WorldWideScience

Sample records for cadherin-mediated cell adhesion

  1. From flexibility to cooperativity: multiscale modeling of cadherin-mediated cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yinghao

    2013-03-01

    Cadherins constitute a large family of Ca2 +-dependent adhesion molecules in the Inter-cellular junctions that play a pivotal role in the assembly of cells into specific three-dimensional tissues. Although the molecular mechanisms underlying cadherin-mediated cell adhesion are still not fully understood, it seems likely that both cis dimers that are formed by binding of extracellular domains of two cadherins on the same cell surface, and trans-dimers formed between cadherins on opposing cell surfaces, are critical to trigger the junction formation. Here we present a new multiscale computational strategy to model the process of junction formation based on the knowledge of cadherin molecular structures and its 3D binding affinities. The cell interfacial region is defined by a simplified system where each of two interacting membrane surfaces is represented as a two-dimensional lattice with each cadherin molecule treated as a randomly diffusing unit. The binding energy for a pair of interacting cadherins in this two-dimensional discrete system is obtained from 3D binding affinities through a renormalization process derived from statistical thermodynamics. The properties of individual cadherins used in the lattice model are based on molecular level simulations. Our results show that within the range of experimentally-measured binding affinities, cadherins condense into junctions driven by the coupling of cis and trans interactions. The key factor appears to be a loss of molecular flexibility during trans dimerization that increases the magnitude of lateral cis interactions. We have also developed stochastic dynamics to study the adhesion of multiple cells. Each cell in the system is described as a mechanical entity and adhesive properties between two cells are derived from the lattice model. The cellular simulations are used to study the specific problems of tissue morphogenesis and tumor metastasis. The consequent question and upcoming challenge is to understand the

  2. N-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion restricts cell proliferation in the dorsal neural tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalasani, Kavita; Brewster, Rachel M

    2011-05-01

    Neural progenitors are organized as a pseudostratified epithelium held together by adherens junctions (AJs), multiprotein complexes composed of cadherins and α- and β-catenin. Catenins are known to control neural progenitor division; however, it is not known whether they function in this capacity as cadherin binding partners, as there is little evidence that cadherins themselves regulate neural proliferation. We show here that zebrafish N-cadherin (N-cad) restricts cell proliferation in the dorsal region of the neural tube by regulating cell-cycle length. We further reveal that N-cad couples cell-cycle exit and differentiation, as a fraction of neurons are mitotic in N-cad mutants. Enhanced proliferation in N-cad mutants is mediated by ligand-independent activation of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, possibly caused by defective ciliogenesis. Furthermore, depletion of Hh signaling results in the loss of junctional markers. We therefore propose that N-cad restricts the response of dorsal neural progenitors to Hh and that Hh signaling limits the range of its own activity by promoting AJ assembly. Taken together, these observations emphasize a key role for N-cad-mediated adhesion in controlling neural progenitor proliferation. In addition, these findings are the first to demonstrate a requirement for cadherins in synchronizing cell-cycle exit and differentiation and a reciprocal interaction between AJs and Hh signaling.

  3. E-cadherin mediates adhesion and endocytosis of Aspergillus fumigatus blastospores in human epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Xiao-yong; SHI Yi; ZHANG Peng-peng; ZHANG Feng; SHEN Yu-ying; SU Xin; ZHAO Bei-lei

    2012-01-01

    Background Aspergillus fumigatus (A.fumigatus) is a ubiquitous saprophytic fungus responsible for the majority of invasive mold infections in patients undergoing chemotherapy,organ transplantation or with persistent neutropenia.This study aimed to determine the role of E-cadherin for adhesion and endocytosis of A.fumigatus blastospores in the human epithelial cell line A549.Methods A.fumigatus blastospores were incubated with the total protein of A549 to investigate the binding of E-cadherin and blastospores followed by an affinity purification procedure.After establishing the adhesion model,the adhesion and endocytosis of A.fumigatus blastospores by A549 cells were evaluated by down-regulating E-cadherin of A549 cells using blocking antibody or small interfering RNA (siRNA).Results E-cadherin was adhered to the surface of A.fumigatus blastospore.Adhesion and endocytosis of the blastospores were reduced by blocking or down-regulating E-cadherin in A549 cells.Conclusions E-cadherin is a receptor for adhesion and endocytosis of A.fumigatus blastospores in epithelial cells.This may open a new approach to treat this fungal infection.

  4. Cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion is perturbed by v-src tyrosine phosphorylation in metastatic fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Rat 3Y1 cells acquire metastatic potential when transformed with v-src, and this potential is enhanced by double transformation with v-src and v-fos (Taniguchi, S., T. Kawano, T. Mitsudomi, G. Kimura, and T. Baba. 1986. Jpn. J. Cancer Res. 77:1193-1197). We compared the activity of cadherin cell adhesion molecules of normal 3Y1 cells with that of v-src transformed (SR3Y1) and v-src and v-fos double transformed (fosSR3Y1) 3Y1 cells. These cells expressed similar amounts of P-cadherin, and show...

  5. The minimal essential unit for cadherin-mediated intercellular adhesion comprises extracellular domains 1 and 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shan, Weisong; Yagita, Yoshiki; Wang, Zhaohui;

    2004-01-01

    , the following questions remain unanswered: what is the minimal domain combination that can generate cell adhesion, how is domain organization related to adhesive strength, and does the cytoplasmic domain serve to facilitate extracellular domain interaction? To address these issues, we made serial constructs...... of the extracellular domains of N-cadherin and produced various cell lines to examine adhesion properties. We show that the first domain of N-cadherin alone on the cell surface fails to generate adhesive activity and that the first two domains of N-cadherin form the "minimal essential unit" to mediate cell adhesion...... domains of N-cadherin have distinct roles in cell adhesion, i.e. the first two domains are responsible for homophilic adhesion activity, and the other domains promote adhesion efficiency most likely by positioning essential domains relatively far out from the cell surface....

  6. The Integrated Role of Wnt/β-Catenin, N-Glycosylation, and E-Cadherin-Mediated Adhesion in Network Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Diego A; Sun, Meng; Sadykov, Khikmet; Kukuruzinska, Maria A; Zaman, Muhammad H

    2016-07-01

    The cellular network composed of the evolutionarily conserved metabolic pathways of protein N-glycosylation, Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion plays pivotal roles in determining the balance between cell proliferation and intercellular adhesion during development and in maintaining homeostasis in differentiated tissues. These pathways share a highly conserved regulatory molecule, β-catenin, which functions as both a structural component of E-cadherin junctions and as a co-transcriptional activator of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, whose target is the N-glycosylation-regulating gene, DPAGT1. Whereas these pathways have been studied independently, little is known about the dynamics of their interaction. Here we present the first numerical model of this network in MDCK cells. Since the network comprises a large number of molecules with varying cell context and time-dependent levels of expression, it can give rise to a wide range of plausible cellular states that are difficult to track. Using known kinetic parameters for individual reactions in the component pathways, we have developed a theoretical framework and gained new insights into cellular regulation of the network. Specifically, we developed a mathematical model to quantify the fold-change in concentration of any molecule included in the mathematical representation of the network in response to a simulated activation of the Wnt/ β-catenin pathway with Wnt3a under different conditions. We quantified the importance of protein N-glycosylation and synthesis of the DPAGT1 encoded enzyme, GPT, in determining the abundance of cytoplasmic β-catenin. We confirmed the role of axin in β-catenin degradation. Finally, our data suggest that cell-cell adhesion is insensitive to E-cadherin recycling in the cell. We validate the model by inhibiting β-catenin-mediated activation of DPAGT1 expression and predicting changes in cytoplasmic β-catenin concentration and stability

  7. Reggies/flotillins regulate E-cadherin-mediated cell contact formation by affecting EGFR trafficking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis, Gonzalo P; Schrock, Yvonne; Hülsbusch, Nikola; Wiechers, Marianne; Plattner, Helmut; Stuermer, Claudia A O

    2012-05-01

    The reggie/flotillin proteins are implicated in membrane trafficking and, together with the cellular prion protein (PrP), in the recruitment of E-cadherin to cell contact sites. Here, we demonstrate that reggies, as well as PrP down-regulation, in epithelial A431 cells cause overlapping processes and abnormal formation of adherens junctions (AJs). This defect in cell adhesion results from reggie effects on Src tyrosine kinases and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR): loss of reggies reduces Src activation and EGFR phosphorylation at residues targeted by Src and c-cbl and leads to increased surface exposure of EGFR by blocking its internalization. The prolonged EGFR signaling at the plasma membrane enhances cell motility and macropinocytosis, by which junction-associated E-cadherin is internalized and recycled back to AJs. Accordingly, blockage of EGFR signaling or macropinocytosis in reggie-deficient cells restores normal AJ formation. Thus, by promoting EGFR internalization, reggies restrict the EGFR signaling involved in E-cadherin macropinocytosis and recycling and regulate AJ formation and dynamics and thereby cell adhesion.

  8. N-cadherin-mediated interaction with multiple myeloma cells inhibits osteoblast differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.W.J. Groen; M.F.M. de Rooij; K.A. Kocemba; R.M. Reijmers; A. de Haan-Kramer; M.B. Overdijk; L. Aalders; H. Rozemuller; A.C.M. Martens; P.L. Bergsagel; M.J. Kersten; S.T. Pals; M. Spaargaren

    2011-01-01

    Background Multiple myeloma is a hematologic malignancy characterized by a clonal expansion of malignant plasma cells in the bone marrow, which is accompanied by the development of osteolytic lesions and/or diffuse osteopenia. The intricate bi-directional interaction with the bone marrow microenviro

  9. A Protocadherin-Cadherin-FLRT3 Complex Controls Cell Adhesion and Morphogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xuejun; Koh, Eunjin; Yoder, Michael; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    2009-01-01

    Background Paraxial protocadherin (PAPC) and fibronectin leucine-rich domain transmembrane protein-3 (FLRT3) are induced by TGFβ signaling in Xenopus embryos and both regulate morphogenesis by inhibiting C-cadherin mediated cell adhesion. Principal Findings We have investigated the functional and physical relationships between PAPC, FLRT3, and C-cadherin. Although neither PAPC nor FLRT3 are required for each other to regulate C-cadherin adhesion, they do interact functionally and physically, ...

  10. New insights into the molecular mechanism of E-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion by free energy calculations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Doro, Fabio; Saladino, Giorgio; Belvisi, Laura;

    2015-01-01

    simulations, we reconstruct its conformational free energy landscape, obtaining the free energy profile connecting the inactive and active form. Our simulations predict that the E-cadherin monomer populates the open and closed forms almost equally, which is in agreement with the proposed "selected fit...

  11. The calcium-sensing receptor-dependent regulation of cell-cell adhesion and keratinocyte differentiation requires Rho and Filamin A

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, Chia-Ling; Chang, Wenhan; Bikle, Daniel D.

    2011-01-01

    Extracellular Ca2+ (Ca2+o) acting through the calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) induces E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion and cellular signals mediating cell differentiation in epidermal keratinocytes. Previous studies indicate that the CaR regulates cell-cell adhesion through the Fyn/Src tyrosine kinases. Here we investigate whether Rho GTPase is a part of the CaR-mediated signaling cascade regulating cell adhesion and differentiation. Suppressing endogenous Rho A expression by small inter...

  12. Cathepsin G, a Neutrophil Protease, Induces Compact Cell-Cell Adhesion in MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoya Kudo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cathepsin G is a serine protease secreted by activated neutrophils that play a role in the inflammatory response. Because neutrophils are known to be invading leukocytes in various tumors, their products may influence the characteristics of tumor cells such as the growth state, motility, and the adhesiveness between cells or the extracellular matrix. Here, we demonstrate that cathepsin G induces cell-cell adhesion of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells resulting from the contact inhibition of cell movement on fibronectin but not on type IV collagen. Cathepsin G subsequently induced cell condensation, a very compact cell colony, resulting due to the increased strength of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion. Cathepsin G action is protease activity-dependent and was inhibited by the presence of serine protease inhibitors. Cathepsin G promotes E-cadherin/catenin complex formation and Rap1 activation in MCF-7 cells, which reportedly regulates E-cadherin-based cell-cell junctions. Cathepsin G also promotes E-cadherin/protein kinase D1 (PKD1 complex formation, and Go6976, the selective PKD1 inhibitor, suppressed the cathepsin G-induced cell condensation. Our findings provide the first evidence that cathepsin G regulates E-cadherin function, suggesting that cathepsin G has a novel modulatory role against tumor cell-cell adhesion.

  13. [Endothelial cell adhesion molecules].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A N; Norkin, I A; Puchin'ian, D M; Shirokov, V Iu; Zhdanova, O Iu

    2014-01-01

    The review presents current data concerning the functional role of endothelial cell adhesion molecules belonging to different structural families: integrins, selectins, cadherins, and the immunoglobulin super-family. In this manuscript the regulatory mechanisms and factors of adhesion molecules expression and distribution on the surface of endothelial cells are discussed. The data presented reveal the importance of adhesion molecules in the regulation of structural and functional state of endothelial cells in normal conditions and in pathology. Particular attention is paid to the importance of these molecules in the processes of physiological and pathological angiogenesis, regulation of permeability of the endothelial barrier and cell transmigration.

  14. A protocadherin-cadherin-FLRT3 complex controls cell adhesion and morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejun Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Paraxial protocadherin (PAPC and fibronectin leucine-rich domain transmembrane protein-3 (FLRT3 are induced by TGFbeta signaling in Xenopus embryos and both regulate morphogenesis by inhibiting C-cadherin mediated cell adhesion. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have investigated the functional and physical relationships between PAPC, FLRT3, and C-cadherin. Although neither PAPC nor FLRT3 are required for each other to regulate C-cadherin adhesion, they do interact functionally and physically, and they form a complex with cadherins. By itself PAPC reduces cell adhesion physiologically to induce cell sorting, while FLRT3 disrupts adhesion excessively to cause cell dissociation. However, when expressed together PAPC limits the cell dissociating and tissue disrupting activity of FLRT3 to make it effective in physiological cell sorting. PAPC counteracts FLRT3 function by inhibiting the recruitment of the GTPase RND1 to the FLRT3 cytoplasmic domain. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: PAPC and FLRT3 form a functional complex with cadherins and PAPC functions as a molecular "governor" to maintain FLRT3 activity at the optimal level for physiological regulation of C-cadherin adhesion, cell sorting, and morphogenesis.

  15. Syndecans and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Chen, L; Woods, A

    2001-01-01

    Now that transmembrane signaling through primary cell-matrix receptors, integrins, is being elucidated, attention is turning to how integrin-ligand interactions can be modulated. Syndecans are transmembrane proteoglycans implicated as coreceptors in a variety of physiological processes, including...... cell adhesion, migration, response to growth factors, development, and tumorigenesis. This review will describe this family of proteoglycans in terms of their structures and functions and their signaling in conjunction with integrins, and indicate areas for future research....

  16. The neural cell adhesion molecule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berezin, V; Bock, E; Poulsen, F M

    2000-01-01

    During the past year, the understanding of the structure and function of neural cell adhesion has advanced considerably. The three-dimensional structures of several of the individual modules of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) have been determined, as well as the structure of the complex...... between two identical fragments of the NCAM. Also during the past year, a link between homophilic cell adhesion and several signal transduction pathways has been proposed, connecting the event of cell surface adhesion to cellular responses such as neurite outgrowth. Finally, the stimulation of neurite...

  17. Syndecan proteoglycans and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Oh, E S; Couchman, J R

    1998-01-01

    It is now becoming clear that a family of transmembrane proteoglycans, the syndecans, have important roles in cell adhesion. They participate through binding of matrix ligand to their glycosaminoglycan chains, clustering, and the induction of signaling cascades to modify the internal microfilament...... organization. Syndecans can modulate the type of adhesive responses induced by other matrix ligand-receptor interactions, such as those involving the integrins, and so contribute to the control of cell morphology, adhesion and migration....

  18. Dynamic and Static Interactions between p120 Catenin and E-Cadherin Regulate the Stability of Cell-Cell Adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishiyama, Noboru; Lee, Seung-Hye; Liu, Shuang; Li, Guang-Yao; Smith, Matthew J.; Reichardt, Louis F.; Ikura, Mitsuhiko (OCI); (UCSF)

    2010-04-26

    The association of p120 catenin (p120) with the juxtamembrane domain (JMD) of the cadherin cytoplasmic tail is critical for the surface stability of cadherin-catenin cell-cell adhesion complexes. Here, we present the crystal structure of p120 isoform 4A in complex with the JMD core region (JMD{sub core}) of E-cadherin. The p120 armadillo repeat domain contains modular binding pockets that are complementary to electrostatic and hydrophobic properties of the JMD{sub core}. Single-residue mutations within the JMD{sub core}-binding site of p120 abolished its interaction with E- and N-cadherins in vitro and in cultured cells. These mutations of p120 enabled us to clearly differentiate between N-cadherin-dependent and -independent steps of neuronal dendritic spine morphogenesis crucial for synapse development. NMR studies revealed that p120 regulates the stability of cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion by associating with the majority of the JMD, including residues implicated in clathrin-mediated endocytosis and Hakai-dependent ubiquitination of E-cadherin, through its discrete dynamic and static binding sites.

  19. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Akihiko Murata; Shin-Ichi Hayashi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of...

  20. Molecular mechanisms involved in TFF3 peptide-mediated modulation of the E-cadherin/catenin cell adhesion complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer zum Büschenfelde, Dirk; Hoschützky, Heinz; Tauber, Rudolf; Huber, Otmar

    2004-05-01

    TFF3 is a member of the TFF-domain peptide family which is constitutively expressed in mucous epithelial tissues where it acts as a motogenic factor and plays an important role during epithelial restitution after wounding and during inflammation. In contrast to these beneficial functions, TFFs were also reported to be involved in cell scattering and tumor invasion. These changes in epithelial cell morphology and motility are associated with a modulation of cell contacts. In this respect, we here investigated the E-cadherin/catenin cell adhesion complex in FLAG-hTFF3-transfected HT29/B6 and MDCK cells. In hTFF3-transfected cells the amount of E-cadherin is reduced with a concomitant reduction of alpha- and beta-catenin levels. On one hand, E-cadherin expression is lowered at the transcriptional level as shown by multiplex RT-PCR analysis. This decrease does not depend on differences in the promoter methylation status as shown by methylation-specific PCR. On the other hand, pulse-chase experiments showed a reduction in the E-cadherin half-life in hTFF3-transfected cells reflecting increased E-cadherin degradation. In summary, hTFF3 induces transcriptional and posttranslational processes resulting in a modulation of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell contacts that may play an important role in the paradoxical benefical and pathogenic function of TFF peptides.

  1. Focal adhesions and cell-matrix interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1988-01-01

    Focal adhesions are areas of cell surfaces where specializations of cytoskeletal, membrane and extracellular components combine to produce stable cell-matrix interactions. The morphology of these adhesions and the components identified in them are discussed together with possible mechanisms...

  2. Syndecans, signaling, and cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Woods, A

    1996-01-01

    Syndecans are transmembrane proteoglycans which can participate in diverse cell surface interactions, involving extracellular matrix macromolecules, growth factors, protease inhibitors, and even viral entry. Currently, all extracellular interactions are believed to be mediated by distinct...... structures within the heparan sulfate chains, leaving the roles of chondroitin sulfate chains and extracellular portion of the core proteins to be elucidated. Evidence that syndecans are a class of receptor involved in cell adhesion is mounting, and their small cytoplasmic domains may link...

  3. Film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A R M Yusoff; M N Syahrul; K Henkel

    2007-08-01

    A major issue encountered during fabrication of triple junction -Si solar cells on polyimide substrates is the adhesion of the solar cell thin films to the substrates. Here, we present our study of film adhesion in amorphous silicon solar cells made on different polyimide substrates (Kapton VN, Upilex-S and Gouldflex), and the effect of tie coats on film adhesion.

  4. Syndecans: synergistic activators of cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woods, A; Couchman, J R

    1998-01-01

    Cell-surface proteoglycans participate in cell adhesion, growth-factor signalling, lipase activity and anticoagulation. Until recently, only the roles of the glycosaminoglycan chains were investigated. Now, with molecular characterization of several core proteins, the roles of each individual...... molecules modulating integrin-based adhesion....

