WorldWideScience

Sample records for cafeterias

  1. Cafeteria Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Ken

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the author discusses an approach that can show today's students how to become more comfortable with a racial or ethnic group different from one's own. "Mix It Up at Lunch" Day calls for students to swap seats in their school cafeterias, break out of their comfort zones, and meet new people. The program originated in 2002 as a way in…

  2. From Cafeteria to Cafe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington-Lueker, Donna

    1992-01-01

    If school architects, cafeteria designers, and some food service personnel have their way, the long, grey serving line characterizing most school cafeterias will go the way of meatloaf and mashed potatoes. This means booths and restaurant-like tables, school colors, brightly lit menu boards, windows overlooking courtyards, and mall-like…

  3. Cafeteria Food. Research Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Karen

    2005-01-01

    Currently, high school students account for 60% of food sold in cafeterias. School lunches should provide 33% of the students' energy intake, however, according to some research, it was found that it tends to only provide 19% because of the sale of "competitive" foods. Research by the U.S. Department of Agriculture found that girls ages…

  4. Summer season | Cafeteria closures

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    Please note the following cafeteria closures over the summer season: Bldg. 54 closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 13: closed from 13/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Restaurant No. 2, table service (brasserie and restaurant): closed from 01/08/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 864: closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013. Bldg. 865: closed from 29/07/2013 to 06/09/2013.

  5. Understanding hospital cafeterias: results from cafeteria manager interviews.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederer, Ashley; Toner, Cassiopeia; Krepp, Erica M; Curtis, Christine J

    2014-01-01

    To describe the characteristics, nutrition-related knowledge, practices, and attitudes of staff managing cafeterias in New York City (NYC) hospitals. An in-person survey was administered over 7 months to cafeteria managers from hospitals participating in the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's Healthy Hospital Food Initiative. The survey assessed nutrition knowledge and attitudes; hospital cafeteria practices; and nutrition standards and policies. The majority of questions required a yes or no response, followed by an open-ended request for details related to the response. Other questions were multiple choice or used 5-point Likert scales to measure respondent perceptions. Seventeen cafeteria managers completed the survey. Less than a third of respondents had training in nutrition, and less than a quarter of hospitals followed nutrition standards for food offered in the cafeteria. Most respondents thought cafeterias could play a role in reducing sodium consumption, yet less than half correctly identified the largest sources of sodium in the average diet. The most commonly cited limitation to making healthy changes in the cafeteria was perceived lack of demand for healthy foods/customer support. Characteristics, nutrition knowledge, practices, and attitudes of hospital cafeteria managers vary. Communication with consumers and education of staff who lack training and experience in nutrition may be important focus areas for hospitals looking to improve their food environment.

  6. Cafeterias/Food-Service Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American School & University, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the design of notable school cafeterias and food service areas, including the educational context and design goals. Includes information on architects, suppliers, and cost, as well as photographs. (EV)

  7. Field guide to hospital cafeterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, R P

    1986-09-01

    We have all faced the problem of whether or not to venture into that gastronomic wasteland known as the hospital cafeteria. Hospital cafeterias have developed a reputation, deserved or otherwise, as less than ideal places to eat. Many people overlook the fact that this is a direct result of trying to provide patient meals that are salt-free, sugar-free, fiber-free, and taste-free. (Some faint traces of color may, occasionally, be found.) How then does one go about choosing whether to venture in, and how does one survive the encounter once there? The following guide has been assembled to help the reader through this difficult process.

  8. Menu optimization for school cafeteria

    OpenAIRE

    Vlačihová, Martina

    2012-01-01

    This bachelor thesis deals with the application of mathematical programming in real data application. Specifically, it is nutritional problem that is defined in the environment of school cafeteria. The main topic is a compilation of the school menus. There are four menus that consist of twenty meals. There are many limitations which have to be observed. These limitations are based on the requirements of the Ministry of Health of the Czech Republic. The model is described with the linear progr...

  9. School Cafeteria Operations: Separating Myth from Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Richard

    2011-01-01

    School officials often assume that the food service director or management company should be the one concerned with the cafeteria program's management details. But of course that's not the case. Cafeteria operations affect the school business bottom line, so they indeed fall under the purview of school business officials. Not only should school…

  10. Aplicatiu per a Cafeteria Andana

    OpenAIRE

    Fortuny Navarro, Jordi

    2012-01-01

    La finalitat del projecte és la realització d'una aplicació per gestionar l'activitat d'una cafeteria. El projecte consta de dues parts ben diferenciades: - Una part interna o Intranet, en la que el propietari podrà portar un control del negoci i on podrà establir una interacció amb els clients, fet que ajudarà a millorar la gestió del negoci. - I una part externa o web pública, accessible per a tothom. Actualment la xarxa és un aparador a nivell mundial que permet als petits negocis donar-se...

  11. Redesign of employee cafeteria increases efficiency, satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snook, I D; Levitsky, S E

    1980-12-01

    By streamlining the menu selection, layout, and operation of its employee cafeteria, a hospital was able to improve employee satisfaction with the service and reallocate needed resources to its inpatient food service.

  12. Business Plan of Cafeteria Foundation

    OpenAIRE

    Dušková, Dita

    2013-01-01

    Práce se zabývá zpracováním podnikatelského záměru pro založení kavárny, určené pro zákazníky různé věkové kategorie a zákazníky s odlišnými zájmy. V teoretické části jsou popsána teoretická východiska potřebná k vypracování podnikatelského záměru. V praktické části je proveden marketingový výzkum, analýza současné situace na trhu, SLEPT analýza, SWOT analýza a návrh podnikatelského záměru s vyčísleným finančním plánem. The work deals with the processing of business plan of cafeteria found...

  13. Pathogenic bacterial contaminations in hospital cafeteria foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattanasena, Paweena; Somboonwatthanakul, Issaraporn

    2010-02-01

    This study aims to examine the pathogenic bacterial contaminations in foods sold in hospital cafeteria. A study was conducted between April and September of 2008 using cafeteria located in Mahasarakham provincial hospital, Thailand, as a study area. The cafeteria foods were evaluated for contaminations with Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Salmonella typhimurium and Streptococcus faecalis, which have been earlier reported to cause nosocomial outbreaks. Of 33 different types of ready-to-eat foods, the majority (54.54%) were found to have bacteria >10(7) colony forming units per gram of food (cfu g(-1)), whereas 36.36% and only 9.10% of them were found to have bacteria at 10(6)-10(7) and foods were also shown to be contaminated with Escherichia coli (57.57%), followed by Streptococcus faecalis (51.51%), Staphylococcus aureus (48.48%) and Salmonella typhimurium (27.27%), respectively. In contrast, of 7 different types of freshly-made foods, the majority (71.42%) were found to have bacterial foods (42.85%), followed by Escherichia coli and Streptococcus faecalis at equal percentages (14.28%). None of the freshly-made foods were found to be contaminated with Streptococcus typhimurium. The results concluded that a number of ready-to-eat foods sold in the Mahasarakham hospital cafeteria were contaminated with several pathogenic bacteria at unacceptable levels. Healthcare authorities should be more aware that ready-to-eat cafeteria foods that are heavily contaminated with pathogenic bacteria may be harmful to healthcare workers and visitors and may result in nosocomial infections of the patients.

  14. 36 CFR 1280.68 - May I use the cafeterias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May I use the cafeterias... the Washington, DC, Area? § 1280.68 May I use the cafeterias? Yes, the Charters Café in the National Archives Building is normally open to the public Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and the cafeteria...

  15. Digital Photography as a Tool to Measure School Cafeteria Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Mark

    2008-01-01

    Background: Assessing actual consumption of school cafeteria meals presents challenges, given recall problems of children, the cost of direct observation, and the time constraints in the school cafeteria setting. This study assesses the use of digital photography as a technique to measure what elementary-aged students select and actually consume…

  16. Bye Bye Cafeteria, Hello Restaurant-Style Dining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milshtein, Amy

    1999-01-01

    Examines how the university cafeteria is being transformed into restaurant-style dining to attract and retain sophisticated student customers. Harvard's and Seattle Pacific University's dining facilities are briefly highlighted. Concluding comments address planning tips for converting the old cafeteria into a better dining experience. (GR)

  17. Periodic inventory system in cafeteria using linear programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usop, Mohd Fais; Ishak, Ruzana; Hamdan, Ahmad Ridhuan

    2017-11-01

    Inventory management is an important factor in running a business. It plays a big role of managing the stock in cafeteria. If the inventories are failed to be managed wisely, it will affect the profit of the cafeteria. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to find the solution of the inventory management in cafeteria. Most of the cafeteria in Malaysia did not manage their stock well. Therefore, this study is to propose a database system of inventory management and to develop the inventory model in cafeteria management. In this study, new database system to improve the management of the stock in a weekly basis will be provided using Linear Programming Model to get the optimal range of the inventory needed for selected categories. Data that were collected by using the Periodic Inventory System at the end of the week within three months period being analyzed by using the Food Stock-take Database. The inventory model was developed from the collected data according to the category of the inventory in the cafeteria. Results showed the effectiveness of using the Periodic Inventory System and will be very helpful to the cafeteria management in organizing the inventory. Moreover, the findings in this study can reduce the cost of operation and increased the profit.

  18. Smartphone app allows online payments in cafeterias on Meyrin site

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    As of October 18, 2016, Novae will implement a new additional system of payment in all the cafeterias on the Meyrin site, using the smartphone application Mobino. For step-by-step instructions watch this short video:

  19. Cafeteria-Style Grading in General Chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, John A.; Gilbert, Brian D.

    2001-04-01

    Self-selected individual course-grade weighting schemes allow students personal choice of course components in the general chemistry sequence at Coastal Carolina University. With the availability of a wide range of commercial and academically produced pedagogical resources, students can select materials that best suit their own learning styles, social situations, and motivation level. Our students use a signed contract to indicate their preferred grade-weighting schemes for determination of the course grade. In doing so, they choose from course components that include peer-led team learning (PLTL) in the Workshop Chemistry (WSC) model, computer-assisted instruction (CAI) using the ChemSkill Builder (CSB) software, a variety of in-class quizzes and group problem-solving exercises, written exams, and the final written exam. Minimum percentage values are required of all components except WSC and CSB, which have been completely optional graded course components at CCU since the summer of 1999. Comparison of student success in the course and content learning suggests that the improvements observed with introduction of a gamut of activities increase even more when the cafeteria-style grading is implemented.

  20. [Cafeterias service and health promotion in the school context].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Padilla, Francisca M; González-Rodríguez, Angustias

    2017-05-01

    To assess the Secondary Schools (IES) cafeterias of Andalusia as services to promote healthy eating among students as well as to check the adequacy of the food supply to the Law on Food Security and Spanish Nutrition, and the knowledge of this law by the school managers. Observational descriptive transversal study. IES of Andalusia's eight provinces. Cafeteria services. Stratified random sample with proportional allocation by province and size of habitat of 95 Andalusian IES with+10% error and confidence level (NC) 95.5. Implementation of the Healthy Food Promotion Guide, validated through a Delphi group, which collects information on: the food supply, the location of the food products and the advertising on healthy eating. Structured interview with a member of the management team. In 84.9% of the cafeterias a deficient healthy eating habits promotion is observed. 100% of the cafeterias offer a wide variety of non-recommended products (candy, soda, snack chips, industrial bakery) breaching the provisions of the Law on Food Safety and Nutrition. 33.68% of the interviewees claim to know the existence of this law. Andalusian IES cafeterias do not promote healthy eating. It can be affirmed that the law has had little impact during its first year. It is a priority to introduce measures in conformity with the law and with recent research in order to promote a healthy school environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. 20 CFR 404.1053 - “Qualified benefits” under a cafeteria plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false âQualified benefitsâ under a cafeteria plan... Wages § 404.1053 “Qualified benefits” under a cafeteria plan. We do not include as wages any qualified benefits under a cafeteria plan as described in section 125 of the Code if such payment would not be...

  2. 34 CFR 395.33 - Operation of cafeterias by blind vendors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... operate a cafeteria in such a manner as to provide food service at comparable cost and of comparable high... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operation of cafeterias by blind vendors. 395.33... BLIND ON FEDERAL AND OTHER PROPERTY Federal Property Management § 395.33 Operation of cafeterias by...

  3. Serving Up Change in School Cafeterias (with Related Video)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capalbo, Mike A.

    2011-01-01

    Today's education institution kitchens are colorful and inviting, designed with curvature and stainless steel to compete with local restaurants, offering more variety and efficiency to the demanding health-conscious "Generation Me" consumer who is short on time and big on selection. In short, campus eateries are less "cafeteria" and more "cafe."…

  4. Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment for the SNL/NM cafeterias.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCord, Samuel Adam

    2005-12-01

    This Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessment (PPOA) was conducted for the two Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico cafeteria facilities between May and August 2005. The primary purpose of this PPOA is to assess waste and resource reduction opportunities and issue Pollution Prevention (P2) recommendations for Sandia's food service facilities. This PPOA contains recommendations for energy, water and resource reduction, as well as material substitution based upon environmentally preferable purchasing. Division 3000 has requested the PPOA report as part of the Division's compliance effort to implement the Environmental Management System (EMS) per DOE Order 450.1. This report contains a summary of the information collected and analyses performed with recommended options for implementation. The SNL/NM P2 Group will work with Division 3000 and the respective cafeteria facilities to implement these options.

  5. 137Cs uptake with cafeteria food after the Chernobyl accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voigt, G.; Paretzke, H.G. (GSF-Institut fuer Strahlenschutz, Neuherberg (Germany))

    1992-11-01

    After the Chernobyl accident, the activity concentrations of radiocesium were measured in both the meals served at the cafeteria of a research center and in the employees eating there. The time-dependent means of monthly 137Cs activities in meals and people show a similar distribution pattern with highest values between March and July 1987, i.e., only 1 y after the accident. In meals, the highest activities were found when the menu consisted of pork, milk, or milk products. The 50-y cumulative effective dose calculated from the whole-body measurements is 0.21 mSv for male and 0.15 mSv for female employees. Cafeteria food contributed only a small share to this exposure.

  6. 137Cs uptake with cafeteria food after the Chernobyl accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, G; Paretzke, H G

    1992-11-01

    After the Chernobyl accident, the activity concentrations of radiocesium were measured in both the meals served at the cafeteria of a research center and in the employees eating there. The time-dependent means of monthly 137Cs activities in meals and people show a similar distribution pattern with highest values between March and July 1987, i.e., only 1 y after the accident. In meals, the highest activities were found when the menu consisted of pork, milk, or milk products. The 50-y cumulative effective dose calculated from the whole-body measurements is 0.21 mSv for male and 0.15 mSv for female employees. Cafeteria food contributed only a small share to this exposure.

  7. Ergonomic assessments of three Idaho National Engineering Laboratory cafeterias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrom, L.T.; Romero, H.A.; Gilbert, B.G.; Wilhelmsen, C.A.

    1993-05-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is a Department of Energy facility that performs a variety of engineering and research projects. EG&G Idaho is the prime contractor for the laboratory and, as such, performs the support functions in addition to technical, research, and development functions. As a part of the EG&G Idaho Industrial Hygiene Initiative, ergonomic assessments were conducted at three Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Cafeterias. The purposes of the assessments were to determine whether ergonomic problems existed in the work places and, if so, to make recommendations to improve the work place and task designs. The study showed there were ergonomic problems in all three cafeterias assessed. The primary ergonomic stresses observed included wrist and shoulder stress in the dish washing task, postural stress in the dish washing and food preparation tasks, and back stress in the food handling tasks.

  8. Ergonomic assessments of three Idaho National Engineering Laboratory cafeterias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostrom, L.T.; Romero, H.A.; Gilbert, B.G.; Wilhelmsen, C.A.

    1993-01-01

    The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory is a Department of Energy facility that performs a variety of engineering and research projects. EG G Idaho is the prime contractor for the laboratory and, as such, performs the support functions in addition to technical, research, and development functions. As a part of the EG G Idaho Industrial Hygiene Initiative, ergonomic assessments were conducted at three Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Cafeterias. The purposes of the assessments were to determine whether ergonomic problems existed in the work places and, if so, to make recommendations to improve the work place and task designs. The study showed there were ergonomic problems in all three cafeterias assessed. The primary ergonomic stresses observed included wrist and shoulder stress in the dish washing task, postural stress in the dish washing and food preparation tasks, and back stress in the food handling tasks.

  9. Baseline for food waste generation – A case study in Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia cafeterias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alias, A. R.; Mokhlis, N. A. Mohd; Zainun, N. Y.

    2017-11-01

    Increasing population and economy status have contributed to the increasing volume of solid wastes produced in Malaysia and it creates problems on the existing solid waste management system. Ineffective waste management system was one of the issues that often discussed. The purpose of this study was to suggest the best method for managing food waste in Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia (UTHM) cafeterias. The scope of the study was to identify the type and quantity of waste generated in each cafeteria. The study area was carried out at six cafeteria in UTHM including residential college cafeteria which are Tun Dr. Ismail (TDI), Tun Fatimah (TF) and Tun Syed Nasir (TSN), G3’s cafeteria, Arked, and Dr. Munie’s cafeteria located at the Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering (FKAAS). In this study, food waste was quantified in unit of kilogram (kg). Results of the study showed that total food waste in selected UTHM’s cafeterias was 6197.5 kg for two months. Food waste generated in G3’s cafeteria was the highest value with 1823.5 kg among another cafeteria. This is due to strategic location for students and staff to take meals, the variety of food sold and reasonable price were major factors of generating food waste. Meanwhile, the Dr. Munie's Cafeteria located in FKAAS recorded the least total production of food waste as staffs and students take their meals at others cafeterias. Through literature review, there are list of methods on waste management were identified and composting method was suggested for food waste management in UTHM since the waste was produce in very large quantity.

  10. 26 CFR 54.4980G-5 - HSA comparability rules and cafeteria plans and waiver of excise tax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false HSA comparability rules and cafeteria plans and... HSA comparability rules and cafeteria plans and waiver of excise tax. Q-1: If an employer makes contributions through a section 125 cafeteria plan to the HSA of each employee who is an eligible individual...

  11. 41 CFR 102-74.60 - Are Federal agencies required to give blind vendors priority in operating cafeterias?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... required to give blind vendors priority in operating cafeterias? 102-74.60 Section 102-74.60 Public....60 Are Federal agencies required to give blind vendors priority in operating cafeterias? Yes. Federal agencies are required to give Randolph-Sheppard vendors priority in the operation of cafeterias when the...

  12. 41 CFR 102-74.65 - Are cafeterias authorized under the Randolph-Sheppard Act operated by permit or contract?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Are cafeterias....65 Are cafeterias authorized under the Randolph-Sheppard Act operated by permit or contract? They are... State licensing agency to license blind vendors to operate cafeterias on Federal property. ...

  13. Stakeholder Perspectives on Implementing Menu Labeling in a Cafeteria Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlee, Lana; Vine, Michelle M; Fenton, Nancy E; Hammond, David

    2016-05-01

    Mandatory and voluntary menu-labeling policies are increasingly common to support informed food choices among consumers. This study sought to examine stakeholder perspectives of developing, implementing, and maintaining a voluntary menu-labeling program in a hospital cafeteria setting. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 9 key cafeteria stakeholders. Data were coded by 2 independent researchers. Themes were generated deductively around 4 key themes: (1) motivation for the program; (2) program and menu development; (3) program implementation process; and, (4) "lessons learned," and inductively as they emerged from interview transcripts. These themes were mapped onto Damschroder's Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research. Motivations for the program were both internal and external to enable consumers to make educated food choices. Barriers to implementation included financial resources, digital menu board maintenance, and availability of healthy options from providers. Supports included availability of nutritional analysis software and nutritional information, and controlled food preparation. Ownership, program adaptation, a supportive collegial environment, a program champion and a culture valuing healthy eating were conducive to successful implementation. Both internal and external factors can support the voluntary implementation of menu-labeling programs.

  14. Effects of environmental intervention in workplace cafeterias on vegetable consumption by male workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushida, Osamu; Murayama, Nobuko

    2014-01-01

    To assess the effects of an environmental intervention based on the transtheoretical model to increase access to nutritional information about vegetable consumption in workplace cafeterias. Nonrandomized controlled trial. Sixteen workplaces with cafeterias in Niigata, Japan, were assigned to intervention (n = 8) or comparison sites (n = 8). A total of 349 Japanese male workers aged 20-59 years, who visited the cafeterias ≥ 3 times/wk. For the intervention group, 12 types of table tents containing information on increasing vegetable consumption, based on the transtheoretical model stages and processes of change, were distributed to cafeterias for 24 weeks in 2009. Information was presented according to the sequence suggested by the stages of change. Vegetable consumption in the cafeteria and per day and stage of change were assessed using self-administered questionnaires. Differences between groups were tested using a generalized linear model adjusted for age, work environment, and position. The difference in the stage of change was not statistically significantly different (P = .05), but the intervention group (n = 181) had increased vegetable consumption in the cafeteria (+0.18 servings; P = .01) and per day (+0.32 servings; P = .01) vs the comparison group. The findings suggest a beneficial effect of providing access to nutrition information about vegetable consumption as an environmental intervention in workplace cafeterias. Copyright © 2014 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Effect of Coleus forskohlii extract on cafeteria diet-induced obesity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shivaprasad, Hebbani Nagarajappa; Gopalakrishna, Sushma; Mariyanna, Bhanumathy; Thekkoot, Midhun; Reddy, Roopa; Tippeswamy, Boreddy Shivanandappa

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is a metabolic disorder that can lead to adverse metabolic effects on blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides and insulin resistance and also increases the risk of coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study was designed to determine the effect of Coleus forskohlii on obesity and associated metabolic changes in rats fed with cafeteria diet. The aim of this study was to evaluate antiobesogenic and metabolic benefits of C. forskohlii in cafeteria diet induced obesity rat model. RATS WERE RANDOMLY DIVIDED INTO FIVE GROUPS OF SIX ANIMALS IN EACH GROUP AND AS FOLLOWS: Normal pellet diet group; cafeteria diet group; cafeteria diet followed by 50 mg/kg/d Coleus forskohlii extract (CFE), 100 mg/kg/d CFE and 45 mg/kg/d orlistat groups, respectively. Indicators of obesity such as food intake, body weight and alteration in serum lipid profiles were studied. Feeding of cafeteria diet induced obesity in rats. Administration of CFE significantly halted increase in food intake and weight gain associated with cafeteria diet. Development of dyslipidemia was also significantly inhibited. The observed effects validate that supplementation of CFE with cafeteria diet could curb the appetite and mitigate the development of dyslipidemia.

  16. An Intervention Study Targeting Nutritional Intake in Worksite Cafeterias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Michael R.; Tappe, Karyn A.; Butryn, Meghan L.; Annunziato, Rachel A.; Coletta, Maria C.; Ochner, Christopher N.; Rolls, Barbara J.

    2010-01-01

    Modifying the food environment is a promising strategy for promoting healthier eating behavior. This study aimed to evaluate nutritional and weight changes in a program that used worksite cafeterias to reduce employees’ calorie content of purchased foods and improve their macronutrient intake. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: 1) only environmental change (i.e., the introduction of 10 new low-energy-density (ED) foods and provision of labels for all foods sold at lunch, which listed ED, calories, and macronutrient content) or 2) the environmental change plus pricing incentives for purchasing low-ED foods and education about low-ED eating delivered in four, 1-hour group sessions. Participant lunch choices were monitored electronically at the point of purchase for 3 months before the intervention was instituted (i.e., the baseline period) and for 3 months afterward (i.e., intervention period). Participants were adults (n = 96, BMI = 29.7 ± 6.0 kg/m2) who regularly ate lunch at their workplace cafeteria. There was no difference between groups in total energy intake over the study period. Across groups, energy and percent of energy from fat decreased and percent of energy from carbohydrate increased from baseline to the intervention period (all p <. 01). Follow-up analyses, conducted by averaging Baseline Months 1 and 2 and comparing them to Intervention Month 3 as a conservative estimate of overall impact of the intervention, indicated that change in energy, carbohydrate, and fat intake remained significant (p < .001). Providing nutrition labels and reducing the ED of selected foods was associated with improved dietary intake. PMID:20434060

  17. Behavioral Economic Concepts To Encourage Healthy Eating in School Cafeterias: Experiments and Lessons From College Students

    OpenAIRE

    Just, David R.; Wansink, Brian; Mancino, Lisa; Guthrie, Joanne F.

    2008-01-01

    Changing small factors that influence consumer choice may lead to healthier eating within controlled settings, such as school cafeterias. This report describes a behavioral experiment in a college cafeteria to assess the effects of various payment options and menu selection methods on food choices. The results indicate that payment options, such as cash or debit cards, can significantly affect food choices. College students using a card that prepaid only for healthful foods made more nutritio...

  18. Does a grill menu redesign influence sales, nutrients purchased, and consumer acceptance in a worksite cafeteria?

    OpenAIRE

    Vadiveloo, Maya K; Malik, Vasanti S.; Spiegelman, Donna; Walter C. Willett; Mattei, Josiemer

    2017-01-01

    Worksite cafeterias are compelling venues to improve diet quality through environmental changes. We conducted a pre-post study to evaluate how a cafeteria-initiated grill menu redesign influenced sales, revenue, and nutrient content of foods purchased. Secondly, we evaluated consumer opinions about menu changes to inform practices for worksite environment interventions. Monthly sales data (2012–2015) were used to compute gross sales and revenue of entrées and side dishes pre-post menu changes...

  19. Using nudging and social marketing techniques to create healthy worksite cafeterias in the Netherlands: intervention development and study design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Velema

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The worksite cafeteria is a suitable setting for interventions focusing on changing eating behavior, because a lot of employees visit the worksite cafeteria regularly and a variety of interventions could be implemented there. The aim of this paper is to describe the intervention development and design of the evaluation of an intervention to make the purchase behavior of employees in the worksite cafeteria healthier. The developed intervention called “the worksite cafeteria 2.0” consists of a set of 19 strategies based on theory of nudging and social marketing (marketing mix. The intervention will be evaluated in a real-life setting, that is Dutch worksite cafeterias of different companies and with a number of contract catering organizations. Methods/design The study is a randomized controlled trial (RCT, with 34 Dutch worksite cafeterias randomly allocated to the 12-week intervention or to the control group. Primary outcomes are sales data of selected products groups like sandwiches, salads, snacks and bread topping. Secondary outcomes are satisfaction of employees with the cafeteria and vitality. Discussion When executed, the described RCT will provide better knowledge in the effect of the intervention “the worksite cafeteria 2.0” on the purchasing behavior of Dutch employees in worksite cafeterias. Trial registration Dutch Trial register: NTR5372 .

  20. Using nudging and social marketing techniques to create healthy worksite cafeterias in the Netherlands: intervention development and study design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velema, Elizabeth; Vyth, Ellis L; Steenhuis, Ingrid H M

    2017-01-11

    The worksite cafeteria is a suitable setting for interventions focusing on changing eating behavior, because a lot of employees visit the worksite cafeteria regularly and a variety of interventions could be implemented there. The aim of this paper is to describe the intervention development and design of the evaluation of an intervention to make the purchase behavior of employees in the worksite cafeteria healthier. The developed intervention called "the worksite cafeteria 2.0" consists of a set of 19 strategies based on theory of nudging and social marketing (marketing mix). The intervention will be evaluated in a real-life setting, that is Dutch worksite cafeterias of different companies and with a number of contract catering organizations. The study is a randomized controlled trial (RCT), with 34 Dutch worksite cafeterias randomly allocated to the 12-week intervention or to the control group. Primary outcomes are sales data of selected products groups like sandwiches, salads, snacks and bread topping. Secondary outcomes are satisfaction of employees with the cafeteria and vitality. When executed, the described RCT will provide better knowledge in the effect of the intervention "the worksite cafeteria 2.0" on the purchasing behavior of Dutch employees in worksite cafeterias. Dutch Trial register: NTR5372 .

  1. Marketing Vegetables in Elementary School Cafeterias to Increase Uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanks, Andrew S; Just, David R; Brumberg, Adam

    2016-08-01

    Children do not eat enough servings of vegetables, underscoring the need for effective interventions encouraging this behavior. The purpose of this research was to measure the impact that daily exposure to branded vegetable characters has on vegetable selection among boys and girls in elementary schools. In a large urban school district, 10 elementary schools agreed to participate in the study. They were randomly assigned to a control condition or 1 of 3 treatment conditions: (1) a vinyl banner displaying vegetable characters that was fastened around the base of the salad bar; (2) short television segments with health education delivered by vegetable characters; or (3) a combination of the vinyl banner and television segments. We collected 22 206 student-day observations over a 6-week period by tallying the number of boys and girls taking vegetables from the school's salad bar. Results show that 90.5% (from 12.6% to 24.0%; P = .04) more students took vegetables from the salad bar when exposed to the vinyl banner only, and 239.2% (from 10.2% to 34.6%; P children's vegetable selection in the school cafeteria. Results from this study suggest potential opportunities for using branded media to encourage healthier choices for children. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  2. Promoting Healthy Choices in Workplace Cafeterias: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Erica L; Puig Ribera, Anna; Senye-Mir, Anna; Eves, Frank F

    2016-02-01

    To develop 3 point-of-choice campaigns to influence food choice in workplace cafeterias. Eight focus groups were conducted to guide campaign development. Focus groups were conducted in the workplace. University employees (n = 36) aged 23-58 years (mean, 33.8 years). To explore ways to prompt changes in behavior. Transcripts were analyzed using thematic analysis. This study identified calories and saturated fat as information that would have the greatest influence on food selection. Participants want this information at the time the choice is made. Participants reported limited time to eat at work, so converting nutrient density per 100 g or per serving to per portion consumed from point-of-choice labels was not a priority. Participants said that they have more time to read information in places where they line up for food, so at this point they are more open to persuasive messages. Effective messages urge the reader to take immediate action and explain why they should choose the behavior and how it will help them achieve health. Point-of-choice campaigns were well received, but factors such as cost, time, and availability of healthy food at work may shape choices to a greater extent than nutrition information. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Antiobesity effect of Safoof Mohazzil, a polyherbal formulation, in cafeteria diet induced obesity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Pooja; Mehla, Jogender; Gupta, Yogendra Kumar

    2012-11-01

    Obesity is reaching epidemic proportions all over the world yet it lacks adequate treatment. Most of the drugs have failed either due to ineffectiveness or adverse effects. Complementary and alternative system of medicine is being used since ancient times. However, many of them have not been tested for efficacy and safety using modern scientific methods. Therefore, the antiobesity effect of Safoof Mohazzil, a polyherbal formulation, was evaluated in cafeteria diet induced obesity in female Sprague Dawley rats. Animals weighing 100-150 g were divided into four groups (n = 8) i.e. standard pellet diet, cafeteria diet control, cafeteria diet + Safoof Mohazzil and standard pellet diet plus Safoof Mohazzil. The formulation was administered orally at a dose of 1 g/kg/day for 14 weeks. At the end of study, cafeteria diet significantly increased body weight, Lee's index, lipid profile (cholesterol and triglycerides), insulin and leptin levels as compared to standard pellet diet control group. Fourteen week treatment with Safoof Mohazzil significantly prevented the increase in body weight, Lee's index, lipid profile, insulin and leptin levels as compared to cafeteria diet control group without affecting food and water intake. Safoof Mohazzil had no adverse effect on hepatic transaminases, locomotor activity and motor coordination. The study provides evidence for antiobesity effect of Safoof Mohazzil.

  4. 26 CFR 1.125-3 - Effect of the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA) on the operation of cafeteria plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) on the operation of cafeteria plans. 1.125-3 Section 1.125-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE... operation of cafeteria plans. The following questions and answers provide guidance on the effect of the Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), 29 U.S.C. 2601 et seq., on the operation of cafeteria plans: Q-1...

  5. Effects of maternal linseed oil supplementation on oxidative stress markers in cafeteria diet induced obese rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hafida Merzouk

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the role of dietary linseed oil in the modulation of biochemical parameters and oxidant/antioxidant markers in cafeteria-induced obese rats and their offspring. Female wistar rats were fed on control or cafeteria diet, supplemented or not with linseed oil (5% for one month before and during the gestation. At parturition, the mothers and their offspring were killed. Weight gain, food intake, serum biochemical and oxidant/antioxidant markers were determined. Cafeteria diet induced a significant increase in body weight, food intake and adverse alterations in biochemical parameters such as an increase in serum glucose, triglyceride, cholesterol and oxidant markers. Linseed oil supplementation induced a reduction in weight gain, serum lipids and a modulation of oxidative stress, improving metabolic status. In conclusions, linseed oil displayed remarkable health benefits by decreasing plasma and oxidant/antioxidant markers in both obese mothers and their newborns.

  6. Effects of Maternal Linseed Oil Supplementation on Metabolic Parameters in Cafeteria Diet-induced Obese Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaissa, Nawel; Merzouk, Hafida; Merzouk, Sid Ahmed; Narce, Michel

    2015-04-01

    Because linseed oil may influence maternal and fetal metabolisms, we investigated its role in the modulation of lipid metabolism in cafeteria diet-induced obese rats and their offspring. Female Wistar rats were fed control or cafeteria food, which were either supplemented or not supplemented with linseed oil (5%) for 1 month before and during gestation. At parturition, serum and tissue lipids and enzyme activities were analyzed. Cafeteria diet induced adverse metabolic alterations in both mothers and offspring. Linseed oil improved metabolic status. In conclusion, linseed oil displayed health benefits by modulating tissue enzyme activities in both obese mothers and their newborns. Copyright © 2015 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  7. Does nutrition information on menus impact food choice? Comparisons across two hospital cafeterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlee, Lana; Hammond, David

    2014-06-01

    Food prepared and consumed away from home accounts for a significant proportion of dietary intake among Canadians. Currently, Canadians receive little or no nutrition information when eating in restaurant and fast-food outlets. The present study examined the impact of nutrition information on menus in hospital cafeterias on noticing and perceived influence of nutrition information and on food consumption. Cross-sectional surveys. Exit surveys (n 1003) were conducted in two hospital cafeterias. The 'intervention' site featured energy (calorie), sodium and fat content on digital menu boards, as well as a health logo for 'healthier' items. The intervention site had also revised its menu items to improve the nutrient profiles. The 'control' site provided limited nutrition information at the point of sale. Cafeteria patrons recruited using the intercept technique. Significantly more respondents at the intervention site reported noticing nutrition information (OR = 7·6, P menu labelling.

  8. Availability of drinking water in US public school cafeterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood, Nancy E; Turner, Lindsey; Colabianchi, Natalie; Chaloupka, Frank J; Johnston, Lloyd D

    2014-09-01

    This study examined the availability of free drinking water during lunchtime in US public schools, as required by federal legislation beginning in the 2011-2012 school year. Data were collected by mail-back surveys in nationally representative samples of US public elementary, middle, and high schools from 2009-2010 to 2011-2012. Overall, 86.4%, 87.4%, and 89.4% of students attended elementary, middle, and high schools, respectively, that met the drinking water requirement. Most students attended schools with existing cafeteria drinking fountains and about one fourth attended schools with water dispensers. In middle and high schools, respondents were asked to indicate whether drinking fountains were clean, and whether they were aware of any water-quality problems at the school. The vast majority of middle and high school students (92.6% and 90.4%, respectively) attended schools where the respondent perceived drinking fountains to be clean or very clean. Approximately one in four middle and high school students attended a school where the survey respondent indicated that there were water-quality issues affecting drinking fountains. Although most schools have implemented the requirement to provide free drinking water at lunchtime, additional work is needed to promote implementation at all schools. School nutrition staff at the district and school levels can play an important role in ensuring that schools implement the drinking water requirement, as well as promote education and behavior-change strategies to increase student consumption of water at school. Copyright © 2014 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Euterpe edulis effects on cardiac and renal tissues of Wistar rats fed with cafeteria diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Barrios Freitas, Rodrigo; Melato, Fernanda Araujo; Oliveira, Jerusa Maria de; Bastos, Daniel Silva Sena; Cardoso, Raisa Mirella; Leite, João Paulo Viana; Lima, Luciana Moreira

    2017-02-01

    This study's objective was to evaluate the antioxidant and toxic effects of E. edulison cardiac and renal tissues of Wistar rats fed with cafeteria diet. Catalase (CAT), glutathione-S-transferase (GST), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were measured in cardiac muscle and renal tissue of 60 animals, which were randomly assigned for 10 equal groups. Half of the rats were fed with cafeteria diet and the other half with commercial chow, combined or not to E. edulislyophilized extract, E. edulis deffated lyophilized extract or E. edulisoil. Data were evaluated using ANOVA, followed by the Student-Newman-Keuls test. Data showed a significant increase of CAT activity in cardiac tissue of animals from the groups fed with cafeteria diet associated to E. edulis lyophilized extract at 5%, E. edulis lyophilized extract at 10% and E. edulis deffated lyophilized extract at 10%. In addition, the same result was found in animals from the groups fed with commercial chow and commercial chow combined with E. edulislyophilized extract at 10% in comparison to the group fed exclusively with cafeteria diet. GST and SOD enzyme activity showed significant increase in the heart tissue of animals nourished with commercial chow when compared to the groups fed with cafeteria diet. On the other hand, there were no significant differences enzymatic levels in renal tissues. The oil and the extract of E. edulishad an important role promoting an increase of antioxidant enzymes levels in cardiac muscle, which prevent the oxidative damage resulting from the cafeteria diet in Wistar rats. There were no evidenced signs of lipid peroxidation in renal or in cardiac tissue of the animals studied, indicating that the E. edulisuse did not promote any increase in malondialdehyde cytotoxic products formation. This show that both E. edulis oil and extracts evaluated in this study were well tolerated in the studied doses.

  10. The process evaluation of two interventions aimed at portion size in worksite cafeterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeer, W M; Leeuwis, F H; Koprulu, S; Zouitni, O; Seidell, J C; Steenhuis, I H M

    2012-04-01

      In a previous study, the effectiveness of introducing a small meal in addition to the existing size and a proportional pricing strategy have been assessed in Dutch worksite cafeterias. To assess the degree of implementation and to inform the design of future interventions, the present study aimed to describe the process evaluation of both interventions.   Process evaluation components from Baranowski and Stables, and Rogers (i.e. Recruitment, Maintenance, Context, Resources, Implementation, Exposure, Contamination, and Continued use) were chosen as a theoretical basis. The process evaluation involved qualitative (e.g. structured observations, semi-structured interviews) and quantitative data (e.g. consumer questionnaires) collected from 17 intervention and eight control worksite cafeterias.   In all intervention cafeterias, two portion sizes were offered. The pricing instructions were followed in 13 intervention cafeterias. The cafeterias managers indicated that they did not consider offering large and small meals as being complex, risky or time-consuming to implement. Some managers perceived the consumer demand as high, others as (too) low. One year after the study had ended, nine of the intervention cafeterias had continued (at least partly) to follow the protocol.   Offering a smaller portion size in addition to the existing size, as well as proportional pricing, was generally implemented as prescribed by the protocol and can be considered promising in terms of continued use. However, additional efforts are needed to make the intervention more effective in motivating consumers to replace their large portion with a small portion. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Human Nutrition and Dietetics © 2011 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  11. Microbiological criteria in public catering: sampling and auditing experiences in canteens and cafeterias in Piedmont

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amaranta Traversa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In the period 2006-2011 six public catering establishments (3 canteens and 3 cafeterias were monitored, trough audit and sampling, in order to verify the application of good manufacturing and hygiene practices during food production, handling and serving. The compliance to microbiological food safety criteria (Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella spp. and process hygiene criteria were investigated using ISO standards for microbiological analyses. A total of 612 samples were collected: 192 food samples and 288 environmental swab samples from canteens; 33 food samples and 99 swab samples from cafeterias. Regarding food safety, two samples were in disagreement with criteria fixed in EU Regulation as Listeria monocytogenes was isolated from a turkey breast in a canteen and from a sandwich in a cafeteria. Regarding process hygiene criteria, as no microbiological limits are legally defined for catering services, for this study limits were fixed according to the quality standards of tender, scientific literature and laboratory experience. 23.4% foodstuffs and 8.7% swabs resulted non-compliant in canteens; 48.5% foodstuffs and 6.1% swabs resulted non-compliant in cafeterias. The count of coagulase-positive staphylococci (CPS was higher of the fixed limits in raw turkey meat and in cooked spinach: the presence among CPS of S. aureus was confirmed, strains were not able to produce enterotoxins. The most common non-compliance in hygiene criteria was represented by aerobic colony count (60.7% of total non-compliance in canteens and 75.0% in cafeterias and coliform bacteria (20.3% in canteens and 25.0% in cafeterias. Nine raw foods or raw readyto- eat food samples were non-compliant for both coliform bacteria and aerobic count; one sample (raw turkey meat was non-compliant for CPS and aerobic count but resulted to be compliant after cooking. Auditing and sampling are the most effective tools to improve food quality standard and to enhance food business

  12. Trayless cafeterias lead diners to take less salad and relatively more dessert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wansink, Brian; Just, David R

    2015-06-01

    Many colleges are removing trays from their dining facilities in hope of reducing waste. How does not having a tray impact food choice? A field study was conducted in a university cafeteria (n 417) on two evenings with identical menus, one with tray service and one without. A dining hall of a large north-eastern university, USA. Undergraduate students. Trayless dining decreased the percentage of diners (average age 19.1 years) who took salad by 65.2% but did not decrease the percentage who took dessert, leading to a markedly higher ratio of dessert to salad. Cafeterias going trayless should consider complementary policies to encourage balanced diets.

  13. The effect of price reduction on salad bar purchases at a corporate cafeteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottke, Thomas E; Pronk, Nicolaas P; Katz, Abigail S; Tillema, Juliana O; Flottemesch, Thomas J

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of a price reduction on salad bar purchases in a corporate cafeteria. We reduced the price of salad bar purchases by 50% during March 2012 and analyzed sales data by month for February through June 2012. We also conducted an anonymous survey. Salad bar sales by weight more than tripled during the price reduction and returned to baseline afterward. Survey respondents reported that the high price of salad relative to other choices is a barrier to purchases. Policies that make the price of salads equal to other choices in cafeterias may significantly increase healthful food consumption.

  14. Market research for a business plan : a child-friendly cafeteria

    OpenAIRE

    Rundberg, Janika

    2013-01-01

    The object of this Bachelor's thesis is to see whether there is a market in Turku for a new business plan, a child-friendly cafeteria. The author has an option of starting up a company if the thesis proves that there is a market for the business. The author wanted to know if other people with children feel the same way than she does about the existing cafeteria culture, the lack of healthy food and drink options and not very child-friendly enviroments being the main problems in the market. ...

  15. 'When operating a cafeteria, sales come before nutrition' - finding barriers and facilitators to serving reduced-sodium meals in worksite cafeterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sohyun; Lee, Jounghee

    2016-06-01

    The present study was conducted to examine barriers to and facilitators of serving reduced-sodium meals (RSM) in worksite cafeterias. We conducted in-depth interviews with key stakeholders in food catering companies. Food catering companies at various customer sites in South Korea. A total of nineteen interviews with twenty-five participants from ten catering companies were conducted. Sixteen on-site dietitians and nine managers from the catering companies' headquarters participated in the interviews. Four main themes emerged from the interviews. First, key stakeholders' psychosocial characteristics (perception, intention and knowledge) are important in serving RSM in worksite cafeterias. Second, skills and techniques related to measuring sodium content and preparing RSM were emphasized by the interviewees. Third, the lack of various delicious low-sodium menus is a barrier to serving RSM. Lastly, a number of environmental factors were addressed, which include social support for reduced-sodium diets (a facilitator) and pressure to maintain profit margins (a barrier), that contribute to serving meals with less salt. Based on these factors, various recommendations for future sodium reduction policies and programmes were suggested. It is important to implement population-wide sodium reduction as a means of preventing CVD and stroke. The study provided important facilitators of and barriers to serving RSM in worksite cafeterias, which could be helpful in developing environmental interventions that promote low-sodium diets.

  16. Schools′ cafeteria status: Does it affect snack patterns? a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Esfarjani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate patterns of students′ snacks habits regarding to their schools′ cafeteria status in Tehran by focus group discussion (FGD technique. Methods: Participants were 240 students (12-15 years old, selected from12 middle-schools in Tehran. The field study consisted of 24 FGDs sessions; involving 8-10 participants. Collected data were coded, categorized and analyzed using constant comparative method. Results: Over half of the students believed that snack consumption is necessary. Although, majority of students believed that their schools′ cafeterias are not acceptable, they noted them as one of the necessary parts of school. Nearly half of the children were complaining of unvaried and expensive food items. The most purchased items were: Cookies, sandwiches with mayonnaise and ketchup, soft drinks and chocolate milk. Most of the students were interested in having roles in their cafeterias. Conclusions: Schools′ cafeteria are significant sources of supplying adolescents′ snacks, so developing hygienic stores containing healthy and nutritious food items is a key element to affect their snack selection positively. Reaching this goal requires a multi disciplinary approach through participation of students, school staff, parents, and the support of community and media.

  17. Effect of Food Service Nutrition Improvements on Elementary School Cafeteria Lunch Purchase Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluss, Patricia A.; Fee, LuAnn; Culyba, Rebecca J.; Bhat, Kiran B.; Owen, Kay

    2014-01-01

    Background: Schools can play a major role in prevention and intervention for childhood obesity. We describe changes in elementary school cafeteria lunch sales patterns resulting from nutritional improvements in menu offerings that were part of a community-wide focus on health. Methods: Elementary school lunch sales data were collected for 1 week…

  18. Table Hopping in the Cafeteria: An Exploration of "Racial" Integration in Early Adolescent Social Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zisman, Paul; Wilson, Vernon

    1992-01-01

    Qualitative and quantitative studies of a class of 208 urban eighth graders demonstrate that loose-knit peer groups encourage interracial integration, whereas cliques do not. Loose-knit voluntary peer groups created by the social dynamic of cafeteria table hopping provide an opportunity for meaningful cross-race interaction. (SLD)

  19. A Group Contingency Program to Improve the Behavior of Elementary School Students in a Cafeteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabiano, Gregory A.; Pelham, William E., Jr.; Karmazin, Karen; Kreher, Joanne; Panahon, Carlos J.; Carlson, Carl

    2008-01-01

    Studies of behavior modification interventions for disruptive behavior in schools have generally focused on classroom behavior with less research directed toward child behavior in other school settings (e.g., cafeterias). The present report documents the effect of a group contingency intervention with a random reward component, targeting…

  20. Strengthening environmental and educational nutrition programmes in worksite cafeterias and supermarkets in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenhuis, I H; Van Assema, P; Glanz, K

    2001-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess conditions for the adoption and continued implementation of different healthy nutrition programmes in worksite cafeterias and supermarkets, i.e. an educational programme and two environmental programmes (a food labelling programme and a food supply programme). Twenty semi-structured interviews were conducted with representatives of worksite cafeterias and supermarkets. Concepts of theories of diffusion were used as a framework for the study. Questions were formulated about the attributes of the innovation, and organizational and personal characteristics that might influence programme adoption and implementation. Results indicated that educational and environmental programmes in both worksite cafeterias and supermarkets should meet specific requirements regarding programme design, methods and materials in order to be adopted and implemented. Besides, some important implementation strategies of the educational and environmental programmes were identified. It is concluded that it seems feasible to conduct educational and environmental intervention programmes in worksite cafeterias and supermarkets, but that certain conditions for adoption and continued implementation have to be met. Based on the implications of this study, the development of an educational programme, a labelling programme and a food supply programme was completed.

  1. The impact of educational and environmental interventions in Dutch worksite cafeterias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.H.M. Steenhuis; P. van Assema (Patricia); G.J.P. van Breukelen (Gerard); K. Glanz; G.J. Kok (Gerjo); H. de Vries (Hein)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractEnvironmental interventions as labeling of healthy foods and an increased availability of healthy foods may help consumers to meet the guidelines for a healthy diet. This article describes a study into the effectiveness of two environmental programs to be used in worksite cafeterias

  2. Using the Hospital Nutrition Environment Scan to Evaluate Health Initiative in Hospital Cafeterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derrick, Jennifer Willahan; Bellini, Sarah Gunnell; Spelman, Julie

    2015-11-01

    Health-promoting environments advance health and prevent chronic disease. Hospitals have been charged to promote health and wellness to patients, communities, and 5.3 million adults employed in United States health care environments. In this cross-sectional observational study, the Hospital Nutrition Environment Scan (HNES) was used to measure the nutrition environment of hospital cafeterias and evaluate the influence of the LiVe Well Plate health initiative. Twenty-one hospitals in the Intermountain West region were surveyed between October 2013 and May 2014. Six hospitals participated in the LiVe Well Plate health initiative and were compared with 15 hospitals not participating. The LiVe Well Plate health initiative identified and promoted a healthy meal defined as cafeterias were scored on four subcategories: facilitators and barriers, grab-and-go items, menu offerings, and selection options at point of purchase. Overall, hospitals scored 35.3±13.7 (range=7 to 63) points of 86 total possible points. Cafeterias in health initiative hospitals had significantly higher mean nutrition composite scores compared with non-health initiative hospitals (49.2 vs 29.7; Pcafeterias. Additional research is needed to quantify and strategize ways to improve nutrition environments within hospital cafeterias and assess the influence on healthy lifestyle behaviors. Copyright © 2015 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Reducing Disruptive Behavior in an Urban School Cafeteria: An Extension of the Good Behavior Game

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCurdy, Barry L.; Lannie, Amanda L.; Barnabas, Ernesto

    2009-01-01

    Non-classroom settings are often the most violence-prone areas within a school. This study investigated the impact of an interdependent group contingency on the disruptive behaviors of students in grades K-6 in an urban school cafeteria. Nine female noontime aides and National School and Community Corps staff members implemented the Lunchroom…

  4. Cafeteria diet impairs expression of sensory-specific satiety and stimulus-outcome learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Claire Reichelt

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A range of animal and human data demonstrates that excessive consumption of palatable food leads to neuroadaptive responses in brain circuits underlying reward. Unrestrained consumption of palatable food has been shown to increase the reinforcing value of food and weaken inhibitory control; however whether it impacts upon the sensory representations of palatable solutions has not been formally tested. These experiments sought to determine whether exposure to a cafeteria diet consisting of palatable high fat foods impacts upon the ability of rats to learn about food-associated cues and the sensory properties of ingested foods. We found that rats fed a cafeteria diet for 2 weeks were impaired in the control of Pavlovian responding in accordance to the incentive value of palatable outcomes associated with auditory cues following devaluation by sensory-specific satiety. Sensory-specific satiety is one mechanism by which a diet containing different foods increases ingestion relative to one lacking variety. Hence, choosing to consume greater quantities of a range of foods may contribute to the current prevalence of obesity. We observed that rats fed a cafeteria diet for 2 weeks showed impaired sensory-specific satiety following consumption of a high calorie solution. The deficit in expression of sensory-specific satiety was also present 1 week following the withdrawal of cafeteria foods. Thus, exposure to obesogenic diets may impact upon neurocircuitry involved in motivated control of behaviour.

  5. Cafeteria diet intake for fourteen weeks can cause obesity and insulin resistance in Wistar rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danilo Antônio Corrêa Pinto Júnior

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Obesity is a strong predictor of some kinds of diseases. High intake of high-fat foods contributes significantly to the growth of the obese population globally. The aim of this study was to verify if consumption of a cafeteria diet for fourteen weeks could increase white fat mass, body weight and skeletal muscle mass and promote insulin resistance in male Wistar rats. METHODS: Twenty animals were divided into two groups: control and obese. Both were fed standard chow and water ad libitum. Additionally, a cafeteria diet consisting of bacon, bologna sausage, sandwich cookies and soft drink was given to the obese group. RESULTS: The obese group was significantly heavier (p<0.0001 than controls from the second week until the end of the cafeteria-diet intervention. Absolute and relative fat mass, liver weight and Lee Index increased significantly (p<0.05 in the obese group. Furthermore, the obese group had lower (p<0.05 insulin sensitivity than the control group. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, fourteen weeks of cafeteria diet promoted a progressive increase of fat mass and insulin resistance. Therefore, this is a great and inexpensive diet-induced insulin resistance model.

  6. Cafeteria diet impairs expression of sensory-specific satiety and stimulus-outcome learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichelt, Amy C; Morris, Margaret J; Westbrook, R F

    2014-01-01

    A range of animal and human data demonstrates that excessive consumption of palatable food leads to neuroadaptive responses in brain circuits underlying reward. Unrestrained consumption of palatable food has been shown to increase the reinforcing value of food and weaken inhibitory control; however, whether it impacts upon the sensory representations of palatable solutions has not been formally tested. These experiments sought to determine whether exposure to a cafeteria diet consisting of palatable high fat foods impacts upon the ability of rats to learn about food-associated cues and the sensory properties of ingested foods. We found that rats fed a cafeteria diet for 2 weeks were impaired in the control of Pavlovian responding in accordance to the incentive value of palatable outcomes associated with auditory cues following devaluation by sensory-specific satiety. Sensory-specific satiety is one mechanism by which a diet containing different foods increases ingestion relative to one lacking variety. Hence, choosing to consume greater quantities of a range of foods may contribute to the current prevalence of obesity. We observed that rats fed a cafeteria diet for 2 weeks showed impaired sensory-specific satiety following consumption of a high calorie solution. The deficit in expression of sensory-specific satiety was also present 1 week following the withdrawal of cafeteria foods. Thus, exposure to obesogenic diets may impact upon neurocircuitry involved in motivated control of behavior.

  7. Schools' Cafeteria Status: Does it Affect Snack Patterns? A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfarjani, Fatemeh; Mohammadi, Fatemeh; Roustaee, Roshanak; Hajifaraji, Majid

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate patterns of students' snacks habits regarding to their schools' cafeteria status in Tehran by focus group discussion (FGD) technique. Participants were 240 students (12-15 years old), selected from12 middle-schools in Tehran. The field study consisted of 24 FGDs sessions; involving 8-10 participants. Collected data were coded, categorized and analyzed using constant comparative method. Over half of the students believed that snack consumption is necessary. Although, majority of students believed that their schools' cafeterias are not acceptable, they noted them as one of the necessary parts of school. Nearly half of the children were complaining of unvaried and expensive food items. The most purchased items were: Cookies, sandwiches with mayonnaise and ketchup, soft drinks and chocolate milk. Most of the students were interested in having roles in their cafeterias. Schools' cafeteria are significant sources of supplying adolescents' snacks, so developing hygienic stores containing healthy and nutritious food items is a key element to affect their snack selection positively. Reaching this goal requires a multi disciplinary approach through participation of students, school staff, parents, and the support of community and media.

