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Sample records for cadmium telluride solar cells

  1. Thin-film cadmium telluride solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, T. L.

    1987-10-01

    Cadmium telluride, with a room-temperature band-gap energy of 1.5 eV, is a promising thin-film photovoltaic material. The major objective of this research has been to demonstrate thin-film CdTe heterojunction solar cells with a total area greater than 1 sq cm and photovoltaic efficiencies of 13 percent or more. Thin-film p-CdTe/CdS/SnO2:F/glass solar cells with an AM1.5 efficiency of 10.5 percent have been reported previously. This report contains results of work done on: (1) the deposition, resistivity control, and characterization of p-CdTe films by the close-spaced sublimation process; (2) the deposition of large-band-gap window materials; (3) the electrical properties of CdS/CdTe heterojunctions; (4) the formation of stable, reproducible, ohmic contacts (such as p-HgTe) to p-CdTe; and (5) the preparation and evaluation of heterojunction solar cells.

  2. Method of making a thin film cadmium telluride solar cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for making a photovoltaic cell is described comprising the steps of: (a) depositing a transparent or semi-transparent conductive window layer onto a substrate; (b) depositing a layer of cadmium telluride including phosphorus onto the window layer; (c) depositing a layer of lead telluride onto the layer of cadmium telluride; and (d) depositing a metallic electrode onto the lead telluride layer

  3. Thin film cadmium telluride, zinc telluride, and mercury zinc telluride solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.L. (University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States))

    1992-04-01

    This report describes research to demonstrate (1) thin film cadmium telluride solar cells with a quantum efficiency of 75% or higher at 0. 44 {mu}m and a photovoltaic efficiency of 11.5% or greater, and (2) thin film zinc telluride and mercury zinc telluride solar cells with a transparency to sub-band-gap radiation of 65% and a photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 5% and 8%, respectively. Work was directed at (1) depositing transparent conducting semiconductor films by solution growth and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, (2) depositing CdTe films by close-spaced sublimation (CSS) and MOCVD techniques, (3) preparing and evaluating thin film CdTe solar cells, and (4) preparing and characterizing thin film ZnTe, CD{sub 1-x}Zn{sub 1-x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te solar cells. The deposition of CdS films from aqueous solutions was investigated in detail, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. CdTe films were deposited from DMCd and DIPTe at 400{degrees}C using TEGa and AsH{sub 3} as dopants. CdTe films deposited by CSS had significantly better microstructures than those deposited by MOCVD. Deep energy states in CdTe films deposited by CSS and MOCVD were investigated. Thin films of ZnTe, Cd{sub 1- x}Zn{sub x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te were deposited by MOCVD, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. 67 refs.

  4. Thin films and solar cells of cadmium telluride and cadmium zinc telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferekides, C.S.

    1991-01-01

    The objectives of this dissertation are to investigate (1) the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and properties of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (Cd(1-x)Zn(z)Te) films and junctions, and their potential application to solar cells, and (2) the fabrication and characterization of CdTe solar cells by the close spaced sublimation (CSS) technique. CdTe and Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te films have been deposited by MOCVD on a variety of substrates at 300-400 C.The effect of the deposition parameters and post deposition heat treatments on the electrical, optical, and structural properties have been investigated. Heterojunctions of the configuration CdTe/transparent conducting semiconductor (TCS) and Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te/TCS have been prepared and characterized. CdTe(MOCVD)/CdS and Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te(E sub g = 1.65eV)/Cd(1-x)Zn(x)S solar cells with efficiencies of 9.9 percent and 2.4 percent, respectively have been fabricated. The as-deposited CdTe(MOCVD)/CdS junctions exhibited high dark current densities due to deflects at the interface associated with small grain size. No effective post-deposition heat treatment has been developed. CdTe/CdS solar cells have also been fabricated by the close spaced sublimation (CSS). Significant improvements in material and processing have been made, and in collaboration with fellow researchers an AM1.5 conversion efficiency of 13.4 percent has been demonstrated, the highest efficiency ever measured for such devices. The highest conversion efficiency for the CdTe(CSS)/CdS solar cell was achieved by reaching high open-circuit voltages and fill factors, while the short-circuit current densities were moderate. These results indicate that further improvements to increase the short-circuit current densities can result in conversion efficiencies over 15 percent.

  5. High efficiency thin film cadmium telluride solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, T. L.; Chu, Shirley S.; Britt, J.; Chen, G.; Ferekides, C.; Schultz, N.; Wang, C.; Wu, C. Q.

    1992-12-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS), grown from an aqueous solution, and zinc oxide (ZnO), cadmium zinc sulfide (Cd1-xZnxS), and zinc selenide (ZnSe), deposited by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), have been used as the window for thin film cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar cells. Thin film solar cells were prepared by the successive deposition of the window and p-CdTe (by MOCVD and close-spaced sublimation, CSS) on SnO2:F/glass substrates. CdS/CdTe(CSS) solar cells show considerably better characteristics than CdS/CdTe(MOCVD) solar cells because of the better microstructure of CSS CdTe films. Total area conversion efficiency of 14.6%, verified by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has been achieved for solar cells of about 1 cm2 area. Solar cell prepared by using ZnO, ZnSe, or Cd1-xZnxS as window have significantly lower photovoltage than CdS/CdTe solar cells.

  6. Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells with PEDOT:PSS Back Contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Michael; Duarte, Fernanda; Paudel, Naba; Yan, Yanfa; Wang, Weining

    Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) solar cell is one of the most promising thin film solar cells and its highest efficiency has reached 21%. To keep improving the efficiency of CdTe solar cells, a few issues need to be addressed, one of which is the back contact. The back contact of CdTe solar cells are mostly Cu-base, and the problem with Cu-based back contact is that Cu diffuses into the grain boundary and into the CdS/CdTe junction, causing degradation problem at high temperature and under illumination. To continue improving the efficiency of CdTe/CdS solar cells, a good ohmic back contact with high work function and long term stability is needed. In this work, we report our studies on the potential of conducting polymer being used as the back contact of CdTe/CdS solar cells. Conducting polymers are good candidates because they have high work functions and high conductivities, are easy to process, and cost less, meeting all the requirements of a good ohmic back contact for CdTe. In our studies, we used poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) with different conductivities and compared them with traditional Cu-based back contact. It was observed that the CdTe solar cell performance improves as the conductivity of the PEDOT:PSS increase, and the efficiency (9.1%) is approaching those with traditional Cu/Au back contact (12.5%). Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells with PEDOT:PSS Back Contact.

  7. Thin-film cadmium telluride solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, T. L.

    1986-08-01

    The major objective of this work was to demonstrate CdTe devices grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with a total area greater than 1 cm2 and photovoltic efficiencies of at least 13%. During the period covered, various processing steps were investigated for the preparation of thin-film CdTe heterojunction solar cells of the inverted configuration. Glass coated with fluorine-doped tin oxide was used as the substrate. Thin-film heterojunction solar cells were prepared by depositing p-CdTe films on substrates using CVD and close-spaced sublimation (CSS). Cells prepared from CSS CdTe usually have a higher conversion efficiency than those prepared from CVD CdTe, presumably due to the chemical interaction between CdS and CdTe at the interface during the CVD process. The best cell, about 1.2 sq cm in area, had an AM 1.5 (global) efficiency of 10.5%, and further improvements are expected by optimizing the process parameters.

  8. Thin film cadmium telluride solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, T. L.; Chu, Shirley S.; Ang, S. T.; Mantravadi, M. K.

    1987-08-01

    Thin-film p-CdTe/CdS/SnO2:F/glass solar cells of the inverted configuration were prepared by the deposition of p-type CdTe films onto CdS/SnO2:F/glass substrates using CVD or close-spaced sublimation (CSS) techniques based on the procedures of Chu et al. (1983) and Nicholl (1963), respectively. The deposition rates of p-CdTe films deposited by CSS were higher than those deposited by the CVD technique (4-5 min were sufficient), and the efficiencies higher than 10 percent were obtained. However, the resistivity of films prepared by CSS was not as readily controlled as that of the CVD films. The simplest technique to reduce the resistivity of the CSS p-CdTe films was to incorporate a dopant, such as As or Sb, into the reaction mixture during the preparation of the source material. The films with resistivities in the range of 500-1000 ohm cm were deposited in this manner.

  9. Stable, high efficiency thin film solar cells produced by electrodeposition of cadmium telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, A.K.; Woodcock, J.M.; Ozsan, M.E.; Summers, J.G.; Barker, J.; Binns, S.; Buchanan, K.; Chai, C.; Dennison, S.; Hart, R.; Johnson, D.; Marshall, R.; Oktik, S.; Patterson, M.; Perks, R.; Roberts, S.; Sadeghi, M.; Sherborne, J.; Szubert, J.; Webster, S. (BP Solar, Solar House, Leatherhead (United Kingdom))

    1991-12-01

    The highest known efficiency of 9.5% for a 300x300 mm series interconnected cadmium telluride solar cell is reported. In addition, efficiencies of up to 13% have been measured for small cells based on electrodeposited CdTe. The stability of modules in outdoor tests is discussed and an outline is given of the device fabrication procedure. (orig.).

  10. Controlled cadmium telluride thin films for solar cell applications (emerging materials systems for solar cell applications). Quarterly progress report No. 1, April 9-July 8, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedam, K.

    1979-08-01

    Preparation and properties of cadmium telluride thin films for use in solar cells are studied. CdTe sputter deposition, crystal doping, and carrier typing are discussed. Future experimental plans are described. (WHK)

  11. High efficiency indium oxide/cadmium telluride solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, T.; Takamizawa, K.; Ito, K.

    1987-02-01

    Solar cells have been fabricated by reactive deposition of thin-film n-In2O3 onto single-crystal p-CdTe. The cell has a total area solar power conversion efficiency of 13.4 percent which corresponds to an active area efficiency of 14.4 percent at air mass 1.5 without antireflection coatings. The cell consists of a buried homojunction structure with low dark saturation current density.

  12. Polycrystalline cadmium telluride 3n-i-p solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, P. V.

    1989-06-01

    The CdS/CdTe/ZnTe n-i-p solar cell and its ternary relatives have the potential to meet Department of Energy cost, efficiency, and stability goals. This report describes results of a continuing program to achieve these goals. A record-breaking efficiency of 11 percent has been demonstrated and verified at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). Stability testing for 3000 hours indicates that the n-i-p structure is stable. Improving the short-circuit current by substituting Cd/sub x/Zn/sub 1-x/S for CdS has been successful and has produced 8 plus percent efficient cells with 2.6 eV windows using improved pyrolysis equipment. Transparent n-i-p devices have been produced with a SERI-verified efficiency of 9.4 percent . Collaborations with researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology, the Institute of Energy Conversion, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory have resulted in jointly produced n-i-p cells. Cells produced by molecular beam epitaxy and metal organic chemical vapor deposition had efficiencies greater than 9 percent; cells produced by thermal vacuum evaporation had efficiencies greater than 7 percent.

  13. Thin film cadmium telluride, zinc telluride, and mercury zinc telluride solar cells. Final subcontract report, 1 July 1988--31 December 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.L. [University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States)

    1992-04-01

    This report describes research to demonstrate (1) thin film cadmium telluride solar cells with a quantum efficiency of 75% or higher at 0. 44 {mu}m and a photovoltaic efficiency of 11.5% or greater, and (2) thin film zinc telluride and mercury zinc telluride solar cells with a transparency to sub-band-gap radiation of 65% and a photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 5% and 8%, respectively. Work was directed at (1) depositing transparent conducting semiconductor films by solution growth and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, (2) depositing CdTe films by close-spaced sublimation (CSS) and MOCVD techniques, (3) preparing and evaluating thin film CdTe solar cells, and (4) preparing and characterizing thin film ZnTe, CD{sub 1-x}Zn{sub 1-x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te solar cells. The deposition of CdS films from aqueous solutions was investigated in detail, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. CdTe films were deposited from DMCd and DIPTe at 400{degrees}C using TEGa and AsH{sub 3} as dopants. CdTe films deposited by CSS had significantly better microstructures than those deposited by MOCVD. Deep energy states in CdTe films deposited by CSS and MOCVD were investigated. Thin films of ZnTe, Cd{sub 1- x}Zn{sub x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te were deposited by MOCVD, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. 67 refs.

  14. Varying cadmium telluride growth temperature during deposition to increase solar cell reliability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albin, David S.; Johnson, James Neil; Zhao, Yu; Korevaar, Bastiaan Arie

    2016-04-26

    A method for forming thin films or layers of cadmium telluride (CdTe) for use in photovoltaic modules or solar cells. The method includes varying the substrate temperature during the growth of the CdTe layer by preheating a substrate (e.g., a substrate with a cadmium sulfide (CdS) heterojunction or layer) suspended over a CdTe source to remove moisture to a relatively low preheat temperature. Then, the method includes directly heating only the CdTe source, which in turn indirectly heats the substrate upon which the CdTe is deposited. The method improves the resulting CdTe solar cell reliability. The resulting microstructure exhibits a distinct grain size distribution such that the initial region is composed of smaller grains than the bulk region portion of the deposited CdTe. Resulting devices exhibit a behavior suggesting a more n-like CdTe material near the CdS heterojunction than devices grown with substrate temperatures held constant during CdTe deposition.

  15. Thin film cadmium telluride solar cells by two chemical vapor deposition techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.L.

    1988-01-15

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) has long been recognized as a promising thin film photovoltaic material. In this work, polycrystalline p-CdTe films have been deposited by two chemical vapor deposition techniques, namely the combination of vapors of elements (CVE) and close-spaced sublimation (CSS). The CVE technique is more flexible in controlling the composition of deposited films while the CSS technique can provide very high deposition rates. The resistivity of p-CdTe films deposited by the CVE and CSS techniques can be controlled by intrinsic (cadmium vacancies) or extrinsic (arsenic or antimony) doping, and the lowest resistivity obtainable is about 200 ..cap omega.. cm. Both front-wall (CdTe/TCS/glass) and back-wall (TCS/CdTe/substrate) cells have been prepared. The back-wall cells are less efficient because of the high and irreproducible p-CdTe-substrate interface resistance. The CSS technique is superior to the CVE technique because of its simplicity and high deposition rates; however, the cleaning of the substrate in situ is more difficult. The interface cleanliness is an important factor determining the electrical and photovoltaic characteristics of the heterojunction. Heterojunction CdS/CdTe solar cells of area 1 cm/sup 2/ with conversion efficiencies higher than 10% have been prepared and junction properties characterized.

  16. High efficiency cadmium telluride and zinc telluride based thin-film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohatgi, A.; Sudharsanan, R.; Ringel, S.A.; Chou, H.C. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States))

    1992-10-01

    This report describes work to improve the basic understanding of CdTe and ZnTe alloys by growing and characterizing these films along with cell fabrication. The major objective was to develop wide-band-gap (1.6--1.8 eV) material for the top cell, along with compatible window material and transparent ohmic contacts, so that a cascade cell design can be optimized. Front-wall solar cells were fabricated with a glass/SnO{sub 2}/CdS window, where the CdS film is thin to maximize transmission and current. Wide-band-gap absorber films (E{sub g} = 1.75 eV) were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) techniques, which provided excellent control for tailoring the film composition and properties. CdZnTe films were grown by both MBE and MOCVD. All the as-grown films were characterized by several techniques (surface photovoltage spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)) for composition, bulk uniformity, thickness, and film and interface quality. Front-wall-type solar cells were fabricated in collaboration with Ametek Materials Research Laboratory using CdTe and CdZnTe polycrystalline absorber films. The effects of processing on ternary film were studied by AES and XPS coupled with capacitance voltage and current voltage measurements as a function of temperature. Bias-dependent spectral response and electrical measurements were used to test some models in order to identify and quantify dominant loss mechanisms.

  17. Mercury telluride as an ohmic contact to efficient thin film cadmium telluride solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of a stable, reproducible, low-resistance contact to p-CdTe thin films is a major problem in the fabrication of efficient solar cells. Two general approaches to this problem are: the formation of a region of high carrier concentration under the contact to reduce the contact resistance, and the use of contact materials with a higher work function than p-CdTe. The second approach is investigated in this work using p-HgTe as the contact material. The deposition of p-HgTe on p-CdTe was carried out by the direct combination of the elemental vapors in a gas flow system and by the close-spaced sublimation, (CSS) technique. The process parameters in the direct combination technique are more readily controlled than those in the CSS technique. The p-HgTe/p-CdTe contact resistance has been found to be very similar to the Au/p-CdTe contact resistance

  18. Thin-film cadmium telluride solar cells: Final subcontract report, 1 May 1985--31 May 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.L.

    1988-06-01

    This report describes results of research performed to demonstrate thin-film cadmium telluride heterojunction solar cells with a total area greater than 1 cm/sup 2/ and efficiencies of 13% or higher. Efforts were directed to (1) the deposition, resistivity control, and characterization of p-CdTe films by combining the vapor of the elements (CVE) and close-spaced sublimation (CSS) techniques; (2) the deposition and characterization of transparent conducting semiconductors; (3) the deposition of p-HgTe as a low-resistance ohmic contact to p-CdTe; (4) the electrical properties of CdS/CdTe heterojunctions; and (5) the preparation and evaluation of heterojunction solar cells. CdS/CdTe solar cells showed the best photovoltaic characteristics, and the best cell had a conversion efficiency of about 10.6%. 20 refs., 30 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Controlled cadmium telluride thin films for solar-cell applications. Final technical report, June 1, 1980-May 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, M.B.; Krishnaswamy, S.V.

    1981-06-01

    The objectives of this contract were to carry out a systematic study on the preparation and characterization of rf-sputtered CdTe thin films in order to establish reproducibility of the films with good electrical characteristics and to demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating various types of junctions and ohmic contacts with reproducible characteristics and finally to optimize the most promising solar cell structure in order to achieve an efficiency of 6% or higher. Efforts have been directed to the control of various sputtering parameters in order to obtain good quality films. The structure, crystallographic, compositional and electrical properties of cadmium telluride films sputtered over a wide range of conditions have been evaluated. A series of doping experiments have been carried out using primarily Cd, Te, In, as the n-type dopants and Cu as the p-type dopant. Of these dopants, indium doping provided films with which S.B. junctions can be obtained for further electrical characterization. Use of cadmium overpressure during CdTe:In sputtering has improved the film characteristics. Ion Beam Sputtering was attempted as an alternative technique for film preparation. For lack of time and due to a number of mechanical failures, no significant results could be obtained.

  20. Cadmium sulfide thin films deposited by close spaced sublimation and cadmium sulfide/cadmium telluride solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinskiy, Dmitriy Nikolaevich

    1998-12-01

    One of the applications of CdS films is as a window layer in CdTe and Cu(In,Ga)Sesb2 solar cells. The study of the optical and structural properties of CdS films deposited by close spaced sublimation as well as their influence on CdS/CdTe solar cell performance is part of the CdTe solar cell program at the University of South Florida. CdS films have been deposited by the close-spaced sublimation technique. The influence of the main process parameters, the substrate and source temperatures, and the ambient in the deposition chamber has been investigated. As-deposited films have been subjected to heat treatments in Hsb2 ambient, in CdClsb2 atmosphere, and in atmosphere with small amounts of oxygen. A special annealing chamber was built to carry out the annealing experiments in the presence of CdClsb2 vapor and oxygen. Several CSS chambers were assembled to study the influence of various process parameters simultaneously and validate the results. Results of scanning electron microscopy and photoluminescence measurements have been used as the primary characterization techniques. X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe analysis, and transmission measurements have also been carried out. It was found that as deposited CdS films have a hexagonal structure independent of the process parameters used. The presence of a CdO phase was detected in the samples grown with the highest oxygen concentration in the ambient. The resistivity of CdS films is controlled by intergrain barriers. Photoluminescence measurements showed the presence of oxygen-acceptor transition and a wide variation in the intensity of deep emission bands. The variation in the intensities was correlated with the variation in the deposition and annealing conditions. However, no correlation was found between the PL intensities of defect bands and cell performance. CdS/CdTe junctions have been fabricated using standard deposition and postgrowth techniques developed in the USF solar cells laboratory. All cells have

  1. Polycrystalline thin film cadmium telluride n-i-p solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, P.V. (Ametek, Inc., Harleysville, PA (USA))

    1990-06-01

    This paper discusses experiments and analyses of technical, economic and environmental issues relating to CdTe n-i-p solar cells and their potential to satisfy the DOE PV program goals. The basic cell structure is CdS-CdTe-ZnTe. Included is an experimental and theoretical study of the operation of these devices. Experiments related to deposition of the CdS and ZnTe layers, cascaded solar cells, and module fabrication are described. Manufacturing issues relating to costs, worker safety, and environmental security are discussed. 40 refs., 25 figs., 16 tabs.

  2. High efficiency cadmium and zinc telluride-based thin film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohatgi, A.; Summers, C.J.; Erbil, A.; Sudharsanan, R.; Ringel, S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (USA). School of Electrical Engineering)

    1990-10-01

    Polycrystalline Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te and Cd{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te films with a band gap of 1.7 eV were successfully grown on glass/SnO{sub 2}/CdS substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), respectively. Polycrystalline Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te films grown by MBE resulted in uniform composition and sharp interfaces. However, polycrystalline Cd{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te films grown by MOCVD showed nonuniform compositions and evidence of manganese accumulation at the Cd{sub 1-x}Mn{sub x}Te/CdS interface. We found that manganese interdiffuses and replaces cadmium in the CdS film. By improving the CdTe/CdS interface and, thus, reducing the collection function effects, the efficiency of the MOCVD CdTe cell can be improved to about 13.5%. MBE-grown CdTe cells also produced 8%--9% efficiencies. The standard CdTe process was not optimum for ternary films and resulted in a decrease in the band gap. Recent results indicate that CdCl{sub 2} + ZnCl{sub 2} chemical treatment may prevent the band-gap reduction, and that chromate etch (rather than bromine etch) may provide the solution to contact resistance in the ternary cells.

  3. High efficiency cadmium and zinc telluride-based thin film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohatgi, A.; Summers, C. J.; Erbil, A.; Sudharsanan, R.; Ringel, S.

    1990-10-01

    Polycrystalline Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te and Cd(1-x)Mn(x)Te films with a band gap of 1.7 eV were successfully grown on glass/SnO2/CdS substrates by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), respectively. Polycrystalline Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te films grown by MBE resulted in uniform composition and sharp interfaces. However, polycrystalline Cd(1-x)Mn(x)Te films grown by MOCVD showed nonuniform compositions and evidence of manganese accumulation at the Cd(1-x)Mn(x)Te/CdS interface. We found that manganese interdiffuses and replaces cadmium in the CdS film. By improving the CdTe/CdS interface and, thus, reducing the collection function effects, the efficiency of the MOCVD CdTe cell can be improved to about 13.5 percent. MBE-grown CdTe cells also produced 8 to 9 percent efficiencies. The standard CdTe process was not optimum for ternary films and resulted in a decrease in the band gap. Recent results indicate that CdCl2 + ZnCl2 chemical treatment may prevent the band-gap reduction, and that chromate etch (rather than bromine etch) may provide the solution to contact resistance in the ternary cells.

  4. Effects of annealing conditions of electrodes on the photovoltaic properties of sintered cadmium sulfide/cadmium telluride solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, C.S.; Im, H.B. (Korea Advanced Inst. of Science, Seoul (Republic of Korea). Dept. of Materials Science)

    1990-01-01

    Polycrystalline n-CdS/p-CdTe solar cells with a commercial carbon paint on the p-CdTe layer and an In- Ag paint on the n-CdS layer were fabricated by a coating and sintering method. Electrical properties of the conducting paints and solar cell parameters of the heterojunction solar cells were investigated as a function of electrode annealing conditions. The sintered CdS/CdTe solar cells whose electrode contacts were annealed at 350{degrees}C for 10 min in nitrogen showed maximum values of short-circuit current density, fill factor, and solar efficiency. Commercial carbon and silver paints can be used as electrodes to fabricate sintered CdS/CdTe solar cells with efficiency over 10%.

  5. High-efficiency cadmium and zinc-telluride-based thin-film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohatgi, A.; Sudharsanan, R.; Ringel, S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States))

    1992-02-01

    This report describes research into polycrystalline CdTe solar cells grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Efficiencies of {approximately}10% were achieved using both p-i-n and p-n structures. A pre-heat treatment of CdS/SnO{sub 2}/glass substrates at 450{degrees}C in hydrogen atmosphere prior to the CdTe growth was found to be essential for high performance because this heat treatment reduces oxygen-related defects from the CdS surface. However, this treatment also resulted in a Cd-deficient CdS surface, which may in part limit the CdTe cell efficiency to 10% due to Cd vacancy-related interface defects. Preliminary model calculations suggest that removing these states can increase the cell efficiency from 10% to 13.5%. Photon absorption in the CdS film also limits the cell performance, and eliminating this loss mechanism can result in CdTe efficiencies in excess of 18%. Polycrystalline, 1.7-e, CdZnTe films were also grown for tandem-cell applications. CdZnTe/CdS cells processed using the standard CdTe cell fabrication procedure resulted in 4.4% efficiency, high series resistance, and a band-gap shift to 1.55 eV. The formation of Zn-O at and near the CdZnTe surface is the source of high contact resistance. A saturated dichromate each prior to contact deposition was found to solve the contact resistance problem. The CdCl{sub 2} treatment was identified as the cause of the observed band-gap shift due to the preferred formation of ZnCl{sub 2}. 59 refs.

  6. Nature of physical processes in solar cells utilizing cadmium telluride--electrolyte junctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panosyan, Z.R.; Arutyunyan, V.M.; Meliksetyan, V.A.

    1985-09-01

    An investigation was made of the physical processes occurring in photoelectrochemical conversion of solar energy by a CdTe--electrolyte junction involving surface exciton and electron states. The influence of these processes on the efficiency of conversion of solar energy into chemical energy of hydrogen was analyzed.

  7. Spectral analysis of the effects of 1.7 MeV electron irradiation on the current transfer characteristic of cadmium telluride solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jin-Xiu; Zeng, Guang-Gen; He, Xu-Lin; Zhang, Jing-Quan; Wu, Li-Li; Li, Wei; Li, Bing; Wang, Wen-Wu; Feng, Liang-Huan

    2014-04-01

    The effects of device performance of 1.7 MeV electron irradiation on cadmium telluride polycrystalline thin film solar cells with the structure of anti-radiation glass/ITO/ZnO/CdS/CdTe/ZnTe/ZnTe : Cu/Ni have been studied. Light and dark I-V characteristics, dark C-V characteristics, quantum efficiency (QE), admittance spectrum (AS) and other testing methods were used to analyze cells performance such as the open-circuit voltage (Voc), short-circuit current (Isc), fill factor (FF) and conversion efficiency (eta). It was explored to find out the effects of irradiation on the current transfer characteristic of solar cells combined with the dark current density (Jo), diode ideal factor (A), quantum efficiency, carrier concentration and the depletion layer width. The decline in short-circuit current was very large and the efficiency of solar cells decreased obviously after irradiation. Reverse saturation current density increased, which indicates that p-n junction characteristics of solar cells were damaged, and diode ideal factor was almost the same, so current transport mechanism of solar cells has not changed. Quantum efficiency curves proved that the damage of solar cells' p-n junction influenced the collection of photo-generated carriers. Irradiation made carrier concentration reduce to 40.6%. The analyses have shown that. A new defect was induced by electron irradiation, whose position is close to 0.58 eV above the valence band in the forbidden band, and capture cross section is 1.78 x 10(-16) cm2. These results indicate that irradiation influences the generation of photo-generated carriers, increases the risk of the carrier recombination and the reverse dark current, and eventually makes the short-circuit current of solar cells decay. PMID:25007593

  8. Thin film cadmium telluride photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, A.; Bohn, R. (Toledo Univ., OH (United States))

    1992-04-01

    This report describes research to develop to vacuum-based growth techniques for CdTe thin-film solar cells: (1) laser-driven physical vapor deposition (LDPVD) and (2) radio-frequency (rf) sputtering. The LDPVD process was successfully used to deposit thin films of CdS, CdTe, and CdCl{sub 2}, as well as related alloys and doped semiconductor materials. The laser-driven deposition process readily permits the use of several target materials in the same vacuum chamber and, thus, complete solar cell structures were fabricated on SnO{sub 2}-coated glass using LDPVD. The rf sputtering process for film growth became operational, and progress was made in implementing it. Time was also devoted to enhancing or implementing a variety of film characterization systems and device testing facilities. A new system for transient spectroscopy on the ablation plume provided important new information on the physical mechanisms of LDPVD. The measurements show that, e.g., Cd is predominantly in the neutral atomic state in the plume but with a fraction that is highly excited internally ({ge} 6 eV), and that the typical neutral Cd translational kinetic energies perpendicular to the target are 20 eV and greater. 19 refs.

  9. High-efficiency cadmium and zinc telluride based thin-film solar cells: Annual report, June 1, 1987--May 31, 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohatgi, A.; Summers, C.J.; Erbil, A.; Sudharsanan, R.; Ringel. S.

    1989-04-01

    This report contains results of research on high-efficiency cadmium and zinc telluride based thin-film solar cells from June 1987 to May 1988. CdTe and CdZnTe and CdTe and CdMnTe films were grown on CdS/SnO/sub 2//glass substrates by molecular beam epitaxy and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition, respectively. As-grown films were characterized by x-ray diffraction, surface photovoltage spectroscopy, and infrared, Raman, and Auger electron spectroscopy, among others, for composition, bulk uniformity, thickness, and film and interface quality. Single-crystal films were grown simultaneously to understand the growth conditions of the polycrystalline films. Cell efficiencies ranging from 6.0% to 6.7% were achieved with the Cd/sub 0.95/Mn/sub 0.05/Te film employing the glass/SnO/sub 2//CdS/CdMnTe/ZnTe/Au front-wall solar cell structure. Cells fabricated by using CdZnTe films yielded efficiencies from 3.0% to 3.6%. 12 refs., 32 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. High efficiency cadmium telluride and zinc telluride based thin-film solar cells. Annual subcontract report, 1 March 1990--28 February 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohatgi, A.; Sudharsanan, R.; Ringel, S.A.; Chou, H.C. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1992-10-01

    This report describes work to improve the basic understanding of CdTe and ZnTe alloys by growing and characterizing these films along with cell fabrication. The major objective was to develop wide-band-gap (1.6--1.8 eV) material for the top cell, along with compatible window material and transparent ohmic contacts, so that a cascade cell design can be optimized. Front-wall solar cells were fabricated with a glass/SnO{sub 2}/CdS window, where the CdS film is thin to maximize transmission and current. Wide-band-gap absorber films (E{sub g} = 1.75 eV) were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) techniques, which provided excellent control for tailoring the film composition and properties. CdZnTe films were grown by both MBE and MOCVD. All the as-grown films were characterized by several techniques (surface photovoltage spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)) for composition, bulk uniformity, thickness, and film and interface quality. Front-wall-type solar cells were fabricated in collaboration with Ametek Materials Research Laboratory using CdTe and CdZnTe polycrystalline absorber films. The effects of processing on ternary film were studied by AES and XPS coupled with capacitance voltage and current voltage measurements as a function of temperature. Bias-dependent spectral response and electrical measurements were used to test some models in order to identify and quantify dominant loss mechanisms.

  11. Effect of Nanosized Tin Oxide Layer on the Efficiency of Photovoltaic Processes in Film Solar Cells Based on Cadmium Telluride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.S. Khrypunov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the thickness of the nanosized layer on the efficiency of photoelectric processes in solar cells (SC ITO / SnO2 / CdS / CdTe / Cu / Au formed on different substrates was investigated. For device structures formed on the glass substrates, the maximum efficiency of 11.4 % is achieved when thickness of the tin oxide layer is 80 nm. For flexible solar cells formed on a polyimide film, the maximum efficiency of 10.8 % is observed when thickness of the tin oxide layer is 50 nm. This paper discusses the physical mechanisms of the observed differences in efficiency.

  12. Polycrystalline cadmium telluride n-i-p solar cell: Annual subcontract report, 1 June 1987--31 August 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, P.V.

    1989-06-01

    The CdS/CdTe/ZnTe n-i-p solar cell and its ternary relatives have the potential to meet Department of Energy cost, efficiency, and stability goals. This report describes results of a continuing program to achieve these goals. A record-breaking efficiency of 11% has been demonstrated and verified at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). Stability testing for 3000 hours indicates that the n-i-p structure is stable. Improving the short-circuit current by substituting Cd/sub x/Zn/sub 1-x/S for CdS has been successful and has produced 8+% efficient cells with 2.6 eV windows using improved pyrolysis equipment. Transparent n-i-p devices have been produced with a SERI-verified efficiency of 9.4%. Collaborations with researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology, the Institute of Energy Conversion, and Jet Propulsion Laboratory have resulted in jointly produced n-i-p cells. Cells produced by molecular beam epitaxy and metal organic chemical vapor deposition had efficiencies greater than 9%; cells produced by thermal vacuum evaporation had efficiencies greater than 7%. 18 refs., 35 figs., 13 tabs.

  13. Polycrystalline thin film cadmium telluride solar cells fabricated by electrodeposition. Annual technical report, 20 March 1995--19 March 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trefny, J U; Mao, D [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this project is to develop improved processes for fabricating CdTe/CdS polycrystalline thin-film solar cells. Researchers used electrodeposition to form CdTe; electrodeposition is a non-vacuum, low-cost technique that is attractive for economic, large-scale production. During the past year, research and development efforts focused on several steps that are most critical to the fabricating high-efficiency CdTe solar cells. These include the optimization of the CdTe electrodeposition process, the effect of pretreatment of CdS substrates, the post-deposition annealing of CdTe, and back-contact formation using Cu-doped ZnTe. Systematic investigations of these processing steps have led to a better understanding and improved performance of the CdTe-based cells. Researchers studied the structural properties of chemical-bath-deposited CdS thin films and their growth mechanisms by investigating CdS samples prepared at different deposition times; investigated the effect of CdCl{sub 2} treatment of CdS films on the photovoltaic performance of CdTe solar cells; studied Cu-doped ZnTe as a promising material for forming stable, low-resistance contacts to the p-type CdTe; and investigated the effect of CdTe and CdS thickness on the photovoltaic performance of the resulting cells. As a result of their systematic investigation and optimization of the processing conditions, researchers improved the efficiency of CdTe/CdS cells using ZnTe back-contact and electrodeposited CdTe. The best CdTe/CdS cell exhibited a V{sub oc} of 0.778 V, a J{sub sc} of 22.4 mA/cm{sup 2}, a FF of 74%, and an efficiency of 12.9% (verified at NREL). In terms of individual parameters, researchers obtained a V{sub oc} over 0.8 V and a FF of 76% on other cells.

  14. Controlled cadmium telluride thin films for solar cell applications. Second quarterly report, September 1-December 1, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, M. B.; Krishnaswamy, S. V.

    1981-01-01

    A thermal annealing procedure to improve the photovoltaic and other electrical characteristics of CdTe sputtered films doped with In is described. For an understanding of the characteristics of these films, SEM, Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning ellipsometry analyses have been carried out. Dark and illuminated I/V characteristics and capacitance and conductance vs. frequency behavior of In doped CdTe Schottky barrier diodes based on Cr and Ni substrates indicate that thermal annealing is an effective means of reducing the trap concentrations on these films that can lead to a significant improvement of the quality of sputtered films for solar cell applications.

  15. Controlled cadmium telluride thin films for solar cell applications (emerging materials systems for solar cell applications). Quarterly progress report No. 3, October 9, 1979-January 8, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedam, K; Das, M B; Krishnaswamy, S V

    1980-02-01

    The main emphasis during the third quarter of the program was on the improvement of the quality of sputtered films, their characterization and use in the fabrication of Schottky barrier type diodes and solar cell structures. Films prepared under different conditions and on different substrates were examined by SEM showing nodular growths under certain conditions. I-V, C-V and photovoltaic characteristics were measured on numerous samples based on n- and p-type films on Ni substrates having top metallization of either evaporated Au and Al. The n-type samples showed up to 200mV V/sub oc/ and small short-circuit currents. The characteristics observed are indicative of the presence of interfacial layer and surface states. Surface state's capacitance were measured on p-type samples metallized with Au.

  16. Thin-film cadmium telluride photovoltaic cells. Final subcontract report, 1 November 1992--1 January 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, A.D.; Bohn, R.G. [Toledo Univ., OH (United States)

    1994-09-01

    This report describes work to develop and optimize radio-frequency (rf) sputtering for the deposition of thin films of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and related semiconductors for thin-film solar cells. Pulsed laser physical vapor deposition was also used for exploratory work on these materials, especially where alloying or doping are involved, and for the deposition of cadmium chloride layers. The sputtering work utilized a 2-in diameter planar magnetron sputter gun. The film growth rate by rf sputtering was studied as a function of substrate temperature, gas pressure, and rf power. Complete solar cells were fabricated on tin-oxide-coated soda-lime glass substrates. Currently, work is being done to improve the open-circuit voltage by varying the CdTe-based absorber layer, and to improve the short-circuit current by modifying the CdS window layer.

  17. Thin-film cadmium telluride photovoltaics: ES and H issues, solutions, and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Photovoltaics (PV) is a growing business worldwide, with new technologies evolving towards potentially large-volume production. PV use produces no emissions, thus offsetting many potential environmental problems. However, the new PV technologies also bring unfamiliar environment, safety, and health (ES and H) challenges that require innovative solutions. This is a summary of the issues, solutions, and perspectives associated with the use of cadmium in one of the new and important PV technologies: thin-film, cadmium telluride (CdTe) PV, which is being developed and commercialized by several companies including Solar Cells Inc. (Toledo, Ohio), BP Solar (Fairfield, California), and Matsushita (Japan). The principal ES and H issue for thin-film cadmium telluride PV is the potential introduction of cadmium--a toxic heavy metal--into the air or water. The amount of cadmium in thin-film PV, however, is quite small--one nickel cadmium flashlight battery has about as much cadmium (7 g) as a square meter of PV module using current technology--and a typical cordless power tool will have 5--10 batteries. CdTe modules are also very well sealed, limiting the chance of release. Nonetheless, minimizing the amount of cadmium in cadmium telluride modules and preventing the introduction of that cadmium into the environment is a top priority for National Renewable Energy Laboratory researchers and cadmium telluride PV manufacturers

  18. Cadmium telluride nuclear radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics and performance of undoped high resistivity cadmium telluride detectors are compared to chlorine lifted counters. It is shown, in particular, that Undodep CdTe is in fact aluminium doped and that compensation occurs, as an silicon or germanium, by pair and triplet formation between the group III donor and the doubly charged cadmium vacancy acceptor. Furthermore, in chlorine doped samples, the polarization effect results from the unpaired level at Esub(c)-0,6eV

  19. The photocorrosion of n-cadmium telluride and its suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, J. S.

    1980-09-01

    The photoelectrochemical properties of n-type cadmium telluride were studied in water and five other organic solvents, with a view to suppression of the photocorrosion reaction which prevents this and other n-type small bandgap semiconductors from being used in a practical semiconductor-electrolyte junction solar cell. Only the low donicity organic solvents propylene carbonate and methyl nitrate reduce the corrosion rate significantly. A stable photocurrent can be obtained using a solution of ferrocene in these two solvents but analysis of photoelectrolyzed solutions revealed a slow photocorrosion. The dependence of the flatband potential and of the practical significance with respect to solar cell applications considered.

  20. High-efficiency cadmium and zinc-telluride-based thin-film solar cells. Annual subcontract report, 1 March 1990--28 February 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohatgi, A.; Sudharsanan, R.; Ringel, S. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1992-02-01

    This report describes research into polycrystalline CdTe solar cells grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Efficiencies of {approximately}10% were achieved using both p-i-n and p-n structures. A pre-heat treatment of CdS/SnO{sub 2}/glass substrates at 450{degrees}C in hydrogen atmosphere prior to the CdTe growth was found to be essential for high performance because this heat treatment reduces oxygen-related defects from the CdS surface. However, this treatment also resulted in a Cd-deficient CdS surface, which may in part limit the CdTe cell efficiency to 10% due to Cd vacancy-related interface defects. Preliminary model calculations suggest that removing these states can increase the cell efficiency from 10% to 13.5%. Photon absorption in the CdS film also limits the cell performance, and eliminating this loss mechanism can result in CdTe efficiencies in excess of 18%. Polycrystalline, 1.7-e, CdZnTe films were also grown for tandem-cell applications. CdZnTe/CdS cells processed using the standard CdTe cell fabrication procedure resulted in 4.4% efficiency, high series resistance, and a band-gap shift to 1.55 eV. The formation of Zn-O at and near the CdZnTe surface is the source of high contact resistance. A saturated dichromate each prior to contact deposition was found to solve the contact resistance problem. The CdCl{sub 2} treatment was identified as the cause of the observed band-gap shift due to the preferred formation of ZnCl{sub 2}. 59 refs.

  1. Cadmium telluride module development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrigth, S.P.; Chamberlin, R.R.; Jordan, J.F. (Photon Energy, Inc., El Paso, TX (USA))

    1991-05-01

    Efficiencies of up to 12.3% have been achieved on small devices. It is expected that 14% efficiency will be exceeded on small devices by improving the fill factors on the present devices in the reasonably near future. Efficiencies in the range 16%-18% are expected to be achieved in the longer term. Modules of 6 W, approximately 929 cm{sup 2} in area with an active area efficiency of over 8% (aperture efficiency of 7.3%) have been achieved. The feasibility of producing 4 ft{sup 2} modules of CdS/CdTe has been shown and requires further efforts in order to realize the overall potentials. The structural integrity of the encapsulation design has been studied by thermal cycling and outdoor life testing. Submodules have been life tested for over 270 days with no observable degradation by the SERI Outdoor Reliability and Life Testing Laboratory. In addition to further optimization of materials and device structure, module output in the future will be increased by an improvement in the uniformity of the deposition process, and by minimizing the loss of active area due to cell division interconnections. Module output is expected to attain 135 W m{sup -2} in the mid 1990s and over 150 W m{sup -2} in the long term. (orig.).

  2. Cadmium zinc telluride spectral modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors are the highest resolution room temperature gamma-ray detectors available for isotopic analysis. As with germanium detectors, accurate isotopic analysis using spectra requires peak deconvolution. The CZT peak shapes are asymmetric, with a long low energy tail. The asymmetry is a result of the physics of the electron/hole transport in the semiconductor. An accurate model of the physics of the electron/hole transport through an electric field will allow the parameterization of the peak shapes as a function of energy. In turn this leads to the ability to perform accurate spectral deconvolution and therefore accurate isotopic analysis. The model and the peak-shape parameterization as a function of energy will be presented

  3. Cadmium telluride quantum dots advances and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Donegan, John

    2013-01-01

    Optical Properties of Bulk and Nanocrystalline Cadmium Telluride, Núñez Fernández and M.I. VasilevskiyAqueous Synthesis of Colloidal CdTe Nanocrystals, V. Lesnyak, N. Gaponik, and A. EychmüllerAssemblies of Thiol-Capped CdTe Nanocrystals, N. GaponikFörster Resonant Energy Transfer in CdTe Nanocrystal Quantum Dot Structures, M. Lunz and A.L. BradleyEmission of CdTe Nanocrystals Coupled to Microcavities, Y.P. Rakovich and J.F. DoneganBiological Applications of Cadmium Telluride Semiconductor Quantum Dots, A. Le Cign

  4. Electron mobility in mercury cadmium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, James D.

    1988-01-01

    A previously developed program, which includes all electronic interactions thought to be important, does not correctly predict the value of electron mobility in mercury cadmium telluride particularly near room temperature. Part of the reason for this discrepancy is thought to be the way screening is handled. It seems likely that there are a number of contributors to errors in the calculation. The objective is to survey the calculation, locate reasons for differences between experiment and calculation, and suggest improvements.

  5. Using atomistic simulations to model cadmium telluride thin film growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Miao; Kenny, Steven D.

    2016-03-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) is an excellent material for low-cost, high efficiency thin film solar cells. It is important to conduct research on how defects are formed during the growth process, since defects lower the efficiency of solar cells. In this work we use computer simulation to predict the growth of a sputter deposited CdTe thin film. On-the-fly kinetic Monte Carlo technique is used to simulate the CdTe thin film growth on the (1 1 1) surfaces. The results show that on the (1 1 1) surfaces the growth mechanisms on surfaces which are terminated by Cd or Te are quite different, regardless of the deposition energy (0.1∼ 10 eV). On the Te-terminated (1 1 1) surface the deposited clusters first form a single mixed species layer, then the Te atoms in the mixed layer moved up to form a new layer. Whilst on the Cd-terminated (1 1 1) surface the new Cd and Te layers are formed at the same time. Such differences are probably caused by stronger bonding between ad-atoms and surface atoms on the Te layer than on the Cd layer.

  6. Brief review of cadmium telluride-based photovoltaic technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başol, Bülent M.; McCandless, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) is the most commercially successful thin-film photovoltaic technology. Development of CdTe as a solar cell material dates back to the early 1980s when ˜10% efficient devices were demonstrated. Implementation of better quality glass, more transparent conductive oxides, introduction of a high-resistivity transparent film under the CdS junction-partner, higher deposition temperatures, and improved Cl-treatment, doping, and contacting approaches yielded >16% efficient cells in the early 2000s. Around the same time period, use of a photoresist plug monolithic integration process facilitated the demonstration of the first 11% efficient module. The most dramatic advancements in CdTe device efficiencies were made during the 2013 to 2014 time frame when small-area cell conversion efficiency was raised to 20% range and a champion module efficiency of 17% was reported. CdTe technology is attractive in terms of its limited life-cycle greenhouse gas and heavy metal emissions, small carbon footprint, and short energy payback times. Limited Te availability is a challenge for the growth of this technology unless Te utilization rates are greatly enhanced along with device efficiencies.

  7. Effect of Annealing on the Properties of Antimony Telluride Thin Films and Their Applications in CdTe Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhouling Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimony telluride alloy thin films were deposited at room temperature by using the vacuum coevaporation method. The films were annealed at different temperatures in N2 ambient, and then the compositional, structural, and electrical properties of antimony telluride thin films were characterized by X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, and Hall measurements. The results indicate that single phase antimony telluride existed when the annealing temperature was higher than 488 K. All thin films exhibited p-type conductivity with high carrier concentrations. Cell performance was greatly improved when the antimony telluride thin films were used as the back contact layer for CdTe thin film solar cells. The dark current voltage and capacitance voltage measurements were performed to investigate the formation of the back contacts for the cells with or without Sb2Te3 buffer layers. CdTe solar cells with the buffer layers can reduce the series resistance and eliminate the reverse junction between CdTe and metal electrodes.

  8. Thin film cadmium telluride photovoltaic cells. Annual subcontract report, 23 July 1990--31 October 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, A.; Bohn, R. [Toledo Univ., OH (United States)

    1992-04-01

    This report describes research to develop to vacuum-based growth techniques for CdTe thin-film solar cells: (1) laser-driven physical vapor deposition (LDPVD) and (2) radio-frequency (rf) sputtering. The LDPVD process was successfully used to deposit thin films of CdS, CdTe, and CdCl{sub 2}, as well as related alloys and doped semiconductor materials. The laser-driven deposition process readily permits the use of several target materials in the same vacuum chamber and, thus, complete solar cell structures were fabricated on SnO{sub 2}-coated glass using LDPVD. The rf sputtering process for film growth became operational, and progress was made in implementing it. Time was also devoted to enhancing or implementing a variety of film characterization systems and device testing facilities. A new system for transient spectroscopy on the ablation plume provided important new information on the physical mechanisms of LDPVD. The measurements show that, e.g., Cd is predominantly in the neutral atomic state in the plume but with a fraction that is highly excited internally ({ge} 6 eV), and that the typical neutral Cd translational kinetic energies perpendicular to the target are 20 eV and greater. 19 refs.

  9. Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Cadmium Telluride (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Cadmium Telluride at the National Center for Photovoltaics.

  10. Avalanche multiplication of electrons and holes in cadmium telluride

    CERN Document Server

    Demich, N V

    2001-01-01

    Determination of the ratio of the coefficients of the electrons and holes of the diode structures impact ionization is carried out with the purpose of optimizing the parameters of the avalanche diodes from the cadmium telluride. It is shown experimentally, that the process of the impact ionization in the cadmium telluride is stimulated by holes. The ratio of the coefficients of the holes and electrons impact ionization constitutes approx = 30-40

  11. Thin film cadmium telluride photovoltaic cells. Annual subcontract report, 1 November 1991--31 October 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, C.D.; Bohn, R.G. [Toledo Univ., OH (United States)

    1993-10-01

    This report describes work to develop and optimize radio-frequency (RF) sputtering and laser-driven physical vapor deposition (LDPVD) for CdTe-based thin-film solar cells. Both of these techniques are vacuum-based and share several other common physical principles. However, they differ somewhat in the typical kinetic energies of Cd, Te, and S that impact on the growth surface. The values of several processing parameters-optimized with the LDPVD technique-were taken as starting values for the RF sputtering method. We completed an initial optimization of the sputtering parameters for the CdTe growth and also successfully sputtered CdS for the first time. In addition, we successfully fabricated what we believe are the first CdS/CdTe cells in which RF sputtering was used for both CdS and CdTe layers. We achieved an all-LDPVD ell with an air mass (AM) 1.5 efficiency of 10.5% and an all-RF-sputtered cell with AM 1.5 efficiency of 10.4%, as tested by NREL.

  12. High-efficiency, thin-film cadmium telluride photovoltaic cells. Annual subcontract report, 20 January 1994--19 January 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, A.D.; Bohn, R.G.; Rajakarunanayake, Y. [Toledo Univ., OH (United States)

    1995-08-01

    This report describes work performed to develop and optimize the process of radio frequency (RF) sputtering for the fabrication of thin-film solar cells on glass. The emphasis is on CdTe-related materials including CdTe, CdS, ZnTe, and ternary alloy semiconductors. Pulsed laser physical vapor deposition (LPVD) was used for exploratory work on these materials, especially where alloying or doping are involved, and for the deposition of cadmium chloride layers. For the sputtering work, a two-gun sputtering chamber was implemented, with optical access for monitoring temperature and growth rate. We studied the optical and electrical properties of the plasmas produced by two different kinds of planar magnetron sputter guns with different magnetic field configurations and strengths. Using LPVD, we studied alloy semiconductors such as CdZnTe and heavily doped semiconductors such as ZnTe:Cu for possible incorporation into graded band gap CdTe-based photovoltaic devices.

  13. 1.7 MeV电子辐照对CdTe太阳电池电流传输特性影响的图谱分析%Spectral Analysis of the Effects of 1.7 MeV Electron Irradiation on the Current Transfer Characteristic of Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田金秀; 曾广根; 何绪林; 张静全; 武莉莉; 李卫; 黎兵; 王文武; 冯良桓

    2014-01-01

    研究了1.7 MeV的电子辐照对具有Anti-radiation glass/ITO/ZnO/CdS/CdTe/ZnTe/ZnTe∶Cu/Ni结构的碲化镉多晶薄膜太阳电池器件性能的影响。抗辐照玻璃的使用,有效防止了普通玻璃受辐照后性能变化对测试结果的影响。利用光、暗I-V ,C-V ,QE ,AS等测试手段,分析了包括开路电压、短路电流、转换效率在内的电池性能。通过对比研究暗电流密度、分析了辐照对电池电流传输特性的影响。辐照后短路电流下降很大,电池效率明显降低。反向饱和电流密度有所增加,表明太阳电池的pn结特性受到损伤,而二极管理想因子几乎不变,说明太阳电池电流的输运机制未发生了变化。量子效率曲线证明是由于太阳电池结区损伤影响了光生载流子的收集。辐照使载流子浓度下降为原来的40.6%。导纳谱研究最终发生辐照会引入Cd2+缺陷能级,其位置为 Et -Ev =(0.58±0.02)eV ,俘获截面为1.78×10-16 cm2,表明辐照会影响光生载流子的产生,增加了载流子复合的概率,使得反向暗电流增大,最终导致电池的短路电流衰减。%The effects of device performance of 1.7 MeV electron irradiation on cadmium telluride polycrystal-line thin film solar cells with the structure of anti-radiation glass/ITO/ZnO/CdS/CdTe/ZnTe/ZnTe∶Cu/Ni have been studied .Light and dark I-V characteristics ,dark C-V characteristics ,quantum efficiency (QE) ,ad-mittance spectrum (AS) and other testing methods were used to analyze cells performance such as the open-cir-cuit voltage (Voc) ,short-circuit current (Isc) ,fill factor (FF) and conversion efficiency (η) .It was explored to find out the effects of irradiation on the current transfer characteristic of solar cells combined with the dark current density (Jo) ,diode ideal factor (A) ,quantum efficiency ,carrier concentration and the depletion layer width .The decline in short-circuit current was very

  14. Apoptosis Induction and Imaging of Cadmium-Telluride Quantum Dots with Wogonin in Multidrug-Resistant Leukemia K562/A02 Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bin; Liu, Hongyi; Huang, Dongliang; Mao, Xuhua; Hu, Xianyun; Jiang, Caiyun; Pu, Maomao; Zhang, Gen; Zeng, Xin

    2016-03-01

    Wogonin (5,7-dihydroxy-8-methoxyflavone) is one of the active components of flavonoids isolated from Scutellariae radix and possesses antitumor effect against leukemia. Cadmium-telluride quantum dots (CdTe-QDs) are a kind of nanoparticles with great potential in functioning as an efficient drug delivery vector in biomedical research. In this study, we investigated the synergistic effect of CdTe-QDs with Wogonin on the induction of apoptosis using drug-resistant human leukemia KA cells. Flow cytometry analysis, assay of morphology under electron microscope, quantitative analysis of tumor volume and micro-CT imaging demonstrated that compared with that by pure CdTe-QDs or wogonin, the apoptosis rate increased sharply when treated wirh CdTe-QDs together with wogonin on KA cells. These results proved that the nanocomposites readily overcame the barrier of drug-resistance and provoked cell apoptosis in vitro and in vivo by facilitating the interaction between wogonin and KA cells. As known to all, it is an inevitable tendency that new effective therapies will take the place of conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy presenting significant disadvantages. According to this article, CdTe-QD combined with wogonin is a possible alternative for some cancer treatments. PMID:27455661

  15. The Cadmium Zinc Telluride Imager on AstroSat

    CERN Document Server

    Bhalerao, V; Vibhute, A; Pawar, P; Rao, A R; Hingar, M K; Khanna, Rakesh; Kutty, A P K; Malkar, J P; Patil, M H; Arora, Y K; Sinha, S; Priya, P; Samuel, Essy; Sreekumar, S; Vinod, P; Mithun, N P S; Vadawale, S V; Vagshette, N; Navalgund, K H; Sarma, K S; Pandiyan, R; Seetha, S; Subbarao, K

    2016-01-01

    The Cadmium Zinc Telluride Imager (CZTI) is a high energy, wide-field imaging instrument on AstroSat. CZT's namesake Cadmium Zinc Telluride detectors cover an energy range from 20 keV to > 200 keV, with 11% energy resolution at 60 keV. The coded aperture mask attains an angular resolution of 17' over a 4.6 deg x 4.6 deg (FWHM) field of view. CZTI functions as an open detector above 100 keV, continuously sensitive to GRBs and other transients in about 30% of the sky. The pixellated detectors are sensitive to polarisation above ~100 keV, with exciting possibilities for polarisation studies of transients and bright persistent sources. In this paper, we provide details of the complete CZTI instrument, detectors, coded aperture mask, mechanical and electronic configuration, as well as data and products.

  16. Transient Response of Cadmium Telluride Modules to Light Exposure: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deline, C.; del Cueto, J.; Albin, D. S.; Petersen, C.; Tyler, L.; TamizhMani, G.

    2011-07-01

    Commercial cadmium telluride (CdTe) photovoltaic (PV) modules from three different manufacturers were monitored for performance changes during indoor and outdoor light-exposure. Short-term transients in Voc were recorded on some modules, with characteristic times of ~1.1 hours. Outdoor performance data shows a similar drop in Voc after early morning light exposure. Preliminary analysis of FF changes show light-induced changes on multiple time scales, including a long time scale.

  17. Mitochondrial Toxicity of Cadmium Telluride Quantum Dot Nanoparticles in Mammalian Hepatocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Kathy C; Rippstein, Peter; Tayabali, Azam F.; Willmore, William G.

    2015-01-01

    There are an increasing number of studies indicating that mitochondria are relevant targets in nanomaterial-induced toxicity. However, the underlying mechanisms by which nanoparticles (NPs) interact with these organelles and affect their functions are unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of cadmium telluride quantum dot (CdTe-QD) NPs on mitochondria in human hepatocellular carcinoma HepG2 cells. CdTe-QD treatment resulted in the enlargement of mitochondria as examined...

  18. Predeposition ultraviolet treatment for adhesion improvement of thin films on mercury cadmium telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poor film adhesion to mercury cadmium telluride is a problem of general concern because of the low film deposition temperatures (11 cm-2 and slow interface state densities of 4x1010 cm-2 were obtained at 100 K for aluminum nitiride/mercury cadmium telluride metal-insulator-semiconductor structures which had undergone the treatment

  19. High-efficiency thin-film cadmium telluride photovoltaic cells. Annual subcontract report, January 20, 1995--January 19, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, A D; Bohn, R G; Contreras-Puente, G [Toledo Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    1996-05-01

    This annual report covers the second year of a 3-year NREL subcontract with the University of Toledo that is focused on improvements in efficiency for radio frequency (rf)-sputtered CdS/CdTe solar cells. In earlier work supported by NREL, the University of Toledo established the viability of two new deposition methods for CdS/CdTe solar cells by fabricating cells with efficiencies greater than 10% at air mass (AM) 1.5 on soda lime glass for all-sputtered cells and also for all-laser-deposited cells. Most of the effort has been placed on radio frequency sputtering (RFS) because it was judged to be more economical and more easily scaled to large-area deposition. However, laser physical vapor deposition (LPVD) has remained the method of choice for the deposition of CdCl{sub 2} layers and also for the exploration of new materials such as the ternary alloys including CdS{sub x} Te{sub 1{minus}x} and dopants such as Cu in ZnTe.

  20. Radiation resistance of thin-film solar cells for space photovoltaic power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodyard, James R.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Copper indium diselenide, cadmium telluride, and amorphous silicon alloy solar cells have achieved noteworthy performance and are currently being studied for space power applications. Cadmium sulfide cells had been the subject of much effort but are no longer considered for space applications. A review is presented of what is known about the radiation degradation of thin film solar cells in space. Experimental cadmium telluride and amorphous silicon alloy cells are reviewed. Damage mechanisms and radiation induced defect generation and passivation in the amorphous silicon alloy cell are discussed in detail due to the greater amount of experimental data available.

  1. High-efficiency thin-film cadmium telluride photovoltaic cells. Annual technical report, January 20, 1996--January 19, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, A D; Bohn, R G; Contreras-Puente, G [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The University of Toledo photovoltaics group has been instrumental in developing rf sputtering for CDs/CdTe thin-film solar cells. During the third phase of the present contract our work focussed on efforts to determine factors which limit the efficiency in our {open_quotes}all-sputtered{close_quotes} thin-film CdTe solar cells on soda-lime glass. We find that our all-sputtered cells, which are deposited at substantially lower temperature than those by sublimation or vapor deposition, require less aggressive CdCl{sub 2} treatments than do other deposition techniques and this is presumably related to CDs/CdTe interdiffusion. The CDs/CdTe interdiffusion process has been studied by several methods, including photoluminescence and capacitance-voltage measurements. Furthermore, we have deposited special thin bilayer films on quartz and borosilicate glass. Interdiffusion in these thin bilayers have been probed by Rutherford backscattering, with collaborators at Case Western Reserve University, and grazing incidence x-ray scattering (GIXS), with collaborators at the University at Buffalo and Brookhaven National Lab. Also, in order better to understand the properties of the ternary alloy material, we used laser physical vapor deposition to prepare a series of CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} films on borosilicate glass. The composition of the alloy films was determined by wavelength dispersive x-ray spectroscopy at NREL. These films are currently being investigated by us and other groups at NREL and IEC.

