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Sample records for cadmium telluride photovoltaic

  1. Device characterization of cadmium telluride photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geisthardt, Russell M.

    Thin-film photovoltaics have the potential to make a large impact on the world energy supply. They can provide clean, affordable energy for the world. Understanding the device physics and behavior will enable increases in efficiency which will increase their impact. This work presents novel approaches for evaluating efficiency, as well as a set of tools for in-depth whole-cell and uniformity characterization. The understanding of efficiency losses is essential for reducing or eliminating the losses. The efficiency can be characterized by a breakdown into three categories: solar spectrum, optical, and electronic efficiency. For several record devices, there is little difference in the solar spectrum efficiency, modest difference in the optical efficiency, and large difference in the electronic efficiency. The losses within each category can also be further characterized. The losses due to the broad solar spectrum and finite temperature are well understood from a thermodynamic physics perspective. Optical losses can be fully characterized using quantum efficiency and optical measurements. Losses in fill factor can be quantified from series and shunt resistance, as well as the expected fill factor from the measured V oc and A. Open-circuit voltage losses are the most significant, but are also be the hardest to understand, as well as the most technology-dependent. Characterization of the whole cell helps to understand the behavior, performance, and properties of the cell. Several different tools can be used for whole-cell characterization, including current-voltage, quantum efficiency, and capacitance measurements. Each of these tools give specific information about the behavior of the cell. When combined, they can lead to a more complete understanding of the cell performance than when taken individually. These tools were applied to several specific CdTe experiments. They have helped to characterize the baseline performance of both the deposition tool and the

  2. Brief review of cadmium telluride-based photovoltaic technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Başol, Bülent M.; McCandless, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) is the most commercially successful thin-film photovoltaic technology. Development of CdTe as a solar cell material dates back to the early 1980s when ˜10% efficient devices were demonstrated. Implementation of better quality glass, more transparent conductive oxides, introduction of a high-resistivity transparent film under the CdS junction-partner, higher deposition temperatures, and improved Cl-treatment, doping, and contacting approaches yielded >16% efficient cells in the early 2000s. Around the same time period, use of a photoresist plug monolithic integration process facilitated the demonstration of the first 11% efficient module. The most dramatic advancements in CdTe device efficiencies were made during the 2013 to 2014 time frame when small-area cell conversion efficiency was raised to 20% range and a champion module efficiency of 17% was reported. CdTe technology is attractive in terms of its limited life-cycle greenhouse gas and heavy metal emissions, small carbon footprint, and short energy payback times. Limited Te availability is a challenge for the growth of this technology unless Te utilization rates are greatly enhanced along with device efficiencies.

  3. LEACHING OF CADMIUM, TELLURIUM AND COPPER FROM CADMIUM TELLURIDE PHOTOVOLTAIC MODULES.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FTHENAKIS,V.

    2004-02-03

    Separating the metals from the glass is the first step in recycling end-of-life cadmium telluride photovoltaic modules and manufacturing scrap. We accomplished this by leaching the metals in solutions of various concentrations of acids and hydrogen peroxide. A relatively dilute solution of sulfuric acid and hydrogen peroxide was found to be most effective for leaching cadmium and tellurium from broken pieces of CdTe PV modules. A solution comprising 5 mL of hydrogen peroxide per kg of PV scrap in 1 M sulfuric acid, gave better results than the 12 mL H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/kg, 3.2 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution currently used in the industry. Our study also showed that this dilute solution is more effective than hydrochloric-acid solutions and it can be reused after adding a small amount of hydrogen peroxide. These findings, when implemented in large-scale operation, would result in significant savings due to reductions in volume of the concentrated leaching agents (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and of the alkaline reagents required to neutralize the residuals of leaching.

  4. Charge Carrier Processes in Photovoltaic Materials and Devices: Lead Sulfide Quantum Dots and Cadmium Telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roland, Paul

    Charge separation, transport, and recombination represent fundamental processes for electrons and holes in semiconductor photovoltaic devices. Here, two distinct materials systems, based on lead sulfide quantum dots and on polycrystalline cadmium telluride, are investigated to advance the understanding of their fundamental nature for insights into the material science necessary to improve the technologies. Lead sulfide quantum dots QDs have been of growing interest in photovoltaics, having recently produced devices exceeding 10% conversion efficiency. Carrier transport via hopping through the quantum dot thin films is not only a function of inter-QD distance, but of the QD size and dielectric media of the surrounding materials. By conducting temperature dependent transmission, photoluminescence, and time resolved photoluminescence measurements, we gain insight into photoluminescence quenching and size-dependent carrier transport through QD ensembles. Turning to commercially relevant cadmium telluride (CdTe), we explore the high concentrations of self-compensating defects (donors and acceptors) in polycrystalline thin films via photoluminescence from recombination at defect sites. Low temperature (25 K) photoluminescence measurements of CdTe reveal numerous radiative transitions due to exciton, trap assisted, and donor-acceptor pair recombination events linked with various defect states. Here we explore the difference between films deposited via close space sublimation (CSS) and radio frequency magnetron sputtering, both as-grown and following a cadmium chloride treatment. The as-grown CSS films exhibited a strong donor-acceptor pair transition associated with deep defect states. Constructing photoluminescence spectra as a function of time from time-resolved photoluminescence data, we report on the temporal evolution of this donor-acceptor transition. Having gained insight into the cadmium telluride film quality from low temperature photoluminescence measurements

  5. Spectroscopic ellipsometry as a process control tool for manufacturing cadmium telluride thin film photovoltaic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Westcott P.

    In recent decades, there has been concern regarding the sustainability of fossil fuels. One of the more promising alternatives is Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) thin-film photovoltaic (PV) devices. Improved quality measurement techniques may aid in improving this existing technology. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) is a common, non-destructive technique for measuring thin films in the silicon wafer industry. SE results have also been tied to properties believed to play a role in CdTe PV device efficiency. A study assessing the potential of SE for use as a quality measurement tool had not been previously reported. Samples of CdTe devices produced by both laboratory and industrial scale processes were measured by SE and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Mathematical models of the optical characteristics of the devices were developed and fit to SE data from multiple angles and locations on each sample. Basic statistical analysis was performed on results from the automated fits to provide an initial evaluation of SE as a quantitative quality measurement process. In all cases studied, automated SE models produced average stack thickness values within 10% of the values produced by SEM, and standard deviations for the top bulk layer thickness were less than 1% of the average values.

  6. Structural and Optical Properties of Sputtered Cadmium Telluride Thin Films Deposited on Flexible Substrates for Photovoltaic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Woochang; Lee, Kiwon; Kim, Donguk; Lee, Jaehyeong

    2016-05-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) is a photovoltaic technology based on the use of thin films of CdTe to absorb and convert sunlight into electricity. In this paper, polycrystalline CdTe thin films were deposited using radio frequency magnetron sputtering onto flexible substrates including polyimide and molybdenum foil. The structural and optical properties of the films grown at various sputtering pressures were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), and UV/Nis/NIR spectrophotometry. The sputtering pressure was found to have significant effects on the structural properties, including crystallinity, preferential orientation, and microstructure. Deterioration of the optical properties of CdTe thin films were observed at high sputtering pressure.

  7. Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Cadmium Telluride (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2013-06-01

    This National Center for Photovoltaics sheet describes the capabilities of its polycrystalline thin-film research in the area of cadmium telluride. The scope and core competencies and capabilities are discussed.

  8. Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Cadmium Telluride (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Cadmium Telluride at the National Center for Photovoltaics.

  9. Derived reference doses for three compounds used in the photovoltaics industry: Copper indium diselenide, copper gallium diselenide, and cadmium telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Bernholc, N.; DePhillips, M.P.; Viren, J.

    1995-07-06

    Polycrystalline thin-film photovoltaic modules made from copper indium diselenide (CIS), copper gallium diselenide (CGS), and cadmium telluride (CdTe) arc nearing commercial development. A wide range of issues are being examined as these materials move from the laboratory to large-scale production facilities to ensure their commercial success. Issues of traditional interest include module efficiency, stability and cost. More recently, there is increased focus given to environmental, health and safety issues surrounding the commercialization of these same devices. An examination of the toxicological properties of these materials, and their chemical parents is fundamental to this discussion. Chemicals that can present large hazards to human health or the environment are regulated often more strictly than those that are less hazardous. Stricter control over how these materials are handled and disposed can increase the costs associated with the production and use of these modules dramatically. Similarly, public perception can be strongly influenced by the inherent biological hazard that these materials possess. Thus, this report: presents a brief background tutorial on how toxicological data are developed and used; overviews the toxicological data available for CIS, CGS and CdTe; develops ``reference doses`` for each of these compounds; compares the reference doses for these compounds with those of their parents; discusses the implications of these findings to photovoltaics industry.

  10. Thin-film cadmium telluride photovoltaic cells. Final subcontract report, 1 November 1992--1 January 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, A.D.; Bohn, R.G. [Toledo Univ., OH (United States)

    1994-09-01

    This report describes work to develop and optimize radio-frequency (rf) sputtering for the deposition of thin films of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and related semiconductors for thin-film solar cells. Pulsed laser physical vapor deposition was also used for exploratory work on these materials, especially where alloying or doping are involved, and for the deposition of cadmium chloride layers. The sputtering work utilized a 2-in diameter planar magnetron sputter gun. The film growth rate by rf sputtering was studied as a function of substrate temperature, gas pressure, and rf power. Complete solar cells were fabricated on tin-oxide-coated soda-lime glass substrates. Currently, work is being done to improve the open-circuit voltage by varying the CdTe-based absorber layer, and to improve the short-circuit current by modifying the CdS window layer.

  11. Thin film cadmium telluride, zinc telluride, and mercury zinc telluride solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.L. (University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States))

    1992-04-01

    This report describes research to demonstrate (1) thin film cadmium telluride solar cells with a quantum efficiency of 75% or higher at 0. 44 {mu}m and a photovoltaic efficiency of 11.5% or greater, and (2) thin film zinc telluride and mercury zinc telluride solar cells with a transparency to sub-band-gap radiation of 65% and a photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 5% and 8%, respectively. Work was directed at (1) depositing transparent conducting semiconductor films by solution growth and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, (2) depositing CdTe films by close-spaced sublimation (CSS) and MOCVD techniques, (3) preparing and evaluating thin film CdTe solar cells, and (4) preparing and characterizing thin film ZnTe, CD{sub 1-x}Zn{sub 1-x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te solar cells. The deposition of CdS films from aqueous solutions was investigated in detail, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. CdTe films were deposited from DMCd and DIPTe at 400{degrees}C using TEGa and AsH{sub 3} as dopants. CdTe films deposited by CSS had significantly better microstructures than those deposited by MOCVD. Deep energy states in CdTe films deposited by CSS and MOCVD were investigated. Thin films of ZnTe, Cd{sub 1- x}Zn{sub x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te were deposited by MOCVD, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. 67 refs.

  12. Thin film cadmium telluride, zinc telluride, and mercury zinc telluride solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, T. L.

    1992-04-01

    This report describes research to demonstrate (1) thin film cadmium telluride solar cells with a quantum efficiency of 75 percent or higher at 0.44 microns and a photovoltaic efficiency of 11.5 percent or greater, and (2) thin film zinc telluride and mercury zinc telluride solar cells with a transparency to sub-band-gap radiation of 65 percent and a photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 5 percent and 8 percent, respectively. Work was directed at (1) depositing transparent conducting semiconductor films by solution growth and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, (2) depositing CdTe films by close-spaced sublimation (CSS) and MOCVD techniques, (3) preparing and evaluating thin film CdTe solar cells, and (4) preparing and characterizing thin film ZnTe, CD(1-x)Zn(1-x)Te, and Hg(1-x)Zn(x)Te solar cells. The deposition of CdS films from aqueous solutions was investigated in detail, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. CdTe films were deposited from DMCd and DIPTe at 400 C using TEGa and AsH3 as dopants. CdTe films deposited by CSS had significantly better microstructures than those deposited by MOCVD. Deep energy states in CdTe films deposited by CSS and MOCVD were investigated. Thin films of ZnTe, Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te, and Hg(1-x)Zn(x)Te were deposited by MOCVD, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized.

  13. High-efficiency, thin-film cadmium telluride photovoltaic cells. Annual subcontract report, 20 January 1994--19 January 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, A.D.; Bohn, R.G.; Rajakarunanayake, Y. [Toledo Univ., OH (United States)

    1995-08-01

    This report describes work performed to develop and optimize the process of radio frequency (RF) sputtering for the fabrication of thin-film solar cells on glass. The emphasis is on CdTe-related materials including CdTe, CdS, ZnTe, and ternary alloy semiconductors. Pulsed laser physical vapor deposition (LPVD) was used for exploratory work on these materials, especially where alloying or doping are involved, and for the deposition of cadmium chloride layers. For the sputtering work, a two-gun sputtering chamber was implemented, with optical access for monitoring temperature and growth rate. We studied the optical and electrical properties of the plasmas produced by two different kinds of planar magnetron sputter guns with different magnetic field configurations and strengths. Using LPVD, we studied alloy semiconductors such as CdZnTe and heavily doped semiconductors such as ZnTe:Cu for possible incorporation into graded band gap CdTe-based photovoltaic devices.

  14. Cadmium telluride quantum dots advances and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Donegan, John

    2013-01-01

    Optical Properties of Bulk and Nanocrystalline Cadmium Telluride, Núñez Fernández and M.I. VasilevskiyAqueous Synthesis of Colloidal CdTe Nanocrystals, V. Lesnyak, N. Gaponik, and A. EychmüllerAssemblies of Thiol-Capped CdTe Nanocrystals, N. GaponikFörster Resonant Energy Transfer in CdTe Nanocrystal Quantum Dot Structures, M. Lunz and A.L. BradleyEmission of CdTe Nanocrystals Coupled to Microcavities, Y.P. Rakovich and J.F. DoneganBiological Applications of Cadmium Telluride Semiconductor Quantum Dots, A. Le Cign

  15. Transport phenomena in the close-spaced sublimation deposition process for manufacture of large-area cadmium telluride photovoltaic panels: Modeling and optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhotra, C. P.

    With increasing national and global demand for energy and concerns about the effect of fossil fuels on global climate change, there is an increasing emphasis on the development and use of renewable sources of energy. Solar cells or photovoltaics constitute an important renewable energy technology but the major impediment to their widespread adoption has been their high initial cost. Although thin-film photovoltaic semiconductors such as cadmium sulfide-cadmium telluride (CdS/CdTe) can potentially be inexpensively manufactured using large area deposition techniques such as close-spaced sublimation (CSS), their low stability has prevented them from becoming an alternative to traditional polycrystalline silicon solar cells. A key factor affecting the stability of CdS/CdTe cells is the uniformity of deposition of the thin films. Currently no models exist that can relate the processing parameters in a CSS setup with the film deposition uniformity. Central to the development of these models is a fundamental understanding of the complex transport phenomena which constitute the deposition process which include coupled conduction and radiation as well as transition regime rarefied gas flow. This thesis is aimed at filling these knowledge gaps and thereby leading to the development of the relevant models. The specific process under consideration is the CSS setup developed by the Materials Engineering Group at the Colorado State University (CSU). Initially, a 3-D radiation-conduction model of a single processing station was developed using the commercial finite-element software ABAQUS and validated against data from steady-state experiments carried out at CSU. A simplified model was then optimized for maximizing the steady-state thermal uniformity within the substrate. It was inferred that contrary to traditional top and bottom infrared lamp heating, a lamp configuration that directs heat from the periphery of the sources towards the center results in the minimum temperature

  16. Ellipsometric Analysis of Cadmium Telluride Films’ Structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Evmenova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ellipsometric analysis of CdTe films grown on Si and CdHgTe substrates at the “hot-wall” epitaxy vacuum setup has been performed. It has been found that ellipsometric data calculation carried out by using a simple one-layer film model leads to radical distortion of optical constants spectra: this fact authenticates the necessity to attract a more complicated model that should include heterogeneity of films. Ellipsometric data calculation within a two-layer film model permitted to conclude that cadmium telluride films have an outer layer that consists of the three-component mixture of CdTe, cavities, and basic matter oxide. Ratio of mixture components depends on the time of deposition, that is, on the film thickness. The inner layer consists of cadmium telluride.

  17. Numerical Simulation of the Performance Characteristics, Instability, and Effects of Band Gap Grading in Cadmium Telluride Based Photovoltaic Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Michael David [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-05-01

    Using computer simulations, the performance of several CdTe based photovoltaic structures has been studied. The advantages and disadvantages of band gap grading, through the use of (Zn,Cd)Te, have also been investigated in these structures. Grading at the front interface between a CdS window layer and a CdTe absorber layer, can arise due to interdiffusion between the materials during growth or due to the intentional variation of the material composition. This grading has been shown to improve certain performance metrics, such as the open-circuit voltage, while degrading others, such as the fill factor, depending on the amount and distance of the grading. The presence of a Schottky barrier as the back contact has also been shown to degrade the photovoltaic performance of the device, resulting in a characteristic IV curve. However, with the appropriate band gap grading at the back interface, it has been shown that the performance can be enhanced through more efficient carrier collection. These results were then correlated with experimental observations of the performance degradation in devices subjected to light and heat stress.

  18. Numerical Simulation of the Performance Characteristics, Instability, and Effects of Band Gap Grading in Cadmium Telluride Based Photovoltaic Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Michael David [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Using computer simulations, the performance of several CdTe based photovoltaic structures has been studied. The advantages and disadvantages of band gap grading, through the use of (Zn, Cd)Te, have also been investigated in these structures. Grading at the front interface between a CdS window layer and a CdTe absorber layer, can arise due to interdiffusion between the materials during growth or due to the intentional variation of the material composition. This grading has been shown to improve certain performance metrics, such as the open-circuit voltage, while degrading others, such as the fill factor, depending on the amount and distance of the grading. The presence of a Schottky barrier as the back contact has also been shown to degrade the photovoltaic performance of the device, resulting in a characteristic IV curve. However, with the appropriate band gap grading at the back interface, it has been shown that the performance can be enhanced through more efficient carrier collection. These results were then correlated with experimental observations of the performance degradation in devices subjected to light and heat stress.

  19. High-efficiency thin-film cadmium telluride photovoltaic cells. Annual technical report, January 20, 1996--January 19, 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, A D; Bohn, R G; Contreras-Puente, G [Univ. of Toledo, OH (United States)

    1997-08-01

    The University of Toledo photovoltaics group has been instrumental in developing rf sputtering for CDs/CdTe thin-film solar cells. During the third phase of the present contract our work focussed on efforts to determine factors which limit the efficiency in our {open_quotes}all-sputtered{close_quotes} thin-film CdTe solar cells on soda-lime glass. We find that our all-sputtered cells, which are deposited at substantially lower temperature than those by sublimation or vapor deposition, require less aggressive CdCl{sub 2} treatments than do other deposition techniques and this is presumably related to CDs/CdTe interdiffusion. The CDs/CdTe interdiffusion process has been studied by several methods, including photoluminescence and capacitance-voltage measurements. Furthermore, we have deposited special thin bilayer films on quartz and borosilicate glass. Interdiffusion in these thin bilayers have been probed by Rutherford backscattering, with collaborators at Case Western Reserve University, and grazing incidence x-ray scattering (GIXS), with collaborators at the University at Buffalo and Brookhaven National Lab. Also, in order better to understand the properties of the ternary alloy material, we used laser physical vapor deposition to prepare a series of CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x} films on borosilicate glass. The composition of the alloy films was determined by wavelength dispersive x-ray spectroscopy at NREL. These films are currently being investigated by us and other groups at NREL and IEC.

  20. Optical Constants of Cadmium Telluride Thin Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithyakalyani, P.; Pandiaraman, M.; Pannir, P.; Sanjeeviraja, C.; Soundararajan, N.

    2008-04-01

    Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) is II-VI direct band gap semiconductor compound with potential application in Solar Energy conversion process. CdTe thin film of thickness 220 mn was prepared by thermal evaporation technique at a high vacuum better than 10-5 m.bar on well cleaned glass substrates of dimensions (l cm×3 cm). The transmittance spectrum and the reflectance spectrum of the prepared CdTc thin film was recorded using UV-Vis Spectrophotometer in the wavelength range between 300 nm and 900 nm. These spectral data were analyzed and the optical band and optical constants of CdTe Thin film have been determined by adopting suitable relations. The optical band gap of CdTe thin film is found to be 1.56 eV and this value is also agreeing with the published works of CdTe thin film prepared by various techniques. The absorption coefficient (α) has been higher than 106 cm-1. The Refractive index (n) and the Extinction Coefficient (k) are found to be varying from 3.0 to 4.0 and 0.1 Cm-1 to 0.5 Cm-1 respectively by varying the energy from l.0 eV to 4.0 eV. These results are also compared with the literature.

  1. Optical properties of zinc telluride with cadmium telluride submonolayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agekyan, V. F.; Serov, A. Yu.; Filosofov, N. G.; Shtrom, I. V.; Karczewski, G.

    2016-10-01

    Reflection, luminescence, and Raman spectra of epitaxial ZnTe layers nominally incorporating double CdTe submonolayers were studied. The band of an exciton localized at the potential produced by narrow-gap planar inclusions dominated the luminescence of these heterostructures. The emission parameters of localized excitons (specifically, the ratio of integral emission intensity to localization energy) were determined, and it was found that excitons interact with longitudinal optical phonons of the layer enriched with cadmium. Giant amplification of the Stokes component resonant with the localized exciton level was observed in Raman scattering.

  2. Thin films and solar cells of cadmium telluride and cadmium zinc telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferekides, Christos Savva

    The objectives of this dissertation are to investigate (1) the metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and properties of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium zinc telluride (Cd(1-x)Zn(z)Te) films and junctions, and their potential application to solar cells, and (2) the fabrication and characterization of CdTe solar cells by the close spaced sublimation (CSS) technique. CdTe and Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te films have been deposited by MOCVD on a variety of substrates at 300-400 C. The effect of the deposition parameters and post deposition heat treatments on the electrical, optical, and structural properties have been investigated. Heterojunctions of the configuration CdTe/transparent conducting semiconductor (TCS) and Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te/TCS have been prepared and characterized. CdTe(MOCVD)/CdS and Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te(E sub g = 1.65eV)/Cd(1-x)Zn(x)S solar cells with efficiencies of 9.9 percent and 2.4 percent, respectively have been fabricated. The as-deposited CdTe(MOCVD)/CdS junctions exhibited high dark current densities due to deflects at the interface associated with small grain size. Their characteristics of the Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te junctions degraded with increasing Zn concentration due to the crystalline quality and very small grain size (0.3 microns) in films with high ZnTe contents (greater than 25 percent). No effective post-deposition heat treatment has been developed. CdTe/CdS solar cells have also been fabricated by the close spaced sublimation (CSS). Significant improvements in material and processing have been made, and in collaboration with fellow researchers an AM1.5 conversion efficiency of 13.4 percent has been demonstrated, the highest efficiency ever measured for such devices. The highest conversion efficiency for the CdTe(CSS)/CdS solar cell was achieved by reaching high open-circuit voltages and fill factors, while the short-circuit current densities were moderate. These results indicate that further improvements to increase the short-circuit current densities

  3. Thin film cadmium telluride, zinc telluride, and mercury zinc telluride solar cells. Final subcontract report, 1 July 1988--31 December 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, T.L. [University of South Florida, Tampa, FL (United States)

    1992-04-01

    This report describes research to demonstrate (1) thin film cadmium telluride solar cells with a quantum efficiency of 75% or higher at 0. 44 {mu}m and a photovoltaic efficiency of 11.5% or greater, and (2) thin film zinc telluride and mercury zinc telluride solar cells with a transparency to sub-band-gap radiation of 65% and a photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 5% and 8%, respectively. Work was directed at (1) depositing transparent conducting semiconductor films by solution growth and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, (2) depositing CdTe films by close-spaced sublimation (CSS) and MOCVD techniques, (3) preparing and evaluating thin film CdTe solar cells, and (4) preparing and characterizing thin film ZnTe, CD{sub 1-x}Zn{sub 1-x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te solar cells. The deposition of CdS films from aqueous solutions was investigated in detail, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. CdTe films were deposited from DMCd and DIPTe at 400{degrees}C using TEGa and AsH{sub 3} as dopants. CdTe films deposited by CSS had significantly better microstructures than those deposited by MOCVD. Deep energy states in CdTe films deposited by CSS and MOCVD were investigated. Thin films of ZnTe, Cd{sub 1- x}Zn{sub x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te were deposited by MOCVD, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. 67 refs.

  4. The Cadmium Zinc Telluride Imager on AstroSat

    CERN Document Server

    Bhalerao, V; Vibhute, A; Pawar, P; Rao, A R; Hingar, M K; Khanna, Rakesh; Kutty, A P K; Malkar, J P; Patil, M H; Arora, Y K; Sinha, S; Priya, P; Samuel, Essy; Sreekumar, S; Vinod, P; Mithun, N P S; Vadawale, S V; Vagshette, N; Navalgund, K H; Sarma, K S; Pandiyan, R; Seetha, S; Subbarao, K

    2016-01-01

    The Cadmium Zinc Telluride Imager (CZTI) is a high energy, wide-field imaging instrument on AstroSat. CZT's namesake Cadmium Zinc Telluride detectors cover an energy range from 20 keV to > 200 keV, with 11% energy resolution at 60 keV. The coded aperture mask attains an angular resolution of 17' over a 4.6 deg x 4.6 deg (FWHM) field of view. CZTI functions as an open detector above 100 keV, continuously sensitive to GRBs and other transients in about 30% of the sky. The pixellated detectors are sensitive to polarisation above ~100 keV, with exciting possibilities for polarisation studies of transients and bright persistent sources. In this paper, we provide details of the complete CZTI instrument, detectors, coded aperture mask, mechanical and electronic configuration, as well as data and products.

  5. Gamma-ray peak shapes from cadmium zinc telluride detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Namboodiri, M.N.; Lavietes, A.D.; McQuaid, J.H.

    1996-09-01

    We report the results of a study of the peak shapes in the gamma spectra measured using several 5 x 5 x 5 mm{sup 3} cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors. A simple parameterization involving a Gaussian and an exponential low energy tail describes the peak shapes sell. We present the variation of the parameters with gamma energy. This type of information is very useful in the analysis of complex gamma spectra consisting of many peaks.

  6. Removal of CdTe in acidic media by magnetic ion-exchange resin: A potential recycling methodology for cadmium telluride photovoltaic waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Teng, E-mail: zhangteng@mail.iee.ac.cn; Dong, Zebin; Qu, Fei; Ding, Fazhu; Peng, Xingyu; Wang, Hongyan; Gu, Hongwei

    2014-08-30

    Highlights: • Sulfonated magnetic microsphere was prepared as one strong acid cation-exchange resin. • Cd and Te can be removed directly from the highly acidic leaching solution of CdTe. • Good chemical stability, fast adsorbing rate and quick magnetic separation in strong acidic media. • A potential path for recycling CdTe photovoltaic waste. - Abstract: Sulfonated magnetic microspheres (PSt-DVB-SNa MPs) have been successfully prepared as adsorbents via an aqueous suspension polymerization of styrene-divinylbenzene and a sulfonation reaction successively. The resulting adsorbents were confirmed by means of Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM), scanning electron microscope equipped with an energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS) and vibrating sample magnetometer (VSM). The leaching process of CdTe was optimized, and the removal efficiency of Cd and Te from the leaching solution was investigated. The adsorbents could directly remove all cations of Cd and Te from a highly acidic leaching solution of CdTe. The adsorption process for Cd and Te reached equilibrium in a few minutes and this process highly depended on the dosage of adsorbents and the affinity of sulfonate groups with cations. Because of its good adsorption capacity in strong acidic media, high adsorbing rate, and efficient magnetic separation from the solution, PSt-DVB-SNa MPs is expected to be an ideal material for the recycling of CdTe photovoltaic waste.

  7. Structural properties of oxygenated amorphous cadmium telluride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Azhari, M.Y. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides et des Couches Minces, Marakech (Morocco). Dept. de Physique; Azizan, M. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides et des Couches Minces, Marakech (Morocco). Dept. de Physique; Bennouna, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides et des Couches Minces, Marakech (Morocco). Dept. de Physique; Outzourhit, A. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides et des Couches Minces, Marakech (Morocco). Dept. de Physique; Ameziane, E.L. [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides et des Couches Minces, Marakech (Morocco). Dept. de Physique; Brunel, M. [Laboratoire de Cristallographie, CNRS, Grenoble (France)

    1997-02-28

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin films were prepared by diode radio-frequency sputtering from polycrystalline CdTe targets in an atmosphere of argon, nitrogen and oxygen. The layers prepared in the presence of nitrogen gas were amorphous and their oxygen contents increased with the partial pressure of nitrogen. The evolution of the composition of the layers as a function of the nitrogen partial pressure during deposition was followed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It is found that the oxygen is bound to both tellurium and cadmium atoms. The surface of the CdTe thin films was also studied as a function of their exposure time to a plasma containing a mixture of nitrogen and oxygen. It is found that the oxygen contents of the surface increases with increased exposure time. Also, this exposure resulted in an increase of the oxide thickness and a net decrease in the surface roughness of the films. (orig.)

  8. Cadmium Telluride-Titanium Dioxide Nanocomposite for Photodegradation of Organic Substance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ontam, Areeporn; Khaorapapong, Nithima; Ogawa, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    Cadmium telluride-titanium dioxide nanocomposite was prepared by hydrothermal reaction of sol-gel derived titanium dioxide and organically modified cadmium telluride. The crystallinity of titanium dioxide in the nanocomposite was higher than that of pure titanium dioxide obtained by the reaction under the same temperature and pressure conditions, showing that cadmium telluride induced the crystallization of titanium dioxide. Diffuse reflectance spectrum of the nanocomposite showed the higher absorption efficiency in the UV-visible region due to band-gap excitation of titanium dioxide. The nanocomposite significantly showed the improvement of photocatalytic activity for 4-chlorophenol with UV light.

  9. Thin film cadmium telluride photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, A.; Bohn, R. (Toledo Univ., OH (United States))

    1992-04-01

    This report describes research to develop to vacuum-based growth techniques for CdTe thin-film solar cells: (1) laser-driven physical vapor deposition (LDPVD) and (2) radio-frequency (rf) sputtering. The LDPVD process was successfully used to deposit thin films of CdS, CdTe, and CdCl{sub 2}, as well as related alloys and doped semiconductor materials. The laser-driven deposition process readily permits the use of several target materials in the same vacuum chamber and, thus, complete solar cell structures were fabricated on SnO{sub 2}-coated glass using LDPVD. The rf sputtering process for film growth became operational, and progress was made in implementing it. Time was also devoted to enhancing or implementing a variety of film characterization systems and device testing facilities. A new system for transient spectroscopy on the ablation plume provided important new information on the physical mechanisms of LDPVD. The measurements show that, e.g., Cd is predominantly in the neutral atomic state in the plume but with a fraction that is highly excited internally ({ge} 6 eV), and that the typical neutral Cd translational kinetic energies perpendicular to the target are 20 eV and greater. 19 refs.

  10. High efficiency thin film cadmium telluride solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, T. L.; Chu, Shirley S.; Britt, J.; Chen, G.; Ferekides, C.; Schultz, N.; Wang, C.; Wu, C. Q.

    1992-12-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS), grown from an aqueous solution, and zinc oxide (ZnO), cadmium zinc sulfide (Cd1-xZnxS), and zinc selenide (ZnSe), deposited by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD), have been used as the window for thin film cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar cells. Thin film solar cells were prepared by the successive deposition of the window and p-CdTe (by MOCVD and close-spaced sublimation, CSS) on SnO2:F/glass substrates. CdS/CdTe(CSS) solar cells show considerably better characteristics than CdS/CdTe(MOCVD) solar cells because of the better microstructure of CSS CdTe films. Total area conversion efficiency of 14.6%, verified by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has been achieved for solar cells of about 1 cm2 area. Solar cell prepared by using ZnO, ZnSe, or Cd1-xZnxS as window have significantly lower photovoltage than CdS/CdTe solar cells.

  11. Megapixel mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays for infrared imaging out to 12 microns Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the fabrication of large format, long wave infrared (LWIR) mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe or MCT) detector arrays where the cutoff wavelength is...

  12. Mercury Cadmium Telluride Photoconductive Long Wave Infrared Linear Array Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risal Singh

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Mercury cadmium telluride (Hg1-x, CdxTe (MCT photoconductive long wave infrared linear arrays are still in demand due to several advantages. The linear array technology is well established, easier, economical and is quite relevant to thermal imaging even today. The scan thermal imaging systems based on this technology offer wider field of view coverage and capacity for higher resolution in the scan direction relative to staring systems that use expensive and yet to mature focal plane array detector technology. A critical review on photoconductive n-Hg1-x CdxTe linear array detector technology for the long wave infrared range has been presented. The emphasis lies on detector design and processing technology. The critical issues of diffusion and drift effects, Hi-Lo and heterostructure blocking contacts, surface passivation, and other related aspects have been considered from the detector design angle. The device processing technology aspects are of vital importance

  13. Photosensitive cadmium telluride thin-film field-effect transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Gwangseok; Kim, Donghwan; Kim, Jihyun

    2016-02-22

    We report on the graphene-seeded growth and fabrication of photosensitive Cadmium telluride (CdTe)/graphene hybrid field-effect transistors (FETs) subjected to a post-growth activation process. CdTe thin films were selectively grown on pre-defined graphene, and their morphological, electrical and optoelectronic properties were systemically analyzed before and after the CdCl2 activation process. CdCl2-activated CdTe FETs showed p-type behavior with improved electrical features, including higher electrical conductivity (reduced sheet resistance from 1.09 × 10(9) to 5.55 × 10(7) Ω/sq.), higher mobility (from 0.025 to 0.20 cm2/(V·s)), and faster rise time (from 1.23 to 0.43 s). A post-growth activation process is essential to fabricate high-performance photosensitive CdTe/graphene hybrid devices.

  14. Study on thermal annealing of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; Fochuk, P.M.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.; Horace, J.; McCall, B.; Gul, R.; Xu, L.; Kopach, O.V.; and James, R.B.

    2010-08-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) has attracted increasing interest with its promising potential as a room-temperature nuclear-radiation-detector material. However, different defects in CZT crystals, especially Te inclusions and dislocations, can degrade the performance of CZT detectors. Post-growth annealing is a good approach potentially to eliminate the deleterious influence of these defects. At Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), we built up different facilities for investigating post-growth annealing of CZT. Here, we report our latest experimental results. Cd-vapor annealing reduces the density of Te inclusions, while large temperature gradient promotes the migration of small-size Te inclusions. Simultaneously, the annealing lowers the density of dislocations. However, only-Cd-vapor annealing decreases the resistivity, possibly reflecting the introduction of extra Cd in the lattice. Subsequent Te-vapor annealing is needed to ensure the recovery of the resistivity after removing the Te inclusions.

  15. Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells with PEDOT:PSS Back Contact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, Michael; Duarte, Fernanda; Paudel, Naba; Yan, Yanfa; Wang, Weining

    Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) solar cell is one of the most promising thin film solar cells and its highest efficiency has reached 21%. To keep improving the efficiency of CdTe solar cells, a few issues need to be addressed, one of which is the back contact. The back contact of CdTe solar cells are mostly Cu-base, and the problem with Cu-based back contact is that Cu diffuses into the grain boundary and into the CdS/CdTe junction, causing degradation problem at high temperature and under illumination. To continue improving the efficiency of CdTe/CdS solar cells, a good ohmic back contact with high work function and long term stability is needed. In this work, we report our studies on the potential of conducting polymer being used as the back contact of CdTe/CdS solar cells. Conducting polymers are good candidates because they have high work functions and high conductivities, are easy to process, and cost less, meeting all the requirements of a good ohmic back contact for CdTe. In our studies, we used poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) with different conductivities and compared them with traditional Cu-based back contact. It was observed that the CdTe solar cell performance improves as the conductivity of the PEDOT:PSS increase, and the efficiency (9.1%) is approaching those with traditional Cu/Au back contact (12.5%). Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells with PEDOT:PSS Back Contact.

  16. Using atomistic simulations to model cadmium telluride thin film growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Miao; Kenny, Steven D.

    2016-03-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) is an excellent material for low-cost, high efficiency thin film solar cells. It is important to conduct research on how defects are formed during the growth process, since defects lower the efficiency of solar cells. In this work we use computer simulation to predict the growth of a sputter deposited CdTe thin film. On-the-fly kinetic Monte Carlo technique is used to simulate the CdTe thin film growth on the (1 1 1) surfaces. The results show that on the (1 1 1) surfaces the growth mechanisms on surfaces which are terminated by Cd or Te are quite different, regardless of the deposition energy (0.1∼ 10 eV). On the Te-terminated (1 1 1) surface the deposited clusters first form a single mixed species layer, then the Te atoms in the mixed layer moved up to form a new layer. Whilst on the Cd-terminated (1 1 1) surface the new Cd and Te layers are formed at the same time. Such differences are probably caused by stronger bonding between ad-atoms and surface atoms on the Te layer than on the Cd layer.

  17. Cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium selenide (CdSe) leaching behavior and surface chemistry in response to pH and O2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Chao; Ramos-Ruiz, Adriana; Field, Jim A; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes

    2015-05-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium selenide (CdSe) are increasingly being applied in photovoltaic solar cells and electronic components. A major concern is the public health and ecological risks associated with the potential release of toxic cadmium, tellurium, and/or selenium species. In this study, different tests were applied to investigate the leaching behavior of CdTe and CdSe in solutions simulating landfill leachate. CdTe showed a comparatively high leaching potential. In the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and Waste Extraction Test (WET), the concentrations of cadmium released from CdTe were about 1500 and 260 times higher than the regulatory limit (1 mg/L). In contrast, CdSe was relatively stable and dissolved selenium in both leaching tests was below the regulatory limit (1 mg/L). Nonetheless, the regulatory limit for cadmium was exceeded by 5- to 6- fold in both tests. Experiments performed under different pH and redox conditions confirmed a marked enhancement in CdTe and CdSe dissolution both at acidic pH and under aerobic conditions. These findings are in agreement with thermodynamic predictions. Taken as a whole, the results indicate that recycling of decommissioned CdTe-containing devices is desirable to prevent the potential environmental release of toxic cadmium and tellurium in municipal landfills.

  18. Directional Solidification of Mercury Cadmium Telluride in Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechoczhy, Sandor L.; Gillies, Donald C.; Szofran, Frank R.; Watring, Dale A.

    1998-01-01

    Mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) has been directionally solidified for ten days in the Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) on the second United States Microgravity Payload Mission (USMP-2). A second growth experiment is planned for the USMP-4 mission in November 1997. Results from USMP-2 demonstrated significant changes between microgravity and ground-based experiments, particularly in the compositional homogeneity. Changes were also observed during the microgravity mission which were dependent on the attitude of the space shuttle and the relative magnitudes of axial and transverse residual accelerations with respect to the growth axis of the crystal. Issues of shuttle operation, especially those concerned with safety and navigation, and the science needs of other payloads dictated the need for changes in attitude. One consequence for solidification of MCT in the USMP4 mission is the desire for a shorter growth time to complete the experiment without subjecting the sample to shuttle maneuvers. By using a seeded technique and a pre-processed boule of MCT with an established diffusion layer quenched into the solid, equilibrium steady state growth can be established within 24 hours, rather than the three days needed in USMP-2. The growth of MCT in AADSF during the USMP-4 mission has been planned to take less than 72 hours with 48 hours of actual growth time. A review of the USMP-2 results will be presented, and the rationale for the USMP-4 explained. Pre-mission ground based tests for the USN4P-4 mission will be presented, as will any available preliminary flight results from the mission.

  19. Current transport mechanisms in mercury cadmium telluride diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal, Vishnu; Li, Qing; He, Jiale; He, Kai; Lin, Chun; Hu, Weida

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the results of modelling of the current-voltage characteristics (I-V) of a planar mid-wave Mercury Cadmium Telluride photodiode in a gate controlled diode experiment. It is reported that the diode exhibits nearly ideal I-V characteristics under the optimum surface potential leading to the minimal surface leakage current. Deviations from the optimum surface potential lead to non ideal I-V characteristics, indicating a strong relationship between the ideality factor of the diode with its surface leakage current. Diode's I-V characteristics have been modelled over a range of gate voltages from -9 V to -2 V. This range of gate voltages includes accumulation, flat band, and depletion and inversion conditions below the gate structure of the diode. It is shown that the I-V characteristics of the diode can be very well described by (i) thermal diffusion current, (ii) ohmic shunt current, (iii) photo-current due to background illumination, and (iv) excess current that grows by the process of avalanche multiplication in the gate voltage range from -3 V to -5 V that corresponds to the optimum surface potential. Outside the optimum gate voltage range, the origin of the excess current of the diode is associated with its high surface leakage currents. It is reported that the ohmic shunt current model applies to small surface leakage currents. The higher surface leakage currents exhibit a nonlinear shunt behaviour. It is also shown that the observed zero-bias dynamic resistance of the diode over the entire gate voltage range is the sum of ohmic shunt resistance and estimated zero-bias dynamic resistance of the diode from its thermal saturation current.

  20. Prospects of novel front and back contacts for high efficiency cadmium telluride thin film solar cells from numerical analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matin, M.A. [Department of Electrical, Electronic and System Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Chittagong University of Engineering and Technology (CUET), Chittagong (Bangladesh); Mannir Aliyu, M.; Quadery, Abrar H. [Department of Electrical, Electronic and System Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Amin, Nowshad [Department of Electrical, Electronic and System Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Built Environment, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Solar Energy Research Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Center of Excellence for Research in Engineering Materials (CEREM), College of Engineering, King Saud University, Riyadh 11421 (Saudi Arabia)

    2010-09-15

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin film solar cell has long been recognized as a leading photovoltaic candidate for its high efficiency and low cost. A numerical simulation has been performed using AMPS-1D simulator to explore the possibility of higher efficiency and stable CdS/CdTe cell among several cell structures with indium tin oxide (ITO) and cadmium stannate (Cd{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}) as front contact material, tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}), zinc oxide (ZnO) and zinc stannate (Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4}) as buffer layer, and silver (Ag) or antimony telluride (Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}) with molybdenum (Mo) or zinc telluride (ZnTe) with aluminium (Al) as back contact material. The cell structure ITO/i-ZnO/CdS/CdS{sub x}Te{sub 1-x}/CdTe/Ag has shown the best conversion efficiency of 16.9% (Voc=0.9 V, Jsc=26.35 mA/cm{sup 2}, FF=0.783). This analysis has shown that ITO as front contact material, ZnO as buffer layer and ZnTe or Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} back surface reflector (BSR) are suitable material system for high efficiency (>15%) and stable CdS/CdTe cells. The cell normalized efficiency linearly decreased at a temperature gradient of -0.25%/ C for ZnTe based cells, and at -0.40%/ C for other cells. (author)

  1. From front contact to back contact in cadmium telluride/cadmium sulfide solar cells: Buffer layer and interfacial layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roussillon, Yann

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) polycrystalline thin film solar cells, with their near optimum direct band-gap of 1.4 eV matching almost perfectly the sun radiation spectrum, are a strong contender as a less expensive alternative, among photovoltaic materials, than the more commonly used silicon-based cells. Polycrystalline solar cells are usually deposited over large areas. Such devices often exhibit strong fluctuations (nonuniformities) in electronic properties, which originate from deposition and post-deposition processes, and are detrimental to the device performance. Therefore their effects need to be constrained. A new approach in this work was, when a CdS/CdTe solar cell is exposed to light and immersed in a proper electrolyte, fluctuations in surface potential can drive electrochemical reactions which result in a nonuniform interfacial layer that could balance the original nonuniformity. This approach improved the device efficiency for CdS/CdTe photovoltaic devices from 1--3% to 11--12%. Cadmium sulfide (CdS), used as a window layer and heterojunction partner to CdTe, is electrically inactive and absorb light energies above its band-gap of 2.4 eV. Therefore, to maximize the device efficiency, a thin US layer needs to be used. However, more defects, such as pinholes, are likely to be present in the film, leading to shunts. A resistive transparent layer, called buffer layer, is therefore deposited before CdS. A key observation was that the open-circuit voltage (Voc) for cells made using a buffer layer was high, around 800 mV, similar to cells without buffer layer after Cu doping. The standard p-n junction theory cannot explain this phenomena, therefore an alternative junction mechanism, similar to metal-insulator-semiconductor devices, was developed. Furthermore, alternative Cu-free back-contacts were used in conjunction with a buffer layer. The Voc of the devices was found to be dependent of the back contact used. This change occurs as the back-contact junction

  2. Spectroscopic, microscopic, and internal stress analysis in cadmium telluride grown by close-space sublimation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manciu, Felicia S., E-mail: fsmanciu@utep.edu [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Salazar, Jessica G. [Department of Physics, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States); Diaz, Aryzbe; Quinones, Stella A. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, TX 79968 (United States)

    2015-08-31

    High quality materials with excellent ordered structure are needed for developing photovoltaic and infrared devices. With this end in mind, the results of our research prove the importance of a detailed, comprehensive spectroscopic and microscopic analysis in assessing cadmium telluride (CdTe) characteristics. The goal of this work is to examine not only material crystallinity and morphology, but also induced stress in the deposit material. A uniform, selective growth of polycrystalline CdTe by close-space sublimation on patterned Si(111) and Si(211) substrates is demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy images. Besides good crystallinity of the samples, as revealed by both Raman scattering and Fourier transform infrared absorption investigations, the far-infrared transmission data also show the presence of surface optical phonon modes, which is direct evidence of confinement in such a material. The qualitative identification of the induced stress was achieved by performing confocal Raman mapping microscopy on sample surfaces and by monitoring the existence of the rock-salt and zinc-blende structural phases of CdTe, which were associated with strained and unstrained morphologies, respectively. Although the induced stress in the material is still largely due to the high lattice mismatch between CdTe and the Si substrate, the current results provide a direct visualization of its partial release through the relaxation effect at crystallite boundaries and of preferential growth directions of less strain. Our study, thus offers significant value for improvement of material properties, by targeting the needed adjustments in the growth processes. - Highlights: • Assessing the characteristics of CdTe deposited on patterned Si substrates • Proving the utility of confocal Raman microscopy in monitoring the induced stress • Confirming the partial stress release through the grain boundary relaxation effect • Demonstrating the phonon confinement effect in low

  3. Characterization of large cadmium zinc telluride crystals grown by traveling heater method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, H.; Awadalla, S.A.; Iniewski, K.

    2008-01-01

    The focus of this paper is to evaluate thick, 20 X 20 X 10 and 10 X 10 X 10 mm(3), cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), Cd0.9Zn0.1Te, crystals grown using the traveling heater method (THIM). The phenomenal spectral performance and small size and low concentration of Te inclusions/precipitates of these c......The focus of this paper is to evaluate thick, 20 X 20 X 10 and 10 X 10 X 10 mm(3), cadmium zinc telluride (CZT), Cd0.9Zn0.1Te, crystals grown using the traveling heater method (THIM). The phenomenal spectral performance and small size and low concentration of Te inclusions...

  4. Optical property of amorphous semiconductor mercury cadmium telluride from first-principles study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    The structural and optical properties of amorphous semiconductor mercury cadmium telluride (a-MCT) are obtained by the first principles calculations. The total pair distribution functions and the density of states show that the a-MCT has the semiconductor characteristic. The calculated results of dielectric function show that E2 peak of the imaginary of dielectric function for the crystal mercury cadmium telluride abruptly disappears in the amorphous case due to the long-range disorders. And the imaginary of dielectric function of a-MCT shows a large broad peak, which is in agreement with the available results of other amorphous semiconductors. From the linear extrapolation of the curve ωε 2(ω)1/2 versus ω, it can be obtained that the optical energy gap of amorphous semiconductor Hg0.5Cd0.5Te is 0.51±0.05 eV.

  5. Epitaxial growth of cadmium telluride films on silicon with a buffer silicon carbide layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antipov, V. V.; Kukushkin, S. A.; Osipov, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    An epitaxial 1-3-μm-thick cadmium telluride film has been grown on silicon with a buffer silicon carbide layer using the method of open thermal evaporation and condensation in vacuum for the first time. The optimum substrate temperature was 500°C at an evaporator temperature of 580°C, and the growth time was 4 s. In order to provide more qualitative growth of cadmium telluride, a high-quality 100-nm-thick buffer silicon carbide layer was previously synthesized on the silicon surface using the method of topochemical substitution of atoms. The ellipsometric, Raman, X-ray diffraction, and electron-diffraction analyses showed a high structural perfection of the CdTe layer in the absence of a polycrystalline phase.

  6. Recycling of cadmium and selenium from photovoltaic modules and manufacturing wastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Zweibel, K. (eds.)

    1992-01-01

    Since the development of the first silicon based photovoltaic cell in the 1950's, large advances have been made in photovoltaic material and processing options. At present there is growing interest in the commercial potential of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and copper indium diselenide (CIS) photovoltaic modules. As the commercial potential of these technologies becomes more apparent, interest in the environmental, health and safety issues associated with their production, use and disposal has also increased because of the continuing regulatory focus on cadmium and selenium. In future, recycling of spent or broken CdTe and CIS modules and manufacturing wastes may be needed for environmental, economic or political reasons. To assist industry to identify recycling options early in the commercialization process, a Workshop was convened. At this Workshop, representatives from the photovoltaic, electric utility, and nonferrous metals industries met to explore technical and institutional options for the recycling of spent CdTe and CIS modules and manufacturing wastes. This report summarizes the results of the Workshop. This report includes: (1) A discussion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act regulations and their potential implications to the photovoltaic industry; (2) an assessment of the needs of the photovoltaic industry from the perspective of module manufacturers and consumers; (3) an overview of recycling technologies now employed by other industries for similar types of materials; and, (4) a list of recommendation.

  7. Recycling of cadmium and selenium from photovoltaic modules and manufacturing wastes. A workshop report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskowitz, P.D.; Zweibel, K. [eds.

    1992-10-01

    Since the development of the first silicon based photovoltaic cell in the 1950`s, large advances have been made in photovoltaic material and processing options. At present there is growing interest in the commercial potential of cadmium telluride (CdTe) and copper indium diselenide (CIS) photovoltaic modules. As the commercial potential of these technologies becomes more apparent, interest in the environmental, health and safety issues associated with their production, use and disposal has also increased because of the continuing regulatory focus on cadmium and selenium. In future, recycling of spent or broken CdTe and CIS modules and manufacturing wastes may be needed for environmental, economic or political reasons. To assist industry to identify recycling options early in the commercialization process, a Workshop was convened. At this Workshop, representatives from the photovoltaic, electric utility, and nonferrous metals industries met to explore technical and institutional options for the recycling of spent CdTe and CIS modules and manufacturing wastes. This report summarizes the results of the Workshop. This report includes: (1) A discussion of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act regulations and their potential implications to the photovoltaic industry; (2) an assessment of the needs of the photovoltaic industry from the perspective of module manufacturers and consumers; (3) an overview of recycling technologies now employed by other industries for similar types of materials; and, (4) a list of recommendation.

  8. The effect of different annealing temperatures on tin and cadmium telluride phases obtained by a modified chemical route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mesquita, Anderson Fuzer [Departamento de Química, CCE, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Campus Goiabeiras, 29075-910 Vitória, Espírito Santo (Brazil); Porto, Arilza de Oliveira, E-mail: arilzaporto@yahoo.com.br [Departamento de Química, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Magela de Lima, Geraldo [Departamento de Química, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Paniago, Roberto [Departamento de Física, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Ardisson, José Domingos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, CDTN/CNEN, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Synthesis of cadmium and tin telluride. ► Chemical route to obtain pure crystalline cadmium and tin telluride. ► Effect of the annealing temperature on the crystalline phases. ► Removal of tin oxide as side product through thermal treatment. -- Abstract: In this work tin and cadmium telluride were prepared by a modification of a chemical route reported in the literature to obtain metallacycles formed by oxidative addition of tin-tellurium bonds to platinum (II). Through this procedure it was possible to obtain tin and cadmium telluride. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to identify the crystalline phases obtained as well as the presence of side products. In the case of tin telluride it was identified potassium chloride, metallic tellurium and tin oxide as contaminants. The tin oxidation states were also monitored by {sup 119}Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy. The annealing in hydrogen atmosphere was chosen as a strategy to reduce the tin oxide and promote its reaction with the excess of tellurium present in the medium. The evolution of this tin oxide phase was studied through the annealing of the sample at different temperatures. Cadmium telluride was obtained with high degree of purity (98.5% relative weight fraction) according to the Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction data. The modified procedure showed to be very effective to obtain amorphous tin and cadmium telluride and the annealing at 450 °C has proven to be useful to reduce the amount of oxide produced as side product.

  9. Spatial mapping of cadmium zinc telluride materials properties and electrical response to improve device yield and performance

    CERN Document Server

    Van Scyoc, J M; Yoon, H; Gilbert, T S; Hilton, N R; Lund, J C; James, R B

    1999-01-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride has experienced tremendous growth in its application to various radiation sensing problems over the last five years. However, there are still issues with yield, particularly of the large volume devices needed for imaging and sensitivity-critical applications. Inhomogeneities of various types and on various length scales currently prevent the fabrication of large devices of high spectral performance. This paper discusses the development of a set of characterization tools for quantifying these inhomogeneities, in order to develop improvement strategies to achieve the desired cadmium zinc telluride crystals for detector fabrication.

  10. Structure and Surface Analysis of SHI Irradiated Thin Films of Cadmium Telluride

    OpenAIRE

    Neelam Pahwa; A.D. Yadav; S.K. Dubey; A.P. Patel; Arvind Singh; D.C. Kothari

    2012-01-01

    Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) thin films grown by thermal evaporation on quartz substrates were irradiated with swift (100 MeV) Ni + 4 ions at various fluences in the range 1011 – 1013 cm – 2. The modification in structure and surface morphology has been analyzed as a function of fluence using XRD and AFM techniques. The XRD showed a reduction in peak intensity and grain size with increasing fluence. The AFM micrographs of irradiated thin films show small spherical nanostructures. In addition to d...

  11. Operational Studies of Cadmium Zinc Telluride Microstrip Detectors using SVX ASIC Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krizmanic, John; Barbier, L. M.; Barthelmy, S.; Bartlett, L.; Birsa, F.; Gehrels, N.; Hanchak, C.; Kurczynski, P.; Odom, J.; Parsons, A.; Palmer, D.; Sheppard, D.; Snodgrass, S.; Stahle, C. M.; Teegarden, B.; Tueller, J.

    1997-04-01

    We have been investigating the operational properties of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) microstrip detectors by using SVX ASIC readout electronics. This research is in conjunction with the development of a CZT-based, next generation gamma-ray telescope for use in the gamma-ray Burst ArcSecond Imaging and Spectroscopy (BASIS) experiment. CZT microstrip detectors with 128 channels and 100 micron strip pitch have been fabricated and were interfaced to SVX electronics at Goddard Space Flight Center. Experimental results involving position sensing, spectroscopy, and CZT operational properties will be presented.

  12. Study of a high-resolution, 3-D positioning cadmium zinc telluride detector for PET

    OpenAIRE

    Gu, Y.; Matteson, J. L.; Skelton, R T; Deal, A C; Stephan, E A; Duttweiler, F; Gasaway, T M; Levin, C S

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the performance of 1 mm resolution Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors for positron emission tomography (PET) capable of positioning the 3-D coordinates of individual 511 keV photon interactions. The detectors comprise 40 mm × 40 mm × 5 mm monolithic CZT crystals that employ a novel cross-strip readout with interspersed steering electrodes to obtain high spatial and energy resolution. The study found a single anode FWHM energy resolution of 3.06±0.39% at 511 keV thr...

  13. Te-doped cadmium telluride films fabricated by close spaced sublimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, J.; Zheng, Y. F.; Xu, J. B.; Dai, K.

    2003-07-01

    Te-doped cadmium telluride (CdTe) films were deposited on ITO/glass substrates using the close spaced sublimation (CSS) method. The films were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), the x-ray fixed-quantity (XRF) method, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and the Hall effect. The XRD and SEM results show that appropriate Te doping would be favourable to the growth of CdTe crystallite. The Hall effect measurements indicate that the conductivity of CdTe films could be dramatically improved by Te doping. The work presented here suggests that p-type doping CdTe films can be produced using this deposition method.

  14. Seeded Physical Vapor Transport of Cadmium-Zinc Telluride Crystals: Growth and Characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palosz, W.; George, M. A.; Collins, E. E.; Chen, K.-T.; Zhang, Y.; Burger, A.

    1997-01-01

    Crystals of Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te with x = 0.2 and 40 g in weight were grown on monocrystalline cadmium-zinc telluride seeds by closed-ampoule physical vapor transport with or without excess (Cd + Zn) in the vapor phase. Two post-growth cool-down rates were used. The crystals were characterized using low temperature photoluminescence, atomic force microscopy, chemical etching, X-ray diffraction and electrical measurements. No formation of a second, ZnTe-rich phase was observed.

  15. Synthesis of cadmium telluride quantum wires and the similarity of their band gaps to those of equidiameter cadmium telluride quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Sun, Jianwei; Wang, Lin-Wang; Buhro, William E.

    2008-07-11

    High-quality colloidal CdTe quantum wires having purposefully controlled diameters in the range of 5-11 nm are grown by the solution-liquid-solid (SLS) method, using Bi-nanoparticle catalysts, cadmium octadecylphosphonate and trioctylphosphine telluride as precursors, and a TOPO solvent. The wires adopt the wurtzite structure, and grow along the [002] direction (parallel to the c axis). The size dependence of the band gaps in the wires are determined from the absorption spectra, and compared to the experimental results for high-quality CdTe quantum dots. In contrast to the predictions of an effective-mass approximation, particle-in-a-box model, and previous experimental results from CdSe and InP dot-wire comparisons, the band gaps of CdTe dots and wires of like diameter are found to be experimentally indistinguishable. The present results are analyzed using density functional theory under the local-density approximation by implementing a charge-patching method. The higher-level theoretical analysis finds the general existence of a threshold diameter, above which dot and wire band gaps converge. The origin and magnitude of this threshold diameter is discussed.

  16. Controlled cadmium telluride thin films for solar cell applications (emerging materials systems for solar cell applications). Quarterly progress report No. 1, April 9-July 8, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedam, K.

    1979-08-01

    Preparation and properties of cadmium telluride thin films for use in solar cells are studied. CdTe sputter deposition, crystal doping, and carrier typing are discussed. Future experimental plans are described. (WHK)

  17. Structure and Surface Analysis of SHI Irradiated Thin Films of Cadmium Telluride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Pahwa

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium Telluride (CdTe thin films grown by thermal evaporation on quartz substrates were irradiated with swift (100 MeV Ni + 4 ions at various fluences in the range 1011 – 1013 cm – 2. The modification in structure and surface morphology has been analyzed as a function of fluence using XRD and AFM techniques. The XRD showed a reduction in peak intensity and grain size with increasing fluence. The AFM micrographs of irradiated thin films show small spherical nanostructures. In addition to direct imaging, AFM profile data enable to derive the Power Spectral Density (PSD of the surface roughness. In the present work PSD spectra computed from AFM data were used for studying the surface morphology of films. The PSD curves were fitted with an appropriate analytic function and characteristic parameters were deduced and discussed in order to compare film morphology with varying fluence levels.

  18. Experiments and Monte Carlo modeling of a higher resolution Cadmium Zinc Telluride detector for safeguards applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borella, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre is engaged in R&D activity in the field of Non Destructive Analysis on nuclear materials, with focus on spent fuel characterization. A 500 mm3 Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) with enhanced resolution was recently purchased. With a full width at half maximum of 1.3% at 662 keV, the detector is very promising in view of its use for applications such as determination of uranium enrichment and plutonium isotopic composition, as well as measurement on spent fuel. In this paper, I report about the work done with such a detector in terms of its characterization. The detector energy calibration, peak shape and efficiency were determined from experimental data. The data included measurements with calibrated sources, both in a bare and in a shielded environment. In addition, Monte Carlo calculations with the MCNPX code were carried out and benchmarked with experiments.

  19. Improved performance of silicon nanowire/cadmium telluride quantum dots/organic hybrid solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ge, Zhaoyun [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Jiangsu University of Science and Technology, Zhenjiang 212003, Jiangsu Province (China); Xu, Ling, E-mail: xuling@nju.edu.cn [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Zhang, Renqi; Xue, Zhaoguo; Wang, Hongyu; Xu, Jun; Yu, Yao; Su, Weining; Ma, Zhongyuan; Chen, Kunji [National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • We introduce an intermediate cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) layer between the organic with silicon nanowires of hybrid solar cells as a down-shifting layer. • The hybrid solar cell got the maximum short circuit current density of 33.5 mA/cm{sup 2}, getting an increase of 15.1% comparing to solar cell without CdTe QDs. • The PCE of the hybrid solar cells with CdTe QDs layer increases 28.8%. - Abstract: We fabricated silicon nanowire/cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs)/organic hybrid solar cells and investigated their structure and electrical properties. Transmission electron microscope revealed that CdTe QDs were uniformly distributed on the surface of the silicon nanowires, which made PEDOT:PSS easily filled the space between SiNWs. The current density–voltage (J–V) characteristics of hybrid solar cells were investigated both in dark and under illumination. The result shows that the performance of the hybrid solar cells with CdTe QDs layer has an obvious improvement. The optimal short-circuit current density (J{sub sc}) of solar cells with CdTe QDs layer can reach 33.5 mA/cm{sup 2}. Compared with the solar cells without CdTe QDs, J{sub sc} has an increase of 15.1%. Power conversion efficiency of solar cells also increases by 28.8%. The enhanced performance of the hybrid solar cells with CdTe QDs layers are ascribed to down-shifting effect of CdTe QDs and the modification of the silicon nanowires surface with CdTe QDs. The result of our experiments suggests that hybrid solar cells with CdTe QDs modified are promising candidates for solar cell application.