  5. Cadherins mediate sequential roles through a hierarchy of mechanisms in the developing mammillary body

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nora eSzabo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Expression of intricate combinations of cadherins (a family of adhesive membrane proteins is common in the developing central nervous system. On this basis, a combinatorial cadherin code has long been proposed to underlie neuronal sorting and to be ultimately responsible for the layers, columns and nuclei of the brain. However, experimental proof of this particular function of cadherins has proven difficult to obtain and the question is still not clear. Alternatively, non-specific, non-combinatorial, purely quantitative adhesive differentials have been proposed to explain neuronal sorting in the brain. Do cadherin combinations underlie brain cytoarchitecture? We approached this question using as model a well-defined forebrain nucleus, the mammillary body (MBO, which shows strong, homogeneous expression of one single cadherin (Cdh11 and patterned, combinatorial expression of Cdh6, -8 and -10.We found that, besides the known combinatorial Cdh pattern, MBO cells are organized into a second, non-overlapping pattern grouping neurons with the same date of neurogenesis. Abolition of Cdh11 expression in the entire MBO during development disrupted the combination-based as well as the birthdate-based sorting. In utero RNAi experiments knocking down Cdh11 in MBO-fated migrating neurons at one specific age showed that Cdh11 expression is required for chronological entrance in the MBO.Our results suggest that neuronal sorting in the developing MBO is caused by adhesion-based, non-combinatorial mechanisms that keep neurons sorted according to birthdate information (possibly matching them to target neurons chronologically sorted in the same manner. Non-specific adhesion mechanisms would also prevent cadherin combinations from altering the birthdate-based sorting. Cadherin combinations would presumably act later to support specific synaptogenesis through specific axonal fasciculation and final target recognition.

  6. Analytical cell adhesion chromatography reveals impaired persistence of metastatic cell rolling adhesion to P-selectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Jaeho; Edwards, Erin E; McClatchey, P Mason; Thomas, Susan N

    2015-10-15

    Selectins facilitate the recruitment of circulating cells from the bloodstream by mediating rolling adhesion, which initiates the cell-cell signaling that directs extravasation into surrounding tissues. To measure the relative efficiency of cell adhesion in shear flow for in vitro drug screening, we designed and implemented a microfluidic-based analytical cell adhesion chromatography system. The juxtaposition of instantaneous rolling velocities with elution times revealed that human metastatic cancer cells, but not human leukocytes, had a reduced capacity to sustain rolling adhesion with P-selectin. We define a new parameter, termed adhesion persistence, which is conceptually similar to migration persistence in the context of chemotaxis, but instead describes the capacity of cells to resist the influence of shear flow and sustain rolling interactions with an adhesive substrate that might modulate the probability of extravasation. Among cell types assayed, adhesion persistence to P-selectin was specifically reduced in metastatic but not leukocyte-like cells in response to a low dose of heparin. In conclusion, we demonstrate this as an effective methodology to identify selectin adhesion antagonist doses that modulate homing cell adhesion and engraftment in a cell-subtype-selective manner.

  7. Hierarchical Nanopatterns for Cell Adhesion Studies

    OpenAIRE

    Schwieder, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Hierarchical nanopatterned interfaces are an intriguing tool to study clustering processes of proteins like for example integrins that mediate cell adhesion. The aim of this work is the development of innovative methods for the fabrication of hierarchical micro-nanopatterned surfaces and the use of such systems as platforms to study cell adhesion. In the first part of this work different approaches are presented which are suitable for preparing micro-nanopatterned interfaces at a large scale ...

  8. Micropatterning cell adhesion on polyacrylamide hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian; Guo, Wei-Hui; Rape, Andrew; Wang, Yu-Li

    2013-01-01

    Cell shape and substrate rigidity play critical roles in regulating cell behaviors and fate. Controlling cell shape on elastic adhesive materials holds great promise for creating a physiologically relevant culture environment for basic and translational research and clinical applications. However, it has been technically challenging to create high-quality adhesive patterns on compliant substrates. We have developed an efficient and economical method to create precise micron-scaled adhesive patterns on the surface of a hydrogel (Rape et al., Biomaterials 32:2043-2051, 2011). This method will facilitate the research on traction force generation, cellular mechanotransduction, and tissue engineering, where precise controls of both materials rigidity and adhesive patterns are important. PMID:23955741

  9. Cell adhesion molecules: detection with univalent second antibody

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    Identification of cell surface molecules that play a role in cell-cell adhesion (here called cell adhesion molecules) has been achieved by demonstrating the inhibitory effect of univalent antibodies that bind these molecules in an in vitro assay of cell-cell adhesion. A more convenient reagent, intact (divalent) antibody, has been avoided because it might agglutinate the cells rather than blocking cell-cell adhesion. In this report, we show that intact rabbit immunoglobulin directed against c...

  10. Yielding elastic tethers stabilize robust cell adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt J Whitfield

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteria and eukaryotic cells express adhesive proteins at the end of tethers that elongate reversibly at constant or near constant force, which we refer to as yielding elasticity. Here we address the function of yielding elastic adhesive tethers with Escherichia coli bacteria as a model for cell adhesion, using a combination of experiments and simulations. The adhesive bond kinetics and tether elasticity was modeled in the simulations with realistic biophysical models that were fit to new and previously published single molecule force spectroscopy data. The simulations were validated by comparison to experiments measuring the adhesive behavior of E. coli in flowing fluid. Analysis of the simulations demonstrated that yielding elasticity is required for the bacteria to remain bound in high and variable flow conditions, because it allows the force to be distributed evenly between multiple bonds. In contrast, strain-hardening and linear elastic tethers concentrate force on the most vulnerable bonds, which leads to failure of the entire adhesive contact. Load distribution is especially important to noncovalent receptor-ligand bonds, because they become exponentially shorter lived at higher force above a critical force, even if they form catch bonds. The advantage of yielding is likely to extend to any blood cells or pathogens adhering in flow, or to any situation where bonds are stretched unequally due to surface roughness, unequal native bond lengths, or conditions that act to unzip the bonds.

  11. Physics of cell elasticity, shape and adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, S. A.; Gov, N.; Nicolas, A.; Schwarz, U. S.; Tlusty, T.

    2005-07-01

    We review recent theoretical work that analyzes experimental measurements of the shape, fluctuations and adhesion properties of biological cells. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of the cytoskeleton and cell elasticity and we contrast the shape and adhesion of elastic cells with fluid-filled vesicles. In red blood cells (RBC), the cytoskeleton consists of a two-dimensional network of spectrin proteins. Our analysis of the wavevector and frequency dependence of the fluctuation spectrum of RBC indicates that the spectrin network acts as a confining potential that reduces the fluctuations of the lipid bilayer membrane. However, since the cytoskeleton is only sparsely connected to the bilayer, one cannot regard the composite cytoskeleton-membrane as a polymerized object with a shear modulus. The sensitivity of RBC fluctuations and shapes to ATP concentration may reflect topological defects induced in the cytoskeleton network by ATP. The shapes of cells that adhere to a substrate are strongly determined by the cytoskeletal elasticity that can be varied experimentally by drugs that depolymerize the cytoskeleton. This leads to a tension-driven retraction of the cell body and a pearling instability of the resulting ray-like protrusions. Recent experiments have shown that adhering cells exert polarized forces on substrates. The interactions of such “force dipoles” in either bulk gels or on surfaces can be used to predict the nature of self-assembly of cell aggregates and may be important in the formation of artificial tissues. Finally, we note that cell adhesion strongly depends on the forces exerted on the adhesion sites by the tension of the cytoskeleton. The size and shape of the adhesion regions are strongly modified as the tension is varied and we present an elastic model that relates this tension to deformations that induce the recruitment of new molecules to the adhesion region. In all these examples, cell shape and adhesion differ from vesicle shape and

  12. Cell adhesion during bullet motion in capillaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeishi, Naoki; Imai, Yohsuke; Ishida, Shunichi; Omori, Toshihiro; Kamm, Roger D; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2016-08-01

    A numerical analysis is presented of cell adhesion in capillaries whose diameter is comparable to or smaller than that of the cell. In contrast to a large number of previous efforts on leukocyte and tumor cell rolling, much is still unknown about cell motion in capillaries. The solid and fluid mechanics of a cell in flow was coupled with a slip bond model of ligand-receptor interactions. When the size of a capillary was reduced, the cell always transitioned to "bullet-like" motion, with a consequent decrease in the velocity of the cell. A state diagram was obtained for various values of capillary diameter and receptor density. We found that bullet motion enables firm adhesion of a cell to the capillary wall even for a weak ligand-receptor binding. We also quantified effects of various parameters, including the dissociation rate constant, the spring constant, and the reactive compliance on the characteristics of cell motion. Our results suggest that even under the interaction between P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) and P-selectin, which is mainly responsible for leukocyte rolling, a cell is able to show firm adhesion in a small capillary. These findings may help in understanding such phenomena as leukocyte plugging and cancer metastasis.

  13. Single Cell Adhesion Assay Using Computer Controlled Micropipette

    OpenAIRE

    Rita Salánki; Csaba Hős; Norbert Orgovan; Beatrix Péter; Noémi Sándor; Zsuzsa Bajtay; Anna Erdei; Robert Horvath; Bálint Szabó

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today's techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5-10 cells per day). Here, we introduc...

  14. White blood cell deformation and firm adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szatmary, Alex; Eggleton, Charles

    2011-11-01

    For a white blood cell (WBC) to arrive at infection sites, it forms chemical attachments with activated endothelial cells. First, it bonds with P-selectin, which holds it to the wall, but weakly; this allows the WBC to roll under the shear flow of the blood around it. Later, the WBCs bond with the stronger intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1); it is these ICAM bonds that allow the WBCs to fully resist the flow and stop rolling, allowing them to crawl through the endothelial wall. We model this numerically. Our model uses the immersed boundary method to represent the interaction of the shear flow with the deformable cell membrane. Receptors are on the tips of microvilli-little fingers sticking off of the cell membrane. The microvilli also deform. The receptors stochastically form and break bonds with molecules on the wall. Using this method, the history of each microvillus and its bonds can be found, as well as the distribution of the adhesion traction forces and how all of these vary with the deformability of the white blood cell. At higher shear rates, the white blood cell membrane deforms more, increasing its contact area with the surface; this effect is larger for softer membranes. We investigate how the deformability of the WBC affects the ease with which it forms firm adhesion.

  15. Optical biosensors for cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsden, Jeremy J; Horvath, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Planar optical waveguides offer an ideal substratum for cells on which to reside. The materials from which the waveguides are made--high refractive index transparent dielectrics--correspond to the coatings of medical implants (e.g., the oxides of niobium, tantalum, and titanium) or the high molecular weight polymers used for culture flasks (e.g., polystyrene). The waveguides can furthermore be modified both chemically and morphologically while retaining their full capability for generating an evanescent optical field that has its greatest strength at the interface between the solid substratum and the liquid phase with which it is invariably in contact (i.e., the culture medium bathing the cells), decaying exponentially perpendicular to the interface at a rate controllable by varying the material parameters of the waveguide. Analysis of the perturbation of the evanescent field by the presence of living cells within it enables their size, number density, shape, refractive index (linked to their constitution) and so forth to be determined, the number of parameters depending on the number of waveguide lightmodes analyzed. No labeling of any kind is necessary, and convenient measurement setups are fully compatible with maintaining the cells in their usual environment. If the temporal evolution of the perturbation is analyzed, even more information can be obtained, such as the amount of material (microexudate) secreted by the cell while residing on the surface. Separation of parallel effects simultaneously contributing to the perturbation of the evanescent field can be accomplished by analysis of coupling peak shape when a grating coupler is used to measure the propagation constants of the waveguide lightmodes. PMID:19635032

  16. Cell adhesion in regulation of asymmetric stem cell division

    OpenAIRE

    Yamashita, Yukiko M

    2010-01-01

    Adult stem cells inevitably communicate with their cellular neighbors within the tissues they sustain. Indeed, such communication, particularly with components of the stem cell niche, is essential for many aspects of stem cell behavior, including the maintenance of stem cell identity and asymmetric cell division. Cell adhesion mediates this communication by placing stem cells in close proximity to the signaling source and by providing a polarity cue that orients stem cells. Here, I review the...

  17. Adhesion of cells to polystyrene surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    1983-01-01

    The surface treatment of polystyrene, which is required to make polystyrene suitable for cell adhesion and spreading, was investigated. Examination of surfaces treated with sulfuric acid or various oxidizing agents using (a) x-ray photoelectron and attenuated total reflection spectroscopy and (b) measurement of surface carboxyl-, hydroxyl-, and sulfur-containing groups by various radiochemical methods showed that sulfuric acid produces an insignificant number of sulfonic acid groups on polyst...

  18. Characterization of adhesive interactions between human endothelial cells and megakaryocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Avraham, H; Cowley, S; Chi, S. Y.; Jiang, S.; Groopman, J E

    1993-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion is essential for many immunological functions and is believed to be important in the regulation of hematopoiesis. Adhesive interactions between human endothelial cells and megakaryocytes were characterized in vitro using the CMK megakaryocytic cell line as well as marrow megakaryocytes. Although there was no adhesion between unactivated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and megakaryocytes, treatment of HUVEC with inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1 beta, tumor ...

  19. Cell Adhesion on Surface-Functionalized Magnesium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, Victoria; Schilling, Achim; Mainka, Astrid; Hennig, Diana; Gerum, Richard; Kelch, Marie-Luise; Keim, Simon; Fabry, Ben; Virtanen, Sannakaisa

    2016-05-18

    The biocompatibility of commercially pure magnesium-based (cp Mg) biodegradable implants is compromised of strong hydrogen evolution and surface alkalization due to high initial corrosion rates of cp Mg in the physiological environment. To mitigate this problem, the addition of corrosion-retarding alloying elements or coating of implant surfaces has been suggested. In the following work, we explored the effect of organic coatings on long-term cell growth. cp Mg was coated with aminopropyltriehtoxysilane + vitamin C (AV), carbonyldiimidazole (CDI), or stearic acid (SA). All three coatings have been previously suggested to reduce initial corrosion and to enhance protein adsorption and hence cell adhesion on magnesium surfaces. Endothelial cells (DH1+/+) and osteosarcoma cells (MG63) were cultured on coated samples for up to 20 days. To quantify Mg corrosion, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was measured after 1, 3, and 5 days of cell culture. We also investigated the speed of initial cell spreading after seeding using fluorescently labeled fibroblasts (NIH/3T3). Hydrogen evolution after contact with cell culture medium was markedly decreased on AV- and SA-coated Mg compared to uncoated Mg. These coatings also showed improved cell adhesion and spreading after 24 h of culture comparable to tissue-treated plastic surfaces. On AV-coated cp Mg, a confluent layer of endothelial cells formed after 5 days and remained intact for up to 20 days. Together, these data demonstrate that surface coating with AV is a viable strategy for improving long-term biocompatibility of cp Mg-based implants. EIS measurements confirmed that the presence of a confluent cell layer increased the corrosion resistance. PMID:27089250

  20. Cooperative inhibitory effects of antisense oligonucleotide of cell adhesion molecules and cimetidine on cancer cell adhesion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan-Hong Tang; Yan-Ling Chen; Xiao-Qian Wang; Xiu-Jin Li; Feng-Zhi Yin; Xiao-Zhong Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore the cooperative effects of antisense oligonucleotide (ASON) of cell adhesion molecules and cimetidine on the expression of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells and their adhesion to tumor cells.METHODS: After treatment of endothelial cells with ASON and/or cimetidine and induction with TNF-α, the protein and mRNA changes of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells were examined by flow cytometry and RT-PCR,respectively. The adhesion rates of endothelial cells to tumor cells were measured by cell adhesion experiment.RESULTS: In comparison with TNF-α inducing group, lipoASON and lipo-ASON/cimetidine could significantly decrease the protein and mRNA levels of E-selectin and ICAM-1 in endothelial cells, and lipo-ASON/cimetidine had most significant inhibitory effect on E-selectin expression (from 36.37±1.56% to 14.23±1.07%, P<0.001). Meanwhile,cimetidine alone could inhibit the expression of E-selectin (36.37±1.56% vs 27.2±1.31%, P<0.001), but not ICAM-1 (69.34±2.50% vs68.07±2.10%,P>O.05)and the two kinds of mRNA, either. Compared with TNF-αα inducing group, the rate of adhesion was markedly decreased in lipo-E-selectin ASON and lipo-E-selectin ASON/cimetidine treated groups(P<0.05),and Jipo-E-selectin ASON/cimetidine worked better than lipo-E-selectin ASON alone except for HepG2/ECV304 group(P<0.05). However, the decrease of adhesion was not significant in lipo-ICAM-1 ASON and lipo-ICAM-1 ASON/cimetidine treated groups except for HepG2/ECV304 group (P >0.05).CONCLUSION: These data demonstrate that ASON in combination with cimetidine in vitro can significantly reduce the adhesion between endothelial cells and hepatic or colorectal cancer cells, which is stronger than ASON or cimetidine alone. This study provides some useful proofs for gene therapy of antiadhesion.

  1. Tuning cell adhesion by direct nanostructuring silicon into cell repulsive/adhesive patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Premnath, Priyatha, E-mail: priyatha.premnath@ryerson.ca [Micro/Nanofabrication Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3 (Canada); Tavangar, Amirhossein, E-mail: atavanga@ryerson.ca [Micro/Nanofabrication Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3 (Canada); Tan, Bo, E-mail: tanbo@ryerson.ca [Nanocharacterization Laboratory, Department of Aerospace Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3 (Canada); Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan, E-mail: venkat@ryerson.ca [Micro/Nanofabrication Laboratory, Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, Ryerson University, 350 Victoria Street, Toronto, ON, Canada M5B 2K3 (Canada)

    2015-09-10

    Developing platforms that allow tuning cell functionality through incorporating physical, chemical, or mechanical cues onto the material surfaces is one of the key challenges in research in the field of biomaterials. In this respect, various approaches have been proposed and numerous structures have been developed on a variety of materials. Most of these approaches, however, demand a multistep process or post-chemical treatment. Therefore, a simple approach would be desirable to develop bio-functionalized platforms for effectively modulating cell adhesion and consequently programming cell functionality without requiring any chemical or biological surface treatment. This study introduces a versatile yet simple laser approach to structure silicon (Si) chips into cytophobic/cytophilic patterns in order to modulate cell adhesion and proliferation. These patterns are fabricated on platforms through direct laser processing of Si substrates, which renders a desired computer-generated configuration into patterns. We investigate the morphology, chemistry, and wettability of the platform surfaces. Subsequently, we study the functionality of the fabricated platforms on modulating cervical cancer cells (HeLa) behaviour. The results from in vitro studies suggest that the nanostructures efficiently repel HeLa cells and drive them to migrate onto untreated sites. The study of the morphology of the cells reveals that cells evade the cytophobic area by bending and changing direction. Additionally, cell patterning, cell directionality, cell channelling, and cell trapping are achieved by developing different platforms with specific patterns. The flexibility and controllability of this approach to effectively structure Si substrates to cell-repulsive and cell-adhesive patterns offer perceptible outlook for developing bio-functionalized platforms for a variety of biomedical devices. Moreover, this approach could pave the way for developing anti-cancer platforms that selectively repel

  2. Adhesion of Aeromonas sp. to cell lines used as models for intestinal adhesion.

    OpenAIRE

    Kirov, S M; Hayward, L. J.; Nerrie, M. A.

    1995-01-01

    Adhesion to HEp-2 cells has been shown to correlate with enteropathogenicity for Aeromonas species. Such adhesion is thought to reflect the ability of strains to adhere to human intestinal enterocytes, although HEp-2 cells are not of intestinal origin. In this study strains of Aeromonas veronii biotype sobria isolated from various sources were investigated in parallel assays for their ability to adhere to HEp-2 cells and to an intestinal cell line (Caco-2). Quantitative assays showed identica...

  3. Dynamic force spectroscopy to probe adhesion strength of living cells

    OpenAIRE

    Prechtel, K.; Bausch, A. R.; Marchi-Artzner, V.; Kantlehner, M.; Kessler, H; Merkel, R

    2002-01-01

    We studied the mechanical strength of the adhesion of living cells to model membranes. The latter contained a RGD lipopeptide which is a high affinity binding site for a cell adhesion molecule (integrin alpha(V)beta(3)). Cells adhered specifically to the vesicles. We used micropipette aspiration for breaking this adhesion with well defined forces. Systematic variation of the rate of force application revealed pronounced kinetic effects. The dependence of the detachment forces on the loading r...