  2. An evaluation of cadmium telluride detectors for computer assisted tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, D; Kaufman, L; Hosier, K; Hoenninger, J

    1978-11-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) presents a set of extremely attractive features as an X-ray detector for computer assisted tomography (CAT). It is stable and easily handled; has a high detection efficiency and very efficient conversion of energy to charge; and permits a high element density in a compact configuration. Unfortunately, effects due to "polarization," "tailing," high and variable leakage currents, and long "memory" are incompatible with the needs of CAT instrumentation. Pulse-processing techniques have allowed us to eliminate these problems in positive-sensitive detectors, thus opening the way for utilization of CdTe in CAT. PMID:711945

  3. Surface Passivation of Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride Infrared Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Singh

    1991-07-01

    Full Text Available The theoretical considerations and practical aspects of passivating insulator films, in the context of their use on high-performance mercury cadmium telluride (MCT infrared detectors are reviewed. The methods of growth, the interface properties and the applications of both native and deposited passivant films have been discussed. Native films include anodic, chemical, photochemical, and plasma oxides as well as anodic sulphides and fluoro-oxides. Deposited films include ZnS, photo-CVD-grown SiO2, CDTe, and SiN/sub x/. The properties of all these passivant films on MCT have been summarized.

  4. Study of rectification at the metal-cadmium telluride contact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The barrier heights at the contact between metals and N or P type cadmium telluride have been determined. Various surface treatments have been used for the semiconductor: lapping, polishing and etching in a bromine in methanol solution. Depending on these preparation differences of about 0.1 eV have been observed for the barrier height which in any case was no more than 0.9 - 1.0 eV. These results can not be explained by only considering the Schottky theory of rectification

  5. Cadmium Telluride-Titanium Dioxide Nanocomposite for Photodegradation of Organic Substance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontam, Areeporn; Khaorapapong, Nithima; Ogawa, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    Cadmium telluride-titanium dioxide nanocomposite was prepared by hydrothermal reaction of sol-gel derived titanium dioxide and organically modified cadmium telluride. The crystallinity of titanium dioxide in the nanocomposite was higher than that of pure titanium dioxide obtained by the reaction under the same temperature and pressure conditions, showing that cadmium telluride induced the crystallization of titanium dioxide. Diffuse reflectance spectrum of the nanocomposite showed the higher absorption efficiency in the UV-visible region due to band-gap excitation of titanium dioxide. The nanocomposite significantly showed the improvement of photocatalytic activity for 4-chlorophenol with UV light.

  6. Lead Telluride Quantum Dot Solar Cells Displaying External Quantum Efficiencies Exceeding 120%.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Marcus L; Jellicoe, Tom C; Tabachnyk, Maxim; Davis, Nathaniel J L K; Wisnivesky-Rocca-Rivarola, Florencia; Ducati, Caterina; Ehrler, Bruno; Bakulin, Artem A; Greenham, Neil C

    2015-12-01

    Multiple exciton generation (MEG) in semiconducting quantum dots is a process that produces multiple charge-carrier pairs from a single excitation. MEG is a possible route to bypass the Shockley-Queisser limit in single-junction solar cells but it remains challenging to harvest charge-carrier pairs generated by MEG in working photovoltaic devices. Initial yields of additional carrier pairs may be reduced due to ultrafast intraband relaxation processes that compete with MEG at early times. Quantum dots of materials that display reduced carrier cooling rates (e.g., PbTe) are therefore promising candidates to increase the impact of MEG in photovoltaic devices. Here we demonstrate PbTe quantum dot-based solar cells, which produce extractable charge carrier pairs with an external quantum efficiency above 120%, and we estimate an internal quantum efficiency exceeding 150%. Resolving the charge carrier kinetics on the ultrafast time scale with pump-probe transient absorption and pump-push-photocurrent measurements, we identify a delayed cooling effect above the threshold energy for MEG.

  7. Lead Telluride Quantum Dot Solar Cells Displaying External Quantum Efficiencies Exceeding 120%.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Marcus L; Jellicoe, Tom C; Tabachnyk, Maxim; Davis, Nathaniel J L K; Wisnivesky-Rocca-Rivarola, Florencia; Ducati, Caterina; Ehrler, Bruno; Bakulin, Artem A; Greenham, Neil C

    2015-12-01

    Multiple exciton generation (MEG) in semiconducting quantum dots is a process that produces multiple charge-carrier pairs from a single excitation. MEG is a possible route to bypass the Shockley-Queisser limit in single-junction solar cells but it remains challenging to harvest charge-carrier pairs generated by MEG in working photovoltaic devices. Initial yields of additional carrier pairs may be reduced due to ultrafast intraband relaxation processes that compete with MEG at early times. Quantum dots of materials that display reduced carrier cooling rates (e.g., PbTe) are therefore promising candidates to increase the impact of MEG in photovoltaic devices. Here we demonstrate PbTe quantum dot-based solar cells, which produce extractable charge carrier pairs with an external quantum efficiency above 120%, and we estimate an internal quantum efficiency exceeding 150%. Resolving the charge carrier kinetics on the ultrafast time scale with pump-probe transient absorption and pump-push-photocurrent measurements, we identify a delayed cooling effect above the threshold energy for MEG. PMID:26488847

  8. Megapixel mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays for infrared imaging out to 12 microns Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the fabrication of large format, long wave infrared (LWIR) mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe or MCT) detector arrays where the cutoff wavelength is...

  9. Optical properties of thermally evaporated cadmium telluride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khairnar, U.P.; Bhavsar, D.S.; Vaidya, R.U.; Bhavsar, G.P

    2003-05-26

    Polycrystalline CdTe films have been deposited onto glass substrates at 373 K by vacuum evaporation technique. The transmittance and reflectance have been measured at normal and near normal incidence, respectively, in the spectral range 200-2500 nm. The dependence of absorption coefficient, {alpha} on the photon energy have been determined. Analysis of the result showed that for CdTe films of different thicknesses, direct transition occurs with band gap energies in the range 1.45-1.52 eV. Refractive indices and extinction coefficients have been evaluated in the above spectral range. The XRD analysis confirmed that CdTe films are polycrystalline having hexagonal structure. The lattice parameters of thin films are almost matching with the JCPDS 82-0474 data for cadmium telluride.

  10. Mercury Cadmium Telluride Photoconductive Long Wave Infrared Linear Array Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risal Singh

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Mercury cadmium telluride (Hg1-x, CdxTe (MCT photoconductive long wave infrared linear arrays are still in demand due to several advantages. The linear array technology is well established, easier, economical and is quite relevant to thermal imaging even today. The scan thermal imaging systems based on this technology offer wider field of view coverage and capacity for higher resolution in the scan direction relative to staring systems that use expensive and yet to mature focal plane array detector technology. A critical review on photoconductive n-Hg1-x CdxTe linear array detector technology for the long wave infrared range has been presented. The emphasis lies on detector design and processing technology. The critical issues of diffusion and drift effects, Hi-Lo and heterostructure blocking contacts, surface passivation, and other related aspects have been considered from the detector design angle. The device processing technology aspects are of vital importance

  11. Study on thermal annealing of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; Fochuk, P.M.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.; Horace, J.; McCall, B.; Gul, R.; Xu, L.; Kopach, O.V.; and James, R.B.

    2010-08-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) has attracted increasing interest with its promising potential as a room-temperature nuclear-radiation-detector material. However, different defects in CZT crystals, especially Te inclusions and dislocations, can degrade the performance of CZT detectors. Post-growth annealing is a good approach potentially to eliminate the deleterious influence of these defects. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), we built up different facilities for investigating post-growth annealing of CZT. Here, we report our latest experimental results. Cd-vapor annealing reduces the density of Te inclusions, while large temperature gradient promotes the migration of small-size Te inclusions. Simultaneously, the annealing lowers the density of dislocations. However, only-Cd-vapor annealing decreases the resistivity, possibly reflecting the introduction of extra Cd in the lattice. Subsequent Te-vapor annealing is needed to ensure the recovery of the resistivity after removing the Te inclusions.

  12. Study of oxide films on the surface of cadmium telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Study of oxide films on surfaces of CdTe monocrystals is continued by methods of ellipsometry and by absorption in IR-spectral range. Index values of refruction of oxide films, produced by cadmium telluride oxidation in hydrogen peroxide solutions, in oxigen flow at 673 K and by anode oxidation, as a rule, differ essentially in dependence on method of production, that gives evidence of differences in these films composition. Oxide films, produced in oxygen flow, as opposed to films, produced by two other methods, have intensive absorption, characteristic for tellurite group. Film thickness, produced by oxidation in hydrogen peroxide and in oxygen flow, varies within rather wide limits with observance of externally similar conditions of production. By contrast to it, thickness of anode films is regulated reliably by anode potential

  13. Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector is disclosed. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radionuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components. 9 figs

  14. Review of the field performance of one cadmium telluride module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cueto, J.A. del [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-12-01

    Performance data gathered in situ from a large-area cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin-film photovoltaic (PV) module that has been deployed outdoors since February 1995 are investigated. It appears that the module's performance has been stable over the last 2 years but it exhibits a semi-cyclical variation whereby the efficiency appears to peak between the autumnal equinox and winter solstice. Analyses are performed that dissect module current-voltage parameters by irradiance and examine their dependence on temperature. The temperature coefficient of the efficiency is quite small and negative from 80% of 1-sun intensity and upwards. Its meager value is the outcome of the sizes and opposite sings of the temperature coefficients of the open-circuit voltage and fill factor. Average module series resistance is quantified and shown to be a determinant in power loss of 11% at 1-sun intensity. It is demonstrated to constrain the fill factor at illumination intensities above 60% of 1-sun, which occurs in the same range of illumination intensities that the temperature coefficients of the fill factor exhibit positive values. Evidence is presented that points to some spectrally-induced variations in the efficiency. (Author)

  15. Preliminary uranium enrichment analysis results using cadmium zinc telluride detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and EG ampersand G ORTEC have jointly developed a portable ambient-temperature detection system that can be used in a number of application scenarios. The detection system uses a planar cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector with custom-designed detector support electronics developed at LLNL and is based on the recently released MicroNOMAD multichannel analyzer (MCA) produced by ORTEC. Spectral analysis is performed using software developed at LLNL that was originally designed for use with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector systems. In one application, the CZT detection system determines uranium enrichments ranging from less than 3% to over 75% to within accuracies of 20%. The analysis was performed using sample sizes of 200 g or larger and acquisition times of 30 min. The authors have demonstrated the capabilities of this system by analyzing the spectra gathered by the CZT detection system from uranium sources of several enrichments. These experiments demonstrate that current CZT detectors can, in some cases, approach performance criteria that were previously the exclusive domain of larger HPGe detector systems

  16. X-ray computed tomography system utilizing a cadmium telluride detector

    OpenAIRE

    佐藤, 英一; 野宮, 聖一郎; 人見, 啓太朗; 尾鍋, 秀明; 河合, 敏明; 小川, 彰; 佐藤, 成大; 市丸, 俊夫; サトウ, エイイチ; ノミヤ, セイイチロウ; ヒトミ, ケイタロウ; オナベ, ヒデアキ; カワイ, トシアキ; オガワ, アキラ; サトウ, シゲヒロ

    2007-01-01

    A simple x-ray computed tomography(CT) system utilizing a cadmium telluride detector is described. The CT system is of the first generation type and consists of an x-ray generator, a turn table, a translation table, a motor drive unit, a cadmium telluride detector, an interface unit for the detector, and a personal computer(PC). Tomography was performed by the repetition of the translation and rotation of an object. The maximum values of the tube voltage and the tube current were 110kV and 2....

  17. Current transport mechanisms in mercury cadmium telluride diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Vishnu; Li, Qing; He, Jiale; He, Kai; Lin, Chun; Hu, Weida

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the results of modelling of the current-voltage characteristics (I-V) of a planar mid-wave Mercury Cadmium Telluride photodiode in a gate controlled diode experiment. It is reported that the diode exhibits nearly ideal I-V characteristics under the optimum surface potential leading to the minimal surface leakage current. Deviations from the optimum surface potential lead to non ideal I-V characteristics, indicating a strong relationship between the ideality factor of the diode with its surface leakage current. Diode's I-V characteristics have been modelled over a range of gate voltages from -9 V to -2 V. This range of gate voltages includes accumulation, flat band, and depletion and inversion conditions below the gate structure of the diode. It is shown that the I-V characteristics of the diode can be very well described by (i) thermal diffusion current, (ii) ohmic shunt current, (iii) photo-current due to background illumination, and (iv) excess current that grows by the process of avalanche multiplication in the gate voltage range from -3 V to -5 V that corresponds to the optimum surface potential. Outside the optimum gate voltage range, the origin of the excess current of the diode is associated with its high surface leakage currents. It is reported that the ohmic shunt current model applies to small surface leakage currents. The higher surface leakage currents exhibit a nonlinear shunt behaviour. It is also shown that the observed zero-bias dynamic resistance of the diode over the entire gate voltage range is the sum of ohmic shunt resistance and estimated zero-bias dynamic resistance of the diode from its thermal saturation current.

  18. Directional Solidification of Mercury Cadmium Telluride in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechoczhy, Sandor L.; Gillies, Donald C.; Szofran, Frank R.; Watring, Dale A.

    1998-01-01

    Mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) has been directionally solidified for ten days in the Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) on the second United States Microgravity Payload Mission (USMP-2). A second growth experiment is planned for the USMP-4 mission in November 1997. Results from USMP-2 demonstrated significant changes between microgravity and ground-based experiments, particularly in the compositional homogeneity. Changes were also observed during the microgravity mission which were dependent on the attitude of the space shuttle and the relative magnitudes of axial and transverse residual accelerations with respect to the growth axis of the crystal. Issues of shuttle operation, especially those concerned with safety and navigation, and the science needs of other payloads dictated the need for changes in attitude. One consequence for solidification of MCT in the USMP4 mission is the desire for a shorter growth time to complete the experiment without subjecting the sample to shuttle maneuvers. By using a seeded technique and a pre-processed boule of MCT with an established diffusion layer quenched into the solid, equilibrium steady state growth can be established within 24 hours, rather than the three days needed in USMP-2. The growth of MCT in AADSF during the USMP-4 mission has been planned to take less than 72 hours with 48 hours of actual growth time. A review of the USMP-2 results will be presented, and the rationale for the USMP-4 explained. Pre-mission ground based tests for the USN4P-4 mission will be presented, as will any available preliminary flight results from the mission.

  19. Recent technological advances in thin film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullal, H.S.; Zwelbel, K.; Surek, T.

    1990-03-01

    High-efficiency, low-cost thin film solar cells are an exciting photovoltaic technology option for generating cost-effective electricity in 1995 and beyond. This paper reviews the substantial advances made by several thin film solar cell technologies, namely, amorphous silicon, copper indium diselenide, cadmium telluride, and polycrystalline silicon. Recent examples of utility demonstration projects of these emerging materials are also discussed. 8 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Effective performance for undoped and boron-doped double-layered nanoparticles-copper telluride and manganese telluride on tungsten oxide photoelectrodes for solar cell devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srathongluan, Pornpimol; Vailikhit, Veeramol; Teesetsopon, Pichanan; Choopun, Supab; Tubtimtae, Auttasit

    2016-11-01

    This work demonstrates the synthesis of a novel double-layered Cu2-xTe/MnTe structure on a WO3 photoelectrode as a solar absorber for photovoltaic devices. Each material absorber is synthesized using a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The synthesized individual particle sizes are Cu2-xTe(17) ∼5-10nm and MnTe(3) ∼2nm, whereas, the aggregated particle sizes of undoped and boron-doped Cu2-xTe(17)/MnTe(11) are ∼50 and 150nm, respectively. The larger size after doping is due to the interconnecting of nanoparticles as a network-like structure. A new alignment of the energy band is constructed after boron/MnTe(11) is coated on boron/Cu2-xTe nanoparticles (NPs), leading to a narrower Eg equal to 0.58eV. Then, the valence band maximum (VBM) and conduction band minimum (CBM) with a trap state are also up-shifted to near the CBM of WO3, leading to the shift of a Fermi level for ease of electron injection. The best efficiency of 1.41% was yielded for the WO3/boron-doped [Cu2-xTe(17)/MnTe(11)] structure with a photocurrent density (Jsc)=16.43mA/cm(2), an open-circuit voltage (Voc)=0.305V and a fill factor (FF)=28.1%. This work demonstrates the feasibility of this double-layered structure with doping material as a solar absorber material. PMID:27451035

  1. Improved Sensitization of Zinc Oxide Nanorods by Cadmium Telluride Quantum Dots through Charge Induced Hydrophilic Surface Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Laxman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on UV-mediated enhancement in the sensitization of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs on zinc oxide (ZnO nanorods, improving the charge transfer efficiency across the QD-ZnO interface. The improvement was primarily due to the reduction in the interfacial resistance achieved via the incorporation of UV light induced surface defects on zinc oxide nanorods. The photoinduced defects were characterized by XPS, FTIR, and water contact angle measurements, which demonstrated an increase in the surface defects (oxygen vacancies in the ZnO crystal, leading to an increase in the active sites available for the QD attachment. As a proof of concept, a model cadmium telluride (CdTe QD solar cell was fabricated using the defect engineered ZnO photoelectrodes, which showed ∼10% increase in photovoltage and ∼66% improvement in the photocurrent compared to the defect-free photoelectrodes. The improvement in the photocurrent was mainly attributed to the enhancement in the charge transfer efficiency across the defect rich QD-ZnO interface, which was indicated by the higher quenching of the CdTe QD photoluminescence upon sensitization.

  2. Semiconductor materials for solar photovoltaic cells

    CERN Document Server

    Wong-Ng, Winnie; Bhattacharya, Raghu

    2016-01-01

    This book reviews the current status of semiconductor materials for conversion of sunlight to electricity, and highlights advances in both basic science and manufacturing.  Photovoltaic (PV) solar electric technology will be a significant contributor to world energy supplies when reliable, efficient PV power products are manufactured in large volumes at low cost.  Expert chapters cover the full range of semiconductor materials for solar-to-electricity conversion, from crystalline silicon and amorphous silicon to cadmium telluride, copper indium gallium sulfide selenides, dye sensitized solar cells, organic solar cells, and environmentally friendly copper zinc tin sulfide selenides. The latest methods for synthesis and characterization of solar cell materials are described, together with techniques for measuring solar cell efficiency. Semiconductor Materials for Solar Photovoltaic Cells presents the current state of the art as well as key details about future strategies to increase the efficiency and reduce ...

  3. Effects of Long-term exposure of Gelatinated and Non-gelatinated Cadmium Telluride Quantum Dots on Differentiated PC12 cells

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Prasad, Babu R

    2012-01-20

    Abstract Background The inherent toxicity of unmodified Quantum Dots (QDs) is a major hindrance to their use in biological applications. To make them more potent as neuroprosthetic and neurotherapeutic agents, thioglycolic acid (TGA) capped CdTe QDs, were coated with a gelatine layer and investigated in this study with differentiated pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells. The QD - cell interactions were investigated after incubation periods of up to 17 days by MTT and APOTOX-Glo Triplex assays along with using confocal microscopy. Results Long term exposure (up to 17 days) to gelatinated TGA-capped CdTe QDs of PC12 cells in the course of differentiation and after neurites were grown resulted in dramatically reduced cytotoxicity compared to non-gelatinated TGA-capped CdTe QDs. Conclusion The toxicity mechanism of QDs was identified as caspase-mediated apoptosis as a result of cadmium leaking from the core of QDs. It was therefore concluded that the gelatine capping on the surface of QDs acts as a barrier towards the leaking of toxic ions from the core QDs in the long term (up to 17 days).

  4. The energetic impact of small Cd{sub x}Te{sub y} clusters on Cadmium Telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Miao, E-mail: M.Yu2@lboro.ac.uk; Kenny, Steven D., E-mail: S.D.Kenny@lboro.ac.uk

    2015-06-01

    Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) is an excellent material for low-cost, high efficiency thin film solar cells. It is important to do research on how these defects are formed during the growth process, since defects lower the efficiency of solar cells. In this work we use computer simulation to predict the growth of a sputter deposited CdTe thin film. Single deposition tests have been performed, to study the behaviour of deposited clusters under different conditions. We deposit a Cd{sub x}Te{sub y} (x,y = 0,1) cluster onto the (100) and (111) Cd and Te terminated surfaces with energies ranging from 1 to 40 eV. More than 1000 simulations have been performed for each of these cases so as to sample the possible deposition positions and to collect sufficient statistics. The results show that Cd atoms are more readily sputtered from the surface than Te atoms and the sticking probability is higher on Te terminated surfaces than Cd terminated surfaces. They also show that increasing the deposition energy typically leads to an increase in the number of atoms sputtered from the system and tends to decrease the number of atoms that sit on or in the surface layer, whilst increasing the number of interstitials observed. - Highlights: • Deposition of Cd, Te and CdTe particles on (100) and (111) Cd and Te surfaces • Cd atoms are more readily sputtered from the surface than Te atoms. • The Te terminated surfaces have a higher sticking probability than the Cd ones. • Higher impact energies imply more sputtered atoms from the surface.

  5. Enhanced performance of hybrid solar cells using longer arms of quantum cadmium selenide tetrapods

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Kyu-Sung

    2011-12-01

    We demonstrate that enhanced device performance of hybrid solar cells based on tetrapod (TP)-shaped cadmium selenide (CdSe) nanoparticles and conjugated polymer of poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) can be obtained by using longer armed tetrapods which aids in better spatial connectivity, thus decreasing charge hopping events which lead to better charge transport. Longer tetrapods with 10 nm arm length lead to improved power conversion efficiency of 1.12% compared to 0.80% of device having 5 nm short-armed tetrapods:P3HT photoactive blends.

  6. Cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe-QDs and enhanced ultraviolet-B (UV-B radiation trigger antioxidant enzyme metabolism and programmed cell death in wheat seedlings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huize Chen

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles (NPs are becoming increasingly widespread in the environment. Free cadmium ions released from commonly used NPs under ultraviolet-B (UV-B radiation are potentially toxic to living organisms. With increasing levels of UV-B radiation at the Earth's surface due to the depletion of the ozone layer, the potential additive effect of NPs and UV-B radiation on plants is of concern. In this study, we investigated the synergistic effect of CdTe quantum dots (CdTe-QDs, a common form of NP, and UV-B radiation on wheat seedlings. Graded doses of CdTe-QDs and UV-B radiation were tested, either alone or in combination, based on physical characteristics of 5-day-old seedlings. Treatments of wheat seedlings with either CdTe-QDs (200 mg/L or UV-B radiation (10 KJ/m(2/d induced the activation of wheat antioxidant enzymes. CdTe-QDs accumulation in plant root cells resulted in programmed cell death as detected by DNA laddering. CdTe-QDs and UV-B radiation inhibited root and shoot growth, respectively. Additive inhibitory effects were observed in the combined treatment group. This research described the effects of UV-B and CdTe-QDs on plant growth. Furthermore, the finding that CdTe-QDs accumulate during the life cycle of plants highlights the need for sustained assessments of these interactions.

  7. Characterization of large cadmium zinc telluride crystals grown by traveling heater method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, H.; Awadalla, S.A.; Iniewski, K.;

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to evaluate thick, 20 X 20 X 10 and 10 X 10 X 10 mm(3), cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), Cd0.9Zn0.1Te, crystals grown using the traveling heater method (THIM). The phenomenal spectral performance and small size and low concentration of Te inclusions/precipitates of these c......The focus of this paper is to evaluate thick, 20 X 20 X 10 and 10 X 10 X 10 mm(3), cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), Cd0.9Zn0.1Te, crystals grown using the traveling heater method (THIM). The phenomenal spectral performance and small size and low concentration of Te inclusions...

  8. Optical property of amorphous semiconductor mercury cadmium telluride from first-principles study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The structural and optical properties of amorphous semiconductor mercury cadmium telluride (a-MCT) are obtained by the first principles calculations. The total pair distribution functions and the density of states show that the a-MCT has the semiconductor characteristic. The calculated results of dielectric function show that E2 peak of the imaginary of dielectric function for the crystal mercury cadmium telluride abruptly disappears in the amorphous case due to the long-range disorders. And the imaginary of dielectric function of a-MCT shows a large broad peak, which is in agreement with the available results of other amorphous semiconductors. From the linear extrapolation of the curve ωε 2(ω)1/2 versus ω, it can be obtained that the optical energy gap of amorphous semiconductor Hg0.5Cd0.5Te is 0.51±0.05 eV.

  9. Optical property of amorphous semiconductor mercury cadmium telluride from first-principles study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Liang; CHEN XiaoShuang; LU Wei; HUANG Yan; WANG XiaoFang; ZHAO JiJun

    2009-01-01

    The structural and optical properties of amorphous semiconductor mercury cadmium telluride(a-MCT) are obtained by the first principles calculations. The total pair distribution functions and the density of states show that the a-MCT has the semiconductor characteristic. The calculated results of dielectric function show that E2 peak of the imaginary of dielectric function for the crystal mercury cadmium telluride abruptly disappears in the amorphous case due to the long-range disorders. And the imaginary of dielectric function of a-MCT shows a large broad peak, which is in agreement with the available results of other amorphous semiconductors. From the linear extrapolation of the curve (n)ωε2(ω)1/2 versus (n)ω,it can be obtained that the optical energy gap of amorphous semiconductor Hg0.5Cd0.5Te is 0.51±0.05 eV.

  10. Reproductive toxicity and gender differences induced by cadmium telluride quantum dots in an invertebrate model organism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Si-Qi; Xing, Rui; Zhou, Yan-Feng; Li, Kai-Le; Su, Yuan-Yuan; Qiu, Jian-Feng; Zhang, Yun-Hu; Zhang, Ke-Qin; He, Yao; Lu, Xiao-Ping; Xu, Shi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Sexual glands are key sites affected by nanotoxicity, but there is no sensitive assay for measuring reproductive toxicity in animals. The aim of this study was to investigate the toxic effects of cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe-QDs) on gonads in a model organism, Bombyx mori. After dorsal vein injection of 0.32 nmol of CdTe-QDs per individual, the QDs passed through the outer membranes of gonads via the generation of ROS in the membranes of spermatocysts and ovarioles, as well as internal germ cells, thereby inducing early germ cell death or malformations via complex mechanisms related to apoptosis and autophagy through mitochondrial and lysosomal pathways. Histological observations of the gonads and quantitative analyses of germ cell development showed that the reproductive toxicity was characterized by obvious male sensitivity. Exposure to QDs in the early stage of males had severe adverse effects on the quantity and quality of sperm, which was the main reason for the occurrence of unfertilized eggs. Ala- or Gly-conjugated QDs could reduce the nanotoxicity of CdTe-QDs during germ cell development and fertilization of their offspring. The results demonstrate that males are preferable models for evaluating the reproductive toxicity of QDs in combined in vivo/in vitro investigations. PMID:27669995

  11. Inhibition of autophagy contributes to the toxicity of cadmium telluride quantum dots in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Junpeng; Shao, Ming; Lai, Lu; Liu, Yi; Xie, Zhixiong

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) are used as near-infrared probes in biologic and medical applications, but their cytological effects and mechanism of potential toxicity are still unclear. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of CdTe QDs of different sizes and investigated their mechanism of toxicity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A growth inhibition assay revealed that orange-emitting CdTe (O-CdTe) QDs (half inhibitory concentration [IC50] =59.44±12.02 nmol/L) were more toxic than green-emitting CdTe QDs (IC50 =186.61±19.74 nmol/L) to S. cerevisiae. Further studies on toxicity mechanisms using a transmission electron microscope and green fluorescent protein tagged Atg8 processing assay revealed that O-CdTe QDs could partially inhibit autophagy at a late stage, which differs from the results reported in mammalian cells. Moreover, autophagy inhibited at a late stage by O-CdTe QDs could be partially recovered by enhancing autophagy with rapamycin (an autophagy activator), combined with an increased number of living cells. These results indicate that inhibition of autophagy acts as a toxicity mechanism of CdTe QDs in S. cerevisiae. This work reports a novel toxicity mechanism of CdTe QDs in yeast and provides valuable information on the effect of CdTe QDs on the processes of living cells. PMID:27524895

  12. Cadmium Sulfide Nanoparticles Synthesized by Microwave Heating for Hybrid Solar Cell Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Martínez-Alonso

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium sulfide nanoparticles (CdS-n are excellent electron acceptor for hybrid solar cell applications. However, the particle size and properties of the CdS-n products depend largely on the synthesis methodologies. In this work, CdS-n were synthetized by microwave heating using thioacetamide (TA or thiourea (TU as sulfur sources. The obtained CdS-n(TA showed a random distribution of hexagonal particles and contained TA residues. The latter could originate the charge carrier recombination process and cause a low photovoltage (Voc, 0.3 V in the hybrid solar cells formed by the inorganic particles and poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT. Under similar synthesis conditions, in contrast, CdS-n synthesized with TU consisted of spherical particles with similar size and contained carbonyl groups at their surface. CdS-n(TU could be well dispersed in the nonpolar P3HT solution, leading to a Voc of about 0.6–0.8 V in the resulting CdS-n(TU : P3HT solar cells. The results of this work suggest that the reactant sources in microwave methods can affect the physicochemical properties of the obtained inorganic semiconductor nanoparticles, which finally influenced the photovoltaic performance of related hybrid solar cells.

  13. Thin film solar cells. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-11-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning research and development of high-efficiency and low-cost thin film solar cells. References discuss the design and fabrication of silicon, gallium arsenide, copper selenide, indium selenide, cadmium telluride, and copper indium selenide solar cells. Applications in space and utilities are examined. Government projects and foreign technology are also reviewed. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  14. Improved performance of carbon nanotubes—manganese doped cadmium sulfide quantum dot nanocomposite based solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Rajnish; Priya, Nidhi; Deep, Akash

    2016-01-01

    The nanocomposites of carbon nanotubes with quantum dots (MWCNT-QDS) display the capability of light induced charge dissociation and transport, which make them suitable for photovoltaic applications. The present work reports the coupling of multiwalled CNT (MWCNT) with L-cysteine (2-amino 3-mercaptopropionic acid) capped manganese doped cadmium sulfide QDs (CdS:Mn). The confirmation of the MWCNT-CdS:Mn nanocomposite formation is done with various instrumental techniques. Current-voltage studies of the MWCNT-CdS:Mn thin film indicate their semiconducting behavior. Further, cyclic voltammetry and frequency response analyses of the above MWCNT-CdS:Mn thin film have highlighted their potential application as a photoanode material in dye sanitized solar cells. It has been demonstrated that the use of MWCNT-CdS:Mn nanocomposite as a photoanode material offer better photocurrent characteristics as compared to QDS alone.

  15. Spatial mapping of cadmium zinc telluride materials properties and electrical response to improve device yield and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Van Scyoc, J M; Yoon, H; Gilbert, T S; Hilton, N R; Lund, J C; James, R B

    1999-01-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride has experienced tremendous growth in its application to various radiation sensing problems over the last five years. However, there are still issues with yield, particularly of the large volume devices needed for imaging and sensitivity-critical applications. Inhomogeneities of various types and on various length scales currently prevent the fabrication of large devices of high spectral performance. This paper discusses the development of a set of characterization tools for quantifying these inhomogeneities, in order to develop improvement strategies to achieve the desired cadmium zinc telluride crystals for detector fabrication.

  16. Specific features of the photoconductivity of semi-insulating cadmium telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golubyatnikov, V. A.; Grigor’ev, F. I.; Lysenko, A. P., E-mail: aplysenko@hse.ru; Strogankova, N. I.; Shadov, M. B. [National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow Institute of Electronics and Mathematics (Russian Federation); Belov, A. G. [OAO GIREDMET State Research and Design Institute of the Rare-Metal Industry (Russian Federation)

    2014-12-15

    The effect of local illumination providing a high level of free-carrier injection on the conductivity of a sample of semi-insulating cadmium telluride and on the properties of ohmic contacts to the sample is studied. It is found that, irrespective of the illumination region, the contact resistance of ohmic contacts decreases and the concentration of majority carriers in the sample grows in proportion to the illumination intensity. It is shown that inherent heterogeneities in crystals of semi-insulating semiconductors can be studied by scanning with a light probe.

  17. Optimization of High-Efficiency CdS/CdTe Thin Film Solar Cell Using Step Doping Grading and Thickness of the Absorption Layer

    OpenAIRE

    Masoud Sabaghi; Abbas Majdabadi; Saeid Marjani; Saeed Khosroabadi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the influence of stepped doping of the absorber layer on performance of Cadmium Sulfide/Cadmium Telluride (CdS/CdTe) solar cell has been investigated. At first, the electrical characteristics of conventional CdS/CdTe solar cell is validated with fabricated CdS/CdTe solar cell. To improve the maximum efficiency of CdS/CdTe solar cell, the doping and thickness of the absorption layer are optimized. By step doping concentration within the absorber layer using buffer layer back con...

  18. Advanced Processing of CdTe- and CuInxGa1-xSe2-Based Solar Cells: Final Report: 18 April 1995 - 31 May 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes work performed by the University of South Florida Department of Electrical Engineering under this subcontract. The Cadmium telluride(CdTe) portion of this project deals with the development of high-efficiency thin-filmed CdTe solar cells using fabrication techniques that are suitable for manufacturing environments

  19. Cadmium zinc telluride based infrared interferometry for X-ray detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lohstroh, A., E-mail: A.Lohstroh@surrey.ac.uk; Della Rocca, I. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Parsons, S. [Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); AWE Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Langley, A.; Shenton-Taylor, C.; Blackie, D. [AWE Aldermaston, Reading RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)

    2015-02-09

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) is a wide band gap semiconductor for room temperature radiation detection. The electro-optic Pockels effect of the material has been exploited in the past to study electric field non-uniformities and their consequence on conventional detector signals in CZT, by imaging the intensity distribution of infrared (IR) light transmitted through a device placed between crossed polarizers. Recently, quantitative monitoring of extremely high intensity neutron pulses through the change of transmitted IR intensity was demonstrated, offering the advantage to place sensitive electronics outside the measured radiation field. In this work, we demonstrate that X-ray intensity can be deduced directly from measuring the change in phase of 1550 nm laser light transmitted through a 7 × 7 × 2 mm{sup 3} CZT based Pockels cell in a simple Mach Zehnder interferometer. X-rays produced by a 50 kVp Mo X-ray tube incident on the CZT cathode surface placed at 7 mm distance cause a linearly increasing phase shift above 0.3 mA tube current, with 1.58 ± 0.02 rad per mA for an applied bias of 500 V across the 2 mm thick device. Pockels images confirm that the sample properties are in agreement with the literature, exhibiting electric field enhancement near the cathode under irradiation, which may cause the non-linearity at low X-ray tube anode current settings. The laser used to probe the X-ray intensity causes itself some space charge, whose spatial distribution does not seem to be exclusively determined by the incident laser position, i.e., charge carrier generation location, with respect to the electrodes.

  20. Cadmium zinc telluride based infrared interferometry for X-ray detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) is a wide band gap semiconductor for room temperature radiation detection. The electro-optic Pockels effect of the material has been exploited in the past to study electric field non-uniformities and their consequence on conventional detector signals in CZT, by imaging the intensity distribution of infrared (IR) light transmitted through a device placed between crossed polarizers. Recently, quantitative monitoring of extremely high intensity neutron pulses through the change of transmitted IR intensity was demonstrated, offering the advantage to place sensitive electronics outside the measured radiation field. In this work, we demonstrate that X-ray intensity can be deduced directly from measuring the change in phase of 1550 nm laser light transmitted through a 7 × 7 × 2 mm3 CZT based Pockels cell in a simple Mach Zehnder interferometer. X-rays produced by a 50 kVp Mo X-ray tube incident on the CZT cathode surface placed at 7 mm distance cause a linearly increasing phase shift above 0.3 mA tube current, with 1.58 ± 0.02 rad per mA for an applied bias of 500 V across the 2 mm thick device. Pockels images confirm that the sample properties are in agreement with the literature, exhibiting electric field enhancement near the cathode under irradiation, which may cause the non-linearity at low X-ray tube anode current settings. The laser used to probe the X-ray intensity causes itself some space charge, whose spatial distribution does not seem to be exclusively determined by the incident laser position, i.e., charge carrier generation location, with respect to the electrodes

  1. Synthesis and application in solar cell of poly(3-octylthiophene)/cadmium sulfide nanocomposite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Zhiyue [Institute of Modern Catalysis, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing 100029 (China); Zhang, Jingchang; Cao, Weiliang [Institute of Modern Catalysis, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, State Key Laboratory of Chemical Resource Engineering, Beijing 100029 (China); Hainan Institute of Science and Technology, Haikou 571126 (China); Yang, Xiuying [Hainan Institute of Science and Technology, Haikou 571126 (China)

    2011-02-15

    A conducting polymer composite, poly(3-octylthiophene)/cadmium sulfide (POT/CdS) was first synthesized. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) depict the morphology of the samples, defining that CdS was successfully coated by poly(3-octylthiophene) molecules. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared spectroscopy (IR) show that there is a chemical interaction in the composite. The energy gap of the POT/CdS composite is lower at 0.824 eV, which also shows that the optical performance of the new material is far superior to POT or CdS separately, by ultraviolet-visible spectra (UV-vis). Solar cell was sensitized by POT/CdS. A solar-to-electric energy conversion efficiency of 0.581% was attained with the system. The results show that POT/CdS nanocomposites are promising materials with excellent performance characteristics in photoelectric applications. (author)

  2. Core-Shell Nanopillar Array Solar Cells using Cadmium Sulfide Coating on Indium Phosphide Nanopillars

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, Bor-An Clayton

    2013-01-01

    This thesis presents a new strategy to fabricate nanostructured indium phosphide and cadmium sulfide photovoltaics. The cells are formed by chemical bath deposition (electroless deposition) of cadmium sulfide onto indium phosphide nanopillar arrays grown by selective-area metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. Characterizations through electrical and optical measurements show that the devices consisting of p-InP core and CdS shell have a conversion efficiency, open circuit voltage, short cir...

  3. Synthesis of cadmium telluride quantum wires and the similarity of their band gaps to those of equidiameter cadmium telluride quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Sun, Jianwei; Wang, Lin-Wang; Buhro, William E.

    2008-07-11

    High-quality colloidal CdTe quantum wires having purposefully controlled diameters in the range of 5-11 nm are grown by the solution-liquid-solid (SLS) method, using Bi-nanoparticle catalysts, cadmium octadecylphosphonate and trioctylphosphine telluride as precursors, and a TOPO solvent. The wires adopt the wurtzite structure, and grow along the [002] direction (parallel to the c axis). The size dependence of the band gaps in the wires are determined from the absorption spectra, and compared to the experimental results for high-quality CdTe quantum dots. In contrast to the predictions of an effective-mass approximation, particle-in-a-box model, and previous experimental results from CdSe and InP dot-wire comparisons, the band gaps of CdTe dots and wires of like diameter are found to be experimentally indistinguishable. The present results are analyzed using density functional theory under the local-density approximation by implementing a charge-patching method. The higher-level theoretical analysis finds the general existence of a threshold diameter, above which dot and wire band gaps converge. The origin and magnitude of this threshold diameter is discussed.

  4. Inhibition of autophagy contributes to the toxicity of cadmium telluride quantum dots in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan J

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Junpeng Fan,1–4 Ming Shao,1–4 Lu Lai,3–5 Yi Liu,3–5 Zhixiong Xie1–4,6 1College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, 2Hubei Provincial Cooperative Innovation Center of Industrial Fermentation,3State Key Laboratory of Virology, 4Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (MOE, 5College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 6School of Life Science and Technology, Hubei Engineering University, Xiaogan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs are used as near-infrared probes in biologic and medical applications, but their cytological effects and mechanism of potential toxicity are still unclear. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of CdTe QDs of different sizes and investigated their mechanism of toxicity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A growth inhibition assay revealed that orange-emitting CdTe (O-CdTe QDs (half inhibitory concentration [IC50] =59.44±12.02 nmol/L were more toxic than green-emitting CdTe QDs (IC50 =186.61±19.74 nmol/L to S. cerevisiae. Further studies on toxicity mechanisms using a transmission electron microscope and green fluorescent protein tagged Atg8 processing assay revealed that O-CdTe QDs could partially inhibit autophagy at a late stage, which differs from the results reported in mammalian cells. Moreover, autophagy inhibited at a late stage by O-CdTe QDs could be partially recovered by enhancing autophagy with rapamycin (an autophagy activator, combined with an increased number of living cells. These results indicate that inhibition of autophagy acts as a toxicity mechanism of CdTe QDs in S. cerevisiae. This work reports a novel toxicity mechanism of CdTe QDs in yeast and provides valuable information on the effect of CdTe QDs on the processes of living cells. Keywords: CdTe quantum dots, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, toxicity, autophagy

  5. The use of cadmium telluride detectors for the qualitative analysis of diagnostic x-ray spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Castro, E; Pani, R; Pellegrini, R; Bacci, C

    1984-09-01

    A method is introduced for the evaluation of x-ray spectra from x-ray machines operating in the range 50-100 kVp using a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with low detection efficiency. The pulse height distribution obtained with this kind of detector does not represent the true photon spectra owing to the presence of K-escape, Compton scattering, etc.; these effects were evaluated using a Monte Carlo method. A stripping procedure is described for implementation on a Univac 1100/82 computer. The validity of our method was finally tested by comparison with experimental results obtained with a Ge detector and with data from the literature; the results are in good agreement with published data. PMID:6483976

  6. Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) Studies of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) Radiation Detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride is an emerging material for room temperature radiation detectors. In order to optimize the performance of these detectors, it is important to determine how the electronic properties of CZT are related to the presence of impurities and defects that are introduced during the crystal growth and detector fabrication. At the Sandia microbeam facility IBICC and Time Resolved IBICC (TRIBICC) were used to image electronic properties of various CZT detectors. Two-dimensional areal maps of charge collection efficiency were deduced from the measurements. In order to determine radiation damage to the detectors, we measured the deterioration of the IBICC signal as the function of dose. A model to explain quantitatively the pattern observed in the charge collection efficiency maps of the damaged detectors has been developed and will be discussed in the paper

  7. Electronic properties of chlorine doped cadmium telluride used as high energy photoconductive detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new high energy X-ray chlorine doped Cadmium Telluride (CdTe:Cl) photoconductor is described. We discuss different deposition techniques (Sputtering, Evaporation, Electroless) to realize ohmic contacts which have low leakage current and which allow high applied electric field. The temperature dependence of the dark current give an activation energy of 0.6 eV for standard CdTe:Cl. The transient response of photoconductors under high X-ray energy beams has been characterized using three different pulse duration 150 ps, 30 ns and 4 μs. Sensitivity and speed of response are studied as a function of neutron pre-irradiated doses (0, 1014, 1015, 1016 n/cm2): neutron irradiations reduce the carrier lifetime at the expense of a lower sensitivity

  8. Internal Electric Field Behavior of Cadmium Zinc Telluride Radiation Detectors Under High Carrier Injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.H.; Gul, R.; and James, R.B.

    2010-10-26

    The behavior of the internal electric-field of nuclear-radiation detectors substantially affects the detector's performance. We investigated the distribution of the internal field in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors under high carrier injection. We noted the build-up of a space charge region near the cathode that produces a built-in field opposing the applied field. Its presence entails the collapse of the electric field in the rest of detector, other than the portion near the cathode. Such a space-charge region originates from serious hole-trapping in CZT. The device's operating temperature greatly affects the width of the space-charge region. With increasing temperature from 5 C to 35 C, its width expanded from about 1/6 to 1/2 of the total depth of the detector.

  9. An optically-interrogated microwave-Poynting-vector sensor using cadmium manganese telluride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chia-Chu; Whitaker, John F

    2010-06-01

    A single cadmium-manganese-telluride crystal that exhibits both the Pockels and Faraday effects is used to produce a Poynting-vector sensor for signals in the microwave regime. This multi-birefringent crystal can independently measure either electric or magnetic fields through control of the polarization of the optical probe beam. After obtaining all the relevant electric and magnetic field components, a map of the Poynting vector along a 50-Omega microstrip was experimentally determined without the need for any further transformational calculations. The results demonstrate that this sensor can be used for near-field mapping of the Poynting vector. Utilizing both amplitude and phase information from the fields in the microwave signal, it was confirmed for the case of an open-terminated microstrip that no energy flowed to the load, while for a microstrip with a matched termination, the energy flowed consistently along the transmission line. PMID:20588348

  10. Cadmium telluride quantum dots as pH-sensitive probes for tiopronin determination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Yunqing; Ye Chao; Zhu Zhenghui [Key Laboratory of Drug Quality Control and Pharmacovigilance, Ministry of Education, Nanjing 210009 (China); Department of Analytical Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Hu Yuzhu [Key Laboratory of Drug Quality Control and Pharmacovigilance, Ministry of Education, Nanjing 210009 (China) and Department of Analytical Chemistry, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China)], E-mail: njhuyuzu@126.com

    2008-03-03

    The pH-sensitive cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dots (QDs) were used as proton probes for tiopronin determination. Based on the fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs caused by tiopronin, a simple, rapid and specific quantitative method was proposed. Under the optimal conditions, the calibration plot of ln(F{sub 0}/F) with concentration of tiopronin was linear in the range of 0.15-20 {mu}g mL{sup -1}(0.92-122.5 {mu}mol L{sup -1}) with correlation coefficient of 0.998. The limit of detection (LOD) (3{sigma}/k) was 0.15 {mu}g mL{sup -1}(0.92 {mu}mol mL{sup -1}). The content of tiopronin in pharmaceutical tablet was determined by the proposed method and the result agreed with that obtained from the oxidation-reduction titration method and the claimed value.

  11. Cadmium telluride quantum dots as pH-sensitive probes for tiopronin determination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pH-sensitive cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dots (QDs) were used as proton probes for tiopronin determination. Based on the fluorescence quenching of CdTe QDs caused by tiopronin, a simple, rapid and specific quantitative method was proposed. Under the optimal conditions, the calibration plot of ln(F0/F) with concentration of tiopronin was linear in the range of 0.15-20 μg mL-1(0.92-122.5 μmol L-1) with correlation coefficient of 0.998. The limit of detection (LOD) (3σ/k) was 0.15 μg mL-1(0.92 μmol mL-1). The content of tiopronin in pharmaceutical tablet was determined by the proposed method and the result agreed with that obtained from the oxidation-reduction titration method and the claimed value

  12. Experiments and Monte Carlo modeling of a higher resolution Cadmium Zinc Telluride detector for safeguards applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borella, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre is engaged in R&D activity in the field of Non Destructive Analysis on nuclear materials, with focus on spent fuel characterization. A 500 mm3 Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) with enhanced resolution was recently purchased. With a full width at half maximum of 1.3% at 662 keV, the detector is very promising in view of its use for applications such as determination of uranium enrichment and plutonium isotopic composition, as well as measurement on spent fuel. In this paper, I report about the work done with such a detector in terms of its characterization. The detector energy calibration, peak shape and efficiency were determined from experimental data. The data included measurements with calibrated sources, both in a bare and in a shielded environment. In addition, Monte Carlo calculations with the MCNPX code were carried out and benchmarked with experiments.

  13. Comparison of fluorescent down-shifting layers for increasing the efficiency of CdS/CdTe solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Parel, Thomas; Fang, Liping; Chu, Xishu; Danos, Lefteris; Markvart, Tom

    2011-01-01

    The poor spectral response of some Cadmium Sulfide/Cadmium Telluride (CdTe/CdS) solar cells in the UV/blue part of the spectrum can be improved through down-shifting of light using fluorescent dyes. A fluorescent down-shifting structure absorbs UV/blue light and emits it at a longer wavelength where the External Quantum Efficiency (EQE) of the solar cell is significantly higher. This study compares fluorescent structures with different dyes and different concentrations, some benefiting from r...

  14. Liver Toxicity of Cadmium Telluride Quantum Dots (CdTe QDs Due to Oxidative Stress in Vitro and in Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Zhang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available With the applications of quantum dots (QDs expanding, many studies have described the potential adverse effects of QDs, yet little attention has been paid to potential toxicity of QDs in the liver. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of cadmium telluride (CdTe QDs in mice and murine hepatoma cells alpha mouse liver 12 (AML 12. CdTe QDs administration significantly increased the level of lipid peroxides marker malondialdehyde (MDA in the livers of treated mice. Furthermore, CdTe QDs caused cytotoxicity in AML 12 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner, which was likely mediated through the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS and the induction of apoptosis. An increase in ROS generation with a concomitant increase in the gene expression of the tumor suppressor gene p53, the pro-apoptotic gene Bcl-2 and a decrease in the anti-apoptosis gene Bax, suggested that a mitochondria mediated pathway was involved in CdTe QDs’ induced apoptosis. Finally, we showed that NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2 deficiency blocked induced oxidative stress to protect cells from injury induced by CdTe QDs. These findings provide insights into the regulatory mechanisms involved in the activation of Nrf2 signaling that confers protection against CdTe QDs-induced apoptosis in hepatocytes.

  15. Regulatory policy governing cadmium-telluride photovoltaics: A case study contrasting life cycle management with the precautionary principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Market projections for cadmium-telluride (CdTe) thin-film photovoltaics (PV) are tempered by global environmental policies based on the precautionary principle which restrict electronic products containing cadmium, a known human carcinogen. An alternative to the precautionary principle is life cycle management, which involves manufacturers assuming product stewardship from beginning to end of product life. Both approaches have the aim of minimizing environmental contamination, but attempt to do so in different ways. Restrictions on electronic products containing cadmium by the precautionary principle-based restriction of hazardous substances (RoHS) directive in the European Union and a similar policy in China are presented, relative to their potential impact on CdTe PV. Life cycle environmental risks with respect to potential release of cadmium to the environment are also presented for routine operation of CdTe PV panels, potential catastrophic release of cadmium from a residential fire, and at the end of the product life. There is negligible risk of environmental cadmium contamination during routine operation and insignificant risk during catastrophic exposure events such as fire. At the end of the product life, risks of contamination are minimized by take-back programs that may be paid for by insurance premiums incorporated into the cost of the product. Therefore, policies based on the precautionary principle that could potentially ban the product based on its cadmium content may not be warranted

  16. Low-cost cadmium zinc telluride radiation detectors based on electron-transport-only designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this project was to utilize a novel device design to build a compact, high resolution, room temperature operated semiconductor gamma ray sensor. This sensor was constructed from a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) crystal. It was able to both detect total radiation intensity and perform spectroscopy on the detected radiation. CZT detectors produced today have excellent electron charge carrier collection, but suffer from poor hole collection. For conventional gamma-ray spectrometers, both the electrons and holes must be collected with high efficiency to preserve energy resolution. The requirement to collect the hole carriers, which have relatively low lifetimes, limits the efficiency and performance of existing experimental devices. By implementing novel device designs such that the devices rely only on the electron signal for energy information, the sensitivity of the sensors for detecting radiation can be increased substantially. In this report the authors describe a project to develop a new type of electron-only CZT detector. They report on their successful efforts to design, implement and test these new radiation detectors. In addition to the design and construction of the sensors the authors also report, in considerable detail, on the electrical characteristics of the CZT crystals used to make their detectors

  17. Novel Cadmium Zinc Telluride Devices for Myocardial Perfusion Imaging-Technological Aspects and Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Haim, Simona; Kennedy, John; Keidar, Zohar

    2016-07-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging plays an important role in the assessment of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease and is well established for diagnosis and for prognostic evaluation in these patients. The dedicated cardiac SPECT cameras with solid-state cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors were first introduced a decade ago. A large body of evidence is building up, showing the superiority of the new technology compared with conventional gamma cameras. Not only the CZT detectors, but also new collimator geometries, the ability to perform focused imaging optimized for the heart and advances in data processing algorithms all contribute to the significantly improved sensitivity up to 8-10 times, as well as improved energy resolution and improved reconstructed spatial resolution compared with conventional technology. In this article, we provide an overview of the physical characteristics of the CZT cameras, as well as a review of the literature published so far, including validation studies in comparison with conventional myocardial perfusion imaging and with invasive coronary angiography, significant reduction in radiation dose, and new imaging protocols enabled by the new technology.

  18. Low-cost cadmium zinc telluride radiation detectors based on electron-transport-only designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. A. Brunett; J. C. Lund; J. M. Van Scyoc; N. R. Hilton; E. Y. Lee; R. B. James

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this project was to utilize a novel device design to build a compact, high resolution, room temperature operated semiconductor gamma ray sensor. This sensor was constructed from a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) crystal. It was able to both detect total radiation intensity and perform spectroscopy on the detected radiation. CZT detectors produced today have excellent electron charge carrier collection, but suffer from poor hole collection. For conventional gamma-ray spectrometers, both the electrons and holes must be collected with high efficiency to preserve energy resolution. The requirement to collect the hole carriers, which have relatively low lifetimes, limits the efficiency and performance of existing experimental devices. By implementing novel device designs such that the devices rely only on the electron signal for energy information, the sensitivity of the sensors for detecting radiation can be increased substantially. In this report the authors describe a project to develop a new type of electron-only CZT detector. They report on their successful efforts to design, implement and test these new radiation detectors. In addition to the design and construction of the sensors the authors also report, in considerable detail, on the electrical characteristics of the CZT crystals used to make their detectors.

  19. Directional Solidification of Mercury Cadmium Telluride During the Second United States Microgravity Payload Mission (USMP-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, D. C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.; Watring, D. A.; Alexander, H. A.; Jerman, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    As a solid solution semiconductor having, a large separation between liquidus and solidus, mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) presents a formidable challenge to crystal growers desiring an alloy of high compositional uniformity. To avoid constitutional supercooling during Bridgman crystal growth it is necessary to solidify slowly in a high temperature gradient region. The necessary translation rate of less than 1 mm/hr results in a situation where fluid flow induced by gravity on earth is a significant factor in material transport. The Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) is equipped to provide the stable thermal environment with a high gradient, and the required slow translation rate needed. Ground based experiments in AADSF show clearly the dominance of flow driven transport. The first flight of AADSF in low gravity on USMP-2 provided an opportunity to test theories of fluid flow in MCT and showed several solidification regimes which are very different from those observed on earth. Residual acceleration vectors in the orbiter during the mission were measured by the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE), and correlated well with observed compositional differences in the samples.

  20. Heart imaging by cadmium telluride gamma camera European Program 'BIOMED' consortium

    CERN Document Server

    Scheiber, C; Chambron, J; Prat, V; Kazandjan, A; Jahnke, A; Matz, R; Thomas, S; Warren, S; Hage-Hali, M; Regal, R; Siffert, P; Karman, M

    1999-01-01

    Cadmium telluride semiconductor detectors (CdTe) operating at room temperature are attractive for medical imaging because of their good energy resolution providing excellent spatial and contrast resolution. The compactness of the detection system allows the building of small light camera heads which can be used for bedside imaging. A mobile pixellated gamma camera based on 2304 CdTe (pixel size: 3x3 mm, field of view: 15 cmx15 cm) has been designed for cardiac imaging. A dedicated 16-channel integrated circuit has also been designed. The acquisition hardware is fully programmable (DSP card, personal computer-based system). Analytical calculations have shown that a commercial parallel hole collimator will fit the efficiency/resolution requirements for cardiac applications. Monte-Carlo simulations predict that the Moire effect can be reduced by a 15 deg. tilt of the collimator with respect to the detector grid. A 16x16 CdTe module has been built for the preliminary physical tests. The energy resolution was 6.16...

  1. Heart imaging by cadmium telluride gamma cameraEuropean Program ``BIOMED'' consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiber, Ch.; Eclancher, B.; Chambron, J.; Prat, V.; Kazandjan, A.; Jahnke, A.; Matz, R.; Thomas, S.; Warren, S.; Hage-Hali, M.; Regal, R.; Siffert, P.; Karman, M.

    1999-06-01

    Cadmium telluride semiconductor detectors (CdTe) operating at room temperature are attractive for medical imaging because of their good energy resolution providing excellent spatial and contrast resolution. The compactness of the detection system allows the building of small light camera heads which can be used for bedside imaging. A mobile pixellated gamma camera based on 2304 CdTe (pixel size: 3×3 mm, field of view: 15 cm×15 cm) has been designed for cardiac imaging. A dedicated 16-channel integrated circuit has also been designed. The acquisition hardware is fully programmable (DSP card, personal computer-based system). Analytical calculations have shown that a commercial parrallel hole collimator will fit the efficiency/resolution requirements for cardiac applications. Monte-Carlo simulations predict that the Moire effect can be reduced by a 15° tilt of the collimator with respect to the detector grid. A 16×16 CdTe module has been built for the preliminary physical tests. The energy resolution was 6.16±0.6 keV (mean ± standard deviation, n=30). Uniformity was ±10%, improving to ±1% when using a correction table. Test objects (emission data: letters 1.8 mm in width) and cold rods in scatter medium have been acquired. The CdTe images have been compared to those acquired with a conventionnal gamma camera.

  2. Investigation of the Electronic Properties of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) Detectors using a Nuclear Microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electronic transport properties of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) determine the charge collection efficiency (i.e. the signal quality) of CZT detectors. These properties vary on both macroscopic and microscopic scale and depend on the presence of impurities and defects introduced during the crystal growth. Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) is a proven method to measure the charge collection efficiency. Using an ion microbeam, the charge collection efficiency can be mapped with submicron resolution, and the map of electronic properties (such as drift length) can be calculated from the measurement. A more sophisticated version of IBICC, the Time Resolved IBICC (TRIBICC) allows them to determine the mobility and the life time of the charge carriers by recording and analyzing the transient waveform of the detector signal. Furthermore, lateral IBICC and TRIBICC can provide information how the charge collection efficiency depends on the depth where the charge carriers are generated. This allows one to deduce information on the distribution of the electric field and transport properties of the charge carriers along the detector axis. IBICC and TRIBICC were used at the Sandia microbeam facility to image electronic properties of several CZT detectors. From the lateral TRIBICC measurement the electron and hole drift length profiles were calculated

  3. Investigation of the electrochemical deposition of thick layers of cadmium telluride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis deals with the problem of electrochemical deposition of thick layers of cadmium telluride (CdTe) meeting the requirements of high energy radiation detection. The author first recalls the physicochemical properties of CdTe and the basic principles of radiology. He details the different criteria which define a material for X ray detection. He describes the experimental conditions, the nature and preparation of substrates, and the different electrochemical systems used in this research. He studies the impact of the applied potential on the material properties, and compares previously obtained results available in the literature with those obtained in the chosen pool conditions. He discusses the synthesis of CdTe thick layers for which different methods are tested: static in potential, static in intensity, pulsed. The coatings obtained with a given potential and then with a given current are investigated. Finally, the influence of a thermal treatment in presence or absence of a sintering agent on the morphology, the chemical composition, and the crystalline and electric properties of the deposited material is discussed, and the results of the behaviour under X rays of a electrodeposited layer are presented

  4. 3D Particle Track Reconstrution in a Single Layer Cadmium-Telluride Hybrid Active Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Filipenko, Mykhaylo; Anton, Gisela; Michel, Thilo

    2014-01-01

    In the past 20 years the search for neutrinoless double beta decay has driven many developements in all kind of detector technology. A new branch in this field are highly-pixelated semiconductor detectors - such as the CdTe-Timepix detectors. It compromises a cadmium-telluride sensor of 14 mm x 14 mm x 1 mm size with an ASIC which has 256 x 256 pixel of 55 \\textmu m pixel pitch and can be used to obtain either spectroscopic or timing information in every pixel. In regular operation it can provide a 2D projection of particle trajectories; however, three dimensional trajectories are desirable for neutrinoless double beta decay and other applications. In this paper we present a method to obtain such trajectories. The method was developed and tested with simulations that assume some minor modifications to the Timepix ASIC. Also, we were able to test the method experimentally and in the best case achieved a position resolution of about 90 \\textmu m with electrons of 4.4 GeV.

  5. Cadmium telluride nanoparticles loaded on activated carbon as adsorbent for removal of sunset yellow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaedi, M.; Hekmati Jah, A.; Khodadoust, S.; Sahraei, R.; Daneshfar, A.; Mihandoost, A.; Purkait, M. K.