  20. CdTe Photovoltaic Devices for Solar Cell Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    July 28, 2011 14. ABSTRACT Cadmium telluride ( CdTe ) has been recognized as a promising photovoltaic material for thin - film solar cells because of...mail.mil Phone: 301 394 0963 ABSTRACT Cadmium telluride ( CdTe ) has been recognized as a promising photovoltaic material for thin - film ...absorption coefficient allows films as thin as 2 μm to absorb more than 98% of the above-bandgap radiation. Cells with efficiencies near 17% have been

  1. High-Rate Vapor Deposition of Cadmium Telluride Films for Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nasim Akhter

    1992-01-01

    High rate vapor deposition is presently used for large scale low cost deposition of thin films for packaging and other applications. The feasibility of using this technology for low cost deposition of solar cells was explored. After an exhaustive literature survey, the cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar cell was found to be most suitable candidate for high rate vapor deposition. The high rate vapor deposition was investigated by sublimation with a short distance between sublimation source and the substrate (Close-Spaced Sublimation, CSS). Cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar cells were fabricated by depositing CdTe films at different rates on cadmium sulphide (CdS) films deposited by CSS or by evaporation. The CdTe films deposited at higher deposition rates were observed to have open circuit voltages (V_{ rm oc}) comparable to those deposited at lower rates. The effect of CdS film which acts as window layer for the cells were also investigated on the V_ {rm oc} of the solar cells. The results achieved proved the fact that CdS window layer is necessary to achieve higher V_{ rm oc} from solar cells. The substrate temperature during deposition of films by close space sublimation plays a vital role in the performance of solar cell. The increase in the substrate temperature during deposition of CdTe films increased the V_{rm oc} of solar cells. The solar cells with indium tin oxide (ITO) as top conductor, i.e. ITO/CdS/CdTe configuration were fabricated at rates up to 34 mum/minute and with tin oxide (TO) i.e. TO/CdTe configuration fabricated at rates up to 79 mum/minute have shown similar V_{rm oc} compared to those produced at lower rates. Higher CdTe film deposition rates are possible with larger capacity experimental setup. The method of contacting CdTe, used in this study, results in higher series resistance. An improved method of contacting CdTe needs to be developed.

  2. Directional Solidification of Mercury Cadmium Telluride During the Second United States Microgravity Payload Mission (USMP-2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillies, D. C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.; Watring, D. A.; Alexander, H. A.; Jerman, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    As a solid solution semiconductor having, a large separation between liquidus and solidus, mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) presents a formidable challenge to crystal growers desiring an alloy of high compositional uniformity. To avoid constitutional supercooling during Bridgman crystal growth it is necessary to solidify slowly in a high temperature gradient region. The necessary translation rate of less than 1 mm/hr results in a situation where fluid flow induced by gravity on earth is a significant factor in material transport. The Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) is equipped to provide the stable thermal environment with a high gradient, and the required slow translation rate needed. Ground based experiments in AADSF show clearly the dominance of flow driven transport. The first flight of AADSF in low gravity on USMP-2 provided an opportunity to test theories of fluid flow in MCT and showed several solidification regimes which are very different from those observed on earth. Residual acceleration vectors in the orbiter during the mission were measured by the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE), and correlated well with observed compositional differences in the samples.

  3. Heart imaging by cadmium telluride gamma camera European Program 'BIOMED' consortium

    CERN Document Server

    Scheiber, C; Chambron, J; Prat, V; Kazandjan, A; Jahnke, A; Matz, R; Thomas, S; Warren, S; Hage-Hali, M; Regal, R; Siffert, P; Karman, M

    1999-01-01

    Cadmium telluride semiconductor detectors (CdTe) operating at room temperature are attractive for medical imaging because of their good energy resolution providing excellent spatial and contrast resolution. The compactness of the detection system allows the building of small light camera heads which can be used for bedside imaging. A mobile pixellated gamma camera based on 2304 CdTe (pixel size: 3x3 mm, field of view: 15 cmx15 cm) has been designed for cardiac imaging. A dedicated 16-channel integrated circuit has also been designed. The acquisition hardware is fully programmable (DSP card, personal computer-based system). Analytical calculations have shown that a commercial parallel hole collimator will fit the efficiency/resolution requirements for cardiac applications. Monte-Carlo simulations predict that the Moire effect can be reduced by a 15 deg. tilt of the collimator with respect to the detector grid. A 16x16 CdTe module has been built for the preliminary physical tests. The energy resolution was 6.16...

  4. Reproductive toxicity and gender differences induced by cadmium telluride quantum dots in an invertebrate model organism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Si-Qi; Xing, Rui; Zhou, Yan-Feng; Li, Kai-Le; Su, Yuan-Yuan; Qiu, Jian-Feng; Zhang, Yun-Hu; Zhang, Ke-Qin; He, Yao; Lu, Xiao-Ping; Xu, Shi-Qing

    2016-09-01

    Sexual glands are key sites affected by nanotoxicity, but there is no sensitive assay for measuring reproductive toxicity in animals. The aim of this study was to investigate the toxic effects of cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe-QDs) on gonads in a model organism, Bombyx mori. After dorsal vein injection of 0.32 nmol of CdTe-QDs per individual, the QDs passed through the outer membranes of gonads via the generation of ROS in the membranes of spermatocysts and ovarioles, as well as internal germ cells, thereby inducing early germ cell death or malformations via complex mechanisms related to apoptosis and autophagy through mitochondrial and lysosomal pathways. Histological observations of the gonads and quantitative analyses of germ cell development showed that the reproductive toxicity was characterized by obvious male sensitivity. Exposure to QDs in the early stage of males had severe adverse effects on the quantity and quality of sperm, which was the main reason for the occurrence of unfertilized eggs. Ala- or Gly-conjugated QDs could reduce the nanotoxicity of CdTe-QDs during germ cell development and fertilization of their offspring. The results demonstrate that males are preferable models for evaluating the reproductive toxicity of QDs in combined in vivo/in vitro investigations.

  5. Inhibition of autophagy contributes to the toxicity of cadmium telluride quantum dots in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Junpeng; Shao, Ming; Lai, Lu; Liu, Yi; Xie, Zhixiong

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) are used as near-infrared probes in biologic and medical applications, but their cytological effects and mechanism of potential toxicity are still unclear. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of CdTe QDs of different sizes and investigated their mechanism of toxicity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A growth inhibition assay revealed that orange-emitting CdTe (O-CdTe) QDs (half inhibitory concentration [IC50] =59.44±12.02 nmol/L) were more toxic than green-emitting CdTe QDs (IC50 =186.61±19.74 nmol/L) to S. cerevisiae. Further studies on toxicity mechanisms using a transmission electron microscope and green fluorescent protein tagged Atg8 processing assay revealed that O-CdTe QDs could partially inhibit autophagy at a late stage, which differs from the results reported in mammalian cells. Moreover, autophagy inhibited at a late stage by O-CdTe QDs could be partially recovered by enhancing autophagy with rapamycin (an autophagy activator), combined with an increased number of living cells. These results indicate that inhibition of autophagy acts as a toxicity mechanism of CdTe QDs in S. cerevisiae. This work reports a novel toxicity mechanism of CdTe QDs in yeast and provides valuable information on the effect of CdTe QDs on the processes of living cells.

  6. Two-color detector: Mercury-cadmium-telluride as a terahertz and infrared detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sizov, F.; Zabudsky, V.; Petryakov, V.; Golenkov, A.; Andreyeva, K.; Tsybrii, Z. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics, 03028 Kiev (Ukraine); Dvoretskii, S. [Institute of Semiconductor Physics of SB RAS, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-02-23

    In this paper, issues associated with the development of infrared (IR) and terahertz (THz) radiation detectors based on HgCdTe are discussed. Two-color un-cooled and cooled to 78 K narrow-gap mercury-cadmium-telluride semiconductor thin layers with antennas were considered both as sub-THz (sub-THz) direct detection bolometers and 3–10 μm IR photoconductors. The noise equivalent power (NEP) for one of the detectors studied at ν ≈ 140 GHz reaches NEP{sub 300 K} ≈ 4.5 × 10{sup −10} W/Hz{sup 1/2} and NEP{sub 78 K} ≈ 5 × 10{sup −9} W/Hz{sup 1/2}. The same detector used as an IR photoconductor showed the responsivity at temperatures T = 78 K and 300 K with signal-to-noise ratio S/N ≈ 750 and 50, respectively, under illumination by using IR monochromator and globar as a thermal source.

  7. Low-cost cadmium zinc telluride radiation detectors based on electron-transport-only designs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. A. Brunett; J. C. Lund; J. M. Van Scyoc; N. R. Hilton; E. Y. Lee; R. B. James

    1999-01-01

    The goal of this project was to utilize a novel device design to build a compact, high resolution, room temperature operated semiconductor gamma ray sensor. This sensor was constructed from a cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) crystal. It was able to both detect total radiation intensity and perform spectroscopy on the detected radiation. CZT detectors produced today have excellent electron charge carrier collection, but suffer from poor hole collection. For conventional gamma-ray spectrometers, both the electrons and holes must be collected with high efficiency to preserve energy resolution. The requirement to collect the hole carriers, which have relatively low lifetimes, limits the efficiency and performance of existing experimental devices. By implementing novel device designs such that the devices rely only on the electron signal for energy information, the sensitivity of the sensors for detecting radiation can be increased substantially. In this report the authors describe a project to develop a new type of electron-only CZT detector. They report on their successful efforts to design, implement and test these new radiation detectors. In addition to the design and construction of the sensors the authors also report, in considerable detail, on the electrical characteristics of the CZT crystals used to make their detectors.

  8. Measurement and Modeling of Blocking Contacts for Cadmium Telluride Gamma Ray Detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beck, Patrick R. [California Polytechnic State Univ. (CalPoly), San Luis Obispo, CA (United States)

    2010-01-07

    Gamma ray detectors are important in national security applications, medicine, and astronomy. Semiconductor materials with high density and atomic number, such as Cadmium Telluride (CdTe), offer a small device footprint, but their performance is limited by noise at room temperature; however, improved device design can decrease detector noise by reducing leakage current. This thesis characterizes and models two unique Schottky devices: one with an argon ion sputter etch before Schottky contact deposition and one without. Analysis of current versus voltage characteristics shows that thermionic emission alone does not describe these devices. This analysis points to reverse bias generation current or leakage through an inhomogeneous barrier. Modeling the devices in reverse bias with thermionic field emission and a leaky Schottky barrier yields good agreement with measurements. Also numerical modeling with a finite-element physics-based simulator suggests that reverse bias current is a combination of thermionic emission and generation. This thesis proposes further experiments to determine the correct model for reverse bias conduction. Understanding conduction mechanisms in these devices will help develop more reproducible contacts, reduce leakage current, and ultimately improve detector performance.

  9. Study of a high-resolution, 3D positioning cadmium zinc telluride detector for PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gu, Y; Levin, C S [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Matteson, J L; Skelton, R T; Deal, A C; Stephan, E A; Duttweiler, F; Gasaway, T M, E-mail: cslevin@stanford.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)

    2011-03-21

    This paper investigates the performance of 1 mm resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors for positron emission tomography (PET) capable of positioning the 3D coordinates of individual 511 keV photon interactions. The detectors comprise 40 mm x 40 mm x 5 mm monolithic CZT crystals that employ a novel cross-strip readout with interspersed steering electrodes to obtain high spatial and energy resolution. The study found a single anode FWHM energy resolution of 3.06 {+-} 0.39% at 511 keV throughout most of the detector volume. Improved resolution is expected with properly shielded front-end electronics. Measurements made using a collimated beam established the efficacy of the steering electrodes in facilitating enhanced charge collection across anodes, as well as a spatial resolution of 0.44 {+-} 0.07 mm in the direction orthogonal to the electrode planes. Finally, measurements based on coincidence electronic collimation yielded a point spread function with 0.78 {+-} 0.10 mm FWHM, demonstrating 1 mm spatial resolution capability transverse to the anodes-as expected from the 1 mm anode pitch. These findings indicate that the CZT-based detector concept has excellent performance and shows great promise for a high-resolution PET system.

  10. Study of a high-resolution, 3D positioning cadmium zinc telluride detector for PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Y.; Matteson, J. L.; Skelton, R. T.; Deal, A. C.; Stephan, E. A.; Duttweiler, F.; Gasaway, T. M.; Levin, C. S.

    2011-03-01

    This paper investigates the performance of 1 mm resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors for positron emission tomography (PET) capable of positioning the 3D coordinates of individual 511 keV photon interactions. The detectors comprise 40 mm × 40 mm × 5 mm monolithic CZT crystals that employ a novel cross-strip readout with interspersed steering electrodes to obtain high spatial and energy resolution. The study found a single anode FWHM energy resolution of 3.06 ± 0.39% at 511 keV throughout most of the detector volume. Improved resolution is expected with properly shielded front-end electronics. Measurements made using a collimated beam established the efficacy of the steering electrodes in facilitating enhanced charge collection across anodes, as well as a spatial resolution of 0.44 ± 0.07 mm in the direction orthogonal to the electrode planes. Finally, measurements based on coincidence electronic collimation yielded a point spread function with 0.78 ± 0.10 mm FWHM, demonstrating 1 mm spatial resolution capability transverse to the anodes—as expected from the 1 mm anode pitch. These findings indicate that the CZT-based detector concept has excellent performance and shows great promise for a high-resolution PET system.

  11. Study of a high-resolution, 3-D positioning cadmium zinc telluride detector for PET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Y; Matteson, J L; Skelton, R T; Deal, A C; Stephan, E A; Duttweiler, F; Gasaway, T M; Levin, C S

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the performance of 1 mm resolution Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors for positron emission tomography (PET) capable of positioning the 3-D coordinates of individual 511 keV photon interactions. The detectors comprise 40 mm × 40 mm × 5 mm monolithic CZT crystals that employ a novel cross-strip readout with interspersed steering electrodes to obtain high spatial and energy resolution. The study found a single anode FWHM energy resolution of 3.06±0.39% at 511 keV throughout most the detector volume. Improved resolution is expected with properly shielded front-end electronics. Measurements made using a collimated beam established the efficacy of the steering electrodes in facilitating enhanced charge collection across anodes, as well as a spatial resolution of 0.44±0.07 mm in the direction orthogonal to the electrode planes. Finally, measurements based on coincidence electronic collimation yielded a point spread function with 0.78±0.10 mm FWHM, demonstrating 1 mm spatial resolution capability transverse to the anodes – as expected from the 1 mm anode pitch. These findings indicate that the CZT-based detector concept has excellent performance and shows great promise for a high-resolution PET system. PMID:21335649

  12. Novel Cadmium Zinc Telluride Devices for Myocardial Perfusion Imaging-Technological Aspects and Clinical Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Haim, Simona; Kennedy, John; Keidar, Zohar

    2016-07-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging plays an important role in the assessment of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease and is well established for diagnosis and for prognostic evaluation in these patients. The dedicated cardiac SPECT cameras with solid-state cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors were first introduced a decade ago. A large body of evidence is building up, showing the superiority of the new technology compared with conventional gamma cameras. Not only the CZT detectors, but also new collimator geometries, the ability to perform focused imaging optimized for the heart and advances in data processing algorithms all contribute to the significantly improved sensitivity up to 8-10 times, as well as improved energy resolution and improved reconstructed spatial resolution compared with conventional technology. In this article, we provide an overview of the physical characteristics of the CZT cameras, as well as a review of the literature published so far, including validation studies in comparison with conventional myocardial perfusion imaging and with invasive coronary angiography, significant reduction in radiation dose, and new imaging protocols enabled by the new technology.

  13. Simulation study comparing high-purity germanium and cadmium zinc telluride detectors for breast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, D. L.; Peterson, T. E.

    2014-11-01

    We conducted simulations to compare the potential imaging performance for breast cancer detection with High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) systems with 1% and 3.8% energy resolution at 140 keV, respectively. Using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) simulation package, we modelled both 5 mm-thick CZT and 10 mm-thick HPGe detectors with the same parallel-hole collimator for the imaging of a breast/torso phantom. Simulated energy spectra were generated, and planar images were created for various energy windows around the 140 keV photopeak. Relative sensitivity and scatter and the torso fractions were calculated along with tumour contrast and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Simulations showed that utilizing a ±1.25% energy window with an HPGe system better suppressed torso background and small-angle scattered photons than a comparable CZT system using a -5%/+10% energy window. Both systems provided statistically similar contrast and SNR, with HPGe providing higher relative sensitivity. Lowering the counts of HPGe images to match CZT count density still yielded equivalent contrast between HPGe and CZT. Thus, an HPGe system may provide equivalent breast imaging capability at lower injected radioactivity levels when acquiring for equal imaging time.

  14. Macro-loading Effects in Inductively Coupled Plasma Etched Mercury Cadmium Telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apte, Palash; Rybnicek, Kimon; Stoltz, Andrew

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports the effect of macro-loading on mercury cadmium telluride (Hg1- x Cd x Te) and Photoresist (PR) etched in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP). A significant macro-loading effect is observed, which affects the etch rates of both PR and Hg1- x Cd x Te. It is observed that the exposed silicon area has a significant effect on the PR etch rate, but not on the Hg1- x Cd x Te etch rate. It is also observed that the exposed Hg1- x Cd x Te area has a significant effect on the etch rate of the PR, but the exposed PR area does not seem to have an effect on the Hg1- x Cd x Te etch rate. Further, the exposed Hg1- x Cd x Te area is shown to affect the etch rate of the Hg1- x Cd x Te, but there does not seem to be a similar effect for the exposed PR area on the etch rate of the PR. Since the macro-loading affects the selectivity significantly, this effect can cause significant problems in the etching of deep trenches. A few techniques to reduce the effect of macro-loading on the etch rates of the PR and Hg1- x Cd x Te are listed, herein.

  15. Band gap engineering of zinc selenide thin films through alloying with cadmium telluride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Kuhaili, M F; Kayani, A; Durrani, S M A; Bakhtiari, I A; Haider, M B

    2013-06-12

    This work investigates band gap engineering of zinc selenide (ZnSe) thin films. This was achieved by mixing ZnSe with cadmium telluride (CdTe). The mass ratio (x) of CdTe in the starting material was varied in the range x = 0-0.333. The films were prepared using thermal evaporation. The chemical composition of the films was investigated through energy dispersive spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. Structural analysis was carried out using X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy. Normal incidence transmittance and reflectance were measured over the wavelength range 300-1300 nm. The absorption coefficients and band gaps were determined from these spectrophotometric measurements. The band gap monotonically decreased from 2.58 eV (for x = 0) to 1.75 eV (for x = 0.333). Photocurrent measurements indicated that the maximum current density was obtained for films with x = 0.286. A figure of merit, based on crystallinity, band gap, and photocurrent, was defined. The optimum characteristics were obtained for the films with x = 0.231, for which the band gap was 2.14 eV.

  16. Properties of Te-rich cadmium telluride thin films fabricated by closed space sublimation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas Shah, N.; Ali, A.; Ali, Z.; Maqsood, A.; Aqili, A. K. S.

    2005-11-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin films were prepared by the closed space sublimation (CSS) technique, using CdTe powder as evaporant onto substrates of water-white glass. In the next step, the same procedure was adopted by using tellurium as evaporant and already deposited CdTe film as substrate. Such compositions were then annealed at 300 °C for 30 min to obtain Te-enriched films. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), spectrophotometry, DC electrical resistivity, dark conductivity and activation energy analysis as a function of temperature by two-probe method. The electron microprobe analyzer (EMPA) results showed an increase of Te content composition in the samples as the mass of the Te-deposition increased in CdTe. The Hall measurements indicated the increase in mobility and carrier concentrations of CdTe films by addition of tellurium. A significant change in the shape and size of the CdTe grains were observed.

  17. Investigations of Cadmium Manganese Telluride Crystals for Room-Temperature Radiation Detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A.; Camarda, G.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.; Carcelen, V.; Gul, R.; James, R.

    2009-10-06

    Cadmium manganese telluride (CMT) has high potential as a material for room-temperature nuclear-radiation detectors. We investigated indium-doped CMT crystals taken from the stable growth region of the ingot, and compared its characteristics with that from the last-to-freeze region. We employed different techniques, including synchrotron white-beam X-ray topography (SWBXT), current-voltage (I-V) measurements, and low-temperature photoluminescence spectra, and we also assessed their responses as detectors to irradiation exposure. The crystal from the stable growth region proved superior to that from the last-to-freeze region; it is a single-grain crystal, free of twins, and displayed a resistivity higher by two orders-of-magnitude. The segregation of indium dopant in the ingot might be responsible for its better resistivity. Furthermore, we recorded a good response in the detector fabricated from the crystal taken from the stable growth region; its ({mu}{tau}){sub e} value was 2.6 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup 2}/V, which is acceptable for thin detectors, including for applications in medicine.

  18. Optical properties of cadmium telluride in zinc-blende and wurzite structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini, S.M. [Department of Physics, Materials and Electroceramics Laboratory, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: sma_hosseini@yahoo.com

    2008-05-01

    The optical properties of cadmium telluride including the linear optical dielectric function, the refractive index, the extinction coefficient, the reflectivity and the plasmon energy have been calculated by density functional theory (DFT). The full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FL-LAPW) method was used with the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) including the orbital dependence of the self-energy, i.e. the orbital-dependent potentials of Coulomb and exchange interactions (GGA+U). Using only LDA or GGA methods underestimates the electronic parameters (band gap and band dispersion). Applying orbital-dependent potentials splits the Te-5s state and shifts the binding energies of the Cd-4d levels towards the experimentally determined position. The calculated results indicated that although Te-5s and Cd-4d overlap, Cd-4d plays an important role in absorption and reflectivity constants. The optical constants of CdTe in hexagonal structure exhibit anisotropy (birefringence) in two directions (in basal-plan and c-axis) but the difference is very small in the static limit.

  19. Optical properties of cadmium telluride in zinc-blende and wurzite structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, S. M.

    2008-05-01

    The optical properties of cadmium telluride including the linear optical dielectric function, the refractive index, the extinction coefficient, the reflectivity and the plasmon energy have been calculated by density functional theory (DFT). The full potential linearized augmented plane wave (FL-LAPW) method was used with the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) including the orbital dependence of the self-energy, i.e. the orbital-dependent potentials of Coulomb and exchange interactions (GGA+ U). Using only LDA or GGA methods underestimates the electronic parameters (band gap and band dispersion). Applying orbital-dependent potentials splits the Te-5s state and shifts the binding energies of the Cd-4d levels towards the experimentally determined position. The calculated results indicated that although Te-5s and Cd-4d overlap, Cd-4d plays an important role in absorption and reflectivity constants. The optical constants of CdTe in hexagonal structure exhibit anisotropy (birefringence) in two directions (in basal-plan and c-axis) but the difference is very small in the static limit.

  20. Reproductive toxicity and gender differences induced by cadmium telluride quantum dots in an invertebrate model organism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Si-Qi; Xing, Rui; Zhou, Yan-Feng; Li, Kai-Le; Su, Yuan-Yuan; Qiu, Jian-Feng; Zhang, Yun-Hu; Zhang, Ke-Qin; He, Yao; Lu, Xiao-Ping; Xu, Shi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Sexual glands are key sites affected by nanotoxicity, but there is no sensitive assay for measuring reproductive toxicity in animals. The aim of this study was to investigate the toxic effects of cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe-QDs) on gonads in a model organism, Bombyx mori. After dorsal vein injection of 0.32 nmol of CdTe-QDs per individual, the QDs passed through the outer membranes of gonads via the generation of ROS in the membranes of spermatocysts and ovarioles, as well as internal germ cells, thereby inducing early germ cell death or malformations via complex mechanisms related to apoptosis and autophagy through mitochondrial and lysosomal pathways. Histological observations of the gonads and quantitative analyses of germ cell development showed that the reproductive toxicity was characterized by obvious male sensitivity. Exposure to QDs in the early stage of males had severe adverse effects on the quantity and quality of sperm, which was the main reason for the occurrence of unfertilized eggs. Ala- or Gly-conjugated QDs could reduce the nanotoxicity of CdTe-QDs during germ cell development and fertilization of their offspring. The results demonstrate that males are preferable models for evaluating the reproductive toxicity of QDs in combined in vivo/in vitro investigations. PMID:27669995

  1. 3D Particle Track Reconstrution in a Single Layer Cadmium-Telluride Hybrid Active Pixel Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Filipenko, Mykhaylo; Anton, Gisela; Michel, Thilo

    2014-01-01

    In the past 20 years the search for neutrinoless double beta decay has driven many developements in all kind of detector technology. A new branch in this field are highly-pixelated semiconductor detectors - such as the CdTe-Timepix detectors. It compromises a cadmium-telluride sensor of 14 mm x 14 mm x 1 mm size with an ASIC which has 256 x 256 pixel of 55 \\textmu m pixel pitch and can be used to obtain either spectroscopic or timing information in every pixel. In regular operation it can provide a 2D projection of particle trajectories; however, three dimensional trajectories are desirable for neutrinoless double beta decay and other applications. In this paper we present a method to obtain such trajectories. The method was developed and tested with simulations that assume some minor modifications to the Timepix ASIC. Also, we were able to test the method experimentally and in the best case achieved a position resolution of about 90 \\textmu m with electrons of 4.4 GeV.

  2. Spectral x-ray computed tomography scanner using a cadmium telluride detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Eiichi; Oda, Yasuyuki; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya

    2016-10-01

    To obtain four tomograms with four different photon energy ranges simultaneously, we have developed a quad-energy Xray photon counter with a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector and four sets of comparators and frequency-voltage converters (FVCs). X-ray photons are detected using the CdTe detector, and the event pulses from a shaping amplifier are sent to four comparators simultaneously to regulate four threshold energies of 20, 35, 50 and 65 keV. Using this counter, the energy ranges are 20-100, 35-100, 50-100 and 65-100 keV; the maximum energy corresponds to the tube voltage. Xray photons in the four ranges are counted using the comparators, and the logical pulses from the comparators are input to the FVCs. The outputs from the four FVCs are input to a personal computer through an analog-digital converter (ADC) to carry out quad-energy imaging. To observe contrast variations with changes in the threshold energy, we performed spectral computed tomography utilizing the quad-energy photon counter at a tube voltage of 100 kV and a current of 8.0 μA. In the spectral CT, four tomograms were obtained simultaneously with four energy ranges. The image contrast varied with changes in the threshold energy, and the exposure time for tomography was 9.8 min.

  3. Development and evaluation of polycrystalline cadmium telluride dosimeters for accurate quality assurance in radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, K.; Han, M.; Kim, K.; Heo, Y.; Moon, C.; Park, S.; Nam, S.

    2016-02-01

    For quality assurance in radiation therapy, several types of dosimeters are used such as ionization chambers, radiographic films, thermo-luminescent dosimeter (TLD), and semiconductor dosimeters. Among them, semiconductor dosimeters are particularly useful for in vivo dosimeters or high dose gradient area such as the penumbra region because they are more sensitive and smaller in size compared to typical dosimeters. In this study, we developed and evaluated Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) dosimeters, one of the most promising semiconductor dosimeters due to their high quantum efficiency and charge collection efficiency. Such CdTe dosimeters include single crystal form and polycrystalline form depending upon the fabrication process. Both types of CdTe dosimeters are commercially available, but only the polycrystalline form is suitable for radiation dosimeters, since it is less affected by volumetric effect and energy dependence. To develop and evaluate polycrystalline CdTe dosimeters, polycrystalline CdTe films were prepared by thermal evaporation. After that, CdTeO3 layer, thin oxide layer, was deposited on top of the CdTe film by RF sputtering to improve charge carrier transport properties and to reduce leakage current. Also, the CdTeO3 layer which acts as a passivation layer help the dosimeter to reduce their sensitivity changes with repeated use due to radiation damage. Finally, the top and bottom electrodes, In/Ti and Pt, were used to have Schottky contact. Subsequently, the electrical properties under high energy photon beams from linear accelerator (LINAC), such as response coincidence, dose linearity, dose rate dependence, reproducibility, and percentage depth dose, were measured to evaluate polycrystalline CdTe dosimeters. In addition, we compared the experimental data of the dosimeter fabricated in this study with those of the silicon diode dosimeter and Thimble ionization chamber which widely used in routine dosimetry system and dose measurements for radiation

  4. Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride Focal Plane Array Performance Under Non-Standard Operating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Brandon S.; Eastwood, Michael L.; Bruce, Carl F.; Green, Robert O.; Coles, J. B.

    2011-01-01

    This paper highlights a new technique that allows the Teledyne Scientific & Imaging LLC TCM6604A Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride (MCT) Focal Plane Array (FPA) to operate at room temperature. The Teledyne MCT FPA has been a standard in Imaging Spectroscopy since its creation in the 1980's. This FPA has been used in applications ranging from space instruments such as CRISM, M3 and ARTEMIS to airborne instruments such as MaRS and the Next Generation AVIRIS Instruments1. Precise focal plane alignment is always a challenge for such instruments. The current FPA alignment process results in multiple cold cycles requiring week-long durations, thereby increasing the risk and cost of a project. These alignment cycles are necessary because optimal alignment is approached incrementally and can only be measured with the FPA and Optics at standard operating conditions, requiring a cold instrument. Instruments using this FPA are normally cooled to temperatures below 150K for the MCT FPA to properly function. When the FPA is run at higher temperatures the dark current increases saturating the output. This paper covers the prospect of warm MCT FPA operation from a theoretical and experimental perspective. We discuss the empirical models and physical laws that govern MCT material properties and predict the optimal settings that will result in the best MCT PA performance at 300K. Theoretical results are then calculated for the proposed settings. We finally present the images and data obtained using the actual system with the warm MCT FPA settings. The paper concludes by emphasizing the strong positive correlation between the measured values and the theoretical results.

  5. Photoluminescence study of copper-doped cadmium-telluride and related stability issues for cadmium-sulfide/cadmium-telluride solar-cell devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecu, Dan S.

    Lifetime predictions for CdTe photovoltaic modules represent a complex problem, partly due to the fact that a fundamental understanding of the CdTe material properties and device operation is far from being complete. One of the stability issues actively investigated is the use of Cu for the formation of a back contact. Cu is one of the few good p-dopants for CdTe, which, by forming a p+ layer at the surface of the CdTe, relaxes the requirement for a high work function metal at the back contact. On the other hand, it is known that Cu is a fast diffuser in CdTe and it was suggested that Cu migration within the device could lead to some of the observed degradation effects. in this work, we explore Cu states and migration effects in CdTe and CdS/CdTe devices using photoluminescence (PL) as the main investigative method. We confirm the assignment of several Cu-related PL transitions observed in the CdTe spectrum, namely, a bound exciton transition (X, CUCd) at 1.59eV and a donor-acceptor pair (DAP) (D, CuCd) at 1.45eV. In addition, we observe and characterize new effects related to Cu diffusion in CdTe: (a) the quenching of a DAP, Cd-vacancy related band, at 1.55eV, and (b) the formation of a new strong lattice-coupled transition at 1.555eV. These effects, we suggest, are consistent with Cu atoms occupying substitutional positions on the Cd sublattice and/or forming Frenkel pairs of the type CUi-VCd- with Cd vacancies. Similar spectral characteristics are observed for the low-S-content CdS-CdTe alloy existent in the vicinity of the junction in solar-cell devices. Using Cu-induced changes in the PL spectrum, we propose that Cu diffuses rapidly through an interstitial mechanism, as a positively charged ion, throughout the CdTe and possibly the CdS layer during the back-contact fabrication procedure. Applied electrical fields can reverse the direction of Cu migration leading to device performance degradation. In addition, it was found that Cu-doped CdTe samples exhibit a

  6. Microbial toxicity of ionic species leached from the II-VI semiconductor materials, cadmium telluride (CdTe) and cadmium selenide (CdSe).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos-Ruiz, Adriana; Zeng, Chao; Sierra-Alvarez, Reyes; Teixeira, Luiz H; Field, Jim A

    2016-11-01

    This work investigated the microbial toxicity of soluble species that can potentially be leached from the II-VI semiconductor materials, cadmium telluride and cadmium selenide. The soluble ions tested included: cadmium, selenite, selenate, tellurite, and tellurate. Their toxicity towards the acetoclastic and hydrogen-consuming trophic groups in a methanogenic consortium as well as towards a bioluminescent marine bacterium, Aliivibrio fischeri (Microtox(®) test), was assessed. The acetoclastic methanogenic activity was the most affected as evidenced by the low 50% inhibiting concentrations (IC50) values obtained of 8.6 mg L(-1) for both cadmium and tellurite, 10.2 mg L(-1) for tellurate, and 24.1 mg L(-1) for selenite. Both tellurium oxyanions caused a strong inhibition of acetoclastic methanogenesis at low concentrations, each additional increment in concentration provided progressively less inhibition increase. In the case of the hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis, cadmium followed by selenite caused the greatest inhibition with IC50 values of 2.9 and 18.0 mg L(-1), respectively. Tellurite caused a moderate effect as evidenced by a 36.8% inhibition of the methanogenic activity at the highest concentration tested, and a very mild effect of tellurate was observed. Microtox(®) analyses showed a noteworthy inhibition of cadmium, selenite, and tellurite with 50% loss in bioluminescence after 30 min of exposure of 5.5, 171.1, and 458.6 mg L(-1), respectively. These results suggest that the leaching of cadmium, tellurium and selenium ions from semiconductor materials can potentially cause microbial toxicity.

  7. Inhibition of autophagy contributes to the toxicity of cadmium telluride quantum dots in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan J

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Junpeng Fan,1–4 Ming Shao,1–4 Lu Lai,3–5 Yi Liu,3–5 Zhixiong Xie1–4,6 1College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, 2Hubei Provincial Cooperative Innovation Center of Industrial Fermentation,3State Key Laboratory of Virology, 4Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (MOE, 5College of Chemistry and Molecular Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, 6School of Life Science and Technology, Hubei Engineering University, Xiaogan, People’s Republic of China Abstract: Cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs are used as near-infrared probes in biologic and medical applications, but their cytological effects and mechanism of potential toxicity are still unclear. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of CdTe QDs of different sizes and investigated their mechanism of toxicity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A growth inhibition assay revealed that orange-emitting CdTe (O-CdTe QDs (half inhibitory concentration [IC50] =59.44±12.02 nmol/L were more toxic than green-emitting CdTe QDs (IC50 =186.61±19.74 nmol/L to S. cerevisiae. Further studies on toxicity mechanisms using a transmission electron microscope and green fluorescent protein tagged Atg8 processing assay revealed that O-CdTe QDs could partially inhibit autophagy at a late stage, which differs from the results reported in mammalian cells. Moreover, autophagy inhibited at a late stage by O-CdTe QDs could be partially recovered by enhancing autophagy with rapamycin (an autophagy activator, combined with an increased number of living cells. These results indicate that inhibition of autophagy acts as a toxicity mechanism of CdTe QDs in S. cerevisiae. This work reports a novel toxicity mechanism of CdTe QDs in yeast and provides valuable information on the effect of CdTe QDs on the processes of living cells. Keywords: CdTe quantum dots, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, toxicity, autophagy

  8. Polycrystalline thin film cadmium telluride solar cells fabricated by electrodeposition. Annual subcontract report, 20 March 1993--19 March 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trefny, J.U.; Furtak, T.E.; Williamson, D.L.; Kim, D. [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    1994-07-01

    This report describes the principal results of work performed during the second year of a 3-year program at the Colorado School of Mines (CSM). The work on transparent conducting oxides was carried out primarily by CSM students at NREL and is described in three publications listed in Appendix C. The high-quality ZnO produced from the work was incorporated into a copper indium diselenide cell that exhibited a world-record efficiency of 16.4%. Much of the time was devoted to the improvement of cadmium sulfide films deposited by chemical bath deposition methods and annealed with or without a cadmium chloride treatment. Progress was also made in the electrochemical deposition of cadmium telluride. High-quality films yielding CdS/CdTe/Au cells of greater than 10% efficiency are now being produced on a regular basis. We explored the use of zinc telluride back contacts to form an n-i-p cell structure as previously used by Ametek. We began small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) studies to characterize crystal structures, residual stresses, and microstructures of both CdTe and CdS. Large SAXS signals were observed in CdS, most likely because of scattering from gain boundaries. The signals observed to date from CdTe are much weaker, indicating a more homogeneous microstructure. We began to use the ADEPT modeling program, developed at Purdue University, to guide our understanding of the CdS/CdTe cell physics and the improvements that will most likely lead to significantly enhanced efficiencies.

  9. A rapid and sensitive assay for determination of doxycycline using thioglycolic acid-capped cadmium telluride quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashkhourian, Javad; Absalan, Ghodratollah; Jafari, Marzieh; Zare, Saber

    2016-01-05

    A rapid, simple and inexpensive spectrofluorimetric sensor for determination of doxycycline based on its interaction with thioglycolic acid-capped cadmium telluride quantum dots (TGA/CdTe QDs) has been developed. Under the optimum experimental conditions, the sensor exhibited a fast response time of <10s. The results revealed that doxycycline could quench the fluorescence of TGA/CdTe QDs via electron transfer from the QDs to doxycycline through a dynamic quenching mechanism. The sensor permitted determination of doxycycline in a concentration range of 1.9×10(-6)-6.1×10(-5)molL(-1) with a detection limit of 1.1×10(-7)molL(-1). The sensor was applied for determination of doxycycline in honey and human serum samples.

  10. The effect of substrate rotation rate on physical properties of cadmium telluride films prepared by a glancing angle deposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseini Siyanaki, Fatemeh, E-mail: fatemeh.hosseini@gmail.com; Rezagholipour Dizaji, Hamid, E-mail: hrgholipour@semnan.ac.ir; Ehsani, Mohammad Hossein, E-mail: mhe_ehsani@yahoo.com; Khorramabadi, Shiva, E-mail: khorramabadi.sh@gmail.com

    2015-02-27

    Physical properties of cadmium telluride thin films, deposited on glass substrates by modified glancing angle deposition (GLAD) technique with various substrate rates of rotation, were investigated in this study. In contrast to obliquely columnar thin films fabricated by the conventional GLAD technique, in which higher columnar angle is coupled to higher degree of porosity, this study introduces obliquely deposited thin films which have packed columnar structures despite their highly tilted columns. Structural and optical properties and surface morphology of the CdTe thin films deposited by this technique were studied using X-ray diffraction, UV–visible spectroscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy. - Highlights: • Glancing angle deposition technique was employed to prepare CdTe thin films. • The effect of substrate rate of rotation on optical properties was studied. • Highly tilted and packed columnar structure was fabricated. • A dramatic decline in refractive index in one of the specimens was observed.

  11. OPTIMUM STOICHIOMETRY OF CADMIUM ZINC TELLURIDE THIN FILMS IN THE LIGHT OF OPTICAL, STRUCTURAL AND PHOTON GENERATED GAIN STUDIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. MONISHA CHAKRABORTY

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Cadmium Zinc Telluride (Cd1-xZnxTe is a potential material for high energy imaging devices. Proper methods are adopted in this work to fabricate large area device grade Cd1-xZnxTe thin films for ‘x’ varying from 0.0567 to 0.2210. Large work function Nickel (Ni is the contact points on these films. The fabricated films are subjected to optical characterization, structural characterization and photon generated gain studies. Properties of fabricated films are found to vary with ‘x’. Photon generated gains of Ni-Cd1-xZnxTe structures are obtained. The present paper dealt with the estimation of optimum ‘x’ in Cd1-xZnxTe thin films in the light of optical, structural and photon generated gain studies.

  12. Crystal Growth, Characterization and Fabrication of Cadmium Zinc Telluride-based Nuclear Detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishna, Ramesh M.

    In today's world, nuclear radiation is seeing more and more use by humanity as time goes on. Nuclear power plants are being built to supply humanity's energy needs, nuclear medical imaging is becoming more popular for diagnosing cancer and other diseases, and control of weapons-grade nuclear materials is becoming more and more important for national security. All of these needs require high-performance nuclear radiation detectors which can accurately measure the type and amount of radiation being used. However, most current radiation detection materials available commercially require extensive cooling, or simply do not function adequately for high-energy gamma-ray emitting nuclear materials such as uranium and plutonium. One of the most promising semiconductor materials being considered to create a convenient, field-deployable nuclear detector is cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe, or CZT). CZT is a ternary semiconductor compound which can detect high-energy gamma-rays at room temperature. It offers high resistivity (≥ 1010 O-cm), a high band gap (1.55 eV), and good electron transport properties, all of which are required for a nuclear radiation detector. However, one significant issue with CZT is that there is considerable difficulty in growing large, homogeneous, defect-free single crystals of CZT. This significantly increases the cost of producing CZT detectors, making CZT less than ideal for mass-production. Furthermore, CZT suffers from poor hole transport properties, which creates significant problems when using it as a high-energy gamma-ray detector. In this dissertation, a comprehensive investigation is undertaken using a successful growth method for CZT developed at the University of South Carolina. This method, called the solvent-growth technique, reduces the complexity required to grow detector-grade CZT single crystals. It utilizes a lower growth temperature than traditional growth methods by using Te as a solvent, while maintaining the advantages of

  13. Bulk growth and surface characterization of epitaxy ready cadmium zinc telluride substrates for use in IR imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flint, J. P.; Martinez, B.; Betz, T. E. M.; MacKenzie, J.; Kumar, F. J.; Bindley, G.

    2016-05-01

    Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) is an important compound semiconductor material upon which Mercury Cadmium Telluride (MCT) layers are deposited epitaxially to form structures that are used in high performance detectors covering a wide infrared (IR) spectral band. The epitaxial growth of high quality MCT layers presents many technical challenges and a critical determinant of material performance is the quality of the underlying bulk CZT substrate. CZT itself is a difficult material to manufacture where traditional methods of bulk growth are complex and low yielding, which constrains the supply of commercially available substrates. In this work we report on the epitaxy-ready finishing of Travelling Heather Method (THM) grown Cd0.96Zn0.04Te substrates. The THM method is well established for the growth of high quality CZT crystals used in nuclear, X-ray and spectroscopic imaging applications and in this work we demonstrate the application of this technique to the growth of IR specification CZT substrates with areas of up to 5 cm x 5 cm square. We will discuss the advantages of the THM method over alternative methods of bulk CZT growth where the high yield and material uniformity advantages of this technique will be demonstrated. Chemo-mechanical polishing (CMP) of 4 cm x 4 cm CZT substrates reveals that III-V (InSb/GaSb) like levels of epitaxy-ready surface finishing may be obtained with modified process chemistries. Surface quality assessments will be made by various surface analytical and microscopy techniques from which the suitability of the material for subsequent assessment of quality by epitaxial growth will be ascertained.

  14. Controlled cadmium telluride thin films for solar-cell applications. Final technical report, June 1, 1980-May 31, 1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, M.B.; Krishnaswamy, S.V.

    1981-06-01

    The objectives of this contract were to carry out a systematic study on the preparation and characterization of rf-sputtered CdTe thin films in order to establish reproducibility of the films with good electrical characteristics and to demonstrate the feasibility of fabricating various types of junctions and ohmic contacts with reproducible characteristics and finally to optimize the most promising solar cell structure in order to achieve an efficiency of 6% or higher. Efforts have been directed to the control of various sputtering parameters in order to obtain good quality films. The structure, crystallographic, compositional and electrical properties of cadmium telluride films sputtered over a wide range of conditions have been evaluated. A series of doping experiments have been carried out using primarily Cd, Te, In, as the n-type dopants and Cu as the p-type dopant. Of these dopants, indium doping provided films with which S.B. junctions can be obtained for further electrical characterization. Use of cadmium overpressure during CdTe:In sputtering has improved the film characteristics. Ion Beam Sputtering was attempted as an alternative technique for film preparation. For lack of time and due to a number of mechanical failures, no significant results could be obtained.

  15. Physical properties of Ag-doped cadmium telluride thin films fabricated by closed-space sublimation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas Shah, N.; Ali, A.; Aqili, A. K. S.; Maqsood, A.

    2006-05-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin films were prepared by the closed-space sublimation (CSS) technique, using CdTe powder as evaporant onto substrates of water-white glass. In the next step, the annealed films at 450 °C for 30 min were dipped in AgNO 3-H 2O solution at room temperature. These films were again annealed at 450 °C for 1 h to obtain silver-doped samples. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrically i.e. DC electrical resistivity as well as photo resistivity by van der Pauw method at room temperature, dark conductivity, activation energy analysis as a function of temperature by two-probe method under vacuum, and spectrophotometry. The electron microprobe analyzer (EMPA) results showed an increase of Ag content composition in the samples by increasing the immersion time of films in solution. The Hall measurements indicated the increase in mobility and carrier concentrations of CdTe films by doping of Ag. A significant change in the shape and size of the CdTe grains were observed.

  16. Improved Sensitization of Zinc Oxide Nanorods by Cadmium Telluride Quantum Dots through Charge Induced Hydrophilic Surface Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karthik Laxman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on UV-mediated enhancement in the sensitization of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs on zinc oxide (ZnO nanorods, improving the charge transfer efficiency across the QD-ZnO interface. The improvement was primarily due to the reduction in the interfacial resistance achieved via the incorporation of UV light induced surface defects on zinc oxide nanorods. The photoinduced defects were characterized by XPS, FTIR, and water contact angle measurements, which demonstrated an increase in the surface defects (oxygen vacancies in the ZnO crystal, leading to an increase in the active sites available for the QD attachment. As a proof of concept, a model cadmium telluride (CdTe QD solar cell was fabricated using the defect engineered ZnO photoelectrodes, which showed ∼10% increase in photovoltage and ∼66% improvement in the photocurrent compared to the defect-free photoelectrodes. The improvement in the photocurrent was mainly attributed to the enhancement in the charge transfer efficiency across the defect rich QD-ZnO interface, which was indicated by the higher quenching of the CdTe QD photoluminescence upon sensitization.

  17. Investigation of the electrochemical deposition of thick layers of cadmium telluride; Etude du depot electrochimique de couches epaisses de tellurure de cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rousset, J

    2007-04-15

    This research thesis deals with the problem of electrochemical deposition of thick layers of cadmium telluride (CdTe) meeting the requirements of high energy radiation detection. The author first recalls the physicochemical properties of CdTe and the basic principles of radiology. He details the different criteria which define a material for X ray detection. He describes the experimental conditions, the nature and preparation of substrates, and the different electrochemical systems used in this research. He studies the impact of the applied potential on the material properties, and compares previously obtained results available in the literature with those obtained in the chosen pool conditions. He discusses the synthesis of CdTe thick layers for which different methods are tested: static in potential, static in intensity, pulsed. The coatings obtained with a given potential and then with a given current are investigated. Finally, the influence of a thermal treatment in presence or absence of a sintering agent on the morphology, the chemical composition, and the crystalline and electric properties of the deposited material is discussed, and the results of the behaviour under X rays of a electrodeposited layer are presented.

  18. The 3-5 semiconductor solid solution single crystal growth. [low gravity float zone growth experiments using gallium indium antimonides and cadmium tellurides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertner, E. R.

    1980-01-01

    Techniques used for liquid and vapor phase epitaxy of gallium indium arsenide are described and the difficulties encountered are examined. Results show that the growth of bulk III-V solid solution single crystals in a low gravity environment will not have a major technological impact. The float zone technique in a low gravity environment is demonstrated using cadmium telluride. It is shown that this approach can result in the synthesis of a class of semiconductors that can not be grown in normal gravity because of growth problems rooted in the nature of their phase diagrams.

  19. Myocardial perfusion imaging with a cadmium zinc telluride-based gamma camera versus invasive fractional flow reserve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mouden, Mohamed [Isala klinieken, Department of Cardiology, Zwolle (Netherlands); Isala klinieken, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Zwolle (Netherlands); Ottervanger, Jan Paul; Timmer, Jorik R. [Isala klinieken, Department of Cardiology, Zwolle (Netherlands); Knollema, Siert; Reiffers, Stoffer; Oostdijk, Ad H.J.; Jager, Pieter L. [Isala klinieken, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Zwolle (Netherlands); Boer, Menko-Jan de [University Medical Centre Nijmegen, Department of Cardiology, Nijmegen (Netherlands)

    2014-05-15

    Recently introduced ultrafast cardiac SPECT cameras with cadmium zinc telluride-based (CZT) detectors may provide superior image quality allowing faster acquisition with reduced radiation doses. Although the level of concordance between conventional SPECT and invasive fractional flow reserve (FFR) measurement has been studied, that between FFR and CZT-based SPECT is not yet known. Therefore, we aimed to assess the level of concordance between CZT SPECT and FFR in a large patient group with stable coronary artery disease. Both invasive FFR and myocardial perfusion imaging with a CZT-based SPECT camera, using Tc-tetrofosmin as tracer, were performed in 100 patients with stable angina and intermediate grade stenosis on invasive coronary angiography. A cut-off value of <0.75 was used to define abnormal FFR. The mean age of the patients was 64 ± 11 years, and 64 % were men. SPECT demonstrated ischaemia in 31 % of the patients, and 20 % had FFR <0.75. The concordance between CZT SPECT and FFR was 73 % on a per-patient basis and 79 % on a per-vessel basis. Discordant findings were more often seen in older patients and were mainly (19 %) the result of ischaemic SPECT findings in patients with FFR ≥0.75, whereas only 8 % had an abnormal FFR without ischaemia as demonstrated by CZT SPECT. Only 20 - 30 % of patients with intermediate coronary stenoses had significant ischaemia as assessed by CZT SPECT or invasive FFR. CZT SPECT showed a modest degree of concordance with FFR, which is comparable with previous results with conventional SPECT. Further investigations are particularly necessary in patients with normal SPECT and abnormal FFR, especially to determine whether these patients should undergo revascularization. (orig.)

  20. Downstream resource utilization following hybrid cardiac imaging with an integrated cadmium-zinc-telluride/64-slice CT device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiechter, Michael; Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiology, Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP), Zurich (Switzerland); Ghadri, Jelena R.; Wolfrum, Mathias; Kuest, Silke M.; Pazhenkottil, Aju P.; Nkoulou, Rene N.; Herzog, Bernhard A.; Gebhard, Catherine; Fuchs, Tobias A.; Gaemperli, Oliver [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiology, Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2012-03-15

    Low yield of invasive coronary angiography and unnecessary coronary interventions have been identified as key cost drivers in cardiology for evaluation of coronary artery disease (CAD). This has fuelled the search for noninvasive techniques providing comprehensive functional and anatomical information on coronary lesions. We have evaluated the impact of implementation of a novel hybrid cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT)/64-slice CT camera into the daily clinical routine on downstream resource utilization. Sixty-two patients with known or suspected CAD were referred for same-day single-session hybrid evaluation with CZT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) and coronary CT angiography (CCTA). Hybrid MPI/CCTA images from the integrated CZT/CT camera served for decision-making towards conservative versus invasive management. Based on the hybrid images patients were classified into those with and those without matched findings. Matched findings were defined as the combination of MPI defect with a stenosis by CCTA in the coronary artery subtending the respective territory. All patients with normal MPI and CCTA as well as those with isolated MPI or CCTA finding or combined but unmatched findings were categorized as ''no match''. All 23 patients with a matched finding underwent invasive coronary angiography and 21 (91%) were revascularized. Of the 39 patients with no match, 5 (13%, p < 0.001 vs matched) underwent catheterization and 3 (8%, p < 0.001 vs matched) were revascularized. Cardiac hybrid imaging in CAD evaluation has a profound impact on patient management and may contribute to optimal downstream resource utilization. (orig.)

  1. Comparison between stress myocardial perfusion SPECT recorded with cadmium-zinc-telluride and Anger cameras in various study protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verger, Antoine; Karcher, Gilles [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); INSERM U947, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); Djaballah, Wassila [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); INSERM U947, Nancy (France); Fourquet, Nicolas [Clinique Pasteur, Toulouse (France); Rouzet, Francois; Le Guludec, Dominique [AP-HP, Hopital Bichat, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); INSERM U 773 Inserm and Denis Diderot University, Paris (France); Koehl, Gregoire; Roch, Veronique [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); Imbert, Laetitia [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); Centre Alexis Vautrin, Department of Radiotherapy, Vandoeuvre (France); Poussier, Sylvain [INSERM U947, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); Fay, Renaud [INSERM, Centre d' Investigation Clinique CIC-P 9501, Nancy (France); Marie, Pierre-Yves [CHU-Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); INSERM U961, Nancy (France); Hopital de Brabois, CHU-Nancy, Medecine Nucleaire, Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France)

    2013-03-15

    The results of stress myocardial perfusion SPECT could be enhanced by new cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) cameras, although differences compared to the results with conventional Anger cameras remain poorly known for most study protocols. This study was aimed at comparing the results of CZT and Anger SPECT according to various study protocols while taking into account the influence of obesity. The study population, which was from three different institutions equipped with identical CZT cameras, comprised 276 patients referred for study using protocols involving {sup 201}Tl (n = 120) or {sup 99m}Tc-sestamibi injected at low dose at stress ({sup 99m}Tc-Low; stress/rest 1-day protocol; n = 110) or at high dose at stress ({sup 99m}Tc-High; rest/stress 1-day or 2-day protocol; n = 46). Each Anger SPECT scan was followed by a high-speed CZT SPECT scan (2 to 4 min). Agreement rates between CZT and Anger SPECT were good irrespective of the study protocol (for abnormal SPECT, {sup 201}Tl 92 %, {sup 99m}Tc-Low 86 %, {sup 99m}Tc-High 98 %), although quality scores were much higher for CZT SPECT with all study protocols. Overall correlations were high for the extent of myocardial infarction (r = 0.80) and a little lower for ischaemic areas (r = 0.72), the latter being larger on Anger SPECT (p < 0.001). This larger extent was mainly observed in 50 obese patients who were in the {sup 201}Tl or {sup 99m}Tc-Low group and in whom stress myocardial counts were particularly low with Anger SPECT (228 {+-} 101 kcounts) and dramatically enhanced with CZT SPECT (+279 {+-} 251 %). Concordance between the results of CZT and Anger SPECT is good regardless of study protocol and especially when excluding obese patients who have low-count Anger SPECT and for whom myocardial counts are dramatically enhanced on CZT SPECT. (orig.)

  2. The energetic impact of small Cd{sub x}Te{sub y} clusters on Cadmium Telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Miao, E-mail: M.Yu2@lboro.ac.uk; Kenny, Steven D., E-mail: S.D.Kenny@lboro.ac.uk

    2015-06-01

    Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) is an excellent material for low-cost, high efficiency thin film solar cells. It is important to do research on how these defects are formed during the growth process, since defects lower the efficiency of solar cells. In this work we use computer simulation to predict the growth of a sputter deposited CdTe thin film. Single deposition tests have been performed, to study the behaviour of deposited clusters under different conditions. We deposit a Cd{sub x}Te{sub y} (x,y = 0,1) cluster onto the (100) and (111) Cd and Te terminated surfaces with energies ranging from 1 to 40 eV. More than 1000 simulations have been performed for each of these cases so as to sample the possible deposition positions and to collect sufficient statistics. The results show that Cd atoms are more readily sputtered from the surface than Te atoms and the sticking probability is higher on Te terminated surfaces than Cd terminated surfaces. They also show that increasing the deposition energy typically leads to an increase in the number of atoms sputtered from the system and tends to decrease the number of atoms that sit on or in the surface layer, whilst increasing the number of interstitials observed. - Highlights: • Deposition of Cd, Te and CdTe particles on (100) and (111) Cd and Te surfaces • Cd atoms are more readily sputtered from the surface than Te atoms. • The Te terminated surfaces have a higher sticking probability than the Cd ones. • Higher impact energies imply more sputtered atoms from the surface.

  3. Intense pulsed light treatment of cadmium telluride nanoparticle-based thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmadasa, Ruvini; Lavery, Brandon; Dharmadasa, I M; Druffel, Thad

    2014-04-09

    The search for low-cost growth techniques and processing methods for semiconductor thin films continues to be a growing area of research; particularly in photovoltaics. In this study, electrochemical deposition was used to grow CdTe nanoparticulate based thin films on conducting glass substrates. After material characterization, the films were thermally sintered using a rapid thermal annealing technique called intense pulsed light (IPL). IPL is an ultrafast technique which can reduce thermal processing times down to a few minutes, thereby cutting production times and increasing throughput. The pulses of light create localized heating lasting less than 1 ms, allowing films to be processed under atmospheric conditions, avoiding the need for inert or vacuum environments. For the first time, we report the use of IPL treatment on CdTe thin films. X-ray diffraction (XRD), optical absorption spectroscopy (UV-Vis), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and room temperature photoluminescence (PL) were used to study the effects of the IPL processing parameters on the CdTe films. The results found that optimum recrystallization and a decrease in defects occurred when pulses of light with an energy density of 21.6 J cm(-2) were applied. SEM images also show a unique feature of IPL treatment: the formation of a continuous melted layer of CdTe, removing holes and voids from a nanoparticle-based thin film.

  4. Photoluminescence and extended X-ray absorption fine structure studies on cadmium telluride material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangxin

    The direct-band-gap semiconductor CdTe is an important material for fabricating high efficiency, polycrystalline thin-film solar cells in a heterojunction configuration. The outstanding physical properties of this material such as its good band-gap match to the solar spectrum, ease of fabrication of stoichiometric films, and easy grain boundary passivation make it an important candidate for large area, thin-film solar cells. However, there are several poorly understood processing steps that are commonly utilized in cell fabrication. One of these is a CdCl2 treatment near 400°C in the presence of oxygen, which can improve the cell efficiency a factor of two or more. Another factor is the role of copper in cell performance. In high performance CdS/CdTe thin-film solar cells, copper is usually included in the fabrication of low-resistance back contacts to obtain heavy p-type doping of the absorber CdTe at the contact. However, most of the copper is not electrically active. For example, secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) on typical CdTe cells has shown Cu concentrations of 1019 atoms/cm3 and even higher, although capacitance-voltage (C-V) measurements indicate typical ionized acceptor levels on the order of 1014/cm 3. Thus, there is great interest in the location and role of this inactive copper in CdTe photovoltaic (PV) devices. In this thesis, I will describe results obtained on magnetron-sputtered CdTe films that were diffused with copper following the procedure used for creating a cell back contact. Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) measurements identified the chemical environment of the majority of the copper and show major differences depending on whether the CdTe film has been treated with chloride prior to the Cu diffusion. The EXAFS data indicate that the Cu chemistry is strongly affected by the chloride treatments---predominantly Cu2Te when Cu was diffused into the as-deposited CdTe film, but a Cu2O environment when Cu was diffused after

  5. Size and temperature dependence of the photoluminescence properties of NIR emitting ternary alloyed mercury cadmium telluride quantum dots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagtap, Amardeep M.; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Banerjee, Arup; Babu Pendyala, Naresh; Koteswara Rao, K. S. R.

    2016-04-01

    Exciton-phonon coupling and nonradiative relaxation processes have been investigated in near-infrared (NIR) emitting ternary alloyed mercury cadmium telluride (CdHgTe) quantum dots. Organically capped CdHgTe nanocrystals of sizes varying from 2.5-4.2 nm have been synthesized where emission is in the NIR region of 650-855 nm. Temperature-dependent (15-300 K) photoluminescence (PL) and the decay dynamics of PL at 300 K have been studied to understand the photophysical properties. The PL decay kinetics shows the transition from triexponential to biexponential on increasing the size of the quantom dots (QDs), informing the change in the distribution of the emitting states. The energy gap is found to be following the Varshni relation with a temperature coefficient of 2.1-2.8  ×  10-4 eV K-1. The strength of the electron-phonon coupling, which is reflected in the Huang and Rhys factor S, is found in the range of 1.17-1.68 for QDs with a size of 2.5-4.2 nm. The integrated PL intensity is nearly constant until 50 K, and slowly decreases up to 140 K, beyond which it decreases at a faster rate. The mechanism for PL quenching with temperature is attributed to the presence of nonradiative relaxation channels, where the excited carriers are thermally stimulated to the surface defect/trap states. At temperatures of different region (<140 K and 140-300 K), traps of low (13-25 meV) and high (65-140 meV) activation energies seem to be controlling the quenching of the PL emission. The broadening of emission linewidth is found to due to exciton-acoustic phonon scattering and exciton-longitudinal optical (LO) phonon coupling. The exciton-acoustic phonon scattering coefficient is found to be enhanced up to 55 μeV K-1 due to a stronger confinement effect. These findings give insight into understanding the photophysical properties of CdHgTe QDs and pave the way for their possible applications in the fields of NIR photodetectors and other optoelectronic devices.