  4. Aedes cadherin mediates the in vivo toxicity of the Cry11Aa toxin to Aedes aegypti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su-Bum; Chen, Jianwu; Aimanova, Karlygash G; Gill, Sarjeet S

    2015-06-01

    Cadherin plays an important role in the toxicity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry proteins. We previously cloned a full-length cadherin from Aedes aegypti larvae and reported this protein binds Cry11Aa toxin from B. thuringiensis subsp. israelensis with high affinity, ≈16.7nM. Based on these results, we investigated if Aedes cadherin is involved in the in vivo toxicity of Cry11Aa toxin to Ae. aegypti. We established a mosquito cell line stably expressing the full-length Aedes cadherin and transgenic mosquitoes with silenced Aedes cadherin expression. Cells expressing the Aedes cadherin showed increased sensitivity to Cry11Aa toxin. Cry11Aa toxin at 400nM killed approximately 37% of the cells in 3h. Otherwise, transgenic mosquitoes with silenced Aedes cadherin expression showed increased tolerance to Cry11Aa toxin. Furthermore, cells expressing Aedes cadherin triggered Cry11Aa oligomerization. These results show the Aedes cadherin plays a pivotal role in Cry11Aa toxicity to Ae. aegypti larvae by mediating Cry11Aa oligomerization. However, since high toxicity was not obtained in cadherin-expressing cells, an additional receptor may be needed for manifestation of full toxicity. Moreover, cells expressing Aedes cadherin were sensitive to Cry4Aa and Cry11Ba, but not Cry4Ba. However transgenic mosquitoes with silenced Aedes cadherin expression showed no tolerance to Cry4Aa, Cry4Ba, and Cry11Ba toxins. These results suggest that while Aedes cadherin may mediate Cry4Aa and Cry11Ba toxicity, this cadherin but is not the main receptor of Cry4Aa, Cry4Ba and Cry11Ba toxin in Ae. aegypti.

  5. Dynamic Regulation of Activated Leukocyte Cell Adhesion Molecule–mediated Homotypic Cell Adhesion through the Actin CytoskeletonV⃞

    OpenAIRE

    Nelissen, Judith M. D. T.; Peters, Inge M.; de Grooth, Bart G.; Van Kooyk, Yvette; Figdor, Carl G.

    2000-01-01

    Restricted expression of activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) by hematopoietic cells suggests an important role in the immune system and hematopoiesis. To get insight into the mechanisms that control ALCAM-mediated adhesion we have investigated homotypic ALCAM–ALCAM interactions. Here, we demonstrate that the cytoskeleton regulates ALCAM-mediated cell adhesion because inhibition of actin polymerization by cytochalasin D (CytD) strongly induces homotypic ALCAM–ALCAM interactions....

  6. E-cadherin mediates contact inhibition of proliferation through Hippo signaling-pathway components

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Nam-Gyun; Koh, Eunjin; Chen, Xiao; Gumbiner, Barry M.

    2011-01-01

    Contact inhibition of cell growth is essential for embryonic development and maintenance of tissue architecture in adult organisms, and the growth of tumors is characterized by a loss of contact inhibition of proliferation. The recently identified Hippo signaling pathway has been implicated in contact inhibition of proliferation as well as organ size control. The modulation of the phosphorylation and nuclear localization of Yes-associated protein (YAP) by the highly conserved kinase cascade o...

  7. Dynamic monitoring of changes in endothelial cell-substrate adhesiveness during leukocyte adhesion by microelectrical impedance assay

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yakun Ge; Tongle Deng; Xiaoxiang Zheng

    2009-01-01

    Adhesion of leukocytes to endothelial cells in inflammation processes leads to changes of endothelial cell-substrate adhesiveness, and understanding of such changes will provide us with important information of inflammation processes. In this study, we used a non-invasive biosensor system referred to as real-time cell electronic sensor (RT-CES) system to monitor the changes in endothelial cell-substrate adhesiveness induced by human monoblastic cell line U937 cell adhesion in a dynamic and quantitative manner. This assay, which is based on cell-substrate impedance readout, is able to monitor transient changes in cell-substrate adhesiveness as a result of U937 cell adhesion. The U937 cell adhesion to endothelial cells was induced by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in a dose-dependent manner. Although the number of adherent U937 cells to the endothelial cells was verified by a standard assay, the adhesiveness of endothelial cells after addition of U937 cells was monitored by the RT-CES system. Furthermore, focal adhesion kinase protein decrease and F-actin rearrangement in endothelial cells were observed after addition of U937 cells. Our results indicated that the adhesion of U937 cells to LPS-treated endothelial cells reduced the cell adhesiveness to the substrate, and such reduction might facilitate infiltration of leukocytes.

  8. IL-1β enhances cell adhesion to degraded fibronectin

    OpenAIRE

    Rajshankar, Dhaarmini; Downey, Gregory P.; McCulloch, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    IL-1β is a prominent proinflammatory cytokine that mediates degradation of extracellular matrix proteins through increased expression of matrix metalloproteinases, which involves a signaling pathway in adherent cells that is restricted by focal adhesions. Currently, the mechanism by which IL-1β affects cell adhesion to matrix proteins is not defined, and it is not known whether degraded matrix proteins affect IL-1β signaling. We examined adhesion-related IL-1β signaling in fibroblasts attachi...

  9. Adhesion and Fusion of Muscle Cells Are Promoted by Filopodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Dagan; Dhanyasi, Nagaraju; Schejter, Eyal D; Shilo, Ben-Zion

    2016-08-01

    Indirect flight muscles (IFMs) in Drosophila are generated during pupariation by fusion of hundreds of myoblasts with larval muscle templates (myotubes). Live observation of these muscles during the fusion process revealed multiple long actin-based protrusions that emanate from the myotube surface and require Enabled and IRSp53 for their generation and maintenance. Fusion is blocked when formation of these filopodia is compromised. While filopodia are not required for the signaling process underlying critical myoblast cell-fate changes prior to fusion, myotube-myoblast adhesion appears to be filopodia dependent. Without filopodia, close apposition between the cell membranes is not achieved, the cell-adhesion molecule Duf is not recruited to the myotube surface, and adhesion-dependent actin foci do not form. We therefore propose that the filopodia are necessary to prime the heterotypic adhesion process between the two cell types, possibly by recruiting the cell-adhesion molecule Sns to discrete patches on the myoblast cell surface.

  10. Dynamic cell adhesion and migration on nanoscale grooved substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, E; te Riet, J; Domanski, M; Luttge, R; Figdor, C G; Gardeniers, J G E; Walboomers, X F; Jansen, J A

    2012-01-01

    Organised nanotopography mimicking the natural extracellular matrix can be used to control morphology, cell motility, and differentiation. However, it is still unknown how specific cell types react with specific patterns. Both initial adhesion and preferential cell migration may be important to initiate and increase cell locomotion and coverage with cells, and thus achieve an enhanced wound healing response around an implantable material. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate how MC3T3-E1 osteoblast initial adhesion and directional migration are influenced by nanogrooves with pitches ranging from 150 nm up to 1000 nm. In this study, we used a multi-patterned substrate with five different groove patterns and a smooth area with either a concentric or radial orientation. Initial cell adhesion measurements after 10 s were performed using atomic force spectroscopy-assisted single-cell force spectroscopy, and demonstrated that nascent cell adhesion was highly induced by a 600 nm pitch and reduced by a 150 nm pitch. Addition of RGD peptide significantly reduced adhesion, indicating that integrins and cell adhesive proteins (e.g. fibronectin or vitronectin) are key factors in specific cell adhesion on nanogrooved substrates. Also, cell migration was highly dependent on the groove pitch; the highest directional migration parallel to the grooves was observed on a 600 nm pitch, whereas a 150 nm pitch restrained directional cell migration. From this study, we conclude that grooves with a pitch of 600 nm may be favourable to enhance fast wound closure, thereby promoting tissue regeneration.

  11. Cell adhesion molecules in the central nervous system

    OpenAIRE

    Togashi, Hideru; Sakisaka, Toshiaki; Takai, Yoshimi

    2009-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion molecules play key roles at the intercellular junctions of a wide variety of cells, including interneuronal synapses and neuron-glia contacts. Functional studies suggest that adhesion molecules are implicated in many aspects of neural network formation, such as axon-guidance, synapse formation, regulation of synaptic structure and astrocyte-synapse contacts. Some basic cell biological aspects of the assembly of junctional complexes of neurons and glial cells resemble those ...

  12. Inducible adhesion of mesenchymal cells to elastic fibers: elastonectin.

    OpenAIRE

    Hornebeck, W; Tixier, J M; L. Robert

    1986-01-01

    The addition of highly purified elastic fibers to confluent human skin fibroblast or porcine aorta smooth muscle cell cultures resulted in a time-dependent, strong adhesion of the fibrils to the cell surface. The kinetics of adhesion was studied by video/time-lapse cinematography. After a 0.5-1 hr lag period, adhesion progressed to a maximum amount in 3-6 hr in the described conditions. Adhesion is strongly accelerated by the prior addition of soluble elastin peptides (kappa-elastin) to the c...

  13. Effect of Linomide on adhesion molecules, TNF-alpha, nitrogen oxide, and cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Hai, A; Hershkoviz, R; Weiss, L; Lider, O; Slavin, S

    2005-02-01

    Linomide (quinoline-3-carboxamide) is an immunomodulator with anti-inflammatory effects in rodents with autoimmune diseases. Its mode of action still remains to be elucidated. We hypothesized that an investigation of T cell interactions with the extracellular matrix (ECM), composed of glycoproteins such as fibronectin (FN) and laminin (LN), might provide better understanding of their in vivo mode of action in extravascular inflammatory sites. We examined the effect of Linomide on T cell adhesion to intact ECM, and separately to LN, and FN, and on the release and production of tumor necrosis factor (TNFalpha) and nitrogen oxide (NO) in relation to adhesive molecules in non-obese diabetic (NOD) female spleen cells, focusing on intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and CD44. NOD female mice that developed spontaneous autoimmune insulitis, which destroys pancreatic islets and subsequently leads to insulin-deficient diabetes mellitus, were studied. Linomide, given in the drinking water or added to tissue cultures in vitro, inhibited the beta1 integrin-mediated adhesion of T cells to ECM, FN and LN, as well as the production and release of TNFalpha and NO, which play a major role in the induction and propagation of T cell-mediated insulitis. In addition, exposure of T cells to Linomide resulted in increased expression of CD44 and ICAM-1 molecules on spleen cells of Linomide-treated mice; such an increase in adhesion molecule expression may lead to more effective arrest of T cell migration in vivo. The regulation of T-cell adhesion, adhesion receptor expression, and inhibition of TNFalpha and NO secretion by Linomide may explain its beneficial role and provide a new tool for suppressing self-reactive T cell-dependent autoimmune diseases. PMID:15652754

  14. Cell Adhesion to Plasma-Coated PVC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elidiane C. Rangel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available To produce environments suitable for cell culture, thin polymer films were deposited onto commercial PVC plates from radiofrequency acetylene-argon plasmas. The proportion of argon in the plasmas, PAr, was varied from 5.3 to 65.8%. The adhesion and growth of Vero cells on the coated surfaces were examined for different incubation times. Cytotoxicity tests were performed using spectroscopic methods. Carbon, O, and N were detected in all the samples using XPS. Roughness remained almost unchanged in the samples prepared with 5.3 and 28.9% but tended to increase for the films deposited with PAr between 28.9 and 55.3%. Surface free energy increased with increasing PAr, except for the sample prepared at 28.9% of Ar, which presented the least reactive surface. Cells proliferated on all the samples, including the bare PVC. Independently of the deposition condition there was no evidence of cytotoxicity, indicating the viability of such coatings for designing biocompatible devices.

  15. Differential adhesion of tumor cells to capillary endothelial cells in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    Alby, L; Auerbach, R

    1984-01-01

    Adhesion studies were carried out to determine the relative ability of glioma cells and ovary-derived teratoma cells to adhere to endothelial cells obtained from mouse brain capillaries (designated MBE cell line) or mouse ovaries (designated MOE cell line). The teratoma cells showed preferential adhesion to MOE cells, whereas the glioma cells showed preferential adhesion to the MBE cell line. In contrast, the glioma and teratoma cells adhered equally to L929 and 3T3 fibroblasts. A testicular ...

  16. Laminin and Fibronectin in Cell Adhesion: Enhanced Adhesion of Cells from Regenerating Liver to Laminin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Roland; Engvall, Eva; Freeman, Aaron; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    1981-04-01

    Laminin, a basement membrane glycoprotein isolated from cultures of mouse endodermal cells and rat yolk sac carcinoma cells, promoted the attachment of liver cells obtained from regenerating mouse liver. Cells from normal mouse liver attached readily to dishes coated with fibronectin but attached poorly to surfaces coated with laminin. Both proteins efficiently promoted the attachment of cells from livers undergoing regeneration. After regeneration, the attachment to laminin returned to the low levels found in animals not subjected to partial hepatectomy but attachment to fibronectin remained high. Immunofluorescent staining of sections of normal liver with antilaminin revealed the presence of laminin in or adjacent to the walls of the bile ducts and blood vessels. After induction of regeneration by partial hepatectomy, increased amounts of laminin appeared in the sinusoidal areas. After carbon tetrachloride poisoning, staining for laminin was especially pronounced in the necrotic and postnecrotic areas around the central veins. This additional expression of laminin was transient. It reached a maximum around 5-6 days after the injury and then gradually disappeared. These findings show that laminin is an adhesive protein. The increase of laminin in regenerating liver and the adhesiveness of cells from such livers to laminin suggest a role for laminin in the maintenance of a proper tissue organization during liver regeneration.

  17. Single cell adhesion assay using computer controlled micropipette.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Salánki

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today's techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5-10 cells per day. Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (∼30 min. We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a

  18. Simulation of Cell Adhesion using a Particle Transport Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chesnutt, Jennifer

    2005-11-01

    An efficient computational method for simulation of cell adhesion through protein binding forces is discussed. In this method, the cells are represented by deformable elastic particles, and the protein binding is represented by a rate equation. The method is first developed for collision and adhesion of two similar cells impacting on each other from opposite directions. The computational method is then applied in a particle-transport model for a cloud of interacting and colliding cells, each of which are represented by particles of finite size. One application might include red blood cells adhering together to form rouleaux, which are chains of red blood cells that are found in different parts of the circulatory system. Other potential applications include adhesion of platelets to a blood vessel wall or mechanical heart valve, which is a precursor of thrombosis formation, or adhesion of cancer cells to organ walls in the lymphatic, circulatory, digestive or pulmonary systems.

  19. Regulation of embryonic cell adhesion by the prion protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Málaga-Trillo

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Prion proteins (PrPs are key players in fatal neurodegenerative disorders, yet their physiological functions remain unclear, as PrP knockout mice develop rather normally. We report a strong PrP loss-of-function phenotype in zebrafish embryos, characterized by the loss of embryonic cell adhesion and arrested gastrulation. Zebrafish and mouse PrP mRNAs can partially rescue this knockdown phenotype, indicating conserved PrP functions. Using zebrafish, mouse, and Drosophila cells, we show that PrP: (1 mediates Ca(+2-independent homophilic cell adhesion and signaling; and (2 modulates Ca(+2-dependent cell adhesion by regulating the delivery of E-cadherin to the plasma membrane. In vivo time-lapse analyses reveal that the arrested gastrulation in PrP knockdown embryos is due to deficient morphogenetic cell movements, which rely on E-cadherin-based adhesion. Cell-transplantation experiments indicate that the regulation of embryonic cell adhesion by PrP is cell-autonomous. Moreover, we find that the local accumulation of PrP at cell contact sites is concomitant with the activation of Src-related kinases, the recruitment of reggie/flotillin microdomains, and the reorganization of the actin cytoskeleton, consistent with a role of PrP in the modulation of cell adhesion via signaling. Altogether, our data uncover evolutionarily conserved roles of PrP in cell communication, which ultimately impinge on the stability of adherens cell junctions during embryonic development.

  20. Amygdalin influences bladder cancer cell adhesion and invasion in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina Makarević

    Full Text Available The cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin, derived from Rosaceae kernels, is employed by many patients as an alternative anti-cancer treatment. However, whether amygdalin indeed acts as an anti-tumor agent is not clear. Metastasis blocking properties of amygdalin on bladder cancer cell lines was, therefore, investigated. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml was applied to UMUC-3, TCCSUP or RT112 bladder cancer cells for 24 h or for 2 weeks. Tumor cell adhesion to vascular endothelium or to immobilized collagen as well as tumor cell migration was examined. Effects of drug treatment on integrin α and β subtypes, on integrin-linked kinase (ILK and total and activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK were also determined. Integrin knock-down was carried out to evaluate integrin influence on migration and adhesion. A 24 h or 2 week amygdalin application distinctly reduced tumor cell adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 and RT112 cells. TCCSUP adhesion was also reduced, but migration was elevated under amygdalin. Integrin subtype expression was significantly and specifically altered by amygdalin depending on the cell line. ILK was moderately, and activated FAK strongly, lost in all tumor cell lines in the presence of amygdalin. Knock down of β1 integrin caused a significant decrease in both adhesion and migration of UMUC-3 cells, but a significant increase in TCCSUP adhesion. Knock down of β4 integrin caused a significant decrease in migration of RT112 cells. Since the different actions of amygdalin on the different cell lines was mirrored by β1 or β4 knock down, it is postulated that amygdalin influences adhesion and migratory properties of bladder cancer cells by modulating β1 or β4 integrin expression. The amygdalin induced increase in TCCSUP migratory behavior indicates that any anti-tumor benefits from amygdalin (seen with the other two cell lines may depend upon the cancer cell type.

  1. Adhesive Micropatterns for Cells: A Microcontact Printing Protocol

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Manuel Théry and Matthieu Piel Corresponding authors ([](); []()) ### INTRODUCTION This protocol describes a simple, fast, and efficient method for making adhesive micropatterns that can be used to control individual cell shape and adhesion patterns. It is based on the use of an elastomeric stamp containing microfeatures to print proteins on the substrate of choice. The process can be subdiv...

  2. Probing bacterial adhesion at the single-cell level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Guanghong; Müller, Torsten; Meyer, Rikke Louise

    of contact. Staphylococcus xylosus DSM 20266 and Staphylococcus epidermidis DSM 20044 showed much higher adhesion forces than Pseudomonas fluorescens AH1, but bond strengthening by P. aeruginosa (2 s) was faster than for the staphylococci (10 s) . Escherichia coli DSM 429, which was the only strain unable...... to form biofilm, showed almost no adhesion to any surface. The differences between staphylococci and P. fluorescens in adhesion pattern reflects their differences in the composition of extracellular adhesins. Both adhesion force and rupture length were significantly smaller on mica compared to glass....... Staphylococci adhere stronger on fresh glass than on hydrophilic glass, while the weaker adhesion by P. fluorescens was similar on both types of glass. These results confirmed the importance of surface hydrophobicity in bacterial adhesion. This study has demonstrated that single-cell force spectroscopy allows...

  3. Cell Adhesion and Its Endocytic Regulation in Cell Migration during Neural Development and Cancer Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Kawauchi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell migration is a crucial event for tissue organization during development, and its dysregulation leads to several diseases, including cancer. Cells exhibit various types of migration, such as single mesenchymal or amoeboid migration, collective migration and scaffold cell-dependent migration. The migration properties are partly dictated by cell adhesion and its endocytic regulation. While an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT-mediated mesenchymal cell migration requires the endocytic recycling of integrin-mediated adhesions after the disruption of cell-cell adhesions, an amoeboid migration is not dependent on any adhesions to extracellular matrix (ECM or neighboring cells. In contrast, a collective migration is mediated by both cell-cell and cell-ECM adhesions, and a scaffold cell-dependent migration is regulated by the endocytosis and recycling of cell-cell adhesion molecules. Although some invasive carcinoma cells exhibit an EMT-mediated mesenchymal or amoeboid migration, other cancer cells are known to maintain cadherin-based cell-cell adhesions and epithelial morphology during metastasis. On the other hand, a scaffold cell-dependent migration is mainly utilized by migrating neurons in normal developing brains. This review will summarize the structures of cell adhesions, including adherens junctions and focal adhesions, and discuss the regulatory mechanisms for the dynamic behavior of cell adhesions by endocytic pathways in cell migration in physiological and pathological conditions, focusing particularly on neural development and cancer metastasis.

  4. Cell adhesion molecules during odontogenesis and tooth-related diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Heymann, Robert

    2002-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules play essential roles in the development and disease of tooth and oral structures, as well as in the maintenance of adult tissue structure/function. It has been shown that different types of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) play an important part in craniofacial development when ectomesenchymal cells migrate from the neural list to the primitive oral cavity, giving rise to the palatal processes and tooth germs. The role of CAMs in craniofacial developmen...