    2012-05-01

    Adsorption is a promising technique for decolorization of effluents of textile dyeing industries but its application is limited due to requirement of high amounts of adsorbent required. The objective of this study was to assess the potential of cadmium telluride nanoparticles loaded onto activated carbon (CdTN-AC) for the removal of sunset yellow (SY) dye from aqueous solution. Adsorption studies were conducted in a batch mode varying solution pH, contact time, initial dye concentration, CdTN-AC dose, and temperature. In order to investigate the efficiency of SY adsorption on CdTN-AC, pseudo-first-order, pseudo-second-order, Elovich, and intra-particle diffusion kinetic models were studied. It was observed that the pseudo-second-order kinetic model fits better than other kinetic models with good correlation coefficient. Equilibrium data were fitted to the Langmuir model. Thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy, entropy, activation energy, and sticking probability were also calculated. It was found that the sorption of SY onto CdTN-AC was spontaneous and endothermic in nature. The proposed adsorbent is applicable for SY removal from waste of real effluents including pea-shooter, orange drink and jelly banana with efficiency more than 97%.

  6. Two-color detector: Mercury-cadmium-telluride as a terahertz and infrared detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sizov, F.; Zabudsky, V.; Petryakov, V.; Golenkov, A.; Andreyeva, K.; Tsybrii, Z. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, 03028 Kiev (Ukraine); Dvoretskii, S. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics of SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-02-23

    In this paper, issues associated with the development of infrared (IR) and terahertz (THz) radiation detectors based on HgCdTe are discussed. Two-color un-cooled and cooled to 78 K narrow-gap mercury-cadmium-telluride semiconductor thin layers with antennas were considered both as sub-THz (sub-THz) direct detection bolometers and 3–10 μm IR photoconductors. The noise equivalent power (NEP) for one of the detectors studied at ν ≈ 140 GHz reaches NEP{sub 300 K} ≈ 4.5 × 10{sup −10} W/Hz{sup 1/2} and NEP{sub 78 K} ≈ 5 × 10{sup −9} W/Hz{sup 1/2}. The same detector used as an IR photoconductor showed the responsivity at temperatures T = 78 K and 300 K with signal-to-noise ratio S/N ≈ 750 and 50, respectively, under illumination by using IR monochromator and globar as a thermal source.

  7. Macro-loading Effects in Inductively Coupled Plasma Etched Mercury Cadmium Telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apte, Palash; Rybnicek, Kimon; Stoltz, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports the effect of macro-loading on mercury cadmium telluride (Hg1- x Cd x Te) and Photoresist (PR) etched in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). A significant macro-loading effect is observed, which affects the etch rates of both PR and Hg1- x Cd x Te. It is observed that the exposed silicon area has a significant effect on the PR etch rate, but not on the Hg1- x Cd x Te etch rate. It is also observed that the exposed Hg1- x Cd x Te area has a significant effect on the etch rate of the PR, but the exposed PR area does not seem to have an effect on the Hg1- x Cd x Te etch rate. Further, the exposed Hg1- x Cd x Te area is shown to affect the etch rate of the Hg1- x Cd x Te, but there does not seem to be a similar effect for the exposed PR area on the etch rate of the PR. Since the macro-loading affects the selectivity significantly, this effect can cause significant problems in the etching of deep trenches. A few techniques to reduce the effect of macro-loading on the etch rates of the PR and Hg1- x Cd x Te are listed, herein.

  8. Measurement and Modeling of Blocking Contacts for Cadmium Telluride Gamma Ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Patrick R. [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States)

    2010-01-07

    Gamma ray detectors are important in national security applications, medicine, and astronomy. Semiconductor materials with high density and atomic number, such as Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), offer a small device footprint, but their performance is limited by noise at room temperature; however, improved device design can decrease detector noise by reducing leakage current. This thesis characterizes and models two unique Schottky devices: one with an argon ion sputter etch before Schottky contact deposition and one without. Analysis of current versus voltage characteristics shows that thermionic emission alone does not describe these devices. This analysis points to reverse bias generation current or leakage through an inhomogeneous barrier. Modeling the devices in reverse bias with thermionic field emission and a leaky Schottky barrier yields good agreement with measurements. Also numerical modeling with a finite-element physics-based simulator suggests that reverse bias current is a combination of thermionic emission and generation. This thesis proposes further experiments to determine the correct model for reverse bias conduction. Understanding conduction mechanisms in these devices will help develop more reproducible contacts, reduce leakage current, and ultimately improve detector performance.

  9. Physical characterization of cadmium telluride/cadmium sulfide photovoltaics: Defects, fields, and micrononuniformities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvydka, Diana

    Recent advances in large area thin-film photovoltaic manufacturing have raised a number of problems related to the physical parameters and processes behind the device efficiency and stability. The characteristics of interest include the defect spectra and related optical absorption, the built-in electric field distribution, the degree of lateral uniformity of the device, and the device stability. Established in this thesis is a set of techniques appropriate for the physical characterization of the above features in CdTe/CdS solar cells, addressing the issues of device spectra vs. energy (as revealed in the optical absorption, photoluminescence (PL), and admittance spectroscopy); the electric field distribution analyzed by means of bias dependent PL, and, indirectly, by capacitance measurements; device lateral resistivity and uniformity, through the phenomenon of nonlocal optical response and PL mapping; local parameter fluctuations as appear in virtually all of the above cases. The most important physical conclusions made are: energy spectra of polycrystalline CdTe based photovoltaics combine the features of crystalline materials, such as identifiable point defects, and amorphous materials, which exhibit continuous spectra of localized states; the concept of a single-defect (elemental) capacitance is for the first time defined and applied to estimate the density of states in polycrystalline p-n junctions; a phenomenon of bias-dependent PL in CdTe based photovoltaics is for the first time observed and modeled; a new phenomenon of nonlocal photovoltaic response is observed and interpreted. The results suggest several practical applications, such as: absorption and PL measurements as a diagnostic tool for monitoring the CdCl2, quality of treatments; admittance spectroscopy techniques to diagnose the material quality and degradation through its defect spectra and concentration; bias-dependent PL as a sensitive nondestructive accelerated life testing tool; nonlocal PV

  10. Electronic characterization of defects in narrow gap semiconductors: Comparison of electronic energy levels and formation energies in mercury cadmium telluride, mercury zinc telluride, and mercury zinc selenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, James D.; Li, Wei-Gang

    1995-01-01

    The project has evolved to that of using Green's functions to predict properties of deep defects in narrow gap materials. Deep defects are now defined as originating from short range potentials and are often located near the middle of the energy gap. They are important because they affect the lifetime of charge carriers and hence the switching time of transistors. We are now moving into the arena of predicting formation energies of deep defects. This will also allow us to make predictions about the relative concentrations of the defects that could be expected at a given temperature. The narrow gap materials mercury cadmium telluride (MCT), mercury zinc telluride (MZT), and mercury zinc selenide (MZS) are of interest to NASA because they have commercial value for infrared detecting materials, and because there is a good possibility that they can be grown better in a microgravity environment. The uniform growth of these crystals on earth is difficult because of convection (caused by solute depletion just ahead of the growing interface, and also due to thermal gradients). In general it is very difficult to grow crystals with both radial and axial homogeneity.

  11. Solar Photovoltaic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews information on solar radiation as an energy source. Discusses these topics: the key photovoltaic material; the bank theory of solids; conductors, semiconductors, and insulators; impurity semiconductors; solid-state photovoltaic cell operation; limitations on solar cell efficiency; silicon solar cells; cadmium sulfide/copper (I) sulfide…

  12. Characterization of cadmium manganese telluride (Cd1-xMnxTe) crystals grown by floating zone method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, A.; Gu, G. D.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Gul, R.; Roy, U. N.; Yang, G.; Liu, T.; Zhong, R.; Schneeloch, J.; James, R. B.

    2014-09-01

    Recently, Cadmium Manganese Telluride (CMT) emerged as a promising material for roomtemperature X- and gamma-ray detectors. However, our studies revealed several material defects primarily related to growth processes that are impeding the production of large single crystals with high resistivity and high mobility-lifetime product. In this work, we characterized various defects in materials grown by the floating zone method, including twins, Te inclusions, and dislocations, using our unique facilities. We also fabricated detectors from selected CMT crystals and tested their performance. This paper discusses our detailed findings on the material's properties and the performance of fabricated CMT detectors.

  13. Chemiluminescence studies between aqueous phase synthesized mercaptosuccinic acid capped cadmium telluride quantum dots and luminol-H2O2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviyarasan, Kulandaivelu; Anandan, Sambandam; Mangalaraja, Ramalinga Viswanathan; Asiri, Abdullah M.; Wu, Jerry J.

    2016-08-01

    Mercaptosuccinic acid capped Cadmium telluride quantum dots have been successfully synthesized via aqueous phase method. The products were well characterized by a number of analytical techniques, including FT-IR, XRD, HRTEM, and a corrected particle size analysis by the statistical treatment of several AFM measurements. Chemiluminescence experiments were performed to explore the resonance energy transfer between chemiluminescence donor (luminol-H2O2 system) and acceptor CdTe QDs. The combination of such donor and acceptor dramatically reduce the fluorescence while compared to pristine CdTe QDs without any exciting light source, which is due to the occurrence of chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET) processes.

  14. On the possible role played by tunnel recombination in the loss processes of excess current carriers in cadmium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novikov, G. F.; Marinin, A. A.; Gapanovich, M. V.; Rabenok, E. V.

    2010-05-01

    The microwave photoconductivity method was used to study the kinetics of the decay of current carriers generated by nitrogen laser pulses in n- and p-type cadmium telluride. The dependences of the shape and amplitude of photoresponse decays on temperature and light intensity were studied. Photoresponse decays contained "fast" (at t 50 ns) components. At long times, the dependence of photoresponse on the logarithm of time was linear. The shape of slow component decays was almost independent of temperature. The slow component of photoresponse decay could correspond to the loss process of entrapped charges in tunnel recombination.

  15. Chemiluminescence studies between aqueous phase synthesized mercaptosuccinic acid capped cadmium telluride quantum dots and luminol-H2O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviyarasan, Kulandaivelu; Anandan, Sambandam; Mangalaraja, Ramalinga Viswanathan; Asiri, Abdullah M; Wu, Jerry J

    2016-08-01

    Mercaptosuccinic acid capped Cadmium telluride quantum dots have been successfully synthesized via aqueous phase method. The products were well characterized by a number of analytical techniques, including FT-IR, XRD, HRTEM, and a corrected particle size analysis by the statistical treatment of several AFM measurements. Chemiluminescence experiments were performed to explore the resonance energy transfer between chemiluminescence donor (luminol-H2O2 system) and acceptor CdTe QDs. The combination of such donor and acceptor dramatically reduce the fluorescence while compared to pristine CdTe QDs without any exciting light source, which is due to the occurrence of chemiluminescence resonance energy transfer (CRET) processes. PMID:27131144

  16. Landfill waste and recycling: Use of a screening-level risk assessment tool for end-of-life cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin-film photovoltaic (PV) panels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grid-connected solar photovoltaic (PV) power is currently one of the fastest growing power-generation technologies in the world. While PV technologies provide the environmental benefit of zero emissions during use, the use of heavy metals in thin-film PV cells raises important health and environmental concerns regarding the end-of-life disposal of PV panels. To date, there is no published quantitative assessment of the potential human health risk due to cadmium leaching from cadmium telluride (CdTe) PV panels disposed in a landfill. Thus, we used a screening-level risk assessment tool to estimate possible human health risk associated with disposal of CdTe panels into landfills. In addition, we conducted a literature review of potential cadmium release from the recycling process in order to contrast the potential health risks from PV panel disposal in landfills to those from PV panel recycling. Based on the results of our literature review, a meaningful risk comparison cannot be performed at this time. Based on the human health risk estimates generated for PV panel disposal, our assessment indicated that landfill disposal of CdTe panels does not pose a human health hazard at current production volumes, although our results pointed to the importance of CdTe PV panel end-of-life management. - Highlights: • Analysis of possible human health risk posed by disposal of CdTe panels into landfills. • Qualitative comparison of risks associated with landfill disposal and recycling of CdTe panels. • Landfill disposal of CdTe panels does not pose a human health hazard at current production volumes. • There could be potential risks associated with recycling if not properly managed. • Factors other than concerns over toxic substances will likely drive the decisions of how to manage end-of-life PV panels

  17. Design of a thin film CdTe solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, P.V.

    1988-01-15

    Cadmium telluride was originally considered for thin film solar cells because of its optimum band gap, high optical absorption coefficient and ability to be doped. Furthermore, it is a stable compound which can be produced by a wide variety of methods from stable raw materials. As thin film photovoltaics mature, however, it is clear that several more subtle attributes have a significant impact on the viability of commercialization. We discuss the observations which have provided insight and direction to Ametek's CdTe solar cell program. Rather than try to modify the inherent material properties of CdTe, advances have been made by designing a solar cell that exploits existing properties. Specifically, the tendency to self-compensate, which makes low resistance contacting difficult, is turned into an advantage in the n-i-p configuration; the CdTe provides an intrinsic layer with good carrier collection efficiency.

  18. Spectroscopic, microscopic, and internal stress analysis in cadmium telluride grown by close-space sublimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manciu, Felicia S., E-mail: fsmanciu@utep.edu [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Salazar, Jessica G. [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Diaz, Aryzbe; Quinones, Stella A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)

    2015-08-31

    High quality materials with excellent ordered structure are needed for developing photovoltaic and infrared devices. With this end in mind, the results of our research prove the importance of a detailed, comprehensive spectroscopic and microscopic analysis in assessing cadmium telluride (CdTe) characteristics. The goal of this work is to examine not only material crystallinity and morphology, but also induced stress in the deposit material. A uniform, selective growth of polycrystalline CdTe by close-space sublimation on patterned Si(111) and Si(211) substrates is demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy images. Besides good crystallinity of the samples, as revealed by both Raman scattering and Fourier transform infrared absorption investigations, the far-infrared transmission data also show the presence of surface optical phonon modes, which is direct evidence of confinement in such a material. The qualitative identification of the induced stress was achieved by performing confocal Raman mapping microscopy on sample surfaces and by monitoring the existence of the rock-salt and zinc-blende structural phases of CdTe, which were associated with strained and unstrained morphologies, respectively. Although the induced stress in the material is still largely due to the high lattice mismatch between CdTe and the Si substrate, the current results provide a direct visualization of its partial release through the relaxation effect at crystallite boundaries and of preferential growth directions of less strain. Our study, thus offers significant value for improvement of material properties, by targeting the needed adjustments in the growth processes. - Highlights: • Assessing the characteristics of CdTe deposited on patterned Si substrates • Proving the utility of confocal Raman microscopy in monitoring the induced stress • Confirming the partial stress release through the grain boundary relaxation effect • Demonstrating the phonon confinement effect in low

  19. Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride Focal Plane Array Performance Under Non-Standard Operating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Brandon S.; Eastwood, Michael L.; Bruce, Carl F.; Green, Robert O.; Coles, J. B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper highlights a new technique that allows the Teledyne Scientific & Imaging LLC TCM6604A Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride (MCT) Focal Plane Array (FPA) to operate at room temperature. The Teledyne MCT FPA has been a standard in Imaging Spectroscopy since its creation in the 1980's. This FPA has been used in applications ranging from space instruments such as CRISM, M3 and ARTEMIS to airborne instruments such as MaRS and the Next Generation AVIRIS Instruments1. Precise focal plane alignment is always a challenge for such instruments. The current FPA alignment process results in multiple cold cycles requiring week-long durations, thereby increasing the risk and cost of a project. These alignment cycles are necessary because optimal alignment is approached incrementally and can only be measured with the FPA and Optics at standard operating conditions, requiring a cold instrument. Instruments using this FPA are normally cooled to temperatures below 150K for the MCT FPA to properly function. When the FPA is run at higher temperatures the dark current increases saturating the output. This paper covers the prospect of warm MCT FPA operation from a theoretical and experimental perspective. We discuss the empirical models and physical laws that govern MCT material properties and predict the optimal settings that will result in the best MCT PA performance at 300K. Theoretical results are then calculated for the proposed settings. We finally present the images and data obtained using the actual system with the warm MCT FPA settings. The paper concludes by emphasizing the strong positive correlation between the measured values and the theoretical results.

  20. Development and evaluation of polycrystalline cadmium telluride dosimeters for accurate quality assurance in radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, K.; Han, M.; Kim, K.; Heo, Y.; Moon, C.; Park, S.; Nam, S.

    2016-02-01

    For quality assurance in radiation therapy, several types of dosimeters are used such as ionization chambers, radiographic films, thermo-luminescent dosimeter (TLD), and semiconductor dosimeters. Among them, semiconductor dosimeters are particularly useful for in vivo dosimeters or high dose gradient area such as the penumbra region because they are more sensitive and smaller in size compared to typical dosimeters. In this study, we developed and evaluated Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) dosimeters, one of the most promising semiconductor dosimeters due to their high quantum efficiency and charge collection efficiency. Such CdTe dosimeters include single crystal form and polycrystalline form depending upon the fabrication process. Both types of CdTe dosimeters are commercially available, but only the polycrystalline form is suitable for radiation dosimeters, since it is less affected by volumetric effect and energy dependence. To develop and evaluate polycrystalline CdTe dosimeters, polycrystalline CdTe films were prepared by thermal evaporation. After that, CdTeO3 layer, thin oxide layer, was deposited on top of the CdTe film by RF sputtering to improve charge carrier transport properties and to reduce leakage current. Also, the CdTeO3 layer which acts as a passivation layer help the dosimeter to reduce their sensitivity changes with repeated use due to radiation damage. Finally, the top and bottom electrodes, In/Ti and Pt, were used to have Schottky contact. Subsequently, the electrical properties under high energy photon beams from linear accelerator (LINAC), such as response coincidence, dose linearity, dose rate dependence, reproducibility, and percentage depth dose, were measured to evaluate polycrystalline CdTe dosimeters. In addition, we compared the experimental data of the dosimeter fabricated in this study with those of the silicon diode dosimeter and Thimble ionization chamber which widely used in routine dosimetry system and dose measurements for radiation

  1. Investigations of portable cadmium telluride (CdTe(Cl)) detectors for clinical studies with radioactive indicators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combination of small, portable γ-radiation-sensitive Cadmium Telluride (CdTE(Cl)) crystal detectors and portable solid state data storage memories makes it feasible to extend the measuring period in a number of clinical investigations based on the use of various radioisotopes and external detection. Blood sampling can be avoided in some cases. Continuous ambulatory monitoring of relevant physiological parameters is practicable, e.g. kidney function (GFR), left ventricular ejection fraction, subcutaneous blood flow, muscle blood flow and insulin absorption in diabetic patients. In the present methodological study the applicability of the 133-Xe washout technique to subcutaneous (s.c.) adipose tissue blood flow (SBF) has been investigated and adapted to the use of CdTe(Cl) detectors attached to the skin surface for the measurement of local 133-Xe-disappearance rate constants (k). Physical characterization of CdTe(Cl) detectors as γ-sensitive devices has been performed, and adequate counting sensitivities were found without detector energy-resolution properties. The CdTe(Cl) detectors are therefore suitable for single indicator studies. The measuring geometry of CdTe(Cl) detectors was studied and compared with that of stationary Sodium Iodide (NaI(Tl)) detectors in both phantom and in vivo investigations. The spatial properties of CdTe(Cl) detectors could to some extent be adjusted by pulse height discrimination and lead collimation. When long-term measurements were complicated by for instance physical activity of the patients, the small CdTe(Cl) detectors in general showed equal or better performance than the heavy and voluminous NaI(Tl) detectors. The free movement of the ambulatory patient and the avoidance of cable connections to stationary data-collecting systems gave improved possibilities for measurements of the relevant parameters. From this point of view, portable CdTe(Cl) detectors must be considered an important advance for radioactivity studies in

  2. Machine vision for solar cell characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordaz, Miguel A.; Lush, Gregory B.

    2000-03-01

    An in-line, non-destructive process is being developed for characterizing polycrystalline thin-film and other large area electronic devices using computer vision based imaging of the manufacturing and inspection steps during the device fabrication process. This process is being applied specifically to Cadmium Telluride/Cadmium Sulfide (CdTe/CdS) thin film, polycrystalline solar cells. Our process involves the acquisition of reflective, transmission and electroluminescence (EL) intensity images for each device. The EL intensity images have been processed by use of a modified median cut segmentation. The processed images reveal different gray level regions corresponding to different intensities of EL originating from radiative recombination events occurring within a biased solar cell. Higher efficiency devices show a more uniform intensity distribution in contrast with lower efficiency devices. The uniform intensity regions are made up of gray level intensity values found near the mean of the histogram distribution these are identified as regions of good device performance and are attributed to better material quality and processing. Low intensity regions indicate either material defects or errors in processing. This novel characterization process and analysis are providing new insights into the causes of poor performance in CdTe-based solar cells.

  3. Admittance spectroscopy of copper indium diselenide/cadmium sulfide solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strifler, Walter A.

    This dissertation concentrates on admittance spectroscopy of CuInSe2/CdS heterojunction solar cells prepared by chemical spray pyrolysis (CSP) and by multiple-source evaporation (MSE). The primary goal is to examine some of the more important electrical characteristics of these heterojunctions and determine if the spray-pyrolyzed cells behave similar, albeit at a lower efficiency, to higher quality cells prepared by other techniques. The primary analytical tool used in this study is admittance spectroscopy. The theory of admittance spectroscopy is developed using the concept of equivalent circuits. The traditional temperature-swept technique for admittance spectroscopy is shown to be inadequate for measuring most heterojunction samples examined in this study because of the large parallel leakage conductance found in these devices. Instead, a frequency-swept admittance technique is developed and employed to correct for the parallel conductance effect and reveal the true nature of slow charge in the depletion layer. In addition to admittance spectroscopy, the two sets of solar cell diodes are characterized using a variety of measurement techniques including capacitance-voltage, current-voltage over spectral response, capacitance dispersion over wavelength, and solar efficiency. The different pieces of experimental data are discussed to form a self-consistent physical model of the polycrystalline solar cells. Charge transport across the diode junction is dominated by recombination processes within the CuInSe2 depletion layer for both sets of diodes although the large parallel conductance in the CSP diodes often masks this characteristic. The CSP solar cells exhibit a pronounced blue peak in the spectral response indicating that electron collection is the limiting factor in the overall short-circuit quantum efficiency. A large degree of capacitance dispersion is found in both sets of diodes. Supporting measurements indicate that the majority of this dispersion is due

  4. Electronic Characterization of Defects in Narrow Gap Semiconductors-Comparison of Electronic Energy Levels and Formation Energies in Mercury Cadmium Telluride, Mercury Zinc Telluride, and Mercury Zinc Selenide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, James D.

    1996-01-01

    We have used a Green's function technique to calculate the energy levels and formation energy of deep defects in the narrow gap semiconductors mercury cadmium telluride (MCT), mercury zinc telluride (MZT) and mercury zinc selenide (MZS). The formation energy is calculated from the difference between the total energy with an impurity cluster and the total energy for the perfect crystal. Substitutional (including antisite), interstitial (self and foreign), and vacancy deep defects are considered. Relaxation effects are calculated (with molecular dynamics). By use of a pseudopotential, we generalize the ideal vacancy model so as to be able to consider relaxation for vacancies. Different charge states are considered and the charged state energy shift (as computed by a modified Haldane-Anderson model) can be twice that due to relaxation. Different charged states for vacancies were not calculated to have much effect on the formation energy. For all cases we find deep defects in the energy gap only for cation site s-like orbitals or anion site p-like orbitals, and for the substitutional case only the latter are appreciably effected by relaxation. For most cases for MCT, MZT, MZS, we consider x (the concentration of Cd or Zn) in the range appropriate for a band gap of 0.1 eV. For defect energy levels, the absolute accuracy of our results is limited, but the precision is good, and hence chemical trends are accurately predicted. For the same reason, defect formation energies are more accurately predicted than energy level position. We attempt, in Appendix B, to calculate vacancy formation energies using relatively simple chemical bonding ideas due to Harrison. However, these results are only marginally accurate for estimating vacancy binding energies. Appendix C lists all written reports and publications produced for the grant. We include abstracts and a complete paper that summarizes our work which is not yet available.

  5. Fabrication of CdTe solar cells by laser-driven physical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, A.; Bhat, A.; Tabory, C.; Liu, S.; Nguyen, M.; Aydinli, A.; Tsien, L.H.; Bohn, R.G. (Toledo Univ., OH (USA). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy)

    1991-05-01

    Polycrystalline cadmium sulfide-cadmium telluride heterojunction solar cells were fabricated for the first time using a laser-driven physical vapor deposition method. An XeCl excimer laser was used to deposit both of the II-VI semiconductor layers in a single vacuum chamber from pressed powder targets. Results are presented from optical absorption. Raman scattering, X-ray diffraction, and electrical characterization of the films. Solar cells were fabricated by deposition onto SnO{sub 2}-coated glass with top contacts produced by gold evaporation. Device performance was evaluated from the spectral quantum efficiency and current-voltage measurements in the dark and with air mass 1.5 solar illumination. (orig.).

  6. Microbial toxicity of ionic species leached from the II-VI semiconductor materials, cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium selenide (CdSe).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Ruiz, Adriana; Zeng, Chao; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Teixeira, Luiz H; Field, Jim A

    2016-11-01

    This work investigated the microbial toxicity of soluble species that can potentially be leached from the II-VI semiconductor materials, cadmium telluride and cadmium selenide. The soluble ions tested included: cadmium, selenite, selenate, tellurite, and tellurate. Their toxicity towards the acetoclastic and hydrogen-consuming trophic groups in a methanogenic consortium as well as towards a bioluminescent marine bacterium, Aliivibrio fischeri (Microtox(®) test), was assessed. The acetoclastic methanogenic activity was the most affected as evidenced by the low 50% inhibiting concentrations (IC50) values obtained of 8.6 mg L(-1) for both cadmium and tellurite, 10.2 mg L(-1) for tellurate, and 24.1 mg L(-1) for selenite. Both tellurium oxyanions caused a strong inhibition of acetoclastic methanogenesis at low concentrations, each additional increment in concentration provided progressively less inhibition increase. In the case of the hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, cadmium followed by selenite caused the greatest inhibition with IC50 values of 2.9 and 18.0 mg L(-1), respectively. Tellurite caused a moderate effect as evidenced by a 36.8% inhibition of the methanogenic activity at the highest concentration tested, and a very mild effect of tellurate was observed. Microtox(®) analyses showed a noteworthy inhibition of cadmium, selenite, and tellurite with 50% loss in bioluminescence after 30 min of exposure of 5.5, 171.1, and 458.6 mg L(-1), respectively. These results suggest that the leaching of cadmium, tellurium and selenium ions from semiconductor materials can potentially cause microbial toxicity.

  7. Microbial toxicity of ionic species leached from the II-VI semiconductor materials, cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium selenide (CdSe).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Ruiz, Adriana; Zeng, Chao; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Teixeira, Luiz H; Field, Jim A

    2016-11-01

    This work investigated the microbial toxicity of soluble species that can potentially be leached from the II-VI semiconductor materials, cadmium telluride and cadmium selenide. The soluble ions tested included: cadmium, selenite, selenate, tellurite, and tellurate. Their toxicity towards the acetoclastic and hydrogen-consuming trophic groups in a methanogenic consortium as well as towards a bioluminescent marine bacterium, Aliivibrio fischeri (Microtox(®) test), was assessed. The acetoclastic methanogenic activity was the most affected as evidenced by the low 50% inhibiting concentrations (IC50) values obtained of 8.6 mg L(-1) for both cadmium and tellurite, 10.2 mg L(-1) for tellurate, and 24.1 mg L(-1) for selenite. Both tellurium oxyanions caused a strong inhibition of acetoclastic methanogenesis at low concentrations, each additional increment in concentration provided progressively less inhibition increase. In the case of the hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, cadmium followed by selenite caused the greatest inhibition with IC50 values of 2.9 and 18.0 mg L(-1), respectively. Tellurite caused a moderate effect as evidenced by a 36.8% inhibition of the methanogenic activity at the highest concentration tested, and a very mild effect of tellurate was observed. Microtox(®) analyses showed a noteworthy inhibition of cadmium, selenite, and tellurite with 50% loss in bioluminescence after 30 min of exposure of 5.5, 171.1, and 458.6 mg L(-1), respectively. These results suggest that the leaching of cadmium, tellurium and selenium ions from semiconductor materials can potentially cause microbial toxicity. PMID:27494313

  8. Chemical spray pyrolysis of copper indium diselenide/cadmium sulfide solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, B.J.

    1989-01-01

    This dissertation concentrates on Chemical Spray Pyrolysis (CSP) of CuInSe{sub 2} and CdS thin films and solar cells. The primary goal is to gain an understanding of the chemistry and physics of CSP, and apply this knowledge to the fabrication of CuInSe{sub 2}/CdS solar cells. It provide an extensive review of the literature on the properties of CuInSe{sub 2} an CdS produced by CSP and other techniques. The films are characterized by x-ray diffractometry, scanning electron microscopy, electron microprobe, van der Pauw-Hall measurements, and optical absorption spectroscopy, and the devices are characterized electrically in the dark and under illumination. A model for the chemical mechanisms involved in CSP of CdS an CuInSe{sub 2} thin films is developed which is used to point out similarities between the two systems and explain the correlation between spray solution pH and second phases in CuInSe{sub 2} thin films. Structural investigations show that the CuInSe{sub 2} films can be produced in either the ordered or disordered crystal structure, while different substrates radically change the morphology of the films. By taking into account the effect of second phases, the electrical and optical properties of the sprayed films agree with published results for CuInSe{sub 2} produced by other techniques. The properties of the sprayed CdS films in this work are shown to agree with those sprayed by others. The device properties of cells fabricated in both the backwall and reverse backwall configuration are compared with each other and related to the materials properties of the semiconductor layers. The highest efficiency cell employing sprayed CuInSe{sub 2} is reported; however, the efficiency of the cells still need improvement before becoming practical. The dissertation concludes with recommendations for increasing the efficiency of completely sprayed CuInSe{sub 2}/CdS solar cells.

  9. Characterization of thin film ZnCdS/CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, O.M.; Reddy, P.S.; Naidu, B.S.; Uthanna, S.; Reddy, P.J. (Sri Venkateswara Univ., Tirupati (IN). Dept. of Physics)

    1991-11-01

    Thin films of II-VI compound semiconductors have attracted considerable interest in recent years due to their wide range of applications in the fabrication of cost effective solar cells. Among these, cadmium telluride is one of the most attractive candidates with a direct band gap of 1.5 eV which is optimum for solar energy conversion. Generally, n-CdS is used as window layer to p-CdTe to fabricate heterojunction solar cells because of its reasonable optical transparency and the ease of depositing low-resistivity films. n-ZnCdS/p-CdTe polycrystalline thin film solar cells were fabricated by laser evaporating CdTe onto sprayed ZnCdS films. The cells were characterized by studying current-voltage, capacitance-voltage and spectral response measurements. A maximum efficiency of 7.6% was observed for a cell area of 1 cm{sup 2}. (author).

  10. Evolution of Oxygenated Cadmium Sulfide (CdS:O) During High-Temperature CdTe Solar Cell Fabrication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meysing, Daniel M.; Reese, Matthew O.; Warren, Charles W.; Abbas, Ali; Burst, James M.; Mahabaduge, Hasitha P.; Metzger, Wyatt K.; Walls, John M.; Lonergan, Mark C.; Barnes, Teresa M.; Wolden, Colin A.

    2016-12-01

    Oxygenated cadmium sulfide (CdS:O) produced by reactive sputtering has emerged as a promising alternative to conventional CdS for use as the n-type window layer in CdTe solar cells. Here, complementary techniques are used to expose the window layer (CdS or CdS:O) in completed superstrate devices and combined with a suite of materials characterization to elucidate its evolution during high temperature device processing. During device fabrication amorphous CdS:O undergoes significant interdiffusion with CdTe and recrystallization, forming CdS1-yTey nanocrystals whose Te fraction approaches solubility limits. Significant oxygen remains after processing, concentrated in sulfate clusters dispersed among the CdS1-yTey alloy phase, accounting for ~30% of the post-processed window layer based on cross-sectional microscopy. Interdiffusion and recrystallization are observed in devices with un-oxygenated CdS, but to a much lesser extent. Etching experiments suggest that the CdS thickness is minimally changed during processing, but the CdS:O window layer is reduced from 100 nm to 60-80 nm, which is confirmed by microscopy. Alloying reduces the band gap of the CdS:O window layer to 2.15 eV, but reductions in thickness and areal density improve its transmission spectrum, which is well matched to device quantum efficiency. The changes to the window layer in the reactive environments of device fabrication are profoundly different than what occurs by thermal annealing in an inert environment, which produced films with a band gap of 2.4 eV for both CdS and CdS:O. These results illustrate for the first time the significant changes that occur to the window layer during processing that are critical to the performance of CdTe solar cells.

  11. Development of copper sulfide/cadmium sulfide thin-film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szedon, J. R.; Biter, W. J.; Dickey, H. C.

    1982-03-08

    The most important accomplishments during this period were to demonstrate and to elucidate further the complex effects that occur during the aging of Cu/sub 2/S/CdS thin-film solar cells in flowing wet oxygen. There are two distinct effects. At constant illumination, the short-circuit current of cells aged at room temperature consistently decreases with time. The second effect, related to diode opposing current, is more involved and may result from several competing mechanisms. Over the short term (approx. 4 to 5 hours), the magnitude of diode opposing current decreases. After approx. 20 hours of aging, opposing current generally returns to the level achieved after hydrogen annealing which immediately preceded the aging sequence. Optical measurements of the spectral transmission of the Cu/sub 2/S layers in a cell content have been made using a silicon detector epoxied to the back of a CdS cell after the copper foil substrate was removed. There is no significant change in Cu/sub 2/S transmission behavior for wavelengths ranging from 525 to 1000 nm during wet-oxygen aging for periods of 2 to 36 hours. This suggests that the decrease in J/sub SC/ at constant illumination, for the aging experiments in a flowing wet-oxygen ambient, arises because of changes in minority-carrier transport properties of the Cu/sub 2/S. Before developing a method for using an epoxied silicon detector to measure optical behavior of the Cu/sub 2/S layer, we explored the possibility of using a junction-containing wafer of silicon as a substrate for deposited CdS films. Some monolithic structures were successfully fabricated. Comparisons were made of CdS grain structure details in the junction detector area and in an adjacent metallized area.

  12. Performance of thin-film Cds/CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, O.M.; Reddy, P.J. (Sri Venkateswara Univ., Tirupati (India). Dept. of Physics)

    1991-07-15

    Cadmium telluride is a very promising material for producing efficient thin-film solar cells because is has a direct bandgap of 1.5 eV, which is optimum for solar energy conversion. Many researchers have employed close space vapour transport, screen printing, thermal evaporation and electrochemical deposition techniques for the fabrication of Cds/CdTe solar cells, and have obtained a conversion efficiency of about 10%. In this investigation polycrystalline thin-film Cds/CdTe solar cells were fabricated by employing a laser evaporation technique for the deposition of CdTe films. The cells were characterized by studying the current-voltage, capacitance-voltage and spectral response measurements. (Author).

  13. A rapid and sensitive assay for determination of doxycycline using thioglycolic acid-capped cadmium telluride quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashkhourian, Javad; Absalan, Ghodratollah; Jafari, Marzieh; Zare, Saber

    2016-01-01

    A rapid, simple and inexpensive spectrofluorimetric sensor for determination of doxycycline based on its interaction with thioglycolic acid-capped cadmium telluride quantum dots (TGA/CdTe QDs) has been developed. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the sensor exhibited a fast response time of doxycycline could quench the fluorescence of TGA/CdTe QDs via electron transfer from the QDs to doxycycline through a dynamic quenching mechanism. The sensor permitted determination of doxycycline in a concentration range of 1.9 × 10-6-6.1 × 10-5 mol L-1 with a detection limit of 1.1 × 10-7 mol L-1. The sensor was applied for determination of doxycycline in honey and human serum samples.

  14. Baseline Evaluation of Thin-Film Amorphous Silicon, Copper Indium Diselenide, and Cadmium Telluride for the 21st Century: Preprint

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper examines three thin-film PV technologies: amorphous silicon, cadmium telluride, and copper indium selenide. The purpose is to: (1) assess their status and potential; (2) provide an improved set of criteria for comparing these existing thin films against any new PV technological alternatives, and examining the longer-term (c. 2050) potential of thin films to meet cost goals that would be competitive with conventional sources of energy without any added value from the substantial environmental advantages of PV. Among the conclusions are: (1) today's thin films have substantial economic potential, (2) any new approach to PV should be examined against the substantial achievements and potential of today's thin films, (3) the science and technology base of today's thin films needs substantial strengthening, (4) some need for alternative technologies exists, especially as the future PV marketplace expands beyond about 30 GW of annual production

  15. Crystal Growth, Characterization and Fabrication of Cadmium Zinc Telluride-based Nuclear Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Ramesh M.

    In today's world, nuclear radiation is seeing more and more use by humanity as time goes on. Nuclear power plants are being built to supply humanity's energy needs, nuclear medical imaging is becoming more popular for diagnosing cancer and other diseases, and control of weapons-grade nuclear materials is becoming more and more important for national security. All of these needs require high-performance nuclear radiation detectors which can accurately measure the type and amount of radiation being used. However, most current radiation detection materials available commercially require extensive cooling, or simply do not function adequately for high-energy gamma-ray emitting nuclear materials such as uranium and plutonium. One of the most promising semiconductor materials being considered to create a convenient, field-deployable nuclear detector is cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe, or CZT). CZT is a ternary semiconductor compound which can detect high-energy gamma-rays at room temperature. It offers high resistivity (≥ 1010 O-cm), a high band gap (1.55 eV), and good electron transport properties, all of which are required for a nuclear radiation detector. However, one significant issue with CZT is that there is considerable difficulty in growing large, homogeneous, defect-free single crystals of CZT. This significantly increases the cost of producing CZT detectors, making CZT less than ideal for mass-production. Furthermore, CZT suffers from poor hole transport properties, which creates significant problems when using it as a high-energy gamma-ray detector. In this dissertation, a comprehensive investigation is undertaken using a successful growth method for CZT developed at the University of South Carolina. This method, called the solvent-growth technique, reduces the complexity required to grow detector-grade CZT single crystals. It utilizes a lower growth temperature than traditional growth methods by using Te as a solvent, while maintaining the advantages of

  16. Technical evaluation of Solar Cells, Inc., CdTe module and array at NREL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroposki, B.; Strand, T.; Hansen, R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Powell, R.; Sasala, R. [Solar Cells, Inc., Toledo, OH (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The Engineering and Technology Validation Team at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) conducts in-situ technical evaluations of polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaic (PV) modules and arrays. This paper focuses on the technical evaluation of Solar Cells, Inc., (SCI) cadmium telluride (CdTe) module and array performance by attempting to correlate individual module and array performance. This is done by examining the performance and stability of the modules and array over a period of more than one year. Temperature coefficients for module and array parameters (P{sub max}, V{sub oc}, V{sub max}, I{sub sc}, I{sub max}) are also calculated.

  17. US Polycrystalline Thin Film Solar Cells Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullal, Harin S.; Zweibel, Kenneth; Mitchell, Richard L.

    1989-11-01

    The Polycrystalline Thin Film Solar Cells Program, part of the United States National Photovoltaic Program, performs R and D on copper indium diselenide and cadmium telluride thin films. The objective of the program is to support research to develop cells and modules that meet the U.S. Department of Energy's long-term goals by achieving high efficiencies (15 to 20 percent), low-cost ($50/m(sup 2)), and long-time reliability (30 years). The importance of work in this area is due to the fact that the polycrystalline thin-film CuInSe2 and CdTe solar cells and modules have made rapid advances. They have become the leading thin films for PV in terms of efficiency and stability. The U.S. Department of Energy has increased its funding through an initiative through the Solar Energy Research Institute in CuInSe2 and CdTe with subcontracts to start in spring 1990.

  18. US polycrystalline thin film solar cells program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullal, H S; Zweibel, K; Mitchell, R L [Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA)

    1989-11-01

    The Polycrystalline Thin Film Solar Cells Program, part of the United States National Photovoltaic Program, performs R D on copper indium diselenide and cadmium telluride thin films. The objective of the Program is to support research to develop cells and modules that meet the US Department of Energy's long-term goals by achieving high efficiencies (15%-20%), low-cost ($50/m{sup 2}), and long-time reliability (30 years). The importance of work in this area is due to the fact that the polycrystalline thin-film CuInSe{sub 2} and CdTe solar cells and modules have made rapid advances. They have become the leading thin films for PV in terms of efficiency and stability. The US Department of Energy has increased its funding through an initiative through the Solar Energy Research Institute in CuInSe{sub 2} and CdTe with subcontracts to start in Spring 1990. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Controlled cadmium telluride thin films for solar cell applications (emerging materials systems for solar cell applications). Final technical report, April 9, 1979-April 8, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedam, K; Das, M B; Krishnaswamy, S V

    1980-06-01

    After a brief review of the work done during the first three quarters, the work done during the last quarter is discussed in detail. In brief, CdTe sputtered self-doped and indium-doped n-type layers on Ni-film on glass have been investigated for film resistivity, contact resistance, Hall mobility and Schottky barrier diode characteristics. Ni has been found to provide satisfactory ohmic contacts and self-doped samples have indicated Hall mobility of approximately 8cm/sup 2//Vsec when the effective doping concentration is approximately 10/sup 18/cm/sup -3/. Use of indium doped sputtered films, when properly surface treated prior to metallization, appear to yield the best kind of Schottky barrier diode with approximate barrier height of 0.77 volt and Richardson constant A* approx. = 60 A/cm/sup 20/K/sup 2/. In spite of these attractive parameter values, these devices showed low V/sub oc/ and the capacitance showed unexpected frequency dependence that require further investigation. Finally suggestions for future work is presented.

  20. Temperature dependent electroreflectance study of CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raadik, T., E-mail: taavi.raadik@ttu.ee [Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Krustok, J.; Josepson, R.; Hiie, J. [Tallinn University of Technology, Ehitajate tee 5, 19086 Tallinn (Estonia); Potlog, T.; Spalatu, N. [Moldova State University, A. Mateevici str. 60, MD-2009 Chisinau (Moldova, Republic of)

    2013-05-01

    Cadmium telluride is a promising material for large scale photovoltaic applications. In this paper we study CdS/CdTe heterojunction solar cells with electroreflectance spectroscopy. Both CdS and CdTe layers in solar cells were grown sequentially without intermediate processing by the close-space sublimation method. Electroreflectance measurements were performed in the temperature range of T = 100–300 K. Two solar cells were investigated with conversion efficiencies of 4.1% and 9.6%. The main focus in this work was to study the temperature dependent behavior of the broadening parameter and the bandgap energy of CdTe thin film in solar cells. Room temperature bandgap values of CdTe were E{sub g} = 1.499 eV and E{sub g} = 1.481 eV for higher and lower efficiency solar cells, respectively. Measured bandgap energies are lower than for single crystal CdTe. The formation of CdTe{sub 1−x}S{sub x} solid solution layer on the surface of CdTe is proposed as a possible cause of lower bandgap energies. - Highlights: ► Temperature dependent electroreflectance measurements of CdS/CdTe solar cells ► Investigation of junction properties between CdS and CdTe ► Formation of CdTe{sub 1−} {sub x}S{sub x} solid solution layer in the junction area.

  1. Temperature dependent electroreflectance study of CdTe solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium telluride is a promising material for large scale photovoltaic applications. In this paper we study CdS/CdTe heterojunction solar cells with electroreflectance spectroscopy. Both CdS and CdTe layers in solar cells were grown sequentially without intermediate processing by the close-space sublimation method. Electroreflectance measurements were performed in the temperature range of T = 100–300 K. Two solar cells were investigated with conversion efficiencies of 4.1% and 9.6%. The main focus in this work was to study the temperature dependent behavior of the broadening parameter and the bandgap energy of CdTe thin film in solar cells. Room temperature bandgap values of CdTe were Eg = 1.499 eV and Eg = 1.481 eV for higher and lower efficiency solar cells, respectively. Measured bandgap energies are lower than for single crystal CdTe. The formation of CdTe1−xSx solid solution layer on the surface of CdTe is proposed as a possible cause of lower bandgap energies. - Highlights: ► Temperature dependent electroreflectance measurements of CdS/CdTe solar cells ► Investigation of junction properties between CdS and CdTe ► Formation of CdTe1− xSx solid solution layer in the junction area

  2. High efficiency CSS CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferekides, C.S.; Marinskiy, D.; Viswanathan, V.; Tetali, B.; Palekis, V.; Selvaraj, P.; Morel, D.L. [University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

    2000-02-21

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) has long been recognized as a strong candidate for thin film solar cell applications. It has a bandgap of 1.45 eV, which is nearly ideal for photovoltaic energy conversion. Due to its high optical absorption coefficient essentially all incident radiation with energy above its band-gap is absorbed within 1-2 {mu}m from the surface. Thin film CdTe solar cells are typically heterojunctions, with cadmium sulfide (CdS) being the n-type junction partner. Small area efficiencies have reached the 16.0% level and considerable efforts are underway to commercialize this technology. This paper will present work carried out at the University South Florida sponsored by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory of the United States Department of Energy, on CdTe/CdS solar cells fabricated using the close spaced sublimation (CSS) process. The CSS technology has attractive features for large area applications such as high deposition rates and efficient material utilization. The structural and optical properties of CSS CdTe and CdS films and junctions will be presented and the influence of some important CSS process parameters will be discussed. (orig.)

  3. Thermoelectrically-cooled Cadmium Zinc Telluride detectors (CZT) for X-ray and gamma-ray detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) became one of the most promising room temperature semiconductor detectors. Although significant progress has been made in the growth and characterization of CZT crystals, the energy resolution of CZT detectors at room temperature is still limited by leakage current and the charge transport effects. To optimize the performance of the room temperature CZT detectors a compromise should be made when selecting the shaping time constant of the spectroscopy amplifier. A short shaping time constant reduces leakage current fluctuations. However, the short pulse shapes are more sensitive to ballistic deficit and charge collection fluctuations. In addition, when short shaping time constants are used, the charge sensitive preamplifier noise limits the energy resolution, especially when low energy X-rays are detected. It is therefore important to reduce the leakage current of the detector and to keep the preamplifier noise as low as possible. One way to do this is to cool the detector, the front stage, and the feedback components of the preamplifier. This paper describes a compact, thermoelectrically-cooled radiation detector using a CZT crystal, designated the XR-100T-CZT. (J.P.N.)

  4. Derived reference doses for three compounds used in the photovoltaics industry: Copper indium diselenide, copper gallium diselenide, and cadmium telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Bernholc, N.; DePhillips, M.P.; Viren, J.

    1995-07-06

    Polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaic modules made from copper indium diselenide (CIS), copper gallium diselenide (CGS), and cadmium telluride (CdTe) arc nearing commercial development. A wide range of issues are being examined as these materials move from the laboratory to large-scale production facilities to ensure their commercial success. Issues of traditional interest include module efficiency, stability and cost. More recently, there is increased focus given to environmental, health and safety issues surrounding the commercialization of these same devices. An examination of the toxicological properties of these materials, and their chemical parents is fundamental to this discussion. Chemicals that can present large hazards to human health or the environment are regulated often more strictly than those that are less hazardous. Stricter control over how these materials are handled and disposed can increase the costs associated with the production and use of these modules dramatically. Similarly, public perception can be strongly influenced by the inherent biological hazard that these materials possess. Thus, this report: presents a brief background tutorial on how toxicological data are developed and used; overviews the toxicological data available for CIS, CGS and CdTe; develops ``reference doses`` for each of these compounds; compares the reference doses for these compounds with those of their parents; discusses the implications of these findings to photovoltaics industry.

  5. Measurement of the electrical properties of a polycrystalline cadmium telluride for direct conversion flat panel x-ray detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) is one of the best candidate direct conversion material for medical X-ray application because it satisfies the requirements of direct conversion x-ray material such as high atomic absorption, density, bandgap energy, work fuction, and resistivity. With such properties, single crystal CdTe exhibits high quantum efficiency and charge collection efficiency. However, for the development of low-cost large area detector, the study of the improvement of polycrystalline CdTe property is desirable. In this study, in order to improve the properties of polycrystalline CdTe, we produced polycrystalline CdTe with different kinds of raw materials, high purity Cd and Te powder compounds and bulk CdTe compound synthesized from single crystal CdTe. The electric properties including resistivity, x-ray sensitivity, and charge transport properties were investigated. As a result, polycrystalline CdTe exhibited simular level of resistivity and x-ray sensitivity to single crystal CdTe. The carrier transport properties of polycrystalline CdTe showed poorer properties than those of single crystal CdTe due to significant charge trapping. However, the polycrystalline CdTe fabricated with bulk CdTe compound synthesized from single crystal CdTe showed better charge transport properties than the polycrystalline CdTe fabricated with CdTe powder compounds. This is suitable for diagnostic x-ray detectors, especially for digital fluoroscopy

  6. A novel approach of chemical mechanical polishing using environment-friendly slurry for mercury cadmium telluride semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Wang, Bo; Zhou, Ping; Guo, Dongming; Kang, Renke; Zhang, Bi

    2016-03-01

    A novel approach of chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is developed for mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe or MCT) semiconductors. Firstly, fixed-abrasive lapping is used to machine the MCT wafers, and the lapping solution is deionized water. Secondly, the MCT wafers are polished using the developed CMP slurry. The CMP slurry consists of mainly SiO2 nanospheres, H2O2, and malic and citric acids, which are different from previous CMP slurries, in which corrosive and toxic chemical reagents are usually employed. Finally, the polished MCT wafers are cleaned and dried by deionized water and compressed air, respectively. The novel approach of CMP is environment-friendly. Surface roughness Ra, and peak-to-valley (PV) values of 0.45, and 4.74 nm are achieved, respectively on MCT wafers after CMP. The first and second passivating processes are observed in electrochemical measurements on MCT wafers. The fundamental mechanisms of CMP are proposed according to the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical measurements. Malic and citric acids dominate the first passivating process, and the CMP slurry governs the second process. Te4+3d peaks are absent after CMP induced by the developed CMP slurry, indicating the removing of oxidized films on MCT wafers, which is difficult to achieve using single H2O2 and malic and citric acids solutions.

  7. Polycrystalline thin-film solar cells and modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullal, H.S.; Stone, J.L.; Zweibel, K.; Surek, T.; Mitchell, R.L.

    1991-12-01

    This paper describes the recent technological advances in polycrystalline thin-film solar cells and modules. Three thin film materials, namely, cadmium telluride (CdTe), copper indium diselenide (CuInSe{sub 2}, CIS) and silicon films (Si-films) have made substantial technical progress, both in device and module performance. Early stability results for modules tested outdoors by various groups worldwide are also encouraging. The major global players actively involved in the development of the these technologies are discussed. Technical issues related to these materials are elucidated. Three 20-kW polycrystalline thin-film demonstration photovoltaic (PV) systems are expected to be installed in Davis, CA in 1992 as part of the Photovoltaics for Utility-Scale Applications (PVUSA) project. This is a joint project between the US Department of Energy (DOE), Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E), Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), California Energy Commission (CEC), and a utility consortium.

  8. Polycrystalline thin-film solar cells and modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullal, H.S.; Stone, J.L.; Zweibel, K.; Surek, T.; Mitchell, R.L.

    1991-12-01

    This paper describes the recent technological advances in polycrystalline thin-film solar cells and modules. Three thin film materials, namely, cadmium telluride (CdTe), copper indium diselenide (CuInSe{sub 2}, CIS) and silicon films (Si-films) have made substantial technical progress, both in device and module performance. Early stability results for modules tested outdoors by various groups worldwide are also encouraging. The major global players actively involved in the development of the these technologies are discussed. Technical issues related to these materials are elucidated. Three 20-kW polycrystalline thin-film demonstration photovoltaic (PV) systems are expected to be installed in Davis, CA in 1992 as part of the Photovoltaics for Utility-Scale Applications (PVUSA) project. This is a joint project between the US Department of Energy (DOE), Pacific Gas and Electric (PG E), Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), California Energy Commission (CEC), and a utility consortium.

  9. SemiSPECT: A small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager based on eight cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Hyunki; Furenlid, Lars R.; Crawford, Michael J.; Wilson, Donald W.; Barber, H. Bradford; Todd E. Peterson; Hunter, William C. J.; Liu, Zhonglin; Woolfenden, James M.; Barrett, Harrison H.

    2006-01-01

    The first full single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager to exploit eight compact high-intrinsic-resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, called SemiSPECT, has been completed. Each detector consists of a CZT crystal and a customized application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The CZT crystal is a 2.7 cm × 2.7 cm × ~ 0.2 cm slab with a continuous top electrode and a bottom electrode patterned into a 64 × 64 pixel array by photolithography. The ASIC is attached to ...

  10. Properties of RF sputtered cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin films: Influence of deposition pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, R. R.; Pawbake, A. S.; Waykar, R. G.; Rondiya, S. R.; Jadhavar, A. A.; Pandharkar, S. M.; Karpe, S. D.; Diwate, K. D.; Jadkar, S. R.

    2016-04-01

    Influence of deposition pressure on structural, morphology, electrical and optical properties of CdTe thin films deposited at low substrate temperature (100°C) by RF magnetron sputtering was investigated. The formation of CdTe was confirmed by low angle XRD and Raman spectroscopy. The low angle XRD analysis revealed that the CdTe films have zinc blende (cubic) structure with crystallites having preferred orientation in (111) direction. Raman spectra show the longitudinal optical (LO) phonon mode peak ˜ 165.4 cm-1 suggesting high quality CdTe film were obtained over the entire range of deposition pressure studied. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that films are smooth, homogenous, and crack-free with no evidence of voids. The EDAX data revealed that CdTe films deposited at low deposition pressure are high-quality stoichiometric. However, for all deposition pressures, films are rich in Cd relative to Te. The UV-Visible spectroscopy analysis show the blue shift in absorption edge with increasing the deposition pressure while the band gap show decreasing trend. The highest electrical conductivity was obtained for the film deposited at deposition pressure 1 Pa which indicates that the optimized deposition pressure for our sputtering unit is 1 Pa. Based on the experimental results, these CdTe films can be useful for the application in the flexible solar cells and other opto-electronic devices.

  11. Comparison between stress myocardial perfusion SPECT recorded with cadmium-zinc-telluride and Anger cameras in various study protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verger, Antoine; Karcher, Gilles [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); INSERM U947, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); Djaballah, Wassila [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); INSERM U947, Nancy (France); Fourquet, Nicolas [Clinique Pasteur, Toulouse (France); Rouzet, Francois; Le Guludec, Dominique [AP-HP, Hopital Bichat, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); INSERM U 773 Inserm and Denis Diderot University, Paris (France); Koehl, Gregoire; Roch, Veronique [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); Imbert, Laetitia [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); Centre Alexis Vautrin, Department of Radiotherapy, Vandoeuvre (France); Poussier, Sylvain [INSERM U947, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); Fay, Renaud [INSERM, Centre d' Investigation Clinique CIC-P 9501, Nancy (France); Marie, Pierre-Yves [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); INSERM U961, Nancy (France); Hopital de Brabois, CHU-Nancy, Medecine Nucleaire, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2013-03-15

    The results of stress myocardial perfusion SPECT could be enhanced by new cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) cameras, although differences compared to the results with conventional Anger cameras remain poorly known for most study protocols. This study was aimed at comparing the results of CZT and Anger SPECT according to various study protocols while taking into account the influence of obesity. The study population, which was from three different institutions equipped with identical CZT cameras, comprised 276 patients referred for study using protocols involving {sup 201}Tl (n = 120) or {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi injected at low dose at stress ({sup 99m}Tc-Low; stress/rest 1-day protocol; n = 110) or at high dose at stress ({sup 99m}Tc-High; rest/stress 1-day or 2-day protocol; n = 46). Each Anger SPECT scan was followed by a high-speed CZT SPECT scan (2 to 4 min). Agreement rates between CZT and Anger SPECT were good irrespective of the study protocol (for abnormal SPECT, {sup 201}Tl 92 %, {sup 99m}Tc-Low 86 %, {sup 99m}Tc-High 98 %), although quality scores were much higher for CZT SPECT with all study protocols. Overall correlations were high for the extent of myocardial infarction (r = 0.80) and a little lower for ischaemic areas (r = 0.72), the latter being larger on Anger SPECT (p < 0.001). This larger extent was mainly observed in 50 obese patients who were in the {sup 201}Tl or {sup 99m}Tc-Low group and in whom stress myocardial counts were particularly low with Anger SPECT (228 {+-} 101 kcounts) and dramatically enhanced with CZT SPECT (+279 {+-} 251 %). Concordance between the results of CZT and Anger SPECT is good regardless of study protocol and especially when excluding obese patients who have low-count Anger SPECT and for whom myocardial counts are dramatically enhanced on CZT SPECT. (orig.)

  12. Downstream resource utilization following hybrid cardiac imaging with an integrated cadmium-zinc-telluride/64-slice CT device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Low yield of invasive coronary angiography and unnecessary coronary interventions have been identified as key cost drivers in cardiology for evaluation of coronary artery disease (CAD). This has fuelled the search for noninvasive techniques providing comprehensive functional and anatomical information on coronary lesions. We have evaluated the impact of implementation of a novel hybrid cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT)/64-slice CT camera into the daily clinical routine on downstream resource utilization. Sixty-two patients with known or suspected CAD were referred for same-day single-session hybrid evaluation with CZT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and coronary CT angiography (CCTA). Hybrid MPI/CCTA images from the integrated CZT/CT camera served for decision-making towards conservative versus invasive management. Based on the hybrid images patients were classified into those with and those without matched findings. Matched findings were defined as the combination of MPI defect with a stenosis by CCTA in the coronary artery subtending the respective territory. All patients with normal MPI and CCTA as well as those with isolated MPI or CCTA finding or combined but unmatched findings were categorized as ''no match''. All 23 patients with a matched finding underwent invasive coronary angiography and 21 (91%) were revascularized. Of the 39 patients with no match, 5 (13%, p < 0.001 vs matched) underwent catheterization and 3 (8%, p < 0.001 vs matched) were revascularized. Cardiac hybrid imaging in CAD evaluation has a profound impact on patient management and may contribute to optimal downstream resource utilization. (orig.)

  13. Myocardial perfusion imaging with a cadmium zinc telluride-based gamma camera versus invasive fractional flow reserve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouden, Mohamed [Isala klinieken, Department of Cardiology, Zwolle (Netherlands); Isala klinieken, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Zwolle (Netherlands); Ottervanger, Jan Paul; Timmer, Jorik R. [Isala klinieken, Department of Cardiology, Zwolle (Netherlands); Knollema, Siert; Reiffers, Stoffer; Oostdijk, Ad H.J.; Jager, Pieter L. [Isala klinieken, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Zwolle (Netherlands); Boer, Menko-Jan de [University Medical Centre Nijmegen, Department of Cardiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2014-05-15

    Recently introduced ultrafast cardiac SPECT cameras with cadmium zinc telluride-based (CZT) detectors may provide superior image quality allowing faster acquisition with reduced radiation doses. Although the level of concordance between conventional SPECT and invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurement has been studied, that between FFR and CZT-based SPECT is not yet known. Therefore, we aimed to assess the level of concordance between CZT SPECT and FFR in a large patient group with stable coronary artery disease. Both invasive FFR and myocardial perfusion imaging with a CZT-based SPECT camera, using Tc-tetrofosmin as tracer, were performed in 100 patients with stable angina and intermediate grade stenosis on invasive coronary angiography. A cut-off value of <0.75 was used to define abnormal FFR. The mean age of the patients was 64 ± 11 years, and 64 % were men. SPECT demonstrated ischaemia in 31 % of the patients, and 20 % had FFR <0.75. The concordance between CZT SPECT and FFR was 73 % on a per-patient basis and 79 % on a per-vessel basis. Discordant findings were more often seen in older patients and were mainly (19 %) the result of ischaemic SPECT findings in patients with FFR ≥0.75, whereas only 8 % had an abnormal FFR without ischaemia as demonstrated by CZT SPECT. Only 20 - 30 % of patients with intermediate coronary stenoses had significant ischaemia as assessed by CZT SPECT or invasive FFR. CZT SPECT showed a modest degree of concordance with FFR, which is comparable with previous results with conventional SPECT. Further investigations are particularly necessary in patients with normal SPECT and abnormal FFR, especially to determine whether these patients should undergo revascularization. (orig.)