  8. Schools’ Cafeteria Status: Does it Affect Snack Patterns? A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esfarjani, Fatemeh; Mohammadi, Fatemeh; Roustaee, Roshanak; Hajifaraji, Majid

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate patterns of students’ snacks habits regarding to their schools’ cafeteria status in Tehran by focus group discussion (FGD) technique. Methods: Participants were 240 students (12-15 years old), selected from12 middle-schools in Tehran. The field study consisted of 24 FGDs sessions; involving 8-10 participants. Collected data were coded, categorized and analyzed using constant comparative method. Results: Over half of the students believed that snack consumption is necessary. Although, majority of students believed that their schools’ cafeterias are not acceptable, they noted them as one of the necessary parts of school. Nearly half of the children were complaining of unvaried and expensive food items. The most purchased items were: Cookies, sandwiches with mayonnaise and ketchup, soft drinks and chocolate milk. Most of the students were interested in having roles in their cafeterias. Conclusions: Schools’ cafeteria are significant sources of supplying adolescents’ snacks, so developing hygienic stores containing healthy and nutritious food items is a key element to affect their snack selection positively. Reaching this goal requires a multi disciplinary approach through participation of students, school staff, parents, and the support of community and media. PMID:24319560

  9. Consumer Support for Policies to Reduce the Sodium Content in School Cafeterias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sheena M.; Gunn, Janelle P.; Merlo, Caitlin L.; Tong, Xin; Cogswell, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess consumer support for policies lowering the sodium content of cafeteria foods in schools. Methods: Data were used from 9,634 adults aged >18 years who responded to questions about sodium in general and in school foods in a 2010 national mail panel survey. Prevalence of consumer…

  10. The metabolic and neuroinflammatory changes induced by consuming a cafeteria diet are age-dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Deborah; Cecconello, Ana Lucia; Partata, Wania Aparecida; de Fraga, Luciano Stürmer; Ribeiro, Maria Flávia Marques; Guedes, Renata Padilha

    2017-09-29

    To compare the effects of a palatable cafeteria diet on serum parameters and neuroinflammatory markers of young and aged female Wistar rats. Three-month-old (young) and 18-month-old (aged) female Wistar rats had access to a cafeteria diet (Caf-Young, Caf-Aged) or a standard chow diet (Std-Young, Std-Aged). The Caf-Young group showed a higher food consumption, weight gain, visceral fat depot, serum insulin and leptin levels, and the insulin resistance index (HOMA-IR) than the Std-Young group. The Caf-Aged group exhibited an increase in interleukin-1 levels in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus. The number of GFAP-positive cells did not differ between the groups, but there was a diet effect in the cerebral cortex and an age effect in the hippocampus. Phospho-tau expression did not differ between the groups. The 3- and 18-month-old rats responded differently to a cafeteria diet. Insulin and leptin levels are elevated in young animals fed a cafeteria diet, whereas aged animals are prone to neuroinflammation (indicated by an increase in interleukin-1β levels). A combination of hypercaloric diet and senescence have detrimental effects on the inflammatory response in the brain, which may predispose to neurological diseases.

  11. A foodborne outbreak of brucellosis at a police station cafeteria, Lima, Peru

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Román, Karina; Castillo, Rosa; Gilman, Robert H.; Calderón, Maritza; Vivar, Aldo; Céspedes, Manuel; Smits, Henk L.; Meléndez, Paolo; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Guerra, Humberto; Maves, Ryan C.; Matthias, Michael A.; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Saito, Mayuko

    2013-01-01

    Brucella melitensis is highly infectious for humans and can be transmitted to humans in a number of epidemiological contexts. Within the context of an ongoing brucellosis surveillance project, an outbreak at a Peruvian police officer cafeteria was discovered, which led to active surveillance

  12. The process evaluation of two interventions aimed at portion size in worksite cafeterias.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, W.M.; Leeuwis, F.H.; Koprulu, S.; Zouitni, O.; Seidell, J.C.; Steenhuis, I.H.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: In a previous study, the effectiveness of introducing a small meal in addition to the existing size and a proportional pricing strategy have been assessed in Dutch worksite cafeterias. To assess the degree of implementation and to inform the design of future interventions, the present

  13. Grape-seed procyanidins prevent the cafeteria-diet-induced decrease of glucagon-like peptide-1 production

    OpenAIRE

    Pinent, M; Ardèvol, A.; Blay, M.; Martínez, N.; González, N.

    2014-01-01

    10.1021/jf405239p Grape-seed procyanidin extract (GSPE) has been reported to improve insulin resistance in cafeteria rats. Because glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is involved in glucose homeostasis, the preventive effects of GSPE on GLP-1 production, secretion, and elimination were evaluated in a model of diet-induced insulin resistance. Rats were fed a cafeteria diet for 12 weeks, and 25 mg of GSPE/kg of body weight was administered concomitantly. Vehicle-treated cafeteria-fed rats and c...

  14. Improving Healthy Eating and the Bottom Line: Impact of a Price Incentive Program in 2 Hospital Cafeterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patsch, Amy J; Smith, Jennifer Howard; Liebert, Mina L; Behrens, Timothy K; Charles, Tami

    2016-07-01

    To evaluate the impact of a health-promoting price intervention on food sales and profit. Nonrandomized evaluation study. Two hospital cafeterias. Hospital employees (2800) were the priority population. During baseline phase, healthy versions of existing unhealthy items were introduced. The intervention phase included marketing and price incentives/disincentives for healthy and unhealthy items, with a 35% price differential. Average and proportional change in sales and impact on financial outcomes were assessed. Two-way factorial analyses of variance and two-proportion Z-score tests were run to assess change in sales. Independent samples t tests were used to test for changes in profit. Significant impact was demonstrated on all burger sales in the desired direction during intervention (P Cafeteria gross sales and burger profit (P cafeterias. Incentivizing consumers through price interventions changed hospital cafeteria food sales in the desired direction while improving the bottom line. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Management of Sodium-reduced Meals at Worksite Cafeterias: Perceptions, Practices, Barriers, and Needs among Food Service Personnel

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Jounghee; Park, Sohyun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The sodium content of meals provided at worksite cafeterias is greater than the sodium content of restaurant meals and home meals. The objective of this study was to assess the relationships between sodium-reduction practices, barriers, and perceptions among food service personnel. Methods We implemented a cross-sectional study by collecting data on perceptions, practices, barriers, and needs regarding sodium-reduced meals at 17 worksite cafeterias in South Korea. We implemented Ch...

  16. Effects of food pattern change and physical exercise on cafeteria diet-induced obesity in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goularte, Jéferson F; Ferreira, Maria B C; Sanvitto, Gilberto L

    2012-10-28

    Obesity affects a large number of people around the world and appears to be the result of changes in food intake, eating habits and physical activity levels. Changes in dietary patterns and physical exercise are therefore strongly recommended to treat obesity and its complications. The present study tested the hypothesis that obesity and metabolic changes produced by a cafeteria diet can be prevented with dietary changes and/or physical exercise. A total of fifty-six female Wistar rats underwent one of five treatments: chow diet; cafeteria diet; cafeteria diet followed by a chow diet; cafeteria diet plus exercise; cafeteria diet followed by a chow diet plus exercise. The duration of the experiment was 34 weeks. The cafeteria diet resulted in higher energy intake, weight gain, increased visceral adipose tissue and liver weight, and insulin resistance. The cafeteria diet followed by the chow diet resulted in energy intake, body weight, visceral adipose tissue and liver weight and insulin sensitivity equal to that of the controls. Exercise increased total energy intake at week 34, but produced no changes in the animals' body weight or adipose tissue mass. However, insulin sensitivity in animals subjected to exercise and the diet was similar to that of the controls. The present study found that exposure to palatable food caused obesity and insulin resistance and a diet change was sufficient to prevent cafeteria diet-induced obesity and to maintain insulin sensitivity at normal levels. In addition, exercise resulted in normal insulin sensitivity in obese rats. These results may help to develop new approaches for the treatment of obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus.

  17. Grape Seed Procyanidin Extract Improves Insulin Production but Enhances Bax Protein Expression in Cafeteria-Treated Male Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Lídia Cedó; Anna Castell-Auví; Victor Pallarès; Mayte Blay; Anna Ardévol; Montserrat Pinent

    2013-01-01

    In a previous study, the administration of a grape seed procyanidin extract (GSPE) in female Wistar rats improved insulin resistance, reduced insulin production, and modulated apoptosis biomarkers in the pancreas. Considering that pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters in females are different from these parameters in males, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of GSPE on male Wistar cafeteria-induced obese rats. The results have confirmed that the cafeteria model ...

  18. KEMI-TORNIO UNIVERSITY OF APPLIED SCIENCES : Design and Implementation of Cafeteria Menu System Based on PHP

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Shikai

    2012-01-01

    This project was established on the bases of website development. The system was designed for the cafeteria (Aurinko) of Kemi-Tornio University of Applied Sciences which focuses to two kinds of user groups, and the characteristics of the project are described in the following paragraphs. Firstly, the application allows the cafeteria authority to visit, modify, add and remove the foods in a menu, and then staff can manage the menus from Monday to Saturday. In addition, if the certain menu h...

  19. Grape Seed Procyanidin Extract Improves Insulin Production but Enhances Bax Protein Expression in Cafeteria-Treated Male Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedó, Lídia; Castell-Auví, Anna; Pallarès, Victor; Blay, Mayte; Ardévol, Anna; Pinent, Montserrat

    2013-01-01

    In a previous study, the administration of a grape seed procyanidin extract (GSPE) in female Wistar rats improved insulin resistance, reduced insulin production, and modulated apoptosis biomarkers in the pancreas. Considering that pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters in females are different from these parameters in males, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of GSPE on male Wistar cafeteria-induced obese rats. The results have confirmed that the cafeteria model is a robust model mimicking a prediabetic state, as these rats display insulin resistance, increased insulin synthesis and secretion, and increased apoptosis in the pancreas. In addition, GSPE treatment (25 mg/kg of GSPE for 21 days) in male rats improves insulin resistance and counteracts the cafeteria-induced effects on insulin synthesis. However, the administration of the extract enhances the cafeteria-induced increase in Bax protein levels, suggesting increased apoptosis. This result contradicts previous results from cafeteria-fed female rats, in which GSPE seemed to counteract the increased apoptosis induced by the cafeteria diet.

  20. Grape Seed Procyanidin Extract Improves Insulin Production but Enhances Bax Protein Expression in Cafeteria-Treated Male Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lídia Cedó

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In a previous study, the administration of a grape seed procyanidin extract (GSPE in female Wistar rats improved insulin resistance, reduced insulin production, and modulated apoptosis biomarkers in the pancreas. Considering that pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters in females are different from these parameters in males, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of GSPE on male Wistar cafeteria-induced obese rats. The results have confirmed that the cafeteria model is a robust model mimicking a prediabetic state, as these rats display insulin resistance, increased insulin synthesis and secretion, and increased apoptosis in the pancreas. In addition, GSPE treatment (25 mg/kg of GSPE for 21 days in male rats improves insulin resistance and counteracts the cafeteria-induced effects on insulin synthesis. However, the administration of the extract enhances the cafeteria-induced increase in Bax protein levels, suggesting increased apoptosis. This result contradicts previous results from cafeteria-fed female rats, in which GSPE seemed to counteract the increased apoptosis induced by the cafeteria diet.

  1. How the CATCH eat smart program helps implement the USDA regulations in school cafeterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoelscher, Deanna M; Mitchell, Paul; Dwyer, Johanna; Elder, John; Clesi, Ann; Snyder, Patricia

    2003-08-01

    This article describes the implementation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National School Lunch Program (NSLP) standards in school lunch menus in 56 intervention and 20 control schools from the Child and Adolescent Trial for Cardiovascular Health (CATCH) 5 years after the main trial, compared with 12 schools previously unexposed to CATCH. School food service personnel completed questionnaires to assess CATCH guideline implementation, demographic data, behavioral constructs, training, program material use, and participation in competing programs. Five days of menus and recipes were collected from school cafeteria staff, averaged, and compared to USDA School Meal Initiative (SMI) standards. Significant differences between intervention and unexposed schools were found for training and knowledge of CATCH and in mean percentage energy from fat and carbohydrates. Intervention schools most closely met USDA SMI recommendations for fat. Thus, the CATCH Eat Smart Program assisted school cafeterias in meeting USDA guidelines 5 years postimplementation.

  2. Effect of Argyreia speciosa root extract on cafeteria diet-induced obesity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shiv; Alagawadi, K R; Rao, M Raghavendra

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the antiobesity effects of the ethanolic extract of Argyreia speciosa roots in rats fed with a cafeteria diet (CD). Obesity was induced in albino rats by feeding them a CD daily for 42 days, in addition to a normal diet. Body weight and food intake was measured initially and then every week thereafter. On day 42, the serum biochemical parameters were estimated and the animals were sacrificed with an overdose of ether. The, liver and parametrial adipose tissues were removed and weighed immediately. The liver triglyceride content was estimated. The influence of the extract on the pancreatic lipase activity was also determined by measuring the rate of release of oleic acid from triolein. The body weight at two-to-six weeks and the final parametrial adipose tissue weights were significantly lowered (P cafeteria diet-induced obesity in rats.

  3. Menu Analysis for Improved Customer Demand and Profitability in Hospital Cafeterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Linda L.; MacInnis, Donna; Gardiner, Nicole

    1999-01-01

    Several sophisticated menu analysis methods have been compared in studies using theoretical restaurant menus. Institutional and especially hospital cafeterias differ from commercial restaurants in ways that may influence the effectiveness of these menu analysis methods. In this study, we compared three different menu analysis methods - menu engineering, goal value analysis, and marginal analysis in an institutional setting, to evaluate their relative effectiveness for menu management decision-making. The three methods were used to analyze menu cost and sales data for a representative cafeteria in a large metropolitan hospital. The results were compared with informal analyses by the manager and an employee to determine accuracy and value of information for decision-making. Results suggested that all three methods would improve menu planning and pricing, which in turn would enhance customer demand (revenue) and profitability. However, menu engineering was ranked the easiest of the three methods to interpret.

  4. Promoting consumption of fruit in elementary school cafeterias. The effects of slicing apples and oranges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Mark; Branscum, Adam; Nakayima, Peace Julie

    2009-10-01

    We examined how slicing apples and oranges affected elementary students' selection and consumption of fruit. Slicing increased the percentage of children selecting and consuming oranges, while a similar effect was not found for apples. The impact of slicing fruit was greatest among younger students. These findings suggest that school cafeterias can increase accessibility and consumption of foods through simple, inexpensive food preparation techniques, with the impact of such measures varying by foods and student characteristics.

  5. Effect of Coleus forskohlii extract on cafeteria diet-induced obesity in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Hebbani Nagarajappa Shivaprasad; Sushma Gopalakrishna; Bhanumathy Mariyanna; Midhun Thekkoot; Roopa Reddy; Boreddy Shivanandappa Tippeswamy

    2014-01-01

    Background: Obesity is a metabolic disorder that can lead to adverse metabolic effects on blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides and insulin resistance and also increases the risk of coronary heart disease, ischemic stroke and type 2 diabetes mellitus. This study was designed to determine the effect of Coleus forskohlii on obesity and associated metabolic changes in rats fed with cafeteria diet. Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate antiobesogenic and metabolic benefits of C. f...

  6. Chocolate Milk Consequences: A Pilot Study Evaluating the Consequences of Banning Chocolate Milk in School Cafeterias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanks, Andrew S.; Just, David R.; Wansink, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Currently, 68.3% of the milk available in schools is flavored, with chocolate being the most popular (61.6% of all milk). If chocolate milk is removed from a school cafeteria, what will happen to overall milk selection and consumption? Methods In a before-after study in 11 Oregon elementary schools, flavored milk–which will be referred to as chocolate milk–was banned from the cafeteria. Milk sales, school enrollment, and data for daily participation in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) were compared year to date. Results Total daily milk sales declined by 9.9% (pchocolate milk was also associated with 6.8% fewer students eating school lunches, and although other factors were also involved, this is consistent with the notion of psychological reactance. Conclusions Removing chocolate milk from school cafeterias may reduce calorie and sugar consumption, but it may also lead students to take less milk overall, drink less (waste more) of the white milk they do take, and no longer purchase school lunch. Food service managers need to carefully weigh the costs and benefits of eliminating chocolate milk and should consider alternative options that make white milk more convenient, attractive, and normal to choose. PMID:24740451

  7. Chocolate milk consequences: a pilot study evaluating the consequences of banning chocolate milk in school cafeterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanks, Andrew S; Just, David R; Wansink, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Currently, 68.3% of the milk available in schools is flavored, with chocolate being the most popular (61.6% of all milk). If chocolate milk is removed from a school cafeteria, what will happen to overall milk selection and consumption? In a before-after study in 11 Oregon elementary schools, flavored milk-which will be referred to as chocolate milk-was banned from the cafeteria. Milk sales, school enrollment, and data for daily participation in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) were compared year to date. Total daily milk sales declined by 9.9% (pmilk increased by 161.2 cartons per day (pmilk was thrown away. Eliminating chocolate milk was also associated with 6.8% fewer students eating school lunches, and although other factors were also involved, this is consistent with the notion of psychological reactance. Removing chocolate milk from school cafeterias may reduce calorie and sugar consumption, but it may also lead students to take less milk overall, drink less (waste more) of the white milk they do take, and no longer purchase school lunch. Food service managers need to carefully weigh the costs and benefits of eliminating chocolate milk and should consider alternative options that make white milk more convenient, attractive, and normal to choose.

  8. A Traffic-Light Label Intervention and Dietary Choices in College Cafeterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seward, Michael W; Block, Jason P; Chatterjee, Avik

    2016-10-01

    To examine whether traffic-light labeling and choice architecture interventions improved dietary choices among students at a northeastern US university. In 6 cafeterias at Harvard University, in Cambridge, Massachusetts, we implemented a 7-week intervention including traffic-light labeling (red: least nutrient rich; yellow: nutrient neutral; green: most nutrient rich), choice architecture (how choices are presented to consumers), and "healthy-plate" tray stickers. During the 2014-2015 academic year, 2 cafeterias received all interventions, 2 received choice architecture only, and 2 were controls. We analyzed sales for 6 weeks before and 7 weeks during interventions. Using interrupted time-series analyses, we measured changes in red, yellow, and green items served. We collected 1329 surveys to capture perceptions of labeling. Among 2.6 million portions served throughout the study, we found no significant changes in red (-0.8% change/week; P = .2) or green (+1.1% change/week; P = .4) items served at intervention sites compared with controls. In surveys, 58% of students reported using traffic-light labels at least a few times per week, and 73% wanted them to continue. Although many students reported using traffic-light labels regularly and wanted interventions to continue, cafeteria interventions did not demonstrate clear improvements in dietary quality.

  9. A new direction for public health care: changing cafeteria eating habits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zifferblatt, S M; Wilbur, C S; Pinsky, J L

    1980-01-01

    A "Food for Thought" game, an eight-week, media-based nutrition program designed to influence food choices in a cafeteria setting, was conducted in a National Institutes of Health employee cafeteria. Its purpose was to encourage customers to select lower-caloric food during lunch. The effects of the program on food choices and total calories of food purchased each day were measured by time series analyses. During the eight-week intervention period, skim milk purchases increased, and dessert and bread sales, as well as average number of calories purchased per day per person, declined significantly. Some evidence for a maintenance effect over a ten-week follow-up period was obtained. The "Food for Thought" game delivered nutrition education in an upbeat but unobtrusive way. Although people patronize cafeterias to eat, socialize, and relax and not to be educated, this program had only minimal requirements for participation. The result was a high level of interest and involvement. People can "learn while they eat," if careful attention is paid to customer needs and principles of effective communication.

  10. [Effects of a long-term intervention in a work cafeteria on employee vegetable intake].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misawa, Akemi; Yoshita, Katsushi; Fukumura, Tomoe; Tanaka, Taichiro; Tamaki, Junko; Takebayashi, Toru; Kusaka, Yukinori; Nakagawa, Hideaki; Yamato, Hiroshi; Okayama, Akira; Miura, Katsuyuki; Okamura, Tomonori; Ueshima, Hirotsugu

    2015-01-01

    We examined the effects on employee vegetable intake of a long-term intervention in an employee work cafeteria. The subjects were approximately 1,200 employees (aged 19-61 years) of an industrial company in Fukui prefecture. We promoted the intake of typical Japanese style meals that combined three elements (staple foods, main dishes and vegetable dishes) to increase vegetables intake. We displayed all items on the menus of the employee cafeteria using three colors (yellow, red and green to denote three elements) to indicate healthy food choices for the maintenance of a healthy food environment. We advised employees to choose meals containing the three elements at the time of payment, for nutritional education (appropriate portion choice: APC). We evaluated the ratio of APC at the same time. To calculate the mean daily intake per person, we carried out a questionnaire survey similar to the "semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire" and asked about the frequency and approximate intake of vegetables. The APC was 63.5% after one year of intervention, significantly increased to 82.1% after two years (p cafeteria.

  11. A healthful options food station can improve satisfaction and generate gross profit in a worksite cafeteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimathi, Amber N; Gregoire, Mary B; Dowling, Rebecca A; Stone, Marcelle K

    2009-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to determine customer satisfaction with a healthful options food station offered in a worksite cafeteria and document the financial contribution of such a station. The healthful options station featured daily entrées with fewer than 500 calories and less than 30% of calories from fat. Questionnaires from 655 (24.5% response) employees and students provided data on satisfaction with and usage of the station. The majority of the respondents who had purchased from the healthful options station were female (77.3%), white (51.6%), aged 30 to 50 years (52.0%), and had annual incomes of $60,000 to $100,000 (29.3%) or $20,000 to $39,999 (22.2%). Sales and gross profit from the healthful options station were compared to those of the comfort station. Customers were satisfied with attributes of the healthful options station (means >3 on a 5-point scale). Results of paired t tests suggested that customers who had purchased from the healthful options station rated the station significantly (Pfood presentation, food quality, overall quality of the cafeteria, length of line, and food choices available compared to their ratings for the cafeteria in general. The healthful options station generated average daily sales of $458 and gross profit of $306. However, the sales and gross profit were significantly (P<0.05) less than the comparison comfort station.

  12. Consumer attitudes, barriers, and meal satisfaction associated with sodium-reduced meal intake at worksite cafeterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jounghee; Park, Sohyun

    2015-12-01

    Targeting consumers who consume lunches at their worksite cafeterias would be a valuable approach to reduce sodium intake in South Korea. To assess the relationships between socio-demographic factors, consumer satisfaction, attitudes, barriers and the frequency of sodium-reduced meal intake. We implemented a cross-sectional research, analyzing data from 738 consumers aged 18 years or older (327 males and 411 females) at 17 worksite cafeterias in South Korea. We used the ordinary least squares regression analysis to determine the factors related to overall satisfaction with sodium-reduced meal. General linear models with LSD tests were employed to examine the variables that differed by the frequency of sodium-reduced meal intake. Most subjects always or usually consumed the sodium-reduced meal (49%), followed by sometimes (34%) and rarely or never (18%). Diverse menus, taste and belief in the helpfulness of the sodium-reduced meal significantly increased overall satisfaction with the sodium-reduced diet (P menu diversity' (4.01 points), 2) 'active promotion' (3.97 points), 3) 'display of nutrition labels in a visible location' (3.96 points), 4) 'improvement of taste' (3.88 points), and 5) 'education of sodium-reduction self-care behaviors' (3.82 points). Dietitians could lead consumers to choose sodium-reduced meals by improving their taste and providing diverse menus for the sodium-reduced meals at worksite cafeterias.

  13. Chocolate milk consequences: a pilot study evaluating the consequences of banning chocolate milk in school cafeterias.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew S Hanks

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Currently, 68.3% of the milk available in schools is flavored, with chocolate being the most popular (61.6% of all milk. If chocolate milk is removed from a school cafeteria, what will happen to overall milk selection and consumption? METHODS: In a before-after study in 11 Oregon elementary schools, flavored milk-which will be referred to as chocolate milk-was banned from the cafeteria. Milk sales, school enrollment, and data for daily participation in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP were compared year to date. RESULTS: Total daily milk sales declined by 9.9% (p<0.01. Although white milk increased by 161.2 cartons per day (p<0.001, 29.4% of this milk was thrown away. Eliminating chocolate milk was also associated with 6.8% fewer students eating school lunches, and although other factors were also involved, this is consistent with the notion of psychological reactance. CONCLUSIONS: Removing chocolate milk from school cafeterias may reduce calorie and sugar consumption, but it may also lead students to take less milk overall, drink less (waste more of the white milk they do take, and no longer purchase school lunch. Food service managers need to carefully weigh the costs and benefits of eliminating chocolate milk and should consider alternative options that make white milk more convenient, attractive, and normal to choose.

  14. Disinfection efficiency of chlorine dioxide gas in student cafeterias in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Ching-Shan; Huang, Da-Ji

    2013-07-01

    In Taiwan, the food and drink requirements of students and faculty members are met by student cafeterias. The air quality within these cafeterias should satisfy the guidelines laid down by the Taiwan Environmental Protection Agency (Taiwan EPA). Accordingly, this study performed an experimental investigation into the efficiency of two different gaseous chlorine dioxide (ClO2) treatments in disinfecting a local student cafeteria, namely a single, one-off application and a twice-daily application. In both cases, the ClO2 was applied using strategically placed aerosol devices. The air quality before and after disinfection was evaluated by measuring the bioaerosol levels of bacteria and fungi. Moreover, a stepwise discriminant analysis method was applied for predicting the residual concentrations of bacteria and fungi, as a function of the environmental parameters and the ClO2 concentration. The experimental results showed that the average background levels of bacteria and fungi prior to ClO2 disinfection were 972.5 +/- 623.6 and 1534.1 +/- 631.8 colony-forming units (CFU)/m3, respectively. A single ClO2 application was found to reduce the bacterial and fungal concentration levels by as much as 65% and 30%, respectively. By contrast, a twice-daily ClO2 application was found to reduce the bacterial and fungal concentration levels by as much as 74% and 38%, respectively. The statistical analysis results showed that the residual bacterial concentration level was determined primarily by the number of individuals present in the cafeteria, the temperature, and the ClO2 concentration, whereas the residual fungal concentration level was determined mainly by the temperature, the total number of suspended particles, and the ClO2 concentration. Thus, the integrated results suggest that the air quality guidelines prescribed by the Taiwan EPA for student cafeteria can best be achieved by applying ClO2 twice daily using an appropriate deployment of aerosol devices. ClO2 gas can

  15. Management of Sodium-reduced Meals at Worksite Cafeterias: Perceptions, Practices, Barriers, and Needs among Food Service Personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jounghee; Park, Sohyun

    2016-04-01

    The sodium content of meals provided at worksite cafeterias is greater than the sodium content of restaurant meals and home meals. The objective of this study was to assess the relationships between sodium-reduction practices, barriers, and perceptions among food service personnel. We implemented a cross-sectional study by collecting data on perceptions, practices, barriers, and needs regarding sodium-reduced meals at 17 worksite cafeterias in South Korea. We implemented Chi-square tests and analysis of variance for statistical analysis. For post hoc testing, we used Bonferroni tests; when variances were unequal, we used Dunnett T3 tests. This study involved 104 individuals employed at the worksite cafeterias, comprised of 35 men and 69 women. Most of the participants had relatively high levels of perception regarding the importance of sodium reduction (very important, 51.0%; moderately important, 27.9%). Sodium reduction practices were higher, but perceived barriers appeared to be lower in participants with high-level perception of sodium-reduced meal provision. The results of the needs assessment revealed that the participants wanted to have more active education programs targeting the general population. The biggest barriers to providing sodium-reduced meals were use of processed foods and limited methods of sodium-reduced cooking in worksite cafeterias. To make the provision of sodium-reduced meals at worksite cafeterias more successful and sustainable, we suggest implementing more active education programs targeting the general population, developing sodium-reduced cooking methods, and developing sodium-reduced processed foods.

  16. Modification of the School Cafeteria Environment Can Impact Childhood Nutrition: Results from the Wise Mind and LA Health Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Donald A.; Han, Hongmei; Johnson, William D.; Martin, Corby K.; Newton, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Recent changes in nutrition standards for the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs assume that modification of the nutritional serving practices of school cafeterias will result in improved childhood nutrition in the school environment. The primary aim of this paper is to summarize the findings from two recent cluster randomized controlled trials (Wise Mind and LA Health) that tested the hypothesis that modification of school cafeteria environments, including changes in nutrition standards, would yield beneficial changes in childhood nutrition and healthy eating in the school lunch environment. A secondary aim was to investigate the association of participant characteristics and changes in nutrition and healthy eating. A third aim was to investigate the relationships between the food intake of children and: 1) foods selected by the children and 2) food that was uneaten during the lunch meal (plate waste). The studies used similar approaches for modifying the school cafeteria environment and both studies used the digital photography method to measure changes in food intake, food selection, and plate waste. Both studies reported significant improvements in childhood nutrition, and the LA Health study reported improved healthy eating, following introduction of the cafeteria modification program in comparison to baseline and/or control arms. These studies confirm the hypothesis that interventions that modify the school cafeteria environment can beneficially impact childhood nutrition. PMID:23154216

  17. Grape-seed procyanidins prevent the cafeteria-diet-induced decrease of glucagon-like peptide-1 production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Abuín, Noemi; Martínez-Micaelo, Neus; Blay, Mayte; Ardévol, Anna; Pinent, Montserrat

    2014-02-05

    Grape-seed procyanidin extract (GSPE) has been reported to improve insulin resistance in cafeteria rats. Because glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) is involved in glucose homeostasis, the preventive effects of GSPE on GLP-1 production, secretion, and elimination were evaluated in a model of diet-induced insulin resistance. Rats were fed a cafeteria diet for 12 weeks, and 25 mg of GSPE/kg of body weight was administered concomitantly. Vehicle-treated cafeteria-fed rats and chow-fed rats were used as controls. The cafeteria diet decreased active GLP-1 plasma levels, which is attributed to a decreased intestinal GLP-1 production, linked to reduced colonic enteroendocrine cell populations. Such effects were prevented by GSPE. In the same context, GSPE avoided the decrease on intestinal dipeptidyl-peptidase 4 (DPP4) activity and modulated the gene expression of GLP-1 and its receptor in the hypothalamus. In conclusion, the preventive treatment with GSPE abrogates the effects of the cafeteria diet on intestinal GLP-1 production and DPP4 activity.

  18. Go Slow Whoa meal patterns: cafeteria staff and teacher perceptions of effectiveness in winning with wellness schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slawson, Deborah L; Southerland, Jodi; Lowe, Elizabeth F; Dalton, William T; Pfortmiller, Deborah T; Schetzina, Karen

    2013-07-01

    School-based interventions hold promise for child obesity prevention. Implemented as a part of the Winning With Wellness obesity prevention project, the "Go Slow Whoa" meal pattern (GSW) was designed to promote healthier foods in school cafeterias. This investigation determined perceived program effectiveness and impact on student's food purchases. A mixed method design was used, including focus groups with cafeteria staff (CS), quantitative analysis of CS and teacher surveys, and pre-post analysis of cafeteria sales. A total of 37 CS and 131 teachers from 7 schools in northeast Tennessee participated. CS recognized the important role of school nutrition services in influencing student choices, yet perceived lack of administrative support for cafeteria-based interventions and minimal interaction with teachers were barriers. CS also believed that students choose less nutritious options due to family influence. Cafeteria sales indicated that changes were made in menu planning and production, yet students' choices improved minimally. Teachers expressed moderate levels of confidence in GSW as influential in children's dietary habits. Successful implementation of school-based nutrition programs requires supportive policies, administrators, and teachers. CS should be included in program implementation efforts and the role of school nutrition services should be maximized. © 2013, American School Health Association.

  19. Modification of the school cafeteria environment can impact childhood nutrition. Results from the Wise Mind and LA Health studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Donald A; Han, Hongmei; Johnson, William D; Martin, Corby K; Newton, Robert L

    2013-02-01

    Recent changes in nutrition standards for the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs assume that modification of the nutritional serving practices of school cafeterias will result in improved childhood nutrition in the school environment. The primary aim of this paper is to summarize the findings from two recent cluster randomized controlled trials (Wise Mind and LA Health) that tested the hypothesis that modification of school cafeteria environments, including changes in nutrition standards, would yield beneficial changes in childhood nutrition and healthy eating in the school lunch environment. A secondary aim was to investigate the association of participant characteristics and changes in nutrition and healthy eating. A third aim was to investigate the relationships between the food intake of children and: (1) foods selected by the children and (2) food that was uneaten during the lunch meal (plate waste). The studies used similar approaches for modifying the school cafeteria environment and both studies used the digital photography method to measure changes in food intake, food selection, and plate waste. Both studies reported significant improvements in childhood nutrition, and the LA Health study reported improved healthy eating, following introduction of the cafeteria modification program in comparison to baseline and/or control arms. These studies confirm the hypothesis that interventions that modify the school cafeteria environment can beneficially impact childhood nutrition. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Pre-sliced fruit in school cafeterias: children's selection and intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wansink, Brian; Just, David R; Hanks, Andrew S; Smith, Laura E

    2013-05-01

    It is often assumed that children avoid fruit in school cafeterias because of higher relative prices and preferences for other foods. Interviews with children reveal that eating whole fresh fruit can be difficult for those with small mouths or braces. Older girls find whole fruits messy and unattractive to eat. To determine the effect of offering pre-sliced fruit in schools on selection and intake. Three of six schools were assigned randomly to serve apples in slices. Three control schools served apples whole. Selection, consumption, and waste of apples were measured prior to and during treatment. Cafeterias in six public middle schools in Wayne County NY in 2011. Participants included all students who purchased lunch on days when data were collected. Treatment schools were provided with a standard commercial fruit slicer, and cafeteria staff members were instructed to use it when students requested apples. Trained researchers recorded how much of each apple was consumed and how much was wasted in both control and treatment schools. Daily apple sales, percentage of an apple serving consumed per student, and percentage of an apple serving wasted per student. Data were analyzed in 2012. Schools that used fruit slicers to pre-slice fruit increased average daily apple sales by 71% compared to control schools (p<0.01). The percentage of students who selected apples and ate more than half increased by 73% (p=0.02) at schools that served pre-sliced fruit, and the percentage that wasted half or more decreased by 48% (p=0.03). Sliced fruit is more appealing to children than whole fruit because it is easier and tidier to eat. This study applies the principle of convenience from behavioral economics and provides an example of a scalable, low-cost environmental change that promotes healthy eating and decreases waste. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. on behalf of American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

  1. The impact of educational and environmental interventions in Dutch worksite cafeterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenhuis, Ingrid; Van Assema, Patricia; Van Breukelen, Gerard; Glanz, Karen; Kok, Gerjo; De Vries, Hein

    2004-09-01

    Environmental interventions such as labeling and an increased availability of healthy foods may help consumers to meet guidelines for a healthy diet. This article describes a study into the effectiveness of two environmental programs to be used in worksite cafeterias along with an educational program. The aim of the interventions was to reduce fat intake, and to increase fruit and vegetable intake. In the labeling program, low-fat products were labeled. The food supply program comprised an increased availability of low-fat products and fruits and vegetables in worksite cafeterias. The educational program consisted of information about healthy nutrition through brochures, table tents, a self-help manual and posters. The design consisted of a pre-test-post-test experimental control group design, with four conditions: the educational program; the food supply program plus educational program; the labeling program plus educational program; and a control group. Seventeen worksites were randomly assigned to one of the four research conditions. Total fat, fruit and vegetable intake was measured with a quantitative, self-administered food frequency questionnaire (35 questions). Intake during lunch was measured by asking respondents to write down which food items they had purchased during their last lunch in the cafeteria. Furthermore, sales data for some targeted product categories were collected (milk, butter, cheese, meat products, desserts). For the whole study population, no significant effects on consumption data were found for any of the programs. The data showed a beneficial and significant treatment effect of the labeling program on total fat intake for respondents who believed they ate a high-fat diet. Sales data revealed a significant effect of the labeling program on desserts, but not for the other products.

  2. The addition of whole soy flour to cafeteria diet reduces metabolic risk markers in wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, Gláucia Ferreira; de Almeida, Crislaine das Graças; Espeschit, Ana Cristina Rocha; Dantas, Maria Inês de Souza; Benjamin, Laércio dos Anjos; Ribeiro, Sonia Machado Rocha; Martino, Hércia Stampini Duarte

    2013-10-11

    Soybean is termed a functional food because it contains bioactive compounds. However, its effects are not well known under unbalanced diet conditions. This work is aimed at evaluating the effect of adding whole soy flour to a cafeteria diet on intestinal histomorphometry, metabolic risk and toxicity markers in rats. In this study, 30 male adult Wistar rats were used, distributed among three groups (n = 10): AIN-93 M diet, cafeteria diet (CAF) and cafeteria diet with soy flour (CAFS), for 56 days. The following parameters were measured: food intake; weight gain; serum concentrations of triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL-c, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), aspartate (AST) and alanine (ALT) aminotransferases and Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS); humidity and lipid fecal content; weight and fat of the liver. The villous height, the crypt depth and the thickness of the duodenal and ileal circular and longitudinal muscle layers of the animals were also measured. There was a significant reduction in the food intake in the CAF group. The CAFS showed lower serum concentrations of triglycerides and serum TBARS and a lower percentage of hepatic fat, with a corresponding increase in thickness of the intestinal muscle layers. In the CAF group, an increase in the HbA1c, ALT, lipid excretion, liver TBARS and crypt depth, was observed associated with lower HDL-c and villous height. The addition of soy did not promote any change in these parameters. The inclusion of whole soy flour in a high-fat diet may be helpful in reducing some markers of metabolic risk; however, more studies are required to clarify its effects on unbalanced diets.

  3. Predictive behaviors for anxiety and depression in female Wistar rats subjected to cafeteria diet and stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa Estrela, Dieferson; da Silva, Wellington Alves Mizael; Guimarães, Abraão Tiago Batista; de Oliveira Mendes, Bruna; da Silva Castro, André Luis; da Silva Torres, Iraci Lucena; Malafaia, Guilherme

    2015-11-01

    Obesity and chronic stress have been considered important public health problems that affect millions of people worldwide. Our aim was to analyze the effect of obesity associated with chronic stress on neurobehavioral parameters in female rats, considering that the association of these syndromes can enhance the negative effects on homeostasis. The animals were distributed into standard diet (Std), standard diet+stress (Std+stress), cafeteria diet (Cafe), and cafeteria diet+stress (Cafe+stress) groups. The animals of groups Std and Std+stress were fed with rodent standard feed. Groups Cafe and Cafe+stress, additionally to the standard feed, were offered palatable and calorie-rich processed food and cola-type soft drink ad libitum. From the eighth experimental week, groups Std+stress and Cafe+stress were subjected to restraint chronic stress model (50 days). After the stress protocol, predictive anxiety (open-field and elevated plus-maze tests) and depression (forced swim) were applied. The cafeteria diet was effective in inducing obesity. The ratio locomotion in the central quadrants/total locomotion evaluated during the open field test was not indicative of anxiogenic or anxiolytic effect in the animal's behavior. However, the elevated plus maze test showed that obese and stressed animals were prone to higher anxiety levels. In addition, the obese and stressed animals display less climbing behavior than all the other groups, which can be considered an indicator of depression-like behavior. Nevertheless, it is suggested that the mechanisms involved in effects of obesity associated with chronic stress be better investigated in female rats, considering the organic complexity related to these modern illnesses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Smoking ban in all restaurants and cafeterias on the CERN site

    CERN Multimedia

    CSR

    2006-01-01

    In 2005 the SCC decided that there would be a total smoking ban in all restaurants and satellite cafeterias on the CERN site, except for the designated area in Restaurant No.1. Unfortunately, it seems that this ban is often over-looked, resulting in an unhealthy and unpleasant environment for the users and staff of these facilities. You are asked to respect this ban and are reminded that smoking is only permitted in the room in Restaurant 1 specially installed for this purpose. The CSR Restaurant Monitoring Committee

  5. Effects of extra virgin coconut oil on the clinical and laboratotial parameters in rats with cafeteria diet-induced obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Caleiro, Eliana Miranda

    2012-01-01

    Este estudo objetivou avaliar os efeitos da suplementação do óleo de coco extra virgem (OCEV) sobre os parâmetros lipídicos, peso, medidas e depósito de gordura corporal de ratos machos e fêmeas com obesidade induzida por dieta de cafeteria. Foram estudados 48 ratos Wistar, divididos em 3 grupos (8 machos e 8 fêmeas): Grupo CONTROLE: alimentados com ração comercial; Grupo OBESO: alimentados com dieta de cafeteria ou palatável hiperlipídica (DPH); Grupo OBESO+COCO: alimentados com DPH e suplem...

  6. beta3-adrenoceptor agonist prevents alterations of muscle diacylglycerol and adipose tissue phospholipids induced by a cafeteria diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macé K

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Insulin resistance induced by a high fat diet has been associated with alterations in lipid content and composition in skeletal muscle and adipose tissue. Administration of ?3-adrenoceptor (?3-AR agonists was recently reported to prevent insulin resistance induced by a high fat diet, such as the cafeteria diet. The objective of the present study was to determine whether a selective ?3-AR agonist (ZD7114 could prevent alterations of the lipid profile of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue lipids induced by a cafeteria diet.

  7. The impact of maternal consumption of cafeteria diet on reproductive function in the offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Silvana; Teixeira, Deborah S; Guilherme, Christiane; da Rocha, Cláudio F K; Aranda, Bruno C C; Reis, Adolfo R; de Souza, Marcelo A; Franci, Celso R; Sanvitto, Gilberto L

    2014-04-22

    Maternal obesity is a risk factor for the development of metabolic syndrome and childhood obesity, and early overnutrition seems to induce the development of pathologies in adulthood, including insulin resistance, cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and a higher BMI. In addition, it is known that obesity can negatively affect fertility and reproductive function in men. The objective of this work was to investigate the impact of maternal obesity induced by the consumption of cafeteria diet on metabolic, endocrine and reproductive outcomes in the male offspring. Body weight, abdominal fat content and concentrations of insulin, leptin, glucose and total cholesterol were analyzed in dams. The same parameters were evaluated in pups when in adulthood, in addition to the analysis of sexual behavior, followed by measurement of plasma luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, testosterone, and prolactin. Maternal consumption of cafeteria diet affected reproductive hormone regulation in the offspring and such modifications were reflected on sexual performance. Also, these modifications were independent of time and of the reproductive period during which dams consumed the diet. Our results indicate, for the first time, that maternal nutrition may have a deep impact on the reproductive function of the adult male offspring. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Imaging marine virus CroV and its host Cafeteria roenbergensis with two-photon microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Bin; Chakraborty, Sayan; Sun, Wenqing; Aghvami, Seyedmohammadali; Fischer, Matthias G.; Qian, Wei; Xiao, Chuan; Li, Chunqiang

    2014-02-01

    We use two-photon microscopy to monitor the infection process of marine zooplankton, Cafeteria roenbergensis (C.roenbergensis), by Cafeteria roenbergensis virus (CroV), a giant DNA virus named after its host. Here, we image C.roenbergensis in culture by two-photon excited NADH autofluorescence at video-rate (30 frame/s), and the movement of C.roenbergensis is recorded in live videos. Moreover, CroV is stained with DNA dye SYBR gold and recorded simultaneously with this two-photon microscope. We observed the initial infection moment with this method. The result demonstrates the potential use of two-photon microscopy to investigate the fast dynamic interaction between C.roenbergensis with virus CroV. After catching this initial moment, we will freeze the sample in liquid nitrogen for cryo-electron microscopy (EM) study to resolve the virus-host interaction at molecular level. The long-term goal is to study similar fast moving pathogen-host interaction process which could lead to important medical applications.

  9. Food safety objectives for Listeria monocytogenes in Spanish food sampled in cafeterias and restaurants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doménech, E; Amorós, J A; Escriche, I

    2011-09-01

    To gain more insight into the context of food safety management by public administrations, food safety objectives must be studied. The Valencian administration quantified the prevalence of Listeria monocytogenes in cafeterias and restaurants in this region of Spain between 2002 and 2010. The results obtained from this survey are presented here for 2,262 samples of fish, salad, egg, cold meat, and mayonnaise dishes. Microbiological criteria defined for L. monocytogenes were used to differentiate acceptable and unacceptable samples; more than 99.9% of the samples were acceptable. These findings indicate that established food safety objectives are achievable, consumer health at the time of consumption can be safeguarded, and food safety management systems such as hazard analysis critical control point plans or good manufacturing practices implemented in food establishments are effective. Monitoring of foods and food safety is an important task that must continue to reduce the current L. monocytogenes prevalence of 0.1% in restaurant or cafeteria dishes, which could adversely affect consumer health.

  10. [Hygienic quality of meat used in institutional food services: university cafeterias in Ouagadougou (Burkina Faso)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilboudo, A J; Savadogo, A; Barro, N; Ouedraogo, M; Traore, A S

    2009-01-01

    This present study was conducted to assess the hygienic quality of meals served in three cafeterias at the national university in Ouagadougou and the compliance of kitchen staff with good hygiene practices. Microbiological analyses assessed the hygienic quality of the raw meat and of meat-based meals. The results showed poor hygiene practices by food handlers along the food chain. These observations were confirmed by the identification of salmonella, coliform and staphylococcal bacteria in raw meat and cooked meals. Overall, 60% of the raw meat samples were unsatisfactory for aerobic mesophilic flora and 6.6% for salmonella. For the cooked meat meals, on the other hand, 45% of the samples were satisfactory for aerobic mesophilic flora, 100% for salmonella, 93.3% for fecal thermotolerant coliforms and 96.6% for staphylococci. These results showed poor hygiene in the handling of raw meat, but a clear improvement in hygienic quality after cooking. Raising the awareness of cafeteria staff about compliance with hygiene rules appears primordial. Moreover improvement of the food environment, the kitchen equipment, and organization as well as the introduction of a cleaning-disinfection programme would make it possible to provide more hygienic meals in these institutional facilities.

  11. College cafeteria snack food purchases become less healthy with each passing week of the semester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wansink, Brian; Cao, Ying; Saini, Prerna; Shimizu, Mitsuru; Just, David R

    2013-07-01

    Snacks, stress and parties all contribute to the weight gain – the elusive ‘Freshman 15’ – that some college-goers unfortunately experience. The present study examines how a` la carte snack choice changes on a university campus during each progressing week of the academic calendar. How a` la carte snack choices change on a university campus with each progressing week of the academic calendar was examined. The data were collected from three large cafeterias (or dining halls) on Cornell University’s campus during four semesters (Fall 2006, Spring 2007, Fall 2007 and Spring 2008), for 18 weeks in each semester. After the a` la carte snack items were divided into healthy snacks and unhealthy snacks, the percentage share for each food category was calculated. Within each semester, the unhealthy snack food choices increased consistently by 0?4% per week (b50?00418, P,0?01). Furthermore, a sharp (8 %) increase occurred in the final two weeks of the semester. In contrast, healthy snack food choices decreased by almost 4% (b520?0408, P,0?01) in the final two weeks during the fall semester. These results demonstrate an increased demand for hedonic, or unhealthy, snack foods as the college semester progresses and in particular at the very end of the semester. To counter this tendency towards unhealthy snacking, cafeterias and stores should make extra effort to promote healthy alternatives during the later weeks of the semester.

  12. A comparison of bite size and BMI in a cafeteria setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattfeld, Ryan S; Muth, Eric R; Hoover, Adam

    2017-11-01

    Our study investigated the relationship between BMI and bite size in a cafeteria setting. Two hundred and seventy one participants consumed one meal each. Participants were free to select any food provided by the cafeteria and could return for additional food as desired. Bite weights were measured with a table embedded scale. Data were analyzed with ANOVAs, regressions, Kolmogorov-Smirnov tests, and a repeated measures general linear model for quartile analysis. Obese participants were found to take larger bites than both normal (p=0.002) and overweight participants (p=0.017). Average bite size increased by 0.20g per point increase in BMI. Food bites and drink bites were analyzed individually, showing 0.11g/BMI and 0.23g/BMI slopes, respectively. Quartiles of bites were also analyzed, and a significant interaction was found between normal and obese participants (p=0.034) such that the lower two quartiles were similar, but the upper two quartiles showed an increase in bite size for obese participants. The source of these effects could be the result of a combination of several uncontrolled factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Dietary supplementation with a specific melon concentrate reverses vascular dysfunction induced by cafeteria diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Carillon

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Obesity-related metabolic syndrome is associated with high incidence of cardiovascular diseases partially consecutive to vascular dysfunction. Therapeutic strategies consisting of multidisciplinary interventions include nutritional approaches. Benefits of supplementation with a specific melon concentrate, enriched in superoxide dismutase (SOD, have previously been shown on the development of insulin resistance and inflammation in a nutritional hamster model of obesity. Objective: We further investigated arterial function in this animal model of metabolic syndrome and studied the effect of melon concentrate supplementation on arterial contractile activity. Design and results: The study was performed on a hamster model of diet-induced obesity. After a 15-week period of cafeteria diet, animals were supplemented during 4 weeks with a specific melon concentrate (Cucumis melo L. Contractile responses of isolated aorta to various agonists and antagonists were studied ex vivo. Cafeteria diet induced vascular contractile dysfunction associated with morphological remodeling. Melon concentrate supplementation partially corrected these dysfunctions; reduced morphological alterations; and improved contractile function, especially by increasing nitric oxide bioavailability and expression of endogenous SOD. Conclusions: Supplementation with the specific melon concentrate improves vascular dysfunction associated with obesity. This beneficial effect may be accounted for by induction of endogenous antioxidant defense. Such an approach in line with nutritional interventions could be a useful strategy to manage metabolic syndrome–induced cardiovascular trouble.

  14. Increasing consumption of fruits and vegetables in the school cafeteria: the influence of active choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Sharon M; Meissen, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated a setting-level intervention designed to increase consumption of fruits and vegetables among low-socioeconomic status elementary and middle school students participating in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). The NSLP provides students with access to fruits and vegetables; however, food served does not necessarily equal food consumed. High rates of waste, especially of fruits and vegetables, are well documented. The current, low-cost intervention altered the choice architecture of the cafeteria by introducing an active, forced choice into the school lunch service. Consumption was measured by observing (n=2,064) and weighing (n=84) student plate waste over two 10-day periods pre-intervention and during implementation. Results show an average daily 15% increase in consumption of both fruits and vegetables during the intervention period. These findings suggest that local schools can actively encourage students to take advantage of fruits and vegetables offered through the NSLP by implementing setting-level changes to the cafeteria environment.

  15. Design of an ARM-based Automatic Rice-Selling Machine for Cafeterias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiliang Kang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available To address the problems of low selling efficiency, poor sanitation conditions, labor-intensive requirement, and quick rice cooling speed in manual rice selling in cafeterias, especially in colleges and secondary schools, this paper presented an Advanced RISC Machines (ARM microprocessor-based rice-selling machine for cafeterias. The machines consisted of a funnel-shaped rice bin, a thermal insulation box, and a conveying and scattering mechanism. Moreover, this machine exerts fuzzy control over stepper motor rpm, and the motor drives the conveyor belt with a scraper to scatter rice, deliver it, and keep it warm. Apart from an external 4*4 keyboard, a point of sale (POS machine, an ARM process and a pressure sensor, the machine is also equipped with card swiping and weighting mechanisms to achieve functions of card swiping payment and precise measurement, respectively. In addition, detection of the right amount of rice and the alarm function are achieved using an ultrasonic sensor and a beeper, respectively. The presence of the rice container on the rice outlet is detected by an optoelectronic switch. Results show that this rice-selling machine achieves precise measurement, quick card swiping, fast rice selling, stable operation, and good rice heat preservation. Therefore, the mechanical design enables the machine to achieve its goals.

  16. The Relationship between Nutrition Knowledge and School Cafeteria Purchases of Seventh Grade Students in a Rural Indiana School District

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucciarelli, Deanna; McNeany, Terry; Friesen, Carol

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: School cafeterias have the potential to positively contribute to the prevention and treatment of childhood obesity. The purpose of this project was to assess adolescents' nutrition knowledge and dietary choices, and to measure the relationship between students' nutrition knowledge and the type of food items purchased in their…

  17. Altered nitrogen balance and decreased urea excretion in male rats fed cafeteria diet are related to arginine availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabater, David; Agnelli, Silvia; Arriarán, Sofía; Fernández-López, José-Antonio; Romero, María del Mar; Alemany, Marià; Remesar, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Hyperlipidic diets limit glucose oxidation and favor amino acid preservation, hampering the elimination of excess dietary nitrogen and the catabolic utilization of amino acids. We analyzed whether reduced urea excretion was a consequence of higher NO x ; (nitrite, nitrate, and other derivatives) availability caused by increased nitric oxide production in metabolic syndrome. Rats fed a cafeteria diet for 30 days had a higher intake and accumulation of amino acid nitrogen and lower urea excretion. There were no differences in plasma nitrate or nitrite. NO(x) and creatinine excretion accounted for only a small part of total nitrogen excretion. Rats fed a cafeteria diet had higher plasma levels of glutamine, serine, threonine, glycine, and ornithine when compared with controls, whereas arginine was lower. Liver carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase I activity was higher in cafeteria diet-fed rats, but arginase I was lower. The high carbamoyl-phosphate synthetase activity and ornithine levels suggest activation of the urea cycle in cafeteria diet-fed rats, but low arginine levels point to a block in the urea cycle between ornithine and arginine, thereby preventing the elimination of excess nitrogen as urea. The ultimate consequence of this paradoxical block in the urea cycle seems to be the limitation of arginine production and/or availability.

  18. A nutrition labeling intervention in worksite cafeterias: an implementation evaluation across two large catering companies in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyth, Ellis L; Van Der Meer, Esther W C; Seidell, Jacob C; Steenhuis, Ingrid H M

    2012-06-01

    By both increasing the availability of healthy foods and labeling these products with the Choices logo, caterers may facilitate employees to make a healthier choice in their worksite cafeterias. The aim of this study was to explore which attributes influence the implementation of the Choices logo in worksite cafeterias in the Netherlands. Questionnaires were completed by catering managers of 316 cafeterias of two large caterers in the Netherlands (response rate 49.8%). Attributes from the Diffusion of Innovations Theory were used to investigate whether they could predict implementation. Compatibility (consistency with the beliefs of the catering manager; OR = 1.52), voluntariness (perception of the implementation as voluntary; OR = 0.50), result demonstrability (ability to communicate the implementation; OR = 1.52) and complexity in the sense of time (time needed for implementation; OR = 0.70) were the best predictors for the frequency of offering fresh Choices products (all significant). For the frequency of using Choices promotion material, voluntariness (OR = 0.54), result demonstrability (OR = 1.51) and relative advantage (perceived advantage of the implementation; OR = 1.44) were the best predictors (all significant). In conclusion, this study provides unique insights into which perceived attributes influence the implementation of a nutrition logo in worksite cafeterias. To increase the implementation, the Choices logo should be consistent with catering managers' ideas about healthy food, the workload of implementing the logo should be limited and it could be recommended to incorporate the logo in the health policy of the caterer.