  5. Evidence for heterophilic adhesion of embryonic retinal cells and neuroblastoma cells to substratum-adsorbed NCAM

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    The adhesion of embryonic chicken retinal cells and mouse N2A neuroblastoma cells to purified embryonic chicken retinal NCAM adsorbed on a solid substratum was examined using a quantitative centrifugal adhesion assay. Both cell types adhered to NCAM and the adhesion was specifically inhibited by monovalent anti-NCAM antibody fragments. N2A cell adhesion depended on the amount of NCAM applied to the substratum, was cation independent, and was insensitive to treatment with the cytoskeletal pert...

  6. Physics of adhesion and elasticity of biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, S. A.

    2006-03-01

    Forces exerted by adherent cells are important for many physiological processes such as wound healing and tissue formation. By pulling on their environment, cells sense rigidity gradients, boundaries and strains induced by the presence of other cells. Many cell types respond to these signals by actively adjusting the magnitude and direction of the adhesions that connect cells to surfaces or to each other. These adhesions are formed from membrane-bound integrin proteins and other cytoplasmic proteins that form condensed domains that grow in the direction of externally applied or internal, cytoskeletal forces. We present a model for the adsorption of adhesion proteins from the cell interior to the adhesion site and the resulting, force-sensitive anisotropic growth. The theory couples the mechanical forces to the non- linear adsorption dynamics and predicts the growth velocities of the back and front of the adhesion in qualitative agreement with experiment. The adhesion forces generated by a collection of cells in a tissue significantly alter the overall elastic response of the system. We model an ensemble of cells by an extension of the treatment of dielectric response of polar molecules to elastic interactions. By introducing the elastic analogy of the dielectric constant of the medium, we are able to predict the average cell polarization, their orientational order, and the effective material constants.

  7. Amine-functionalized polypyrrole: Inherently cell adhesive conducting polymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Y; Schmidt, Christine E

    2015-06-01

    Electrically conducting polymers (CPs) have been recognized as novel biomaterials that can electrically communicate with biological systems. For their tissue engineering applications, CPs have been modified to promote cell adhesion for improved interactions between biomaterials and cells/tissues. Conventional approaches to improve cell adhesion involve the surface modification of CPs with biomolecules, such as physical adsorption of cell adhesive proteins and polycationic polymers, or their chemical immobilization; however, these approaches require additional multiple modification steps with expensive biomolecules. In this study, as a simple and effective alternative to such additional biomolecule treatment, we synthesized amine-functionalized polypyrrole (APPy) that inherently presents cell adhesion-supporting positive charges under physiological conditions. The synthesized APPy provides electrical activity in a moderate range and a hydrophilic surface compared to regular polypyrrole (PPy) homopolymers. Under both serum and serum-free conditions, APPy exhibited superior attachment of human dermal fibroblasts and Schwann cells compared to PPy homopolymer controls. Moreover, Schwann cell adhesion onto the APPy copolymer was at least similar to that on poly-l-lysine treated PPy controls. Our results indicate that amine-functionalized CP substrates will be useful to achieve good cell adhesion and potentially electrically stimulate various cells. In addition, amine functionality present on CPs can further serve as a novel and flexible platform to chemically tether various bioactive molecules, such as growth factors, antibodies, and chemical drugs. PMID:25294089

  8. Amplified effect of surface charge on cell adhesion by nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li-Ping; Meng, Jingxin; Zhang, Shuaitao; Ma, Xinlei; Wang, Shutao

    2016-06-01

    Nano-biointerfaces with varied surface charge can be readily fabricated by integrating a template-based process with maleimide-thiol coupling chemistry. Significantly, nanostructures are employed for amplifying the effect of surface charge on cell adhesion, as revealed by the cell-adhesion performance, cell morphology and corresponding cytoskeletal organization. This study may provide a promising strategy for developing new biomedical materials with tailored cell adhesion for tissue implantation and regeneration.Nano-biointerfaces with varied surface charge can be readily fabricated by integrating a template-based process with maleimide-thiol coupling chemistry. Significantly, nanostructures are employed for amplifying the effect of surface charge on cell adhesion, as revealed by the cell-adhesion performance, cell morphology and corresponding cytoskeletal organization. This study may provide a promising strategy for developing new biomedical materials with tailored cell adhesion for tissue implantation and regeneration. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, SEM, KFM AFM, chemical modification and characterization. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00649c

  9. Running with neighbors: coordinating cell migration and cell-cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Caitlin; Nelson, W James

    2015-10-01

    Coordinated movement of large groups of cells is required for many biological processes, such as gastrulation and wound healing. During collective cell migration, cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesions must be integrated so that cells maintain strong interactions with neighboring cells and the underlying substratum. Initiation and maintenance of cadherin adhesions at cell-cell junctions and integrin-based cell-ECM adhesions require integration of mechanical cues, dynamic regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, and input from specific signaling cascades, including Rho family GTPases. Here, we summarize recent advances made in understanding the interplay between these pathways at cadherin-based and integrin-based adhesions during collective cell migration and highlight outstanding questions that remain in the field. PMID:26201843

  10. Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    As the body moves, tissues or organs inside are normally able to shift around each other. This is because these tissues have ... occur if the adhesions cause an organ or body part to: Twist Pull ... unable to move normally The risk of forming adhesions is high ...

  11. The interplay of cell–cell and cell–substrate adhesion in collective cell migration

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Chenlu; Chowdhury, Sagar; Driscoll, Meghan; Parent, Carole A.; Gupta, S.K.; Losert, Wolfgang

    2014-01-01

    Collective cell migration often involves notable cell–cell and cell–substrate adhesions and highly coordinated motion of touching cells. We focus on the interplay between cell–substrate adhesion and cell–cell adhesion. We show that the loss of cell-surface contact does not significantly alter the dynamic pattern of protrusions and retractions of fast migrating amoeboid cells (Dictyostelium discoideum), but significantly changes their ability to adhere to other cells. Analysis of the dynamics ...

  12. Microtubule Disruption in Keratinocytes Induces Cell-Cell Adhesion through Activation of Endogenous E-Cadherin

    OpenAIRE

    Kee, Sun-Ho; Steinert, Peter M.

    2001-01-01

    The association of the cytoskeleton with the cadherin–catenin complex is essential for strong cell-cell adhesion in epithelial cells. In this study, we have investigated the effect of microtubule organization on cell-cell adhesion in differentiating keratinocytes. When microtubules of normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEKs) grown in low calcium media (0.05 mM) were disrupted with nocodazole or colcemid, cell-cell adhesion was induced through relocalization of the ...

  13. Extracellular Protein Interactions Mediated by the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule, NCAM: Heterophilic Interactions Between NCAM and Cell Adhesion Molecules, Extracellular Matrix Proteins, and Viruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Janne; Kulahin, Nikolaj; Walmod, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) mediate cell-to-cell interactions and interactions between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), a prototypic member of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily of CAMs, mediates adhesion through homophilic and heterophilic i...

  14. Dynamic cell adhesion and migration on nanoscale grooved substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E Lamers

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Organised nanotopography mimicking the natural extracellular matrix can be used to control morphology, cell motility, and differentiation. However, it is still unknown how specific cell types react with specific patterns. Both initial adhesion and preferential cell migration may be important to initiate and increase cell locomotion and coverage with cells, and thus achieve an enhanced wound healing response around an implantable material. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate how MC3T3-E1 osteoblast initial adhesion and directional migration are influenced by nanogrooves with pitches ranging from 150 nm up to 1000 nm. In this study, we used a multi-patterned substrate with five different groove patterns and a smooth area with either a concentric or radial orientation. Initial cell adhesion measurements after 10 s were performed using atomic force spectroscopy-assisted single-cell force spectroscopy, and demonstrated that nascent cell adhesion was highly induced by a 600 nm pitch and reduced by a 150 nm pitch. Addition of RGD peptide significantly reduced adhesion, indicating that integrins and cell adhesive proteins (e.g. fibronectin or vitronectin are key factors in specific cell adhesion on nanogrooved substrates. Also, cell migration was highly dependent on the groove pitch; the highest directional migration parallel to the grooves was observed on a 600 nm pitch, whereas a 150 nm pitch restrained directional cell migration. From this study, we conclude that grooves with a pitch of 600 nm may be favourable to enhance fast wound closure, thereby promoting tissue regeneration.

  15. Adhesion of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans to a human oral cell line.

    OpenAIRE

    Mintz, K. P.; Fives-Taylor, P M

    1994-01-01

    Two quantitative, rapid assays were developed to study the adhesion of Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, an oral bacterium associated with periodontal disease, to human epithelial cells. The human oral carcinoma cell line KB was grown in microtiter plates, and adherent bacteria were detected by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with purified anti-A. actinomycetemcomitans serum and horseradish peroxidase-conjugated secondary antibody or [3H]thymidine-labeled bacteria. Adhesion was found...

  16. Cell Adhesion on Polycaprolactone Modified by Plasma Treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Nina Recek; Matic Resnik; Helena Motaln; Tamara Lah-Turnšek; Robin Augustine; Nandakumar Kalarikkal; Sabu Thomas; Miran Mozetič

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of various plasma treatments of electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL) scaffolds on the adhesion and proliferation of human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC). The PCL scaffolds were treated in plasmas created in O2, NH3 or SO2 gas at identical conditions. Surface functionalization of plasma-treated samples was determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Cell adhesion and morphology were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and the influence of p...

  17. Why do receptor-ligand bonds in cell adhesion cluster into discrete focal-adhesion sites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhiwen; Gao, Yanfei

    2016-10-01

    Cell adhesion often exhibits the clustering of the receptor-ligand bonds into discrete focal-adhesion sites near the contact edge, thus resembling a rosette shape or a contracting membrane anchored by a small number of peripheral forces. The ligands on the extracellular matrix are immobile, and the receptors in the cell plasma membrane consist of two types: high-affinity integrins (that bond to the substrate ligands and are immobile) and low-affinity integrins (that are mobile and not bonded to the ligands). Thus the adhesion energy density is proportional to the high-affinity integrin density. This paper provides a mechanistic explanation for the clustering/assembling of the receptor-ligand bonds from two main points: (1) the cellular contractile force leads to the density evolution of these two types of integrins, and results into a large high-affinity integrin density near the contact edge and (2) the front of a propagating crack into a decreasing toughness field will be unstable and wavy. From this fracture mechanics perspective, the chemomechanical equilibrium is reached when a small number of patches with large receptor-ligand bond density are anticipated to form at the cell periphery, as opposed to a uniform distribution of bonds on the entire interface. Cohesive fracture simulations show that the de-adhesion force can be significantly enhanced by this nonuniform bond density field, but the de-adhesion force anisotropy due to the substrate elastic anisotropy is significantly reduced.

  18. The FRIABLE1 gene product affects cell adhesion in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Neumetzler

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion in plants is mediated predominantly by pectins, a group of complex cell wall associated polysaccharides. An Arabidopsis mutant, friable1 (frb1, was identified through a screen of T-DNA insertion lines that exhibited defective cell adhesion. Interestingly, the frb1 plants displayed both cell and organ dissociations and also ectopic defects in organ separation. The FRB1 gene encodes a Golgi-localized, plant specific protein with only weak sequence similarities to known proteins (DUF246. Unlike other cell adhesion deficient mutants, frb1 mutants do not have reduced levels of adhesion related cell wall polymers, such as pectins. Instead, FRB1 affects the abundance of galactose- and arabinose-containing oligosaccharides in the Golgi. Furthermore, frb1 mutants displayed alteration in pectin methylesterification, cell wall associated extensins and xyloglucan microstructure. We propose that abnormal FRB1 action has pleiotropic consequences on wall architecture, affecting both the extensin and pectin matrices, with consequent changes to the biomechanical properties of the wall and middle lamella, thereby influencing cell-cell adhesion.

  19. Loss of cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesion molecules in colorectal cancer.

    OpenAIRE

    Nigam, A. K.; Savage, F. J.; Boulos, P. B.; Stamp, G W; D. Liu; Pignatelli, M.

    1993-01-01

    Adhesion molecules are thought to play a vital role in the induction and maintenance of tissue differentiation and their loss or down-regulation has been implicated in the neoplastic process. Recent studies have shown that the morphoregulatory activities are a consequence of interactive processes between several cell adhesion molecules rather than the function of a single molecule. Therefore, we have investigated a panel of adhesion molecules including members of the integrin, cadherin and im...

  20. Quantifying Cell Adhesion through Impingement of a Controlled Microjet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Claas Willem; Gielen, Marise V.; Hao, Zhenxia; Gac, Le Severine; Lohse, Detlef; Sun, Chao

    2015-01-01

    The impingement of a submerged, liquid jet onto a cell-covered surface allows assessing cell attachment on surfaces in a straightforward and quantitative manner and in real time, yielding valuable information on cell adhesion. However, this approach is insufficiently characterized for reliable and r

  1. Dynamic Cell Adhesion and Migration on Nanoscale Grooved Substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, E.; Riet, te J.; Domanski, M.; Luttge, R.; Figdor, C.G.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Organised nanotopography mimicking the natural extracellular matrix can be used to control morphology, cell motility, and differentiation. However, it is still unknown how specific cell types react with specific patterns. Both initial adhesion and preferential cell migration may be important to init

  2. Dynamic cell adhesion and migration on nanoscale grooved substrates.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamers, E.; Riet, J. te; Domanski, M.; Luttge, R.; Figdor, C.G.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Walboomers, X.F.; Jansen, J.B.M.J.

    2012-01-01

    Organised nanotopography mimicking the natural extracellular matrix can be used to control morphology, cell motility, and differentiation. However, it is still unknown how specific cell types react with specific patterns. Both initial adhesion and preferential cell migration may be important to init

  3. Intercellular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1, Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1, and Regulated on Activation Normal T Cell Expressed and Secreted Are Expressed by Human Breast Carcinoma Cells and Support Eosinophil Adhesion and Activation

    OpenAIRE

    Ali, Shahina; Kaur, Jaswinder; Patel, Kamala D.

    2000-01-01

    Eosinophils are usually associated with parasitic and allergic diseases; however, eosinophilia is also observed in several types of human tumors, including breast carcinomas. In this study we examined several human breast carcinoma cell lines for adhesion molecule expression and the ability to bind and activate eosinophils. MDA-MB-435S and MDA-MB-468 cells constitutively expressed both intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and this expressio...

  4. Apicobasal Polarity Controls Lymphocyte Adhesion to Hepatic Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Reglero-Real

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Loss of apicobasal polarity is a hallmark of epithelial pathologies. Leukocyte infiltration and crosstalk with dysfunctional epithelial barriers are crucial for the inflammatory response. Here, we show that apicobasal architecture regulates the adhesion between hepatic epithelial cells and lymphocytes. Polarized hepatocytes and epithelium from bile ducts segregate the intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1 adhesion receptor onto their apical, microvilli-rich membranes, which are less accessible by circulating immune cells. Upon cell depolarization, hepatic ICAM-1 becomes exposed and increases lymphocyte binding. Polarized hepatic cells prevent ICAM-1 exposure to lymphocytes by redirecting basolateral ICAM-1 to apical domains. Loss of ICAM-1 polarity occurs in human inflammatory liver diseases and can be induced by the inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α. We propose that adhesion receptor polarization is a parenchymal immune checkpoint that allows functional epithelium to hamper leukocyte binding. This contributes to the haptotactic guidance of leukocytes toward neighboring damaged or chronically inflamed epithelial cells that expose their adhesion machinery.

  5. Prostaglandins in Cancer Cell Adhesion, Migration, and Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David G. Menter

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostaglandins exert a profound influence over the adhesive, migratory, and invasive behavior of cells during the development and progression of cancer. Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 and microsomal prostaglandin E2 synthase-1 (mPGES-1 are upregulated in inflammation and cancer. This results in the production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2, which binds to and activates G-protein-coupled prostaglandin E1-4 receptors (EP1-4. Selectively targeting the COX-2/mPGES-1/PGE2/EP1-4 axis of the prostaglandin pathway can reduce the adhesion, migration, invasion, and angiogenesis. Once stimulated by prostaglandins, cadherin adhesive connections between epithelial or endothelial cells are lost. This enables cells to invade through the underlying basement membrane and extracellular matrix (ECM. Interactions with the ECM are mediated by cell surface integrins by “outside-in signaling” through Src and focal adhesion kinase (FAK and/or “inside-out signaling” through talins and kindlins. Combining the use of COX-2/mPGES-1/PGE2/EP1-4 axis-targeted molecules with those targeting cell surface adhesion receptors or their downstream signaling molecules may enhance cancer therapy.

  6. Cell adhesion on ligand gradient substrates: a thermodynamic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvestani, Alireza S

    2010-01-01

    Gradient distribution of bio-adhesive proteins can regulate multiple cellular processes, including adhesion, growth, and migration. The ability to control the cell function by changing the surface density of immobilized ligands has become increasingly important in design of implantable medical devices and tissue regenerating scaffolds. Recent techniques in fabrication of substrates with controlled surface properties allow the examination of cell sensitivity to a wide range of adhesion gradients. Understanding the mechanisms by which cells sense and respond to these directional cues warrants a quantitative assessment of macroscopic cellular response to the surface gradients, supported by predictive theoretical models. This article presents a theoretical basis to examine the effect of ligand gradients on cellular adhesion, using an equilibrium thermodynamic model. The model facilitates a systematic investigation of the complex interplay of cell-substrate specific adhesions, non-specific repulsions, and membrane elasticity. This purely mechanistic model predicts a biphasic dependence between the extent of cell spreading and its position across the gradient substrate. PMID:19701944

  7. Osteoblast Adhesion of Breast Cancer Cells with Scanning Acoustic Microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyasaka, C.; Mercer, R. R.; Mastro, A. M.

    Conditioned medium was collected from a bone-metastatic breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, and cultured with an immature osteoblast cell line, MC3T3-E1. Under these conditions the osteoblasts acquired a changed morphology and appeared to adhere in a different way to the substrate and to each other. To characterize cellular adhesion, MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were cultured with or without MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium for two days. With mechanical scanning acoustic reflection microscopy, we were able to detect a change in the adhesive condition of the interface between the cell and the substrate, but not with optical microscopy

  8. Epithelial cell adhesion and gastrointestinal colonization of Lactobacillus in poultry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, Megan A; Dunn-Horrocks, Sadie L; Duong, Tri

    2014-11-01

    Administration of probiotic Lactobacillus cultures is an important alternative to the use of antibiotic growth promoters and has been demonstrated to improve animal health, growth performance, and preharvest food safety in poultry production. Whereas gastrointestinal colonization is thought to be critical to their probiotic functionality, factors important to Lactobacillus colonization in chickens are not well understood. In this study we investigate epithelial cell adhesion in vitro and colonization of Lactobacillusin vivo in broiler chickens. Adhesion of Lactobacillus cultures to epithelial cells was evaluated using the chicken LMH cell line. Lactobacillus cultures were able adhere effectively to LMH cells relative to Bacillus subtilis and Salmonella Typhimurium. Epithelial cell adhesion was similar for Lactobacillus crispatus TDCC 75, L. cristpatus TDCC 76, and Lactobacillus gallinarum TDCC 77, and all 3 were more adherent than L. gallinarum TDCC 78. However, when colonization was evaluated in the ileum and cecum of broiler chicks, L. crispatus TDCC 75 and L. gallinarum TDCC 77 were more persistent than L. crispatus TDCC 76 and L. gallinarum TDCC 78. The reduction of growth in medium supplemented with oxgal was greater for L. gallinarum TDCC 78 than L. gallinarum TDCC 77, suggesting that whereas adhesion was similar for the 2 strains, the difference in colonization between L. gallinarum strains may be due in part to their bile sensitivity. This study demonstrates that whereas adhesion to epithelial cells may be important in predicting gastrointestinal colonization, other factors including bile tolerance may also contribute to the colonization of Lactobacillus in poultry. Additionally, the chicken LMH cell line is expected to provide a platform for investigating mechanisms of Lactobacillus adhesion to epithelial tissue and evaluating the probiotic potential Lactobacillus in poultry.

  9. Adhesion in the stem cell niche: biological roles and regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Shuyi; Lewallen, Michelle; Xie, Ting

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell self-renewal is tightly controlled by the concerted action of stem cell-intrinsic factors and signals within the niche. Niche signals often function within a short range, allowing cells in the niche to self-renew while their daughters outside the niche differentiate. Thus, in order for stem cells to continuously self-renew, they are often anchored in the niche via adhesion molecules. In addition to niche anchoring, however, recent studies have revealed other important roles for adhe...