  6. Design study of a high-resolution breast-dedicated PET system built from cadmium zinc telluride detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng Hao; Levin, Craig S, E-mail: haopeng@stanford.ed, E-mail: cslevin@stanford.ed [Department of Radiology, Molecular Imaging Program, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2010-05-07

    We studied the performance of a dual-panel positron emission tomography (PET) camera dedicated to breast cancer imaging using Monte Carlo simulation. The proposed system consists of two 4 cm thick 12 x 15 cm{sup 2} area cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) panels with adjustable separation, which can be put in close proximity to the breast and/or axillary nodes. Unique characteristics distinguishing the proposed system from previous efforts in breast-dedicated PET instrumentation are the deployment of CZT detectors with superior spatial and energy resolution, using a cross-strip electrode readout scheme to enable 3D positioning of individual photon interaction coordinates in the CZT, which includes directly measured photon depth-of-interaction (DOI), and arranging the detector slabs edge-on with respect to incoming 511 keV photons for high photon sensitivity. The simulation results show that the proposed CZT dual-panel PET system is able to achieve superior performance in terms of photon sensitivity, noise equivalent count rate, spatial resolution and lesion visualization. The proposed system is expected to achieve {approx}32% photon sensitivity for a point source at the center and a 4 cm panel separation. For a simplified breast phantom adjacent to heart and torso compartments, the peak noise equivalent count (NEC) rate is predicted to be {approx}94.2 kcts s{sup -1} (breast volume: 720 cm{sup 3} and activity concentration: 3.7 kBq cm{sup -3}) for a {approx}10% energy window around 511 keV and {approx}8 ns coincidence time window. The system achieves 1 mm intrinsic spatial resolution anywhere between the two panels with a 4 cm panel separation if the detectors have DOI resolution less than 2 mm. For a 3 mm DOI resolution, the system exhibits excellent sphere resolution uniformity ({sigma}{sub rms}/mean) {<=} 10%) across a 4 cm width FOV. Simulation results indicate that the system exhibits superior hot sphere visualization and is expected to visualize 2 mm diameter spheres

  7. Design study of a high-resolution breast-dedicated PET system built from cadmium zinc telluride detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hao; Levin, Craig S.

    2010-05-01

    We studied the performance of a dual-panel positron emission tomography (PET) camera dedicated to breast cancer imaging using Monte Carlo simulation. The proposed system consists of two 4 cm thick 12 × 15 cm2 area cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) panels with adjustable separation, which can be put in close proximity to the breast and/or axillary nodes. Unique characteristics distinguishing the proposed system from previous efforts in breast-dedicated PET instrumentation are the deployment of CZT detectors with superior spatial and energy resolution, using a cross-strip electrode readout scheme to enable 3D positioning of individual photon interaction coordinates in the CZT, which includes directly measured photon depth-of-interaction (DOI), and arranging the detector slabs edge-on with respect to incoming 511 keV photons for high photon sensitivity. The simulation results show that the proposed CZT dual-panel PET system is able to achieve superior performance in terms of photon sensitivity, noise equivalent count rate, spatial resolution and lesion visualization. The proposed system is expected to achieve ~32% photon sensitivity for a point source at the center and a 4 cm panel separation. For a simplified breast phantom adjacent to heart and torso compartments, the peak noise equivalent count (NEC) rate is predicted to be ~94.2 kcts s-1 (breast volume: 720 cm3 and activity concentration: 3.7 kBq cm-3) for a ~10% energy window around 511 keV and ~8 ns coincidence time window. The system achieves 1 mm intrinsic spatial resolution anywhere between the two panels with a 4 cm panel separation if the detectors have DOI resolution less than 2 mm. For a 3 mm DOI resolution, the system exhibits excellent sphere resolution uniformity (σrms/mean) <= 10%) across a 4 cm width FOV. Simulation results indicate that the system exhibits superior hot sphere visualization and is expected to visualize 2 mm diameter spheres with a 5:1 activity concentration ratio within roughly 7 min

  8. Investigating the effect of characteristic x-rays in cadmium zinc telluride detectors under breast computerized tomography operating conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glick, Stephen J; Didier, Clay

    2013-10-14

    A number of research groups have been investigating the use of dedicated breast computerized tomography (CT). Preliminary results have been encouraging, suggesting an improved visualization of masses on breast CT as compared to conventional mammography. Nonetheless, there are many challenges to overcome before breast CT can become a routine clinical reality. One potential improvement over current breast CT prototypes would be the use of photon counting detectors with cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) (or CdTe) semiconductor material. These detectors can operate at room temperature and provide high detection efficiency and the capability of multi-energy imaging; however, one factor in particular that limits image quality is the emission of characteristic x-rays. In this study, the degradative effects of characteristic x-rays are examined when using a CZT detector under breast CT operating conditions. Monte Carlo simulation software was used to evaluate the effect of characteristic x-rays and the detector element size on spatial and spectral resolution for a CZT detector used under breast CT operating conditions. In particular, lower kVp spectra and thinner CZT thicknesses were studied than that typically used with CZT based conventional CT detectors. In addition, the effect of characteristic x-rays on the accuracy of material decomposition in spectral CT imaging was explored. It was observed that when imaging with 50-60 kVp spectra, the x-ray transmission through CZT was very low for all detector thicknesses studied (0.5-3.0 mm), thus retaining dose efficiency. As expected, characteristic x-ray escape from the detector element of x-ray interaction increased with decreasing detector element size, approaching a 50% escape fraction for a 100 μm size detector element. The detector point spread function was observed to have only minor degradation with detector element size greater than 200 μm and lower kV settings. Characteristic x-rays produced increasing distortion

  9. Role of the copper-oxygen defect in cadmium telluride solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corwine, Caroline R.

    Thin-film CdTe is one of the leading materials used in photovoltaic (PV) solar cells. One way to improve device performance and stability is through understanding how various device processing steps alter defect states in the CdTe layer. Photoluminescence (PL) studies can be used to examine radiative defects in materials. This study uses low-temperature PL to probe the defects present in thin-film CdTe deposited for solar cells. One key defect seen in the thin-film CdTe was reproduced in single-crystal (sX) CdTe by systematic incorporation of known impurities in the thin-film growth process, hence demonstrating that both copper and oxygen were necessary for its formation. Polycrystalline (pX) thin-film glass/SnO2:F/CdS/CdTe structures were examined. The CdTe layer was grown via close-spaced sublimation (CSS), vapor transport deposition (VTD), and physical vapor deposition (PVD). After CdTe deposition, followed by a standard CdC12 treatment and a ZnTe:Cu back contact, a PL peak was seen at ˜1.46 eV from the free back surface of all samples (1.456 eV for CSS and PVD, 1.460-1.463 eV for VTD). However, before the Cu-containing contact was added, this peak was not seen from the front of the CdTe (the CdS/CdTe junction region) in any device with CdTe thickness greater than 4 mum. The CdCl2 treatment commonly used to increase CdTe grain size did not enhance or reduce the peak at ˜1.46 eV relative to the rest of the PL spectrum. When the Cu-containing contact was applied, the PL spectra from both the front and back of the CdTe exhibited the peak at 1.456 eV. The PL peak at ˜1.46 eV was present in thin-film CdTe after deposition, when the dominant impurities are expected to be both Cu from the CdTe source material and O introduced in the chamber during growth to assist in CdTe film density. Since Cu and/or O appeared to be involved in this defect, PL studies were done with sX CdTe to distinguish between the separate effects of Cu or O and the combined effect of Cu and O

  10. Thin film cadmium telluride photovoltaic cells. Annual subcontract report, 23 July 1990--31 October 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, A.; Bohn, R. [Toledo Univ., OH (United States)

    1992-04-01

    This report describes research to develop to vacuum-based growth techniques for CdTe thin-film solar cells: (1) laser-driven physical vapor deposition (LDPVD) and (2) radio-frequency (rf) sputtering. The LDPVD process was successfully used to deposit thin films of CdS, CdTe, and CdCl{sub 2}, as well as related alloys and doped semiconductor materials. The laser-driven deposition process readily permits the use of several target materials in the same vacuum chamber and, thus, complete solar cell structures were fabricated on SnO{sub 2}-coated glass using LDPVD. The rf sputtering process for film growth became operational, and progress was made in implementing it. Time was also devoted to enhancing or implementing a variety of film characterization systems and device testing facilities. A new system for transient spectroscopy on the ablation plume provided important new information on the physical mechanisms of LDPVD. The measurements show that, e.g., Cd is predominantly in the neutral atomic state in the plume but with a fraction that is highly excited internally ({ge} 6 eV), and that the typical neutral Cd translational kinetic energies perpendicular to the target are 20 eV and greater. 19 refs.

  11. Thin film cadmium telluride photovoltaic cells. Annual subcontract report, 1 November 1991--31 October 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, C.D.; Bohn, R.G. [Toledo Univ., OH (United States)

    1993-10-01

    This report describes work to develop and optimize radio-frequency (RF) sputtering and laser-driven physical vapor deposition (LDPVD) for CdTe-based thin-film solar cells. Both of these techniques are vacuum-based and share several other common physical principles. However, they differ somewhat in the typical kinetic energies of Cd, Te, and S that impact on the growth surface. The values of several processing parameters-optimized with the LDPVD technique-were taken as starting values for the RF sputtering method. We completed an initial optimization of the sputtering parameters for the CdTe growth and also successfully sputtered CdS for the first time. In addition, we successfully fabricated what we believe are the first CdS/CdTe cells in which RF sputtering was used for both CdS and CdTe layers. We achieved an all-LDPVD ell with an air mass (AM) 1.5 efficiency of 10.5% and an all-RF-sputtered cell with AM 1.5 efficiency of 10.4%, as tested by NREL.

  12. Laser Damage in 8- to 14-Micron Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride Photovoltaic Detector Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-01-20

    CSS ? C4AM Ez!CMCM7I PROJECT. =ASK(~ ~~o O~m. OARIAO.£AE & WORK Un’r MIMBZXS \\a-.al Research Laboratory I NRL Problem N01-36.501 Washington. D.C. 20375...therefore de- errained empirically in fitting tle data. The thermal conductivity K of R; CdTe varies con- iderably over the temperature range of interesL

  13. Efficient charge transfer and field-induced tunneling transport in hybrid composite device of organic semiconductor and cadmium telluride quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varade, Vaibhav, E-mail: vaibhav.tvarade@gmail.com; Jagtap, Amardeep M.; Koteswara Rao, K. S. R.; Ramesh, K. P.; Menon, R. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India); Anjaneyulu, P. [Department of Physics, Gitam University, Hyderabad 502329 (India)

    2015-06-07

    Temperature and photo-dependent current–voltage characteristics are investigated in thin film devices of a hybrid-composite comprising of organic semiconductor poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):polystyrenesulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) and cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs). A detailed study of the charge injection mechanism in ITO/PEDOT:PSS-CdTe QDs/Al device exhibits a transition from direct tunneling to Fowler–Nordheim tunneling with increasing electric field due to formation of high barrier at the QD interface. In addition, the hybrid-composite exhibits a huge photoluminescence quenching compared to aboriginal CdTe QDs and high increment in photoconductivity (∼ 400%), which is attributed to the charge transfer phenomena. The effective barrier height (Φ{sub B} ≈ 0.68 eV) is estimated from the transition voltage and the possible origin of its variation with temperature and photo-illumination is discussed.

  14. Progress Toward a Stabilization and Preconditioning Protocol for Polycrystalline Thin-Film Photovoltaic Modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    del Cueto, J. A.; Deline, C. A.; Rummel, S. R.; Anderberg, A.

    2010-08-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) and copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) thin-film photovoltaic (PV) modules can exhibit substantial variation in measured performance depending on prior exposure history. This study examines the metastable performance changes in these PV modules with the goal of establishing standard preconditioning or stabilization exposure procedures to mitigate measured variations prior to current-voltage (IV) measurements.

  15. Thin film growths of zinc telluride and cadmium telluride on various substrates using a novel close space sublimation reactor CSS4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrufo, Damian

    Thin films of CdTe have been grown on CdS in a variety of methods for use in thin film photovoltaic systems. Limits to the efficiency of CdTe/CdS solar cells have been attributed to defects in the lattice that occur between the interface of CdS and CdTe due to a lattice mismatch. A close space sublimation (CSS) reactor known as the CSS4 was designed and fabricated in UTEP to deposit complex layers of CdTe and ZnTe on top of a CdS film that is grown via chemical bath deposition in order to obtain a CdTe photovoltaic. Unfortunately, the original design and fabrication of the CSS reactor (CSS3) proved to be unreliable and only a few depositions were made. This thesis summarizes the work done to improve the reactor to turn it into a reliable piece of lab equipment that can be used to conduct graduate level research while also listing known issues that should be addressed in future modifications. A standard procedure for growths is also presented. Some early results of films and devices made with the new CSS4 reactor are also included to demonstrate the potential experiments that could be conducted and the type of results that can be expected.

  16. The influence of reaction times on structural, optical and luminescence properties of cadmium telluride nanoparticles prepared by wet-chemical process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiprotich, Sharon, E-mail: KiprotichS@qwa.ufs.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of the Free State (QwaQwa campus), Private Bag X-13, Phuthaditjhaba 9866 (South Africa); Dejene, Francis B.; Ungula, Jatani [Department of Physics, University of the Free State (QwaQwa campus), Private Bag X-13, Phuthaditjhaba 9866 (South Africa); Onani, Martin O. [Departments of Chemistry, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville 7535 (South Africa)

    2016-01-01

    This paper explains one pot synthesis of type II water soluble L-cysteine capped cadmium telluride (CdTe) core shell quantum dots using cadmium acetate, potassium tellurite and L-cysteine as the starting materials. The reaction was carried out in a single three necked flask without nitrogen under reflux at 100 °C. Results from PL show a sharp absorption excitonic band edge of the CdTe core with respect to the core shell which loses its shoulder during the growth of the shell on the core. The PL spectra indicate a drastic shift in emission window of the core which is simultaneously accompanied by an increase in emission intensity. X-ray diffraction pattern confirms the formation of hexagonal phase for all samples. Some difference in absorption edges were observed due to varying synthesis time of CdTe NPs. The position of the absorption band is observed to shift towards the lower wavelength side for shorter durations of synthesis.

  17. Investigation of dual-energy X-ray photon counting using a cadmium telluride detector with dual-energy selection electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Eiichi; Kosuge, Yoshiyuki; Yamanome, Hayato; Mikata, Akiko; Miura, Tatsuya; Oda, Yasuyuki; Ishii, Tomotaka; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya

    2017-01-01

    To obtain two kinds of tomograms at two different X-ray energy ranges simultaneously, we have developed a dual-energy X-ray photon counter with a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector and two energy-selecting devices (ESDs). The ESD consists of two comparators and a microcomputer (MC). X-ray photons are detected using the CdTe detector, and the event pulses from a shaping amplifier are sent to two ESDs simultaneously to determine two energy ranges. X-ray photons in the two ranges are counted using the MCs, and the logical pulses from the MCs are input to frequency-to-voltage converters (FVCs). The outputs from the two FVCs are input to a personal computer through an analog-to-digital converter to carry out dual-energy computed tomography. The tube voltage and current were 80 kV and 8.5 μA, respectively. Two tomograms were obtained simultaneously with two energy ranges. K-edge CT using iodine and gadolinium media was carried out utilizing two energy ranges of 33-45 and 50-65 keV, respectively. The maximum count rate was 6.8 kilocounts per second with energies ranging from 10 to 80 keV, and the exposure time for tomography was 9.8 min.

  18. Performance of cardiac cadmium-zinc-telluride gamma camera imaging in coronary artery disease: a review from the cardiovascular committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agostini, Denis [CHU Caen and Normandy University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Caen (France); Normandy University, Caen (France); Marie, Pierre-Yves [University of Lorraine, Faculty of Medicine, Nancyclotep Experimental Imaging Platform, Nancy (France); University of Lorraine, Faculty of Medicine, CHU Nancy, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Nancy (France); University of Lorraine, Faculty of Medicine, Nancy (France); Ben-Haim, Simona [University College London, University College Hospital, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Chaim Sheba Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ramat Gan (Israel); Rouzet, Francois [University Hospital of Paris-Bichat, UMR 1148, Inserm et Paris Diderot-Paris 7 University Paris, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); UMR 1148, Inserm and Paris Diderot-Paris 7 University Paris, Paris (France); Songy, Bernard [Centre Cardiologique du Nord, Saint-Denis (France); Giordano, Alessandro [Institute of Nuclear Medicine, Catholic University of Sacred Heart, Largo A. Gemelli, Department of Bioimages and Radiological Sciences, Rome (Italy); Gimelli, Alessia [Fondazione Toscana Gabriele Monasterio, Pisa (Italy); Hyafil, Fabien [Bichat University Hospital, Assistance Publique - Hopitaux de Paris, UMR 1148, Inserm and Paris Diderot-Paris 7 University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Paris (France); Sciagra, Roberto [University of Florence, Nuclear Medicine Unit, Department of Experimental and Clinical Biomedical Sciences, Florence (Italy); Bucerius, Jan [Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht University Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Maastricht (Netherlands); Maastricht University Medical Center, Cardiovascular Research Institute Maastricht (CARIM), Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany); Verberne, Hein J. [Academic Medical Center, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Slart, Riemer H.J.A. [University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Groningen (Netherlands); University of Twente, Faculty of Science and Technology, Department of Biomedical Photonic Imaging, Enschede (Netherlands); Lindner, Oliver [Institute of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Heart and Diabetes Center NRW, Bad Oeynhausen (Germany); Collaboration: Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM)

    2016-12-15

    The trade-off between resolution and count sensitivity dominates the performance of standard gamma cameras and dictates the need for relatively high doses of radioactivity of the used radiopharmaceuticals in order to limit image acquisition duration. The introduction of cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT)-based cameras may overcome some of the limitations against conventional gamma cameras. CZT cameras used for the evaluation of myocardial perfusion have been shown to have a higher count sensitivity compared to conventional single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) techniques. CZT image quality is further improved by the development of a dedicated three-dimensional iterative reconstruction algorithm, based on maximum likelihood expectation maximization (MLEM), which corrects for the loss in spatial resolution due to line response function of the collimator. All these innovations significantly reduce imaging time and result in a lower patient's radiation exposure compared with standard SPECT. To guide current and possible future users of the CZT technique for myocardial perfusion imaging, the Cardiovascular Committee of the European Association of Nuclear Medicine, starting from the experience of its members, has decided to examine the current literature regarding procedures and clinical data on CZT cameras. The committee hereby aims (1) to identify the main acquisitions protocols; (2) to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic value of CZT derived myocardial perfusion, and finally (3) to determine the impact of CZT on radiation exposure. (orig.)

  19. Characterization of a sub-assembly of 3D position sensitive cadmium zinc telluride detectors and electronics from a sub-millimeter resolution PET system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbaszadeh, Shiva; Gu, Yi; Reynolds, Paul D.; Levin, Craig S.

    2016-09-01

    Cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) offers key advantages for small animal positron emission tomography (PET), including high spatial and energy resolution and simple metal deposition for fabrication of very small pixel arrays. Previous studies have investigated the intrinsic spatial, energy, and timing resolution of an individual sub-millimeter resolution CZT detector. In this work we present the first characterization results of a system of these detectors. The 3D position sensitive dual-CZT detector module and readout electronics developed in our lab was scaled up to complete a significant portion of the final PET system. This sub-system was configured as two opposing detection panels containing a total of twelve 40~\\text{mm}× 40~\\text{mm}× 5 mm monolithic CZT crystals for proof of concept. System-level characterization studies, including optimizing the trigger threshold of each channel’s comparators, were performed. 68Ge and 137Cs radioactive isotopes were used to characterize the energy resolution of all 468 anode channels in the sub-system. The mean measured global 511 keV photopeak energy resolution over all anodes was found to be 7.35+/- 1.75 % FWHM after correction for photon interaction depth-dependent signal variation. The measured global time resolution was 37 ns FWHM, a parameter to be further optimized, and the intrinsic spatial resolution was 0.76 mm FWHM.

  20. Nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging with a novel cadmium-zinc-telluride detector SPECT/CT device: first validation versus invasive coronary angiography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fiechter, Michael; Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiology, Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP), Zurich (Switzerland); Ghadri, Jelena R.; Kuest, Silke M.; Pazhenkottil, Aju P.; Wolfrum, Mathias; Nkoulou, Rene N.; Goetti, Robert; Gaemperli, Oliver [University Hospital Zurich, Department of Radiology, Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2011-11-15

    We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of attenuation corrected nuclear myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) with a novel hybrid single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT)/CT device consisting of an ultrafast dedicated cardiac gamma camera with cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) solid-state semiconductor detectors integrated onto a multislice CT scanner to detect coronary artery disease (CAD). Invasive coronary angiography served as the standard of reference. The study population included 66 patients (79% men; mean age 63 {+-} 11 years) who underwent 1-day {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin pharmacological stress/rest examination and angiography within 3 months. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) as well as accuracy of the CT X-ray based attenuation corrected CZT MPI for detection of CAD ({>=}50% luminal narrowing) was calculated on a per-patient basis. The prevalence of angiographic CAD in the study population was 82%. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV and accuracy were 87, 67, 92, 53 and 83%, respectively. In this first report on CZT SPECT/CT MPI comparison versus angiography we confirm a high accuracy for detection of angiographically documented CAD. (orig.)

  1. Rapid long-wave infrared laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy measurements using a mercury-cadmium-telluride linear array detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Clayton S-C; Brown, Eiei; Kumi-Barimah, Eric; Hommerich, Uwe; Jin, Feng; Jia, Yingqing; Trivedi, Sudhir; D'souza, Arvind I; Decuir, Eric A; Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal S; Samuels, Alan C

    2015-11-20

    In this work, we develop a mercury-cadmium-telluride linear array detection system that is capable of rapidly capturing (∼1-5  s) a broad spectrum of atomic and molecular laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) emissions in the long-wave infrared (LWIR) region (∼5.6-10  μm). Similar to the conventional UV-Vis LIBS, a broadband emission spectrum of condensed phase samples covering the whole 5.6-10 μm region can be acquired from just a single laser-induced microplasma or averaging a few single laser-induced microplasmas. Atomic and molecular signature emission spectra of solid inorganic and organic tablets and thin liquid films deposited on a rough asphalt surface are observed. This setup is capable of rapidly probing samples "as is" without the need of elaborate sample preparation and also offers the possibility of a simultaneous UV-Vis and LWIR LIBS measurement.

  2. First principles phase transition, elastic properties and electronic structure calculations for cadmium telluride under induced pressure: density functional theory, LDA, GGA and modified Becke-Johnson potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabita, Kh; Maibam, Jameson; Indrajit Sharma, B.; Brojen Singh, R. K.; Thapa, R. K.

    2016-01-01

    We report first principles phase transition, elastic properties and electronic structure for cadmium telluride (CdTe) under induced pressure in the light of density functional theory using the local density approximation (LDA), generalised gradient approximation (GGA) and modified Becke-Johnson (mBJ) potential. The structural phase transition of CdTe from a zinc blende (ZB) to a rock salt (RS) structure within the LDA calculation is 2.2 GPa while that within GGA is found to be at 4 GPa pressure with a volume collapse of 20.9%. The elastic constants and parameters (Zener anisotropy factor, Shear modulus, Poisson’s ratio, Young’s modulus, Kleinmann parameter and Debye’s temperature) of CdTe at different pressures of both the phases have been calculated. The band diagram of the CdTe ZB structure shows a direct band gap of 1.46 eV as predicted by mBJ calculation which gives better results in close agreement with experimental results as compared to LDA and GGA. An increase in the band gap of the CdTe ZB phase is predicted under induced pressure while the metallic nature is retained in the CdTe RS phase.

  3. Spatial Mapping of the Mobility-Lifetime (microtau) Production in Cadmium Zinc Telluride Nuclear Radiation Detectors Using Transport Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    to the electron beam in the Zeiss Neon 40 EsB FIB/SEM beam as depicted in Figure 42, slices of the sample must initially be removed in a stair-step...tellurium, cadmium, zinc, or other elements. More precise, high-resolution imaging methods, such as transmission electron microscopy are needed to

  4. SemiSPECT: a small-animal single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager based on eight cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyunki; Furenlid, Lars R; Crawford, Michael J; Wilson, Donald W; Barber, H Bradford; Peterson, Todd E; Hunter, William C J; Liu, Zhonglin; Woolfenden, James M; Barrett, Harrison H

    2006-02-01

    The first full single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) imager to exploit eight compact high-intrinsic-resolution cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors, called SemiSPECT, has been completed. Each detector consists of a CZT crystal and a customized application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The CZT crystal is a 2.7 cm x 2.7 cm x -0.2 cm slab with a continuous top electrode and a bottom electrode patterned into a 64 x 64 pixel array by photolithography. The ASIC is attached to the bottom of the CZT crystal by indium-bump bonding. A bias voltage of -180 V is applied to the continuous electrode. The eight detectors are arranged in an octagonal lead-shielded ring. Each pinhole in the eight-pinhole aperture placed at the center of the ring is matched to each individual detector array. An object is imaged onto each detector through a pinhole, and each detector is operated independently with list-mode acquisition. The imaging subject can be rotated about a vertical axis to obtain additional angular projections. The performance of SemiSPECT was characterized using 99mTc. When a 0.5 mm diameter pinhole is used, the spatial resolution on each axis is about 1.4 mm as estimated by the Fourier crosstalk matrix, which provides an algorithm-independent average resolution over the field of view. The energy resolution achieved by summing neighboring pixel signals in a 3 x 3 window is about 10% full-width-at-half-maximum of the photopeak. The overall system sensitivity is about 0.5 x 10(-4) with the energy window of +/-10% from the photopeak. Line-phantom images are presented to visualize the spatial resolution provided by SemiSPECT, and images of bone, myocardium, and human tumor xenografts in mice demonstrate the feasibility of preclinical small-animal studies with SemiSPECT.

  5. Real-time breath-hold triggering of myocardial perfusion imaging with a novel cadmium-zinc-telluride detector gamma camera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechel, Ronny R.; Pazhenkottil, Aju P.; Herzog, Bernhard A.; Husmann, Lars; Nkoulou, Rene N.; Burger, Irene A.; Valenta, Ines; Wyss, Christophe A.; Ghadri, Jelena R. [University Hospital Zurich, Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); Kaufmann, Philipp A. [University Hospital Zurich, Cardiac Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); University of Zurich, Zurich Center for Integrative Human Physiology (ZIHP), Zurich (Switzerland)

    2010-10-15

    The aim of this study was to assess the ability of real-time breath-hold-triggered myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) using a novel cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) gamma camera to discriminate artefacts from true perfusion defects. A group of 40 patients underwent a 1-day {sup 99m}Tc-tetrofosmin pharmacological stress/rest imaging protocol on a conventional dual detector SPECT gamma camera with and without attenuation correction (AC), immediately followed by scanning on an ultrafast CZT camera with and without real-time breath-hold triggering (instead of AC) by intermittent scanning confined to breath-hold at deep inspiration (using list mode acquisition). We studied the use of breath-hold triggering on the CZT camera and its ability to discriminate artefacts from true perfusion defects using AC SPECT MPI as the reference standard. Myocardial tracer uptake (percent of maximum) from CZT was compared to AC SPECT MPI by intraclass correlation and by calculating Bland-Altman limits of agreement. AC of SPECT MPI identified 19 apparent perfusion defects as artefacts. Of these, 13 were correctly identified and 4 were partially unmasked (decrease in extent and/or severity) by breath-hold triggering of the CZT scan. All perfusion defects verified by SPECT MPI with AC were appropriately documented by CZT with and without breath-hold triggering. This was supported by the quantitative analysis, as the correlation (r) of myocardial tracer uptake between CZT and AC SPECT improved significantly from 0.81 to 0.90 (p<0.001) when applying breath-hold triggering. Similarly, Bland-Altman limits of agreement were narrower for CZT scans with breath-hold triggering. This novel CZT camera allows real-time breath-hold triggering as a potential alternative to AC to assist in the discrimination of artefacts from true perfusion defects. (orig.)

  6. Spectral analysis of the effects of 1.7 MeV electron irradiation on the current transfer characteristic of cadmium telluride solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jin-Xiu; Zeng, Guang-Gen; He, Xu-Lin; Zhang, Jing-Quan; Wu, Li-Li; Li, Wei; Li, Bing; Wang, Wen-Wu; Feng, Liang-Huan

    2014-04-01

    The effects of device performance of 1.7 MeV electron irradiation on cadmium telluride polycrystalline thin film solar cells with the structure of anti-radiation glass/ITO/ZnO/CdS/CdTe/ZnTe/ZnTe : Cu/Ni have been studied. Light and dark I-V characteristics, dark C-V characteristics, quantum efficiency (QE), admittance spectrum (AS) and other testing methods were used to analyze cells performance such as the open-circuit voltage (Voc), short-circuit current (Isc), fill factor (FF) and conversion efficiency (eta). It was explored to find out the effects of irradiation on the current transfer characteristic of solar cells combined with the dark current density (Jo), diode ideal factor (A), quantum efficiency, carrier concentration and the depletion layer width. The decline in short-circuit current was very large and the efficiency of solar cells decreased obviously after irradiation. Reverse saturation current density increased, which indicates that p-n junction characteristics of solar cells were damaged, and diode ideal factor was almost the same, so current transport mechanism of solar cells has not changed. Quantum efficiency curves proved that the damage of solar cells' p-n junction influenced the collection of photo-generated carriers. Irradiation made carrier concentration reduce to 40.6%. The analyses have shown that. A new defect was induced by electron irradiation, whose position is close to 0.58 eV above the valence band in the forbidden band, and capture cross section is 1.78 x 10(-16) cm2. These results indicate that irradiation influences the generation of photo-generated carriers, increases the risk of the carrier recombination and the reverse dark current, and eventually makes the short-circuit current of solar cells decay.

  7. Studies on focal alveolar bone healing with technetium (Tc)-99m labeled methylene diphosphonate and gold-collimated cadmium telluride probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuchimochi, M.; Hosain, F.; Engelke, W.; Zeichner, S.J.; Ruttimann, U.E.; Webber, R.L. (National Institute of Dental Research, Bethesda, MD (USA))

    1991-01-01

    The benefit of using a collimator for a miniaturized cadmium telluride probe was evaluated by monitoring the bone-healing processes for 13 weeks after the induction of small iatrogenic alveolar bone lesions in one side of the mandible in beagles. Technetium (Tc)-99m labeled methylene diphosphonate (200 to 300 MBq, 5.1 to 8.1 mCi, in a solution of 0.5 to 1 ml, intravenously) was used as a bone-seeking radiopharmaceutical. The radioactivity over the bone lesion (L) and the contralateral normal site (C) in the mandible were measured between 1.5 and 2 hours after injection of the tracer, and the activity ratio L/C served as an index of relative bone uptake. A study of six dogs revealed that the healing response to a hemispheric bone defect of 2 mm diameter in the cortical bone could not be detected by an uncollimated probe, and in a repeated study in two dogs the use of a gold collimator (5 mm in diameter, 5 mm in length) did not increase the L/C ratio significantly. A second study in six dogs with 5 mm lesions showed that although systematic trends in the time courses of the L/C ratio obtained both with and without the collimator could be demonstrated, the L/C ratio of collimated versus uncollimated measurements was significantly (p less than 0.005) increased. In three of the latter six dogs, abscesses developed after 9 weeks, leading to a second increase (p less than 0.05) of the L/C ratio with collimation compared with the noninflammation group; without collimation no significant (p greater than 0.15) difference between the two groups could be demonstrated.

  8. Controlled cadmium telluride thin films for solar cell applications. Second quarterly report, September 1-December 1, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, M. B.; Krishnaswamy, S. V.

    1981-01-01

    A thermal annealing procedure to improve the photovoltaic and other electrical characteristics of CdTe sputtered films doped with In is described. For an understanding of the characteristics of these films, SEM, Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning ellipsometry analyses have been carried out. Dark and illuminated I/V characteristics and capacitance and conductance vs. frequency behavior of In doped CdTe Schottky barrier diodes based on Cr and Ni substrates indicate that thermal annealing is an effective means of reducing the trap concentrations on these films that can lead to a significant improvement of the quality of sputtered films for solar cell applications.

  9. Effect of Annealing On Thin Film Fabrication of Cadmium Zinc Telluride by Single-R.F. Magnetron Sputtering Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Monisha Chakraborty A,

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work, formation of Cd1-xZnxTe thin films under various annealing-environments, created by layer by layer deposition of individual CdTe and ZnTe targets from a Single-R.F. Magnetron Sputtering unit is investigated. Structural and optical characterization results show that Vacuum Annealing is the best suitable for the formation of better Cd1-xZnxTe XRD peaks of higher intensities in comparison to Argon or Nitrogen-Annealing, for a bi-layered deposited CdTe and ZnTe film on glass substrate. The crystallography of the Cd1-xZnxTe films formed appeared to be either Cubic or Rhombohedral type. Also, it has been noticed, that the more inert the annealing-environment is, the lesser is the heat loss by the film-substrate and this results in better fusing of the deposited particles to move more from the poly-crystalline to the mono-crystalline structure. Also higher inert environment causes more Cadmium evaporation and this consequently drives the lattice-constant and the band-gap energy of the formed Cd1-xZnxTe thin film to move from the CdTe side to the ZnTe side. The method developed here with proper annealing ambiance for Cd1-xZnxTe fabrication can be implemented in laboratories lacking in Co-Sputtering machine.

  10. Characterization of nanocrystalline cadmium telluride thin films grown by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A U Ubale; R J Dhokne; P S Chikhlikar; V S Sangawar; D K Kulkarni

    2006-04-01

    Structural, electrical and optical characteristics of CdTe thin films prepared by a chemical deposition method, successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR), are described. For deposition of CdTe thin films, cadmium acetate was used as cationic and sodium tellurite as anionic precursor in aqueous medium. In this process hydrazine hydrate is used as reducing agent and NH4OH as the catalytic for the decomposition of hydrazine. By conducting several trials optimization of the adsorption, reaction and rinsing time duration for CdTe thin film deposition was done. In this paper the structural, optical and electrical properties of CdTe film are reported. The XRD pattern shows that films are nanocrystalline in nature. The resistivity is found to be of the order of 4.11 × 103 -cm at 523 K temperature with an activation energy of ∼ 0.2 eV. The optical absorption studies show that films have direct band gap (1.41 eV).

  11. Polycrystalline thin film cadmium telluride solar cells fabricated by electrodeposition. Annual technical report, 20 March 1995--19 March 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trefny, J U; Mao, D [Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO (United States)

    1997-04-01

    The objective of this project is to develop improved processes for fabricating CdTe/CdS polycrystalline thin-film solar cells. Researchers used electrodeposition to form CdTe; electrodeposition is a non-vacuum, low-cost technique that is attractive for economic, large-scale production. During the past year, research and development efforts focused on several steps that are most critical to the fabricating high-efficiency CdTe solar cells. These include the optimization of the CdTe electrodeposition process, the effect of pretreatment of CdS substrates, the post-deposition annealing of CdTe, and back-contact formation using Cu-doped ZnTe. Systematic investigations of these processing steps have led to a better understanding and improved performance of the CdTe-based cells. Researchers studied the structural properties of chemical-bath-deposited CdS thin films and their growth mechanisms by investigating CdS samples prepared at different deposition times; investigated the effect of CdCl{sub 2} treatment of CdS films on the photovoltaic performance of CdTe solar cells; studied Cu-doped ZnTe as a promising material for forming stable, low-resistance contacts to the p-type CdTe; and investigated the effect of CdTe and CdS thickness on the photovoltaic performance of the resulting cells. As a result of their systematic investigation and optimization of the processing conditions, researchers improved the efficiency of CdTe/CdS cells using ZnTe back-contact and electrodeposited CdTe. The best CdTe/CdS cell exhibited a V{sub oc} of 0.778 V, a J{sub sc} of 22.4 mA/cm{sup 2}, a FF of 74%, and an efficiency of 12.9% (verified at NREL). In terms of individual parameters, researchers obtained a V{sub oc} over 0.8 V and a FF of 76% on other cells.

  12. Time-dependent toxicity of cadmium telluride quantum dots on liver and kidneys in mice: histopathological changes with elevated free cadmium ions and hydroxyl radicals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang M

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mengmeng Wang,1,2,* Jilong Wang,1,2,* Hubo Sun,1,2 Sihai Han,3 Shuai Feng,1 Lu Shi,1 Peijun Meng,1,2 Jiayi Li,1,2 Peili Huang,1,2 Zhiwei Sun1,2 1Department of Toxicology and Sanitary Chemistry, School of Public Health, Capital Medical University, 2Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmental Toxicology, Capital Medical University, Beijing, 3College of Food and Bioengineering, Henan University of Science and Technology, Luoyang, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: A complete understanding of the toxicological behavior of quantum dots (QDs in vivo is of great importance and a prerequisite for their application in humans. In contrast with the numerous cytotoxicity studies investigating QDs, only a few in vivo studies of QDs have been reported, and the issue remains controversial. Our study aimed to understand QD-mediated toxicity across different time points and to explore the roles of free cadmium ions (Cd2+ and hydroxyl radicals (·OH in tissue damage. Male ICR mice were administered a single intravenous dose (1.5 µmol/kg of CdTe QDs, and liver and kidney function and morphology were subsequently examined at 1, 7, 14, and 28 days. Furthermore, ·OH production in the tissue was quantified by trapping ·OH with salicylic acid (SA as 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (DHBA and detecting it using a high-performance liquid chromatography fluorescence method. We used the induction of tissue metallothionein levels and 2,3-DHBA:SA ratios as markers for elevated Cd2+ from the degradation of QDs and ·OH generation in the tissue, respectively. Our experimental results revealed that the QD-induced histopathological changes were time-dependent with elevated Cd2+ and ·OH, and could recover after a period of time. The Cd2+ and ·OH exhibited delayed effects in terms of histopathological abnormalities. Histological assessments performed at multiple time points might facilitate the evaluation of the biological safety of

  13. High-efficiency thin-film cadmium telluride photovoltaic cells. Annual subcontract report, January 20, 1995--January 19, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Compaan, A D; Bohn, R G; Contreras-Puente, G [Toledo Univ., OH (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy

    1996-05-01

    This annual report covers the second year of a 3-year NREL subcontract with the University of Toledo that is focused on improvements in efficiency for radio frequency (rf)-sputtered CdS/CdTe solar cells. In earlier work supported by NREL, the University of Toledo established the viability of two new deposition methods for CdS/CdTe solar cells by fabricating cells with efficiencies greater than 10% at air mass (AM) 1.5 on soda lime glass for all-sputtered cells and also for all-laser-deposited cells. Most of the effort has been placed on radio frequency sputtering (RFS) because it was judged to be more economical and more easily scaled to large-area deposition. However, laser physical vapor deposition (LPVD) has remained the method of choice for the deposition of CdCl{sub 2} layers and also for the exploration of new materials such as the ternary alloys including CdS{sub x} Te{sub 1{minus}x} and dopants such as Cu in ZnTe.

  14. Effect of Nanosized Tin Oxide Layer on the Efficiency of Photovoltaic Processes in Film Solar Cells Based on Cadmium Telluride

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.S. Khrypunov

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of the thickness of the nanosized layer on the efficiency of photoelectric processes in solar cells (SC ITO / SnO2 / CdS / CdTe / Cu / Au formed on different substrates was investigated. For device structures formed on the glass substrates, the maximum efficiency of 11.4 % is achieved when thickness of the tin oxide layer is 80 nm. For flexible solar cells formed on a polyimide film, the maximum efficiency of 10.8 % is observed when thickness of the tin oxide layer is 50 nm. This paper discusses the physical mechanisms of the observed differences in efficiency.

  15. High-throughput manufacturing of thin-film CdS/CdTe photovoltaic modules. Annual subcontract report, 16 September 1996--15 January 1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandwisch, D.W. [Solar Cells, Inc., Toledo, OH (United States)

    1998-08-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) is recognized as one of the leading materials for low-cost photovoltaic modules. Solar Cells, Inc., has developed this technology and is scaling its pilot production capabilities to a multi-megawatt level. The Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) subcontract supports these efforts. Activities during the third phase of the program concentrated on process development, equipment design and testing, quality assurance, ES and H programs, and large-scale next-generation coating-system prototype development. These efforts broadly addressed the issues of the manufacturing process for producing thin-film, monolithic CdS/CdTe photovoltaic modules.

  16. Cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoeppler, M. (Kernforschungsanlage Juelich G.m.b.H. (Germany, F.R.). Inst. fuer Angewandte Physikalische Chemie); Piscator, M. (Karolinska Inst., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Environmental Hygiene) (eds.)

    1988-01-01

    The proceedings contain the 18 papers presented at the workshop. They are dealing with the following themes: Toxicity, carcinogenesis and metabolism of cadmium, epidemiology; environmental occurrence; quantitative analysis and quality assessment. (MG) With 57 figs., 79 tabs.

  17. Semiconductor materials for solar photovoltaic cells

    CERN Document Server

    Wong-Ng, Winnie; Bhattacharya, Raghu

    2016-01-01

    This book reviews the current status of semiconductor materials for conversion of sunlight to electricity, and highlights advances in both basic science and manufacturing.  Photovoltaic (PV) solar electric technology will be a significant contributor to world energy supplies when reliable, efficient PV power products are manufactured in large volumes at low cost.  Expert chapters cover the full range of semiconductor materials for solar-to-electricity conversion, from crystalline silicon and amorphous silicon to cadmium telluride, copper indium gallium sulfide selenides, dye sensitized solar cells, organic solar cells, and environmentally friendly copper zinc tin sulfide selenides. The latest methods for synthesis and characterization of solar cell materials are described, together with techniques for measuring solar cell efficiency. Semiconductor Materials for Solar Photovoltaic Cells presents the current state of the art as well as key details about future strategies to increase the efficiency and reduce ...

  18. Material and detector properties of cadmium manganese telluride (Cd{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}Te) crystals grown by the modified floating-zone method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hossain, A., E-mail: hossain@bnl.gov; Gu, G.D.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Roy, U.N.; Yang, G.; Liu, T.; Zhong, R.; Schneeloch, J.; James, R.B.

    2015-06-01

    We demonstrated the material- and radiation-detection properties of cadmium manganese telluride (Cd{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}Te; x=0.06), a wide-band-gap semiconductor crystal grown by the modified floating-zone method. We investigated the presence of various bulk defects, such as Te inclusions, twins, and dislocations of several as-grown indium-doped Cd{sub 1−x}Mn{sub x}Te crystals using different techniques, viz., IR transmission microscopy, and chemical etching. We then fabricated four planar detectors from selected CdMnTe crystals, characterized their electrical properties, and tested their performance as room-temperature X- and gamma-ray detectors. Our experimental results show that CMT crystals grown by the modified floating zone method apparently are free from Te inclusions. However, we still need to optimize our growth parameters to attain high-resistivity, large-volume single-crystal CdMnTe.

  19. Bis(3-methyl-2-pyridyl)ditelluride and pyridyl tellurolate complexes of zinc, cadmium, mercury: Synthesis, characterization and their conversion to metal telluride nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedarnath, G; Jain, Vimal K; Wadawale, Amey; Dey, Gautam K

    2009-10-21

    Treatment of an acetonitrile solution of metal chloride with bis(3-methyl-2-pyridyl)ditelluride, [Te(2)(pyMe)(2)], in the same solvent yielded complexes of composition [MCl(2){Te(2)(pyMe)(2)}] (M = Zn or Cd) whereas reactions of [MCl(2)(tmeda)] with NaTepyR (R = H or Me) gave tellurolate complexes of the general formula [M(TepyR)(2)] (M = Cd or Hg). When the cadmium complex [Cd(Tepy)(2)] was crystallized in the presence of excess tmeda, [Cd(Tepy)(2)(tmeda)] was formed exclusively. These complexes were characterized by elemental analyses, uv-vis, (1)H NMR data. The crystal structures of [ZnCl(2){Te(2)(pyMe)(2)}] and [Cd(Tepy)(2)(tmeda)] were established by single crystal X-ray diffraction. In the former zinc is coordinated to nitrogen atoms of the pyridyl group, while in the latter the coordination environment around tetrahedral cadmium is defined by the two neutral nitrogen atoms of tmeda, and two pyridyl tellurolate ligands. Thermal behavior of some of these complexes was studied by thermogravimetric analysis. Pyrolysis of [M(Tepy)(2)] in a furnace or in coordinating solvents such as hexadecylamine/tri-n-octylphosphine oxide (HDA/TOPO) at 350 and 160 degrees C, respectively gave MTe nanoparticles, which were characterized by uv-vis, photoluminiscence, XRD, EDAX and TEM.

  20. Demonstration of enhanced iodine K-edge imaging using an energy-dispersive X-ray computed tomography system with a 25 mm/s-scan linear cadmium telluride detector and a single comparator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, Eiichi, E-mail: dresato@iwate-med.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Iwate Medical University, 2-1-1 Nishitokuta, Yahaba, Iwate 028-3694 (Japan); Oda, Yasuyuki [Department of Physics, Iwate Medical University, 2-1-1 Nishitokuta, Yahaba, Iwate 028-3694 (Japan); Abudurexiti, Abulajiang [Faculty of Software and Information Science, Iwate Prefectural University, 152-52 Sugo, Takizawa, Iwate 020-0193 (Japan); Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Osawa, Akihiro; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya [3rd Department of Surgery, Toho University School of Medicine, 2-17-6 Ohashi, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 153-8515 (Japan); Sato, Shigehiro [Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Iwate Medical University, 19-1 Uchimaru, Morioka, Iwate 020-0023 (Japan); Ogawa, Akira [Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Iwate Medical University, 19-1 Uchimaru, Morioka, Iwate 020-0023 (Japan); Onagawa, Jun [Department of Electronics, Faculty of Engineering, Tohoku Gakuin University, 1-13-1 Chuo, Tagajo, Miyagi 985-8537 (Japan)

    2012-05-15

    An energy-dispersive (ED) X-ray computed tomography (CT) system is useful for carrying out monochromatic imaging. To perform enhanced iodine K-edge CT, we developed an oscillation linear cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector with a scan velocity of 25 mm/s and an energy resolution of 1.2 keV. CT is performed by repeated linear scans and rotations of an object. Penetrating X-ray photons from the object are detected by the CdTe detector, and event signals of X-ray photons are produced using charge-sensitive and shaping amplifiers. The lower photon energy is determined by a comparator device, and the maximum photon energy of 60 keV corresponds to the tube voltage. Rectangular-shaped comparator outputs are counted by a counter card. In the ED-CT, tube voltage and current were 60 kV and 0.30 mA, respectively, and X-ray intensity was 14.8 {mu}Gy/s at 1.0 m from the source at a tube voltage of 60 kV. Demonstration of enhanced iodine K-edge X-ray CT for cancer diagnosis was carried out by selecting photons with energies ranging from 34 to 60 keV. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We developed an energy-dispersive X-ray CT system with a 25 mm/s-scan CdTe detector. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CT is performed by repeated linear scans and rotations of an object. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lower photon energy is determined by a comparator device. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Spatial resolutions were 0.5 Multiplication-Sign 0.5 mm{sup 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Iodine K-edge CT was carried out by selecting photons from 34 to 60 keV.

  1. Environmental benefits of parking-integrated photovoltaics: A 222kWp experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Serrano-Luján, Lucía; García-Valverde, Rafael; Espinosa, Nieves;

    2015-01-01

    The life cycle assessment of a grid-connected, parking integrated, 222kWp cadmium telluride photovoltaic system has been performed. The system was built at the University of Murcia and has been monitored for 2.5years (sampling data every 5min). The detailed material inventory, the energy embedded...... integration (in this case parking integration) have been quantified using a standard methodology for the calculation of several environmental parameters. Finally, the environmental benefits of renewable energy generation because of the savings of producing the same amount of electricity by the Spanish grid...

  2. Controlled cadmium telluride thin films for solar cell applications (emerging materials systems for solar cell applications). Quarterly progress report No. 3, October 9, 1979-January 8, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vedam, K; Das, M B; Krishnaswamy, S V

    1980-02-01

    The main emphasis during the third quarter of the program was on the improvement of the quality of sputtered films, their characterization and use in the fabrication of Schottky barrier type diodes and solar cell structures. Films prepared under different conditions and on different substrates were examined by SEM showing nodular growths under certain conditions. I-V, C-V and photovoltaic characteristics were measured on numerous samples based on n- and p-type films on Ni substrates having top metallization of either evaporated Au and Al. The n-type samples showed up to 200mV V/sub oc/ and small short-circuit currents. The characteristics observed are indicative of the presence of interfacial layer and surface states. Surface state's capacitance were measured on p-type samples metallized with Au.

  3. The performance of a combined solar photovoltaic (PV) and thermoelectric generator (TEG) system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein

    2015-01-01

    The performance of a combined solar photovoltaic (PV) and thermoelectric generator (TEG) system is examined using an analytical model for four different types of commercial PVs and a commercial bismuth telluride TEG. The TEG is applied directly on the back of the PV, so that the two devices have...... the same temperature. The PVs considered are crystalline Si (c-Si), amorphous Si (a-Si), copper indium gallium (di) selenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) cells. The degradation of PV performance with temperature is shown to dominate the increase in power produced by the TEG, due to the low...... efficiency of the TEG. For c-Si, CIGS and CdTe PV cells the combined system produces a lower power and has a lower efficiency than the PV alone, whereas for an a-Si cell the total system performance may be slightly increased by the TEG....

  4. The performance of a combined solar photovoltaic (PV) and thermoelectric generator (TEG) system

    CERN Document Server

    Bjørk, R

    2015-01-01

    The performance of a combined solar photovoltaic (PV) and thermoelectric generator (TEG) system is examined using an analytical model for four different types of commercial PVs and a commercial bismuth telluride TEG. The TEG is applied directly on the back of the PV, so that the two devices have the same temperature. The PVs considered are crystalline Si (c-Si), amorphous Si (a-Si), copper indium gallium (di)selenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe) cells. The degradation of PV performance with temperature is shown to dominate the increase in power produced by the TEG, due to the low efficiency of the TEG. For c-Si, CIGS and CdTe PV cells the combined system produces a lower power and has a lower efficiency than the PV alone, whereas for an a-Si cell the total system performance may be slightly increased by the TEG.

  5. Effects of long-term exposure of gelatinated and non-gelatinated cadmium telluride quantum dots on differentiated PC12 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Babu R

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inherent toxicity of unmodified Quantum Dots (QDs is a major hindrance to their use in biological applications. To make them more potent as neuroprosthetic and neurotherapeutic agents, thioglycolic acid (TGA capped CdTe QDs, were coated with a gelatine layer and investigated in this study with differentiated pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12 cells. The QD - cell interactions were investigated after incubation periods of up to 17 days by MTT and APOTOX-Glo Triplex assays along with using confocal microscopy. Results Long term exposure (up to 17 days to gelatinated TGA-capped CdTe QDs of PC12 cells in the course of differentiation and after neurites were grown resulted in dramatically reduced cytotoxicity compared to non-gelatinated TGA-capped CdTe QDs. Conclusion The toxicity mechanism of QDs was identified as caspase-mediated apoptosis as a result of cadmium leaking from the core of QDs. It was therefore concluded that the gelatine capping on the surface of QDs acts as a barrier towards the leaking of toxic ions from the core QDs in the long term (up to 17 days.

  6. Effects of Long-term exposure of Gelatinated and Non-gelatinated Cadmium Telluride Quantum Dots on Differentiated PC12 cells

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Prasad, Babu R

    2012-01-20

    Abstract Background The inherent toxicity of unmodified Quantum Dots (QDs) is a major hindrance to their use in biological applications. To make them more potent as neuroprosthetic and neurotherapeutic agents, thioglycolic acid (TGA) capped CdTe QDs, were coated with a gelatine layer and investigated in this study with differentiated pheochromocytoma 12 (PC12) cells. The QD - cell interactions were investigated after incubation periods of up to 17 days by MTT and APOTOX-Glo Triplex assays along with using confocal microscopy. Results Long term exposure (up to 17 days) to gelatinated TGA-capped CdTe QDs of PC12 cells in the course of differentiation and after neurites were grown resulted in dramatically reduced cytotoxicity compared to non-gelatinated TGA-capped CdTe QDs. Conclusion The toxicity mechanism of QDs was identified as caspase-mediated apoptosis as a result of cadmium leaking from the core of QDs. It was therefore concluded that the gelatine capping on the surface of QDs acts as a barrier towards the leaking of toxic ions from the core QDs in the long term (up to 17 days).

  7. Cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe-QDs) and enhanced ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation trigger antioxidant enzyme metabolism and programmed cell death in wheat seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huize; Gong, Yan; Han, Rong

    2014-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are becoming increasingly widespread in the environment. Free cadmium ions released from commonly used NPs under ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation are potentially toxic to living organisms. With increasing levels of UV-B radiation at the Earth's surface due to the depletion of the ozone layer, the potential additive effect of NPs and UV-B radiation on plants is of concern. In this study, we investigated the synergistic effect of CdTe quantum dots (CdTe-QDs), a common form of NP, and UV-B radiation on wheat seedlings. Graded doses of CdTe-QDs and UV-B radiation were tested, either alone or in combination, based on physical characteristics of 5-day-old seedlings. Treatments of wheat seedlings with either CdTe-QDs (200 mg/L) or UV-B radiation (10 KJ/m(2)/d) induced the activation of wheat antioxidant enzymes. CdTe-QDs accumulation in plant root cells resulted in programmed cell death as detected by DNA laddering. CdTe-QDs and UV-B radiation inhibited root and shoot growth, respectively. Additive inhibitory effects were observed in the combined treatment group. This research described the effects of UV-B and CdTe-QDs on plant growth. Furthermore, the finding that CdTe-QDs accumulate during the life cycle of plants highlights the need for sustained assessments of these interactions.

  8. Cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe-QDs and enhanced ultraviolet-B (UV-B radiation trigger antioxidant enzyme metabolism and programmed cell death in wheat seedlings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huize Chen

    Full Text Available Nanoparticles (NPs are becoming increasingly widespread in the environment. Free cadmium ions released from commonly used NPs under ultraviolet-B (UV-B radiation are potentially toxic to living organisms. With increasing levels of UV-B radiation at the Earth's surface due to the depletion of the ozone layer, the potential additive effect of NPs and UV-B radiation on plants is of concern. In this study, we investigated the synergistic effect of CdTe quantum dots (CdTe-QDs, a common form of NP, and UV-B radiation on wheat seedlings. Graded doses of CdTe-QDs and UV-B radiation were tested, either alone or in combination, based on physical characteristics of 5-day-old seedlings. Treatments of wheat seedlings with either CdTe-QDs (200 mg/L or UV-B radiation (10 KJ/m(2/d induced the activation of wheat antioxidant enzymes. CdTe-QDs accumulation in plant root cells resulted in programmed cell death as detected by DNA laddering. CdTe-QDs and UV-B radiation inhibited root and shoot growth, respectively. Additive inhibitory effects were observed in the combined treatment group. This research described the effects of UV-B and CdTe-QDs on plant growth. Furthermore, the finding that CdTe-QDs accumulate during the life cycle of plants highlights the need for sustained assessments of these interactions.

  9. Effect of cadmium sulphide quantum dot processing and post thermal annealing on P3HT/PCBM photovoltaic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, M. Taukeer [Polymeric and Soft Materials Section, National Physical Laboratory (CSIR), Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Bhargav, Ranoo [Polymeric and Soft Materials Section, National Physical Laboratory (CSIR), Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Kaur, Amarjeet [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Dhawan, S.K., E-mail: skdhawan@mail.nplindia.erne [Polymeric and Soft Materials Section, National Physical Laboratory (CSIR), Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India); Chand, S., E-mail: schand@mail.nplindia.ernet.i [Polymeric and Soft Materials Section, National Physical Laboratory (CSIR), Dr. K. S. Krishnan Road, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2010-11-30

    The present study demonstrates the effect on photovoltaic performance of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) on doping of cadmium sulphide (CdS) quantum dots (QDs). The P3HT/CdS nanocomposite shows a 10 nm blue shift in the UV-vis absorption relative to the pristine P3HT. The blue shift in the absorption of the P3HT/CdS nanocomposite can be assigned to the quantum confinement effect from the CdS nanoparticles. Significant PL quenching was observed for the nanocomposite films, attributed to additional decaying paths of the excited electrons through the CdS. Solar cell performance of pure P3HT and dispersed with CdS QDs have been studied in the device configuration viz indium tin oxide (ITO)/poly(3,4-ethylendioxythiophene)-poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS)/P3HT:PCBM/Al and ITO/PEDOT:PSS/ P3HT:CdS:PCBM/Al, respectively. Incorporation of CdS QDs in the P3HT matrix results in the enhancement in the device efficiency ({eta}) of the solar cell from 0.45 to 0.87%. Postproduction thermal annealing at 150 {sup o}C for 30 min improves device performance due to enhancement in the device parameters like FF, V{sub OC} and improvement in contact between active layer and Al.

  10. Metals Production Requirements for Rapid Photovoltaics Deployment

    CERN Document Server

    Kavlak, Goksin; Jaffe, Robert L; Trancik, Jessika E

    2015-01-01

    If global photovoltaics (PV) deployment grows rapidly, the required input materials need to be supplied at an increasing rate. In this paper, we quantify the effect of PV deployment levels on the scale of metals production. For example, we find that if cadmium telluride {copper indium gallium diselenide} PV accounts for more than 3% {10%} of electricity generation by 2030, the required growth rates for the production of indium and tellurium would exceed historically-observed production growth rates for a large set of metals. In contrast, even if crystalline silicon PV supplies all electricity in 2030, the required silicon production growth rate would fall within the historical range. More generally, this paper highlights possible constraints to the rate of scaling up metals production for some PV technologies, and outlines an approach to assessing projected metals growth requirements against an ensemble of past growth rates from across the metals production sector. The framework developed in this paper may be...

  11. Module process optimization and device efficiency improvement for stable, low-cost, large-area, cadmium telluride-based photovoltaic module production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albright, S.P.; Ackerman, B.; Chamberlin, R.R.; Jordan, J.F. (Photon Energy, Inc., El Paso, TX (United States))

    1992-04-01

    This report describes work under a three-year phased subcontract to develop CdS/CdTe devices and modules and to further improve the technology base at Photon Energy, Inc. (PEI) to better address the commercialization issues and objectives of the PEI and the US Department of Energy. During this reporting period we (1) achieved efficiencies of 12.7% on small area devices, (2) achieved 1-ft{sup 2} modules with over 8% aperture-area efficiency (and active area efficiencies up to {approximately}10%), (3) tested 4-ft{sup 2} modules at NREL at 23.1 (21.3) watts, normalized (6.3% efficiency), and (4) found no inherent stability problems with CdTe technology during life testing, at both NREL and PEI. 7 refs.

  12. Effect of increasing tellurium content on the electronic and optical properties of cadmium selenide telluride alloys CdSe{sub 1-x}Te{sub x}: An ab initio study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reshak, Ali Hussain, E-mail: maalidph@yahoo.co.uk [Institute of Physical Biology-South Bohemia University, Nove Hrady 37333 (Czech Republic); School of Material Engineering, Malaysia University of Perlis, P.O Box 77, d/a Pejabat Pos Besar, 01007 Kangar, Perlis (Malaysia); Kityk, I.V. [Electrical Engineering Department, Technical University of Czestochowa, Al. Armii Krajowej 17/19, Czestochowa (Poland); Khenata, R. [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et de Modelisation Mathematique de la Matiere (LPQ3 M), universite de Mascara, Mascara 29000 (Algeria); Department of Physics and Astronomy, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2455, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Auluck, S. [National Physical Laboratory Dr. K S Krishnan Marg, New Delhi 110012 (India)

    2011-06-16

    Highlights: > Theoretical study of effect of vary Te content on band structure, density of states, linear and nonlinear optical susceptibilities of CdSe{sub 1-x}Te{sub x}. > Increasing Te content leads to a decrease in the energy band gap. > Significant enhancement of the electronic properties as a function of tellurium concentration - Abstract: An all electron full potential linearized augmented plane wave method, within a framework of GGA (EV-GGA) approach, has been used for an ab initio theoretical study of the effect of increasing tellurium content on the band structure, density of states, and the spectral features of the linear and nonlinear optical susceptibilities of the cadmium-selenide-telluride ternary alloys CdSe{sub 1-x}Te{sub x} (x = 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0). Our calculations show that increasing Te content leads to a decrease in the energy band gap. We find that the band gaps are 0.95 (1.76), 0.89 (1.65), 0.83 (1.56), 0.79 (1.44) and 0.76 (1.31) eV for x = 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, 0.75 and 1.0 in the cubic structure. As these alloys are known to have a wurtzite structure for x less than 0.25, the energy gaps are 0.8 (1.6) eV and 0.7 (1.55) eV for the wurtzite structure (x = 0.0, 0.25) for the GGA (EV-GGA) exchange correlation potentials. This reduction in the energy gaps enhances the functionality of the CdSe{sub 1-x}Te{sub x} alloys, at least for these concentrations, leading to an increase in the effective second-order susceptibility coefficients from 16.75 pm/V (CdSe) to 18.85 pm/V (CdSe{sub 0.75}Te{sub 0.25}), 27.23 pm/V (CdSe{sub 0.5}Te{sub 0.5}), 32.25 pm/V (CdSe{sub 0.25}Te{sub 0.75}), and 37.70 pm/V (CdTe) for the cubic structure and from 12.65 pm/V (CdSe) to 21.11 pm/V (CdSe{sub 0.75}Te{sub 0.25}) in the wurtzite structure. We find a nonlinear relationship between the absorption/emission energies and composition, and a significant enhancement of the electronic properties as a function of tellurium concentration. This variation will help in

  13. Growth and Application of Cadmium Telluride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    photoconductive bodies or infra-red telescopes , image intensifiers, camera tubes, photoelectric cells, X-ray dosimeters and the like." So even by 1959 there...This consists of a stationary heater with a motorised pulley system which provides for movement of the CdTe charge relative to the heater. The furnace

  14. Thin-film cadmium telluride solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, T. L.

    1986-08-01

    The major objective of this work was to demonstrate CdTe devices grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with a total area greater than 1 cm2 and photovoltic efficiencies of at least 13%. During the period covered, various processing steps were investigated for the preparation of thin-film CdTe heterojunction solar cells of the inverted configuration. Glass coated with fluorine-doped tin oxide was used as the substrate. Thin-film heterojunction solar cells were prepared by depositing p-CdTe films on substrates using CVD and close-spaced sublimation (CSS). Cells prepared from CSS CdTe usually have a higher conversion efficiency than those prepared from CVD CdTe, presumably due to the chemical interaction between CdS and CdTe at the interface during the CVD process. The best cell, about 1.2 sq cm in area, had an AM 1.5 (global) efficiency of 10.5%, and further improvements are expected by optimizing the process parameters.