  19. Go Slow Whoa Meal Patterns: Cafeteria Staff and Teacher Perceptions of Effectiveness in "Winning with Wellness" Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slawson, Deborah L.; Southerland, Jodi; Lowe, Elizabeth F.; Dalton, William T.; Pfortmiller, Deborah T.; Schetzina, Karen

    2013-01-01

    Background: School-based interventions hold promise for child obesity prevention. Implemented as a part of the "Winning with Wellness" obesity prevention project, the "Go Slow Whoa" meal pattern (GSW) was designed to promote healthier foods in school cafeterias. This investigation determined perceived program effectiveness and…

  20. Influence of placement of a nutrition logo on cafeteria menu items on lunchtime food Choices at Dutch work sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyth, Ellis L; Steenhuis, Ingrid H M; Heymans, Martijn W; Roodenburg, Annet J C; Brug, Johannes; Seidell, Jacob C

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of labeling foods with the Choices nutrition logo on influencing cafeteria menu selection and the behavioral determinants of menu choices in work site cafeterias in the Netherlands. A cluster randomized controlled trial was conducted. Intervention cafeterias (n=13), where the Choices logo was used to promote healthier eating for a 3-week period, were compared with control cafeterias (n=12), which offered the same menu without the logo. Sales data were collected daily for 9 weeks, from March to May 2009. In addition, employees from one intervention and one control company completed an online questionnaire at baseline and after the intervention (n=368) in which the behavioral determinants of food choice (ie, attitude, self-efficacy, and intention) and logo use were measured. Generalized estimating equation analyses, χ² tests, t tests and linear regression analyses were performed. No nutritionally meaningful intervention effects were found in the sales of sandwiches, soups, snacks, fruit, and salads. Also, no significant differences in behavioral determinants were found. "Intention to eat healthier" and "paying attention to product information" were positively associated with self-reported consumption of foods with the Choices logo at lunch. The intervention did not have a significant effect on employees' lunchtime food choices. Labeling healthy choices might be useful for health-conscious employees in the volitional phase of behavior change. Further research should focus on the possible health benefits of menu reformulation in the catering sector. Copyright © 2011 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Financial incentive policies at workplace cafeterias for preventing obesity--a systematic review and meta-analysis (Protocol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawada, Kimi; Ota, Erika; Shahrook, Sadequa; Mori, Rintaro

    2014-10-28

    Various studies are currently investigating ways to prevent lifestyle-related diseases and obesity among workers through interventions using incentive strategies, including price discounts for low-fat snacks and sugar-free beverages at workplace cafeterias or vending machines, and the provision of a free salad bar in cafeterias. Rather than assessing individual or group interventions, we will focus on the effectiveness of nutrition education programs at the population level, which primarily incorporate financial incentive strategies to prevent obesity. This paper describes the protocol of a systematic review that will examine the effectiveness of financial incentive programs at company cafeterias in improving dietary habits, nutrient intake, and obesity prevention. We will conduct searches in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO. Interventions will be assessed using data from randomized control trials (RCTs) and cluster RCTs. However, if few such trials exist, we will include quasi-RCTs. We will exclude controlled before-and-after studies and crossover RCTs. We will assess food-based interventions that include financial incentive strategies (discount strategies or social marketing) for workplace cafeterias, vending machines, and kiosks. Two authors will independently review studies for inclusion and will resolve differences by discussion and, if required, through consultation with a third author. We will assess the risk of bias of included studies according to the Cochrane Collaboration's "risk of bias" tool. The purpose of this paper is to outline the study protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis that will investigate the effectiveness of population-level, incentive-focused interventions at the workplace cafeteria that aim to promote and prevent obesity. This review will give an important overview of the available evidence about the effectiveness of incentive-based environmental interventions to

  2. Financial incentive policies at workplace cafeterias for preventing obesity—a systematic review and meta-analysis (Protocol)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Various studies are currently investigating ways to prevent lifestyle-related diseases and obesity among workers through interventions using incentive strategies, including price discounts for low-fat snacks and sugar-free beverages at workplace cafeterias or vending machines, and the provision of a free salad bar in cafeterias. Rather than assessing individual or group interventions, we will focus on the effectiveness of nutrition education programs at the population level, which primarily incorporate financial incentive strategies to prevent obesity. This paper describes the protocol of a systematic review that will examine the effectiveness of financial incentive programs at company cafeterias in improving dietary habits, nutrient intake, and obesity prevention. Methods/design We will conduct searches in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO. Interventions will be assessed using data from randomized control trials (RCTs) and cluster RCTs. However, if few such trials exist, we will include quasi-RCTs. We will exclude controlled before-and-after studies and crossover RCTs. We will assess food-based interventions that include financial incentive strategies (discount strategies or social marketing) for workplace cafeterias, vending machines, and kiosks. Two authors will independently review studies for inclusion and will resolve differences by discussion and, if required, through consultation with a third author. We will assess the risk of bias of included studies according to the Cochrane Collaboration’s “risk of bias” tool. Discussion The purpose of this paper is to outline the study protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis that will investigate the effectiveness of population-level, incentive-focused interventions at the workplace cafeteria that aim to promote and prevent obesity. This review will give an important overview of the available evidence about the effectiveness of

  3. Effects of a cafeteria diet on delay discounting in adolescent and adult rats: Alterations on dopaminergic sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Stephen H; Rasmussen, Erin B

    2017-11-01

    Diet-induced obesity is a laboratory procedure in which nonhuman animals are chronically exposed to a high-fat, high-sugar diet (i.e. cafeteria diet), which results in weight gain, altered sensitivity to reward, and alterations in the dopamine D2 system. To date, few (if any) studies have examined age-related diet-induced obesity effects in a rat model or have used an impulsive choice task to characterize diet-induced behavioral alterations in reward processes. We exposed rats to a cafeteria-style diet for eight weeks starting at age 21 or 70 days. Following the diet exposures, the rats were tested on a delay discounting task - a measure of impulsive choice in which preference for smaller, immediate vs larger, delayed food reinforcers was assessed. Acute injections of haloperidol (0.03-0.3 mg/kg) were administered to assess the extent to which diet-induced changes in dopamine D2 influence impulsive food choice. Across both age groups, rats fed a cafeteria diet gained the most weight and consumed more calories than rats fed a standard diet, with rats exposed during development showing the highest weight gain. No age- or diet-related baseline differences in delay discounting were revealed, however, haloperidol unmasked subtle diet-related differences by dose-dependently reducing choice for the larger, later reinforcer. Rats fed a cafeteria diet showed a leftward shift in the dose-response curve, suggesting heightened sensitivity to haloperidol, regardless of age, compared to rats fed a standard diet. Results indicate that chronic exposure to a cafeteria diet resulted in changes in underlying dopamine D2 that manifested as greater impulsivity independent of age at diet exposure.

  4. Cafeteria Plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, John H.

    1986-01-01

    It is no longer financially feasible to require faculty and staff to participate in benefit plans that they do not need or want and that may duplicate a spouse's benefits. Individuals should be allowed to decline to participate in certain benefits without losing the equivalent value applied to other benefits. (Author/MLW)

  5. Norwalk virus gastroenteritis. An outbreak associated with a cafeteria at a college.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieb, S; Gunn, R A; Medina, R; Singh, N; May, R D; Janowski, H T; Woodward, W E

    1985-02-01

    An explosive outbreak of gastrointestinal illness occurred among students and employees at a small college in Florida in November 1980. Common symptoms were diarrhea, nausea, weakness, abdominal cramps, chills, vomiting, and low-grade fever. Cases of illness were identified in 40% of 628 students and 15% of 162 employees who responded to a survey. Among students, there was a sevenfold excess risk associated with eating one or more meals at the campus cafeteria November 3-5 (p much less than 0.001). Tossed salad from one meal was strongly associated with illness (p less than 0.0001). Fecal contamination of the salad was documented, although the source of contamination was not identified. Person-to-person spread could not be demonstrated. Seroconversion to Norwalk antigen occurred in significantly more cases (5/6) than noncases (1/6) (p = 0.04).

  6. Does point-of-purchase nutrition labeling influence meal selections? A test in an Army cafeteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sproul, Allen D; Canter, Deborah D; Schmidt, Jeffrey B

    2003-07-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of nutrition labeling on sales of targeted entrees and measured the perceived influence that factors such as taste, quality, appearance, fat content, calorie content, and price had on meal selection behavior within an Army cafeteria. A quasi-experimental design was used to compare targeted entrée sales between a 1-year baseline period and two 30-day postintervention periods, after the placement of entrée nutrition labels. A brief questionnaire, distributed to 149 patrons, measured the perceived influence of the aforementioned factors on selections. Analysis of variance detected no significant differences in sales between baseline and the two intervention periods; the factors of taste and quality were rated most influential to meal selection (p quality, and appearance) appear to be more influential to meal selection.

  7. ROLE-PLAYS VS. NATURAL DATA: ASKING FOR A DRINK AT A CAFETERIA IN PENINSULAR SPANISH

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    Rebeca Bataller

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to compare the data collected, via two methods, from two groups of Peninsular Spanish native speakers in a service encounter scenario. The methods chosen are open role-plays and naturally occurring interactions, two frequently used approaches in the field of pragmatics. The naturalistic data from this study consisted of request-for-service transactions at cafeterias in Valencia, Spain; these were recorded with audio equipment and then analyzed at the illocutionary and discourse levels. The features analyzed were the strategies and mitigating devices used in all phases of the interactions. The structure and length of interactions from each dataset were also compared. The results of this comparative study indicate that the role-play data resembled the naturalistic interactions in some respects, but there were also some significant differences between the two datasets that may be attributed to the particular type of collection method.

  8. Small Prizes Improve Food Selection in a School Cafeteria Without Increasing Waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudgens, Michelle E; Barnes, Allison S; Lockhart, Mary Kate; Ellsworth, Samantha C; Beckford, Monna; Siegel, Robert M

    2017-02-01

    We recently demonstrated that small prizes given for a "Power Plate" (plain fat-free milk, entrée, fruit and vegetable) can be used in an elementary school cafeteria to increase healthful food selection by over 300%. The purpose of this study was to measure changes in food waste when the Power Plate (PP) program is implemented. The PP intervention was conducted at an inner-city elementary school. Emoticons were placed next to the preferred foods and children were given a small prize if they selected the PP. Data were obtained by observation and cash register receipts. The trays of 111 students before the intervention and 96 after were examined for content and waste. PP selection increased from 2% to 73% ( P < .001). There was no significant change in waste. We conclude that small prizes as an incentive for better food selection does not lead to an increase food waste.

  9. A Foodborne Outbreak of Brucellosis at a Police Station Cafeteria, Lima, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Román, Karina; Castillo, Rosa; Gilman, Robert H.; Calderón, Maritza; Vivar, Aldo; Céspedes, Manuel; Smits, Henk L.; Meléndez, Paolo; Gotuzzo, Eduardo; Guerra, Humberto; Maves, Ryan C.; Matthias, Michael A.; Vinetz, Joseph M.; Saito, Mayuko

    2013-01-01

    Brucella melitensis is highly infectious for humans and can be transmitted to humans in a number of epidemiological contexts. Within the context of an ongoing brucellosis surveillance project, an outbreak at a Peruvian police officer cafeteria was discovered, which led to active surveillance (serology, blood culture) for additional cases among 49 police officers who had also eaten there. The cohort was followed up to 18 months regardless of treatment or symptoms. Active surveillance estimated the attack rate at 26.5% (13 of 49). Blood cultures from four cases were positive; these isolates were indistinguishable using multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis. This investigation indicates the importance of case tracking and active surveillance for brucellosis in the context of potential common source exposure. These results provide rationale for public health investigations of brucellosis index cases including the bioterrorism-related dissemination of Brucella. PMID:23382164

  10. Modulation in Wistar rats of blood corticosterone compartmentation by sex and a cafeteria diet.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María del Mar Romero

    Full Text Available In the metabolic syndrome, glucocorticoid activity is increased, but circulating levels show little change. Most of blood glucocorticoids are bound to corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG, which liver expression and circulating levels are higher in females than in males. Since blood hormones are also bound to blood cells, and the size of this compartment is considerable for androgens and estrogens, we analyzed whether sex or eating a cafeteria diet altered the compartmentation of corticosterone in rat blood. The main corticosterone compartment in rat blood is that specifically bound to plasma proteins, with smaller compartments bound to blood cells or free. Cafeteria diet increased the expression of liver CBG gene, binding plasma capacity and the proportion of blood cell-bound corticosterone. There were marked sex differences in blood corticosterone compartmentation in rats, which were unrelated to testosterone. The use of a monoclonal antibody ELISA and a polyclonal Western blot for plasma CBG compared with both specific plasma binding of corticosterone and CBG gene expression suggested the existence of different forms of CBG, with varying affinities for corticosterone in males and females, since ELISA data showed higher plasma CBG for males, but binding and Western blot analyses (plus liver gene expression and higher physiological effectiveness for females. Good cross-reactivity to the antigen for polyclonal CBG antibody suggests that in all cases we were measuring CBG. The different immunoreactivity and binding affinity may help explain the marked sex-related differences in plasma hormone binding as sex-linked different proportions of CBG forms.

  11. An intervention study targeting energy and nutrient intake in worksite cafeterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, Michael R; Tappe, Karyn A; Butryn, Meghan L; Annunziato, Rachel A; Coletta, Maria C; Ochner, Christopher N; Rolls, Barbara J

    2010-08-01

    Modifying the food environment is a promising strategy for promoting healthier eating behavior. This study aimed to evaluate nutritional and weight changes in a program that used worksite cafeterias to reduce employees' calorie content of purchased foods and improve their macronutrient intake. Participants were randomly assigned to one of two conditions: 1) only environmental change (i.e., the introduction of 10 new low-energy-density (ED) foods and provision of labels for all foods sold at lunch, which listed ED, calories, and macronutrient content) or 2) the environmental change plus pricing incentives for purchasing low-ED foods and education about low-ED eating delivered in four, 1-hour group sessions. Participant lunch choices were monitored electronically at the point of purchase for 3 months before the intervention was instituted (i.e., the baseline period) and for 3 months afterward (i.e., intervention period). Participants were adults (n=96, BMI=29.7+/-6.0 kg/m(2)) who regularly ate lunch at their workplace cafeteria. There was no difference between groups in total energy intake over the study period. Across groups, energy and percent of energy from fat decreased and percent of energy from carbohydrate increased from baseline to the intervention period (all p<.01). Follow-up analyses, conducted by averaging Baseline Months 1 and 2 and comparing them to Intervention Month 3 as a conservative estimate of overall impact of the intervention, indicated that change in energy, carbohydrate, and fat intake remained significant (p<.001). Providing nutrition labels and reducing the ED of selected foods was associated with improved dietary intake. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Frequency of use of school cafeterias in middle and high schools in 3 French districts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, C; Feur, E; Gerbouin-Rérolle, P; Leynaud-Rouaud, C; Chateil, S; Gourdon, M

    2000-09-01

    Reports from the French Ministry of Education warn of a decrease in the use of school food services, especially in sensitive urban areas. They also suggest that this decline has led to cases of malnutrition. This article describes the characteristics of the current supply of school meals and measures the evolution of demand observed between 1992 and 1996 in relation to the economic situation of students' families. The study was carried out in 3 departments in France: Doubs, Herault, and Val de Marne. The administrators of all public and private middle and high schools in the 3 departments received a questionnaire asking them to describe the services offered in their cafeterias and to provide the corresponding statistical and accounting data. External food services near the schools were also taken into account. Seventy-nine percent of schools responded to the survey. Concerning the services offered, 91% of schools have their own cafeterias, of which 81% are managed by the schools. Concerning the evolution of utilisation, a significant decrease in the number of meals served in seen in middle schools. On the other hand, high schools have observed stable utilisation. The positive changes in utilisation are linked, in middle schools, to characteristics of the schools' internal food services (self-service, choice of main courses, modulation of seats). In high schools, positive changes in the utilisation of school services are linked to the lack of external food services near the schools. As middle schools and high schools control the logistics and management of food services offered to students, they are potentially in a position to influence a policy on this issue. The evolution in utilisation is very different among departments and between middle and high schools. While economic precariousness has a negative structural effect on utilisation, it doesn't seem to be a major factor in the evolution of the decrease observed over the past few years.

  13. Small portion sizes in worksite cafeterias: do they help consumers to reduce their food intake?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeer, W M; Steenhuis, I H M; Leeuwis, F H; Heymans, M W; Seidell, J C

    2011-09-01

    Environmental interventions directed at portion size might help consumers to reduce their food intake. To assess whether offering a smaller hot meal, in addition to the existing size, stimulates people to replace their large meal with a smaller meal. Longitudinal randomized controlled trial assessing the impact of introducing small portion sizes and pricing strategies on consumer choices. In all, 25 worksite cafeterias and a panel consisting of 308 consumers (mean age=39.18 years, 50% women). A small portion size of hot meals was offered in addition to the existing size. The meals were either proportionally priced (that is, the price per gram was comparable regardless of the size) or value size pricing was employed. Daily sales of small and the total number of meals, consumers' self-reported compensation behavior and frequency of purchasing small meals. The ratio of small meals sales in relation to large meals sales was 10.2%. No effect of proportional pricing was found B=-0.11 (0.33), P=0.74, confidence interval (CI): -0.76 to 0.54). The consumer data indicated that 19.5% of the participants who had selected a small meal often-to-always purchased more products than usual in the worksite cafeteria. Small meal purchases were negatively related to being male (B=-0.85 (0.20), P=0.00, CI: -1.24 to -0.46, n=178). When offering a small meal in addition to the existing size, a percentage of consumers that is considered reasonable were inclined to replace the large meal with the small meal. Proportional prices did not have an additional effect. The possible occurrence of compensation behavior is an issue that merits further attention.

  14. Food choices of minority and low-income employees: a cafeteria intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Douglas E; Riis, Jason; Sonnenberg, Lillian M; Barraclough, Susan J; Thorndike, Anne N

    2012-09-01

    Effective strategies are needed to address obesity, particularly among minority and low-income individuals. To test whether a two-phase point-of-purchase intervention improved food choices across racial, socioeconomic (job type) groups. A 9-month longitudinal study from 2009 to 2010 assessing person-level changes in purchases of healthy and unhealthy foods following sequentially introduced interventions. Data were analyzed in 2011. Participants were 4642 employees of a large hospital in Boston MA who were regular cafeteria patrons. The first intervention was a traffic light-style color-coded labeling system encouraging patrons to purchase healthy items (labeled green) and avoid unhealthy items (labeled red). The second intervention manipulated "choice architecture" by physically rearranging certain cafeteria items, making green-labeled items more accessible and red-labeled items less accessible. Proportion of green- (or red-) labeled items purchased by an employee. Subanalyses tracked beverage purchases, including calories and price per beverage. Employees self-identified as white (73%); black (10%); Latino (7%); and Asian (10%). Compared to white employees, Latino and black employees purchased a higher percentage of red items at baseline (18%, 28%, and 33%, respectively, p0.05 for interaction between race or job type and intervention). Mean calories per beverage decreased similarly over the study period for all racial groups and job types, with no increase in per-beverage spending. Despite baseline differences in healthy food purchases, a simple color-coded labeling and choice architecture intervention improved food and beverage choices among employees from all racial and socioeconomic backgrounds. Copyright © 2012 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Prevalence of intestinal parasites among food handlers at cafeteria of Jimma University Specialized Hospital, Southwest Ethiopia

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    Hundaol Girma

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the prevalence of intestinal parasites and associated risk factors among food-handlers working at cafeteria of Jimma University Specialized Hospital, Jimma, Ethiopia. Methods: Socio-demographic and associated risk factors data were collected using a pretested structured questionnaire. Stool and finger-nail specimens were screened for intestinal parasites using direct wet mount and formol-ether concentration sedimentation techniques. Data were edited, cleaned, entered and analyzed using statistical package for social science (SPSS version 20. P ≤ 0.05 was taken as statistically significant. Results: A total of 94 food-handlers working at cafeteria of Jimma University Specialized Hospital were participated in the study. From the total 148 samples (94 stool and 54 fingernails content examined, 31 (33% were positive for one or more parasites. Over all eight types of intestinal parasites were identified. The most prevalent parasite identified was Ascaris lumbricoides (16% followed by Entamoeba histolytica/dispar (4.3%. There was significant association between parasitic infection and food handlers who did not practice hand washing after defecation and before serving food. Conclusions: Relatively high prevalence of intestinal parasites is detected indicating poor hygiene practice of the food-handlers at the study site. The study also identified finger-nail status, hand washing after defecation and before serving food as determinants of intestinal parasitic infection. It is crucial for provision of regular training on strict adherence to good personal hygiene and hygienic food-handling practices as well as regular inspection and medical checkup of food-handlers.

  16. A cafeteria diet modifies the response to chronic variable stress in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeni, N; Daher, C; Fromentin, G; Tome, D; Darcel, N; Chaumontet, C

    2013-03-01

    Stress is known to lead to metabolic and behavioral changes. To study the possible relationships between stress and dietary intake, male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed one of three diets for 6 weeks: high carbohydrate (HC), high fat (HF), or "Cafeteria" (CAF) (Standard HC plus a choice of highly palatable cafeteria foods: chocolate, biscuits, and peanut butter). After the first 3 weeks, half of the animals from each group (experimental groups) were stressed daily using a chronic variable stress (CVS) paradigm, while the other half of the animals (control groups) were kept undisturbed. Rats were sacrificed at the end of the 6-week period. The effects of stress and dietary intake on animal adiposity, serum lipids, and corticosterone were analyzed. Results showed that both chronic stress and CAF diet resulted in elevated total cholesterol, increased low-density lipoprotein (LDL), and lower high-density lipoprotein (HDL). In addition, increases in body weight, food intake, and intra-abdominal fat were observed in the CAF group compared with the other dietary groups. In addition, there was a significant interaction between stress and diet on serum corticosterone levels, which manifest as an increase in corticosterone levels in stressed rats relative to non-stressed controls in the HC and HF groups but not in the CAF group. These results show that a highly palatable diet, offering a choice of food items, is associated with a reduction in the response to CVS and could validate a stressor-induced preference for comfort food that in turn could increase body weight.

  17. Process evaluation of two environmental nutrition programmes and an educational nutrition programme conducted at supermarkets and worksite cafeterias in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I.H.M. Steenhuis; P. van Assema (Patricia); A. Reubsaet; G.J. Kok (Gerjo)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractThis article describes the process evaluation of two environmental programs and a educational nutrition program, implemented at supermarkets and worksite cafeterias. Studies conducted earlier, indicated that the programs had no effect on consumers’ eating behavior. Consequently, the more

  18. Effect of the Strong4Life School Nutrition Program on Cafeterias and on Manager and Staff Member Knowledge and Practice, Georgia, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajbhandari-Thapa, Janani; Bennett, Ashley; Keong, Farrah; Palmer, Wendy; Hardy, Trisha; Welsh, Jean

    The goal of the Strong4Life School Nutrition Program is to promote healthy eating in school cafeterias in Georgia by training school nutrition managers and staff members to implement changes in the cafeteria to nudge children to make healthier choices. The objective of our study was to evaluate program effect on (1) school nutrition manager and staff member knowledge of evidence-based strategies and their self-efficacy to make positive changes, (2) the school cafeteria environment, and (3) National School Lunch Program participation. We assessed changes in participant knowledge, beliefs, and self-efficacy by administering a survey before and after training (February-July 2015); a follow-up survey (3 school months posttraining) assessed changes in the cafeteria. A total of 842 school nutrition managers and staff members were trained and completed pre- and posttraining surveys; 325 managers completed the follow-up survey. We used cafeteria records from a subsample of the first schools trained (40 intervention and 40 control) to assess National School Lunch Program participation. From pretraining to posttraining, we found a significant increase in manager and staff member (n = 842) knowledge of strategies for enhancing taste perception through the use of creative menu item names (from 78% to 95%, P cafeteria environment (from 91% to 96%, P 2 locations, P cafeteria managers and staff members in Smarter Lunchrooms Movement techniques may be an effective way to make changes in the school cafeteria environment to encourage healthier choices among students. Additional studies allowing time for more complex changes to be implemented are needed to assess the full effect of the program.

  19. Effects of the cafeteria diet on the salivary glands of trained and sedentary Wistar rats=Efeitos da dieta de cafeteria sobre as glândulas salivares de ratos Wistar sedentários e treinados

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonia Lucy Molinari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the effect of the aerobic physical training and the cafeteria diet introduced after weaning of Wistar rats and on the morphology of the main salivary glands (parotid, submandibular, sublingual. Male rats after weaning were subjected to the cafeteria diet or the standard rodent chow, and either performed aerobic physical training in a treadmill for 100 days, or did not performed any physical activity. Analyses were done considering the response in body weight, adipose tissues and salivary glands, and the data were submitted to statistical treatment (p O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar as características morfológicas das glândulas salivares (parótida, submandibular, sublingual apresentadas por ratos submetidos a treinamento físico aeróbio e dieta de cafeteria após o período de lactação. Ratos machos após a lactação consumiram dieta de cafeteria ou ração-padrão para roedores e realizaram treinamento físico aeróbio em esteira rolante por um período de 100 dias, ou não realizaram nenhuma atividade física. Foram feitas análises sobre a resposta do peso corporal, dos tecidos adiposos e das glândulas salivares e os dados submetidos a tratamento estatístico (p < 0,05. A análise morfológica e morfométrica das glândulas salivares foi realizada a partir de cortes histológicos corados com Hematoxilina e Eosina. Apesar do comportamento normofágico, os roedores alimentados com dieta de cafeteria apresentaram maior quantidade de gordura corporal, com repercussão sobre o peso da glândula parótida. A análise morfométrica das glândulas submandibulares indicou redução na proporção dos ácinos serosos como efeito da dieta de cafeteria e do treinamento físico. No entanto, excesso de gordura corporal, dieta de cafeteria e/ou treinamento físico não influenciou a organização histológica das glândulas salivares. Concluiu-se que as glândulas parótidas e submandibulares são mais

  20. [The therapeutic effects of dietary krill oil (Euphausia superba) supplementation on oxidative stress and DNA damages markers in cafeteria diet-overfed rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellouk, Z; Agustina, M; Ramirez, M; Pena, K; Arivalo, J

    2016-06-01

    To evaluate the therapeutic effects of dietary krill oil supplementation in modulation of oxidative stress components and DNA oxidative damages marker in cafeteria diet-overfed-rats. Eighteen aging male Wistar rats were divided into three groups of six each and were exposed for the ensuing 8 weeks to one of the diets: control group (TS) which was submitted to standard chow (330kcal/100g), containing 24% of proteins, 5% of lipids and 70% of carbohydrates. Cafeteria standard group (TC) exposed to cafeteria diet (420kcal/100g). The last group received a cafeteria diet enriched in oral force-feeding krill oil 2% (CK). The plasma and tissues pro-oxydant status were assessed by assaying thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, hydroperoxydes, and isoprostans. The determination of DNA oxidative damages was evaluated by the measurement of the major products of DNA oxidation (8-OHdG). Exposure to a cafeteria diet increases the metabolic response to the radical attack and DNA oxidative damages in both plasma and key tissues involved in antioxidant defense. Krill oil supplementation in cafeteria diet relieves oxidative stress and DNA damages by lowering several lipid peroxidation components and the main marker of DNA oxidation in obese rats. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of a maternal cafeteria diet on the fatty acid composition of milk and offspring red blood cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vithayathil, M A; Gugusheff, J R; Gibson, R A; Ong, Z Y; Muhlhausler, B S

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that exposure to a maternal cafeteria diet during the lactation period alone produces detrimental effects to offspring metabolic health comparable to exposure during the entire perinatal period. The present study used a rodent model to assess the effect of a maternal cafeteria diet on the fat content and fatty acid composition of the dams' milk, and to determine the degree to which this was related to the fatty acid status of offspring on postnatal day 1 (PND1), weaning and 3 weeks post-weaning onto a standard rodent diet. As expected, omega-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LCPUFA) content of both the milk and pup red blood cells (RBCs) was lower in the cafeteria (CAF) group on PND1. At 2 weeks post-partum, milk produced by CAF dams had a higher total fat, saturated fat and n-6 PUFA content, however these differences were modest in comparison with the differences in maternal intake between groups. Offspring suckled by CAF dams had a lower n-3 LCPUFA and n-6 PUFA status at weaning and higher trans fatty acid levels at both weaning and 6 weeks of age. These findings indicate that the fat content and fatty acid composition of the dam's milk is altered by exposure to a cafeteria diet. While it appears that the dam has a significant capacity to buffer the transfer of most dietary lipids into the milk, the trans fatty acids in particular appear to be readily transferred, resulting in persistent increases in trans fatty acid status of the offspring after weaning. The potential physiological implications of this warrants further examination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of point-of-purchase calorie labeling on restaurant and cafeteria food choices: A review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    French Simone A

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eating away from home has increased in prevalence among US adults and now comprises about 50% of food expenditures. Calorie labeling on chain restaurant menus is one specific policy that has been proposed to help consumers make better food choices at restaurants. The present review evaluates the available empirical literature on the effects of calorie information on food choices in restaurant and cafeteria settings. Methods Computer-assisted searches were conducted using the PUBMED database and the Google Scholar world wide web search engine to identify studies published in peer-review journals that evaluated calorie labeling of cafeteria or restaurant menu items. Studies that evaluated labeling only some menu items (e.g. low calorie foods only were excluded from the review since the influence of selective labeling may be different from that which may be expected from comprehensive labeling. Results Six studies were identified that met the selection criteria for this review. Results from five of these studies provide some evidence consistent with the hypothesis that calorie information may influence food choices in a cafeteria or restaurant setting. However, results from most of these studies suggest the effect may be weak or inconsistent. One study found no evidence of an effect of calorie labeling on food choices. Each of the studies had at least one major methodological shortcoming, pointing toward the need for better designed studies to more rigorously evaluate the influence of point-of-purchase calorie labeling on food choices. Conclusion More research is needed that meets minimum standards of methodological quality. Studies need to include behavioral outcomes such as food purchase and eating behaviors. Also, studies need to be implemented in realistic settings such as restaurants and cafeterias.

  3. Effect of point-of-purchase calorie labeling on restaurant and cafeteria food choices: A review of the literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnack, Lisa J; French, Simone A

    2008-01-01

    Background Eating away from home has increased in prevalence among US adults and now comprises about 50% of food expenditures. Calorie labeling on chain restaurant menus is one specific policy that has been proposed to help consumers make better food choices at restaurants. The present review evaluates the available empirical literature on the effects of calorie information on food choices in restaurant and cafeteria settings. Methods Computer-assisted searches were conducted using the PUBMED database and the Google Scholar world wide web search engine to identify studies published in peer-review journals that evaluated calorie labeling of cafeteria or restaurant menu items. Studies that evaluated labeling only some menu items (e.g. low calorie foods only) were excluded from the review since the influence of selective labeling may be different from that which may be expected from comprehensive labeling. Results Six studies were identified that met the selection criteria for this review. Results from five of these studies provide some evidence consistent with the hypothesis that calorie information may influence food choices in a cafeteria or restaurant setting. However, results from most of these studies suggest the effect may be weak or inconsistent. One study found no evidence of an effect of calorie labeling on food choices. Each of the studies had at least one major methodological shortcoming, pointing toward the need for better designed studies to more rigorously evaluate the influence of point-of-purchase calorie labeling on food choices. Conclusion More research is needed that meets minimum standards of methodological quality. Studies need to include behavioral outcomes such as food purchase and eating behaviors. Also, studies need to be implemented in realistic settings such as restaurants and cafeterias. PMID:18950529

  4. Hypercaloric cafeteria-like diet induced UCP3 gene expression in skeletal muscle is impaired by hypothyroidism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoffolete M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The uncoupling protein UCP3 belongs to a family of mitochondrial carriers located in the inner mitochondrial membrane of certain cell types. It is expressed almost exclusively at high levels in skeletal muscle and its physiological role has not been fully determined in this tissue. In the present study we have addressed the possible interaction between a hypercaloric diet and thyroid hormone (T3, which are strong stimulators of UCP3 gene expression in skeletal muscle. Male Wistar rats weighing 180 ± 20 g were rendered hypothyroid by thyroidectomy and the addition of methimazole (0.05%; w/v to drinking water after surgery. The rats were fed a hypercaloric cafeteria diet (68% carbohydrates, 13% protein and 18% lipids for 10 days and sacrificed by decapitation. Subsequently, the gastrocnemius muscle was dissected, total RNA was isolated with Trizol? and UCP3 gene expression was determined by Northern blotting using a specific probe. Statistical analysis was performed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA followed by the Student-Newman-Keuls post-test. Skeletal muscle UCP3 gene expression was decreased by 60% in hypothyroid rats and UCP3 mRNA expression was increased 70% in euthyroid cafeteria-fed rats compared to euthyroid chow-fed animals, confirming previous studies. Interestingly, the cafeteria diet was unable to stimulate UCP3 gene expression in hypothyroid animals (40% lower as compared to euthyroid cafeteria-fed animals. The results show that a hypercaloric diet is a strong stimulator of UCP3 gene expression in skeletal muscle and requires T3 for an adequate action.

  5. A pricing strategy to promote sales of lower fat foods in high school cafeterias: acceptability and sensitivity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Peter; French, Simone A; Story, Mary; Fulkerson, Jayne A

    2002-01-01

    Prices of four low fat foods were reduced about 25% and prices of three high fat foods were increased about 10% to determine the impact on food purchases in a Midwestern suburban high school cafeteria to explore the impact of price on purchases. Low fat foods averaged about 13% of total sales. Sensitivity analysis was used to estimate that low fat foods would probably have averaged about 9% of total sales without the reduced price.

  6. Effect of point-of-purchase calorie labeling on restaurant and cafeteria food choices: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harnack, Lisa J; French, Simone A

    2008-10-26

    Eating away from home has increased in prevalence among US adults and now comprises about 50% of food expenditures. Calorie labeling on chain restaurant menus is one specific policy that has been proposed to help consumers make better food choices at restaurants. The present review evaluates the available empirical literature on the effects of calorie information on food choices in restaurant and cafeteria settings. Computer-assisted searches were conducted using the PUBMED database and the Google Scholar world wide web search engine to identify studies published in peer-review journals that evaluated calorie labeling of cafeteria or restaurant menu items. Studies that evaluated labeling only some menu items (e.g. low calorie foods only) were excluded from the review since the influence of selective labeling may be different from that which may be expected from comprehensive labeling. Six studies were identified that met the selection criteria for this review. Results from five of these studies provide some evidence consistent with the hypothesis that calorie information may influence food choices in a cafeteria or restaurant setting. However, results from most of these studies suggest the effect may be weak or inconsistent. One study found no evidence of an effect of calorie labeling on food choices. Each of the studies had at least one major methodological shortcoming, pointing toward the need for better designed studies to more rigorously evaluate the influence of point-of-purchase calorie labeling on food choices. More research is needed that meets minimum standards of methodological quality. Studies need to include behavioral outcomes such as food purchase and eating behaviors. Also, studies need to be implemented in realistic settings such as restaurants and cafeterias.

  7. Effect of point-of-purchase calorie labeling on restaurant and cafeteria food choices: A review of the literature

    OpenAIRE

    French Simone A; Harnack Lisa J

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Eating away from home has increased in prevalence among US adults and now comprises about 50% of food expenditures. Calorie labeling on chain restaurant menus is one specific policy that has been proposed to help consumers make better food choices at restaurants. The present review evaluates the available empirical literature on the effects of calorie information on food choices in restaurant and cafeteria settings. Methods Computer-assisted searches were conducted using t...

  8. The effect of changes in visibility and price on fruit purchasing at a university cafeteria in Lima, Peru

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, María Kathia; Benziger, Catherine P; Pillay, Timesh D; Miranda, J Jaime

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine the effect of increasing fruit visibility, adding information and lowering price on fruit purchasing at a university cafeteria in Lima, Peru. Design Quasi-experimental pilot study of a three-phase stepped intervention. In Phase 1, fruit was displayed >3 m from the point of purchase with no additional information. Phase 2 consisted in displaying the fruit near the point of purchase with added health and price information. Phase 3 added a 33 % price reduction. The duration of each phase was 3 weeks and phases were separated by 2-week breaks. Primary outcomes were total pieces of fruit and number of meals sold daily. Setting A university cafeteria in Lima, Peru. Subjects Approximately 150 people, students and non-student adults, who purchased food daily. Twelve students participated in post-intervention interviews. Results Fruit purchasing doubled from Phase 1 to Phase 3 (P price reduction had a positive effect on fruit purchasing in a university cafeteria, especially in males and non-student adults. PMID:25434293

  9. Cafeteria diet-fed mice is a pertinent model of obesity-induced organ damage: a potential role of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeni, Nadine; Dagher-Hamalian, Carole; Dimassi, Hani; Faour, Wissam H

    2015-07-01

    This study is aimed at evaluating the effects of a cafeteria diet (obesity) mouse model on early multi-organ functional, structural, endocrine and biochemical alterations. Multi-organ damage is assessed using clinical, biochemical, pathological, and inflammatory parameters in 30 mice fed one of the three diets for 15 weeks: standard chow diet (SC), high fat (HF), or "Cafeteria diet" (CAF) (standard SC and a choice of highly palatable human cafeteria foods: chocolate, biscuits, and peanut butter). CAF diet was associated with an increase in body weight, energy intake, and serum cholesterol levels compared to the other diets, as well as higher insulin levels and lower glucose tolerance. Additionally, consumption of the CAF diet was associated with significantly higher weight gain, abdominal fat, and serum IL-6 levels, as well as more damage in the heart (coronary perivascular fibrosis and steatosis), kidney (chronic interstitial inflammation and glomerular sclerosis), and liver (liver weight, portal fibrosis, apoptosis, and steatosis) compared to the HF diet. Functional and structural damage in CAF were higher than HF of similar macronutrient composition. This study provides a novel dietary model in mice that mimics multi-organ physiologic alterations in humans secondary to obesity.

  10. Life-long Maternal Cafeteria Diet Promotes Tissue-Specific Morphological Changes in Male Offspring Adult Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CAROLYNE D.S. SANTOS

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Here, we evaluated whether the exposure of rats to a cafeteria diet pre- and/or post-weaning, alters histological characteristics in the White Adipose Tissue (WAT, Brown Adipose Tissue (BAT, and liver of adult male offspring. Female Wistar rats were divided into Control (CTL; fed on standard rodent chow and Cafeteria (CAF; fed with the cafeteria diet throughout life, including pregnancy and lactation. After birth, only male offspring (F1 were maintained and received the CTL or CAF diets; originating four experimental groups: CTL-CTLF1; CTL-CAFF1; CAF-CTLF1; CAF-CAFF1. Data of biometrics, metabolic parameters, liver, BAT and WAT histology were assessed and integrated using the Principal Component Analysis (PCA. According to PCA analysis worse metabolic and biometric characteristics in adulthood are associated with the post-weaning CAF diet compared to pre and post weaning CAF diet. Thus, the CTL-CAFF1 group showed obesity, higher deposition of fat in the liver and BAT and high fasting plasma levels of glucose, triglycerides and cholesterol. Interestingly, the association between pre and post-weaning CAF diet attenuated the obesity and improved the plasma levels of glucose and triglycerides compared to CTL-CAFF1 without avoiding the higher lipid accumulation in BAT and in liver, suggesting that the impact of maternal CAF diet is tissue-specific.

  11. Alternating or continuous exposure to cafeteria diet leads to similar shifts in gut microbiota compared to chow diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaakoush, Nadeem O; Martire, Sarah I; Raipuria, Mukesh; Mitchell, Hazel M; Nielsen, Shaun; Westbrook, R Fred; Morris, Margaret J

    2017-01-01

    Overconsumption of energy-rich food is a major contributor to the obesity epidemic. The eating habits of many people are characterized by the cycling between overconsumption of energy-rich foods and dieting, the effects of which on the microbiota are currently unknown. We compared the fecal microbiota of rats either continuously fed chow or palatable cafeteria diet to a "cycled" group switched between the two diets (chow for 4, cafeteria for 3 days/wk, n = 12/group) over 16 wk. Enriched bacterial metabolic pathways were predicted, and a range of metabolic parameters was correlated to microbial taxa and pathways. Cycled rats showed large excursions in food intake on each diet switch. When switched from chow to cafeteria, they overconsumed, and when switched back to chow they underconsumed relative to those maintained on the two diets. Metabolic parameters of cycled rats were intermediate between those of the other diet groups (p diet, and both groups were significantly different to the chow group. Correlation analyses identified microbial metabolic pathways associated with an obese phenotype. These data suggest that continuous or intermittent exposure to palatable foods have similar effects on the gut microbiota. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Emoticon use Increases Plain Milk and Vegetable Purchase in a School Cafeteria without Adversely Affecting Total Milk Purchase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Robert M; Anneken, Amy; Duffy, Christopher; Simmons, Kenya; Hudgens, Michelle; Kate Lockhart, Mary; Shelly, Jessica

    2015-09-01

    Choosing poor-quality foods in school cafeterias is a risk factor for childhood obesity. Given the option, children often select chocolate milk over plain white milk. Efforts to increase plain white milk selection, such as banning chocolate milk in school cafeterias, increases plain white fat-free milk (PWFFM) purchase but decreases the overall milk purchase. The purpose of this study was to determine whether emoticon placement next to healthful foods would increase healthful purchases, particularly PWFFM. In an inner city elementary school with 297 children, "Green Smiley Face" emoticons were placed to encourage the purchase of healthful foods including an entrée with whole grains, fruits, vegetables, and PWFFM. Purchase data were obtained from cash register receipts. Differences were analyzed by χ(2) Care and Statistical Process Control (SPC) and Graphical Methods. Only 7.4% of students selected white milk at baseline compared with 17.9% after the emoticons were placed (P 8 points above the mean). The addition of emoticons increases the purchase of PWFFM and vegetables in a school cafeteria setting without adversely affecting total milk sales. Emoticons offer a practical, low-cost means to improve food selection by children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier HS Journals, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Workers intake too much salt from dishes of eating out and food service cafeterias; direct chemical analysis of sodium content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hae-Ryun; Jeong, Gye-Ok; Lee, Seung-Lim; Kim, Jin-Young; Kang, Soon-Ah; Park, Kun-Young; Ryou, Hyun-Joo

    2009-01-01

    The average sodium intake of Koreans was reported to be 5,279.9 mg/day, which is one of the highest intake levels worldwide. The average Koreans intake 19.6% of sodium from kimchi, showing kimchi as the main contributor of sodium in this country (Ministry of Health and Welfare, 2005). The sodium content of dishes that are frequently chosen by workers, and which were served by foodservice cafeterias were chemically analyzed. The average sodium content of one meal provided by 10 foodservice cafeterias was 2,777.7 mg. Twenty-one, one-dish-meals, frequently chosen by workers for a lunch menu, were collected at 4 different restaurants for each menu by one male, aged in the twenties and analyzed chemically also. Workers who eat lunch at a workplace cafeteria everyday could intake about 8 g of salt at a one-time meal and those who eat out for a one-dish-meal would intake 3-8 g of salt without counting sodium content from the side dishes. From these study results, one could estimate that over 10 g of salt could be possible for a single meal for workers who eat out everyday. A nationwide nutrition campaign and education for low salt diets for restaurant owners and foodservice providers should be seriously considered.

  14. Dietary exposure to acrylamide from cafeteria foods in Jeddah schools and associated risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Tawila, Mahmoud M; Al-Ansari, Ahmed M; Alrasheedi, Amani A; Neamatallah, Abdulateef A

    2017-10-01

    Acrylamide (AA) is a carcinogenic and genotoxic food contaminant produced at high temperatures in foods that are rich in carbohydrates. Foods sold in schools in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, are among such carbohydrate-rich foods produced at high cooking temperatures. It is crucial to determine the importance of AA exposure with respect to cafeteria foods and assess the associated risks. The highest mean AA level was measured in chocolate pies (439 µg kg-1 ), followed by custard pies (435 µg kg-1 ) and cheese pies (432 µg kg-1 ). The average and 95th percentile values of AA exposure were 0.51 and 1.17 [µg kg-1 body weight (BW) school day-1 ]. The average exposure significantly decreased with an increase in age, from 0.65 (µg kg-1 BW school day-1 ) in primary school students to 0.37 in secondary school students. Cheese and chocolate pies are the main contributors in AA intake. The contributions of cheese and chocolate pies to the average exposure among primary, middle and secondary school students were 23.1%, 24.7% and 29.4% and 16.9%, 12.1% and 11.9%, respectively. Other products with significant contributions included cheese sandwiches (10.8%, 8.9% and 12.7%), plain cookies (7.7%, 5.6% and 6.7%) and custard pies (7.7%, 4.8% and 8.9%). Other cafeteria products contributed to AA exposure at much lower percentages. The calculated margins of exposure (MOEs) for the average [356 and 614 for both benchmark dose lower confidence limit (BMDL) 0.18 and 0.31 mg kg-1 BW day-1 ] and 95th percentile AA exposure values (154 and 265 for both BMDL 0.18 and 0.31 mg kg-1 BW day-1 ) suggest that there is a health concern with respect to school-aged students. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Does a grill menu redesign influence sales, nutrients purchased, and consumer acceptance in a worksite cafeteria?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadiveloo, Maya K; Malik, Vasanti S; Spiegelman, Donna; Willett, Walter C; Mattei, Josiemer

    2017-12-01

    Worksite cafeterias are compelling venues to improve diet quality through environmental changes. We conducted a pre-post study to evaluate how a cafeteria-initiated grill menu redesign influenced sales, revenue, and nutrient content of foods purchased. Secondly, we evaluated consumer opinions about menu changes to inform practices for worksite environment interventions. Monthly sales data (2012-2015) were used to compute gross sales and revenue of entrées and side dishes pre-post menu changes. Alternative protein sources replaced red meat; nutrient composition and nutrients purchased were compared using Food Pro software. Consumer responses were queried using online surveys; open-ended responses were analyzed using NVivo. Differences in sales and nutrient content pre-post menu redesign were tested with Wilcoxon Rank Sum tests. Gross sales of entrées (61 vs. 222 servings/month; p = 0.01) and side dishes (120 vs. 365 servings/month; p = 0.001) increased more than three-fold post-menu changes. Revenue from entrées (312 vs. 1144 USD/month; p = 0.01) and side dishes (238 vs. 914 USD/month; p = 0.001) also increased; per entrée, consumers purchased significantly more unsaturated fat (5 g), and less saturated fat (3 g) and sodium (100 mg). For side dishes, they purchased fewer calories (48 kcal) and unsaturated fat (2.9 g), but more fiber (1.8 g), and sodium (260 mg). Four themes emerged from consumer responses: the importance of 1) variety, novelty, choice; 2) cost, affordability, value; 3) health; and 4) food quality, taste. Menu redesign can improve nutrient content, while also increasing sales and revenue. Multi-dimensional assessment of the nutritional, consumer, and retailer implications is desirable practice for enacting similar environmental changes.

  16. Marked increase in rat red blood cell membrane protein glycosylation by one-month treatment with a cafeteria diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Oliva

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Glucose, an aldose, spontaneously reacts with protein amino acids yielding glycosylated proteins. The compounds may reorganize to produce advanced glycosylation products, which regulatory importance is increasingly being recognized. Protein glycosylation is produced without the direct intervention of enzymes and results in the loss of function. Glycosylated plasma albumin, and glycosylated haemoglobin are currently used as index of mean plasma glucose levels, since higher glucose availability results in higher glycosylation rates. In this study we intended to detect the early changes in blood protein glycosylation elicited by an obesogenic diet.Experimental Design. Since albumin is in constant direct contact with plasma glucose, as are the red blood cell (RBC membranes, we analyzed their degree or glycosylation in female and male rats, either fed a standard diet or subjected to a hyper-energetic self-selected cafeteria diet for 30 days. This model produces a small increase in basal glycaemia and a significant increase in body fat, leaving the animals in the initial stages of development of metabolic syndrome. We also measured the degree of glycosylation of hemoglobin, and the concentration of glucose in contact with this protein, that within the RBC. Glycosylation was measured by colorimetric estimation of the hydroxymethylfurfural liberated from glycosyl residues by incubation with oxalate.Results. Plasma glucose was higher in cafeteria diet and in male rats, both independent effects. However, there were no significant differences induced by sex or diet in either hemoglobin or plasma proteins. Purified RBC membranes showed a marked effect of diet: higher glycosylation in cafeteria rats, which was more marked in females (not in controls. In any case, the number of glycosyl residues per molecule were higher in hemoglobin than in plasma proteins (after correction for molecular weight. The detected levels of glucose in

  17. Effect of cafeteria diet history on cue-, pellet-priming-, and stress-induced reinstatement of food seeking in female rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Wei; Fiscella, Kimberly A; Bacharach, Samuel Z; Calu, Donna J

    2014-01-01

    Relapse to unhealthy eating habits is a major problem in human dietary treatment. The individuals most commonly seeking dietary treatment are overweight or obese women, yet the commonly used rat reinstatement model to study relapse to palatable food seeking during dieting primarily uses normal-weight male rats. To increase the clinical relevance of the relapse to palatable food seeking model, here we pre-expose female rats to a calorically-dense cafeteria diet in the home-cage to make them overweight prior to examining the effect of this diet history on cue-, pellet-priming- and footshock-induced reinstatement of food seeking. Post-natal day 32 female Long-Evans rats had seven weeks of home-cage access to either chow only or daily or intermittent cafeteria diet alongside chow. Next, they were trained to self-administer normally preferred 45 mg food pellets accompanied by a tone-light cue. After extinction, all rats were tested for reinstatement induced by discrete cue, pellet-priming, and intermittent footshock under extinction conditions. Access to daily cafeteria diet and to a lesser degree access to intermittent cafeteria diet decreased food pellet self-administration compared to chow-only. Prior history of these cafeteria diets also reduced extinction responding, cue- and pellet-priming-induced reinstatement. In contrast, modest stress-induced reinstatement was only observed in rats with a history of daily cafeteria diet. A history of cafeteria diet does not increase the propensity for cue- and pellet-priming-induced relapse in the rat reinstatement model but does appear to make rats more susceptible to footshock stress-induced reinstatement.

  18. Effect of cafeteria diet history on cue-, pellet-priming-, and stress-induced reinstatement of food seeking in female rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Wei Chen

    Full Text Available Relapse to unhealthy eating habits is a major problem in human dietary treatment. The individuals most commonly seeking dietary treatment are overweight or obese women, yet the commonly used rat reinstatement model to study relapse to palatable food seeking during dieting primarily uses normal-weight male rats. To increase the clinical relevance of the relapse to palatable food seeking model, here we pre-expose female rats to a calorically-dense cafeteria diet in the home-cage to make them overweight prior to examining the effect of this diet history on cue-, pellet-priming- and footshock-induced reinstatement of food seeking.Post-natal day 32 female Long-Evans rats had seven weeks of home-cage access to either chow only or daily or intermittent cafeteria diet alongside chow. Next, they were trained to self-administer normally preferred 45 mg food pellets accompanied by a tone-light cue. After extinction, all rats were tested for reinstatement induced by discrete cue, pellet-priming, and intermittent footshock under extinction conditions.Access to daily cafeteria diet and to a lesser degree access to intermittent cafeteria diet decreased food pellet self-administration compared to chow-only. Prior history of these cafeteria diets also reduced extinction responding, cue- and pellet-priming-induced reinstatement. In contrast, modest stress-induced reinstatement was only observed in rats with a history of daily cafeteria diet.A history of cafeteria diet does not increase the propensity for cue- and pellet-priming-induced relapse in the rat reinstatement model but does appear to make rats more susceptible to footshock stress-induced reinstatement.

  19. Implementing healthier foodservice guidelines in hospital and federal worksite cafeterias: barriers, facilitators and keys to success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jilcott Pitts, S B; Graham, J; Mojica, A; Stewart, L; Walter, M; Schille, C; McGinty, J; Pearsall, M; Whitt, O; Mihas, P; Bradley, A; Simon, C

    2016-12-01

    Healthy foodservice guidelines are being implemented in worksites and healthcare facilities to increase access to healthy foods by employees and public populations. However, little is known about the barriers to and facilitators of implementation. The present study aimed to examine barriers to and facilitators of implementation of healthy foodservice guidelines in federal worksite and hospital cafeterias. Using a mixed-methods approach, including a quantitative survey followed by a qualitative, in-depth interview, we examined: (i) barriers to and facilitators of implementation; (ii) behavioural design strategies used to promote healthier foods and beverages; and (iii) how implementation of healthy foodservice guidelines influenced costs and profitability. We used a purposive sample of five hospital and four federal worksite foodservice operators who recently implemented one of two foodservice guidelines: the United States Department of Health and Human Services/General Services Administration Health and Sustainability Guidelines ('Guidelines') in federal worksites or the Partnership for a Healthier America Hospital Healthier Food Initiative ('Initiative') in hospitals. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse quantitative survey data. Qualitative data were analysed using a deductive approach. Implementation facilitators included leadership support, adequate vendor selections and having dietitians assist with implementation. Implementation barriers included inadequate selections from vendors, customer complaints and additional expertise required for menu labelling. Behavioural design strategies used most frequently included icons denoting healthier options, marketing using social media and placement of healthier options in prime locations. Lessons learned can guide subsequent steps for future healthy foodservice guideline implementation in similar settings. © 2016 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  20. Reliability of the hospital nutrition environment scan for cafeterias, vending machines, and gift shops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Courtney P; Sallis, James F; Swartz, Michael D; Hoelscher, Deanna M; Peskin, Melissa F

    2013-08-01

    According to ecological models, the physical environment plays a major role in determining individual health behaviors. As such, researchers have started targeting the consumer nutrition environment of large-scale foodservice operations when implementing obesity-prevention programs. In 2010, the American Hospital Association released a call-to-action encouraging health care facilities to join in this movement and improve their facilities' consumer nutrition environments. The Hospital Nutrition Environment Scan (HNES) for Cafeterias, Vending Machines, and Gift Shops was developed in 2011, and the present study evaluated the inter-rater reliability of this instrument. Two trained raters visited 39 hospitals in southern California and completed the HNES. Percent agreement, kappa statistics, and intraclass correlation coefficients were calculated. Percent agreement between raters ranged from 74.4% to 100% and kappa statistics ranged from 0.458 to 1.0. The intraclass correlation coefficient for the overall nutrition composite scores was 0.961. Given these results, the HNES demonstrated acceptable reliability metrics and can now be disseminated to assess the current state of hospital consumer nutrition environments. Copyright © 2013 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of the implementation of the mixed cafeteria system in a hospital nutrition and dietetic service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Kamila Pires de; Martins, Flaviana Pereira de Oliveira; Custódio, Isis Danyelle Dias; Lima, Emanuelle Do Nascimento Santos; Souza, Daniela Nogueira Prado de; Maia, Yara Cristina de Paiva

    2017-10-24

    The type of service offered by the nutrition and dietetics service (NDS) of a hospital has a direct impact on food waste. To evaluate waste in the transition from a simple to a mixed cafeteria service. The study was carried out in a NDS of a University Hospital during 60 days (30 days for each type of service). The meals prepared and distributed and the leftovers of lunch and dinner were weighed. Per capita values of non-usable leftovers were below the acceptable range (7-25 g), not varying with the service transition (p = 0.3) at lunch. At dinner, on the contrary, values were above the acceptable range, with a median of 190 g and 202 g, also showing no difference with the service modification (p = 0.5). At lunch, with the transition, there was a reduction in the plate waste-ingestion (p foods (p = 0.007). At dinner, there was a reduction in the plate waste-ingestion (p food handlers and supervisors, implementation of standardized operating procedures and cost control in order to reduce waste, which has an economic, social and political impact.

  2. Elemental concentrations in kidney and liver of mice fed with cafeteria or standard diet determined by particle induced X-ray emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dimer Leffa, Daniela [Graduate Program in Health Sciences, Health Sciences Unit, University of Southern Santa Catarina, 88806-000 Criciúma, SC (Brazil); Iochims dos Santos, Carla Eliete; Debastiani, Rafaela; Amaral, Livio; Yoneama, Maria Lucia; Ferraz Dias, Johnny [Ion Implantation Laboratory, Physics Institute, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre (Brazil); Moraes Andrade, Vanessa, E-mail: vmoraesdeandrade@yahoo.com.br [Graduate Program in Health Sciences, Health Sciences Unit, University of Southern Santa Catarina, 88806-000 Criciúma, SC (Brazil)

    2014-01-01

    The importance of trace elements in human health is well known and their main source is daily diet. Nowadays, one of the biggest issues is the presence of these micronutrients in levels much higher than required, leading to potential toxic effects. The aim of this work was to investigate the elemental content in organs of mice fed with cafeteria or standard diet using PIXE. Twelve male Swiss mice were divided into two groups: control group (standard chow) and cafeteria group (high-caloric diet). After 17 weeks, samples of different organs (kidney and liver) were collected and prepared for PIXE analysis. The Fe concentration in kidney and liver was statistically higher in animals that received the cafeteria diet (p < 0.001). The Al and Si kidney contents were significantly higher for cafeteria diet in relation to standard diet (p < 0.05). Moreover, the standard diet showed significant differences for Cl and K (p < 0.05) in comparison to cafeteria diet in kidney, and for P, S and Zn (p < 0.005) in liver.

  3. Alterations in gut microbiota associated with a cafeteria diet and the physiological consequences in the host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bas, J M; Guirro, M; Boqué, N; Cereto, A; Ras, R; Crescenti, A; Caimari, A; Canela, N; Arola, L

    2017-11-23

    Gut microbiota have been described as key players in the pathophysiology of obesity and different components of metabolic syndrome (MetS). The cafeteria diet (CAF)-fed rat is a preclinical model that reproduces most of the alterations found in human MetS by simulating a palatable human unbalanced diet. Our objective was to assess the effects of CAF on gut microbiota and their associations with different components of MetS in Wistar rats. Animals were fed a standard diet or CAF for 12 weeks. A PLS-based methodology was used to reveal associations between gut microbiota, characterized by 16S rDNA gene sequencing, and biochemical, nutritional and physiological parameters. CAF feeding resulted in obesity, dyslipidemia, insulin resistance and hepatic steatosis. These changes were accompanied by a significant decrease in gut bacterial diversity, decreased Firmicutes and an increase in Actinobacteria and Proteobacteria abundances, which were concomitant with increased endotoxemia. Associations of different genera with the intake of lipids and carbohydrates were opposed from those associated with the intake of fiber. Changes in gut microbiota were also associated with the different physiological effects of CAF, mainly increased adiposity and altered levels of plasma leptin and glycerol, consistent with altered adipose tissue metabolism. Also hepatic lipid accretion was associated with changes in microbiota, highlighting the relevance of gut microbiota homeostasis in the adipose-liver axis. Overall, our results suggest that CAF feeding has a profound impact on the gut microbiome and, in turn, that these changes may be associated with important features of MetS.International Journal of Obesity accepted article preview online, 23 November 2017. doi:10.1038/ijo.2017.284.