  14. Modelling of illuminated current–voltage characteristics to evaluate leakage currents in long wavelength infrared mercury cadmium telluride photovoltaic detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gopal, Vishnu, E-mail: vishnu-46@yahoo.com, E-mail: wdhu@mail.sitp.ac.cn [Institute of Defence Scientists and Technologists, CFEES Complex, Brig. S. K. Majumdar Marg, Delhi 110054 (India); Qiu, WeiCheng; Hu, Weida, E-mail: vishnu-46@yahoo.com, E-mail: wdhu@mail.sitp.ac.cn [National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200083 (China)

    2014-11-14

    The current–voltage characteristics of long wavelength mercury cadmium telluride infrared detectors have been studied using a recently suggested method for modelling of illuminated photovoltaic detectors. Diodes fabricated on in-house grown arsenic and vacancy doped epitaxial layers were evaluated for their leakage currents. The thermal diffusion, generation–recombination (g-r), and ohmic currents were found as principal components of diode current besides a component of photocurrent due to illumination. In addition, both types of diodes exhibited an excess current component whose growth with the applied bias voltage did not match the expected growth of trap-assisted-tunnelling current. Instead, it was found to be the best described by an exponential function of the type, I{sub excess} = I{sub r0} + K{sub 1} exp (K{sub 2} V), where I{sub r0}, K{sub 1}, and K{sub 2} are fitting parameters and V is the applied bias voltage. A study of the temperature dependence of the diode current components and the excess current provided the useful clues about the source of origin of excess current. It was found that the excess current in diodes fabricated on arsenic doped epitaxial layers has its origin in the source of ohmic shunt currents. Whereas, the source of excess current in diodes fabricated on vacancy doped epitaxial layers appeared to be the avalanche multiplication of photocurrent. The difference in the behaviour of two types of diodes has been attributed to the difference in the quality of epitaxial layers.

  15. Preparation and Properties of Evaporated CdTe and All Thin Film CdTe/CdS Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahzad, Naseem

    1991-05-01

    Cadmium telluride thin films were prepared by vacuum evaporation of CdTe powder in an attempt to fabricate all thin film solar cells of the type CdTe/CdS. Characterization of CdTe has shown it to have a band gap of 1.522 eV and a resistivity of 22Ω-cm. As prepared, solar cells exhibited low values of output parameters. Given quantity of copper was then deposited on top of the CdTe/CdS solar cells and the whole system was annealed at 350° C. This copper doping changed the output parameters favorably with a maximum efficiency of 1.9%.

  16. The performance of a combined solar photovoltaic (PV) and thermoelectric generator (TEG) system

    OpenAIRE

    Bjørk, R.; Nielsen, K K

    2015-01-01

    The performance of a combined solar photovoltaic (PV) and thermoelectric generator (TEG) system is examined using an analytical model for four different types of commercial PVs and a commercial bismuth telluride TEG. The TEG is applied directly on the back of the PV, so that the two devices have the same temperature. The PVs considered are crystalline Si (c-Si), amorphous Si (a-Si), copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) cells. The degradation of PV performance...

  17. Overview and Challenges of Thin Film Solar Electric Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullal, H. S.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, we report on the significant progress made worldwide by thin-film solar cells, namely, amorphous silicon (a-Si), cadmium telluride (CdTe), and copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS). Thin-film photovoltaic (PV) technology status is also discussed in detail. In addition, R&D and technology challenges in all three areas are elucidated. The worldwide estimated projection for thin-film PV technology production capacity announcements are estimated at more than 5000 MW by 2010.

  18. Scientific Approach to Renewable Energy Through Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, M. C.

    Renewable energy is increasingly viewed as critically important globally. Solar cells convert the energy of the sun into electricity. The method of converting solar energy to electricity is pollution free, and appears a good practical solution to the global energy problems. Energy policies have pushed for different technologies to decrease pollutant emissions and reduce global climate change. Photovoltaic technology, which utilizes sunlight to generate energy, is an attractive alternate energy source because it is renewable, harmless and domestically secure. Transparent conducting metal oxides, being n-type were used extensively in the production of heterojunction cells using p-type Cu2O. The long held consensus is that the best approach to improve cell efficiency in Cu2O-based photovoltaic devices is to achieve both p- and n-type Cu2O and thus p-n homojunction of Cu2O solar cells. Silicon, which, next to oxygen, is the most represented element in the earth's crust, is used for the production of monocrystalline silicon solar cells. Silicon is easily obtained and processed and it is not toxic and does not form compounds that would be environmentally harmful. In contemporary electronic industry silicon is the main semiconducting element. Thin-film cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar cells are the basis of a significant technology with major commercial impact on solar energy production. Polycrystalline thin-film solar cells such as CuInSe2 (CIS), Cu (In, Ga) Se2 (CIGS) and CdTe compound semiconductors are important for terrestrial applications because of their high efficiency, long-term stable performance and potential for low-cost production. Highest record efficiencies of 19.2% for CIGS and 16.5% for CdTe have been achieved.

  19. Development of high-efficiency solar cells on copper indium selenide single crystals (cadmium sulfide, zinc oxide)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yip, Lap Sum

    1996-12-31

    Photovoltaic cells with a ZnO/CdS/CuInSe{sub 2} structure were fabricated on bulk CuInSe{sub 2} substrates. Conversion efficiencies of more than or near 10 per cent were obtained on cells with an active area and without the use of antireflection coating. Copper indium selenide single crystals can be used as absorbers in thin film solar cells. In this study, the single crystals were grown by a horizontal Bridgman method. An annealing of the CuInSe{sub 2} substrate before the CdS deposition was found to be essential in obtaining high photovoltaic performance.

  20. Properties of reactively sputtered oxygenated cadmium sulfide (CdS:O) and their impact on CdTe solar cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meysing, Daniel M., E-mail: dmeysing@mines.edu; Wolden, Colin A. [Chemical and Biological Engineering Department, Colorado School of Mines, 1613 Illinois St., Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Griffith, Michelle M. [Department of Physics, Colorado School of Mines, 1523 Illinois St., Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States); Mahabaduge, Hasitha; Pankow, Joel; Reese, Matthew O.; Burst, James M.; Rance, William L.; Barnes, Teresa M. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Pkwy., Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Oxygenated cadmium sulfide (CdS:O) is commonly used as the n-type window layer in high-performance CdTe heterojunction solar cells. This layer is deposited by reactive sputtering, but the optimal amount of oxygen in the sputtering ambient is highly dependent on the specific system and process employed. In this work, the intrinsic properties of CdS:O were measured as a function of the oxygen content (0%–10%) in the sputtering ambient and correlated to device performance with the goal of better defining optimal CdS:O properties for CdTe solar cells. Optimal performance was found using CdS:O films that contained ∼40 at. % oxygen as measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed these results and showed that oxygen is incorporated primarily as oxygenated sulfur compounds (SO{sub x}). Device efficiency improved from 10.5% using CdS to >14% with CdS:O due largely to increases in short-circuit current density as well as a modest improvement in open-circuit voltage. The transparency of the CdS:O films was well correlated with observed improvements in blue quantum efficiency with increasing oxygen content. The optical bandgap of as-deposited CdS:O was identified as a simple metric for process optimization and transfer, with 2.8 eV being ideal for the device architecture employed.

  1. Properties of reactively sputtered oxygenated cadmium sulfide (CdS:O) and their impact on CdTe solar cell performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxygenated cadmium sulfide (CdS:O) is commonly used as the n-type window layer in high-performance CdTe heterojunction solar cells. This layer is deposited by reactive sputtering, but the optimal amount of oxygen in the sputtering ambient is highly dependent on the specific system and process employed. In this work, the intrinsic properties of CdS:O were measured as a function of the oxygen content (0%–10%) in the sputtering ambient and correlated to device performance with the goal of better defining optimal CdS:O properties for CdTe solar cells. Optimal performance was found using CdS:O films that contained ∼40 at. % oxygen as measured by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy confirmed these results and showed that oxygen is incorporated primarily as oxygenated sulfur compounds (SOx). Device efficiency improved from 10.5% using CdS to >14% with CdS:O due largely to increases in short-circuit current density as well as a modest improvement in open-circuit voltage. The transparency of the CdS:O films was well correlated with observed improvements in blue quantum efficiency with increasing oxygen content. The optical bandgap of as-deposited CdS:O was identified as a simple metric for process optimization and transfer, with 2.8 eV being ideal for the device architecture employed

  2. Size and temperature dependence of the photoluminescence properties of NIR emitting ternary alloyed mercury cadmium telluride quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagtap, Amardeep M.; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Banerjee, Arup; Babu Pendyala, Naresh; Koteswara Rao, K. S. R.

    2016-04-01

    Exciton-phonon coupling and nonradiative relaxation processes have been investigated in near-infrared (NIR) emitting ternary alloyed mercury cadmium telluride (CdHgTe) quantum dots. Organically capped CdHgTe nanocrystals of sizes varying from 2.5-4.2 nm have been synthesized where emission is in the NIR region of 650-855 nm. Temperature-dependent (15-300 K) photoluminescence (PL) and the decay dynamics of PL at 300 K have been studied to understand the photophysical properties. The PL decay kinetics shows the transition from triexponential to biexponential on increasing the size of the quantom dots (QDs), informing the change in the distribution of the emitting states. The energy gap is found to be following the Varshni relation with a temperature coefficient of 2.1-2.8  ×  10-4 eV K-1. The strength of the electron-phonon coupling, which is reflected in the Huang and Rhys factor S, is found in the range of 1.17-1.68 for QDs with a size of 2.5-4.2 nm. The integrated PL intensity is nearly constant until 50 K, and slowly decreases up to 140 K, beyond which it decreases at a faster rate. The mechanism for PL quenching with temperature is attributed to the presence of nonradiative relaxation channels, where the excited carriers are thermally stimulated to the surface defect/trap states. At temperatures of different region (<140 K and 140-300 K), traps of low (13-25 meV) and high (65-140 meV) activation energies seem to be controlling the quenching of the PL emission. The broadening of emission linewidth is found to due to exciton-acoustic phonon scattering and exciton-longitudinal optical (LO) phonon coupling. The exciton-acoustic phonon scattering coefficient is found to be enhanced up to 55 μeV K-1 due to a stronger confinement effect. These findings give insight into understanding the photophysical properties of CdHgTe QDs and pave the way for their possible applications in the fields of NIR photodetectors and other optoelectronic devices.

  3. Progress towards high efficiency thin film CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, K.W.; Eberspacher, C.; Cohen, F.; Avery, J.; Duran, G.; Bottenberg, W.

    1988-01-15

    This paper describes work investigating high rate cadmium telluride (CdTe) film deposition by close-space vapor transport, leading to 4 cm/sup 2/ tin oxide/CdTe solar cells of efficiency greater than 10%. Under a 100 mW cm/sup -2/ air mass 1.5 global spectrum, a cell of efficiency 10.5% had a short-circuit current of 28.1 mA cm/sup -2/, an open circuit voltage of 0.663 V and a fill factor of 0.563. Our major achievements include (1) the use of completely nonvacuum processing, (2) the fabrication of simple transparent conductive oxide/CdTe cells without need of a CdS window layer, and (3) screenprinted back contacts.

  4. Cadmium sulfide nanowires for the window semiconductor layer in thin film CdS-CdTe solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin film CdS/CdTe heterojunction device is a leading technology for the solar cells of the next generation. We report on two novel device configurations for these cells where the traditional CdS window layer is replaced by nanowires (NW) of CdS, embedded in an aluminum oxide matrix or free-standing. An estimated 26.8% improvement in power conversion efficiency over the traditional device structure is expected, primarily because of the enhanced spectral transmission of sunlight through the NW-CdS layer and a reduction in the junction area/optical area ratio. In initial experiments, nanostructured devices of the two designs were fabricated and a power conversion efficiency value of 6.5% was achieved.

  5. Material and detector properties of cadmium manganese telluride (Cd1-xMnxTe) crystals grown by the modified floating-zone method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, A.; Gu, G. D.; Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Cui, Y.; Roy, U. N.; Yang, G.; Liu, T.; Zhong, R.; Schneeloch, J.; James, R. B.

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrated the material- and radiation-detection properties of cadmium manganese telluride (Cd1-xMnxTe; x=0.06), a wide-band-gap semiconductor crystal grown by the modified floating-zone method. We investigated the presence of various bulk defects, such as Te inclusions, twins, and dislocations of several as-grown indium-doped Cd1-xMnxTe crystals using different techniques, viz., IR transmission microscopy, and chemical etching. We then fabricated four planar detectors from selected CdMnTe crystals, characterized their electrical properties, and tested their performance as room-temperature X- and gamma-ray detectors. Our experimental results show that CMT crystals grown by the modified floating zone method apparently are free from Te inclusions. However, we still need to optimize our growth parameters to attain high-resistivity, large-volume single-crystal CdMnTe.

  6. Efficient charge transfer and field-induced tunneling transport in hybrid composite device of organic semiconductor and cadmium telluride quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varade, Vaibhav, E-mail: vaibhav.tvarade@gmail.com; Jagtap, Amardeep M.; Koteswara Rao, K. S. R.; Ramesh, K. P.; Menon, R. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Anjaneyulu, P. [Department of Physics, Gitam University, Hyderabad 502329 (India)

    2015-06-07

    Temperature and photo-dependent current–voltage characteristics are investigated in thin film devices of a hybrid-composite comprising of organic semiconductor poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) and cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs). A detailed study of the charge injection mechanism in ITO/PEDOT:PSS-CdTe QDs/Al device exhibits a transition from direct tunneling to Fowler–Nordheim tunneling with increasing electric field due to formation of high barrier at the QD interface. In addition, the hybrid-composite exhibits a huge photoluminescence quenching compared to aboriginal CdTe QDs and high increment in photoconductivity (∼ 400%), which is attributed to the charge transfer phenomena. The effective barrier height (Φ{sub B} ≈ 0.68 eV) is estimated from the transition voltage and the possible origin of its variation with temperature and photo-illumination is discussed.

  7. Investigation of the Internal Electric Field in Cadmium Zinc Telluride Detectors Using the Pockels Effect and the Analysis of Charge Transients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groza, Michael; Krawczynski, Henic; Garson, Alfred, III; Martin, Jerrad W.; Lee, Kuen; Li, Qiang; Beilicke, Matthias; Cui, Yunlong; Buliga, Vladimir; Guo, Mingsheng; Coca, Constantine; Burger, Arnold

    2010-01-01

    The Pockels electro-optic effect can be used to investigate the internal electric field in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) single crystals that are used to fabricate room temperature x and gamma radiation detectors. An agreement is found between the electric field mapping obtained from Pockels effect images and the measurements of charge transients generated by alpha particles. The Pockels effect images of a CZT detector along two mutually perpendicular directions are used to optimize the detector response in a dual anode configuration, a device in which the symmetry of the internal electric field with respect to the anode strips is of critical importance. The Pockels effect is also used to map the electric field in a CZT detector with dual anodes and an attempt is made to find a correlation with the simulated electric potential in such detectors. Finally, the stress-induced birefringence effects seen in the Pockels images are presented and discussed.

  8. Efficient charge transfer and field-induced tunneling transport in hybrid composite device of organic semiconductor and cadmium telluride quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Temperature and photo-dependent current–voltage characteristics are investigated in thin film devices of a hybrid-composite comprising of organic semiconductor poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) and cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs). A detailed study of the charge injection mechanism in ITO/PEDOT:PSS-CdTe QDs/Al device exhibits a transition from direct tunneling to Fowler–Nordheim tunneling with increasing electric field due to formation of high barrier at the QD interface. In addition, the hybrid-composite exhibits a huge photoluminescence quenching compared to aboriginal CdTe QDs and high increment in photoconductivity (∼ 400%), which is attributed to the charge transfer phenomena. The effective barrier height (ΦB ≈ 0.68 eV) is estimated from the transition voltage and the possible origin of its variation with temperature and photo-illumination is discussed

  9. Self-consistent simulation of CdTe solar cells with active defects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrate a self-consistent numerical scheme for simulating an electronic device which contains active defects. As a specific case, we consider copper defects in cadmium telluride solar cells. The presence of copper has been shown experimentally to play a crucial role in predicting device performance. The primary source of this copper is migration away from the back contact during annealing, which likely occurs predominantly along grain boundaries. We introduce a mathematical scheme for simulating this effect in 2D and explain the numerical implementation of the system. Finally, we will give numerical results comparing our results to known 1D simulations to demonstrate the accuracy of the solver and then show results unique to the 2D case

  10. Identification of critical stacking faults in thin-film CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Su-Hyun; Walsh, Aron, E-mail: a.walsh@bath.ac.uk [Global E3 Institute, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies and Department of Chemistry, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Butler, Keith T. [Centre for Sustainable Chemical Technologies and Department of Chemistry, University of Bath, Bath BA2 7AY (United Kingdom); Soon, Aloysius [Global E3 Institute, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Abbas, Ali; Walls, John M., E-mail: j.m.wall@loughborough.ac.uk [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology, School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-11

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) is a p-type semiconductor used in thin-film solar cells. To achieve high light-to-electricity conversion, annealing in the presence of CdCl{sub 2} is essential, but the underlying mechanism is still under debate. Recent evidence suggests that a reduction in the high density of stacking faults in the CdTe grains is a key process that occurs during the chemical treatment. A range of stacking faults, including intrinsic, extrinsic, and twin boundary, are computationally investigated to identify the extended defects that limit performance. The low-energy faults are found to be electrically benign, while a number of higher energy faults, consistent with atomic-resolution micrographs, are predicted to be hole traps with fluctuations in the local electrostatic potential. It is expected that stacking faults will also be important for other thin-film photovoltaic technologies.

  11. Self-consistent simulation of CdTe solar cells with active defects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinkman, Daniel; Ringhofer, Christian [School of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Guo, Da; Akis, Richard; Vasileska, Dragica [School of Electrical, Computer and Energy Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 (United States); Sankin, Igor; Fang, Tian [First Solar, Perrysburg, Ohio 43551 (United States)

    2015-07-21

    We demonstrate a self-consistent numerical scheme for simulating an electronic device which contains active defects. As a specific case, we consider copper defects in cadmium telluride solar cells. The presence of copper has been shown experimentally to play a crucial role in predicting device performance. The primary source of this copper is migration away from the back contact during annealing, which likely occurs predominantly along grain boundaries. We introduce a mathematical scheme for simulating this effect in 2D and explain the numerical implementation of the system. Finally, we will give numerical results comparing our results to known 1D simulations to demonstrate the accuracy of the solver and then show results unique to the 2D case.

  12. Solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuquel, A.; Roussel, M.

    The physical and electronic characteristics of solar cells are discussed in terms of space applications. The principles underlying the photovoltaic effect are reviewed, including an analytic model for predicting the performance of individual cells and arrays of cells. Attention is given to the effects of electromagnetic and ionizing radiation, micrometeors, thermal and mechanical stresses, pollution and degassing encountered in space. The responses of different types of solar cells to the various performance-degrading agents are examined, with emphasis on techniques for quality assurance in the manufacture and mounting of Si cells.

  13. Some Aspects of Sealed Nickel Cadmium Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Saha

    1967-11-01

    Full Text Available Sealed Nickel Cadmium Cell system is termed till today as the most reliable power pack for electronic apparatus specially in low temperature use. This paper brings out the development and production of sealed nickel cadmium cells of pocket plate construction. The author who has gained experience in production of Ni-Cd cells in East Germany discusses also the major problems faced by the battery manufactures of to-day.

  14. Advanced Processing of CdTe- and CuIn{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}Se{sub 2}-Based Solar Cells; Phase I Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morel, D.L.; Ferekides, C.S.

    2000-09-05

    The main tasks of the cadmium telluride portion of this project include the development of simplified processing for fabricating high-efficiency CdTe solar cells, studies on the long-term stability of CdTe devices, and the development of alternative transparent conducting oxides, window layers, and back contacts. The second portion of this project focused on CIGS solar cells. The main tasks include the development of a manufacturable process for CIGS devices and the development of high-band-gap alloys for use in tandem cell structures. Additional objectives include development of improved junction formation processing and contributing to the overall understanding of these materials and devices. Because the processing is manufacturing-driven, the authors use an all solid-state, simplified two-step process that relaxes the level of deposition control required.

  15. Optimization of High-Efficiency CdS/CdTe Thin Film Solar Cell Using Step Doping Grading and Thickness of the Absorption Layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Sabaghi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the influence of stepped doping of the absorber layer on performance of Cadmium Sulfide/Cadmium Telluride (CdS/CdTe solar cell has been investigated. At first, the electrical characteristics of conventional CdS/CdTe solar cell is validated with fabricated CdS/CdTe solar cell. To improve the maximum efficiency of CdS/CdTe solar cell, the doping and thickness of the absorption layer are optimized. By step doping concentration within the absorber layer using buffer layer back contact and the increase in stepping gradient of the doping of CdTe layer, improved the conversion efficiency about 2.4% were obtained. The open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current density, fill factor and total area conversion efficiency of optimized solar cell structure are 952 mV, 25.97 mA/cm2, 78.5% and 18.7% under global AM 1.5 conditions, respectively.

  16. Present status of the development of thin-film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhere, N.G. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The principle types of thin-film solar cells are based on single-junction and multi-junction hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H), copper indium diselenide (CuInSe{sub 2}) and cadmium telluride (CdTe). Impressive gains in the performance of these cells have been reported in recent months. The problem of contacts to CdTe cells has been circumvented, resulting in the development of stable 11% efficient n-CdS/i-CdTe/p-ZnTe heterostructure solar cells. Total small-area (1 cm {sup 2}) efficiencies which have been measured at SERI under standard conditions (global AM 1.5) are as follows: single-junction a-Si:h, 11.5-12%; triple-junction a-Si:H:F, 12.4% (active area 13.3%); CuGaInSe {sub 2}, 14.1% (active area); CdTe, 10-11%; and CuInSe{sub 2}-a-Si:H cascade cells, 14.6%. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon solar-cell panels are being commercialized in several countries. Small-scale production of CdTe panels has also been undertaken. Recently, a CuInSe{sub 2} module with the world's highest thin-film module efficiency, 11.1% , an aperture area of 938 cm{sup 2} and a total power of 10.4 W, has been tested at SERI. (author).

  17. Solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method of producing solar cells is described which consists of producing a substantially monocrystalline tubular body of silicon or other suitable semiconductor material, treating this body to form an annular rectifying junction and then cutting it longitudinally to form a number of nearly flat ribbons from which the solar cells are fabricated. The P=N rectifying junction produced by the formation of silicon dioxide on the layers at the inner and outer surfaces of the body can be formed by ion-implantation or diffusion. (U.K.)

  18. Efficient and ultrafast formation of long-lived charge-transfer exciton state in atomically thin cadmium selenide/cadmium telluride type-II heteronanosheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kaifeng; Li, Qiuyang; Jia, Yanyan; McBride, James R; Xie, Zhao-xiong; Lian, Tianquan

    2015-01-27

    Colloidal cadmium chalcogenide nanosheets with atomically precise thickness of a few atomic layers and size of 10-100 nm are two-dimensional (2D) quantum well materials with strong and precise quantum confinement in the thickness direction. Despite their many advantageous properties, excitons in these and other 2D metal chalcogenide materials are short-lived due to large radiative and nonradiative recombination rates, hindering their applications as light harvesting and charge separation/transport materials for solar energy conversion. We showed that these problems could be overcome in type-II CdSe/CdTe core/crown heteronanosheets (with CdTe crown laterally extending on the CdSe nanosheet core). Photoluminesence excitation measurement revealed that nearly all excitons generated in the CdSe and CdTe domains localized to the CdSe/CdTe interface to form long-lived charge transfer excitons (with electrons in the CdSe domain and hole in the CdTe domain). By ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopy, we showed that the efficient exciton localization efficiency could be attributed to ultrafast exciton localization (0.64 ± 0.07 ps), which was facilitated by large in-plane exciton mobility in these 2D materials and competed effectively with exiton trapping at the CdSe or CdTe domains. The spatial separation of electrons and holes across the CdSe/CdTe heterojunction effectively suppressed radiative and nonradiative recombination processes, leading to a long-lived charge transfer exciton state with a half-life of ∼ 41.7 ± 2.5 ns, ∼ 30 times longer than core-only CdSe nanosheets. PMID:25548944

  19. Semiconductor solar cells: Recent progress in terrestrial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avrutin, V.; Izyumskaya, N.; Morkoç, H.

    2011-04-01

    In the last decade, the photovoltaic industry grew at a rate exceeding 30% per year. Currently, solar-cell modules based on single-crystal and large-grain polycrystalline silicon wafers comprise more than 80% of the market. Bulk Si photovoltaics, which benefit from the highly advanced growth and fabrication processes developed for microelectronics industry, is a mature technology. The light-to-electric power conversion efficiency of the best modules offered on the market is over 20%. While there is still room for improvement, the device performance is approaching the thermodynamic limit of ˜28% for single-junction Si solar cells. The major challenge that the bulk Si solar cells face is, however, the cost reduction. The potential for price reduction of electrical power generated by wafer-based Si modules is limited by the cost of bulk Si wafers, making the electrical power cost substantially higher than that generated by combustion of fossil fuels. One major strategy to bring down the cost of electricity generated by photovoltaic modules is thin-film solar cells, whose production does not require expensive semiconductor substrates and very high temperatures and thus allows decreasing the cost per unit area while retaining a reasonable efficiency. Thin-film solar cells based on amorphous, microcrystalline, and polycrystalline Si as well as cadmium telluride and copper indium diselenide compound semiconductors have already proved their commercial viability and their market share is increasing rapidly. Another avenue to reduce the cost of photovoltaic electricity is to increase the cell efficiency beyond the Shockley-Queisser limit. A variety of concepts proposed along this avenue forms the basis of the so-called third generation photovoltaics technologies. Among these approaches, high-efficiency multi-junction solar cells based on III-V compound semiconductors, which initially found uses in space applications, are now being developed for terrestrial applications. In

  20. Design of a Pneumatic Robotic Arm for Solar Cell Tester System By using PLC controller

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yousif I. Al Mashhadany

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar cell testers sort photovoltaic cells according to their electrical performance, tested under simulated sunlight. A variety of testers exist, but they all face a common challenge of handling cells that are very small and thin, which makes it difficult to transport the cells from the conveyer to the storage box. This paper presents a new design for a handling robot with vacuum end-effectors, which uses a PLC controller to govern the movement of the cells and the testing process. The design applies to solar cell testers for monocrystalline, polycrystalline, cadmium telluride (CdTe, and copper indium diselenide (CIS cells. Each cell is tested for efficiency and categorized accordingly into four groups (A to D. A Virtual Reality (VR model was built to simulate the system, keeping in mind real world constraints. Two photoelectric sensors were used to make detections for both the testing process and the robot movement. The PLC controller guides the trajectory of the robot according to the results of the efficiency testing. It was seen that the system worked very well, with the testing process and the robot movement interacting smoothly. The robot trajectory was seen to be highly accurate, and the pick and place operations were done with great precision.

  1. Solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treble, F. C.

    1980-11-01

    The history, state of the art, and future prospects of solar cells are reviewed. Solar cells are already competitive in a wide range of low-power applications, and during the 1980's they are expected to become cheaper to run than diesel or gasoline generators, the present mainstay of isolated communities. At this stage they will become attractive for water pumping, irrigation, and rural electrification, particularly in developing countries. With further cost reduction, they may be used to augment grid supplies in domestic, commercial, institutional, and industrial premises. Cost reduction to the stage where photovoltaics becomes economic for large-scale power generation in central stations depends on a technological breakthrough in the development of thin-film cells. DOE aims to reach this goal by 1990, so that by the end of the century about 20% of the estimated annual additions to their electrical generating capacity will be photovoltaic.

  2. Characterization of a sub-assembly of 3D position sensitive cadmium zinc telluride detectors and electronics from a sub-millimeter resolution PET system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Gu, Yi; Reynolds, Paul D.; Levin, Craig S.

    2016-09-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) offers key advantages for small animal positron emission tomography (PET), including high spatial and energy resolution and simple metal deposition for fabrication of very small pixel arrays. Previous studies have investigated the intrinsic spatial, energy, and timing resolution of an individual sub-millimeter resolution CZT detector. In this work we present the first characterization results of a system of these detectors. The 3D position sensitive dual-CZT detector module and readout electronics developed in our lab was scaled up to complete a significant portion of the final PET system. This sub-system was configured as two opposing detection panels containing a total of twelve 40~\\text{mm}× 40~\\text{mm}× 5 mm monolithic CZT crystals for proof of concept. System-level characterization studies, including optimizing the trigger threshold of each channel’s comparators, were performed. 68Ge and 137Cs radioactive isotopes were used to characterize the energy resolution of all 468 anode channels in the sub-system. The mean measured global 511 keV photopeak energy resolution over all anodes was found to be 7.35+/- 1.75 % FWHM after correction for photon interaction depth-dependent signal variation. The measured global time resolution was 37 ns FWHM, a parameter to be further optimized, and the intrinsic spatial resolution was 0.76 mm FWHM.

  3. Simulation and experimental characterization of the point spread function, pixel saturation, and blooming of a mercury cadmium telluride focal plane array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soehnel, Grant; Tanbakuchi, Anthony

    2012-11-20

    A custom IR spot scanning experiment was constructed to project subpixel spots on a mercury cadmium telluride focal plane array (FPA). The hardware consists of an FPA in a liquid nitrogen cooled Dewar, high precision motorized stages, a custom aspheric lens, and a 1.55 and 3.39 μm laser source. By controlling the position and intensity of the spot, characterizations of cross talk, saturation, blooming, and (indirectly) the minority carrier lifetime were performed. In addition, a Monte-Carlo-based charge diffusion model was developed to validate experimental data and make predictions. Results show very good agreement between the model and experimental data. Parameters such as wavelength, reverse bias, and operating temperature were found to have little effect on pixel crosstalk in the absorber layer of the detector. Saturation characterizations show that these FPAs, which do not have antiblooming circuitry, exhibit an increase in cross talk due to blooming at ∼39% beyond the flux required for analog saturation. PMID:23207309

  4. Rapid long-wave infrared laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements using a mercury-cadmium-telluride linear array detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Clayton S-C; Brown, Eiei; Kumi-Barimah, Eric; Hommerich, Uwe; Jin, Feng; Jia, Yingqing; Trivedi, Sudhir; D'souza, Arvind I; Decuir, Eric A; Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal S; Samuels, Alan C

    2015-11-20

    In this work, we develop a mercury-cadmium-telluride linear array detection system that is capable of rapidly capturing (∼1-5  s) a broad spectrum of atomic and molecular laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) emissions in the long-wave infrared (LWIR) region (∼5.6-10  μm). Similar to the conventional UV-Vis LIBS, a broadband emission spectrum of condensed phase samples covering the whole 5.6-10 μm region can be acquired from just a single laser-induced microplasma or averaging a few single laser-induced microplasmas. Atomic and molecular signature emission spectra of solid inorganic and organic tablets and thin liquid films deposited on a rough asphalt surface are observed. This setup is capable of rapidly probing samples "as is" without the need of elaborate sample preparation and also offers the possibility of a simultaneous UV-Vis and LWIR LIBS measurement.

  5. Nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging with a novel cadmium-zinc-telluride detector SPECT/CT device: first validation versus invasive coronary angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of attenuation corrected nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with a novel hybrid single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT device consisting of an ultrafast dedicated cardiac gamma camera with cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) solid-state semiconductor detectors integrated onto a multislice CT scanner to detect coronary artery disease (CAD). Invasive coronary angiography served as the standard of reference. The study population included 66 patients (79% men; mean age 63 ± 11 years) who underwent 1-day 99mTc-tetrofosmin pharmacological stress/rest examination and angiography within 3 months. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) as well as accuracy of the CT X-ray based attenuation corrected CZT MPI for detection of CAD (≥50% luminal narrowing) was calculated on a per-patient basis. The prevalence of angiographic CAD in the study population was 82%. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy were 87, 67, 92, 53 and 83%, respectively. In this first report on CZT SPECT/CT MPI comparison versus angiography we confirm a high accuracy for detection of angiographically documented CAD. (orig.)

  6. First principles phase transition, elastic properties and electronic structure calculations for cadmium telluride under induced pressure: density functional theory, LDA, GGA and modified Becke-Johnson potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabita, Kh; Maibam, Jameson; Indrajit Sharma, B.; Brojen Singh, R. K.; Thapa, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    We report first principles phase transition, elastic properties and electronic structure for cadmium telluride (CdTe) under induced pressure in the light of density functional theory using the local density approximation (LDA), generalised gradient approximation (GGA) and modified Becke-Johnson (mBJ) potential. The structural phase transition of CdTe from a zinc blende (ZB) to a rock salt (RS) structure within the LDA calculation is 2.2 GPa while that within GGA is found to be at 4 GPa pressure with a volume collapse of 20.9%. The elastic constants and parameters (Zener anisotropy factor, Shear modulus, Poisson’s ratio, Young’s modulus, Kleinmann parameter and Debye’s temperature) of CdTe at different pressures of both the phases have been calculated. The band diagram of the CdTe ZB structure shows a direct band gap of 1.46 eV as predicted by mBJ calculation which gives better results in close agreement with experimental results as compared to LDA and GGA. An increase in the band gap of the CdTe ZB phase is predicted under induced pressure while the metallic nature is retained in the CdTe RS phase.

  7. Advances in thin-film solar cells for lightweight space photovoltaic power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Bailey, Sheila G.; Flood, Dennis J.

    1989-01-01

    The present stature and current research directions of photovoltaic arrays as primary power systems for space are reviewed. There have recently been great advances in the technology of thin-film solar cells for terrestrial applications. In a thin-film solar cell the thickness of the active element is only a few microns; transfer of this technology to space arrays could result in ultralow-weight solar arrays with potentially large gains in specific power. Recent advances in thin-film solar cells are reviewed, including polycrystalline copper-indium selenide (CuInSe2) and related I-III-VI2 compounds, polycrystalline cadmium telluride and related II-VI compounds, and amorphous silicon:hydrogen and alloys. The best experimental efficiency on thin-film solar cells to date is 12 percent AMO for CuIn Se2. This efficiency is likely to be increased in the next few years. The radiation tolerance of thin-film materials is far greater than that of single-crystal materials. CuIn Se2 shows no degradation when exposed to 1 MeV electrons. Experimental evidence also suggests that most of all of the radiation damage on thin-films can be removed by a low temperature anneal. The possibility of thin-film multibandgap cascade solar cells is discussed, including the tradeoffs between monolithic and mechanically stacked cells. The best current efficiency for a cascade is 12.5 percent AMO for an amorphous silicon on CuInSe2 multibandgap combination. Higher efficiencies are expected in the future. For several missions, including solar-electric propulsion, a manned Mars mission, and lunar exploration and manufacturing, thin-film photovolatic arrays may be a mission-enabling technology.

  8. Impact of thermal annealing on optical properties of vacuum evaporated CdTe thin films for solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chander, Subhash; Purohit, A.; Lal, C.; Nehra, S. P.; Dhaka, M. S.

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the impact of thermal annealing on optical properties of cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin films is investigated. The films of thickness 650 nm were deposited on thoroughly cleaned glass substrate employing vacuum evaporation followed by thermal annealing in the temperature range 250-450 °C. The as-deposited and annealed films were characterized using UV-Vis spectrophotometer. The optical band gap is found to be decreased from 1.88 eV to 1.48 eV with thermal annealing. The refractive index is found to be in the range 2.73-2.92 and observed to increase with annealing treatment. The experimental results reveal that the thermal annealing plays an important role to enhance the optical properties of CdTe thin films and annealed films may be used as absorber layer in CdTe/CdS solar cells.

  9. Physics-Based Compact Model for CIGS and CdTe Solar Cells: From Voltage-Dependent Carrier Collection to Light-Enhanced Reverse Breakdown: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Xingshu; Alam, Muhammad Ashraful; Raguse, John; Garris, Rebekah; Deline, Chris; Silverman, Timothy

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, we develop a physics-based compact model for copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) heterojunction solar cells that attributes the failure of superposition to voltage-dependent carrier collection in the absorber layer, and interprets light-enhanced reverse breakdown as a consequence of tunneling-assisted Poole-Frenkel conduction. The temperature dependence of the model is validated against both simulation and experimental data for the entire range of bias conditions. The model can be used to characterize device parameters, optimize new designs, and most importantly, predict performance and reliability of solar panels including the effects of self-heating and reverse breakdown due to partial-shading degradation.

  10. 13.4% efficient thin-film CdS/CdTe solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, T. L.; Chu, S. S.; Ferekides, C.; Wu, C. Q.; Britt, J.; Wang, C.

    1991-12-01

    Cadmium telluride is a promising thin-film photovoltaic material as shown by the more than 10% efficient CdS/CdTe heterojunction solar cells. In this work, thin-film CdS/CdTe solar cells have been prepared using CdS films grown from an aqueous solution and p-CdTe films deposited by close-spaced sublimation (CSS). The properties of CdS films deposited from an ammonical solution of a Cd-salt, an ammonium salt, and thiourea have been controlled by optimizing the temperature and composition of the solution. The solution-grown CdS films have a high photoconductivity ratio, and its optical transmission is superior to that of vacuum evaporated CdS films. The properties of p-CdTe films deposited by CSS have been optimized by controlling the temperature and composition of the source material, and the substrate temperature. The properties of CdS/CdTe heterojunctions have been studied; junction photovoltage spectroscopy is used for the qualitative comparison of junction characteristics. Solar cells of 1-cm2 area with an AM 1.5 efficiency of 13.4% are reported.

  11. 13. 4% efficient thin-film CdS/CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.L.; Chu, S.S.; Ferekides, C.; Wu, C.Q.; Britt, J.; Wang, C. (Department of Electrical Engineering, University of South Florida, Tampa, Florida (USA))

    1991-12-15

    Cadmium telluride is a promising thin-film photovoltaic material as shown by the more than 10% efficient CdS/CdTe heterojunction solar cells. In this work, thin-film CdS/CdTe solar cells have been prepared using CdS films grown from an aqueous solution and {ital p}-CdTe films deposited by close-spaced sublimation (CSS). The properties of CdS films deposited from an ammonical solution of a Cd-salt, an ammonium salt, and thiourea have been controlled by optimizing the temperature and composition of the solution. The solution-grown CdS films have a high photoconductivity ratio, and its optical transmission is superior to that of vacuum evaporated CdS films. The properties of {ital p}-CdTe films deposited by CSS have been optimized by controlling the temperature and composition of the source material, and the substrate temperature. The properties of CdS/CdTe heterojunctions have been studied; junction photovoltage spectroscopy is used for the qualitative comparison of junction characteristics. Solar cells of 1-cm{sup 2} area with an AM 1.5 efficiency of 13.4% are reported.

  12. Characterization of CdS Thin-Film in High Efficient CdS/CdTe Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Miwa; Aramoto, Tetsuya; Ohyama, Hideaki; Hibino, Takeshi; Omura, Kuniyoshi

    2000-07-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin films are the most commonly used window materials for high efficient cadmium telluride (CdTe) and chalcopyrite polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaic devices. High efficient CdS/CdTe solar cells with thin CdS films have been developed using ultrathin CdS films with a thickness of less than 0.1 μm. CdS films were deposited on transparent conductive oxide (TCO)/glass substrates by the metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique. CdTe films were subsequently deposited by the close-spaced sublimation (CSS) technique. The screen printing and sintering method fabricated carbon and silver electrodes. Cell performance depends primarily on the electrical and optical properties of CdS films. Therefore we started to develop higher-quality CdS films and found clear differences between high- and low-quality CdS films from the analyses of scanning electron microscope (SEM), atomic force microscope (AFM), secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), thermal desorption spectrometry (TDS) and Fourier transforms-infrared spectrometry (FT-IR) measurements. As a result of controlling the quality of CdS films, a photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 10.5% has been achieved for size of 1376 cm2 of the solar cells under the Air Mass (AM) 1.5 conditions of the Japan Quality Assurance Organization.

  13. Historic Developments, Current Technologies and Potential of Nanotechnology to Develop Next Generation Solar Cells with Improved Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisith Raval

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Sun is the continuous source of renewable energy, from where we can get abundant of solar energy. Concept of conversionof solar energy into heat was used back in 200 B.C. since then, the solar cells have been developed which can convert solar energy into theelectrical energy and these systems have been produced commercially. The technologies to enhance the power conversion efficiency (PCEhave been continuously improved. Different technologies used for developing solar cells can be categorized either on the basis of materialused or techniques of technology development which is further termed as ‘first generation’ (e.g. crystalline silicon, ‘second generation’(thin films of Amorphous silicon, Copper indium gallium selenide, Cadmium telluride, ‘Third generation’ (Concentrated, Organic and Dyesensitize solar cell. These technologies give PCE up to 25% depending on the technology and the materials used. Nanotechnology enablesthe use of nanomaterial whose size is below 100 nm with extraordinary properties which has the capability to enhance the PCE to greaterextent. Various nanomaterials like Quantum Dots, Quantum well, carbon nanotubes, Nanowire and graphene have been used to makeefficient and economical solar cells, which not only provide high conversion efficiency economically but also are easy to produce. Today,by using nanotechnology, conversion efficiency up to 44.7 % has been achieved by Fraunhofer Institute at Germany. In this review article,we have reviewed the literature including various patents and publications, summarized the history of solar cell development, developmentof different technologies and rationale of their development highlighting the advantages and challenges involved in their development forcommercial purpose. We have also included the recent developments in solar cell research where different nanomaterials have beendesigned and used successfully to prove their superiority over conventional systems.

  14. Studies on focal alveolar bone healing with technetium (Tc)-99m labeled methylene diphosphonate and gold-collimated cadmium telluride probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchimochi, M.; Hosain, F.; Engelke, W.; Zeichner, S.J.; Ruttimann, U.E.; Webber, R.L. (National Institute of Dental Research, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1991-01-01

    The benefit of using a collimator for a miniaturized cadmium telluride probe was evaluated by monitoring the bone-healing processes for 13 weeks after the induction of small iatrogenic alveolar bone lesions in one side of the mandible in beagles. Technetium (Tc)-99m labeled methylene diphosphonate (200 to 300 MBq, 5.1 to 8.1 mCi, in a solution of 0.5 to 1 ml, intravenously) was used as a bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical. The radioactivity over the bone lesion (L) and the contralateral normal site (C) in the mandible were measured between 1.5 and 2 hours after injection of the tracer, and the activity ratio L/C served as an index of relative bone uptake. A study of six dogs revealed that the healing response to a hemispheric bone defect of 2 mm diameter in the cortical bone could not be detected by an uncollimated probe, and in a repeated study in two dogs the use of a gold collimator (5 mm in diameter, 5 mm in length) did not increase the L/C ratio significantly. A second study in six dogs with 5 mm lesions showed that although systematic trends in the time courses of the L/C ratio obtained both with and without the collimator could be demonstrated, the L/C ratio of collimated versus uncollimated measurements was significantly (p less than 0.005) increased. In three of the latter six dogs, abscesses developed after 9 weeks, leading to a second increase (p less than 0.05) of the L/C ratio with collimation compared with the noninflammation group; without collimation no significant (p greater than 0.15) difference between the two groups could be demonstrated.

  15. Characterization of CdS thin film in high efficient CdS/CdTe solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Miwa; Aramoto, Tetsuya; Ohyama, Hideaki; Hibino, Takeshi; Omura, Kuniyoshi

    2000-06-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) thin film is the most commonly used window material for high-efficient cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin-film photovoltaic devices. High-efficient CdS/CdTe solar cells have been developed using ultra-thin CdS films having a thickness of below 0.1 μm. CdS film is deposited on transparent conductive oxide (TCO) film coated glass substrates by the metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, CdTe film is subsequently deposited by the close-spaced sublimation (CSS) technique. Finally, carbon and Ag-In electrodes are fabricated by the screen printing and sintering method. Cell performance depends primarily on the electrical and optical properties of CdS film, and hence we started to develop higher quality CdS film and found out clear differences between high- and low-quality CdS films from various analyses: SEM, AFM, SIMS, TDS and FT-IR. As a result of controlling qualities of CdS films, photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 10.5% has been achieved for a size of 1376 cm 2 of the solar module under air mass (AM) 1.5 conditions by the Japan Quality Assurance Organization (JQA).

  16. The performance of a combined solar photovoltaic (PV) and thermoelectric generator (TEG) system

    CERN Document Server

    Bjørk, R

    2015-01-01

    The performance of a combined solar photovoltaic (PV) and thermoelectric generator (TEG) system is examined using an analytical model for four different types of commercial PVs and a commercial bismuth telluride TEG. The TEG is applied directly on the back of the PV, so that the two devices have the same temperature. The PVs considered are crystalline Si (c-Si), amorphous Si (a-Si), copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) cells. The degradation of PV performance with temperature is shown to dominate the increase in power produced by the TEG, due to the low efficiency of the TEG. For c-Si, CIGS and CdTe PV cells the combined system produces a lower power and has a lower efficiency than the PV alone, whereas for an a-Si cell the total system performance may be slightly increased by the TEG.

  17. The performance of a combined solar photovoltaic (PV) and thermoelectric generator (TEG) system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein

    2015-01-01

    The performance of a combined solar photovoltaic (PV) and thermoelectric generator (TEG) system is examined using an analytical model for four different types of commercial PVs and a commercial bismuth telluride TEG. The TEG is applied directly on the back of the PV, so that the two devices have ...... efficiency of the TEG. For c-Si, CIGS and CdTe PV cells the combined system produces a lower power and has a lower efficiency than the PV alone, whereas for an a-Si cell the total system performance may be slightly increased by the TEG....... the same temperature. The PVs considered are crystalline Si (c-Si), amorphous Si (a-Si), copper indium gallium (di) selenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) cells. The degradation of PV performance with temperature is shown to dominate the increase in power produced by the TEG, due to the low...

  18. Rapid Deposition Technology Holds the Key for the World's Largest Manufacturer of Thin-Film Solar Modules (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-08-01

    First Solar, Inc. has been collaborating with NREL since 1991, advancing its thin-film cadmium telluride solar technology to grow from a startup company to become one of the world's largest manufacturers of solar modules, and the world's largest manufacturer of thin-film solar modules.

  19. Effect of Annealing On Thin Film Fabrication of Cadmium Zinc Telluride by Single-R.F. Magnetron Sputtering Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Monisha Chakraborty A,

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, formation of Cd1-xZnxTe thin films under various annealing-environments, created by layer by layer deposition of individual CdTe and ZnTe targets from a Single-R.F. Magnetron Sputtering unit is investigated. Structural and optical characterization results show that Vacuum Annealing is the best suitable for the formation of better Cd1-xZnxTe XRD peaks of higher intensities in comparison to Argon or Nitrogen-Annealing, for a bi-layered deposited CdTe and ZnTe film on glass substrate. The crystallography of the Cd1-xZnxTe films formed appeared to be either Cubic or Rhombohedral type. Also, it has been noticed, that the more inert the annealing-environment is, the lesser is the heat loss by the film-substrate and this results in better fusing of the deposited particles to move more from the poly-crystalline to the mono-crystalline structure. Also higher inert environment causes more Cadmium evaporation and this consequently drives the lattice-constant and the band-gap energy of the formed Cd1-xZnxTe thin film to move from the CdTe side to the ZnTe side. The method developed here with proper annealing ambiance for Cd1-xZnxTe fabrication can be implemented in laboratories lacking in Co-Sputtering machine.

  20. Characterization of nanocrystalline cadmium telluride thin films grown by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A U Ubale; R J Dhokne; P S Chikhlikar; V S Sangawar; D K Kulkarni

    2006-04-01

    Structural, electrical and optical characteristics of CdTe thin films prepared by a chemical deposition method, successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR), are described. For deposition of CdTe thin films, cadmium acetate was used as cationic and sodium tellurite as anionic precursor in aqueous medium. In this process hydrazine hydrate is used as reducing agent and NH4OH as the catalytic for the decomposition of hydrazine. By conducting several trials optimization of the adsorption, reaction and rinsing time duration for CdTe thin film deposition was done. In this paper the structural, optical and electrical properties of CdTe film are reported. The XRD pattern shows that films are nanocrystalline in nature. The resistivity is found to be of the order of 4.11 × 103 -cm at 523 K temperature with an activation energy of ∼ 0.2 eV. The optical absorption studies show that films have direct band gap (1.41 eV).

  1. Time-dependent toxicity of cadmium telluride quantum dots on liver and kidneys in mice: histopathological changes with elevated free cadmium ions and hydroxyl radicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang M

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mengmeng Wang,1,2,* Jilong Wang,1,2,* Hubo Sun,1,2 Sihai Han,3 Shuai Feng,1 Lu Shi,1 Peijun Meng,1,2 Jiayi Li,1,2 Peili Huang,1,2 Zhiwei Sun1,2 1Department of Toxicology and Sanitary Chemistry, School of Public Health, Capital Medical University, 2Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Capital Medical University, Beijing, 3College of Food and Bioengineering, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: A complete understanding of the toxicological behavior of quantum dots (QDs in vivo is of great importance and a prerequisite for their application in humans. In contrast with the numerous cytotoxicity studies investigating QDs, only a few in vivo studies of QDs have been reported, and the issue remains controversial. Our study aimed to understand QD-mediated toxicity across different time points and to explore the roles of free cadmium ions (Cd2+ and hydroxyl radicals (·OH in tissue damage. Male ICR mice were administered a single intravenous dose (1.5 µmol/kg of CdTe QDs, and liver and kidney function and morphology were subsequently examined at 1, 7, 14, and 28 days. Furthermore, ·OH production in the tissue was quantified by trapping ·OH with salicylic acid (SA as 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA and detecting it using a high-performance liquid chromatography fluorescence method. We used the induction of tissue metallothionein levels and 2,3-DHBA:SA ratios as markers for elevated Cd2+ from the degradation of QDs and ·OH generation in the tissue, respectively. Our experimental results revealed that the QD-induced histopathological changes were time-dependent with elevated Cd2+ and ·OH, and could recover after a period of time. The Cd2+ and ·OH exhibited delayed effects in terms of histopathological abnormalities. Histological assessments performed at multiple time points might facilitate the evaluation of the biological safety of

  2. Management of light absorption in extraordinary optical transmission based ultra-thin-film tandem solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mashooq, Kishwar; Talukder, Muhammad Anisuzzaman

    2016-05-01

    polygon, total absorption remains approximately the same. However, the total absorption suffers significantly if the holes are triangle. The transmission spectra of incident light into the bottom subcell, and hence the absorption, change significantly for square and circle holes if the active materials change to cadmium selenide (CdSe) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) in the top and bottom subcells, respectively. Although the intermediate metal layer may induce electron-hole pair recombination due to surface defects, the short-circuit current density of an ultra-thin plasmonic solar cell with an intermediate metal layer with two-dimensional hole array is >9% of that of a structure without the intermediate metal layer.

  3. In situ synthesis of binary cobalt-ruthenium nanofiber alloy counter electrode for electrolyte-free cadmium sulfide quantum dot solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Nan; Ren, Lei; Sun, Weifu; Jin, Xiao; Zhao, Qing; Cheng, Yuanyuan; Wei, Taihuei; Li, Qinghua

    2015-06-01

    A facile, low-cost and low-temperature fabrication approach of counter electrode is essential for pursuing robust photovoltaic devices. Herein, we develop a hydrothermal in situ growth of Cobalt-Ruthenium (Co-Ru) alloy nanofiber electrode for quantum dot solar cell (QDSC) applications. Colloidal CdS QDs with tunable absorption band edge are synthesized and used as light absorber. After optimizing the QDs with the highest photoluminescence quantum yield accompanied by considerable solar light absorption ability, QDSC based on Co-Ru alloy electrode delivers a much higher power conversion efficiency than its counterparts, i.e., either pure Co or Ru metal electrodes. In detail, Co-Ru alloy electrode exhibits high specific area, excellent electrical behavior, intimate interface contact, and good stability, thus leading to notable improved device performances. The impressive robust function of Co-Ru alloy with simple manufacturing procedure highlights its potential applications in robust QDSCs.

  4. Effects of nanoassembly on the optoelectronic properties of cadmium telluride - zinc oxide nanocomposite thin films for use in photovoltaic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beal, Russell Joseph

    Quantum-scale semiconductors embedded in an electrically-active matrix have the potential to improve photovoltaic (PV) device power conversion efficiencies by allowing the solar spectral absorption and photocarrier transport properties to be tuned through the control of short and long range structure. In the present work, the effects of phase assembly on quantum confinement effects and carrier transport were investigated in CdTe - ZnO nanocomposite thin films for use as a spectrally sensitized n-type heterojunction element. The nanocomposites were deposited via a dual-source, sequential radio-frequency (RF) sputter technique that offers the unique opportunity for in-situ control of the CdTe phase spatial distribution within the ZnO matrix. The manipulation of the spatial distribution of the CdTe nanophase allowed for variation in the electromagnetic coupling interactions between semiconductor domains and accompanying changes in the effective carrier confinement volume and associated spectral absorption properties. Deposition conditions favoring CdTe connectivity had a red shift in absorption energy onset in comparison to phase assemblies with a more isolated CdTe phase. While manipulating the absorption properties is of significant interest, the electronic behavior of the nanocomposite must also be considered. The continuity of both the matrix and the CdTe influenced the mobility pathways for carriers generated within their respective phases. Photoconductivity of the nanocomposite, dependent upon the combined influences of nanostructure-mediated optical absorption and carrier transport path, increased with an increased semiconductor nanoparticle number density along the applied field direction. Mobility of the carriers in the nanocomposite was further mediated by the interface between the ZnO and CdTe nanophases which acts as a source of carrier scattering centers. These effects were influenced by low temperature annealing of the nanocomposite which served to

  5. Polycrystalline CuInSe{sub 2} and CdTe solar cells. Annual subcontract report, April 15, 1992--April 14, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhere, N.G. [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cape Canaveral, FL (United States)

    1994-08-01

    The principal objective of the research project is to develop processes for the fabrication of cadmium-telluride, CdTe, and copper-indium-gallium-diselenide, Cu(In{sub 1{minus}x}Ga{sub x})Se{sub 2}, polycrystalline-thin-film solar cells using techniques that can be scaled-up for economic manufacture on a large scale. The aims are to fabricate CdTe solar cells using Cd and Te layers sputtered from elemental targets; to promote the interdiffusion between Cd/Te layers, CdTe phase formation, and grain growth; to utilize non-toxic selenization so as to avoid the use of extremely toxic H{sub 2}Se in the fabrication of Cu(In{sub l{minus}x}Ga{sub x})Se{sub 2} thin-film solar cells; to optimize selenization parameters; to improve adhesion; to minimize residual stresses; to improve the uniformity, stoichiometry, and morphology of CdTe and Cu(In{sub 1{minus}x}Ga{sub x})Se{sub 2} thin films, and the efficiency of CdTe and Cu(In{sub 1{minus}x}Ga{sub x})Se{sub 2} solar cells.

  6. Effect of zinc addition on properties of cadmium sulfide layer and performance of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cd(1−x)ZnxS (CdS:Zn) thin films were grown on an indium tin oxide-coated glass substrate and Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) surface by chemical bath deposition for solar cell applications, and their composition, and optical properties were studied to decide the optimum process conditions for buffer layer growth. The average conversion efficiency of CIGS solar panels (24-in.) with the CdS:Zn layer was 0.35% higher than that of conventional solar panels mainly because of the increased open-circuit voltage. This efficiency improvement was not due to modification of the optical properties of the buffer layer, but due to the change in the deposition rate during buffer layer growth. - Highlights: ► CdS:Zn buffer layers were fabricated for Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) photovoltaic (PV) panels. ► Composition of buffer layers on indium–tin–oxide (ITO) and CIGS was investigated. ► Transmittance of CdS:Zn on ITO coated glass showed 5% higher than CdS. ► Efficiency of CdS:Zn solution adopted panels showed 0.47% higher than that with CdS. ► However, it was revealed that only Cd and S ions were found at the surface of CIGS

  7. Fabrication of CdS/CdTe-Based Thin Film Solar Cells Using an Electrochemical Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Dharmadasa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Thin film solar cells based on cadmium telluride (CdTe are complex devices which have great potential for achieving high conversion efficiencies. Lack of understanding in materials issues and device physics slows down the rapid progress of these devices. This paper combines relevant results from the literature with new results from a research programme based on electro-plated CdS and CdTe. A wide range of analytical techniques was used to investigate the materials and device structures. It has been experimentally found that n-, i- and p-type CdTe can be grown easily by electroplating. These material layers consist of nano- and micro-rod type or columnar type grains, growing normal to the substrate. Stoichiometric materials exhibit the highest crystallinity and resistivity, and layers grown closer to these conditions show n → p or p → n conversion upon heat treatment. The general trend of CdCl2 treatment is to gradually change the CdTe material’s n-type electrical property towards i-type or p-type conduction. This work also identifies a rapid structural transition of CdTe layer at 385 ± 5 °C and a slow structural transition at higher temperatures when annealed or grown at high temperature. The second transition occurs after 430 °C and requires more work to understand this gradual transition. This work also identifies the existence of two different solar cell configurations for CdS/CdTe which creates a complex situation. Finally, the paper presents the way forward with next generation CdTe-based solar cells utilising low-cost materials in their columnar nature in graded bandgap structures. These devices could absorb UV, visible and IR radiation from the solar spectrum and combine impact ionisation and impurity photovoltaic (PV effect as well as making use of IR photons from the surroundings when fully optimised.

  8. Cadmium uptake by rat red blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rat red blood cells were employed to study the uptake of cadmium (109Cd). Suspensions of red blood cells were exposed to Cd concentrations (both bound and free) observed following in vivo Cd administration. Cd uptake was biphasic with an initial rapid phase (0C was one-fourth of that at 370C. The metabolic inhibitors: sodium fluoride (1mM), potassium cyanide (1mM) and carbonyl cyanide-m-chlorophenyl hydrazone (2μM) and the Na+-K+-ATPase inhibitor, ouabain (1mM) did not reduce Cd (50μM) uptake into red blood cells. This suggests that the uptake of Cd into red blood cells was not an active process. Incubation of Cd (10μM) with an equimolar concentration of Zn did not alter uptake of Cd into red blood cells, but at 5 and 10 times higher concentrations of Zn, Cd uptake was enhanced 5-fold. Mercury at one-tenth and equimolar concentrations of Cd increased Cd uptake by red blood cells 2-fold. N-Ethylmaleimide (0.5-5mM), which irreversibly inactivates membrane sulfhydryl groups, decreased Cd uptake. The data indicate that Cd uptake into rat red blood cells occurs by passive transport and that alterations of sulfhydryls of red blood cell membrane may modulate the process. (author)

  9. Nanostructured Organic Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radziwon, Michal Jędrzej; Rubahn, Horst-Günter; Madsen, Morten

    Recent forecasts for alternative energy generation predict emerging importance of supporting state of art photovoltaic solar cells with their organic equivalents. Despite their significantly lower efficiency, number of application niches are suitable for organic solar cells. This work reveals...... the principles of bulk heterojunction organic solar cells fabrication as well as summarises major differences in physics of their operation....

  10. PEROVSKITE SOLAR CELLS (REVIEW ARTICLE)

    OpenAIRE

    Benli, Deniz Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    A solar cell is a device that converts sunlight into electricity. There are different types of solar cells but this report mainly focuses on a type of new generation solar cell that has the name organo-metal halide perovskite, shortly perovskite solar cells. In this respect, the efficiency of power conversion is taken into account to replace the dominancy of traditional and second generation solar cell fields by perovskite solar cells. Perovskite solar cell is a type of solar cell including a...

  11. Chalcogenide photovoltaic solar cells of special interest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Champness, C.H. (McGill Univ., Montreal, Quebec (Canada))

    1988-08-01

    A brief review is given of those semiconducting selenides and tellurides that appear suitable for the absorber layer of a photovoltaic solar cell, with energy gaps in the range 1 to 2 eV. Furthermore, to obtain a lower cost cell, the semiconductor is also required to be used in the form of a thin polycrystalline film, necessitating a high optical absorption coefficient in the material. At the present time the two best chalcogenides meeting these requirements are the compounds CuInSe{sub 2} and CdTe, both of which have been used in polycrystalline thin film structures with CdS, as the window layer, yielding conversion efficiencies of over 10%. They have also demonstrated very good chemical stability.