  10. Adhesion between peptides/antibodies and breast cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, J.; Paetzell, E.; Bogorad, A.; Soboyejo, W. O.

    2010-06-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used to measure the adhesion forces between the receptors on breast cancer cells specific to human luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) peptides and antibodies specific to the EphA2 receptor. The adhesion forces between LHRH-coated AFM tips and human MDA-MB-231 cells (breast cancer cells) were shown to be about five times greater than those between LHRH-coated AFM tips and normal Hs578Bst breast cells. Similarly, those between EphA2 antibody-coated AFM tips and breast cancer cells were over five times greater than those between EphA2 antibody-coated AFM tips and normal breast cells. The results suggest that AFM can be used for the detection of breast cancer cells in biopsies. The implications of the results are also discussed for the early detection and localized treatment of cancer.

  11. Raman microspectroscopic study of biomolecular structure inside living adhesive cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Guang; (李光); YANG; Hongying(杨红英); XU; Yiming; (许以明); ZHANG; Zhiyi(张志义)

    2002-01-01

    Cells adhesion is very important for many physiological processes. Using advanced Raman microspectroscopic technique, we selected T Leukemia cells (Jurkat) as the materials and obtained simultaneously conformation information of various biomolecules inside the whole living cells. By comparing the Raman microspectroscopic spectra of single and adhesive cancer cells, we found for the first time that when cells adhered, the conformation of the biomolecules (DNA, protein, carbohydrates and lipids) inside the cells had different changes: (i) the backbone of double-stranded DNA maintained orderly B-form or modified B-form conformation, whereas the groups of its deoxyribose and bases were modified; (ii) the conformational changes of the main chain and the side chain in the protein were obviously variant. The lines intensity belonging to α-helix andβ-sheet decreased, while that ofβ-turn increased. Tyrosine and tryptophane residues of the protein changed from "buried state" to "exposed state"; the lines intensity of its sulfhydryl group also increased; the conformation of its disulfide bond changed from two kinds to three kinds. These facts suggest that the cells adhesion causes changes in H-bonds organization of the main chain and environment of the side chain in the protein; (iii) the groups of the carbohydrates were also modified simultaneously; (iv) the conformation of the lipids bilayers of the membranes changed obviously; the order parameter for lateral interaction between chains decreased gradually with the increase of number of the adhesive cells. So cells adhesion resulted in an increase in fluidity of the membrane and ion permeability on the membrane.

  12. Cell Adhesion on Polycaprolactone Modified by Plasma Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Recek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We have investigated the influence of various plasma treatments of electrospun polycaprolactone (PCL scaffolds on the adhesion and proliferation of human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVEC. The PCL scaffolds were treated in plasmas created in O2, NH3 or SO2 gas at identical conditions. Surface functionalization of plasma-treated samples was determined using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Cell adhesion and morphology were investigated by scanning electron microscopy and the influence of plasma treatment on cell adhesion and viability was evaluated with cell viability assay (MTT assay. The results showed the highest metabolic activity of HUVEC on PCL samples treated with O2 and NH3 plasma. Accordingly, the cells reflected the best adhesion and morphology on O2 and NH3 plasma-treated PCL samples already at 3 h. Moreover, treatment with O2 and NH3 plasma even stimulated endothelial cell proliferation on PCL surfaces by 60% as measured at 24 h, showing significant improvement in endothelialization of this material. Contrarily, SO2 plasma appeared to be less promising in comparison with O2 and NH3 plasma; however, it was still better than without any plasma treatment. Thus, our results importantly contribute to the biocompatibility improvement of the PCL polymer, commonly used for scaffolds in tissue engineering.

  13. Pathogenic Actions of Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 in Pulmonary Emphysema and Atopic Dermatitis

    OpenAIRE

    Yoneshige, Azusa; Hagiyama, Man; Fujita, Mitsugu; Ito, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Cell adhesion mediated by adhesion molecules is of central importance in the maintenance of tissue homeostasis. Therefore, altered expression of adhesion molecules leads to the development of various tissue disorders involving cell activation, degeneration, and apoptosis. Nevertheless, it still remains unclear what initiates the altered expression of adhesion molecules and how the subsequent pathological cascades proceed. In this regard, cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1) is one of the candidat...

  14. Nanoparticle adhesion in proton exchange membrane fuel cell electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Qianping; Joy, David C.; Keffer, David J.

    2013-11-01

    Carbon supported platinum (Pt/C) catalyst remains among the most preferable catalyst materials for Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells. However, platinum (Pt) particles suffer from poor durability and encounter electrochemical surface area (ESA) loss under operation with the accompany of Pt nanoparticle coarsening. Several proposed mechanisms have involved the Pt detachment from its carbonate support as an initial step for the deactivation of Pt nanoparticles. In this study, we investigated the detachment mechanism from the nano-adhesion point of view. Classic molecular dynamics simulations are performed on systems contain Pt nanoparticles of different sizes and shapes. A thin Nafion film (1 nm) at different hydration levels is also included in the system to study the environmental effect on nanoparticle adhesion. We found that the adhesion force strengthens as the Pt size goes up. Pt nanoparticles of tetrahedral shape exhibit relatively stronger connection with the carbon substrate due to its unique ‘anchor-like’ structure. Adhesion is enhanced with the introduction of a Nafion. The humidity level in the Nafion film has a rather complicated effect on the strength of nanoparticle adhesion. The binding energies and maximum adhesive forces are reported for all systems studied.

  15. Amygdalin Influences Bladder Cancer Cell Adhesion and Invasion In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Jasmina Makarević; Jochen Rutz; Eva Juengel; Silke Kaulfuss; Igor Tsaur; Karen Nelson; Jesco Pfitzenmaier; Axel Haferkamp; Blaheta, Roman A.

    2014-01-01

    The cyanogenic diglucoside amygdalin, derived from Rosaceae kernels, is employed by many patients as an alternative anti-cancer treatment. However, whether amygdalin indeed acts as an anti-tumor agent is not clear. Metastasis blocking properties of amygdalin on bladder cancer cell lines was, therefore, investigated. Amygdalin (10 mg/ml) was applied to UMUC-3, TCCSUP or RT112 bladder cancer cells for 24 h or for 2 weeks. Tumor cell adhesion to vascular endothelium or to immobilized collagen as...

  16. Adhesion of human basophils, eosinophils, and neutrophils to interleukin 1-activated human vascular endothelial cells: contributions of endothelial cell adhesion molecules

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    Cytokines such as interleukin 1 (IL-1) promote adhesiveness in human umbilical vein endothelial cells for leukocytes including basophils, eosinophils, and neutrophils, and induce expression of adherence molecules including ICAM-1 (intercellular adhesion molecule-1), ELAM-1 (endothelial-leukocyte adhesion molecule-1), and VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule-1). In the present study, blocking monoclonal antibodies (mAb) recognizing ICAM-1, ELAM-1, and VCAM-1 have been used to compare their ...

  17. Biomimetic emulsions reveal the effect of homeostatic pressure on cell-cell adhesion

    CERN Document Server

    Pontani, Lea-Laetitia; Viasnoff, Virgile; Brujic, Jasna

    2012-01-01

    Cell-cell contacts in tissues are continuously subject to mechanical forces due to homeostatic pressure and active cytoskeleton dynamics. While much is known about the molecular pathways of adhesion, the role of mechanics is less well understood. To isolate the role of pressure we present a dense packing of functionalized emulsion droplets in which surface interactions are tuned to mimic those of real cells. By visualizing the microstructure in 3D we find that a threshold compression force is necessary to overcome electrostatic repulsion and surface elasticity and establish protein-mediated adhesion. Varying the droplet interaction potential maps out a phase diagram for adhesion as a function of force and salt concentration. Remarkably, fitting the data with our theoretical model predicts binder concentrations in the adhesion areas that are similar to those found in real cells. Moreover, we quantify the adhesion size dependence on the applied force and thus reveal adhesion strengthening with increasing homeos...

  18. Mutant p53 in cell adhesion and motility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeudall, W Andrew; Wrighton, Katharine H; Deb, Sumitra

    2013-01-01

    Pro-oncogenic properties of mutant p53 were investigated with the aid of migration assays, adhesion assays, and soft agar growth assays using cells stably expressing gain-of-function p53 mutants. To determine cell migration, "wound-healing" (scratch) assays and haptotactic (chamber) assays were used. H1299 cells expressing mutant p53 were found to migrate more rapidly than cells transfected with empty vector alone. Results from both types of migration assay were broadly similar. Migratory ability differed for different p53 mutants, suggesting allele-specific effects. Cells expressing p53 mutants also showed enhanced adhesion to extracellular matrix compare to controls. Furthermore, stable transfection of mutant p53-H179L into NIH3T3 fibroblasts was sufficient to allow anchorage-independent growth in soft agar. PMID:23150443

  19. Physics of cell adhesion: some lessons from cell-mimetic systems

    OpenAIRE

    Sackmann, Erich; Smith, Ana-Sunčana

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion is a paradigm of the ubiquitous interplay of cell signalling, modulation of material properties and biological functions of cells. It is controlled by competition of short range attractive forces, medium range repellant forces and the elastic stresses associated with local and global deformation of the composite cell envelopes. We review the basic physical rules governing the physics of cell adhesion learned by studying cell-mimetic systems and demonstrate the importance of thes...

  20. Regulation of cell–cell adhesion by the cadherin–catenin complex

    OpenAIRE

    Nelson, W. James

    2008-01-01

    Ca2+-dependent cell–cell adhesion is regulated by the cadherin family of cell adhesion proteins. Cadherins form trans-interactions on opposing cell surfaces which result in weak cell–cell adhesion. Stronger cell–cell adhesion occurs by clustering of cadherins and through changes in the organization of the actin cytoskeleton. Although cadherins were thought to bind directly to the actin cytoskeleton through cytoplasmic proteins, termed α- and β-catenin, recent studies with purified proteins in...

  1. Reinforcing endothelial junctions prevents microvessel permeability increase and tumor cell adhesion in microvessels in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Bingmei M Fu; Jinlin Yang; Bin Cai; Jie Fan; Lin Zhang; Min Zeng

    2015-01-01

    Tumor cell adhesion to the microvessel wall is a critical step during tumor metastasis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a secretion of tumor cells, can increase microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion in the microvessel. To test the hypothesis that inhibiting permeability increase can reduce tumor cell adhesion, we used in vivo fluorescence microscopy to measure both microvessel permeability and adhesion rates of human mammary carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells in post-capillary v...

  2. Neuropeptides, via specific receptors, regulate T cell adhesion to fibronectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levite, M; Cahalon, L; Hershkoviz, R; Steinman, L; Lider, O

    1998-01-15

    The ability of T cells to adhere to and interact with components of the blood vessel walls and the extracellular matrix is essential for their extravasation and migration into inflamed sites. We have found that the beta1 integrin-mediated adhesion of resting human T cells to fibronectin, a major glycoprotein component of the extracellular matrix, is induced by physiologic concentrations of three neuropeptides: calcitonin gene-related protein (CGRP), neuropeptide Y, and somatostatin; each acts via its own specific receptor on the T cell membrane. In contrast, substance P (SP), which coexists with CGRP in the majority of peripheral endings of sensory nerves, including those innervating the lymphoid organs, blocks T cell adhesion to fibronectin when induced by CGRP, neuropeptide Y, somatostatin, macrophage inflammatory protein-1beta, and PMA. Inhibition of T cell adhesion was obtained both by the intact SP peptide and by its 1-4 N-terminal and its 4-11, 5-11, and 6-11 C-terminal fragments, used at similar nanomolar concentrations. The inhibitory effects of the parent SP peptide and its fragments were abrogated by an SP NK-1 receptor antagonist, suggesting they all act through the same SP NK-1 receptor. These findings suggest that neuropeptides, by activating their specific T cell-expressed receptors, can provide the T cells with both positive (proadhesive) and negative (antiadhesive) signals and thereby regulate their function. Thus, neuropeptides may influence diverse physiologic processes involving integrins, including leukocyte-mediated migration and inflammation. PMID:9551939

  3. Endoglin regulates mural cell adhesion in the circulatory system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Elisa; Smadja, David M; Boscolo, Elisa; Langa, Carmen; Arevalo, Miguel A; Pericacho, Miguel; Gamella-Pozuelo, Luis; Kauskot, Alexandre; Botella, Luisa M; Gaussem, Pascale; Bischoff, Joyce; Lopez-Novoa, José M; Bernabeu, Carmelo

    2016-04-01

    The circulatory system is walled off by different cell types, including vascular mural cells and podocytes. The interaction and interplay between endothelial cells (ECs) and mural cells, such as vascular smooth muscle cells or pericytes, play a pivotal role in vascular biology. Endoglin is an RGD-containing counter-receptor for β1 integrins and is highly expressed by ECs during angiogenesis. We find that the adhesion between vascular ECs and mural cells is enhanced by integrin activators and inhibited upon suppression of membrane endoglin or β1-integrin, as well as by addition of soluble endoglin (SolEng), anti-integrin α5β1 antibody or an RGD peptide. Analysis of different endoglin mutants, allowed the mapping of the endoglin RGD motif as involved in the adhesion process. In Eng (+/-) mice, a model for hereditary hemorrhagic telangectasia type 1, endoglin haploinsufficiency induces a pericyte-dependent increase in vascular permeability. Also, transgenic mice overexpressing SolEng, an animal model for preeclampsia, show podocyturia, suggesting that SolEng is responsible for podocytes detachment from glomerular capillaries. These results suggest a critical role for endoglin in integrin-mediated adhesion of mural cells and provide a better understanding on the mechanisms of vessel maturation in normal physiology as well as in pathologies such as preeclampsia or hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia.

  4. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation for leukocyte adhesion deficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qasim, Waseem; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Davies, E Graham;

    2009-01-01

    of leukocyte adhesion deficiency who underwent hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation between 1993 and 2007 was retrospectively analyzed. Data were collected by the registries of the European Society for Immunodeficiencies/European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation, and the Center for International......, with full donor engraftment in 17 cases, mixed multilineage chimerism in 7 patients, and mononuclear cell-restricted chimerism in an additional 3 cases. CONCLUSIONS: Hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation offers long-term benefit in leukocyte adhesion deficiency and should be considered as an early...... therapeutic option if a suitable HLA-matched stem-cell donation is available. Reduced-intensity conditioning was particularly safe, and mixed-donor chimerism seems sufficient to prevent significant symptoms, although careful long-term monitoring will be required for these patients....

  5. Cell adhesion defines the topology of endocytosis and signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossier, Jean-Philippe; Xouri, Georgia; Goud, Bruno; Schauer, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    Preferred sites of endocytosis have been observed in various cell types, but whether they occur randomly or are linked to cellular cues is debated. Here, we quantified the sites of endocytosis of transferrin (Tfn) and epidermal growth factor (EGF) in cells whose adhesion geometry was defined by micropatterns. 3D probabilistic density maps revealed that Tfn was enriched in adhesive sites during uptake, whereas EGF endocytosis was restricted to the dorsal cellular surface. This spatial separation was not due to distributions of corresponding receptors but was regulated by uptake mechanisms. Asymmetric uptake of Tfn resulted from the enrichment of clathrin and adaptor protein 2 at adhesive areas. Asymmetry in EGF uptake was strongly dependent on the actin cytoskeleton and led to asymmetry in EGF receptor activation. Mild alteration of actin dynamics abolished asymmetry in EGF uptake and decreased EGF-induced downstream signaling, suggesting that cellular adhesion cues influence signal propagation. We propose that restriction of endocytosis at distinct sites allows cells to sense their environment in an "outside-in" mechanism. PMID:24366944

  6. [Adhesive cell interactions in the biology of cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocharova, O A

    2002-01-01

    The present review describes a hypothesis for a critical role of cell adhesive interactions in tumorigenesis. Dysregulation of tissue cell-cell interactions initiates first of all local (in the tissue) and then general (in whole body) conditions for tumor growth. Otherwise imbalance of tissue-specific adhesion factor at the very beginning of carcinogenesis is considered to trigger a cascade of pathological reactions responsible for more severe adhesive disorders that are in turn critical for the "totalitarian" behavior of a tumor and its "colonization" of other tissues and organs. Impaired disturbance is likely to be the key mechanism of carcinogenesis since it is significantly associated with the main features of a tumor: tissue proliferation control loss, anaplasia, invasion, metastasis, and immune surveillance deficit. The hypothesis is supported by evolutionary, biological, histological, immunological, and clinical arguments whose combination does not characterize any other known mechanisms of oncogenesis. The concept of adhesiveness opens new possibilities for the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of tumors and also improves a strategy for designing new drugs.

  7. The adhesion receptor CD44 promotes atherosclerosis by mediating inflammatory cell recruitment and vascular cell activation

    OpenAIRE

    Cuff, Carolyn A.; Kothapalli, Devashish; Azonobi, Ijeoma; Chun, Sam; Zhang, Yuanming; Belkin, Richard; Yeh, Christine; Secreto, Anthony; Richard K Assoian; Rader, Daniel J; Puré, Ellen

    2001-01-01

    Atherosclerosis causes most acute coronary syndromes and strokes. The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis includes recruitment of inflammatory cells to the vessel wall and activation of vascular cells. CD44 is an adhesion protein expressed on inflammatory and vascular cells. CD44 supports the adhesion of activated lymphocytes to endothelium and smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, ligation of CD44 induces activation of both inflammatory and vascular cells. To assess the potential contribution of CD4...

  8. The cell adhesion molecules Echinoid and Friend of Echinoid coordinate cell adhesion and cell signaling to regulate the fidelity of ommatidial rotation in the Drosophila eye

    OpenAIRE

    Fetting, Jennifer L.; Spencer, Susan A; Wolff, Tanya

    2009-01-01

    Directed cellular movements are a universal feature of morphogenesis in multicellular organisms. Differential adhesion between the stationary and motile cells promotes these cellular movements to effect spatial patterning of cells. A prominent feature of Drosophila eye development is the 90° rotational movement of the multicellular ommatidial precursors within a matrix of stationary cells. We demonstrate that the cell adhesion molecules Echinoid (Ed) and Friend of Echi...

  9. Hypertonic saline impedes tumor cell-endothelial cell interaction by reducing adhesion molecule and laminin expression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shields, Conor J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Hypertonic saline infusion dampens inflammatory responses and suppresses neutrophil-endothelial interaction by reducing adhesion molecule expression. This study tested the hypothesis that hypertonic saline attenuates tumor cell adhesion to the endothelium through a similar mechanism. METHODS: Human colon cancer cells (LS174T) were transfected with green fluorescent protein and exposed to lipopolysaccharide, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and interleukin-6 under hypertonic and isotonic conditions for 1 and 4 hours. Confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cells were similarly exposed. Cellular apoptosis and expression of adhesion molecules and laminin were measured by flow cytometry. Tumor cell adhesion to endothelium and laminin was assessed with fluorescence microscopy. Data are represented as mean +\\/- standard error of mean, and an ANOVA test was performed to gauge statistical significance, with P <.05 considered significant. RESULTS: Hypertonic exposure significantly reduced tumor cell adhesion despite the presence of the perioperative cell stressors (42 +\\/- 2.9 vs 172.5 +\\/- 12.4, P <.05), attenuated tumor cell beta-1 integrin (14.43 vs 23.84, P <.05), and endothelial cell laminin expression (22.78 +\\/- 2.2 vs 33.74 +\\/- 2.4, P <.05), but did not significantly alter cell viability. CONCLUSION: Hypertonic saline significantly attenuates tumor cell adhesion to endothelium by inhibiting adhesion molecule and laminin expression. This may halt the metastatic behavior of tumor cells shed at surgery.

  10. ADAMTS-10 and -6 differentially regulate cell-cell junctions and focal adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Stuart A.; Mularczyk, Ewa J.; Singh, Mukti; Massam-Wu, Teresa; Kielty, Cay M.