  4. A cafeteria diet triggers intestinal inflammation and oxidative stress in obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Cardoso, K; Ginés, I; Pinent, M; Ardévol, A; Terra, X; Blay, M

    2017-01-01

    The gastrointestinal alterations associated with the consumption of an obesogenic diet, such as inflammation, permeability impairment and oxidative stress, have been poorly explored in both diet-induced obesity (DIO) and genetic obesity. The aim of the present study was to examine the impact of an obesogenic diet on the gut health status of DIO rats in comparison with the Zucker (fa/fa) rat leptin receptor-deficient model of genetic obesity over time. For this purpose, female Wistar rats (n 48) were administered a standard or a cafeteria diet (CAF diet) for 12, 14·5 or 17 weeks and were compared with fa/fa Zucker rats fed a standard diet for 10 weeks. Morphometric variables, plasma biochemical parameters, myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity and reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in the ileum were assessed, as well as the expressions of proinflammatory genes (TNF-α and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)) and intestinal permeability genes (zonula occludens-1, claudin-1 and occludin). Both the nutritional model and the genetic obesity model showed increased body weight and metabolic alterations at the final time point. An increase in intestinal ROS production and MPO activity was observed in the gastrointestinal tracts of rats fed a CAF diet but not in the genetic obesity model. TNF-α was overexpressed in the ileum of both CAF diet and fa/fa groups, and ileal inflammation was associated with the degree of obesity and metabolic alterations. Interestingly, the 17-week CAF group and the fa/fa rats exhibited alterations in the expressions of permeability genes. Relevantly, in the hyperlipidic refined sugar diet model of obesity, the responses to chronic energy overload led to time-dependent increases in gut inflammation and oxidative stress.

  5. A hospital cafeteria-related food-borne outbreak due to Bacillus cereus: unique features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddour, L M; Gaia, S M; Griffin, R; Hudson, R

    1986-09-01

    Although Bacillus cereus is a well-known cause of food-borne illness, hospital-related outbreaks of food-borne disease due to B. cereus have rarely been documented. We report a hospital employee cafeteria outbreak due to foods contaminated with B. cereus in which an outside caterer was employed to prepare the suspect meals. Data were collected from 249 of 291 employees who had eaten either of the two meals. With a mean incubation period of 12.5 hours, 64% (160 of 249) of employees manifested illness. Symptoms, which averaged 24.3 hours in duration, included diarrhea (96.3%), abdominal cramps (90%), nausea (50.6%), weakness (24.7%), and vomiting (13.8%). Eighty-seven employees sought medical attention, 84 of whom were seen in an emergency room. Although a significant difference was not demonstrated in food-specific attack rates, B. cereus was cultured from both rice and chicken items that were served at both meals. Sixty-three employees submitted stools for culture that grew no enteric pathogens, but none were examined for B. cereus. This food-borne outbreak demonstrates: the need for hospital kitchen supervisors to ensure proper handling of food when outside caterers are employed; that significant differences in food-specific attack rates may not be demonstrated in outbreaks, which may be related to several factors; and the importance of notifying microbiology laboratory personnel when B. cereus is a suspect enteric pathogen, since many laboratories do not routinely attempt to identify this organism in stool specimens.

  6. Effects of palatable cafeteria diet on cognitive and noncognitive behaviors and brain neurotrophins' levels in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffa, Daniela D; Valvassori, Samira S; Varela, Roger B; Lopes-Borges, Jésica; Daumann, Francine; Longaretti, Luiza M; Dajori, Ana Luiza F; Quevedo, João; Andrade, Vanessa M

    2015-08-01

    The consumption of palatable high-fat and high-sugar foods have increased dramatically over the past years. Overconsumption of calorically dense food contributes to increasing rates of overweight and obesity that are associated with psychiatry disorders, in particular mood and anxiety disorders. This study evaluated the impact of palatable cafeteria diet (CAF) intake on cognitive and noncognitive behaviors, as well as identified factors related to these behaviors through an evaluation of brain neurotrophic factor (BDNF, NGF, and GDNF) levels in hippocampus of mice. Male Swiss mice received two different diets during 13 weeks: standard chow (STA) and highly CAF. Posteriorly, forced swimming test (FST), tail suspension test (TST), plus-maze test (PMT), open-field tests (OFT), and object recognition task (ORT) were utilized as behavioral tests. In addition, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and nerve growth factor (NGF) neurotrophins' levels were evaluated in hippocampus of mice. The results demonstrated that mice from the CAF group showed a decrease in the immobility time in the FST and TST. Besides, mice in the CAF group spent more time in the open arms of the PMT. No significant differences were observed in the cognitive behaviors, which were evaluated in the OFT and ORT. In addition, the CAF group showed that BDNF and NGF protein levels increased in the hippocampus of mice. In conclusion, our data suggest that the consumption of palatable high-fat and high-sugar foods induces antidepressant- and anxiolytic-like behaviors, which can be related with BDNF and NGF expression increases in hippocampus of mice in the CAF group.

  7. Gamification of dietary decision-making in an elementary-school cafeteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brooke A Jones

    Full Text Available Despite the known health benefits of doing so, most US children do not consume enough fruits and vegetables (FV. School-based interventions can be effective in increasing FV consumption, but the most effective of these require that schools allocate their time, effort, and financial resources to implementing the program: expenditures that schools may be reluctant to provide in climates of academic accountability and economic austerity. The present demonstration project used a behaviorally based gamification approach to develop an intervention designed to increase FV consumption while minimizing material and labor costs to the school. During the intervention, the school (N = 180 students in grades K-8 played a cooperative game in which school-level goals were met by consuming higher-than-normal amounts of either fruit or vegetables (alternating-treatments experimental design. School-level consumption was quantified using a weight-based waste measure in the cafeteria. Over a period of 13 school days, fruit consumption increased by 66% and vegetable consumption by 44% above baseline levels. Use of an alternating-treatment time-series design with differential levels of FV consumption on days when fruit or vegetable was targeted for improvement supported the role of the intervention in these overall consumption increases. In post-intervention surveys, teachers rated the intervention as practical in the classroom and enjoyed by their students. Parent surveys revealed that children were more willing to try new FV at home and increased their consumption of FV following the intervention. These findings suggest that a behaviorally based gamification approach may prove practically useful in addressing concerns about poor dietary decision-making by children in schools.

  8. Does a grill menu redesign influence sales, nutrients purchased, and consumer acceptance in a worksite cafeteria?

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    Maya K. Vadiveloo

    2017-12-01

    We conducted a pre-post study to evaluate how a cafeteria-initiated grill menu redesign influenced sales, revenue, and nutrient content of foods purchased. Secondly, we evaluated consumer opinions about menu changes to inform practices for worksite environment interventions. Monthly sales data (2012–2015 were used to compute gross sales and revenue of entrées and side dishes pre-post menu changes. Alternative protein sources replaced red meat; nutrient composition and nutrients purchased were compared using Food Pro software. Consumer responses were queried using online surveys; open-ended responses were analyzed using NVivo. Differences in sales and nutrient content pre-post menu redesign were tested with Wilcoxon Rank Sum tests. Gross sales of entrées (61 vs. 222 servings/month; p = 0.01 and side dishes (120 vs. 365 servings/month; p = 0.001 increased more than three-fold post-menu changes. Revenue from entrées (312 vs. 1144 USD/month; p = 0.01 and side dishes (238 vs. 914 USD/month; p = 0.001 also increased; per entrée, consumers purchased significantly more unsaturated fat (5 g, and less saturated fat (3 g and sodium (100 mg. For side dishes, they purchased fewer calories (48 kcal and unsaturated fat (2.9 g, but more fiber (1.8 g, and sodium (260 mg. Four themes emerged from consumer responses: the importance of 1 variety, novelty, choice; 2 cost, affordability, value; 3 health; and 4 food quality, taste. Menu redesign can improve nutrient content, while also increasing sales and revenue. Multi-dimensional assessment of the nutritional, consumer, and retailer implications is desirable practice for enacting similar environmental changes.

  9. Social jet-lag potentiates obesity and metabolic syndrome when combined with cafeteria diet in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espitia-Bautista, Estefania; Velasco-Ramos, Mario; Osnaya-Ramírez, Iván; Ángeles-Castellanos, Manuel; Buijs, Ruud M; Escobar, Carolina

    2017-07-01

    Modern lifestyle promotes shifted sleep onset and shifted wake up time between weekdays and weekends, producing a condition termed "social-jet lag." Disrupted sleep promotes increased appetite for carbohydrate and fat-rich food, which in long term leads to overweight, obesity and metabolic syndrome. In order to mimic the human situation we produced an experimental model of social-jet lag (Sj-l). With this model, we explored the link between shifted sleep time with consumption of a cafeteria diet (CafD) and the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome. The first experiment was designed to create and confirm the model of Sj-l. Rats (n=8-10/group) were exposed to a shifted sleep time protocol achieved by placing the rats in slow rotating wheels from Monday to Friday during the first 4h of the light period, while on weekends they were left undisturbed. The second experiment (n=8-12/group) explored the combined effect of Sj-l with the opportunity to ingest CafD. All protocols lasted 12weeks. We evaluated the development of overweight and indicators of metabolic syndrome. The statistical significance for all variables was set at Pmetabolic variables representing a risk factor for metabolic syndrome. Daily restricted access to CafD in the day or night induced glucose intolerance and only CafD during the day led to overweight. Sj-l combined with CafD induced overconsumption of the diet, potentiated body weight gain (16%) and promoted 5 of the criteria for metabolic syndrome including high insulin and dislipidemia. Present data provide an experimental model of social-jet lag that combined with overconsumption of CafD, and maximized the development of obesity and metabolic syndrome. Importantly, access to CafD during the night did not lead to overweight nor metabolic syndrome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Gamification of dietary decision-making in an elementary-school cafeteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brooke A; Madden, Gregory J; Wengreen, Heidi J; Aguilar, Sheryl S; Desjardins, E Anne

    2014-01-01

    Despite the known health benefits of doing so, most US children do not consume enough fruits and vegetables (FV). School-based interventions can be effective in increasing FV consumption, but the most effective of these require that schools allocate their time, effort, and financial resources to implementing the program: expenditures that schools may be reluctant to provide in climates of academic accountability and economic austerity. The present demonstration project used a behaviorally based gamification approach to develop an intervention designed to increase FV consumption while minimizing material and labor costs to the school. During the intervention, the school (N = 180 students in grades K-8) played a cooperative game in which school-level goals were met by consuming higher-than-normal amounts of either fruit or vegetables (alternating-treatments experimental design). School-level consumption was quantified using a weight-based waste measure in the cafeteria. Over a period of 13 school days, fruit consumption increased by 66% and vegetable consumption by 44% above baseline levels. Use of an alternating-treatment time-series design with differential levels of FV consumption on days when fruit or vegetable was targeted for improvement supported the role of the intervention in these overall consumption increases. In post-intervention surveys, teachers rated the intervention as practical in the classroom and enjoyed by their students. Parent surveys revealed that children were more willing to try new FV at home and increased their consumption of FV following the intervention. These findings suggest that a behaviorally based gamification approach may prove practically useful in addressing concerns about poor dietary decision-making by children in schools.

  11. The effect of changes in visibility and price on fruit purchasing at a university cafeteria in Lima, Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, María Kathia; Benziger, Catherine P; Pillay, Timesh D; Miranda, J Jaime

    2015-10-01

    To determine the effect of increasing fruit visibility, adding information and lowering price on fruit purchasing at a university cafeteria in Lima, Peru. Quasi-experimental pilot study of a three-phase stepped intervention. In Phase 1, fruit was displayed >3 m from the point of purchase with no additional information. Phase 2 consisted in displaying the fruit near the point of purchase with added health and price information. Phase 3 added a 33% price reduction. The duration of each phase was 3 weeks and phases were separated by 2-week breaks. Primary outcomes were total pieces of fruit and number of meals sold daily. A university cafeteria in Lima, Peru. Approximately 150 people, students and non-student adults, who purchased food daily. Twelve students participated in post-intervention interviews. Fruit purchasing doubled from Phase 1 to Phase 3 (P<0·01) and remained significant after adjusting for the number of meals sold daily (P<0·05). There was no evidence of a difference in fruit sold between the other phases. Females purchased 100% of the fruit in Phase 1, 82% in Phase 2 and 67% in Phase 3 (P<0·01). Males increased their purchasing significantly between Phase 1 and 3 (P<0·01). Non-student adults purchased more fruit with each phase (P<0·05) whereas students did not. Qualitatively, the most common reason for not purchasing fruit was a marked preference to buy unhealthy snack foods. Promoting fruit consumption by product placement close to the point of purchase, adding health information and price reduction had a positive effect on fruit purchasing in a university cafeteria, especially in males and non-student adults.

  12. Anti-obesity activity of chloroform-methanol extract of Premna integrifolia in mice fed with cafeteria diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mali, Prashant Y; Bigoniya, Papiya; Panchal, Shital S; Muchhandi, Irrappa S

    2013-07-01

    Aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-obesity activity of chloroform:methanol extract of P. integrifolia (CMPI) in mice fed with cafeteria diet. Female Swiss Albino mice were divided into six groups, which received normal and cafeteria diet, standard drug simvastatin (10 mg/kg) and CMPI (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg) daily for 40 days. Parameters such as body weight, body mass index (BMI), Lee index of obesity (LIO), food consumption, locomotor behavior, serum glucose, triglyceride, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), atherogenic index, organ weight and organ fat pad weight were studied for evaluating the anti-obesity activity of P. integrifolia. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) fingerprint profile of chloroform-methanol extract was also studied using quercetin as the reference standard. There was a significant increase in body weight, BMI, LIO, food consumption, organ weight (liver and small intestine), organ fat pad weight (mesenteric and peri-renal fat pad) and in the levels of serum glucose, triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL and VLDL with a significant decrease in locomotor behavior (ambulation, rearing, grooming) and HDL level in cafeteria diet group. Animals treated with CMPI showed dose dependent activity. P. integrifolia (200 mg/kg) supplementation attenuated all the above alterations, which indicates the anti-obesity activity. HPLC fingerprint profile of CMPI showed two peaks in the solvent system of 50 mm potassium diphosphate (pH-3 with ortho phosphoric acid): Methanol (30:70 v/v) at 360 nm. Present findings suggest that, CMPI possessed anti-obesity activity that substantiated its ethno-medicinal use in the treatment of obesity.

  13. Anti-obesity activity of chloroform-methanol extract of Premna integrifolia in mice fed with cafeteria diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Y Mali

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: Aim of the present study was to evaluate the anti-obesity activity of chloroform:methanol extract of P. integrifolia (CMPI in mice fed with cafeteria diet. Materials and Methods: Female Swiss Albino mice were divided into six groups, which received normal and cafeteria diet, standard drug simvastatin (10 mg/kg and CMPI (50, 100 and 200 mg/kg daily for 40 days. Parameters such as body weight, body mass index (BMI, Lee index of obesity (LIO, food consumption, locomotor behavior, serum glucose, triglyceride, total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL, low density lipoprotein (LDL, very low density lipoprotein (VLDL, atherogenic index, organ weight and organ fat pad weight were studied for evaluating the anti-obesity activity of P. integrifolia. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC fingerprint profile of chloroform-methanol extract was also studied using quercetin as the reference standard. Results: There was a significant increase in body weight, BMI, LIO, food consumption, organ weight (liver and small intestine, organ fat pad weight (mesenteric and peri-renal fat pad and in the levels of serum glucose, triglyceride, total cholesterol, LDL and VLDL with a significant decrease in locomotor behavior (ambulation, rearing, grooming and HDL level in cafeteria diet group. Animals treated with CMPI showed dose dependent activity. P. integrifolia (200 mg/kg supplementation attenuated all the above alterations, which indicates the anti-obesity activity. HPLC fingerprint profile of CMPI showed two peaks in the solvent system of 50 mm potassium diphosphate (pH-3 with ortho phosphoric acid: Methanol (30:70 v/v at 360 nm. Conclusion: Present findings suggest that, CMPI possessed anti-obesity activity that substantiated its ethno-medicinal use in the treatment of obesity.

  14. Cafeteria diet overfeeding in young male rats impairs the adaptive response to fed/fasted conditions and increases adiposity independent of body weight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, H; Pomar, C A; Picó, C; Sánchez, J; Palou, A

    2015-03-01

    We analyzed the effects of a short exposure to a cafeteria diet during early infancy in rats on their metabolic response to fed/fasting conditions in key tissues involved in energy homeostasis. Ten-day-old male pups were fed a control or a cafeteria diet for 12 days and then killed under ad libitum feeding conditions or 12 h fasting. The expression of key genes related to energy metabolism in liver, retroperitoneal white adipose tissue (WAT) and hypothalamus were analyzed. Despite no differences in body weight, cafeteria-fed animals had almost double the fat mass of control rats. They also showed higher food intake, higher leptinemia and altered hypothalamic expression of Neuropetide Y, suggesting a dysfunction in the control of food intake. Unlike controls, cafeteria-fed animals did not decrease WAT expression of Pparg, sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 1 or Cidea under fasting conditions, and displayed lower Pnpla2 expression than controls. In liver, compared with controls, cafeteria animals presented: (i) lower expression of genes related with fatty acid uptake and lipogenesis under ad libitum-fed conditions; (ii) higher expression of fatty acid oxidation-related genes and glucokinase under fasting conditions; (iii) greater expression of leptin and insulin receptors; and higher protein levels of insulin receptor and the pAMPK/AMPK ratio. A short period of exposure to a cafeteria diet in early infancy in rat pups is enough to disturb the metabolic response to fed/fasting conditions in key tissues involved in energy homeostasis, particularly in WAT, and hence induces an exacerbated body fat accumulation and increased metabolic risk, with no apparent effects on body weight.

  15. Projeto de Investimento para a Criação de uma cafeteria na praia do Tofo

    OpenAIRE

    Cantero, Leydi Mariana Carracedo

    2016-01-01

    presente projeto de investimento tem por finalidade a criação de uma Cafeteria na Praia do Tofo da Cidade de Inhambane, designada por Mascar Lda. A mesma, tem como missão oferecer aos banhistas da praia do Tofo serviços de restauração e bebidas de qualidade, contribuindo desta forma para o desenvolvimento do turismo na Cidade de Inhambane. A ideia central surgiu para responder à necessidade destes serviços sentida pelos visitantes que procuram a praia do Tofo e necessitam de comida rápida,...

  16. Effects of cafeteria diet and high fat diet intake on anxiety, learning and memory in adult male rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pini, Renata Tavares Beschizza; Ferreira do Vales, Lucas Duarte Manhas; Braga Costa, Telma Maria; Almeida, Sebastião Sousa

    2017-09-01

    The effects of cafeteria and high fat diets were investigated on animal models of behavior. Male Wistar rats were treated with Control (C), Cafeteria (CD) and High Fat (FD) diets and tested in the Elevated Plus-Maze (EPM) and Morris Water Maze (MWM) procedures. Body weight, length, abdominal circumference, retroperitoneal and epididymal adipose tissues were recorded. Physical parameters, weight of tissues, EPM, and MWM data were subjected to ANOVA followed by Newman-Keuls test (P < 0.05). There were no differences on weight and length parameters between CD and C rats up to 98 days of age. However, abdominal circumferences were higher in CD as compared to C at 35 and 70 days of age, respectively, the 5th and the 7th weeks. FD presented lower measures of weight and abdominal circumference; nevertheless there was an increase on those parameters at the end of the nutritional treatment. Even without an apparent weight gain of CD and FD these animals presented a greater accumulation of retroperitoneal and epididymal adipose tissues. In addition, CD and FD demonstrated behaviors that can suggest lower anxiety. CD showed a better learning performance and FD showed better recall of previous learned information in the memory retention test. According to those data it was concluded that hypercaloric diet ingestion was capable of triggering metabolic alterations and possibly lowering anxiety associated to learning or memory improvement on a spatial task.

  17. Strategies for Reducing Energy Consumption in a Student Cafeteria in a Hot-Humid Climate: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Alhaji Mohammed

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Increasing attention is being given to energy consumption and potential for energy savings in public buildings in order to improve energy performance. Due to their size and functional requirements, public buildings especially cafeteria facilities tend to consume a significant amount of energy. Furthermore, due to their operational characteristics and construction pattern, unnecessary energy is likely to be used for maintaining acceptable indoor environmental quality. In this study, a student cafeteria at King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, Saudi Arabia, was selected for the assessment of its energy performance and potential energy conservation opportunities. Energy simulation software Visual DOE 4.1 was used to develop an energy performance model for assessing various energy conservation measures pertinent to the building envelope and HVAC system design. Data required for setting up the model were gathered through simple energy audits. The architectural and mechanical drawings and the history of electrical consumption were collected. Various energy conservation strategies were then implemented including standards, single and combined energy conservation measures. These measures resulted in a combined design saving of 27.4%, the HVAC system saving 10.6%, implementation of standards saving about 16.7%, lighting 6.6%, equipment 2.6%, insulation 2.5% and glazing 1.4%. Based on these results, it is apparent that there is a significant potential for improving energy performance and justification to employ the suggested measures for achieving substantial energy savings and minimize energy consumption.

  18. Impact of a cafeteria diet and daily physical training on the rat serum metabolome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-García, Susana; Del Bas, Josep M; Caimari, Antoni; Escorihuela, Rosa M; Arola, Lluís; Suárez, Manuel

    2017-01-01

    Regular physical activity and healthy dietary patterns are commonly recommended for the prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome (MetS), which is diagnosed at an alarmingly increasing rate, especially among adolescents. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the relevance of physical exercise on the modulation of the metabolome in healthy people and those with MetS. We have previously shown that treadmill exercise ameliorated different symptoms of MetS. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of a MetS-inducing diet and different intensities of aerobic training on the overall serum metabolome of adolescent rats. For 8 weeks, young rats were fed either standard chow (ST) or cafeteria diet (CAF) and were subjected to a daily program of training on a treadmill at different speeds. Non-targeted metabolomics was used to identify changes in circulating metabolites, and a combination of multivariate analysis techniques was implemented to achieve a holistic understanding of the metabolome. Among all the identified circulating metabolites influenced by CAF, lysophosphatidylcholines were the most represented family. Serum sphingolipids, bile acids, acylcarnitines, unsaturated fatty acids and vitamin E and A derivatives also changed significantly in CAF-fed rats. These findings suggest that an enduring systemic inflammatory state is induced by CAF. The impact of physical training on the metabolome was less striking than the impact of diet and mainly altered circulating bile acids and glycerophospholipids. Furthermore, the serum levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 were increased in CAF-fed rats, and C-reactive protein was decreased in trained groups. The leptin/adiponectin ratio, a useful marker of MetS, was increased in CAF groups, but decreased in proportion to training intensity. Multivariate analysis revealed that ST-fed animals were more susceptible to exercise-induced changes in metabolites than animals with MetS, in which moderate

  19. Impact of a cafeteria diet and daily physical training on the rat serum metabolome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Suárez-García

    Full Text Available Regular physical activity and healthy dietary patterns are commonly recommended for the prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome (MetS, which is diagnosed at an alarmingly increasing rate, especially among adolescents. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the relevance of physical exercise on the modulation of the metabolome in healthy people and those with MetS. We have previously shown that treadmill exercise ameliorated different symptoms of MetS. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of a MetS-inducing diet and different intensities of aerobic training on the overall serum metabolome of adolescent rats. For 8 weeks, young rats were fed either standard chow (ST or cafeteria diet (CAF and were subjected to a daily program of training on a treadmill at different speeds. Non-targeted metabolomics was used to identify changes in circulating metabolites, and a combination of multivariate analysis techniques was implemented to achieve a holistic understanding of the metabolome. Among all the identified circulating metabolites influenced by CAF, lysophosphatidylcholines were the most represented family. Serum sphingolipids, bile acids, acylcarnitines, unsaturated fatty acids and vitamin E and A derivatives also changed significantly in CAF-fed rats. These findings suggest that an enduring systemic inflammatory state is induced by CAF. The impact of physical training on the metabolome was less striking than the impact of diet and mainly altered circulating bile acids and glycerophospholipids. Furthermore, the serum levels of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 were increased in CAF-fed rats, and C-reactive protein was decreased in trained groups. The leptin/adiponectin ratio, a useful marker of MetS, was increased in CAF groups, but decreased in proportion to training intensity. Multivariate analysis revealed that ST-fed animals were more susceptible to exercise-induced changes in metabolites than animals with MetS, in which

  20. A physiological characterization of the Cafeteria diet model of metabolic syndrome in the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Smith, Mariana; Karthikeyan, Sudhir; Jeffers, Matthew S; Janik, Rafal; Thomason, Lynsie A; Stefanovic, Bojana; Corbett, Dale

    2016-12-01

    Many promising findings from pre-clinical research have failed to translate to the clinic due to their inability to incorporate human disease co-morbidity. A variety of rodent diets and feeding durations are currently used in models of human metabolic syndrome, obesity and diabetes. One model, the Cafeteria (CAF) diet, makes use of grocery store-purchased food items that more closely approximate the human ultra-processed diet than commercial high-fat or high-sugar rodent diets. The present study describes the development of metabolic syndrome in rats fed a CAF diet as well as the recovery of metabolic syndrome following a healthy "lifestyle" change. In addition, we explored the effects of CAF diet on spatial learning and memory and on neuroinflammation. Three-week old male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a CAF diet for three months that consisted of 16 highly palatable human food items along with standard chow and a 12% sucrose solution to mimic soda consumption. Thereafter, a sub-group of CAF diet rats was switched to a chow diet (SWT) for one month. Both CAF and SWT groups were compared to control rats maintained on a standard chow diet (SD). Prior to the diet switch, CAF and SWT animals developed features akin to metabolic syndrome. Both groups of rats displayed significant abdominal obesity with increased visceral adiposity, hyperinsulinemia, glucose intolerance and dyslipidemia with elevated serum triglyceride levels and reduced HDL cholesterol. Switching to a chow diet for one month completely reversed these features in SWT animals. Although acquisition of the Barnes maze was not affected by the CAF diet, these animals exhibited greater hippocampal neuroinflammation compared to both SD and SWT rats as assessed by Iba1 staining. These results demonstrate that the CAF diet is very effective in creating metabolic syndrome with hippocampal inflammation in rats over a relatively short time span. This model may be of great heuristic importance in determining potential

  1. Process evaluation of two environmental nutrition programmes and an educational nutrition programme conducted at supermarkets and worksite cafeterias in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenhuis, I; van Assema, P; Reubsaet, A; Kok, G

    2004-04-01

    This article describes the process evaluation of two environmental programmes and an educational nutrition programme, implemented at supermarkets and worksite cafeterias. Studies conducted earlier, indicated that the programmes had no effect on consumers' eating behaviour. Consequently, the more specific purpose of the present study was to identify explanations for the ineffectiveness of the programmes and to formulate recommendations for future programmes. The environmental programmes included labelling of healthy products and increasing the range of healthy foods on offer. The education programme consisted of several elements, such as brochures and a self-help guide. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 managers of supermarkets and worksite cafeterias where the programmes were implemented. Although materials were not always entirely compatible with the different supermarkets and worksite cafeterias, the degree of implementation was satisfactory. According to the managers, the programmes were not striking enough, the labelling would have been more effective if it had discriminated between different brands of a product, and the number of new products was too small compared with the total range of foods on offer. The findings suggest that programmes should be promoted intensively. Furthermore, the relevant manufacturers and wholesalers supplying worksite cafeterias should be encouraged to increase their range of suitable low-fat products. Finally, the feasibility and possible effects of brand-specific labelling should be investigated further.

  2. Middle School Cafeteria Food Choice and Waste Prior to Implementation of Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act Changes in the National School Lunch Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connors, Priscilla; Bednar, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The study objective was to document choices of entrées, vegetables, fruits, grains/breads, and beverages on lunch trays and to determine the amount of each that was discarded after mealtime. Methods: A convenience sample of two urban middle school cafeterias in Texas participated in the study which took place in the 2010-2011…

  3. Effects of the cafeteria diet on the salivary glands of trained and sedentary Wistar rats - doi: 10.4025/actascibiolsci.v34i1.7473

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Raquel Marçal Natali

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this work was to study the effect of the aerobic physical training and the cafeteria diet introduced after weaning of Wistar rats and on the morphology of the main salivary glands (parotid, submandibular, sublingual. Male rats after weaning were subjected to the cafeteria diet or the standard rodent chow, and either performed aerobic physical training in a treadmill for 100 days, or did not performed any physical activity. Analyses were done considering the response in body weight, adipose tissues and salivary glands, and the data were submitted to statistical treatment (p < 0.05. The morphological and morphometric analyses of the salivary glands were performed through histological sections stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Despite the normophagic behavior, the rodents fed with the cafeteria diet became obese, with repercussions on parotid gland weight. However, this obesity and/or physical training did not influence the histological organization of the salivary glands. The morphometric analysis of the submandibular glands pointed out a reduction in the levels of serous acinar cells as an effect of the diet and physical training. In conclusion, the parotid and the submandibular glands alter themselves due to the nature and consistency of food present in the cafeteria diet as well as due to the aerobic physical training.

  4. Why are all the white (Asian) kids sitting together in the cafeteria? Resegregation and the role of intergroup attributions and norms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramiah, Ananthi Al; Schmid, Katharina; Hewstone, Miles; Floe, Christina

    2015-03-01

    Over three studies, we identified the phenomenon of ethnic 'resegregation' and assessed the extent to which it was predicted by attributions and norms, among other variables. Study 1, an observational study, showed extensive resegregation between White and Asian students in the cafeteria of a highly mixed school. In Study 2, we found evidence of attributional correspondence for White students, who attributed both their own and the outgroup's contact avoidance more to a lack of interest than fear of rejection, whereas Asian students attributed the outgroup's contact avoidance more to lack of interest, but preferred neither explanation of their own avoidance. In Study 3, we observed a pattern of attributional correspondence among both White and Asian students who attributed both their own and the outgroup's inaction in a hypothetical intergroup cafeteria scenario more to a lack of interest than fear of rejection. Study 3 also demonstrated longitudinally, for both groups, that own lack of interest in the outgroup reduced likelihood of cafeteria contact, whereas having outgroup friends and perceiving positive ingroup norms promoted it. In addition, positive outgroup norms promoted likelihood of cafeteria contact only for Asian students. We discuss how an understanding of the factors driving resegregation is critical to effectively realizing the potential of desegregated settings. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  5. Effects of long-term cycling between palatable cafeteria diet and regular chow on intake, eating patterns, and response to saccharin and sucrose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martire, Sarah I; Westbrook, R Fred; Morris, Margaret J

    2015-02-01

    When exposed to a diet containing foods that are rich in fat and sugar, rats eat to excess and gain weight. We examined the effects of alternating this diet with laboratory chow on intake of each type of diet, the eating elicited by a palatable food (biscuits), and the drinking elicited by sweet solutions that did (sucrose) or did not (saccharin) contain calories. Each week for 13 weeks, cycled rats were provided with the cafeteria diet for three successive days/nights and the chow diet for the remaining four days/nights, whereas other rats received continuous access to either the cafeteria or the chow diets. On each of the 13 weeks, cycled rats ate more across the first 24 hour exposure to the cafeteria diet than rats continuously fed this diet. In contrast, cycled rats ate less across the first 24 hour exposure to the chow diet than rats continuously fed this diet and ate less when presented a novel palatable biscuit than chow-fed rats. The three groups exhibited similar licks per cluster to saccharin, but cafeteria-fed and cycled rats showed fewer clusters than chow-fed rats. In contrast, chow-fed rats and cycled rats exhibited more licks per cluster to sucrose than cafeteria-fed rats, but all three groups had a similar number of clusters. The results were discussed in relation to the effects of diet cycling on eating patterns, body weight, and 'wanting' and 'liking'. These findings with rats may have important implications for yo-yo dieting in people. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Chronic intake of a cafeteria diet and subsequent abstinence. Sex-specific effects on gene expression in the mesolimbic reward system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Zhi Yi; Wanasuria, Ayumi F; Lin, Mark Z P; Hiscock, Jennifer; Muhlhausler, Beverly S

    2013-06-01

    Studies examining the impact of chronic palatable food intake on the mesolimbic reward system have been conducted almost exclusively in males. This study aimed to determine the effects of chronic intake of a palatable cafeteria diet and subsequent abstinence on fat mass, food intake and key gene expression of the mesolimbic reward system in both males and females. Albino Wistar rats were fed for 8 weeks on standard chow (Control, n=5 males, 5 females) or cafeteria diet (CD; n=16 males, 16 females). The cafeteria diet was then removed from a subset of CD rats for 72 h (CD-Withdrawal group, CD-W). The nucleus accumbens (NAc) was isolated and mRNA expression of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine active transporter (DAT), D1 and D2 dopamine receptors, and μ-opioid receptor determined by qRT-PCR. Chronic cafeteria diet intake increased fat mass in all CD rats but body weight and chow intake were reduced during the period of cafeteria diet abstinence. TH mRNA was reduced in male CD and CD-W rats, but increased in female CD and CD-W rats. D1 mRNA was reduced in CD and CD-W females, but increased in CD males, compared to Controls. μ-opioid receptor expression was reduced in CD and CD-W males but not females. These data highlight the importance of investigating sex differences in the neurobiological response to palatable food intake and the need for future studies in this area to include both sexes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Foods offered in Quebec school cafeterias: do they promote healthy eating habits? Results of a provincial survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, Pascale; Demers, Karine; Gray-Donald, Katherine; Mongeau, Lyne

    2012-06-05

    A school environment that encourages students to opt for food with sound nutritional value is both essential and formative in ensuring that young people adopt healthy eating habits. The aim of this paper is to describe the food offered for lunch in the cafeteria service lines in Quebec schools on regular school days. A cross-sectional survey was conducted between November 2008 and June 2009 with a representative sample of 207 French-speaking schools in the province of Quebec. The response rate was 71%. The cafeteria food available from the service line was observed directly and systematically by research assistants trained in observational procedures. Bivariate and descriptive analyses were performed. While most schools offered a vegetable side dish, only 71% of primary schools, 71% of public secondary schools, and 54% of private secondary schools did not offer cold-cut dishes, stuffed pastry, or a fried food on their daily menus. The sandwiches available were rarely made with whole-grain bread. Public secondary schools had more cookies, biscuits, muffins, and chewing gum than private primary and secondary schools. Milk was available in 85% of the primary schools. Most of the schools had eliminated sodas but were still offering fruit cocktails instead of 100% fruit juice. The school eating environment changed significantly from 2002 to 2009, presumably as a result of the government action plan and the Framework Policy. Improvements must be made with respect to reducing added sugar in beverages and desserts and promoting baked rather than fried snacks. Vigilance is required since many new products are making their way into the market.

  8. Rats eat a cafeteria-style diet to excess but eat smaller amounts and less frequently when tested with chow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy South

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity is associated with excessive consumption of palatable, energy dense foods. The present study used an animal model to examine feeding patterns during exposure to and withdrawal from these foods. METHODS: Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to standard lab chow only (Chow rats or a range of cafeteria-style foods eaten by people (Caf rats. After 1, 4, 7 and 10 weeks of diet in their home cage, rats were subjected to 24-hour test sessions in a Comprehensive Lab Animal Monitoring System (CLAMS. In the first two test sessions, Chow rats were exposed to standard lab chow only while Caf rats were exposed to a biscuit and high-fat chow diet. In the final two test sessions, half the rats in each group were switched to the opposing diet. In each session we recorded numbers of bouts, energy consumed per bout, and intervals between bouts across the entire 24 hours. RESULTS: Relative to Chow rats, Caf rats initiated fewer bouts but consumed more energy per bout; however, their motivation to feed in the CLAMS declined over time, which was attributed to reduced variety of foods relative to their home cage diet. This decline in motivation was especially pronounced among Caf rats switched from the palatable CLAMS diet to standard lab chow only: the reduced energy intake in this group was due to a modest decline in bout frequency and a dramatic decline in bout size. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to a cafeteria-diet, rich in variety, altered feeding patterns, reduced rats' motivation to consume palatable foods in the absence of variety, and further diminished motivation to feed when palatable foods were withdrawn and replaced with chow. Hence, variety is a key factor in driving excessive consumption of energy dense foods, and therefore, excessive weight gain.

  9. Laser photobiomodulation as an adjunct of the wound healing impairment of rats exposed to a cafeteria diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzeda, V.; Paraguassu, G. M.; Dos Santos, J. N.; Ramalho, M. J.; Rodriguez, T. T.; Ramalho, L. M. P.

    2014-02-01

    Obesity is associated to a delayed wound healing and prolonged inflammatory phase. Laser light has shown positive results in the photobiomodulation of tissue repair; however, its use associated with systemic disorders such as obesity is still little explored in the literature. The aim of this study was to validate an experimental system for studying weight gaining by consuming a high fat diet called "cafeteria diet" (CD) for the induction of obesity. Forty-eight rats were weaned, divided into two experimental groups: standard diet (SD) and Cafeteria Diet (CD). Free feeding was carried out during 20 weeks and the mass gaining was accompanied. After general anesthesia standardized surgical wounds were created (1cm2) in the dorsal midline region of each animal. Both groups (SD; CD) were divided into 2 subgroups of 12 animals, G1 and G3 (non-irradiated) and G2 and G4 (irradiated). The irradiation protocols (λ660 nm, 40 mW, CW; 24 J/cm2) started immediately after surgery and were repeated every other day during 14 days. The rats were killed at the 8th or 15th days after surgery. The abdominal fat was removed and weighed to verify the success of the induction technique. The specimens were taken and routinely processed histology (hematoxylin/eosin) was performed. It was concluded that the ingestion of fast-food increased abdominal fat in rats and modified the inflammatory pattern of the healing. Laser phototherapy in the parameters employed decreased inflammatory intensity quickening wound healing in obese rats.

  10. Effects of Acerola (Malpighia emarginata DC.) Juice Intake on Brain Energy Metabolism of Mice Fed a Cafeteria Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffa, Daniela Dimer; Rezin, Gislaine Tezza; Daumann, Francine; Longaretti, Luiza M; Dajori, Ana Luiza F; Gomes, Lara Mezari; Silva, Milena Carvalho; Streck, Emílio L; de Andrade, Vanessa Moraes

    2017-03-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disease that comes from an imbalance between food intake and energy expenditure. Moreover, studies have shown a relationship between mitochondrial dysfunction and obesity. In the present study, we investigated the effect of acerola juices (unripe, ripe, and industrial) and its main pharmacologically active components (vitamin C and rutin) on the activity of enzymes of energy metabolism in the brain of mice fed a palatable cafeteria diet. Two groups of male Swiss mice were fed on a standard diet (STA) or a cafeteria diet (CAF) for 13 weeks. Afterwards, the CAF-fed animals were divided into six subgroups, each of which received a different supplement for one further month (water, unripe, ripe or industrial acerola juices, vitamin C, or rutin) by gavage. Our results demonstrated that CAF diet inhibited the activity of citrate synthase in the prefrontal cortex, hippocampus, and hypothalamus. Moreover, CAF diet decreased the complex I activity in the hypothalamus, complex II in the prefrontal cortex, complex II-III in the hypothalamus, and complex IV in the posterior cortex and striatum. The activity of succinate dehydrogenase and creatine kinase was not altered by the CAF diet. However, unripe acerola juice reversed the inhibition of the citrate synthase activity in the prefrontal cortex and hypothalamus. Ripe acerola juice reversed the inhibition of citrate synthase in the hypothalamus. The industrial acerola juice reversed the inhibition of complex I activity in the hypothalamus. The other changes were not reversed by any of the tested substances. In conclusion, we suggest that alterations in energy metabolism caused by obesity can be partially reversed by ripe, unripe, and industrial acerola juice.

  11. Cafeteria diet-induced insulin resistance is not associated with decreased insulin signaling or AMPK activity and is alleviated by physical training in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Nina; De Bock, Katrien; Richter, Erik

    2010-01-01

    ) among the groups. In conclusion, surplus energy intake of a palatable but low-fat cafeteria diet resulted in obesity and insulin resistance that was rescued by exercise training. Interestingly, insulin resistance was not accompanied by major defects in the insulin-signaling cascade or in altered AMPK......Excess energy intake via a palatable low-fat diet (cafeteria diet) is known to induce obesity and glucose intolerance in rats. However, the molecular mechanisms behind this adaptation are not known, and it is also not known whether exercise training can reverse it. Male Wistar rats were assigned...... expression or phosphorylation. Thus, compared with previous studies of high-fat feeding, where insulin signaling is significantly impaired, the mechanism by which CAF diet induces insulin resistance seems different....

  12. Nourishing change. Partnership enlists dozens of hospitals to put healthier food on their menus and kick junk food out of the cafeteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jaimy

    2012-10-08

    More than 150 hospitals have signed on to the Partnership for a Healthier America's push to ditch the deep-fat fryer in their cafeterias and bulk up on fruit and veggies. "Our focus is to ensure that if people want to make a healthy choice, they can," says Larry Soler, left, president and CEO of the partnership, which is working to reduce childhood obesity.

  13. Effect of Cafeteria Diet History on Cue-, Pellet-Priming-, and Stress-Induced Reinstatement of Food Seeking in Female Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Yu-Wei Chen; Fiscella, Kimberly A.; Bacharach, Samuel Z.; Calu, Donna J.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Relapse to unhealthy eating habits is a major problem in human dietary treatment. The individuals most commonly seeking dietary treatment are overweight or obese women, yet the commonly used rat reinstatement model to study relapse to palatable food seeking during dieting primarily uses normal-weight male rats. To increase the clinical relevance of the relapse to palatable food seeking model, here we pre-expose female rats to a calorically-dense cafeteria diet in the home-cage to ...

  14. Consumer Nutrition Environments of Hospitals: An Exploratory Analysis Using the Hospital Nutrition Environment Scan for Cafeterias, Vending Machines, and Gift Shops, 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallis, James F.; Swartz, Michael D.; Hoelscher, Deanna M.; Peskin, Melissa F.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Hospitals are the primary worksite of over 5 million adults in the United States, and millions of meals are procured and consumed in this setting. Because many worksite nutrition initiatives use an ecological framework to improve the dietary habits of employees, the nutrition values of foods served in hospitals is receiving attention. Methods This study used the Hospital Nutrition Environment Scan for Cafeterias, Vending Machines, and Gift Shops to quantitatively describe the consumer nutrition environments of 39 hospitals in Southern California. Data were collected by visiting each facility once from February 2012 through May 2012. Results On average, hospitals achieved only 29%, 33%, and less than 1% of the total possible points for their cafeteria, vending machines, and gift shops sections, respectively; overall, hospitals scored 25% of the total possible points. Large facility size and contracted food service operations were associated with some healthy practices in hospital cafeterias, but we found no association between these variables and the sectional or overall nutrition composite scores. Conclusion The average consumer nutrition environment of hospitals in this sample was minimally conducive to healthful eating. Nutrition-related interventions are warranted in hospital settings. PMID:23823699

  15. Consumer nutrition environments of hospitals: an exploratory analysis using the Hospital Nutrition Environment Scan for Cafeterias, Vending Machines, and Gift Shops, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Courtney P; Sallis, James F; Swartz, Michael D; Hoelscher, Deanna M; Peskin, Melissa F

    2013-07-03

    Hospitals are the primary worksite of over 5 million adults in the United States, and millions of meals are procured and consumed in this setting. Because many worksite nutrition initiatives use an ecological framework to improve the dietary habits of employees, the nutrition values of foods served in hospitals is receiving attention. This study used the Hospital Nutrition Environment Scan for Cafeterias, Vending Machines, and Gift Shops to quantitatively describe the consumer nutrition environments of 39 hospitals in Southern California. Data were collected by visiting each facility once from February 2012 through May 2012. On average, hospitals achieved only 29%, 33%, and less than 1% of the total possible points for their cafeteria, vending machines, and gift shops sections, respectively; overall, hospitals scored 25% of the total possible points. Large facility size and contracted food service operations were associated with some healthy practices in hospital cafeterias, but we found no association between these variables and the sectional or overall nutrition composite scores. The average consumer nutrition environment of hospitals in this sample was minimally conducive to healthful eating. Nutrition-related interventions are warranted in hospital settings.

  16. A study of the importance of education and cost incentives on individual food choices at the Harvard School of Public Health cafeteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, Karin B; Bloom, Barry R; Riccardi, Paul; Rosner, Bernard A; Willett, Walter C

    2008-02-01

    To investigate the importance of cost and awareness of health- or disease-promoting properties of foods and meals for choices by customers of a cafeteria. A non-randomized intervention study. A medium size cafeteria in the Harvard School of Public Health. Customers of the cafeteria mainly consisting of public health students, faculty, and school staff and workers from the medical campus. The purchase of healthy foods and dishes was subsidized and their prices reduced by 20%. This promotion was accompanied by the distribution of educational material. Change in consumption of healthy and less healthy foods. The geometric mean was used to calculate the change in consumption. During the intervention, we observed a 6% increase in the consumption of healthy foods (95% confidence interval [CI]; 5% to 8%), and a 2% decline in the consumption of less-healthy foods (95% CI; -1% to -4%). After the prices returned to their original levels, the consumption of healthy foods increased further to 17% (95% CI; 13% to 20%) and a 2% decline in the consumption of less-healthy foods (95% CI; % 1 to -5%) persisted. Subsidizing healthful meals and educating consumers about the importance of a healthy diet can result in a modest increase in the selection of healthy foods and meals that can be maintained beyond the periods of subsidy and promotion.

  17. Cafeteria diet differentially alters the expression of feeding-related genes through DNA methylation mechanisms in individual hypothalamic nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazzarino, Gisela Paola; Andreoli, María Florencia; Rossetti, María Florencia; Stoker, Cora; Tschopp, María Virgina; Luque, Enrique Hugo; Ramos, Jorge Guillermo

    2017-07-15

    We evaluated the effect of cafeteria diet (CAF) on the mRNA levels and DNA methylation state of feeding-related neuropeptides, and neurosteroidogenic enzymes in discrete hypothalamic nuclei. Besides, the expression of steroid hormone receptors was analyzed. Female rats fed with CAF from weaning increased their energy intake, body weight, and fat depots, but did not develop metabolic syndrome. The increase in energy intake was related to an orexigenic signal of paraventricular (PVN) and ventromedial (VMN) nuclei, given principally by upregulation of AgRP and NPY. This was mildly counteracted by the arcuate nucleus, with decreased AgRP expression and increased POMC and kisspeptin expression. CAF altered the transcription of neurosteroidogenic enzymes in PVN and VMN, and epigenetic mechanisms associated with differential promoter methylation were involved. The changes observed in the hypothalamic nuclei studied could add information about their differential role in food intake control and how their action is disrupted in obesity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A Novel Role of SIRT1/ FGF-21 in Taurine Protection Against Cafeteria Diet-Induced Steatohepatitis in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azza H. Abd Elwahab

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is one of the alarmingly rising clinical problems in the 21st century with no effective drug treatment until now. Taurine is an essential amino acid in humans that proved efficacy as a non-pharmacological therapy in a plethora of diseases; however, its impact on NAFLD remains elusive. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the protective mechanism of taurine in experimental steatohepatitis induced by junk food given as cafeteria-diet (CAF-D in male albino rats. Methods: Forty adult male albino rats of local strain between 8-10 weeks old, weighing 150 ± 20 g, were divided into four equal groups: Group I (control group, Group II (Taurine group, Group III (CAF-D for 12 weeks and Group IV (CAF-D +Taurine. CAF-D was given in addition to the standard chow for 12 weeks, where each rat was given one piece of beef burger fried in 15 g of sunflower oil, one teaspoonful of mayonnaise, and one piece of petit pan bread, weighing 60g/ piece. In the serum, liver function tests; ALT, AST, ALP, GGT and the lipid profile; TG, TC, HDL-C added to reduced glutathione (GSH were assessed colorimetrically, while fibroblast growth factor (FGF-21, adiponectin & interleukin (IL-6 via ELISA. The same technique was used for the assays of the hepatic levels of FGF-21, silent information regulator (SIRT1, malondialdehyde (MDA,IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α as well as the apoptotic markers; caspase-3 and B-cell lymphoma (Bcl-2. Results: The cafeteria-diet induced steatohepatitis was reflected by significantly increased body and liver weight gain, elevation of liver enzymes; ALT, AST, ALP and GGT added to the dyslipidemic panel, presented as increased TC, TG, LDL-C and decreased HDL-C levels. The steatosis-induced inflammatory milieu, marked by elevated serum levels of FGF-21, IL-6, hepatic TNF-α, as well as reduced IL-10 and adiponectin, was associated with steatosis- induced hepatic oxidative stress

  19. A Novel Role of SIRT1/ FGF-21 in Taurine Protection Against Cafeteria Diet-Induced Steatohepatitis in Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Elwahab, Azza H; Ramadan, Basma K; Schaalan, Mona F; Tolba, Amina M

    2017-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the alarmingly rising clinical problems in the 21st century with no effective drug treatment until now. Taurine is an essential amino acid in humans that proved efficacy as a non-pharmacological therapy in a plethora of diseases; however, its impact on NAFLD remains elusive. The aim of the current study is to evaluate the protective mechanism of taurine in experimental steatohepatitis induced by junk food given as cafeteria-diet (CAF-D) in male albino rats. Forty adult male albino rats of local strain between 8-10 weeks old, weighing 150 ± 20 g, were divided into four equal groups: Group I (control group), Group II (Taurine group), Group III (CAF-D for 12 weeks) and Group IV (CAF-D +Taurine). CAF-D was given in addition to the standard chow for 12 weeks, where each rat was given one piece of beef burger fried in 15 g of sunflower oil, one teaspoonful of mayonnaise, and one piece of petit pan bread, weighing 60g/ piece. In the serum, liver function tests; ALT, AST, ALP, GGT and the lipid profile; TG, TC, HDL-C added to reduced glutathione (GSH) were assessed colorimetrically, while fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-21, adiponectin & interleukin (IL)-6 via ELISA. The same technique was used for the assays of the hepatic levels of FGF-21, silent information regulator (SIRT1), malondialdehyde (MDA),IL-10, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) as well as the apoptotic markers; caspase-3 and B-cell lymphoma (Bcl-2). The cafeteria-diet induced steatohepatitis was reflected by significantly increased body and liver weight gain, elevation of liver enzymes; ALT, AST, ALP and GGT added to the dyslipidemic panel, presented as increased TC, TG, LDL-C and decreased HDL-C levels. The steatosis-induced inflammatory milieu, marked by elevated serum levels of FGF-21, IL-6, hepatic TNF-α, as well as reduced IL-10 and adiponectin, was associated with steatosis- induced hepatic oxidative stress, reflected by increased hepatic MDA and

  20. Validity and Interrater Reliability of the Visual Quarter-Waste Method for Assessing Food Waste in Middle School and High School Cafeteria Settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getts, Katherine M; Quinn, Emilee L; Johnson, Donna B; Otten, Jennifer J

    2017-11-01

    Measuring food waste (ie, plate waste) in school cafeterias is an important tool to evaluate the effectiveness of school nutrition policies and interventions aimed at increasing consumption of healthier meals. Visual assessment methods are frequently applied in plate waste studies because they are more convenient than weighing. The visual quarter-waste method has become a common tool in studies of school meal waste and consumption, but previous studies of its validity and reliability have used correlation coefficients, which measure association but not necessarily agreement. The aims of this study were to determine, using a statistic measuring interrater agreement, whether the visual quarter-waste method is valid and reliable for assessing food waste in a school cafeteria setting when compared with the gold standard of weighed plate waste. To evaluate validity, researchers used the visual quarter-waste method and weighed food waste from 748 trays at four middle schools and five high schools in one school district in Washington State during May 2014. To assess interrater reliability, researcher pairs independently assessed 59 of the same trays using the visual quarter-waste method. Both validity and reliability were assessed using a weighted κ coefficient. For validity, as compared with the measured weight, 45% of foods assessed using the visual quarter-waste method were in almost perfect agreement, 42% of foods were in substantial agreement, 10% were in moderate agreement, and 3% were in slight agreement. For interrater reliability between pairs of visual assessors, 46% of foods were in perfect agreement, 31% were in almost perfect agreement, 15% were in substantial agreement, and 8% were in moderate agreement. These results suggest that the visual quarter-waste method is a valid and reliable tool for measuring plate waste in school cafeteria settings. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of exposure to a cafeteria diet during gestation and after weaning on the metabolism and body weight of adult male offspring in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucellini, Amanda Brondani; Goularte, Jéferson Ferraz; de Araujo da Cunha, Ana Carla; Caceres, Rafael Corrêa; Noschang, Cristie; da Silva Benetti, Carla; Silveira, Patrícia Pelufo; Sanvitto, Gilberto Luiz

    2014-04-28

    In the present study, we investigated whether maternal exposure to a cafeteria diet affects the metabolism and body composition of offspring and whether such an exposure has a cumulative effect during the lifetime of the offspring. Female rats were fed a control (CON) or a cafeteria (CAF) diet from their own weaning to the weaning of their offspring. At 21 d of age, male offspring were divided into four groups by diet during gestation and after weaning (CON-CON, CON-CAF, CAF-CON and CAF-CAF). Blood was collected from dams (after weaning) and pups (at 30 and 120 d of age) by decapitation. CAF dams had significantly greater body weight and adipose tissue weight and higher concentrations of total cholesterol, insulin and leptin than CON dams (Student's t test). The energy intake of CAF rats was higher than that of CON rats regardless of the maternal diet (two-way ANOVA). Litters had similar body weights at weaning and at 30 d of age, but at 120 d, CON-CAF rats were heavier. At both ages, CAF rats had greater adipose tissue weight than CON rats regardless of the maternal diet, and the concentrations of TAG and cholesterol were similar between the two groups, as were blood glucose concentrations at 30 d of age. However, at 120 d of age, CAF rats were hyperglycaemic, hyperinsulinaemic and hyperleptinaemic regardless of the maternal diet. These findings suggest that maternal obesity does not modulate the metabolism of male offspring independently, modifying body weight only when associated with the intake of a cafeteria diet by the offspring.

  2. A study on the short-term effect of cafeteria diet and pioglitazone on insulin resistance and serum levels of adiponectin and ghrelin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, G; Bazzo, M L; Nogueira, C L; Colombo, M D H P; Schiavon, L L; d'Acampora, A J

    2012-10-01

    The interaction between ghrelin and adiponectin is still controversial. We investigated the effect of cafeteria diet and pioglitazone on body weight, insulin resistance, and adiponectin/ghrelin levels in an experimental study on male Wistar rats. The animals were divided into four groups of 6 rats each, and received balanced chow with saline (CHOW-O) or pioglitazone (CHOW-P), or a cafeteria diet with saline (CAFE-O) or pioglitazone (CAFE-P). The chow/cafeteria diets were administered for 35 days, and saline/pioglitazone (10 mg · kg body weight(-1) · day(-1)) was added in the last 14 days prior to euthanasia. CAFE-O animals had a higher mean final weight (372.5 ± 21.01 g) than CHOW-O (317.66 ± 25.11 g, P = 0.017) and CHOW-P (322.66 ± 28.42 g, P = 0.035) animals. Serum adiponectin levels were significantly higher in CHOW-P (55.91 ± 20.62 ng/mL) than in CHOW-O (30.52 ± 6.97 ng/mL, P = 0.014) and CAFE-O (32.54 ± 9.03 ng/mL, P = 0.027) but not in CAFE-P. Higher total serum ghrelin levels were observed in CAFE-P compared to CHOW-P animals (1.65 ± 0.69 vs 0.65 ± 0.36 ng/mL, P = 0.006). Likewise, acylated ghrelin levels were higher in CAFE-P (471.52 ± 195.09 pg/mL) than in CHOW-P (193.01 ± 87.61 pg/mL, P = 0.009) and CAFE-O (259.44 ± 86.36 pg/mL, P = 0.047) animals. In conclusion, a cafeteria diet can lead to a significant weight gain. Although CAFE-P animals exhibited higher ghrelin levels, this was probably related to food deprivation rather than to a direct pharmacological effect, possibly attenuating the increase in adiponectin levels.