  15. Thin film cadmium telluride solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, T. L.; Chu, Shirley S.; Ang, S. T.; Mantravadi, M. K.

    1987-08-01

    Thin-film p-CdTe/CdS/SnO2:F/glass solar cells of the inverted configuration were prepared by the deposition of p-type CdTe films onto CdS/SnO2:F/glass substrates using CVD or close-spaced sublimation (CSS) techniques based on the procedures of Chu et al. (1983) and Nicholl (1963), respectively. The deposition rates of p-CdTe films deposited by CSS were higher than those deposited by the CVD technique (4-5 min were sufficient), and the efficiencies higher than 10 percent were obtained. However, the resistivity of films prepared by CSS was not as readily controlled as that of the CVD films. The simplest technique to reduce the resistivity of the CSS p-CdTe films was to incorporate a dopant, such as As or Sb, into the reaction mixture during the preparation of the source material. The films with resistivities in the range of 500-1000 ohm cm were deposited in this manner.

  16. Ellipsometric Analysis of Cadmium Telluride Films’ Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Anna Evmenova; Volodymyr Odarych; Mykola Vuichyk; Fedir Sizov

    2015-01-01

    Ellipsometric analysis of CdTe films grown on Si and CdHgTe substrates at the “hot-wall” epitaxy vacuum setup has been performed. It has been found that ellipsometric data calculation carried out by using a simple one-layer film model leads to radical distortion of optical constants spectra: this fact authenticates the necessity to attract a more complicated model that should include heterogeneity of films. Ellipsometric data calculation within a two-layer film model permitted to conclude tha...

  17. Surface study of mercury-cadmium-telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lops, V.C.

    1985-01-01

    Single crystals of Hg/sub 1-x/Cd/sub x/Te were studied to determine how changes in the surface conditions affected electrical properties. Infrared detector grade material from Honeywell Radiation Center (x = 0.2, bandgap near 10 ..mu..m) was used to examine the effects of changes in the surface charge density on electrical I/f noise. The surface charge density, which was controlled by the pH of the aqueous solution was measured in a zeta meter that operated much like a Millikan oil-drop experiment. The electrophoresis zeta potential measurements on (HgCd)Te identified the active surface oxide as TeO/sub 2/ and also revealed information on the surface chemistry. An experimental fit yielded the dissociation constant of tellurous acid, which was the result of TeO/sub 2/ combining with H/sub 2/O. The dissociation of tellurous acid was responsible for the measured surface charge densities and the surface chemistry from pH = 1 to pH = 8. At pH = 1, the surface was H/sub 3/TeO/sub 2//sup +/. At pH = 1.5, the surface was H/sub 2/TeO/sub 3/ which gave the neutral point, PZZP (Point of Zero Zeta Potential). With the pH between 2 and 6, the surface was HTeO/sub 3//sup -/. As the pH was changed to 7 and greater, the surface was TeO/sub 3//sup -/. Electrical I/f noise in (HgCd)Te was found to be dominated by bulk and not surface effects at room temperature.

  18. Evaluation of critical materials in five additional advance design photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, S.A.; Watts, R.L.; Martin, P.; Gurwell, W.E.

    1981-02-01

    The objective of this study is to identify potential material supply constraints due to the large-scale deployment of five advanced photovoltaic (PV) cell designs, and to suggest strategies to reduce the impacts of these production capacity limitations and potential future material shortages. The Critical Materials Assessment Program (CMAP) screens the designs and their supply chains and identifies potential shortages which might preclude large-scale use of the technologies. The results of the screening of five advanced PV cell designs are presented: (1) indium phosphide/cadmium sulfide, (2) zinc phosphide, (3) cadmium telluride/cadmium sulfide, (4) copper indium selenium, and (5) cadmium selenide photoelectrochemical. Each of these five cells is screened individually assuming that they first come online in 1991, and that 25 Gwe of peak capacity is online by the year 2000. A second computer screening assumes that each cell first comes online in 1991 and that each cell has a 5 GWe of peak capacity by the year 2000, so that the total online capacity for the five cells is 25 GWe. Based on a review of the preliminary baseline screening results, suggestions were made for varying such parameters as the layer thickness, cell production processes, etc. The resulting PV cell characterizations were then screened again by the CMAP computer code. The CMAP methodology used to identify critical materials is described; and detailed characterizations of the advanced photovoltaic cell designs under investigation, descriptions of additional cell production processes, and the results are presented. (WHK)

  19. Towards sustainable photovoltaics: the search for new materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, L M

    2011-05-13

    The opportunities for photovoltaic (PV) solar energy conversion are reviewed in the context of projected world energy demands for the twenty-first century. Conventional single-crystal silicon solar cells are facing increasingly strong competition from thin-film solar cells based primarily on polycrystalline absorber materials, such as cadmium telluride (CdTe) and copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS). However, if PVs are to make a significant contribution to satisfy global energy requirements, issues of sustainability and cost will need to be addressed with increased urgency. There is a clear need to expand the range of materials and processes that is available for thin-film solar cell manufacture, placing particular emphasis on low-energy processing and sustainable non-toxic raw materials. The potential of new materials is exemplified by copper zinc tin sulphide, which is emerging as a viable alternative to the more toxic CdTe and the more expensive CIGS absorber materials.

  20. NREL preprints for the 23rd IEEE Photovoltaic Specialists Conference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fitzgerald, M. [ed.

    1993-05-01

    Topics covered include various aspects of solar cell fabrication and performance. Aluminium-gallium arsenides, cadmium telluride, amorphous silicon, and copper-indium-gallium selenides are all characterized in their applicability in solar cells.

  1. Ternary spinel cadmium stannate, cadmium indate, and zinc stannate and binary tin oxide and indium oxide transparent conducting oxides as front contact materials for cadmium sulfide/cadmium tellurium photovoltaic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamazza, Robert, Jr.

    Transparent conducting oxides (TCO's) of Cd2SnO 4 (cadmium stannate), CdIn2O4 (cadmium indate), and Zn2SnO4 (zinc stannate) thin films were investigated from a materials and applications point of view through. All films were deposited by co-sputtering using either binary oxide or metallic (reactive sputtering) targets. The film properties were investigated as a function of film composition and stoichiometry. The effect of process parameters such as deposition temperatures, and post-deposition heat treatments on the structural and electro-optical properties of the films were also investigated extensively. All as-deposited films were found to be amorphous independent of substrate deposition temperature. The electro-optical and crystallographic properties were heavily dependant on the post deposition heat treatments. Cd2SnO4, Zn 2SnO4, and CdIn2O4 all produced highly transparent films with average transmission values (400--900 nm range) of 92%, 93%, and 90%, respectively. Cd2SnO4 and CdIn 2O4 were highly conductive with resistivity values as low as 2.01 x 10-4 O-cm and 2.90 x 10 -4 O-cm, respectively. Conversely, Zn2SnO 4 was not able to produce highly conductive films, with the lowest resistivity being 4.3 x 10-3 O-cm. CdTe solar cells were fabricated using al the above materials as front contacts or as high-ρ layers in bi-layer structures. All cells were of the superstrate configuration: Low-ρ TCO/high-ρ TCO/CdS/CdTe/Back contact. Only the TCO layers were varied; the remainder of the device was held constant. In most cases the inclusion of a high-ρ TCO layer was found to improve solar cell performance, especially in regard to the open circuit voltage. Cd2SnO4 was the exception. The incorporation of Zn2SnO4 as a high-ρ layer enabled a greatest current collection from high energy wavelengths through an apparent thinning effect on the CdS. This increased the overall short circuit current density to values in excess of 24.9 mA/cm2. The standard device consisted of

  2. Printed interconnects for photovoltaic modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fields, J. D.; Pach, G.; Horowitz, K. A. W.; Stockert, T. R.; Woodhouse, M.; van Hest, M. F. A. M.

    2017-01-01

    Film-based photovoltaic modules employ monolithic interconnects to minimize resistance loss and enhance module voltage via series connection. Conventional interconnect construction occurs sequentially, with a scribing step following deposition of the bottom electrode, a second scribe after deposition of absorber and intermediate layers, and a third following deposition of the top electrode. This method produces interconnect widths of about 300 um, and the area comprised by interconnects within a module (generally about 3%) does not contribute to power generation. The present work reports on an increasingly popular strategy capable of reducing the interconnect width to less than 100 um: printing interconnects. Cost modeling projects a savings of about $0.02/watt for CdTe module production through the use of printed interconnects, with savings coming from both reduced capital expense and increased module power output. Printed interconnect demonstrations with copper-indium-gallium-diselenide and cadmium-telluride solar cells show successful voltage addition and miniaturization down to 250 um. Material selection guidelines and considerations for commercialization are discussed.

  3. Photovoltaics: From the laboratory to the marketplace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basso, T.S.; Surek, T.; Thornton, J.

    1991-03-01

    Photovoltaics (PV), the direct conversion of sunlight to electricity, is experiencing significant improvements in technology performance and lowered costs. Fostering these improvements, the SERI Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development (PV AR D) Project supports research and provides services to the US PV industry. This paper presents the recent advances and future direction of the PV project. Research areas are Fundamental and Supporting Research, Advanced Thin-Film Materials, High-Efficiency Materials, Module Development, and Systems Development. Materials of interest include amorphous silicon, copper indium diselenide, cadmium telluride, crystalline silicon, gallium arsenide and related alloys, transparent conductors, antireflection coatings, substrates, and encapsulants. The PV project inherently provides technology transfer that helps industry shorten the time to bring R D advances to the marketplace. SERI annually performs over 10,000 measurements for the entire PV community, participates in collaborative research, and welcomes visiting scientists. Two specific areas of recently increased national focus are: (1) manufacturing processes for cost-effective PV modules, and (2) systems development for high-value utility applications. The SERI research approach is based on facilitating direct contact between industry, electric utilities, and others interested in PV technology. This approach heavily relies on SERI/industry partnerships. The arrangements vary to address generic and company-specific problems to improve the US industry's competitive position and accelerate greater electric utility deployment of PV systems. 5 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Solar Photovoltaic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mickey, Charles D.

    1981-01-01

    Reviews information on solar radiation as an energy source. Discusses these topics: the key photovoltaic material; the bank theory of solids; conductors, semiconductors, and insulators; impurity semiconductors; solid-state photovoltaic cell operation; limitations on solar cell efficiency; silicon solar cells; cadmium sulfide/copper (I) sulfide…

  5. Lead telluride alloy thermoelectrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron D. LaLonde

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The opportunity to use solid-state thermoelectrics for waste heat recovery has reinvigorated the field of thermoelectrics in tackling the challenges of energy sustainability. While thermoelectric generators have decades of proven reliability in space, from the 1960s to the present, terrestrial uses have so far been limited to niche applications on Earth because of a relatively low material efficiency. Lead telluride alloys were some of the first materials investigated and commercialized for generators but their full potential for thermoelectrics has only recently been revealed to be far greater than commonly believed. By reviewing some of the past and present successes of PbTe as a thermoelectric material we identify the issues for achieving maximum performance and successful band structure engineering strategies for further improvements that can be applied to other thermoelectric materials systems.

  6. Energize Your Photovoltaics: NREL's Process Development and Integration Laboratory (PDIL)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2008-04-01

    The Process Development and Integration Laboratory (PDIL) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a unique collaborative facility where industry and universities can work closely with NREL scientists on integrated equipment to answer pressing questions related to photovoltaics (PV). The integrated equipment includes deposition, processing, and characterization tools. We work with a wide range of PV materials, from crystalline silicon to thin-films (amorphous, nano- and microcrystalline silicon, copper indium gallium diselenide, cadmium telluride) to organic PV. The PDIL integrates all the data to: Automate control via recipes; Share data easily and securely; and Facilitate analysis. The PDIL integrates all the tools to: Eliminate air exposure between steps; Sequence steps in any order ; and Incorporate combinatorial techniques. The PDIL integrates all the materials to: Provide greater device flexibility; Allow diverse experts to work together; and Better support industry and universities.

  7. Optimization of material/device parameters of CdTe photovoltaic for solar cells applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijewarnasuriya, Priyalal S.

    2016-05-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) has been recognized as a promising photovoltaic material for thin-film solar cell applications due to its near optimum bandgap of ~1.5 eV and high absorption coefficient. The energy gap is near optimum for a single-junction solar cell. The high absorption coefficient allows films as thin as 2.5 μm to absorb more than 98% of the above-bandgap radiation. Cells with efficiencies near 20% have been produced with poly-CdTe materials. This paper examines n/p heterostructure device architecture. The performance limitations related to doping concentrations, minority carrier lifetimes, absorber layer thickness, and surface recombination velocities at the back and front interfaces is assessed. Ultimately, the paper explores device architectures of poly- CdTe and crystalline CdTe to achieve performance comparable to gallium arsenide (GaAs).

  8. High rate deposition of thin film cadmium sulphide by pulsed direct current magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lisco, F., E-mail: F.Lisco@lboro.ac.uk [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Kaminski, P.M.; Abbas, A.; Bowers, J.W.; Claudio, G. [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom); Losurdo, M. [Institute of Inorganic Methodologies and of Plasmas, IMIP-CNR, via Orabona 4, 70126 Bari (Italy); Walls, J.M. [Centre for Renewable Energy Systems Technology (CREST), School of Electronic, Electrical and Systems Engineering, Loughborough University, Leicestershire LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium Sulphide (CdS) is an important n-type semiconductor widely used as a window layer in thin film photovoltaics Copper Indium Selenide, Copper Indium Gallium (di)Selenide, Copper Zinc Tin Sulphide and Cadmium Telluride (CdTe). Cadmium Sulphide has been deposited using a number of techniques but these techniques can be slow (chemical bath deposition and Radio Frequency sputtering) or the uniformity and the control of thickness can be relatively difficult (close space sublimation). In this paper we report on the development of a process using pulsed Direct Current magnetron sputtering which allows nanometre control of thin film thickness using time only. The CdS thin films deposited in this process are highly uniform and smooth. They exhibit the preferred hexagonal structure at room temperature deposition and they have excellent optical properties. Importantly, the process is highly stable despite the use of a semi-insulating magnetron target. Moreover, the process is very fast. The deposition rate using 1.5 kW of power to a 6-inch circular magnetron was measured to be greater than 8 nm/s. This makes the process suitable for industrial deployment. - Highlights: • Pulsed DC magnetron sputtering of CdS • High deposition rate deposition • Uniform, pinhole free films.

  9. CdTe Photovoltaics for Sustainable Electricity Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munshi, Amit; Sampath, Walajabad

    2016-09-01

    Thin film CdTe (cadmium telluride) is an important technology in the development of sustainable and affordable electricity generation. More than 10 GW of installations have been carried out using this technology around the globe. It has been demonstrated as a sustainable, green, renewable, affordable and abundant source of electricity. An advanced sublimation tool has been developed that allows highly controlled deposition of CdTe films onto commercial soda lime glass substrates. All deposition and treatment steps can be performed without breaking the vacuum within a single chamber in an inline process that can be conveniently scaled to a commercial process. In addition, an advanced cosublimation source has been developed to allow the deposition of ternary alloys such as Cd x Mg1- x Te to form an electron reflector layer which is expected to address the voltage deficits in current CdTe devices and to achieve very high efficiency. Extensive materials characterization, including but not limited to scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy and electron back-scatter diffraction, has been performed to get a better understanding of the effects of processing conditions on CdTe thin film photovoltaics. This combined with computer modeling such as density function theory modeling gives a new insight into the mechanism of CdTe photovoltaic function. With all these efforts, CdTe photovoltaics has seen great progress in the last few years. Currently, it has been recorded as the cheapest source of electricity in the USA on a commercial scale, and further improvements are predicted to further reduce the cost while increasing its utilization. Here, we give an overview of the advantages of thin film CdTe photovoltaics as well as a brief review of the challenges that need to be addressed. Some fundamental studies of processing conditions for thin film CdTe are also presented

  10. Radiation resistance of thin-film solar cells for space photovoltaic power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodyard, James R.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Copper indium diselenide, cadmium telluride, and amorphous silicon alloy solar cells have achieved noteworthy performance and are currently being studied for space power applications. Cadmium sulfide cells had been the subject of much effort but are no longer considered for space applications. A review is presented of what is known about the radiation degradation of thin film solar cells in space. Experimental cadmium telluride and amorphous silicon alloy cells are reviewed. Damage mechanisms and radiation induced defect generation and passivation in the amorphous silicon alloy cell are discussed in detail due to the greater amount of experimental data available.

  11. Module process optimization and device efficiency improvement for stable, low-cost, large-area, cadmium telluride-based photovoltaic module production. Annual subcontract report, 1 July 1990--31 December 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albright, S.P.; Ackerman, B.; Chamberlin, R.R.; Jordan, J.F. [Photon Energy, Inc., El Paso, TX (United States)

    1992-04-01

    This report describes work under a three-year phased subcontract to develop CdS/CdTe devices and modules and to further improve the technology base at Photon Energy, Inc. (PEI) to better address the commercialization issues and objectives of the PEI and the US Department of Energy. During this reporting period we (1) achieved efficiencies of 12.7% on small area devices, (2) achieved 1-ft{sup 2} modules with over 8% aperture-area efficiency (and active area efficiencies up to {approximately}10%), (3) tested 4-ft{sup 2} modules at NREL at 23.1 (21.3) watts, normalized (6.3% efficiency), and (4) found no inherent stability problems with CdTe technology during life testing, at both NREL and PEI. 7 refs.

  12. Module process optimization and device efficiency improvement for stable, low-cost, large-area, cadmium telluride-based photovoltaic module production. Final subcontract report, 1 July 1990--30 April 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albright, S P; Johnson, S X [Golden Photon, Inc., CO (United States)

    1994-06-01

    This report describes work performed under a three-phase subcontract. The objectives of the program include (1) achievement of active-area efficiencies of greater than 14% on small cells; (2) achievement of aperture-area efficiencies of greater than 13% on 0.09-m{sup 2} (1 ft{sup 2}) modules; (3) achievement of aperture-area efficiencies of greater than 12.5% on 0.37-m{sup 2} (4 ft{sup 2}) modules; and achievement of greater than 20-year module life (based on life testing extrapolations) with no greater than 10% efficiency degradation. The results obtained and described herein include the following: (1) efficiencies of 12.7% were achieved on small-area devices; (2) 0.09-m{sup 2} (1 ft{sup 2}) modules achieved greater than 8% aperture-area efficiency, but work for further efficiency improvement was redirected toward the 0.37-M{sup 2} (4 if) modules; (3) 0.37-m{sup 2} (4 ft{sup 2}) modules achieved 26.5-W output, which calculates to 8.0% aperture-area efficiency; (4) consistent prototype production was focused on and substantially achieved within Phase 2; (5) life testing at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory showed no inherent stability problems with the CdTe technology, and the accuracy of module measurement was satisfactorily resolved; and (6) a ``cradle-to-cradle`` recycling program was begun based upon the philosophy that the establishment of such mechanisms will be required to ensure maximum recapture and recycling of all manufacturing waste materials and/or modules returned from the field.

  13. Experience Scaling Up Manufacturing of Emerging Photovoltaic Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braun, G. W.; Skinner, D. E.

    2007-01-01

    This report examines two important generic photovoltaic technologies at particularly revealing stages of development, i.e., the stages between R&D and stable commercial production and profitable sales. Based on two historical cases, it attempts to shed light on the difference between: (1) costs and schedules validated by actual manufacturing and market experience, and (2) estimated costs and schedules that rely on technology forecasts and engineering estimates. The amorphous Silicon case also identifies some of the costs that are incurred in meeting specific market requirements, while the Cadmium Telluride case identifies many of the operational challenges involved in transferring R&D results to production. The transition between R&D and commercial success takes a great deal of time and money for emerging energy conversion technologies in general. The experience reported here can be instructive to those managing comparable efforts, and to their investors. It can also be instructive to R&D managers responsible for positioning such new technologies for commercial success.

  14. Progress in Understanding Degradation Mechanisms and Improving Stability in Organic Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateker, William R; McGehee, Michael D

    2016-12-22

    Understanding the degradation mechanisms of organic photovoltaics is particularly important, as they tend to degrade faster than their inorganic counterparts, such as silicon and cadmium telluride. An overview is provided here of the main degradation mechanisms that researchers have identified so far that cause extrinsic degradation from oxygen and water, intrinsic degradation in the dark, and photo-induced burn-in. In addition, it provides methods for researchers to identify these mechanisms in new materials and device structures to screen them more quickly for promising long-term performance. These general strategies will likely be helpful in other photovoltaic technologies that suffer from insufficient stability, such as perovskite solar cells. Finally, the most promising lifetime results are highlighted and recommendations to improve long-term performance are made. To prevent degradation from oxygen and water for sufficiently long time periods, OPVs will likely need to be encapsulated by barrier materials with lower permeation rates of oxygen and water than typical flexible substrate materials. To improve stability at operating temperatures, materials will likely require glass transition temperatures above 100 °C. Methods to prevent photo-induced burn-in are least understood, but recent research indicates that using pure materials with dense and ordered film morphologies can reduce the burn-in effect.

  15. GEOLOGY OF THE FLORENCIA GOLD – TELLURIDE DEPOSIT (CAMAGÜEY, CUBA AND SOME METALLURGICAL CONSIDERATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    López K Jesús M.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the results from a study of the Florencia gold-telluride deposit in Central Cuba, including mineralogical, petrographical, microprobe and chemical analysis. Valuable information is provided for the exploration, mining and processing of gold ores from other nearby deposits with similar characteristics. Results highlight changes in the mineralogical composition of the ores between the north and south sectors of the deposit, as reflected in metallurgical concentrates after beneficiation and flotation of samples from these sectors.
    It is shown that gold deposits of the Cretaceous Volcanic Arc of Cuba largely consist of native gold, telluride and pyrite, where arsenopyrite is almost absent. Traces of lead, zinc and cadmium are present in the periphery of the main ore zones.

  16. Radio-frequency magnetron triode sputtering of cadmium telluride and zinc telluride films and solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanford, Adam Lee

    The n-CdS/p-CdTe solar cell has been researched for many years now. Research groups use a variety of processes to fabricate thin-film CdS/CdTe cells, including physical vapor deposition, chemical vapor deposition, and RF diode sputtering. One of the central areas of investigation concerning CdS/CdTe cells is the problem of a Schottky barrier at the back contact. Even cells fabricated with ohmic back contacts degrade into Schottky barriers as the devices are used. This severely degrades power generation. One possible solution is to use p+-ZnTe as an interlayer between CdTe and the back contact. ZnTe is easily doped with Cu to be p-type. However, even contacts with this ZnTe interlayer degrade over time, because Cu is highly mobile and diffuses away from the contact towards the CdS/CdTe junction. Another possibility is to dope ZnTe with N. It has been demonstrated using molecular beam epitaxy and RF diode sputtering. In this study, CdTe films are fabricated using a variation of RF diode sputtering called triode sputtering. This technique allows for control of ion bombardment to the substrate during deposition. Also, a higher plasma density near the target is achieved allowing depositions at lower pressures. These films are characterized structurally to show the effects of the various deposition parameters. N-doped ZnTe films are also fabricated using this technique. These films are characterized electrically to show the effects of the various deposition parameters. Also, the effects of post-deposition annealing are observed. It is found that annealing at the right temperature can increase the conductivity of the films by a factor of 3 or more. However, annealing at higher temperatures decreases the conductivity to as low as 12% of the initial conductivity. Finally, RF triode sputtered N-doped ZnTe films are used as an interlayer at the back contact of a CdS/CdTe solar cell. The effects of annealing the device before and after contact deposition are observed. Annealing before depositing contacts results in an increase in Voc of 20mV. Annealing after contact deposition results in a degradation of fill factor over time.

  17. High efficiency cadmium telluride and zinc telluride based thin-film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohatgi, A.; Sudharsanan, R.; Ringel, S.A.; Chou, H.C. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States))

    1992-10-01

    This report describes work to improve the basic understanding of CdTe and ZnTe alloys by growing and characterizing these films along with cell fabrication. The major objective was to develop wide-band-gap (1.6--1.8 eV) material for the top cell, along with compatible window material and transparent ohmic contacts, so that a cascade cell design can be optimized. Front-wall solar cells were fabricated with a glass/SnO{sub 2}/CdS window, where the CdS film is thin to maximize transmission and current. Wide-band-gap absorber films (E{sub g} = 1.75 eV) were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) techniques, which provided excellent control for tailoring the film composition and properties. CdZnTe films were grown by both MBE and MOCVD. All the as-grown films were characterized by several techniques (surface photovoltage spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)) for composition, bulk uniformity, thickness, and film and interface quality. Front-wall-type solar cells were fabricated in collaboration with Ametek Materials Research Laboratory using CdTe and CdZnTe polycrystalline absorber films. The effects of processing on ternary film were studied by AES and XPS coupled with capacitance voltage and current voltage measurements as a function of temperature. Bias-dependent spectral response and electrical measurements were used to test some models in order to identify and quantify dominant loss mechanisms.

  18. Ellipsometric Studies on Silver Telluride Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Pandiaraman

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Silver telluride thin films of thickness between 45 nm and 145 nm were thermally evaporated on well cleaned glass substrates at high vacuum better than 10 – 5 mbar. Silver telluride thin films are polycrystalline with monoclinic structure was confirmed by X-ray diffractogram studies. AFM and SEM images of these films are also recorded. The phase ratio and amplitude ratio of these films were recorded in the wavelength range between 300 nm and 700 nm using spectroscopic ellipsometry and analysed to determine its optical band gap, refractive index, extinction coefficient, and dielectric functions. High absorption coefficient determined from the analysis of recorded spectra indicates the presence of direct band transition. The optical band gap of silver telluride thin films is thickness dependent and proportional to square of reciprocal of thickness. The dependence of optical band gap of silver telluride thin films on film thickness has been explained through quantum size effect.

  19. Dendritic tellurides acting as antioxidants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Huaping; WANG Yapei; WANG Zhiqiang; LIU Junqiu; Mario Smet; Wim Dehaen

    2006-01-01

    We have described the synthesis of a series of poly(aryl ether) dendrimers with telluride in the core and oligo(ethylene oxide) chains at the periphery which act as glutathione peroxidase (GPx) mimics. These series of compounds were well characterized by 1H-NMR, 13C-NMR and ESI-MS. Using different ROOH (H2O2, cumene hydroperoxide) for testing the antioxidizing properties of these compounds, we have found that from generation 0 to 2, the activity of the dendritic GPx mimics first decreased and then increased. This can be explained on the basis of a greater steric hindrance, going from generation 0 to 1, and stronger binding interactions going from generation 1 to 2. In other words, there exists a balance between binding interactions and steric hindrance that may optimize the GPx activity.

  20. Photoluminescence Excitation Spectroscopy Characterization of Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, James E.; Wang, Xufeng; Grubbs, Elizabeth K.; Drayton, Jennifer; Johnston, Steve; Levi, Dean; Lundstrom, Mark S.; Bermel, Peter

    2016-11-21

    The use of steady-state photoluminescence spectroscopy as a contactless characterization tool, suitable for inline optical characterization, has been previously demonstrated for high efficiency solar cells such as GaAs. In this paper, we demonstrate the use of PLE characterization on a thin film CdS/CdTe np heterojunction solar cell, and compare the results to measured EQE and I-V data. In contrast to previous work on high-quality GaAs, the PLE and EQE spectra do not match closely here. We still find, however, that reliable material parameters can be extracted from the PLE measurements. We also provide a physical explanation of the limits defining the cases when the PLE and EQE spectra may be expected to match.

  1. Far Infrared Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride Photoconductive Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-09-01

    mobl come, v~r, donipŕ Sh totmid c clmtui Mistime Imduileg Uhwtksj-bmd ,wmblund.. and imeelty 5 value of 0.4 us. Below 30 K the lifetime increases...Laboratories), 2) D. L. Smith (California Institute of Technology ), 3) P. M. Raccah (University of Illinois at Chicago Circle), 4) R. E. Longshore (Night

  2. Theoretical Investigation of Point Defects of Mercury Cadmium Telluride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-11-01

    J.C. Phillips and L. Kleinman , Phys. Rev. 116, 287(1959). 46. B.J. Austin, V. Heine, and L.J. Sham, "General theory of pseudopotentials," Phys, Rev. 127...R.A. Logan, and J.R. Arthur ,Jr., "The lower conduction band structure of (AI,Ga)As," Inst. Phys. Conf. Ser. No. 33a, 210(1977). 82.M.H. Weiler

  3. Laser induced damage studies in mercury cadmium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Amit; Kapoor, Avinashi; Tripathi, K. N.; Bansal, S. K.

    2007-10-01

    We have investigated laser induced damage at 1.06 μm laser wavelength in diamond paste polished (mirror finish) and carborundum polished Hg0.8Cd0.2Te (MCT) samples with increasing fluence as well as number of pulses. Evolution of damage morphology in two types of samples is quite different. In case of diamond paste polished samples, evolution of damage morphological features is consistent with Hg evaporation with transport of Cd/Te globules towards the periphery of the molten region. Cd/Te globules get accumulated with successive laser pulses at the periphery indicating an accumulation effect. Real time reflectivity (RTR) measurement has been done to understand melt pool dynamics. RTR measurements along with the thermal profile of the melt pool are in good agreement with thermal melting model of laser irradiated MCT samples. In case of carborundum polished samples, laser damage threshold is significantly reduced. Damage morphological features are significantly influenced by surface microstructural condition. From comparison of the morphological features in the two cases, it can be inferred that laser processing of MCT for device applications depends significantly on surface preparation conditions.

  4. A surface study of mercury-cadmium-telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, V. C.

    1985-12-01

    Single crystals of Hg (sub 1-x) Cd (sub x) Te were studied to determine how changes in the surface conditions affected electrical properties, infrared detector grade material was used to examine the effects of changes in the surface charge density on electrical l/f noise. The surface charge density which was controlled by the pH of the aqueous solution was measured in a zeta meter which operated much like a Millikan oil drop experiment. The electrophoresis zeta potential measurements on (HgCd)Te have identified the active surface oxide as TeO2 and has also revealed information on the surface chemistry. Electrical l/f noise in-(HgCd)Te was found to be dominated by bulk and not surface effects at room temperature. Laser Raman and Auger spectroscopy were used to assess mechanical surface damage and anodic oxide composition.

  5. a Surface Study of Mercury-Cadmium Telluride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Vincent C.

    Single crystals of Hg(,1-x)Cd(,x)Te were studied to determine how changes in the surface conditions affected electrical properties. Infrared detector grade material from Honeywell Radiation Center (x = 0.2, bandgap near 10(mu)m) was used to examine the effects of changes in the surface charge density on electrical l/f noise. The surface charge density which was controlled by the pH of the aqueous solution was measured in a zeta meter which operated much like a Millikan oil drop experiment. The electrophoresis zeta potential measurements on (HgCd)Te have identified the active surface oxide as TeO(,2) and has also revealed information on the surface chemistry. An experimental fit yielded the dissociation constant of tellurous acid which was the result of TeO(,2) combining with H(,2)O. The dissociation of tellurous acid was responsible for the measured surface charge densities and the surface chemistry from pH = 1 to pH = 8. At pH = 1, the surface was H(,3)TeO(,3)('+). At pH = 1.5, the surface was H(,2)TeO(,3) which gave the neutral point, PZZP (Point of Zero Zeta Potential). With the pH between 2 and 6, the surface was HTeO(,3)('-). As the pH was changed to 7 and greater, the surface was TeO(,3)-. Electrical l/f noise in (HgCd)Te was found to be dominated by bulk and not surface effects at room temperature. l/f noise measure- ments were made in an air ambient and in various electrolytic solu- tions which produced different surface charge conditions. The l/f noise voltage did not change within experimental error as the surface charge density was changed (due to major changes in the surface chemistry) by pH; at pH = 7, ((sigma)(,s) = -3 x 10('12) e/cm('2) due to TeO(,3)-), with the pH between 2 and 6 (-1 x 10('12) e/cm('2) < (sigma)(,s) < -2 x 10('12) e/cm('2) due to HTeO(,3)('-)), and to pH = 1.5 ((sigma)(,s) = 0 due to H(,2)TeO(,3)). Laser Raman and Auger spectroscopy were used to assess mechanical surface damage and anodic oxide composition. Surface damage on (HgCd)Te produced dramatic changes in the Raman spectrum which was restored to its pre-damaged state by use of the bromine-methanol etch. Auger spectroscopy of anodically oxidized (HgCd)Te further confirmed that the tellurium surface oxide was TeO(,2). The ratio of the atomic concentrations of Te to O in the oxide was found to be approximately 1 to 2.

  6. A portable cadmium telluride multidetector probe for cardiac function monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Arntz, Y; Dumitresco, B; Eclancher, B; Prat, V

    1999-01-01

    A new nuclear stethoscope based on a matrix of small CdTe semiconductor detectors has been developed for studying the cardiac performance by gamma ventriculography at the equilibrium, in rest and stress conditions, in the early and recovery phases of the coronary disease and to follow the long-term therapy. The light-weight probe consists of an array of 64 detectors 5x5x2 mm grouped in 16 independent units in a lead shielded aluminum box including 16 preamplifiers. The probe is connected to an electronic box containing DC power supply, 16 channel amplifiers, discriminators and counters, two analog-triggering ECG channels, and interface to a PC. The left ventricle activity is, preferentially, detected by using a low-resolution matching convergent collimator. A physical evaluation of the probe has been performed, both with static tests and dynamically with a hydraulic home-built model of beating heart ventricle paced by a rhythm simulator. The sum of the 16 detectors activity provided a radiocardiogram (RCG) wh...

  7. Compendium of photovoltaic degradation rates: Photovoltaic degradation rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Dirk C. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; Kurtz, Sarah R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), 15013 Denver West Parkway Golden CO 80401 USA; VanSant, Kaitlyn [Colorado School of Mines, 1500 Illinois Street Golden CO 8040 USA; Newmiller, Jeff [DNV GL, 2420 Camino Ramon, Suite 300 San Ramon CA 95483 USA

    2016-02-07

    Published data on photovoltaic (PV) degradation measurements were aggregated and re-examined. The subject has seen an increased interest in recent years resulting in more than 11 000 degradation rates in almost 200 studies from 40 different countries. As studies have grown in number and size, we found an impact from sampling bias attributable to size and accuracy. Because of the correlational nature of this study we examined the data in several ways to minimize this bias. We found median degradation for x-Si technologies in the 0.5-0.6%/year range with the mean in the 0.8-0.9%/year range. Hetero-interface technology (HIT) and microcrystalline silicon (..mu..c-Si) technologies, although not as plentiful, exhibit degradation around 1%/year and resemble thin-film products more closely than x-Si. Several studies showing low degradation for copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) have emerged. Higher degradation for cadmium telluride (CdTe) has been reported, but these findings could reflect a convolution of less accurate studies and longer stabilization periods for some products. Significant deviations for beginning-of-life measurements with respect to nameplate rating have been documented over the last 35 years. Therefore, degradation rates that use nameplate rating as reference may be significantly impacted. Studies that used nameplate rating as reference but used solar simulators showed less variation than similar studies using outdoor measurements, even when accounting for different climates. This could be associated with confounding effects of measurement uncertainty and soiling that take place outdoors. Hotter climates and mounting configurations that lead to sustained higher temperatures may lead to higher degradation in some, but not all, products. Wear-out non-linearities for the worst performing modules have been documented in a few select studies that took multiple measurements of an ensemble of modules during the lifetime of the system. However, the majority

  8. Selective and low temperature transition metal intercalation in layered tellurides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yajima, Takeshi; Koshiko, Masaki; Zhang, Yaoqing; Oguchi, Tamio; Yu, Wen; Kato, Daichi; Kobayashi, Yoji; Orikasa, Yuki; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Green, Mark A.; Kageyama, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    Layered materials embrace rich intercalation reactions to accommodate high concentrations of foreign species within their structures, and find many applications spanning from energy storage, ion exchange to secondary batteries. Light alkali metals are generally most easily intercalated due to their light mass, high charge/volume ratio and in many cases strong reducing properties. An evolving area of materials chemistry, however, is to capture metals selectively, which is of technological and environmental significance but rather unexplored. Here we show that the layered telluride T2PTe2 (T=Ti, Zr) displays exclusive insertion of transition metals (for example, Cd, Zn) as opposed to alkali cations, with tetrahedral coordination preference to tellurium. Interestingly, the intercalation reactions proceed in solid state and at surprisingly low temperatures (for example, 80 °C for cadmium in Ti2PTe2). The current method of controlling selectivity provides opportunities in the search for new materials for various applications that used to be possible only in a liquid.

  9. Damage in Monolithic Thin-Film Photovoltaic Modules Due to Partial Shade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silverman, Timothy J.; Mansfield, Lorelle; Repins, Ingrid; Kurtz, Sarah

    2016-09-01

    The typical configuration of monolithic thin-film photovoltaic modules makes it possible for partial shade to place one or more cells in such a module in reverse bias. Reverse bias operation leads to high voltage, current density, and power density conditions, which can act as driving forces for failure. We showed that a brief outdoor shadow event can cause a 7% permanent loss in power. We applied an indoor partial shade durability test that moves beyond the standard hot spot endurance test by using more realistic mask and bias conditions and by carefully quantifying the permanent change in performance due to the stress. With the addition of a pass criterion based on change in maximum power, this procedure will soon be proposed as a part of the module-type qualification test. All six commercial copper indium gallium diselenide and cadmium telluride modules we tested experienced permanent damage due to the indoor partial shade test, ranging from 4% to 14% loss in maximum power. We conclude by summarizing ways to mitigate partial shade stress at the cell, module, and system levels.

  10. NREL photovoltaic subcontract reports: Abstracts and document control information, 1 August 1992--31 July 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-09-01

    This report contains document control information and abstracts for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) program publications. It also lists source information on additional publications that describe US Department of Energy (DOE) PV research activities. It is not totally exhaustive, so it lists NREL contacts for requesting further information on the DOE and NREL PV programs. This report covers the period from August 1, 1992, through July 31, 1993. This report is published periodically, with the previous one covering the period from August 1, 1991, through July 31, 1992. The purpose of continuing this type of publication is to help keep people abreast of specific PV interests, while maintaining a balance on the costs to the PV program. The information in this report is organized under PV technology areas: Amorphous Silicon Research; Polycrystalline Thin Films (including copper indium diselenide, cadmium telluride, and thin-film silicon); Crystalline Materials and Advanced Concepts (including silicon, gallium arsenide, and other group III-V materials); PV Manufacturing Technology Development (which may include manufacturing information for various types of PV materials).

  11. MOCVD of thin film photovoltaic solar cells—Next-generation production technology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, S. J. C.; Barrioz, V.; Lamb, D.; Jones, E. W.; Rowlands-Jones, R. L.

    2008-11-01

    This paper will review the chalcogenide thin film photovoltaic (PV) solar cells, based on cadmium telluride (CdTe) and copper indium diselenide (CIS) and discuss the potential for metalorganic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD) to enable more advanced devices in the second generation of CdTe module production. The current generation of production methods is based on physical vapour deposition (PVD) or close-spaced sublimation (CSS). This paper concentrates on the less well-known topic of MOCVD of thin film chalcogenide cells, and in particular that of CdTe. Efficient CdTe PV solar cells (>10% AM1.5) have been demonstrated from deposition of the CdS, CdTe and CdCl 2 films in a single MOCVD chamber. The CdTe layer was doped with As and an additional high As concentration CdTe layer provides effective low resistance contacting without the need for wet etching the surface. The high level of flexibility in using MOCVD has been demonstrated where the CdS window layer has been alloyed with Zn to improve the blue response of the PV device and improve AM1.5 efficiency to 13.3%.

  12. Metastable Electrical Characteristics of Polycrystalline Thin-Film Photovoltaic Modules upon Exposure and Stabilization: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deline, C. A.; del Cueto, J. A.; Albin, D. S.; Rummel, S. R.

    2011-09-01

    The significant features of a series of stabilization experiments conducted at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) between May 2009 and the present are reported. These experiments evaluated a procedure to stabilize the measured performance of thin-film polycrystalline cadmium telluride (CdTe) and copper indium gallium diselenide (CIGS) thin-film photovoltaic (PV) modules. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of CdTe and CIGS thin-film PV devices and modules exhibit transitory changes in electrical performance after thermal exposure in the dark and/or bias and light exposures. We present the results of our case studies of module performance versus exposure: light-soaked at 65 degrees C; exposed in the dark under forward bias at 65 degrees C; and, finally, longer-term outdoor exposure. We find that stabilization can be achieved to varying degrees using either light-soaking or dark bias methods and that the existing IEC 61646 light-soaking interval may be appropriate for CdTe and CIGS modules with one caveat: it is likely that at least three exposure intervals are required for stabilization.

  13. Electronic-structure calculations of large cadmium chalcogenide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frenzel, Johannes [Lehrstuhl fuer Theoretische Chemie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum (Germany); Joswig, Jan-Ole [Physikalische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Dresden (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    In this paper, we will review our studies of large cadmium chalcogenide nanoparticles and present some new results on cadmium telluride systems. All calculations have been performed using density-functional based methods. The studies deal with the structural properties of saturated and unsaturated nanoparticles where the surfactants generally are hydrogen atoms or thiol groups. We have focused on the investigation of the density of states, the Mulliken charges, the eigenvalue spectra, and the spatial distributions of the frontier orbitals. Optical excitation spectra of pure CdS and CdSe/CdS core-shell systems have been calculated using a linear-response formalism. The reviewed studies are compared to the state of the art of modeling large cadmium chalcogenide particles. Optical excitations in large saturated cadmium chalcogenide nanoparticles with several thousand atoms. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. The Status and Outlook for the Photovoltaics Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, David

    2006-03-01

    The first silicon solar cell was made at Bell Labs in 1954, and over the following decades, shipments of photovoltaic (PV) modules increased at a rate of about 18% annually. In the last several years, the annual growth rate has increased to ˜ 35% due largely to government-supported programs in Japan and Germany. Silicon technology has dominated the PV industry since its inception, and in 2005 about 65% of all solar cells were made from polycrystalline (or multicrystalline) silicon, 24% from monocrystalline silicon and ˜ 4% from ribbon silicon. While conversion efficiencies as high as 24.7% have been obtained in the laboratory for silicon solar cells, the best efficiencies for commercial PV modules are in the range of 17 18% (the efficiency limit for a silicon solar cell is ˜ 29%). A number of companies are commercializing solar cells based on other materials such as amorphous silicon, microcrystalline silicon, cadmium telluride, copper-indium-gallium-diselenide (CIGS), gallium arsenide (and related compounds) and dye- sensitized titanium oxide. Thin film CIGS solar cells have been fabricated with conversion efficiencies as high as 19.5% while efficiencies as high as 39% have been demonstrated for a GaInP/Ga(In)As/Ge triple-junction cell operating at a concentration of 236 suns. Thin film solar cells are being used in consumer products and in some building-integrated applications, while PV concentrator systems are being tested in grid-connected arrays located in high solar insolation areas. Nonetheless, crystalline silicon PV technology is likely to dominate the terrestrial market for at least the next decade with module efficiencies > 20% and module prices of < 1/Wp expected by 2020, which in turn should allow significant penetration of the utility grid market. However, crystalline silicon solar cells may be challenged in the next decade or two by new low-cost, high performance devices based on organic materials and nanotechnology.

  15. Molecular modelling of some para-substituted aryl methyl telluride and diaryl telluride antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisell, H.; Engman, L.

    2000-08-01

    Quantum mechanical calculations using the 3-21G(d) basis-set were performed on some p-substituted diaryl tellurides and aryl methyl tellurides, and the corresponding cationic radicals of these compounds. Calculated relative radical stabilization energies (RSE:s) were shown to correlate with experimentally determined peak oxidation potentials ( R=0.93) and 125Te-NMR chemical shifts ( R=0.91). A good correlation was also observed between the RSE:s and the Mulliken charge at the tellurium atoms ( R=0.97). The results showed that Hartree-Fock calculations using the 3-21G(d) basis set was sufficiently accurate for estimating the impact of p-substituents in aryl tellurides on experimentally determined properties such as peak oxidation potentials and 125Te-NMR chemical shifts.

  16. Stability studies of cadmium telluride/cadmium sulfide thin film solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetali, Bhaskar Reddy

    CdTe/CdS solar cells have shown great potential for terrestrial solar power applications. To be commercially viable they need to operate efficiently for about 30 years. CdS/CdTe solar cells fabricated at USF have shown record efficiencies upto 16.5% [46]. This research involves the study of thermal stress (TS) and light soaking (LS) on the stability of high efficiency (>10%) solar cells. The change in key electrical parameters Voc, FF, J sc, A and Jo are quantified for more than 2000 hours of stressing. The device degradation was found to increase with stress temperature for TS. Below 100°C, the changes were due to collection and recombination losses. Above 100°C, "shunting" mechanisms were found to start affecting the device performance. A fast drop in performance within the first 500 hours was observed. It is believed to be due to an increase in deep-level Cu-related defects that increase with stress temperature. Diffusion of Cu i+ ions from the back contact along CdTe grain boundaries had been previously reported [16]. An increase in light/dark J-V crossover and bulk Rs with stress time and temperature was observed. A slow degradation component attributed to Cu-related substitutional defect [23] formation/diffusion to the junction and CdS is proposed. This should compensate the CdS over time and increase its photoconductivity/resistivity. An improvement in the current collection and FF within 100 hours of LS was observed. This is possibly due to the enhancement of Cui + diffusion into the junction and CdS during LS as previously reported [16]. A reduction in light/dark J-V crossover was observed, possibly due to an increase in CdS doping and reduction in the CdS/SnO2 front contact barrier. However, a fast decrease in Voc and increase in recombination current was also observed in the first 1000 hours of LS. This is possibly due to the existence of higher concentration of Cu-related deep level defects at the junction. A larger decrease in Voc was found for LS than TS at the same operating temperature. A continuous drop in performance over time is observed for both TS and LS. The existence of a slow degradation component involving the formation/diffusion of Cu-related substitutional defects at the junction and CdS is proposed. The concentration of this defect is probably not high enough in CdS for LS samples to affect their photoconductivity and cause light/dark J-V crossover in 2000 hours.

  17. Electro-Plating and Characterisation of CdTe Thin Films Using CdCl2 as the Cadmium Source

    OpenAIRE

    Nor A. Abdul-Manaf; Hussein I. Salim; Mohammad L. Madugu; Olajide I. Olusola; Imyhamy M. Dharmadasa

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin films have been successfully prepared from an aqueous electrolyte bath containing cadmium chloride (CdCl2)·H2O and tellurium dioxide (TeO2) using an electrodeposition technique. The structural, electrical, morphological and optical properties of these thin films have been characterised using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, optical profilometry, DC current-voltage (I-V) measurements, photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell measurement, scanning electron micr...

  18. Photovoltaic device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reese, Jason A; Keenihan, James R; Gaston, Ryan S; Kauffmann, Keith L; Langmaid, Joseph A; Lopez, Leonardo; Maak, Kevin D; Mills, Michael E; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R

    2017-03-21

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  19. Photovoltaic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-06-02

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  20. Photovoltaic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-09-01

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device (10) with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly (100) and a body portion (200) joined at an interface region (410) and including an intermediate layer (500), at least one interconnecting structural member (1500), relieving feature (2500), unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  1. Cadmium sulfide thin films deposited by close spaced sublimation and cadmium sulfide/cadmium telluride solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinskiy, Dmitriy Nikolaevich

    1998-12-01

    One of the applications of CdS films is as a window layer in CdTe and Cu(In,Ga)Sesb2 solar cells. The study of the optical and structural properties of CdS films deposited by close spaced sublimation as well as their influence on CdS/CdTe solar cell performance is part of the CdTe solar cell program at the University of South Florida. CdS films have been deposited by the close-spaced sublimation technique. The influence of the main process parameters, the substrate and source temperatures, and the ambient in the deposition chamber has been investigated. As-deposited films have been subjected to heat treatments in Hsb2 ambient, in CdClsb2 atmosphere, and in atmosphere with small amounts of oxygen. A special annealing chamber was built to carry out the annealing experiments in the presence of CdClsb2 vapor and oxygen. Several CSS chambers were assembled to study the influence of various process parameters simultaneously and validate the results. Results of scanning electron microscopy and photoluminescence measurements have been used as the primary characterization techniques. X-ray diffraction, electron microprobe analysis, and transmission measurements have also been carried out. It was found that as deposited CdS films have a hexagonal structure independent of the process parameters used. The presence of a CdO phase was detected in the samples grown with the highest oxygen concentration in the ambient. The resistivity of CdS films is controlled by intergrain barriers. Photoluminescence measurements showed the presence of oxygen-acceptor transition and a wide variation in the intensity of deep emission bands. The variation in the intensities was correlated with the variation in the deposition and annealing conditions. However, no correlation was found between the PL intensities of defect bands and cell performance. CdS/CdTe junctions have been fabricated using standard deposition and postgrowth techniques developed in the USF solar cells laboratory. All cells have been characterized by light and dark current-voltage (I-V) measurements. Based on the I-V results samples were selected for Quantum Efficiency (QE), and I-V-T measurements. The goal of this project was to understand what properties of CdS are important for the formation of a good electrical CdS/CdTe junction and high efficiency solar cells. It was found that passivation of the CdS/CdTe interface is essential to obtain efficient devices. The passivation can be achieved by promoting mixing at the interface or by performing a heat treatment of the CdS surface prior to the CdTe deposition. For the latter case no noticeable intermixing at the CdS/CdTe interface occurs. Therefore, it is suggested that the CdS/CdTe interface is the most critical part of the device and the condition of the CdS surface just before CdTe deposition is one of the factors controlling its formation. To date, the best device has shown an efficiency of 15.1% as verified at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. It is the highest efficiency reported for an all CSS fabricated solar cell. The best all CSS device fabricated on LOF glass substrate demonstrated an efficiency of 14.3%, which is a new record for the USF solar cell laboratory.

  2. Photovoltaic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duty, C.; Angelini, J.; Armstrong, B.; Bennett, C.; Evans, B.; Jellison, G. E.; Joshi, P.; List, F.; Paranthaman, P.; Parish, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2012-10-15

    cells and modules in the field for 25 years. Under this project, Ferro leveraged world leading analytical capabilities at ORNL to characterize the paste-to-silicon interface microstructure and develop high efficiency next generation contact pastes. Ampulse Corporation is developing a revolutionary crystalline-silicon (c-Si) thin-film solar photovoltaic (PV) technology. Utilizing uniquely-textured substrates and buffer materials from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and breakthroughs in Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HW-CVD) techniques in epitaxial silicon developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Ampulse is creating a solar technology that is tunable in silicon thickness, and hence in efficiency and economics, to meet the specific requirements of multiple solar PV applications. This project focused on the development of a high rate deposition process to deposit Si, Ge, and Si1-xGex films as an alternate to hot-wire CVD. Mossey Creek Solar is a start-up company with great expertise in the solar field. The primary interest is to create and preserve jobs in the solar sector by developing high-yield, low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells using MSC-patented and -proprietary technologies. The specific goal of this project was to produce large grain formation in thin, net-shape-thickness mc-Si wafers processed with high-purity silicon powder and ORNL's plasma arc lamp melting without introducing impurities that compromise absorption coefficient and carrier lifetime. As part of this project, ORNL also added specific pieces of equipment to enhance our ability to provide unique insight for the solar industry. These capabilities include a moisture barrier measurement system, a combined physical vapor deposition and sputtering system dedicated to cadmium-containing deposits, adeep level transient spectroscopy system useful for identifying defects, an integrating sphere photoluminescence system, and a high-speed ink jet printing system. These

  3. The single molecular precursor approach to metal telluride thin films: imino-bis(diisopropylphosphine tellurides) as examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritch, Jamie S; Chivers, Tristram; Afzaal, Mohammad; O'Brien, Paul

    2007-10-01

    Interest in metal telluride thin films as components in electronic devices has grown recently. This tutorial review describes the use of single-source precursors for the preparation of metal telluride materials by aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) and acquaints the reader with the basic techniques of materials characterization. The challenges in the design and synthesis of suitable precursors are discussed, focusing on metal complexes of the recently-developed imino-bis(diisopropylphosphine telluride) ligand. The generation of thin films and nanoplates of CdTe, Sb(2)Te(3) and In(2)Te(3) from these precursors are used as illustrative examples.

  4. Photovoltaic Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karolis Kiela

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with an overview of photovoltaic cells that are currently manufactured and those being developed, including one or several p-n junction, organic and dye-sensitized cells using quantum dots. The paper describes the advantages and disadvantages of various photovoltaic cells, identifies the main parameters, explains the main reasons for the losses that may occur in photovoltaic cells and looks at the ways to minimize them.Article in Lithuanian

  5. Growth mechanism and strain relaxation in zinc selenide and cadmium telluride/zinc telluride semiconductor thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hsiang-Yi

    The application of II--VI semiconductor devices such as blue-green light emitters (ZnSe-based materials) and HgCdTe infrared detectors are limited by the high density of defects and lack of large size substrates that are lattice matched and chemically compatible with the films. By growing a single thick buffer layer or a composite buffer structure of dissimilar materials can lead to a final top layer that is structurally and chemically compatible with the active layer of the device. Low defect density and flat surface morphology are the basic requirements for an applicable buffer layer. In this work, transmission electron microscopy is used to investigate the crystalline structure and defect generation mechanism in buffer layers for the growth of ZnSe-based and HgCdTe films. We investigate the interface chemistry, defect density, and growth mechanism of ZnSe films grown on GaAs substrates with different surface processing techniques. Undesirable high density of funnel defects (˜1010 cm-2) are always observed when the growth is performed on the epi-ready GaAs. We also observe that Sb can act as a surfactant and promote a truly layer-by-layer growth mode when the ZnSe film is grown on Sb-stabilized GaAs substrates. The defect density can be reduced to values as low as in the low 103 cm-2 range, which is the lowest defect density ever reported for ZnSe films. Moreover, the ZnSe surface exhibits a characteristic brick-like pattern for all of the substrate preparation methods used (except for Sb-stabilized GaAs) and the thickness of the ZnSe epilayers for films grown at ˜280--330°C. At a much higher growth temperature (410°C), a corrugated surface forms with high periodicity along the [110] direction. We propose a kinetics-limited surface roughness mechanism for the ZnSe films based on a competition of nucleation of 2D islands followed by step evolution. In the CdTe/ZnTe/Si epitaxial system, we investigated the influence of different surface precursors on the growth mechanism and defect density in the films. For As---precursor on the Si surface, Te adsorption on the terraces is inhibited and its migration to the step edges is enhanced. Therefore, the growth is expected to proceed in a step-flow growth mode. A strain relaxation mechanism including misfit dislocation generation, twin formation, and crystal tilt is proposed to account for the large lattice mismatch (f = 12.3%) in this system.

  6. Le Tellurure de Cadmium amorphe oxygéné a - CdTe:O Synthèse et étude de quelques propriétés physico-chimiques

    OpenAIRE

    El Azhari, Youssef

    2003-01-01

    The work presented in this thesis is part of the study of the properties of thin layers of semiconductor materials based on cadmium telluride CdTe. The study of the influence of various deposition parameters on the properties of CdTe thin films has enabled us to develop a method of preparing a new material based on CdTe. It is the oxygenated amorphous cadmium telluride aCddTe: O. The thin film deposition of CdTe a-O from a target polycrystalline CdTe requires the use of a plasma high oxidizin...

  7. Thin-film photovoltaic power generation offers decreasing greenhouse gas emissions and increasing environmental co-benefits in the long term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergesen, Joseph D; Heath, Garvin A; Gibon, Thomas; Suh, Sangwon

    2014-08-19

    Thin-film photovoltaic (PV) technologies have improved significantly recently, and similar improvements are projected into the future, warranting reevaluation of the environmental implications of PV to update and inform policy decisions. By conducting a hybrid life cycle assessment using the most recent manufacturing data and technology roadmaps, we compare present and projected environmental, human health, and natural resource implications of electricity generated from two common thin-film PV technologies-copper indium gallium selenide (CIGS) and cadmium telluride (CdTe)-in the United States (U.S.) to those of the current U.S. electricity mix. We evaluate how the impacts of thin films can be reduced by likely cost-reducing technological changes: (1) module efficiency increases, (2) module dematerialization, (3) changes in upstream energy and materials production, and (4) end-of-life recycling of balance of system (BOS). Results show comparable environmental and resource impacts for CdTe and CIGS. Compared to the U.S. electricity mix in 2010, both perform at least 90% better in 7 of 12 and at least 50% better in 3 of 12 impact categories, with comparable land use, and increased metal depletion unless BOS recycling is ensured. Technological changes, particularly efficiency increases, contribute to 35-80% reductions in all impacts by 2030.

  8. Photovoltaic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Roy G.; Kurtz, Sarah

    1984-11-27

    In a photovoltaic cell structure containing a visibly transparent, electrically conductive first layer of metal oxide, and a light-absorbing semiconductive photovoltaic second layer, the improvement comprising a thin layer of transition metal nitride, carbide or boride interposed between said first and second layers.

  9. Studies of antimony telluride and copper telluride films electrodeposition from choline chloride containing ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catrangiu, Adriana-Simona; Sin, Ion [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, POLITEHNICA University of Bucharest, Calea Grivitei 132, Bucharest (Romania); Prioteasa, Paula [INCDIE ICPE-Advanced Research, Splaiul Unirii 313, Bucharest (Romania); Cotarta, Adina [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, POLITEHNICA University of Bucharest, Calea Grivitei 132, Bucharest (Romania); Cojocaru, Anca, E-mail: a_cojocaru@chim.upb.ro [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, POLITEHNICA University of Bucharest, Calea Grivitei 132, Bucharest (Romania); Anicai, Liana [Center of Surface Science and Nanotechnology, University POLITEHNICA of Bucharest, Splaiul Independentei 313, Bucharest (Romania); Visan, Teodor [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry, POLITEHNICA University of Bucharest, Calea Grivitei 132, Bucharest (Romania)

    2016-07-29

    Cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy were used to investigate the deposition of antimony telluride or copper telluride from ionic liquid consisting in mixture of choline chloride with oxalic acid. In addition, the cathodic process during copper telluride formation was studied in the mixture of choline chloride with ethylene glycol. The results indicate that the Pt electrode is first covered with a Te layer, and then the more negative polarisation leads to the deposition of Sb{sub x}Te{sub y} or Cu{sub x}Te{sub y} semiconductor compounds. Thin films were deposited on copper and carbon steel at 60–70 °C and were characterised by scanning electron microscopy, energy X-ray dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). Their stoichiometry depends on the bath composition and applied potential. EDS and XRD patterns indicate the possible synthesis of stoichiometric Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} phase and Cu{sub 2}Te, Cu{sub 5}Te{sub 3}, and Cu{sub 2.8}Te{sub 2} phases, respectively, by controlling the ratio of ion concentrations in ionic liquid electrolytes and deposition potential. - Highlights: • Sb{sub x}Te{sub y} and Cu{sub x}Te{sub y} films electrodeposited from choline-chloride-based ionic liquids. • The stoichiometry of film depends on the bath composition and deposition potential. • Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Cu{sub 2}Te, Cu{sub 5}Te{sub 3}, Cu{sub 2.8}Te{sub 2} phases were identified in X-ray diffraction patterns.

  10. Photovoltaic device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell module including a plurality of serially connected photovoltaic cells on a common substrate, each including a first electrode, a printed light-harvesting layer and a printed second electrode, wherein at least one of the electrodes is transparent, and wherein the second electrode...... of a first cell is printed such that it forms an electrical contact with the first electrode of an adjacent second cell without forming an electrical contact with the first electrode of the first cell or the light-harvesting layer of the second cell, and a method of making such photovoltaic cell modules....

  11. NCPV preprints for the 2. world conference on photovoltaic solar energy conversion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-09-01

    The proceedings contain 26 papers arranged under the following topical sections: Silicon (3 papers); Thin-film PV technologies (11 papers): amorphous silicon, cadmium telluride, copper indium diselenide, and high efficiency devices; Module and BOS manufacturing (2 papers); Cell, module, and system testing (7 papers); and Market development (3 papers). Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  12. Photovoltaic Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duty, C.; Angelini, J.; Armstrong, B.; Bennett, C.; Evans, B.; Jellison, G. E.; Joshi, P.; List, F.; Paranthaman, P.; Parish, C.; Wereszczak, A.