  12. Physical vapor deposition of CdTe thin films at low temperature for solar cell applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium telluride is successfully utilized as an absorber material for thin film solar cells. Industrial production makes use of high substrate temperatures for the deposition of CdTe absorber layers. However, in order to exploit flexible substrates and to simplify the manufacturing process, lower deposition temperatures are beneficial. Based on the phase diagram of CdTe, predictions on the stoichiometry of CdTe thin films grown at low substrate temperatures are made in this work. These predictions were verified experimentally using additional sources of Cd and Te during the deposition of the CdTe thin films at different substrate temperatures. The deposited layers were analyzed with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. In case of CdTe layers which were deposited at substrate temperatures lower than 200 C without usage of additional sources we found a non-stoichiometric growth of the CdTe layers. The application of the additional sources leads to a stoichiometric growth for substrate temperatures down to 100 C which is a significant reduction of the substrate temperature during deposition.

  13. Solar cell concentrating system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study reviews fabrication techniques and testing facilities for different solar cells under concentration which have been developed and tested. It is also aimed to examine solar energy concentrators which are prospective candidates for photovoltaic concentrator systems. This may provide an impetus to the scientists working in the area of solar cell technology

  14. Photovoltaic solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Gupta, Vipin P.; Okandan, Murat; Watts, Michael R.

    2015-09-08

    A photovoltaic solar concentrator is disclosed with one or more transverse-junction solar cells (also termed point contact solar cells) and a lens located above each solar cell to concentrate sunlight onto the solar cell to generate electricity. Piezoelectric actuators tilt or translate each lens to track the sun using a feedback-control circuit which senses the electricity generated by one or more of the solar cells. The piezoelectric actuators can be coupled through a displacement-multiplier linkage to provide an increased range of movement of each lens. Each lens in the solar concentrator can be supported on a frame (also termed a tilt plate) having three legs, with the movement of the legs being controlled by the piezoelectric actuators.

  15. Numerical study of the influence of ZnTe thickness on CdS/ZnTe solar cell performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skhouni, Othmane; El Manouni, Ahmed; Mari, Bernabe; Ullah, Hanif

    2016-05-01

    At present most of II-VI semiconductor based solar cells use the CdTe material as an absorber film. The simulation of its performance is realized by means of various numerical modelling programs. We have modelled a solar cell based on zinc telluride (ZnTe) thin film as absorber in substitution to the CdTe material, which contains the cadmium element known by its toxicity. The performance of such photovoltaic device has been numerically simulated and the thickness of the absorber layer has been optimized to give the optimal conversion efficiency. A photovoltaic device consisting of a ZnTe layer as absorber, CdS as the buffer layer and ZnO as a window layer was modelled through Solar Cell Capacitance Simulator Software. Dark and illuminated I-V characteristics and the results for different output parameters of ZnO/CdS/ZnTe solar cell were analyzed. The effect of ZnTe absorber thickness on different main working parameters such as: open-circuit voltage Voc, short-circuit current density Jsc, fill factor FF, photovoltaic conversion efficiency η was intensely studied in order to optimize ZnTe film thickness. This study reveals that increasing the thickness of ZnTe absorber layer results in higher efficiency until a maximum value and then decreases slightly. This maximum was found to be 10% at ZnTe optimum thickness close to 2 µm. Contribution to the topical issue "Materials for Energy Harvesting, Conversion and Storage (ICOME 2015) - Elected submissions", edited by Jean-Michel Nunzi, Rachid Bennacer and Mohammed El Ganaoui

  16. Rectenna solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Moddel, Garret

    2013-01-01

    Rectenna Solar Cells discusses antenna-coupled diode solar cells, an emerging technology that has the potential to provide ultra-high efficiency, low-cost solar energy conversion. This book will provide an overview of solar rectennas, and provide thorough descriptions of the two main components: the diode, and the optical antenna. The editors discuss the science, design, modeling, and manufacturing of the antennas coupled with the diodes. The book will provide concepts to understanding the challenges, fabrication technologies, and materials required to develop rectenna structures. Written by e

  17. CdTe-based solar cells prepared by physical vapor deposition and close-spaced sublimation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text : In the photovoltaic material family, cadmium telluride is regarded as one of the most promising material for fabrication of high efficiency polycrystalline CdTe/CdS thin film solar cells because of its near-optimum band gap of about 1.46 eV and high optical absorption coefficient in visible range. The maximum efficiency of about 16.5 percent of the laboratory samples of polycrystalline CdTe based thin film solar cells was achieved by using nanostructured CdS:O window layer and the modified device structure. In spite of the large lattice mismatch between cubic CdTe and hexagonal CdS (nearly 9.7 percent) the CdTe/CdS solar cells are characterized by essentially high efficiencies caused by interdiffusion at the junction interface removing the lattice mismatch. To identify the structural mechanisms leading to the solar cell efficiency increase we have studied the effect of CdCl2 treatment on the output parameters of CdS/CdTe-based solar cells and crystal structure of the base layers deposited on glass substrates by different ways. In the first way both of CdS and CdTe layers were deposited by physical vapor deposition (PVD) method meanwhile in the second way the chemical bath deposition (CBD) and close-spaced sublimation (CSS) methods were used for CdS and CdTe films deposition, respectively. For the PVD structures. The average grain size of the film increases from 1 μm to 4 μm due to the lattice strain caused by macrodeformations and stacking faults. The maximum efficiency (ηA=10.3 percent) of solar cells on the basis of cadmium telluride layers deposited by PVD method corresponds to 0,35 μm CdRl2 thickness at CdCl2 treatment. CBD/CSS samples were exposed to CdCl2 vapor at 400 degrees Celsium for 5-7 min in vacuum chamber in the presence of 100 torr oxygen and 400 torr helium. As-grown CdTe films were characterized by clearly faceted surface morphology and an average grain size of about 3-4 μm. Unlike the thermally evaporated CdTe films, no

  18. 133Xenon absorption into rubber-protected portable cadmium telluride (CdTe(Cl)) detectors invalidating the 133Xenon washout method for measurement of cutaneous and subcutaneous blood flow rates in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, J L

    1991-01-01

    The importance of 133Xenon absorption into rubber detector caps during cutaneous and subcutaneous blood flow measurement was investigated in 46 experiments involving 38 persons. 133Xenon was administered atraumatically. Cutaneous and subcutaneous washout rates were registered by portable Cadmium Telluride detectors without rubber caps, with rubber caps, and with rubber caps with Mylar membranes interposed between the rubber and the tissue investigated. No difference in rate constants obtained by means of various detector types was detected. The accumulation of 133Xenon in the rubber caps was found to take place within the first few minutes after the detectors had been brought into position. The 133Xenon then diffused back into the tissue exhibiting a great variation regarding rate constants. The 133Xenon diffused form rubber into air and perfused tissue tracing a monoexponential course; and again the rate constants would vary considerably. No correlation was found between elimination rates obtained with detectors with and without 133Xenon polluted caps, and no way of correcting for the 133Xenon content in the rubber caps was found. Relative changes in rate constants could still be recognized, but absolute values were not obtainable. PMID:1789123

  19. Quantum dot solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Wu, Jiang

    2013-01-01

    The third generation of solar cells includes those based on semiconductor quantum dots. This sophisticated technology applies nanotechnology and quantum mechanics theory to enhance the performance of ordinary solar cells. Although a practical application of quantum dot solar cells has yet to be achieved, a large number of theoretical calculations and experimental studies have confirmed the potential for meeting the requirement for ultra-high conversion efficiency. In this book, high-profile scientists have contributed tutorial chapters that outline the methods used in and the results of variou

  20. Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Di Wei

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC is the only solar cell that can offer both the flexibility and transparency. Its efficiency is comparable to amorphous silicon solar cells but with a much lower cost. This review not only covers the fundamentals of DSSC but also the related cutting-edge research and its development for industrial applications. Most recent research topics on DSSC, for example, applications of nanostructured TiO2, ZnO electrodes, ionic liquid electrolytes, carbon nanotubes, graphene and solid state DSSC have all been included and discussed.

  1. Solar cell radiation handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, H. Y.; Carter, J. R., Jr.; Anspaugh, B. E.; Downing, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    The handbook to predict the degradation of solar cell electrical performance in any given space radiation environment is presented. Solar cell theory, cell manufacturing and how they are modeled mathematically are described. The interaction of energetic charged particles radiation with solar cells is discussed and the concept of 1 MeV equivalent electron fluence is introduced. The space radiation environment is described and methods of calculating equivalent fluences for the space environment are developed. A computer program was written to perform the equivalent fluence calculations and a FORTRAN listing of the program is included. Data detailing the degradation of solar cell electrical parameters as a function of 1 MeV electron fluence are presented.

  2. Induction of cytoprotective autophagy in PC-12 cells by cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qiwen [College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Jiangsu Co-innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and Zoonoses, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Bijie Pilot Area Research Institute of Bijie University, Bijie 551700 (China); Zhu, Jiaqiao; Zhang, Kangbao; Jiang, Chenyang; Wang, Yi; Yuan, Yan; Bian, Jianchun; Liu, Xuezhong; Gu, Jianhong [College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Jiangsu Co-innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and Zoonoses, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Liu, Zongping, E-mail: liuzongping@yzu.edu.cn [College of Veterinary Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225009 (China); Jiangsu Co-innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Diseases and Zoonoses, Yangzhou 225009 (China)

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •Cadmium can promote early upregulation of autophagy in PC-12 cells. •Autophagy precedes apoptosis in cadmium-treated PC-12 cells. •Cadmium-induced autophagy is cytoprotective in PC-12 cells. •Class III PI3K/beclin-1/Bcl-2 signaling pathway plays a positive role in cadmium-triggered autophagy. -- Abstract: Laboratory data have demonstrated that cadmium (Cd) may induce neuronal apoptosis. However, little is known about the role of autophagy in neurons. In this study, cell viability decreased in a dose- and time-dependent manner after treatment with Cd in PC-12 cells. As cells were exposed to Cd, the levels of LC3-II proteins became elevated, specific punctate distribution of endogenous LC3-II increased, and numerous autophagosomes appeared, which suggest that Cd induced a high level of autophagy. In the late stages of autophagy, an increase in the apoptosis ratio was observed. Likewise, pre-treatment with chloroquine (an autophagic inhibitor) and rapamycin (an autophagic inducer) resulted in an increased and decreased percentage of apoptosis in contrast to other Cd-treated groups, respectively. The results indicate that autophagy delayed apoptosis in Cd-treated PC-12 cells. Furthermore, co-treatment of cells with chloroquine reduced autophagy and cell activity. However, rapamycin had an opposite effect on autophagy and cell activity. Moreover, class III PI3 K/beclin-1/Bcl-2 signaling pathways served a function in Cd-induced autophagy. The findings suggest that Cd can induce cytoprotective autophagy by activating class III PI3 K/beclin-1/Bcl-2 signaling pathways. In sum, this study strongly suggests that autophagy may serve a positive function in the reduction of Cd-induced cytotoxicity.

  3. Photovoltaic solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, Gregory N; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Okandan, Murat; Resnick, Paul J

    2014-05-20

    A photovoltaic solar cell for generating electricity from sunlight is disclosed. The photovoltaic solar cell comprises a plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions formed in a semiconductor body to receive the sunlight and generate the electricity therefrom, the plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions having a first plurality of regions having a first doping type and a second plurality of regions having a second doping type. In addition, the photovoltaic solar cell comprises a first electrical contact electrically connected to each of the first plurality of regions and a second electrical contact electrically connected to each of the second plurality of regions, as well as a passivation layer covering major surfaces and sidewalls of the photovoltaic solar cell.

  4. Photovoltaic solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, Gregory N; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J

    2013-11-26

    A photovoltaic solar cell for generating electricity from sunlight is disclosed. The photovoltaic solar cell comprises a plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions formed in a semiconductor body to receive the sunlight and generate the electicity therefrom, the plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions having a first plurality of regions having a first doping type and a second plurality of regions having a second doping type. In addition, the photovoltaic solar cell comprises a first electrical contact electrically connected to each of the first plurality of regions and a second electrical contact electrically connected to each of the second plurality of regions, as well as a passivation layer covering major surfaces and sidewalls of the photovoltaic solar cell.

  5. Nanocrystal Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gur, Ilan

    2006-12-15

    This dissertation presents the results of a research agenda aimed at improving integration and stability in nanocrystal-based solar cells through advances in active materials and device architectures. The introduction of 3-dimensional nanocrystals illustrates the potential for improving transport and percolation in hybrid solar cells and enables novel fabrication methods for optimizing integration in these systems. Fabricating cells by sequential deposition allows for solution-based assembly of hybrid composites with controlled and well-characterized dispersion and electrode contact. Hyperbranched nanocrystals emerge as a nearly ideal building block for hybrid cells, allowing the controlled morphologies targeted by templated approaches to be achieved in an easily fabricated solution-cast device. In addition to offering practical benefits to device processing, these approaches offer fundamental insight into the operation of hybrid solar cells, shedding light on key phenomena such as the roles of electrode-contact and percolation behavior in these cells. Finally, all-inorganic nanocrystal solar cells are presented as a wholly new cell concept, illustrating that donor-acceptor charge transfer and directed carrier diffusion can be utilized in a system with no organic components, and that nanocrystals may act as building blocks for efficient, stable, and low-cost thin-film solar cells.

  6. Welded solar cell interconnection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stofel, E. J.; Browne, E. R.; Meese, R. A.; Vendura, G. J.

    1982-01-01

    The efficiency of the welding of solar-cell interconnects is compared with the efficiency of soldering such interconnects, and the cases in which welding may be superior are examined. Emphasis is placed on ultrasonic welding; attention is given to the solar-cell welding machine, the application of the welding process to different solar-cell configurations, producibility, and long-life performance of welded interconnects. Much of the present work has been directed toward providing increased confidence in the reliability of welding using conditions approximating those that would occur with large-scale array production. It is concluded that there is as yet insufficient data to determine which of three methods (soldering, parallel gap welding, and ultrasonic welding) provides the longest-duration solar panel life.

  7. Chronic cadmium exposure in vitro induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Person, Rachel J.; Tokar, Erik J.; Xu, Yuanyuan; Orihuela, Ruben; Ngalame, Ntube N. Olive; Waalkes, Michael P., E-mail: waalkes@niehs.nih.gov

    2013-12-01

    Cadmium is a known human lung carcinogen. Here, we attempt to develop an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung carcinogenesis by chronically exposing the peripheral lung epithelia cell line, HPL-1D, to a low level of cadmium. Cells were chronically exposed to 5 μM cadmium, a noncytotoxic level, and monitored for acquired cancer characteristics. By 20 weeks of continuous cadmium exposure, these chronic cadmium treated lung (CCT-LC) cells showed marked increases in secreted MMP-2 activity (3.5-fold), invasion (3.4-fold), and colony formation in soft agar (2-fold). CCT-LC cells were hyperproliferative, grew well in serum-free media, and overexpressed cyclin D1. The CCT-LC cells also showed decreased expression of the tumor suppressor genes p16 and SLC38A3 at the protein levels. Also consistent with an acquired cancer cell phenotype, CCT-LC cells showed increased expression of the oncoproteins K-RAS and N-RAS as well as the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition marker protein Vimentin. Metallothionein (MT) expression is increased by cadmium, and is typically overexpressed in human lung cancers. The major MT isoforms, MT-1A and MT-2A were elevated in CCT-LC cells. Oxidant adaptive response genes HO-1 and HIF-1A were also activated in CCT-LC cells. Expression of the metal transport genes ZNT-1, ZNT-5, and ZIP-8 increased in CCT-LC cells culminating in reduced cadmium accumulation, suggesting adaptation to the metal. Overall, these data suggest that exposure of human lung epithelial cells to cadmium causes acquisition of cancer cell characteristics. Furthermore, transformation occurs despite the cell's ability to adapt to chronic cadmium exposure. - Highlights: • Chronic cadmium exposure induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells. • This provides an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung cell transformation. • This occurred with general and lung specific changes typical for cancer cells. • These findings add insight to the

  8. Chronic cadmium exposure in vitro induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium is a known human lung carcinogen. Here, we attempt to develop an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung carcinogenesis by chronically exposing the peripheral lung epithelia cell line, HPL-1D, to a low level of cadmium. Cells were chronically exposed to 5 μM cadmium, a noncytotoxic level, and monitored for acquired cancer characteristics. By 20 weeks of continuous cadmium exposure, these chronic cadmium treated lung (CCT-LC) cells showed marked increases in secreted MMP-2 activity (3.5-fold), invasion (3.4-fold), and colony formation in soft agar (2-fold). CCT-LC cells were hyperproliferative, grew well in serum-free media, and overexpressed cyclin D1. The CCT-LC cells also showed decreased expression of the tumor suppressor genes p16 and SLC38A3 at the protein levels. Also consistent with an acquired cancer cell phenotype, CCT-LC cells showed increased expression of the oncoproteins K-RAS and N-RAS as well as the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition marker protein Vimentin. Metallothionein (MT) expression is increased by cadmium, and is typically overexpressed in human lung cancers. The major MT isoforms, MT-1A and MT-2A were elevated in CCT-LC cells. Oxidant adaptive response genes HO-1 and HIF-1A were also activated in CCT-LC cells. Expression of the metal transport genes ZNT-1, ZNT-5, and ZIP-8 increased in CCT-LC cells culminating in reduced cadmium accumulation, suggesting adaptation to the metal. Overall, these data suggest that exposure of human lung epithelial cells to cadmium causes acquisition of cancer cell characteristics. Furthermore, transformation occurs despite the cell's ability to adapt to chronic cadmium exposure. - Highlights: • Chronic cadmium exposure induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells. • This provides an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung cell transformation. • This occurred with general and lung specific changes typical for cancer cells. • These findings add insight to the relationship

  9. Separator Qualification for Aerospace Nickel-cadmium Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milden, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    The development plans for a new separator for nickel cadmium (NiCd) cells is described. Research includes acceptance testing, operation in a charge/discharge characterization matrix, and life testing in low earth orbit (LEO) and geosynchronous (GEO) orbit under real time and accelerated conditions.

  10. Demonstration of enhanced iodine K-edge imaging using an energy-dispersive X-ray computed tomography system with a 25 mm/s-scan linear cadmium telluride detector and a single comparator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Eiichi, E-mail: dresato@iwate-med.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Iwate Medical University, 2-1-1 Nishitokuta, Yahaba, Iwate 028-3694 (Japan); Oda, Yasuyuki [Department of Physics, Iwate Medical University, 2-1-1 Nishitokuta, Yahaba, Iwate 028-3694 (Japan); Abudurexiti, Abulajiang [Faculty of Software and Information Science, Iwate Prefectural University, 152-52 Sugo, Takizawa, Iwate 020-0193 (Japan); Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Osawa, Akihiro; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya [3rd Department of Surgery, Toho University School of Medicine, 2-17-6 Ohashi, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8515 (Japan); Sato, Shigehiro [Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Iwate Medical University, 19-1 Uchimaru, Morioka, Iwate 020-0023 (Japan); Ogawa, Akira [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Iwate Medical University, 19-1 Uchimaru, Morioka, Iwate 020-0023 (Japan); Onagawa, Jun [Department of Electronics, Faculty of Engineering, Tohoku Gakuin University, 1-13-1 Chuo, Tagajo, Miyagi 985-8537 (Japan)

    2012-05-15

    An energy-dispersive (ED) X-ray computed tomography (CT) system is useful for carrying out monochromatic imaging. To perform enhanced iodine K-edge CT, we developed an oscillation linear cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with a scan velocity of 25 mm/s and an energy resolution of 1.2 keV. CT is performed by repeated linear scans and rotations of an object. Penetrating X-ray photons from the object are detected by the CdTe detector, and event signals of X-ray photons are produced using charge-sensitive and shaping amplifiers. The lower photon energy is determined by a comparator device, and the maximum photon energy of 60 keV corresponds to the tube voltage. Rectangular-shaped comparator outputs are counted by a counter card. In the ED-CT, tube voltage and current were 60 kV and 0.30 mA, respectively, and X-ray intensity was 14.8 {mu}Gy/s at 1.0 m from the source at a tube voltage of 60 kV. Demonstration of enhanced iodine K-edge X-ray CT for cancer diagnosis was carried out by selecting photons with energies ranging from 34 to 60 keV. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We developed an energy-dispersive X-ray CT system with a 25 mm/s-scan CdTe detector. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CT is performed by repeated linear scans and rotations of an object. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lower photon energy is determined by a comparator device. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spatial resolutions were 0.5 Multiplication-Sign 0.5 mm{sup 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Iodine K-edge CT was carried out by selecting photons from 34 to 60 keV.

  11. Parameterization of solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, J.; Chait, A.; Thompson, D.

    1992-10-01

    The aggregation (sorting) of the individual solar cells into an array is commonly based on a single operating point on the current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curve. An alternative approach for cell performance prediction and cell screening is provided by modeling the cell using an equivalent electrical circuit, in which the parameters involved are related to the physical phenomena in the device. These analytical models may be represented by a double exponential I-V characteristic with seven parameters, by a double exponential model with five parameters, or by a single exponential equation with four or five parameters. In this article we address issues concerning methodologies for the determination of solar cell parameters based on measured data points of the I-V characteristic, and introduce a procedure for screening of solar cells for arrays. We show that common curve fitting techniques, e.g., least squares, may produce many combinations of parameter values while maintaining a good fit between the fitted and measured I-V characteristics of the cell. Therefore, techniques relying on curve fitting criteria alone cannot be directly used for cell parameterization. We propose a consistent procedure which takes into account the entire set of parameter values for a batch of cells. This procedure is based on a definition of a mean cell representing the batch, and takes into account the relative contribution of each parameter to the overall goodness of fit. The procedure is demonstrated on a batch of 50 silicon cells for Space Station Freedom.

  12. Bis(3-methyl-2-pyridyl)ditelluride and pyridyl tellurolate complexes of zinc, cadmium, mercury: Synthesis, characterization and their conversion to metal telluride nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedarnath, G; Jain, Vimal K; Wadawale, Amey; Dey, Gautam K

    2009-10-21

    Treatment of an acetonitrile solution of metal chloride with bis(3-methyl-2-pyridyl)ditelluride, [Te(2)(pyMe)(2)], in the same solvent yielded complexes of composition [MCl(2){Te(2)(pyMe)(2)}] (M = Zn or Cd) whereas reactions of [MCl(2)(tmeda)] with NaTepyR (R = H or Me) gave tellurolate complexes of the general formula [M(TepyR)(2)] (M = Cd or Hg). When the cadmium complex [Cd(Tepy)(2)] was crystallized in the presence of excess tmeda, [Cd(Tepy)(2)(tmeda)] was formed exclusively. These complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, uv-vis, (1)H NMR data. The crystal structures of [ZnCl(2){Te(2)(pyMe)(2)}] and [Cd(Tepy)(2)(tmeda)] were established by single crystal X-ray diffraction. In the former zinc is coordinated to nitrogen atoms of the pyridyl group, while in the latter the coordination environment around tetrahedral cadmium is defined by the two neutral nitrogen atoms of tmeda, and two pyridyl tellurolate ligands. Thermal behavior of some of these complexes was studied by thermogravimetric analysis. Pyrolysis of [M(Tepy)(2)] in a furnace or in coordinating solvents such as hexadecylamine/tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (HDA/TOPO) at 350 and 160 degrees C, respectively gave MTe nanoparticles, which were characterized by uv-vis, photoluminiscence, XRD, EDAX and TEM.

  13. Solar cell element

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakano, Akihiko; Matsumoto, Hitoshi; Uda, Hiroshi; Komatsu, Yasumitsu; Ikegami, Kiyoharu.

    1989-05-18

    In the existing CdS/CdTe-based solar cell element, nothing is formed except the component effective for generating electromotive force and the components necessary for leading, collecting and extracting the generated electricity, hence even when the element shows deterioration of its performance during its usage, it has been difficult to analyze the above situation. In addition, it has also a defect that its characteristic such as the transfer efficiency in the neighborhood of its glass substrate in connection also with its manufacturing process. In order to solve the above problematical points, this invention proposes, with regard to a CdS-based solar cell element composed by forming a thin film on its substrate, to make a blank space on the above substrate and form thereon a thin film which composes the solar cell element concerned alone or in a piling up manner. 4 figs.

  14. Capacity fade in nickel cadmium and nickel hydrogen cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Tim; Hayden, Jeff; Pickett, David F.; Abrams-Blakemore, Bruce; Liptak, ED

    1993-01-01

    Research and operational experience with capacity fade in nickel cadmium and nickel hydrogen cells are summarized in outline form. The theoretical causes of capacity fade are reviewed and the role of cell storage, positive electrodes, and cobalt additives are addressed. Three examples of observed capacity fade are discussed: INTELSAT 5, INTELSAT 6, and an Explorer platform. Finally, prevention and recovery methods are addressed and the current status of Eagle Picher/Hughes research is discussed.

  15. Optoelectronics of solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Smestad, Greg P

    2002-01-01

    With concerns about worldwide environmental security, global warming, and climate change due to emissions of carbon dioxide from the burning of fossil fuels, it is desirable to have a wide range of energy technologies in a nation's portfolio. Photovoltaics, or solar cells, are a viable option as a nonpolluting renewable energy source. This text is designed to be an overview of photovoltaic solar cells for those in the fields of optics and optical engineering, as well as those who are interested in energy policy, economics, and the requirements for efficient photo-to-electric energy conversion.

  16. Characterization of solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haerkoenen, J.; Tuominen, E.; Nybergh, K.; Ezer, Y.; Yli-Koski, M.; Sinkkonen, J. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Otaniemi (Finland). Dept. of Electrical and Communications Engineering

    1998-10-01

    Photovoltaic research in the Electron Physics Laboratory started in 1993, when laboratory joined the national TEKES/NEMO 2 research program. Since the beginning of the project, characterization as well as experimentally orientated development of the fabrication process of the solar cells were carried out parallery. The process development research started by the initiatives of the Finnish industry. At the moment a large amount of the laboratory personnel works on solar cell research and the financing comes mainly from external projects. The funding for the research has come from TEKES, Ministry of Education, Finnish Academy, GETA graduate school, special equipment grants of the university, and from the laboratory

  17. Cadmium Impairs p53 Activity in HepG2 Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Urani, C.; Melchioretto, P.; M. Fabbri; Bowe, G.; Maserati, E.; Gribaldo, L.

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium and cadmium compounds are contaminants of the environment, food, and drinking water and are important constituents of cigarette smoke. Cd exposure has also been associated with airborne particulate CdO and with Cd-containing quantum dots in medical therapy. Adverse cadmium effects reported in the literature have stimulated during recent years an ongoing discussion to better elucidate cadmium outcomes at cell and molecular level. The present work is designed to gain an insight into the...

  18. Study of deep level defects of n+-CdS/p-CdTe solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharangarh, Poonam Rani

    Among various photovoltaic materials, polycrystalline cadmium telluride thin film is now the most promising material, due to its low production cost excellent stability and reliability. Current-voltage and capacitance-voltage measurements of CdTe photovoltaic devices at different temperatures can provide valuable information about non-idealities in the n-p semiconductor junction. There are certain limitations which limit the efficiency of CdTe solar cells. There is no real distinction between defects and impurities in CdTe solar cells as both act as beneficial dopants or detrimental traps unlike Si where intentional shallow dopants and traps are distinctly different. Therefore, the role of defect states on CdTe solar cell performance, the effect of processing on defect states, and simple and effective characterization techniques must be investigated and identified. In this research the thin film n+-CdS/p-CdTe solar cells made with evaporated Cu as a primary back contact, are characterized by using the temperature dependence of the reverse bias diode current (J-V-T) to determine the energy levels of deep defects. The results of the J-V-T measurements on solar cells made at NJIT show that while modest amounts of Cu enhance cell performance, an excessive high temperature annealing step degrades device quality and reduces efficiency. This work addresses the error that can be introduced during defect energy level estimation if the temperature dependence of the carrier capture cross-section is neglected. Therefore, the location of traps is derived using a Shockley-Read-Hall recombination model with modified assumptions. A Cu-related deep level defect with activation energy of 0.57eV is observed for Cu evaporated back contact cells and an intrinsic defect with activation energy 0.89eV is found. Frequency dispersion in Capacitance-Voltage measurements confirms the presence of Cu-related deep level traps for cells with a Cu evaporated back contact, whereas no such defects

  19. NASA Facts, Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The design and function of solar cells as a source of electrical power for unmanned space vehicles is described in this pamphlet written for high school physical science students. The pamphlet is one of the NASA Facts Science Series (each of which consists of four pages) and is designed to fit in the standard size three-ring notebook. Review…

  20. Reduced cadmium-induced cytotoxicity in cultured liver cells following 5-azacytidine pretreatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waalkes, M.P.; Wilson, M.J.; Poirier, L.A.

    1985-11-01

    Recent work indicated that administration of the pyrimidine analog 5-azacytidine (AZA), either to cells in culture or to rats, results in an enhancement of expression of the metallothionein (MT) gene. Since MT is thought to play a central role in the detoxification of cadmium, the present study was designed to assess the effect of AZA pretreatment on cadmium cytotoxicity. Cultured rat liver cells in log phase of growth were first exposed to AZA (8 microM). Forty-eight hours later, cadmium was added. A modest increase in MT amounts over control was detected after AZA treatment alone. Cadmium alone resulted in a 10-fold increase in MT concentrations. The combination of AZA pretreatment followed by cadmium exposure caused a 23-fold increase in MT concentrations over control. Treatment with the DNA synthesis inhibitor hydroxyurea (HU) eliminated the enhancing effect of AZA pretreatment on cadmium induction of MT, indicating that cell division is required. AZA-pretreated cells were also harvested and incubated in suspension with cadmium for 0 to 90 min. AZA-pretreated cells showed marked reductions in cadmium-induced cytotoxicity as reflected by reduced intracellular potassium loss, glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase loss, and lipid peroxidation following cadmium exposure. Results suggest that AZA pretreatment induces tolerance to cadmium cytotoxicity which appears to be due to an increased capacity to synthesize MT rather than high quantities of preexisting MT at the time of cadmium exposure.

  1. Reduced cadmium-induced cytotoxicity in cultured liver cells following 5-azacytidine pretreatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recent work indicated that administration of the pyrimidine analog 5-azacytidine (AZA), either to cells in culture or to rats, results in an enhancement of expression of the metallothionein (MT) gene. Since MT is thought to play a central role in the detoxification of cadmium, the present study was designed to assess the effect of AZA pretreatment on cadmium cytotoxicity. Cultured rat liver cells in log phase of growth were first exposed to AZA (8 microM). Forty-eight hours later, cadmium was added. A modest increase in MT amounts over control was detected after AZA treatment alone. Cadmium alone resulted in a 10-fold increase in MT concentrations. The combination of AZA pretreatment followed by cadmium exposure caused a 23-fold increase in MT concentrations over control. Treatment with the DNA synthesis inhibitor hydroxyurea (HU) eliminated the enhancing effect of AZA pretreatment on cadmium induction of MT, indicating that cell division is required. AZA-pretreated cells were also harvested and incubated in suspension with cadmium for 0 to 90 min. AZA-pretreated cells showed marked reductions in cadmium-induced cytotoxicity as reflected by reduced intracellular potassium loss, glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase loss, and lipid peroxidation following cadmium exposure. Results suggest that AZA pretreatment induces tolerance to cadmium cytotoxicity which appears to be due to an increased capacity to synthesize MT rather than high quantities of preexisting MT at the time of cadmium exposure

  2. Degradation of CIGS solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Thin film CIGS solar cells and individual layers within these solar cells have been tested in order to assess their long term stability. Alongside with the execution of standard tests, in which elevated temperatures and humidity levels are used, the solar cells have also been exposed to a combinatio

  3. Characterization of solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haerkoenen, J.; Tuominen, E.; Nybergh, K.; Ezer, Y.; Yli-Koski, M.; Sinkkonen, J. [Helsinki Univ. of Technology (Finland). Dept. of Electrical and Communications Engineering

    1998-12-31

    Photovoltaic research began at the Electron Physics Laboratory of the Helsinki University of Tehnology in 1993, when the laboratory joined the national NEMO 2 research program. During the early stages of the photovoltaic research the main objective was to establish necessary measurement and characterisation routines, as well as to develop the fabrication process. The fabrication process development work has been supported by characterisation and theoretical modelling of the solar cells. Theoretical investigations have been concerned with systematic studies of solar cell parameters, such as diffusion lengths, surface recombination velocities and junction depths. The main result of the modelling and characterisation work is a method which is based on a Laplace transform of the so-called spatial collection efficiency function of the cell. The basic objective of the research has been to develop a fabrication process cheap enough to be suitable for commercial production

  4. Effective Ag doping by He-Ne laser exposure to improve the electrical and the optical properties of CdTe thin films for heterostructured thin film solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin film solar cell is one of the strongest candidates due to the optimum band gap energy (about 1.4 eV) for solar energy absorption, high light absorption capability and lower cost requirements for solar cell production. However, the maximum efficiency of a CdTe thin film solar cell still remains just 16.5% despite its excellent absorption coefficient; i.e., the electrical properties of CdTe thin film, including the resistivity, must be improved to enhance the energy conversion efficiency. Silver (Ag) was doped by using helium-neon (He-Ne) laser (632.8 nm) exposure into sputtering-deposited p-type CdTe thin films. The resistivity of the Ag-doped CdTe thin films was reduced from 2.97 x 104 Ω-cm to the order of 5.16 x 10'-'2 Ω-cm. The carrier concentration of CdTe thin films had increased to 1.6 x 1018 cm-3 after a 15-minute exposure to the He-Ne laser. The average absorbance value of CdTe thin films was improved from 1.81 to 3.01 by the doping of Ag due to impurity-scattering. These improved properties should contribute to the efficiency of the photovoltaic effect of the photogenerated charged carriers. The methodology in this study is very simple and effective to dope a multilayered thin film solar cell with a relatively short process time, no wet-process, and selective treatment.

  5. Formation of Semimetallic Cobalt Telluride Nanotube Film via Anion Exchange Tellurization Strategy in Aqueous Solution for Electrocatalytic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Supriya A; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Shrestha, Nabeen K; Chang, Jinho; Lee, Joong Kee; Han, Sung-Hwan

    2015-11-25

    Metal telluride nanostructures have demonstrated several potential applications particularly in harvesting and storing green energy. Metal tellurides are synthesized by tellurization process performed basically at high temperature in reducing gas atmosphere, which makes the process expensive and complicated. The development of a facile and economical process for desirable metal telluride nanostructures without complicated manipulation is still a challenge. In an effort to develop an alternative strategy of tellurization, herein we report a thin film formation of self-standing cobalt telluride nanotubes on various conducting and nonconducting substrates using a simple binder-free synthetic strategy based on anion exchange transformation from a thin film of cobalt hydroxycarbonate nanostructures in aqueous solution at room temperature. The nanostructured films before and after ion exchange transformation reaction are characterized using field emission scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray analyzer, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thin film X-ray diffraction technique, high resolution transmission electron microscope, and selected area electron diffraction analysis technique. After the ion exchange transformation of nanostructures, the film shows conversion from insulator to highly electrical conductive semimetallic characteristic. When used as a counter electrode in I3(-)/I(-) redox electrolyte based dye-sensitized solar cells, the telluride film exhibits an electrocatalytic reduction activity for I3(-) with a demonstration of solar-light to electrical power conversion efficiency of 8.10%, which is highly competitive to the efficiency of 8.20% exhibited by a benchmarked Pt-film counter electrode. On the other hand, the telluride film electrode also demonstrates electrocatalytic activity for oxygen evolution reaction from oxidation of water.

  6. Nanowire Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garnett, Erik C.; Brongersma, Mark L.; Cui, Yi; McGehee, Michael D.

    2011-08-01

    The nanowire geometry provides potential advantages over planar wafer-based or thin-film solar cells in every step of the photoconversion process. These advantages include reduced reflection, extreme light trapping, improved band gap tuning, facile strain relaxation, and increased defect tolerance. These benefits are not expected to increase the maximum efficiency above standard limits; instead, they reduce the quantity and quality of material necessary to approach those limits, allowing for substantial cost reductions. Additionally, nanowires provide opportunities to fabricate complex single-crystalline semiconductor devices directly on low-cost substrates and electrodes such as aluminum foil, stainless steel, and conductive glass, addressing another major cost in current photovoltaic technology. This review describes nanowire solar cell synthesis and fabrication, important characterization techniques unique to nanowire systems, and advantages of the nanowire geometry.

  7. Nanostructures for Organic Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goszczak, Arkadiusz Jarosław

    2016-01-01

    The experimental work in this thesis is focused on the fabrication of nanostructures that can be implemented in organic solar cell (OSC) architecture for enhancement of the device performance. Solar devices made from organic material are gaining increased attention, compared to their inorganic...... for organic solar cell applications, opening new patterning possibilities....

  8. Transparent solar cell window module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chau, Joseph Lik Hang; Chen, Ruei-Tang; Hwang, Gan-Lin; Tsai, Ping-Yuan [Nanopowder and Thin Film Technology Center, ITRI South, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Tainan County 709 (China); Lin, Chien-Chu [I-Lai Acrylic Corporation, Tainan City (China)

    2010-03-15

    A transparent solar cell window module based on the integration of traditional silicon solar cells and organic-inorganic nanocomposite material was designed and fabricated. The transparent solar cell window module was composed of a nanocomposite light-guide plate and traditional silicon solar cells. The preparation of the nanocomposite light-guide plate is easy without modification of the traditional casting process, the nanoparticles sol can be added directly to the polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) monomer syrup during the process. The solar energy collected by this window can be used to power up small household electrical appliances. (author)

  9. Silicon heterojunction solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Fahrner, W R; Neitzert, H C

    2006-01-01

    The world of today must face up to two contradictory energy problems: on the one hand, there is the sharply growing consumer demand in countries such as China and India. On the other hand, natural resources are dwindling. Moreover, many of those countries which still possess substantial gas and oil supplies are politically unstable. As a result, renewable natural energy sources have received great attention. Among these, solar-cell technology is one of the most promising candidates. However, there still remains the problem of the manufacturing costs of such cells. Many attempts have been made

  10. Carbon Nanotube Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Klinger, Colin; Patel, Yogeshwari; Postma, Henk W. Ch.

    2012-01-01

    We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabr...

  11. CdTe quantum dots-sensitized solar cells featuring PCBM/P3HT as hole transport material and assistant sensitizer provide 3.40% efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A CdTe QD-sensitized solar cell was fabricated by using PCBM/P3HT heterojunction. ► The QDSSC shows a light-to-electric energy conversion efficiency of 3.40%. ► Microporous Pt/C60 film is better than Pt film as counter electrode for the QDSSC. ► PCBM/P3HT is better than I−/I3− and S2−/Sx as transferring medium for the QDSSC. - Abstract: A heterojunction consisted of [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) was employed as hole transporter and light absorber assistant, a microporous platinum/fullerenes (Pt/C60) counter electrode was prepared by using a facile thermal decomposition method, and a polydimethyldiallyl ammonium–cadmium telluride [(PDDA)–CdTe] quantum dots photoanode was prepared by using chemical bath deposition method. Based on above components, a CdTe quantum dot-sensitized solar cell (QDSSC) was fabricated. The QDSSC shows a light-to-electric energy conversion efficiency of 3.40% under a simulated solar light irradiation with an intensity of 100 mW cm−2. The electrochemical and photovoltaic measurements indicate that microporous Pt/C60 film is better than Pt film as counter electrode material for the QDSSCs, and PCBM/P3HT is better than iodide/triiodide and sulfide/polysulfide as transferring medium for QDSSCs.

  12. Space solar cells - tradeoff analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, M.R. [ISRO Satellite Centre, Bangalore (India). Power Systems Group

    2003-05-15

    This paper summarizes the study that had the objective to tradeoff space solar cells and solar array designs to determine the best choice of solar cell and array technology that would be more beneficial in terms of mass, area and cost for different types of space missions. Space solar cells, which are commercially now available in the market and to be available in the near future, were considered for this trade study. Four solar array designs: rigid, flexible, thin film flexible and concentrator solar arrays were considered for assessment. Performance of the solar cells along with solar array designs were studied for two types of space missions:geo synchronous orbit (GEO) and low earth orbit (LEO) spacecraft. The Solar array designs assumed were to provide 15 kW power for 15 years mission life in GEO and 5 kW power for 5 years mission life in LEO altitudes. To perform tradeoff analysis a spread sheet model was developed that calculates the size, mass and estimates the cost of solar arrays based on different solar cell and array technologies for given set of mission requirements. Comparative performance metrics (W/kg, W/m{sup 2}, kg/m{sup 2}, and $/W) were calculated for all solar arrays studied and compared, at the solar array subsystem level and also at the spacecraft system level. The trade analysis results show that high-efficiency multijunction solar cells bring lot of cost advantages for both types of missions. The trade study also shows that thin film solar cells with moderate efficiency with ultra lightweight flexible array design may become competitive with well-established single crystalline solar cell technologies in the future. (author)

  13. Space solar cells. Tradeoff analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, M. Raja [Power Systems Group, Solar Panels Division, ISRO Satellite Centre, Bangalore 560017 (India)

    2003-05-15

    This paper summarizes the study that had the objective to tradeoff space solar cells and solar array designs to determine the best choice of solar cell and array technology that would be more beneficial in terms of mass, area and cost for different types of space missions. Space solar cells, which are commercially now available in the market and to be available in the near future, were considered for this trade study. Four solar array designs: rigid, flexible, thin film flexible and concentrator solar arrays were considered for assessment. Performance of the solar cells along with solar array designs were studied for two types of space missions: geo synchronous orbit (GEO) and low earth orbit (LEO) spacecraft. The Solar array designs assumed were to provide 15kW power for 15 years mission life in GEO and 5kW power for 5 years mission life in LEO altitudes. To perform tradeoff analysis a spread sheet model was developed that calculates the size, mass and estimates the cost of solar arrays based on different solar cell and array technologies for given set of mission requirements. Comparative performance metrics (W/kg, W/m{sup 2}, kg/m{sup 2}, and $/W) were calculated for all solar arrays studied and compared, at the solar array subsystem level and also at the spacecraft system level. The trade analysis results show that high-efficiency multijunction solar cells bring lot of cost advantages for both types of missions. The trade study also show that thin film solar cells with moderate efficiency with ultra lightweight flexible array design may become competitive with well-established single crystalline solar cell technologies in the future.

  14. Involvement of ethylene and lipid signalling in cadmium-induced programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakimova, E T; Kapchina-Toteva, V M; Laarhoven, L-J; Harren, F M; Woltering, E J

    2006-10-01

    Cadmium-induced cell death was studied in suspension-cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cells (line MsK8) treated with CdSO(4). Within 24 h, cadmium treatment induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Cell cultures showed recovery after 2-3 days which indicates the existence of an adaptation mechanism. Cadmium-induced cell death was alleviated by the addition of sub muM concentrations of peptide inhibitors specific to human caspases indicating that cell death proceeds through a mechanism with similarities to animal programmed cell death (PCD, apoptosis). Cadmium-induced cell death was accompanied by an increased production of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and simultaneous addition of antioxidants greatly reduced cell death. Inhibitors of phospholipase C (PLC) and phospholipase D (PLD) signalling pathway intermediates reduced cadmium-induced cell death. Treatment with the G-protein activator mastoparan and a cell permeable analogue of the lipid signal second messenger phosphatidic acid (PA) induced cell death. Ethylene, while not inducing cell death when applied alone, stimulated cadmium-induced cell death. Application of the ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor aminoethoxy vinylglycine (AVG) reduced cadmium-induced cell death, and this effect was alleviated by simultaneous treatment with ethylene. Together the results show that cadmium induces PCD exhibiting apoptotic-like features. The cell death process requires increased H(2)O(2) production and activation of PLC, PLD and ethylene signalling pathways.

  15. Involvement of ethylene and lipid signalling in cadmium-induced programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yakimova, E.T.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Laarhoven, L.J.J.; Harren, F.J.M.; Woltering, E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium-induced cell death was studied in suspension-cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cells (line MsK8) treated with CdSO4. Within 24 h, cadmium treatment induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Cell cultures showed recovery after 23 days which indicates the existence

  16. Involvement of ethylene and lipid signalling in cadmium-induced programmed cell death in tomato suspension cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iakimova, E.T.; Kapchina-Toteva, V.M.; Laarhoven, L.J.; Harren, F.; Woltering, E.J.

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium-induced cell death was studied in suspension-cultured tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) cells (line MsK8) treated with CdSO4. Within 24 h, cadmium treatment induced cell death in a concentration-dependent manner. Cell cultures showed recovery after 2¿3 days which indicates the existence

  17. Cascade Organic Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Schlenker, Cody W.

    2011-09-27

    We demonstrate planar organic solar cells consisting of a series of complementary donor materials with cascading exciton energies, incorporated in the following structure: glass/indium-tin-oxide/donor cascade/C 60/bathocuproine/Al. Using a tetracene layer grown in a descending energy cascade on 5,6-diphenyl-tetracene and capped with 5,6,11,12-tetraphenyl- tetracene, where the accessibility of the π-system in each material is expected to influence the rate of parasitic carrier leakage and charge recombination at the donor/acceptor interface, we observe an increase in open circuit voltage (Voc) of approximately 40% (corresponding to a change of +200 mV) compared to that of a single tetracene donor. Little change is observed in other parameters such as fill factor and short circuit current density (FF = 0.50 ± 0.02 and Jsc = 2.55 ± 0.23 mA/cm2) compared to those of the control tetracene-C60 solar cells (FF = 0.54 ± 0.02 and Jsc = 2.86 ± 0.23 mA/cm2). We demonstrate that this cascade architecture is effective in reducing losses due to polaron pair recombination at donor-acceptor interfaces, while enhancing spectral coverage, resulting in a substantial increase in the power conversion efficiency for cascade organic photovoltaic cells compared to tetracene and pentacene based devices with a single donor layer. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  18. Solar cell materials developing technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Conibeer, Gavin J

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a comparison of solar cell materials, including both new materials based on organics, nanostructures and novel inorganics and developments in more traditional photovoltaic materials. It surveys the materials and materials trends in the field including third generation solar cells (multiple energy level cells, thermal approaches and the modification of the solar spectrum) with an eye firmly on low costs, energy efficiency and the use of abundant non-toxic materials.

  19. Thermal Management of Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    The focus on solar cells as a source of photovoltaic energy is rapidly increasing nowadays. The amount of sun's energy entering earth surface in one hour is more than the world consume in one year. The photovoltaic market has been increasing by more than 20% annually since 2002. Improving solar cells aims at increasing the power conversion efficiency and reducing manufacturing costs. Crystalline silicon is the most commonly used material in making solar cells with more than 90% market use. So...

  20. Diffused quantum well solar cell

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, ASW; Li, EH; Cheng, Y

    1995-01-01

    An alternative multi-bandgap solar cell made of diffused quantum well (DFQW) as the absorber is proposed here. The modeling of the spectral response and energy conversion efficiency of the solar cell will be shown. Significant enhancement in energy conversion efficiency is demonstrated when compared to that of the single bandgap cells.

  1. High performance nickel-cadmium cells for electric vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornu, Jean-Pierre

    A new concept of a cadmium electrode associated with a lighter nickel structure, a multi-cell module technology, allows the proposal of a very promisig alternative power source for electric vehicle (EV) batteries, the usable specific energy being 31% of the theoretical value. Every characteristic of this Ni-Cd module (i.e., specific energy and power, energy and power density, energy efficiency, life and reliability) gives the best performing EV battery, to date. Thus, with the efficient support of two major French car manufacturers and the French government, SAFT will launch, during Spring '95, the first pilot line of EV Ni-Cd module manufacturing.

  2. Cadmium induced oxidative stress in kidney epithelia cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregaard, Henning F.

    2007-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is an important industrial and environmental pollutant. In humans exposed to Cd via oral and/or pulmonary routes, the kidney is by far the primary organ affected adversely by Cd. It have been estimated that 7% of the human population may develop renal dysfunction from Cd exposure...... of generation of ROS in this pathway remains unclear.     The aim of the present study was to monitor, in real time, the rates of ROS generation to be able to directly determine their production dynamics in living cells in response to drugs. Initial studies were planed in to use 2,7-dichlorofluorescein...

  3. Bifacial tandem solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wojtczuk, Steven J.; Chiu, Philip T.; Zhang, Xuebing; Gagnon, Edward; Timmons, Michael

    2016-06-14

    A method of fabricating on a semiconductor substrate bifacial tandem solar cells with semiconductor subcells having a lower bandgap than the substrate bandgap on one side of the substrate and with subcells having a higher bandgap than the substrate on the other including, first, growing a lower bandgap subcell on one substrate side that uses only the same periodic table group V material in the dislocation-reducing grading layers and bottom subcells as is present in the substrate and after the initial growth is complete and then flipping the substrate and growing the higher bandgap subcells on the opposite substrate side which can be of different group V material.

  4. Curcumin regulates airway epithelial cell cytokine responses to the pollutant cadmium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Cadmium induces secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 by two distinct pathways. ► Cadmium increases NAPDH oxidase activity leading to Erk activation and IL-8 secretion. ► Curcumin prevents cadmium-induced secretion of both IL-6 and IL-8 by airway cells. ► Curcumin could be use to suppress lung inflammation due to cadmium inhalation. -- Abstract: Cadmium is a toxic metal present in the environment and its inhalation can lead to pulmonary disease such as lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. These lung diseases are characterized by chronic inflammation. Here we show that exposure of human airway epithelial cells to cadmium promotes a polarized apical secretion of IL-6 and IL-8, two pivotal pro-inflammatory cytokines known to play an important role in pulmonary inflammation. We also determined that two distinct pathways controlled secretion of these proinflammatory cytokines by human airway epithelial cells as cadmium-induced IL-6 secretion occurs via an NF-κB dependent pathway, whereas IL-8 secretion involves the Erk1/2 signaling pathway. Interestingly, the natural antioxidant curcumin could prevent both cadmium-induced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion by human airway epithelial cells. In conclusion, curcumin could be used to prevent airway inflammation due to cadmium inhalation.

  5. Curcumin regulates airway epithelial cell cytokine responses to the pollutant cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennolds, Jessica; Malireddy, Smitha; Hassan, Fatemat; Tridandapani, Susheela; Parinandi, Narasimham [Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Boyaka, Prosper N. [Department of Veterinary Biosciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle, E-mail: Estelle.boyaka@osumc.edu [Division of Pulmonary, Allergy, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cadmium induces secretion of IL-6 and IL-8 by two distinct pathways. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cadmium increases NAPDH oxidase activity leading to Erk activation and IL-8 secretion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Curcumin prevents cadmium-induced secretion of both IL-6 and IL-8 by airway cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Curcumin could be use to suppress lung inflammation due to cadmium inhalation. -- Abstract: Cadmium is a toxic metal present in the environment and its inhalation can lead to pulmonary disease such as lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. These lung diseases are characterized by chronic inflammation. Here we show that exposure of human airway epithelial cells to cadmium promotes a polarized apical secretion of IL-6 and IL-8, two pivotal pro-inflammatory cytokines known to play an important role in pulmonary inflammation. We also determined that two distinct pathways controlled secretion of these proinflammatory cytokines by human airway epithelial cells as cadmium-induced IL-6 secretion occurs via an NF-{kappa}B dependent pathway, whereas IL-8 secretion involves the Erk1/2 signaling pathway. Interestingly, the natural antioxidant curcumin could prevent both cadmium-induced IL-6 and IL-8 secretion by human airway epithelial cells. In conclusion, curcumin could be used to prevent airway inflammation due to cadmium inhalation.

  6. Dye Sensitized Solar Cell, DSSC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pongsatorn Amornpitoksuk

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available A dye sensitized solar cell is a new type of solar cell. The operating system of this solar cell type is similar to plant’s photosynthesis process. The sensitizer is available for absorption light and transfer electrons to nanocrystalline metal oxide semiconductor. The ruthenium(II complexes with polypyridyl ligands are usually used as the sensitizers in solar cell. At the present time, the complex of [Ru(2,2',2'’-(COOH3- terpy(NCS3] is the most efficient sensitizer. The total photon to current conversion efficiency was approximately 10% at AM = 1.5.

  7. Space Solar Cell Characterization Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Measures, characterizes, and analyzes photovoltaic materials and devices. The primary focus is the measurement and characterization of solar cell response...

  8. Solar Cell Fabrication Studies Pertinent to Developing Countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prah, Joseph Henry

    That there is a need in the world today, and in the Third World in particular, for developing renewable energy sources is a proposition without question. Toward that end, the harnessing of solar energy has attracted much attention recently. In this thesis, we have addressed the question of Photovoltaics among the many approaches to the problem as being of poignant relevance in the Third World. Based on our studies, which involved the physics of solar cells, various solar cell configurations, the materials for their fabrication and their fabrication sequences, we arrived at the conclusion that silicon homojunction solar cells are best suited to the present needs and environment of, and suitable for development in the Third World, though Cadmium Sulphide-Cuprous Sulphide solar cell could be considered as a viable future candidate. Attendant with the adoption of photovoltaics as electric energy supply, is the problem of technology transfer and development. Towards that goal, we carried out in the laboratory, the fabrication of solar cells using very simple fabrication sequences and materials to demonstrate that tolerable efficiencies are achievable by their use. The view is also presented that for a thriving and viable solar cell industry in the Third World, the sine qua non is an integrated national policies involving all facets of solar cell manufacture and application, namely, material processing and fabrication, basic research, and development and socio -economic acceptance of solar cell appliances. To demonstrate how basic research could benefit solar cell fabrication, we undertook a number of experiments, such as varying our fabrication sequences and materials, finding their radiation tolerance, and carrying out Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (DLTS) studies, in an attempt to understand some of the fabrication and environmental factors which limit solar cell performance. We thus found that subjecting wafers to preheat treatments does not improve solar cell

  9. Quantum Junction Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Tang, Jiang

    2012-09-12

    Colloidal quantum dot solids combine convenient solution-processing with quantum size effect tuning, offering avenues to high-efficiency multijunction cells based on a single materials synthesis and processing platform. The highest-performing colloidal quantum dot rectifying devices reported to date have relied on a junction between a quantum-tuned absorber and a bulk material (e.g., TiO 2); however, quantum tuning of the absorber then requires complete redesign of the bulk acceptor, compromising the benefits of facile quantum tuning. Here we report rectifying junctions constructed entirely using inherently band-aligned quantum-tuned materials. Realizing these quantum junction diodes relied upon the creation of an n-type quantum dot solid having a clean bandgap. We combine stable, chemically compatible, high-performance n-type and p-type materials to create the first quantum junction solar cells. We present a family of photovoltaic devices having widely tuned bandgaps of 0.6-1.6 eV that excel where conventional quantum-to-bulk devices fail to perform. Devices having optimal single-junction bandgaps exhibit certified AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies of 5.4%. Control over doping in quantum solids, and the successful integration of these materials to form stable quantum junctions, offers a powerful new degree of freedom to colloidal quantum dot optoelectronics. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  10. Module process optimization and device efficiency improvement for stable, low-cost, large-area, cadmium telluride-based photovoltaic module production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, S. P.; Johnson, S. X.

    1994-06-01

    This report describes work performed under a three-phase subcontract. The objectives of the program include (1) achievement of active-area efficiencies of greater than 14% on small cells; (2) achievement of aperture-area efficiencies of greater than 13% on 0.09-sq m (1 sq ft) modules; (3) achievement of aperture-area efficiencies of greater than 12.5% on 0.37-sq m (4 sq ft) modules; and achievement of greater than 20-year module life (based on life testing extrapolations) with no greater than 10% efficiency degradation. The results obtained and described herein include the following: (1) efficiencies of 12.7% were achieved on small-area devices; (2) 0.09-sq m(1 sq ft) modules achieved greater than 8% aperture-area efficiency, but work for further efficiency improvement was redirected toward the 0.37-sq m(4 sq ft) modules; (3) 0.37-sq m (4 sq ft) modules achieved 26.5-W output, which calculates to 8.0% aperture-area efficiency; (4) consistent prototype production was focused on and substantially achieved within Phase 2; (5) life testing at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory showed no inherent stability problems with the CdTe technology, and the accuracy of module measurement was satisfactorily resolved; and (6) a 'cradle-to-cradle' recycling program was begun based upon the philosophy that the establishment of such mechanisms will be required to ensure maximum recapture and recycling of all manufacturing waste materials and/or modules returned from the field.

  11. Carbon nanotube solar cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colin Klinger

    Full Text Available We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement.

  12. Cadmium Chloride Induces DNA Damage and Apoptosis of Human Liver Carcinoma Cells via Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Skipper

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium is a heavy metal that has been shown to cause its toxicity in humans and animals. Many documented studies have shown that cadmium produces various genotoxic effects such as DNA damage and chromosomal aberrations. Ailments such as bone disease, renal damage, and several forms of cancer are attributed to overexposure to cadmium.  Although there have been numerous studies examining the effects of cadmium in animal models and a few case studies involving communities where cadmium contamination has occurred, its molecular mechanisms of action are not fully elucidated. In this research, we hypothesized that oxidative stress plays a key role in cadmium chloride-induced toxicity, DNA damage, and apoptosis of human liver carcinoma (HepG2 cells. To test our hypothesis, cell viability was determined by MTT assay. Lipid hydroperoxide content stress was estimated by lipid peroxidation assay. Genotoxic damage was tested by the means of alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet assay. Cell apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry assessment (Annexin-V/PI assay. The result of MTT assay indicated that cadmium chloride induces toxicity to HepG2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner, showing a 48 hr-LD50 of 3.6 µg/mL. Data generated from lipid peroxidation assay resulted in a significant (p < 0.05 increase of hydroperoxide production, specifically at the highest concentration tested. Data obtained from the Comet assay indicated that cadmium chloride causes DNA damage in HepG2 cells in a concentration-dependent manner. A strong concentration-response relationship (p < 0.05 was recorded between annexin V positive cells and cadmium chloride exposure. In summary, these in vitro studies provide clear evidence that cadmium chloride induces oxidative stress, DNA damage, and programmed cell death in human liver carcinoma (HepG2 cells.

  13. Hybrid solar cells using CdS thin films deposited via spray pyrolysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the photovoltaic performance of hybrid solar cells comprising of thin films of cadmium sulphide and poly(3-hexyl)thiophene. Cadmium sulphide thin films were deposited using spray pyrolysis technique. Current-voltage characterizations were performed for cadmium sulphide/poly(3-hexyl)thiophene heterojunctions in dark and under illumination (100 mWcm−2). The best device yields a short circuit current density of 1.54 mA/cm2, an open circuit voltage of 343 mV, and a power conversion efficiency of 0.15%. - Highlights: • Hybrid solar cells were fabricated using CdS and poly(3-hexyl)thiophene. • CdS thin films were grown by spray pyrolysis technique. • The best cell performance was achieved for the 100 nm thick CdS films. • The highest short circuit current was measured as 1.54 mAcm−2 for the best cell

  14. An Introduction to Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Bernard J.

    2010-01-01

    Most likely, solar cells will play a significant role in this country's strategy to address the two interrelated issues of global warming and dependence on imported oil. The purpose of this paper is to present an explanation of how solar cells work at an introductory high school, college, or university physics course level. The treatment presented…

  15. Using expression profiling to understand the effects of chronic cadmium exposure on MCF-7 breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zelmina Lubovac-Pilav

    Full Text Available Cadmium is a metalloestrogen known to activate the estrogen receptor and promote breast cancer cell growth. Previous studies have implicated cadmium in the development of more malignant tumors; however the molecular mechanisms behind this cadmium-induced malignancy remain elusive. Using clonal cell lines derived from exposing breast cancer cells to cadmium for over 6 months (MCF-7-Cd4, -Cd6, -Cd7, -Cd8 and -Cd12, this study aims to identify gene expression signatures associated with chronic cadmium exposure. Our results demonstrate that prolonged cadmium exposure does not merely result in the deregulation of genes but actually leads to a distinctive expression profile. The genes deregulated in cadmium-exposed cells are involved in multiple biological processes (i.e. cell growth, apoptosis, etc. and molecular functions (i.e. cadmium/metal ion binding, transcription factor activity, etc.. Hierarchical clustering demonstrates that the five clonal cadmium cell lines share a common gene expression signature of breast cancer associated genes, clearly differentiating control cells from cadmium exposed cells. The results presented in this study offer insights into the cellular and molecular impacts of cadmium on breast cancer and emphasize the importance of studying chronic cadmium exposure as one possible mechanism of promoting breast cancer progression.