  3. A study on the short-term effect of cafeteria diet and pioglitazone on insulin resistance and serum levels of adiponectin and ghrelin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Colombo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The interaction between ghrelin and adiponectin is still controversial. We investigated the effect of cafeteria diet and pioglitazone on body weight, insulin resistance, and adiponectin/ghrelin levels in an experimental study on male Wistar rats. The animals were divided into four groups of 6 rats each, and received balanced chow with saline (CHOW-O or pioglitazone (CHOW-P, or a cafeteria diet with saline (CAFE-O or pioglitazone (CAFE-P. The chow/cafeteria diets were administered for 35 days, and saline/pioglitazone (10 mg·kg body weight-1·day-1 was added in the last 14 days prior to euthanasia. CAFE-O animals had a higher mean final weight (372.5 ± 21.01 g than CHOW-O (317.66 ± 25.11 g, P = 0.017 and CHOW-P (322.66 ± 28.42 g, P = 0.035 animals. Serum adiponectin levels were significantly higher in CHOW-P (55.91 ± 20.62 ng/mL than in CHOW-O (30.52 ± 6.97 ng/mL, P = 0.014 and CAFE-O (32.54 ± 9.03 ng/mL, P = 0.027 but not in CAFE-P. Higher total serum ghrelin levels were observed in CAFE-P compared to CHOW-P animals (1.65 ± 0.69 vs 0.65 ± 0.36 ng/mL, P = 0.006. Likewise, acylated ghrelin levels were higher in CAFE-P (471.52 ± 195.09 pg/mL than in CHOW-P (193.01 ± 87.61 pg/mL, P = 0.009 and CAFE-O (259.44 ± 86.36 pg/mL, P = 0.047 animals. In conclusion, a cafeteria diet can lead to a significant weight gain. Although CAFE-P animals exhibited higher ghrelin levels, this was probably related to food deprivation rather than to a direct pharmacological effect, possibly attenuating the increase in adiponectin levels.

  4. Cafeteria diet induces obesity and insulin resistance associated with oxidative stress but not with inflammation: improvement by dietary supplementation with a melon superoxide dismutase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carillon, Julie; Romain, Cindy; Bardy, Guillaume; Fouret, Gilles; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Gaillet, Sylvie; Lacan, Dominique; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Rouanet, Jean-Max

    2013-12-01

    Oxidative stress is involved in obesity. However, dietary antioxidants could prevent oxidative stress-induced damage. We have previously shown the preventive effects of a melon superoxide dismutase (SODB) on oxidative stress. However, the mechanism of action of SODB is still unknown. Here, we evaluated the effects of a 1-month curative supplementation with SODB on the liver of obese hamsters. Golden Syrian hamsters received either a standard diet or a cafeteria diet composed of high-fat, high-sugar, and high-salt supermarket products, for 15 weeks. This diet resulted in insulin resistance and in increased oxidative stress in the liver. However, inflammatory markers (IL-6, TNF-α, and NF-κB) were not enhanced and no liver steatosis was detected, although these are usually described in obesity-induced insulin resistance models. After the 1-month supplementation with SODB, body weight and insulin resistance induced by the cafeteria diet were reduced and hepatic oxidative stress was corrected. This could be due to the increased expression of the liver antioxidant defense proteins (manganese and copper/zinc superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase). Even though no inflammation was detected in the obese hamsters, inflammatory markers were decreased after SODB supplementation, probably through the reduction of oxidative stress. These findings suggest for the first time that SODB could exert its antioxidant properties by inducing the endogenous antioxidant defense. The mechanisms underlying this induction need to be further investigated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Integrating two-photon microscopy and cryo-electron microscopy for studying the interaction of Cafeteria roenbergensis and CroV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghvami, Seyedmohammadali

    Cafeteria roenbergensis (Cro) is a marine zooplankton; its voracious appetite plays a significant role in regulating bacteria populations. The giant virus that lives within Cro, known as Cafeteria roenbergensis virus (CroV), has an important effect on the mortality of Cro populations. Although viral infections are extremely abundant in oceans, the complete procedure of the infection is still unknown. We study the infection process of Cro by CroV to find out whether the initial contact is through phagocytosis or CroV penetrating the host cell membrane directly. Cro is a moving at speed in the range of 10-100 um/s, therefore, there are many difficulties and challenges for traditional imaging techniques to study this viral-host interaction. We apply two-photon fluorescence microscopy to image this infection process. The image is taken at video rate (30 frame/s), which makes us able to catch the moment of interaction. We are able to image host and virus simultaneously where CroV is stained by SYBR gold dye and Cro is excited through NADH autofluorescence. For further structural biology study, we will obtain atomic level resolution information of infection. After catching the initial moment of infection, we will freeze the sample instantly and image it with cryo-electron microscope .

  6. Effects of Supplemental Acerola Juice on the Mineral Concentrations in Liver and Kidney Tissue Samples of Mice Fed with Cafeteria Diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffa, Daniela Dimer; dos Santos, Carla Eliete Iochims; Daumann, Francine; Longaretti, Luiza Martins; Amaral, Livio; Dias, Johnny Ferraz; da Silva, Juliana; Andrade, Vanessa Moraes

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated the impact of a supplemental acerola juice (unripe, ripe, and industrial) and its main pharmaceutically active components on the concentrations of minerals in the liver and kidney of mice fed with cafeteria diet. Swiss male mice were fed with a cafeteria (CAF) diet for 13 weeks. The CAF consisted of a variety of supermarket products with high energy content. Subsequently, animals received one of the following food supplements for 1 month: water, unripe acerola juice, ripe acerola juice, industrial acerola juice, vitamin C, or rutin. Mineral concentrations of the tissues were determined by particle-induced X-ray emission (PIXE). Our study suggests that the simultaneous intake of acerola juices, vitamin C, or rutin in association with a hypercaloric and hyperlipidic diet provides change in the mineral composition of organisms in the conditions of this study, which plays an important role in the antioxidant defenses of the body. This may help to reduce the metabolism of the fat tissue or even to reduce the oxidative stress.

  7. Lack of tissue accumulation of grape seed flavanols after daily long-term administration in healthy and cafeteria-diet obese rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margalef, Maria; Pons, Zara; Iglesias-Carres, Lisard; Bravo, Francisca Isabel; Muguerza, Begoña; Arola-Arnal, Anna

    2015-11-18

    After ingestion flavanols are metabolized by phase-II enzymes and the microbiota and are distributed throughout the body depending on several factors. Herein we aim to evaluate whether flavanols are tissue-accumulated after the long-term administration of a grape seed polyphenol extract (GSPE) in rats and to study if compounds present in tissues differ in a cafeteria-diet obesity state. For that, plasma, liver, mesenteric white adipose tissue (MWAT), brain, and aorta flavanol metabolites from standard chow-diet-fed (ST) and cafeteria-diet-fed (CAF) rats were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) 21 h after the last 12-week-daily GSPE (100 mg/kg) dosage. Results showed that long-term GSPE intake did not trigger a flavanol tissue accumulation, indicating a clearance of products at each daily dosage. Therefore, results suggest that polyphenol benefits in a disease state would be due to a daily pulsatile effect. Moreover, obesity induced by diet also influences the metabolism and bioavailability of flavanols in rats.

  8. Effect of Nutritional Intervention on Food Choices of French Students in Middle School Cafeterias, Using an Interactive Educational Software Program (Nutri-Advice).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turnin, Marie-Christine; Buisson, Jean-Christophe; Ahluwalia, Namanjeet; Cazals, Laurent; Bolzonella-Pene, Caroline; Fouquet-Martineau, Caroline; Martini, Pascale; Tauber, Maïthé; Hanaire, Hélène

    2016-02-01

    To evaluate the impact of interactive Nutri-Advice kiosks on children's nutritional skills and their ability to apply it to food choices in a middle school cafeteria menu (food choice competencies). Quasi-experimental design; pre/post-test. Freestanding interactive computer terminals (kiosks) were installed in three middle schools in Toulouse, France. A total of 580 children were enrolled into the study (mean age, 13 ± 1 years). Each child's physiological profile was stored in a personal barcode card. During 1 school year, once a day, each child could access the kiosk with this card, trying to find the most balanced meal according to his or her profile and the food available on the cafeteria menu. Children's food choice competency changes and body mass index z-score were evaluated. Significance of change in food choice competencies (postintervention vs baseline) was examined using paired t test. Across the study, children chose significantly less cheese and pastry or desserts, and significantly more starchy food and dairy, and tended to choose fruits and vegetables more often. Body mass index z-score decreased significantly during the period. Personalized nutrition counseling through an interactive device has the potential to improve the food choice competencies of children. Copyright © 2016 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Student Acceptance of Plain Milk Increases Significantly 2 Years after Flavored Milk Is Removed from School Cafeterias: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Marlene B; Henderson, Kathryn E; Read, Margaret; Cornelius, Talea

    2017-07-13

    Previous studies document decreases in lunchtime milk consumption immediately after flavored milk is removed. Less is known about longer-term effects. Plain milk selection and consumption were measured the first year flavored milk was removed in a school district (2010 to 2011 [Time 1]) and 2 years later (2012 to 2013 [Time 2]). Four behavioral economic interventions to promote milk were tested in one school at Time 2. This was a longitudinal, observational study. Participants were kindergarten through grade 8 students in two schools in an urban district. Primary data were collected 10 times per school year at Time 1 and Time 2, yielding 40 days of data and 13,883 student observations. The milk promotion interventions were tested on 6 additional days. Outcomes were the percentage of students selecting milk at lunch, the ounces of milk consumed per carton, and the ounces of milk consumed school-wide per student. Logistic regressions were used to assess how sex, grade, time, availability of 100% juice, and behavioral interventions affected milk selection and consumption. At Time One, 51.5% of students selected milk and drank 4 oz (standard deviation=3.2 oz) per carton, indicating school-wide per-student consumption of 2.1 oz (standard deviation=3.0 oz). At Time Two, 72% of students selected milk and consumed 3.4 oz per carton (standard deviation=3.2 oz), significantly increasing the school-wide per-student consumption to 2.5 oz (standard deviation=3.1 oz). Older students and boys consumed significantly more milk. Availability of 100% fruit juice was associated with a 16-percentage point decrease in milk selection. None of the behavioral economic interventions significantly influenced selection. These data suggest that after flavored milk is removed from school cafeterias, school-wide per-student consumption of plain milk increases over time. In addition, the presence of 100% juice is associated with lower milk selection. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and

  10. A Holistic Approach to Healthy School Meals: "How Hopkins High School Looked Beyond its Cafeteria when it Changed Meal Service from Fast Food to Nutritional Food. IssueTrak": A CEFPI Brief on Educational Facility Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufault, Timothy; Parsons, Meg

    2006-01-01

    The new cafeteria at Hopkins High School in Minnetonka, Minnesota is part restaurant, part study hall, part lounge area and part health-food store. From the beginning, the superintendent and food service leaders planned the facility to ensure that balanced diets with quickly prepared, but healthy, foods are offered to students to help them…

  11. The cafeteria terrace

    CERN Multimedia

    1987-01-01

    The large terrace area outside Restaurant 1 at CERN is a hive of activity in the summer. Visitors and staff members meet here for breaks from work. Often the air is filled with discussion in many different accents and languages on topics from theoretical physics to the weekend's activities.

  12. Crisis in the Cafeteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Patrick

    1998-01-01

    Because schools are entrusted with children's safety, any crisis (particularly food poisoning) affecting that inviolable trust is fodder for a ravenous media. Proactive school business officials and food-service personnel work together to publicize the school nutrition department's good work. Communicating clearly and assigning a food-service…

  13. Effects Of A Post-Weaning Cafeteria Diet In Young Rats: Metabolic Syndrome, Reduced Activity And Low Anxiety-Like Behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lalanza, Jaume F.; Caimari, Antoni; del Bas, Josep M.; Torregrosa, Daniel; Cigarroa, Igor; Pallàs, Mercè; Capdevila, Lluís; Arola, Lluís; Escorihuela, Rosa M.

    2014-01-01

    Among adolescents, overweight, obesity and metabolic syndrome are rapidly increasing in recent years as a consequence of unhealthy palatable diets. Animal models of diet-induced obesity have been developed, but little is known about the behavioural patterns produced by the consumption of such diets. The aim of the present study was to determine the behavioural and biochemical effects of a cafeteria diet fed to juvenile male and female rats, as well as to evaluate the possible recovery from these effects by administering standard feeding during the last week of the study. Two groups of male and female rats were fed with either a standard chow diet (ST) or a cafeteria (CAF) diet from weaning and for 8 weeks. A third group of males (CAF withdrawal) was fed with the CAF diet for 7 weeks and the ST in the 8th week. Both males and females developed metabolic syndrome as a consequence of the CAF feeding, showing overweight, higher adiposity and liver weight, increased plasma levels of glucose, insulin and triglycerides, as well as insulin resistance, in comparison with their respective controls. The CAF diet reduced motor activity in all behavioural tests, enhanced exploration, reduced anxiety-like behaviour and increased social interaction; this last effect was more pronounced in females than in males. When compared to animals only fed with a CAF diet, CAF withdrawal increased anxiety in the open field, slightly decreased body weight, and completely recovered the liver weight, insulin sensitivity and the standard levels of glucose, insulin and triglycerides in plasma. In conclusion, a CAF diet fed to young animals for 8 weeks induced obesity and metabolic syndrome, and produced robust behavioural changes in young adult rats, whereas CAF withdrawal in the last week modestly increased anxiety, reversed the metabolic alterations and partially reduced overweight. PMID:24482678

  14. Liraglutide suppression of caloric intake competes with the intake-promoting effects of a palatable cafeteria diet, but does not impact food or macronutrient selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Kellie M; Blonde, Ginger D; le Roux, Carel W; Spector, Alan C

    2017-08-01

    Liraglutide, a Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonist, is used as a treatment for Type 2 diabetes mellitus and obesity because it improves glycemia and decreases food intake. Here, we tested whether chronic activation of the GLP-1 receptor system with liraglutide would induce decreases in intake accompanied by changes in proportional food or macronutrient intake similar to those seen following RYGB in rats when a variety of palatable food options are available. A "cafeteria diet" was used that included: laboratory rodent chow, refried beans (low-fat/low-sugar), low-fat yogurt (low-fat/high-sugar), peanut butter (high-fat/low-sugar) and sugar-fat whip (high-fat/high-sugar). Liraglutide (1mg/kg daily, sc, n=6) induced significant reductions in body weight and total caloric intake compared to saline-injected control rats (n=6). Although access to a cafeteria diet induced increases in caloric intake in both groups relative to chow alone, liraglutide still effectively decreased intake compared with saline-injected rats suggesting that chronic GLP-1 activation competes with the energy density and palatability of available food options in modulating ingestive behavior. Even with the substantial effects on overall intake, liraglutide did not change food choice or relative macronutrient intake when compared to pre-treatment baseline. When drug treatment was discontinued, the liraglutide group increased caloric intake and rapidly gained body weight to match that of the saline group. These results demonstrate that, while liraglutide effectively decreases caloric intake and body weight in rats, it does not cause adjustments in relative macronutrient consumption. Our data also show that drug-induced decreases in intake and body weight are not maintained following termination of treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Inflamação renal, alterações metabólicas e oxidativas após 6 semanas de dieta de cafeteria em ratos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Eugênia Lopes Navarro

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Resumo Introdução: A obesidade é uma doença em que a inflamação está inteiramente envolvida e pode causar insuficiência renal. Objetivo: Avaliar a influência da exposição a curto prazo de uma dieta de cafeteria sobre a inflamação no tecido renal e a formação de produtos de glicação avançada (AGEs no plasma de rato. Métodos: Ratos Wistar machos (10 semanas de idade, pesando 350 g foram designados para receber dieta de ração comercial (C; n = 8 animais/grupo, 5% de energia a partir de gordura ou dieta de cafeteria (CAF-D, n = 8 animais/grupo: 29% de energia de gordura e de sacarose em água (300 g/L de beber durante 6 semanas. Resultados: Índice de adiposidade em seis semanas foi maior no grupo CAF-D em comparação com C. O mesmo comportamento foi observado para os níveis plasmáticos de glicose, triglicerídeos, leptina, insulina e AGEs. A expressão do gene de IL-6 e TNF-α em tecido renal foi maior no grupo D-CAF e nenhuma diferença significativa no tecido adiposo. Não houve aumento destas citocinas no plasma ou rim. Houve uma diminuição significativa de adiponectina no grupo CAF-D. Conclusão: A exposição a curto prazo da CAF-D reflete alterações no metabolismo, aumento dos níveis plasmáticos de AGEs, o que pode refletir o aumento expressão de citocinas inflamatórias no rim.

  16. Oral Administration of Oleuropein and Its Semisynthetic Peracetylated Derivative Prevents Hepatic Steatosis, Hyperinsulinemia, and Weight Gain in Mice Fed with High Fat Cafeteria Diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saverio Massimo Lepore

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The high consumption of olive tree products in the Mediterranean diet has been associated with a lower incidence of metabolic disorders and cardiovascular diseases. In particular, the protective effects of olive oil have been attributed to the presence of polyphenols such as oleuropein (Ole and its derivatives. We have synthesized a peracetylated derivative of Ole (Ac-Ole which has shown in vitro antioxidant and growth-inhibitory activity higher than the natural molecule. In this study, male C57BL/6JOlaHsd mice were fed with a standard (std, cafeteria (caf diet, and caf diet supplemented with Ole (0.037 mmol/kg/day and Ac-Ole (0.025 mmol/kg/day for 15 weeks. We observed a significant reduction in the caf diet-induced body weight gain and increase of abdominal adipose tissue. Also, Ole and Ac-Ole prevented the development of hepatic steatosis. Finally, Ole and Ac-Ole determined a lower increase of HDL and LDL-cholesterol levels and corrected caf diet-induced elevation of plasma glucose concentrations by improving insulin sensitivity. The observed beneficial properties of Ole and Ac-Ole make these compounds and in particular Ac-Ole promising candidates for a potential pharmaceutic use in metabolic disorders.

  17. The use of point-of-sale machines in school cafeterias as a method of parental influence over child lunch food choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrepont, Emmy; Cullen, Karen W; Taylor, Wendell C

    2011-05-01

    Computerized point-of-sale (POS) machine software that allows parents to place restrictions on their child's school meal accounts is available. Parents could restrict specific foods (eg, chips), identify specific days the child can purchase extra foods, or set monetary limits. This descriptive study examines the use of parental restrictions on student cafeteria POS accounts in a convenience sample of 2 school districts. POS alerts, with student gender, grade, ethnicity, and students' free or reduced-price meal eligibility, were obtained from 2 school food service departments for the 2007-2008 school year. The alerts were coded into 5 categories: financial, medical, restrictions, snacks OK, and extras OK. The distribution of alerts by district, students, and demographics was then tabulated. District A (4839 students) had more students with alerts (n = 789, 16%) than District B (8510 students; n = 217, 2.6%), and 94 District A students had a second alert. District A parents had to provide written permission for their child to purchase snacks (n = 654, 13.5%) and extra meal items (n = 113, 2.3%). Most alerts were for full-pay students in both districts (74% and 66%) and varied by demographics of the students. Few parents actually used this system to limit student purchases of foods outside the school meal. Future studies should investigate the influence of these restrictions on student food choices. © 2011, American School Health Association.

  18. Characterization of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Expression in Nucleus Accumbens and Hippocampus of Rats Subjected to Food Selection in the Cafeteria Diet Protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarro-Ramírez, Andrea; Sánchez, Daniel; Tejeda-Padrón, Alma; Buenfil-Canto, Linda Vianey; Valladares-García, Jorge; Pacheco-Pantoja, Elda; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Murillo-Rodríguez, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a world-wide health problem that requires different experimental perspectives to understand the onset of this disease, including the neurobiological basis of food selection. From a molecular perspective, obesity has been related with activity of several endogenous molecules, including the mitogenactivated protein kinases (MAP-K). The aim of this study was to characterize MAP-K expression in hedonic and learning and memory brain-associated areas such as nucleus accumbens (AcbC) and hippocampus (HIPP) after food selection. We show that animals fed with cafeteria diet during 14 days displayed an increase in p38 MAP-K activity in AcbC if chose cheese. Conversely, a diminution was observed in animals that preferred chocolate in AcbC. Also, a decrease of p38 MAP-K phosphorylation was found in HIPP in rats that selected either cheese or chocolate. Our data demonstrate a putative role of MAP-K expression in food selection. These findings advance our understanding of neuromolecular basis engaged in obesity.

  19. The effects of calorie labels on those at high-risk of eating pathologies: a pre-post intervention study in a University cafeteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillico, H G; Hanning, R; Findlay, S; Hammond, D

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effect of a public policy (menu labelling) on those at high-risk for eating pathologies. Specifically, the study looked for any adverse effects related to eating disturbance level. The study employed a pre-post intervention design. Baseline collection took place in October 2012. One week prior to follow-up in November 2012, calorie labels were displayed next to virtually all menu items in a University cafeteria. Labels remained throughout the entire duration of follow-up. Participants were female undergraduates (N = 299). At baseline and follow-up, a survey assessed eating disturbance level (Eating Attitudes Test-26), emotional state, frequency of engaging in unhealthy weight-related behaviours, and calorie consumption. Generalized estimating equations were used to test changes in negative outcomes over time in response to calorie labels. Calorie consumption did not significantly decrease from baseline (mean = 660.5 kcal) to follow-up (mean = 600.5 kcal; P = 0.104). There were no changes in emotional states such as body image satisfaction (P = 0.447), anxiety (P = 0.595), positive affect (P = 0.966), negative affect (P = 0.576), and unhealthy weight-related behaviours such as binging (P = 0.268), exercising excessively (P = 0.847), or restricting calories (P = 0.504). Additionally, there were no interactions between eating disturbance level and time. Overall, no adverse outcomes were found for this at-risk population. Calorie labels did not differentially affect those with higher levels of eating disturbance. Future research should focus on examining the impact of calorie labels among those with clinical eating disorders. Copyright © 2015 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Foodborne Pathogens Recovered from Ready-to-Eat Foods from Roadside Cafeterias and Retail Outlets in Alice, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa: Public Health Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roland N. Ndip

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This study assessed the microbiological quality of various ready-to-eat foods sold in Alice, South Africa. Microbiological analysis was conducted on 252 samples which included vegetables, potatoes, rice, pies, beef and chicken stew. The isolates were identified using biochemical tests and the API 20E, API 20NE and API Listeria kits; results were analyzed using the one-way-ANOVA test. Bacterial growth was present in all the food types tested; high levels of total aerobic count were observed in vegetables, 6.8 ± 0.07 followed by rice, 6.7 ± 1.7 while pies had the lowest count (2.58 ± 0.24. Organisms isolated included: Listeria spp. (22%, Enterobacter spp. (18%, Aeromonas hydrophila (12%, Klebsiella oxytoca (8%, Proteus mirabilis (6.3%, Staphylococcus aureus (3.2% and Pseudomonas luteola (2.4%. Interestingly, Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli were not isolated in any of the samples. There was a statistically significant difference (p < 0.05 in the prevalence of foodborne pathogens from hygienic and unhygienic cafeterias. The results indicated that most of the ready-to-eat food samples examined in this study did not meet bacteriological quality standards, therefore posing potential risks to consumers. This should draw the attention of the relevant authorities to ensure that hygienic standards are improved to curtain foodborne infections.

  1. Prevalence of intestinal parasites, salmonella and shigella among apparently health food handlers of Addis Ababa University student's cafeteria, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aklilu, Addis; Kahase, Daniel; Dessalegn, Mekonnen; Tarekegn, Negatu; Gebremichael, Saba; Zenebe, Seyfe; Desta, Kassu; Mulugeta, Gebru; Mamuye, Yeshiwodim; Mama, Mohammedaman

    2015-01-24

    Food contamination may occur at any point during its journey through production, processing, distribution, and preparation. The risk of food getting contaminated depends largely on the health status of the food handlers, their personal hygiene, knowledge and practice of food hygiene. Food borne diseases are a public health problem in developed and developing countries like Ethiopia. A cross sectional study was conducted among food handlers in Addis Ababa student's cafeteria from January to May 2013. Structured questionnaire was used to collect socio demographic data and associated risk factors. Stool specimens were examined for bacteria and intestinal parasites following standard procedures. Biochemical tests were done to identify the species of bacterial isolates. Sensitivity testing was done using Kirby- Baur disk diffusion method. A total of 172 food handlers were enrolled in the study. The majority of study participants were females 134 (77.9%). About 78 (45.3%) of food handlers were found to be positive for different intestinal parasites with the most abundant parasite of Entameoba histolytica/dispar 68 (70.8%) followed by Giardia lamblia 18 (18.8%), Taenia species 5 (5.2%), Ascaris lumbricoides 2 (2.1%), hookworm 2 (2.1%) and Trichuris trichiura 1 (1.1%). Stool cultures revealed 3.5% of Salmonella isolates (Sero-grouping on Salmonella isolate was not done), while Shigella species was not isolated from any of the stool samples obtained from Food handlers. All isolates of Salmonella were sensitive to ciprofloxacin, amikacin and gentamicin but resistant to ampicillin, clindamycin, and erythromycin. The present study revealed a high prevalence of intestinal parasite in asymptomatic (apparently health) food handlers. Such infected food handlers can contaminate food, drinks and could serve as source of infection to consumers via food chain.

  2. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass in rats progressively decreases the proportion of fat calories selected from a palatable cafeteria diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathes, Clare M; Letourneau, Chanel; Blonde, Ginger D; le Roux, Carel W; Spector, Alan C

    2016-05-15

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) decreases caloric intake in both human patients and rodent models. In long-term intake tests, rats decrease their preference for fat and/or sugar after RYGB, and patients may have similar changes in food selection. Here we evaluated the impact of RYGB on intake during a "cafeteria"-style presentation of foods to assess if rats would lower the percentage of calories taken from fat and/or sugar after RYGB in a more complex dietary context. Male Sprague-Dawley rats that underwent either RYGB or sham surgery (Sham) were presurgically and postsurgically given 8-days free access to four semisolid foods representative of different fat and sugar levels along with standard chow and water. Compared with Sham rats, RYGB rats took proportionally fewer calories from fat and more calories from carbohydrates; the latter was not attributable to an increase in sugar intake. The proportion of calories taken from protein after RYGB also increased slightly. Importantly, these postsurgical macronutrient caloric intake changes in the RYGB rats were progressive, making it unlikely that the surgery had an immediate impact on the hedonic evaluation of the foods and strongly suggesting that learning is influencing the food choices. Indeed, despite these dietary shifts, RYGB, as well as Sham, rats continued to select the majority of their calories from the high-fat/high-sugar option. Apparently after RYGB, rats can progressively regulate their intake and selection of complex foods to achieve a seemingly healthier macronutrient dietary composition. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Modern 'junk food' and minimally-processed 'natural food' cafeteria diets alter the response to sweet taste but do not impair flavor-nutrient learning in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palframan, Kristen M; Myers, Kevin P

    2016-04-01

    Animals learn to prefer and increase consumption of flavors paired with postingestive nutrient sensing. Analogous effects have been difficult to observe in human studies. One possibility is experience with the modern, processed diet impairs learning. Food processing manipulates flavor, texture, sweetness, and nutrition, obscuring ordinary correspondences between sensory cues and postingestive consequences. Over time, a diet of these processed 'junk' foods may impair flavor-nutrient learning. This 'flavor-confusion' hypothesis was tested by providing rats long-term exposure to cafeteria diets of unusual breadth (2 or 3 foods per day, 96 different foods over 3 months, plus ad libitum chow). One group was fed processed foods (PF) with added sugars/fats and manipulated flavors, to mimic the sensory-nutrient properties of the modern processed diet. Another group was fed only 'natural' foods (NF) meaning minimally-processed foods without manipulated flavors or added sugars/fats (e.g., fresh fruits, vegetables, whole grains) ostensibly preserving the ordinary correspondence between flavors and nutrition. A CON group was fed chow only. In subsequent tests of flavor-nutrient learning, PF and NF rats consistently acquired strong preferences for novel nutrient-paired flavors and PF rats exhibited enhanced learned acceptance, contradicting the 'flavor-confusion' hypothesis. An unexpected finding was PF and NF diets both caused lasting reduction in ad lib sweet solution intake. Groups did not differ in reinforcing value of sugar in a progressive ratio task. In lick microstructure analysis the NF group paradoxically showed increased sucrose palatability relative to PF and CON, suggesting the diets have different effects on sweet taste evaluation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Combination of the sodium-glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitor empagliflozin with orlistat or sibutramine further improves the body-weight reduction and glucose homeostasis of obese rats fed a cafeteria diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vickers SP

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Steven P Vickers,1 Sharon C Cheetham,1 Katie R Headland,1 Keith Dickinson,1 Rolf Grempler,2 Eric Mayoux,2 Michael Mark,2 Thomas Klein2 1RenaSci, BioCity Nottingham, Nottingham, UK; 2Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma, Biberach an der Riss, Germany Abstract: The present study assessed the potential of the sodium glucose-linked transporter (SGLT-2 inhibitor empagliflozin to decrease body weight when administered alone or in combination with the clinically effective weight-loss agents orlistat and sibutramine in obese rats fed a cafeteria diet. Female Wistar rats were exposed to a cafeteria diet to induce obesity. Empagliflozin was dosed once daily (10, 30, and 60 mg/kg for 28 days. Combination studies were subsequently performed using a submaximal empagliflozin dose (10 mg/kg with either sibutramine or orlistat. Body weight, food, and water intake were recorded daily. The effect of drug treatment on glucose tolerance, relevant plasma parameters, and carcass composition was determined. Empagliflozin dose-dependently reduced body weight, plasma leptin, and body fat though increased urinary glucose excretion. The combination of empagliflozin and orlistat significantly reduced body weight compared to animals treated with either drug alone, and significantly improved glucose tolerance, plasma insulin, and leptin compared to vehicle-treated controls. The effect of sibutramine to improve glycemic control in an oral glucose-tolerance test was also significantly increased, with empagliflozin and combination treatment leading to a reduction in carcass fat greater than that observed with either drug alone. These data demonstrate that empagliflozin reduces body weight in cafeteria-fed obese rats. In combination studies, empagliflozin further improved the body-weight or body-fat loss of animals in comparison to orlistat or sibutramine alone. Such studies may indicate improved strategies for the treatment of obese patients with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. Keywords

  5. Stimulation of S14 mRNA and lipogenesis in brown fat by hypothyroidism, cold exposure, and cafeteria feeding: evidence supporting a general role for S14 in lipogenesis and lipogenesis in the maintenance of thermogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freake, H.C.; Oppenheimer, J.H.

    1987-05-01

    In liver, thyroid hormone rapidly induces S14 mRNA, which encodes a small acidic protein. This sequence is abundantly expressed only in lipogenic tissues and is thought to have some function in fat metabolism. In the euthyroid rat, we measured 20-fold higher levels of S14 mRNA in interscapular brown adipose tissue than liver. Furthermore, whereas in liver or epididymal fat, hypothyroidism resulted in an 80% fall in S14 mRNA, in brown fat the level of this sequence increased a further 3-fold. In all three tissues, the expression of S14 mRNA correlated well with lipogenesis, as assessed by /sup 3/H/sub 2/O incorporation. Physiological activation of brown fat by chronic cold exposure or cafeteria feeding increased the concentration of S14 mRNA in this tissue and again this was accompanied by a greater rate of fatty acid synthesis. Overall, in liver and white and brown adipose tissue, S14 mRNA and lipogenesis were well correlated and strongly suggest a function of the S14 protein related to fat synthesis. These studies suggest that the S14 protein and lipogenesis may be important for thyroid hormone-induced and brown adipose tissue thermogenesis and that stimulation of these functions in hypothyroid brown fat is a consequence of decreased thyroid hormone-induced thermogenesis elsewhere.

  6. Chronic administration of grape-seed polyphenols attenuates the development of hypertension and improves other cardiometabolic risk factors associated with the metabolic syndrome in cafeteria diet-fed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Zara; Margalef, Maria; Bravo, Francisca I; Arola-Arnal, Anna; Muguerza, Begoña

    2017-01-01

    The effects of grape-seed polyphenols against the development of hypertension and other cardiometabolic conditions associated with the metabolic syndrome (MetS) were studied in rats fed a high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet, known as the cafeteria (CAF) diet. Two groups of Wistar rats were fed standard (STD) or CAF diets for 12 weeks. The CAF diet-fed rats were administered different doses of a low-molecular-weight grape-seed polyphenol extract (LM-GSPE) (25, 100 and 200 mg/kg per d) or vehicle daily, and the STD diet-fed rats were administered LM-GSPE (100 mg/kg per d) or vehicle using ten animals per group. Body weight (BW), waist perimeter (WP) and systolic and diastolic blood pressures (BP) by the tail-cuff method were recorded weekly. The animals were housed in metabolic chambers every 2 weeks to estimate daily food and liquid intakes and to collect faeces and urine samples. The plasma lipid profile was analysed at time 0 and on the 4th, 7th, 10th and 12th weeks of the experiment. Moreover, plasma leptin was measured at the end of the experiment. Results demonstrated that LM-GSPE, when administered with the CAF diet, attenuated the increase in BP, BW, WP and improved lipid metabolism in these animals. However, although the 25- and 100-mg/kg per d doses were sufficient to produce beneficial effects on BP and lipid metabolism, a 200-mg/kg per d dose was necessary to have an effect on BW and WP. The present findings suggest that LM-GSPE is a good candidate for a BP-lowering agent that can also ameliorate other conditions associated with the MetS.

  7. In rats fed high-energy diets, taste, rather than fat content, is the key factor increasing food intake: a comparison of a cafeteria and a lipid-supplemented standard diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliva, Laia; Aranda, Tània; Caviola, Giada; Fernández-Bernal, Anna; Alemany, Marià; Fernández-López, José Antonio; Remesar, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    Food selection and ingestion both in humans and rodents, often is a critical factor in determining excess energy intake and its related disorders. Two different concepts of high-fat diets were tested for their obesogenic effects in rats; in both cases, lipids constituted about 40% of their energy intake. The main difference with controls fed standard lab chow, was, precisely, the lipid content. Cafeteria diets (K) were self-selected diets devised to be desirable to the rats, mainly because of its diverse mix of tastes, particularly salty and sweet. This diet was compared with another, more classical high-fat (HF) diet, devised not to be as tasty as K, and prepared by supplementing standard chow pellets with fat. We also analysed the influence of sex on the effects of the diets. K rats grew faster because of a high lipid, sugar and protein intake, especially the males, while females showed lower weight but higher proportion of body lipid. In contrast, the weight of HF groups were not different from controls. Individual nutrient's intake were analysed, and we found that K rats ingested large amounts of both disaccharides and salt, with scant differences of other nutrients' proportion between the three groups. The results suggest that the key differential factor of the diet eliciting excess energy intake was the massive presence of sweet and salty tasting food. The significant presence of sugar and salt appears as a powerful inducer of excess food intake, more effective than a simple (albeit large) increase in the diet's lipid content. These effects appeared already after a relatively short treatment. The differential effects of sex agree with their different hedonic and obesogenic response to diet.

  8. In rats fed high-energy diets, taste, rather than fat content, is the key factor increasing food intake: a comparison of a cafeteria and a lipid-supplemented standard diet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laia Oliva

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Food selection and ingestion both in humans and rodents, often is a critical factor in determining excess energy intake and its related disorders. Methods Two different concepts of high-fat diets were tested for their obesogenic effects in rats; in both cases, lipids constituted about 40% of their energy intake. The main difference with controls fed standard lab chow, was, precisely, the lipid content. Cafeteria diets (K were self-selected diets devised to be desirable to the rats, mainly because of its diverse mix of tastes, particularly salty and sweet. This diet was compared with another, more classical high-fat (HF diet, devised not to be as tasty as K, and prepared by supplementing standard chow pellets with fat. We also analysed the influence of sex on the effects of the diets. Results K rats grew faster because of a high lipid, sugar and protein intake, especially the males, while females showed lower weight but higher proportion of body lipid. In contrast, the weight of HF groups were not different from controls. Individual nutrient’s intake were analysed, and we found that K rats ingested large amounts of both disaccharides and salt, with scant differences of other nutrients’ proportion between the three groups. The results suggest that the key differential factor of the diet eliciting excess energy intake was the massive presence of sweet and salty tasting food. Conclusions The significant presence of sugar and salt appears as a powerful inducer of excess food intake, more effective than a simple (albeit large increase in the diet’s lipid content. These effects appeared already after a relatively short treatment. The differential effects of sex agree with their different hedonic and obesogenic response to diet.

  9. A escola promovendo hábitos alimentares saudáveis: uma proposta metodológica de capacitação para educadores e donos de cantina escolar Promotion of healthy eating habits by schools: a methodological proposal for training courses for educators and school cafeteria owners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethsáida de Abreu Soares Schmitz

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available O projeto A Escola Promovendo Hábitos Alimentares Saudáveis estimula, desde 2001 no Distrito Federal, Brasil, a formação de bons hábitos alimentares na comunidade escolar, no contexto da promoção de estilos de vida saudáveis e prevenção das doenças crônicas não- transmissíveis. Este trabalho apresenta e avalia uma metodologia desenvolvida em 2006, para capacitação de educadores do ensino infantil e fundamental até a 4ª série e donos de cantina escolar. As oficinas tiveram aulas expositivas, atividades práticas, jogos educativos, entre outros. Como indicadores de avaliação analisaram-se itens relacionados à ampliação e aplicabilidade dos conhecimentos, além da implantação dos 10 passos da cantina escolar saudável. As atividades pedagógicas propostas foram verificadas pela análise dos portfólios dos educadores. A avaliação geral foi positiva, houve ampliação dos conhecimentos (p The project entitled Promotion of Health Eating Habits by Schools, operating in the Federal District of Brazil since 2001, encourages good eating habits in the school community within the context of promoting healthy lifestyles and preventing chronic non-communicable diseases. The current article presents and analyzes a methodology to train preschool and elementary educators and school cafeteria owners. The workshops included theoretical classes, practical activities, and educational games and were evaluated on the basis of expansion and applicability of knowledge, in addition to implementation of the 10 steps to a healthy school cafeteria. The proposed pedagogical activities were verified by an analysis of the teachers' workshop folders. The overall evaluation was positive, with expansion of knowledge (p < 0.05 among participants for the three workshop modules. The objectives laid out in the workshop folders were reached by 44% of the teachers. In the implementation of the healthy cafeteria, positive results were observed when comparing

  10. College Cafeteria Gets an "A" in Economics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modern Schools, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Marriott Corporation, long known for its work in institutional food service operations, has now entered the school field with happy results for students--a more varied menu and lower food costs. (Author)

  11. Quantificação e análise do custo da sobra limpa em unidades de alimentação e nutrição de uma empresa de grande porte Quantification and analysis of the cost of food wastage in the cafeterias of a large company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Cristina Cordeiro Soares

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO:O propósito deste estudo foi quantificar e avaliar o custo da sobra limpa em oito unidades de alimentação e nutrição de uma empresa siderúrgica de grande porte. MÉTODOS: Foram avaliadas oito unidades de alimentação e nutrição durante cinco meses. A quantificação da sobra limpa considerou as sobras e o número de refeições planejadas e servidas diariamente. As preparações foram divididas em grupos, sendo os custos obtidos a partir do valor médio dos alimentos adquiridos no mês. RESULTADOS: Cinquenta por cento das unidades de alimentação e nutrição não atingiram valores inferiores ou iguais a 30g, meta per capita de sobra limpa determinada pela empresa. Os per capitas totais de sobra limpa variaram entre 24g e 60g, equivalentes a 176kg-1.213kg de alimentos desperdiçados mensalmente. As saladas apresentaram as maiores porcentagens de desperdício na maioria das unidades. O custo mensal com as sobras atingiu de 2,2% a 3% do valor gasto mensalmente com alimentos, representando um custo elevado para a empresa (entre 80 a 108 salários-mínimos. Diante dos resultados obtidos, foram propostas medidas de intervenção, tais como planejamento e elaboração adequada das preparações, caracterização dos clientes e ações para educação nutricional. CONCLUSÃO: As unidades de alimentação e nutrição apresentaram considerável perda de alimentos com a sobra limpa. A implementação das intervenções propostas poderá minimizar essa perda. O valor gasto com esse desperdício poderia ser revertido em melhorias nos processos produtivos.OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to quantify and assess the cost of food wastage in eight cafeterias of a big steel mill. METHODS: Eight cafeterias were followed during five months. Quantification of food wastage was done considering the leftovers and the number of meals planned and served daily. For determining the cost, preparations were divided into groups, and the cost was

  12. O treinamento de merendeiras: análise do material instrucional do Instituto de Nutrição Annes Dias - Rio de Janeiro (1956-94 The training of public school cafeteria staff: an analysis of the instructional material developed by Instituto de Nutrição Annes Dias - Rio de Janeiro (1956-1994

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester de Queirós Costa

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo analisar a concepção educacional do treinamento de merendeiras nos anos de 1956 a 1994, a partir de 17 boletins instrucionais produzidos pelo Instituto de Nutrição Annes Dias, no município do Rio de Janeiro. A análise documental considerou dois períodos: de 1956 a 1971, caracterizado pela criação do instituto e pelo esboço das primeiras atividades de treinamento; e de 1972 a 1994, caracterizado pela consolidação da estrutura organizacional do instituto e da concepção educativa da atividade de treinamento. Ficou evidenciado que o treinamento teve como foco a dimensão técnica do trabalho das merendeiras e a recorrência dos temas de higiene e organização do serviço. A discussão sobre a formação das merendeiras passa pela definição de que trabalhadora se quer formar, o que antecede a preocupação com as competências (saberes e habilidades que devem desenvolver.The present study aims at analyzing educational approaches in the training of public school cafeteria staff members from 1956 to 1994 through the study 17 instructions brochures developed by Instituto de Nutrição Annes Dias in the municipality of Rio de Janeiro. The analysis of the documents has considered two periods: the first one, from 1956 to 1971, is characterized by the foundation of the institute and its first training activities; the second period goes from 1972 to 1994, which is characterized by the consolidation of the institute's organizational structure and the presence of educational concepts in its training activities. Training focused on technical aspects and recurrently alluded to hygiene and organization. Discussions on the training of school cafeteria staff members should define what kind of workers is expected before defining what skills and abilities they are expected to develop.

  13. Cafeteria e sua Influência no Consumo do Café na Cidade de São PauloThe Coffee Shop Influence on Coffee Consumption in the City of Sao PauloCafetería y su Influencia en el Consumo de Café en la Ciudad de São Paulo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BAZANINI, Roberto

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available RESUMOO café é um produto de forte apelo nacional e tem estado presente nos hábitos do consumidor deste produto, denotando uma busca por cafés diferenciados e de qualidade. As avaliações do produto se baseiam nas posições descritivas, dedutivas e de informações do mesmo. As características percebidas podem ser intrínsecas como o sabor, o aroma, a cor, a aparência e a consistência e extrínsecas, que referem-se a parte externa e que envolve o produto, tais como o ambiente, a embalagem, a marca e também o país de origem. Este estudo teve por objetivo investigar se as características intrínsecas (sabor, aroma, cor, aparência e consistência da bebida café e às características extrínsecas associadas ao produto estimulam o consumidor em freqüentar cafeterias (ambiente especializado em café. Para tal foi realizada uma pesquisa de caráter exploratória, com levantamento de campo e bibliográfico cujos resultados foram tratados por meio da análise de conteúdo. Utilizou-se como instrumento de coleta de dados um roteiro de entrevistas e foram entrevistadas 87 pessoas, freqüentadores de cafeterias. As cafeterias pesquisadas estão localizadas na cidade de São Paulo sendo: duas num Shopping Center do bairro de Higienópolis e uma cafeteria em uma universidade no centro da capital. Os resultados obtidos demonstraram que o sabor, prioritariamente e, depois o aroma do café foram as características intrínsecas consideradas mais relevantes entre os respondentes. Por outro lado, um ambiente agradável, confortável e requintado foram fatores valorizados pelos entrevistados. Ambas características se mostraram complementares e estes fatores citados foram os apontados como aqueles que estimulam o consumidor a freqüentar as cafeterias. ABSTRACTCoffee is a product of high national demand and has been present in the consumer habits, indicating a great search for distinguished and quality coffees. The evaluations of this product are

  14. Qualidade nutricional das refeições servidas em uma unidade de alimentação e nutrição de uma indústria da região metropolitana de São Paulo Nutritional quality of meals served by the cafeteria of a company located in the metropolitan region of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartira Mendes Gorgulho

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a qualidade nutricional das refeições servidas em uma Unidade de Alimentação e Nutrição de uma fábrica da região metropolitana da cidade de São Paulo. MÉTODOS: Dentre os cardápios praticados no período de um ano (242 dias na unidade mencionada, foram selecionados 30% por sorteio sistemático, e avaliados utilizando-se o Índice de Qualidade da Refeição, com base nas recomendações da Organização Mundial da Saúde e do Ministério da Saúde brasileiro. Esse índice compõe-se de cinco itens que variam entre zero e 20 pontos cada um: adequação na oferta de hortaliças e frutas; oferta de carboidratos; oferta de gordura total; oferta de gordura saturada e variabilidade do cardápio. No período analisado, foram servidas 367 preparações, agrupadas em 30 categorias, segundo composição e forma de preparo. A correlação de Spearman foi utilizada para investigar a correlação do índice com os nutrientes da refeição. As análises foram realizadas no pacote estatístico STATA, considerando-se o nível de significância de 5%. RESULTADOS: O valor médio do Índice de Qualidade da Refeição foi de 64,60 (DP=21,18 pontos, sendo 44% das refeições classificadas como "refeição que necessita de melhora" e apenas 25% como "adequadas". Além do arroz e do feijão, servidos diariamente, as preparações mais frequentes foram: legumes e frutas (30%, massas e cremes (12%, frituras (9% e sobremesas com creme (8%. Encontrou-se correlação positiva entre o Índice de Qualidade da Refeição e a vitamina C (r=0,32. CONCLUSÃO: Apesar da presença constante de frutas, legumes e verduras, há a necessidade de adequar a oferta das preparações às recomendações para uma alimentação saudável, que efetivamente colaborem na promoção da saúde.OBJECTIVE: This study assessed the nutritional quality of meals served by the cafeteria of a company located in the metropolitan region of São Paulo city, Brazil. METHODS

  15. Determinação de elementos minerais e traços por ativação neutrônica, em refeições servidas no restaurante da Faculdade de Saúde Pública/USP Determination of mineral and trace elements by neutron activation analysis, in meals served at the central cafeteria of Faculty of Public Health/USP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Déborah I.T. FÁVARO

    2000-08-01

    estes elementos nos dias estudados.The objective of this research was to check the nutritional adequacy of diets served to University students related to essential elements and also to monitor for some toxic elements. Within this framework, the aim was to determine the levels of these elements in meals served at the Cafeteria of the School of Public Health at USP used by students and workers along one week. The 5 meals served along the week at the Cafeteria were analyzed separately. Three trays per meal were used to collect the food according to a duplicate portion technique. The centesimal composition of the meals was determined according to the methods suggested by AOAC. Neutron Activation Analysis was used and the concentration of the following elements was determined: Ba, Br, Ca, Ce, Cl, Co, Cr, Cs, Fe, K, Mg, Mn, Mo, Na, Rb, Sb, Sc, Se and Zn. The calculated intake obtained in the present work was compared to the daily recommended values set by RDA, WHO and Reference Man. Regarding macronutrients, the protein and lipid levels were high in some cases. The fiber content of the meals was adequate. Concerning the mineral contents of Br, Ca, Fe, Mg, Mn, Rb, Se and Zn, the intake was adequate, but for the elements K, Mo, Na, Cl and Cr, the intake was too high concerning to recommendations. For the elements Ba, Co, Cs and Sb the daily intakes were compared to the values set by Reference Man. There are no recommendations for Ce and Sc elements. A great variability was also observed in the concentrations of these elements during the period of this study.

  16. RESTAURANT and CAFETERIA SERVICES: ARRANGEMENTS for MAY 1st, 2003

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    1. Restaurants As Thursday, May 1st, is an official CERN holiday, restaurants no. 2 (DSR : Bldg. 504 - Meyrin) and no. 3 (Avenance : Bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed as from Wednesday, April 30 at 18h00. They will reopen on Friday, May 2nd at 6h30 (rest. no. 2) and at 7h00 (rest. no. 3). On May 1st, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 1 (COOP : Bldg. 501 - Meyrin) from 8h00 to 21h00 with hot meals served from 11h30 to 14h00 and from 18h00 to 19h30. 2. Newspaper stand The newspaper kiosque run by restaurant no. 1 in building 501 will be closed. 3. Decentralised services No decentralised services (satellite cafétérias etc.) will operate on May 1st, but will resume their normal activites on Friday, May 2nd, except for those dependent on restaurant no. 3 (Prévessin site) which will not reopen until Monday, May 5, 2003.

  17. RESTAURANT AND CAFETERIA SERVICES ARRANGEMENTS FOR MAY 1ST, 2001

    CERN Multimedia

    Restaurant Supervisory Committee

    2001-01-01

    1. Restaurants As Tuesday, May 1st, is an official CERN holiday, restaurants no 2 (DSR : Bldg. 504 - Meyrin) and no 3 (Avenance : Bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed as from Monday, April 30 at 18h00. They will reopen on Wednesday, May 2nd at 6h30 (rest. no 2) and at 7h00 (rest. no 3). On May 1st, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 1 (COOP : Bldg. 501 - Meyrin) from 8h00 to 21h00 with hot meals served from 11h30 to 14h00 and from 18h00 to 19h30. 2. Satellite cafétérias All satellite cafétérias will be closed on May 1st. They will all operate normally on Monday, April 30, except for buildings 17 (Meyrin), 865 and 892 (Prévessin) which will be closed. 3. Newspaper stand The newspaper kiosque in building 501 will be closed on May 1st.

  18. RESTAURANT AND CAFETERIA SERVICES ARRANGEMENTS FOR 1 MAY 2002

    CERN Multimedia

    Restaurant Supervisory Committee

    2002-01-01

    1. Restaurants As Wednesday 1 May is an official CERN holiday, restaurants no. 2 (DSR: bldg. 504 - Meyrin) and no. 3 (Avenance: bldg. 866 - Prévessin) will be closed as from Tuesda 30 April at 18h00. They will reopen on Thursday 2 May at 6h30 (rest. no. 2) and at 7h00 (rest. no. 3). On 1 May, a limited service will be provided by restaurant no. 1 (COOP: bldg. 501 - Meyrin) from 8h00 to 21h00 with hot meals served from 11h30 to 14h00 and from 18h00 to 19h30. 2. Decentralised services No decentralised services (satellite cafétérias etc.) will operate. 3. Newspaper stand The newspaper kiosque in building 501 will be closed. Restaurant Supervisory Committee, tel. 77551

  19. In the Cafeteria and beyond, Colleges Take On Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Libby

    2012-01-01

    College students are a generally healthy lot. But as they grow heavier each year, reflecting the national rise in obesity rates, campus officials are trying to promote healthier habits--and, they hope, mitigate the impact of a sobering trend. More than one-third of college students have a body-mass index, the main measurement for obesity, that…

  20. [Bacteriologic quality of the prepared dishes in cafeterias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouffok, F; Lebres, E; Makhlouf, B

    1992-01-01

    In this work, we reports results of bacteriologic analysis of 352 cooked meals (vegetables, meats, desserts). Although, 32% of analysed samples are bacteriologically good, 68% are contamined either by S.P.C but potentially dangerous either by pathogenic bacteria involved in food-born infections.

  1. Connecting Classroom and Cafeteria in a School Wellness Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grenci, Alexandra; Hughes, Luanne J.; Savoca, LeeAnne

    2011-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The Child Nutrition and WIC Reauthorization Act of 2004 required all school districts participating in federally funded child nutrition programs to adopt and implement a school wellness policy by the beginning of the 2006-2007 school year. One drawback of this federal mandate was that it did not provide funding to assist with…

  2. The Cafeteria Workers' Skills Enhancement Training Program. Performance Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt, Miriam

    A program was conducted by the Food and Beverage Workers Union in Washington, D.C., to provide workplace literacy classes for food service workers in the city's government agencies, universities, and museums. A curriculum for workplace literacy skills was developed, sites were selected, and students were recruited. From a target audience of…

  3. SMOKING / NON-SMOKING IN THE CERN RESTAURANTS AND CAFETERIAS

    CERN Multimedia

    Restaurant Supervisory Committee, tel. 77551

    2001-01-01

    As you may remember, all CERN buildings and cars are considered to be non-smoking areas with a few exceptions (Safety Instruction no. 46). The ban on smoking applies in particular to all public areas, such as restaurants and cafétérias. Smoking is therefore prohibited in all parts of the free-flow and the dining rooms. As for the cafétérias, they are divided into well-defined non-smoking and smoking areas, the latter being clearly indicated as such, i.e : Cafétéria of Restaurant no. 1 : at the back of the cafétéria (on the outside terrace side) opposite the Users' Office and the offices of the Staff Association; Cafétéria of Restaurant no. 2 : the full length of the cafétéria on the wineyard side, except for the room next to the entrance to the building, furnished with red arm-chairs; Cafétéria of Restaurant no. 3 : between the bar and the row of artificial ...

  4. Cafeteria Staff Perceptions of the New USDA School Meal Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaraz, Brenda; Cullen, Karen Weber

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The new nutrition standards for the school meal programs implemented in 2012 align the school meal patterns with the US Dietary Guidelines for Americans, including more fruit, vegetable and whole grain offerings and minimum and maximum amount of calories per meal averaged over a week. The purpose of this study was to assess…

  5. Development and Evaluation of the School Cafeteria Nutrition Assessment Measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krukowski, Rebecca A.; Philyaw Perez, Amanda G.; Bursac, Zoran; Goodell, Melanie; Raczynski, James M.; Smith West, Delia; Phillips, Martha M.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Foods provided in schools represent a substantial portion of US children's dietary intake; however, the school food environment has proven difficult to describe due to the lack of comprehensive, standardized, and validated measures. Methods: As part of the Arkansas Act 1220 evaluation project, we developed the School Cafeteria…

  6. Food-borne tonsillopharyngitis outbreak in a hospital cafeteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertugrul, B M; Erol, N; Emek, M; Ozturk, B; Saylak, O M; Cetin, K; Sakarya, S

    2012-02-01

    A food-borne tonsillopharyngitis outbreak was reported between 9th and 13th of February, 2008, in Söke State Hospital, Aydın, Turkey. This descriptive cohort study was carried out immediately after the outbreak. In order to determine the probable origin, a questionnaire involving demographical features, clinical features, and possible risk factors was distributed to 403 persons. The participants of the questionnaire (n = 403) were divided into two groups: the study group (n = 252); those with any two of the following three complaints; sore throat, fever, and dizziness, and the control group (n = 151); those without these complaints. This investigation revealed that 252 people were affected by this outbreak. Group A β-hemolytic streptococci were isolated from the throat cultures of 63 affected individuals (25%) and an employee working in the patisserie that made desserts served for lunch. Since the number of people who ate the milky dessert was statistically higher compared to the non-eaters, the milky dessert was thought to be the origin of the outbreak. We suggest that throat infections among employees working in food production may cause outbreaks of upper respiratory tract infections.