    2012-10-15

    cells and modules in the field for 25 years. Under this project, Ferro leveraged world leading analytical capabilities at ORNL to characterize the paste-to-silicon interface microstructure and develop high efficiency next generation contact pastes. Ampulse Corporation is developing a revolutionary crystalline-silicon (c-Si) thin-film solar photovoltaic (PV) technology. Utilizing uniquely-textured substrates and buffer materials from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), and breakthroughs in Hot-Wire Chemical Vapor Deposition (HW-CVD) techniques in epitaxial silicon developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Ampulse is creating a solar technology that is tunable in silicon thickness, and hence in efficiency and economics, to meet the specific requirements of multiple solar PV applications. This project focused on the development of a high rate deposition process to deposit Si, Ge, and Si1-xGex films as an alternate to hot-wire CVD. Mossey Creek Solar is a start-up company with great expertise in the solar field. The primary interest is to create and preserve jobs in the solar sector by developing high-yield, low-cost, high-efficiency solar cells using MSC-patented and -proprietary technologies. The specific goal of this project was to produce large grain formation in thin, net-shape-thickness mc-Si wafers processed with high-purity silicon powder and ORNL's plasma arc lamp melting without introducing impurities that compromise absorption coefficient and carrier lifetime. As part of this project, ORNL also added specific pieces of equipment to enhance our ability to provide unique insight for the solar industry. These capabilities include a moisture barrier measurement system, a combined physical vapor deposition and sputtering system dedicated to cadmium-containing deposits, adeep level transient spectroscopy system useful for identifying defects, an integrating sphere photoluminescence system, and a high-speed ink jet printing system. These

  13. Photovoltaic technologies

    OpenAIRE

    Bagnall, Darren M.; Boreland, Matt

    2008-01-01

    Photovoltaics is already a billion dollar industry. It is experiencing rapid growth as concerns over fuel supplies and carbon emissions mean that governments and individuals are increasingly prepared to ignore its current high costs. It will become truly mainstream when its costs are comparable to other energy sources. At the moment, it is around four times too expensive for competitive commercial production. Three generations of photovoltaics have been envisaged that will take solar power in...

  14. High-temperature thermoelectric behavior of lead telluride

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M P Singh; C M Bhandari

    2004-06-01

    Usefulness of a material in thermoelectric devices is temperature specific. The central problem in thermoelectric material research is the selection of materials with high figure-of-merit in the given temperature range of operation. It is of considerable interest to know the utility range of the material, which is decided by the degrading effect of minority carrier conduction. Lead telluride is among the best-known materials for use in the temperature range 400—900 K. This paper presents a detailed theoretical investigation of the role of minority carriers in degrading the thermoelectric properties of lead telluride and outlines the temperature range for optimal performance.

  15. Unconventional temperature enhanced magnetism in iron telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zalinznyak, I. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Xu, Zhijun [ORNL; Tranquada, John M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Gu, G. D. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Tsvelik, A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Stone, Matthew B [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Discoveries of copper and iron-based high-temperature superconductors (HTSC)1-2 have challenged our views of superconductivity and magnetism. Contrary to the pre-existing view that magnetism, which typically involves localized electrons, and superconductivity, which requires freely-propagating itinerant electrons, are mutually exclusive, antiferromagnetic phases were found in all HTSC parent materials3,4. Moreover, highly energetic magnetic fluctuations, discovered in HTSC by inelastic neutron scattering (INS) 5,6, are now widely believed to be vital for the superconductivity 7-10. In two competing scenarios, they either originate from local atomic spins11, or are a property of cooperative spin-density-wave (SDW) behavior of conduction electrons 12,13. Both assume clear partition into localized electrons, giving rise to local spins, and itinerant ones, occupying well-defined, rigid conduction bands. Here, by performing an INS study of spin dynamics in iron telluride, a parent material of one of the iron-based HTSC families, we have discovered that this very assumption fails, and that conduction and localized electrons are fundamentally entangled. In the temperature range relevant for the superconductivity we observe a remarkable redistribution of magnetism between the two groups of electrons. The effective spin per Fe at T 10 K, in the2 antiferromagnetic phase, corresponds to S 1, consistent with the recent analyses that emphasize importance of Hund s intra-atomic exchange15-16. However, it grows to S 3/2 in the disordered phase, a result that profoundly challenges the picture of rigid bands, broadly accepted for HTSC.

  16. Applied photovoltaics

    CERN Document Server

    Wenham, Stuart R; Watt, Muriel E; Corkish, Richard; Sproul, Alistair

    2013-01-01

    The new edition of this thoroughly considered textbook provides a reliable, accessible and comprehensive guide for students of photovoltaic applications and renewable energy engineering. Written by a group of award-winning authors it is brimming with information and is carefully designed to meet the needs of its readers. Along with exercises and references at the end of each chapter, it features a set of detailed technical appendices that provide essential equations, data sources and standards. The new edition has been fully updated with the latest information on photovoltaic cells,

  17. Phase transition of bismuth telluride thin films grown by MBE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fülöp, Attila; Song, Yuxin; Charpentier, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    A previously unreported phase transition between Bi2Te3 and Bi4Te3 in bismuth telluride grown by molecular beam epitaxy is recorded via XRD, AFM, and SIMS observations. This transition is found to be related to the Te/Bi beam equivalent pressure (BEP) ratio. BEP ratios below 17 favor the formation...

  18. Cadmium and zinc relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elinder, C G; Piscator, M

    1978-08-01

    Cadmium and zinc concentrations in kidney and liver have been measured under different exposure situations in different species including man. The results show that zinc increases almost equimolarly with cadmium in kidney after long-term low-level exposure to cadmium, e.g., in man, horse, pig, and lamb. In contrast, the increase of zinc follows that of cadmium to only a limited extent, e.g., in guinea pig, rabbit, rat, mouse, and chicks. In liver, the cadmium--zinc relationship seems to be reversed in such a way that zinc increases with cadmium more markedly in laboratory animals than in higher mammals. These differences between cadmium and zinc relationships in humans and large farm animals and those in commonly used laboratory animals must be considered carefully before experimental data on cadmium and zinc relationships in laboratory animals can be extrapolated to humans.

  19. Organic photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demming, Anna; Krebs, Frederik C; Chen, Hongzheng

    2013-01-01

    spectrum as possible can be converted into an electrical current', explains Mukundan Thelakkat and colleagues in Germany, the US and UK. In this special issue they report on how charge carrier mobility and morphology of the active blend layer in thin film organic solar cells correlate with device...... parameters [2]. The work contributes to a better understanding of the solar-cell characteristics of polymer:fullerene blends, which form the material basis for some of the most successful solution processable organic photovoltaic devices at present. Andrey E Rudenko, Sangtaik Noh, and Barry C Thompson...... Z and Wang L 2013 Fine tuning of the PCDTBT-OR:PC71BM blend nanoscale phase separation via selective solvent annealing toward high-performance polymer photovoltaics Nanotechnology 24 484004 [6] Arar M et al 2013 Influence of morphology and polymer:nanoparticle ratio on device performance of hybrid...

  20. Impact of back-contact materials on performance and stability of cadmium sulfide/cadmium telluride solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demtsu, Samuel H.

    Thin-film CdTe based solar cells are one of the leading contenders for providing lowcost and pollution-free energy, The formation of a stable, low resistance, non-rectifying contact to p-CdTe thin-film is one of the major and critical challenges associated with this technology in the fabrication of efficient and stable solar cells. The premise of this thesis is a systematic study of the impact of back-contact materials on the initial performance and the degradation of CdS/CdTe solar cells. Two different back-contact structures that incorporate Cu as a key element are investigated in this study: (a) Cu1.4Te:HgTe-doped graphite and (b) evaporated-Cu back contacts. The effect of Cu inclusion is not limited to the back-contact layer where it is deposited. Cu is a known fast diffuser in p-CdTe, and therefore, a significant amount of Cu reaches both the CdTe and US layers. Hence, the effect of the presence of Cu on the individual layers: back-contact, the absorber (CdTe), and the window (CdS) layers is discussed respectively. The effect of different metals used to form the current-carrying electrode following the Cu layer is also evaluated. Devices are studied through current-voltage (JV) measurements at different temperatures and intensities, quantum efficiency (QE) measurements under light and voltage bias, capacitance-voltage (CV), drive-level-capacitance-profiling (DLCP), and time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) measurements. Numerical simulation is also used to reproduce and explain some of the experimental results. In devices made without Cu, a current-limiting effect, rollover (distortion) in the current-voltage characteristic, was observed. With the inclusion of a small amount of Cu (5-nm), however, the distortion disappeared, and higher FF was obtained. The performance of these devices was comparable to devices made with the standard Cu-doped graphite paste contacts when the same CdTe absorber is used. Small amount of Cu (5-20 nm) partially diffused into the CdTe absorber layer resulted in increased hole density, and improved Vo. However, excess Cu (100 nm) created recombination centers that significantly reduced the FF and Voc. The presence of Cu in the CdS window layer had minimal effect on device performance. It was found, however, to be responsible for anomalies such as dark/light crossover and distortions in apparent quantum efficiency, neither of which has a direct impact on the device performance. Numerous metals: Au; Cr, Pd, Pt, and Ni were evaporated, following the Cu layer, and were found to form good current-carrying electrodes. Ag and Al, however, did not perform well in this role. With exposure to elevated temperature (60-120°C) for extended period of time, diffusion of Cu from the back contact was found to cause back-contact degradation and additional increases in CdTe recombination. This degradation resulted in a reduced fill factor, due to the formation of the Cu-depleted blocking contact and the consequent reduction in collection efficiency.

  1. Photovoltaic Wire Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Small Business Innovation Research Phase I project will investigate a new architecture for photovoltaic devices based on nanotechnology: photovoltaic wire. The...

  2. Roof Photovoltaic Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — In order to accurately predict the annual energy production of photovoltaic systems for any given geographical location, building orientation, and photovoltaic cell...

  3. Kelvin Probe Studies of Cesium Telluride Photocathode for AWA Photoinjector

    CERN Document Server

    Wisniewski, Eric; Yusof, Zikri; Spentzouris, Linda; Terry, Jeff; Harkay, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Cesium telluride is an important photocathode as an electron source for particle accelerators. It has a relatively high quantum efficiency (>1%), is sufficiently robust in a photoinjector, and has a long lifetime. This photocathode is grown in-house for a new Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) beamline to produce high charge per bunch (~50 nC) in a long bunch train. Here, we present a study of the work function of cesium telluride photocathode using the Kelvin Probe technique. The study includes an investigation of the correlation between the quantum efficiency and the work function, the effect of photocathode aging, the effect of UV exposure on the work function, and the evolution of the work function during and after photocathode rejuvenation via heating.

  4. Studies of the grain boundary effect in electrodeposited cadmium telluride films from optical measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, J.; Bhattacharyva, D.; Maiti, A.B.; Chaudhuri, S.; Pal, A.K. (Indian Association for the Cultivation of Science, Calcutta (India). Dept. of Materials Science)

    1995-01-01

    Polycrystalline CdTe films were deposited onto SnO[sub 2] coated glass substrates using electrodeposition with different deposition potentials, ranging from -670 to -725 mV, with respect to a saturated calomel electrode (SCE). The grain boundary potential (E[sub b]), the density of trap states at the intercrystalline boundary (Q[sub t]) and the carrier concentration (p) in the films were obtained. The surface roughness ([sigma][sub o]) of the films was determined by utilising reflectance measurements while the band gap ([approx] 1.49 eV) was determined from transmittance vs wavelength traces. The barrier height was found to increase from 0.23 eV to 0.25 eV with the variation of the deposition potential from -675 to -725 mV; while the corresponding variation in the density of trap states at the grain boundary region was 1.0 x 10[sup 12]-2.1x10[sup 12]. The carrier concentration was obtained from experimental values of the Debye length, determined from the optical transmittance measurements. (Author)

  5. An ultrasensitive method for the determination of melamine using cadmium telluride quantum dots as fluorescence probes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Xiafei; Li, Jin; Kuang, Huiyan; Feng, Lei; Yi, Shoujun; Xia, Xiaodong; Huang, Haowen [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry and Molecular Simulation of Ministry of Education of China, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Chen, Yong; Tang, Chunran [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Zeng, Yunlong, E-mail: yunlongzeng1955@126.com [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry and Molecular Simulation of Ministry of Education of China, Hunan University of Science and Technology, Xiangtan 411201 (China); State Key Laboratory for Chemo/Biosensing and Chemometrics, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2013-11-13

    Graphical abstract: Melamine takes place of the TGA on the surface of TGA-CdTe QDs with negative charge to form melamine coated QDs changing the surface charge of the QDs, resulting the fluorescence quenched as the QDs aggregation occurred by electrostatic attraction of the two opposite charged nanocrystals. -- Highlights: •An ultrasensitive and selective method for the determination of melamine was developed at pH 11.0. •The selectivity of the method was improved. •The sensitivity of the method enhanced obviously as the CdTe QDs have higher QYs at pH 11. •The sensitivity and linear range for the analysis are size dependent using QDs PL probes. •Melamine takes the place of TGA resulting fluorescence quenched of QDs. -- Abstract: An ultrasensitive and simple method for the determination of melamine was developed based on the fluorescence quenching of thioglycolic acid (TGA) capped CdTe quantum dots (QDs) at pH 11.0. In strong alkaline aqueous solution, the selectivity of the method has been greatly improved due to most heavy metal ions show no interference as they are in the precipitation form or in their anion form. Furthermore, CdTe quantum dots have higher quantum yields at higher pH. The method has a wider concentration range and lower detection limit. The influence factors on the determination of melamine were investigated and the optimum conditions were determined. Under optimum conditions, the fluorescence intensity change of TGA coated CdTe quantum dots was linearly proportional to melamine over a concentration range from 1.0 × 10{sup −11} to 1.0 × 10{sup −5} mol L{sup −1} with a correlation coefficient of 0.9943 and a detection limit of 5 × 10{sup −12} mol L{sup −1}. The mechanism of fluorescence quenching of the QDs has been proposed based on the infrared spectroscopy information and electrophoresis experiments in presence of melamine under alkaline condition. The proposed method was employed to detect trace melamine in milk powder and pet feeds with satisfactory results.

  6. High-efficiency cadmium and zinc-telluride-based thin-film solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohatgi, A.; Sudharsanan, R.; Ringel, S. (Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States))

    1992-02-01

    This report describes research into polycrystalline CdTe solar cells grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Efficiencies of {approximately}10% were achieved using both p-i-n and p-n structures. A pre-heat treatment of CdS/SnO{sub 2}/glass substrates at 450{degrees}C in hydrogen atmosphere prior to the CdTe growth was found to be essential for high performance because this heat treatment reduces oxygen-related defects from the CdS surface. However, this treatment also resulted in a Cd-deficient CdS surface, which may in part limit the CdTe cell efficiency to 10% due to Cd vacancy-related interface defects. Preliminary model calculations suggest that removing these states can increase the cell efficiency from 10% to 13.5%. Photon absorption in the CdS film also limits the cell performance, and eliminating this loss mechanism can result in CdTe efficiencies in excess of 18%. Polycrystalline, 1.7-e, CdZnTe films were also grown for tandem-cell applications. CdZnTe/CdS cells processed using the standard CdTe cell fabrication procedure resulted in 4.4% efficiency, high series resistance, and a band-gap shift to 1.55 eV. The formation of Zn-O at and near the CdZnTe surface is the source of high contact resistance. A saturated dichromate each prior to contact deposition was found to solve the contact resistance problem. The CdCl{sub 2} treatment was identified as the cause of the observed band-gap shift due to the preferred formation of ZnCl{sub 2}. 59 refs.

  7. Temperature-dependent adsorption of tellurium and mercury species on cadmium telluride studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badano, Giacomo

    In this study, a subsonic molecular beam of Hg was directed on CdTe surfaces and the absorption spectra were measured for the first time by ellipsometry. We analyze the optical spectra of Hg adsorbed on CdTe surfaces, over the range 1.6--4.5 eV, for a variety of temperatures and Hg fluxes. When a CdTe(211)B surface is subjected to a Hg flux, various effects can occur. Hg will be present on and just beneath the surface in a variety of forms: chemisorbed on the Te sites or on excess Te (forming a 2D surface, 1D chains or isolated atoms or clusters), physisorbed as a 2D liquid, or diffused into the CdTe bulk. In our analysis of the change in the pseudo dielectric function, we made several approximations. We treated the different constituents as separate layers, which is strictly speaking not true, because the various Hg forms are probably mixed. Second, we used the 3D form of the Hg1- xCdxTe e(□; x) dielectric function to mimic chemisorbed Hg on the surface. Also, we used a Drude function to model the presence of physisorbed Hg, although that is probably a good approximation. Third, we fit only the imaginary part of the dielectric function, , because it has a more direct physical meaning, and unlike the real part does not depend on the presence of out-of-range critical points. In addition, the limited resolution of the M88 ellipsometer prevented us from using a critical point analysis to interpret the data. These limitations notwithstanding, our analysis gives surprisingly good results, in that it reproduces the expected dependence of the thickness of the chemisorbed and physisorbed components correctly as a function of temperature and pressure and gives reasonable values for the composition of the Hg1-xCd xTe. Although we do not at present believe the absolute numbers that the analysis provides, we believe that this approach confirms our general ideas regarding the nature of the CdTe(211) surface under Hg, and is valuable at least technologically, to obtain a reliable run-to-run characterization of the surface before growth.

  8. Non-Uniformities in Thin-Film Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells Using Electroluminescence and Photoluminescence: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaunbrecher, K.; Johnston, S.; Yan, F.; Sites, J.

    2011-07-01

    It is the purpose of this research to develop specific imaging techniques that have the potential to be fast, in-line tools for quality control in thin-film CdTe solar cells. Electroluminescence (EL) and photoluminescence (PL) are two techniques that are currently under investigation on CdTe small area devices made at Colorado State University. It is our hope to significantly advance the understanding of EL and PL measurements as applied to CdTe. Qualitative analysis of defects and non-uniformities is underway on CdTe using EL, PL, and other imaging techniques.

  9. Characterization of metal contacts on and surfaces of cadmium zinc telluride

    CERN Document Server

    Bürger, A; Chattopadhyay, K; Shi, D; Morgan, S H; Collins, W E; James, R B

    1999-01-01

    In the past several years significant progress has been made in building a database of physical properties for detector quality Cd sub x Zn sub 1 sub - sub x Te (CZT) (x=0.1-0.2) crystal material. CZT's high efficiency combined with its room temperature operation make the material an excellent choice for imaging and spectroscopy in the 10-200 keV energy range. For detector grade material, superior crystallinity and high bulk resistivity are required. The surface preparation during the detector fabrication plays a vital role in determining the contact characteristics and the surface leakage current, which are often the dominant factors influencing its performance. This paper presents a surface and contact characterization study aimed at establishing the effects of the surface preparation steps prior to contacting (polishing and chemical etching), the choice of the metal and contact deposition technique, and the surface oxidation process. A photoconductivity mapping technique is used for studying the effects of...

  10. Modeling effects of solute concentration in Bridgman growth of cadmium zinc telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelian, Carmen; Duffar, Thierry

    2016-07-01

    Numerical modeling is used to investigate the effect of solute concentration on the melt convection and interface shape in Bridgman growth of Cd1-x Znx Te (CZT). The numerical analysis is compared to experimental growth in cylindrical ampoules having a conical tip performed by Komar et al. (2001) [15]. In these experiments, the solidification process occurs at slow growth rate (V = 2 ṡ10-7 m / s) in a thermal field characterized by a vertical gradient GT = 20 K / cm at the growth interface. The computations performed by accounting the solutal effect show a progressive damping of the melt convection due to the depleted Zn at the growth interface. The computed shape of the crystallization front is in agreement with the experimental measurement showing a convex-concave shape for the growth through the conical part of the ampoule and a concave shape of the interface in the cylindrical region. The distribution of Zn is nearly uniform over the crystal length except for the end part of the ingots. The anomalous zinc segregation observed in some experiments is explained by introducing the hypothesis of incomplete charge mixing during the homogenization time which precedes the growth process. When the crystallization is started in ampoules having a very sharp conical tip, the heavy CdTe is accumulated at the bottom part of the melt, giving rise to anomalous segregation patterns, featuring very low zinc concentration in the ingots during the first stage of the solidification.

  11. Next Generation Semiconductor-Based Radiation Detectors Using Cadmium Magnesium Telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trivedi, Sudhir B [Brimrose Technology Corporation, Sparks Glencoe, MD (United States); Kutcher, Susan W [Brimrose Technology Corporation, Sparks Glencoe, MD (United States); Palsoz, Witold [Brimrose Technology Corporation, Sparks Glencoe, MD (United States); Berding, Martha [SRI International, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Burger, Arnold [Brimrose Technology Corporation, Sparks Glencoe, MD (United States)

    2014-11-17

    The primary objective of Phase I was to perform extensive studies on the purification, crystal growth and annealing procedures of CdMgTe to gain a clear understanding of the basic material properties to enable production of detector material with performance comparable to that of CdZnTe. Brimrose utilized prior experience in the growth and processing of II-VI crystals and produced high purity material and good quality single crystals of CdMgTe. Processing techniques for these crystals including annealing, mechanical and chemical polishing, surface passivation and electrode fabrication were developed. Techniques to characterize pertinent electronic characteristics were developed and gamma ray detectors were fabricated. Feasibility of the development of comprehensive defect modeling in this new class of material was demonstrated by our partner research institute SRI International, to compliment the experimental work. We successfully produced a CdMgTe detector that showed 662 keV gamma response with energy resolution of 3.4% (FWHM) at room temperature, without any additional signal correction. These results are comparable to existing CdZnTe (CZT) technology using the same detector size and testing conditions. We have successfully demonstrated detection of gamma-radiation from various isotopes/sources, using CdMgTe thus clearly proving the feasibility that CdMgTe is an excellent, low-cost alternative to CdZnTe.

  12. Space processing of electronic materials. [determining ther themal conductivity of mercury cadmium tellurides and furnace design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, G. L.; Holland, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    The relative values of thermal conductivity of solid and liquid HgCdTe are critically important in the design configuration of the furnaces used for Bridgman crystal growth. The thermal diffusivity of the material is closely linked to the conductivity by the defining relation D = k/rho c, where D is the diffusivity, K is the thermal conductivity, rho is the density, and c is the specific heat. The use of transient and periodic heating approaches to measure the diffusivity are explored. A system for securing and extracting heat from silica or glass tubes under high C vacuum conditions is described.

  13. Nature of AX centers in antimony-doped cadmium telluride nanobelts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Liubing; Lin, Chien-Chih; Riediger, Max; Röder, Robert; Tse, Pok Lam; Ronning, Carsten; Lu, Jia Grace

    2015-02-11

    Single crystalline p-type CdTe:Sb nanobelts were fabricated using an Au-catalyzed chemical vapor deposition method. Low carrier concentration and low mobility even at high Sb incorporation manifest compensation in the system. From cross examination of temperature-dependent charge transport and photoluminescence measurements, two major acceptor levels induced by Sb doping are determined: a shallow level attributed to substitutional Sb dopants without lattice relaxation and an associated deeper level resulted from large lattice relaxation-AX centers. Persistent photoconductivity and hysteresis photoconductance under the thermal cycle elucidate the nature of AX centers. This comprehensive investigation of the impurity levels in the material system is essential for the design and development of nanoelectronic devices based on the CdTe nanostructures.

  14. Prognostic evaluation in obese patients using a dedicated multipinhole cadmium-zinc telluride SPECT camera.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, Andrea; Peclat, Thais; Amaral, Ana Carolina; Lima, Ronaldo S L

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the prognostic value of myocardial perfusion SPECT obtained in CZT cameras (CZT-SPECT) with multipinhole collimation in obese patients. CZT-SPECT may be technically challenging in the obese, and its prognostic value remains largely unknown. Patients underwent single-day, rest/stress (supine and prone) imaging. Images were visually inspected and graded as poor, fair or good/excellent. Summed stress and difference scores (SSS and SDS, respectively) were converted into percentages of total perfusion defect and of ischemic defect by division by the maximum possible score. Obesity was defined as a body mass index (BMI) ≥ 30 kg/m(2) and classified as class I (BMI 30-34.9 kg/m(2)), II (BMI 35-39.9 kg/m(2)), or III (BMI ≥ 40 kg/m(2)). Patients were followed-up by telephone interview for the occurrence of all-cause death, myocardial infarction or revascularization. A Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to assess the independent predictors of death. Among 1396 patients, 365 (26.1 %) were obese (mean BMI 33.9 ± 3.6; 17.5 % class I, 3.4 % class II, and 3.4 % class III). Image quality was good/excellent in 94.5 % of the obese patients. The annualized mortality rates were not significantly different among obese and non-obese patients, being obese and non-obese patients. Age, the use of pharmacologic stress and an abnormal CZT-SPECT, but not obesity, were independent predictors of death. In obese patients, single-day rest/stress CZT-SPECT with a multipinhole camera provides prognostic discrimination with high image quality.

  15. Properties of RF sputtered cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin films: Influence of deposition pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, R. R.; Pawbake, A. S.; Waykar, R. G.; Rondiya, S. R.; Jadhavar, A. A.; Pandharkar, S. M.; Karpe, S. D.; Diwate, K. D.; Jadkar, S. R.

    2016-04-01

    Influence of deposition pressure on structural, morphology, electrical and optical properties of CdTe thin films deposited at low substrate temperature (100°C) by RF magnetron sputtering was investigated. The formation of CdTe was confirmed by low angle XRD and Raman spectroscopy. The low angle XRD analysis revealed that the CdTe films have zinc blende (cubic) structure with crystallites having preferred orientation in (111) direction. Raman spectra show the longitudinal optical (LO) phonon mode peak ˜ 165.4 cm-1 suggesting high quality CdTe film were obtained over the entire range of deposition pressure studied. Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that films are smooth, homogenous, and crack-free with no evidence of voids. The EDAX data revealed that CdTe films deposited at low deposition pressure are high-quality stoichiometric. However, for all deposition pressures, films are rich in Cd relative to Te. The UV-Visible spectroscopy analysis show the blue shift in absorption edge with increasing the deposition pressure while the band gap show decreasing trend. The highest electrical conductivity was obtained for the film deposited at deposition pressure 1 Pa which indicates that the optimized deposition pressure for our sputtering unit is 1 Pa. Based on the experimental results, these CdTe films can be useful for the application in the flexible solar cells and other opto-electronic devices.

  16. Research of oxidation processes of a cadmium telluride film surface by ellipsometric method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabashta, Lubov A.; Opanasyuk, A. S.; Kharchenko, V. I.

    1997-04-01

    Kinetics of formation of an oxide on the CdTe surface was investigated during a sample exposition in air at temperatures Th equals 20 degrees C, 260 degrees C, 340 degrees C, 420 degrees C, for 200 hours. For nonoxide CdTe surface the following values of optical constants ns equals 2.6 and ks equals 0.6 are received. At a exposition of samples at room temperature a refractive index of an oxide film changed from nf equals 1.7 at initial stages of growth up to nf equals 2.37 after 200 hours oxidation. At all stages of oxidation process the monotone reduction of a refractive index of oxide layers at an increase of heating temperature is found out. During natural oxidation oxide layer thickness reaches 1.8 nm in the course of 20 hours. Hereafter oxide formation speed decreases that results in stabilization of its thickness. It is shown that the growth of the oxide phase is descried with the parabolic law and is checked with diffusion processes. To determine the energy of oxidation process activation the charts of dependence of logarithm of oxide film thickness upon inverse temperature at constant oxidation time were built. The presence of two areas of heating temperatures with different energy of oxidation process activation is established. The parameters of kinetic equation are determined which describe oxide film growth in low temperature and high temperature fields.

  17. Analysis of the traveling heater method for the growth of cadmium telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Jeffrey H.; Fiederle, Michael; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2016-11-01

    We discuss the development and implementation of a comprehensive mathematical model for the traveling heater method (THM) that is formulated to realistically represent the interactions of heat and species transport, fluid flow, and interfacial dissolution and growth under conditions of local thermodynamic equilibrium and steady-state growth. We examine the complicated interactions among zone geometry, continuum transport, phase change, and fluid flow driven by buoyancy. Of particular interest and importance is the formation of flow structures in the liquid zone of the THM that arise from the same physical mechanism as lee waves in atmospheric flows and demonstrate the same characteristic Brunt-Väisälä scaling. We show that flow stagnation and reversal associated with lee-wave formation are responsible for the accumulation of tellurium and supercooled liquid near the growth interface, even when the lee-wave vortex is not readily apparent in the overall flow structure. The supercooled fluid is posited to result in morphological instability at growth rates far below the limit predicted by the classical criterion by Tiller et al. for constitutional supercooling.

  18. Imaging properties of small-pixel spectroscopic x-ray detectors based on cadmium telluride sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Thomas; Schulze, Julia; Zuber, Marcus; Rink, Kristian; Butzer, Jochen; Hamann, Elias; Cecilia, Angelica; Zwerger, Andreas; Fauler, Alex; Fiederle, Michael; Oelfke, Uwe

    2012-11-07

    Spectroscopic x-ray imaging by means of photon counting detectors has received growing interest during the past years. Critical to the image quality of such devices is their pixel pitch and the sensor material employed. This paper describes the imaging properties of Medipix2 MXR multi-chip assemblies bump bonded to 1 mm thick CdTe sensors. Two systems were investigated with pixel pitches of 110 and 165 μm, which are in the order of the mean free path lengths of the characteristic x-rays produced in their sensors. Peak widths were found to be almost constant across the energy range of 10 to 60 keV, with values of 2.3 and 2.2 keV (FWHM) for the two pixel pitches. The average number of pixels responding to a single incoming photon are about 1.85 and 1.45 at 60 keV, amounting to detective quantum efficiencies of 0.77 and 0.84 at a spatial frequency of zero. Energy selective CT acquisitions are presented, and the two pixel pitches' abilities to discriminate between iodine and gadolinium contrast agents are examined. It is shown that the choice of the pixel pitch translates into a minimum contrast agent concentration for which material discrimination is still possible. We finally investigate saturation effects at high x-ray fluxes and conclude with the finding that higher maximum count rates come at the cost of a reduced energy resolution.

  19. Thin film cadmium telluride charged particle sensors for large area neutron detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, J. W.; Smith, L.; Calkins, J.; Mejia, I.; Cantley, K. D.; Chapman, R. A.; Quevedo-Lopez, M.; Gnade, B., E-mail: gnade@utdallas.edu [Materials Science and Engineering, University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson, Texas 75080 (United States); Kunnen, G. R.; Allee, D. R. [Flexible Display Center, Arizona State University, Phoenix, Arizona 85284 (United States); Sastré-Hernández, J.; Contreras-Puente, G. [Escuela Superior de Física y Matemáticas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Mexico City 07738 (Mexico); Mendoza-Pérez, R. [Universidad Autónoma de la Ciudad de México, Mexico City 09790 (Mexico)

    2014-09-15

    Thin film semiconductor neutron detectors are an attractive candidate to replace {sup 3}He neutron detectors, due to the possibility of low cost manufacturing and the potential for large areas. Polycrystalline CdTe is found to be an excellent material for thin film charged particle detectors—an integral component of a thin film neutron detector. The devices presented here are characterized in terms of their response to alpha and gamma radiation. Individual alpha particles are detected with an intrinsic efficiency of >80%, while the devices are largely insensitive to gamma rays, which is desirable so that the detector does not give false positive counts from gamma rays. The capacitance-voltage behavior of the devices is studied and correlated to the response due to alpha radiation. When coupled with a boron-based neutron converting material, the CdTe detectors are capable of detecting thermal neutrons.

  20. Femtosecond optical characterization and applications in cadmium(manganese) telluride diluted magnetic semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Daozhi

    This thesis is devoted to the optical characterization of Cd(Mn)Te single crystals. I present the studies of free-carrier dynamics and generation and detection of coherent acoustic phonons (CAPS) using time-resolved femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. The giant Faraday effect and ultrafast responsivity of Cd(Mn)Te to sub-picosecond electromagnetic transients are also demonstrated and discussed in detail. The first, few-picosecond-long electronic process after the initial optical excitation exhibits very distinct characteristic dependence on the excitation condition, and in case of Cd(Mn)Te, it has been attributed to the collective effects of band filling, band renormalization, and two-photon absorption. A closed-form, analytic expression for the differential reflectivity induced by the CAPs is derived based on the propagating-strain-pulse model and it accounts very well for our experimental observations. The accurate values of the Mn concentration and longitudinal sound velocity nu s in Cd(Mn)Te were obtained by fitting the data of the refractive index dependence on the probe wavelength to the Schubert model. In Cd 0.91Mn0.09Te, nus was found to be 3.6x103 m/s. Our comparison studies from the one-color and two-color experiments reveal that the intrinsic phonon lifetime in Cd(Mn)Te was at least on the order of nanoseconds, and the observed exponential damping of the CAP oscillations was due to the finite absorption depth of the probe light. Optically-induced electronic stress has been demonstrated to be the main generation mechanism of CAPs. We also present the giant Faraday effect in the Cd(Mn)Te and the spectra of the Verdet constant, which is mainly due to the exchange interaction between the Mn ions and band electrons. The spectral characteristics of the Verdet constant in Cd(Mn)Te exhibit very unique features compared to that in pure semiconductors. In our time-resolved sampling experiments at the room temperature, the response of the Cd(Mn)Te, particularly with low Mn concentrations, to the sub-picosecond electromagnetic pulses has been demonstrated for the first time and studied in detail. The physical origin of the ultrafast responsivity is shown to be the electro-optic (Pockels) effect, simultaneously excluding the magneto-optical (Faraday) effect due to the Mn-ion spin dynamics. The discrepancy between the absence of the low-frequency Pockels effect and the ultrafast sampling results, suggests that in Cd(Mn)Te crystals at low frequencies, the electric field component of the external electromagnetic transients is screened by the free carriers (holes). At very high (THz) frequencies, tested by our sampling experiment, Mn spins are too slow to respond and we observe the very large Pockels effect in Cd(Mn)Te crystals.

  1. Study of copper-free back contacts to thin film cadmium telluride solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Vijay

    The goals of this project are to study Cu free back contact alternatives for CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells, and to research dry etching for CdTe surface preparation before contact application. In addition, an attempt has been made to evaluate the stability of some of the contacts researched. The contacts studied in this work include ZnTe/Cu2Te, Sb2Te 3, and Ni-P alloys. The ZnTe/Cu2Te contact system is studied as basically an extension of the earlier work done on Cu2Te at USF. RF sputtering from a compound target of ZnTe and Cu2Te respectively deposits these layers on etched CdTe surface. The effect of Cu2Te thickness and deposition temperature on contact and cell performance will be studied with the ZnTe depositions conditions kept constant. C-V measurements to study the effect of contact deposition conditions on CdTe doping will also be performed. These contacts will then be stressed to high temperatures (70--100°C) and their stability with stress time is analyzed. Sb2Te3 will be deposited on glass using RF sputtering, to study film properties with deposition temperature. The Sb2Te 3 contact performance will also be studied as a function of the Sb 2Te3 deposition temperature and thickness. The suitability of Ni-P alloys for back contacts to CdTe solar cells was studied by forming a colloidal mixture of Ni2P in graphite paste. The Ni-P contacts, painted on Br-methanol etched CdTe surface, will be studied as a function of Ni-P concentration (in the graphite paste), annealing temperature and time. Some of these cells will undergo temperature stress testing to determine contact behavior with time. Dry etching of CdTe will be studied as an alternative for wet etching processes currently used for CdTe solar cells. The CdTe surface is isotropically etched in a barrel reactor in N2, Ar or Ar:O 2 ambient. The effect of etching ambient, pressure, plasma power and etch time on contact performance will be studied.

  2. Nanostructured photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Lan; Tan, H. Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati

    2013-01-01

    Energy and the environment are two of the most important global issues that we currently face. The development of clean and sustainable energy resources is essential to reduce greenhouse gas emission and meet our ever-increasing demand for energy. Over the last decade photovoltaics, as one of the leading technologies to meet these challenges, has seen a continuous increase in research, development and investment. Meanwhile, nanotechnology, which is considered to be the technology of the future, is gradually revolutionizing our everyday life through adaptation and incorporation into many traditional technologies, particularly energy-related technologies, such as photovoltaics. While the record for the highest efficiency is firmly held by multijunction III-V solar cells, there has never been a shortage of new research effort put into improving the efficiencies of all types of solar cells and making them more cost effective. In particular, there have been extensive and exciting developments in employing nanostructures; features with different low dimensionalities, such as quantum wells, nanowires, nanotubes, nanoparticles and quantum dots, have been incorporated into existing photovoltaic technologies to enhance their performance and/or reduce their cost. Investigations into light trapping using plasmonic nanostructures to effectively increase light absorption in various solar cells are also being rigorously pursued. In addition, nanotechnology provides researchers with great opportunities to explore the new ideas and physics offered by nanostructures to implement advanced solar cell concepts such as hot carrier, multi-exciton and intermediate band solar cells. This special issue of Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics contains selected papers on nanostructured photovoltaics written by researchers in their respective fields of expertise. These papers capture the current excitement, as well as addressing some open questions in the field, covering topics including the

  3. Solvothermal synthesis and study of nonlinear optical properties of nanocrystalline thallium doped bismuth telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molli, Muralikrishna, E-mail: muralikrishnamolli@sssihl.edu.in [Department of Physics, Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning, Prasanthinilayam-515 134 (India); Parola, Sowmendran; Avinash Chunduri, L.A.; Aditha, Saikiran; Sai Muthukumar, V; Mimani Rattan, Tanu; Kamisetti, Venkataramaniah [Department of Physics, Sri Sathya Sai Institute of Higher Learning, Prasanthinilayam-515 134 (India)

    2012-05-15

    Nanocrystalline Bismuth telluride and thallium (4 mol %) doped Bismuth telluride were synthesized through hydrothermal method. The as-prepared products were characterized using Powder X-ray Diffraction, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy, UV-Visible spectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Powder XRD results revealed the crystalline nature of the obtained phases. HRTEM showed the particle-like morphology of the products. The decrease in the absorption coefficient due to thallium doping was observed in FTIR spectra. The intensity dependent nonlinear optical properties of nanocrystalline bismuth telluride and thallium doped bismuth telluride were studied using the Z-scan technique in open-aperture configuration. Bismuth telluride doped with thallium showed enhanced nonlinear optical response compared to pristine bismuth telluride and hence could be used as a potential candidate for optical power limiting applications. - Graphical Abstract: Nonlinear transmission (Z-scan) curves of nanocrystalline bismuth telluride ({Delta}) and thallium doped bismuth telluride ({open_square}). Thallium doped bismuth telluride showed enhanced nonlinear absorption compared to bismuth telluride. Inset: TEM micrograph of bismuth telluride nanocrystallites. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis of Nanocrystalline Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Thallium doped Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} through solvothermal method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reduced absorption coefficient due to thallium doping found from IR spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Open-aperture Z-scan technique for nonlinear optical studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two photon absorption based model for theoretical fitting of Z-scan data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhanced nonlinear absorption in Thallium doped Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} - potential candidate for optical power limiting applications.

  4. Photovoltaic solar concentrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Okandan, Murat; Resnick, Paul J.; Sanchez, Carlos Anthony; Clews, Peggy J.; Gupta, Vipin P.

    2015-09-08

    A process including forming a photovoltaic solar cell on a substrate, the photovoltaic solar cell comprising an anchor positioned between the photovoltaic solar cell and the substrate to suspend the photovoltaic solar cell from the substrate. A surface of the photovoltaic solar cell opposite the substrate is attached to a receiving substrate. The receiving substrate may be bonded to the photovoltaic solar cell using an adhesive force or a metal connecting member. The photovoltaic solar cell is then detached from the substrate by lifting the receiving substrate having the photovoltaic solar cell attached thereto and severing the anchor connecting the photovoltaic solar cell to the substrate. Depending upon the type of receiving substrate used, the photovoltaic solar cell may be removed from the receiving substrate or remain on the receiving substrate for use in the final product.

  5. Fabrication of stable, large-area thin-film CdTe photovoltaic modules. Final subcontract report, May 10, 1991--February 28, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, T.X. [Solar Cells, Inc., Toledo, OH (United States)

    1995-06-01

    During the period of this subcontract, May 1991 through February 1995, Solar Cells, Inc. has developed and demonstrated a low-cost process to fabricate stable large-area cadmium telluride based thin-film photovoltaic modules. This report summarizes the final phase of the project which is concentrated on process optimization and product life tests. One of the major post-deposition process steps, the CdCl{sub 2} heat treatment, has been experimentally replaced with alternative treatments with vapor chloride or chlorine gas. Material and device qualities associated with alternative treatments are comparable or superior to those with the conventional treatment. Extensive experiments have been conducted to optimize the back-electrode structure in order to ensure long term device stability. Numerous small-area cells and minimodules have been subjected to a variety of stress tests, including but not limited to continuous light soak under open or short circuit or with resistive load, for over 10,000 hours. Satisfactory stability has been demonstrated on 48 cm{sup 2} and 64 cm{sup 2} minimodules under accelerated tests and on 7200 cm{sup 2} large modules under normal operating conditions. The conversion efficiency has also been significantly improved during this period. The total area efficiency of 7200 cm{sup 2} module has reached 8.4%, corresponding to a 60.3W normalized output; the efficiency of 64 cm{sup 2} minimodules and 1.1 cm{sup 2} cells has reached 10.5% (aperture area) and 12.4% (total area), respectively.

  6. Organic photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demming, Anna; Krebs, Frederik C.; Chen, Hongzheng

    2013-12-01

    Energy inflation, the constant encouragement to economize on energy consumption and the huge investments in developing alternative energy resources might seem to suggest that there is a global shortage of energy. Far from it, the energy the Sun beams on the Earth each hour is equivalent to a year's supply, even at our increasingly ravenous rate of global energy consumption [1]. But it's not what you have got it's what you do with it. Hence the intense focus on photovoltaic research to find more efficient ways to harness energy from the Sun. Recently much of this research has centred on organic solar cells since they offer simple, low-cost, light-weight and large-area flexible photovoltaic structures. This issue with guest editors Frederik C Krebs and Hongzheng Chen focuses on some of the developments at the frontier of organic photovoltaic technology. Improving the power conversion efficiency of organic photovoltaic systems, while maintaining the inherent material, economic and fabrication benefits, has absorbed a great deal of research attention in recent years. Here significant progress has been made with reports now of organic photovoltaic devices with efficiencies of around 10%. Yet operating effectively across the electromagnetic spectrum remains a challenge. 'The trend is towards engineering low bandgap polymers with a wide optical absorption range and efficient hole/electron transport materials, so that light harvesting in the red and infrared region is enhanced and as much light of the solar spectrum as possible can be converted into an electrical current', explains Mukundan Thelakkat and colleagues in Germany, the US and UK. In this special issue they report on how charge carrier mobility and morphology of the active blend layer in thin film organic solar cells correlate with device parameters [2]. The work contributes to a better understanding of the solar-cell characteristics of polymer:fullerene blends, which form the material basis for some of the most

  7. Method of Creating Micro-scale Silver Telluride Grains Covered with Bismuth Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Jung (Inventor); Choi, Sang Hyouk (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Lee, Kunik (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Provided is a method of enhancing thermoelectric performance by surrounding crystalline semiconductors with nanoparticles by contacting a bismuth telluride material with a silver salt under a substantially inert atmosphere and a temperature approximately near the silver salt decomposition temperature; and recovering a metallic bismuth decorated material comprising silver telluride crystal grains.

  8. Cadmium and zinc relationships

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elinder, C.; Piscator, M.

    1978-08-01

    Higher mammals, such as homo sapiens, accumulate zinc in kidney cortex almost equimolarly with cadmium. A different pattern seems to be present in liverthere is a limited increase of zinc in two species of large farm animals compared with a marked increase in the laboratory. In large farm animals, an equimolar increase of zinc with cadmium in renal cortex seems to indicate that the form of metallothionein that binds equal amounts of cadmium and zinc in present. Differences in cadmium and zinc relationships in large animals and humans compared with laboratory animals must be carefully considered. (4 graphs, 26 references)

  9. Analysis of energy production with different photovoltaic technologies in the Colombian geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Y.; Zafra, D.; Acevedo, V.; Ospino, A.

    2014-06-01

    This research has analyzed the photovoltaic technologies, Polycrystalline silicon, Monocrystalline Silicon, GIS, Cadmium Tellurium and Amorphous Silicon; in eight cities of the Colombian territory, in order to obtain a clear idea of what is the most appropriate for each city or region studied. PVsyst simulation software has been used to study in detail each photovoltaic technology, for an installed capacity of 100kW knowing the specific data of losses by temperature, mismatch, efficiency, wiring, angle inclination of the arrangement, among others

  10. Analysis and optimization of thin film photovoltaic materials and device fabrication by real time spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jian; Stoke, Jason A.; Podraza, Nikolas J.; Sainju, Deepak; Parikh, Anuja; Cao, Xinmin; Khatri, Himal; Barreau, Nicolas; Marsillac, Sylvain; Deng, Xunming; Collins, Robert W.

    2007-09-01

    Methods of spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) have been applied to investigate the growth and properties of the material components used in the three major thin film photovoltaics technologies: (1) hydrogenated silicon (Si:H); (2) cadmium telluride (CdTe); and (3) copper indium-gallium diselenide (CuIn 1-xGa xSe2 or CIGS). In Si:H technology, real time SE (RTSE) has been applied to establish deposition phase diagrams that describe very high frequency (vhf) plasmaenhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) processes for hydrogenated silicon (Si:H) and silicon-germanium alloy (Si 1-xGe x:H) thin films. This study has reaffirmed that the highest efficiencies for a-Si:H and a-Si 1-xGe x:H component solar cells of multijunction devices are obtained when the i-layers are prepared under maximal H II dilution conditions. In CdTe technology, the magnetron sputter deposition of polycrystalline CdTe, CdS, and CdTe 1-xS x thin films as well as the formation of CdS/CdTe and CdTe/CdS heterojunctions has been studied. The nucleation and growth behaviors of CdTe and CdS show strong variations with deposition temperature, and this influences the ultimate grain size. The dielectric functions ɛ of the CdTe 1-xS x alloys have been deduced in order to set up a database for real time investigation of inter-diffusion at the CdS/CdTe and CdTe/CdS interfaces. In CIGS technology, strong variations in ɛ of the Mo back contact during sputter deposition have been observed, and these results have been understood applying a Drude relaxation time that varies with the Mo film thickness. Ex-situ SE measurements of a novel In IIS 3 window layer have shown critical point structures at 2.77+/-0.08 eV, 4.92+/-0.005 eV, and 5.64+/-0.005 eV, as well as an absorption tail with an onset near 1.9 eV. Simulations of solar cell performance comparing In IIS 3 and the conventional CdS have revealed similar quantum efficiencies, suggesting the possibility of a Cd-free window layer in CIGS technology.

  11. Origin of anomalous anharmonic lattice dynamics of lead telluride

    CERN Document Server

    Shiga, Takuma; Hori, Takuma; Delaire, Olivier; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2015-01-01

    The origin of the anomalous anharmonic lattice dynamics of lead telluride is investigated using molecular dynamics simulations with interatomic force constants (IFCs) up to quartic terms obtained from first principles. The calculations reproduce the peak asymmetry of the radial distribution functions and the double peaks of transverse optical phonon previously observed with neutron diffraction and scattering experiments. They are identified to be due to the extremely large nearest-neighbor cubic IFCs in the [100] direction. The outstanding strength of the nearest-neighbor cubic IFCs relative to the longer-range ones explains the reason why the distortion in the radial distribution function is local.

  12. Zinc and cadmium monosalicylates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharitonov, Yu.Ya.; Tujebakhova, Z.K. (Moskovskij Khimiko-Tekhnologicheskij Inst. (USSR))

    1984-06-01

    Zinc and cadmium monosalicylates of the composition MSal, where M-Zn or Cd, Sal - twice deprotonated residue of salicylic acid O-HOC/sub 6/H/sub 4/COOH (H/sub 2/Sal), are singled out and characterized. When studying thermograms, thermogravigrams, IR absorption spectra, roentgenograms of cadmium salicylate compounds (Cd(OC/sub 6/H/sub 4/COO) and products of their thermal transformations, the processes of thermal decomposition of the compounds have been characterized. The process of cadmium monosalicylate decomposition takes place in one stage. Complete loss of salicylate acido group occurs in the range of 320-460 deg. At this decomposition stage cadmium oxide is formed. A supposition is made that cadmium complex has tetrahedral configuration, at that, each salicylate group plays the role of tetradentate-bridge ligand. The compound evidently has a polymer structure.

  13. Kelvin probe studies of cesium telluride photocathode for AWA photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wisniewski, Eric E., E-mail: ewisniew@anl.gov [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Velazquez, Daniel [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Yusof, Zikri, E-mail: zyusof@hawk.iit.edu [High Energy Physics Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Spentzouris, Linda; Terry, Jeff [Physics Department, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3300 South Federal Street, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States); Sarkar, Tapash J. [Rice University, 6100 Main, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Harkay, Katherine [Accelerator Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S. Cass, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States)

    2013-05-21

    Cesium telluride is an important photocathode as an electron source for particle accelerators. It has a relatively high quantum efficiency (>1%), is sufficiently robust in a photoinjector, and has a long lifetime. This photocathode is grown in-house for a new Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) beamline to produce high charge per bunch (≈50nC) in a long bunch train. Here, we present a study of the work function of cesium telluride photocathode using the Kelvin probe technique. The study includes an investigation of the correlation between the quantum efficiency and the work function, the effect of photocathode aging, the effect of UV exposure on the work function, and the evolution of the work function during and after photocathode rejuvenation via heating. -- Highlights: ► The correlation between Quantum Efficiency (QE) and work function. ► How QE and work function evolve together. ► Rejuvenation of the photocathode via heating and the effect on work function. ► The effects on the work function due to exposure to UV light.

  14. A photovoltaic module

    OpenAIRE

    Krebs, Frederik C.; Sommer-Larsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a photovoltaic module comprising a carrier substrate, said carrier substrate carrying a purely printed structure comprising printed positive and negative module terminals, a plurality of printed photovoltaic cell units each comprising one or more printed photovoltaic cells, wherein the plurality of printed photovoltaic cell units are electrically connected in series between the positive and the negative module terminals such that any two neighbouring photovolt...

  15. High density photovoltaic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haigh, R.E.; Jacobson, G.F.; Wojtczuk, S. [Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (United States)

    1997-10-14

    Photovoltaic technology can directly generate high voltages in a solid state material through the series interconnect of many photovoltaic diodes. We are investigating the feasibility of developing an electrically isolated, high-voltage power supply using miniature photovoltaic devices that convert optical energy to electrical energy.

  16. Photovoltaic device and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleereman, Robert; Lesniak, Michael J.; Keenihan, James R.; Langmaid, Joe A.; Gaston, Ryan; Eurich, Gerald K.; Boven, Michelle L.

    2015-11-24

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PVD") and method of use, more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with an integral locator and electrical terminal mechanism for transferring current to or from the improved photovoltaic device and the use as a system.

  17. Effect of metallic coatings on thermoelectric properties of lead telluride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ukhlinov, G.A.; Lakhno, I.G. (Moskovskij Inst. Ehlektronnoj Tekhniki (USSR))

    1984-05-01

    Effect of sprayed coatings of different metals on thermoelectric properties of lead telluride films was investigated. The basic films were prepared by the method of vacuum thermal evaporation of sample of stoichiometric lead telluride at 5x10/sup -4/ Pa residual pressure on mica (muscovite) sublayer at 330-350 deg C and approximately 10 nm/s deposition rate. It was established that fine coatings of copper, silver and gold modify sufficiently electric properties of lead telluride films. The effect is conditioned mainly by decoration and electric shunting of grain boundaries by metal island, which removes the contribution of grain boundaries to film electric conductivity.

  18. Synthesis of 1,3-diynes via detelluration of bis(ethynyl)tellurides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefani, Helio A.; PenaI, Jesus M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (FCF/USP), SP (Brazil). Fac. de Ciencias Farmaceuticas; Zukerman-Schpector, Julio [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (DQ/UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Tiekink, Edward R.T. [University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia). Dept. of Chemistry

    2011-07-01

    The synthesis of symmetric conjugated diyne systems with electron-withdrawing or electron-donating substituents via a palladium-catalyzed detelluration of bis(arylethynyl)tellurides and bis(alkylethynyl)tellurides is described. This procedure is effected under atmospheric conditions in DMF using Pd(OAc)2 as a catalyst and AgOAc as an additive in the presence of triethylamine. This route offers efficient access to conjugated diyne systems in short reaction time. X-ray crystallographic structure and solid-state conformation of bis(p-tolylethynyl)telluride show a supramolecular chain aligned along the b axis, sustained by C-H...p interactions. (author)

  19. Transparent ultraviolet photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xun; Shan, Chong-Xin; Lu, Ying-Jie; Xie, Xiu-Hua; Li, Bing-Hui; Wang, Shuang-Peng; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Shen, De-Zhen

    2016-02-15

    Photovoltaic cells have been fabricated from p-GaN/MgO/n-ZnO structures. The photovoltaic cells are transparent to visible light and can transform ultraviolet irradiation into electrical signals. The efficiency of the photovoltaic cells is 0.025% under simulated AM 1.5 illumination conditions, while it can reach 0.46% under UV illumination. By connecting several such photovoltaic cells in a series, light-emitting devices can be lighting. The photovoltaic cells reported in this Letter may promise the applications in glass of buildings to prevent UV irradiation and produce power for household appliances in the future.

  20. High efficiency cadmium telluride and zinc telluride based thin-film solar cells. Annual subcontract report, 1 March 1990--28 February 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohatgi, A.; Sudharsanan, R.; Ringel, S.A.; Chou, H.C. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1992-10-01

    This report describes work to improve the basic understanding of CdTe and ZnTe alloys by growing and characterizing these films along with cell fabrication. The major objective was to develop wide-band-gap (1.6--1.8 eV) material for the top cell, along with compatible window material and transparent ohmic contacts, so that a cascade cell design can be optimized. Front-wall solar cells were fabricated with a glass/SnO{sub 2}/CdS window, where the CdS film is thin to maximize transmission and current. Wide-band-gap absorber films (E{sub g} = 1.75 eV) were grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) techniques, which provided excellent control for tailoring the film composition and properties. CdZnTe films were grown by both MBE and MOCVD. All the as-grown films were characterized by several techniques (surface photovoltage spectroscopy, Auger electron spectroscopy (AES), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)) for composition, bulk uniformity, thickness, and film and interface quality. Front-wall-type solar cells were fabricated in collaboration with Ametek Materials Research Laboratory using CdTe and CdZnTe polycrystalline absorber films. The effects of processing on ternary film were studied by AES and XPS coupled with capacitance voltage and current voltage measurements as a function of temperature. Bias-dependent spectral response and electrical measurements were used to test some models in order to identify and quantify dominant loss mechanisms.

  1. Cadmium status in Egypt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    It is inferred from these studies that releases of Cd are still increasing and it is recommended that measures must be taken to reduce emissions of cadmium. Any cadmium discharged into the Egyptian environment may move from one compartment to another at varying rates,resulting in an accumulation in compartments such as soils and biota. Such accumulation can be expected to increase with continued emissions,and attention should be given to all sources of cadmium, natural as well as anthropogenic especially in the industrial cities in Egypt. Cadmium present in sewage, as well as industrial effluent (also, other liquid and solid wastes) and sewage sludge will increase levels in soils and is xpected to contribute to dietary levels and body burdens. The current information indicates that such effects may have to be evaluated over long periods of time, possibly as long as 50 - 100 years.

  2. Rhizopus stolonifer mediated biosynthesis of biocompatible cadmium chalcogenide quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mareeswari, P; Brijitta, J; Harikrishna Etti, S; Meganathan, C; Kaliaraj, Gobi Saravanan

    2016-12-01

    We report an efficient method to biosynthesize biocompatible cadmium telluride and cadmium sulphide quantum dots from the fungus Rhizopus stolonifer. The suspension of the quantum dots exhibited purple and greenish-blue luminescence respectively upon UV light illumination. Photoluminescence spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy confirms the formation of the quantum dots. From the photoluminescence spectrum the emission maxima is found to be 424 and 476nm respectively. The X-ray diffraction of the quantum dots matches with results reported in literature. The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay for cell viability evaluation carried out on 3-days transfer, inoculum 3×10(5) cells, embryonic fibroblast cells lines shows that more than 80% of the cells are viable even after 48h, indicating the biocompatible nature of the quantum dots. A good contrast in imaging has been obtained upon incorporating the quantum dots in human breast adenocarcinoma Michigan Cancer Foundation-7 cell lines.

  3. Photovoltaic fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaudiana, Russell; Eckert, Robert; Cardone, John; Ryan, James; Montello, Alan

    2006-08-01

    It was realized early in the history of Konarka that the ability to produce fibers that generate power from solar energy could be applied to a wide variety of applications where fabrics are utilized currently. These applications include personal items such as jackets, shirts and hats, to architectural uses such as awnings, tents, large covers for cars, trucks and even doomed stadiums, to indoor furnishings such as window blinds, shades and drapes. They may also be used as small fabric patches or fiber bundles for powering or recharging batteries in small sensors. Power generating fabrics for clothing is of particular interest to the military where they would be used in uniforms and body armor where portable power is vital to field operations. In strong sunlight these power generating fabrics could be used as a primary source of energy, or they can be used in either direct sunlight or low light conditions to recharge batteries. Early in 2002, Konarka performed a series of proof-of-concept experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of building a photovoltaic cell using dye-sensitized titania and electrolyte on a metal wire core. The approach taken was based on the sequential coating processes used in making fiber optics, namely, a fiber core, e.g., a metal wire serving as the primary electrode, is passed through a series of vertically aligned coating cups. Each of the cups contains a coating fluid that has a specific function in the photocell. A second wire, used as the counter electrode, is brought into the process prior to entering the final coating cup. The latter contains a photopolymerizable, transparent cladding which hardens when passed through a UV chamber. Upon exiting the UV chamber, the finished PV fiber is spooled. Two hundred of foot lengths of PV fiber have been made using this process. When the fiber is exposed to visible radiation, it generates electrical power. The best efficiency exhibited by these fibers is 6% with an average value in the 4

  4. Pbsub(1-x)Snsub(x)Te (x=0,00 and 0,20) alloying with gallium and cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novoselova, A.V.; Zlomanov, V.P.; Gas' kov, A.M.; Ryabova, L.I.; Lazarenko, M.A.; Lisina, N.G.

    Investigation results of doping conditions of PbTe and Pbsub(O.8)Snsub(0.2)Te crystals with gallium and cadmium both in the process of growing and diffusional annealing in component vapours are presented. The concentration of the introduced addition in alloyed samples is determined by chemical analysis; homogeneity of its distribution in crystal volume is studied using the Auger-electron microanalysis. Kinetics of gallium solid solution decomposition in lead telluride is investigated. Galvanomagentic and photoelectric properties of the doped crystals are studied in the temperature range of 4-300 K.

  5. Electrochemical Studies of Lead Telluride Behavior in Acidic Nitrate Solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudnik E.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemistry of lead telluride stationary electrode was studied in nitric acid solutions of pH 1.5-3.0. E-pH diagram for Pb-Te-H2O system was calculated. Results of cyclic voltammetry of Pb, Te and PbTe were discussed in correlation with thermodynamic predictions. Anodic dissolution of PbTe electrode at potential approx. -100÷50 mV (SCE resulted in tellurium formation, while above 300 mV TeO2 was mainly produced. The latter could dissolve to HTeO+2 under acidic electrolyte, but it was inhibited by increased pH of the bath.

  6. Growth of lead-tin telluride crystals under high gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regel, L. L.; Turchaninov, A. M.; Shumaev, O. V.; Bandeira, I. N.; An, C. Y.; Rappl, P. H. O.

    1992-04-01

    The influence of high gravity environment on several growth habits of lead-tin telluride crystals began to be investigated. Preliminary experiments with Pb 0.8Sn 0.2te grown by the Bridgman technique had been made at the centrifuge facilities of the Y.A. Gagarin Cosmonauts Center in the USSR, using accelerations of 5 g, 5.2 g and 8 g. The Sn distribution for these crystals was compared with that obtained for growth at normal gravity and the results show the existence of significant compositional inhomogeneities along the axial direction. Convection currents at high gravity seem to help multiple nucleation and subsequent random orientation of growth. Analyses of carrier concentrations as well as morphological characteristics were also made.

  7. Process dependent thermoelectric properties of EDTA assisted bismuth telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulsi, Chiranjit; Kargupta, Kajari; Banerjee, Dipali

    2016-04-01

    Comparison between the structure and thermoelectric properties of EDTA (Ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid) assisted bismuth telluride prepared by electrochemical deposition and hydrothermal route is reported in the present work. The prepared samples have been structurally characterized by high resolution X-ray diffraction spectra (HRXRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopic images (HRTEM). Crystallite size and strain have been determined from Williamson-Hall plot of XRD which is in conformity with TEM images. Measurement of transport properties show sample in the pellet form (S1) prepared via hydrothermal route has higher value of thermoelectric power (S) than the electrodeposited film (S2). But due to a substantial increase in the electrical conductivity (σ) of the film (S2) over the pellet (S1), the power factor and the figure of merit is higher for sample S2 than the sample S1 at room temperature.

  8. Shock-Wave Consolidation of Nanostructured Bismuth Telluride Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Jan; Alvarado, Manuel; Nemir, David; Nowell, Mathew; Murr, Lawrence; Prasad, Narasimha

    2012-06-01

    Nanostructured thermoelectric powders can be produced using a variety of techniques. However, it is very challenging to build a bulk material from these nanopowders without losing the nanostructure. In the present work, nanostructured powders of the bismuth telluride alloy system are obtained in kilogram quantities via a gas atomization process. These powders are characterized using a variety of methods including scanning electron microscopy, transition electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction analysis. Then the powders are consolidated into a dense bulk material using a shock-wave consolidation technique whereby a nanopowder-containing tube is surrounded by explosives and then detonated. The resulting shock wave causes rapid fusing of the powders without the melt and subsequent grain growth of other techniques. We describe the test setup and consolidation results.