  16. Health, safety and environmental issues relating to cadmium usage in photovoltaic energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Zweibel, K. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA))

    1989-12-01

    This paper discusses the current technology base and hazards associated with two promising thin-film photovoltaic cells that contain cadmium compounds -- cadmium telluride (CdTe) and copper indium diselenide (CuInSe{sub 2}). More specifically, this paper summarizes the toxicological information on cadmium (Cd) compounds; evaluates potential health, safety and environmental hazards associated with cadmium usage in the photovoltaics industry; describes regulatory requirements associated with the use, handling and disposal of cadmium compounds; and lists management options to permit the safe and continued use of these materials. Handling of cadmium in photovoltaic production can present hazards to health, safety and the environment. Prior recognition of these hazards can allow device manufacturers and regulators to implement appropriate and readily available hazard management strategies. Hazards associated with product use (i.e., array fires) and disposal remain controversial and partially unresolved. The most likely effects that could be expected would be those associated with chronic low-level exposures to cadmium wastes. Because of the general immobility of the cadmium present in these devices and availability of environmental and biomonitoring protocols, chronic hazards can be monitored, and remediated if necessary. Nevertheless, concern about cadmium hazards should continue to be emphasized to ensure that health, safety and environmental issues are properly managed. At the same time, the potential role that these systems can play in ameliorating some important health and environmental hazards related to other energy systems should not be ignored. 27 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Photorefractive properties of doped cadmium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bylsma, R. B.; Bridenbaugh, P. M.; Olson, D. H.; Glass, A. M.

    1987-09-01

    The first study of the photorefractive properties of doped CdTe has demonstrated high sensitivity for optical processing applications. Of the binary II-VI and III-V semiconductors, CdTe has the highest electro-optic coefficient r41 in the infrared, some three times larger than that of GaAs and InP. Deep levels introduced into CdTe exhibit appropriate absorption and photoconductivity at 1.06 μm by doping with V and Ti impurities. Photorefractive beam coupling experiments in CdTe:V gave small signal gains of 0.7 cm-1, and diffraction efficiencies with no applied electrical field of 0.7%. Thus, CdTe appears to be superior to previously studied III-V semiconductors, in the near-infrared spectrum. Optimization of doping and trap densities is expected to result in gain which exceeds the absorption loss, thereby allowing phase conjugation with infrared injection lasers.

  18. Back wall solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandhorst, H. W., Jr. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A solar cell is disclosed which comprises a first semiconductor material of one conductivity type with one face having the same conductivity type but more heavily doped to form a field region arranged to receive the radiant energy to be converted to electrical energy, and a layer of a second semiconductor material, preferably highly doped, of opposite conductivity type on the first semiconductor material adjacent the first semiconductor material at an interface remote from the heavily doped field region. Instead of the opposite conductivity layer, a metallic Schottky diode layer may be used, in which case no additional back contact is needed. A contact such as a gridded contact, previous to the radiant energy may be applied to the heavily doped field region of the more heavily doped, same conductivity material for its contact.

  19. Upconversion in solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Sark, Wilfried Gjhm; de Wild, Jessica; Rath, Jatin K; Meijerink, Andries; Schropp, Ruud Ei

    2013-02-15

    The possibility to tune chemical and physical properties in nanosized materials has a strong impact on a variety of technologies, including photovoltaics. One of the prominent research areas of nanomaterials for photovoltaics involves spectral conversion. Modification of the spectrum requires down- and/or upconversion or downshifting of the spectrum, meaning that the energy of photons is modified to either lower (down) or higher (up) energy. Nanostructures such as quantum dots, luminescent dye molecules, and lanthanide-doped glasses are capable of absorbing photons at a certain wavelength and emitting photons at a different (shorter or longer) wavelength. We will discuss upconversion by lanthanide compounds in various host materials and will further demonstrate upconversion to work for thin-film silicon solar cells.

  20. Higher sensitivity to cadmium induced cell death of basal forebrain cholinergic neurons: A cholinesterase dependent mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium is an environmental pollutant, which is a cause of concern because it can be greatly concentrated in the organism causing severe damage to a variety of organs including the nervous system which is one of the most affected. Cadmium has been reported to produce learning and memory dysfunctions and Alzheimer like symptoms, though the mechanism is unknown. On the other hand, cholinergic system in central nervous system (CNS) is implicated on learning and memory regulation, and it has been reported that cadmium can affect cholinergic transmission and it can also induce selective toxicity on cholinergic system at peripheral level, producing cholinergic neurons loss, which may explain cadmium effects on learning and memory processes if produced on central level. The present study is aimed at researching the selective neurotoxicity induced by cadmium on cholinergic system in CNS. For this purpose we evaluated, in basal forebrain region, the cadmium toxic effects on neuronal viability and the cholinergic mechanisms related to it on NS56 cholinergic mourine septal cell line. This study proves that cadmium induces a more pronounced, but not selective, cell death on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) on cholinergic neurons. Moreover, MTT and LDH assays showed a dose dependent decrease of cell viability in NS56 cells. The ACh treatment of SN56 cells did not revert cell viability reduction induced by cadmium, but siRNA transfection against AChE partially reduced it. Our present results provide new understanding of the mechanisms contributing to the harmful effects of cadmium on the function and viability of neurons, and the possible relevance of cadmium in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases

  1. Progress in polymer solar cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI LiGui; LU GuangHao; YANG XiaoNiu; ZHOU EnLe

    2007-01-01

    This review outlines current progresses in polymer solar cell. Compared to traditional silicon-based photovoltaic (PV) technology, the completely different principle of optoelectric response in the polymer cell results in a novel configuration of the device and more complicated photovoltaic generation process. The conception of bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) is introduced and its advantage in terms of morphology is addressed. The main aspects including the morphology of photoactive layer, which limit the efficiency and stability of polymer solar cell, are discussed in detail. The solutions to boosting up both the efficiency and stability (lifetime) of the polymer solar cell are highlighted at the end of this review.

  2. Absorptivity of semiconductors used in the production of solar cell panels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dependence of the absorptivity of semiconductors on the thickness of the absorbing layer is studied for crystalline silicon (c-Si), amorphous silicon (a-Si), cadmium telluride (CdTe), copper indium diselenide (CuInSe2, CIS), and copper gallium diselenide (CuGaSe2, CGS). The calculations are performed with consideration for the spectral distribution of AM1.5 standard solar radiation and the absorption coefficients of the materials. It is shown that, in the region of wavelengths λ = λg = hc/Eg, almost total absorption of the photons in AM1.5 solar radiation is attained in c-Si at the thickness d = 7−8 mm, in a-Si at d = 30–60 μm, in CdTe at d = 20−30 μm, and in CIS and CGS at d = 3−4 μm. The results differ from previously reported data for these materials (especially for c-Si). In previous publications, the thickness needed for the semiconductor to absorb solar radiation completely was identified with the effective light penetration depth at a certain wavelength in the region of fundamental absorption for the semiconductor.

  3. Photon management in solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Rau, Uwe; Gombert, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Written by renowned experts in the field of photon management in solar cells, this one-stop reference gives an introduction to the physics of light management in solar cells, and discusses the different concepts and methods of applying photon management. The authors cover the physics, principles, concepts, technologies, and methods used, explaining how to increase the efficiency of solar cells by splitting or modifying the solar spectrum before they absorb the sunlight. In so doing, they present novel concepts and materials allowing for the cheaper, more flexible manufacture of solar cells and systems. For educational purposes, the authors have split the reasons for photon management into spatial and spectral light management. Bridging the gap between the photonics and the photovoltaics communities, this is an invaluable reference for materials scientists, physicists in industry, experimental physicists, lecturers in physics, Ph.D. students in physics and material sciences, engineers in power technology, appl...

  4. Plastic Solar Cells: Understanding the Special Additive

    OpenAIRE

    van Franeker, Jacobus J.; Janssen, René A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Solar cells use freely available sunlight to make electricity. At the present time, solar electricity does not come cheap, because solar panels are rather expensive. Now imagine that we could reduce costs by printing solar panels like we print newspapers! We can do just that with plastic solar cells. In this article, we explain the basic working principles of these novel plastic solar cells and then show how a stunning threefold increase in solar energy efficiency can be achieved by including...

  5. Guidelines for the Procurement of Aerospace Nickel Cadmium Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thierfelder, Helmut

    1997-01-01

    NASA has been using a Modular Power System containing "standard" nickel cadmium (NiCd) batteries, composed of "standard" NiCd cells. For many years the only manufacturer of the NASA "standard" NiCd cells was General Electric Co. (subsequently Gates Aerospace and now SAFT). This standard cell was successfully used in numerous missions. However, uncontrolled technical changes, and changes in industrial restructuring require a new approach. General Electric (now SAFT Aerospace Batteries) had management changes, new manufacturers entered the market (Eagle-Picher Industries, ACME Electric Corporation, Aerospace Division, Sanyo Electric Co.) and battery technology advanced. New NASA procurements for aerospace NiCd cells will have specifications unique to the spacecraft and mission requirements. This document provides the user/customer guidelines for the new approach to procuring of and specifying performance requirements for highly reliable NiCd cells and batteries. It includes details of key parameters and their importance. The appendices contain a checklist, detailed calculations, and backup information.

  6. A Biphasic Ligand Exchange Reaction on Cdse Nanoparticles: Introducing Undergraduates to Functionalizing Nanoparticles for Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemke, Jennifer M.; Franz, Justin

    2016-01-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles, including cadmium selenide (CdSe) particles, are attractive as light harvesting materials for solar cells. In the undergraduate laboratory, the size-tunable optical and electronic properties can be easily investigated; however, these nanoparticles (NPs) offer another platform for application-based tunability--the NP…

  7. The large-area CdTe thin film for CdS/CdTe solar cell prepared by physical vapor deposition in medium pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Run; Liu, Bo; Yang, Xiaoyan; Bao, Zheng; Li, Bing; Zhang, Jingquan; Li, Wei; Wu, Lili; Feng, Lianghuan

    2016-01-01

    The Cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin film has been prepared by physical vapor deposition (PVD), the Ar + O2 pressure is about 0.9 kPa. This method is a newer technique to deposit CdTe thin film in large area, and the size of the film is 30 × 40 cm2. This method is much different from the close-spaced sublimation (CSS), as the relevance between the source temperature and the substrate temperature is weak, and the gas phase of CdTe is transferred to the substrate by Ar + O2 flow. Through this method, the compact and uniform CdTe film (30 × 40 cm2) has been achieved, and the performances of the CdTe thin film have been determined by transmission spectrum, SEM and XRD. The film is observed to be compact with a good crystallinity, the CdTe is polycrystalline with a cubic structure and a strongly preferred (1 1 1) orientation. Using the CdTe thin film (3 × 5 cm2) which is taken from the deposited large-area film, the 14.6% efficiency CdS/CdTe thin film solar cell has been prepared successfully. The structure of the cell is glass/FTO/CdS/CdTe/graphite slurry/Au, short circuit current density (Jsc) of the cell is 26.9 mA/cm2, open circuit voltage (Voc) is 823 mV, and filling factor (FF) is 66.05%. This technique can be a quite promising method to apply in the industrial production, as it has great prospects in the fabricating of large-area CdTe film.

  8. Fundamentals of thin solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yablonovitch, E. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    It is now widely recognized that thin solar cells can present certain advantages for performance and cost. This is particularly the case when light trapping in the semiconductor film is incorporated, as compensation for the diminished single path thickness of the solar cell. In a solar cell thinner than a minority carrier diffusion length, the current collection is of course very easy. More importantly the concentration of an equivalent number of carriers in a thinner volume results in a higher Free Energy, or open circuit voltage. This extra Free Energy may be regarded as due to the concentration factor, just as it would be for photons, electrons, or for any chemical species. The final advantage of a thin solar cell is in the diminished material usage, a factor of considerable importance when we consider the material cost of the high quality semiconductors which we hope to employ.

  9. Solar cell with back side contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, Gregory N; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J; Wanlass, Mark Woodbury; Clews, Peggy J

    2013-12-24

    A III-V solar cell is described herein that includes all back side contacts. Additionally, the positive and negative electrical contacts contact compoud semiconductor layers of the solar cell other than the absorbing layer of the solar cell. That is, the positive and negative electrical contacts contact passivating layers of the solar cell.

  10. Thin-film solar cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Metselaar, J.W.; Kuznetsov, V.I.

    1998-01-01

    The invention relates to a thin-film solar cell provided with at least one p-i-n junction comprising at least one p-i junction which is at an angle alpha with that surface of the thin-film solar cell which collects light during operation and at least one i-n junction which is at an angle beta with t

  11. Industrial Silicon Wafer Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk-Holger Neuhaus

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In 2006, around 86% of all wafer-based silicon solar cells were produced using screen printing to form the silver front and aluminium rear contacts and chemical vapour deposition to grow silicon nitride as the antireflection coating onto the front surface. This paper reviews this dominant solar cell technology looking into state-of-the-art equipment and corresponding processes for each process step. The main efficiency losses of this type of solar cell are analyzed to demonstrate the future efficiency potential of this technology. In research and development, more various advanced solar cell concepts have demonstrated higher efficiencies. The question which arises is “why are new solar cell concepts not transferred into industrial production more frequently?”. We look into the requirements a new solar cell technology has to fulfill to have an advantage over the current approach. Finally, we give an overview of high-efficiency concepts which have already been transferred into industrial production.

  12. Health, safety and environmental issues relating to cadmium usage in photovoltaic energy systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Fthenakis, V.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Zweibel, K. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA))

    1990-01-01

    This paper discusses the current technology base and hazards associated with two promising thin-film photovoltaic cells that contain cadmium compounds--cadmium telluride (CdTe) and copper indium deselenide (CuInSe{sub 2}). More specifically, this paper summarized the toxicological information on cadmium (Cd) compounds;evaluates potential health, safety and environmental hazards associated with cadmium usage in the photovoltaics industry; describes regulatory requirements associated with the use, handling and disposal of cadmium compounds; and lists management options to permit the safe and continued use of these materials. Handling of cadmium in photovoltaic production can present hazards to health, safety and the environment. Prior recognition of these hazards can allow device manufacturers and regulators to implement appropriate and readily available hazard management strategies. Hazards associated with product use (i.e., array fires) and disposal remain controversial and partially unresolved. The most likely effects that could be expected would be those associated with chronic low-level exposures to cadmium wastes. Because of the general immobility of the cadmium present in these devices and availability of environmental and biomonitoring protocols, chronic hazards can be monitored, and remediated if necessary. 26 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Comparison of manufactured and modeled solar cell

    OpenAIRE

    Strachala, D.; Hylský, J.

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the work is to compare the model of monocrystalline silicon solar cell in PC1D with the real solar cell structure in terms of using a model in manufacture process. Real solar cell was firstly measured and analyzed to determine input parameters for a simulation and then realized in free available PC1D software. Degree of conformity of modeled and real solar cell was in the end established for basic prediction of solar cell parameters before manufacturing process.

  14. Solar electron source and thermionic solar cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parham Yaghoobi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Common solar technologies are either photovoltaic/thermophotovoltaic, or use indirect methods of electricity generation such as boiling water for a steam turbine. Thermionic energy conversion based on the emission of electrons from a hot cathode into vacuum and their collection by an anode is also a promising route. However, thermionic solar conversion is extremely challenging as the sunlight intensity is too low for heating a conventional cathode to thermionic emission temperatures in a practical manner. Therefore, compared to other technologies, little has been done in this area, and the devices have been mainly limited to large experimental apparatus investigated for space power applications. Based on a recently observed “Heat Trap” effect in carbon nanotube arrays, allowing their efficient heating with low-power light, we report the first compact thermionic solar cell. Even using a simple off-the-shelf focusing lens, the device delivered over 1 V across a load. The device also shows intrinsic storage capacity.

  15. Cadmium Impairs p53 Activity in HepG2 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urani, C; Melchioretto, P; Fabbri, M; Bowe, G; Maserati, E; Gribaldo, L

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium and cadmium compounds are contaminants of the environment, food, and drinking water and are important constituents of cigarette smoke. Cd exposure has also been associated with airborne particulate CdO and with Cd-containing quantum dots in medical therapy. Adverse cadmium effects reported in the literature have stimulated during recent years an ongoing discussion to better elucidate cadmium outcomes at cell and molecular level. The present work is designed to gain an insight into the mechanism of p53 impairment at gene and protein level to understand Cd-induced resistance to apoptosis. We used a hepatoma cell line (HepG2) derived from liver, known to be metal responsive. At genotoxic cadmium concentrations no cell cycle arrest was observed. The p53 at gene and protein level was not regulated. Fluorescence images showed that p53 was correctly translocated into the nucleus but that the p21(Cip1/WAF-1), a downstream protein of p53 network involved in cell cycle regulation, was not activated at the highest cadmium concentrations used. The miRNAs analysis revealed an upregulation of mir-372, an miRNA able to affect p21(Cip1/WAF-1) expression and promote cell cycle progression and proliferation. The role of metallothioneins and possible conformational changes of p53 are discussed. PMID:25101185

  16. Cadmium increases ferroportin-1 gene expression in J774 macrophage cells via the production of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bo-Yeon; Chung, Jayong

    2009-01-01

    Cadmium intoxication has been associated with the dysregulation of iron homeostasis. In the present study, we investigated the effect of cadmium on the expression of ferroportin 1 (FPN1), an important iron transporter protein that is involved in iron release from macrophages. When we incubated cadmium with J774 mouse macrophage cells, FPN1 mRNA levels were significantly increased in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Furthermore, the cadmium-induced FPN1 mRNA expression was associated with increased levels of FPN1 protein. On the other hand, cadmium-mediated FPN1 mRNA induction in J774 cells was completely blocked when cells were co-treated with a transcription inhibitor, acitomycin D. Also, cadmium directly stimulated the activity of the FPN1-promoter driven luciferase reporter, suggesting that the cadmium up-regulates FPN1 gene expression in a transcription-dependent manner. Finally, cadmium exposure to J774 macrophages increased intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels by ~ 2-fold, compared to untreated controls. When J774 cells were co-treated with antioxidant N-acetylcystein, the cadmium-induced FPN1 mRNA induction was significantly attenuated. In summary, the results of this study clearly demonstrated that cadmium increased FPN1 expression in macrophages through a mechanism that involves ROS production, and suggests another important interaction between iron and cadmium metabolism. PMID:20090884

  17. Advances in Perovskite Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Chuantian; Bolink, Henk J.; Han, Hongwei; Huang, Jinsong

    2016-01-01

    Organolead halide perovskite materials possess a combination of remarkable optoelectronic properties, such as steep optical absorption edge and high absorption coefficients, long charge carrier diffusion lengths and lifetimes. Taken together with the ability for low temperature preparation, also from solution, perovskite‐based devices, especially photovoltaic (PV) cells have been studied intensively, with remarkable progress in performance, over the past few years. The combination of high efficiency, low cost and additional (non‐PV) applications provides great potential for commercialization. Performance and applications of perovskite solar cells often correlate with their device structures. Many innovative device structures were developed, aiming at large‐scale fabrication, reducing fabrication cost, enhancing the power conversion efficiency and thus broadening potential future applications. This review summarizes typical structures of perovskite solar cells and comments on novel device structures. The applications of perovskite solar cells are discussed.

  18. Effect of In Situ Thermal Annealing Process on Structural, Optical and Electrical Properties of CdSCdTe Thin-Film Solar Cells Fabricated by Pulsed Laser Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-mebir, Alaa Ayad Khedhair

    Cadmium Telluride has long been recognized as the second lowest- cost material after Si in the world photovoltaic market, specifically for thin-film solar cells. The two attractive properties of the CdTe are its nearly ideal band gap of ˜1.5 eV for single p-n junction photovoltaic and its high optical absorption coefficient up to 105 cm-1. Therefore, a thickness of ˜1 mum of CdTe can absorb up to 90% of the incident light. The key to high-performance thin film CdTe-based solar cells is controlling microstructure of the CdS/CdTe through obtaining high-quality crystalline CdTe thin films that have low density pinholes and other defects and form high-quality p-n heterojunction interfaces on the CdS or other window layers. Considering these, the relative high temperatures used for CdTe thick film growth may not be suitable in the thin film case due to lack of control in CdTe microstructure evolution. Therefore, development of low-temperature processes for CdTe thin film solar cells is important to achieving a precise control of the CdS/CdTe microstructure and optoelectronic properties. In addition, low temperatures provide benefits in wider selection of substrates especially those for low-cost, flexible solar cells applications. However, the CdS/CdTe solar cells based on thin CdTe films fabricated at low temperature have generally poor performance as a result of increased density of grain boundaries and defects. In order to address this issue, we have developed an in situ thermal annealing process (iTAP) immediately after the CdS/CdTe deposition using Pulsed laser deposition (PLD) at 200 °C and before the common ex situ CdCl2 annealing typically employed for optimization of the CdTe-based solar cells. A systematic study on the microstructure, optical and optoelectronic properties of CdS/CdTe solar cells processed under different iTAP conditions has been carried out. It has been found that these physical properties depend sensitively on the iTAP processing conditions

  19. Molecular Mechanisms of Malignant Transformation by Low Dose Cadmium in Normal Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cartularo

    Full Text Available Cadmium is a carcinogenic metal, the mechanisms of which are not fully understood. In this study, human bronchial epithelial cells were transformed with sub-toxic doses of cadmium (0.01, 0.05, and 0.1 μM and transformed clones were characterized for gene expression changes using RNA-seq, as well as other molecular measurements. 440 genes were upregulated and 47 genes were downregulated in cadmium clones relative to control clones over 1.25-fold. Upregulated genes were associated mostly with gene ontology terms related to embryonic development, immune response, and cell movement, while downregulated genes were associated with RNA metabolism and regulation of transcription. Several embryonic genes were upregulated, including the transcription regulator SATB2. SATB2 is critical for normal skeletal development and has roles in gene expression regulation and chromatin remodeling. Small hairpin RNA knockdown of SATB2 significantly inhibited growth in soft agar, indicating its potential as a driver of metal-induced carcinogenesis. An increase in oxidative stress and autophagy was observed in cadmium clones. In addition, the DNA repair protein O6-methylguanine-DNA-methyltransferase was depleted by transformation with cadmium. MGMT loss caused significant decrease in cell viability after treatment with the alkylating agent temozolomide, demonstrating diminished capacity to repair such damage. Results reveal various mechanisms of cadmium-induced malignant transformation in BEAS-2B cells including upregulation of SATB2, downregulation of MGMT, and increased oxidative stress.

  20. Cadmium toxicity: Effects on cytoskeleton, vesicular trafficking and cell wall construction

    OpenAIRE

    Wan, Lichuan; Zhang, Haiyan

    2012-01-01

    Cadmium is a well-known environmental pollutant with distinctly toxic effects on plants. It can displace certain essential metals from a wealth of metalloproteins, and thus disturb many normal physiological processes and cause severe developmental aberrant. The harmful effects of cadmium stress include, but are not limited to: reactive oxygen species overproduction, higher lipid hydroperoxide contents, and chloroplast structure change, which may lead to cell death. Plants have developed diver...

  1. Polymer tandem solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadipour, Afshin

    2007-01-01

    The global demand for energy is expanding continually. Therefore, realization of green power sources are needed since combustion of fossil fuels will have serious consequences for the climate on the Earth. With a photovoltaic device, the solar light can be converted into electricity which is the mos

  2. Lactobacillus plantarum L67 glycoprotein protects against cadmium chloride toxicity in RAW 264.7 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sooyeon; Oh, Sejong; Lim, Kye-Taek

    2016-03-01

    The food and water we consume may be contaminated with a range of chemicals and heavy metals, such as lead, cadmium, arsenic, chromium, and mercury by accumulation through the food chain. Cadmium is known to be one of the major components in cigarette smoke and can cause lesions in many organs. Some lactobacilli can bind and remove heavy metals such as cadmium, lead, and copper. However, the mechanisms of cadmium toxicity and inhibition by probiotics are not clear. In this study, we demonstrated that glycoprotein (18 kDa) isolated from Lactobacillus plantarum L67 protected RAW 264.7 cells from expression of inflammation-related factors stimulated by cadmium chloride (100 µM). Furthermore, we evaluated the cytotoxicity of cadmium using the MTT assay and intracellular Ca(2+) using fluorescence, and assessed activities of activator protein kinase C (PKC-α), inducible nitric oxide synthase, activator protein (AP)-1, and mitogen-activated protein kinases using immunoblot. Our results indicated that glycoprotein isolated from L. plantarum L67 inhibited intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization. It also significantly suppressed inflammatory factors such as AP-1 (c-Jun and c-Fos), mitogen-activated protein kinases (ERK, JNK, and p38), and inducible nitric oxide synthase. Our findings suggest that the 24-kDa glycoprotein isolated from L. plantarum L67 might be used as a food component for protection of inflammation caused by cadmium ion.

  3. Solar cell is not absolutely ecologically sound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Calmthout, M.

    1988-11-01

    The University of Utrecht, Netherlands, inventorized the social costs of a large-scale solar cell industry in particular with regard to the environmental impacts. During production and dismantlement of photovoltaic systems hazardous wastes and dangerous situations can be released respectively can occur. The most important results are discussed. Four solar cell technologies are highlighted: the crystalline silicon solar cell, the amorphous silicon solar cell, the CdS/CuInSe/sub 2/ solar cell, and the GaAs solar cell. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  4. Solar cell circuit and method for manufacturing solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardesich, Nick (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The invention is a novel manufacturing method for making multi-junction solar cell circuits that addresses current problems associated with such circuits by allowing the formation of integral diodes in the cells and allows for a large number of circuits to readily be placed on a single silicon wafer substrate. The standard Ge wafer used as the base for multi-junction solar cells is replaced with a thinner layer of Ge or a II-V semiconductor material on a silicon/silicon dioxide substrate. This allows high-voltage cells with multiple multi-junction circuits to be manufactured on a single wafer, resulting in less array assembly mass and simplified power management.

  5. Current-Enhanced Quantum Well Solar Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LOU Chao-Gang; SUN Qiang; XU Jun; ZHANG Xiao-Bing; LEI Wei; WANG Bao-Ping; CHEN Wen-Jun; QIAO Zai-Xiang

    2006-01-01

    We present the experimental results that demonstrate the enhancement of the short-circuit current of quantum well solar cells. The spectral response shows that the introduction of quantum wells extends the absorption spectrum of solar cells. The current densities under different truncated spectrums significantly increase, showing that quantum well solar cells are suitable to be the middle cells of GaInP/GaAs/Ge triple-junction solar cells to increase their overall conversion efficiency.

  6. Photon upconversion for thin film solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wild, J.

    2012-01-01

    In this research one of the many possible methods to increase the efficiency of solar cells is described. The method investigated is based on adapting the solar light in such a way that the solar cell can convert more light into electricity. The part of the solar spectrum that is adapted is the part

  7. NREL preprints for the 23rd IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzgerald, M. [ed.

    1993-05-01

    Topics covered include various aspects of solar cell fabrication and performance. Aluminium-gallium arsenides, cadmium telluride, amorphous silicon, and copper-indium-gallium selenides are all characterized in their applicability in solar cells.

  8. Effect of arsenic, cadmium and lead on the induction of apoptosis of normal human mononuclear cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    DE LA FUENTE, H; PORTALES-PÉREZ, D; BARANDA, L; DÍAZ-BARRIGA, F; SAAVEDRA-ALANÍS, V; LAYSECA, E; GONZÁLEZ-AMARO, R

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of cadmium, lead and arsenic on the apoptosis of human immune cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNC) were incubated with increasing concentrations of these metals and then cellular apoptosis was determined by flow cytometry and by DNA electrophoresis. We found that arsenic induced a significant level of apoptosis at 15 μm after 48h of incubation. Cadmium had a similar effect, but at higher concentrations (65 μm). In addition, cadmium exerted a cytotoxic effect on MNC that seemed to be independent of the induction of apoptosis. In contrast, concentrations of lead as high as 500 μm were nontoxic and did not induce a significant degree of apoptosis. Additional experiments showed that arsenic at concentrations as low as 1·0 μm had a significant pro-apoptotic effect when cells were cultured in the presence of this pollutant for more than 72. Non-T cells were more susceptible than T lymphocytes to the effect of arsenic and cadmium. Interestingly, MNC from children chronically exposed to arsenic showed a high basal rate of apoptosis and a diminished in vitro sensibility to this metalloid. Our results indicate that both arsenic and cadmium are able to induce apoptosis of lymphoid cells, and suggest that this phenomenon may contribute to their immunotoxic effect in vivo. PMID:12100024

  9. Lead telluride alloy thermoelectrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron D. LaLonde

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The opportunity to use solid-state thermoelectrics for waste heat recovery has reinvigorated the field of thermoelectrics in tackling the challenges of energy sustainability. While thermoelectric generators have decades of proven reliability in space, from the 1960s to the present, terrestrial uses have so far been limited to niche applications on Earth because of a relatively low material efficiency. Lead telluride alloys were some of the first materials investigated and commercialized for generators but their full potential for thermoelectrics has only recently been revealed to be far greater than commonly believed. By reviewing some of the past and present successes of PbTe as a thermoelectric material we identify the issues for achieving maximum performance and successful band structure engineering strategies for further improvements that can be applied to other thermoelectric materials systems.

  10. Organic and hybrid solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    This book delivers a comprehensive evaluation of organic and hybrid solar cells and identifies their fundamental principles and numerous applications. Great attention is given to the charge transport mechanism, donor and acceptor materials, interfacial materials, alternative electrodes, device engineering and physics, and device stability. The authors provide an industrial perspective on the future of photovoltaic technologies.

  11. Fullerene based organic solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popescu, Lacramioara Mihaela

    2008-01-01

    The direct conversion of the sunlight into electricity is the most elegant process to generate environmentally-friendly renewable energy. Plastic solar cells offer the prospect of flexible, lightweight, lower cost of manufacturing, and hopefully an efficient way to produce electricity from sunlight.

  12. Solar-Cell Slide Rule

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, K. A.

    1983-01-01

    Slide rule relates efficiency, impurity types, impurity concentrations, and process types. Solar cell slide rule calculations are determination of allowable impurity concentration for nonredistributive process, determination of impurity buildup factor for redistributive process and determination of allowable impurity concentration for redistributive process.

  13. Nanowire-based All Oxide Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Peidong

    2009-01-01

    We present an all-oxide solar cell fabricated from vertically oriented zinc oxide nanowires and cuprous oxide nanoparticles. Our solar cell consists of vertically oriented n-type zinc oxide nanowires, surrounded by a film constructed from p-type cuprous oxide nanoparticles. Our solution-based synthesis of inexpensive and environmentally benign oxide materials in a solar cell would allow for the facile production of large-scale photovoltaic devices. We found that the solar cell performance is ...

  14. Electromagnetic approach to ultrathin solar cell efficiencies

    OpenAIRE

    Niv, A.; Gharghi, M.; Abrams, Z. R.; Gladden, C.; Zhang, X.

    2011-01-01

    Current methods for evaluating solar cell efficiencies cannot be applied to extremely thin cells where phenomena from the realm of near field optics prevail. We overcome this problem by offering a rigorous electromagnetic calculation of solar cell efficiencies based on the fluctuation dissipation theorem. Our approach is demonstrated by calculating the efficiency of a GaAs solar cell with an Au back reflector for thicknesses well below the typical wavelength of the solar flux. It is shown tha...

  15. Perovskite solar cells: an emerging photovoltaic technology

    OpenAIRE

    Nam-Gyu Park

    2015-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells based on organometal halides represent an emerging photovoltaic technology. Perovskite solar cells stem from dye-sensitized solar cells. In a liquid-based dye-sensitized solar cell structure, the adsorption of methylammonium lead halide perovskite on a nanocrystalline TiO2 surface produces a photocurrent with a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of around 3–4%, as first discovered in 2009. The PCE was doubled after 2 years by optimizing the perovskite coating conditions....

  16. Key Physical Mechanisms in Nanostructured Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr Stephan Bremner

    2010-07-21

    The objective of the project was to study both theoretically and experimentally the excitation, recombination and transport properties required for nanostructured solar cells to deliver energy conversion efficiencies well in excess of conventional limits. These objectives were met by concentrating on three key areas, namely, investigation of physical mechanisms present in nanostructured solar cells, characterization of loss mechanisms in nanostructured solar cells and determining the properties required of nanostructured solar cells in order to achieve high efficiency and the design implications.

  17. Investigation on Silicon Thin Film Solar Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The preparation, current status and trends are investigated for silicon thin film solar cells. The advantages and disadvantages of amorphous silicon thin film, polycrystalline silicon thin film and mono-crystalline silicon thin film solar cells are compared. The future development trends are pointed out. It is found that polycrystalline silicon thin film solar cells will be more promising for application with great potential.

  18. Sheet plastic filters for solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wizenick, R. J.

    1972-01-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride) (PVF) film protects solar cells on Mars surface from radiation and prevents degradation of solar cell surfaces by Martian dust storms. PVF films may replace glass or quartz windows on solar cell arrays used to generate power on earth.

  19. Film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A R M Yusoff; M N Syahrul; K Henkel

    2007-08-01

    A major issue encountered during fabrication of triple junction -Si solar cells on polyimide substrates is the adhesion of the solar cell thin films to the substrates. Here, we present our study of film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells made on different polyimide substrates (Kapton VN, Upilex-S and Gouldflex), and the effect of tie coats on film adhesion.

  20. Hibiscus sabdariffa extractivities on cadmium-mediated alterations of human U937 cell viability and activation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tebekeme Okoko; Diepreye Ere

    2012-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the effect of the anthocyanin-rich extract of Hibiscus sabdariffa (H. sabdariffa) calyx on the viability of cadmium-treated U937 cells and cadmium-mediated activation of U937-derived macrophages. Methods:The macrophage cell line U937 was treated with cadmium (0.1μmol/L) and later incubated with the anthocyanin-rich extract and cell viability was assessed via trypan blue staining. In the other experiment, the U937 cells were transformed to the macrophage form by treatment with phorbol 12, myristate 13, and acetate and incubated with cadmium (10μmol/L). The anthocyanin-rich extract was added to the cells later and subsequently, the supernatant of each cell culture was analysed for the production of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin 1 (IL-1), interleukin 6 (IL-6), nitric oxide, and catalase activity as indices for the activation of macrophages. Results:It revealed that the anthocynanin-rich extract significantly (P <0.05) increased the viability of the cells which was suppressed by cadmium when compared to quercetin dihydrate. The extract also reduced the cadmium-mediated production of the markers of macrophage-activation when compared to quercetin dihydrate. In both experiments, the activity of the extract was concentration-dependent (P <0.05). Conclusion:The findings show that H. sabdariffa possesses significant immunoprotective effect. These corroborate the immense reported antioxidant and medicinal potential of the calyces of the plant which could be exploited for pharmacological and neutraceutical advantages.

  1. Polymer-based solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alex C. Mayer

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available A significant fraction of the cost of solar panels comes from the photoactive materials and sophisticated, energy-intensive processing technologies. Recently, it has been shown that the inorganic components can be replaced by semiconducting polymers capable of achieving reasonably high power conversion efficiencies. These polymers are inexpensive to synthesize and can be solution-processed in a roll-to-roll fashion with high throughput. Inherently poor polymer properties, such as low exciton diffusion lengths and low mobilities, can be overcome by nanoscale morphology. We discuss polymer-based solar cells, paying particular attention to device design and potential improvements.

  2. Concentrated sunlight for organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tromholt, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Concentrated sunlight provides a novel approach to the study of the physical and electrical parameters of organic solar cells. The study of performance of organic solar cells at high solar concentrations provides insight into the physics, which cannot be studied with conventional solar simulators...... studies of polymers for organic solar cells. Degradation was monitored by the evolution of the UV-vis absorption over time. Varying the solar intensity from 1 to 200 suns, the degradation rates were increased by more than a factor of 100 relative to degradation at 1 simulated sun. 5 different polymers....... A high solar intensity study of inverted P3HT:PCBM solar cells is presented. Performance peak positions were found to be in the range of 1-5 suns, with smaller cells peaking at higher solar concentrations. Additionally, concentrated sunlight is demonstrated as a practical tool for accelerated stability...

  3. Pin solar cells made of amorphous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaettner, R. D.; Kruehler, W. W.

    Investigations leading to solar cells with a structure SnO2-pin and an efficiency up to 9.8% are reviewed. The production of large-surface metal/pin/transparent conductive oxide (TCO)-solar cells is discussed. A two-chamber reactor, grid structure and tinning of cells, and an a-Si-module are described. The production of glass/TCO/pin/metal-solar cells and a-SiGe:H-compounds is outlined. Measurements on solar cells and diodes including the efficiency of a-Si:H-solar cells, spectral sensitivity, diffusion lengths, field effect measurements, and modifications of solar cells (space-charge limited currents, reduction of solar cells aging) are treated.

  4. Electro-Plating and Characterisation of CdTe Thin Films Using CdCl2 as the Cadmium Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor A. Abdul-Manaf

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium telluride (CdTe thin films have been successfully prepared from an aqueous electrolyte bath containing cadmium chloride (CdCl2·H2O and tellurium dioxide (TeO2 using an electrodeposition technique. The structural, electrical, morphological and optical properties of these thin films have been characterised using X-ray diffraction (XRD, Raman spectroscopy, optical profilometry, DC current-voltage (I-V measurements, photoelectrochemical (PEC cell measurement, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, atomic force microscopy (AFM and UV-Vis spectrophotometry. It is observed that the best cathodic potential is 698 mV with respect to standard calomel electrode (SCE in a three electrode system. Structural analysis using XRD shows polycrystalline crystal structure in the as-deposited CdTe thin films and the peaks intensity increase after CdCl2 treatment. PEC cell measurements show the possibility of growing p-, i- and n-type CdTe layers by varying the growth potential during electrodeposition. The electrical resistivity of the as-deposited layers are in the order of 104 Ω·cm. SEM and AFM show that the CdCl2 treated samples are more roughness and have larger grain size when compared to CdTe grown by CdSO4 precursor. Results obtained from the optical absorption reveal that the bandgap of as-deposited CdTe (1.48–1.52 eV reduce to (1.45–1.49 eV after CdCl2 treatment. Full characterisation of this material is providing new information on crucial CdCl2 treatment of CdTe thin films due to its built-in CdCl2 treatment during the material growth. The work is progressing to fabricate solar cells with this material and compare with CdTe thin films grown by conventional sulphate precursors.

  5. Hybrid emitter all back contact solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loscutoff, Paul; Rim, Seung

    2016-04-12

    An all back contact solar cell has a hybrid emitter design. The solar cell has a thin dielectric layer formed on a backside surface of a single crystalline silicon substrate. One emitter of the solar cell is made of doped polycrystalline silicon that is formed on the thin dielectric layer. The other emitter of the solar cell is formed in the single crystalline silicon substrate and is made of doped single crystalline silicon. The solar cell includes contact holes that allow metal contacts to connect to corresponding emitters.

  6. High Efficiency Polymer Solar Cells Technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Abdrhman M G; LI Hang-quan; ZHANG Li-ye; ZHOU Bing

    2006-01-01

    The conjugated polymer-based solar cell is one of the most promising devices in search of sustainable, renewable energy sources in last decade. It is the youngest field in organic solar cell research and also is certainly the fastest growing one at the moment. In addition, the key factor for polymer-based solar cells with high-efficiency is to invent new materials. Organic solar cell has attracted significant researches and commercial interest due to its low cost in fabrication and flexibility in applications. However, they suffer from relatively low conversion efficiency. The summarization of the significance and concept of high efficiency polymer solar cell technologies are presented.

  7. CdTe/CdS solar cells with transparent contacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkmire, R.W.; McCandless, B.E.; Shafarman, W.N.

    1988-01-15

    Evaporated CdTe/CdS solar cells with a transparent Cu-indium tin oxide contact have been made with an efficiency greater than 8.5%. The deposition of single-phase CdTe films from a compound source required a cadmium-to-tellurium flux ratio of 1.7 incident on the substrate. To obtain the needed p-type conductivity of the CdTe films required a high temperature heat treatment in air which reduced the transmission through the CdTe film owing to the formation of a CdTeO/sub 3/ surface layer. The heating and cooling rates used for the heat treatment affected the open-circuit voltage and contact resistance of the cells. The total subband gap absorption of the entire cell is 40%-50%.

  8. Phytoremediation of cadmium-contaminated soils by young Douglas fir trees: effects of cadmium exposure on cell wall composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astier, Cédric; Gloaguen, Vincent; Faugeron, Céline

    2014-01-01

    Douglas fir trees grown on an artificially Cd-contaminated soil, can tolerate this trace element (up to 68 mg/kg in soil) during several months. Most of the absorbed Cd is retained in roots (25 mg/kg DM), but transfer to aerial part is also effective. Showing the highest content, up to 6 mg/kg DM, among all the aboveground parts, barks seem to be a preferred storage compartment. However, the transfer factor is quite low, about 0.3. Another objective of this study was to compare the cell wall components of trees exposed to increasing Cd amounts in soil. A decrease in lignin and an increase in pectin contents were observed in response to increasing soil cadmium concentration. A concurrent reduction in methyl-esterification of pectin suggests than the structure of this major binding site could therefore be modified as a reaction to cadmium contamination. Future prospects will focus on the modulation of pectin composition in response to Cd exposure.

  9. Apoptosis and necroptosis are induced in rainbow trout cell lines exposed to cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krumschnabel, Gerhard, E-mail: Gerhard.Krumschnabel@i-med.ac.at [Division of Developmental Immunology, Biocenter, Medical University Innsbruck, Fritz-Preglstr. 3, Innsbruck (Austria); Ebner, Hannes L.; Hess, Michael W. [Division of Histology and Embryology, Medical University Innsbruck, Innsbruck (Austria); Villunger, Andreas [Division of Developmental Immunology, Biocenter, Medical University Innsbruck, Fritz-Preglstr. 3, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2010-08-01

    Cadmium is an important environmental toxicant that can kill cells. A number of studies have implicated apoptosis as well as necrosis and, most recently, a form of programmed necrosis termed necroptosis in the process of cadmium-mediated toxicity, but the exact mechanism remains ill-defined and may depend on the affected cell type. This study investigated which mode of cell death may be responsible for cell death induction in cadmium-exposed trout cell lines from gill and liver and if this cell death was sensitive to inhibitors of necroptosis or apoptosis, respectively. It was observed that intermediate levels of cadmium that killed approximately 50% of the cells over 96-120 h of exposure caused cell death that morphologically resembled apoptosis and was associated with an increase of apoptotic markers such as the number of cells with diminished DNA content (sub-G1 cells), condensed or fragmented nuclei, and elevation of caspase-3 activity. At the same time, however, cells also lost plasma membrane integrity, as indicated by uptake of propidium iodide, showed a decrease of ATP levels and mitochondrial membrane potential, and displayed cell swelling, signs associated with secondary necrosis, or equally possible, necroptotic cell death. Importantly, many of these alterations were at least partly inhibited by the necroptosis inhibitor necrostatin-1 and were to a lesser extent also sensitive to the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk, indicating that multiple modes of cell death are concurrently induced in cadmium-exposed trout cells, including necroptosis and apoptosis. Cell death appeared to lack concurrent radical formation, consistent with genetically regulated necroptotic cell death, but was characterized by the rapid induction of DNA damage markers, and the early onset of disintegration of the Golgi complex. Comparative experiments evaluating copper-toxicity indicated that in comparison to cadmium much higher concentrations of this metal were required to induce cell

  10. Prenatal cadmium exposure alters postnatal immune cell development and function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, Miranda L.; Holásková, Ida; Elliott, Meenal; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Schafer, Rosana; Barnett, John B., E-mail: jbarnett@hsc.wvu.edu

    2012-06-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is generally found in low concentrations in the environment due to its widespread and continual use, however, its concentration in some foods and cigarette smoke is high. Although evidence demonstrates that adult exposure to Cd causes changes in the immune system, there are limited reports of immunomodulatory effects of prenatal exposure to Cd. This study was designed to investigate the effects of prenatal exposure to Cd on the immune system of the offspring. Pregnant C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to an environmentally relevant dose of CdCl{sub 2} (10 ppm) and the effects on the immune system of the offspring were assessed at two time points following birth (2 and 7 weeks of age). Thymocyte and splenocyte phenotypes were analyzed by flow cytometry. Prenatal Cd exposure did not affect thymocyte populations at 2 and 7 weeks of age. In the spleen, the only significant effect on phenotype was a decrease in the number of macrophages in male offspring at both time points. Analysis of cytokine production by stimulated splenocytes demonstrated that prenatal Cd exposure decreased IL-2 and IL-4 production by cells from female offspring at 2 weeks of age. At 7 weeks of age, splenocyte IL-2 production was decreased in Cd-exposed males while IFN-γ production was decreased from both male and female Cd-exposed offspring. The ability of the Cd-exposed offspring to respond to immunization with a S. pneumoniae vaccine expressing T-dependent and T-independent streptococcal antigens showed marked increases in the levels of both T-dependent and T-independent serum antibody levels compared to control animals. CD4{sup +}FoxP3{sup +}CD25{sup +} (nTreg) cell percentages were increased in the spleen and thymus in all Cd-exposed offspring except in the female spleen where a decrease was seen. CD8{sup +}CD223{sup +} T cells were markedly decreased in the spleens in all offspring at 7 weeks of age. These findings suggest that even very low levels of Cd exposure during gestation can

  11. Three-Terminal Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Hung Tai

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Many defects exist within amorphous silicon since it is not crystalline. This provides recombination centers, thus reducing the efficiency of a typical a-Si solar cell. A new structure is presented in this paper: a three-terminal a-Si solar cell. The new back-to-back p-i-n/n-i-p structure increased the average electric field in a solar cell. A typical a-Si p-i-n solar cell was also simulated for comparison using the same thickness and material parameters. The 0.28 μm-thick three-terminal a-Si solar cell achieved an efficiency of 11.4%, while the efficiency of a typical a-Si p-i-n solar cell was 9.0%. Furthermore, an efficiency of 11.7% was achieved by thickness optimization of the three-terminal solar cell.

  12. NCPV preprints for the 2. world conference on photovoltaic solar energy conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The proceedings contain 26 papers arranged under the following topical sections: Silicon (3 papers); Thin-film PV technologies (11 papers): amorphous silicon, cadmium telluride, copper indium diselenide, and high efficiency devices; Module and BOS manufacturing (2 papers); Cell, module, and system testing (7 papers); and Market development (3 papers). Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  13. Effects of cadmium on cation concentrations in sycamore cells (Acer pseudoplatanus L.): application of EDXRF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, M L; Silveira, L; Casimiro, A

    2002-04-01

    Knowledge of the element content of biological systems is important in enabling understanding of uptake mechanisms and physiological response to stress conditions. In this work concentrations of mineral elements in sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cells grown in the presence of cadmium have been analysed and compared with concentrations in control cells. Energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) was used to quantify the nutrients K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Cu, and Zn present in the cells. The reproducibility and accuracy of the technique were demonstrated by analysis of biological reference materials. Exposure of sycamore cells to cadmium had induced variation in the content of some elements. Mn, Cu, Zn, and, particularly, Fe concentrations in cells exposed to Cd were higher than those found in control cells. Ca is adsorbed on the cell walls and the concentration of K is not affected by the presence of Cd.

  14. Silicon Carbide Solar Cells Investigated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.

    2001-01-01

    The semiconductor silicon carbide (SiC) has long been known for its outstanding resistance to harsh environments (e.g., thermal stability, radiation resistance, and dielectric strength). However, the ability to produce device-quality material is severely limited by the inherent crystalline defects associated with this material and their associated electronic effects. Much progress has been made recently in the understanding and control of these defects and in the improved processing of this material. Because of this work, it may be possible to produce SiC-based solar cells for environments with high temperatures, light intensities, and radiation, such as those experienced by solar probes. Electronics and sensors based on SiC can operate in hostile environments where conventional silicon-based electronics (limited to 350 C) cannot function. Development of this material will enable large performance enhancements and size reductions for a wide variety of systems--such as high-frequency devices, high-power devices, microwave switching devices, and high-temperature electronics. These applications would supply more energy-efficient public electric power distribution and electric vehicles, more powerful microwave electronics for radar and communications, and better sensors and controls for cleaner-burning, more fuel-efficient jet aircraft and automobile engines. The 6H-SiC polytype is a promising wide-bandgap (Eg = 3.0 eV) semiconductor for photovoltaic applications in harsh solar environments that involve high-temperature and high-radiation conditions. The advantages of this material for this application lie in its extremely large breakdown field strength, high thermal conductivity, good electron saturation drift velocity, and stable electrical performance at temperatures as high as 600 C. This behavior makes it an attractive photovoltaic solar cell material for devices that can operate within three solar radii of the Sun.

  15. The fatty acid profile of rainbow trout liver cells modulates their tolerance to methylmercury and cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferain, Aline; Bonnineau, Chloé; Neefs, Ineke; Rees, Jean François; Larondelle, Yvan; Schamphelaere, Karel A C De; Debier, Cathy

    2016-08-01

    The polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) composition of fish tissues, which generally reflects that of the diet, affects various cellular properties such as membrane structure and fluidity, energy metabolism and susceptibility to oxidative stress. Since these cellular parameters can play an important role in the cellular response to organic and inorganic pollutants, a variation of the PUFA supply might modify the toxicity induced by such xenobiotics. In this work, we investigated whether the cellular fatty acid profile has an impact on the in vitro cell sensitivity to two environmental pollutants: methylmercury and cadmium. Firstly, the fatty acid composition of the rainbow trout liver cell line RTL-W1 was modified by enriching the growth medium with either alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6), arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6) or docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, 22:5n-6). These modified cells and their control (no PUFA enrichment) were then challenged for 24h with increasing concentrations of methylmercury or cadmium. We observed that (i) the phospholipid composition of the RTL-W1 cells was profoundly modulated by changing the PUFA content of the growth medium: major modifications were a high incorporation of the supplemented PUFA in the cellular phospholipids, the appearance of direct elongation and desaturation metabolites in the cellular phospholipids as well as a change in the gross phospholipid composition (PUFA and monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) levels and n-3/n-6 ratio); (ii) ALA, EPA and DPA enrichment significantly protected the RTL-W1 cells against both methylmercury and cadmium; (iv) DHA enrichment significantly protected the cells against cadmium but not methylmercury; (v) AA and LA enrichment had no impact on the cell tolerance to both methylmercury and cadmium; (vi) the abundance of 20:3n-6, a metabolite of the n-6 biotransformation pathway, in

  16. Recent Advances in Solar Cell Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Bailey, Sheila G.; Piszczor, Michael F., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The advances in solar cell efficiency, radiation tolerance, and cost over the last decade are reviewed. Potential performance of thin-film solar cells in space are discussed, and the cost and the historical trends in production capability of the photovoltaics industry are considered with respect to the requirements of space power systems. Concentrator cells with conversion efficiency over 30%, and nonconcentrating solar cells with efficiency over 25% are now available, and advanced radiation-tolerant cells and lightweight, thin-film arrays are both being developed. Nonsolar applications of solar cells, including thermophotovoltaics, alpha- and betavoltaics, and laser power receivers, are also discussed.

  17. Work Station For Inverting Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feder, H.; Frasch, W.

    1982-01-01

    Final work station along walking-beam conveyor of solar-array assembly line turns each pretabbed solar cell over, depositing it back-side-up onto landing pad, which centers cell without engaging collector surface. Solar cell arrives at inverting work station collector-side-up with two interconnect tabs attached to collector side. Cells are inverted so that second soldering operation takes place in plain view of operator. Inversion protects collector from damage when handled at later stages of assembly.

  18. Cadmium uptake and sequestration kinetics in individual leaf cell protoplasts of the Cd/Zn hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens

    OpenAIRE

    Leitenmaier, Barbara; Küpper, Hendrik

    2011-01-01

    Hyperaccumulators store accumulated metals in the vacuoles of large leaf epidermal cells (storage cells). For investigating cadmium uptake, we incubated protoplasts obtained from leaves of Thlaspi caerulescens (Ganges ecotype) with a Cd-specific fluorescent dye. A fluorescence kinetic microscope was used for selectively measuring Cd-uptake and photosynthesis in different cell types, so that physical separation of cell types was not necessary. Few minutes after its addition, cadmium accumulate...

  19. Use of Tunable Whole-Cell Bioreporters to Assess Bioavailable Cadmium and Remediation Performance in Soils.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngdae Yoon

    Full Text Available It is important to have tools to measure the bioavailability to assess the risks of pollutants because the bioavailability is defined as the portions of pollutants showing the biological effects on living organisms. This study described the construction of tunable Escherichia coli whole-cell bioreporter (WCB using the promoter region of zinc-inducible operon and its application on contaminated soils. It was verified that this WCB system showed specific and sensitive responses to cadmium rather than zinc in the experimental conditions. It was inferred that Cd(II associates stronger with ZntR, a regulatory protein of zinc-inducible operon, than other metal ions. Moreover, the expression of reporter genes, egfp and mcherry, were proportional to the concentration of cadmium, thereby being a quantitative sensor to monitor bioavailable cadmium. The capability to determine bioavailable cadmium was verified with Cd(II amended LUFA soils, and then the applicability on environmental systems was investigated with field soils collected from smelter area in Korea before and after soil-washing. The total amount of cadmium was decreased after soil washing, while the bioavailability was increased. Consequently, it would be valuable to have tools to assess bioavailability and the effectiveness of soil remediation should be evaluated in the aspect of bioavailability as well as removal efficiency.

  20. An Evaluation of Kinetic Parameters of Cadmium and Copper Biosorption by Immobilized Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelly Georgieva

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Bioremediation is the use of living organisms to reduce or eliminate environmental hazards resulting from the accumulation of toxic chemicals and other hazardous wastes. This technology is based on the utilization of microorganisms to transform organic and inorganic compounds. The filamentous yeast Trichosporon cutaneum strain R57, immobilized and free cells was cultivated as batch culture on a liquid medium in the presence of various concentrations of cadmium and copper ions. The simultaneous uptake and accumulation of Cd2+ and Cu2+ ions by Tr. cutaneum cells depending on the initial concentration of Cd2+ and Cu2+ in the medium were studied. The potential use of the free and immobilized cells of Trichosporon cutaneum to remove cadmium and copper ions, from aqueous solutions was evaluated. Two important physicochemical aspects for the evaluation of the sorption process as a unit operation are the equilibrium of sorption and the kinetics. The Cd2+ and Cu2+ ions biosorption capacities of all tested adsorbent were presented as a function of the initial concentration of metal ions within the aqueous biosorption medium. The individual, as well as bicomponent sorption kinetics of copper and cadmium ions by immobilised cells of Trichosporon cutaneum R57 is presented. A second order kinetic model obtains kinetic parameters for the copper and cadmium ions.

  1. Supramolecular photochemistry and solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IHA NEYDE YUKIE MURAKAMI

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Supramolecular photochemistry as well as solar cells are fascinating topics of current interest in Inorganic Photochemistry and very active research fields which have attracted wide attention in last two decades. A brief outline of the investigations in these fields carried out in our Laboratory of Inorganic Photochemistry and Energy Conversion is given here with no attempt of an exhaustive coverage of the literature. The emphasis is placed on recent work and information on the above mentioned subjects. Three types of supramolecular systems have been the focus of this work: (i cage-type coordination compounds; (ii second-sphere coordination compounds, exemplified by ion-pair photochemistry of cobalt complexes and (iii covalently-linked systems. In the latter, modulation of the photoluminescence and photochemistry of some rhenium complexes are discussed. Solar energy conversion and development of thin-layer photoelectrochemical solar cells based on sensitization of nanocrystalline semiconductor films by some ruthenium polypyridyl complexes are presented as an important application that resulted from specifically engineered artificial assemblies.

  2. Solution processing of next-generation nanocrystal solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Embden, J.; Chesman, A. S. R.; Duffy, N. W.; Della Gaspera, E.; Jasieniak, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Next-generation solar cells will be fabricated from low-cost and earth abundant elements, using processes that are amenable to printing on a variety of light-weight substrates. The utilization of compositionally and structurally controlled colloidal nanocrystals as building blocks for such devices fulfills these criteria. Our recent efforts in developing kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanocrystals, one of the most promising materials to emerge in this area, enable the deposition of CZTS thin-films directly from a variety of solution-processed methods. Nanocrystalline thin films possess poor electronic properties, which precludes their use in solar cell devices. In order to overcome this, thermal treatment steps under an atmosphere of vaporous selenium are applied to induce large scale crystallite growth and the production of selenized CZTSSe films. This process results in a highly photoactive p-type layer. The n-type cadmium sulfide layer is also deposited from solution using chemical bath deposition. We will discuss each of these accomplishments in detail, highlighting the significant challenges that need to be overcome in order to fabricate working CZTSSe thin film solar cells.

  3. Energy Conversion: Nano Solar Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yahaya, Muhammad; Yap, Chi Chin; Mat Salleh, Muhamad

    2009-09-01

    Problems of fossil-fuel-induced climate change have sparked a demand for sustainable energy supply for all sectors of economy. Most laboratories continue to search for new materials and new technique to generate clean energy at affordable cost. Nanotechnology can play a major role in solving the energy problem. The prospect for solar energy using Si-based technology is not encouraging. Si photovoltaics can produce electricity at 20-30 c//kWhr with about 25% efficiency. Nanoparticles have a strong capacity to absorb light and generate more electrons for current as discovered in the recent work of organic and dye-sensitized cell. Using cheap preparation technique such as screen-printing and self-assembly growth, organic cells shows a strong potential for commercialization. Thin Films research group at National University Malaysia has been actively involved in these areas, and in this seminar, we will present a review works on nanomaterials for solar cells and particularly on hybrid organic solar cell based on ZnO nanorod arrays. The organic layer consisting of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy)-1, 4-phenylenevinylene] (MEHPPV) and [6, 6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid 3-ethylthiophene ester (PCBE) was spin-coated on ZnO nanorod arrays. ZnO nanorod arrays were grown on FTO glass substrates which were pre-coated with ZnO nanoparticles using a low temperature chemical solution method. A gold electrode was used as the top contact. The device gave a short circuit current density of 2.49×10-4 mA/cm2 and an open circuit voltage of 0.45 V under illumination of a projector halogen light at 100 mW/cm2.

  4. Solar Energy Cell with Rare Earth Film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Baojun; Yang Tao; Zhou Yao; Zhou Meng; Fu Xiliang; Fu Li

    2004-01-01

    The characteristic of the solar energy cell with the rare earth film according to theory of molecular structure was introduced.When sunlight shines, the molecules of the rare earth film can absorb energy of the photon and jump to the excited state from the basic state, and play a role in storing solar energy.When sunlight do not shine, the electron of the excited state returns to the basic state, the rare earth film can automatically give out light and shine to surface of the solar cell, which can make solar cell continuously generate electric current.The rare earth film can absorb direct,scattering sunlight, and increase density of solar energy to reach surface of the solar cell, and play focusing function.The rare earth film can bear 350 ~ 500 ℃, which make the solar cell be able to utilize the focusing function system.Because after luminescence of the rare earth film, it can release again the absorbed solar energy through 1 ~ 8 h, and play a role in storing solar energy; The solar cell with the rare-earth film can generate electricity during night and cloudy days, and remarkably increase efficiency of the solar cell.