  7. Gamification of dietary decision-making in an elementary-school cafeteria

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jones, Brooke A; Madden, Gregory J; Wengreen, Heidi J; Aguilar, Sheryl S; Desjardins, E Anne

    2014-01-01

    .... The present demonstration project used a behaviorally based gamification approach to develop an intervention designed to increase FV consumption while minimizing material and labor costs to the school...

  8. That, That, but Not That... Using a Cafeteria Plan to Enhance Writing Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Tina T.; Hatala, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    College students have difficulty in written communication, despite attempts by universities to place English courses in the "core curriculum." Although many companies indicate that writing is an expected competency, and many companies consider writing when they promote, students still enter the workforce with poor grammar skills. Clear…

  9. Pairing Fruit and Vegetables to Promote Consumption in Elementary School Cafeterias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelling, Anastasia; Newman, Constance; Watts, Erin; Van Dyke, Hugo; Malloy, Elizabeth; Gharmarian, Yasha; Guthrie, Joanne; Mancino, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: This study evaluated a behavioral economic strategy which paired a fresh cold fruit and cold vegetable to increase consumption of vegetables among elementary school children. Methods: The 14-day study was conducted in 12 public elementary schools in a suburban school district, which follows the offer model allowing students to…

  10. Building Healthier Children through Family-Style Service in School Cafeterias

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coborn, Jamie E.; Marquart, Len; Burgess-Champoux, Teri L.; Rosen, Renee A.

    2015-01-01

    Schools are recognized as ideal environments to promote and enhance the health of children. Previous research has shown a positive association exists between increased prevalence of family-style meals and children's health. Use of family-style service provides opportunities to improve children's overall health and well-being through increased…

  11. Student food choices in a university cafeteria in Saudi Arabia : an empirical investigation.

    OpenAIRE

    Halimic, Aida

    2017-01-01

    Background: One of the major health, social and economic problems in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia is the rising prevalence of overweight and obesity amongst young people and the implications this has for the future burden of chronic diseases, such as type 2 diabetes. Nearly 10% of the Saudi population are now diagnosed with diabetes at a cost to the nation in 2010 estimated at $0.9 billion. Aim: To investigate factors influencing choice of healthy food items by students in a university caf...

  12. Food for thought: obstacles to menu labelling in restaurants and cafeterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Erica

    2016-08-01

    Menu labelling is recommended as a policy intervention to reduce obesity and diet-related disease. The present commentary considers the many challenges the restaurant industry faces in providing nutrition information on its menus. Barriers include lack of nutrition expertise, time, cost, availability of nutrition information for exotic ingredients, ability to provide accurate nutrition information, libel risk, customer dissatisfaction, limited space on the menu, menu variations, loss of flexibility in changing the menu, staff training and resistance of employees to change current practice. Health promotion specialists and academics involved in fieldwork must help restaurateurs find solutions to these barriers for menu labelling interventions to be widely implemented and successful. Practical support for small independent restaurants such as free or subsidised nutrition analysis, nutrition training for staff and menu design may also be necessary to encourage voluntary participation.

  13. Serving vegetables first: A strategy to increase vegetable consumption in elementary school cafeterias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elsbernd, S L; Reicks, M M; Mann, T L; Redden, J P; Mykerezi, E; Vickers, Z M

    2016-01-01

    Vegetable consumption in the United States is low despite the wealth of evidence that vegetables play an important role in reducing risk of various chronic diseases. Because eating patterns developed in childhood continue through adulthood, we need to form healthy eating habits in children. The objective of this study was to determine if offering vegetables before other meal components would increase the overall consumption of vegetables at school lunch. We served kindergarten through fifth-grade students a small portion (26-33 g) of a raw vegetable (red and yellow bell peppers) while they waited in line to receive the rest of their lunch meal. They then had the options to take more of the bell peppers, a different vegetable, or no vegetable from the lunch line. We measured the amount of each vegetable consumed by each child. Serving vegetables first greatly increased the number of students eating vegetables. On intervention days most of the vegetables consumed came from the vegetables-first portions. Total vegetable intake per student eating lunch was low because most students chose to not eat vegetables, but the intervention significantly increased this value. Serving vegetables first is a viable strategy to increase vegetable consumption in elementary schools. Long-term implementation of this strategy may have an important impact on healthy eating habits, vegetable consumption, and the health consequences of vegetable intake. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Preference of laying hens for different protein sources in a cafeteria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Laying hens (29-wk old) had access to a basal diet and one of full-fat soybeans, fish meal or blood meal during a 6-week trial to investigate their preference for different protein sources. There was no effect of the dietary treatment on egg production, egg weight or mortality mte (P>0.05). However, weight loss was different ...

  15. Small portion sizes in worksite cafeterias: do they help consumers to reduce their food intake?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeer, W.M.; Steenhuis, I.H.M.; Leeuwis, F.H.; Heijmans, M.W.; Seidell, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Background:Environmental interventions directed at portion size might help consumers to reduce their food intake.Objective:To assess whether offering a smaller hot meal, in addition to the existing size, stimulates people to replace their large meal with a smaller meal.Design:Longitudinal randomized

  16. Simple interventions to improve healthy eating behaviors in the school cafeteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The National School Lunch Program in the United States provides an important opportunity to improve nutrition for the 30 million children who participate every school day. The purpose of this narrative review is to present and evaluate simple, evidence-based strategies to improve healthy eating behaviors at school. Healthy eating behaviors are defined as increased selection/consumption of fruits and/or vegetables, increased selection of nutrient-dense foods, or decreased selection of low-nutrient, energy-dense foods. Data were collected from sales records, 24-hour food recalls, direct observation, and estimation of plate waste. The review is limited to simple, discrete interventions that are easy to implement. Sixteen original, peer-reviewed articles are included. Interventions are divided into 5 categories: modification of choice, behavior modification, marketing strategies, time-efficiency strategies, and fruit slicing. All interventions resulted in improved eating behaviors, but not all interventions are applicable or feasible in all settings. Because these studies were performed prior to the implementation of the new federally mandated school meal standards, it is unknown if these interventions would yield similar results if repeated now. PMID:26874753

  17. A cafeteria diet alters the decision making strategy and metabolic markers in Sprague-Dawley male rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Virtuoso, Alessandro; Forkman, Björn; Sarruf, David A.

    2018-01-01

    Consumption of diets rich in refined sugar and saturated fat has been linked with development of mild cognitive impairment and dementia in humans. Most cognitive paradigms used in biomedical research to investigate the relationship between obesity and cognition rely on food motivation and speed o...... at one month after diet initiation. In absence of insulin resistance and dyslipidemia, these results show that the CAF influences the cognitive performance of male rats in the DM prior to signs of developing metabolic syndrome....

  18. [The search for Yersinia enterocolitica in vegetables treated by a cold line in school cafeterias in Montpellier].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darbas, H; Riviere, M; Oberti, J

    1985-01-01

    From 134 samples of raw or cooked vegetables taken in two points of a cold line we isolated 19 strains of Yersinia enterocolitica, 3 of Y. intermedia 3 of Y. kristensenii. None of them belongs to serotypes usually pathogenic for man. The raw vegetables are most contaminated. Y. kristensenii and Y. intermedia were isolated especially from samples of green salad. The used method was a cold enrichment at 4 degrees C followed by a potassium hydroxyde treatment. The activity of 16 antimicrobial drugs was studied by the disk diffusion test at 28 degrees C. All strains were sensitive to aminoglycosides, minocycline, colistine and cotrimoxazole. The results obtained with chloramphenicol and beta-lactam antibiotics vary in terms of species and/or biotypes.

  19. Children in School Cafeterias Select Foods Containing More Saturated Fat and Energy than the Institute of Medicine Recommendations1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Corby K.; Thomson, Jessica L.; LeBlanc, Monique M.; Stewart, Tiffany M.; Newton, Robert L.; Han, Hongmei; Sample, Alicia; Champagne, Catherine M.; Williamson, Donald A.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we examined if children's food selection met the School Meals Initiative (SMI) standards and the recently released Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations. Mean food selection, plate waste, and food intake were also examined. Food intake of 2049 4th–6th grade students was measured objectively at lunch over 3 d with digital photography in 33 schools. The percent of children whose food selection met the SMI standards and IOM recommendations for energy (kJ), fat and saturated fat, calcium, iron, and vitamin A and C were calculated. The SMI standards provide lower limits for most nutrients; the IOM provides a range of values, including an upper limit for energy. Seventy-seven percent of children's energy selection met the SMI lower limit, but only 16% of children met the IOM's recommended range and 74% of children exceeded the upper limit. More than 70% of children exceeded the SMI and IOM's saturated fat recommendations. Children selected (mean ± SD) 3168 ± 621 kJ, discarded 882 ± 581 kJ, and consumed 2286 ± 716 kJ. Children were less likely to discard fat than carbohydrate, resulting in proportionally more fat being consumed. Most children met SMI and IOM recommendations for protein, calcium, iron, and vitamin A. With few exceptions, energy selection was similar among groups of children, but plate waste differed (P < 0.001), resulting in greater energy intake among boys compared with girls, Caucasians compared with African Americans, and heavier compared with lighter children. Children's selection was high in saturated fat and, based on IOM criteria, included excess energy. PMID:20668251

  20. Children in school cafeterias select foods containing more saturated fat and energy than the institute of medicine recommends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this study, we examined if children’s food selections met the School Meals Initiative (SMI) standards, and the recently released Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations. Mean food selection, plate waste, and food intake were also examined. Food intake of 2,049 4th-6th grade students were meas...

  1. Children in school cafeterias select foods containing more saturated fat and energy than the Institute of Medicine recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Corby K; Thomson, Jessica L; LeBlanc, Monique M; Stewart, Tiffany M; Newton, Robert L; Han, Hongmei; Sample, Alicia; Champagne, Catherine M; Williamson, Donald A

    2010-09-01

    In this study, we examined if children's food selection met the School Meals Initiative (SMI) standards and the recently released Institute of Medicine (IOM) recommendations. Mean food selection, plate waste, and food intake were also examined. Food intake of 2049 4th-6th grade students was measured objectively at lunch over 3 d with digital photography in 33 schools. The percent of children whose food selection met the SMI standards and IOM recommendations for energy (kJ), fat and saturated fat, calcium, iron, and vitamin A and C were calculated. The SMI standards provide lower limits for most nutrients; the IOM provides a range of values, including an upper limit for energy. Seventy-seven percent of children's energy selection met the SMI lower limit, but only 16% of children met the IOM's recommended range and 74% of children exceeded the upper limit. More than 70% of children exceeded the SMI and IOM's saturated fat recommendations. Children selected (mean +/- SD) 3168 +/- 621 kJ, discarded 882 +/- 581 kJ, and consumed 2286 +/- 716 kJ. Children were less likely to discard fat than carbohydrate, resulting in proportionally more fat being consumed. Most children met SMI and IOM recommendations for protein, calcium, iron, and vitamin A. With few exceptions, energy selection was similar among groups of children, but plate waste differed (P < 0.001), resulting in greater energy intake among boys compared with girls, Caucasians compared with African Americans, and heavier compared with lighter children. Children's selection was high in saturated fat and, based on IOM criteria, included excess energy.

  2. College Cafeteria Signage Increases Water Intake but Water Position on the Soda Dispenser Encourages More Soda Consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montuclard, Astrid Linn; Park-Mroch, Jennifer; O'Shea, Amy M J; Wansink, Brian; Irvin, Jill; Laroche, Helena H

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the effects of improved water location visibility and water dispenser position on the soda dispenser on undergraduate students' beverage choices. Two focus groups with pilot intervention surveys before and after, adding a small sign above the soda dispensers' water button for 6 weeks in a large US university's all-you-can-eat, prepaid dining hall (measured with chi-square tests and logistic and ordinal logistic regression). Focus groups included 15 students. Survey participants included 357 students before and 301 after the intervention. After the intervention, more students reported ever having drunk water with the meal (66.4% to 77.0%; P = .003) and water consumption frequency increased (P = .005). Postintervention, the odds of drinking water increased by 1.57. Preference for other drinks was the main reason for not drinking water. A total of 59% of students had ever changed their preference from water to soda. The clear indication of the water's location increased students' reported water consumption. Further investigation is needed into how a non-independent water dispenser influences students' beverage choice. Clearly labeled, independent water dispensers are recommended. Copyright © 2017 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. All rights reserved.

  3. Opportunities in the Classroom or Cafeteria for a "Tasting Challenge" to Influence First Grade Students' Willingness to Try New Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellows, Laura L.; Conlon, Tara; Cunningham-Sabo, Leslie; Johnson, Susan L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To develop and implement a "Tasting Challenge" activity that is feasible for schools to influence and measure the willingness of elementary students to try new foods. Methods: The Tasting Challenge was as part of a classroom activity. Children were individually offered jicama and edamame to taste and rate (yummy, ok,…

  4. Validating the plate mapping method: Comparing drawn foods and actual foods of university students in a cafeteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, David E

    2016-05-01

    To examine effects of plate size on meals, I developed a method I label plate mapping. To validate plate mapping, a quasi-experimental between participants study was conducted that asked university students to accurately draw their lunch meal. Participants were randomized into groups where they were asked either pre-consumption or post-consumption to draw their lunch on either a 9″ or 11″ paper plate. Coding plate drawings for total meal size revealed that students drew bigger meals on larger plates and participant meal size drawings were more accurate when the plate provided was the same size as the meal plate used. Gender moderated meal size drawings, with women generally drawing meals that were more highly correlated and similarly sized to actual meals when compared to the drawings of men. Overall, the size of plate drawings was highly correlated with the size of actual foods, which provides support for the validity of the method of plate mapping. These findings suggest that plate mapping can be applied to estimate meal size and assess sensitivity to plate size. Gaining a better understanding of the mechanisms and processes that influence food consumption habits can help increase awareness of these cues for both academics as well as for consumers of food and benefit short- and long-term health goals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Development of Visual Aids for Training Student Employees in Certain Dishroom Procedures in a College Cafeteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    1951-09-01

    stripped of paper napkins, straws, paper dishes, cerLain food waste, suct, as orange and melonr ririds, milk bottles, glasses, and silver. ±he bottles...8217oishos truck 2. :laces a stack of approximateli ý_ ýrais oi left drai;, board of :’a,,, washing sink. a. ’. aslies eac. -ra bi 1.a.,d s.ISinc a iff

  6. Altered Nitrogen Balance and Decreased Urea Excretion in Male Rats Fed Cafeteria Diet Are Related to Arginine Availability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Sabater

    2014-01-01

    rats, but low arginine levels point to a block in the urea cycle between ornithine and arginine, thereby preventing the elimination of excess nitrogen as urea. The ultimate consequence of this paradoxical block in the urea cycle seems to be the limitation of arginine production and/or availability.

  7. 76 FR 73582 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Proposed Collection; Comment Request-Community...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-29

    ... School Information Questionnaire (School Cafeteria Managers) Menu Survey Data abstraction from....0 Menu Survey Booklet School Cafeteria Completed......... 156 5 780 0.75 585.0 Managers. Attempted... (CN) Directors, LEA Foodservice Directors, School Cafeteria Managers, and School Administrators...

  8. Feeding conditions control the expression of genes involved in sterol metabolism in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of normoweight and diet-induced (cafeteria) obese rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Caimari, A.; Oliver, P.; Rodenburg, W.; Keijer, J.; Palou, A.

    2010-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are easily obtainable cells from blood whose gene expression profiles have been proven to be highly robust in distinguishing a disease state from healthy state. Sterol metabolism is of physiological importance, and although its nutritional response in liver

  9. Maternal consumption of a cafeteria diet during lactation in rats leads the offspring to a thin-outside-fat-inside phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pomar, C.A.; Nes, van R.; Sánchez, J.; Picó, C.; Keijer, J.; Palou, A.

    2017-01-01

    Background and objective:The suckling period is a critical phase of development, in which maternal overnutrition may program the susceptibility of developing chronic diseases and disorders, such as obesity and metabolic alterations, in adult life. Here, we questioned whether the consumption of a

  10. Détermination de quelques paramètres biochimiques chez la rateWISTAR consommant un régime cafeteria enrichi en huile de lin

    OpenAIRE

    BENYOUB, Nor Eddine

    2011-01-01

    L’objectif de notre travail est d’évaluer les effets d’enrichissement en AGPI n-3 du régime standard (ONAB) et du régime cafétéria (hyperlipidique et hypercalorique) à l’huile de lin (2.5%) sur le poids corporel et sur quelques paramètres biochimiques (cholestérol total, triglycérides, et protéines totales) et les marqueurs du stress oxydatif (malondialdéhydes, Hydropéroxydes, Protéines carbonylés, les diènes conjugués, Vitamines A, C et E, Catalase, ORAC et oxydation des lipoprot...

  11. Does the provision of cooled filtered water in secondary school cafeterias increase water drinking and decrease the purchase of soft drinks?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughridge, J L; Barratt, J

    2005-08-01

    Secondary school students often do not drink sufficient quantities of water during the school day to prevent dehydration, promote learning and good health. The study aimed to measure the effect of health promotion and the free provision of cooled filtered water on the consumption of water and soft drinks. It also aimed to explore students' views of drinking water provision. A study was conducted with three secondary schools in North Tyneside. Over a 3 month period one school was given cooled filtered water and active promotion (W + P), another had water only (W). The control school (C) took part in post-intervention focus group work. The average volume of water drunk by students, in school 'W + P' was greater (P = 0.05) than that drunk in school 'W' and control school 'C'. The volume of soft drinks purchased by students in all three schools before and during the intervention remained static. Focus group data revealed that students viewed their existing water provision as poor and wanted sufficient supplies of cooled filtered water in school. This pilot study indicates that active promotion of water drinking increased consumption of water by secondary school students. Further developments of the project are suggested.

  12. Promoting the selection of low-fat milk in elementary school cafeterias in an inner-city Latino community: evaluation of an intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wechsler, H; Basch, C E; Zybert, P; Shea, S

    1998-03-01

    This study examined the effects of a school-based intervention designed to promote the consumption of low-fat white milk at lunchtime in 6 elementary schools in an inner-city, primarily Latino neighborhood. A multifaceted intervention based on social marketing techniques was delivered at 3 randomly selected schools. The school was the unit of assignment and analysis; 6902 children were involved in the study. Milk selection and consumption were measured by sampling discarded milk and/or tallying milk carton disappearance at baseline, immediately postintervention, and at 3 to 4 months follow-up. Immediately postintervention, the mean proportion of sampled milk cartons that contained low-fat milk increased in the intervention schools, from 25% to 57%, but remained constant at 28% in the control schools. Differences between intervention and control schools remained significant at 3 to 4 months follow-up. The intervention was not associated with a decrease in overall milk consumption. A school-based intervention can lead to significant increases in student consumption of low-fat milk.

  13. The Use of Point-of-Sale Machines in School Cafeterias as a Method of Parental Influence over Child Lunch Food Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrepont, Emmy; Cullen, Karen W.; Taylor, Wendell C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Computerized point-of-sale (POS) machine software that allows parents to place restrictions on their child's school meal accounts is available. Parents could restrict specific foods (e.g., chips), identify specific days the child can purchase extra foods, or set monetary limits. This descriptive study examines the use of parental…

  14. Hot Potato in the School Cafeteria: More Districts Outsource Their Food Services, but Some Raise Questions about Personnel Relations and Savings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beem, Kate

    2004-01-01

    It is such a simple mandate: Prepare healthy, nutritious meals for the schoolchildren so they can go about the business of learning. But operating a school district food service department is anything but simple. Even in the smallest districts, food service operations are businesses that must comply with many more rules than those in the private…

  15. Foodborne pathogens recovered from ready-to-eat foods from roadside cafeterias and retail outlets in Alice, Eastern Cape Province, South Africa: public health implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyenje, Mirriam E; Odjadjare, Collins E; Tanih, Nicoline F; Green, Ezekiel; Ndip, Roland N

    2012-08-01

    This study assessed the microbiological quality of various ready-to-eat foods sold in Alice, South Africa. Microbiological analysis was conducted on 252 samples which included vegetables, potatoes, rice, pies, beef and chicken stew. The isolates were identified using biochemical tests and the API 20E, API 20NE and API Listeria kits; results were analyzed using the one-way-ANOVA test. Bacterial growth was present in all the food types tested; high levels of total aerobic count were observed in vegetables, 6.8 ± 0.07 followed by rice, 6.7 ± 1.7 while pies had the lowest count (2.58 ± 0.24). Organisms isolated included: Listeria spp. (22%), Enterobacter spp. (18%), Aeromonas hydrophila (12%), Klebsiella oxytoca (8%), Proteus mirabilis (6.3%), Staphylococcus aureus (3.2%) and Pseudomonas luteola (2.4%). Interestingly, Salmonella spp. and Escherichia coli were not isolated in any of the samples. There was a statistically significant difference (p food samples examined in this study did not meet bacteriological quality standards, therefore posing potential risks to consumers. This should draw the attention of the relevant authorities to ensure that hygienic standards are improved to curtain foodborne infections.

  16. 26 CFR 1.132-8T - Nondiscrimination rules-1985 through 1988 (temporary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... dining room or cafeteria in which meals are served is treated as a separate eating facility, regardless of whether each such dining room or cafeteria has its own kitchen or other food-preparation area. (3...

  17. 26 CFR 1.132-7 - Employer-operated eating facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... dining room or cafeteria in which meals are served is treated as a separate eating facility, whether each such dining room or cafeteria has its own kitchen or other food-preparation area. (2) Employer-operated... employees are charged for food service at the cafeteria and the policy of the hospital is to charge the...

  18. Efeitos da modificação alimentar e exercício físico sobre alterações produzidas pela dieta de cafeteria em ratas

    OpenAIRE

    Jeferson Ferraz Goularte

    2011-01-01

    A obesidade afeta um número considerável de pessoas em todo o mundo e é caracterizada pelo acúmulo excessivo de tecido adiposo. A epidemia de obesidade parece ser o resultado de mudanças nos alimentos, nos hábitos alimentares e nos níveis de atividade física, sendo que a obesidade é considerada um fator de risco importante para o desenvolvimento de doenças como o diabetes mellitus tipo 2. Recentemente, a distribuição de gordura corporal na região intra-abdominal passou a ser mais importante p...

  19. Podpora využití regionálních potravin ve školním stravování pomocí produktové mapy

    OpenAIRE

    MELOUN, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is design a collection of action, which will speed up distributional ways between regional grocery producers and schools cafeterias in the district of Jindrichuv Hradec and at the same time supports higher regional, fresh, seasonal and ecologist products in schools cafeterias via the website Regional Agrarian Chamber of the South Bohemian Region "Map of products" (interactive regional map of suppliers of foods and different schools cafeterias at www.produktova-mapa....

  20. Food Waste Auditing at Three Florida Schools

    OpenAIRE

    Ann C. Wilkie; Ryan E. Graunke; Camilo Cornejo

    2015-01-01

    School cafeterias are a significant source of food waste and represent an ideal opportunity for diverting food waste from landfills. In this study, cafeteria waste audits were conducted at three Florida schools. Food waste comprised the largest fraction of school cafeteria waste streams, ranging from 47% to 58%, followed by milk, paper products (tissue, milk cartons, pasteboard, paper plates, and cardboard), and plastics (plastic wrap, packaging, and utensils). Metal and glass comprised the s...

  1. Gymnasieungdomars kostvanor under skoldagen och deras uppfattningar om skolkafeteriornas utbud

    OpenAIRE

    Jönsson, Emma; Lundqvist, Frida

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this thesis was to investigate whether the selection of products in the school cafeterias in Uppsala county high schools' comply with NFA's (National Food Administration) recommendations. Furthermore, the intention was to examine pupils´ eating habits before and during the school day, and their views on the school cafeteria´s selection of products. To investigate this, an inventory of school cafeterias in six high schools in Uppsala County, and a survey among 60 pupils were carried...

  2. 40 CFR 180.422 - Tralomethrin; tolerances for residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... residue from application of tralomethrin in food-handling establishments, including food service, manufacturing, and processing establishments, such as restaurants, cafeterias, supermarkets, bakeries, breweries...

  3. 40 CFR 180.501 - Hydroprene; tolerances for residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-handling establishments, including warehouses, food service, manufacturing, and processing establishments such as restaurants, cafeterias, supermarkets, bakeries, breweries, dairies, meat slaughtering and...

  4. 40 CFR 180.530 - 2,2-Dimethyl-1,3-benzodioxol-4-ol methylcarbamate; tolerances for residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... crevice treatments in food handling establishments, including food service, manufacturing and processing establishments, such as restaurants, cafeterias, supermarkets, bakeries, breweries, dairies, meat slaughtering...

  5. Cronicas Academicas (Academic Chronicles).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucci, Bruno

    2000-01-01

    Uses a scene glimpsed in a university cafeteria (cafeteria workers listening intently to the story another worker is telling them) and a stroll through the campus to reflect on how much professors are storytellers. Finds that the work of teaching is very similar to narrating. (BT)

  6. Traffic-light labels and choice architecture: promoting healthy food choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorndike, Anne N; Riis, Jason; Sonnenberg, Lillian M; Levy, Douglas E

    2014-02-01

    Preventing obesity requires maintenance of healthy eating behaviors over time. Food labels and strategies that increase visibility and convenience of healthy foods (choice architecture) promote healthier choices, but long-term effectiveness is unknown. Assess effectiveness of traffic-light labeling and choice architecture cafeteria intervention over 24 months. Longitudinal pre-post cohort follow-up study between December 2009 and February 2012. Data were analyzed in 2012. Large hospital cafeteria with a mean of 6511 transactions daily. Cafeteria sales were analyzed for (1) all cafeteria customers and (2) a longitudinal cohort of 2285 hospital employees who used the cafeteria regularly. After a 3-month baseline period, cafeteria items were labeled green (healthy); yellow (less healthy); or red (unhealthy) and rearranged to make healthy items more accessible. Proportion of cafeteria sales that were green or red during each 3-month period from baseline to 24 months. Changes in 12- and 24-month sales were compared to baseline for all transactions and transactions by the employee cohort. The proportion of sales of red items decreased from 24% at baseline to 20% at 24 months (pchoice architecture cafeteria intervention resulted in sustained healthier choices over 2 years, suggesting that food environment interventions can promote long-term changes in population eating behaviors. © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine Published by American Journal of Preventive Medicine All rights reserved.

  7. 26 CFR 1.132-7T - Treatment of employer-operated eating facilities-1985 through 1988 (temporary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... or cafeteria has its own kitchen or other food-preparation area. (3) Operation by the employer. If an... workday. For purposes of this section, the term “meals” means food, beverages, and related services... meals provided to such employees. For purposes of this section, each dining room or cafeteria in which...

  8. 75 FR 67775 - Compass Group USA, Inc., Canteen, Webster City, Iowa; Notice of Negative Determination on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-03

    ... with the cafeteria services or vending machine services supplied by the workers or acquire from a foreign country services like or directly competitive with the cafeteria services or vending machine... any increase in imports of like or directly competitive food services or a shift in service...

  9. 75 FR 60139 - Compass Group USA, Inc. Canteen: Webster City, Iowa; Notice of Affirmative Determination...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-29

    ..., shift to a foreign county services like or directly competitive with the cafeteria services or vending... competitive with the cafeteria services or vending machine services supplied by the workers; that the workers... competitive food services or a shift in service/acquisition of such food services abroad, and that the workers...

  10. 34 CFR 395.1 - Terms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... subtends an angle of no greater than 20°. (d) Cafeteria means a food dispensing facility capable of providing a broad variety of prepared foods and beverages (including hot meals) primarily through the use of a line where the customer serves himself from displayed selections. A cafeteria may be fully...

  11. 32 CFR 260.3 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-controlled property. Cafeteria. A food dispensing facility capable of providing a broad variety of prepared foods and beverages (including hot meals) primarily through the use of a line where the customer serves... facilities are always provided. The DoD Component food dispensing facilities that conduct cafeteria-type...

  12. Using Incentives to Align Individual Choice with Organiztional Objectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    Experiments 7 N P R S T Cafeteria Style Compensation Packages • Current compensation is fixed • Explore feasibility of offering a menu of...organizational objectives • 4 sets of experiments - Multi-attribute Auction » Precursor to Assignment Incentive Pay (AIP) - Cafeteria Style

  13. 78 FR 65302 - Notice of Public Meetings for the Draft Environmental Impact Statement/Overseas Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-31

    ... Business and Public Administration Building, Anthony Leon Guerrero Multi-Purpose Room 129, Mangilao, Guam..., MP 96950. 3. Thursday, November 14, 2013, at the Tinian High School Cafeteria, San Jose Village, Tinian, MP 96952. 4. Friday, November 15, 2013, at the Sinapalo Elementary School Cafeteria, Sinapalo I...

  14. 26 CFR 31.3121(s)-1 - Concurrent employment by related corporations with common paymaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... Example 2. P, Q, and R are related corporations whose geographical zones of business activity do not... and executives. All three corporations maintain cafeterias for the use of their employees. B is a cafeteria manager who has worked at P's headquarters for 3 years. On June 1, 1980, B is transferred from P...

  15. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CREM-01-0003 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CREM-01-0003 ref|NP_051147.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Cafeteria roenberg...ensis] gb|AAF05798.1|AF193903_21 NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Cafeteria roenbergensis] NP_051147.1 1e-04 27% ...

  16. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-0972 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-0972 ref|NP_051157.1| ATP synthase F0 subunit 6 [Cafeteria roenbergens...is] gb|AAF05808.1|AF193903_31 ATP synthase F0 subunit 6 [Cafeteria roenbergensis] NP_051157.1 0.001 29% ...

  17. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-TTRU-01-1294 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-TTRU-01-1294 ref|NP_051157.1| ATP synthase F0 subunit 6 [Cafeteria roenbergens...is] gb|AAF05808.1|AF193903_31 ATP synthase F0 subunit 6 [Cafeteria roenbergensis] NP_051157.1 0.057 29% ...

  18. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-2064 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-2064 ref|NP_051147.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Cafeteria roenberg...ensis] gb|AAF05798.1|AF193903_21 NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Cafeteria roenbergensis] NP_051147.1 0.009 24% ...

  19. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-CBRE-01-1180 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-CBRE-01-1180 ref|NP_051147.1| NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Cafeteria roenberg...ensis] gb|AAF05798.1|AF193903_21 NADH dehydrogenase subunit 2 [Cafeteria roenbergensis] NP_051147.1 2e-05 24% ...

  20. NCBI nr-aa BLAST: CBRC-DNOV-01-2150 [SEVENS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available CBRC-DNOV-01-2150 ref|NP_051152.1| ribosomal protein S4 [Cafeteria roenbergensis] g...b|AAF05803.1|AF193903_26 ribosomal protein S4 [Cafeteria roenbergensis] NP_051152.1 0.86 27% ...

  1. Analysis of the Solar Resource Information Datasets for Thermal and/or electric Generation Using a Geographical Information System. Cases of Application: Central Cafeteria - University of the Valley, Cali Municipality and Farm {sup P}ozo Verde{sup ,} Jamundi Municipality , Cauca Valley, Colombia; Analisis de las Fuentes de Informacion sobre Recurso Solar para Generacion Termica y/o Electrica Empleando un Sistema de Informacion Geografica. Casos de Aplicacion: Cafeteria Central - Universidad del Valle, Municipio de Cali y Granja {sup P}ozo Verde{sup ,} Municipio de Jamundi, Valle del Cauca, Colombia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dominguez, J.; Manrique, P. A.; Pinedo, I.

    2009-10-12

    In this report, two examples of renewable energy assessments based on Geographical Information Systems are presented. Several case studies have been carried out in the Valley of Cauca (Colombia), and one on them has been used to size a hybrid system. The results of this particular case study are presented in a second report. The aim of this document is analysing the different sources of data that could be used in the characterization of solar energy for electricity and electricity-heat use. With this purpose, data of two areas in Valley of Cauca obtained from the Atlas of Solar Radiation of Colombia, SWERA project and SSE-NASA have been compared. The data coming from these sources has been analysed using a Geographical Information System, and the conclusions are described along with cartographic and numeric products. These reports are the result of a collaboration established between Universidad del Valle (Colombia) and CIEMAT (Spain), and have been done by the author while his staying at our center included on his PhD program.

  2. Traffic-Light Labels and Choice Architecture Promoting Healthy Food Choices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorndike, Anne N.; Riis, Jason; Sonnenberg, Lillian M.; Levy, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Preventing obesity requires maintenance of healthy eating behaviors over time. Food labels and strategies that increase visibility and convenience of healthy foods (choice architecture) promote healthier choices, but long-term effectiveness is unknown. Purpose Assess effectiveness of traffic-light labeling and choice architecture cafeteria intervention over 24 months. Design Longitudinal pre–post cohort follow-up study between December 2009 and February 2012. Data were analyzed in 2012. Setting/participants Large hospital cafeteria with mean of 6511 transactions daily. Cafeteria sales were analyzed for: (1) all cafeteria customers and (2) longitudinal cohort of 2285 hospital employees who used the cafeteria regularly. Intervention After 3-month baseline period, cafeteria items were labeled green (healthy), yellow (less healthy) or red (unhealthy) and rearranged to make healthy items more accessible. Main outcome measures Proportion of cafeteria sales that were green or red during each 3-month period from baseline to 24 months. Changes in 12- and 24-month sales were compared to baseline for all transactions and transactions by the employee cohort. Results The proportion of sales of red items decreased from 24% at baseline to 20% at 24 months (pcafeteria intervention resulted in sustained healthier choices over 2 years, suggesting food environment interventions can promote long-term changes in population eating behaviors. PMID:24439347

  3. Short-term intake of a Japanese-style healthy lunch menu contributes to prevention and/or improvement in metabolic syndrome among middle-aged men: a non-randomized controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Inoue, Hiroko; Sasaki, Ryosuke; Aiso, Izumi; Kuwano, Toshiko

    2014-01-01

    .... Our study is designed to influence these developments. We conducted a non-randomized controlled trial by offering a Japanese-style healthy lunch menu to middle-aged men in a workplace cafeteria...

  4. Maintenance Resources by Building Use for U.S. Army Installations. Volume 2. Appendices A through H

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-05-01

    U5 U5 U5 74012 CAFETERIA 74013 CANTEEN 74051 EXCH CAFETERIA 74060 LUNCH ROOM 74062 SNACK BAR 74064 RESTAURANT/CAFETERIA 74066 YOUTH CENTER U3 U3 U3...74053 U7 QH SH 74057 EXCH SUPT FAC 74053 U7 QH SH 74060 LUNCH ROOM 74064 U5 U5 U5 74062 SNACK BAR 74064 U5 U5 U5 74064 RESTAURANT/CAFETERIA 74064 U5...CYlJ 4 a0O n 2- oomO C F 0n NO cm~ MONO 0P. 01. -GVI Ans ".- Q1 ;;R 8P 00 rs V IV 99 999 .. 9 -N .9 .99 .9 . -- C e99*- . FliO -k SANO P41N a-4 0 L

  5. Isolation of Campylobacter and Salmonella from houseflies (Musca domestica) in a university campus and a poultry farm in Selangor, Malaysia

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Choo, L C; Saleha, A A; Wai, S S; Fauziah, N

    2011-01-01

    ...: an animal teaching facility and a cafeteria in a university campus, and a poultry farm. Five percent (5%) and 13.3% of flies sampled were found to carry Campylobacter and Salmonella, respectively.

  6. Determination of Biological Oxygen Demand Rate Constant and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Determination of Biological Oxygen Demand Rate Constant and Ultimate Biological Oxygen Demand for Liquid Waste Generated from Student Cafeteria at Jimma University: A Tool for Development of Scientific Criteria to Protect Aquatic Health in the Region.

  7. Reality of Retainers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You've probably seen a kid in the cafeteria take out his retainer before eating lunch. Carefully, ... your mouth along with bacteria, plaque, and leftover food particles. You should clean your retainer every day, ...

  8. A Researcher's Proposal for Changes in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astin, Alexander W.

    1970-01-01

    Researcher recommends a lottery for admissions and a curricular cafeteria" with an educational menu" because research findings do not support assumptions used to justify traditional practices of college and unicersity admissions and tradiational approaches to curriculum and certification. (Editor)

  9. School District Health Care Expense: Moderating the Escalation Rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Gene P.

    1991-01-01

    The cafeteria plan for health insurance benefits employers by reducing the overall escalation of health costs. Employees benefit by tailoring their benefit packages to their needs to including the option to decline coverage because of spouse employment. (MLF)

  10. Broadening Your Employee Benefit Portfolio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaski, Nancy J.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Cost increases and realization of the diverse needs of employees have prompted organizations to review the cost and value of employee benefits. Examines alternatives including "cafeteria plans," managed care programs, and disability income plans. (MLF)

  11. Rural Campus Creates A Small City Under One Roof - But It's a Big Roof

    Science.gov (United States)

    College and University Business, 1974

    1974-01-01

    To combat the feeling of isolation for Rhode Island Junior College's mainly commuter students, an urban environment was created in a multipurpose building that houses classrooms, theaters, lounges, cafeterias, and a gymnasium. (Author/PG)

  12. 75 FR 36772 - Future of Aviation Advisory Committee (FAAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... registration. There is no publicly available Internet access at this site. A cafeteria is available on-site for... FAAC must be received by close of business on Monday, July 12. All foreign nationals must provide their...

  13. Seasonal variations in diet selection of Nguni goats: effects of physical and chemical traits of browse

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fomum, SW

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Goats select some browse species more than others, given options. Seasonal trends of diet selection of Nguni goats indexed by intake were investigated in cafeteria-style experiments. The relationships between diet selection and plant chemical...

  14. Scalable Deployment of Advanced Building Energy Management Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    rooms, classrooms, a quarterdeck with a two-story atrium and office spaces, and a large cafeteria /galley. Buildings 7113 and 7114 are functionally...similar (include barracks, classroom, cafeteria , etc.) and share a common central chilled water plant. 3.1.1 Building 7230 The drill hall (Building...scalability of the proposed approach, and expanded the capabilities developed for a single building to a building campus at Naval Station Great Lakes

  15. A Wireless Platform for Energy Efficient Building Control Retrofits

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-01

    equipment condition; (iii) building size (7000 sq. ft. space) and usage (mixed with offices, conference rooms, cubicles and a cafeteria having different...by the Multi consisting of offices, conference room, and cafeteria . Figure 7. CERL Building 1 Figure 8. CERL Building 2 Layout with Highlighted...Wideband Microwave Discone antenna Model DA-1 800MHz – 6GHz ESTCP EW-0938 Final Report 63 July 2012 Test Locations illustrated on campus map and

  16. Microbiological surveillance of food handling at NASA-MSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyerle, F. J.

    1973-01-01

    A microbiological surveillance program of cafeterias and snack bars was conducted to supplement the inspections by NASA Medical Center personnel and to gather information for cafeteria management to pinpoint areas of possible contamination. The work conducted under the program from its inception in January, 1972, to its termination on September 15, 1972 is summarized. Ten food handling facilities were included in the surveillance at NASA-MSFC.

  17. Compensation and Voluntary Participation in a Continuum of Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    literature that discusses compensation " menus ," or cafeteria -style compensation packages. 14 Of course, it is important to set the levels of these...compensation. A compensation " menu " Another approach would be to offer reservists a choice of compensa- tion packages. 8 So-called compensation menus , or... cafeteria -style compensation packages, allow reservists to choose the form of com- pensation that has the most appeal to their unique situations and

  18. Undergraduate Training in the Epidemiology of Prostate Cancer with Focus on Genetics of Disease Progression and Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Cafeteria , Student Union and University offices - neat, modest, casual, or dressy attire. 2. Formal programs in Ogden Hall, the Convocation Center...the Little Theater and the Memorial Chapel - business or dressy attire. 3. Interviews, - business attire. 4. Social/Recreational activities... cafeteria , Student Union or other indoor activities. This policy item does not apply to headgear considered as a part of religious or cultural dress

  19. School canteens in the Federal District, Brazil and the promotion of healthy eating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Blamires Santos Porto

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To characterize the school cafeterias in the Federal District of Brazil with respect to the promotion of healthy eating in schools. Methods: This is a descriptive, analytical, cross-sectional study, with a representative sample of schools with cafeterias in the Federal District, Brazil (n=202. The data were collected from April to November 2010 by means of on-site interviews and a structured questionnaire. The Pearson's chi-squared and Student's t tests were used. Results: A higher prevalence of outsourcing, and few employees and dieticians were observed. The prevailing foods were baked sausage, cheese, or chicken rolls or pastries. It was also found that 42.2% of the schools influence the menu of the cafeterias, and 58.6% of the representatives believe in the possibility of influencing the students' eating habits. However, 68.0% of the respondents do not believe in the economic feasibility of completely healthful school cafeterias. Approximately 30.0% of the respondents carry out activities to promote healthy eating. Conclusion: Most of the school cafeterias in the Federal District do not encourage healthful eating. The high prevalence of outsourced services with little interference from the school community gives high autonomy to the cafeteria's owner, whose priority is the pursuit of profit at the expense of the students' nutritional education. Improving the nutritional quality of school foods should be a continuous interactive effort of the food suppliers, principals, students, parents, and government authorities.

  20. Efeitos do exercício crônico sobre a concentração circulante da leptina e grelina em ratos com obesidade induzida por dieta Effects of the chronic exercise on the circulating concentration of leptin and ghrelin in rats With diet-induced obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Eguchi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available A obesidade vem se tornando uma das maiores epidemias mundiais, dessa forma, conhecer sua etiologia e mecanismos que regulam seu desenvolvimento é de grande relevância para o seu Tratamento. Portanto, o objetivo do presente estudo foi avaliar os efeitos da obesidade exógena induzida pela dieta de cafeteria e da atividade física crônica em ratos, sobre a adiposidade e a concentração sérica dos hormônios reguladores do balanço energético (leptina e grelina. Foram utilizados 32 ratos Wistar machos, divididos em quatro grupos: Sedentário alimentado com dieta padrão (SN, sedentário alimentado com dieta de cafeteria (SC, treinado alimentado com dieta padrão (TN e treinado alimentado com dieta de cafeteria (TC. A dieta de cafeteria aumentou significativamente a adiposidade central (RET e visceral (EPI (pObesity is becoming one of the biggest worldwide epidemics. Therefore, knowing its etiology and mechanisms that regulate its development is of great relevance for its treatment. Thus, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of obesity induced by the palatable hyperlipidic diet and of the chronic physical activity in rats, on the adiposity and the serum concentration of regulating hormones of the energy balance (leptin and ghrelin. 32 male Wistar rats were divided in four groups: Sedentary fed with chow diet (SN, sedentary fed with cafeteria diet (SC, trained fed with chow diet (TN and trained fed with cafeteria diet (TC. The cafeteria diet led to a significant increase of central (RET and visceral (EPI adiposity (p<0.05. Conversely,the exercise training minimized the effect of the cafeteria diet, diminishing the central and visceral adiposity. Leptin was also increased in the groups fed with the cafeteria diet, suggesting increase of the resistance to the action of this hormone. Chronic physical activity did not hinder the development of hyperleptinemia. Reduction in the serum ghrelin concentration was observed only in

  1. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells as a potential source of biomarkers to test the efficacy of weight-loss strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynés, Bàrbara; Díaz-Rúa, Rubén; Cifre, Margalida; Oliver, Paula; Palou, Andreu

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) constitute an easily obtainable blood cell fraction useful in nutrition and obesity studies. Our aim was to study the potential use of PBMC to reflect metabolic recovery associated with weight loss in rats. By real-time PCR, the fasting response of key energy homeostatic genes in PBMC samples of control and cafeteria-obese rats and of rats fed a control diet after the intake of a cafeteria diet (post-cafeteria model) was analyzed. Fasting caused decreased mRNA expression of lipogenic (Fasn and Srebp1a) and adipogenic (Pparγ) genes in PBMC, whereas it increased the expression of the key beta-oxidation gene Cpt1a and the orexigenic gene Npy. Fasting response of the genes studied was impaired in cafeteria-obese animals but was recovered in post-cafeteria rats, which showed a significant body weight decrease and normalization of adipose and metabolic parameters. Npy expression analyzed in PBMC has been revealed to be especially useful as a marker of fasting sensitivity, as its fasting response is not affected by the age of the animals and it is recovered even after shorter time of exposure to a balanced diet. PBMC reflect homeostatic balance recovery associated with weight loss in obese animals, when reverting from a hyperlipidic to a control balanced diet. © 2014 The Obesity Society.

  2. Changes in Consumer Attitudes toward Broad-Based and Environment-Specific Sodium Policies—SummerStyles 2012 and 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odom, Erika C.; Whittick, Corine; Tong, Xin; Cogswell, Mary E.

    2017-01-01

    We examined temporal changes in consumer attitudes toward broad-based actions and environment-specific policies to limit sodium in restaurants, manufactured foods, and school and workplace cafeterias from the 2012 and 2015 SummerStyle surveys. We used two online, national research panel surveys to conduct a cross-sectional analysis of 7845 U.S. adults. Measures included self-reported agreement with broad-based actions and environment-specific policies to limit sodium in restaurants, manufactured foods, school cafeterias, workplace cafeterias, and quick-serve restaurants. Wald Chi-square tests were used to examine the difference between the two survey years and multivariate logistic regression was used to obtain odds ratios. Agreement with broad-based actions to limit sodium in restaurants (45.9% agreed in 2015) and manufactured foods (56.5% agreed in 2015) did not change between 2012 and 2015. From 2012 to 2015, there was a significant increase in respondents that supported environment-specific policies to lower sodium in school cafeterias (80.0% to 84.9%; p cafeterias (71.2% to 76.6%; p < 0.0001), and quick-serve restaurants (70.8% to 76.7%; p < 0.0001). Results suggest substantial agreement and support for actions to limit sodium in commercially-processed and prepared foods since 2012, with most consumers ready for actions to lower sodium in foods served in schools, workplaces, and quick-serve restaurants. PMID:28777339

  3. Changes in Consumer Attitudes toward Broad-Based and Environment-Specific Sodium Policies-SummerStyles 2012 and 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odom, Erika C; Whittick, Corine; Tong, Xin; John, Katherine A; Cogswell, Mary E

    2017-08-04

    We examined temporal changes in consumer attitudes toward broad-based actions and environment-specific policies to limit sodium in restaurants, manufactured foods, and school and workplace cafeterias from the 2012 and 2015 SummerStyle surveys. We used two online, national research panel surveys to conduct a cross-sectional analysis of 7845 U.S. adults. Measures included self-reported agreement with broad-based actions and environment-specific policies to limit sodium in restaurants, manufactured foods, school cafeterias, workplace cafeterias, and quick-serve restaurants. Wald Chi-square tests were used to examine the difference between the two survey years and multivariate logistic regression was used to obtain odds ratios. Agreement with broad-based actions to limit sodium in restaurants (45.9% agreed in 2015) and manufactured foods (56.5% agreed in 2015) did not change between 2012 and 2015. From 2012 to 2015, there was a significant increase in respondents that supported environment-specific policies to lower sodium in school cafeterias (80.0% to 84.9%; p cafeterias (71.2% to 76.6%; p < 0.0001), and quick-serve restaurants (70.8% to 76.7%; p < 0.0001). Results suggest substantial agreement and support for actions to limit sodium in commercially-processed and prepared foods since 2012, with most consumers ready for actions to lower sodium in foods served in schools, workplaces, and quick-serve restaurants.

  4. Food Waste Auditing at Three Florida Schools

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann C. Wilkie

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available School cafeterias are a significant source of food waste and represent an ideal opportunity for diverting food waste from landfills. In this study, cafeteria waste audits were conducted at three Florida schools. Food waste comprised the largest fraction of school cafeteria waste streams, ranging from 47% to 58%, followed by milk, paper products (tissue, milk cartons, pasteboard, paper plates, and cardboard, and plastics (plastic wrap, packaging, and utensils. Metal and glass comprised the smallest fraction of the waste stream. Average total waste generation ranged from 50.5 to 137.6 g·student−1·day−1. The mean generation rates for food waste ranged from 24.7 to 64.9 g·student−1·day−1. The overall average for cafeteria waste generation among all three schools was 102.3 g·student−1·day−1, with food waste alone contributing 52.2 g·student−1·day−1. There are two primary approaches to diverting school food waste from landfills: reduction and recycling. Food waste can be reduced through educating students and staff in order to change behaviors that cause food waste. Food waste can be collected and recycled through composting or anaerobic digestion in order to generate beneficial end products, including soil amendments and bioenergy. Over 75% of the cafeteria waste measured in this study could be recycled in this manner.

  5. The national school lunch and competitive food offerings and purchasing behaviors of high school students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snelling, Anastasia M; Korba, Casey; Burkey, Alyvia

    2007-12-01

    Across the nation, schools have become actively involved in developing obesity prevention strategies both in classrooms and in cafeterias. We sought to determine the type of foods being offered during lunch in the cafeteria of 3 public high schools in 1 county and if this reflects the purchasing patterns of students. By labeling foods based on nutrient density using a stoplight approach of green, yellow, and red colors, we were able to categorize all foods including the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and competitive foods available in the cafeteria. Over a 4-week cycle, daily food purchases were gathered and the proportions of green, yellow, and red foods offered and purchased was compared. Findings from this study suggest that students in these 3 high schools purchased foods in relative proportion to what was available in the school cafeteria for the NSLP. Green and yellow foods included in the NSLP comprised 77% of the offerings and 73% of the purchases. In contrast, 61% of the competitive foods were classified as red foods, and the purchasing of red foods made up 83% of competitive food sales. These results indicate that students purchase foods of minimal nutritional value at greater proportions in the school cafeteria. These results suggest that the nutritional policy for the NSLP promotes the offerings of a wide array of foods. Schools should consider a nutrition policy that regulates the sale of competitive foods.

  6. Increasing portion sizes of fruits and vegetables in an elementary school lunch program can increase fruit and vegetable consumption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nicole; Reicks, Marla; Redden, Joseph P; Mann, Traci; Mykerezi, Elton; Vickers, Zata

    2015-08-01

    Increasing portion size can increase children's consumption of food. The goal of this study was to determine whether increasing the portion sizes of fruits and vegetables in an elementary school cafeteria environment would increase children's consumption of them. We measured each child's consumption of the fruit and vegetables served in a cafeteria line on a control day (normal cafeteria procedures) and on two intervention days. When we increased the portion size of 3 of the 4 fruits and vegetables by about 50%, children who took those foods increased their consumption of them. Although this was an effective strategy for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption among students who took those foods, many children chose not to take any fruits or vegetables. Further efforts are needed to increase children's selection and consumption of fruits and vegetables in an environment of competing foods of higher palatability. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Heterogenous customer satisfaction index for evaluating university food service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aziz, Nazrina; Zain, Zakiyah; Syarifi, Nadia Asyikin Mohammad; Klivon, Julia; Ap, Nurasiah Che; Zaki, Mahirah

    2017-11-01

    This paper aims to measure the performance of university food service based on students' perception. Two cafeterias were chosen for comparison: one located at student residential hall (Café 1) and another at the university administration centre (Café 2). By considering the components of importance and satisfaction, the Heterogeneous Customer Satisfaction Index-HCSI was computed to measure the performance of quality items in both cafeterias. Stratified sampling method was used to select 278 students and the DINESERVE instrument was used to assess customer perception on service quality. The findings show that the customer rate these two cafeterias as quite satisfied only, with the HCSI for Café 1 slightly higher than that for Café 2.

  8. The intake of high-fat diets induces an obesogenic-like gene expression profile in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, which is reverted by dieting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynés, Bàrbara; García-Ruiz, Estefanía; Palou, Andreu; Oliver, Paula

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are increasingly used for nutrigenomic studies. In this study, we aimed to identify whether these cells could reflect the development of an obesogenic profile associated with the intake of high-fat (HF) diets. We analysed, by real-time RT-PCR, the dietary response of key genes related to lipid metabolism, obesity and inflammation in PBMC of control rats, rats fed a cafeteria or a commercial HF diet and rats fed a control diet after the intake of a cafeteria diet (post-cafeteria model). Cafeteria diet intake, which resulted in important overweight and related complications, altered the expressions of most of the studied genes in PBMC, evidencing the development of an obesogenic profile. Commercial HF diet, which produced metabolic alterations but in the absence of noticeably increased body weight, also altered PBMC gene expression, inducing a similar regulatory pattern as that observed for the cafeteria diet. Regulation of carnitine palmitoyltransferase I (Cpt1a) mRNA expression was of special interest; its expression reflected metabolic alterations related to the intake of both obesogenic diets (independently of increased body weight) even at an early stage as well as metabolic recovery in post-cafeteria animals. Thus, PBMC constitute an important source of biomarkers that reflect the increased adiposity and metabolic deregulation associated with the intake of HF diets. In particular, we propose an analysis of Cpt1a expression as a good biomarker to detect the early metabolic alterations caused by the consumption of hyperlipidic diets, and also as a marker of metabolic recovery associated to weight loss.

  9. Preventing the cure from being worse than the disease: special issues in hospital outsourcing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beardwood, John; Alleyne, Andrew

    2004-01-01

    Like private sector organizations, hospitals are increasingly outsourcing services from food/cafeteria and security and facilities maintenance to the consulting and training of personnel and information technology (IT) functions. Also like private sector organizations, while hospitals seek the cure that will improve services at less cost, without careful management, the cure can be worse than the disease.

  10. A Guide to Conducting Student Food Waste Audits: A Resource for Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    This guide is intended to help educate students about the amount of food they waste in their school cafeterias and to encourage them to reduce waste and eat more of the nutritious foods provided through USDA's school meals programs or brought from home.

  11. Breaking with Tradition: Can a Public School District Take Such a Step?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Michael A.

    1991-01-01

    An Arkansas school district increased student participation in the school lunch program by using top quality food, a large variety of menu items, and a dedicated staff. The district pulled all its secondary schools from the federal lunch program; however, any student could eat free by assisting in the cafeteria for at least 20 minutes. (MLF)

  12. Shape Up Somerville: District Tackles Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluggish, Sarah; Kinder, Gretchen

    2008-01-01

    Walking today through Somerville, Massachusetts' Winter-Hill Community School during school hours differs markedly compared with just a few years ago. Gone are the greasy potato chips and chocolate-chip cookies from the a la carte offerings in the cafeteria. Missing are the late morning fundraisers when children would fill up on cupcakes and other…

  13. Shape up Somerville: A District Tackles Childhood Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cluggish, Sarah; Kinder, Gretchen

    2008-01-01

    Walking today through Somerville, Massachusetts's Winter Hill Community School during school hours differs markedly compared to just a few years ago. Gone are the greasy potato chips and chocolate-chip cookies from the a la carte offerings in the cafeteria. Missing are the late morning fundraisers when children would fill up on cupcakes and other…

  14. Attack of the Junk Food Giant: Giving Children and Teens a Taste for Nutrition in an Age of Super Size Portions and Junk Food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Marilyn

    2001-01-01

    Discusses what parents can do to ensure their children's healthy eating, examining whether students are eating school lunches or junk food in the cafeteria; discussing junk food temptations outside of school; noting rising soda consumption rates; and presenting advice for healthy eating (e.g., include children in meal planning and preparation and…

  15. Rain Forest Murals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiner, Cheryl

    2010-01-01

    The rain forest murals in the author's school began as a request from her principal to have students decorate the cafeteria with their own paintings. She decided to brainstorm ideas with her eighth-grade students. Taking into consideration the architectural space and the environmental concerns they wanted to convey, students chose the rain forest…

  16. Job Expertise: Key to Success for Culinary Arts and JJC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Robert P.; Kern, Claude

    1974-01-01

    An integral part of the culinary arts program at Joliet Junior College (Joliet, Illinois) is the daily business operation of the college cafeteria. The program has been so successful that students sometimes are lured by employment before completion of the two-year program. (EA)

  17. RHM 4.indb

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    Numerous categories make up the foodservice market, such as independent consumer foodservice, home delivery or takeaway, cafes and bars where food is also provided, fast foods, full service restaurants, self-service cafeterias, street stalls or the pizza consumer foodservice. In this paper, the terminology as developed ...