  9. Effect of Annealing on the Properties of Antimony Telluride Thin Films and Their Applications in CdTe Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhouling Wang; Yu Hu; Wei Li; Guanggen Zeng; Lianghuan Feng; Jingquan Zhang; Lili Wu; Jingjing Gao

    2014-01-01

    Antimony telluride alloy thin films were deposited at room temperature by using the vacuum coevaporation method. The films were annealed at different temperatures in N2 ambient, and then the compositional, structural, and electrical properties of antimony telluride thin films were characterized by X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, and Hall measurements. The results indicate that single phase antimony telluride existed when the annealing temperature was high...

  10. Plausible Mechanisms of Cadmium Carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadmium is a transition metal and an ubiquitous environmental and industrial pollutant. Laboratory animal studies and epidemiological studies have shown that exposure to cadmium is associated with various organ toxicities and carcinogenic effects. Several national and internation...

  11. A photovoltaic module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    The present invention relates to a photovoltaic module comprising a carrier substrate, said carrier substrate carrying a purely printed structure comprising printed positive and negative module terminals, a plurality of printed photovoltaic cell units each comprising one or more printed...... photovoltaic cells, wherein the plurality of printed photovoltaic cell units are electrically connected in series between the positive and the negative module terminals such that any two neighbouring photovoltaic cell units are electrically connected by a printed interconnecting electrical conductor....... The carrier substrate comprises a foil and the total thickness of the photovoltaic module is below 500 [mu]m. Moreover, the nominal voltage level between the positive and the negative terminals is at least 5 kV DC....

  12. Photovoltaic technology assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, C.E.

    1981-01-01

    After a brief review of the history of photovoltaic devices and a discussion of the cost goals set for photovoltaic modules, the status of photovoltaic technology is assessed. Included are discussions of: current applications, present industrial production, low-cost silicon production techniques, energy payback periods for solar cells, advanced materials research and development, concentrator systems, balance-of-system components. Also discussed are some nontechnical aspects, including foreign markets, US government program approach, and industry attitudes and approaches. (LEW)

  13. Photovoltaics - The endless spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the developments in the photovoltaic field over the past decade or two is presened. Accomplishments in the terrestrial field are reviewed along with projections and challenges toward meeting cost goals. The contrasts and commonality of space and terrestrial photovoltaics are presented. Finally, a strategic philosophy of photovoltaics research highlighting critical factors, appropriate directions, emerging opportunities, and challenges of the future is given.

  14. Photovoltaics: The endless spring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the developments in the photovoltaic field over the past decade or two is presented. Accomplishments in the terrestrial field are reviewed along with projections and challenges toward meeting cost goals. The contrasts and commonality of space and terrestrial photovoltaics are presented. Finally, a strategic philosophy of photovoltaics research highlighting critical factors, appropriate directions, emerging opportunities, and challenges of the future is given.

  15. Current and future photovoltaics

    OpenAIRE

    Boreland, M.B.; Bagnall, D.M.

    2006-01-01

    Photovoltaics, now a billion-dollar industry, is experiencing staggering growth as increased concerns over fuel supply and carbon emissions have encouraged governments and environmentalists to become increasingly prepared to offset the extra cost of solar energy. Three 'generations' of photovoltaics have been envisaged that will take solar power into the mainstream. Photovoltaic production is currently 90% 'first-generation' or '1G' solar cells that rely on expensive bulk multi-crystalline or...

  16. Science technology of photovoltaics

    CERN Document Server

    Reddy, P Jayarama

    2010-01-01

    A comprehensive introductory text covering solar photovoltaic technologies and its increasing number of applications to generate clean energy around the globe. It treats the fundamentals of solar cells, technologies, solar modules and arrays, solar photovoltaic systems, storage batteries, power conditioning, equipment design of solar PV systems, building integrated photovoltaics, system installation, operation and maintenance, manufacturing and worldwide players and markets. Written in a clear style and with multiple illustrations, this volume is intended for students in natural sciences, engi

  17. Photovoltaic System in Progress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shoro, Ghulam Mustafa; Hussain, Dil Muhammad Akbar; Sera, Dezso

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides a comprehensive update on photovoltaic (PV) technologies and the materials. In recent years, targeted research advancement has been made in the photovoltaic cell technologies to reduce cost and increase efficiency. Presently, several types of PV solar panels are commercially...... utilized and playing an important role in the market. Three generations of photovoltaic technologies are investigated and discussed; Crystalline Silicon Technology categorized as first generation of PV technology, Thin Film Technologies are second generation of PV technologies and Multi-junction Cells...... structure. Silicon remains the prominent semiconductor within photovoltaic....

  18. Application of Copper Indium Gallium Diselenide Photovoltaic Cells to Extend the Endurance and Capabilities of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    gallium diselenide (CIGS, Cu(In1-xGax)Se2), cadmium telluride ( CdTe ), and amorphous silicon (a- Si). There are other thin - film technologies that... CdTe (10.8), and a-Si (8.5) [70]. Table 3. Maximum Recorded Efficiencies for Thin - Film Solar Cells (From [71]). As shown in Figure 51, the... thin - film cells, and compared each of three TFSC to each other: a-Si, CdTe , and CIGS. After further review of some of the advantages and

  19. Electrolytically deposited Cadmium Selenide Films for Photovoltaic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palaiologopoulou M. D.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available CdSe films were electrodeposited on pure nickel substrates. The nickel substrate was polished to a mirror finish by Al2O3 paste, etched in 10% HCl solution for 40 s and rinsed thoroughly by de-ionized water. The deposition bath contained solutions with excessive Cd2+ (0.2M from CdSO4 and small amounts of SeO2 (1x10-3 M. The pH of the bath was adjusted to a value of 2.2 at RT by adding 10% H2SO4. The bath was first thermostated at the required temperature, which varied from 55°C to 65°C. Plating was accomplished at deposition potential 1000 mV (vs. Hg/Hg2SO4. The films formed had a uniform thickness and it was found to be approximately 2.0 μm thick (for 20 min electrodeposition process. The produced CdSe films were characterized by X-Ray diffraction and SEM. The induced semiconductor doping effect by thermal annealing in pure dry nitrogen gas was also investigated. Gold contacts were placed on top of the CdSe films, either by evaporation, or mechanically. Depending on the deposition parameters the electrical characteristics of the Ni/CdSe/Au structures may exhibit rectification properties. The optical excitation of the structure was investigated for various CdSe thicknesses.

  20. Photovoltaics for residential applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-02-01

    Information is given about the parts of a residential photovoltaic system and considerations relevant to photovoltaic power use in homes that are also tied to utility lines. In addition, factors are discussed that influence implementation, including legal and environmental factors such as solar access and building codes, insurance, utility buyback, and system longevity. (LEW)

  1. Urban photovoltaic electricity policies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-10-15

    This report for the International Energy Agency (IEA) made by Task 10 of the Photovoltaic Power Systems (PVPS) programme takes a look at urban photovoltaic electricity policies. The mission of the Photovoltaic Power Systems Programme is to enhance the international collaboration efforts which accelerate the development and deployment of photovoltaic solar energy as a significant and sustainable renewable energy option. The objective of Task 10 is stated as being to enhance the opportunities for wide-scale, solution-oriented application of photovoltaics in the urban environment. The goal of the study presented was to evaluate a standardised basis for urban policies regarding photovoltaic integration in a set of cities in the countries participating in the IEA's Task 10, Urban Scale PV. The investigation was focused on three topics: the present state of the policies, the prospects for future policies fostering photovoltaic deployment and the prospects for future policies to cope with large-scale photovoltaic integration. The first section analyses the state of the policies; this analysis is then confirmed in section 2, which deals with present obstacles to PV deployment and solutions to overcome them. The third section investigates future prospects for PV deployment with the question of mastering large scale integration. The report concludes that cities could formulate urban solutions by developing integrated, specific provisions for PV deployment in their urban infrastructure planning.

  2. Solar Photovoltaic Energy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenreich, Henry; Martin, John H.

    1979-01-01

    The goals of solar photovoltaic technology in contributing to America's future energy needs are presented in this study conducted by the American Physical Society. Although the time needed for photovoltaics to become popular is several decades away, according to the author, short-range applications are given. (Author/SA)

  3. Handbook for photovoltaic cabling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klein, D. N.

    1980-08-01

    This volume, originally written as part of the Interim Performance Criteria Document Development Implementation Plan and Procedures for Photovoltaic Energy Systems, is an analysis of the several factors to be considered in selecting cabling for photovoltaic purposes. These factors, correspoonding to chapter titles, are electrical, structural, safety, durability/reliability, and installation. A glossary of terms used within the volume is included for reference.

  4. Photovoltaics industry profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-10-01

    A description of the status of the US photovoltaics industry is given. Principal end-user industries are identified, domestic and foreign market trends are discussed, and industry-organized and US government-organized trade promotion events are listed. Trade associations and trade journals are listed, and a photovoltaic product manufacturers list is included. (WHK)

  5. Characterization of Photovoltaic Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boitier, V.; Cressault, Y.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses photovoltaic panel systems and reviews their electrical properties and use in several industrial fields. We explain how different photovoltaic panels may be characterized by undergraduate students at university using simple methods to retrieve their electrical properties (power, current and voltage) and compare these values…

  6. Frustrated square lattice Heisenberg model and magnetism in Iron Telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaliznyak, Igor; Xu, Zhijun; Gu, Genda; Tranquada, John; Stone, Matthew

    2011-03-01

    We have measured spin excitations in iron telluride Fe1.1Te, the parent material of (1,1) family of iron-based superconductors. It has been recognized that J1-J2-J3 frustrated Heisenberg model on a square lattice might be relevant for the unusual magnetism and, perhaps, the superconductivity in cuprates [1,2]. Recent neutron scattering measurements show that similar frustrated model might also provide reasonable account for magnetic excitations in iron pnictide materials. We find that it also describes general features of spin excitations in FeTe parent compound observed in our recent neutron measurements, as well as in those by other groups. Results imply proximity of magnetic system to the limit of extreme frustration. Selection of spin ground state under such conditions could be driven by weak extrinsic interactions, such as lattice distortion, or strain. Consequently, different nonuniversal types of magnetic order could arise, both commensurate and incommensurate. These are not necessarily intrinsic to an ideal J1-J2-J3 model, but might result from lifting of its near degeneracy by weak extrinsic perturbations.

  7. Thickness-induced structural phase transformation of layered gallium telluride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Q; Wang, T; Miao, Y; Ma, F; Xie, Y; Ma, X; Gu, Y; Li, J; He, J; Chen, B; Xi, S; Xu, L; Zhen, H; Yin, Z; Li, J; Ren, J; Jie, W

    2016-07-28

    The thickness-dependent electronic states and physical properties of two-dimensional materials suggest great potential applications in electronic and optoelectronic devices. However, the enhanced surface effect in ultra-thin materials might significantly influence the structural stability, as well as the device reliability. Here, we report a spontaneous phase transformation of gallium telluride (GaTe) that occurred when the bulk was exfoliated to a few layers. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results indicate a structural variation from a monoclinic to a hexagonal structure. Raman spectra suggest a critical thickness for the structural transformation. First-principle calculations and thermodynamic analysis show that the surface energy and the interlayer interaction compete to dominate structural stability in the thinning process. A two-stage transformation process from monoclinic (m) to tetragonal (T) and then from tetragonal to hexagonal (h) is proposed to understand the phase transformation. The results demonstrate the crucial role of interlayer interactions in the structural stability, which provides a phase engineering strategy for device applications.

  8. Thin tungsten telluride layer preparation by thermal annealing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei; Zhang, Yudao; Zhu, Zusong; Lai, Jiawei; Zhao, Chuan; Liu, Xuefeng; Liu, Jing; Sun, Dong

    2016-10-01

    We report a simple method to prepare a thin Tungsten Telluride (WTe2) flake with accurate thickness control, which allows preparing and studying this two dimensional material conveniently. First, the WTe2 flake, which is relatively thick due to its strong interlayer van der Waals forces, is obtained by a conventional mechanical exfoliation method. Then, the exfoliated flake is annealed at 600 °C under a constant Ar protecting flow. Raman and atomic force spectroscopy characterizations demonstrate that thermal annealing can effectively thin down the WTe2 flake and retain its original lattice structure, though its surface smoothness is slightly deteriorated. Additionally, systematical study indicates that the thinning process strongly depends on the initial thickness of the WTe2 flake before annealing: the thinning rate increases from 0.12 nm min-1 to 0.36 nm min-1 as the initial thickness increases from 10 nm to 45 nm, while the roughness of the final product also increases with the increase of its initial thickness. However, the method fails when it is applied to WTe2 flakes thicker than 100 nm, resulting in uneven or burnt surface, which is possibly caused by big cavities formed by a large amount of defects gathered at the top surface.

  9. 29 CFR 1910.1027 - Cadmium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... battery Plate making, plate preparation 50 All other processes 15 Zinc/Cadmium refining* Cadmium refining... as an airborne concentration of cadmium of 2.5 micrograms per cubic meter of air (2.5 µg/m3... air cadmium level to which an employee is exposed means the exposure to airborne cadmium that...

  10. Cadmium - is it hazardous

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zartner-Nyilas, G.; Valentin, H.; Schaller, K.H.; Schiele, R.

    1983-01-01

    The report summarizes the state of knowledge and experience on cadmium. Biological, toxicological and epidemiological data have been evaluated. Cd pollution of the environment is reviewed under the aspect of human health. Uptake in food, threshod values of Cd exposure of the population, types and extent of health hazards, possible carcinogenic effects and future fields of research are discussed.

  11. Cadmium and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartwig, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium is an established human and animal carcinogen. Most evidence is available for elevated risk for lung cancer after occupational exposure; however, associations between cadmium exposure and tumors at other locations including kidney, breast, and prostate may be relevant as well. Furthermore, enhanced cancer risk may not be restricted to comparatively high occupational exposure, but may also occur via environmental exposure, for example in areas in close proximity to zinc smelters. The underlying mechanisms are still a matter of manifold research activities. While direct interactions with DNA appear to be of minor importance, elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been detected in diverse experimental systems, presumably due to an inactivation of detoxifying enzymes. Also, the interference with proteins involved in the cellular response to DNA damage, the deregulation of cell growth as well as resistance to apoptosis appears to be involved in cadmium-induced carcinogenicity. Within this context, cadmium has been shown to disturb nucleotide excision repair, base excision repair, and mismatch repair. Particularly sensitive targets appear to be proteins with zinc-binding structures, present in DNA repair proteins such as XPA, PARP-1 as well as in the tumor suppressor protein p53. Whether or not these interactions are due to displacement of zinc or due to reactions with thiol groups involved in zinc complexation or in other critical positions under realistic exposure conditions remains to be elucidated. Further potential mechanisms relate to the interference with cellular redox regulation, either by enhanced generation of ROS or by reaction with thiol groups involved in the regulation of signaling pathways. Particularly the combination of these multiple mechanisms may give rise to a high degree of genomic instability evident in cadmium-adapted cells, relevant not only for tumor initiation, but also for later steps in tumor development.

  12. Workshop proceedings: Photovoltaic conversion of solar energy for terrestrial applications. Volume 1: Working group and panel reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    1973-01-01

    Technological aspects of solar energy conversion by photovoltaic cells are considered. The advantage of the single crystal silicon solar cell approach is developed through comparisons with polycrystalline silicon, cadmium sulfide/copper sulfide thin film cells, and other materials and devices.

  13. Performance of hybrid photovoltaic collector

    OpenAIRE

    Garbisu Eugui, Josu

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present project is the study of the performance of a combined photovoltaic-thermal plant, called also hybrid system, located in south Italy, evaluating the efficiency of the photovoltaic and thermal systems and the advantage respect to the two single plants (photovoltaic and thermal ). This research project has two objectives fundamentals of efficiency improvement energy from solar photovoltaic panels. On one hand, increase photovoltaic efficiency, at the same time an...

  14. Effect of Indium on the Superconducting Transition Temperature of Tin Telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Ruidan; Schneeloch, John; Shi, Xiaoya; Li, Qiang; Tranquada, John; Gu, Genda

    2013-03-01

    Indium-doped tin telluride is one of the most appealing topological superconductors. We have grown a series of Sn1-xInxTe crystals with different indium concentrations (0.1 <=x <=1.0). The results show indium doping improves the superconducting transition temperature significantly and is highly related to the indium concentration. The maximum Tc of indium-doped tin telluride polycrystalline is 4.5K for x =0.4. Single crystals of Sn1-xInxTe were also grown by the floating zone method, and their magnetic properties were characterized.

  15. Organic photovoltaic films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Nelson

    2002-05-01

    The last two years have seen an unprecedented growth of interest in solar cells made from organic electronic materials. This is partly due to the rapid growth of the photovoltaic market1, which has stimulated research into longer term, more innovative photovoltaic technologies, and partly to the development of organic electronic materials for display applications. The rapid progress in optoelectronic molecular materials has introduced a range of potential new photovoltaic materials, as well as an improved understanding of the capabilities of such materials and confidence in their application2.

  16. Clean electricity from photovoltaics

    CERN Document Server

    Green, Martin A

    2015-01-01

    The second edition of Clean Electricity from Photovoltaics , first published in 2001, provides an updated account of the underlying science, technology and market prospects for photovoltaics. All areas have advanced considerably in the decade since the first edition was published, which include: multi-crystalline silicon cell efficiencies having made impressive advances, thin-film CdTe cells having established a decisive market presence, and organic photovoltaics holding out the prospect of economical large-scale power production. Contents: The Past and Present (M D Archer); Limits to Photovol

  17. Survey of photovoltaic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-08-01

    In developing this survey of photovoltaic systems, the University of Alabama in Huntsville assembled a task team to perform an extensive telephone survey of all known photovoltaic manufacturers. Three US companies accounted for 77% of the total domestic sales in 1978. They are Solarex Corporation, Solar Power Croporation, and ARCO Solar, Inc. This survey of solar photovoltaic (P/V) manufacturers and suppliers consists of three parts: a catalog of suppliers arranged alphabetically, data sheets on specific products, and typical operating, installation, or maintenance instructions and procedures. This report does not recommend or endorse any company product or information presented within as the results of this survey.

  18. Telluride films and waveguides for IR integrated optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barthelemy, Eleonore; Vigreux, Caroline; Pradel, Annie [Institut Charles Gerhardt Montpellier, UMR CNRS 5253, Universite Montpellier II, CC1503, 34095 Montpellier Cedex 5 (France); Parent, Gilles [Laboratoire d' Energetique et de Mecanique Theorique et Appliquee, Universite de Nancy-Lorraine, BP239, 54506 Vandoeuvre Les Nancy Cedex (France); Barillot, Marc [Thales Alenia Space, 100 Bld. du midi, BP99, 06156 Cannes La Bocca Cedex (France)

    2011-09-15

    The fabrication of micro-components for far infrared applications such as spatial interferometry requires the realization of single-mode channel waveguides being able to work in the infrared region. One of the key issues in case of channel waveguides is the selection of materials for the core layer. Amorphous telluride films are particularly attractive for their transparency in a large spectral domain in the infrared region. A second key issue is the selection of an appropriate method for film deposition. Indeed, waveguides for far infrared applications are characterized by a thick core layer (10-15 {mu}m, typically). The challenge is thus to select a deposition method which ensures the deposition of thick films of optical quality. In this paper, it is shown that thermal co-evaporation meets this challenge. In particular, it allows varying the composition of the films very easily and thus adjusting their optical properties (refractive index, optical band gap). The example of thermally co-evaporated Te-Ge films is given. Films with typical thickness of 7-15 {mu}m were elaborated. Their morphological, structural, thermal and optical properties were measured. A particular attention was paid to the checking of the film homogeneity. The realized waveguiding structures and their optical testing are then described. In particular, the first transmission measurements at 10.6 {mu}m are presented. In conclusion, the feasibility of micro-components based on the stacking and etching of chalcogenide films is demonstrated, opening the door to applications related to detection in the mid- and thermal infrared spectral domains (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Cytocompatibility of direct water synthesized cadmium selenide quantum dots in colo-205 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez-Torres, Marcos R.; Velez, Christian; Zayas, Beatriz; Rivera, Osvaldo; Arslan, Zikri; Gonzalez-Vega, Maxine N.; Diaz-Diestra, Daysi; Beltran-Huarac, Juan; Morell, Gerardo; Primera-Pedrozo, Oliva M.

    2015-01-01

    Cadmium selenide quantum dots (CdSe QDs), inorganic semiconducting nanocrystals, are alluring increased attraction due to their highly refined chemistry, availability, and super tunable optical properties suitable for many applications in different research areas, such as photovoltaics, light-emitting devices, environmental sciences, and nanomedicine. Specifically, they are being widely used in bio-imaging in contrast to organic dyes due to their high brightness and improved photo-stability, ...

  20. Cadmium in Sweden - environmental risks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkman, H.; Iverfeldt, Aa. [Swedish Environmental Research Inst. (Sweden); Borg, H.; Lithner, G. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Inst. for Applied Environmental Research

    1998-03-01

    This report aims at assessing possible effects of cadmium in the Swedish environment. Swedish soils and soft freshwater systems are, due to a generally poor buffering capacity, severely affected by acidification. In addition, the low salinity in the Baltic Sea imply a naturally poor organism structure, with some important organisms living close to their limit of physiological tolerance. Cadmium in soils is mobilized at low pH, and the availability and toxicity of cadmium in marine systems are enhanced at low salinity. The Swedish environment is therefore extra vulnerable to cadmium pollution. The average concentrations of cadmium in the forest mor layers, agricultural soils, and fresh-waters in Sweden are enhanced compared to `back-ground concentrations`, with a general increasing trend from the north to the south-west, indicating strong impact of atmospheric deposition of cadmium originating from the central parts of Europe. In Swedish sea water, total cadmium concentrations, and the fraction of bio-available `free` cadmium, generally increases with decreasing salinity. Decreased emissions of cadmium to the environment have led to decreasing atmospheric deposition during the last decade. The net accumulation of cadmium in the forest mor layer has stopped, and even started to decrease. In northern Sweden, this is due to the decreased deposition, but in southern Sweden the main reason is increased leakage of cadmium from the topsoil as a consequence of acidification. As a result, cadmium in the Swedish environments is undergoing an extended redistribution between different soil compartments, and from the soils to the aquatic systems. 90 refs, 23 figs, 2 tabs. With 3 page summary in Swedish

  1. Renal cadmium overload without nephrotoxicity.

    OpenAIRE

    1981-01-01

    A redundant nickel/cadmium battery worker was investigated for non-specific fatigue after completing five years in the industry. Sensitive techniques for in-vivo organ cadmium measurement showed a moderate accumulation in the liver but a very large concentration in the kidneys. Despite this, overall glomerular and tubular function were not impaired. It was concluded that the mechanism of proteinuria observed in some cadmium workers is obscure and not clearly related to the degree of kidney sa...

  2. Photovoltaic module and interlocked stack of photovoltaic modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wares, Brian S.

    2014-09-02

    One embodiment relates to an arrangement of photovoltaic modules configured for transportation. The arrangement includes a plurality of photovoltaic modules, each photovoltaic module including a frame. A plurality of individual male alignment features and a plurality of individual female alignment features are included on each frame. Adjacent photovoltaic modules are interlocked by multiple individual male alignment features on a first module of the adjacent photovoltaic modules fitting into and being surrounded by corresponding individual female alignment features on a second module of the adjacent photovoltaic modules. Other embodiments, features and aspects are also disclosed.

  3. Post-CMOS FinFET integration of bismuth telluride and antimony telluride thin-film-based thermoelectric devices on SoI substrate

    KAUST Repository

    Aktakka, Ethem Erkan

    2013-10-01

    This letter reports, for the first time, heterogeneous integration of bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) and antimony telluride (Sb 2Te3) thin-film-based thermoelectric ffect transistors) via a characterized TE-film coevaporationand shadow-mask patterning process using predeposition surface treatment methods for reduced TE-metal contact resistance. As a demonstration vehicle, a 2 × 2 mm2-sized integrated planar thermoelectric generator (TEG) is shown to harvest 0.7 μ W from 21-K temperature gradient. Transistor performance showed no significant change upon post-CMOS TEG integration, indicating, for the first time, the CMOS compatibility of the Bi2Te3 and Sb2Te3 thin films, which could be leveraged for realization of high-performance integrated micro-TE harvesters and coolers. © 2013 IEEE.

  4. CADMIUM – ENVIRONMENTAL HAZARD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henryka Langauer-Lewowicka

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents some information about current status of cadmium as an environmental health problem. Agricultural uses of phosphate fertilizers, sewage sludge and industrial uses of Cd are the major source of widespread of this metal at trace levels into the general environment and human foodstuffs. It is well known that high cadmium (Cd exposure causes renal damage, anemia, enteropathy, osteoporosis, osteomalacia, whereas the dose-response relationship at low levels exposure is less established. During the last decade an increasing number of studies have found an adverse health effects due to low environmental exposure to Cd. Many authors try to determine the relationship between Cd intake and Cd toxicity indicators, especially dealing renal tubular damage. The level of b2-microglobulin in urine is regarded as the most sensitive biomarker of renal disfunction due to low environmental Cd concentrations.

  5. Photovoltaic solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, Gregory N; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Resnick, Paul J

    2013-11-26

    A photovoltaic solar cell for generating electricity from sunlight is disclosed. The photovoltaic solar cell comprises a plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions formed in a semiconductor body to receive the sunlight and generate the electicity therefrom, the plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions having a first plurality of regions having a first doping type and a second plurality of regions having a second doping type. In addition, the photovoltaic solar cell comprises a first electrical contact electrically connected to each of the first plurality of regions and a second electrical contact electrically connected to each of the second plurality of regions, as well as a passivation layer covering major surfaces and sidewalls of the photovoltaic solar cell.

  6. Photovoltaic solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, Gregory N; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Okandan, Murat; Resnick, Paul J

    2014-05-20

    A photovoltaic solar cell for generating electricity from sunlight is disclosed. The photovoltaic solar cell comprises a plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions formed in a semiconductor body to receive the sunlight and generate the electricity therefrom, the plurality of spaced-apart point contact junctions having a first plurality of regions having a first doping type and a second plurality of regions having a second doping type. In addition, the photovoltaic solar cell comprises a first electrical contact electrically connected to each of the first plurality of regions and a second electrical contact electrically connected to each of the second plurality of regions, as well as a passivation layer covering major surfaces and sidewalls of the photovoltaic solar cell.

  7. Photonic Design for Photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kosten, E.; Callahan, D.; Horowitz, K.; Pala, R.; Atwater, H.

    2014-08-28

    We describe photonic design approaches for silicon photovoltaics including i) trapezoidal broadband light trapping structures ii) broadband light trapping with photonic crystal superlattices iii) III-V/Si nanowire arrays designed for broadband light trapping.

  8. Speciation of Dissolved Cadmium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Peter Engelund; Andersen, Sjur; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1995-01-01

    Equilibrium dialysis and ion exchange methods, as well as computer calculations (GEOCHEM), were applied for speciation of dissolved cadmium (Cd) in test solutions and leachate samples. The leachate samples originated from soil, compost, landfill waste and industrial waste. The ion exchange (IE...... leachates showed different Cd speciation patterns as expected. Some leachates were dominated by free divalent Cd (1-70%), some by inorganic complexes (1-87%), and some by organic complexes (7-98%)....

  9. Plastic photovoltaic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Niyazi Serdar Sariciftci

    2004-01-01

    The development of organic, polymer-based photovoltaic elements has introduced the possibility of obtaining cheap and easy-to-produce energy from light. Photoinduced electron transfer from donor-type semiconducting polymers onto acceptor-type polymers or molecules, such as C60, is the basic phenomenon utilized in these photovoltaic devices. This process mimics the early photo-effects in natural photosynthesis. The polymeric semiconductors combine the photoelectrical properties of inorganic se...

  10. Photovoltaic systems and applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    Abstracts are given of presentations given at a project review meeting held at Albuquerque, NM. The proceedings cover the past accomplishments and current activities of the Photovoltaic Systems Research, Balance-of-System Technology Development and System Application Experiments Projects at Sandia National Laboratories. The status of intermediate system application experiments and residential system analysis is emphasized. Some discussion of the future of the Photovoltaic Program in general, and the Sandia projects in particular is also presented.

  11. Photovoltaic barometer; Barometre photovoltaique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon

    2009-04-15

    spain and Germany set the pace for the world photovoltaic market in 2008, which grew to more than twice its 2007 size. The European Union continued to drive photocell installation with an additional 4 592.3 MWp in 2008, or 151.6% growth over 2007. However, European growth prospects for the photovoltaic market in 2009 are being dampened by the global financial crisis and the scheduled slow-down of the Spanish market. (author)

  12. Customized color patterning of photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis; Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Lentine, Anthony L.; Resnick, Paul J.; Gupta, Vipin P.

    2016-11-15

    Photovoltaic cells and photovoltaic modules, as well as methods of making and using such photovoltaic cells and photovoltaic modules, are disclosed. More particularly, embodiments of the photovoltaic cells selectively reflect visible light to provide the photovoltaic cells with a colorized appearance. Photovoltaic modules combining colorized photovoltaic cells may be used to harvest solar energy while providing a customized appearance, e.g., an image or pattern.

  13. Photovoltaic mounting/demounting unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention relates to a photovoltaic arrangement comprising a photovoltaic assembly comprising a support structure defining a mounting surface onto which a photovoltaic module is detachably mounted; and a mounting/demounting unit comprising at least one mounting/demounting apparatus...... which when the mounting/demounting unit is moved along the mounting surface, causes the photovoltaic module to be mounted or demounted to the support structure; wherein the photovoltaic module comprises a carrier foil and wherein a total thickness of the photo voltaic module is below 500 muiotaeta....... The present invention further relates to an associated method for mounting/demounting photovoltaic modules....

  14. Electrodeposition of bismuth telluride thermoelectric films from a nonaqueous electrolyte using ethylene glycol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, H.P.; Wu, M.; Su, J.; Vullers, R.J.M.; Vereecken, P.M.; Fransaer, J.

    2012-01-01

    Ethylene glycol was studied as an electrolyte for the electrodeposition of thermoelectric bismuth telluride films by cyclic voltammetry, rotating ring disk electrode and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM). The reduction of both Bi3+ and Te4+ ions proceeds in one step without the form

  15. Structural Engineering of Vacancy Defected Bismuth Tellurides for Thermo-electric Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Termentzidis, K.; Pokropivny, A.; Xiong, S.-Y.; Chumakov, Y.; Cortona, P.; Volz, S.

    2012-10-01

    Molecular Dynamics and ab-initio simulations are used to find the most stable stoichiometries of Bismuth Tellurides with vacancy defects. The interest is to decrease the thermal conductivity of these compounds a key point to achieve high figure of merits. A reduction of 70% of the thermal conductivity is observed with Te vacancies of only 5%.

  16. Low-temperature, template-free synthesis of single-crystal bismuth telluride nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purkayastha, A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Lupo, F. [Max Planck Institut fuer Metallforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 3, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Kim, S.; Borca-Tasciuc, T. [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Ramanath, G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Max Planck Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Heisenbergstrasse 1, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2006-02-17

    Synthesis of single-crystal bismuth telluride nanorods is reported by using a low-temperature, template-free approach. Films of thioglycolic acid functionalized nanorods doped with sulfur exhibit n-type behavior with a high Seebeck coefficient, holding promise for thermoelectric device applications. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Structural Engineering of Vacancy Defected Bismuth Tellurides for Thermo-electric Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chumakov Y.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Molecular Dynamics and ab-initio simulations are used to find the most stable stoichiometries of Bismuth Tellurides with vacancy defects. The interest is to decrease the thermal conductivity of these compounds a key point to achieve high figure of merits. A reduction of 70% of the thermal conductivity is observed with Te vacancies of only 5%.

  18. Is cadmium hazardous to health. Cadmium - ein Gesundheitsrisiko

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zartner-Nyilas, G.; Valentin, H.; Schaller, K.H.; Schiele, R.

    1983-01-01

    This study entitled ''Is cadmium hazardous to health'' summarizes the current state of knowledge on and experience with cadmium. The authors have made efforts to take into account the more recent literature relating to cadmium. The data evaluated were, especially, biological, toxicological, and epidemiological ones. A principal object was to try to assess the importance of the presence of cadmium in the environment to man. The interest was focused on the uptake of heavy metals with food, danger thresholds for the cadmium exposure of the population, nature and extent of eventual damage to health including possible carcinogenous effects, and suggestions for further points of main emphasis in research. 3 figs., 12 tabs.

  19. Solar-energy conversion by combined photovoltaic converters with CdTe and CuInSe{sub 2} base layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khrypunov, G. S., E-mail: khrip@ukr.net; Sokol, E. I. [National Technical University “Kharkiv Polytechnic Institute” (Ukraine); Yakimenko, Yu. I. [National Technical University “Kyiv Polytechnic Institute”, Research Institute of Applied Electronics (Ukraine); Meriuts, A. V. [National Technical University “Kharkiv Polytechnic Institute” (Ukraine); Ivashuk, A. V. [National Technical University “Kyiv Polytechnic Institute”, Research Institute of Applied Electronics (Ukraine); Shelest, T. N. [National Technical University “Kharkiv Polytechnic Institute” (Ukraine)

    2014-12-15

    The possibility of the combined use of bifacial thin-film solar cells based on CdTe and frontal solar cells with a CuInSe{sub 2} base layer in tandem structures is experimentally confirmed. It is found that, for the use of bifacial solar cells based on cadmium telluride in a tandem structure, the optimal thickness of their base layer should be 1 μm. The gain in the efficiency of the tandem structure, compared with an individual CuInSe{sub 2}-based solar cell, is 1.8% in the case of series-connected solar cells and 1.3%, for parallel-connected.

  20. Mercury cadmium telluride (HgCdTe) passivation by advanced thin conformal Al2O3 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Richard; Pattison, James; Chen, Andrew; Nayfeh, Osama

    2012-06-01

    HgCdTe passivation process must be performed at low temperature in order to reduce Hg depletion. Low temperature plasma enhanced atomic layer deposition (PE-ALD) is an emerging deposition technology for thin highly conformal films to meet the demand. Room temperature PE-ALD Al2O3 film's passivation on HgCdTe has been studied. Conformal film was investigated through SEM images of the Al2O3 film deposited onto high aspect ratio features dry etched into HgCdTe. Minority carrier lifetime was measured and compared by photoconductive decay transients of HgCdTe before and after deposition. Room temperature ALD Al2O3 film increased the minority carrier lifetime of HgCdTe.

  1. Special characteristics of fluorescence and resonance Rayleigh scattering for cadmium telluride nanocrystal aqueous solution and its interactions with aminoglycoside antibiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    CdTe nanocrystals(CdTe NCs) were achieved by reaction of CdCl2 with KHTe solution and were capped with sodium mercaptoacetate.The product was detected by transmission electron microscopy(TEM),high-resolution transmission electron microscopy(HRTEM),energy dispersive spectroscopy(EDS),fluorescence spectra,ultraviolet-visible spectra and X-ray diffraction(XRD).The CdTe NCs are of cubic structure and the average size is about 5 nm.The fluorescence quantum yield of CdTe NCs aqueous solution increased from 37% to 97% after 20 d under room light.The maximum λem of fluorescence changed from 543 nm to 510 nm and the blue shift was 33 nm.CdTe NCs aqueous solution can be steady for at least 10 months at 4℃ in a refrigerator.The resonance Rayleigh scattering(RRS) of CdTe NCs in the aqueous solution was investigated.The maximum scattering peak was located at about 554 nm.The interactions of CdTe NCs with amikacin sulfate(AS) and micronomicin sulfate(MS) were investigated respectively.The effects of AS and MS on fluorescence and RRS of CdTe NCs were analyzed.It was found that AS and MS quenched the photoluminescence of CdTe NCs and enhanced RRS of CdTe NCs.Under optimum conditions,there are linear relationships between quenching intensity(F0-F),intensity of RRS(I-I0) and concentration of AS and MS.The detection limits(3б) of AS and MS are respectively 3.4 ng·mL-1 and 2.6 ng·mL-1 by the fluorescence quenching method,and 15.2 ng·mL-1 and 14.0 ng·mL-1 by the RRS method.The methods have high sensitivity,thus CdTe NCs may be used as fluorescence probes and RRS probes for the detection of aminoglycoside antibiotics.

  2. a Cdlts Study of the Deep Levels in n- and P - Cadmium Telluride Thin Films Deposited by Hot Wall Evaporation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginting, Masno

    CdTe thin films, both undoped and with different dopants, have been deposited unto graphite and Corning 7059 glass substrates using a Three-Stage Hot Wall Vacuum Evaporator (TSHWVE) system. The dopants were incorporated into the CdTe thin films using a "delta doping" technique. The conductivity type of the doped CdTe thin films was determined using the hot probe method, and the film stoichiometry was determined using X-ray and Auger electron spectroscopy measurements. Schottky diodes fabricated on the CdTe thin films that were deposited on graphite substrates have been studied using Current-Voltage (I-V), Capacitance-Voltage (C-V), and Capacitance Deep Level Transient Spectroscopy (CDLTS). The conductivity type of CdTe films that were undoped and doped with Antimony (Sb), Phosphorus (P), Gold (Au), Silver (Ag), and Copper (Cu) were found to be p-type, while Indium (In) doped CdTe thin films were found to be n-type. The highest carrier concentration of the CdTe films are 1 times 10^ {16} cm^{-3} , 1 times 10^ {17} cm^{-3} , and 7.5 times 10 ^{15} cm^{ -3} for In-, Sb-, and P-doped CdTe, respectively. For the In-doped CdTe films three majority carrier trap are found with activation energies measured from the conduction band of 0.23 +/- 0.05 eV, 0.46 +/- 0.06 eV, and 0.78 +/- 0.05 eV. For the Sb-doped CdTe films three majority carrier traps are found with activation energies measured from the valence band of 0.27 +/- 0.06 eV, 0.50 +/- 0.06 eV, and 0.80 +/- 0.06 eV. For the P-doped CdTe films three majority carrier traps are found with activation energies measured from the valence band of 0.28 +/- 0.05 eV, 0.50 +/- 0.06 eV and 0.75 +/- 0.05 eV. Our capture measurements on In-, Sb-, and P-doped CdTe showed non-exponential transients, however they could be fitted very well by Pons theory, and allowed us to determine values for the trap concentration (N_{ rm T}), the trap capture rate (c _{rm n,p}) and the trap capture cross-section (sigma_{rm n,p}). However, the capture cross-sections so derived are approximately two orders of magnitude smaller than estimates given in the literature earlier. (Abstract shortened by UMI.).

  3. Gated tomographic radionuclide angiography using cadmium-zinc-telluride detector gamma camera; comparison to traditional gamma cameras

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Maria Maj; Schmidt, Ulla; Huang, Chenxi

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Estimation of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) with equilibrium 99MTc-HSA equilibrium radionuclide angiography (MUGA) is frequently used for assessing cardiac function. The purpose of this study was to compare intra- and interobserver variation between three different gamma...... of agreement between each sequence of analyses for each of the three cameras. RESULTS: The lowest intraobserver variations in LVEF for the two NaI-detector cameras were 3.1% (-4.0% to 3.5%) for the planar and 3.4% (-4.2% to 4.5%) for SPECT (P ≤ 0.001-0.019), the highest result for the CZT SPECT camera was 2.......6% (-2.9% to 3.1%). Similarly, interobserver variation was 4.8% (-4.8% to 6.4%) and 4.9% (-5.4% to 7.5%), respectively, for each of the NaI-detector cameras and 3.3% (-3.4% to 4.3%) for the CZT SPECT camera (P ≤ 0.001-0.008). DISCUSSION: The CZT detector camera was superior to both NaI detector cameras...

  4. Micro-Raman and UV-VIS Studies of 100 MeV Ni4+ Irradiated Cadmium Telluride Thin Films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neelam Pahwa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available CdTe thin films grown by thermal evaporation on quartz substrates were irradiated with Swift (100 MeV Ni 4 + ions for fluences in the range 1.0 × 1011 - 1.0 × 1013 cm – 2. The modification in the structure and optical properties has been studied as a function of ion fluence using Micro-Raman spectroscopy and UV-VIS spectroscopy. In Micro Raman spectrum, weak LO and TO modes of CdTe and A1 & E modes of Te were observed with blue shift which was found to increase with increase in fluence. Intensity of these modes decreased with increase in ion fluence. UV-transmission showed pronounced interference fringes, indicating a good quality of the films. The bandgap was found to increase in the range 1.4-1.75 eV with increase in fluence.

  5. The ^{55}Fe X-ray Energy Response of Mercury Cadmium Telluride Near-Infrared Detector Arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Fox, Ori D; Wen, Yiting; Foltz, Roger D; Hill, Robert J; Kimble, Randy A; Malumuth, Eliot; Rauscher, Bernard J

    2009-01-01

    A technique involving ^{55}Fe X-rays provides a straightforward method to measure the response of a detector. The detector's response can lead directly to a calculation of the conversion gain (e^- ADU^{-1}), as well as aid detector design and performance studies. We calibrate the ^{55}Fe X-ray energy response and pair production energy of HgCdTe using 8 HST WFC3 1.7 \\micron flight grade detectors. The results show that each K$\\alpha$ X-ray generates 2273 \\pm 137 electrons, which corresponds to a pair-production energy of 2.61 \\pm 0.16 eV. The uncertainties are dominated by our knowledge of the conversion gain. In future studies, we plan to eliminate this uncertainty by directly measuring conversion gain at very low light levels.

  6. Special characteristics of fluorescence and resonance Rayleigh scattering for cadmium telluride nanocrystal aqueous solution and its interactions with aminoglycoside antibiotics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI TaiShan; LIU ShaoPu; LIU ZhongFang; HU XiaoLi; ZHANG LiPing

    2009-01-01

    CdTe nanocrystals (CdTe NCs) were achieved by reaction of CdCl2 with KHTe solution and were capped with sodium mercaptoacetate. The product was detected by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), fluorescence spectra, ultraviolet-visible spectra and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The CdTe NCs are of cubic structure and the average size is about 5 nm. The fluorescence quantum yield of CdTe NCs aqueous solution increased from 37% to 97% after 20 d under room light. The maximum λem of fluorescence changed from 543 nm to 510 nm and the blue shift was 33 nm. CdTe NCs aqueous solution can be steady for at least 10 months at 4℃ in a refrigerator. The resonance Rayleigh scattering (RRS) of CdTe NCs in the aqueous solution was investigated. The maximum scattering peak was located at about 554 nm. The interactions of CdTe NCs with amikacin sulfate (AS) and micronomicin sulfate (MS) were in-vestigated respectively. The effects of AS and MS on fluorescence and RRS of CdTe NCs were analyzed. It was found that AS and MS quenched the photoluminescence of CdTe NCs and enhanced RRS of CdTe NCs. Under optimum conditions, there are linear relationships between quenching intensity (F0-F), intensity of RRS (1-10) and concentration of AS and MS. The detection limits (3σ) of AS and MS are re-spectively 3.4 ng.mL-1 and 2.6 ng.mL-1 by the fluorescence quenching method, and 15.2 ng.mL-1 and 14.0 ng.mL-1 by the RRS method. The methods have high sensitivity, thus CdTe NCs may be used as fluorescence probes and RRS probes for the detection of aminoglycoside antibiotics.

  7. Cadmium exposure in the Swedish environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-01

    This report gives a thorough description of cadmium in the Swedish environment. It comprises three parts: Cadmium in Sweden - environmental risks;, Cadmium in goods - contribution to environmental exposure;, and Cadmium in fertilizers, soil, crops and foods - the Swedish situation. Separate abstracts have been prepared for all three parts

  8. Cadmium carcinogenesis – some key points

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    The article presents briefly the main mechanisms of cadmium carcinogenesis and the most important sites of cancer (lung, breast, prostate, testes, kidney) induced by cadmium. In spite of some evidence showing carcinogenic potential of cadmium, further research is still required to elucidate the relative contributions of various molecular mechanisms involved in cadmium carcinogenesis

  9. Cadmium carcinogenesis – some key points

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loreta Strumylaite

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The article presents briefly the main mechanisms of cadmium carcinogenesis and the most important sites of cancer (lung, breast, prostate, testes, kidney induced by cadmium. In spite of some evidence showing carcinogenic potential of cadmium, further research is still required to elucidate the relative contributions of various molecular mechanisms involved in cadmium carcinogenesis

  10. Nanostructured conjugated polymers for photovoltaic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Dongjuan

    reported and tested. The drawbacks of using these polythiophene nanotube arrays will be analyzed based on the photovoltaic performance. Interdigitated hybrid solar cells based on directly deposited cadmium sulfide nanorods arrays will also be reported. Both pre-formed and in-situ electropolymerized conjugated polymers are investigated as photo-absorbers. Photoluminescence quenching study shows obvious dependence of exciton dissociation on the aspect ratio of the nanorod arrays. Raman spectrum and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy will be applied to study the interface between conjugated polymers and the nanorod arrays. The advantages and drawbacks of using pre-formed or in-situ electropolymerized conjugated polymers will be analyzed and discussed.

  11. Benchmarking concentrating photovoltaic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duerr, Fabian; Muthirayan, Buvaneshwari; Meuret, Youri; Thienpont, Hugo

    2010-08-01

    Integral to photovoltaics is the need to provide improved economic viability. To achieve this goal, photovoltaic technology has to be able to harness more light at less cost. A large variety of concentrating photovoltaic concepts has provided cause for pursuit. To obtain a detailed profitability analysis, a flexible evaluation is crucial for benchmarking the cost-performance of this variety of concentrating photovoltaic concepts. To save time and capital, a way to estimate the cost-performance of a complete solar energy system is to use computer aided modeling. In this work a benchmark tool is introduced based on a modular programming concept. The overall implementation is done in MATLAB whereas Advanced Systems Analysis Program (ASAP) is used for ray tracing calculations. This allows for a flexible and extendable structuring of all important modules, namely an advanced source modeling including time and local dependence, and an advanced optical system analysis of various optical designs to obtain an evaluation of the figure of merit. An important figure of merit: the energy yield for a given photovoltaic system at a geographical position over a specific period, can be calculated.

  12. International Photovoltaic Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, D.; Koontz, R.; Posner, D.; Heiferling, P.; Carpenter, P.; Forman, S.; Perelman, L.

    1979-12-01

    The International Photovoltaics Program Plan is in direct response to the Solar Photovoltaic Energy Research, Development, and Demonstration Act of 1978 (PL 95-590). As stated in the Act, the primary objective of the plan is to accelerate the widespread use of photovoltaic systems in international markets. Benefits which could result from increased international sales by US companies include: stabilization and expansion of the US photovoltaic industry, preparing the industry for supplying future domestic needs; contribution to the economic and social advancement of developing countries; reduced world demand for oil; and improvements in the US balance of trade. The plan outlines programs for photovoltaic demonstrations, systems developments, supplier assistance, information dissemination/purchaser assistance, and an informaion clearinghouse. Each program element includes tactical objectives and summaries of approaches. A program management office will be established to coordinate and manage the program plan. Although the US Department of Energy (DOE) had the lead responsibility for preparing and implementing the plan, numerous federal organizations and agencies (US Departments of Commerce, Justice, State, Treasury; Agency for International Development; ACTION; Export/Import Bank; Federal Trade Commission; Small Business Administration) were involved in the plan's preparation and implementation.

  13. Dual-channel optical sensing platform for detection of diminazene aceturate based on thioglycolic acid-wrapped cadmium telluride/cadmium sulfide quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Chenxia; Zhou, Tao; Liu, Shaopu; Wang, Linlin; Huang, Bowen; Kuang, Nianxi; He, Youqiu

    2016-06-15

    A dual-channel optical sensing platform which combines the advantages of dual-wavelength overlapping resonance Rayleigh scattering (DWO-RRS) and fluorescence has been designed for the detection of diminazene aceturate (DA). It is based on the use of thioglycolic acid-wrapped CdTe/CdS quantum dots (Q-dots). In the absence of DA, the thioglycolic acid-wrapped CdTe/CdS Q-dots exhibit the high fluorescence spectrum and low RRS spectrum, so are selected to develop an easy-to-get system. In the presence of DA, the thioglycolic acid-wrapped CdTe/CdS Q-dots and DA form a complex through electrostatic interaction, which result in the RRS intensity getting enhanced significantly with new RRS peaks appearing at 317 and 397 nm; the fluorescence is powerfully quenched. Under optimum conditions, the scattering intensities of the two peaks are proportional to the concentration of DA in the range of 0.0061-3.0 μg mL(-1). The detection limits for the two single peaks are 4.1 ng mL(-1) and 3.3 ng mL(-1), while that of the DWO-RRS method is 1.8 ng mL(-1), indicating that the DWO-RRS method has high sensitivity. Besides, the fluorescence also exhibits good linear range from 0.0354 to 10.0 μg mL(-1) with a detection limit of 10.6 ng mL(-1). In addition, the system has been applied to the detection of DA in milk samples with satisfactory results.

  14. Laser generated nanoparticles based photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petridis, C; Savva, K; Kymakis, E; Stratakis, E

    2017-03-01

    The exploitation of nanoparticles (NP), synthesized via laser ablation in liquids, in photovoltaic devices is reviewed. In particular, the impact of NPs' incorporation into various building blocks within the solar cell architecture on the photovoltaic performance and stability is presented and analysed for the current state of the art photovoltaic technologies.

  15. Photovoltaic Subcontract Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Surek, Thomas; Catalano, Anthony

    1993-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal year (FY) 1992 progress of the subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R D) performed under the Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL)-formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The mission of the national PV program is to develop PV technology for large-scale generation of economically competitive electric power in the United States. The technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontract program: the Crystalline Materials and Advanced Concepts project, the Polycrystalline Thin Films project, Amorphous Silicon Research project, the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project, PV Module and System Performance and Engineering project, and the PV Analysis and Applications Development project. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1992, and future research directions.

  16. Photovoltaic programme - edition 2003

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This publication issued by the Swiss Federal Office of Energy's Photovoltaics (PV) Programme presents an overview (in English) of activities and projects in the photovoltaics research and pilot and demonstration area in Switzerland. Progress in the area of future solar cell technologies, modules and building integration, system technologies, planning and operating aids is summarised. Also, PV for applications in developing countries, thermo-photovoltaics and international co-operation are commented on. In the area of pilot and demonstration projects, component development, PV integration in sloping roofs, on flat roofs and noise barriers as well as further PV plant are looked at. Also, measurement campaigns, studies, statistics and further PV-related topics are summarised. This volume also presents the abstracts of reports made by the project managers of 73 research and pilot and demonstration projects in these areas for 2002.

  17. Photovoltaic barometer; Barometre photovoltaique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    2011-04-15

    The photovoltaic sector is continuing on track, just as the extent of solar energy's electricity-generating potential is dawning on the public mind. The annual global installation figure was up more than twofold in 2010 (rising from just short of 7000 MWp in 2009). It leapt to over 16000 MWp, bringing worldwide installed photovoltaic capacity close to 38000 MWp. The photovoltaic power generated in the European Union at the end of 2010 reached 22.5 TWh which means an additional capacity of 13023 MWp during 2010. Concerning the cumulated installed capacity, Germany and Spain rank first and second in the European Union with respectively 17370 MWp and 3808 MWp

  18. Photovoltaic systems in Patagonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawand, T.A. [McGill Univ., Ste. Anne de Bellevue, PQ (Canada). Brace Research Inst., Macdonald Coll; Rapallini, A. [MR Consultores, Buenos Aires, (Argentina); Pedro, G. [Ente Provincial de Energia del Neuquen, Neuquen, (Argentina)

    1998-05-01

    The feasibility of using of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems in the remote cold areas of the Neuquen province in Argentina was discussed. A program was developed by the local public utility to provide schools with electricity using photovoltaic panels. The PV systems have replaced expensive diesel generators which had become unreliable. In the first phase of the program, 27 schools were electrified using photovoltaic panels, battery storage systems and simple control panels. A review of the performance of the system components under the harsh climatic conditions of the region was discussed. The program has been expanded to include about 50 family systems. Another 150 are projected for the near future. 3 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  19. Three-dimensional photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Bryan; Bernardi, Marco; Grossman, Jeffrey C.

    2010-03-01

    The concept of three-dimensional (3D) photovoltaics is explored computationally using a genetic algorithm to optimize the energy production in a day for arbitrarily shaped 3D solar cells confined to a given area footprint and total volume. Our simulations demonstrate that the performance of 3D photovoltaic structures scales linearly with height, leading to volumetric energy conversion, and provides power fairly evenly throughout the day. Furthermore, we show that optimal 3D shapes are not simple box-like shapes, and that design attributes such as reflectivity can be optimized in new ways using three-dimensionality.

  20. Photovoltaic systems overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, J. L.

    1981-01-01

    Selected photovoltaic systems currently under user-environment field test by the U.S. Department of Energy Photovoltaics Program are discussed, and operational results are summarized. There are many systems in the stand-alone sector that are cost effective now. As proven products become available, distributed residential, commercial, institutional and industrial on-site systems should be able to displace significant amounts of centrally-generated electricity throughout most of the United States. Finally, utilities should ultimately be able to augment their generating capacity with larger-scale systems. Field experience and industry interface has led to excellent overall product performance.

  1. The DOE photovoltaics program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferber, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    The considered program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has the objective to provide federal support for research and development work related to photovoltaics. According to definitions of policy in 1981, a strong emphasis is to be placed on long-term, high-risk research and development that industry could not reasonably be expected to perform using their own funds. Attention is given to the program structure, the photovoltaics program management organization, the advanced research and development subprogram, the collector research and development subprogram, flat-plate collectors, concentrator collectors, and the systems research and technology subprogram.

  2. Asphaltene based photovoltaic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chianelli, Russell R.; Castillo, Karina; Gupta, Vipin; Qudah, Ali M.; Torres, Brenda; Abujnah, Rajib E.

    2016-03-22

    Photovoltaic devices and methods of making the same, are disclosed herein. The cell comprises a photovoltaic device that comprises a first electrically conductive layer comprising a photo-sensitized electrode; at least one photoelectrochemical layer comprising metal-oxide particles, an electrolyte solution comprising at least one asphaltene fraction, wherein the metal-oxide particles are optionally dispersed in a surfactant; and a second electrically conductive layer comprising a counter-electrode, wherein the second electrically conductive layer comprises one or more conductive elements comprising carbon, graphite, soot, carbon allotropes or any combinations thereof.

  3. Photovoltaic array performance model.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kratochvil, Jay A.; Boyson, William Earl; King, David L.

    2004-08-01

    This document summarizes the equations and applications associated with the photovoltaic array performance model developed at Sandia National Laboratories over the last twelve years. Electrical, thermal, and optical characteristics for photovoltaic modules are included in the model, and the model is designed to use hourly solar resource and meteorological data. The versatility and accuracy of the model has been validated for flat-plate modules (all technologies) and for concentrator modules, as well as for large arrays of modules. Applications include system design and sizing, 'translation' of field performance measurements to standard reporting conditions, system performance optimization, and real-time comparison of measured versus expected system performance.

  4. Photovoltaic Solar Energy Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetzberger, Adolf; Hoffmann, Volker U.

    This comprehensive description and discussion of photovoltaics (PV) is presented at a level that makes it accessible to the interested academic. Starting with an historical overview, the text outlines the relevance of photovoltaics today and in the future. Then follows an introduction to the physical background of solar cells and the most important materials and technologies, with particular emphasis placed on future developments and prospects. The book goes beyond technology by also describing the path from the cell to the module to the system, proceeding to important applications such as grid-connected and stand-alone systems.

  5. Distributed photovoltaic grid transformers

    CERN Document Server

    Shertukde, Hemchandra Madhusudan

    2014-01-01

    The demand for alternative energy sources fuels the need for electric power and controls engineers to possess a practical understanding of transformers suitable for solar energy. Meeting that need, Distributed Photovoltaic Grid Transformers begins by explaining the basic theory behind transformers in the solar power arena, and then progresses to describe the development, manufacture, and sale of distributed photovoltaic (PV) grid transformers, which help boost the electric DC voltage (generally at 30 volts) harnessed by a PV panel to a higher level (generally at 115 volts or higher) once it is

  6. Concentrating photovoltaic solar panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cashion, Steven A; Bowser, Michael R; Farrelly, Mark B; Hines, Braden E; Holmes, Howard C; Johnson, Jr., Richard L; Russell, Richard J; Turk, Michael F

    2014-04-15

    The present invention relates to photovoltaic power systems, photovoltaic concentrator modules, and related methods. In particular, the present invention features concentrator modules having interior points of attachment for an articulating mechanism and/or an articulating mechanism that has a unique arrangement of chassis members so as to isolate bending, etc. from being transferred among the chassis members. The present invention also features adjustable solar panel mounting features and/or mounting features with two or more degrees of freedom. The present invention also features a mechanical fastener for secondary optics in a concentrator module.

  7. Cadmium immobilization by hydroxyapatite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smičiklas Ivana D.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The contamination of air, soil and water by cadmium is a great environmental problem. If cadmium occurs in nature in ionic form, soluble in water, it easily enters into the food chain. Hydroxyapatite (HAP, Ca-o(POAe(OH2 is a sparingly soluble salt and an excellent matrix for the removal of heavy metals from solutions. Considerable research attention has been paid to the bond between Cc/2+ ions and synthetic hydroxyapatite of known composition. The sorption mechanism is complex. The dominant process is ion exchange, but surface adsorption, surface complexation and coprecipitation can also contribute to the overall mechanism. The sorption capacity depends on the characteristics of hydroxyapatite itself and on the experimental conditions. Under optimum conditions a maximum capacity of 0.8 mol Cd2+/mol HAP can be achieved. HAP is a potential sorbent for the remediation of contaminated water and soil, for industrial waste treatment, and it is also referenced as a material that can be used as a barrier around waste depositories.

  8. Photovoltaics fundamentals, technology and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Mertens, Konrad

    2013-01-01

    Concise introduction to the basic principles of solar energy, photovoltaic systems, photovoltaic cells, photovoltaic measurement techniques, and grid connected systems, overviewing the potential of photovoltaic electricity for students and engineers new to the topic After a brief introduction to the topic of photovoltaics' history and the most important facts, Chapter 1 presents the subject of radiation, covering properties of solar radiation, radiation offer, and world energy consumption. Chapter 2 looks at the fundamentals of semiconductor physics. It discusses the build-up of semiconducto

  9. Interfaces in nanoscale photovoltaics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Öner, S.Z.

    2016-01-01

    This thesis deals with material interfaces in nanoscale photovoltaics. Interface properties between the absorbing semiconductor and other employed materials are crucial for an efficient solar cell. While the optical properties are largely unaffected by a few nanometer thin layer, the electronic prop

  10. Autonomous photovoltaic lighting system

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed A. A. Hafez; Montesinos Miracle, Daniel; Sudrià Andreu, Antoni

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a comparison between the conventional and Photovoltaic (PV) lighting systems. A simple sizing procedure for a PV stand-alone system was advised. The paper also proposes a novel PV lighting system. The proposed system is simple, compact and reliable. The system operation was investigated by thoroughly mathematical and simulation work.

  11. BMDO photovoltaics program overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caveny, Leonard H.; Allen, Douglas M.

    1994-01-01

    This is an overview of the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) Photovoltaic Program. Areas discussed are: (1) BMDO advanced Solar Array program; (2) Brilliant Eyes type satellites; (3) Electric propulsion; (4) Contractor Solar arrays; (5) Iofee Concentrator and Cell development; (6) Entech linear mini-dome concentrator; and (7) Flight test update/plans.

  12. Photovoltaics in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, K.

    1985-01-01

    Report surveys status of research and development on photovoltaics in Japan. Report based on literature searches, private communications, and visits by author to Japanese facilities. Included in survey are Sunshine Project, national program to develop energy sources; industrial development at private firms; and work at academic institutions.

  13. Modelling the Photovoltaic Module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katsanevakis, Markos

    2011-01-01

    This paper refers into various ways in simulation the Photovoltaic (PV) module behaviour under any combination of solar irradiation and ambient temperature. There are three different approaches presented here briefly and one of them is chosen because of its good accuracy and relatively low...

  14. Photovoltaics (Fact Sheet)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program

    2011-10-13

    DOE works with national labs, academia, and industry to support the domestic photovoltaics (PV) industry and research enterprise. SunShot aims to achieve widespread, unsubsidized cost-competitiveness through an applied research and development (R&D) portfolio spanning PV materials, devices, and manufacturing technologies.

  15. Photovoltaic solar; Solaire photovoltaique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-01-01

    This study aims to observe, from european examples, the local governments policies in matter of the photovoltaic development. This approach is very different for each town. The first part evaluates the initiatives, the second part is devoted to the global situation in Europe and the third part brings recommendations. (A.L.B.)

  16. Cadmium effects on the thyroid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jancic, Snezana A; Stosic, Bojan Z

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium has been listed as one of the 126 priority pollutants and a category I carcinogen. Carcinogenic effects of cadmium on the lungs, testicles, and prostate are widely recognized, but there has been insufficient research on the effect of cadmium on the thyroid gland. Cadmium has the affinity to accumulate not only in the liver, kidneys, and pancreas but also in the thyroid gland. It has been established that cadmium blood concentration correlates positively with its accumulation in the thyroid gland. Women of fertile age have higher cadmium blood and urine concentrations than men. In spite of its redox inertia, cadmium brings about oxidative stress and damage to the tissue by indirect mechanisms. Mitochondria are considered to be the main intracellular targets for cadmium. Colloid cystic goiter, adenomatoid follicular hyperplasia with low-grade dysplasia and thyroglobulin hypo- and asecretion, and parafollicular cell diffuse and nodular hyperplasia and hypertrophy are often found in chronic cadmium toxicity.

