

    The combination of theobromine and caffeine, methylxanthines found in chocolate, has previously been shown to improve mood and cognition. However, it is unknown whether these molecules act synergistically. This study tested the hypothesis that a combination of caffeine and theobromine has synergistic effects on cognition, mood and blood pressure in 24 healthy female subjects. The effects of theobromine (700 mg), caffeine (120 mg) or the combination of both, or placebo were tested on mood (the Bond-Lader visual analog scale), psychomotor performance (the Digit Symbol Substitution Test (DSST)) and blood pressure before and at 1, 2 and 3 h after administration. Theobromine alone decreased self-reported calmness 3h after ingestion and lowered blood pressure relative to placebo 1 h after ingestion. Caffeine increased self-reported alertness 1, 2 and 3h after ingestion and contentedness 1 and 2 h after ingestion, and increased blood pressure relative to placebo (at 1 h). The combination of caffeine+theobromine had similar effects as caffeine alone on mood, but with no effect on blood pressure. There was no treatment effect on DSST performance. Together these results suggest that theobromine and caffeine could have differential effects on mood and blood pressure. It was tentatively concluded that caffeine may have more CNS-mediated effects on alertness, while theobromine may be acting primarily via peripheral physiological changes.

  19. Meiotic polyploidization with homoeologous recombination induced by caffeine treatment in interspecific lily hybrids

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim, K.B.; Barba Gonzalez, R.; Shujun Zhou,; Ramanna, M.S.; Tuyl, van J.M.

    2005-01-01

    Caffeine solution was injected into the flower bud to recover F, fertility of the intersectional diploid Lilium species hybrid (2n=2x=24). 0.3% of caffeine solution was the most effective concentration to produce fertile 2n-gametes. The male and female gametes had a range of fertility following caff

  20. The effect of different dosages of caffeine on endurance performance time

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pasman, W.J.; Baak, M.A. van; Jeukendrup, A.E.; Haan, A. de

    1995-01-01

    The effect of different dosages of caffeine (0 - 5 - 9 - 13 mg · kg body weight-1) on endurance performance was examined. Nine well-trained cyclists participated in this study (VO2max 65.1 + 2.6 ml · kg-1 · min-1). Caffeine capsules were administered in random order and double-blind. One hour after