  18. Forecasting Water Use on Fixed Army Installations within the Contiguous United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-06-22

    Laundromats Car wash L Cafeterias/ restaurants Main clubs and annexes Industrial Public/Institutional Vehicle and aircraft wash facilities Offices and...indoor swimming pools; banks, service personnel clubs and open restaurants ; theaters and auditoriums, recreational and entertainment workshops and craft...accommodate medical mission sustentation . Operations This category of buildings is dominated by military mission-related 110 activities, such as

  19. 75 FR 8674 - Western Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... will be held at the Rota Social Hall, Tinian Elementary School Cafeteria and the Fiesta Resort and Spa... at the Fiesta Resort and Spa, Saipan, and the Guam Student Symposium will be held at the Guam Hilton... Fiesta Resort and Spa, Saipan and at the Guam Hilton on Guam. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Kitty M...

  20. Ecology and behaviour of Palm-nut Vultures Gypohierax angolensis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Their foraging behaviour is described and cafeteria trials showed their preference for fish over oil palm fruits. However, it is estimated that oil palm fruits account for almost 50% of the assimilated diet, followed by fish, crabs and Green Turtle hatchlings or eggs, as revealed by stable isotopes and Bayesian mixing models.

  1. Marine Debris and Plastic Source Reduction Toolkit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many plastic food service ware items originate on college and university campuses—in cafeterias, snack rooms, cafés, and eateries with take-out dining options. This Campus Toolkit is a detailed “how to” guide for reducing plastic waste on college campuses.

  2. The School Library: A Space for Critical Thinking about Data and Mathematical Questions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimmel, Sue C.

    2012-01-01

    Which potato chip is healthiest: (1) regular; (2) baked; or (3) sour cream and onion? This problem requires critical and numerical skills in order to read and compare nutrition labels. The question has applications in mathematics and science classrooms but also in teachers' lounges and school cafeterias. It is a problem that addresses the five…

  3. Microbiological quality of urban-vended salad and its association with gastrointestinal diseases in Kumasi, Ghana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fung, Jessica; Keraita, Bernard; Konradsen, Flemming

    2011-01-01

    -to-eat salad. Findings showed higher contamination in street-vended salads than those in cafeterias with thermotelerant coliforms levels of 4.00-5.43 log units per 100 g salad, 32% of samples had Salmonella sp., and 17% had helminth eggs. Overall, there was an insignificant inverse relationship between salad...

  4. 76 FR 48831 - Arbitration Panel Decision Under the Randolph-Sheppard Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-09

    ... that the DPSST campus would be closed, i.e., that trainees would not be permitted to return home on... DPSST facility as an open campus in which trainees were allowed to go home on weekends. At the same time, the SLA learned that the DPSST cafeteria was selling items in competition with Complainant's vending...

  5. Educational Master Plan Student Survey: Perceptions of the San Diego Community College District. Student Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, William B.

    In 1989, a survey was conducted in the San Diego Community College District to determine students' perspectives of the services offered at their college or continuing education site. The range of services evaluated included instruction, administration, student services, cafeteria, and facilities. A total of 246 classes taught at 13 campuses and…

  6. The Home of the Brave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    How do and should students develop--emotionally, socially, intellectually, morally, and spiritually--on a college campus and, more particularly, as members of a residential learning community? What advantages does a learning community offer over the more fragmented and specialized cafeteria of courses in place on most campuses? What new structures…

  7. An Atlas of Illinois State University Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sublett, Michael D., Ed.; And Others

    Twelve reports on the spatial patterns present on the campus of Illinois State University are divided into three sections. Following an introduction, the first section focuses on behavioral patterns such as seating choices made in the university cafeteria or the classroom. Section II deals with the measures people take to save time. A microstudy…

  8. An Elementary School with a Global Perspective: The Building as a Teaching Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Sean; Cuthbert, Marjorie; Cronin, Abbie; Urbieta, Melissa Nosal

    2011-01-01

    Just 19 months after the start of design, Stoddert Elementary School's modernized and expanded campus in northwest Washington, DC reopened, welcoming back the school and its community. Featuring spaces that had been missing since the school was founded in 1932, such as a gym, cafeteria, and library/media center and up-to-date building systems and…

  9. 77 FR 27671 - State of Hawaii; Regional Haze Federal Implementation Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-11

    ... Air Act (CAA) establishes as a national goal the ``prevention of any future, and the remedying of any... University of Hawaii, Maui College in the Pilina Multipurpose Room, 310 W. Kaahumanu Ave., Kahului, Hawaii...: Waiakea High School in the Cafeteria, 155 W. Kawili St., Hilo, Hawaii 96720. To provide opportunities for...

  10. 21 CFR 1.227 - What definitions apply to this subpart?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (including pet food), food and feed ingredients, food and feed additives, dietary supplements and dietary.... (i) Entities in which food is provided to humans, such as cafeterias, lunchrooms, cafes, bistros... kitchens, day care kitchens, and nursing home kitchens are restaurants; and (ii) Pet shelters, kennels, and...

  11. 26 CFR 1.401(a)-21 - Rules relating to the use of an electronic medium to provide applicable notices and to make...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... cafeteria plan under section 125; an educational assistance program under section 127; a qualified... requirements needed to access or retain the applicable notice and such change creates a material risk that the... designed for creating, generating, sending, receiving, storing, retrieving, displaying, or processing...

  12. School site visits for community-based participatory research on healthy eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Anisha I; Bogart, Laura M; Uyeda, Kimberly E; Martinez, Homero; Knizewski, Ritamarie; Ryan, Gery W; Schuster, Mark A

    2009-12-01

    School nutrition policies are gaining support as a means of addressing childhood obesity. Community-based participatory research (CBPR) offers an approach for academic and community partners to collaborate to translate obesity-related school policies into practice. Site visits, in which trained observers visit settings to collect multilevel data (e.g., observation, qualitative interviews), may complement other methods that inform health promotion efforts. This paper demonstrates the utility of site visits in the development of an intervention to implement obesity-related policies in Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) middle schools. In 2006, trained observers visited four LAUSD middle schools. Observers mapped cafeteria layout; observed food/beverage offerings, student consumption, waste patterns, and duration of cafeteria lines; spoke with school staff and students; and collected relevant documents. Data were examined for common themes and patterns. Food and beverages sold in study schools met LAUSD nutritional guidelines, and nearly all observed students had time to eat most or all of their meal. Some LAUSD policies were not implemented, including posting nutritional information for cafeteria food, marketing school meals to improve student participation in the National School Lunch Program, and serving a variety of fruits and vegetables. Cafeteria understaffing and costs were obstacles to policy implementation. Site visits were a valuable methodology for evaluating the implementation of school district obesity-related policies and contributed to the development of a CBPR intervention to translate school food policies into practice. Future CBPR studies may consider site visits in their toolbox of formative research methods.

  13. Contamination of Ethiopian paper currency notes from various food ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Contamination rate of Ethiopian paper currency notes handled by various food handlers with E. coli and antimicrobial susceptibility was assessed. A total of 384 Ethiopian Birr (ETB) notes were randomly sampled from meat handlers at butchers, bread and the related food handlers at cafeteria, fruit and vegetables handlers ...

  14. Schoolchildren's Consumption of Competitive Foods and Beverages, Excluding a la Carte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakarala, Madhuri; Keast, Debra R.; Hoerr, Sharon

    2010-01-01

    Background: Competitive foods/beverages are those in school vending machines, school stores, snack bars, special sales, and items sold a la carte in the school cafeteria that compete with United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) meal program offerings. Grouping a la carte items with less nutritious items allowed in less regulated venues may…

  15. White Whole-Wheat Flour Can Be Partially Substituted for Refined-Wheat Flour in Pizza Crust in School Meals without Affecting Consumption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Hing Wan; Burgess Champoux, Teri; Reicks, Marla; Vickers, Zata; Marquart, Len

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Recent dietary guidance recommends that children consume at least three servings of whole-grains daily. This study examined whether white whole-wheat (WWW) flour can be partially substituted for refined-wheat (RW) flour in pizza crust without affecting consumption by children in a school cafeteria. Methods: Subjects included first to…

  16. Journey: A Service Learning Mural

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, Lisa

    2009-01-01

    Winthrop Middle School's cafeteria had three paintings on the wall in which the paint was fading and the plaster was falling off. Many students wanted a change since the paintings had been there for over 15 years. This situation seemed appropriate for a service learning project for this Winthrop, Maine middle school. After the students reviewed…

  17. La recherche, ça creuse

    CERN Multimedia

    Rébillard, Jocelyne

    2001-01-01

    Like a town with several thousand people CERN offers, besides offices, research laboratories and other technical underground installations, some essential services for its members: 3 restaurants and 10 cafeterias on the sites of Meyrin and Prevessin are unavoidable meeting points. Every day, about 2500 meals are served to satisfy a wide and growing range of people and nationalities (2 pages)

  18. Predicting the benefit of binaural cue preservation in bilateral directional processing schemes for listeners with impaired hearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brand, Thomas; Hauth, Christopher; Wagener, Kirsten C.

    thresholds below 2 kHz. The acoustic scenarios consisted of a frontal target talker presented against two speech maskers from ±60° azimuth or spatially diffuse cafeteria noise. In (Neher et al, ISAAR 2017), N0Sπ detection performance at 500 Hz was found to be a good predictor of individual benefit from low...

  19. The Effect of Providing Breakfast on Student Performance: Evidence from an In-Class Breakfast Program. NBER Working Paper No. 17720

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imberman, Scott A.; Kugler, Adriana D.

    2012-01-01

    In response to low take-up, many public schools have experimented with moving breakfast from the cafeteria to the classroom. We examine whether such a program increases performance as measured by standardized test scores, grades and attendance rates. We exploit quasi-random timing of program implementation that allows for a…

  20. The Effect of Providing Breakfast in Class on Student Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imberman, Scott A.; Kugler, Adriana D.

    2014-01-01

    Many schools have recently experimented with moving breakfast from the cafeteria to the classroom. We examine whether such a program increases achievement, grades, and attendance rates. We exploit quasi-random timing of program implementation that allows for a difference-in-differences identification strategy. We find that providing breakfast in…

  1. Monosodium Glutamate Toxicity

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Olaleye

    on the brain, it is used as a major taste enhancer in most eateries and cafeteria in Nigeria. However, information is scanty on the potential of Sida acuta leaf ethanolic extract. (SALEE) to mitigate MSG-induced effect on the brain. This study aimed to investigate the possible toxic effect of MSG, a natural constituent of many ...

  2. 10 CFR 434.401 - Electrical power and lighting systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ....401 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY CODE FOR NEW FEDERAL COMMERCIAL AND MULTI... power that is an essential technical element for the function performed in theatrical, stage... confusion with “Occupancy Type Categories.” (a) Food service, fast food, and cafeteria: This group includes...

  3. 5-Second Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the tools used to wash them (picture eating food off the mop in the cafeteria if you need a visual). Even with a brand-new mop or sponge, stubborn germs can still remain on the floor after ... enough. Although a piece of food does pick up more bacteria the longer it's ...

  4. 75 FR 56502 - National Advisory Committee on Meat and Poultry Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ... Food Safety and Inspection Service National Advisory Committee on Meat and Poultry Inspection AGENCY: Food Safety and Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of public meeting. SUMMARY: The Food Safety... will take place at the South Building Cafeteria, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), 14th...

  5. Pilot Implementation of the Improving Children's Health through Farming, Food, and Fitness Program in Select California Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heneman, Karrie; Junge, Sharon K.; Schneider, Connie; Zidenberg-Cherr, Sheri

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this pilot project was to evaluate the effect of the Improving Children's Health through Farming, Food, and Fitness Program (CHF3) on the dietary knowledge and habits of participating children. Methods: The CHF3 program aims to 1) establish salad bars and integrate nutrition messages into cafeteria activities; 2) develop…

  6. Grassroots Philanthropy on the Prairie

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Joanne M.

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-one students were homeless. One student had asked a cafeteria worker on a Friday afternoon for leftover food to take home for the weekend. Those were among the facts that high school English teacher Ann Haugland heard at a professional development event in her Boone, Iowa, Community School District. "I couldn't sleep that night,"…

  7. School-Meals Makeover Stirs the Pot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Nirvi

    2011-01-01

    Proposed new federal rules governing the meals served to school children across the country each weekday are causing a stir among food industry groups, cafeteria managers, parents, and students. The skirmish is over the U.S. Department of Agriculture's efforts, prompted by the recent passage of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act, to rewrite the…

  8. Young Citizens Take Action for Better School Lunches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serriere, Stephanie; Mitra, Dana; Cody, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they used student's complaints about limited salad choices in the cafeteria as the focus of a class project. Following steps of the Project Citizen protocol of the Center for Civic Education, the authors facilitated students' efforts, which included researching the problem, talking with adult…

  9. Three Squares at School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Ed

    2012-01-01

    What's for dinner? In thousands of school districts across the country, students are no longer asking that question to mom or dad but rather to cafeteria workers. That's because of the federal Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act, signed into law in December 2010, which funds a third meal in schools where at least half of students qualify for free or…

  10. 36 CFR 7.16 - Yosemite National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... of food and drink. (1) No restaurant, coffee shop, cafeteria, short order cafe, lunch room, tavern... place in which food and drink is prepared for sale elsewhere, may be operated on any privately-owned... Director's decision. (6) The revocable permit for eating and drinking establishments and sale of food and...

  11. How Important Are High Response Rates for College Surveys?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fosnacht, Kevin; Sarraf, Shimon; Howe, Elijah; Peck, Leah K.

    2017-01-01

    Surveys play an important role in understanding the higher education landscape. About 60 percent of the published research in major higher education journals utilized survey data (Pike, 2007). Institutions also commonly use surveys to assess student outcomes and evaluate programs, instructors, and even cafeteria food. However, declining survey…

  12. Starving for Recess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patt, Mary Johnson

    2011-01-01

    Every weekday, millions of American schoolchildren throw away their half-eaten cafeteria lunches so that they can run outside to play. The traditional placement of lunch before recess, coupled with the recent decline in overall recess time to meet academic time constraints, forces children to choose between two essential needs: (1) food; and (2)…

  13. Michigan School Privatization Survey 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hohman, James M.; Woodman, Zachary D.

    2014-01-01

    In 2003, when it came to contracting out for common public school services, only outsourcing food provision could be considered a rather common occurrence in Michigan. There was good reason for this: school districts are prohibited from making a profit from their cafeteria, but any deficits created in providing food for students must be covered by…

  14. 75 FR 28302 - American Food and Vending Spring Hill, TN; Notice of Negative Determination Regarding Application...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-20

    ... Employment and Training Administration American Food and Vending Spring Hill, TN; Notice of Negative... Food and Vending, Spring Hill, Tennessee, was based on the findings that the subject firm did not... the cafeteria services or vending machine services supplied by the workers or acquire from a foreign...

  15. Potato Chips, Cookies, and Candy Oh My! Public Commentary on Proposed Rules Regulating Competitive Foods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinour, Lauren M.; Pole, Antoinette

    2017-01-01

    Background: The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 authorizes the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to establish nutritional standards for all foods sold in schools participating in federally funded meal programs. These foods, known as competitive foods, are commonly found in school cafeterias, vending machines, fundraisers, and snack bars…

  16. Weight Measurements and Standards for Soldiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-01

    include improvements to the menu planner, as well as to the peripheral links that provide depth and substance to the website. Additionally, an APFT...DA, Allen HR, Martin PD, Alfonso A, Gerald B, Hunt A. Digital photography: a new method for estimating food intake in cafeteria settings. Eat Weight

  17. Report of the Tenth Quadrennial Review of Military Compensation. Volume 1: Cash Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    meet this need, the Army offered eligible captains a menu of retention incentives to encourage extended tours of service . These incentives include...including benefits . Flexible benefits, such as cafeteria plans and flexible spending accounts (FSAs), for example, allow employees to make decisions

  18. A School Discovers the Gustatory Arts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiechman, Jurgen

    1987-01-01

    Gives a brief report on an experimental program that provided good tasting nutritious food to students during school breaks as an alternative to cafeteria school lunches. Describes program planning, how and where the food supplies were purchased, and how the program gained general acceptance. Includes a sample menu. (AEM)

  19. The Feud over Food: The Truth about the School Lunch Wars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Stephanie

    2010-01-01

    Serving meals and snacks at school is fraught with politics and pitfalls. While the battle rages in school cafeterias over menu choices, beverage sales, vending foods, and outright bans on what students can buy or even bring to school, there is some good news. More school districts are reducing the number of fried foods, increasing the levels of…

  20. Monetary and Non-monetary SWO Retention Bonuses: An Experimental Approach to the Combinatorial Retention Auction Mechanism (CRAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    as well as disclosing the cost of the non-monetary incentive before submitting bids. Lastly, we recommend running experiments with a menu type...gym, quality cafeteria , etc. You should have three stacks of papers in front of you, a yellow stack, a blue sheet, and a stack of pink sheets

  1. On the Menu.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Mary Kay

    2000-01-01

    Today, students want choice in school cafeteria menus. A survey of 210 high schools found that nearly 22 percent of students were very unhappy campers; only 5.6 percent were very happy. Scores were higher in schools offering alternative selections. Food must also be attractive, tasty, and nutritious. (MLH)

  2. Lunch Online.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savino, Ann

    1998-01-01

    Affluent and disadvantaged children stand in lunch lines and dine in school cafeterias as equals at the Bay Shore Schools (NY). Thanks to a computerized "LunchBox" point-of-sale system, cashiers know children by name, their birthdays, who suffers from which food allergies, and which children are entitled to free or reduced-price meals.…

  3. Building High Participation in School Food Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rednak, Jon

    1987-01-01

    A Pennsylvania school district served meals to nearly 80 percent of the students this past year. Student participation was achieved by asking students' opinions, monitoring food quality, redesigning menus, increasing staff morale, providing a pleasant cafeteria atmosphere, and sponsoring nutrition programs. (MLF)

  4. 40 CFR 372.38 - Exemptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the facility such as in a facility operated cafeteria, store, or infirmary. (4) Use of products... that is subject to the requirements of this part, where the owner has no other business interest in the... such as industrial parks. If two or more persons, who do not have any common corporate or business...

  5. Automated Information System for School Food Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazarika, Panna; Galligan, Stephen

    1982-01-01

    Controlling warehousing operations and food inventory, administering school cafeteria activity, and measuring the profitability of food service operations are identified as food service administrative problems. A comprehensive school food services information system developed to address these problems is described. (Author/MLF)

  6. 76 FR 30855 - Accident/Incident Reporting Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-27

    ... related to the railroad's rail transportation business. 68 FR 10108-09, March 3, 2003 (FRA's 2003 Final... cafeteria/lunch room; D1--At lodging facility; D2--On highway/street; D3--On private property; D4--On... including a small business concern that is independently owned and operated, and is not dominant in its...

  7. A New Trend in Dining Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanquist, Barry

    1999-01-01

    Describes how to create additional revenue streams by designing campus facilities that are flexible, multifunctional, and satisfy student preferences. The college dining hall is used to illustrate how a cafeteria is transformed into a multifunctional business enterprise designed to keep students on campus. (GR)

  8. 78 FR 32255 - HHS-Operated Risk Adjustment Data Validation Stakeholder Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... described in section III. of this notice) to [email protected] at least 12 business days in advance of... the meeting area, the main lobby, and the cafeteria. If a visitor is found outside of those areas... of Critical Infrastructure Protection (DCIP) at least 12 business days in advance of any visit by a...

  9. Characteristics of Operators in the Randolph-Sheppard Business Enterprises Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tedder, Norma E.; Maxson, John H.

    1989-01-01

    Interviews were conducted with operators in the Randolph-Sheppard Program, which encourages blind people to become self-supporting by giving them priority in establishing cafeterias, vending operations, and snack bars on federal properties. Characteristics investigated were age, years of experience, gender, ethnic origin, degree of vision loss,…

  10. 26 CFR 54.4980B-0 - Table of contents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... requirements apply to cafeteria plans and other flexible benefit arrangements? Q-9: What is the effect of a... from multiemployer plans. Q-1: For purposes of this section, what are a business reorganization, a... immediately before the sale? Q-7: In a business reorganization, are the buying group and the selling group...

  11. Critical Elements in New School Planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, Kenneth R.

    1998-01-01

    It is critical that school facility planning and design include auxiliary spaces that uphold the primary instructional program. This article identifies major support elements (storage, hallways, cafeteria, library/media center, administrative and guidance offices, and outdoor facilities) to be incorporated and discusses how to make these…

  12. 26 CFR 1.414(q)-1T - Highly compensated employee (temporary).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (accident and health plans), 117(d) (qualified tuition reduction), section 125 (cafeteria plans), section... place of business and receives compensation in an amount equal to 80 percent of her average annual... businesses (whether or not incorporated) that are under common control (as defined in section 414(c)) which...

  13. Risk Management: Supporting the District's Ancillary Services Staff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Steve; Strasburger, Tom

    2013-01-01

    The everyday operations of a school district depend on a network of people, including students, teachers, staff, and administrators. However, the ancillary services staff are really responsible for making the school day run smoothly. They are often the first employees that students see in the morning, either on the school bus or in the cafeteria,…

  14. Developing an Effective Crisis Management Plan: The Role of a Project Manager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orifici, J. Michael

    2000-01-01

    After fire and smoke damaged an upstate New York school's cafeteria, kitchen, and administrative offices, the district superintendent contacted a professional construction-management firm to begin restoration and reopen the school within days. Safety and sensitivity to building occupants' needs were paramount. (MLH)

  15. Project IDEALS. Educational Applications of Computer Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Duncan; And Others

    This is a booklet in the Project IDEALS series which deals with the use of Educational Data Processing (EDP) systems. A section is devoted to the use of the computer in such varied school operations as the processing of student records, schedules, computer simulation, grade reports, business, student applications, cafeterias, and transportation.…

  16. Outcome evaluation of a pilot study using "nudges"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Every school day, over 31 million U.S. children eat school lunches. Unfortunately, students often do not choose the healthy options in the school cafeteria. This paper describes outcome results of a pilot study using "nudges" to improve elementary school students' fruits and vegetables selections. A...

  17. Dining Room Service/Setting Table Covers. Learning Activity Pack and Instructor's Guide 8.1a. Commercial Foods and Culinary Arts Competency-Based Series. Section 8: Related Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Univ., Tallahassee. Center for Studies in Vocational Education.

    This document consists of a learning activity packet (LAP) for the student and an instructor's guide for the teacher. The LAP is intended to acquaint occupational home economics students with table appointments and to illustrate table covers for breakfast, luncheon, and dinner; for counter and cafeteria service; and for banquets and buffets.…

  18. 7 CFR 65.140 - Food service establishment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., PEANUTS, AND GINSENG General Provisions Definitions § 65.140 Food service establishment. Food service establishment means a restaurant, cafeteria, lunch room, food stand, saloon, tavern, bar, lounge, or other... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Food service establishment. 65.140 Section 65.140...

  19. Dicty_cDB: Contig-U12926-1 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available nts: (bits) Value AF193903_21( AF193903 |pid:none) Cafeteria roenbergensis mitochond... 35 2.3 T14275( T1427...44508_246( AL844508 |pid:none) Plasmodium falciparum 3D7 chromo... 33 8.6 >AF193903_21( AF193903 |pid:none) Cafe

  20. Dicty_cDB: VSK340 [Dicty_cDB

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 1 AF193903 |AF193903.1 Cafeteria roenbergensis mitochondrial DNA, complete genome. 48 0.056 1 AC016532 |AC0...o sapiens genomic clone Plate=2130 Col=2 Row=N, genomic survey sequence. 48 0.056

  1. 75 FR 28155 - Acephate, Cacodylic acid, Dicamba, Dicloran et al.; Proposed Tolerance Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-19

    ... were as high as 0.02 ppm for only one of seven exposed food items following both a spot treatment and... degradates other than methamidophos, in or on all food items ] (other than those already covered by a higher... establishments, such as restaurants, cafeterias, supermarkets, bakeries, breweries, dairies, meat slaughtering...

  2. Development of an Intervention Programme to Encourage High School Students to Stay in School for Lunch Instead of Eating at Nearby Fast-Food Restaurants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Dominique; Godin, Gaston

    2012-01-01

    Many schools have recently adopted food policies and replaced unhealthy products by healthy foods. Consequently, adolescents are more likely to consume a healthy meal if they stay in school for lunch to eat a meal either prepared at home or purchased in school cafeterias. However, many continue to eat in nearby fast-food restaurants. The present…

  3. A Consumer Evaluation of Air Force Food Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-07-01

    have decided to have an INEXPENSIVE NOON or EVENING MEAL. Would you prefer a cafeteria, self-service system or a waitress -service system? Self-service...345 > 2 E 4) 2 0 1 c O et 2 C Q CD CD CD a> ■Ii Waitress service 73 APPENDIX 11/ TABLE 28 Sex of Samples Male Female Totals Travis

  4. The Conceptualization of Violence-Prone School Subcontexts: Is the Sum of the Parts Greater than the Whole?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astor, Ron Avi; Meyer, Heather Ann

    2001-01-01

    Raises concerns about how context is conceptualized and researched in many current school violence inquiries, explaining that teachers' and students' understandings of violence in certain school subcontexts (hallways, bathrooms, and cafeterias) remains an under-researched area. Raises other concerns about lack of a philosophical discussion…

  5. Mixing It up with Purpose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holladay, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    The basketball players sit in a corner of the cafeteria. The rockers hang out near the stage. The ditchers and smokers congregate near the school gates. The JV football players and cheerleaders? They're near the field. This is how students at California's Hawthorne High described the typical lunch period at their school. In doing so, they also…

  6. Entre permanencias y reiteraciones: conversacion con el profesor Jesus Arroyo de la UNAM, a proposito de un curso sobre literatura y contabilidad

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pinzon-Pinto, Jorge Emiro

    2013-01-01

    ... en un intercambio institucional y entre sus tareas, surgio la de realizar un curso sobre literatura y contabilidad, dirigido a los profesores de la Facultad. En esta conversacion de cafeteria, el profesor Arroyo pudo referirse muy generosamente a las cosas que nos inquietan y se hacen importantes para nuestra vida intelectual; entonces, los intereses comun...

  7. 40 CFR 763.83 - Definitions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... a room, group of rooms, or homogeneous area (including crawl spaces or the space between a dropped ceiling and the floor or roof deck above), such as classroom(s), a cafeteria, gymnasium, hallway(s... means a program of work practices to maintain friable ACBM in good condition, ensure clean up of...

  8. Shoptalk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meade, Jeff

    1991-01-01

    Describes innovative programs for teaching elementary school students. In Illinois, students learn about the artists Raphael, Michelangelo, Leonardo, and Donatello using the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles. An Oregon program prints student poetry and places it on cafeteria tables. In rural Texas, students learn about restaurant etiquette through play…

  9. Creating a Learner-Centered Teaching Environment Using Student Choice in Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanewicz, Cheryl; Platt, Angela; Arendt, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Learner-centered teaching (LCT) has been found to be a more effective pedagogy for online students, as traditional teaching methods do not work well in online courses. Professors in an upper-level technology management class revised their online introductory course to incorporate cafeteria-style grading. This LCT approach allowed students to…

  10. Measuring Competitive Foods in Schools: A Point of Sales Approach. Nutrition Assistance Program Report Series. Report No. CN-04-CFMPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Rhoda; KewalRamani, Angelina; Nogales, Renee; Ohls, James; Sinclair, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This report describes research that Mathematica Policy Research, Inc. (MPR) has conducted for the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), to develop methods to track the use of "competitive foods" in schools over time. Competitive foods are foods from a la carte cafeteria sales, vending machines, school stores,…

  11. The State High Biodiesel Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heasley, Paul L.; Van Der Sluys, William G.

    2009-01-01

    Through a collaborative project in Pennsylvania, high school students developed a method for converting batches of their cafeteria's waste fryer oil into biodiesel using a 190 L (50 gal) reactor. While the biodiesel is used to supplement the school district's heating and transportation energy needs, the byproduct--glycerol--is used to make hand…

  12. 76 FR 16392 - Notice of Proposed Information Collection Requests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-23

    ... Number(s): N/A. Frequency of Responses: Annually. Affected Public: Businesses or other for-profit; State... who are blind as operators of vending facilities (including cafeterias, snack bars, vending machines... vending machine income received by the state from federal property managers can be distributed to blind...

  13. America's Assembly Line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nye, David Edwin

    A social history of the assembly line, invented in 1913. Both praised as a boon to consumers and as a curse for workers, it has been satirized, imitated, and celebrated for 100 years. It has inspired fiction, comedy, cafeteria layouts, and suburban housing. It transformed industrial labor...

  14. Junk food diet-induced obesity increases D2 receptor autoinhibition in the ventral tegmental area and reduces ethanol drinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jason B; Hendrickson, Linzy M; Garwood, Grant M; Toungate, Kelsey M; Nania, Christina V; Morikawa, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    Similar to drugs of abuse, the hedonic value of food is mediated, at least in part, by the mesostriatal dopamine (DA) system. Prolonged intake of either high calorie diets or drugs of abuse both lead to a blunting of the DA system. Most studies have focused on DAergic alterations in the striatum, but little is known about the effects of high calorie diets on ventral tegmental area (VTA) DA neurons. Since high calorie diets produce addictive-like DAergic adaptations, it is possible these diets may increase addiction susceptibility. However, high calorie diets consistently reduce psychostimulant intake and conditioned place preference in rodents. In contrast, high calorie diets can increase or decrease ethanol drinking, but it is not known how a junk food diet (cafeteria diet) affects ethanol drinking. In the current study, we administered a cafeteria diet consisting of bacon, potato chips, cheesecake, cookies, breakfast cereals, marshmallows, and chocolate candies to male Wistar rats for 3-4 weeks, producing an obese phenotype. Prior cafeteria diet feeding reduced homecage ethanol drinking over 2 weeks of testing, and transiently reduced sucrose and chow intake. Importantly, cafeteria diet had no effect on ethanol metabolism rate or blood ethanol concentrations following 2g/kg ethanol administration. In midbrain slices, we showed that cafeteria diet feeding enhances DA D2 receptor (D2R) autoinhibition in VTA DA neurons. These results show that junk food diet-induced obesity reduces ethanol drinking, and suggest that increased D2R autoinhibition in the VTA may contribute to deficits in DAergic signaling and reward hypofunction observed with obesity.

  15. Junk food diet-induced obesity increases D2 receptor autoinhibition in the ventral tegmental area and reduces ethanol drinking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrickson, Linzy M.; Garwood, Grant M.; Toungate, Kelsey M.; Nania, Christina V.; Morikawa, Hitoshi

    2017-01-01

    Similar to drugs of abuse, the hedonic value of food is mediated, at least in part, by the mesostriatal dopamine (DA) system. Prolonged intake of either high calorie diets or drugs of abuse both lead to a blunting of the DA system. Most studies have focused on DAergic alterations in the striatum, but little is known about the effects of high calorie diets on ventral tegmental area (VTA) DA neurons. Since high calorie diets produce addictive-like DAergic adaptations, it is possible these diets may increase addiction susceptibility. However, high calorie diets consistently reduce psychostimulant intake and conditioned place preference in rodents. In contrast, high calorie diets can increase or decrease ethanol drinking, but it is not known how a junk food diet (cafeteria diet) affects ethanol drinking. In the current study, we administered a cafeteria diet consisting of bacon, potato chips, cheesecake, cookies, breakfast cereals, marshmallows, and chocolate candies to male Wistar rats for 3–4 weeks, producing an obese phenotype. Prior cafeteria diet feeding reduced homecage ethanol drinking over 2 weeks of testing, and transiently reduced sucrose and chow intake. Importantly, cafeteria diet had no effect on ethanol metabolism rate or blood ethanol concentrations following 2g/kg ethanol administration. In midbrain slices, we showed that cafeteria diet feeding enhances DA D2 receptor (D2R) autoinhibition in VTA DA neurons. These results show that junk food diet-induced obesity reduces ethanol drinking, and suggest that increased D2R autoinhibition in the VTA may contribute to deficits in DAergic signaling and reward hypofunction observed with obesity. PMID:28859110

  16. [ANDALIES project: consumption, offer and promotion of healthy eating habits within secondary schools in Andalusia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Rodríguez, Angustias; García Padilla, Francisca M; Martos Cerezuela, Ildefonso; Silvano Arranz, Agustina; Fernández Lao, Isabel

    2015-04-01

    The school context stands out as one of the factors influencing the food practices of adolescents. Food consumption during the school day, the cafeterias' supply and the promotional activities proposed by the centers are objects of increasing attention to community health services. To describe students' eating habits during the school day; to analyze the food on offer by the cafeterias and surrounding establishments; and to assess whether secondary schools are suitable environments for the promotion of healthy eating habits. Cross-sectional study during 2010-2012 courses. Sampling units: public secondary schools (95) and students (8.068). Multistage cluster sampling: random and stratified selection by province and habitat size. Selection of students: systematic sampling of classrooms. 77.5% of students have breakfast at home: cereals and a dairy product (40.9%) or a liquid (29.2%); 70.3% eat something at school and most of them choose a cold meat sandwich. Fruit consumption is infrequent (2.5%) while packed juices are very common (63.3%). 75% eat sweets, the figure increasing significantly in schools with cafeterias. Cafeterias offer a large number of non-recommended products: soft drinks (97,3%), cold meats (91,8%), sweets and chips (89%). Lack of control of the products on offer is common (68.42%); only 28.4% of the managers know the law. 72.5% of the centers undertake isolated activities for the promotion of healthy eating habits. 71.5% of the centers are surrounded by shops that supply the students. Low protection of students' food health is evident, resulting from: students' nutritional deficits, the low quality of the food offered by the cafeterias and the lack of activities to encourage healthy habits. For which reason, educational, health and local administrations must accept shared responsibility on this subject. Copyright AULA MEDICA EDICIONES 2014. Published by AULA MEDICA. All rights reserved.

  17. The relationship between emotions and food consumption (macronutrient) in a foodservice college setting - a preliminary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwell, Heather J; Edwards, John S A; Brown, Lorraine

    2013-05-01

    Many aspects of eating out have been studied, yet emotions remain an under-researched area, despite having been shown to play a significant role in food consumption. The aim of this research is to critically evaluate the relationship between emotions and food consumption (macronutrient) in a realistic eating environment, a college cafeteria. Subjects (n = 408), diners using a cafeteria, completed an emotions questionnaire before and after freely choosing, paying for and consuming a hot main meal. The results demonstrated a greater feeling of contentment with a high fat, high energy meal, whereas with a low carbohydrate meal, participants felt unfulfilled. In addition, a high protein meal also leads to a feeling of contentment. These results are rather counter-intuitive to public health nutrition policy but indicate the importance of inclusion of a protein or high carbohydrate item in any dish design in a foodservice setting.

  18. Morfologia testicular de ratos Wistar obesos sedentários e submetidos a treinamento físico - doi: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v33i1.7698 Testicular morphology in obese and sedentary Wistar rats submitted to physical training - doi: 10.4025/actascihealthsci.v33i1.7698

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Marta Franzói de Moraes

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar morfologicamente os efeitos da dieta de cafeteria e o treinamento físico em esteira sobre o testículo de ratos Wistar. Ratos machos adultos foram divididos em grupos (sedentário-controle; sedentário-cafeteria; treinado-controle; e treinado-cafeteria. Para comprovar a instalação da obesidade calculou-se o índice de Lee e o peso dos tecidos adiposos periepididimal e retroperitoneal. A análise testicular envolveu o peso da gônada e após processamento histológico e coloração por Hematoxilina-Eosina, os parâmetros de diâmetro tubular, altura do epitélio seminífero, identificação dos tipos celulares presentes nos túbulos seminíferos, contagem de células e rendimento geral da espermatogênese. O aumento significativo do Índice de Lee e do peso dos tecidos adiposos, nos grupos que receberam dieta de cafeteria, comprovou a instalação da obesidade e indicou ser este um modelo adequado para induzir obesidade experimental. Não houve efeito da dieta ou do treinamento sobre o peso testicular, diâmetro tubular e altura do epitélio seminífero não havendo também diferenças na organização histológica dos testículos e túbulos seminíferos. Após quantificação celular e cálculo dos índices mitótico e meiótico e da capacidade total de suporte das células de Sertoli, verificamos efeito positivo do treinamento físico, independente da dieta recebida, sobre o rendimento geral da espermatogênese.The aim of this study was to morphologically evaluate the effects of the cafeteria diet and physical training on the testicles of adult Wistar rats. Adult male rats were divided into groups (sedentary-control, sedentary-cafeteria, trained-control, and trained-cafeteria In order to state the obesity condition both the Lee index and the weight of retroperitoneal and periepididymal adipose tissues were calculated. The testicular analysis involved the gonad weight and after the histological processing

  19. Nature and forensic investigation of crime in Second Life

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Rakitianskaia, AS

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available ?. C. Discrimination Discrimination is an act of prejudice against a person, based on their physical, mental, or social characteristics, e.g. gender, race, social status, or religion [20]. There are two types of discrimination, namely direct.... This is usually done by people feeling hate for the opposite gender for personal reasons. Indirect discrimination can be encountered in virtual workplaces in Second Life, such as virtual shops and virtual cafeterias. Similar to real life, virtual shop owners...

  20. United States Air Force F-35A Operational Basing Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2, Appendices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    to conclude that daycare centers and schools should not be located near major sources of noise, such as highways, airports, and industrial sites...Board meeting will take place on Tuesday, January 12th, 2010, at the SAF/AQ Conference and Innovation Center , 1550 Crystal Dr., Arlington, VA...Community Center , 32 Malletts Bay Avenue, Winooski, Vermont • Tuesday, January 26, 2010, Littleton High School (Cafeteria), 159 Oak Hill Avenue

  1. Integrating Monetary and Non-monetary Reenlistment Incentives Utilizing the Combinatorial Retention Auction Mechanism (CRAM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    unplanned EAOS losses. The simplest way to implement CRAM would be a “ cafeteria -style” plan where Sailors are given a menu of NMIs along with...Terry Rea, CAPT, USN Acting Dean, Graduate School of Business and Public Policy iv THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK v ABSTRACT This research... business objectives.”30 Additionally, employees must be educated as to the true value of their total compensation. This final point is

  2. The New Balance: Limited Armed Stabilization and the Future of U.S. Landpower

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    defense planning cafeteria - style. Defense capability options relevant to different points along a linear spectrum of conflict are presented as menu ...the business of deliberately assessing U.S. land forces in light of these circumstances. One good starting point is a comparison of two competing...practice on the ground. Thus, in unconventional contingencies abroad, U.S. land force leaders will remain in the business of responding to both

  3. Effects of physical activity calorie expenditure (PACE) labeling: study design and baseline sample characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viera, Anthony J; Tuttle, Laura; Olsson, Emily; Gras-Najjar, Julie; Gizlice, Ziya; Hales, Derek; Linnan, Laura; Lin, Feng-Chang; Noar, Seth M; Ammerman, Alice

    2017-09-12

    Obesity and physical inactivity are responsible for more than 365,000 deaths per year and contribute substantially to rising healthcare costs in the US, making clear the need for effective public health interventions. Calorie labeling on menus has been implemented to guide consumer ordering behaviors, but effects on calories purchased has been minimal. In this project, we tested the effect of physical activity calorie expenditure (PACE) food labels on actual point-of-decision food purchasing behavior as well as physical activity. Using a two-group interrupted time series cohort study design in three worksite cafeterias, one cafeteria was assigned to the intervention condition, and the other two served as controls. Calories from food purchased in the cafeteria were assessed by photographs of meals (accompanied by notes made on-site) using a standardized calorie database and portion size-estimation protocol. Primary outcomes will be average calories purchased and minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA) by individuals in the cohorts. We will compare pre-post changes in study outcomes between study groups using piecewise generalized linear mixed model regressions (segmented regressions) with a single change point in our interrupted time-series study. The results of this project will provide evidence of the effectiveness of worksite cafeteria menu labeling, which could potentially inform policy intervention approaches. Labels that convey information in a more readily understandable manner may be more effective at motivating behavior change. Strengths of this study include its cohort design and its robust data capture methods using food photographs and accelerometry.

  4. Effects of physical activity calorie expenditure (PACE labeling: study design and baseline sample characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony J. Viera

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity and physical inactivity are responsible for more than 365,000 deaths per year and contribute substantially to rising healthcare costs in the US, making clear the need for effective public health interventions. Calorie labeling on menus has been implemented to guide consumer ordering behaviors, but effects on calories purchased has been minimal. Methods In this project, we tested the effect of physical activity calorie expenditure (PACE food labels on actual point-of-decision food purchasing behavior as well as physical activity. Using a two-group interrupted time series cohort study design in three worksite cafeterias, one cafeteria was assigned to the intervention condition, and the other two served as controls. Calories from food purchased in the cafeteria were assessed by photographs of meals (accompanied by notes made on-site using a standardized calorie database and portion size-estimation protocol. Primary outcomes will be average calories purchased and minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity (MVPA by individuals in the cohorts. We will compare pre-post changes in study outcomes between study groups using piecewise generalized linear mixed model regressions (segmented regressions with a single change point in our interrupted time-series study. The results of this project will provide evidence of the effectiveness of worksite cafeteria menu labeling, which could potentially inform policy intervention approaches. Discussion Labels that convey information in a more readily understandable manner may be more effective at motivating behavior change. Strengths of this study include its cohort design and its robust data capture methods using food photographs and accelerometry.

  5. Validity of energy intake estimated by digital photography + recall in overweight and obese young adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptomey, Lauren T.; Willis, Erik A.; Honas, Jeffery J.; Mayo, Matthew S.; Washburn, Richard A.; Herrmann, Stephen D.; Sullivan, Debra K.; Donnelly, Joseph E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent reports have questioned the adequacy of self-report measures of dietary intake as the basis for scientific conclusions regarding the associations of dietary intake and health, and reports have recommended the development and evaluation of better methods for the assessment of dietary intake in free-living individuals. We developed a procedure that utilized pre- and post-meal digital photographs in combination with dietary recalls (DP+R) to assess energy intake during ad libitum eating in a cafeteria setting. Objective To compare mean daily energy intake of overweight and obese young adults assessed by a DP+R method with mean total daily energy expenditure assessed by doubly labelled water (TDEEDLW). Methods Energy intake was assessed using the DP+R method in 91 overweight and obese young adults (age = 22.9±3.2 yrs., BMI=31.2 ± 5.6 kg·m2, female = 49%) over 7-days of ad libitum eating in a University cafeteria. Foods consumed outside the cafeteria (i.e., snacks, non-cafeteria meals) were assessed using multiple-pass recall procedures using food models and standardized, neutral probing questions. TDEEDLW was assessed in all participants over the 14-day period. Results The mean energy intakes estimated by DP+R and TDEEDLW were not significantly different (DP+R = 2912 ± 661 kcal/d; TDEEDLW = 2849 ± 748 kcal/d, p = 0.42). The DP+R method overestimated TDEEDLW by 63 ± 750 kcal/d (6.8 ± 28%). Conclusion Results suggest that the DP+R method provides estimates of energy intake comparable to those obtained by TDEEDLW. PMID:26122282

  6. Naloxone treatment alters gene expression in the mesolimbic reward system in 'junk food' exposed offspring in a sex-specific manner but does not affect food preferences in adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gugusheff, J R; Ong, Z Y; Muhlhausler, B S

    2014-06-22

    We have previously reported that the opioid receptor blocker, naloxone, is less effective in reducing palatable food intake in offspring exposed to a maternal cafeteria diet during the perinatal period, implicating a desensitization of the central opioid pathway in the programming of food preferences. The present study aimed to investigate the effect of a maternal cafeteria diet and naloxone treatment on the development of the mesolimbic reward pathway and food choices in adulthood. We measured mRNA expression of key components of the reward pathway (mu-opioid receptor, proenkephalin, tyrosine hydroxylase, D1 and D2 receptors and the dopamine active transporter (DAT)) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and ventral tegmental area (VTA) of the offspring of control and cafeteria fed (JF) dams at weaning and after a 10-day naloxone treatment post-weaning and determined food preferences in adulthood in the remaining offspring. Naloxone treatment decreased the expression of DAT by 8.2 fold in female control offspring but increased it by 4.3 fold in female offspring of JF dams relative to the saline-injected reference groups. Proenkephalin mRNA expression was higher in the NAc of female JF offspring compared to controls, independent of naloxone treatment (Pfood preferences in adulthood in either control or JF offspring. These data indicate that prenatal exposure to a cafeteria diet alters the impact of opioid signaling blockade in the early post-weaning period on gene expression in the central reward pathway in a sex specific manner, but that these changes in gene expression do not appear to have any persistent impact on food preferences in adulthood. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Untitled

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    d from Cafeterias bulk (storage) after mixing with sterile plunger, using sterile apped container with 250 ml capacity. One bottle of ... borne disease generally or may not be reported (5.6). The problem in Ethiopian is not an ... (CFU)/ml, those from storage container had count of 1 *10 CFU/ml and the count reached 1 x 10° c. f. ...

  8. Průzkum stravovacích návyků u studentů FM VŠE

    OpenAIRE

    Jelínková, Barbora

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this bachelor thesis/study is to chart eating habits, bad eating habits, preferences of food and the way of catering by students of the bachelor degree at the Faculty of Management of the University of Economis in Prague. The final results of the study might be of use for decision making about the menu of catering facilities, which are established by the faculty (cafeteria, buffet). Furthermore, these informations might be beneficial for students themselves.

  9. Proposed Architecture and the Development of Nfcafe: an Nfc-based Android Mobile Applications for Trading Transaction System in Cafetaria

    OpenAIRE

    Nadra, Fikrul Arif; Kurniawan, Heri; Hilman, Muhammad Hafizhuddin

    2013-01-01

    The development of mobile technology and RFID leads to an innovative mobile payment technology by using NFC. One of the popular mobile device platforms today is Android. This research proposes an architecture of NFC-based payment system in cafeteria – which is called NFCafe – and the implementation of it in Android applications. It is a closed payment systems – without involving third parties such as banks. The security issue is handled by using symmetric and asymmetric encryptions, they are ...

  10. Short exposure to a diet rich in both fat and sugar or sugar alone impairs place, but not object recognition memory in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beilharz, Jessica E; Maniam, Jayanthi; Morris, Margaret J

    2014-03-01

    High energy diets have been shown to impair cognition however, the rapidity of these effects, and the dietary component/s responsible are currently unclear. We conducted two experiments in rats to examine the effects of short-term exposure to a diet rich in sugar and fat or rich in sugar on object (perirhinal-dependent) and place (hippocampal-dependent) recognition memory, and the role of inflammatory mediators in these responses. In Experiment 1, rats fed a cafeteria style diet containing chow supplemented with lard, cakes, biscuits, and a 10% sucrose solution performed worse on the place, but not the object recognition task, than chow fed control rats when tested after 5, 11, and 20 days. In Experiment 2, rats fed the cafeteria style diet either with or without sucrose and rats fed chow supplemented with sucrose also performed worse on the place, but not the object recognition task when tested after 5, 11, and 20 days. Rats fed the cafeteria diets consumed five times more energy than control rats and exhibited increased plasma leptin, insulin and triglyceride concentrations; these were not affected in the sucrose only rats. Rats exposed to sucrose exhibited both increased hippocampal inflammation (TNF-α and IL-1β mRNA) and oxidative stress, as indicated by an upregulation of NRF1 mRNA compared to control rats. In contrast, these markers were not significantly elevated in rats that received the cafeteria diet without added sucrose. Hippocampal BDNF and neuritin mRNA were similar across all groups. These results show that relatively short exposures to diets rich in both fat and sugar or rich in sugar, impair hippocampal-dependent place recognition memory prior to the emergence of weight differences, and suggest a role for oxidative stress and neuroinflammation in this impairment. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pine seed predation by mice: an experimental assessment of preference

    OpenAIRE

    Flores–Peredo, R.; Bolívar Cimé, B. S.

    2016-01-01

    Seed traits are considered an essential factor influencing rodents’ foraging preferences. We evaluated the mouse’s preferences for seeds of four pine species, Pinus patula, P. pseudostrobus, P. teocote and P. montezumae, that differ in length, width, nutritional content, and concentrated tannins. In ‘cafeteria experiments’ in the laboratory, we tested six of the nine mice species commonly found in the temperate forest of Southern Mexico. Longer and wider seeds were those of P. teocote and P. ...

  12. Analisis Tingkat Keberhasilan Pengusaha Kecil Di Sekitar Kampus (Studi Kasus Pada Pengusaha Kantin di Universitas Sumatera Utara)

    OpenAIRE

    Amaliasari, Astri

    2014-01-01

    The research aims to identify and analyze the influence of the location and the price to the success of canteen entrepreneurs around the campus of the Sumatera Utara University. The type of research is carried out based on the level of explanation is associative research. Population and sample in this research is the cafeteria entrepreneurs around the campus of the Sumatera Utara University. The results of this research indicate location and price variables significantly influence the s...

  13. Isolation of Campylobacter and Salmonella from houseflies (Musca domestica) in a university campus and a poultry farm in Selangor, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, L C; Saleha, A A; Wai, S S; Fauziah, N

    2011-04-01

    Insects, in particular house flies and cockroaches, have been shown to be associated with the spread of pathogens in livestock farms and in human disease outbreaks: among these pathogens are salmonellae and campylobacters. A total of 60 flies were caught in three locations: an animal teaching facility and a cafeteria in a university campus, and a poultry farm. Five percent (5%) and 13.3% of flies sampled were found to carry Campylobacter and Salmonella, respectively.

  14. Mobile Rah!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villano, Matt

    2006-01-01

    This article reports that at many institutions, fight songs are now playing all over campus: on the quad, on the bus, in the cafeteria, and sometimes (though not the ideal situation) even in class. Just about any place one would find a cellular phone, one can hear a school's fight song in all of its rah-rah glory. Thanks to a new and lucrative…

  15. German Universities Cope with a Novelty--Tuition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, Ian

    2008-01-01

    The past two years have not been easy for Axel Freimuth, rector of the University of Cologne. Students have doused him with water as he walked through the campus, taken his lunch in the cafeteria, and held a two-week sit-in at his wood-paneled office in the Hauptgebaude, or main building. Their anger at the rector arose from a controversial…

  16. JPRS Report, Science & Technology, Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-08-01

    Carso region; the services are the usual ones such as telephone , telex, and cafeteria. Director Mirano Sancin, however, explains that the most...Europe Bares Its Teeth" first paragraph is SCIENCES & AVENIR introduction] [Excerpts] Until now, the Americans and the Japanese have had a monopoly on...the merger between the semiconductor activities of the French Thomson-CSF group and the Italian STET [Turin Telephone Company]. According to Geyres

  17. Why did I Prefer to Vote for my Political Party?

    OpenAIRE

    Saxena, Stuti

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. The case study revolves around discussions by a group of students of a popular university in a cafeteria. State elections in Uttar Pradesh had just finished and students were wondering as to how the election results were against their pre-conceived notions. They were discussing about the reasons as to why they voted for their preferred political party as first-time voters. Overall, this case study purports to assess the impact of political parties’ branding on voters’ decision-makin...

  18. Undergraduate Training in the Epidemiology of Prostate Cancer with Focus on Genetics of Disease Progression and Quality of Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    727-8 7) Mutetwa B, Taioli E, Attong-Rogers A, Layne P, Roach V, Ragin C. Prostate cancer characteristics and survival in males of African Ancestry ...inclusion of pregnant women , children, or prisoners. If you would like to include these populations, please notify the IRB for further instruction...for men and women in classrooms, the cafeteria, Student Union or other indoor activities. This policy item does not apply to headgear considered as a

  19. Trialogue on the number of fundamental constants

    CERN Document Server

    Duff, Michael J; Veneziano, Gabriele

    2002-01-01

    This paper consists of three separate articles on the number of fundamental dimensionful constants in physics. We started our debate in summer 1992 on the terrace of the famous CERN cafeteria. In the summer of 2001 we returned to the subject to find that our views still diverged and decided to explain our current positions. LBO develops the traditional approach with three constants, GV argues in favor of just two, while MJD advocates zero.

  20. Give & Take

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, Gail

    2012-01-01

    Employees in a negotiation training workshop are chatting happily in a company cafeteria near San Francisco. They're not on break. They're on assignment. Their objective: to discover three things they didn't know--and wouldn't have guessed--about each other. The exercise isn't about the information, though. It's about the methods they used to get…

  1. [Purchase of local foods for school meals in Andalusia, the Canary Islands and the Principality of Asturias (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Panmela; Caballero, Pablo; Davó-Blanes, Mari Carmen

    To explore and compare the characteristics of Primary Education Centres (PEC) in Andalusia, the Canary Islands and the Principality of Asturias depending on whether or not they make local food purchases (LFP) for school meals and to explore the opinion of cafeteria managers about the benefits and challenges of this type of purchase. Information on the characteristics of 186 PECs and opinions of cafeteria managers about the benefits/challenges of LFP was collected through an electronic questionnaire. Data were stratified according to how the products were purchased (LFP: yes/no), and the chi square test was applied. 38.2% of the PECs studied make LFP. This is more frequent in rural areas (51.0 with self-managed cafeterias (80.0%), and their own kitchen (65.5%). These centres have less expensive menus than their peers (69.8%), participate more frequently in healthy eating programmes (81.5%) and purchase more organic food products (65.8%). According to the majority of the participants whose centres engage in LFP, the benefits include: supporting the local economy (97.2%), the offer of fresh foods (97.2%) and environmental sustainability (93.0%). The challenges include: productive capacity of the region (50.7%), the seasonal variation in food production (71.8%), and the lack of support (42.3%) and information from the government (46.5%). The location of the centres, the management of the cafeteria and the availability of a kitchen on site can influence the development of LFP in schools. Government support could help to integrate LFP in schools, improving school meals at a lower economic and environmental cost. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Effect of Coconut Oil Administration on Some Hemostatic Changes Associated with Obesity in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Fatma Ahmed Mohamed, Nehal Mohammad Bahgat

    2009-01-01

    In the last few decades, coconut oil was claimed to have some beneficial health effects, attributed mainly to its medium chain triglycerides. It was, thus, intriguing to investigate the potential benefit of coconut oil in alleviating the prothrombotic tendency often encountered in obese individuals. The present study was carried out on 44 rats, of both sexes, aged 10 days at the start of the study. 31 out of 44 rats were offered high caloric diet (the cafeteria diet) for induction of obesity....

  3. An Intervention to Increase Availability of Healthy Foods and Beverages in New York City Hospitals: The Healthy Hospital Food Initiative, 2010-2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, Alyssa; Krepp, Erica M; Johnson Curtis, Christine; Lederer, Ashley

    2016-06-09

    Hospitals serve millions of meals and snacks each year; however, hospital food is often unhealthy. Hospitals are ideal settings for modeling healthy eating, but few programs have sought to improve nutrition in all venues where food is served. The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene created the Healthy Hospital Food Initiative (HHFI) to improve the healthfulness of food served in hospitals. The HHFI built on prior work implementing mandatory nutrition standards for patient meals and vending in public hospitals. Public hospitals joined the HHFI by voluntarily adopting standards for cafeterias and cafés. Private hospitals joined by implementing nutrition standards for patient meals, food and beverage vending machines, and cafeterias and cafés. Hospitals were recruited from 2010 through 2014 and provided technical assistance from health department staff. Implementation in each of the 4 areas was monitored through on-site assessments and menu review. Twenty-eight hospital cafeterias and cafés were evaluated at baseline and at the end of the HHFI to assess changes. Sixteen public hospitals and 24 private hospitals joined the HHFI. Most (n = 18) private hospitals implemented standards in at least 2 areas. In cafeterias, most hospitals introduced a healthy value meal (n = 19), removed unhealthy items from the entrance and checkout (n = 18), increased whole grains to at least half of all grains served (n = 17), and reduced calories in pastries and desserts (n = 15). Most New York City hospitals joined the HHFI and voluntarily adopted rigorous nutrition standards. Partnerships between hospitals and local government are feasible and can lead to significant improvements in hospital food environments.