  17. Synthesis of copper telluride nanowires using template-based electrodeposition method as chemical sensor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sandeep Arya; Saleem Khan; Suresh Kumar; Rajnikant Verma; Parveen Lehana

    2013-08-01

    Copper telluride (CuTe) nanowires were synthesized electrochemically from aqueous acidic solution of copper (II) sulphate (CuSO4.5H2O) and tellurium oxide (TeO2) on a copper substrate by template-assisted electrodeposition method. The electrodeposition was conducted at 30 °C and the length of nanowires was controlled by adjusting deposition time. Structural characteristics were examined using X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope which confirm the formation of CuTe nanowires. Investigation for chemical sensing was carried out using air and chloroform, acetone, ethanol, glycerol, distilled water as liquids having dielectric constants 1, 4.81, 8.93, 21, 24.55, 42.5 and 80.1, respectively. The results unequivocally prove that copper telluride nanowires can be fabricated as chemical sensors with enhanced sensitivity and reliability.

  18. Kelvin probe studies of cesium telluride photocathode for the AWA photoinjector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Velazquez, D.; Wisniewski, E. E.; Yusof, Z.; Harkay, K.; Spentzouris, L.; Terry, J. [Physics Department at Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL 60616 and High Energy Physics Division at Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); High Energy Physics Division at Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Accelerator Science Division at Argonne National Laboratory, Lemont, IL 60439 (United States); Physics Department at Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States)

    2012-12-21

    Cesium telluride is an important photocathode as an electron source for particle accelerators. It has a relatively high quantum efficiency (> 1%), is robust in a photoinjector, and long lifetime. This photocathode is fabricated in-house for a new Argonne Wakefield Accelerator (AWA) beamline to produce high charge per bunch ({approx}50 nC) in a long bunch train. We present some results from a study of the work function of cesium telluride photocathode using the Kelvin Probe technique. The study includes an investigation of the correlation between the quantum efficiency and the work function, the effect of photocathode aging, the effect of UV light exposure on the work function, and the evolution of the work function during and after photocathode rejuvenation via heating.

  19. Synthesis of lead telluride particles by thermal decomposition method for thermoelectric applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leontyev, V.G.; Ivanova, L.D. [Institution of Russian Academy of Sciences A.A. Baikov Institute of Metallurgy and Material Science RAS, Leninskii prospect, 49, 119991 Moscow (Russian Federation); Bente, K.; Lazenka, V.V. [Institut fuer Mineralogie, Kristallographie und Materialwissenschaft, Leipzig University, Scharnhorst str. 20, 04275 Leipzig (Germany); Gremenok, V.F. [Scientific-Practical Materials Research Centre of the NAS of Belarus, P. Brovka str. 19, 220072 Minsk (Belarus)

    2012-06-15

    The lead telluride fine crystalline particles were synthesized using thermal decomposition and chemical interaction of lead acetate and tellurium powder mixture in reducing atmosphere (H{sub 2}). For the process control, thermal gravimetry (TG), the different-scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), electronic microscopy (SEM) and measurements of the specific surface of particles were used. Additionally the influence of gas phases on the decomposition kinetics, crystal structure, size, specific surface of the particles and the physical properties were analyzed. Seebeck coefficient values increased with decreasing synthesis temperature and increasing specific surfaces of the powder. The presented method of preparing lead telluride polydisperse particles is developed to create nano-structured thermoelectric materials with high figure of merit. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Ab initio lattice dynamics and thermochemistry of layered bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurhelle, Alexander F.; Deringer, Volker L.; Stoffel, Ralf P.; Dronskowski, Richard

    2016-03-01

    We present density-functional theory calculations of the lattice dynamics of bismuth telluride, yielding force constants, mean-square displacements and partial densities of phonon states which corroborate and complement previous nuclear inelastic scattering experiments. From these data, we derive an element- and energy-resolved view of the vibrational anharmonicity, quantified by the macroscopic Grüneisen parameter γ which results in 1.56. Finally, we calculate thermochemical properties in the quasiharmonic approximation, especially the heat capacity at constant pressure and the enthalpy of formation for bismuth telluride; the latter arrives at ▵H f (Bi2Te3)  =  -102 kJ mol-1 at 298 K.

  1. General Situations of Development of Photovoltaic Agriculture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaohang; ZHANG; Shoufu; CUI; Fuping; LIU

    2015-01-01

    This paper firstly introduced policy of photovoltaic agriculture in China. It discussed significance of developing photovoltaic agriculture. Then,it introduced progress in application of photovoltaic agriculture at both home and abroad. Finally,it pointed out existing problems in photovoltaic agriculture and came up with recommendations for development of photovoltaic agriculture in China.

  2. Enrichment of cadmium in biomasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwenner, C.; Wittig, H.; Glombitza, F.

    1986-01-01

    The uptake of cadmium ions from an aqueous solution by living, resting, and dead biomasses was investigated. The dependence of the uptaked amounts on pH-value of the medium, temperature and concentration of cadmium ions is demonstrated as well as the rate of uptake. Maximum realisable concentrations were 12 mg/g biomass in living cells and about 20 mg/g biomass in resting or dead cells, respectively.

  3. Aqueous-solution route to zinc telluride films for application to CO₂ reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ji-Wook; Cho, Seungho; Magesh, Ganesan; Jang, Youn Jeong; Kim, Jae Young; Kim, Won Yong; Seo, Jeong Kon; Kim, Sungjee; Lee, Kun-Hong; Lee, Jae Sung

    2014-06-01

    As a photocathode for CO2 reduction, zinc-blende zinc telluride (ZnTe) was directly formed on a Zn/ZnO nanowire substrate by a simple dissolution-recrystallization mechanism without any surfactant. With the most negative conduction-band edge among p-type semiconductors, this new photocatalyst showed efficient and stable CO formation in photoelectrochemical CO2 reduction at -0.2--0.7 V versus RHE without a sacrificial reagent.

  4. The heat capacity of solid antimony telluride Sb2Te3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pashinkin, A. S.; Malkova, A. S.; Mikhailova, M. S.

    2008-05-01

    The literature data on the heat capacity of solid antimony telluride over the range 53 895 K were analyzed. The heat capacity of Sb2Te3 was measured over the range 350 700 K on a DSM-2M calorimeter. The equation for the temperature dependence was suggested. The thermodynamic functions of Sb2Te3 were calculated over the range 298.15 700 K.

  5. Photovoltaic module and interlocked stack of photovoltaic modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wares, Brian S.

    2012-09-04

    One embodiment relates to an arrangement of photovoltaic modules configured for transportation. The arrangement includes a plurality of photovoltaic modules, each photovoltaic module including a frame having at least a top member and a bottom member. A plurality of alignment features are included on the top member of each frame, and a plurality of alignment features are included on the bottom member of each frame. Adjacent photovoltaic modules are interlocked by the alignment features on the top member of a lower module fitting together with the alignment features on the bottom member of an upper module. Other embodiments, features and aspects are also disclosed.

  6. Three-phase Photovoltaic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kerekes, Tamas; Sera, Dezso; Máthé, Lászlo

    2015-01-01

    the grid through a three-phase power electronic converter are now well on the way to becoming a major player in the power system in many countries. Therefore, this article gives an overview of photovoltaic systems with a focus on three-phase applications, presenting these both from a hardware point of view......Photovoltaic technology has experienced unprecedented growth in the last two decades, transforming from mainly off-grid niche generation to a major renewable energy technology, reaching approximately 180 GW of capacity worldwide at the end of 2014. Large photovoltaic power plants interfacing......, detailing the different photovoltaic inverter structures and topologies as well as discussing the different control layers within a grid-connected photovoltaic plant. Modulation schemes for various photovoltaic inverter topologies, grid synchronization, current control, active and reactive power control...

  7. Photovoltaic solar energy conversion

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, Gottfried H

    2015-01-01

    This concise primer on photovoltaic solar energy conversion invites readers to reflect on the conversion of solar light into energy at the most fundamental level and encourages newcomers to the field to help find meaningful answers on how photovoltaic solar energy conversion can work (better), eventually contributing to its ongoing advancement. The book is based on lectures given to graduate students in the Physics Department at the University of Oldenburg over the last two decades, yet also provides an easy-to-follow introduction for doctoral and postdoctoral students from related disciplines such as the materials sciences and electrical engineering. Inspired by classic textbooks in the field, it reflects the author’s own ideas on how to understand, visualize and eventually teach the microscopic physical mechanisms and effects, while keeping the text as concise as possible so as to introduce interested readers to the field and balancing essential knowledge with open questions.

  8. Photovoltaic prospects in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starr, M. R.

    The economics of solar cells is reviewed with an eye to potential cost reductions in processing, and potential markets are explored. Current solar cell systems costs are noted to be on the road to achieving the U.S. DoE goals of $0.40/kWp by 1990. Continued progress will depend on technical developments in cheaper materials and processes, scaling up production, and the success of sales programs. Various consumer and professional markets are outlined, with a prediction that a 12 MWp deman will be reached as a steady state by 1995. Photovoltaic panels may conceivably replace conventional roofing materials, resulting in the projection that, if grid-supplied power continues to inflate in price, then all new European homes would be equipped with photovoltaics by the year 2000. Further, accomplishment of the cost goals could generate a 1 GWp/yr industrial market at the same time.

  9. Photovoltaic Solar Energy Generation

    CERN Document Server

    Lotsch, H.K.V; U.Hoffmann, Volker; Rhodes, William T; Asakura, Toshimitsu; Brenner, Karl-Heinz; Hänsch, Theodor W; Kamiya, Takeshi; Krausz, Ferenc; Monemar, Bo; Venghaus, Herbert; Weber, Horst; Weinfurter, Harald

    2005-01-01

    This comprehensive description and discussion of photovoltaics (PV) is presented at a level that makes it accessible to the interested academic. Starting with an historical overview, the text outlines the relevance of photovoltaics today and in the future. Then follows an introduction to the physical background of solar cells and the most important materials and technologies, with particular emphasis placed on future developments and prospects. The book goes beyond technology by also describing the path from the cell to the module to the system, proceeding to important applications, such as grid-connected and stand-alone systems. The composition and development of the markets and the role of PV in future energy systems are also considered. Finally, the discussion turns to the future structure of energy supplies, expected to comprise more distributed generation, and addresses synergies and competition from other carbon-free energy sources.

  10. Inverted organic photovoltaic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Liu, Chang; Meng, Tianyu; Yi, Chao; Gong, Xiong

    2016-05-21

    The advance in lifestyle, modern industrialization and future technological revolution are always at high expense of energy consumption. Unfortunately, there exist serious issues such as limited storage, high cost and toxic contamination in conventional fossil fuel energy sources. Instead, solar energy represents a renewable, economic and green alternative in the future energy market. Among the photovoltaic technologies, organic photovoltaics (OPVs) demonstrate a cheap, flexible, clean and easy-processing way to convert solar energy into electricity. However, OPVs with a conventional device structure are still far away from industrialization mainly because of their short lifetime and the energy-intensive deposition of top metal electrode. To address the stability and cost issue simultaneously, an inverted device structure has been introduced into OPVs, bridging laboratory research with practical application. In this review, recent progress in device structures, working mechanisms, functions and advances of each component layer as well their correlations with the efficiency and stability of inverted OPVs are reviewed and illustrated.

  11. Zinc-induced protection against cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Early, J.L.; Schnell, R.C.

    1978-02-01

    Pretreatment of male rats with cadmium acetate potentiates the duration of hexobarbital hypnosis and inhibits the rate of hepatic microsomal drug metabolism. Pretreatment of rats with zinc acetate protects against these alterations in drug action elicited by cadmium.

  12. Photovoltaics. III - Concentrators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backus, C. E.

    1980-02-01

    Photovoltaic concentration systems that redirect sunlight falling on a surface to a smaller solar-cell surface concentrating the intensity of sunlight many times are examined. It is noted that solar cells for concentrating systems must be designed for low internal resistance as well as for high sunlight intensities. Two designs of silicon cells are presented that perform well at high concentrations; these are interdigitated back-contact cells and vertical multijunction cells. Attention is given to heat tapping of reemitted light.

  13. Photovoltaic systems. Program summary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-12-01

    Each of the Department of Energy's Photovoltaic Systems Program projects funded and/or in existence during fiscal year 1978 (October 1, 1977 through September 30, 1978) are described. The project sheets list the contractor, principal investigator, and contract number and funding and summarize the programs and status. The program is divided into various elements: program assessment and integration, research and advanced development, technology development, system definition and development, system application experiments, and standards and performance criteria. (WHK)

  14. Increased voltage photovoltaic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, B.; Bickler, D. B.; Gallagher, B. D. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell, such as a solar cell, is provided which has a higher output voltage than prior cells. The improved cell includes a substrate of doped silicon, a first layer of silicon disposed on the substrate and having opposite doping, and a second layer of silicon carbide disposed on the first layer. The silicon carbide preferably has the same type of doping as the first layer.

  15. Photovoltaic cell array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliason, J. T. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A photovoltaic cell array consisting of parallel columns of silicon filaments is described. Each fiber is doped to produce an inner region of one polarity type and an outer region of an opposite polarity type to thereby form a continuous radial semi conductor junction. Spaced rows of electrical contacts alternately connect to the inner and outer regions to provide a plurality of electrical outputs which may be combined in parallel or in series.

  16. Design of photovoltaic systems

    OpenAIRE

    Laso Martínez, Miguel

    2014-01-01

    Photovoltaic (PV) harvesting of solar energy is based on capturing sunlight and transforming it into electricity. This type of electricity generation does not pollute the environment as much as other types of energy production, that is why nowadays some engineers would like to improve it. To carry out this change we use solar cells made of semiconductor materials (Silicon) in which it is artificially created a permanent electric field. These cells are connected in series or par...

  17. Photovoltaic sources modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Petrone, Giovanni; Spagnuolo, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    This comprehensive guide surveys all available models for simulating a photovoltaic (PV) generator at different levels of granularity, from cell to system level, in uniform as well as in mismatched conditions. Providing a thorough comparison among the models, engineers have all the elements needed to choose the right PV array model for specific applications or environmental conditions matched with the model of the electronic circuit used to maximize the PV power production.

  18. Do photovoltaics have a future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, B. F.

    1979-01-01

    There is major concern as to the economic practicality of widespread terrestrial use because of the high cost of the photovoltaic arrays themselves. Based on their high efficiency, photovoltaic collectors should be one of the cheapest forms of energy generators known. Present photovoltaic panels are violating the trend of lower costs with increasing efficiency due to their reliance on expensive materials. A medium technology solution should provide electricity competitive with the existing medium to high technology energy generators such as oil, coal, gas, and nuclear fission thermal plants. Programs to reduce the cost of silicon and develop reliable thin film materials have a realistic chance of producing cost effective photovoltaic panels.

  19. Quantum Dot Based Photovoltaics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Hybrid photovoltaic cells that combine nanostructured inorganic semiconductors with organic conductors such as the cell proposed, show promise for energy generation...

  20. Solar photovoltaics for development applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepperd, L.W. [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cape Canaveral, FL (United States); Richards, E.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-08-01

    This document introduces photovoltaic technology to individuals and groups specializing in development activities. Examples of actual installations illustrate the many services supplied by photovoltaic systems in development applications, including water pumping, lighting, health care, refrigeration, communications, and a variety of productive uses. The various aspects of the technology are explored to help potential users evaluate whether photovoltaics can assist them in achieving their organizational goals. Basic system design, financing techniques, and the importance of infrastructure are included, along with additional sources of information and major US photovoltaic system suppliers.

  1. Quo Vadis photovoltaics 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jäger-Waldau A.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Since more than 10 years photovoltaics is one of the most dynamic industries with growth rates well beyond 40% per annum. This growth is driven not only by the progress in materials knowledge and processing technology, but also by market introduction programmes in many countries around the world. Despite the negative impacts on the economy by the financial crisis since 2009, photovoltaics is still growing at an extraordinary pace and had in 2010 an extraordinary success, as both production and markets doubled. The open question is what will happen in 2011 and the years after as the situation is dominated by huge manufacturing overcapacities and an increasing unpredictability of policy support. How can the PV industry continue their cost reduction to ensure another 10 to 20 years of sustained and strong growth necessary to make PV to one of the main pillars of a sustainable energy supply in 2030. Despite the fact, that globally the share of electricity from photovoltaic systems is still small, at local level it can be already now above 30% of the demand at certain times of the year. Future research in PV has to provide intelligent solutions not only on the solar cell alone, but also on the module and the system integration level in order to permit a 5 to 10% share of electricity in 2020.

  2. Photovoltaic self-assembly.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavin, Judith; Kemp, Richard Alan; Stewart, Constantine A.

    2010-10-01

    This late-start LDRD was focused on the application of chemical principles of self-assembly on the ordering and placement of photovoltaic cells in a module. The drive for this chemical-based self-assembly stems from the escalating prices in the 'pick-and-place' technology currently used in the MEMS industries as the size of chips decreases. The chemical self-assembly principles are well-known on a molecular scale in other material science systems but to date had not been applied to the assembly of cells in a photovoltaic array or module. We explored several types of chemical-based self-assembly techniques, including gold-thiol interactions, liquid polymer binding, and hydrophobic-hydrophilic interactions designed to array both Si and GaAs PV chips onto a substrate. Additional research was focused on the modification of PV cells in an effort to gain control over the facial directionality of the cells in a solvent-based environment. Despite being a small footprint research project worked on for only a short time, the technical results and scientific accomplishments were significant and could prove to be enabling technology in the disruptive advancement of the microelectronic photovoltaics industry.

  3. Quo Vadis photovoltaics 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jäger-Waldau, A.

    2011-10-01

    Since more than 10 years photovoltaics is one of the most dynamic industries with growth rates well beyond 40% per annum. This growth is driven not only by the progress in materials knowledge and processing technology, but also by market introduction programmes in many countries around the world. Despite the negative impacts on the economy by the financial crisis since 2009, photovoltaics is still growing at an extraordinary pace and had in 2010 an extraordinary success, as both production and markets doubled. The open question is what will happen in 2011 and the years after as the situation is dominated by huge manufacturing overcapacities and an increasing unpredictability of policy support. How can the PV industry continue their cost reduction to ensure another 10 to 20 years of sustained and strong growth necessary to make PV to one of the main pillars of a sustainable energy supply in 2030. Despite the fact, that globally the share of electricity from photovoltaic systems is still small, at local level it can be already now above 30% of the demand at certain times of the year. Future research in PV has to provide intelligent solutions not only on the solar cell alone, but also on the module and the system integration level in order to permit a 5 to 10% share of electricity in 2020.

  4. Photovoltaic module reliability workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mrig, L. (ed.)

    1990-01-01

    The paper and presentations compiled in this volume form the Proceedings of the fourth in a series of Workshops sponsored by Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI/DOE) under the general theme of photovoltaic module reliability during the period 1986--1990. The reliability Photo Voltaic (PV) modules/systems is exceedingly important along with the initial cost and efficiency of modules if the PV technology has to make a major impact in the power generation market, and for it to compete with the conventional electricity producing technologies. The reliability of photovoltaic modules has progressed significantly in the last few years as evidenced by warranties available on commercial modules of as long as 12 years. However, there is still need for substantial research and testing required to improve module field reliability to levels of 30 years or more. Several small groups of researchers are involved in this research, development, and monitoring activity around the world. In the US, PV manufacturers, DOE laboratories, electric utilities and others are engaged in the photovoltaic reliability research and testing. This group of researchers and others interested in this field were brought together under SERI/DOE sponsorship to exchange the technical knowledge and field experience as related to current information in this important field. The papers presented here reflect this effort.

  5. Metallothionein and bioaccumulation of cadmium in juvenile bluegills exposed to aqueous and sediment-associated cadmium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cope, W.G.

    1991-01-01

    The author evaluated metallothionein (MT), free (unbound) hepatic cadmium and whole body cadmium as indicators of cadmium exposure in juvenile bluegills Lepomis macrochirus in laboratory tests. Two types of cadmium exposure were tested; aqueous and sediment-associated. In the aqueous tests, fish were exposed to cadmium (0.0 to 32.3 [mu]g/L) in an intermittent-flow diluter. In the sediment-associated cadmium test, fish were exposed to resuspended river sidment containing 1.3 to 21.4 [mu]g Cd/g (dry weight) at a nominal total suspended solids concentration of 1,000 mg/L in revolving, circular glass exposure chambers. Total cadmium concentrations were measured in various bluegill liver fractions, whole bluegill, water, and resuspended sediment to assess the partitioning and bioaccumulation of cadmium after the tests. Mean concentrations of MT and free cadmium in bluegill livers and concentrations of cadmium in whole bluegills were positively correlated with aqueous cadmium concentration and were equally suitable as indicators of aqueous cadmium exposure. Sediment-associated cadmium was biologically available, but to a lesser extent than aqueous cadmium. Cadmium concentrations in whole bluegills exposed to resuspended river sediment were 1.5- to 3.5-fold the concentrations in bluegills in sediment-free controls. Free cadmium and MT concentrations in bluegill liver and whole-body cadmium concentrations in bluegills were positively correlated with the cadmium concentrations in filtered water, resuspended sediment, and bulk river sediment; however, whole-body cadmim concentrations were a more sensitive indicator of exposure to sediment-associated cadmium than either free cadmium or MT concentratons in liver.

  6. Bioavailability of cadmium from linseed and cocoa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Max; Sloth, Jens Jørgen; Rasmussen, Rie Romme

    In Denmark and EU the exposure of cadmium from food is at a level that is relatively close to the Tolerable Daily Intake (TDI). This report describes an investigation of the bioavailability of cadmium in selected food items known to contain high levels of cadmium. The purpose was to provide data ...... or crushed linseed nor the intake of cocoa and chocolate....

  7. Prospects and performance limitations for Cu-Zn-Sn-S-Se photovoltaic technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitzi, David B; Gunawan, Oki; Todorov, Teodor K; Barkhouse, D Aaron R

    2013-08-13

    While cadmium telluride and copper-indium-gallium-sulfide-selenide (CIGSSe) solar cells have either already surpassed (for CdTe) or reached (for CIGSSe) the 1 GW yr⁻¹ production level, highlighting the promise of these rapidly growing thin-film technologies, reliance on the heavy metal cadmium and scarce elements indium and tellurium has prompted concern about scalability towards the terawatt level. Despite recent advances in structurally related copper-zinc-tin-sulfide-selenide (CZTSSe) absorbers, in which indium from CIGSSe is replaced with more plentiful and lower cost zinc and tin, there is still a sizeable performance gap between the kesterite CZTSSe and the more mature CdTe and CIGSSe technologies. This review will discuss recent progress in the CZTSSe field, especially focusing on a direct comparison with analogous higher performing CIGSSe to probe the performance bottlenecks in Earth-abundant kesterite devices. Key limitations in the current generation of CZTSSe devices include a shortfall in open circuit voltage relative to the absorber band gap and secondarily a high series resistance, which contributes to a lower device fill factor. Understanding and addressing these performance issues should yield closer performance parity between CZTSSe and CdTe/CIGSSe absorbers and hopefully facilitate a successful launch of commercialization for the kesterite-based technology.

  8. Graphite-based photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagally, Max; Liu, Feng

    2010-12-28

    The present invention uses lithographically patterned graphite stacks as the basic building elements of an efficient and economical photovoltaic cell. The basic design of the graphite-based photovoltaic cells includes a plurality of spatially separated graphite stacks, each comprising a plurality of vertically stacked, semiconducting graphene sheets (carbon nanoribbons) bridging electrically conductive contacts.

  9. Oral cadmium chloride intoxication in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, O; Nielsen, J B; Svendsen, P

    1988-01-01

    Diethyldithiocarbamate (DDC) is known to alleviate acute toxicity due to injection of cadmium salts. However, when cadmium chloride was administered by the oral route, DDC enhanced rather than alleviated the acute toxicity; both oral and intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of DDC had this effect....... Thus, orally administered DDC enhanced cadmium-induced duodenal and ileal tissue damage and inhibition of peristalsis, as indicated by an increased intestinal transit time. At low cadmium doses, the whole-body retention of cadmium was increased by oral DDC administration. Intraperitoneally administered...

  10. Steady-State Screening-Photovoltaic Spatial Solitons in the Biased Photorefractive-Photovoltaic Crystals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Ke-Qing; ZHANG Yan-Peng; TANG Tian-Tong; LU Zhi-Xian; LIU Lin

    2001-01-01

    The theory of the screening-photovoltaic solitons is improved in biased photorefractive-photovoltaic crystals. When the photovoltaic effect is negligible, the screening-photovoltaic solitons are the screening ones, and their space-charge field is the space-charge field of the screening solitons. If the external field is absent, the screening photovoltaic solitons are the photovoltaic ones on the open- and closed-circuit conditions, and their space-charge field is of the photovoltaic solitons. We also show theoretically that the screening and the photovoltaic solitons on the open- and closed-circuit conditions may be studies together as the screening-photovoltaic solitons.

  11. Formation of Semimetallic Cobalt Telluride Nanotube Film via Anion Exchange Tellurization Strategy in Aqueous Solution for Electrocatalytic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Supriya A; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Shrestha, Nabeen K; Chang, Jinho; Lee, Joong Kee; Han, Sung-Hwan

    2015-11-25

    Metal telluride nanostructures have demonstrated several potential applications particularly in harvesting and storing green energy. Metal tellurides are synthesized by tellurization process performed basically at high temperature in reducing gas atmosphere, which makes the process expensive and complicated. The development of a facile and economical process for desirable metal telluride nanostructures without complicated manipulation is still a challenge. In an effort to develop an alternative strategy of tellurization, herein we report a thin film formation of self-standing cobalt telluride nanotubes on various conducting and nonconducting substrates using a simple binder-free synthetic strategy based on anion exchange transformation from a thin film of cobalt hydroxycarbonate nanostructures in aqueous solution at room temperature. The nanostructured films before and after ion exchange transformation reaction are characterized using field emission scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray analyzer, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thin film X-ray diffraction technique, high resolution transmission electron microscope, and selected area electron diffraction analysis technique. After the ion exchange transformation of nanostructures, the film shows conversion from insulator to highly electrical conductive semimetallic characteristic. When used as a counter electrode in I3(-)/I(-) redox electrolyte based dye-sensitized solar cells, the telluride film exhibits an electrocatalytic reduction activity for I3(-) with a demonstration of solar-light to electrical power conversion efficiency of 8.10%, which is highly competitive to the efficiency of 8.20% exhibited by a benchmarked Pt-film counter electrode. On the other hand, the telluride film electrode also demonstrates electrocatalytic activity for oxygen evolution reaction from oxidation of water.

  12. Arsenic-cadmium interaction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Barriga, F; Llamas, E; Mejía, J J; Carrizales, L; Santoyo, M E; Vega-Vega, L; Yáñez, L

    1990-11-01

    Simultaneous exposure to cadmium and arsenic is highly probable in the urban area of San Luis Potosi, Mexico due to common localization of copper and zinc smelters. Therefore, in this work, rats were intraperitoneally exposed either to cadmium or arsenic alone, or simultaneously to both metals. The effects of these treatments on three different toxicological parameters were studied. Cadmium modified the LD50 of arsenic and conversely arsenic modified the LD50 for cadmium. At the histopathological level, arsenic appeared to protect against the cadmium effects, especially on testes. This protective effect seemed to be related to the glutathione levels found in this tissue: rats exposed to both arsenic and cadmium, presented glutathione values intermediate to those observed after exposure to either metal alone; arsenic had the highest value and cadmium the lowest. In liver, rats exposed to arsenic, cadmium or arsenic and cadmium, presented glutathione values below those in the saline group, with the lowest value corresponding to the arsenic and cadmium treatment. The results appear to support the proposed interaction between arsenic and cadmium and coexposure to both metals seems to alter certain effects produced by either metal alone.

  13. Feasibility of preparing patterned molybdenum coatings on bismuth telluride thermoelectric modules.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarobol, Pylin; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Miller, Stephen Samuel; Knight, Marlene E.; LePage, William S.; Sobczak, Catherine Elizabeth.; Wesolowski, Daniel Edward

    2013-09-01

    Molybdenum electrical interconnects for thermoelectric modules were produced by air plasma spraying a 30%CE%BCm size molybdenum powder through a laser-cut Kapton tape mask. Initial feasibility demonstrations showed that the molybdenum coating exhibited excellent feature and spacing retention (~170%CE%BCm), adhered to bismuth-telluride, and exhibited electrical conductivity appropriate for use as a thermoelectric module interconnect. A design of experiments approach was used to optimize air plasma spray process conditions to produce a molybdenum coating with low electrical resistivity. Finally, a molybdenum coating was successfully produced on a fullscale thermoelectric module. After the addition of a final titanium/gold layer deposited on top of the molybdenum coating, the full scale module exhibited an electrical resistivity of 128%CE%A9, approaching the theoretical resistivity value for the 6mm module leg of 112%CE%A9. Importantly, air plasma sprayed molybdenum did not show significant chemical reaction with bismuth-telluride substrate at the coating/substrate interface. The molybdenum coating microstructure consisted of lamellar splats containing columnar grains. Air plasma sprayed molybdenum embedded deeply (several microns) into the bismuth-telluride substrate, leading to good adhesion between the coating and the substrate. Clusters of round pores (and cracks radiating from the pores) were found immediately beneath the molybdenum coating. These pores are believed to result from tellurium vaporization during the spray process where the molten molybdenum droplets (2623%C2%B0C) transferred their heat of solidification to the substrate at the moment of impact. Substrate cooling during the molybdenum deposition process was recommended to mitigate tellurium vaporization in future studies.

  14. Insulin Expression in Rats Exposed to Cadmium

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effects of cadmium exposure on insulin expression in rats. Methods Eighteen adult SD assessed. The levels of cadmium and zinc in pancreas, blood and urine glucose, serum insulin and urine NAG (N-acyetyl-β-glucosaminidase) were determined. The gene expressions of metallothionein (MT) and insulin were also measured,and the oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) were carried out. Results The contents of cadmium in pancreas in cadmium-treated rats were higher than that in the control group, which was associated with slight increase of zinc in pancreas.not change significantly after cadmium administration, and the UNAG had no change in Cd-treated group. The gene expression the change of the expression of insulin, MT-Ⅰ and MT-Ⅱ genes. Cadmium can influence the biosynthesis of insulin, but does not induce the release of insulin. The dysfunction of pancreas occurs earlier than that of kidney after administration of cadmium.

  15. Experimental investigation to evaluate the potential environmental hazards of photovoltaic panels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tammaro, Marco; Salluzzo, Antonio; Rimauro, Juri; Schiavo, Simona; Manzo, Sonia

    2016-04-05

    Recently the potential environmental hazard of photovoltaic modules together with their management as waste has attracted the attention of scientists. Particular concern is aroused by the several metals contained in photovoltaic panels whose potential release in the environment were scarcely investigated. Here, for the first time, the potential environmental hazard of panels produced in the last 30 years was investigated through the assessment of up to 18 releasable metals. Besides, the corresponding ecotoxicological effects were also evaluated. Experimental data were compared with the current European and Italian law limits for drinking water, discharge on soil and landfill inert disposal in order to understand the actual pollution load. Results showed that less than 3% of the samples respected all law limits and around 21% was not ecotoxic. By considering the technological evolutions in manufacturing, we have shown that during the years crystalline silicon panels have lower tendency to release hazardous metals with respect to thin film panels. In addition, a prediction of the amounts of lead, chromium, cadmium and nickel releasable from next photovoltaic waste was performed. The prevision up to 2050 showed high amounts of lead (30t) and cadmium (2.9t) releasable from crystalline and thin film panels respectively.

  16. Experimental and theoretical investigations of cadmium diffusion in vacancy-rich Cu(In, Ga)Se2 material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biderman, Norbert J.

    Copper indium gallium selenide (Cu(In,Ga)Se2 or CIGS) has become a significant topic of research and development for photovoltaic application. CIGS photovoltaic devices have demonstrated record conversion efficiencies however are still below the maximum solar conversion efficiency. Losses in performance have been attributed structural defects including vacancies, doping, grain boundaries, and compositional non-uniformity that are poorly understood and controlled. The cadmium sulfide (CdS) buffer layer plays a critical role in high-performance CIGS photovoltaic devices, serving as the n-type component of the p-n junction formed with the p-type CIGS absorber layer. Cadmium diffusion into the CIGS surface during CdS deposition creates a buried p-n homojunction in addition to the CIGS/CdS p-n heterojunction. CdS is believed to assist in reducing carrier recombination at the CIGS/CdS interface, an important attribute of high-efficiency solar cells. In the present work, cadmium diffusion mechanisms in CIGS are experimentally investigated via secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Two cadmium diffusion profiles with distinct Arrhenius diffusion kinetics within a single depth profile of the CIGS thin film are observed with SIMS and AES: an intense first-stage diffusion profile directly below the CIGS/CdS interface and a long-range, second-stage diffusion profile that extends deep into the thin film. Cadmium grain boundary diffusion is also detected in fine-grain CIGS samples. These multiple diffusion processes are quantified in the present work, and the two-stage cadmium diffusion profiles suggest distinctive lattice diffusion mechanisms. Calculations and modeling of general impurity diffusion via interstitial sites in CIGS are also conducted via numerical including cadmium, iron, and zinc. In the numerical simulations, the standard diffusion-reaction kinetics theory is extended to vacancy-rich materials like CIGS that contain 1 at

  17. Lead telluride with increased mechanical stability for cylindrical thermoelectric generators; Bleitellurid mit erhoehter mechanischer Stabilitaet fuer zylindrische thermoelektrische Generatoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitz, Andreas

    2013-04-30

    The aim of this work is to improve the mechanical stability of lead telluride (PbTe), trying to vary its mechanical properties independently from its thermoelectric properties. Thus the influence of material preparation as well as different dopants on the mechanical and thermoelectric properties of lead telluride is being analysed. When using appropriately set process parameters, milling and sintering of lead telluride increases the material's hardness. With sintering temperatures exceeding 300 C stable material of high relative density can be achieved. Milling lead telluride generates lattice defects leading to a reduction of the material's charge carrier density. These defects can be reduced by increased sintering temperatures. Contamination of the powder due to the milling process leads to bloating during thermal cycling and thus reduced density of the sintered material. In addition to that, evaporation of tellurium at elevated temperatures causes instability of the material's thermoelectric properties. Based on the experimental results obtained in this work, the best thermoelectric and mechanical properties can be obtained by sintering coarse powders at around 400 C. Within this work a concept was developed to vary the mechanical properties of lead telluride via synthesis of PbTe with electrically nondoping elements, which thus may keep the thermoelectric properties unchanged. Therefore, the mechanical and thermoelectric properties of Pb{sub 1-x}Ca{sub x}Te were investigated. Doping pure PbTe with calcium causes a significant increase of the material's hardness while only slightly decreasing the charge carrier density and thus keeping the thermoelectric properties apart from a slight reduction of the electrical conductivity nearly unchanged. The abovementioned concept is proven using sodium doped lead telluride, as it is used for thermoelectric generators: The additional doping with calcium again increases the material's hardness while

  18. Air Stable Photovoltaic Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    , TiOx and ZnO; (c) providing the layer of metal oxide nanoparticles with a bulk hetero junction layer comprising metal oxide nanoparticles and a hole conducting polymer containing thermocleavable groups, wherein the metal oxide is selected from the group consisting of : TiO2, TiOx, CeO2, Nb2O5 and Zn......A method of forming a conducting polymer based photovoltaic device comprising the steps of : (a) providing a transparent first electrode; (b) providing the transparent first electrode with a layer of metal oxide nanoparticles, wherein the metal oxide is selected from the group consisting of : TiO2...

  19. Photovoltaic panel clamp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittan, Margaret Birmingham; Miros, Robert H. J.; Brown, Malcolm P.; Stancel, Robert

    2012-06-05

    A photovoltaic panel clamp includes an upper and lower section. The interface between the assembled clamp halves and the module edge is filled by a flexible gasket material, such as EPDM rubber. The gasket preferably has small, finger like protrusions that allow for easy insertion onto the module edge while being reversed makes it more difficult to remove them from the module once installed. The clamp includes mounting posts or an integral axle to engage a bracket. The clamp also may include a locking tongue to secure the clamp to a bracket.

  20. Optical waveguide enhanced photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühle, Sven; Greenwald, Shlomit; Koren, Elad; Zaban, Arie

    2008-12-22

    Enhanced light to electric power conversion efficiency of photovoltaic cells with a low absorbance was achieved using waveguide integration. We present a proof of concept using a very thin dye-sensitized solar cell which absorbed only a small fraction of the light at normal incidence. The glass substrate in conjunction with the solar cells reflecting back contact formed a planar waveguide, which lead to more than four times higher conversion efficiency compared to conventional illumination at normal incidence. This illumination concept leads to a new type of multi-junction PV systems based on enforced spectral splitting along the waveguide.

  1. Lifetime of organic photovoltaics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corazza, Michael; Krebs, Frederik C; Gevorgyan, Suren A.

    2015-01-01

    A comprehensive outdoor study of polymer solar cells and modules for duration of one year was conducted. Different sample geometries and encapsulations were employed in order to study the spread in the lifetimes. The study is a complimentary report to previous work that focused on indoor ageing...... tests. Comparison of the indoor and outdoor lifetimes was performed by means of the o-diagram, which constitutes the initial steps towards establishing a method for predicting the lifetime of an organic photovoltaic device under real operational conditions based on a selection of accelerated indoor...

  2. Photovoltaic system reliability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maish, A.B.; Atcitty, C. [Sandia National Labs., NM (United States); Greenberg, D. [Ascension Technology, Inc., Lincoln Center, MA (United States)] [and others

    1997-10-01

    This paper discusses the reliability of several photovoltaic projects including SMUD`s PV Pioneer project, various projects monitored by Ascension Technology, and the Colorado Parks project. System times-to-failure range from 1 to 16 years, and maintenance costs range from 1 to 16 cents per kilowatt-hour. Factors contributing to the reliability of these systems are discussed, and practices are recommended that can be applied to future projects. This paper also discusses the methodology used to collect and analyze PV system reliability data.

  3. Incoherently Coupled Grey Photovoltaic Spatial Soliton Families

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hong-Cheng; SHE Wei-Long

    2005-01-01

    @@ A theory is developed for incoherently coupled grey photovoltaic soliton families in unbiased photovoltaic crystals.Both the properties and the forming conditions of these soliton families are discussed in detail The theory canalso be used to investigate the dark photovoltaic soliton families. Some relevant examples are presented, in which the photovoltaic-photorefractive crystal is of lithium niobate type.

  4. High resolution X-ray diffraction imaging of lead tin telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, Bruce; Dobbyn, Ronald C.; Black, David; Burdette, Harold; Kuriyama, Masao; Spal, Richard; Simchick, Richard; Fripp, Archibald

    1991-01-01

    High resolution X-ray diffraction images of two directly comparable crystals of lead tin telluride, one Bridgman-grown on Space Shuttle STS 61A and the other terrestrially Bridgman-grown under similar conditions from identical material, present different subgrain structure. In the terrestrial, sample 1 the appearance of an elaborate array of subgrains is closely associated with the intrusion of regions that are out of diffraction in all of the various images. The formation of this elaborate subgrain structure is inhibited by growth in microgravity.

  5. Terahertz-field-induced second harmonic generation through Pockels effect in zinc telluride crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornet, Marion; Degert, Jérôme; Abraham, Emmanuel; Freysz, Eric

    2014-10-15

    We report on the second harmonic generation (SHG) of a near-infrared pulse in a zinc telluride crystal through the Pockels effect induced by an intense terahertz pulse. The temporal and angular behaviors of the SHG have been measured and agree well with theoretical predictions. This phenomenon, so far overlooked, makes it possible to generate second harmonic through cascading of two second-order nonlinear phenomena in the near-infrared and terahertz ranges. We also show how this cascading process can be used to sample terahertz pulses.

  6. Iron telluride nanorods-based system for the detection of total mercury in blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Prathik; Lin, Zong-Hong [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Liang, Chi-Te [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chang, Huan-Tsung, E-mail: changht@ntu.edu.tw [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, 1, Section 4, Roosevelt Road, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-15

    Graphical abstract: Elucidation of the detection of mercury using iron telluride nanorods (FeTe NRs), and dose-response curve for varying concentrations of Hg{sup 2+}. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Iron telluride nanorods (FeTe NRs) are prepared from tellurium nanowires (Te NWs). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mercury telluride nanorods (HgTe NRs) form by cation exchange reaction of FeTe NRs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fe{sup 2+} ions released catalyze the oxidation of ABTS by H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mercury is effectively determined in blood with an LOD of 1.31 nM at S/N ratio 3. - Abstract: We have developed a simple, colorimetric iron telluride (FeTe) nanorods (NRs) based system for the detection of mercury, mainly based on the cation exchange reaction between FeTe NRs and Hg{sup 2+}. FeTe NRs (length, 105 {+-} 21 nm) react with Hg{sup 2+} to form HgTe NRs (length, 112 {+-} 26 nm) and consequently release Fe{sup 2+} ions that catalyzes the oxidation between a peroxidase substrate 2,2 Prime -azino-bis(3-ethylbenzo-thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt (ABTS) and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The concentration of Fe{sup 2+} and thereby Hg{sup 2+} can be determined by measuring the absorbance of the ABTS oxidized product at 418 nm. This approach allows the detection of Hg{sup 2+}, with a limit of detection of 1.31 nM at a signal-to-noise ratio 3 and a linear range 5-100 nM (R{sup 2} = 0.99). The low-cost, simple, sensitive, and reproducible assay has been validated for the detection of Hg{sup 2+} in a blood sample (SRM 955c), with the result being in good agreement with that provided by National Institute of Standards and Technology.

  7. Photovoltaic Product Directory and Buyers Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, R.L.; Smith, S.A.; Dirks, J.A.; Mazzucchi, R.P.; Lee, V.E.

    1984-04-01

    The directory guide explains photovoltaic systems briefly and shows what products are available off-the-shelf. Information is given to assist in designing a photovoltaic system and on financial incentives. Help is given for determining if photovoltaic products can meet a particular buyer's needs, and information is provided on actual photovoltaic user's experiences. Detailed information is appended on various financial incentives available from state and federal governments, sources of additional information on photovoltaics, sources of various photovoltaic products, and a listing of addresses of photovoltaic products suppliers. (LEW)

  8. Photovoltaics information user study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marie, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

    1980-10-01

    The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on photovoltaics (PV) are described. These results, part of a larger study on many different solar technologies, identify types of information each group needed and the best ways to get information to each group. The report is 1 of 10 discussing study results. The overall study provides baseline data about information needs in the solar community. It covers these technological areas: photovoltaics, passive solar heating and cooling, active solar heating and cooling, biomass energy, solar thermal electric power, solar industrial and agricultural process heat, wind energy, ocean energy, and advanced energy storage. An earlier study identified the information user groups in the solar community and the priority (to accelerate solar energy commercialization) of getting information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from seven PV groups respondents are analyzed in this report: DOE-Funded Researchers, Non-DOE-Funded Researchers, Researchers Working for Manufacturers, Representatives of Other Manufacturers, Representatives of Utilities, Electric Power Engineers, and Educators.

  9. Nanocarbon-based photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardi, Marco; Lohrman, Jessica; Kumar, Priyank V; Kirkeminde, Alec; Ferralis, Nicola; Grossman, Jeffrey C; Ren, Shenqiang

    2012-10-23

    Carbon materials are excellent candidates for photovoltaic solar cells: they are Earth-abundant, possess high optical absorption, and maintain superior thermal and photostability. Here we report on solar cells with active layers made solely of carbon nanomaterials that present the same advantages of conjugated polymer-based solar cells, namely, solution processable, potentially flexible, and chemically tunable, but with increased photostability and the possibility to revert photodegradation. The device active layer composition is optimized using ab initio density functional theory calculations to predict type-II band alignment and Schottky barrier formation. The best device fabricated is composed of PC(70)BM fullerene, semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes, and reduced graphene oxide. This active-layer composition achieves a power conversion efficiency of 1.3%-a record for solar cells based on carbon as the active material-and we calculate efficiency limits of up to 13% for the devices fabricated in this work, comparable to those predicted for polymer solar cells employing PCBM as the acceptor. There is great promise for improving carbon-based solar cells considering the novelty of this type of device, the high photostability, and the availability of a large number of carbon materials with yet untapped potential for photovoltaics. Our results indicate a new strategy for efficient carbon-based, solution-processable, thin film, photostable solar cells.

  10. Photovoltaic programme, edition 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    This comprehensive publication issued by the Swiss Federal Office of Energy's Photovoltaics (PV) Programme presents an overview (in English) of activities and projects in the photovoltaics research and pilot and demonstration areas in Switzerland for the year 2003. Progress in future solar cell technologies as well as in the area of modules, building integration and system technologies is summarised. Also, national and international co-operation and multi-national pilot and demonstration projects are commented on. Associated projects such as eco-balances for PV systems, forecasting and modelling tools as well as system monitoring tools are discussed. In the area of pilot and demonstration projects, component development, PV integration in sloping roofs, on flat roofs and on facades as well as further PV plant are looked at. Also, measurement campaigns, studies, statistics and other PV-related topics are summarised. This volume presents a list of 92 projects in the PV area including the appropriate Internet links and is completed with a collection of project abstracts.

  11. Modulation of cadmium bioaccumulation and enhancing cadmium tolerance in Pichia kudriavzevii by sodium chloride preincubation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Li, Chunsheng; Zhang, Dandan; Yu, Jinzhi; Xu, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Application of growing microorganisms for cadmium removal is limited by the sensitivity of living cells to cadmium. The effects of sodium chloride (NaCl) preincubation on the cadmium bioaccumulation and tolerance of Pichia kudriavzevii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated in this study. NaCl preincubation significantly reduced the intracellular and cell-surface cadmium bioaccumulation of P. kudriavzevii at both 6 and 20 mg L(-1) cadmium, while no obvious effect was observed in S. cerevisiae except that the intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation at 20 mg L(-1) cadmium was reduced obviously by 20-60 g L(-1)  NaCl. For both yeasts, the improved contents of protein and proline after NaCl preincubation contributed to the cadmium tolerance. The thiol contents in P. kudriavzevii under cadmium stress were alleviated by NaCl preincubation, which might be due to the decrease of intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation. NaCl preincubation enhanced the contents of glycerol and trehalose in P. kudriavzevii under cadmium stress, while no acceleration was observed in S. cerevisiae. The results suggested that NaCl preincubation could be applied in cadmium removal by growing P. kudriavzevii to increase the cadmium tolerance of the yeast.

  12. Silicon processing for photovoltaics II

    CERN Document Server

    Khattak, CP

    2012-01-01

    The processing of semiconductor silicon for manufacturing low cost photovoltaic products has been a field of increasing activity over the past decade and a number of papers have been published in the technical literature. This volume presents comprehensive, in-depth reviews on some of the key technologies developed for processing silicon for photovoltaic applications. It is complementary to Volume 5 in this series and together they provide the only collection of reviews in silicon photovoltaics available.The volume contains papers on: the effect of introducing grain boundaries in silicon; the

  13. Photovoltaic module with adhesion promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xavier, Grace

    2013-10-08

    Photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters and methods for fabricating photovoltaic modules with adhesion promoters are described. A photovoltaic module includes a solar cell including a first surface and a second surface, the second surface including a plurality of interspaced back-side contacts. A first glass layer is coupled to the first surface by a first encapsulating layer. A second glass layer is coupled to the second surface by a second encapsulating layer. At least a portion of the second encapsulating layer is bonded directly to the plurality of interspaced back-side contacts by an adhesion promoter.

  14. Optimization of photovoltaic power systems

    CERN Document Server

    Rekioua, Djamila

    2012-01-01

    Photovoltaic generation is one of the cleanest forms of energy conversion available. One of the advantages offered by solar energy is its potential to provide sustainable electricity in areas not served by the conventional power grid. Optimisation of Photovoltaic Power Systems details explicit modelling, control and optimisation of the most popular stand-alone applications such as pumping, power supply, and desalination. Each section is concluded by an example using the MATLAB(R) and Simulink(R) packages to help the reader understand and evaluate the performance of different photovoltaic syste

  15. Facile production of thermoelectric bismuth telluride thick films in the presence of polyvinyl alcohol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, C; Burton, M R; Nandhakumar, I S

    2016-06-01

    Bismuth telluride is currently the best performing thermoelectric material for room temperature operations in commercial thermoelectric devices. We report the reproducible and facile production of 600 micron thick bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) layers by low cost and room temperature pulsed and potentiostatic electrodeposition from a solution containing bismuth and tellurium dioxide in 2 M nitric acid onto nickel in the presence of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). This was added to the electrolyte to promote thick layer formation and its effect on the structure, morphology and composition of the electrodeposits was investigated by SEM and EDX. Well adherent, uniform, compact and stoichiometric n-type Bi2Te3 films with a high Seebeck coefficient of up to -200 μV K(-1) and a high electrical conductivity of up to 400 S cm(-1) resulting in a power factor of 1.6 × 10(-3) W m(-1) K(-2) at film growth rates of 100 μm h(-1) for potentiostatic electrodeposition were obtained. The films also exhibited a well defined hexagonal structure as determined by XRD.

  16. Telluride buried channel waveguides operating from 6 to 20 μm for photonic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigreux, C.; Escalier, R.; Pradel, A.; Bastard, L.; Broquin, J.-E.; Zhang, X.; Billeton, T.; Parent, G.; Barillot, M.; Kirschner, V.

    2015-11-01

    One of the technological challenges of direct observation of extra-solar planets by nulling interferometry is the development of a modal filter operating from 6 to 20 μm. In the present paper a candidate technology for the fabrication of such modal filters is presented: Integrated Optics. A solution based on all-telluride buried channel waveguides is considered. In the proposed waveguides, vertical guiding of light is achieved by a 15 μm-thick Te83Ge17 core film deposited onto a lower-index Te75Ge15Ga10 substrate, and covered by a 15 μm-thick Te76Ge24 superstrate. Horizontal guiding of light is obtained by modifying the geometry of the core layer by ion beam etching. As this stage, all-telluride buried channel waveguide prototypes demonstrate light guiding and transmission from 2 to 20 μm. The validity of the technology and the good quality of the fabrication process, in particular the input and output facets surface finish are thus confirmed. These results consolidate the potential of Te-based integrated optics components for nulling interferometry.

  17. Electrowetting on dielectric-actuation of microdroplets of aqueous bismuth telluride nanoparticle suspensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dash, Raj K [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Borca-Tasciuc, T [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Purkayastha, A [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Ramanath, G [Materials Science and Engineering Department, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)

    2007-11-28

    This work reports the actuation of droplets of nanofluid by the electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD) effect. The nanofluid is comprised of an aqueous (deionized water) suspension of 3 nm diameter bismuth telluride nanoparticles capped with thioglycolic acid (TGA). Microdroplets of nanofluid are cast on Si(001) wafers coated with 100 nm thick layers of silicon dioxide and AF Teflon. Applying an electric field between the substrate and an electrode immersed in the nanofluid droplet results in a strong change in the contact angle from 110{sup 0} to 84{sup 0} for a 0-60 V voltage range. The droplets of nanofluid exhibit enhanced stability and absence of contact angle saturation in the tested voltage range when compared with droplets of aqueous solutions of 0.01 M Na{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or thioglycolic acid in deionized water. We propose that ion generation due to capping-agent desorption is a key factor determining the EWOD effect in the bismuth telluride nanofluid along with the nanoparticle contribution to charge transport. Our results open up new vistas for using nanofluids for microscale actuator device applications.

  18. A density-functional study on the electronic and vibrational properties of layered antimony telluride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, Ralf P.; Deringer, Volker L.; Simon, Ronnie E.; Hermann, Raphaël P.; Dronskowski, Richard

    2015-03-01

    We present a comprehensive survey of electronic and lattice-dynamical properties of crystalline antimony telluride (Sb2Te3). In a first step, the electronic structure and chemical bonding have been investigated, followed by calculations of the atomic force constants, phonon dispersion relationships and densities of states. Then, (macroscopic) physical properties of Sb2Te3 have been computed, namely, the atomic thermal displacement parameters, the Grüneisen parameter γ, the volume expansion of the lattice, and finally the bulk modulus B. We compare theoretical results from three popular and economic density-functional theory (DFT) approaches: the local density approximation (LDA), the generalized gradient approximation (GGA), and a posteriori dispersion corrections to the latter. Despite its simplicity, the LDA shows excellent performance for all properties investigated—including the Grüneisen parameter, which only the LDA is able to recover with confidence. In the absence of computationally more demanding hybrid DFT methods, the LDA seems to be a good choice for further lattice dynamical studies of Sb2Te3 and related layered telluride materials.

  19. Bioaccumulation of cadmium by growing Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chunsheng; Jiang, Wei; Ma, Ning; Zhu, Yinglian; Dong, Xiaoyan; Wang, Dongfeng; Meng, Xianghong; Xu, Ying

    2014-03-01

    Bioaccumulation via growing cells is a potential technique for heavy metal removal from food materials. The cadmium bioaccumulation characteristics by growing Zygosaccharomyces rouxii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were investigated. Z. rouxii displayed powerful cadmium removal ability at low cadmium concentrations, which mainly depended on the intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation. The percentage of intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation of both yeasts obviously decreased with the increase of initial biomass and cadmium concentrations. Low pH and elevated concentrations of zinc and copper significantly decreased the intracellular cadmium bioaccumulation of both yeasts but improved the cadmium tolerance and the cell-surface cadmium bioaccumulation of Z. rouxii. Cadmium removal of Z. rouxii was improved by zinc and copper conditionally. Z. rouxii that possessed more powerful cadmium tolerance and removal ability at low pH and high concentration of competing ions can be developed into a potential cadmium removal agent using in complex food environment in future.

  20. Effect of Annealing on the Properties of Antimony Telluride Thin Films and Their Applications in CdTe Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhouling Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antimony telluride alloy thin films were deposited at room temperature by using the vacuum coevaporation method. The films were annealed at different temperatures in N2 ambient, and then the compositional, structural, and electrical properties of antimony telluride thin films were characterized by X-ray fluorescence, X-ray diffraction, differential thermal analysis, and Hall measurements. The results indicate that single phase antimony telluride existed when the annealing temperature was higher than 488 K. All thin films exhibited p-type conductivity with high carrier concentrations. Cell performance was greatly improved when the antimony telluride thin films were used as the back contact layer for CdTe thin film solar cells. The dark current voltage and capacitance voltage measurements were performed to investigate the formation of the back contacts for the cells with or without Sb2Te3 buffer layers. CdTe solar cells with the buffer layers can reduce the series resistance and eliminate the reverse junction between CdTe and metal electrodes.

  1. 76 FR 46288 - Adequacy Determination for Colorado Springs, Cañon City, Greeley, Pagosa Springs, and Telluride...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-02

    ... AGENCY Adequacy Determination for Colorado Springs, Ca on City, Greeley, Pagosa Springs, and Telluride... Carbon Monoxide Attainment/Maintenance Plan Colorado Springs Attainment/ Maintenance Area'' and ``Revised...,'' ``Final Revised PM10 Maintenance Plan for the Pagosa Springs Attainment/Maintenance Area,'' and...

  2. Facile preparation of carbon wrapped copper telluride nanowires as high performance anodes for sodium and lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong; Yang, Jun; Geng, Hongbo; Chao Li, Cheng

    2017-04-01

    Uniform carbon wrapped copper telluride nanowires were successfully prepared by using an in situ conversion reaction. The length of these nanowires is up to several micrometers and the width is around 30–40 nm. The unique one dimensional structure and the presence of conformal carbon coating of copper telluride greatly accommodate the large volumetric changes during cycling, significantly increase the electrical conductivity and reduce charge transfer resistance. The copper telluride nanowires show promising performance in a lithium ion battery with a discharge capacity of 130.2 mA h g‑1 at a high current density of 6.0 A g‑1 (26.74 C) and a stable cycling performance of 673.3 mA h g‑1 during the 60th cycle at 100 mA g‑1. When evaluated as anode material for a sodium ion battery, the copper telluride nanowires deliver a reversible capacity of 68.1 mA h g‑1 at 1.0 A g‑1 (∼4.46 C) and have a high capacity retention of 177.5 mA h g‑1 during the 500th cycle at 100 mA g‑1.

  3. Cadmium content of plants as affected by soil cadmium concentration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehoczky, E. [Pannon Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Keszthely (Hungary); Szabados, I.; Marth, P. [Plant Health and Soil Conservation Station, Higany (Hungary)

    1996-12-31

    Pot experiments were conducted in greenhouse conditions to study the effects of increasing cadmium (Cd) levels on biomass production and Cd contents in corn, (Zea mays L.), garlic (Allium sativum L.), and spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.). Plants were grown in two soil types: Eutric cambisol soil and A gleyic luvisol soil. Spinach proved to be the most sensitive to Cd treatments as its biomass considerably decreased with the increasing Cd levels. Cadmium contents of the three crops increased with increasing levels of Cd applications. Statistical differences were observed in the Cd contents of crops depending on soil type. With the same Cd rates, Cd tissue concentration of test plants grown in the strongly acidic Gleyic luvisol soil were many times higher than that of plants grown in a neutral Eutric cambisol soil. 14 refs., 4 tabs.

  4. Photovoltaic module mounting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miros, Robert H. J.; Mittan, Margaret Birmingham; Seery, Martin N.; Holland, Rodney H.

    2012-04-17

    A solar array mounting system having unique installation, load distribution, and grounding features, and which is adaptable for mounting solar panels having no external frame. The solar array mounting system includes flexible, pedestal-style feet and structural links connected in a grid formation on the mounting surface. The photovoltaic modules are secured in place via the use of attachment clamps that grip the edge of the typically glass substrate. The panel mounting clamps are then held in place by tilt brackets and/or mid-link brackets that provide fixation for the clamps and align the solar panels at a tilt to the horizontal mounting surface. The tilt brackets are held in place atop the flexible feet and connected link members thus creating a complete mounting structure.

  5. Photovoltaic building blocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanberg, Peter Jesper; Jørgensen, Anders Michael

    2014-01-01

    it directcompetitive with fossil energy sources a further reduction is needed. By increasing the efficiency of the solar cells one gain an advantage through the whole chain of cost. So that per produced Watt of power less material is spent, installation costs are lower, less area is used etc. With an average...... efficiency of about 15% for commercial Silicon solar cells there is still much to gain. DTU Danchip provides research facilities, equipment and expertise for the building blocks that comprises fabricating the efficient solar cell. In order to get more of the sun light into the device we provide thin film......Photovoltaics (PV), better known as solar cells, are now a common day sight on many rooftops in Denmark.The installed capacity of PV systems worldwide is growing exponentially1 and is the third most importantrenewable energy source today. The cost of PV is decreasing fast with ~10%/year but to make...

  6. All-Oxide Photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rühle, Sven; Anderson, Assaf Y; Barad, Hannah-Noa; Kupfer, Benjamin; Bouhadana, Yaniv; Rosh-Hodesh, Eli; Zaban, Arie

    2012-12-20

    Recently, a new field in photovoltaics (PV) has emerged, focusing on solar cells that are entirely based on metal oxide semiconductors. The all-oxide PV approach is very attractive due to the chemical stability, nontoxicity, and abundance of many metal oxides that potentially allow manufacturing under ambient conditions. Already today, metal oxides (MOs) are widely used as components in PV cells such as transparent conducting front electrodes or electron-transport layers, while only very few MOs have been used as light absorbers. In this Perspective, we review recent developments of all-oxide PV systems, which until today were mostly based on Cu2O as an absorber. Furthermore, ferroelectric BiFeO3-based PV systems are discussed, which have recently attracted considerable attention. The performance of all-oxide PV cells is discussed in terms of general PV principles, and directions for progress are proposed, pointing toward the development of novel metal oxide semiconductors using combinatorial methods.

  7. Photovoltaic spectral responsivity measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Emery, K.; Dunlavy, D.; Field, H.; Moriarty, T. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-09-01

    This paper discusses the various elemental random and nonrandom error sources in typical spectral responsivity measurement systems. The authors focus specifically on the filter and grating monochrometer-based spectral responsivity measurement systems used by the Photovoltaic (PV) performance characterization team at NREL. A variety of subtle measurement errors can occur that arise from a finite photo-current response time, bandwidth of the monochromatic light, waveform of the monochromatic light, and spatial uniformity of the monochromatic and bias lights; the errors depend on the light source, PV technology, and measurement system. The quantum efficiency can be a function of he voltage bias, light bias level, and, for some structures, the spectral content of the bias light or location on the PV device. This paper compares the advantages and problems associated with semiconductor-detector-based calibrations and pyroelectric-detector-based calibrations. Different current-to-voltage conversion and ac photo-current detection strategies employed at NREL are compared and contrasted.

  8. Photovoltaic solar concentrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Gupta, Vipin P.; Okandan, Murat; Watts, Michael R.

    2016-03-15

    A photovoltaic solar concentrator is disclosed with one or more transverse-junction solar cells (also termed point contact solar cells) and a lens located above each solar cell to concentrate sunlight onto the solar cell to generate electricity. Piezoelectric actuators tilt or translate each lens to track the sun using a feedback-control circuit which senses the electricity generated by one or more of the solar cells. The piezoelectric actuators can be coupled through a displacement-multiplier linkage to provide an increased range of movement of each lens. Each lens in the solar concentrator can be supported on a frame (also termed a tilt plate) having three legs, with the movement of the legs being controlled by the piezoelectric actuators.