  5. Effects of cadmium on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and proto-oncogene expression in zebrafish liver cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Ying Ying; Zhu, Jin Yong; Chan, King Ming, E-mail: kingchan@cuhk.edu.hk

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Cd stimulated ZFL cell proliferation with decreasing apoptotic cell numbers. • Cd down regulated p53 and RAD51. • Cd up regulated immediate early cancer genes of GADD45 and growth factors. • Cd promoted tumorigenic effects in ZFL cells. - Abstract: Cadmium (Cd) is one of the major transitional metal that has toxic effects in aquatic organisms and their associated ecosystem; however, its hepatic toxicity and carcinogenicity are not very well characterized. We used a zebrafish liver (ZFL) cell line as a model to investigate the mechanism of Cd-induced toxicity on hepatocytes. Our results showed that Cd can be effectively accumulated in ZFL cells in our exposure experiments. Cell cytotoxicity assays and flow cytometer measurements revealed that Cd{sup 2+} stimulated ZFL cell proliferation with decreasing apoptotic cell numbers indicating potentially tumorigenic effects of Cd in ZFL cells. Gene expression profiles also indicated that Cd downregulated oncogenes p53 and rad51 and upregulated immediate response oncogenes, growth arrest and DNA damage-inducible (gadd45) genes, and growth factors. We also found dramatic changes in the gene expression of c-jun and igf1rb at different exposure time points, supporting the notion that potentially tumorigenic of Cd-is involved in the activation of immediate early genes or genes related to apoptosis in cancer promotion.

  6. Nanostructured Interfaces in Hybrid Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Weickert, Jonas

    2014-01-01

    Excitonic solar cells are an emerging technology which holds the great promise of generating clean and sustainable photovoltaic power at lower cost than conventional silicon solar cells. In excitonic solar cells, the light is absorbed by organic semiconductors and dye molecules, which typically exhibit higher exciton binding energies than inorganic semiconductors. Therefore, free charge carriers can be generated only at interfaces between donor and acceptor materials. These interfaces can pro...

  7. Including excitons in semiconductor solar cell modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Burgelman, Marc; Minnaert, Ben

    2005-01-01

    Excitons are marginally important in classical semiconductor device physics, and their treatment is not included in standard solar cell modelling. However, in organic semiconductors and solar cells, the role of excitons is essential, as the primary effect of light absorption is exciton generation, and free electrons and holes are created by exciton dissociation. First steps to include excitons in solar cell modelling were presented by Green 1996 and Zhang 1998. Their model was restricted to a...

  8. Bypass diode for a solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Seung Bum; Kim, Taeseok; Smith, David D.; Cousins, Peter J.

    2012-03-13

    Bypass diodes for solar cells are described. In one embodiment, a bypass diode for a solar cell includes a substrate of the solar cell. A first conductive region is disposed above the substrate, the first conductive region of a first conductivity type. A second conductive region is disposed on the first conductive region, the second conductive region of a second conductivity type opposite the first conductivity type.

  9. Device operation of organic tandem solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadipour, A.; de Boer, B.; Blom, P. W. M.

    2008-01-01

    A generalized methodology is developed to obtain the current-voltage characteristic of polymer tandem solar cells by knowing the electrical performance of both sub cells. We demonstrate that the electrical characteristics of polymer tandem solar cells are correctly predicted for both the series and

  10. Solar Cells Using Quantum Funnels

    KAUST Repository

    Kramer, Illan J.

    2011-09-14

    Colloidal quantum dots offer broad tuning of semiconductor bandstructure via the quantum size effect. Devices involving a sequence of layers comprised of quantum dots selected to have different diameters, and therefore bandgaps, offer the possibility of funneling energy toward an acceptor. Here we report a quantum funnel that efficiently conveys photoelectrons from their point of generation toward an intended electron acceptor. Using this concept we build a solar cell that benefits from enhanced fill factor as a result of this quantum funnel. This concept addresses limitations on transport in soft condensed matter systems and leverages their advantages in large-area optoelectronic devices and systems. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  11. Integration of Solar Cells on Top of CMOS Chips - Part II: CIGS Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Jiwu; Liu, Wei; Kovalgin, Alexey Y.; Sun, Yun; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2011-01-01

    We present the monolithic integration of deepsubmicrometer complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) microchips with copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) solar cells. Solar cells are manufactured directly on unpackaged CMOS chips. The microchips maintain comparable electronic performance,

  12. Three-Terminal Amorphous Silicon Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng-Hung Tai; Chu-Hsuan Lin; Chih-Ming Wang; Chun-Chieh Lin

    2011-01-01

    Many defects exist within amorphous silicon since it is not crystalline. This provides recombination centers, thus reducing the efficiency of a typical a-Si solar cell. A new structure is presented in this paper: a three-terminal a-Si solar cell. The new back-to-back p-i-n/n-i-p structure increased the average electric field in a solar cell. A typical a-Si p-i-n solar cell was also simulated for comparison using the same thickness and material parameters. The 0.28 μm-thick three-terminal a-Si...

  13. CdS/CdTe solar cells by the screen-printing-sintering technique: Fabrication, photovoltaic properties and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikegami, Seiji

    1988-01-15

    CdS/CdTe solar cells are fabricated on a borosilicate glass substrate by successively repeating screen printing and sintering (heating) in a belt furnace pastes of CdS, cadmium plus tellurium, carbon, silver plus indium and silver. In various sizes of solar cells, the highest efficiencies have been achieved for II-VI compound solar cells. The present solar cells have a spectral sensitivity up to a slightly longer wavelength than that of the usual CdS/CdTe solar cells. This may be due to the formation of CdS/sub x/Te/sub 1-x/ mixed crystals during the sintering of CdTe. In reliability tests under rooftop conditions, no remarkable change in the output power was observed in encapsulated solar cells over 800 days. From the results of accelerated tests on unencapsulated solar cells, a waterproof-type structure for the present solar cell module is required. The present solar cells and modules are now on the market for both indoor use and outdoor use; this is the first experience of the use of II-VI compound solar cells. Efforts to expand their application are being continued.

  14. Cadmium chloride alters mRNA levels of angiogenesis related genes in primary human endometrial endothelial cells grown in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmestam, Malin; Stavreus-Evers, Anneli; Olovsson, Matts

    2010-11-01

    Cadmium, is known to cause adverse reproductive effects, and classified as an endocrine disrupting chemical (EDC). Human endometrial endothelial cells (HEEC) have a key role in the regulation of endometrial angiogenesis. These cells are known to express estrogen receptors, a feature that makes them potential targets for EDCs such as cadmium. We have designed a co-culture system, in which HEEC were grown in the same cell culture medium as endometrial stromal cells but in separate, communicating chambers. With quantitative PCR, we investigated changes in mRNA expression of genes associated with angiogenesis, sex steroids and endothelial cell specific functions. We found that cadmium altered the mRNA expression of the two important angiogenic molecules VEGF-A and PLGF. Cadmium might thus affect endometrial angiogenesis and as a consequence cause endometrial dysfunction with an increased risk for fertility problems. PMID:20580663

  15. Life Cycle Assessment of Titania Perovskite Solar Cell Technology for Sustainable Design and Manufacturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingyi; Gao, Xianfeng; Deng, Yelin; Li, Bingbing; Yuan, Chris

    2015-11-01

    Perovskite solar cells have attracted enormous attention in recent years due to their low cost and superior technical performance. However, the use of toxic metals, such as lead, in the perovskite dye and toxic chemicals in perovskite solar cell manufacturing causes grave concerns for its environmental performance. To understand and facilitate the sustainable development of perovskite solar cell technology from its design to manufacturing, a comprehensive environmental impact assessment has been conducted on titanium dioxide nanotube based perovskite solar cells by using an attributional life cycle assessment approach, from cradle to gate, with manufacturing data from our laboratory-scale experiments and upstream data collected from professional databases and the literature. The results indicate that the perovskite dye is the primary source of environmental impact, associated with 64.77% total embodied energy and 31.38% embodied materials consumption, contributing to more than 50% of the life cycle impact in almost all impact categories, although lead used in the perovskite dye only contributes to about 1.14% of the human toxicity potential. A comparison of perovskite solar cells with commercial silicon and cadmium-tellurium solar cells reveals that perovskite solar cells could be a promising alternative technology for future large-scale industrial applications. PMID:26489525

  16. Integration of Solar Cells on Top of CMOS Chips Part I: a-Si Solar Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lu, Jiwu; Kovalgin, Alexey Y.; Werf, van der Karine H.M.; Schropp, Ruud E.I.; Schmitz, Jurriaan

    2011-01-01

    We present the monolithic integration of deepsubmicrometer complementary metal–oxide–semiconductor (CMOS) microchips with a-Si:H solar cells. Solar cells are manufactured directly on the CMOS chips. The microchips maintain comparable electronic performance, and the solar cells show efficiency values

  17. Morphology of polymer solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Böttiger, Arvid P.L.

    of making the transition from the laboratory into the commercial market. One of the biggest challenges in this process is upscaling the production. The object of this thesis is to investigate the morphology of OPV devices produced from pilot scale roll to roll (R2R) coaters. OPV devices still struggle...... with low performance, and the morphology is known to have a critical impact on the performance of a device. Several studies have tried to identify the optimal morphology of OPV devices and how to achieve it. Most work has been focused on OPVs produced by spin coating in a small laboratory scale. Devices...... the morphology of the active layer of the solar cells when produced with water based inks using R2R coating. Using a broad range of scattering and imaging techniques, cells coated with water based inks were investigated, and compared to their spin coated counterpart. Two challenges to be addressed were small...

  18. Advances in thin-film solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Dharmadasa, I M

    2012-01-01

    This book concentrates on the latest developments in our understanding of solid-state device physics. The material presented is mainly experimental and based on CdTe thin-film solar cells. It extends these new findings to CIGS thin-film solar cells and presents a new device design based on graded bandgap multilayer solar cells. This design has been experimentally tested using the well-researched GaAs/AlGaAs system and initial devices have shown impressive device parameters. These devices are capable of absorbing all radiation (UV, visible, and infra-red) within the solar spectrum and combines

  19. Organic Tandem Solar Cells: Design and Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chun-Chao

    In the past decade, research on organic solar cells has gone through an important development stage leading to major enhancements in power conversion efficiency, from 4% to 9% in single-junction devices. During this period, there are many novel processing techniques and device designs that have been proposed and adapted in organic solar-cell devices. One well-known device architecture that helps maximize the solar cell efficiency is the multi-junction tandem solar-cell design. Given this design, multiple photoactive absorbers as subcells are stacked in a monolithic fashion and assembled via series connection into one complete device, known as the tandem solar cell. Since multiple absorbers with different optical energy bandgaps are being applied in one tandem solar-cell device, the corresponding solar cell efficiency is maximized through expanded absorption spectrum and reduced carrier thermalization loss. In Chapter 3, the architecture of solution-processible, visibly transparent solar cells is introduced. Unlike conventional organic solar-cell devices with opaque electrodes (such as silver, aluminum, gold and etc.), the semi-transparent solar cells rely on highly transparent electrodes and visibly transparent photoactive absorbers. Given these two criteria, we first demonstrated the visibly transparent single-junction solar cells via the polymer absorber with near-infrared absorption and the top electrode based on solution-processible silver nanowire conductor. The highest visible transparency (400 ˜ 700 nm) of 65% was achieved for the complete device structure. More importantly, power conversion efficiency of 4% was also demonstrated. In Chapter 4, we stacked two semi-transparent photoactive absorbers in the tandem architecture in order to realize the semi-transparent tandem solar cells. A noticeable performance improvement from 4% to 7% was observed. More importantly, we modified the interconnecting layers with the incorporation of a thin conjugated

  20. Perovskite solar cells: an emerging photovoltaic technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam-Gyu Park

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Perovskite solar cells based on organometal halides represent an emerging photovoltaic technology. Perovskite solar cells stem from dye-sensitized solar cells. In a liquid-based dye-sensitized solar cell structure, the adsorption of methylammonium lead halide perovskite on a nanocrystalline TiO2 surface produces a photocurrent with a power conversion efficiency (PCE of around 3–4%, as first discovered in 2009. The PCE was doubled after 2 years by optimizing the perovskite coating conditions. However, the liquid-based perovskite solar cell receives little attention because of its stability issues, including instant dissolution of the perovskite in a liquid electrolyte. A long-term, stable, and high efficiency (∼10% perovskite solar cell was developed in 2012 by substituting the solid hole conductor with a liquid electrolyte. Efficiencies have quickly risen to 18% in just 2 years. Since PCE values over 20% are realistically anticipated with the use of cheap organometal halide perovskite materials, perovskite solar cells are a promising photovoltaic technology. In this review, the opto-electronic properties of perovskite materials and recent progresses in perovskite solar cells are described. In addition, comments on the issues to current and future challenges are mentioned.

  1. Infrared-Controlled Welding of Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulson, R.; Finnell, S. E.; Decker, H. J.; Hodor, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed apparatus for welding large arrays of solar cells to flexible circuit substrates would sense infrared emission from welding spot. Emission would provide feedback for control of welding heat. Welding platform containing optical fibers moves upward through slots in movable holding fixture to contact solar cells. Fibers pick up infrared radiation from weld area.

  2. Screen Printed Metallization of Silicon Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Govaerts, R.; Van Overstraeten, R.; Mertens, R.; Ph. Lauwers; Frisson, L.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents a screen printing process for the metallization of silicon solar cells. The physics and construction of a classical solar cell are reviewed. The results obtained with a screen printing process are comparable with other, more expensive technologies. This technology does not introduce an additional contact resistance on silicon. The process optimization and the influence of different parameters are discussed.

  3. Towards upconversion for amorphous silicon solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wild, J.; Meijerink, A.; Rath, J.K.; van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.; Schropp, R.E.I.

    2010-01-01

    Upconversion of subbandgap light of thin film single junction amorphous silicon solar cells may enhance their performance in the near infrared (NIR). In this paper we report on the application of the NIR–vis upconverter β-NaYF4:Yb3+(18%) Er3+(2%) at the back of an amorphous silicon solar cell in com

  4. Scaling up ITO-Free solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galagan, Y.O.; Coenen, E.W.C.; Zimmermann, B.; Slooff, L.H.; Verhees, W.J.H.; Veenstra, S.C.; Kroon, J.M.; Jørgensen, M.; Krebs, F.C.; Andriessen, H.A.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Indium-tin-oxide-free (ITO-free) polymer solar cells with composite electrodes containing current-collecting grids and a semitransparent poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) conductor are demonstrated. The up-scaling of the length of the solar cell from 1 to 6 cm and th

  5. Perovskite solar cells: Different facets of performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eperon, Giles E.; Ginger, David S.

    2016-08-01

    The electronic properties of halide perovskites vary significantly between crystalline grains, but the impact of this heterogeneity on solar cell performance is unclear. Now, this variability is shown to limit the photovoltaic properties of solar cells, and its origins are linked to differing properties between crystal facets.

  6. Fullerene surfactants and their use in polymer solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jen, Kwan-Yue; Yip, Hin-Lap; Li, Chang-Zhi

    2015-12-15

    Fullerene surfactant compounds useful as interfacial layer in polymer solar cells to enhance solar cell efficiency. Polymer solar cell including a fullerene surfactant-containing interfacial layer intermediate cathode and active layer.

  7. Methodologies for high efficiency perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Nam-Gyu

    2016-06-01

    Since the report on long-term durable solid-state perovskite solar cell in 2012, perovskite solar cells based on lead halide perovskites having organic cations such as methylammonium CH3NH3PbI3 or formamidinium HC(NH2)2PbI3 have received great attention because of superb photovoltaic performance with power conversion efficiency exceeding 22 %. In this review, emergence of perovskite solar cell is briefly introduced. Since understanding fundamentals of light absorbers is directly related to their photovoltaic performance, opto-electronic properties of organo lead halide perovskites are investigated in order to provide insight into design of higher efficiency perovskite solar cells. Since the conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cell is found to depend significantly on perovskite film quality, methodologies for fabricating high quality perovskite films are particularly emphasized, including various solution-processes and vacuum deposition method.

  8. Nanowire-based All Oxide Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang*, Benjamin D. Yuhas and Peidong; Yang, Peidong

    2008-12-07

    We present an all-oxide solar cell fabricated from vertically oriented zinc oxide nanowires and cuprous oxide nanoparticles. Our solar cell consists of vertically oriented n-type zinc oxide nanowires, surrounded by a film constructed from p-type cuprous oxide nanoparticles. Our solution-based synthesis of inexpensive and environmentally benign oxide materials in a solar cell would allow for the facile production of large-scale photovoltaic devices. We found that the solar cell performance is enhanced with the addition of an intermediate oxide insulating layer between the nanowires and the nanoparticles. This observation of the important dependence of the shunt resistance on the photovoltaic performance is widely applicable to any nanowire solar cell constructed with the nanowire array in direct contact with one electrode.

  9. High Radiation Resistance IMM Solar Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Noren

    2015-01-01

    Due to high launch costs, weight reduction is a key driver for the development of new solar cell technologies suitable for space applications. This project is developing a unique triple-junction inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) technology that enables the manufacture of very lightweight, low-cost InGaAsP-based multijunction solar cells. This IMM technology consists of indium (In) and phosphorous (P) solar cell active materials, which are designed to improve the radiation-resistant properties of the triple-junction solar cell while maintaining high efficiency. The intrinsic radiation hardness of InP materials makes them of great interest for building solar cells suitable for deployment in harsh radiation environments, such as medium Earth orbit and missions to the outer planets. NASA Glenn's recently developed epitaxial lift-off (ELO) process also will be applied to this new structure, which will enable the fabrication of the IMM structure without the substrate.

  10. Dynamics of mercury, cadmium and vanadium in cultured bovine kidney cells: an examination of relationships to cytotoxicity and cell function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was to partially define the in vitro cellular response to mercury, cadmium and vanadium insult. A bovine kidney cell line served as the model system for examining the relationship of the cellular dynamics of metal accumulation and distribution to cytotoxicity. Additionally, biochemical marker functions were monitored in surviving cells to determine the importance of metal uptake and distribution to cell functionality. Each metal (HgCl2, CdCl2, and Na3VO4) elicited a concentration-related cytotoxicity which was correlated to the cellular metal burden. Multiphasic accumulation kinetics were established for mercury and vanadium; cadmium was accumulated in a linear fashion. Subcellular metal distribution was independent of both the extra-cellular metal concentration and the degree of cytotoxicity. Biochemical marker functions indicated a toxicity-related decrease in cell functionality in surviving cells for all metals

  11. Glucose alleviates cadmium toxicity by increasing cadmium fixation in root cell wall and sequestration into vacuole in Arabidopsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yuan-Zhi Shi; Xiao-Fang Zhu; Jiang-Xue Wan; Gui-Xin Li; Shao-Jian Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Glucose (Glu) is involved in not only plant physiological and developmental events but also plant responses to abiotic stresses. Here, we found that the exogenous Glu improved root and shoot growth, reduced shoot cadmium (Cd) concentration, and rescued Cd-induced chlorosis in Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia ecotype, Col-0) under Cd stressed conditions. Glucose increased Cd retained in the roots, thus reducing its translocation from root to shoot significantly. The most Cd retained in the roots was found in the hemicellulose 1. Glucose combined with Cd (Glu þ Cd) treatment did not affect the content of pectin and its binding capacity of Cd while it increased the content of hemicelluloses 1 and the amount of Cd retained in it significantly. Furthermore, Leadmium Green staining indicated that more Cd was compartmented into vacuoles in Glu þ Cd treatment compared with Cd treatment alone, which was in accordance with the significant upregulation of the expression of tonoplast-localized metal transporter genes, suggesting that com-partmentation of Cd into vacuoles also contributes to the Glu-alleviated Cd toxicity. Taken together, we demonstrated that Glu-alleviated Cd toxicity is mediated through increas-ing Cd fixation in the root cell wall and sequestration into the vacuoles.

  12. Coating Processes Boost Performance of Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    NASA currently has spacecraft orbiting Mercury (MESSENGER), imaging the asteroid Vesta (Dawn), roaming the red plains of Mars (the Opportunity rover), and providing a laboratory for humans to advance scientific research in space (the International Space Station, or ISS). The heart of the technology that powers those missions and many others can be held in the palm of your hand - the solar cell. Solar, or photovoltaic (PV), cells are what make up the panels and arrays that draw on the Sun s light to generate electricity for everything from the Hubble Space Telescope s imaging equipment to the life support systems for the ISS. To enable NASA spacecraft to utilize the Sun s energy for exploring destinations as distant as Jupiter, the Agency has invested significant research into improving solar cell design and efficiency. Glenn Research Center has been a national leader in advancing PV technology. The Center s Photovoltaic and Power Technologies Branch has conducted numerous experiments aimed at developing lighter, more efficient solar cells that are less expensive to manufacture. Initiatives like the Forward Technology Solar Cell Experiments I and II in which PV cells developed by NASA and private industry were mounted outside the ISS have tested how various solar technologies perform in the harsh conditions of space. While NASA seeks to improve solar cells for space applications, the results are returning to Earth to benefit the solar energy industry.

  13. Effects of high-temperature annealing on ultra-thin CdTe solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-temperature annealing (HTA), a process step prior to vapor cadmium chloride (VCC) treatment, has been found to be useful for improving the crystallinity of CdTe films and the efficiency of ultra-thin CdTe solar cells. Scanning electron microscopy, optical absorption, photoluminescence measurements and analyses on photoluminescence results using spectral deconvolution reveal that the additional HTA step produces substantial grain growth and reduces grain boundary defects. It also reduces excessive sulfur diffusion across the junction that can occur during the VCC treatment. The HTA step helps to produce pinhole-free CdTe films and reduce electrical shorts in ultra-thin CdTe solar cells. An efficiency of about 11.6% has been demonstrated for ultra-thin CdS/CdTe solar cells processed with HTA step.

  14. Effects of high-temperature annealing on ultra-thin CdTe solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia Wei; Lin Hao; Wu, Hsiang N.; Tang, Ching W., E-mail: chtang@che.rochester.edu

    2011-10-31

    High-temperature annealing (HTA), a process step prior to vapor cadmium chloride (VCC) treatment, has been found to be useful for improving the crystallinity of CdTe films and the efficiency of ultra-thin CdTe solar cells. Scanning electron microscopy, optical absorption, photoluminescence measurements and analyses on photoluminescence results using spectral deconvolution reveal that the additional HTA step produces substantial grain growth and reduces grain boundary defects. It also reduces excessive sulfur diffusion across the junction that can occur during the VCC treatment. The HTA step helps to produce pinhole-free CdTe films and reduce electrical shorts in ultra-thin CdTe solar cells. An efficiency of about 11.6% has been demonstrated for ultra-thin CdS/CdTe solar cells processed with HTA step.

  15. CdS: Characterization and recent advances in CdTe solar cell performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferekides, C.; Marinskiy, D.; Morel, D.L. [Univ. of South Florida, FL (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) films deposited by chemical bath deposition (CBD) have been used for the fabrication of high efficiency CdTe and CuIn{sub 1{minus}x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} thin film solar cells. An attractive alternative deposition technology with manufacturing advantages over the CBD is the close spaced sublimation (CSS). In this work CdTe/CdS solar cells prepared entirely by the CSS process exhibited 15.0% efficiencies under global AM1.5 conditions as verified at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This paper reports on studies carried out on as deposited and heat treated CSS CdS films and all CSS CdTe/CdS solar cells using photoluminescence, x-ray diffraction, and I-V-T measurements.

  16. Industrial n-type solar cells with >20% cell efficiency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romijn, I.G.; Anker, J.; Burgers, A.R.; Gutjahr, A.; Koppes, M.; Kossen, E.J.; Lamers, M.W.P.E.; Heurtault, Benoit; Saynova-Oosterling, D.S.; Tool, C.J.J. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-03-15

    To realize high efficiencies at low costs, ECN has developed the n-Pasha solar cell concept. The n-Pasha cell concept is a bifacial solar cell concept on n-Cz base material, with which average efficiencies of above 20% have been demonstrated. In this paper recent developments at ECN to improve the cost of ownership (lower Euro/Wp) of the n-Pasha cell concept are discussed. Two main drivers for the manufacturing costs of n-type solar cells are addressed: the n-type Cz silicon material and the silver consumption. We show that a large resistivity range between 2 and 8 cm can be tolerated for high cell efficiency, and that the costs due to the silver metallization can be significantly reduced while increasing the solar cell efficiency. Combining the improved efficiency and cost reduction makes the n-Pasha cell concept a very cost effective solution to manufacture high efficient solar cells and modules.

  17. Tandem photovoltaic solar cells and increased solar energy conversion efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loferski, J. J.

    1976-01-01

    Tandem photovoltaic cells, as proposed by Jackson (1955) to increase the efficiency of solar energy conversion, involve the construction of a system of stacked p/n homojunction photovoltaic cells composed of different semiconductors. It had been pointed out by critics, however, that the total power which could be extracted from the cells in the stack placed side by side was substantially greater than the power obtained from the stacked cells. A reexamination of the tandem cell concept in view of the development of the past few years is conducted. It is concluded that the use of tandem cell systems in flat plate collectors, as originally envisioned by Jackson, may yet become feasible as a result of the development of economically acceptable solar cells for large scale terrestrial power generation.

  18. Amorphous silicon crystalline silicon heterojunction solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Fahrner, Wolfgang Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Amorphous Silicon/Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells deals with some typical properties of heterojunction solar cells, such as their history, the properties and the challenges of the cells, some important measurement tools, some simulation programs and a brief survey of the state of the art, aiming to provide an initial framework in this field and serve as a ready reference for all those interested in the subject. This book helps to ""fill in the blanks"" on heterojunction solar cells. Readers will receive a comprehensive overview of the principles, structures, processing techniques and the curre

  19. Solar Cell Panel and the Method for Manufacturing the Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Sarver, Charles F. (Inventor); Naidenkova, Maria (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    According to an aspect of an embodiment of the present disclosure, there is provided a solar cell panel and a method for manufacturing the same. The solar cell panel comprises: a solar cell for generating electric power from sunlight; a coverglass for covering the solar cell; transparent shims, which are disposed between the solar cell and the coverglass at the points where the distance between the solar cell and the coverglass needs to be controlled, and form a space between the solar cell and the coverglass; and adhesive layer, which fills the space between the solar cell and the coverglass and has the thickness the same as that of the transparent shims.

  20. Dye-sensitized Solar Cells for Solar Energy Harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, M. S.; Deol, Y. S.; Kumar, Manish; Prasad, Narottam; Janu, Yojana

    2011-10-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) also known as Gratzel cells, have attracted the interests of researchers to a great extent because of its cost effective and easy manufacturing process without involving highly sophisticated lithographic technique and high cost raw materials as usually seen in conventional solar cell. Based on simple photo-electrochemical process, it has got immense potential in converting solar energy to electrical power in remote and desert area where the supply of conventional power is not possible. The overall peak power-production efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells has been reported around 11 percent, so they are best suited to low-density applications and the price-to-performance ratio obtained through these solar cells is superior to others. DSSCs have ability to absorb even diffused sunlight and therefore work in cloudy whether as well without much impact over the efficiency. The present communication deals with a review of our work on DSSCs wherein we have used cost effective natural dyes/pigments as a sensitizer of nc-TiO2 and discussed about various key factors affecting the conversion efficiency of DSSC.

  1. Recent Advancements and Techniques in Manufacture of Solar Cells: Organic Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Naga Venkata Sai Ganesh,

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The major problem faced by the society is power crisis. All the non-renewable resources like fossil fuelsnecessary for producing power are being used excessively, which might result a day in future where, the world might godark due to lack of power producing resources. Usage of renewable resources like solar energy can be a solution to thisproblem. Solar cells invented to overcome this problem show rigidity in their structure which is a drawback. Inorganicsolar cells are rigid and can be mounted only on rooftops. Hence only upper surface of buildings are utilized. In this paperwe bring out a new era or solar cells- organic solar cells, which are flexible. These organic solar cells offer the bestsolution for the above problem for a tradeoff of efficiency. This paper briefs the manufacturing technique of solar cellsfrom plastic i.e. ,organic polymers, their architecture, the working process of solar energy production from the organicsolar cells with their ease of usage

  2. Recent Advances in Organic Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Kietzke

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar cells based on organic semiconductors have attracted much attention. The thickness of the active layer of organic solar cells is typically only 100 nm thin, which is about 1000 times thinner than for crystalline silicon solar cells and still 10 times thinner than for current inorganic thin film cells. The low material consumption per area and the easy processing of organic semiconductors offer a huge potential for low cost large area solar cells. However, to compete with inorganic solar cells the efficiency of organic solar cells has to be improved by a factor of 2-3. Several organic semiconducting materials have been investigated so far, but the optimum material still has to be designed. Similar as for organic light emitting devices (OLED small molecules are competing with polymers to become the material of choice. After a general introduction into the device structures and operational principles of organic solar cells the three different basic types (all polymer based, all small molecules based and small molecules mixed with polymers are described in detail in this review. For each kind the current state of research is described and the best of class reported efficiencies are listed.

  3. Snakehead-fish cell line, SSN-1 (Ophicephalus striatus) as a model for cadmium genotoxicity testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aramphongphan, A; Laovitthayanggoon, S; Himakoun, L

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential of snakehead-fish cell line (SSN-1 cells) derived from a striped snakehead (Ophicephalus striatus) as a model in the genotoxic assessment of cadmium (Cd). The first approach employed was to determine the contaminated Cd levels in commercial snakehead fish by the Graphite Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer. In the second approach, the sensitivity of SSN-1 cells to cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of Cd was assessed by Trypan blue and micronucleus assays following 24, 48, and 72 h of incubation period. Exposure of SSN-1 cells to four increasing Cd concentrations ranging from 0.005 to 5 ppm for 72 h did not affect their survival as compared to the control cells. The Cd uptake by SSN-1 cells showed a concentration-dependent increase in intracellular Cd levels. Three non-cytotoxic Cd concentrations (0.05, 0.5, and 5 ppm) showed a concentration-dependent genotoxic effect, compared to relevant control cells. Both micronucleus frequencies and cadmium uptake levels by SSN-1 cells depended on exposure concentrations. These results showed that the SSN-1 cells are suitable for use as a model for in vitro Cd genotoxicity testing.

  4. Electrochemical monitoring of phytochelatin accumulation in Nicotiana tabacum cells exposed to sub-cytotoxic and cytotoxic levels of cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fojta, Miroslav [Laboratory of Biophysical Chemistry and Molecular Oncology, Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Kralovopolska 135, 612 65 Brno (Czech Republic)]. E-mail: fojta@ibp.cz; Fojtova, Miloslava [Laboratory of Molecular Epigenetics, Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Kralovopolska 135, 612 65 Brno (Czech Republic); Havran, Ludek [Laboratory of Biophysical Chemistry and Molecular Oncology, Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Kralovopolska 135, 612 65 Brno (Czech Republic); Pivonkova, Hana [Laboratory of Biophysical Chemistry and Molecular Oncology, Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Kralovopolska 135, 612 65 Brno (Czech Republic); Dorcak, Vlastimil [Laboratory of Biophysical Chemistry and Molecular Oncology, Institute of Biophysics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Kralovopolska 135, 612 65 Brno (Czech Republic); Sestakova, Ivana [J. Heyrovsky Institute of Physical Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Dolejskova 3, 182 23 Prague 8 (Czech Republic)

    2006-02-03

    Cadmium belongs to the most dangerous environmental pollutants among the toxic heavy metals seriously affecting vital functions in both animal and plant cells. It has been previously shown that cadmium ions at 50-100 {mu}M concentrations caused tobacco BY-2 (TBY-2) cells to enter apoptosis within several days of exposure. Phytochelatins (PCs), the 'plant metallothioneins', are cysteine-rich peptides involved in detoxification of heavy metals in plants. The PCs are synthesized in response to the heavy metal exposure. In this paper, we utilized electrochemical analysis to monitor accumulation of PCs in the TBY-2 cells exposed to cadmium ions. Measurements of a characteristic PC signal at mercury electrode in the presence of cobalt ions made it possible to detect changes in the cellular PC levels during the time of cultivation, starting from 30 min after exposure. Upon TBY-2 cultivation in the presence of cytotoxic cadmium concentrations, the PC levels remarkably increased during the pre-apoptotic phase and reached a limiting value at cultivation times coinciding with apoptosis trigger. The PC level observed for a sub-cytotoxic cadmium concentration (10 {mu}M) was about three-times lower than that observed for the 50 or 100 {mu}M cadmium ions after 5 days of exposure. We show that using a simple electrochemical analysis, synthesis of PCs in plant cells can be easily followed in parallel with other tests of the cellular response to the toxic heavy metal stress.

  5. Thin-film crystalline silicon solar cells

    CERN Document Server

    Brendel, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    This introduction to the physics of silicon solar cells focuses on thin cells, while reviewing and discussing the current status of the important technology. An analysis of the spectral quantum efficiency of thin solar cells is given as well as a full set of analytical models. This is the first comprehensive treatment of light trapping techniques for the enhancement of the optical absorption in thin silicon films.

  6. Over-expression of human endosulfatase-1 exacerbates cadmium-induced injury to transformed human lung cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Huiying [Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, Center for Comparative Molecular Translational Research, College of Veterinary Medicine, NC State University, Raleigh, NC 27607 (United States); Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, NC State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Newman, Donna R. [Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, Center for Comparative Molecular Translational Research, College of Veterinary Medicine, NC State University, Raleigh, NC 27607 (United States); Bonner, James C. [Department of Environmental and Molecular Toxicology, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, NC State University, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Sannes, Philip L., E-mail: philip_sannes@ncsu.edu [Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, Center for Comparative Molecular Translational Research, College of Veterinary Medicine, NC State University, Raleigh, NC 27607 (United States)

    2012-11-15

    Environmental exposure to cadmium is known to cause damage to alveolar epithelial cells of the lung, impair their capacity to repair, and result in permanent structural alterations. Cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) can modulate cell responses to injury through their interactions with soluble effector molecules. These interactions are often sulfate specific, and the removal of sulfate groups from HS side chains could be expected to influence cellular injury, such as that caused by exposure to cadmium. The goal of this study was to define the role 6-O-sulfate plays in cellular responses to cadmium exposure in two pulmonary epithelial cancer cell lines (H292 and A549) and in normal human primary alveolar type II (hAT2) cells. Sulfate levels were modified by transduced transient over-expression of 6-O-endosulfatase (HSulf-1), a membrane-bound enzyme which specifically removes 6-O-sulfate groups from HSPG side chains. Results showed that cadmium decreased cell viability and activated apoptosis pathways at low concentrations in hAT2 cells but not in the cancer cells. HSulf-1 over-expression, on the contrary, decreased cell viability and activated apoptosis pathways in H292 and A549 cells but not in hAT2 cells. When combined with cadmium, HSulf-1 over-expression further decreased cell viability and exacerbated the activation of apoptosis pathways in the transformed cells but did not add to the toxicity in hAT2 cells. The finding that HSulf-1 sensitizes these cancer cells and intensifies the injury induced by cadmium suggests that 6-O-sulfate groups on HSPGs may play important roles in protection against certain environmental toxicants, such as heavy metals. -- Highlights: ► Primary human lung alveolar type 2 (hAT2) cells and H292 and A549 cells were used. ► Cadmium induced apoptosis in hAT2 cells but not in H292 or A549 cells. ► HSulf-1exacerbates apoptosis induced by cadmium in H292 and A549 but not hAT2 cells.

  7. The activation of thin film CdTe solar cells using alternative chlorine containing compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maniscalco, B., E-mail: B.Maniscalco@lboro.ac.uk [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering (United Kingdom); Abbas, A.; Bowers, J.W.; Kaminski, P.M.; Bass, K. [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering (United Kingdom); West, G. [Department of Materials, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Walls, J.M. [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-01

    The re-crystallisation of thin film cadmium telluride (CdTe) using cadmium chloride (CdCl{sub 2}) is a vital process for obtaining high efficiency photovoltaic devices. However, the precise micro-structural mechanisms involved are not well understood. In this study, we have used alternative chlorine-containing compounds to determine if these can also assist the re-crystallisation of the CdTe layer and to understand the separate roles of cadmium and chlorine during the activation. The compounds used were: tellurium tetrachloride (TeCl{sub 4}), cadmium acetate (Cd(CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2}){sub 2}), hydrochloric acid (HCl) and zinc chloride (ZnCl{sub 2}). TeCl{sub 4} was used to assess the role of Cl and the formation of a Te-rich outer layer which may assist the formation of the back contact. (Cd(CH{sub 3}CO{sub 2}){sub 2}) and HCl were used to distinguish between the roles of cadmium and chlorine in the process. Finally, ZnCl{sub 2} was employed as an alternative to CdCl{sub 2}. We report on the efficacy of using these alternative Cl-containing compounds to remove the high density of planar defects present in untreated CdTe. - Highlights: • Cadmium chloride (CdCl{sub 2}) activation treatment • Alternative chlorine containing compounds • Microstructure analysis and electrical performances.

  8. Electron irradiation of modern solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Miyahira, T. F.

    1977-01-01

    A number of modern solar cell types representing 1976 technology (as well as some older types) were irradiated with 1 MeV electrons (and a limited number with 2 MeV electrons and 10 MeV protons). After irradiation, the cells were annealed, with I-V curves measured under AMO at 30 C. The purpose was to provide data to be incorporated in the revision of the solar cell radiation handbook. Cell resistivities ranged from 2 to 20 ohm-cm, and cell thickness from 0.05 to 0.46 mm. Cell types examined were conventional, shallow junction, back surface field (BSF), textured, and textured with BSF.

  9. Inorganic caesium lead iodide perovskite solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Eperon, GE; Paterno', GM; Sutton, RJ; Zampetti, A.; Haghighirad, A; Cacialli, F.; Snaith, H.

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of perovskite solar cell research has focused on organic-inorganic lead trihalide perovskites. Herein, we present working inorganic CsPbI3 perovskite solar cells for the first time. CsPbI3 normally resides in a yellow non-perovskite phase at room temperature, but by careful processing control and development of a low-temperature phase transition route we have stabilised the material in the black perovskite phase at room temperature. As such, we have fabricated solar cell dev...

  10. Photoelectrochemical Solar Cells Based on Chitosan Electroylte

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M.H.A.Buraidah; A.K.Arof

    2007-01-01

    1 Results ITO-ZnTe/Chitosan-NH4I-I2/ITO photoelectrochemical solar cells have been fabricated and characterized by current-voltage characteristics.In this work,the ZnTe thin film was prepared by electrodeposition on indium-tin-oxide coated glass.The chitosan electrolyte consists of NH4I salt and iodine.Iodine was added to provide the I3-/I- redox couple.The PEC solar cell was fabricated by sandwiching an electrolyte film between the ZnTe semiconductor and ITO conducting glass.The area of the solar cell...

  11. Metamorphic Epitaxy for Multijunction Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    France, Ryan M.; Dimroth, Frank; Grassman, Tyler J.; King, Richard R.

    2016-03-01

    Multijunction solar cells have proven to be capable of extremely high efficiencies by combining multiple semiconductor materials with bandgaps tuned to the solar spectrum. Reaching the optimum set of semiconductors often requires combining high-quality materials with different lattice constants into a single device, a challenge particularly suited for metamorphic epitaxy. In this article, we describe different approaches to metamorphic multijunction solar cells, including traditional upright metamorphic, state-of-the-art inverted metamorphic, and forward-looking multijunction designs on silicon. We also describe the underlying materials science of graded buffers that enables metamorphic subcells with low dislocation densities. Following nearly two decades of research, recent efforts have demonstrated high-quality lattice-mismatched multijunction solar cells with very little performance loss related to the mismatch, enabling solar-to-electric conversion efficiencies over 45%.

  12. Recent Advances in Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umer Mehmood

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy is an abundant and accessible source of renewable energy available on earth, and many types of photovoltaic (PV devices like organic, inorganic, and hybrid cells have been developed to harness the energy. PV cells directly convert solar radiation into electricity without affecting the environment. Although silicon based solar cells (inorganic cells are widely used because of their high efficiency, they are rigid and manufacturing costs are high. Researchers have focused on organic solar cells to overcome these disadvantages. DSSCs comprise a sensitized semiconductor (photoelectrode and a catalytic electrode (counter electrode with an electrolyte sandwiched between them and their efficiency depends on many factors. The maximum electrical conversion efficiency of DSSCs attained so far is 11.1%, which is still low for commercial applications. This review examines the working principle, factors affecting the efficiency, and key challenges facing DSSCs.

  13. Optical models for silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marshall, T.; Sopori, B. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Light trapping is an important design feature for high-efficiency silicon solar cells. Because light trapping can considerably enhance optical absorption, a thinner substrate can be used which, in turn, can lower the bulk carrier recombination and concommitantly increase open-circuit voltage, and fill factor of the cell. The basic concepts of light trapping are similar to that of excitation of an optical waveguide, where a prism or a grating structure increases the phase velocity of the incoming optical wave such that waves propagated within the waveguide are totally reflected at the interfaces. Unfortunately, these concepts break down because the entire solar cell is covered with such a structure, making it necessary to develop new analytical approaches to deal with incomplete light trapping in solar cells. This paper describes two models that analyze light trapping in thick and thin solar cells.

  14. MoSe2 / Polyaniline Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.S. Patel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar cells have been investigated since long for harnessing the solar energy. During this decade, a new direction has come up where in the polymers have been used in the fabrication of solar cells. Polyaniline is one of the polymers which has shown potential for its applications in heterostructure solar cells. This material is being used along with the semiconductors like InSe, TiO2, Si etc. to form the photosensitive interface. In this direction, we report our investigations on the use of Molybdenum diselenide (MoSe2 as photosensitive semiconducting material in MoSe2 / polyaniline solar cells. In this paper, the preparation of MoSe2 / polyaniline solar cells has been reported. Also, the photovoltage → photocurrent characteristics of this structure have been discussed in detail in this paper. The variation of different parameters of MoSe2 / polyaniline solar cells (like open circuit voltage, short circuit current, photoconversion efficiency and fill factor with the intensity of incident illuminations has been reported in this paper. In present case, the photocurrent density was found to be around 250 µA/cm2 with the photovoltage around 8.5 mV (which is low the photoconversion efficiency was found to be around 0.7 % along with the fill factor around 0.33. The efforts have been made to explain the low values of the photoconversion efficiency.

  15. Coupling of Luminescent Solar Concentrators to Plasmonic Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shu-Yi

    To make inexpensive solar cells is a continuous goal for solar photovoltaic (PV) energy industry. Thin film solar cells of various materials have been developed and continue to emerge in order to replace bulk silicon solar cells. A thin film solar cell not only uses less material but also requires a less expensive refinery process. In addition, other advantages coming along with small thickness are higher open circuit voltage and higher conversion efficiency. However, thin film solar cells, especially those made of silicon, have significant optical losses. In order to address this problem, this thesis investigates the spectral coupling of thin films PV to luminescent solar concentrators (LSC). LSC are passive devices, consisting of plastic sheets embedded with fluorescent dyes which absorb part of the incoming radiation spectrum and emit at specific wavelength. The emitted light is concentrated by total internal reflection to the edge of the sheet, where the PVs are placed. Since the light emitted from the LSC edge is usually in a narrow spectral range, it is possible to employ diverse strategies to enhance PV absorption at the peak of the emission wavelength. Employing plasmonic nanostructures has been shown to enhance absorption of thin films via forward scattering, diffraction and localized surface plasmon. These two strategies are theoretically investigated here for improving the absorption and elevating the output power of a thin film solar cell. First, the idea of spectral coupling of luminescent solar concentrators to plasmonic solar cells is introduced to assess its potential for increasing the power output. This study is carried out employing P3HT/PC60BM organic solar cells and LSC with Lumogen Red dyes. A simplified spectral coupling analysis is employed to predict the power density, considering the output spectrum of the LSC equivalent to the emission spectrum of the dye and neglecting any angular dependence. Plasmonic tuning is conducted to enhance

  16. Microcrystalline silicon and micromorph tandem solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Keppner, H.; Meier, Johannes; Torres, P.; Fischer, D.; Shah, A.

    2008-01-01

    “Micromorph” tandem solar cells consisting of a microcrystalline silicon bottom cell and an amorphous silicon top cell are considered as one of the most promising new thin-film silicon solar-cell concepts. Their promise lies in the hope of simultaneously achieving high conversion efficiencies at relatively low manufacturing costs. The concept was introduced by IMT Neuchâtel, based on the VHF-GD (very high frequency glow discharge) deposition method. The key element of the micromorph cell is t...

  17. Towards high performance inverted polymer solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xiong

    2013-03-01

    Bulk heterojunction polymer solar cells that can be fabricated by solution processing techniques are under intense investigation in both academic institutions and industrial companies because of their potential to enable mass production of flexible and cost-effective alternative to silicon-based electronics. Despite the envisioned advantages and recent technology advances, so far the performance of polymer solar cells is still inferior to inorganic counterparts in terms of the efficiency and stability. There are many factors limiting the performance of polymer solar cells. Among them, the optical and electronic properties of materials in the active layer, device architecture and elimination of PEDOT:PSS are the most determining factors in the overall performance of polymer solar cells. In this presentation, I will present how we approach high performance of polymer solar cells. For example, by developing novel materials, fabrication polymer photovoltaic cells with an inverted device structure and elimination of PEDOT:PSS, we were able to observe over 8.4% power conversion efficiency from inverted polymer solar cells.

  18. Highly stable tandem solar cell monolithically integrating dye-sensitized and CIGS solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Sang Youn; Park, Se Jin; Joo, Oh-Shim; Jun, Yongseok; Min, Byoung Koun; Hwang, Yun Jeong

    2016-01-01

    A highly stable monolithic tandem solar cell was developed by combining the heterogeneous photovoltaic technologies of dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) and solution-processed CuInxGa1-xSeyS1-y (CIGS) thin film solar cells. The durability of the tandem cell was dramatically enhanced by replacing the redox couple from to [Co(bpy)3]2+ /[Co(bpy)3]3+), accompanied by a well-matched counter electrode (PEDOT:PSS) and sensitizer (Y123). A 1000 h durability test of the DSSC/CIGS tandem solar cell in ambient conditions resulted in only a 5% decrease in solar cell efficiency. Based on electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and photoelectrochemical cell measurement, the enhanced stability of the tandem cell is attributed to minimal corrosion by the cobalt-based polypyridine complex redox couple. PMID:27489138

  19. Heavily doped polysilicon-contact solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindholm, F. A.; Neugroschel, A.; Arienzo, M.; Iles, P. A.

    1985-01-01

    The first use of a (silicon)/heavily doped polysilicon)/(metal) structure to replace the conventional high-low junction or back-surface-field (BSF) structure of silicon solar cells is reported. Compared with BSF and back-ohmic-contact (BOC) control samples, the polysilicon-back solar cells show improvements in red spectral response (RSR) and open-circuit voltage. Measurement reveals that a decrease in effective surface recombination velocity S is responsible for this improvement. Decreased S results for n-type (Si:As) polysilicon, consistent with past findings for bipolar transistors, and for p-type (Si:B) polysilicon, reported here for the first time. Though the present polysilicon-back solar cells are far from optimal, the results suggest a new class of designs for high efficiency silicon solar cells. Detailed technical reasons are advanced to support this view.

  20. Solar Cell Efficiency Tables (Version 48)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, Martin A.; Emery, Keith; Hishikawa, Yoshihiro; Warta, Wilhelm; Dunlop, Ewan D.

    2016-07-01

    Consolidated tables showing an extensive listing of the highest independently confirmed efficiencies for solar cells and modules are presented. Guidelines for inclusion of results into these tables are outlined, and new entries since January 2016 are reviewed.

  1. Black Silicon Solar Cells with Black Ribbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Tang, Peter Torben; Mizushima, Io;

    2016-01-01

    We present the combination of mask-less reactive ion etch (RIE) texturing and blackened interconnecting ribbons as a method for obtaining all-black solar panels, while using conventional, front-contacted solar cells. Black silicon made by mask-less reactive ion etching has total, average...... in the range 15.7-16.3%. The KOH-textured reference cell had an efficiency of 17.9%. The combination of black Si and black interconnecting ribbons may result in aesthetic, all-black panels based on conventional, front-contacted silicon solar cells....... reflectance below 0.5% across a 156x156 mm2 silicon (Si) wafer. Black interconnecting ribbons were realized by oxidizing copper resulting in reflectance below 3% in the visible wavelength range. Screen-printed Si solar cells were realized on 156x156 mm2 black Si substrates with resulting efficiencies...

  2. Electrospun Polymer-Fiber Solar Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinobu Nagata

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel electrospun polymer-fiber solar cell was synthesized by electrospinning a 1 : 2.5 weight% ratio mixture of poly[2-methoxy-5-(2-ethylhexyloxy-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV and [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM resulting in bulk heterojunctions. Electrospinning is introduced as a technique that may increase polymer solar cell efficiency, and a list of advantages of the technique applied to solar cells is discussed. The device achieved a power conversion efficiency of %. The absorption and photoluminescence of MEH-PPV nanofibers are compared to thin films of the same material. Electrospun nanofibers are discussed as a favorable structure for application in polymer solar cells.

  3. Multijunction Ultralight Solar Cells and Arrays Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is a continuing need within NASA for solar cells and arrays with very high specific power densities (1000-5000 kW/kg) for generating power in a new generation...

  4. A space solar cell bonding robot

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FU Zhuang; ZHAO Yan-zheng; LIU Ren-qiang; DONG Zhi

    2006-01-01

    A space solar cell bonding robot system which consists of a three-axis Cartesian coordinate's robot,coating device,bonding device,orientation plate,and control subsystem was studied.A method,which can control the thickness of adhesive layer on the solar cell,was put forward and the mechanism was designed.Another method which can achieve the auto-bonding between thin coverglass and the space solar cell was studied and realized.It produced no air bubble in the adhesives layer under the condition of no vacuum environment,and ensures the assembly dislocation ≤0.1 mm.Compared to the conventional method,it has advantages such as no fragment exists,and no adhesives outflow onto the cover-glass and solar cells.

  5. High Efficiency, Deployable Solar Cells Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ultrathin, lightweight, flexible, and easily deployable solar cell (SC) capable of specific power greater than 1kW/kg are at an early stage of development for...

  6. Toxicity of organometal halide perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babayigit, Aslihan; Ethirajan, Anitha; Muller, Marc; Conings, Bert

    2016-03-01

    In the last few years, the advent of metal halide perovskite solar cells has revolutionized the prospects of next-generation photovoltaics. As this technology is maturing at an exceptional rate, research on its environmental impact is becoming increasingly relevant.

  7. Growth Inhibition Occurs Independently of Cell Mortality in Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) Exposed to High Cadmium Concentrations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Christine Delpérée; Stanley Lutts

    2008-01-01

    In order to analyze the adaptation potential of tomato shoots to a sudden increase in Cd concentration, tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum L. var. Ailsa Craig) were exposed under controlled environmental conditions to a high dose of this heavy metal (250 μM CdCl2>) in nutrient solution for 7 and 14 d. Both root and shoot growth was completely inhibited but all plants remained alive until the end of the treatment. Cell viability remained unaffected but the activity of the mitochondrial alternative pathway was stimulated by Cd stress at the expense of the cytochrome pathway. Cadmium concentration was higher in roots than in shoots and a decrease In the rate of net Cd translocation was noticed during the second week of stress. Cadmium decreased both leaf conductance (g1>) and chlorophyll concentration. However, the effect on net CO2 assimilation remained limited and soluble sugars accumulated in leaves. Photochemical efficiency of PSll (FvlFm) was not affected despite a decrease in the number of reaction centers and an inhibition of electron transfer to acceptors of PSII. It is concluded that tomato shoot may sustain short term exposure to high doses of cadmium despite growth inhibition. This property implies several physiological strategies linked to both avoidance and tolerance mechanisms.

  8. Solar cells on the base of organic semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The parameters of organic solar cells on the base of different organic semiconductors as poly epoxypropyl carbazole, copper phthalocyanine and bordeaux perylene are considered. Moreover the properties of solar cells on the base of n-GaAs and copper phthalocyanine heterostructure are described. The new technologies in the field of organic solar cells as bulk heterostructure solar cells are discussed. (author)

  9. Singlet fission: Towards efficient solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Havlas, Zdeněk; Wen, Jin [Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Flemingovo nám. 2, 16610 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Michl, Josef [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0215 (United States); Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Flemingovo nám. 2, 16610 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2015-12-31

    Singlet fission (SF) offers an opportunity to improve solar cell efficiency, but its practical use is hindered by the limited number of known efficient materials, limited knowledge of SF mechanism, mainly the relation between the dimer structure and SF efficiency and diffusion of the triplet states allowing injection of electrons into the solar cell semiconductor band. Here we report on our attempt to design new classes of chromophores and to study the relation between the structure and SF efficiency.

  10. Singlet fission: Towards efficient solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singlet fission (SF) offers an opportunity to improve solar cell efficiency, but its practical use is hindered by the limited number of known efficient materials, limited knowledge of SF mechanism, mainly the relation between the dimer structure and SF efficiency and diffusion of the triplet states allowing injection of electrons into the solar cell semiconductor band. Here we report on our attempt to design new classes of chromophores and to study the relation between the structure and SF efficiency

  11. Multijunction Solar Cells Optimized for the Mars Surface Solar Spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edmondson, Kenneth M.; Fetzer, Chris; Karam, Nasser H.; Stella, Paul; Mardesich, Nick; Mueller, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This paper gives an update on the performance of the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) which have been continually performing for more than 3 years beyond their original 90-day missions. The paper also gives the latest results on the optimization of a multijunction solar cell that is optimized to give more power on the surface of Mars.

  12. Cadmium induces carcinogenesis in BEAS-2B cells through ROS-dependent activation of PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Young-Ok; Wang, Lei; Poyil, Pratheeshkumar; Budhraja, Amit; Hitron, J. Andrew; Zhang, Zhuo [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Lee, Jeong-Chae [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); School of Dentistry and Institute of Oral Biosciences (BK21 program), Research Center of Bioactive Materials, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju 561-756 (Korea, Republic of); Shi, Xianglin, E-mail: xshi5@email.uky.edu [Graduate Center for Toxicology, College of Medicine, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2012-10-15

    Cadmium has been widely used in industry and is known to be carcinogenic to humans. Although it is widely accepted that chronic exposure to cadmium increases the incidence of cancer, the mechanisms underlying cadmium-induced carcinogenesis are unclear. The main aim of this study was to investigate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cadmium-induced carcinogenesis and the signal transduction pathways involved. Chronic exposure of human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells to cadmium induced cell transformation, as evidenced by anchorage-independent growth in soft agar and clonogenic assays. Chronic cadmium treatment also increased the potential of these cells to invade and migrate. Injection of cadmium-stimulated cells into nude mice resulted in the formation of tumors. In contrast, the cadmium-mediated increases in colony formation, cell invasion and migration were prevented by transfection with catalase, superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1), or SOD2. In particular, chronic cadmium exposure led to activation of signaling cascades involving PI3K, AKT, GSK-3β, and β-catenin and transfection with each of the above antioxidant enzymes markedly inhibited cadmium-mediated activation of these signaling proteins. Inhibitors specific for AKT or β-catenin almost completely suppressed the cadmium-mediated increase in total and active β-catenin proteins and colony formation. Moreover, there was a marked induction of AKT, GSK-3β, β-catenin, and carcinogenic markers in tumor tissues formed in mice after injection with cadmium-stimulated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest a direct involvement of ROS in cadmium-induced carcinogenesis and implicate a role of AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling in this process. -- Highlights: ► Chronic exposure to cadmium induces carcinogenic properties in BEAS-2B cells. ► ROS involved in cadmium-induced tumorigenicity of BEAS-2B cells. ► Cadmium activates ROS-dependent AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin-mediated signaling. ► ROS

  13. Cadmium induces carcinogenesis in BEAS-2B cells through ROS-dependent activation of PI3K/AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cadmium has been widely used in industry and is known to be carcinogenic to humans. Although it is widely accepted that chronic exposure to cadmium increases the incidence of cancer, the mechanisms underlying cadmium-induced carcinogenesis are unclear. The main aim of this study was to investigate the role of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cadmium-induced carcinogenesis and the signal transduction pathways involved. Chronic exposure of human bronchial epithelial BEAS-2B cells to cadmium induced cell transformation, as evidenced by anchorage-independent growth in soft agar and clonogenic assays. Chronic cadmium treatment also increased the potential of these cells to invade and migrate. Injection of cadmium-stimulated cells into nude mice resulted in the formation of tumors. In contrast, the cadmium-mediated increases in colony formation, cell invasion and migration were prevented by transfection with catalase, superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1), or SOD2. In particular, chronic cadmium exposure led to activation of signaling cascades involving PI3K, AKT, GSK-3β, and β-catenin and transfection with each of the above antioxidant enzymes markedly inhibited cadmium-mediated activation of these signaling proteins. Inhibitors specific for AKT or β-catenin almost completely suppressed the cadmium-mediated increase in total and active β-catenin proteins and colony formation. Moreover, there was a marked induction of AKT, GSK-3β, β-catenin, and carcinogenic markers in tumor tissues formed in mice after injection with cadmium-stimulated cells. Collectively, our findings suggest a direct involvement of ROS in cadmium-induced carcinogenesis and implicate a role of AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin signaling in this process. -- Highlights: ► Chronic exposure to cadmium induces carcinogenic properties in BEAS-2B cells. ► ROS involved in cadmium-induced tumorigenicity of BEAS-2B cells. ► Cadmium activates ROS-dependent AKT/GSK-3β/β-catenin-mediated signaling. ► ROS

  14. Harnessing Sun’s Energy with Quantum Dots Based Next Generation Solar Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A. Halim

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Our energy consumption relies heavily on the three components of fossil fuels (oil, natural gas and coal and nearly 83% of our current energy is consumed from those sources. The use of fossil fuels, however, has been viewed as a major environmental threat because of their substantial contribution to greenhouse gases which are responsible for increasing the global average temperature. Last four decades, scientists have been searching for alternative sources of energy which need to be environmentally clean, efficient, cost-effective, renewable, and sustainable. One of the promising sustainable sources of energy can be achieved by harnessing sun energy through silicon wafer, organic polymer, inorganic dye, and quantum dots based solar cells. Among them, quantum dots have an exceptional property in that they can excite multiple electrons using only one photon. These dots can easily be synthesized, processed in solution, and incorporated into solar cell application. Interestingly, the quantum dots solar cells can exceed the Shockley-Queisser limit; however, it is a great challenge for other solar cell materials to exceed the limit. Theoretically, the quantum dots solar cell can boost the power conversion efficiency up to 66% and even higher to 80%. Moreover, in changing the size of the quantum dots one can utilize the Sun’s broad spectrum of visible and infrared ranges. This review briefly overviews the present performance of different materials-based solar cells including silicon wafer, dye-sensitized, and organic solar cells. In addition, recent advances of the quantum dots based solar cells which utilize cadmium sulfide/selenide, lead sulfide/selenide, and new carbon dots as light harvesting materials has been reviewed. A future outlook is sketched as to how one could improve the efficiency up to 10% from the current highest efficiency of 6.6%.

  15. Perovskite Solar Cells: Progress and Advancements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen Kumar Elumalai

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Organic–inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells (PSCs have emerged as a new class of optoelectronic semiconductors that revolutionized the photovoltaic research in the recent years. The perovskite solar cells present numerous advantages include unique electronic structure, bandgap tunability, superior charge transport properties, facile processing, and low cost. Perovskite solar cells have demonstrated unprecedented progress in efficiency and its architecture evolved over the period of the last 5–6 years, achieving a high power conversion efficiency of about 22% in 2016, serving as a promising candidate with the potential to replace the existing commercial PV technologies. This review discusses the progress of perovskite solar cells focusing on aspects such as superior electronic properties and unique features of halide perovskite materials compared to that of conventional light absorbing semiconductors. The review also presents a brief overview of device architectures, fabrication methods, and interface engineering of perovskite solar cells. The last part of the review elaborates on the major challenges such as hysteresis and stability issues in perovskite solar cells that serve as a bottleneck for successful commercialization of this promising PV technology.

  16. Electrospinning Nanofiber Based Organic Solar Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhenhua; Liu, Ying; Moffa, Maria; Nam, Chang-Yong; Pisignano, Dario; Rafailovich, Miriam

    Bulk heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar cells are an area of intense interest due to their potential to result in printable, inexpensive solar cells which can be processed onto flexible substrates. The active layer is typically spin coated from the solution of polythiophene derivatives (donor) and fullerenes (acceptor) and interconnected domains are formed because of phase separation. However, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of BHJ solar cell is restricted by the presence of unfavorable morphological features, including dead ends or isolated domains. Here we MEH-PPV:PVP:PCBM electrospun nanofiber into BHJ solar cell for the active layer morphology optimization. Larger interfacial area between donor and acceptor is abtained with electrospinning method and the high aspect ratio of the MEH-PPV:PVP:PCBM nanofibers allow them to easily form a continuous pathway. The surface morphology is investigated with atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Electrospun nanofibers are discussed as a favorable structure for application in bulk-heterojunction organic solar cells. Electrospinning Nanofiber Based Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cell.