    2016-01-01

    ADAMTS10 and ADAMTS6 are homologous metalloproteinases with ill-defined roles. ADAMTS10 mutations cause Weill-Marchesani syndrome (WMS), implicating it in fibrillin microfibril biology since some fibrillin-1 mutations also cause WMS. However little is known about ADAMTS6 function. ADAMTS10 is resistant to furin cleavage, however we show that ADAMTS6 is effectively processed and active. Using siRNA, over-expression and mutagenesis, it was found ADAMTS6 inhibits and ADAMTS10 is required for focal adhesions, epithelial cell-cell junction formation, and microfibril deposition. Either knockdown of ADAMTS6, or disruption of its furin processing or catalytic sites restores focal adhesions, implicating its enzyme activity acts on targets in the focal adhesion complex. In ADAMTS10-depleted cultures, expression of syndecan-4 rescues focal adhesions and cell-cell junctions. Recombinant C-termini of ADAMTS10 and ADAMTS6, both of which induce focal adhesions, bind heparin and syndecan-4. However, cells overexpressing full-length ADAMTS6 lack heparan sulphate and focal adhesions, whilst depletion of ADAMTS6 induces a prominent glycocalyx. Thus ADAMTS10 and ADAMTS6 oppositely affect heparan sulphate-rich interfaces including focal adhesions. We previously showed that microfibril deposition requires fibronectin-induced focal adhesions, and cell-cell junctions in epithelial cultures. Here we reveal that ADAMTS6 causes a reduction in heparan sulphate-rich interfaces, and its expression is regulated by ADAMTS10. PMID:27779234

  11. Rapid and Localized Mechanical Stimulation and Adhesion Assay: TRPM7 Involvement in Calcium Signaling and Cell Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishitani, Wagner Shin; Alencar, Adriano Mesquita; Wang, Yingxiao

    2015-01-01

    A cell mechanical stimulation equipment, based on cell substrate deformation, and a more sensitive method for measuring adhesion of cells were developed. A probe, precisely positioned close to the cell, was capable of a vertical localized mechanical stimulation with a temporal frequency of 207 Hz, and strain magnitude of 50%. This setup was characterized and used to probe the response of Human Umbilical Endothelial Vein Cells (HUVECs) in terms of calcium signaling. The intracellular calcium ion concentration was measured by the genetically encoded Cameleon biosensor, with the Transient Receptor Potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7) expression inhibited. As TRPM7 expression also regulates adhesion, a relatively simple method for measuring adhesion of cells was also developed, tested and used to study the effect of adhesion alone. Three adhesion conditions of HUVECs on polyacrylamide gel dishes were compared. In the first condition, the substrate is fully treated with Sulfo-SANPAH crosslinking and fibronectin. The other two conditions had increasingly reduced adhesion: partially treated (only coated with fibronectin, with no use of Sulfo-SANPAH, at 5% of the normal amount) and non-treated polyacrylamide gels. The cells showed adhesion and calcium response to the mechanical stimulation correlated to the degree of gel treatment: highest for fully treated gels and lowest for non-treated ones. TRPM7 inhibition by siRNA on HUVECs caused an increase in adhesion relative to control (no siRNA treatment) and non-targeting siRNA, but a decrease to 80% of calcium response relative to non-targeting siRNA which confirms the important role of TRPM7 in mechanotransduction despite the increase in adhesion.

  12. Rapid and Localized Mechanical Stimulation and Adhesion Assay: TRPM7 Involvement in Calcium Signaling and Cell Adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Shin Nishitani

    Full Text Available A cell mechanical stimulation equipment, based on cell substrate deformation, and a more sensitive method for measuring adhesion of cells were developed. A probe, precisely positioned close to the cell, was capable of a vertical localized mechanical stimulation with a temporal frequency of 207 Hz, and strain magnitude of 50%. This setup was characterized and used to probe the response of Human Umbilical Endothelial Vein Cells (HUVECs in terms of calcium signaling. The intracellular calcium ion concentration was measured by the genetically encoded Cameleon biosensor, with the Transient Receptor Potential cation channel, subfamily M, member 7 (TRPM7 expression inhibited. As TRPM7 expression also regulates adhesion, a relatively simple method for measuring adhesion of cells was also developed, tested and used to study the effect of adhesion alone. Three adhesion conditions of HUVECs on polyacrylamide gel dishes were compared. In the first condition, the substrate is fully treated with Sulfo-SANPAH crosslinking and fibronectin. The other two conditions had increasingly reduced adhesion: partially treated (only coated with fibronectin, with no use of Sulfo-SANPAH, at 5% of the normal amount and non-treated polyacrylamide gels. The cells showed adhesion and calcium response to the mechanical stimulation correlated to the degree of gel treatment: highest for fully treated gels and lowest for non-treated ones. TRPM7 inhibition by siRNA on HUVECs caused an increase in adhesion relative to control (no siRNA treatment and non-targeting siRNA, but a decrease to 80% of calcium response relative to non-targeting siRNA which confirms the important role of TRPM7 in mechanotransduction despite the increase in adhesion.

  13. Modeling keratinocyte wound healing dynamics: Cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained collective migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, John T; Chapnick, Douglas A; Liu, Xuedong; Bortz, David M

    2016-07-01

    The in vitro migration of keratinocyte cell sheets displays behavioral and biochemical similarities to the in vivo wound healing response of keratinocytes in animal model systems. In both cases, ligand-dependent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) activation is sufficient to elicit collective cell migration into the wound. Previous mathematical modeling studies of in vitro wound healing assays assume that physical connections between cells have a hindering effect on cell migration, but biological literature suggests a more complicated story. By combining mathematical modeling and experimental observations of collectively migrating sheets of keratinocytes, we investigate the role of cell-cell adhesion during in vitro keratinocyte wound healing assays. We develop and compare two nonlinear diffusion models of the wound healing process in which cell-cell adhesion either hinders or promotes migration. Both models can accurately fit the leading edge propagation of cell sheets during wound healing when using a time-dependent rate of cell-cell adhesion strength. The model that assumes a positive role of cell-cell adhesion on migration, however, is robust to changes in the leading edge definition and yields a qualitatively accurate density profile. Using RNAi for the critical adherens junction protein, α-catenin, we demonstrate that cell sheets with wild type cell-cell adhesion expression maintain migration into the wound longer than cell sheets with decreased cell-cell adhesion expression, which fails to exhibit collective migration. Our modeling and experimental data thus suggest that cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained migration as cells pull neighboring cells into the wound during wound healing. PMID:27105673

  14. Modeling keratinocyte wound healing dynamics: Cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained collective migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, John T; Chapnick, Douglas A; Liu, Xuedong; Bortz, David M

    2016-07-01

    The in vitro migration of keratinocyte cell sheets displays behavioral and biochemical similarities to the in vivo wound healing response of keratinocytes in animal model systems. In both cases, ligand-dependent Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) activation is sufficient to elicit collective cell migration into the wound. Previous mathematical modeling studies of in vitro wound healing assays assume that physical connections between cells have a hindering effect on cell migration, but biological literature suggests a more complicated story. By combining mathematical modeling and experimental observations of collectively migrating sheets of keratinocytes, we investigate the role of cell-cell adhesion during in vitro keratinocyte wound healing assays. We develop and compare two nonlinear diffusion models of the wound healing process in which cell-cell adhesion either hinders or promotes migration. Both models can accurately fit the leading edge propagation of cell sheets during wound healing when using a time-dependent rate of cell-cell adhesion strength. The model that assumes a positive role of cell-cell adhesion on migration, however, is robust to changes in the leading edge definition and yields a qualitatively accurate density profile. Using RNAi for the critical adherens junction protein, α-catenin, we demonstrate that cell sheets with wild type cell-cell adhesion expression maintain migration into the wound longer than cell sheets with decreased cell-cell adhesion expression, which fails to exhibit collective migration. Our modeling and experimental data thus suggest that cell-cell adhesion promotes sustained migration as cells pull neighboring cells into the wound during wound healing.

  15. Differential expression of cell adhesion genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stein, Wilfred D; Litman, Thomas; Fojo, Tito;

    2005-01-01

    It is well known that tumors arising from tissues such as kidney, pancreas, liver and stomach are particularly refractory to treatment. Searching for new anticancer drugs using cells in culture has yielded some effective therapies, but these refractory tumors remain intractable. Studies that comp......It is well known that tumors arising from tissues such as kidney, pancreas, liver and stomach are particularly refractory to treatment. Searching for new anticancer drugs using cells in culture has yielded some effective therapies, but these refractory tumors remain intractable. Studies...... survival might, therefore, act through such a matrix-to-cell suppression of apoptosis. Indeed, correlative mining of gene expression and patient survival databases suggests that poor survival in patients with metastatic cancer correlates highly with tumor expression of a common theme: the genes involved...

  16. Radial Glial Cell-Neuron Interaction Directs Axon Formation at the Opposite Side of the Neuron from the Contact Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chundi; Funahashi, Yasuhiro; Watanabe, Takashi; Takano, Tetsuya; Nakamuta, Shinichi; Namba, Takashi; Kaibuchi, Kozo

    2015-10-28

    How extracellular cues direct axon-dendrite polarization in mouse developing neurons is not fully understood. Here, we report that the radial glial cell (RGC)-cortical neuron interaction directs axon formation at the opposite side of the neuron from the contact site. N-cadherin accumulates at the contact site between the RGC and cortical neuron. Inhibition of the N-cadherin-mediated adhesion decreases this oriented axon formation in vitro, and disrupts the axon-dendrite polarization in vivo. Furthermore, the RGC-neuron interaction induces the polarized distribution of active RhoA at the contacting neurite and active Rac1 at the opposite neurite. Inhibition of Rho-Rho-kinase signaling in a neuron impairs the oriented axon formation in vitro, and prevents axon-dendrite polarization in vivo. Collectively, these results suggest that the N-cadherin-mediated radial glia-neuron interaction determines the contacting neurite as the leading process for radial glia-guided neuronal migration and directs axon formation to the opposite side acting through the Rho family GTPases.

  17. OSTEOBLAST ADHESION OF BREAST CANCER CELLS WITH SCANNING ACOUSTIC MICROSCOPY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiaki Miyasaka; Robyn R. Mercer; Andrea M. Mastro; Ken L. Telschow

    2005-03-01

    Breast cancer frequently metastasizes to the bone. Upon colonizing bone tissue, the cancer cells stimulate osteoclasts (cells that break bone down), resulting in large lesions in the bone. The breast cancer cells also affect osteoblasts (cells that build new bone). Conditioned medium was collected from a bone-metastatic breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231, and cultured with an immature osteoblast cell line, MC3T3-E1. Under these conditions the osteoblasts acquired a changed morphology and appeared to adherer in a different way to the substrate and to each other. To characterize cell adhesion, MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were cultured with or without MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium for two days, and then assayed with a mechanical scanning acoustic reflection microscope (SAM). The SAM indicated that in normal medium the MC3T3-E1 osteoblasts were firmly attached to their plastic substrate. However, MC3T3-E1 cells cultured with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium displayed both an abnormal shape and poor adhesion at the substrate interface. The cells were fixed and stained to visualize cytoskeletal components using optical microscopic techniques. We were not able to observe these differences until the cells were quite confluent after 7 days of culture. However, using the SAM, we were able to detect these changes within 2 days of culture with MDA-MB-231 conditioned medium

  18. Combinational Effect of Cell Adhesion Biomolecules and Their Immobilized Polymer Property to Enhance Cell-Selective Adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rio Kurimoto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although surface immobilization of medical devices with bioactive molecules is one of the most widely used strategies to improve biocompatibility, the physicochemical properties of the biomaterials significantly impact the activity of the immobilized molecules. Herein we investigate the combinational effects of cell-selective biomolecules and the hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity of the polymeric substrate on selective adhesion of endothelial cells (ECs, fibroblasts (FBs, and smooth muscle cells (SMCs. To control the polymeric substrate, biomolecules are immobilized on thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-2-carboxyisopropylacrylamide (poly(NIPAAm-co-CIPAAm-grafted glass surfaces. By switching the molecular conformation of the biomolecule-immobilized polymers, the cell-selective adhesion performances are evaluated. In case of RGDS (Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser peptide-immobilized surfaces, all cell types adhere well regardless of the surface hydrophobicity. On the other hand, a tri-Arg-immobilized surface exhibits FB-selectivity when the surface is hydrophilic. Additionally, a tri-Ile-immobilized surface exhibits EC-selective cell adhesion when the surface is hydrophobic. We believe that the proposed concept, which is used to investigate the biomolecule-immobilized surface combination, is important to produce new biomaterials, which are highly demanded for medical implants and tissue engineering.

  19. Ion implantation induced nanotopography on titanium and bone cell adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braceras, Iñigo, E-mail: inigo.braceras@tecnalia.com [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Vera, Carolina; Ayerdi-Izquierdo, Ana [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Muñoz, Roberto [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); Lorenzo, Jaione; Alvarez, Noelia [Tecnalia, Mikeletegi Pasealekua 2, 20009 Donostia-San Sebastian (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (Ciber-BBN) (Spain); Maeztu, Miguel Ángel de [Private Practice, P° San Francisco, 43 A-1°, 20400 Tolosa (Spain)

    2014-08-15

    Graphical abstract: Titanium surfaces modified by inert ion implantation affect cell adhesion through modification of the nanotopography in the same dimensional range of that of human bone inorganic phases. - Highlights: • Inert ion implantation on Ti modifies surface nanotopography and bone cell adhesion. • Ion implantation can produce nanostructured surfaces on titanium in the very same range as of those of the mineral phase of the human bone. • Appropriate tool for studying the relevance of nanostructured surfaces on bone mineralization and implant osseointegration. • Ion implantation induced nanotopography have a statistically significant influence on bone cell adhesion. - Abstract: Permanent endo-osseous implants require a fast, reliable and consistent osseointegration, i.e. intimate bonding between bone and implant, so biomechanical loads can be safely transferred. Among the parameters that affect this process, it is widely admitted that implant surface topography, surface energy and composition play an important role. Most surface treatments to improve osseointegration focus on micro-scale features, as few can effectively control the effects of the treatment at nanoscale. On the other hand, ion implantation allows controlling such nanofeatures. This study has investigated the nanotopography of titanium, as induced by different ion implantation surface treatments, its similarity with human bone tissue structure and its effect on human bone cell adhesion, as a first step in the process of osseointegration. The effect of ion implantation treatment parameters such as energy (40–80 keV), fluence (1–2 e17 ion/cm{sup 2}) and ion species (Kr, Ar, Ne and Xe) on the nanotopography of medical grade titanium has been measured and assessed by AFM and contact angle. Then, in vitro tests have been performed to assess the effect of these nanotopographies on osteoblast adhesion. The results have shown that the nanostructure of bone and the studied ion implanted

  20. Dystrophin Dp71f associates with the beta1-integrin adhesion complex to modulate PC12 cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerna, Joel; Cerecedo, Doris; Ortega, Arturo; García-Sierra, Francisco; Centeno, Federico; Garrido, Efrain; Mornet, Dominique; Cisneros, Bulmaro

    2006-10-01

    Dystrophin Dp71 is the main product of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy gene in the brain; however, its function is unknown. To study the role of Dp71 in neuronal cells, we previously generated by antisense treatment PC12 neuronal cell clones with decreased Dp71 expression (antisense-Dp71 cells). PC12 cells express two different splicing isoforms of Dp71, a cytoplasmic variant called Dp71f and a nuclear isoform called Dp71d. We previously reported that antisense-Dp71 cells display deficient adhesion to substrate and reduced immunostaining of beta1-integrin in the cell area contacting the substrate. In this study, we isolated additional antisense-Dp71 clones to analyze in detail the potential involvement of Dp71f isoform with the beta1-integrin adhesion system of PC12 cells. Immunofluorescence analyses as well as immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that the PC12 cell beta1-integrin adhesion complex is composed of beta1-integrin, talin, paxillin, alpha-actinin, FAK and actin. In addition, our results showed that Dp71f associates with most of the beta1-integrin complex components (beta1-integrin, FAK, alpha-actinin, talin and actin). In the antisense-Dp71 cells, the deficiency of Dp71 provokes a significant reduction of the beta1-integrin adhesion complex and, consequently, the deficient adhesion of these cells to laminin. In vitro binding experiments confirmed the interaction of Dp71f with FAK and beta1-integrin. Our data indicate that Dp71f is a structural component of the beta1-integrin adhesion complex of PC12 cells that modulates PC12 cell adhesion by conferring proper complex assembly and/or maintenance.

  1. Fibronectin adsorption, cell adhesion, and proliferation on nanostructured tantalum surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolatshahi-Pirouz, A; Jensen, T; Kraft, David Christian; Foss, Morten; Kingshott, Peter; Hansen, John Lundsgaard; Larsen, Arne Nylandsted; Chevallier, Jacques; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2010-05-25

    The interaction between dental pulp derived mesenchymal stem cells (DP-MSCs) and three different tantalum nanotopographies with and without a fibronectin coating is examined: sputter-coated tantalum surfaces with low surface roughness tantalum surfaces were examined, as well as cellular attachment, proliferation, and vinculin focal adhesion spot assembly on the respective surfaces. The results showed the highest fibronectin mass uptake on the hut structures, with a slightly higher availability of cell-binding domains and the most pronounced formation of vinculin focal adhesion spots as compared to the other surfaces. The proliferation of DP-MSCs was found to be significantly higher on dome and hut surfaces coated with fibronectin compared to the uncoated flat tantalum surfaces. Consequently, the results presented in this study indicate that fibronectin-coated nanotopographies with a vertical dimension of less than 5 nm influence cell adhesion. This rather interesting behavior is argued to originate from the more available fibronectin cell-binding domains observed on the hut structures. PMID:20443575

  2. Glycosynapses: microdomains controlling carbohydrate-dependent cell adhesion and signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakomori Senitiroh

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The concept of microdomains in plasma membranes was developed over two decades, following observation of polarity of membrane based on clustering of specific membrane components. Microdomains involved in carbohydrate-dependent cell adhesion with concurrent signal transduction that affect cellular phenotype are termed "glycosynapse". Three types of glycosynapse have been distinguished: "type 1" having glycosphingolipid associated with signal transducers (small G-proteins, cSrc, Src family kinases and proteolipids; "type 2" having O-linked mucin-type glycoprotein associated with Src family kinases; and "type 3" having N-linked integrin receptor complexed with tetraspanin and ganglioside. Different cell types are characterized by presence of specific types of glycosynapse or their combinations, whose adhesion induces signal transduction to either facilitate or inhibit signaling. E.g., signaling through type 3 glycosynapse inhibits cell motility and differentiation. Glycosynapses are distinct from classically-known microdomains termed "caveolae", "caveolar membrane", or more recently "lipid raft", which are not involved in carbohydrate-dependent cell adhesion. Type 1 and type 3 glycosynapses are resistant to cholesterol-binding reagents, whereas structure and function of "caveolar membrane" or "lipid raft" are disrupted by these reagents. Various data indicate a functional role of glycosynapses during differentiation, development, and oncogenic transformation.

  3. Cell surface localization and tissue distribution of a hepatocyte cell-cell adhesion glycoprotein (cell-CAM 105)

    OpenAIRE

    Ocklind, C; Forsum, U; Obrink, B

    1983-01-01

    We recently identified a 105,000-dalton plasma membrane glycoprotein, denoted cell-CAM 105 (CAM, cell adhesion molecule), that is involved in intercellular adhesion of reaggregating rat hepatocytes (Ocklind, C., and B. Obrink, 1982, J. Biol. Chem., 257:6788-6795). In this communication we used a monospecific rabbit antiserum against cell-CAM 105 to localize the antigen by indirect immunofluorescence on isolated rat cells and on frozen rat tissue sections. This antiserum stained the surface of...

  4. Tumor suppressor gene E-cadherin and its role in normal and malignant cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pećina-Šlaus Nives

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract E-cadherin tumor suppressor genes are particularly active area of research in development and tumorigenesis. The calcium-dependent interactions among E-cadherin molecules are critical for the formation and maintenance of adherent junctions in areas of epithelial cell-cell contact. Loss of E-cadherin-mediated-adhesion characterises the transition from benign lesions to invasive, metastatic cancer. Nevertheless, there is evidence that E-cadherins may also play a role in the wnt signal transduction pathway, together with other key molecules involved in it, such as beta-catenins and adenomatous poliposis coli gene products. The structure and function of E-cadherin, gene and protein, in normal as well as in tumor cells are reviewed in this paper.

  5. Growth hormone increases vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Troels Krarup; Fisker, Sanne; Dall, Rolf;

    2004-01-01

    We investigated the impact of GH administration on endothelial adhesion molecules, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and E-selectin, in vivo and in vitro. Soluble VCAM-1, E-selectin, and C-reactive protein concentrations were measured before and after treatment in 25 healthy subjects...... and 25 adult GH-deficient (GHD) patients randomized to GH treatment or placebo. Furthermore, we studied the direct effect of GH and IGF-I and serum from GH-treated subjects on basal and TNF alpha-stimulated expression of VCAM-1 and E-selectin on cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Baseline...... levels of VCAM-1, but not E-selectin, were significantly lower in GHD patients than in healthy subjects (362 +/- 15 microg/liter vs. 516 +/- 21 microg/liter, P treatment, compared with placebo [net difference between groups 151.8 microg/liter (95...