  9. Chalcogenide perovskites for photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yi-Yang; Agiorgousis, Michael L; Zhang, Peihong; Zhang, Shengbai

    2015-01-14

    Chalcogenide perovskites are proposed for photovoltaic applications. The predicted band gaps of CaTiS3, BaZrS3, CaZrSe3, and CaHfSe3 with the distorted perovskite structure are within the optimal range for making single-junction solar cells. The predicted optical absorption properties of these materials are superior compared with other high-efficiency solar-cell materials. Possible replacement of the alkaline-earth cations by molecular cations, e.g., (NH3NH3)(2+), as in the organic-inorganic halide perovskites (e.g., CH3NH3PbI3), are also proposed and found to be stable. The chalcogenide perovskites provide promising candidates for addressing the challenging issues regarding halide perovskites such as instability in the presence of moisture and containing the toxic element Pb.

  10. Photovoltaic cell assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavis, Leonard C.; Panitz, Janda K. G.; Sharp, Donald J.

    1990-01-01

    A photovoltaic assembly for converting high intensity solar radiation into lectrical energy in which a solar cell is separated from a heat sink by a thin layer of a composite material which has excellent dielectric properties and good thermal conductivity. This composite material is a thin film of porous Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 in which the pores have been substantially filled with an electrophoretically-deposited layer of a styrene-acrylate resin. This composite provides electrical breakdown strengths greater than that of a layer consisting essentially of Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 and has a higher thermal conductivity than a layer of styrene-acrylate alone.

  11. Photovoltaic solar concentrator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Resnick, Paul J.; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis

    2012-12-11

    A photovoltaic solar concentrator is disclosed with one or more transverse-junction solar cells (also termed point contact solar cells) and a lens located above each solar cell to concentrate sunlight onto the solar cell to generate electricity. Piezoelectric actuators tilt or translate each lens to track the sun using a feedback-control circuit which senses the electricity generated by one or more of the solar cells. The piezoelectric actuators can be coupled through a displacement-multiplier linkage to provide an increased range of movement of each lens. Each lens in the solar concentrator can be supported on a frame (also termed a tilt plate) having three legs, with the movement of the legs being controlled by the piezoelectric actuators.

  12. Polymer Photovoltaic Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jianhui Hou; Chunhe Yang; Erjun Zhou; Chang He; Zhan'ao Tan; Youjun He; Yongfang Li

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction Polymer photovoltaic cells (PPVCs) have attracted much attention recently because of its easy fabrication, low cost and possibility to make flexible devices[1]. PPVC is composed of a conjugated polymer/C60blend layer (photosensitive layer) sandwiched between a transparent ITO electrode and a metal electrode.When a light through ITO electrode irradiates on the photosensitive layer, the photons with appropriate energy will be absorbed by the conjugated polymer (CP) and excitons (electron-hole pair) are produced. The excitons move to the interface of CP/C60 where the electrons transfer to the LUMO of C60 and holes leave on the HOMO of the CP. The separated electrons migrate through the C60 network to and are collected by the metal electrode, and the holes migrate through the CP network to and are collected by the ITO electrode, so that the photocurrent and photovoltage are attained.

  13. Photovoltaics Fact Sheet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2016-02-01

    This fact sheet is an overview of the Photovoltaics (PV) subprogram at the U.S. Department of Energy SunShot Initiative. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)’s Solar Energy Technologies Office works with industry, academia, national laboratories, and other government agencies to advance solar PV, which is the direct conversion of sunlight into electricity by a semiconductor, in support of the goals of the SunShot Initiative. SunShot supports research and development to aggressively advance PV technology by improving efficiency and reliability and lowering manufacturing costs. SunShot’s PV portfolio spans work from early-stage solar cell research through technology commercialization, including work on materials, processes, and device structure and characterization techniques.

  14. Photovoltaic sources modeling and emulation

    CERN Document Server

    Piazza, Maria Carmela Di

    2012-01-01

    This book offers an extensive introduction to the modeling of photovoltaic generators and their emulation by means of power electronic converters will aid in understanding and improving design and setup of new PV plants.

  15. Polymer Substrates For Lightweight, Thin-Film Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Carol R.

    1993-01-01

    Substrates survive high deposition temperatures. High-temperature-resistant polymers candidate materials for use as substrates of lightweight, flexible, radiation-resistant solar photovoltaic cells. According to proposal, thin films of copper indium diselenide or cadmium telluride deposited on substrates to serve as active semiconductor layers of cells, parts of photovoltaic power arrays having exceptionally high power-to-weight ratios. Flexibility of cells exploited to make arrays rolled up for storage.

  16. On the plasmonic photovoltaic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubeen, Syed; Lee, Joun; Lee, Woo-Ram; Singh, Nirala; Stucky, Galen D; Moskovits, Martin

    2014-06-24

    The conversion of sunlight into electricity by photovoltaics is currently a mature science and the foundation of a lucrative industry. In conventional excitonic solar cells, electron-hole pairs are generated by light absorption in a semiconductor and separated by the "built in" potential resulting from charge transfer accompanying Fermi-level equalization either at a p-n or a Schottky junction, followed by carrier collection at appropriate electrodes. Here we report a stable, wholly plasmonic photovoltaic device in which photon absorption and carrier generation take place exclusively in the plasmonic metal. The field established at a metal-semiconductor Schottky junction separates charges. The negative carriers are high-energy (hot) electrons produced immediately following the plasmon's dephasing. Some of the carriers are energetic enough to clear the Schottky barrier or quantum mechanically tunnel through it, thereby producing the output photocurrent. Short circuit photocurrent densities in the range 70-120 μA cm(-2) were obtained for simulated one-sun AM1.5 illumination with devices based on arrays of parallel gold nanorods, conformally coated with 10 nm TiO2 films and fashioned with a Ti metal collector. For the device with short circuit currents of 120 μA cm(-2), the internal quantum efficiency is ∼2.75%, and its wavelength response tracks the absorption spectrum of the transverse plasmon of the gold nanorods indicating that the absorbed photon-to-electron conversion process resulted exclusively in the Au, with the TiO2 playing a negligible role in charge carrier production. Devices fabricated with 50 nm TiO2 layers had open-circuit voltages as high as 210 mV, short circuit current densities of 26 μA cm(-2), and a fill factor of 0.3. For these devices, the TiO2 contributed a very small but measurable fraction of the charge carriers.

  17. Handbook of secondary storage batteries and charge regulators in photovoltaic systems. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-08-01

    Solar photovoltaic systems often require battery subsystems to store reserve electrical energy for times of zero insolation. This handbook is designed to help the system designer make optimum choices of battery type, battery size and charge control circuits. Typical battery performance characteristics are summarized for four types of lead-acid batteries: pure lead, lead-calcium and lead-antimony pasted flat plate and lead-antimony tubular positive types. Similar data is also provided for pocket plate nickel cadmium batteries. Economics play a significant role in battery selection. Relative costs of each battery type are summarized under a variety of operating regimes expected for solar PV installations.

  18. LIFE CYCLE INVENTORY ANALYSIS IN THE PRODUCTION OF METALS USED IN PHOTOVOLTAICS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FTHENAKIS,V.M.; KIM, H.C.; WANG, W.

    2007-03-30

    Material flows and emissions in all the stages of production of zinc, copper, aluminum, cadmium, indium, germanium, gallium, selenium, tellurium, and molybdenum were investigated. These metals are used selectively in the manufacture of solar cells, and emission and energy factors in their production are used in the Life Cycle Analysis (LCA) of photovoltaics. Significant changes have occurred in the production and associated emissions for these metals over the last 10 years, which are not described in the LCA databases. Furthermore, emission and energy factors for several of the by-products of the base metal production were lacking. This report aims in updating the life-cycle inventories associated with the production of the base metals (Zn, Cu, Al, Mo) and in defining the emission and energy allocations for the minor metals (Cd, In, Ge, Se, Te and Ga) used in photovoltaics.

  19. Photovoltaic Devices from Multi-Armed CdS Nanorods and Conjugated Polyme, Composites

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Yan-Shan; WANG Li; QIN Dong-Huan; CAO Yong

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate the preparation of composite photovoltaic devices by using the blends of multi-armed CdS nanorods with conjugated polymer, poly[2-methoxy-5-(2'-ethylhexyloxy)-l,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEH-PPV). Multi-armed CdS nanorods are prepared by thermolysing single precursor cadmium ethylxanthate [Cd(exan)2] in pure hexadecylamine solution under ambient conditions. The photoluminescence of MEH-PPV can be ef fectively quenched in the composites at high CdS nanocrystal (nc-CdS)/MEH-PPV ratios. Post-treatment of the multi-armed CdS nanorods by refluxing in pyridine significantly increases the performance of the composite photovoltaic devices. Power conversion efficiency is obtained to be 0.17% under AM 1.5 illumination for this composite device.

  20. Tolerance to cadmium and cadmium-binding ligands in Great Salt Lake brine shrimp (Artemia salina)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jayasekara, S.; Drown, D.B.; Sharma, R.P.

    1986-02-01

    Information on the accumulation of cadmium in cytosolic proteins of Great Lake brine shrimp (Artemia salina) was obtained from animals collected directly from the lake and also from animal hatched and maintained in three sublethal concentrations of cadmium (0.5, 2.0, 5.0 ppm) in saltwater aquaria. Brine shrimp growth under these conditions was monitored by measuring body lengths during a 7-day exposure period. Heat-stable, cadmium-binding ligands were isolated and identified by Sephadex G-75 chromatography and atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Cadmium was found to be equally distributed between high and low molecular weight proteins in animals collected from the lake and the 0.5 ppm cadmium group. There was also a slight growth stimulation noted in the 0.5-pm group. Higher cadmium incorporation was noted in low molecular weight fractions with increasing cadmium concentration in the exposure media. Low molecular weight fractions were also found to have high uv absorption characteristics at 250 nm and low absorption at 280 nm. Molecular weight of the cadmium-binding ligands was found to be 11,000 as estimated by the gel filtration method. De novo synthesis of this protein was increased as a function of cadmium concentration in the media. However, slow accumulation of cadmium in other protein fractions was also noticed in higher cadmium exposure groups, suggesting the existence of possible tolerance mechanisms in brine shrimp exposed to suspected acute cadmium concentrations.

  1. Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Solid State Photovoltaic Research Branch of the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) from October 1, 1988, through September 30,l 1989. Six technical sections of the report cover these main areas of SERIs in-house research: Semiconductor Crystal Growth, Amorphous Silicon Research, Polycrystalline Thin Films, III-V High-Efficiency Photovoltaic Cells, Solid-State Theory, and Laser Raman and Luminescence Spectroscopy. Sections have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  2. Zone refining of cadmium and related characterization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N R Munirathnam; D S Prasad; Ch Sudheer; J V Rao; T L Prakash

    2005-06-01

    We present the zone refining results of cadmium using horizontal resistive zone refiner under constant flow of moisture free hydrogen gas. The boron impurity in cadmium can be avoided using quartz (GE 214 grade) boat in lieu of high pure graphite boat. The analytical results using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICPOES) show that majority of the impurities are less than the detection limits. Comparatively, zinc is the most difficult impurity element to remove in cadmium matrix by zone refining.

  3. The Epigenetic Effects of Prenatal Cadmium Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilahur, Nadia; Vahter, Marie; Broberg, Karin

    2015-06-01

    Prenatal exposure to the highly toxic and common pollutant cadmium has been associated with adverse effects on child health and development. However, the underlying biological mechanisms of cadmium toxicity remain partially unsolved. Epigenetic disruption due to early cadmium exposure has gained attention as a plausible mode of action, since epigenetic signatures respond to environmental stimuli and the fetus undergoes drastic epigenomic rearrangements during embryogenesis. In the current review, we provide a critical examination of the literature addressing prenatal cadmium exposure and epigenetic effects in human, animal, and in vitro studies. We conducted a PubMed search and obtained eight recent studies addressing this topic, focusing almost exclusively on DNA methylation. These studies provide evidence that cadmium alters epigenetic signatures in the DNA of the placenta and of the newborns, and some studies indicated marked sexual differences for cadmium-related DNA methylation changes. Associations between early cadmium exposure and DNA methylation might reflect interference with de novo DNA methyltransferases. More studies, especially those including environmentally relevant doses, are needed to confirm the toxicoepigenomic effects of prenatal cadmium exposure and how that relates to the observed health effects of cadmium in childhood and later life.

  4. Photovoltaic array mounting apparatus, systems, and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Jack Raymond; Atchley, Brian; Hudson, Tyrus Hawkes; Johansen, Emil

    2015-04-14

    A photovoltaic array, including: (a) supports laid out on a surface in rows and columns; (b) photovoltaic modules positioned on top of the supports; and (c) fasteners connecting the photovoltaic modules to the supports, wherein the supports have an upper pedestal surface and a lower pedestal surface such that the photovoltaic modules are positioned at a non-horizontal angle when edges of the photovoltaic modules are positioned on top of the upper and lower pedestal surfaces, and wherein a portion of the fasteners rotate to lock the photovoltaic modules onto the supports.

  5. Improvement of cadmium phytoremediation after soil inoculation with a cadmium-resistant Micrococcus sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangthong, Chirawee; Setkit, Kunchaya; Prapagdee, Benjaphorn

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium-resistant Micrococcus sp. TISTR2221, a plant growth-promoting bacterium, has stimulatory effects on the root lengths of Zea mays L. seedlings under toxic cadmium conditions compared to uninoculated seedlings. The performance of Micrococcus sp. TISTR2221 on promoting growth and cadmium accumulation in Z. mays L. was investigated in a pot experiment. The results indicated that Micrococcus sp. TISTR2221significantly promoted the root length, shoot length, and dry biomass of Z. mays L. transplanted in both uncontaminated and cadmium-contaminated soils. Micrococcus sp. TISTR2221 significantly increased cadmium accumulation in the roots and shoots of Z. mays L. compared to uninoculated plants. At the beginning of the planting period, cadmium accumulated mainly in the shoots. With a prolonged duration of cultivation, cadmium content increased in the roots. As expected, little cadmium was found in maize grains. Soil cadmium was significantly reduced with time, and the highest percentage of cadmium removal was found in the bacterial-inoculated Z. mays L. after transplantation for 6 weeks. We conclude that Micrococcus sp. TISTR2221 is a potent bioaugmenting agent, facilitating cadmium phytoextraction in Z. mays L.

  6. Size distribution effects of cadmium tellurium quantum dots (CdS/CdTe) immunotoxicity on aquatic organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruneau, A; Fortier, M; Gagne, F; Gagnon, C; Turcotte, P; Tayabali, A; Davis, T L; Auffret, M; Fournier, M

    2013-03-01

    The increasing use of products derived from nanotechnology has raised concern about their potential toxicity to aquatic life. This study sought to examine the comparative immunotoxicity of capped cadmium sulphide/cadmium telluride (CdS/CdTe) quantum dots (QDs) and possible impact of particle/aggregate size on two bivalves (Mytilus edulis and Elliptio complanata) and a fish (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The QDs were dispersed in sterile water and fractionated using a series of micro/ultrafiltration membranes of decreasing pore size: 450 nm, 100 nm, 50 nm, 25 nm, 100 kDa (6.8 nm), 30 kDa (4.6 nm), 10 kDa (3.2 nm) and 1 kDa (1.5 nm). The total concentrations of cadmium and tellurium were determined for the filtered material and for that retained on the filters (retentate). The immunotoxicity was determined by measuring cell viability and phagocytosis. Results revealed that nanoparticles retained on the ultrafilters had a higher Cd/Te ratio compared to the permeate fraction (ratio of 5 and 2 respectively) which could indicate that the CdS core was not associated with the permeable fraction of Cd. Our results demonstrate that the toxicity of CdS/CdTe QDs was concentration and size dependent. Large CdS/CdTe QD aggregates (25 nm < size < 100 nm) reduced phagocytosis more than did smaller nanoparticles (<25 nm). Moreover, our results revealed that the different species responded differently to these fractions. Mytilus edulis hemocytes were less sensitive to CdS/CdTe QDs than the Oncorhynchus mykiss macrophage and Elliptio complanata hemocytes.

  7. Preparation of bismuth telluride thin film by electrochemical atomic layer epitaxy(ECALE)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHU Wen; YANG Junyou; GAO Xianhui; HOU Jie; BAO Siqian; FAN Xian

    2007-01-01

    Thin-layer electrochemical studies of the underpotential deposition(UPD)of Bi and Te on cold rolled silver substrate have been performed.The voltammetric analysis of underpotential shift demonstrates that the initial Te UPD on Bi-covered Ag and Bi UPD on Te-covered Ag fitted UPD dynamics mechanism.A thin film of bismuth telluride was formed by alternately depositing Te and Bi via an automated flow deposition system.X-ray diffraction indicated the deposits of Bi2Te3.Energy Dispersive X-ray Detector quantitative analysis gave a 2:3 stoichiornetric ratio of Bi to Te,which was consistent with X-ray Diffraction results.Electron probe microanalysis of the deposits showed a network structure that results from the surface defects of the cold rolled Ag substrate and the lattice mismatch between substrate and deposit.

  8. Role of Van der Waals interactions in determining the structure of liquid tellurides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micoulaut, Matthieu; Flores-Ruiz, Hugo; Coulet, Vanessa; Piarristeguy, Andrea; Johnson, Mark; Cuello, Gabriel; Pradel, Annie

    The simulation of tellurides using standard density functional (DFT) theory based molecular dynamics usually leads to an overestimation of the bond distances and a noticeable mismatch between theory and experiments when e.g. structure functions are being directly compared. Here, the structural properties of several compositions of Ge-Te and Ge-Sb-Te liquids are studied from a combination of neutron diffraction and DFT-based molecular dynamics. Importantly, we find an excellent agreement in the reproduction of the structure in real and reciprocal spaces, resulting from the incorporation of dispersion forces in the simulation. We then investigate structural properties including structure factors, pair distribution functions, angular distributions, coordination numbers, neighbor distributions, and compare our results with experimental findings. References:Physical Review B 92, 134205 (2015)Physical Review B 89, 174205 (2014)Physical Review B 90, 094207 (2014) Support from Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) (Grant No. ANR-11-BS08-0012) is gratefully acknowledged.

  9. New Insights into High-Performance Thermoelectric Tellurides from ^125Te NMR Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levin, E. M.; Hu, Y.-Y.; Cook, B. A.; Harringa, J. L.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.; Kanatzidis, M. G.

    2009-11-01

    Thermoelectric materials are widely used for direct transformation of heat to electricity (Seebeck effect) and for solid state refrigeration (Peltier effect). Efforts to increase the efficiency of high-performance thermoelectrics, which include narrow-gap, doped tellurium-based semiconductors, require detailed knowledge of their local structure and bonding. We have used ^125Te nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a local probe for obtaining better understanding of these high-performance thermoelectric tellurides, specifically PbTe doped with Ag and Sb (LAST materials) and GeTe doped with Ag and Sb (TAGS materials). The resonance frequencies and line shapes of the NMR spectra, as well as spin-lattice relaxation times and chemical shift anisotropies are highly sensitive to the composition and synthesis conditions of LAST and TAGS materials, enabling studies of the local composition, distortion, bonding, and carrier concentration. Several intriguing phenomena including electronic inhomogeneity and local distortions of the crystal lattice have been observed by NMR.

  10. Nanoscale arrays of antimony telluride single crystals by selective chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ruomeng; Benjamin, Sophie L.; Gurnani, Chitra; Wang, Yudong; Hector, Andrew L.; Levason, William; Reid, Gillian; De Groot, C. H. (Kees)

    2016-01-01

    Arrays of individual single nanocrystals of Sb2Te3 have been formed using selective chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from a single source precursor. Crystals are self-assembled reproducibly in confined spaces of 100 nm diameter with pitch down to 500 nm. The distribution of crystallite sizes across the arrays is very narrow (standard deviation of 15%) and is affected by both the hole diameter and the array pitch. The preferred growth of the crystals in the orientation along the diagonal of the square holes strongly indicates that the diffusion of adatoms results in a near thermodynamic equilibrium growth mechanism of the nuclei. A clear relationship between electrical resistivity and selectivity is established across a range of metal selenides and tellurides, showing that conductive materials result in more selective growth and suggesting that electron donation is of critical importance for selective deposition. PMID:27283116

  11. Chemical pressure and hidden one-dimensional behavior in rare earth tri-telluride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacchetti, A.; Degiorgi, L.; /Zurich, ETH; Giamarchi, T.; /Geneva U.; Ru, N.; Fisher, I.R.; /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

    2009-12-14

    We report on the first optical measurements of the rare-earth tri-telluride charge-density-wave systems. Our data, collected over an extremely broad spectral range, allow us to observe both the Drude component and the single-particle peak, ascribed to the contributions due to the free charge carriers and to the charge-density-wave gap excitation, respectively. The data analysis displays a diminishing impact of the charge-density-wave condensate on the electronic properties with decreasing lattice constant across the rare-earth series. We propose a possible mechanism describing this behavior and we suggest the presence of a one-dimensional character in these two-dimensional compounds. We also envisage that interactions and umklapp processes might play a relevant role in the formation of the charge-density-wave state in these compounds.

  12. Immunocytotoxicity, cytogenotoxicity and genotoxicity of cadmium-based quantum dots in the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocha, Thiago Lopes; Gomes, Tânia; Cardoso, Cátia; Letendre, Julie; Pinheiro, José Paulo; Sousa, Vânia Serrão; Teixeira, Margarida Ribau; Bebianno, Maria João

    2014-10-01

    There is an increased use of Quantum Dot (QDs) in biological and biomedical applications, but little is known about their marine ecotoxicology. So, the aim of this study was to investigate the possible immunocytotoxic, cytogenotoxic and genotoxic effects of cadmium telluride QDs (CdTe QDs) on the marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis. Mussels were exposed to 10 μg L(-1) of CdTe QDs or to soluble Cd [Cd(NO3)2] for 14 days and Cd accumulation, immunocytotoxicity [hemocyte density, cell viability, lysosomal membrane stability (LMS), differential cell counts (DCC)], cytogenotoxicity (micronucleus test and nuclear abnormalities assay) and genotoxicity (comet assay) were analyzed. Results show that in vivo exposure to QDs, Cd is accumulated in mussel soft tissues and hemolymph and induce immunotoxic effects mediated by a decrease in LMS, changes in DCC, as well as genotoxicity (DNA damage). However, QDs do not induce significant changes in hemocytes density, cell viability and cytogenetic parameters in opposition to Cd(2+). Soluble Cd is the most cytotoxic and cytogenotoxic form on Mytilus hemocytes due to a higher accumulation of Cd in tissues. Results indicate that immunotoxicity and genotoxicity of CdTe QDs and Cd(2+) are mediated by different modes of action and show that Mytilus hemocytes are important targets for in vivo QDs toxicity.

  13. Photovoltaic product directory and buyers guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watts, R.L.; Smith, S.A.; Mazzucchi, R.P.

    1981-06-01

    Basic information on photovoltaic conversion technology is provided for those unfamiliar with the field. Various types of photovoltaic products and systems currently available off-the-shelf are described. These include products without batteries, battery chargers, power packages, home electric systems, and partial systems. Procedures are given for designing a photovoltaic system from scratch. A few custom photovoltaic systems are described, and a list is compiled of photovoltaic firms which can provide custom systems. Guidance is offered for deciding whether or not to use photovoltaic products. A variety of installations are described and their performance is appraised by the owners. Information is given on various financial incentives available from state and federal governments. Sources of additional information on photovoltaics are listed. A matrix is provided indicating the sources of various types of photovoltaic products. The addresses of suppliers are listed. (LEW)

  14. Optimizing Grid Patterns on Photovoltaic Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, D. R.

    1984-01-01

    CELCAL computer program helps in optimizing grid patterns for different photovoltaic cell geometries and metalization processes. Five different powerloss phenomena associated with front-surface metal grid pattern on photovoltaic cells.

  15. ULTRA BARRIER TOPSHEET (UBT) FOR FLEXIBLE PHOTOVOLTAICS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeScioli, Derek

    2013-06-01

    This slide-show presents 3M photovoltaic-related products, particularly flexible components. Emphasis is on the 3M Ultra Barrier Solar Films. Topics covered include reliability and qualification testing and flexible photovoltaic encapsulation costs.

  16. Transparent contacts for stacked compound photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tauke-Pedretti, Anna; Cederberg, Jeffrey; Nielson, Gregory N.; Okandan, Murat; Cruz-Campa, Jose Luis

    2016-11-29

    A microsystems-enabled multi-junction photovoltaic (MEM-PV) cell includes a first photovoltaic cell having a first junction, the first photovoltaic cell including a first semiconductor material employed to form the first junction, the first semiconductor material having a first bandgap. The MEM-PV cell also includes a second photovoltaic cell comprising a second junction. The second photovoltaic cell comprises a second semiconductor material employed to form the second junction, the second semiconductor material having a second bandgap that is less than the first bandgap, the second photovoltaic cell further comprising a first contact layer disposed between the first junction of the first photovoltaic cell and the second junction of the second photovoltaic cell, the first contact layer composed of a third semiconductor material having a third bandgap, the third bandgap being greater than or equal to the first bandgap.

  17. Mounting support for a photovoltaic module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Gregory Michael; Barsun, Stephan K.; Coleman, Nathaniel T.; Zhou, Yin

    2013-03-26

    A mounting support for a photovoltaic module is described. The mounting support includes a foundation having an integrated wire-way ledge portion. A photovoltaic module support mechanism is coupled with the foundation.

  18. Nanocrystal grain growth and device architectures for high-efficiency CdTe ink-based photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Ryan W; Panthani, Matthew G; Rance, William L; Duenow, Joel N; Parilla, Philip A; Callahan, Rebecca; Dabney, Matthew S; Berry, Joseph J; Talapin, Dmitri V; Luther, Joseph M

    2014-09-23

    We study the use of cadmium telluride (CdTe) nanocrystal colloids as a solution-processable "ink" for large-grain CdTe absorber layers in solar cells. The resulting grain structure and solar cell performance depend on the initial nanocrystal size, shape, and crystal structure. We find that inks of predominantly wurtzite tetrapod-shaped nanocrystals with arms ∼5.6 nm in diameter exhibit better device performance compared to inks composed of smaller tetrapods, irregular faceted nanocrystals, or spherical zincblende nanocrystals despite the fact that the final sintered film has a zincblende crystal structure. Five different working device architectures were investigated. The indium tin oxide (ITO)/CdTe/zinc oxide structure leads to our best performing device architecture (with efficiency >11%) compared to others including two structures with a cadmium sulfide (CdS) n-type layer typically used in high efficiency sublimation-grown CdTe solar cells. Moreover, devices without CdS have improved response at short wavelengths.

  19. Nanowire Photovoltaic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, David

    2015-01-01

    Firefly Technologies, in collaboration with the Rochester Institute of Technology and the University of Wisconsin-Madison, developed synthesis methods for highly strained nanowires. Two synthesis routes resulted in successful nanowire epitaxy: direct nucleation and growth on the substrate and a novel selective-epitaxy route based on nanolithography using diblock copolymers. The indium-arsenide (InAs) nanowires are implemented in situ within the epitaxy environment-a significant innovation relative to conventional semiconductor nanowire generation using ex situ gold nanoparticles. The introduction of these nanoscale features may enable an intermediate band solar cell while simultaneously increasing the effective absorption volume that can otherwise limit short-circuit current generated by thin quantized layers. The use of nanowires for photovoltaics decouples the absorption process from the current extraction process by virtue of the high aspect ratio. While no functional solar cells resulted from this effort, considerable fundamental understanding of the nanowire epitaxy kinetics and nanopatterning process was developed. This approach could, in principle, be an enabling technology for heterointegration of dissimilar materials. The technology also is applicable to virtual substrates. Incorporating nanowires onto a recrystallized germanium/metal foil substrate would potentially solve the problem of grain boundary shunting of generated carriers by restricting the cross-sectional area of the nanowire (tens of nanometers in diameter) to sizes smaller than the recrystallized grains (0.5 to 1 micron(exp 2).

  20. Photovoltaic Incentive Design Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoff, T. E.

    2006-12-01

    Investments in customer-owned grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) energy systems are growing at a steady pace. This is due, in part, to the availability of attractive economic incentives offered by public state agencies and utilities. In the United States, these incentives have largely been upfront lump payments tied to the system capacity rating. While capacity-based ''buydowns'' have stimulated the domestic PV market, they have been criticized for subsidizing systems with potentially poor energy performance. As a result, the industry has been forced to consider alternative incentive structures, particularly ones that pay based on long-term measured performance. The industry, however, lacks consensus in the debate over the tradeoffs between upfront incentive payments versus longer-term payments for energy delivery. This handbook is designed for agencies and utilities that offer or intend to offer incentive programs for customer-owned PV systems. Its purpose is to help select, design, and implement incentive programs that best meet programmatic goals. The handbook begins with a discussion of the various available incentive structures and then provides qualitative and quantitative tools necessary to design the most appropriate incentive structure. It concludes with program administration considerations.

  1. Electrodialytic Removal of Cadmium from Straw Ash

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.; Villumsen, Arne;

    1999-01-01

    A problem with flyash from straw and wood combustion is the high level of heavy metals, especially cadmium. Two electrodialytic remediation experiments were carried out on cadmium polluted flyash from straw combustion. The flyash could be cleaned to 1/3 of its initial level after 24 days...

  2. Cadmium and children : Exposure and health effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schoeters, G.; Hond, E. Den; Zuurbier, M.; Naginiene, R.; Hazel, P.J. van den; Stilianakis, N.; Ronchetti, R.; Koppe, J.G.

    2006-01-01

    Cadmium exposure and accumulation in the body start at young age. Exposure routes in children are mainly via food, environmental tobacco smoke and house dust. Excretion from the body is limited. Cadmium accumulation in the kidney is responsible for effects such as nephrotoxicity and osteoporosis whi

  3. Cadmium and children: exposure and health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeters, Greet; Den Hond, Elly; Zuurbier, Moniek; Naginiene, Rima; van den Hazel, Peter; Stilianakis, Nikolaos; Ronchetti, Roberto; Koppe, Janna G

    2006-10-01

    Cadmium exposure and accumulation in the body start at young age. Exposure routes in children are mainly via food, environmental tobacco smoke and house dust. Excretion from the body is limited. Cadmium accumulation in the kidney is responsible for effects such as nephrotoxicity and osteoporosis which are observed at adult age. Cadmium exposure through inhalation is also associated with lung cancer in adulthood. Although transfer to the neonate through the placenta and through breast milk is limited, teratogenic and developmental effects were observed in experimental animals. The database on human studies involving children is limited, yet effects on motoric and perceptual behaviour in children have been associated with elevated in utero cadmium exposure. In school age children urinary cadmium levels were associated with immune suppressive effects. More studies are needed to confirm these results. Experimental data in vitro and in animals refer to effects of cadmium on the hypothalamus-pituitary axis at different levels. This may lead to disorders of the endocrine and/or immune system. Cadmium exposure at early age should be limited as much as possible to prevent direct effects on children and to prevent accumulation of cadmium which may have serious health effects only becoming manifest at older age.

  4. Grounds of two positions photovoltaic panels

    OpenAIRE

    Castán Fortuño, Fernando

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this Master Thesis is to find the optimum positioning for a two positions photovoltaic panel. Hence, it will be implemented a model in order to optimize the energy of the sun that the photovoltaic panel is receiving by its positioning. Likewise this project will include the comparison with other photovoltaic panel systems as the single position photovoltaics panels. Ultimately, it is also going to be designed a system array for the optimized model of two positions photovoltai...

  5. Dynamics of Incoherent Photovoltaic Spatial Solitons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Yi-Qi; LU Ke-Qing; ZHANG Mei-Zhi; LI Ke-Hao; LIU Shuang; ZHANG Yan-Peng

    2009-01-01

    Propagation properties of bright and dark incoherent beams are numerically studied in photovoltaic-photorefractive crystal by using coherent density approach for the first time.Numerical simulations not only exhibit that bright incoherent photovoltaic quasi-soliton,grey-like incoherent photovoltaic soliton,incoherent soliton doublet and triplet can be established under proper conditions,but also display that the spatial coherence properties of these incoherent beams can be significantly affected during propagation by the photovoltaic field.

  6. Process Development for Nanostructured Photovoltaics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elam, Jeffrey W.

    2015-01-01

    Photovoltaic manufacturing is an emerging industry that promises a carbon-free, nearly limitless source of energy for our nation. However, the high-temperature manufacturing processes used for conventional silicon-based photovoltaics are extremely energy-intensive and expensive. This high cost imposes a critical barrier to the widespread implementation of photovoltaic technology. Argonne National Laboratory and its partners recently invented new methods for manufacturing nanostructured photovoltaic devices that allow dramatic savings in materials, process energy, and cost. These methods are based on atomic layer deposition, a thin film synthesis technique that has been commercialized for the mass production of semiconductor microelectronics. The goal of this project was to develop these low-cost fabrication methods for the high efficiency production of nanostructured photovoltaics, and to demonstrate these methods in solar cell manufacturing. We achieved this goal in two ways: 1) we demonstrated the benefits of these coatings in the laboratory by scaling-up the fabrication of low-cost dye sensitized solar cells; 2) we used our coating technology to reduce the manufacturing cost of solar cells under development by our industrial partners.

  7. INCOHERENTLY COUPLED SCREENING-PHOTOVOLTAIC SOLITON FAMILIES IN BIASED PHOTOVOLTAIC PHOTOREFRACTIVE CRYSTALS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU CHUN-FENG; LI BIN; SUN XIU-DONG; JIANG YONG-YUAN; XU KE-BIN

    2001-01-01

    It is shown that the existence of incoherently coupled screening-photovoltaic soliton families is possible in biased photovoltaic photorefractive crystals under steady-state conditions. These screening-photovoltaic soliton families can be established provided the multiple incident beams have the same polarization and wavelength, and are mutually incoherent. Such soliton families reduce to screening-photovoltaic soliton pairs when they contain only two components. Relevant examples are presented where the photovoltaic photorefractive crystal is of the lithium niobate type.

  8. Immunoassay for Cadmium Detection and Quantification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GONG-LIANG LIU; JU-FANG WANG; ZHI-YONG LI; SHI-ZHONG LIANG; XIAO-NING WANG

    2009-01-01

    Objective To detect cadmium in environmental and food samples by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy (GFAAS) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (ICPAES). Methods An indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (IC-ELISA) was developed based on a cadmium-specific monoclonal antibody.IC-ELISA for cadmium in environmental and food samples was evaluated. Results IC-ELISA showed an IC50 of 45.6 μg/L with a detection limit of 1.95 μg/L for cadmium,and showed a mean recovery ranging 97.67%-107.08%.The coefficient of variations for intra- and iuterassay was 3.41%-6.61% and 4.70%-9.21%,respectively.The correlation coefficient between IC-ELISA and GFAAS was 0.998. Conclusion IC-ELISA can detect and quantify cadmium residue in environmental or food samples.

  9. Cadmium a metalloestrogen: are we convinced?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Nalinda; Peiris-John, Roshini; Wickremasinghe, Rajitha; Senanayake, Hemantha; Sathiakumar, Nalini

    2012-05-01

    Metalloestrogens are inorganic metal ions that bind to and activate oestrogen receptors. They are implicated in the aetiology of oestrogen-dependent diseases such as cancers of the breast and endometrium as well as endometriosis. Cadmium is one of the most studied metalloestrogens. In this review, scientific evidence for the oestrogenic effects of cadmium is critically evaluated to determine if there is sufficient evidence to support cadmium as an aetiological factor of oestrogen-dependent disease in humans. Results of the review indicated that, although the in vitro and in vivo evidence of the oestrogenic properties of cadmium was persuasive, evidence from population-based human studies remains conflicting. Considerable knowledge gaps exist on the potential oestrogenic effect of cadmium in humans. Research that focuses on bridging these knowledge gaps would be useful in preventing and managing oestrogen-dependent disease in humans.

  10. International photovoltaic products and manufacturers directory, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shepperd, L.W. [ed.] [Florida Solar Energy Center, Cocoa, FL (United States)

    1995-11-01

    This international directory of more than 500 photovoltaic-related manufacturers is intended to guide potential users of photovoltaics to sources for systems and their components. Two indexes help the user to locate firms and materials. A glossary describes equipment and terminology commonly used in the photovoltaic industry.

  11. A MARKETING STRATEGY ON PHOTOVOLTAIC MARKET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coita Dorin Cristian

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Photovoltaic is an increasingly important energy technology. Deriving energy from the sun offers numerous environmental benefits. It is an extremely clean energy source, and few other power-generating technologies have as little environmental impact as photovoltaic. In this article we explored some dimensions of photovoltaic market and suggested a marketing strategy for solar panels manufacturers

  12. Cadmium mobility and accumulation in soils of the European Communities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraters B; van Beurden AUCJ

    1993-01-01

    In this overview of the effects of cadmium pollution on agricultural soils in the European Community, both the cadmium loads on agricultural land and the soil sensitivity to cadmium accumulation have been estimated. Cadmium loads have been estimated separately for arable land and grassland. The ef

  13. Enhanced diode performance in cadmium telluride–silicon nanowire heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akgul, Funda Aksoy, E-mail: fundaaksoy01@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Nigde University, 51240 Nigde (Turkey); Center for Solar Energy Research and Applications, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Akgul, Guvenc, E-mail: guvencakgul@gmail.com [Bor Vocational School, Nigde University, 51700 Nigde (Turkey); Center for Solar Energy Research and Applications, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Gullu, Hasan Huseyin [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Center for Solar Energy Research and Applications, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Unalan, Husnu Emrah [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Center for Solar Energy Research and Applications, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Turan, Rasit [Department of Physics, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey); Center for Solar Energy Research and Applications, Middle East Technical University, 06800 Ankara (Turkey)

    2015-09-25

    Highlights: • Vertically well oriented Si nanowire arrays on Si wafer were synthesized. • Semiconductor CdTe thin film/Si nanowire devices were successfully fabricated. • Optoelectronic properties of the fabricated devices were investigated. • Enhanced electrical and diode properties for the devices were observed. • The devices exhibited strong photosensitivity in near infrared region. - Abstract: We report on the structural and optoelectronic characteristics and photodetection properties of cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin film/silicon (Si) nanowire heterojunction diodes. A simple and cost-effective metal-assisted etching (MAE) method is applied to fabricate vertically oriented Si nanowires on n-type single crystalline Si wafer. Following the nanowire synthesis, CdTe thin films are directly deposited onto the Si nanowire arrays through RF magnetron sputtering. A comparative study of X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Raman spectroscopy shows the improved crystallinity of the CdTe thin films deposited onto the Si nanowires. The fabricated nanowire based heterojunction devices exhibit remarkable diode characteristics, enhanced optoelectronic properties and photosensitivity in comparison to the planar reference device. The electrical measurements revealed that the diodes have a well-defined rectifying behavior with a superior rectification ratio of 10{sup 5} at ±5 V and a relatively small ideality factor of n = 1.9 with lower reverse leakage current and series resistance at room temperature in dark condition. Moreover, an open circuit voltage of 120 mV is also observed under illumination. Based on spectral photoresponsivity measurements, the nanowire based device exhibits a distinct responsivity (0.35–0.5 A W{sup −1}) and high detectivity (6 × 10{sup 12}−9 × 10{sup 12} cm Hz{sup 1/2} W{sup −1}) in near-infrared wavelength region. The enhanced device performance and photosensitivity is believed to be due to three-dimensional nature of the interface between

  14. 10-kilowatt Photovoltaic Concentrator Array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donovan, R.L.; Broadbent, S.

    1978-05-01

    Martin Marietta has designed a Photovoltaic Concentrator Array (PCA) for Sandia Laboratories, Kirtland AFB, New Mexico. The PCA is based on the use of an acrylic Fresnel lens to concentrate sunlight on high intensity solar cells. The objective of the development was to obtain economical photovoltaic power generation by replacing relatively high priced solar cells with low cost lenses. Consequently, a major task of the program was to optimize the design for minimum cost per unit power output. Major design aspects considered for optimization were the concentration ratio, size and shape of the Fresnel lens, array size and shape, structure minimization, tracking and control and the practical aspects of operation and maintenance. In addition to design of the complete array, several porototype photovoltaic concentrator module subassemblies were fabricated and delivered to Sandia for evaluation. These prototypes exceed the 9.0% efficiency requirement established for this program.

  15. Photovoltaic Subcontract Program, FY 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-01

    This report summarizes the fiscal year (FY) 1991 (October 1, 1990, through September 30, 1991) progress of the subcontracted photovoltaic (PV) research and development (R D) performed under the Photovoltaic Advanced Research and Development Project at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) -- formerly the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI). The mission of the national PV program is to develop PV technology for large-scale generation of economically competitive electric power in the United States. The technical sections of the report cover the main areas of the subcontract program: the Amorphous Silicon Research Project, Polycrystalline Thin Films, Crystalline Silicon Materials Research, High-Efficiency Concepts, the New Ideas Program, the University Participation Program, and the Photovoltaic Manufacturing Technology (PVMaT) project. Technical summaries of each of the subcontracted programs provide a discussion of approaches, major accomplishments in FY 1991, and future research directions.

  16. Photovoltaics characterization: Beyond the horizon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazmerski, Lawrence L.

    1997-04-01

    This paper examines current photovoltaic test, measurement, and characterization techniques and makes evaluations and predictions of the next-generation technologies needed to meet the evolving requirements of photovoltaics. The range of support and research areas, from array through atomic-level analysis, are cited. The specific requirements of research and manufacturing sectors are addressed, including the need for more rapid response, new and photovoltaic-specific measurement techniques, manufacturing-environment measurement capabilities, and electronic-based centralized facilities. The integration and cohesion of analytical services with the evolving capabilities of the information highway are discussed and anticipated. To ensure the security of both intellectual and product property, the increased demands of protection of data are emphasized. Trends toward greater accuracy, precision, smaller- and larger-area analysis, and more-versatile measurement technologies are discussed.

  17. Sealed nickel-cadmium battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-08-15

    Overcharge protection, and especially the chargeability of a sealed Ni/Cd battery with high currents is improved by rolling a carbon-containing powdered material into the surface of the negative electrode, which material catalyzes the reduction of oxygen. Wetting of the electrode with a Tylose dispersion prior to application of the powder (by powdering, vibration or in an agitator) improves the adhesion of the powder. The cadmium electrode thus prepared combines in itself the functions of a negative principal electrode and of an auxiliary oxygen electrode.

  18. Interband Cascade Photovoltaic Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Rui Q. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Santos, Michael B. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Johnson, Matthew B. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    2014-09-24

    In this project, we are performing basic and applied research to systematically investigate our newly proposed interband cascade (IC) photovoltaic (PV) cells [1]. These cells follow from the great success of infrared IC lasers [2-3] that pioneered the use of quantum-engineered IC structures. This quantum-engineered approach will enable PV cells to efficiently convert infrared radiation from the sun or other heat source, to electricity. Such cells will have important applications for more efficient use of solar energy, waste-heat recovery, and power beaming in combination with mid-infrared lasers. The objectives of our investigations are to: achieve extensive understanding of the fundamental aspects of the proposed PV structures, develop the necessary knowledge for making such IC PV cells, and demonstrate prototype working PV cells. This research will focus on IC PV structures and their segments for utilizing infrared radiation with wavelengths from 2 to 5 μm, a range well suited for emission by heat sources (1,000-2,000 K) that are widely available from combustion systems. The long-term goal of this project is to push PV technology to longer wavelengths, allowing for relatively low-temperature thermal sources. Our investigations address material quality, electrical and optical properties, and their interplay for the different regions of an IC PV structure. The tasks involve: design, modeling and optimization of IC PV structures, molecular beam epitaxial growth of PV structures and relevant segments, material characterization, prototype device fabrication and testing. At the end of this program, we expect to generate new cutting-edge knowledge in the design and understanding of quantum-engineered semiconductor structures, and demonstrate the concepts for IC PV devices with high conversion efficiencies.

  19. Photovoltaic hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiser, H.W.; Memory, S.B.; Veziroglu, T.N.; Padin, J. [Univ. of Miami, Coral Gables, FL (United States)

    1996-10-01

    This is a new project, which started in June 1995, and involves photovoltaic hydrogen production as a fuel production method for the future. In order to increase the hydrogen yield, it was decided to use hybrid solar collectors to generate D.C. electricity, as well as high temperature steam for input to the electrolyzer. In this way, some of the energy needed to dissociate the water is supplied in the form of heat (or low grade energy), to generate steam, which results in a reduction of electrical energy (or high grade energy) needed. As a result, solar to hydrogen conversion efficiency is increased. In the above stated system, the collector location, the collector tracking sub-system (i.e., orientation/rotation), and the steam temperature have been taken as variables. Five locations selected - in order to consider a variety of latitudes, altitudes, cloud coverage and atmospheric conditions - are Atlanta, Denver, Miami, Phoenix and Salt Lake City. Plain PV and hybrid solar collectors for a stationary south facing system and five different collector rotation systems have been analyzed. Steam temperatures have been varied between 200{degrees}C and 1200{degrees}C. During the first year, solar to hydrogen conversion efficiencies have been considered. The results show that higher steam temperatures, 2 dimensional tracking system, higher elevations and dryer climates causes higher conversion efficiencies. Cost effectiveness of the sub-systems and of the overall system will be analyzed during the second year. Also, initial studies will be made of an advanced high efficiency hybrid solar hydrogen production system.

  20. The Harvard organic photovoltaic dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Steven A.; Pyzer-Knapp, Edward O.; Simm, Gregor N.; Lutzow, Trevor; Li, Kewei; Seress, Laszlo R.; Hachmann, Johannes; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2016-01-01

    The Harvard Organic Photovoltaic Dataset (HOPV15) presented in this work is a collation of experimental photovoltaic data from the literature, and corresponding quantum-chemical calculations performed over a range of conformers, each with quantum chemical results using a variety of density functionals and basis sets. It is anticipated that this dataset will be of use in both relating electronic structure calculations to experimental observations through the generation of calibration schemes, as well as for the creation of new semi-empirical methods and the benchmarking of current and future model chemistries for organic electronic applications. PMID:27676312

  1. Macromolecular architectures for organic photovoltaics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popere, Bhooshan C; Della Pelle, Andrea M; Poe, Ambata; Thayumanavan, S

    2012-03-28

    Research in the field of organic photovoltaics has gained considerable momentum in the last two decades owing to the need for developing low-cost and efficient energy harvesting systems. Elegant molecular architectures have been designed, synthesized and employed as active materials for photovoltaic devices thereby leading to a better molecular structure-device property relationship understanding. In this perspective, we outline new macromolecular scaffolds that have been designed within the purview of each of the three fundamental processes involving light harvesting, charge separation and charge transport.

  2. The Harvard organic photovoltaic dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Steven A.; Pyzer-Knapp, Edward O.; Simm, Gregor N.; Lutzow, Trevor; Li, Kewei; Seress, Laszlo R.; Hachmann, Johannes; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2016-09-01

    The Harvard Organic Photovoltaic Dataset (HOPV15) presented in this work is a collation of experimental photovoltaic data from the literature, and corresponding quantum-chemical calculations performed over a range of conformers, each with quantum chemical results using a variety of density functionals and basis sets. It is anticipated that this dataset will be of use in both relating electronic structure calculations to experimental observations through the generation of calibration schemes, as well as for the creation of new semi-empirical methods and the benchmarking of current and future model chemistries for organic electronic applications.

  3. A Photovoltaic System Payback Calculator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riley, Daniel M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Fleming, Jeffrey E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gallegos, Gerald R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2016-06-01

    The Roof Asset Management Program (RAMP) is a DOE NNSA initiative to manage roof repairs and replacement at NNSA facilities. In some cases, installation of a photovoltaic system on new roofs may be possible and desired for financial reasons and to meet federal renewable energy goals. One method to quantify the financial benefits of PV systems is the payback period, or the length of time required for a PV system to generate energy value equivalent to the system's cost. Sandia Laboratories created a simple spreadsheet-based solar energy valuation tool for use by RAMP personnel to quickly evaluate the estimated payback period of prospective or installed photovoltaic systems.

  4. Voltage Regulators for Photovoltaic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delombard, R.

    1986-01-01

    Two simple circuits developed to provide voltage regulation for highvoltage (i.e., is greater than 75 volts) and low-voltage (i.e., is less than 36 volts) photovoltaic/battery power systems. Use of these circuits results in voltage regulator small, low-cost, and reliable, with very low power dissipation. Simple oscillator circuit controls photovoltaic-array current to regulate system voltage and control battery charging. Circuit senses battery (and system) voltage and adjusts array current to keep battery voltage from exceeding maximum voltage.

  5. Photovoltaic cell and production thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Srinivasamohan; Kumar, Bikash

    2008-07-22

    An efficient photovoltaic cell, and its process of manufacture, is disclosed wherein the back surface p-n junction is removed from a doped substrate having an oppositely doped emitter layer. A front surface and edges and optionally the back surface periphery are masked and a back surface etch is performed. The mask is not removed and acts as an anti-reflective coating, a passivating agent, or both. The photovoltaic cell retains an untextured back surface whether or not the front is textured and the dopant layer on the back surface is removed to enhance the cell efficiency. Optionally, a back surface field is formed.

  6. Photovoltaic Systems Test Facilities: Existing capabilities compilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkmer, K.

    1982-01-01

    A general description of photovoltaic systems test facilities (PV-STFs) operated under the U.S. Department of Energy's photovoltaics program is given. Descriptions of a number of privately operated facilities having test capabilities appropriate to photovoltaic hardware development are given. A summary of specific, representative test capabilities at the system and subsystem level is presented for each listed facility. The range of system and subsystem test capabilities available to serve the needs of both the photovoltaics program and the private sector photovoltaics industry is given.

  7. Rapid screening buffer layers in photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, III, Frederick Alyious; Tuncer, Enis

    2014-09-09

    An apparatus and method of testing electrical impedance of a multiplicity of regions of a photovoltaic surface includes providing a multi-tipped impedance sensor with a multiplicity of spaced apart impedance probes separated by an insulating material, wherein each impedance probe includes a first end adapted for contact with a photovoltaic surface and a second end in operable communication with an impedance measuring device. The multi-tipped impedance sensor is used to contact the photovoltaic surface and electrical impedance of the photovoltaic material is measured between individual first ends of the probes to characterize the quality of the photovoltaic surface.

  8. System tests and applications photovoltaic program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-05-01

    A summary of all the photovoltaic system tests and application experiments that have been initiated since the start of the US DOE Photovoltaics Program in 1975 is presented. They are organized in the following manner for ease of reference: (1) application experiments: these are independently designed and constructed projects which are funded by DOE; (2) system field tests: projects designed and monitored by the national laboratories involved in the photovoltaic program; (3) exhibits: designed to acquaint the general public to photovoltaics; (4) component field tests: real time endurance testing conducted to monitor module reliability under actual environmental conditions; and (5) test facilities: descriptions of the four national laboratories involved in the photovoltaic program.

  9. Geology of the florencia gold – telluride deposit (camagüey, cuba) and some metallurgical considerations

    OpenAIRE

    López K Jesús M.; Moreira Jesús; Gandarillas José

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the results from a study of the Florencia gold-telluride deposit in Central Cuba, including mineralogical, petrographical, microprobe and chemical analysis. Valuable information is provided for the exploration, mining and processing of gold ores from other nearby deposits with similar characteristics. Results highlight changes in the mineralogical composition of the ores between the north and south sectors of the deposit, as reflected in metallurgical concentrates after b...

  10. Response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to cadmium stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Luciana Mara Costa; Ribeiro, Frederico Haddad; Neves, Maria Jose [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Radiobiologia], e-mail: luamatu@uol.com.br; Porto, Barbara Abranches Araujo; Amaral, Angela M.; Menezes, Maria Angela B.C. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Ativacao Neutronica], e-mail: menezes@cdtn.br; Rosa, Carlos Augusto [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Microbiologia], e-mail: carlrosa@icb.ufmg

    2009-07-01

    The intensification of industrial activity has been greatly contributing with the increase of heavy metals in the environment. Among these heavy metals, cadmium becomes a serious pervasive environmental pollutant. The cadmium is a heavy metal with no biological function, very toxic and carcinogenic at low concentrations. The toxicity of cadmium and several other metals can be mainly attributed to the multiplicity of coordination complexes and clusters that they can form. Some aspects of the cellular response to cadmium were extensively investigated in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The primary site of interaction between many toxic metals and microbial cells is the plasma membrane. Plasma-membrane permeabilisation has been reported in a variety of microorganisms following cadmium exposure, and is considered one mechanism of cadmium toxicity in the yeast. In this work, using the yeast strain S. cerevisiae W303-WT, we have investigated the relationships between Cd uptake and release of cellular metal ions (K{sup +} and Na{sup +}) using neutron activation technique. The neutron activation was an easy, rapid and suitable technique for doing these metal determinations on yeast cells; was observed the change in morphology of the strains during the process of Cd accumulation, these alterations were observed by Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) during incorporation of cadmium. (author)

  11. Response of Pleurotus ostreatus to cadmium exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Favero, N.; Bressa, G.; Costa, P. (Univ. of Padua (Italy))

    1990-08-01

    The possibility of utilizing agroindustrial wastes in the production of edible, high-quality products (e.g., mushrooms) implies the risk of bringing toxic substances, such as heavy metals, into the human food chain. Thus, growth in the presence of cadmium and cadmium accumulation limits have been studied in the industrially cultivated fungus P. ostreatus. Fruit body production is substantially unaffected in the presence of 25, 139, and 285 mg Cd/kg of dried substrate. Cadmium concentration in fruit bodies is related to cadmium substrate level, the metal being present at higher levels in caps (22-56 mg/kg dry wt) than in stems (13-36 mg/kg dry wt). Concentration factor (CF), very low in the controls (about 2), further decreases in treated specimens. The presence of a cadmium control mechanism in this fungi species is suggested. Fruit body cadmium levels could, however, represent a risk for P. ostreatus consumers, according to FAO/WHO limits related to weekly cadmium intake.

  12. Interactions of cadmium and zinc during pregnancy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorell, T.L.

    1988-01-01

    The interactions of cadmium exposure and zinc during pregnancy were investigated by studying rats exposed to 0, 5, 50, or 100 ppm cadmium (as CdCl{sub 2}) in the drinking water from day 6 to day 20 of pregnancy. On day 20 of pregnancy, fetuses of rats exposed to 50 and 100 ppm of cadmium were slightly but significantly smaller than those of control animals. Fetal weight was negatively correlated with fetal cadmium concentration and positively correlated with fetal cadmium concentration. Significant fetal cadmium accumulation occurred in both the 50 and 100 ppm cadmium exposure groups; fetal zinc concentrations were decreased. Maternal liver and kidney zinc concentrations were slightly elevated, and the possible role of maternal organ sequestration of available zinc is discussed. The activity of two zinc metalloenzymes, alkaline phosphatase and {delta}-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase, was decreased in maternal and fetal tissues, providing evidence of an alteration in zinc metabolism. In addition, the placental transport of {sup 65}Zn was characterized in control animals and compared to exposed groups; placental zinc transport was significantly decreased in the 50 and 100 ppm exposure groups.

  13. Cadmium inhalation and male reproductive toxicity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ragan, H.A.; Mast, T.J. (Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, WA (USA))

    1990-01-01

    Cadmium is a highly toxic element that is cumulative and has a long biological half-life in mammals. The severe toxicity of cadmium in man has been known for more than 100 years. Despite the knowledge that cadmium is toxic, only 20 human cases of poisoning via ingestion were recorded prior to 1941, whereas in the ensuing five-year period more than 680 cases of cadmium poisonings from accidental oral ingestion of this metal were documented. Some of the recorded effects of exposure to cadmium in laboratory animals include renal tubular damage, placental and testicular necrosis, structural and functional liver damage, osteomalacia, testicular tumors, teratogenic malformations, anemia, hypertension, pulmonary edema, chronic pulmonary emphysema, and induced deficiencies of iron, copper, and zinc. Some of these effects have also been observed in human after accidental exposures to cadmium oxide fumes and are characteristic of the syndrome described in Japan as Itai Itai disease in which ingestion of cadmium is the inciting chemical.134 references.

  14. [Association between cadmium and breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strumylaite, Loreta; Bogusevicius, Algirdas; Ryselis, Stanislovas; Pranys, Darius; Poskiene, Lina; Kregzdyte, Rima; Abdrachmanovas, Olegas; Asadauskaite, Rūta

    2008-01-01

    Cadmium is a known human lung carcinogen, although some studies indicate a link between cadmium exposure and human breast cancer. The objective of this study was to assess cadmium concentration in breast tissue samples of patients with breast cancer and benign breast tumor. MATERIAL AND METHODS. The concentration of cadmium was determined in breast tissue samples of 21 breast cancer and 19 benign tumor patients. Two samples of breast tissue from each patient, i.e. tumor and normal tissue close to tumor, were taken for the analysis. Cadmium was determined by atomic absorption spectrometry (Perkin-Elmer, Zeeman 3030). RESULTS. In patients with breast cancer, the mean cadmium concentration was 33.1 ng/g (95% CI, 21.9-44.4) in malignant breast tissue and 10.4 ng/g (95% CI, 5.6-15.2) in normal breast tissue (P=0.002). In patients with benign tumor, the corresponding values were 17.5 ng/g (95% CI, 8.4-26.5) and 11.8 ng/g (95% CI, 5.1-18.5) (P=0.3144). There was a statistically significant difference in cadmium concentration between malignant and benign breast tissues (P=0.009). CONCLUSION. The data obtained show that cadmium concentration is significantly higher in malignant breast tissue as compared with normal breast tissue of the same women or benign breast tissue. Further studies are necessary to determine the association between cadmium concentration in malignant breast tissue and estrogen receptor level, and smoking.

  15. Biochemical Effects of Cadmium Exposure and the Potential Pharmacologic Significance of Cadmium Mediated Hydrolase Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-04-18

    increase Cd absorption from the intestines (Larson and Piscator 1971; Itokawa, Abe et al. 197 4; Pond and Walker 1975). Pyridoxine, vitamin B 6 , is...considerations on uptake and retention of cadmium in human kidney cortex. Cadmium in the Environment. L. Friberg, M. Piscator and G. F. Nordberg. Cleveland...Columbia, Missouri, University of Missouri. Larson, S.-E. and M. Piscator (1971). "Effect of cadmium on skeletal tissue in normal and calcium

  16. Photovoltaic power generation system free of bypass diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentine, Anthony L.; Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N.

    2015-07-28

    A photovoltaic power generation system that includes a solar panel that is free of bypass diodes is described herein. The solar panel includes a plurality of photovoltaic sub-modules, wherein at least two of photovoltaic sub-modules in the plurality of photovoltaic sub-modules are electrically connected in parallel. A photovoltaic sub-module includes a plurality of groups of electrically connected photovoltaic cells, wherein at least two of the groups are electrically connected in series. A photovoltaic group includes a plurality of strings of photovoltaic cells, wherein a string of photovoltaic cells comprises a plurality of photovoltaic cells electrically connected in series. The strings of photovoltaic cells are electrically connected in parallel, and the photovoltaic cells are microsystem-enabled photovoltaic cells.

  17. Cadmium Toxicity to Ringed Seals (Phoca hispida)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Christian; Dietz, R.; Riget, F. F.;

    as laboratory mammals. We have studied possible cadmium induced histopathological changes in the kidneys as well as a demineralisation of the skeletal system (DXA-scanning of lumbal vertebraes). No obvious cadmium induced toxic changes were found. Food composition and physiological adaptations may explain......Cadmium concentrations in kidneys from ringed seals (Phoca hispida) from North West Greenland (Qaanaaq) are high. Concentrations range at level known to induce renal toxic effects (mainly tubulopathy) and demineralisation (osteopenia) of the skeletal system (Fanconi's Syndrome) in humans as well...

  18. SAM Photovoltaic Model Technical Reference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gilman, P. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-05-27

    This manual describes the photovoltaic performance model in the System Advisor Model (SAM). The U.S. Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory maintains and distributes SAM, which is available as a free download from https://sam.nrel.gov. These descriptions are based on SAM 2015.1.30 (SSC 41).

  19. Photovoltaics radiometric issues and needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myers, D.R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States)

    1995-11-01

    This paper presents a summary of issues discussed at the photovoltaic radiometric measurements workshop. Topics included radiometric measurements guides, the need for well-defined goals, documentation, calibration checks, accreditation of testing laboratories and methods, the need for less expensive radiometric instrumentation, data correlations, and quality assurance.

  20. NREL Photovoltaic Program FY 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-08-01

    This report reviews the in-house and subcontracted research and development (R&D) activities under the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) Photovoltaic (PV) Program from October 1, 1992, through September 30, 1993 (fiscal year [FY] 1993). The NREL PV Program is part of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) National Photovoltaics Program, as described in the DOE Photovoltaics Program Plan, FY 1991 - FY 1995. The FY 1993 budget authority (BA) for carrying out the NREL PV Program was $40.1 million in operating funds and $0.9 million in capital equipment funds. An additional $4.8 million in capital equipment funds were made available for the new Solar Energy Research Facility (SERF) that will house the in-house PV laboratories beginning in FY 1994. Subcontract activities represent a major part of the NREL PV Program, with more than $23.7 million (nearly 59%) of the FY 1993 operating funds going to 70 subcontractors. In FY 1993, DOE assigned certain other PV subcontracting efforts to the DOE Golden Field Office (DOE/GO), and assigned responsibility for their technical support to the NREL PV Program. An example is the PV:BONUS (Building Opportunities in the U.S. for Photovoltaics) Project. These DOE/GO efforts are also reported in this document.