  17. Effect of solar-terrestrial phenomena on solar cell's efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is assumed that the solar cell efficiency of PV device is closely related to the solar irradiance, consider the solar parameter Global Solar Irradiance (G) and the meteorological parameters like daily data of Earth Skin Temperature (E), Average Temperature (T), Relative Humidity (H) and Dew Frost Point (D), for the coastal city Karachi and a non-coastal city Jacobabad, K and J is used as a subscripts for parameters of Karachi and Jacobabad respectively. All variables used here are dependent on the location (latitude and longitude) of our stations except G. To employ ARIMA modeling, the first eighteen years data is used for modeling and forecast is done for the last five years data. In most cases results show good correlation among monthly actual and monthly forecasted values of all the predictors. Next, multiple linear regression is employed to the data obtained by ARIMA modeling and models for mean monthly observed G values are constructed. For each station, two equations are constructed, the R values are above 93% for each model, showing adequacy of the fit. Our computations show that solar cell efficiency can be increased if better modeling for meteorological predictors governs the process. (author)

  18. Research on polycrystalline thin-film materials, cells, and modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, R.L.; Zweibel, K.; Ullal, H.S.

    1990-11-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) supports research activities in polycrystalline thin films through the Polycrystalline Thin-Film Program at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). This program includes research and development (R D) in both copper indium diselenide and cadmium telluride thin films for photovoltaic applications. The objective of this program is to support R D of photovoltaic cells and modules that meet the DOE long-term goals of high efficiency (15%--20%), low cost ($50/m{sup 2}), and reliability (30-year life time). Research carried out in this area is receiving increased recognition due to important advances in polycrystalline thin-film CuInSe{sub 2} and CdTe solar cells and modules. These have become the leading thin-film materials for photovoltaics in terms of efficiency and stability. DOE has recognized this potential through a competitive initiative for the development of CuInSe{sub 2} and CdTe modules. This paper focuses on the recent progress and future directions of the Polycrystalline Thin-Film Program and the status of the subcontracted research on these promising photovoltaic materials. 26 refs., 12 figs, 1 tab.

  19. Nanocrystalline silicon based thin film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Swati

    2012-06-01

    Amorphous silicon solar cells and panels on glass and flexible substrate are commercially available. Since last few years nanocrystalline silicon thin film has attracted remarkable attention due to its stability under light and ability to absorb longer wavelength portion of solar spectrum. For amorphous silicon/ nanocrystalline silicon double junction solar cell 14.7% efficiency has been achieved in small area and 13.5% for large area modules internationally. The device quality nanocrystalline silicon films have been fabricated by RF and VHF PECVD methods at IACS. Detailed characterizations of the materials have been done. Nanocrystalline films with low defect density and high stability have been developed and used as absorber layer of solar cells.

  20. Review of the CdCl2 Treatment Used in CdS/CdTe Thin Film Solar Cell Development and New Evidence towards Improved Understanding

    OpenAIRE

    Dharmadasa, I. M.

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium chloride treatment is a key processing step identified in the late 1970s to drastically improve the solar to electric conversion efficiency of CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells. Although a large body of experimental results are available to date, this process is yet to be understood even after three decades of research. This paper reviews the experimental results available, presents some new clues leading to improved understanding and suggests key research areas necessary to fully unders...

  1. Electron irradiation of tandem junction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anspaugh, B. E.; Miyahira, T. F.; Scott-Monck, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The electrical behavior of 100 micron thick tandem junction solar cells manufactured by Texas Instruments was studied as a function of 1 MeV electron fluence, photon irradiation, and 60 C annealing. These cells are found to degrade rapidly with radiation, the most serious loss occurring in the blue end of the cell's spectral response. No photon degradation was found to occur, but the cells did anneal a small amount at 60 C.

  2. Progress in Thin Film Solar Cells Based on Cu2ZnSnS4

    OpenAIRE

    Hongxia Wang

    2011-01-01

    The research in thin film solar cells has been dominated by light absorber materials based on CdTe and Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) in the last several decades. The concerns of environment impact of cadmium and the limited availability of indium in those materials have driven the research towards developing new substitute light absorbers made from earth abundant, environment benign materials. Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) semiconductor material has emerged as one of the most promising candidates for this aim and h...

  3. Cadmium Toxicity on Arterioles Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells of Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elbert L. Myles

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium (Cd is frequently used in various industrial applications and is a ubiquitous environmental toxicant, also present in tobacco smoke. An important route of exposure is the circulatory system whereas blood vessels are considered to be main stream organs of Cd toxicity. Our previous results indicate that cadmium chloride (CdCl2 affects mean arterial blood pressure in hypertensive rats. We hypothesized that Cd alters the intracellular calcium transient mechanism, by cadmium-induced stimulation of MAPKs (ERK 1 & 2 which is mediated partially through calcium-dependent PKC mechanism. To investigate this hypothesis, we exposed primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs from wistar kyoto (WKY and spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR to increased concentrations of CdCl2 on cell viability, expression of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs/ERK 1 & 2, and protein kinase C (PKC which are activated by Cd in several cell types. The results from these studies indicate that CdCl2 decreased cell viability of both SHR and WKY VSMCs in a concentration dependent-manner. Viability of both cell types decreased 33±5.3 (SHR and 39±2.3% (WKY when exposed to 1 μM CdCl2, whereas, 8 and 16 μM reduced viability by 66±3.1 and 62±4.5% in SHR cells. CdCl2 increased ERK 1 & 2 in a biphasic manner with maximum increase occurring when cells are exposed to 1 and 4 μM in SHR VSMCs, whereas, a reduction in ERK 1 and 2 is observed when WKY cells are treated with 2 μM. The results also indicate that CdCl2 increased PKC a/ß in both SHR and WKY VSMCs with a greater increase in expression in SHR VSMCs. In addition, the [Ca2+]i chelator, BAPTA, suppressed the CdCl2 effect, whereas, the PKC inhibitor, GF109203X, reduced the CdCl2 induced-effect on PKC expression. The present studies support the hypothesis that Cd can be a risk factor of hypertension through dysfunction of vascular smooth muscle cells

  4. Response of quiescent and total tumor cells in solid tumors to neutrons with various cadmium ratios

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Response of quiescent (Q) and total tumor cells in solid tumors to neutron irradiation with three different cadmium (Cd) ratios was examined. The role of Q cells in tumor control was also discussed. Methods and Materials: C3H/He mice bearing SCC VII tumors received continuous administration of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) for 5 days using implanted mini-osmotic pumps to label all proliferating (P) cells. Thirty minutes after intraperitoneal injection of sodium borocaptate-10B (BSH), or 3 h after oral administration of dl-p-boronophenylalanine-10B (BPA), the tumors were irradiated with neutrons, or those without 10B-compounds were irradiated with gamma rays. This neutron irradiation was performed using neutrons with three different cadmium (Cd) ratios. The tumors were then excised, minced, and trypsinized. The tumor cell suspensions were incubated with cytochalasin-B (a cytokinesis-blocker), and the micronucleus (MN) frequency in cells without BrdU labeling (Q cells) was determined using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. The MN frequency in total (P + Q) tumor cells was determined from tumors that were not pretreated with BrdU. The sensitivity to neutrons was evaluated in terms of the frequency of induced micronuclei in binuclear tumor cells (MN frequency). Results: Without 10B-compounds, the MN frequency in Q cells was lower than that in the total cell population. The sensitivity difference between total and Q cells was reduced by neutron irradiation. Relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of neutrons compared with gamma rays was larger in Q cells than in total cells, and the RBE values for low-Cd-ratio neutrons tended to be larger than those for high-Cd-ratio neutrons. With 10B-compounds, MN frequency for each cell population was increased, especially for total cells. This increase in MN frequency was marked when high-Cd-ratio neutrons were used. BPA increased the MN frequency for total tumor cells more than BSH. Nevertheless, the sensitivity of Q

  5. Organic solar cells fundamentals, devices, and upscaling

    CERN Document Server

    Rand, Barry P

    2014-01-01

    Solution-Processed DonorsB. Burkhart, B. C. ThompsonSmall-Molecule and Vapor-Deposited Organic Photovoltaics R. R. Lunt, R. J. HolmesAcceptor Materials for Solution-Processed Solar Cells Y. HeInterfacial Layers R. Po, C. Carbonera, A. BernardiElectrodes in Organic Photovoltaic Cells S. Yoo, J.-Y. Lee, H. Kim, J. LeeTandem and Multi-Junction Organic Solar Cells J. Gilot, R. A. J. JanssenBulk Heterojunction Morphology Control and Characterization T. Wang, D. G. LidzeyOptical Modeling and Light Management

  6. Microscopic optoelectronic defectoscopy of solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dallaeva D.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Scanning probe microscopes are powerful tool for micro- or nanoscale diagnostics of defects in crystalline silicon solar cells. Solar cell is a large p-n junction semiconductor device. Its quality is strongly damaged by the presence of defects. If the cell works under low reverse-biased voltage, defects emit a light in visible range. The suggested method combines three different measurements: electric noise measurement, local topography and near-field optical beam induced current and thus provides more complex information. To prove its feasibility, we have selected one defect (truncated pyramid in the sample, which emitted light under low reverse-biased voltage.

  7. GEOLOGY OF THE FLORENCIA GOLD – TELLURIDE DEPOSIT (CAMAGÜEY, CUBA AND SOME METALLURGICAL CONSIDERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López K Jesús M.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the results from a study of the Florencia gold-telluride deposit in Central Cuba, including mineralogical, petrographical, microprobe and chemical analysis. Valuable information is provided for the exploration, mining and processing of gold ores from other nearby deposits with similar characteristics. Results highlight changes in the mineralogical composition of the ores between the north and south sectors of the deposit, as reflected in metallurgical concentrates after beneficiation and flotation of samples from these sectors.
    It is shown that gold deposits of the Cretaceous Volcanic Arc of Cuba largely consist of native gold, telluride and pyrite, where arsenopyrite is almost absent. Traces of lead, zinc and cadmium are present in the periphery of the main ore zones.

  8. Scaling Up ITO-free solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galagan, Yulia; Coenen, Erica W. C.; Zimmermann, Birger;

    2014-01-01

    Indium-tin-oxide-free (ITO-free) polymer solar cells with composite electrodes containing current-collecting grids and a semitransparent poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) conductor are demonstrated. The up-scaling of the length of the solar cell from 1 to 6 cm...... and the effect of the grid line resistance are explored for a series of devices. Laser-beam-induced current (LBIC) mapping is used for quality control of the devices. A theoretical modeling study is presented that enables the identification of the most rational cell dimension for the grids with different...... resistances. The performance of ITO-free organic solar cells with different dimensions and different electrode resistances are evaluated for different light intensities. The current generation and electric potential distribution are found to not be uniformly distributed in large-area devices at simulated 1...

  9. Influence of radiation on the properties of solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zdravković Miloš R.; Vasić Aleksandra I.; Radosavljević Radovan Lj.; Vujisić Miloš Lj.; Osmokrović Predrag V.

    2011-01-01

    The wide substitution of conventional types of energy by solar energy lies in the rate of developing solar cell technology. Silicon is still the mostly used element for solar cell production, so efforts are directed to the improvement of physical properties of silicon structures. There are several trends in the development of solar cells, but mainly two directions are indicated: the improvement of the conventional solar cell characteristics based on semiconductor materials, and explorin...

  10. Cadmium affects viability of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells through membrane impairment, intracellular calcium elevation and DNA breakage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abnosi Mohammad Hussein

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cadmium is an important heavy metal with occupational and environmental hazard. Cadmium toxicity results mainly in bone-related complication such as itai-itai disease. Mesenchymal stem cells of the bone marrow have the ability to differentiate to osteoblasts which ensure the well-being of the bone tissue. Thus the aim was to investigate the effect of cadmium on viability of rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells. Materials and Methods: The rat bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells were grown to confluency in DMEM medium supplemented with 15% fetal bovine serum and penicillin-streptomycin up to third passage. Then the cells were treated with 0, 5, 15, 25, 35, and 45 of CdCl 2 at 12, 24, 36, and 48 h, and their viability was investigated using trypan blue staining. In addition, after treatment with selected dose (15 and 45 μM and time (24 and 48 h the cell morphology, DNA damage and calcium content of the cells were evaluated. Data was analyzed using one and two-way ANOVA (Tukey test and the P2+ was observed. Conclusion: Cadmium chloride is a toxic compound which might affect the well-being of bone tissue through affecting the mesenchymal stem cells.

  11. CZTSSe thin film solar cells: Surface treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joglekar, Chinmay Sunil

    Chalcopyrite semiconducting materials, specifically CZTS, are a promising alternative to traditional silicon solar cell technology. Because of the high absorption coefficient; films of the order of 1 micrometer thickness are sufficient for the fabrication of solar cells. Liquid based synthesis methods are advantageous because they are easily scalable using the roll to roll manufacturing techniques. Various treatments are explored in this study to enhance the performance of the selenized CZTS film based solar cells. Thiourea can be used as a sulfur source and can be used to tune band gap of CZTSSe. Bromine etching can be used to manipulate the thickness of sintered CZTSSe film. The etching treatment creates recombination centers which lead to poor device performance. Various after treatments were used to improve the performance of the devices. It was observed that the performance of the solar cell devices could not be improved by any of the after treatment steps. Other surface treatment processes are explored including KCN etching and gaseous H2S treatments. Hybrid solar cells which included use of CIGS nanoparticles at the interface between CZTSSe and CdS are also explored.

  12. Neutral Color Semitransparent Microstructured Perovskite Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Eperon, Giles E.

    2014-01-28

    Neutral-colored semitransparent solar cells are commercially desired to integrate solar cells into the windows and cladding of buildings and automotive applications. Here, we report the use of morphological control of perovskite thin films to form semitransparent planar heterojunction solar cells with neutral color and comparatively high efficiencies. We take advantage of spontaneous dewetting to create microstructured arrays of perovskite "islands", on a length-scale small enough to appear continuous to the eye yet large enough to enable unattenuated transmission of light between the islands. The islands are thick enough to absorb most visible light, and the combination of completely absorbing and completely transparent regions results in neutral transmission of light. Using these films, we fabricate thin-film solar cells with respectable power conversion efficiencies. Remarkably, we find that such discontinuous films still have good rectification behavior and relatively high open-circuit voltages due to the inherent rectification between the n- and p-type charge collection layers. Furthermore, we demonstrate the ease of "color-tinting" such microstructured perovksite solar cells with no reduction in performance, by incorporation of a dye within the hole transport medium. © 2013 American Chemical Society.

  13. Solar cell and its manufacturing process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Hisashi; Komatsu, Yasumitsu.

    1989-01-20

    The solar cell with a structure of the Cds sintered film/CdTe sintered film is excellent at mass productivity because of usage of screen printing, but its conversion efficiency is insufficient in comparison with that of the single crystal silicon solar cell. Since the CdS/CdTe solar cell is a heterojunction solar cell, it is necessary that lattice constants of two materials are close each other in order to improve its performance. However, the mismatching of the lattices of CdS and CdTe is as fairly big as 11%. In order to ameliorate this mismatching, this invention substitutes the CdTe sintered film with the CdS-CdTe mixed crystal sintered film. Besides, the CdS-CdTe mixed crystal phase has its narrow forbidden bandwidth at or below 50 mol % of its CdS content, hence with it, a solar cell can be obtained which is highly sensitive to the light of long wave lengths. 2 tabs.

  14. Antimony selenide thin-film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Kai; Xue, Ding-Jiang; Tang, Jiang

    2016-06-01

    Due to their promising applications in low-cost, flexible and high-efficiency photovoltaics, there has been a booming exploration of thin-film solar cells using new absorber materials such as Sb2Se3, SnS, FeS2, CuSbS2 and CuSbSe2. Among them, Sb2Se3-based solar cells are a viable prospect because of their suitable band gap, high absorption coefficient, excellent electronic properties, non-toxicity, low cost, earth-abundant constituents, and intrinsically benign grain boundaries, if suitably oriented. This review surveys the recent development of Sb2Se3-based solar cells with special emphasis on the material and optoelectronic properties of Sb2Se3, the solution-based and vacuum-based fabrication process and the recent progress of Sb2Se3-sensitized and Sb2Se3 thin-film solar cells. A brief overview further addresses some of the future challenges to achieve low-cost, environmentally-friendly and high-efficiency Sb2Se3 solar cells.

  15. Light-trapping in perovskite solar cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing Guo Du

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We numerically demonstrate enhanced light harvesting efficiency in both CH3NH3PbI3 and CH(NH22PbI3-based perovskite solar cells using inverted vertical-cone photonic-crystal nanostructures. For CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cells, the maximum achievable photocurrent density (MAPD reaches 25.1 mA/cm2, corresponding to 92% of the total available photocurrent in the absorption range of 300 nm to 800 nm. Our cell shows 6% absorption enhancement compared to the Lambertian limit (23.7 mA/cm2 and has a projected power conversion efficiency of 12.9%. Excellent solar absorption is numerically demonstrated over a broad angular range from 0 to 60 degree for both S- and P- polarizations. For the corresponding CH(NH22PbI3 based perovskite solar cell, with absorption range of 300 nm to 850 nm, we find a MAPD of 29.1 mA/cm2, corresponding to 95.4% of the total available photocurrent. The projected power conversion efficiency of the CH(NH22PbI3 based photonic crystal solar cell is 23.4%, well above the current world record efficiency of 20.1%.

  16. Light-trapping in perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Qing Guo; Shen, Guansheng; John, Sajeev

    2016-06-01

    We numerically demonstrate enhanced light harvesting efficiency in both CH3NH3PbI3 and CH(NH2)2PbI3-based perovskite solar cells using inverted vertical-cone photonic-crystal nanostructures. For CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cells, the maximum achievable photocurrent density (MAPD) reaches 25.1 mA/cm2, corresponding to 92% of the total available photocurrent in the absorption range of 300 nm to 800 nm. Our cell shows 6% absorption enhancement compared to the Lambertian limit (23.7 mA/cm2) and has a projected power conversion efficiency of 12.9%. Excellent solar absorption is numerically demonstrated over a broad angular range from 0 to 60 degree for both S- and P- polarizations. For the corresponding CH(NH2)2PbI3 based perovskite solar cell, with absorption range of 300 nm to 850 nm, we find a MAPD of 29.1 mA/cm2, corresponding to 95.4% of the total available photocurrent. The projected power conversion efficiency of the CH(NH2)2PbI3 based photonic crystal solar cell is 23.4%, well above the current world record efficiency of 20.1%.

  17. Microbial solar cells: applying photosynthetic and electrochemically active organisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Strik, D.P.B.T.B.; Timmers, R.A.; Helder, M.; Steinbusch, K.J.J.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2011-01-01

    Microbial solar cells (MSCs) are recently developed technologies that utilize solar energy to produce electricity or chemicals. MSCs use photoautotrophic microorganisms or higher plants to harvest solar energy, and use electrochemically active microorganisms in the bioelectrochemical system to gener

  18. Solar heating of GaAs nanowire solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shao-Hua; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2015-11-30

    We use a coupled thermal-optical approach to model the operating temperature rise in GaAs nanowire solar cells. We find that despite more highly concentrated light absorption and lower thermal conductivity, the overall temperature rise in a nanowire structure is no higher than in a planar structure. Moreover, coating the nanowires with a transparent polymer can increase the radiative cooling power by 2.2 times, lowering the operating temperature by nearly 7 K. PMID:26698787

  19. Solar heating of GaAs nanowire solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shao-Hua; Povinelli, Michelle L

    2015-11-30

    We use a coupled thermal-optical approach to model the operating temperature rise in GaAs nanowire solar cells. We find that despite more highly concentrated light absorption and lower thermal conductivity, the overall temperature rise in a nanowire structure is no higher than in a planar structure. Moreover, coating the nanowires with a transparent polymer can increase the radiative cooling power by 2.2 times, lowering the operating temperature by nearly 7 K.

  20. Quantum-Tuned Multijunction Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleilat, Ghada I.

    Multijunction solar cells made from a combination of CQDs of differing sizes and thus bandgaps are a promising means by which to increase the energy harvested from the Sun's broad spectrum. In this dissertation, we first report the systematic engineering of 1.6 eV PbS CQD solar cells, optimal as the front cell responsible for visible wavelength harvesting in tandem photovoltaics. We rationally optimize each of the device's collecting electrodes---the heterointerface with electron accepting TiO2 and the deep-work-function hole-collecting MoO3 for ohmic contact---for maximum efficiency. Room-temperature processing enables flexible substrates, and permits tandem solar cells that integrate a small-bandgap back cell atop a low thermal-budget larger-bandgap front cell. We report an electrode strategy that enables a depleted heterojunction CQD PV device to be fabricated entirely at room temperature. We develop a two-layer donor-supply electrode (DSE) in which a highly doped, shallow work function layer supplies a high density of free electrons to an ultrathin TiO2 layer via charge-transfer doping. Using the DSE we build all-room-temperature-processed small-bandgap (1 eV) colloidal quantum dot solar cells suitable for use as the back junction in tandem solar cells. We further report in this work the first efficient CQD tandem solar cells. We use a graded recombination layer (GRL) to provide a progression of work functions from the hole-accepting electrode in the bottom cell to the electron-accepting electrode in the top cell. The recombination layers must allow the hole current from one cell to recombine, with high efficiency and low voltage loss, with the electron current from the next cell. We conclude our dissertation by presenting the generalized conditions for design of efficient graded recombination layer solar devices. We demonstrate a family of new GRL designs experimentally and highlight the benefits of the progression of dopings and work functions in the

  1. Preparation of strongly fluorescent silica nanoparticles of polyelectrolyte-protected cadmium telluride quantum dots and their application to cell toxicity and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Jianhua; Xie Lian; Zhang Bin; Qiu Ting [College of Pharmaceutical Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Qi Bin [College of Pharmaceutical Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, China West Normal University, Nangchong 637002 (China); Xie Hongping, E-mail: hpxie@suda.edu.cn [College of Pharmaceutical Science, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2012-03-30

    Graphical abstract: The staining effect of the control group (a), QDs-SiO{sub 2} (b) and QDs-PDADMAC-SiO{sub 2}(c). Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fluorescence intensity of QDs-PDADMAC-SiO{sub 2} is stronger than that of QDs-SiO{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fluorescence stability of QDs-PDADMAC-SiO{sub 2} is better than that of QDs-SiO{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cytotoxicity of QDs-PDADMAC-SiO{sub 2} was lower than that of QDs-SiO{sub 2} Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The staining effect of QDs-PDADMAC-SiO{sub 2} was much better than that of QDs-SiO{sub 2}. - Abstract: Based on the polyelectrolyte-protected CdTe quantum dots (QDs), which were prepared by self-assembling of QDs and poly-diallyldimethylammonium chloride (PDADMAC) in the help of electrostatic attraction, the strong fluorescence silica nanoparticles (QDs-PDADMAC-SiO{sub 2}) have been prepared via a water-in-oil reverse microemulsion method. Transmission electron microscopy and Zeta potential analysis were used to characterize the as-prepared nanoparticles. All of the particles were almost spherical and there is a uniform distribution of the particle size with the average diameter about 25 nm. There is a large Zeta potential of -35.07 mV which is necessary for good monodispersity of nanoparticles solution. As compared with the QDs coated by SiO{sub 2} (QDs-SiO{sub 2}), the QDs-PDADMAC-SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles have much stronger fluorescence, and their fluorescence stability could be obviously improved. Moreover, QDs-PDADMAC-SiO{sub 2} exhibits good biological compatibility which promotes their application in cellular imaging.

  2. Review of the CdCl2 Treatment Used in CdS/CdTe Thin Film Solar Cell Development and New Evidence towards Improved Understanding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Dharmadasa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium chloride treatment is a key processing step identified in the late 1970s to drastically improve the solar to electric conversion efficiency of CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells. Although a large body of experimental results are available to date, this process is yet to be understood even after three decades of research. This paper reviews the experimental results available, presents some new clues leading to improved understanding and suggests key research areas necessary to fully understand this crucial processing step. Improved understanding will lead to further increase in conversion efficiency of CdS/CdTe solar cells well beyond 20%.

  3. Chapter 10: CPV Multijunction Solar Cell Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterwald, Carl R.; Siefer, Gerald

    2016-04-15

    Characterization of solar cells can be divided into two types: the first is measurement of electrooptical semiconductor device parameters, and the second is determination of electrical conversion efficiency. This chapter reviews the multijunction concepts that are necessary for understanding Concentrator photovoltaic (CPV) cell characterization techniques, and describes how CPV efficiency is defined and used. For any I-V measurement of a multijunction cell, the sun simulator spectrum has to be adjusted in a way that all junctions generate the same photocurrent ratios with respect to each other as under reference conditions. The chapter discusses several procedures for spectral irradiance adjustments of solar simulators, essential for multijunction measurements. It overviews the light sources and optics commonly used in simulators for CPV cells under concentration. Finally, the chapter talks about the cell area, quantum efficiency (QE), and current-voltage (I-V) curve measurements that are needed to characterize cells as a function of irradiance.

  4. Ellipsometric Studies on Silver Telluride Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pandiaraman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver telluride thin films of thickness between 45 nm and 145 nm were thermally evaporated on well cleaned glass substrates at high vacuum better than 10 – 5 mbar. Silver telluride thin films are polycrystalline with monoclinic structure was confirmed by X-ray diffractogram studies. AFM and SEM images of these films are also recorded. The phase ratio and amplitude ratio of these films were recorded in the wavelength range between 300 nm and 700 nm using spectroscopic ellipsometry and analysed to determine its optical band gap, refractive index, extinction coefficient, and dielectric functions. High absorption coefficient determined from the analysis of recorded spectra indicates the presence of direct band transition. The optical band gap of silver telluride thin films is thickness dependent and proportional to square of reciprocal of thickness. The dependence of optical band gap of silver telluride thin films on film thickness has been explained through quantum size effect.

  5. Development and characterization of PCDTBT:CdSe QDs hybrid solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dixit, Shiv Kumar, E-mail: shivkumardixit.7@gmail.com; Bhatnagar, Chhavi, E-mail: shivkumardixit.7@gmail.com; Kumari, Anita, E-mail: shivkumardixit.7@gmail.com; Madhwal, Devinder, E-mail: shivkumardixit.7@gmail.com; Bhatnagar, P. K., E-mail: shivkumardixit.7@gmail.com; Mathur, P. C., E-mail: shivkumardixit.7@gmail.com [Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi, 110021 (India)

    2014-10-15

    Solar cell consisting of low band gap polymer poly[N-900-hepta-decanyl-2,7-carbazole-alt-5,5-(40,70-di-2-thienyl-20,10, 30-benzothiadiazole)] (PCDTBT) as donor and cadmium selenide/zinc sulphide (CdSe/ZnS) core shell quantum dots (QDs) as an acceptor has been developed. The absorption measurements show that the absorption coefficient increases in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) structure covering broad absorption spectrum (200nm–700nm). Also, the photoluminescence (PL) of the PCDTBT:QDs film is found to decrease by an order of magnitude showing a significant transfer of electrons to the QDs. With this approach and under broadband white light with an irradiance of 8.19 mW/cm{sup 2}, we have been able to achieve a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.1 % with fill factor 0.42 for our typical solar cell.

  6. Recombination barrier layers in solid-state quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Roelofs, Katherine E.

    2012-06-01

    By replacing the dye in the dye-sensitized solar cell design with semiconductor quantum dots as the light-absorbing material, solid-state quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (ss-QDSSCs) were fabricated. Cadmium sulfide quantum dots (QDs) were grown in situ by successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR). Aluminum oxide recombination barrier layers were deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at the TiO2/hole-conductor interface. For low numbers of ALD cycles, the Al2O3 barrier layer increased open circuit voltage, causing an increase in device efficiency. For thicker Al2O3 barrier layers, photocurrent decreased substantially, leading to a decrease in device efficiency. © 2012 IEEE.

  7. Hybrid solar cell on a carbon fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grynko, Dmytro A.; Fedoryak, Alexander N.; Smertenko, Petro S.; Dimitriev, Oleg P.; Ogurtsov, Nikolay A.; Pud, Alexander A.

    2016-05-01

    In this work, a method to assemble nanoscale hybrid solar cells in the form of a brush of radially oriented CdS nanowire crystals around a single carbon fiber is demonstrated for the first time. A solar cell was assembled on a carbon fiber with a diameter of ~5-10 μm which served as a core electrode; inorganic CdS nanowire crystals and organic dye or polymer layers were successively deposited on the carbon fiber as active components resulting in a core-shell photovoltaic structure. Polymer, dye-sensitized, and inverted solar cells have been prepared and compared with their analogues made on the flat indium-tin oxide electrode.

  8. A special issue on solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yi-Bing CHENG

    2011-01-01

    @@ The increasing demand for renewable energy has made the solar cell technology as one of the most significantresearch and development areas of today.Silicon based solar cells are the dominant photovoltaic products at the present time, but the relatively high costs are barriers for their broad applications.Research has been active worldwide in developing other photovoltaic technologies that use cheap materials and can be easily manufactured.Organic solar cells have attracted a lot of interests recently due to their potential to be low cost photovoltaic technologies.This special issue of the Frontiers of Optoelectronics in China has collected research articles by a number of Chinese and international experts.It is aimed to broaden the readers' view about some of the recent developments and challenges in this important R&D field.Thirteen excellent papers are in this special issue including 4 review articles and 9 research articles.

  9. Thin-film solar cells. Duennschichtsolarzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bloss, W.H.; Pfisterer, F.; Schock, H.W. (Stuttgart Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Physikalische Elektronik)

    1990-01-01

    The authors present the state of the art in research and development, technology, production and marketing, and of the prospects of thin-film solar cells. Thin-film solar cells most used at present are based on amorphous silicon and on the compound semiconductors CuInSe{sub 2} and CdTe. Efficiencies in excess 12% have been achieved (14.1% with CuInSe{sub 2}). Stability is the main problem with amorphous silicon. Thin-film solar cells made from compound semiconductors do not have this problem, though their cost-effective series production needs to be shown still. The development potential of the three types mentioned will be ca. 30% in terms of efficiency: in terms of production cost, it is estimated with some certainty to be able to reach the baseline of 1 DM/Watt peak output (W{sub p}). (orig.).

  10. Hybrid solar cell on a carbon fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grynko, Dmytro A; Fedoryak, Alexander N; Smertenko, Petro S; Dimitriev, Oleg P; Ogurtsov, Nikolay A; Pud, Alexander A

    2016-12-01

    In this work, a method to assemble nanoscale hybrid solar cells in the form of a brush of radially oriented CdS nanowire crystals around a single carbon fiber is demonstrated for the first time. A solar cell was assembled on a carbon fiber with a diameter of ~5-10 μm which served as a core electrode; inorganic CdS nanowire crystals and organic dye or polymer layers were successively deposited on the carbon fiber as active components resulting in a core-shell photovoltaic structure. Polymer, dye-sensitized, and inverted solar cells have been prepared and compared with their analogues made on the flat indium-tin oxide electrode. PMID:27216603

  11. Stability Issues on Perovskite Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Zhao

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Organo lead halide perovskite materials like methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3 and formamidinium lead iodide (HC(NH22PbI3 show superb opto-electronic properties. Based on these perovskite light absorbers, power conversion efficiencies of the perovskite solar cells employing hole transporting layers have increased from 9.7% to 20.1% within just three years. Thus, it is apparent that perovskite solar cell is a promising next generation photovoltaic technology. However, the unstable nature of perovskite was observed when exposing it to continuous illumination, moisture and high temperature, impeding the commercial development in the long run and thus becoming the main issue that needs to be solved urgently. Here, we discuss the factors affecting instability of perovskite and give some perspectives about further enhancement of stability of perovskite solar cell.

  12. Fabricating solar cells with silicon nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loscutoff, Paul; Molesa, Steve; Kim, Taeseok

    2014-09-02

    A laser contact process is employed to form contact holes to emitters of a solar cell. Doped silicon nanoparticles are formed over a substrate of the solar cell. The surface of individual or clusters of silicon nanoparticles is coated with a nanoparticle passivation film. Contact holes to emitters of the solar cell are formed by impinging a laser beam on the passivated silicon nanoparticles. For example, the laser contact process may be a laser ablation process. In that case, the emitters may be formed by diffusing dopants from the silicon nanoparticles prior to forming the contact holes to the emitters. As another example, the laser contact process may be a laser melting process whereby portions of the silicon nanoparticles are melted to form the emitters and contact holes to the emitters.

  13. Towards upconversion for amorphous silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    de Wild, J.; Rath, J.K.; Schropp, R.E.I. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Nanophotonics, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); Meijerink, A. [Utrecht University, Faculty of Science, Debye Institute for Nanomaterials Science, Condensed Matter and Interfaces, P.O. Box 80000, 3508 TA Utrecht (Netherlands); van Sark, W.G.J.H.M. [Utrecht University, Copernicus Institute for Sustainable Development and Innovation, Science, Technology and Society, Heidelberglaan 2, 3584 CS Utrecht (Netherlands)

    2010-11-15

    Upconversion of subbandgap light of thin film single junction amorphous silicon solar cells may enhance their performance in the near infrared (NIR). In this paper we report on the application of the NIR-vis upconverter {beta}-NaYF{sub 4}:Yb{sup 3+}(18%) Er{sup 3+}(2%) at the back of an amorphous silicon solar cell in combination with a white back reflector and its response to infrared irradiation. Current-voltage measurements and spectral response measurements were done on experimental solar cells. An enhancement of 10 {mu}A/cm{sup 2} was measured under illumination with a 980 nm diode laser (10 mW). A part of this was due to defect absorption in localized states of the amorphous silicon. (author)

  14. Impact of nanocrystal spray deposition on inorganic solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Troy K; Yoon, Woojun; Foos, Edward E; Tischler, Joseph G

    2014-05-28

    Solution-synthesized inorganic cadmium telluride nanocrystals (∼4 nm; 1.45 eV band gap) are attractive elements for the fabrication of thin-film-based low-cost photovoltaic (PV) devices. Their encapsulating organic ligand shell enables them to be easily dissolved in organic solvents, and the resulting solutions can be spray-cast onto indium-tin oxide (ITO)-coated glass under ambient conditions to produce photoactive thin films of CdTe. Following annealing at 380 °C in the presence of CdCl2(s) and evaporation of metal electrode contacts (glass/ITO/CdTe/Ca/Al), Schottky-junction PV devices were tested under simulated 1 sun conditions. An improved PV performance was found to be directly tied to control over the film morphology obtained by the adjustment of spray parameters such as the solution concentration, delivery pressure, substrate distance, and surface temperature. Higher spray pressures produced thinner layers (CdTe spray deposition was then applied to heterojunction devices (ITO/CdTe/ZnO/Al) to reach 3.0% efficiency after light soaking under forward bias. The film thickness, surface morphology, and light absorption were examined with scanning electron microscopy, optical profilometry, and UV/vis spectroscopy. PMID:24755091

  15. Recent progress on microcrystalline solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, A.; Meier, J.; Torres, P.; Kroll, U.; Fischer, D.; Beck, N.; Wyrsch, N.; Keppner, H. [Univ. of Neuchatel (Switzerland). Inst. of Microtechnology

    1997-12-31

    The most important features of microcrystalline silicon ({micro}c-Si:H) and microcrystalline silicon based p-i-n solar cells (specially those deposited by VHF-Glow Discharge) are reviewed. Since such material has been recognized to be a photovoltaically active material, stabilized cell efficiencies have steadily risen and have now reached 12% in the so called micromorph (microcrystalline/amorphous) tandem cell configuration.

  16. Questionable effects of antireflective coatings on inefficiently cooled solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akhmatov, Vladislav; Galster, Georg; Larsen, Esben

    1998-01-01

    of the output power and efficiency curves throughout the day the coherence between technical parameters of the solar cells and the climate in the operation region is observed and examined. It is shown how the drop in output power around noon can be avoided by fitting technical parameters of the solar cells......A model for temperature effects in p-n junction solar cells is introduced. The temperature of solar cells and the losses in the solar cell junction region caused by elevating temperature are discussed. The model developed is examined for low-cost silicon solar cells. In order to improve the shape...

  17. Photovoltage analysis of a heterojunction solar cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiong Chao; Yao Ruo-He; Geng Kui-Wei

    2011-01-01

    According to the p-n junction model of Shockley, the relationship between the equilibrium carrier concentrations of n-type and p-type semiconductors on the edges of the depletion region of a p-n junction solar cell is analysed. The calculation results show that the photovoltage can exceed the built-in voltage for a special kind of heterojunction solar cell. When the photovoltage exceeds the built-in voltage under illumination, the dark current and the photocurrent are impeded by the peak of voltage barrier at the interface and the expression of the total Ⅰ-Ⅴ characteristic is given.

  18. Modeling light trapping in nanostructured solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferry, Vivian E; Polman, Albert; Atwater, Harry A

    2011-12-27

    The integration of nanophotonic and plasmonic structures with solar cells offers the ability to control and confine light in nanoscale dimensions. These nanostructures can be used to couple incident sunlight into both localized and guided modes, enhancing absorption while reducing the quantity of material. Here we use electromagnetic modeling to study the resonances in a solar cell containing both plasmonic metal back contacts and nanostructured semiconductor top contacts, identify the local and guided modes contributing to enhanced absorption, and optimize the design. We then study the role of the different interfaces and show that Al is a viable plasmonic back contact material.

  19. Stability Issues on Perovskite Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Xing Zhao; Nam-Gyu Park

    2015-01-01

    Organo lead halide perovskite materials like methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) and formamidinium lead iodide (HC(NH2)2PbI3) show superb opto-electronic properties. Based on these perovskite light absorbers, power conversion efficiencies of the perovskite solar cells employing hole transporting layers have increased from 9.7% to 20.1% within just three years. Thus, it is apparent that perovskite solar cell is a promising next generation photovoltaic technology. However, the unstable natu...

  20. High performance polymer tandem solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Wilson Jose; Schneider, Fabio Kurt; Mohd Yusoff, Abd. Rashid Bin; Jang, Jin

    2015-12-01

    A power conversion efficiency of 9.02% is obtained for a fully solution-processed polymer tandem solar cell, based on the diketopyrrolopyrrole unit polymer as a low bandgap photoactive material in the rear subcell, in conjunction with a new robust interconnecting layer. This interconnecting layer is optically transparent, electrically conductive, and physically strong, thus, the charges can be collected and recombined in the interconnecting layer under illumination, while the charge is generated and extracted under dark conditions. This indicates that careful interface engineering of the charge-carrier transport layer is a useful approach to further improve the performance of polymer tandem solar cells.

  1. Kesterite Deposited by Spray Pyrolysis for Solar Cell Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Espindola Rodriguez, Moises

    2015-01-01

    Solar cells generate electrical power by direct conversion of solar radiation into electricity using semiconductors. Once produced, the solar cells do not require the use of water; operate in silence and can be easily installed almost everywhere, as solar panels with low technological risk. In this thesis new photovoltaic materials and solar cells are investigated. From the beginning of the semiconductor era, silicon has been present; the semiconductor theory improved with the silicon tec...

  2. Genotoxic effects of cadmium chloride on human amniotic fluid cells cultured in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fogu, G. [Sassari Univ., Sassari (Italy). Dept. of Physiological, Biochemical and Cellular sciences; Sassari Univ., Sassari (Italy). Centre of Clinical Genetics; Congiu, A. M.; Sini, M. C.; Ladu, R. [Sassari Univ., Sassari (Italy). Dept. of Physiological, Biochemical and Cellular sciences; Campus, P. M.; Sanna, R.; Soro, G. [Sassari Univ., Sassari (Italy). Centre of Clinical Genetics

    2000-12-01

    In this study it has been reported the results of cytogenetic tests, namely a search for chromosome aberrations (CA) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs), performed on human amniotic fluid cells cultured and treated with Cadmium chloride. The cells from primary cultures were exposed to CdCl{sub 2} at 1 {mu}M and 10 {mu}M for 24 h. At the higher dose, no metaphases were scored and at the lower dose (1 {mu}M) no effects were evident on cell proliferation, and no chromosome aberrations were found. In the subsequent experiments were used cells from subcultures exposed to 1 {mu}M and 5 {mu}M CdCl{sub 2}. At the 5 {mu}M dose was evident the induction of chromatid breaks, while the frequency of sister chromatid exchanges shows a small increase, not statistically significant at the dose of 1 {mu}M. In this study it was positively demonstrated that amniotic fluid cells grown in vitro are reliable for testing various mutagenic or teratogenic substances. With regard to cadmium treatment results, it is evident a clastogenic effect of cadmium chloride but not a significant induction of SCEs. [Italian] In questo studio abbiamo riportato i risultati dei tests citogenici di valutazione degli scambi fra cromatidi fratelli (SCEs) e di induzione di aberrazioni cromosomiche (CA) condotti su colture cellulari di liquido amniotico umano, trattate con cloruro di cadmio. Le cellule delle colture primarie venivano esposte al CdCl{sub 2} a concentrazioni di 1 {mu}M 10 {mu}M per 24 h. Alla dose piu' alta (10 {mu}M) non sono state osservate metafasi, mentre alla dose piu' bassa (1 {mu}M) non sono stati evidenziati ne' effetti sulla proliferazione cellulare ne' CA. Nei successivi esperimenti il CdC{sub 2} e' stato testato su subcolture cellulari alle dosi di 1 {mu}M e 5 {mu}M. Alla dose di 5 {mu}M sono state evidenziate rotture cromatidiche, mentre la frequenza di SCE alla dose di 1 {mu}M ha mostrato un piccolo incremento, statisticamente non significativo. In questo

  3. Cadmium uptake and sequestration kinetics in individual leaf cell protoplasts of the Cd/Zn hyperaccumulator Thlaspi caerulescens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitenmaier, Barbara; Küpper, Hendrik

    2011-02-01

    Hyperaccumulators store accumulated metals in the vacuoles of large leaf epidermal cells (storage cells). For investigating cadmium uptake, we incubated protoplasts obtained from leaves of Thlaspi caerulescens (Ganges ecotype) with a Cd-specific fluorescent dye. A fluorescence kinetic microscope was used for selectively measuring Cd-uptake and photosynthesis in different cell types, so that physical separation of cell types was not necessary. Few minutes after its addition, cadmium accumulated in the cytoplasm before its transport into the vacuole. This demonstrated that vacuolar sequestration is the rate-limiting step in cadmium uptake into protoplasts of all leaf cell types. During accumulation in the cytoplasm, Cd-rich vesicle-like structures were observed. Cd uptake rates into epidermal storage cells were higher than into standard-sized epidermal cells and mesophyll cells. This shows that the preferential heavy metal accumulation in epidermal storage cells, previously observed for several metals in intact leaves of various hyperaccumulator species, is due to differences in active metal transport and not differences in passive mechanisms like transpiration stream transport or cell wall adhesion. Combining this with previous studies, it seems likely that the transport steps over the plasma and tonoplast membranes of leaf epidermal storage cells are driving forces behind the hyperaccumulation phenotype. PMID:20880204

  4. A portable cadmium telluride multidetector probe for cardiac function monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Arntz, Y; Dumitresco, B; Eclancher, B; Prat, V

    1999-01-01

    A new nuclear stethoscope based on a matrix of small CdTe semiconductor detectors has been developed for studying the cardiac performance by gamma ventriculography at the equilibrium, in rest and stress conditions, in the early and recovery phases of the coronary disease and to follow the long-term therapy. The light-weight probe consists of an array of 64 detectors 5x5x2 mm grouped in 16 independent units in a lead shielded aluminum box including 16 preamplifiers. The probe is connected to an electronic box containing DC power supply, 16 channel amplifiers, discriminators and counters, two analog-triggering ECG channels, and interface to a PC. The left ventricle activity is, preferentially, detected by using a low-resolution matching convergent collimator. A physical evaluation of the probe has been performed, both with static tests and dynamically with a hydraulic home-built model of beating heart ventricle paced by a rhythm simulator. The sum of the 16 detectors activity provided a radiocardiogram (RCG) wh...

  5. Cadmium telluride leaching behavior: Discussion of Zeng et al. (2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Parikhit

    2015-11-01

    Zeng et al. (2015) evaluate the leaching behavior and surface chemistry of II-VI semiconductor materials, CdTe and CdSe, in response to pH and O2. Under agitation in acidic and aerobic conditions, the authors found approximately 3.6%-6.4% (w/w) solubility of Cd content in CdTe in the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP), Waste Extraction Test (WET), and dissolution test, with lower solubility (0.56-0.58%) under agitation in acidic and anoxic conditions. This range is comparable with prior long-term transformation and dissolution testing and bio-elution testing of CdTe (2.3%-4.1% w/w solubility of Cd content in CdTe). The implications for potential leaching behavior of CdTe-containing devices require further data. Since CdTe PV modules contain approximately 0.05% Cd content by mass, the starting Cd content in the evaluation of CdTe-containing devices would be lower by three orders of magnitude than the starting Cd content in the authors' study, and leaching potential would be further limited by the monolithic glass-adhesive laminate-glass structure of the device that encapsulates the semiconductor material. Experimental evaluation of leaching potential of CdTe PV modules crushed by landfill compactor has been conducted, with results of TCLP and WET tests on the crushed material below regulatory limits for Cd. CdTe PV recycling technology has been in commercial operation since 2005 with high yields for semiconductor (95%) and glass (90%) recovery. PMID:26320011

  6. Acceptors in cadmium telluride. Identification and electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown that electronic properties of CdTe are determined by impurities more than by intrinsic defects like vacancies or interstitials in Cd or Te contrary to classical theories. These results are based on annealing, diffusion, implantation and electron irradiation at 4 K. Centers appearing in treated samples are accurately identified by photoluminescence, cathodoluminescence infra-red absorption, electrical measurements and magneto-optic properties. Acceptors identified are Li, Na, Cu, Ag and Au impurities in Cd and N, P and As in Te. Energy levels of all acceptors and fine structure of excitons are determined

  7. Laser-induced grating spectroscopy of cadmium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Mark S.; Suchocki, Andrzej; Powell, Richard C.; Cantwell, Gene; Aldridge, Jeff

    1989-08-01

    Laser-induced transient gratings produced by two-photon absorption of picosecond pulses at 1.064 μm were used to examine the room-temperature nonlinear optical responses of CdTe crystals with different types of conductivity. Pulse-probe degenerate four-wave mixing measurements of grating dynamics on subnanosecond time scales were used to measure the ambipolar diffusion coefficient (Da) of charge carriers in the crystals. The value of Da =3.0 cm2 s-1 which was obtained is in very good agreement with theoretical estimates. A long-lived contribution to the signal consistent with a trapped charge photorefractive effect was observed at large grating spacings for n-type conductivity, and is tentatively attributed to a larger trap density in this sample. Measurements of the relative scattering efficiencies of successive diffracted orders in the Raman-Nath regime allowed for calculation of the laser-induced change in the index of refraction, due to the creation of free carriers. The value of Δn=4×10-4 which was obtained is in good agreement with theoretical estimates.

  8. Study and microscopic characterization of the cadmium telluride deep levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectroscopic methods PICTS, QTS and CTS were developed and perfected to investigate deep level analysis of high resistivity CdTe crystals which were either undoped, or doped with chlorine and copper. Crystals which were grown in space were also investigated. The main characterization of defect levels was determined and different correlations were established between the material's resistivity, chemical residues, dopant concentration and the nuclear radiation detector parameters. Using PICTS and CTS techniques, the generation of defects, under strong gamma-ray irradiation and particle bombardment was also studied. The influence of hydrogen on the main electrical characteristics of CdTe, in particular its ability to passivate the electrical activity of many deep defect and impurity states have been demonstrated. The compensation effects of Cl, Cu and H+ are interpreted using the qualitative models based on different possibilities of pairing or triplet formation between the ions of these dopants and those of defects

  9. Kinetics of plastic flow in cadmium telluride single crystal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To identify the microscopic mechanism of plastic flow, we have analyzed temperature dependence of the critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) and of the activation volume for CdTe single crystals deformed in compression at various temperatures between 150 and 275K in terms of the kink-pair nucleation model of plastic flow in intrinsically strong crystals. In this model, stress-assisted thermally -activated kink-pair nucleation is considered to facilitate the passage of screw dislocation over a Peierls barrier. It is found that the yield stress tow depends on temperature T as tow/sup 0.5/ = A - BT, where A and B are positive constants, whereas the activation volume v varies with temperature T through the relation v/sup -I/ = C - DT, where C and D are positive constants. However, the slope of the straight line fitted to the data point in each case undergoes a change at a critical temperature 200K, indicating a transition in the rate process of yielding. For T direction in slip plane (Ill) was nearly equal to the distance between two neighboring Peierls valleys. But for T >200K, the maximum kink-pair height was almost twice the intervalley separation. We believe that the formation of kink-pair having a height larger than intervalley distance is hardly possible. Most probably stress-assisted thermally-activated breakaway of edge- dislocation segments from localized barriers, e.g. vacancies in above-equilibrium concentration, solid and gaseous residual impurities, dislocation debris formed during the stage of anelastic deformation of the specimen in the process of raising the stress from zero to the macro yield-point etc. determines the CRSS of nominally pure CdTe crystals in the temperature range 200 to 275K. (author)

  10. Development of Inorganic Solar Cells by Nano-technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yafei Zhang; HueyLiang Hwang; Huijuan Geng; Zhihua Zhou; Jiang Wu; Zhiming Wang; Yaozhong Zhang; Zhongli Li; Liying Zhang; Zhi Yang

    2012-01-01

    Inorganic solar cells, as durable photovoltaic devices for harvesting electric energy from sun light, have received tremendous attention due to the fear of exhausting the earth’s energy resources and damaging the living environment due to greenhouse gases. Some recent developments in nanotechnology have opened up new avenues for more relevant inorganic solar cells produced by new photovoltaic conversion concepts and effective solar energy harvesting nanostructures. In this review, the multiple exciton generation effect solar cells, hot carrier solar cells, one dimensional material constructed asymmetrical schottky barrier arrays, noble nanoparticle induced plasmonic enhancement, and light trapping nanostructured semiconductor solar cells are highlighted.

  11. The High Energy X-ray Imager Technology (HEXITEC) for Solar Hard X-ray Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christe, Steven; Shih, Albert Y.; Gaskin, Jessica; Wilson-Hodge, Colleen; Seller, Paul; Wilson, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    High angular resolution HXR optics require detectors with a large number of fine pixels in order to adequately sample the telescope point spread function (PSF) over the entire field of view. Excessively over-sampling the PSF will increase readout noise and require more processing with no appreciable increase in image quality. An appropriate level of over-sampling is to have 3 pixels within the HPD. For current high resolution X-ray mirrors, the HPD is about 25 arcsec. Over a 6-m focal length this converts to 750 µm, the optimum pixel size is around 250 µm. Annother requirement are that the detectors must also have high efficiency in the HXR region, good energy resolution, low background, low power requirements, and low sensitivity to radiation damage. For solar observations, the ability to handle high counting rates is also extremely desirable. The Rutherford Appleton Laboratory (RAL) in the UK has been developing the electronics for such a detector. Dubbed HEXITEC, for High Energy X-Ray Imaging Technology, this Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC), can be bonded to 1- or 2- mm-thick Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) or Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT), to create a fine (250 µm pitch) HXR detector. The NASA Marshall Space Flight CenterMSFC and the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has been working with RAL over the past few years to develop these detectors to be used with HXR focusing telescopes. We present on recent results and capabilities as applied to solar observations.

  12. Embryotoxicity hazard assessment of cadmium and arsenic compounds using embryonic stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) has been successfully validated as an in vitro method for detecting embryotoxicity, showing a good overall test accuracy of 78% [Genschow, E., Spielmann, H., Scholz, G., Seiler, A., Brown, N., Piersma, A., Brady, M., Clemann, N., Huuskonen, H., Paillard, F., Bremer, S., Becker, K., 2002. The ECVAM international validation study on in vitro embryotoxicity tests: results of the definitive phase and evaluation of prediction models. European Centre for the Validation of Alternative Methods. Altern. Lab. Anim. 30, 151-176]. Methylmercury was the only strong in vivo embryotoxicant falsely predicted as non-embryotoxic making the metal the most significant outlayer [Genschow, E., Spielmann, H., Scholz, G., Pohl, I., Seiler, A., Clemann, N., Bremer, S., Becker, K., 2004. Validation of the Embryonic Stem Cell Test in the international ECVAM validation study on three in vitro embryotoxicity tests. Altern. Lab. Anim. 32, 209-244]. The misclassification of methylmercury and the potential environmental exposure to developmental toxic heavy metals promoted our investigation of whether the EST applicability domain covers cadmium and arsenic compounds. The EST misclassified cadmium, arsenite and arsenate compounds as non-embryotoxic, even when including arsenic metabolites (methylarsonate, methylarsonous and dimethylarsinic). The reasons were the lack of higher cytotoxicity towards embryonic stem cells as compared to more mature cells (3T3 fibroblasts) or the absence of inhibition of cardiac differentiation by specific mechanisms rather than general cytotoxicity. Including EST data on heavy metals from the literature (lithium, methylmercury, trivalent chromium and hexavalent chromium) revealed that the test correctly predicted the embryotoxic potential of three out of the seven heavy metals, indicating an insufficient predictivity for such metals. Refinement of the EST prediction model and inclusion of additional toxicological endpoints could

  13. Nanostructured Semiconductor Device Design in Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Hongmei

    We demonstrate the use of embedded CdS nanowires in improving spectral transmission loss and the low mechanical and electrical robustness of planar CdS window layer and thus enhancing the quantum efficiency and the reliability of the CdS-CdTe solar cells. CdS nanowire window layer enables light transmission gain at 300nm-550nm. A nearly ideal spectral response of quantum efficiency at a wide spectrum range provides an evidence for improving light transmission in the window layer and enhancing absorption and carrier generation in absorber. Nanowire CdS/CdTe solar cells with Cu/graphite/silver paste as back contacts, on SnO2/ITO-soda lime glass substrates, yield the highest efficiency of 12% in nanostructured CdS-CdTe solar cells. Reliability is improved by approximately 3 times over the cells with the traditional planar CdS counterpart. Junction transport mechanisms are delineated for advancing the basic understanding of device physics at the interface. Our results prove the efficacy of this nanowire approach for enhancing the quantum efficiency and the reliability in windowabsorber type solar cells (CdS-CdTe, CdS-CIGS and CdS-CZTSSe etc) and other optoelectronic devices. We further introduce MoO3-x as a transparent, low barrier back contact. We design nanowire CdS-CdTe solar cells on flexible foils of metals in a superstrate device structure, which makes low-cost roll-to-roll manufacturing process feasible and greatly reduces the complexity of fabrication. The MoO3 layer reduces the valence band offset relative to the CdTe, and creates improved cell performance. Annealing as-deposited MoO3 in N 2 reduces series resistance from 9.98 O/cm2 to 7.72 O/cm2, and hence efficiency of the nanowire solar cell is improved from 9.9% to 11%, which efficiency comparable to efficiency of planar counterparts. When the nanowire solar cell is illuminated from MoO 3-x /Au side, it yields an efficiency of 8.7%. This reduction in efficiency is attributed to decrease in Jsc from 25.5m

  14. Microcrystalline silicon and micromorph tandem solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keppner, H.; Meier, J.; Torres, P.; Fischer, D.; Shah, A.

    ``Micromorph'' tandem solar cells consisting of a microcrystalline silicon bottom cell and an amorphous silicon top cell are considered as one of the most promising new thin-film silicon solar-cell concepts. Their promise lies in the hope of simultaneously achieving high conversion efficiencies at relatively low manufacturing costs. The concept was introduced by IMT Neuchâtel, based on the VHF-GD (very high frequency glow discharge) deposition method. The key element of the micromorph cell is the hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon bottom cell that opens new perspectives for low-temperature thin-film crystalline silicon technology. According to our present physical understanding microcrystalline silicon can be considered to be much more complex and very different from an ideal isotropic semiconductor. So far, stabilized efficiencies of about 12% (10.7% independently confirmed) could be obtained with micromorph solar cells. The scope of this paper is to emphasize two aspects: the first one is the complexity and the variety of microcrystalline silicon. The second aspect is to point out that the deposition parameter space is very large and mainly unexploited. Nevertheless, the results obtained are very encouraging and confirm that the micromorph concept has the potential to come close to the required performance criteria concerning price and efficiency.

  15. Microcrystalline silicon and micromorph tandem solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keppner, H. [Univ. of Appl. Sci., Le Locle (Switzerland); Meier, J.; Torres, P.; Fischer, D.; Shah, A. [Institute of Microtechnology, University of Neuchatel, A.-L. Breguet 2, CH-2000 Neuchatel (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    ``Micromorph`` tandem solar cells consisting of a microcrystalline silicon bottom cell and an amorphous silicon top cell are considered as one of the most promising new thin-film silicon solar-cell concepts. Their promise lies in the hope of simultaneously achieving high conversion efficiencies at relatively low manufacturing costs. The concept was introduced by IMT Neuchatel, based on the VHF-GD (very high frequency glow discharge) deposition method. The key element of the micromorph cell is the hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon bottom cell that opens new perspectives for low-temperature thin-film crystalline silicon technology. According to our present physical understanding microcrystalline silicon can be considered to be much more complex and very different from an ideal isotropic semiconductor. So far, stabilized efficiencies of about 12% (10.7% independently confirmed) could be obtained with micromorph solar cells. The scope of this paper is to emphasize two aspects: the first one is the complexity and the variety of microcrystalline silicon. The second aspect is to point out that the deposition parameter space is very large and mainly unexploited. Nevertheless, the results obtained are very encouraging and confirm that the micromorph concept has the potential to come close to the required performance criteria concerning price and efficiency. (orig.) With 13 figs., 2 tabs., 62 refs.

  16. Calculation of the Performance of Solar Cells With Spectral Down Shifters Using Realistic Outdoor Solar Spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Sark, W.G.J.H.M.

    2007-01-01

    Spectral down converters and shifters have been proposed as a good means to enhance the efficiency of underlying solar cells. In this paper, we focus on the simulation of the outdoor performance of solar cells with spectral down shifters, i.e., multicrystalline silicon solar cells with semiconductor

  17. Hybrid Silicon Nanocone–Polymer Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Jeong, Sangmoo

    2012-06-13

    Recently, hybrid Si/organic solar cells have been studied for low-cost Si photovoltaic devices because the Schottky junction between the Si and organic material can be formed by solution processes at a low temperature. In this study, we demonstrate a hybrid solar cell composed of Si nanocones and conductive polymer. The optimal nanocone structure with an aspect ratio (height/diameter of a nanocone) less than two allowed for conformal polymer surface coverage via spin-coating while also providing both excellent antireflection and light trapping properties. The uniform heterojunction over the nanocones with enhanced light absorption resulted in a power conversion efficiency above 11%. Based on our simulation study, the optimal nanocone structures for a 10 μm thick Si solar cell can achieve a short-circuit current density, up to 39.1 mA/cm 2, which is very close to the theoretical limit. With very thin material and inexpensive processing, hybrid Si nanocone/polymer solar cells are promising as an economically viable alternative energy solution. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  18. Baselines for Lifetime of Organic Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gevorgyan, Suren; Espinosa Martinez, Nieves; Ciammaruchi, Laura;

    2016-01-01

    The process of accurately gauging lifetime improvements in organic photovoltaics (OPVs) or other similar emerging technologies, such as perovskites solar cells is still a major challenge. The presented work is part of a larger effort of developing a worldwide database of lifetimes that can help...

  19. Stability and Degradation of Polymer Solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrman, Kion

    The current state-of-the-art allows for roll-to-roll manufacture of polymer solar cells in high volume with stability and efficiency sufficient to grant success in low-energy applications. However, further improvement is needed for the successful application of the devices in real life applications...

  20. Screen printed interdigitated back contact solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraona, C. R.; Mazaris, G. A.; Chai, A. T. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    Interdigitated back contact solar cells are made by screen printing dopant materials onto the back surface of a semiconductor substrate in a pair of interdigitated patterns. These dopant materials are then diffused into the substrate to form junctions having configurations corresponding to these patterns. Contacts having configurations which match the patterns are then applied over the junctions.