  6. N-Cadherin Induction by ECM Stiffness and FAK Overrides the Spreading Requirement for Proliferation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keeley L. Mui

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In contrast to the accepted pro-proliferative effect of cell-matrix adhesion, the proliferative effect of cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion remains unresolved. Here, we studied the effect of N-cadherin on cell proliferation in the vasculature. We show that N-cadherin is induced in smooth muscle cells (SMCs in response to vascular injury, an in vivo model of tissue stiffening and proliferation. Complementary experiments performed with deformable substrata demonstrated that stiffness-mediated activation of a focal adhesion kinase (FAK-p130Cas-Rac signaling pathway induces N-cadherin. Additionally, by culturing paired and unpaired SMCs on microfabricated adhesive islands of different areas, we found that N-cadherin relaxes the spreading requirement for SMC proliferation. In vivo SMC deletion of N-cadherin strongly reduced injury-induced cycling. Finally, SMC-specific deletion of FAK inhibited proliferation after vascular injury, and this was accompanied by reduced induction of N-cadherin. Thus, a stiffness- and FAK-dependent induction of N-cadherin connects cell-matrix to cell-cell adhesion and regulates the degree of cell spreading needed for cycling.

  7. How cells tiptoe on adhesive surfaces before sticking

    CERN Document Server

    Pierres, Anne; Touchard, Dominique; Bongrand, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    Cell membranes are studded with protrusions that were thoroughly analyzed with electron microscopy. However, the nanometer-scale three-dimensional motions generated by cell membranes to fit the topography of foreign surfaces and initiate adhesion remain poorly understood. Here, we describe the dynamics of surface deformations displayed by monocytic cells bumping against fibronectin-coated surfaces. We observed membrane undulations with typically 5 nm amplitude and 5-10 second lifetime. Cell membranes behaved as independent units of micrometer size. Cells detected the presence of foreign surfaces at 50 nm separation, resulting in time-dependent amplification of membrane undulations. Molecular contact then ensued with apparent cell-membrane separation of 30-40 nm, and this distance steadily decreased during the following tens of seconds. Contact maturation was associated with in-plane egress of bulky molecules and robust membrane fluctuations. Thus, membrane undulations may be the major determinant of cell sens...

  8. Reversing adhesion with light: a general method for functionalized bead release from cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulet-Hanssens, Alexis; Magdesian, Margaret H; Lopez-Ayon, G Monserratt; Grutter, Peter; Barrett, Christopher J

    2016-07-19

    Coated beads retain great importance in the study of cell adhesion and intracellular communication; we present a generally applicable method permitting spatiotemporal control of bead adhesion from cells. Herein we demonstrate in vitro release of a poly-d-lysine (PDL) layer from anionic polystyrene beads, allowing complete bead release from rat cortical neurons post-adhesion. PMID:27165466

  9. Cadherin-Based Intercellular Adhesions Organize Epithelial Cell-Matrix Traction Forces

    CERN Document Server

    Mertz, Aaron F; Banerjee, Shiladitya; Goldstein, Jill; Rosowski, Kathryn R; Niessen, Carien M; Marchetti, M Cristina; Dufresne, Eric R; Horsley, Valerie

    2012-01-01

    Cell--cell and cell-matrix adhesions play essential roles in the function of tissues. There is growing evidence for the importance of crosstalk between these two adhesion types, yet little is known about the impact of these interactions on the mechanical coupling of cells to the extracellular-matrix (ECM). Here, we combine experiment and theory to reveal how intercellular adhesions modulate forces transmitted to the ECM. In the absence of cadherin-based adhesions, primary mouse keratinocytes within a colony appear to act independently, with significant traction forces extending throughout the colony. In contrast, with strong cadherin-based adhesions, keratinocytes in a cohesive colony localize traction forces to the colony periphery. Through genetic or antibody-mediated loss of cadherin expression or function, we show that cadherin-based adhesions are essential for this mechanical cooperativity. A minimal physical model in which cell--cell adhesions modulate the physical cohesion between contractile cells is ...

  10. A cell cycle and nutritional checkpoint controlling bacterial surface adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aretha Fiebig

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In natural environments, bacteria often adhere to surfaces where they form complex multicellular communities. Surface adherence is determined by the biochemical composition of the cell envelope. We describe a novel regulatory mechanism by which the bacterium, Caulobacter crescentus, integrates cell cycle and nutritional signals to control development of an adhesive envelope structure known as the holdfast. Specifically, we have discovered a 68-residue protein inhibitor of holdfast development (HfiA that directly targets a conserved glycolipid glycosyltransferase required for holdfast production (HfsJ. Multiple cell cycle regulators associate with the hfiA and hfsJ promoters and control their expression, temporally constraining holdfast development to the late stages of G1. HfiA further functions as part of a 'nutritional override' system that decouples holdfast development from the cell cycle in response to nutritional cues. This control mechanism can limit surface adhesion in nutritionally sub-optimal environments without affecting cell cycle progression. We conclude that post-translational regulation of cell envelope enzymes by small proteins like HfiA may provide a general means to modulate the surface properties of bacterial cells.

  11. Polyelectrolytes Multilayers to Modulate Cell Adhesion: A Study of the Influence of Film Composition and Polyelectrolyte Interdigitation on the Adhesion of the A549 Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzio, Nicolás E; Pasquale, Miguel A; Gregurec, Danijela; Diamanti, Eleftheria; Kosutic, Marija; Azzaroni, Omar; Moya, Sergio E

    2016-04-01

    Polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) with different polycation/polyanion pairs are fabricated by the layer-by-layer technique employing synthetic, natural, and both types of polyelectrolytes. The impact of the chemical composition of PEMs on cell adhesion is assessed by studying cell shape, spreading area, focal contacts, and cell proliferation for the A549 cell line. Cells exhibit good adhesion on PEMs containing natural polycations and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) as polyanion, but limited adhesion is observed on PEMs fabricated from both natural polyelectrolytes. PEMs are then assembled, depositing a block of natural polyelectrolytes on top of a stiffer block with PSS as polyanion. Cell adhesion is enhanced on top of the diblock PEMs compared to purely natural PEMs. This fact could be explained by the interdigitation between polyelectrolytes from the two blocks. Diblock PEM assembly provides a simple means to tune cell adhesion on biocompatible PEMs. PMID:26663657

  12. Timescales and Frequencies of Reversible and Irreversible Adhesion Events of Single Bacterial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Michelle D; Zucker, Lauren I; Brown, Pamela J B; Kysela, David T; Brun, Yves V; Jacobson, Stephen C

    2015-12-15

    In the environment, most bacteria form surface-attached cell communities called biofilms. The attachment of single cells to surfaces involves an initial reversible stage typically mediated by surface structures such as flagella and pili, followed by a permanent adhesion stage usually mediated by polysaccharide adhesives. Here, we determine the absolute and relative timescales and frequencies of reversible and irreversible adhesion of single cells of the bacterium Caulobacter crescentus to a glass surface in a microfluidic device. We used fluorescence microscopy of C. crescentus expressing green fluorescent protein to track the swimming behavior of individual cells prior to adhesion, monitor the cell at the surface, and determine whether the cell reversibly or irreversibly adhered to the surface. A fluorescently labeled lectin that binds specifically to polar polysaccharides, termed holdfast, discriminated irreversible adhesion events from reversible adhesion events where no holdfast formed. In wild-type cells, the holdfast production time for irreversible adhesion events initiated by surface contact (23 s) was 30-times faster than the holdfast production time that occurs through developmental regulation (13 min). Irreversible adhesion events in wild-type cells (3.3 events/min) are 15-times more frequent than in pilus-minus mutant cells (0.2 events/min), indicating the pili are critical structures in the transition from reversible to irreversible surface-stimulated adhesion. In reversible adhesion events, the dwell time of cells at the surface before departing was the same for wild-type cells (12 s) and pilus-minus mutant cells (13 s), suggesting the pili do not play a significant role in reversible adhesion. Moreover, reversible adhesion events in wild-type cells (6.8 events/min) occur twice as frequently as irreversible adhesion events (3.3 events/min), demonstrating that most cells contact the surface multiple times before transitioning from reversible to

  13. RNA-binding IMPs promote cell adhesion and invadopodia formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikesaa, Jonas; Hansen, Thomas V O; Jønson, Lars;

    2006-01-01

    Oncofetal RNA-binding IMPs have been implicated in mRNA localization, nuclear export, turnover and translational control. To depict the cellular actions of IMPs, we performed a loss-of-function analysis, which showed that IMPs are necessary for proper cell adhesion, cytoplasmic spreading...... and invadopodia formation. Loss of IMPs was associated with a coordinate downregulation of mRNAs encoding extracellular matrix and adhesion proteins. The transcripts were present in IMP RNP granules, implying that IMPs were directly involved in the post-transcriptional control of the transcripts. In particular......, we show that a 5.0 kb CD44 mRNA contained multiple IMP-binding sites in its 3'UTR, and following IMP depletion this species became unstable. Direct knockdown of the CD44 transcript mimicked the effect of IMPs on invadopodia, and we infer that CD44 mRNA stabilization may be involved in IMP...

  14. Multiple effects of electroporation on the adhesive behaviour of breast cancer cells and fibroblasts

    OpenAIRE

    Pehlivanova Viktoria N; Tsoneva Iana H; Tzoneva Rumiana D

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Recently electroporation using biphasic pulses was successfully applied in clinical developments for treating tumours in humans and animals. We evaluated the effects of electrical treatment on cell adhesion behaviour of breast cancer cells and fibroblasts. By applying bipolar electrical pulses we studied short- and long-lived effects on cell adhesion and survival, actin cytoskeleton and cell adhesion contacts in adherent cancer cells and fibroblasts. Methods Two cancer cel...

  15. Role of cell adhesion signal molecules in hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Min Su; Li-Ying Wang; Yu-Long Liang; Xi-Liang Zha

    2005-01-01

    AIM: Cell adhesion molecules and their signal molecules play a very important role in carcinogenesis. The aim of this study is to elucidate the role of these molecules and the signal molecules of integrins and E-cadherins, such as (focal adhesion kinase) FAK, (integrin linked kinase)ILK, and β-catenin in hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis.METHODS: We first synthesized the small molecular compound, S-(1,2-dichlorovinyl)-L-cysteine (DCVC), and identified it, by element analysis and 1H NMR. To establish the apoptosis model of the SMMC-7721 hepatocellular carcinoma cell, we treated cells with DCVC in EBSS for different concentrations or for various length times in the presence of 20 μmol/L N,N-diphenyl-p-phenylenediamine,which blocks necrotic cell death and identified this model by flow cytometry and DNA ladder. Then we studied the changes of FAK, ILK, β-catenin, and PKB in this apoptotic model by Western blot.RESULTS: We found that the loss or decrease of cell adhesion signal molecules is an important reason in apoptosis of SMMC-7721 hepatocellular carcinoma cell and the apoptosis of SMMC-7721 cell was preceded by the loss or decrease of FAK, ILK, PKB, and β-catenin or the damage of cell-matrix and cell-cell adhesion.CONCLUSION: Our results suggested that the decrease of adhesion signal molecules, FAK, ILK, PKB, and β-catenin,could induce hepatocellular carcinoma cell apoptosis.

  16. Quantifying the effect of electric current on cell adhesion studied by single-cell force spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaatinen, Leena; Young, Eleanore; Hyttinen, Jari; Vörös, János; Zambelli, Tomaso; Demkó, László

    2016-03-01

    This study presents the effect of external electric current on the cell adhesive and mechanical properties of the C2C12 mouse myoblast cell line. Changes in cell morphology, viability, cytoskeleton, and focal adhesion structure were studied by standard staining protocols, while single-cell force spectroscopy based on the fluidic force microscopy technology provided a rapid, serial quantification and detailed analysis of cell adhesion and its dynamics. The setup allowed measurements of adhesion forces up to the μN range, and total detachment distances over 40 μm. Force-distance curves have been fitted with a simple elastic model including a cell detachment protocol in order to estimate the Young's modulus of the cells, as well as to reveal changes in the dynamic properties as functions of the applied current dose. While the cell spreading area decreased monotonously with increasing current doses, small current doses resulted only in differences related to cell elasticity. Current doses above 11 As/m(2), however, initiated more drastic changes in cell morphology, viability, cellular structure, as well as in properties related to cell adhesion. The observed differences, eventually leading to cell death toward higher doses, might originate from both the decrease in pH and the generation of reactive oxygen species.

  17. Quantification of depletion-induced adhesion of Red Blood Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, Patrick; Wagner, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBC) are known to form aggregates in the forms of rouleaux due to the presence of plasma proteins under physiological conditions. Rouleaux formation can be also induced in vitro by the addition of macromolecules to the RBC solution. Current data on the adhesion strength between red blood cells in their natural discocyte shapes mostly rely on indirect measurements like flow chamber experiments, but on the single cell level data is lacking. Here we present measurements on the dextran induced aggregation of red blood cells by use of atomic force microscopy based single cell force spectroscopy (SCFS). The effects of dextran concentration and molecular weight on the interaction energy of adhering RBCs was determined. The results are in good agreement with a model based on the depletion effect and former experimental studies.

  18. 3D surface topology guides stem cell adhesion and differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Priyalakshmi; Ondeck, Matthew G; Chirasatitsin, Somyot; Ngamkham, Kamolchanok; Reilly, Gwendolen C; Engler, Adam J; Battaglia, Giuseppe

    2015-06-01

    Polymerized high internal phase emulsion (polyHIPE) foams are extremely versatile materials for investigating cell-substrate interactions in vitro. Foam morphologies can be controlled by polymerization conditions to result in either open or closed pore structures with different levels of connectivity, consequently enabling the comparison between 2D and 3D matrices using the same substrate with identical surface chemistry conditions. Additionally, here we achieve the control of pore surface topology (i.e. how different ligands are clustered together) using amphiphilic block copolymers as emulsion stabilizers. We demonstrate that adhesion of human mesenchymal progenitor (hES-MP) cells cultured on polyHIPE foams is dependent on foam surface topology and chemistry but is independent of porosity and interconnectivity. We also demonstrate that the interconnectivity, architecture and surface topology of the foams has an effect on the osteogenic differentiation potential of hES-MP cells. Together these data demonstrate that the adhesive heterogeneity of a 3D scaffold could regulate not only mesenchymal stem cell attachment but also cell behavior in the absence of soluble growth factors.

  19. CADM1 controls actin cytoskeleton assembly and regulates extracellular matrix adhesion in human mast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena P Moiseeva

    Full Text Available CADM1 is a major receptor for the adhesion of mast cells (MCs to fibroblasts, human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs and neurons. It also regulates E-cadherin and alpha6beta4 integrin in other cell types. Here we investigated a role for CADM1 in MC adhesion to both cells and extracellular matrix (ECM. Downregulation of CADM1 in the human MC line HMC-1 resulted not only in reduced adhesion to HASMCs, but also reduced adhesion to their ECM. Time-course studies in the presence of EDTA to inhibit integrins demonstrated that CADM1 provided fast initial adhesion to HASMCs and assisted with slower adhesion to ECM. CADM1 downregulation, but not antibody-dependent CADM1 inhibition, reduced MC adhesion to ECM, suggesting indirect regulation of ECM adhesion. To investigate potential mechanisms, phosphotyrosine signalling and polymerisation of actin filaments, essential for integrin-mediated adhesion, were examined. Modulation of CADM1 expression positively correlated with surface KIT levels and polymerisation of cortical F-actin in HMC-1 cells. It also influenced phosphotyrosine signalling and KIT tyrosine autophosphorylation. CADM1 accounted for 46% of surface KIT levels and 31% of F-actin in HMC-1 cells. CADM1 downregulation resulted in elongation of cortical actin filaments in both HMC-1 cells and human lung MCs and increased cell rigidity of HMC-1 cells. Collectively these data suggest that CADM1 is a key adhesion receptor, which regulates MC net adhesion, both directly through CADM1-dependent adhesion, and indirectly through the regulation of other adhesion receptors. The latter is likely to occur via docking of KIT and polymerisation of cortical F-actin. Here we propose a stepwise model of adhesion with CADM1 as a driving force for net MC adhesion.

  20. Adhesion defective BHK cell mutant has cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycan of altered properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Austria, R; Woods, A;

    1988-01-01

    sulfation, reduced affinity for fibronectin and decreased half-life on the cell surface when compared to the normal counterpart. Our conclusions based on this data are that these altered properties may, in part, account for the adhesion defect in the ricin-resistant mutant. Whether this results from......In the light of accumulating data that implicate cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) with a role in cell interactions with extracellular matrix molecules such as fibronectin, we have compared the properties of these molecules in wild-type BHK cells and an adhesion-defective ricin......-resistant mutant (RicR14). Our results showed that the mutant, unlike BHK cells, cannot form focal adhesions when adherent to planar substrates in the presence of serum. Furthermore, while both cell lines possess similar amounts of cell surface HSPG with hydrophobic properties, that of RicR14 cells had decreased...

  1. Rapid and Localized Mechanical Stimulation and Adhesion Assay: TRPM7 Involvement in Calcium Signaling and Cell Adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner Shin Nishitani; Adriano Mesquita Alencar; Yingxiao Wang

    2015-01-01

    A cell mechanical stimulation equipment, based on cell substrate deformation, and a more sensitive method for measuring adhesion of cells were developed. A probe, precisely positioned close to the cell, was capable of a vertical localized mechanical stimulation with a temporal frequency of 207 Hz, and strain magnitude of 50%. This setup was characterized and used to probe the response of Human Umbilical Endothelial Vein Cells (HUVECs) in terms of calcium signaling. The intracellular calcium i...

  2. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition-the roles of cell morphology, labile adhesion and junctional coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, Tariq; Luna-Zurita, Luis; de la Pompa, José Luis; Schleich, Jean-Marc; Summers, Ron

    2013-08-01

    Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a fundamental process during development and disease, including development of the heart valves and tumour metastases. An extended cellular Potts model was implemented to represent the behaviour emerging from autonomous cell morphology, labile adhesion, junctional coupling and cell motility. Computer simulations normally focus on these functional changes independently whereas this model facilitates exploration of the interplay between cell shape changes, adhesion and migration. The simulation model is fitted to an in vitro model of endocardial EMT, and agrees with the finding that Notch signalling increases cell-matrix adhesion in addition to modulating cell-cell adhesion. PMID:23787029

  3. Cell adhesion molecule control of planar spindle orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuncay, Hüseyin; Ebnet, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Polarized epithelial cells align the mitotic spindle in the plane of the sheet to maintain tissue integrity and to prevent malignant transformation. The orientation of the spindle apparatus is regulated by the immobilization of the astral microtubules at the lateral cortex and depends on the precise localization of the dynein-dynactin motor protein complex which captures microtubule plus ends and generates pulling forces towards the centrosomes. Recent developments indicate that signals derived from intercellular junctions are required for the stable interaction of the dynein-dynactin complex with the cortex. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms that regulate planar spindle orientation in polarized epithelial cells and we illustrate how different cell adhesion molecules through distinct and non-overlapping mechanisms instruct the cells to align the mitotic spindle in the plane of the sheet. PMID:26698907

  4. Biological length scale topography enhances cell-substratum adhesion of human corneal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuri, Nancy W; Liliensiek, Sara; Teixeira, Ana I; Abrams, George; Campbell, Sean; Nealey, Paul F; Murphy, Christopher J

    2004-07-01

    The basement membrane possesses a rich 3-dimensional nanoscale topography that provides a physical stimulus, which may modulate cell-substratum adhesion. We have investigated the strength of cell-substratum adhesion on nanoscale topographic features of a similar scale to that of the native basement membrane. SV40 human corneal epithelial cells were challenged by well-defined fluid shear, and cell detachment was monitored. We created silicon substrata with uniform grooves and ridges having pitch dimensions of 400-4000 nm using X-ray lithography. F-actin labeling of cells that had been incubated for 24 hours revealed that the percentage of aligned and elongated cells on the patterned surfaces was the same regardless of pitch dimension. In contrast, at the highest fluid shear, a biphasic trend in cell adhesion was observed with cells being most adherent to the smaller features. The 400 nm pitch had the highest percentage of adherent cells at the end of the adhesion assay. The effect of substratum topography was lost for the largest features evaluated, the 4000 nm pitch. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of the cells during and after flow indicated that the aligned and elongated cells on the 400 nm pitch were more tightly adhered compared to aligned cells on the larger patterns. Selected experiments with primary cultured human corneal epithelial cells produced similar results to the SV40 human corneal epithelial cells. These findings have relevance to interpretation of cell-biomaterial interactions in tissue engineering and prosthetic design.