  4. Detecting Structural Heat Losses with Mobile Infrared Thermography. Part 3. Survey of USA CRREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-12-01

    convection. The horizontal black arrows point to insulated porcelain -enamel panels r 1 Figure 7. Northwest comer of cafeteria addition (metal building...Black arrows point to insulated porcelain -enamel panels. White arrow points to location of heal leak at roof- wall joint of metal building. (iVs...advantage in having a foyer (which can act as an air lock) leading into a building. Because of the insulating value of the airspace in the foyer, the

  5. After Action Report: Cursor On Target International User Group Meeting (2nd). Held on 1-2 April 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    food / drink, meeting expenses, security, parking, availability of meeting rooms for sidebar discussion (including Classified meetings) MITRE...is ready access to the cafeteria and Starbucks coffee bar in an area where all can travel without escort. Use of the ACME facilities adjacent to...4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 Physical Attendee ratings Facilities Audio/Visual Food Overall 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Content Networking Speakers Digital

  6. Joint Force Pre-Deployment Training: An Initial Analysis and Product Definition (Strategic Mobility 21: IT Planning Document for APS Demonstration Document (Task 3.7)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    local motels/hotels and had food service catered by a commercial cafeteria . Aircraft were prepared for shipping under contract and commercial...with Service and Joint Deployment Regulations. These same procedures and references will be available through the HELP Menu . The final selection of...reference manuals to be placed in the HELP Menu must be made during development of the final design. Scenario Parameters Screen This screen will

  7. Business Case Analysis: Increasing Air Force Dining Hall Use as an Alternative to Closure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    authorize officers to eat meals in the dining facility after determining other facilities, including NAF food activities, base exchange cafeteria ...to George Miller Jr., Chief of Air Force Food and Beverage Operations: 14 Aramark was hired to provide the full foodservice scheme: new menus , new...of food items. Aramark can change out the menu more rapidly than we can. A college feeding operation is what we’re driving ourselves toward” (King

  8. Habitability Improvements for Aircraft Carrier Messdecks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-01

    being "cooled," hot glasses cause milk to become warm. 5. Some of the messdeck crew need more training to provide improved cafeteria service. 6. The... menu is inconsistent. The larger number of crew seems to be a factor in a more limited menu since, for example, storing, preparing, and servit.g...the forward messdeck is a distinct eating area for a "fast-serve" menu . A dominant, distinctive color graphic was used, since parts of the space are

  9. Reduced-portion entr?es in a worksite and restaurant setting: impact on food consumption and waste

    OpenAIRE

    Berkowitz, Sarah; Marquart, Len; Mykerezi, Elton; Degeneffe, Dennis; Reicks, Marla

    2016-01-01

    Objective Large portion sizes in restaurants have been identified as a public health risk. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether customers in two different food-service operator segments (non-commercial worksite cafeteria and commercial upscale restaurant) would select reduced-portion menu items and the impact of selecting reduced-portion menu items on energy and nutrient intakes and plate waste. Design Consumption and plate waste data were collected for 5 weeks before and...

  10. Combinatorial Auction Theory Applied to the Selection of Surface Warfare Officer Retention Incentives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-12-01

    The authors used a reverse combinatorial auction to examine the effects of offering a “ menu ” of retention incentives. The following explanation of...the menu ), and the eight different combinations of non- traditional incentives (including “none” as an option), there are 64 unique packages that could...SWOCP model that is similar to a cafeteria auction, where officers would be guaranteed homeport, platform type, and job type but required to accept a

  11. One Size Does Not Fit All: Personalized Incentives in Military Compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-25

    ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AND ADDRESS(ES) Graduate School of Business & Public Policy Naval Postgraduate School 555 Dyer Road, Monterey, CA...personalized NMI packages in military compensation through a sealed-bid reverse auction, where service members select individual NMIs from a “ cafeteria ...Coughlan William R. Gates Research Associate Professor Dean Graduate School of Business & Graduate School of Business & Public Policy Public

  12. Operation of the PAVE PAWS Radar System at Beale Air Force Base, California. Part 1. Basic EIS & Appendices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-07-01

    cafeteria. Figure 1-3, p. 1-4, shows other facilities on the approximately 11-acre site, including an access road, parking areas, a gatehouse , fuel...constructed. Virtually all precipitation occurs during 6 months of the year, and drainage on the flat western portions of the base is a problem. The...tennis court) o Administration and support buildings 1.2.3.2.2 Demographics and Economics. Virtually all Mill Valley AFS personnel and their dependents

  13. Understanding the Regulation of Body Weight: A Focus on Eating Patterns, Energy Intake, and Metabolic Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    eating disorder (e.g., Anorexia Nervosa, Bulimia Nervosa, etc.) other than Binge Eating Disorder or who scored in the clinical depression range on the...provide you a list of local places where you can get help. Those individuals who meet criteria for some eating disorders (such as anorexia or bulimia ) will...schools for 226 overweight and normal weight children and adolescents (both male and female), cafeteria schedules were arranged to serve three, five, or

  14. Pengaruh Pengenceran Dan Pengadukan Limbah Dapur Daerah Ngesrep Terhadap Peningkatan Produksi Biogas Dengan Menggunakan Ekstrak Rumen Sapi Sebagai Starter

    OpenAIRE

    Soeroso, Mohammad Rama Fadillah; Sudarno, Sudarno; Wardhana, Irawan Wisnu

    2013-01-01

    The increase of oil prices affects economic activity in the world including Indonesia, it would encourage the government to develop renewable energy including biogas. Kitchen wastes have the potential to be a source of renewable energy, namely biogas. Food waste and kitchen activities in sufficient quantities from the cafeteria collected, and treated such as refining and homogenizing, then enter a stage of the substrate and its extracts as a source of rumen anaerobic bacteria into the batch r...

  15. Market potential for guinea fowl (Numidia meleagris) products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madzimure, James; Saina, Happyson; Ngorora, Grace P K

    2011-12-01

    The survey evaluated the market potential for guinea fowl (GF; Numidia meleagris) products in the city of Harare, Zimbabwe. Questionnaires were administered to traders/producers (n = 17), retailers (n = 12), cafeteria industry (n = 33) and consumers (n = 1,680) to establish their perceptions on guinea fowl products. The average household size was 6 ± 2. Each trader sold 10 ± 6.30 keets (mean ± standard error), 33 ± 15.05 growers, 20 ± 12.69 breeders and 20 ± 10.1 crates of 30 eggs per month. Each household consumed 2.5 ± 1.39 kg of GF meat and 3 ± 0.65 dozens of GF eggs per month. Retailers purchased 52 ± 44.42 crates of GF eggs and 41 ± 30.50/kg of GF meat whilst cafeteria purchased 33.6 ± 14 crates of GF eggs and 65.5 ± 33.52 kg of GF meat per month. Growers for breeding were the major product for sale by traders (94.1%) at a price of US$7.50 ± 1.74/bird. Different industries were offering different prices for guinea fowl products because of their scarcity on the market. The mean purchase price per crate of 30 guinea fowl eggs sold to the retail and cafeteria were US$3.00 ± 0.58 and US$4.50 ± 0.50, respectively. The mean purchase prices for GF meat was lower (P marketing of guinea fowl products included poor supply due to the absence of good road networks to connect source areas and the market, perishability of dressed chickens due to power cuts and poor publicity. Overall, the study showed that there is greater market potential for guinea fowl products and farmers can channel their products through traders, cafeteria and retail industries.

  16. Glucoamylase production from food waste by solid state fermentation and its evaluation in the hydrolysis of domestic food waste

    OpenAIRE

    Esra Uçkun Kiran; Antoine P. Trzcinski; Yu Liu

    2014-01-01

    In this study, food wastes such as waste bread, savory, waste cakes, cafeteria waste, fruits, vegetables and potatoes were used as sole substrate for glucoamylase production by solid state fermentation. Response surface methodology was employed to optimize the fermentation conditions for improving the production of high activity enzyme. It was found that waste cake was the best substrate for glucoamylase production. Among all the parameters studied, glucoamylase activity was significantly aff...

  17. The Availability of Competitive Foods and Beverages to Middle School Students in Appalachian Virginia Before Implementation of the 2014 Smart Snacks in School Standards

    OpenAIRE

    Mann, G.; Kraak, V; Serrano, E.

    2015-01-01

    The study objective was to examine the nutritional quality of competitive foods and beverages (foods and beverages from vending machines and à la carte foods) available to rural middle school students, before implementation of the US Department of Agriculture’s Smart Snacks in School standards in July 2014. In spring 2014, we audited vending machines and à la carte cafeteria foods and beverages in 8 rural Appalachian middle schools in Virginia. Few schools had vending machines. Few à la carte...

  18. Location of food consumption and travelers' diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjoa, W S; DuPont, H L; Sullivan, P; Pickering, L K; Holguin, A H; Olarte, J; Evans, D G; Evans, D J

    1977-07-01

    Daily food histories for one month were obtained in summer, 1975, from students attending a Mexican university to determine the influence of food consumption on the development and etiology of diarrhea. In newly-arrived students from the U.S. who ate half or more of their meals in the school cafeteria and public restaurants there were significant increases in diarrhea (p less than 0.005); shigella infection (p less than 0.05) and toxigenic E. coli infection (p less than 0.025) compared to the students eating a comparable number of meals in private homes. In the summer U.S. students there was also an association of diarrhea and eating from street vendors (p less than 0.05). In full-time U.S. students who had lived in Mexico a year or longer as well as in Latin American students a relationship between location of meals and occurrence of enteric disease was not apparent. High numbers of enteric bacteria were recovered from food from the school's cafeteria, public restaurants, street vendors and small grocery stores. Shigella were isolated from cooked and uncooked hamburger patties from the school cafeteria. Four shigella carriers were found among kitchen personnel at the school. This study demonstrates that food serves as a major vehicle through which travelers' diarrhea occurs.

  19. Antiobesogenic and Antiatherosclerotic Properties of Caralluma fimbriata Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soundararajan Kamalakkannan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There is evidence that the principles present in the widely consumed Indian food plant C. fimbriata extract (CFE suppress appetite, and provide antiobesogenic and metabolic benefits. The Diet-Induced Obesity (DIO rat model was used to investigate CFE's anorexigenic effects. Rats were randomly divided into three groups: (i untreated control (C, (ii control for cafeteria diet (CA, and (iii cafeteria diet fed + CFE treated. Rats in the test group received cafeteria diet and CFE from day one onwards. CFE was administered by gavage at three doses (25, 50, 100 mg/Kg BW per day for 90 days. The antiobesogenic effects of CFE were evaluated by monitoring changes in feed intake, body weight, serum lipid and hormonal (leptin profiles, fat pads, and liver weight. Antiatherosclerotic effects were measured by histology. CFE induced significant and dose-dependent inhibition of food intake, with dose-related prevention of gains in body weight, liver weight, and fat pad mass. Alterations in serum lipid profiles associated with weight gain were similarly inhibited, as were the typical increases in serum leptin levels. These data substantiate CFE's reported anorexigenic effects. CFE treatment also conferred protection against atherogenesis. We conclude that CFE possesses antiobesogenic and antiatherosclerotic properties.

  20. A Water Availability Intervention in New York City Public Schools: Influence on Youths’ Water and Milk Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijanovich, Tod; Abrams, Courtney; Cantor, Jonathan; Dunn, Lillian; Nonas, Cathy; Cappola, Kristin; Onufrak, Stephen; Park, Sohyun

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We determined the influence of “water jets” on observed water and milk taking and self-reported fluid consumption in New York City public schools. Methods. From 2010 to 2011, before and 3 months after water jet installation in 9 schools, we observed water and milk taking in cafeterias (mean 1000 students per school) and surveyed students in grades 5, 8, and 11 (n = 2899) in the 9 schools that received water jets and 10 schools that did not. We performed an observation 1 year after implementation (2011–2012) with a subset of schools. We also interviewed cafeteria workers regarding the intervention. Results. Three months after implementation we observed a 3-fold increase in water taking (increase of 21.63 events per 100 students; P schools. At 1 year, relative to baseline, there was a similar increase in water taking and no decrease in milk taking. Cafeteria workers reported that the water jets were simple to clean and operate. Conclusions. An environmental intervention in New York City public schools increased water taking and was simple to implement. PMID:25521867

  1. A water availability intervention in New York City public schools: influence on youths' water and milk behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbel, Brian; Mijanovich, Tod; Abrams, Courtney; Cantor, Jonathan; Dunn, Lillian; Nonas, Cathy; Cappola, Kristin; Onufrak, Stephen; Park, Sohyun

    2015-02-01

    We determined the influence of "water jets" on observed water and milk taking and self-reported fluid consumption in New York City public schools. From 2010 to 2011, before and 3 months after water jet installation in 9 schools, we observed water and milk taking in cafeterias (mean 1000 students per school) and surveyed students in grades 5, 8, and 11 (n=2899) in the 9 schools that received water jets and 10 schools that did not. We performed an observation 1 year after implementation (2011-2012) with a subset of schools. We also interviewed cafeteria workers regarding the intervention. Three months after implementation we observed a 3-fold increase in water taking (increase of 21.63 events per 100 students; Pschools. At 1 year, relative to baseline, there was a similar increase in water taking and no decrease in milk taking. Cafeteria workers reported that the water jets were simple to clean and operate. An environmental intervention in New York City public schools increased water taking and was simple to implement.

  2. Effect of compression ratio in a slow-acting compression hearing aid: paired-comparison judgments of quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuman, A C; Bakke, M H; Hellman, S; Levitt, H

    1994-09-01

    Paired-comparison judgments of quality were obtained from 20 hearing-impaired listeners (half with a small dynamic range and half with a large dynamic range) for speech-in-noise (vent, apartment, and cafeteria) processed through a slow-acting compression hearing aid. Compression ratio was varied (1, 1.5, 2, 3, 5, and 10:1). Compression threshold, attack time, and release time were fixed. Sound quality judgments were significantly affected by compression ratio, noise, and dynamic range. Preference decreased with increasing compression ratio. The selection of compression ratio. The selection of compression ratios compression ratios > 3:1. Less compression (no compression or 1.5:1) was preferred with the highest level noise (cafeteria noise) than with the lower level noises (vent or apartment). In particular, the small dynamic range group preferred compression with the vent and apartment noises (noise below the compression threshold), but preferred a linear hearing aid with the cafeteria noise (above the compression threshold). The large dynamic range group showed a slightly greater preference for the linear hearing aid for all three noises.

  3. Radiographic evaluation of the effect of obesity on alveolar bone in rats with ligature-induced periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    do Nascimento CM

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cassiane Merigo do Nascimento,1 Tiago Cassol,2 Fernanda Soares da Silva,3 Maria Lucia Bonfleur,4 Carlos Augusto Nassar,5 Patricia Oehlmeyer Nassar5 1Biologica Science and Health Center, State University of West Paraná (UNIOESTE, Cascavel, Paraná, Brazil; 2State University of West Paraná (UNIOESTE, Cascavel, Paraná, Brazil; Department of 3Pharmacy, 4Fisiology, 5Periodontology, Dental School, State University of West Paraná (UNIOESTE, Cascavel, Paraná, Brazil Abstract: There is evidence that the lack of metabolic control of obese patients may accelerate periodontitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate radiographically the effect of cafeteria-diet-induced obesity on alveolar bone loss in rats subjected to periodontal disease. Twenty male Wistar rats were randomly divided into four groups: 1 control group, 2 control and ligature group; 3 cafeteria group; and 4 cafeteria and ligature group. The animals were evaluated for obesity and euthanized, and the mandible of each rat was removed to perform a radiographic evaluation of alveolar bone loss and its effect on diet-induced obesity. The results showed greater alveolar bone loss in the mice in Group 4 (P<0.01. Thus, we concluded that obese mice, on average, showed greater radiographic evidence of alveolar bone loss than mice undergoing induction of obesity. Keywords: periodontal disease, radiography, obesity

  4. The Healthy School Canteen Programme: A Promising Intervention to Make the School Food Environment Healthier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fréderike Mensink

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The environment can exert a strong influence on people's food decisions. In order to facilitate students to make more healthy food choices and to develop healthy eating habits, it is important that the school food environment is healthy. The Healthy School Canteen programme of The Netherlands Nutrition Centre is an intervention that helps schools to make their cafeteria's offering healthier. A descriptive study was conducted by an independent research agency to survey the perceptions, experiences, and opinions of users of the programme (school directors, parents, students, and health professionals. Results show that directors and students of participating schools perceive their cafeteria's offering to be healthier after implementing the programme than prior to implementation. Next, further important results of the study are highlighted and relations with other projects, caveats, and practical recommendations are discussed. It is concluded that the Healthy School Canteen programme is a promising intervention to change the school food environment but that further research is needed to ultimately establish its effectiveness. Also, it will be a challenge to motivate all schools to enroll in the programme in order to achieve the goal of the Dutch Government of all Dutch school cafeterias being healthy by 2015.

  5. The Healthy School Canteen programme: a promising intervention to make the school food environment healthier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensink, Fréderike; Schwinghammer, Saskia Antoinette; Smeets, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    The environment can exert a strong influence on people's food decisions. In order to facilitate students to make more healthy food choices and to develop healthy eating habits, it is important that the school food environment is healthy. The Healthy School Canteen programme of The Netherlands Nutrition Centre is an intervention that helps schools to make their cafeteria's offering healthier. A descriptive study was conducted by an independent research agency to survey the perceptions, experiences, and opinions of users of the programme (school directors, parents, students, and health professionals). Results show that directors and students of participating schools perceive their cafeteria's offering to be healthier after implementing the programme than prior to implementation. Next, further important results of the study are highlighted and relations with other projects, caveats, and practical recommendations are discussed. It is concluded that the Healthy School Canteen programme is a promising intervention to change the school food environment but that further research is needed to ultimately establish its effectiveness. Also, it will be a challenge to motivate all schools to enroll in the programme in order to achieve the goal of the Dutch Government of all Dutch school cafeterias being healthy by 2015.

  6. A Trypsin Inhibitor from Tamarind Reduces Food Intake and Improves Inflammatory Status in Rats with Metabolic Syndrome Regardless of Weight Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana M. C. Carvalho

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Trypsin inhibitors are studied in a variety of models for their anti-obesity and anti-inflammatory bioactive properties. Our group has previously demonstrated the satietogenic effect of tamarind seed trypsin inhibitors (TTI in eutrophic mouse models and anti-inflammatory effects of other trypsin inhibitors. In this study, we evaluated TTI effect upon satiety, biochemical and inflammatory parameters in an experimental model of metabolic syndrome (MetS. Three groups of n = 5 male Wistar rats with obesity-based MetS received for 10 days one of the following: (1 Cafeteria diet; (2 Cafeteria diet + TTI (25 mg/kg; and (3 Standard diet. TTI reduced food intake in animals with MetS. Nevertheless, weight gain was not different between studied groups. Dyslipidemia parameters were not different with the use of TTI, only the group receiving standard diet showed lower very low density lipoprotein (VLDL and triglycerides (TG (Kruskal–Wallis, p < 0.05. Interleukin-6 (IL-6 production did not differ between groups. Interestingly, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α was lower in animals receiving TTI. Our results corroborate the satietogenic effect of TTI in a MetS model. Furthermore, we showed that TTI added to a cafeteria diet may decrease inflammation regardless of weight loss. This puts TTI as a candidate for studies to test its effectiveness as an adjuvant in MetS treatment.

  7. The Influence of Palatable Diets in Reward System Activation: A Mini Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Cristina de Macedo

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The changes in eating patterns that have occurred in recent decades are an important cause of obesity. Food intake and energy expenditure are controlled by a complex neural system involving the hypothalamic centers and peripheral satiety system (gastrointestinal and pancreatic hormones. Highly palatable and caloric food disrupts appetite regulation; however, palatable foods induce pleasure and reward. The cafeteria diet is such a palatable diet and has been shown consistently to increase body weight and induce hyperplasia in animal obesity models. Moreover, palatable high-fat foods (such as those of the cafeteria diet can induce addiction-like deficits in brain reward function and are considered to be an important source of motivation that might drive overeating and contribute to the development of obesity. The mechanism of neural adaptation triggered by palatable foods is similar to those that have been reported for nondrug addictions and long-term drug use. Thus, this review attempts to describe the potential mechanisms that might lead to highly palatable diets, such as the cafeteria diet, triggering addiction, or compulsion through the reward system.

  8. Examination of the Food and Nutrient Content of School Lunch Menus of Two School Districts in Mississippi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavon Young

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the diet quality of the school meals in two Mississippi school districts and compared them to the national guidelines. We examined the lunch menus of the two school districts that participated in the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program focusing on food quality and assessing both healthy and unhealthy foods and eating behaviors. This analysis was completed through a computerized review used to accurately determine the nutrient content. Both the standard and the alternative meals provided by the cafeterias in the two school districts exceeded the minimum requirement for calories for all grade levels. The meals from the urban schools cafeteria provide more calories than meals from the cafeteria in the rural school district. Although schools believe that they are making positive changes to children’s diets, the programs are falling short of the nutrient recommendations. Poor nutrition and improper dietary practices are now regarded as important risk factors in the emerging problems of obesity, diabetes mellitus, hypertension and other chronic diseases, with excessive energy intake listed as a possible reason. Dieticians, school professionals and other health care practitioners need to accurately assess energy intake and adequately promote a dietary responsible lifestyle among children.

  9. Morfologia testicular de ratos Wistar obesos sedentários e submetidos a treinamento físico = Testicular morphology in obese and sedentary Wistar rats submitted to physical training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ken Sekine Takashiba

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar morfologicamente os efeitos da dieta de cafeteria e o treinamento físico em esteira sobre o testículo de ratos Wistar. Ratos machos adultos foram divididos em grupos (sedentário-controle; sedentário-cafeteria; treinado-controle; e treinadocafeteria. Para comprovar a instalação da obesidade calculou-se o índice de Lee e o peso dos tecidos adiposos periepididimal e retroperitoneal. A análise testicular envolveu o peso da gônada e após processamento histológico e coloração por Hematoxilina-Eosina, os parâmetros de diâmetro tubular, altura do epitélio seminífero, identificação dos tipos celulares presentes nos túbulos seminíferos, contagem de células e rendimento geral da espermatogênese. O aumento significativo do Índice de Lee e do peso dos tecidos adiposos, nos grupos que receberam dieta de cafeteria, comprovou a instalação da obesidade e indicou ser este um modelo adequado para induzir obesidade experimental. Não houve efeito da dieta ou do treinamento sobre o peso testicular, diâmetro tubular e altura do epitélio seminífero não havendo também diferenças na organização histológica dos testículos e túbulos seminíferos. Após quantificação celular e cálculo dos índices mitótico e meiótico e da capacidade total de suporte das células de Sertoli, verificamos efeito positivo do treinamento físico, independente da dieta recebida, sobre o rendimento geral da espermatogênese.The aim of this study was to morphologically evaluate the effects of the cafeteria diet and physical training on the testicles of adult Wistar rats. Adult male rats were divided into groups (sedentary-control, sedentary-cafeteria, trained-control, and trainedcafeteriaIn order to state the obesity condition both the Lee index and the weight of retroperitoneal and periepididymal adipose tissues were calculated. The testicular analysis involved the gonad weight and after the histological processing

  10. Factors across home, work, and school domains influence nutrition and physical activity behaviors of nontraditional college students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quintiliani, Lisa M; Bishop, Hillary L; Greaney, Mary L; Whiteley, Jessica A

    2012-10-01

    Nontraditional college students (older, part-time, and/or working) have less healthful nutrition and physical activity behaviors compared to traditional students, yet few health promotion efforts focus on nontraditional students. The purpose of this study was to use qualitative methods to explore factors affecting nutrition and physical activity behaviors of nontraditional students. Fourteen semi-structured individual interviews were conducted with nontraditional undergraduate students attending a large university. The sample had a median age of 25 (range, 21-64), 57% were men, 43% were racial/ethnic minorities, and 57% were employed (mean 22 hours/week). Data were coded using a systematic team-based approach. Consistent themes (mentioned by 4+ students) were identified and categorized into three domains: home, work, and school. Home (themes: neighborhood characteristics, family, partners), work (theme: work environment), and school (themes: cafeteria, vending machines) factors consistently influenced positive nutrition behaviors. Similarly, home (themes: neighborhood including safety, friends from home, partner,), work (theme: work environment), and school (themes: not having a car, campus structure, campus gym, friends at school) factors consistently influenced positive physical activity. Financial resources and perceptions of autonomy had influence across domains. Results indicate consistent influences on nutrition and physical activity behaviors across home, work, and school domains for nontraditional college students. Study findings suggest possible, and sometimes unconventional, intervention strategies to promote healthful eating and physical activity. For example, when cafeteria meal plans are not offered and financial constraints limit eating at the cafeteria, encouraging healthful choices from vending machines could be preferable to not eating at all. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. A tannin-blocking agent does not modify the preference of sheep towards tannin-containing plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Orduño, G; Torres-Acosta, J F J; Sandoval-Castro, C A; Capetillo-Leal, C M; Aguilar-Caballero, A J; Alonso-Díaz, M A

    2015-06-01

    Sheep have been suggested to use their senses to perceive plant properties and associate their intake with consequences after ingestion. However, sheep with browsing experience do not seem to select against tannin-rich browsing materials in cafeteria trials. Thus, the objective of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between the chemical composition, selectivity index (SI), preference and intake rate (IR) of tannin-containing forage trees offered to sheep in cafeteria experiments. Four trees were selected for their condensed tannin content and their varying biological activities. Havardia albicans (high biological activity), Leucaena leucocephala (medium biological activity), Acacia gaumeri (low biological activity) and Brosimum alicastrum (very low biological activity) were used in this study. Ten hair sheep (23.7kg±1.43LW) with eight months of browsing experience in native vegetation were used in this study. Polyethylene glycol (PEG 3600MW) was administered to five sheep during all experiments. In experiment 1, fresh foliage from all trees was offered ad libitum for 4h. In experiment 2, B. alicastrum was withdrawn and the preference was determined again. The forage preference in experiment 1 was A. gaumeri (14.77gDM/kgLW)>B. alicastrum (11.77gDM/kgLW)>H. albicans (3.71gDM/kgLW)=L. leucocephala (1.87gDM/kgLW) (PH. albicans=L. leucocephala. PEG administration had no effect on the preference or IR. The intake rate seemed to have been affected by the plant density. Moreover, fiber compounds were found to be better predictors of DM intake than polyphenolic compounds at levels typically found in the evaluated forages. It was concluded that tannins and PEG did not modify the preferences of sheep in cafeteria trials. Thus, tannins are not involved in the preference regulation of animals with browsing experience. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Rationale, design and methods of the HEALTHY study nutrition intervention component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillis, B; Mobley, C; Stadler, D D; Hartstein, J; Virus, A; Volpe, S L; El ghormli, L; Staten, M A; Bridgman, J; McCormick, S

    2009-08-01

    The HEALTHY study was a randomized, controlled, multicenter and middle school-based, multifaceted intervention designed to reduce risk factors for the development of type 2 diabetes. The study randomized 42 middle schools to intervention or control, and followed students from the sixth to the eighth grades. Here we describe the design of the HEALTHY nutrition intervention component that was developed to modify the total school food environment, defined to include the following: federal breakfast, lunch, after school snack and supper programs; a la carte venues, including snack bars and school stores; vending machines; fundraisers; and classroom parties and celebrations. Study staff implemented the intervention using core and toolbox strategies to achieve and maintain the following five intervention goals: (1) lower the average fat content of foods, (2) increase the availability and variety of fruits and vegetables, (3) limit the portion sizes and energy content of dessert and snack foods, (4) eliminate whole and 2% milk and all added sugar beverages, with the exception of low fat or nonfat flavored milk, and limit 100% fruit juice to breakfast in small portions and (5) increase the availability of higher fiber grain-based foods and legumes. Other nutrition intervention component elements were taste tests, cafeteria enhancements, cafeteria line messages and other messages about healthy eating, cafeteria learning laboratory (CLL) activities, twice-yearly training of food service staff, weekly meetings with food service managers, incentives for food service departments, and twice yearly local meetings and three national summits with district food service directors. Strengths of the intervention design were the integration of nutrition with the other HEALTHY intervention components (physical education, behavior change and communications), and the collaboration and rapport between the nutrition intervention study staff members and food service personnel at both school

  13. Ablation of TRPM5 in Mice Results in Reduced Body Weight Gain and Improved Glucose Tolerance and Protects from Excessive Consumption of Sweet Palatable Food when Fed High Caloric Diets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie H Larsson

    Full Text Available The calcium activated cation channel transient receptor potential channel type M5 (TRPM5 is part of the downstream machinery of the taste receptors and have been shown to play a central role in taste signalling. In addition it is also found in other types of chemosensory cells in various parts of the body as well as in pancreatic β-cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of TRPM5 gene ablation on body weight, insulin sensitivity and other metabolic parameters in long-term high caloric diet induced obesity. Trpm5-/- mice gained significantly less body weight and fat mass on both palatable carbohydrate and fat rich cafeteria diet and 60% high fat diet (HFD and developed less insulin resistance compared to wild type mice. A main finding was the clearly improved glucose tolerance in Trpm5-/- mice compared to wild type mice on cafeteria diet, which was independent of body weight. In addition, it was shown that Trpm5-/- mice consumed the same amount of calories when fed a HFD only or a HFD in combination with a palatable chocolate ball, which is in contrast to wild type mice that increased their caloric intake when fed the combination, mainly due to excessive consumption of the chocolate ball. Thus the palatable sugar containing diet induced overeating was prevented in Trpm5-/- mice. This indicates that sweet taste induced overeating may be a cause for the increased energy intake and glucose intolerance development seen for wild type mice on a sugar and high fat rich cafeteria diet compared to when on a high fat diet. This study point to an important role for the taste signalling system and TRPM5 in diet induced glucose intolerance.

  14. Long-term impact of a chef on school lunch consumption: findings from a 2-year pilot study in Boston middle schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Juliana F W; Smit, Liesbeth A; Parker, Ellen; Austin, S Bryn; Frazier, A Lindsay; Economos, Christina D; Rimm, Eric B

    2012-06-01

    School cafeterias can play an important role in providing healthy meals. Although schools participating in the National School Lunch Program are required to meet minimum program standards, advocates recommend that innovations be sought to enhance menu dietary quality. This study evaluated the Chef Initiative, a 2-year pilot study in two Boston middle schools, designed to increase the availability and consumption of healthier school foods. Between 2007 and 2009, a professional chef trained cafeteria staff to prepare healthier school lunches (ie, more whole grains, fresh/frozen fruits and vegetables, and less sugar, salt, saturated fats, and trans fats). Meal nutrient compositions were monitored from 2007 to 2009, and a plate waste study conducted in the spring of 2009 compared food selection and consumption patterns among students at Chef Initiative schools, with students receiving standard school lunches at two matched control schools. Paired t tests and descriptive statistics were used to examine differences in menus and mixed-model analysis of variance was used to analyze differences in students' food selection and consumption between Chef Initiative and control schools. Overall, the Chef Initiative schools provided healthier lunches and the percent of foods consumed at Chef Initiative and control schools were similar (61.6% vs 57.3%; P=0.63). Of the areas targeted, there was greater whole-grain selection and vegetable consumption; 51% more students selected whole grains (P=0.02) and students consumed 0.36 more vegetable servings/day (P=0.01) at Chef Initiative schools. The potential of chefs collaborating with cafeteria staff to improve the availability, selection, and consumption of healthier meals is promising. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Reduced-portion entrées in a worksite and restaurant setting: impact on food consumption and waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkowitz, Sarah; Marquart, Len; Mykerezi, Elton; Degeneffe, Dennis; Reicks, Marla

    2016-11-01

    Large portion sizes in restaurants have been identified as a public health risk. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether customers in two different food-service operator segments (non-commercial worksite cafeteria and commercial upscale restaurant) would select reduced-portion menu items and the impact of selecting reduced-portion menu items on energy and nutrient intakes and plate waste. Consumption and plate waste data were collected for 5 weeks before and 7 weeks after introduction of five reduced-size entrées in a worksite lunch cafeteria and for 3 weeks before and 4 weeks after introduction of five reduced-size dinner entrées in a restaurant setting. Full-size entrées were available throughout the entire study periods. A worksite cafeteria and a commercial upscale restaurant in a large US Midwestern metropolitan area. Adult worksite employees and restaurant patrons. Reduced-size entrées accounted for 5·3-12·8 % and 18·8-31·3 % of total entrées selected in the worksite and restaurant settings, respectively. Food waste, energy intake and intakes of total fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, Na, fibre, Ca, K and Fe were significantly lower when both full- and reduced-size entrées were served in the worksite setting and in the restaurant setting compared with when only full-size entrées were served. A relatively small proportion of reduced-size entrées were selected but still resulted in reductions in overall energy and nutrient intakes. These outcomes could serve as the foundation for future studies to determine strategies to enhance acceptance of reduced-portion menu items in restaurant settings.

  16. Survey of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus and intestinal parasites among food handlers working at Gondar University, Northwest Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagnew Mulat

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Food borne disease are major health problems in developing countries like Ethiopia. Food handlers with poor personal hygiene working in food establishments could be potential sources of disease due to pathogenic organisms. However; information on disease prevalence among food handlers working in University of Gondar cafeterias are very scarce. The aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus, their drug resistance pattern and prevalence of intestinal parasites among food handlers working in University of Gondar student’s cafeterias. Method A cross sectional study was conducted among food handlers working in University of Gondar student’s cafeterias. A pretested structured questionnaire was used for collecting data. Nasal swab and stool were investigated for S. aureus and intestinal parasites; respectively as per the standard of the laboratory methods. Results Among 200 food handlers, females comprised 171(85.5%. The majority (67.5% of the food-handlers were young adults aged 18–39 years. One hundred ninety four (97% of the food handlers were not certified as a food handler. Forty one (20.5% food handlers were positive for nasal carriage of S. aureus, of these 4(9.8% was resistant for methicilin. Giardia lamblia was the most prevalent parasites 22 (11%, followed by Ascaris lumbricoides 13(6.5%, Entamoeba histolytica 12 (6%, Strongyloides stercolaris (0.5, Taenia species 1(0.5% and Schistosoma mansoni 1(0.5%. Conclusion The finding stressed that food handlers with different pathogenic micro organisms may pose significant risk on the consumers. Higher officials should implement food handler’s training on food safety, periodic medical checkup and continuous monitoring of personal hygiene of food handlers.

  17. Green tea polyphenols change the profile of inflammatory cytokine release from lymphocytes of obese and lean rats and protect against oxidative damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina, N; Bolin, A P; Otton, R

    2015-10-01

    This study aimed to investigate whether green tea polyphenols (GT) modulate some functional parameters of lymphocytes from obese rats. Male Wistar rats were treated with GT by gavage (12 weeks/5 days/week; 500 mg/kg of body weight) and obesity was induced by cafeteria diet (8 weeks). Lymphocytes were obtained from mesenteric lymph nodes for analyses. In response to the cafeteria diet we observed an increase in activity of the metabolic enzyme hexokinase, ROS production, MnSOD, CuZnSOD and GR enzyme activities and proliferation capacity of the cells (baseline), whereas IL-10 production was decreased. Obese rats treated with GT decreased cell proliferation (under ConA stimulation). Hexokinase and G6PDH activity, ROS production and MnSOD, CuZnSOD, GPx and GR enzymes remained increased, accompanied by an increase in Nrf2 mRNA level. There was a decrease in pro-inflammatory IL-2, IL-6, IL-1β, TNF-α cytokines that were accompanied by a decrease in the mRNA level of TRL4 while IL-10 production was increased in obese rats treated with GT. GT treatment of lean rats showed similar results to that of obese rats treated with GT, indicating that the effects of GT are independent of diet. Foxp3 and IRF4 mRNA levels were increased by GT. In conclusion, cafeteria diet modulated the function of lymphocytes from lymph nodes, increasing ROS production and decreasing anti-inflammatory IL-10, which could contribute to the inflammatory state in obesity. GT reduced ROS production, improving the redox status and reducing pro-inflammatory cytokine production by lymphocytes, suggesting that GT treatment may be driving lymphocytes to a more anti-inflammatory than pro-inflammatory microenvironment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Education and Computers: An AI (Artificial Intelligence) Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-10-01

    business contexts. e- .7-. • :. ’_. _ ’’-’- -’-’" - -’" ’ " II S’liank and Slade 28 EilIcafioti arid (Colputers 4.1.5 Don’t violate expectations There...common way to request input is through a highlighted menu for which the space bar cycles through each item, and the return key selects the current item...computer to the Sti(1,-Ilt. Vttll 1" to pilt tII, utachine in thte cafeteria so that, the students- could instantly find out the * uttu~wtrit tetual %:flue

  19. Exploiting anti-obesity mechanism of Clerodendrum phlomidis against two different models of rodents

    OpenAIRE

    Chidrawar, Vijay R.; Krishnakant N Patel; Shiromwar, Shruti S.; Kshirsagar, Ajay D.

    2011-01-01

    Roots of Clerodendrum phlomidis are used by the local people of Dibrugarh district of Assam state India as a dietary supplement for treating weight issues and are also mentioned in the traditional system of Indian medicine as a remedy for obesity. We examined the anti-obesity effect of Clerodendrum phlomidis (family Verbenaceae) L. roots against cafeteria diet (CD) and progesterone-induced obesity. In CD-induced model obesity was induced by feeding CD for 48-days and increase in body weight a...

  20. 熊本高専八代キャンパス女子寮増改築計画,北寮食堂周辺・中庭整備計画の提案

    OpenAIRE

    磯田, 節子; 五十川, 読

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the renovation plan of enlargement of our women’s dormitory with reference to Ochadai SCC and Kurume Kosen’s women’s dormitory. And also it discusses the improvement of our dormitory’s student cafeteria and courtyard. Recently female students are increasing and our women’s dormitory become short. On the other hand, our men’s dormitory is increasing vacancies. So, we have proposed the renovation of men’s dormitory to the women’s dormitory. The dormitory is the most importa...

  1. Novel thioamide derivatives as neutral CB1 receptor antagonists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boström, Jonas; Olsson, Roine I; Tholander, Joakim; Greasley, Peter J; Ryberg, Erik; Nordberg, Henrik; Hjorth, Stephan; Cheng, Leifeng

    2010-01-15

    A novel class of cannabinoid-1 (CB1) receptor antagonists for the treatment of obesity is presented. The carboxamide linker in a set of 5,6-diaryl-pyrazine-2-amide derivatives was transformed into the corresponding thioamide, by using a one-pot synthesis. The structural series of thioamides not only showed retained CB1 potency (below 10nM), but also showed improved solubility. In addition, the neutral antagonist 2c significantly reduced body weight in cafeteria diet obese mice. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Er etnisk identitet kun for minoriteter?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steensen, Jette Johanne Elisabeth

    2010-01-01

    Kapitlet bygger på indsigter fra kritisk multikulturel pædagogik, som anvender racismebegrebet i bredere betydning end vi sædvanligvis forstår det i Danmark og spørger om ikke etniske minoriteter i Danmark kan siges at blive udsat for racisme. Kapitlet introducerer vigtige pointer fra Beverely Ta...... Tatums bog: " Why are all the black kids sitting together in the cafeteria? Tatum definerer begrebet racisme som et " system of advantage based on race" og pointen hermed er, at det ikke bare drejer sig om individuelle fordomme, men om strukturel ulighed....

  3. LIMITED RESTAURANT SERVICE: WHITSUNTIDE WEEKEND

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Details of the arrangements to ensure the provision of a restaurant service during the Whitsuntide weekend are given below. On all the days indicated, hot meals will be served from 11h30 to 14h00 and 18h00 to 19h30. DATE RESTAURANT No. Opening times Saturday, June 7 1 08h00 - 21h00 2 and 3 closed Sunday, June 8 1 08h00 - 21h00 2 and 3 closed Monday, June 9 1 08h00 - 21h00 2 and 3 closed SATELLITE CAFETERIAS (Bldgs. 30, 40, 54) and the KIOSK will be closed on 7, 8 and 9 June.

  4. "Nutritional Wastelands": Vending Machines, Fast Food Outlets, and the Fight over Junk Food in Canadian Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidney, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    In light of a growing obesity crisis among children and concern about junk food in schools, this article investigates the attempt by food and beverage companies to gain entry into Canadian schools. Focusing in particular on the introduction of fast-food franchises in cafeterias and on school boards' secret exclusivity deals with soft drink manufacturers in the 1990s, it examines how and why this process occurred, public reactions to it, and government responses. Placing this phenomenon within a larger pattern of commercialization in North American schools, it argues that long-lasting reforms require government intervention and enforcement.

  5. User-centric design of a personal assistance robot (FRASIER) for active aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padir, Taşkin; Skorinko, Jeanine; Dimitrov, Velin

    2015-01-01

    We present our preliminary results from the design process for developing the Worcester Polytechnic Institute's personal assistance robot, FRASIER, as an intelligent service robot for enabling active aging. The robot capabilities include vision-based object detection, tracking the user and help with carrying heavy items such as grocery bags or cafeteria trays. This work-in-progress report outlines our motivation and approach to developing the next generation of service robots for the elderly. Our main contribution in this paper is the development of a set of specifications based on the adopted user-centered design process, and realization of the prototype system designed to meet these specifications.

  6. Retail food reform: How to effectively bridge what we say and what we do in our hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dojeiji, Laurie; Taylor, Andra; Boland, Cholly; Brennan, Carolyn; Penney, Randy

    2017-03-01

    Hospital leaders in Eastern Ontario, Canada, have acknowledged the critical role of food to health and the need for progressive change that goes beyond personal responsibility paradigms. The Healthy Foods in Champlain Hospitals program aims to create supportive, healthy nutrition environments in hospital retail food settings. Twenty independent hospital corporations have collectively initiated a plan to transition cafeteria, vending, franchise, and volunteer operations towards healthier offerings. Hospitals are actively implementing a set of progressively phased, evidence-based nutrition criteria, which cover food and beverage categories, preparation methods, product placement, and provision of nutrition information. Implementation strategies and successes, as well as challenges and limitations, are discussed.

  7. Nourishing a partnership to improve middle school lunch options: a community-based participatory research project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Stephanie M; Kay, Joseph S; Lin, Grace C

    2015-01-01

    Community-based participatory research is predicated on building partnerships that tackle important issues to the community and effectively improve these issues. Community-based participatory research can also be an empowering experience, especially for children. This article describes a university-community partnership in which students at a low-income middle school worked to improve the quality of the cafeteria food provided to the 986 students eligible for free and reduced price lunches. The project led to menu changes, improved communication between youth, school administrators, and district staff, and enabled youth to enact school improvements that were beneficial for their health.

  8. Plan de negocios para la creación de una microempresa de servicio de cafetería gourmet en la ciudad de Cuenca, sector centro histórico

    OpenAIRE

    Tapia Jaya, Mercy Carolina

    2015-01-01

    El documento consiste en un análisis del macro y micro entorno del mercado de servicio de cafetería en la ciudad de Cuenca con el fin de proponer un perfil de negocio (orientado al servicio gourmet), que permita ingresar a un mercado cada vez más competitivo y atraer a clientes potenciales. Por último determinar la viabilidad que tendrá el negocio. The document consists of an analysis of the macro and micro market environment of cafeteria service in the city of Cuenca in order to propose a...

  9. Diseño de un plan de negocio Minimarket Carmita en el cantón Suscal provincia del Cañar

    OpenAIRE

    Pomaquiza Illescas, Luz Carmita

    2015-01-01

    Se analiza la situación actual del negocio con una propuesta de mejorar el servicio con la implementación de una cafetería acompañado de un producto tradicional el chivil, para ello es necesario estructurar costos, gastos, determinar ventas, inversión y la forma de financiamiento para la ejecución del negocio y tomar una decisión de invertir si es rentable. The current business situation is analyzed with a proposal to improve service by implementing a cafeteria accompanied by a traditional...

  10. Plan de negocios para la implementación de una cafetería móvil en la ciudad de Guayaquil

    OpenAIRE

    Villacis Delgado, Evelyn Paola; Peralta Lopez, Paola Esther; Gaibor Loaiza, Frank Rommel

    2009-01-01

    We though in this Project due to in this times most of the people from 20 years old have a very accelerate style of life so they have to do several activities and often they do not have time to prepare at their homes their breakfast or any aperitif that complements their meals, some of them choose to not have breakfast so they take the risk of get any digestive sickness, because of this we decide to create CoffyPan , which is about to offer a fast service Cafeteria through a vehi...

  11. America's Assembly Line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nye, David Edwin

    A social history of the assembly line, invented in 1913. Both praised as a boon to consumers and as a curse for workers, it has been satirized, imitated, and celebrated for 100 years. It has inspired fiction, comedy, cafeteria layouts, and suburban housing. It transformed industrial labor...... and provoked strikes and union drives in the 1930s, but became a symbol of victory in the Second World War and Cold War. Reinvented by Japan as "lean production" and then increasingly automated after 1990, it remains a cornerstone of production but no longer employs many workers, even as it evolves toward...

  12. PROPOSED ARCHITECTURE AND THE DEVELOPMENT OF NFCAFE: AN NFC-BASED ANDROID MOBILE APPLICATIONS FOR TRADING TRANSACTION SYSTEM IN CAFETARIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikrul Arif Nadra

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The development of mobile technology and RFID leads to an innovative mobile payment technology by using NFC. One of the popular mobile device platforms today is Android. This research proposes an architecture of NFC-based payment system in cafeteria – which is called NFCafe – and the implementation of it in Android applications. It is a closed payment systems – without involving third parties such as banks. The security issue is handled by using symmetric and asymmetric encryptions, they are RSA and AES. The application has been developed and successfully passed the testing conducted by several respondents.

  13. Eating to save wildlife

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerris, Mickey; Birkved, Morten; Gamborg, Christian

    2016-01-01

    , could be: Does it make sense to work for conservation by preserving animal species in captivity while selling food to visitors that may be undermining this effort? Complicating the issue is that zoos and aquariums are dependent on generating a profit from “non-core” services such as cafeterias...... and the like to generate funds for running the zoo, and conceivably, in turn for conservation purposes - funds that might diminish if zoos and aquariums do not sell a variety of food products, including animal-based ones to their visitors. The main question addressed by this paper is: If zoos and aquariums...

  14. A Systematic Review of Calorie Labeling and Modified Calorie Labeling Interventions: Impact on Consumer and Restaurant Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bleich, Sara N; Economos, Christina D; Spiker, Marie L; Vercammen, Kelsey A; VanEpps, Eric M; Block, Jason P; Elbel, Brian; Story, Mary; Roberto, Christina A

    2017-12-01

    Evidence on the effects of restaurant calorie labeling on consumer and restaurant behavior is mixed. This paper examined: (1) consumer responses to calorie information alone or compared to modified calorie information and (2) changes in restaurant offerings following or in advance of menu labeling implementation. Searches were conducted in PubMed, Web of Science, Policy File, and PAIS International to identify restaurant calorie labeling studies through October 1, 2016, that measured calories ordered, consumed, or available for purchase on restaurant menus. The reference lists of calorie labeling articles were also searched. Fifty-three studies were included: 18 in real-world restaurants, 9 in cafeterias, and 21 in laboratory or simulation settings. Five examined restaurant offerings. Because of a lack of well-powered studies with strong designs, the degree to which menu labeling encourages lower-calorie purchases and whether that translates to a healthier population are unclear. Although there is limited evidence that menu labeling affects calories purchased at fast-food restaurants, some evidence demonstrates that it lowers calories purchased at certain types of restaurants and in cafeteria settings. The limited data on modified calorie labels find that such labels can encourage lower-calorie purchases but may not differ in effects relative to calorie labels alone. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  15. Methodology of recent solid waste stream assessments and summary of current recycling endeavors at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, K.

    1996-04-01

    Solid Waste Stream Assessments determine the components of given waste streams. An evaluation of findings allows components to be targeted for effective source reduction, reuse, or recycling. LLNL assessed 10% of its onsite dumpster locations (25 of 250). Dumpsters were selected based on location and surrounding facility use. Dumpster contents were sorted according to type into containers. The filled containers were weighed and photographed. The information was noted on field tabulation sheets. Dumpster locations, date of sort, sort categories, weight, and cubic yardage were entered into a database for review and tabulation. LLNL sorted approximately 7000 pounds of waste in each of the two assessments. A high incidence of cardboard (uncompacted) was present in most dumpsters. A high incidence of polystyrene was also present at dumpsters serving the LLNL cafeterias. Very little glass or aluminium was found. Enough waste paper was present to indicate that the paper recycling program needed increased employee awareness and a possible expansion. As a result of our assessments, LLNL has expanded its cardboard and paper recycling programs and implemented moving box and pallet reuse programs. LLNL is also studying a possible recycling program for cafeteria polystyrene and possible program expansions for magazine, newsprint, and glass recycling.

  16. Density of biofuel in function of temperature; Densidade de biocombustiveis em funcao da temperatura

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Melina C.J.; Lopes, Afonso [Universidade Estadual Paulista Julio de Mesquita Filho (FCAV/UNESP), Jaboticabal, SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Agrarias e Veterinarias. Dept. de Engenharia Rural], email: melina_cais@yahoo.com.br; Camara, Felipe T. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Cariri, CE (Brazil); Lima, Leomar P. [Instituto Federal do Triangulo Mineiro (IFTM), Uberlandia, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Considering the oil a non-renewable natural resource, Biodiesel is an alternative fuel, the same being renewable, biodegradable and made from vegetable oil or residual transesterified with anhydrous alcohol in the presence of a catalyst. This study aimed to evaluate the density of biodiesel methyl filtered residual oil from the university cafeteria, biodiesel methyl filtered hydrogenated fat residual McDonald's and the density of the mixture of 50% of residual oil from the university cafeteria with 50% of hydrogenated fat residual McDonald's all a function of temperature (10 deg C to 70 deg C). The experiment was conducted at the Agricultural Engineering Department of UNESP-Jaboticabal, SP. Was used 3x13x7 factorial experimental design, which represent three types of biodiesel, 13 July and the temperatures of the mixtures. We conclude that the residual oil biodiesel university restaurant density was lower, while biodiesel from hydrogenated fat from McDonald's and the mixture had higher densities, but differ from each other. The diesel (B0) had the lowest density and Biodiesel (B100) the largest. The B0 and B5 blends did not differ regarding density, but differed from the mix B15, B25, B50, B75 and B100. For all the mixtures tested, with the increase of temperature decreased the density. (author)

  17. Smoking at school: views of Turkish university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdogan, Nazmiye; Erdogan, Irfan

    2009-01-01

    The recent interest in cigarette smoking among university students has brought attention to problems concerning opinions, attitudes, prevention, health education, policy formulation and implementation. This survey research tested five hypotheses on the views of college students about smoking in school hallways and cafeteria, compliance with anti smoking laws, considering cigarette smoking as an expression of freedom of choice, teachers' smoking in classrooms and in their offices, and school administration's policy on enforcing the law. Hypothesized differences between students' views on the issues according to gender, smoking status and years at school were investigated. Data were obtained from 3,659 students attending six universities in Ankara, Turkey. The study findings provided support for all the hypothesized differences (except a single issue). Males and females differed significantly on all the issues studied. The majority of nonsmoking students have anti-smoking views in regards of the studied issues as compared to regular and occasional smokers. Smokers and nonsmokers markedly disagree on banning cigarette smoking in the cafeteria and hallways. However, the majority of students are against teachers' smoking in classrooms and in their offices with the doors open. Although most students want a smoke free environment, there is no active-anti smoking policy on smoking by universities. Findings point out the need for campus-wide effective smoking prevention programs, as well as cessation programs and services for the students.

  18. Grab a Cup, Fill It Up! An Intervention to Promote the Convenience of Drinking Water and Increase Student Water Consumption During School Lunch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Erica L; Gortmaker, Steven L; Carter, Jill E; Howe, M Caitlin W; Reiner, Jennifer F; Cradock, Angie L

    2015-09-01

    We evaluated a low-cost strategy for schools to improve the convenience and appeal of drinking water. We conducted a group-randomized, controlled trial in 10 Boston, Massachusetts, schools in April through June 2013 to test a cafeteria-based intervention. Signage promoting water and disposable cups were installed near water sources. Mixed linear regression models adjusting for clustering evaluated the intervention impact on average student water consumption over 359 lunch periods. The percentage of students in intervention schools observed drinking water during lunch nearly doubled from baseline to follow-up compared with controls (+ 9.4%; P < .001). The intervention was associated with a 0.58-ounce increase in water intake across all students (P < .001). Without cups, children were observed drinking 2.4 (SE = 0.08) ounces of water from fountains; with cups, 5.2 (SE = 0.2) ounces. The percentage of intervention students observed with sugar-sweetened beverages declined (-3.3%; P < .005). The current default of providing water through drinking fountains in cafeterias results in low water consumption. This study shows that an inexpensive intervention to improve drinking water's convenience by providing cups can increase student water consumption.

  19. Comparing Binaural Pre-processing Strategies I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk-Becker, Martin; Marquardt, Daniel; Völker, Christoph; Hu, Hongmei; Herzke, Tobias; Coleman, Graham; Adiloğlu, Kamil; Ernst, Stephan M. A.; Gerkmann, Timo; Doclo, Simon; Kollmeier, Birger; Hohmann, Volker; Dietz, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    In a collaborative research project, several monaural and binaural noise reduction algorithms have been comprehensively evaluated. In this article, eight selected noise reduction algorithms were assessed using instrumental measures, with a focus on the instrumental evaluation of speech intelligibility. Four distinct, reverberant scenarios were created to reflect everyday listening situations: a stationary speech-shaped noise, a multitalker babble noise, a single interfering talker, and a realistic cafeteria noise. Three instrumental measures were employed to assess predicted speech intelligibility and predicted sound quality: the intelligibility-weighted signal-to-noise ratio, the short-time objective intelligibility measure, and the perceptual evaluation of speech quality. The results show substantial improvements in predicted speech intelligibility as well as sound quality for the proposed algorithms. The evaluated coherence-based noise reduction algorithm was able to provide improvements in predicted audio signal quality. For the tested single-channel noise reduction algorithm, improvements in intelligibility-weighted signal-to-noise ratio were observed in all but the nonstationary cafeteria ambient noise scenario. Binaural minimum variance distortionless response beamforming algorithms performed particularly well in all noise scenarios. PMID:26721920

  20. Duodeno-jejunal tube placement in an experimental model of obesity: effects on food behaviour and basal energy expenditure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabench Pereferrer, Fàtima; Vives Espelta, Margarida; Cabrera Vilanova, Arantxa; Hernández González, Mercè; Feliu Rovira, Albert; Blanco Blasco, Santiago; Molina López, Alicia; Beltrán Nebot, Raul; Joven Maried, Jorge; Del Castillo Déjardin, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic surgery can modulate weight as well as food intake and basal energy expenditure. In this study, we evaluate the effectiveness of duodenal exclusion by analysing anthropometric results, intake variations, food behaviour and calorimetric parameters. This is an experimental study with 8-week-old Sprague-Dawley male rats. The sequences used are as follows: Cafeteria diet for 3 weeks, followed by surgery and sacrifice at 4 weeks. Four experimental groups are as follows: two non-obese groups (n = 15; surgery = 10, sham = 5) and two obese groups by cafeteria diet (n = 15; surgery = 10, sham = 5). Surgery performed was duodenal exclusion with physical barrier. Weight, intake, glycaemia and basal energy expenditure by indirect calorimetry were monitored before and after surgery. Weight changes in groups that underwent intervention were significant. The reduction in calorie consumption after surgery was significant in the obese intervention group despite an increased standard feed consumption (161 ± 11 vs 139 ± 13 Kcal/day, p thermogenic effect of food and a slowing in the animal's weight gain.