  5. CXC chemokine ligand 12/Stromal cell-derived factor-1 regulates cell adhesion in human colon cancer cells by induction of intercellular adhesion molecule-1

    OpenAIRE

    Tung Shui-Yi; Chang Shun-Fu; Chou Ming-Hui; Huang Wen-Shih; Hsieh Yung-Yu; Shen Chien-Heng; Kuo Hsing-Chun; Chen Cheng-Nan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The CXC chemokine ligand 12 (CXCL12)/stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) and CXC receptor 4 (CXCR4) axis is involved in human colorectal cancer (CRC) carcinogenesis and can promote the progression of CRC. Interaction between CRC cells and endothelium is a key event in tumor progression. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of SDF-1 on the adhesion of CRC cells. Methods Human CRC DLD-1 cells were used to study the effect of SDF-1 on intercellular adhesion m...

  6. Adhesion of subsets of human blood mononuclear cells to porcine endothelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Cellular immune response is a major barrier to xenotransplantation, and cell adhesion is the first step in intercellular recognition. Flow-cytometric adhesion assay has been used to investigate the differential adhesions of monocyte (Mo), natural killer cell (NK) and T lymphocyte (T) present within human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAEC), and to demonstrate the effect of human interferon-γ(hIFN-γ) or/and tumor necrosis factor-α (hTNF-α) pretreatment of PAEC on their adhesiveness for different PBMC subsets. The preferential sequence for PBMC subset binding to resting PAEC is Mo, NK and T cells, among which T cells show the slightest adherence; hTNF-α can act across the species, and augment Mo, NK and T cell adhesion ratios by 40%, 110% and 3 times, respectively. These results confirm at the cell level that host Mo and NK cells are major participants in the cellular xenograft rejection, thereby, providing a prerequisite for further studying the human Mo/NK-PAEC interactive mechanisms.

  7. Homophilic Adhesion Mechanism of Neurofascin, a Member of the L1 Family of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Heli; Focia, Pamela J.; He, Xiaolin (NWU, MED)

    2012-02-13

    The L1 family neural cell adhesion molecules play key roles in specifying the formation and remodeling of the neural network, but their homophilic interaction that mediates adhesion is not well understood. We report two crystal structures of a dimeric form of the headpiece of neurofascin, an L1 family member. The four N-terminal Ig-like domains of neurofascin form a horseshoe shape, akin to several other immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion molecules such as hemolin, axonin, and Dscam. The neurofascin dimer, captured in two crystal forms with independent packing patterns, reveals a pair of horseshoes in trans-synaptic adhesion mode. The adhesion interaction is mediated mostly by the second Ig-like domain, which features an intermolecular {beta}-sheet formed by the joining of two individual GFC {beta}-sheets and a large but loosely packed hydrophobic cluster. Mutagenesis combined with gel filtration assays suggested that the side chain hydrogen bonds at the intermolecular {beta}-sheet are essential for the homophilic interaction and that the residues at the hydrophobic cluster play supplementary roles. Our structures reveal a conserved homophilic adhesion mode for the L1 family and also shed light on how the pathological mutations of L1 affect its structure and function.

  8. Cell adhesion to agrin presented as a nanopatterned substrate is consistent with an interaction with the extracellular matrix and not transmembrane adhesion molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfram Tobias

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecular spacing is important for cell adhesion in a number of ways, ranging from the ordered arrangement of matrix polymers extracellularly, to steric hindrance of adhesion/signaling complexes intracellularly. This has been demonstrated using nanopatterned RGD peptides, a canonical extracellular matrix ligand for integrin interactions. Cell adhesion was greatly reduced when the RGD-coated nanoparticles were separated by more than 60 nm, indicating a sharp spacing-dependent threshold for this form of cell adhesion. Results Here we show a similar dependence of cell adhesion on the spacing of agrin, a protein that exists as both a secreted, matrix-bound form and a type-2 transmembrane form in vivo. Agrin was presented as a substrate for cell adhesion assays by anchoring recombinant protein to gold nanoparticles that were arrayed at tunable distances onto glass coverslips. Cells adhered well to nanopatterned agrin, and when presented as uniformly coated substrates, adhesion to agrin was comparable to other well-studied adhesion molecules, including N-Cadherin. Adhesion of both mouse primary cortical neurons and rat B35 neuroblastoma cells showed a spacing-dependent threshold, with a sharp drop in adhesion when the space between agrin-coated nanoparticles increased from 60 to 90 nm. In contrast, adhesion to N-Cadherin decreased gradually over the entire range of distances tested (uniform, 30, 60, 90, and 160 nm. The spacing of the agrin nanopattern also influenced cell motility, and peptide competition suggested adhesion was partially integrin dependent. Finally, differences in cell adhesion to C-terminal agrin fragments of different lengths were detected using nanopatterned substrates, and these differences were not evident using uniformly coated substrates. Conclusion These results suggest nanopatterned substrates may provide a physiological presentation of adhesive substrates, and are consistent with cells adhering to agrin

  9. Involvement of cell surface phosphatidylinositol-anchored glycoproteins in cell-cell adhesion of chick embryo myoblasts

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    During myogenesis myoblasts fuse to form multinucleate cells that express muscle-specific proteins. A specific cell-cell adhesion process precedes lipid bilayer union during myoblast fusion (Knudsen, K. A., and A. F. Horwitz. 1977. Dev. Biol. 58:328-338) and is mediated by cell surface glycoproteins (Knudsen, K. A., 1985. J. Cell Biol. 101:891- 897). In this paper we show that myoblast adhesion and myotube formation are inhibited by treating fusion-competent myoblasts with phosphatidylinosito...

  10. Effect of hydroxyapatite surface morphology on cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwamoto, Takashi; Hieda, Yohki; Kogai, Yasumichi

    2016-12-01

    We obtained hydroxyapatite (HAp) materials as a block by mixing HAp nanoparticles and polymer, and then calcining the mixtures. The surface morphology of the HAp materials was tuned by varying heat treatment conditions. After calcining the mixtures at 1200 or 800°C for 4h, the surface morphology of the HAp materials was flat or convexo-concave, respectively. The flat surface morphology, which showed micrometer-ordered grain boundaries, was formed by the aggregation of HAp nanoparticles. On the other hand, the convexo-concave surface morphology resulted from the agglomeration of HAp nanoparticles after heat treatment at 800°C for 4h with nanometer-ordered particle size. We tested cell adhesion to HAp materials with flat or convexo-concave surface morphology and found that cells adhered well to the flat HAp materials but not to the convexo-concave HAp materials. This technique for selectively preparing HAp materials with flat or convexo-concave surface morphology was very easy because we merely mixed commercial HAp nanoparticles with polymer and then calcined the mixtures. As a result, the heat treatment temperature affected the surface morphology of our HAp materials, and their surface morphologies contributed to cell adhesion independently of other material properties. PMID:27612825

  11. The Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule NCAM2/OCAM/RNCAM, a Close Relative to NCAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulahin, Nikolaj; Walmod, Peter

    2008-01-01

    molecule (NCAM) is a well characterized, ubiquitously expressed CAM that is highly expressed in the nervous system. In addition to mediating cell adhesion, NCAM participates in a multitude of cellular events, including survival, migration, and differentiation of cells, outgrowth of neurites, and formation...... and plasticity of synapses. NCAM shares an overall sequence identity of approximately 44% with the neural cell adhesion molecule 2 (NCAM2), a protein also known as olfactory cell adhesion molecule (OCAM) and Rb-8 neural cell adhesion molecule (RNCAM), and the region-for-region sequence homology between the two...

  12. Hepatocyte adhesion to carbohydrate-derivatized surfaces. II. Regulation of cytoskeletal organization and cell morphology

    OpenAIRE

    1991-01-01

    Rat hepatic lectins mediate adhesion of isolated rat hepatocytes to synthetic surfaces derivatized with galactosides. Initial weak adhesion is followed by rapid adhesion strengthening. After hepatocytes contact galactose-derivatized gels, the hepatic lectins move rapidly into an inaccessible patch at the adhesive surface (Weisz, O. A., and R. L. Schnaar. 1991. J. Cell Biol. 115:485-493). Hepatic lectin patching, which occurs both at 37 degrees C and 4 degrees C, is not responsible for adhesio...

  13. Functional nanoparticles translocation into cell and adhesion force curve analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Haisung; Veerapandian, Murugan; Kim, Byung Tae; Yun, Kyusik; Seo, Soo-Won

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate the cell translocation of two functional nanoparticles (barium sulfate (BaSO4NPs), europium (III) doped gadolinium oxide nanoparticles (Gd2O3@EuNPs)) into A549 cells by Bio-Atomic Force Microscopy (Bio-AFM). Successful cell translocation of these two nanoparticles are ensured from the measurement of changes in the cell surface roughness and interaction (extension), retraction forces from the vertical deflection of tip towards substrate surfaces through force-distance curve slope analysis. Measurement of typical adhesion forces (i.e., extension and retraction) between the tip-substrate (0.0963 and 1.155 nN), tip-A549 cell substrate (0.1177 and 2.468 nN), tip-Gd2O3@EuNPs/A549 substrate (0.0785 and 0.4276 nN) and tip-BaSO4NPs/A549 substrate (0.518 and 6.838 nN) confirms the successful cell translocation of functional nanoparticles into A549 cells. Further the nanoscale resolution of topographical height and 3D images evinces the surface characteristics of normal A549 cells and nanoparticles translocated A549 cells. PMID:23421137

  14. Cell Wall Microstructure Analysis Implicates Hemicellulose Polysaccharides in Cell Adhesion in Tomato Fruit Pericarp Parenchyma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jose J. Ordaz-Ortiz; Susan E. Marcus; J. Paul Knox

    2009-01-01

    Methods developed to isolate intact cells from both unripe and ripe tomato fruit pericarp parenchyma have allowed the cell biological analysis of polysaccharide epitopes at the surface of separated cells. The LM7 pectic homoga-lacturonan epitope is a marker of the junctions of adhesion planes and intercellular spaces in parenchyma systems. The LM7 epitope persistently marked the former edge of adhesion planes at the surface of cells separated from unripe and ripened tomato fruit and also from fruits with the Cnr mutation. The LM 11 xylan epitope was associated, in sections, with cell walls lining intercellular space but the epitope was not detected at the surface of isolated cells, being lost during cell isolation. The LM15 xyloglucan epitope was present at the surface of cells isolated from unripe fruit in a pattern reflecting the former edge of cell adhesion planes/intercellular space but with gaps and apparent breaks, An equivalent pattern ofLM15 epitope occurrence was revealed at the surface of cells isolated by pectate lyase action but was not present in cells isolated from ripe fruit or from Cnr fruit. In contrast to wild-type cells, the LM5 galactan and LM21 mannan epitopes oc-curred predominantly in positions reflecting intercellular space in Cnr, suggesting a concerted alteration in cell wall mi-crostructure in response to this mutation. Galactanase and mannanase, along with pectic homogalacturonan-degrading enzymes, were capable of releasing cells from unripe fruit parenchyma. These observations indicate that hemicellulose polymers are present in architectural contexts reflecting cell adhesion and that several cell wall polysaccharide classes are likely to contribute to cell adhesion/cell separation in tomato fruit pericarp parenchyma.

  15. Surface deformation and shear flow in ligand mediated cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sircar, Sarthok; Roberts, Anthony; Sarthok Sircar / Anthony Roberts Collaboration

    We present a unified, multiscale model to study the attachment/detachment dynamics of two deforming, near spherical cells, coated with binding ligands and subject to a slow, homogeneous shear flow in a viscous fluid medium. The binding ligands on the surface of the cells experience attractive and repulsive forces in an ionic medium and exhibit finite resistance to rotation via bond tilting. The microscale drag forces and couples describing the fluid flow inside the small separation gap between the cells, are calculated using a combination of methods in lubrication theory and previously published numerical results. For a select range of material and fluid parameters, a hysteretic transition of the sticking probability curves (i.e., the function g*) between the adhesion phase (when g*>0.5) and the fragmentation phase (when g*University startup funds and AR is supported by the Australian Research Council Discovery Grant DP150102385.

  16. Cell adhesion on Ti surface with controlled roughness

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgos-Asperilla, L.; Garcia-Alonso, M. C.; Escudero, M. L.; Alonso, C.

    2015-07-01

    In this report, the in situ interaction between Saos-2 osteoblast cells and a smooth Ti surface was examined over time. The adhesion kinetics and mechanisms of cellular proliferation were monitored by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The rate of Saos-2 attachment on Ti surfaces, obtained from the measurements performed with the QCM, is a first-order reaction, with k=2.10{sup -}3 min{sup -}1. The impedance measurements indicate that in the absence of cells, the Ti resistance diminishes over time (7 days), due to the presence of amino acids and proteins from the culture medium that have been adsorbed, while in the presence of osteoblasts, this decrease is much greater because of the compounds generated by the cells that accelerate the dissolution of Ti. (Author)

  17. CD13 is a novel mediator of monocytic/endothelial cell adhesion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mina-Osorio, Paola; Winnicka, Beata; O'Conor, Catherine;

    2008-01-01

    rearrangement and filopodia formation. Treatment with soluble recombinant (r)CD13 blocks this CD13-dependent adhesion, and CD13 molecules from monocytic and endothelial cells are present in the same immunocomplex, suggesting a direct participation of CD13 in the adhesive interaction. This concept......During inflammation, cell surface adhesion molecules guide the adhesion and migration of circulating leukocytes across the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels to access the site of injury. The transmembrane molecule CD13 is expressed on monocytes and endothelial cells and has been shown...... to mediate homotypic cell adhesion, which may imply a role for CD13 in inflammatory monocyte trafficking. Here, we show that ligation and clustering of CD13 by mAb or viral ligands potently induce myeloid cell/endothelial adhesion in a signal transduction-dependent manner involving monocytic cytoskeletal...

  18. Proteomic and phosphoproteomic analysis of signalling by adhesion and growth factor receptors in mammary epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Paul, Nikki

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion and communication are essential for tissue morphogenesis and repair in healthy multicellular organisms. However, dysregulation of these processes can drive disease progression in conditions such as cancer. Selective cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix is mediated by integrins, a family of transmembrane receptors that compartmentalise signalling and organise the cytoskeleton. Adhesion receptors provide spatial cues to cells to allow them to respond to growth factor and cyto...

  19. Effect of Zinc and Nitric Oxide on Monocyte Adhesion to Endothelial Cells under Shear Stress

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sungmun; Eskin, Suzanne G.; Shah, Ankit K.; Schildmeyer, Lisa A.; McIntire, Larry V.

    2011-01-01

    This study describes the effect of zinc on monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells under different shear stress regimens, which may trigger atherogenesis. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were exposed to steady shear stress (15 dynes/cm2 or 1 dyne/cm2) or reversing shear stress (time average 1 dyne/cm2) for 24 hours. In all shear stress regimes, zinc deficiency enhanced THP-1 cell adhesion, while heparinase III reduced monocyte adhesion following reversing shear stress exposure. Unlike o...

  20. Cell adhesion behavior on the silicone rubber surface modified by using ion beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, In Tae; Jung, Chan Hee; Nh, Young Chang; Choi, Jae Hak [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kuk, In Seol [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); An, Mi Young [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    In this study we studied cell adhesion and proliferation on the surface of a silicone rubber modified by ion beam irradiation. The surface property of the irradiated silicone rubber was characterized by water contact angle and FT-IR analyses. It was observed that human (HEK293) fibroblast cells exhibit strong adhesion to the irradiated silicone surface. This enhanced adhesion of mammalian cells can be attributed to the increase in the hydrophilicity of the silicone surface by ion beam irradiation.

  1. Multiple effects of electroporation on the adhesive behaviour of breast cancer cells and fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pehlivanova Viktoria N

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recently electroporation using biphasic pulses was successfully applied in clinical developments for treating tumours in humans and animals. We evaluated the effects of electrical treatment on cell adhesion behaviour of breast cancer cells and fibroblasts. By applying bipolar electrical pulses we studied short- and long-lived effects on cell adhesion and survival, actin cytoskeleton and cell adhesion contacts in adherent cancer cells and fibroblasts. Methods Two cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 and one fibroblast cell line 3T3 were used. Cells were exposed to high field intensity (200 - 1000 V/cm. Cell adhesion and survival after electrical exposure were studied by crystal violet assay and MTS assay. Cytoskeleton rearrangement and cell adhesion contacts were visualized by actin staining and fluorescent microscope. Results The degree of electropermeabilization of the adherent cells elevated steadily with the increasing of the field intensity. Adhesion behaviour of fibroblasts and MCF-7 was not significantly affected by electrotreatment. Interestingly, treating the loosely adhesive cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 with 200 V/cm and 500 V/cm resulted in increased cell adhesion. Cell replication of both studied cancer cell lines was disturbed after electropermeabilization. Electroporation influenced the actin cytoskeleton in cancer cells and fibroblasts in different ways. Since it disturbed temporarily the actin cytoskeleton in 3T3 cells, in cancer cells treated with lower and middle field intensity actin cytoskeleton was well presented in stress fibers, filopodia and lamellipodia. The electrotreatment for cancer cells provoked preferentially cell-cell adhesion contacts for MCF-7 and cell-ECM contacts for MDA-MB- 231. Conclusions Cell adhesion and survival as well as the type of cell adhesion (cell-ECM or cell-cell adhesion induced by the electroporation process is cell specific. The application of suitable electric pulses can

  2. Cell adhesion and proliferation on polyethylene grafted with Au nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasalkova, N. Slepickova [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Slepicka, P., E-mail: petr.slepicka@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Kolska, Z. [Department of Chemistry, J.E. Purkyne University, 400 96 Usti nad Labem (Czech Republic); Sajdl, P. [Department of Power Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Bacakova, L. [Institute of Physiology, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic 142 20 Prague (Czech Republic); Rimpelova, S. [Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, Prague (Czech Republic); Svorcik, V. [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2012-02-01

    Plasma treatment and subsequent Au nano-particles grafting of polyethylene (PE) lead to changes in surface morphology, roughness and wettability, significantly increasing the attractiveness of the material for cells. The PE samples were exposed to argon plasma. Plasma modified PE was chemically grafted by immersion to biphenyldithiol and consequently into solution of Au nano-particles. Changes in chemical structure of the modified PE were studied using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and electrokinetic analysis ({zeta}-potential). The surface wettability of the modified PE samples was examined by measurement of the contact angle by standard goniometry. The surface morphology of the plasma modified PE and that grafted with Au nano-particles was studied by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The modified PE samples were seeded with rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and their adhesion and proliferation were studied. Chemically bounded biphenyldithiol increases the number of the incorporated gold nano-particles and changes sample surface properties. The presence of the biphenyldithiol and the gold nano-particles on the PE surface influences dramatically adhesion and proliferation of VSMCs.

  3. Cell adhesion and proliferation on polyethylene grafted with Au nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasálková, N. Slepičková; Slepička, P.; Kolská, Z.; Sajdl, P.; Bačáková, L.; Rimpelová, S.; Švorčík, V.

    2012-02-01

    Plasma treatment and subsequent Au nano-particles grafting of polyethylene (PE) lead to changes in surface morphology, roughness and wettability, significantly increasing the attractiveness of the material for cells. The PE samples were exposed to argon plasma. Plasma modified PE was chemically grafted by immersion to biphenyldithiol and consequently into solution of Au nano-particles. Changes in chemical structure of the modified PE were studied using X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) and electrokinetic analysis ( ζ-potential). The surface wettability of the modified PE samples was examined by measurement of the contact angle by standard goniometry. The surface morphology of the plasma modified PE and that grafted with Au nano-particles was studied by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). The modified PE samples were seeded with rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and their adhesion and proliferation were studied. Chemically bounded biphenyldithiol increases the number of the incorporated gold nano-particles and changes sample surface properties. The presence of the biphenyldithiol and the gold nano-particles on the PE surface influences dramatically adhesion and proliferation of VSMCs.

  4. Cell surface molecules and fibronectin-mediated cell adhesion: effect of proteolytic digestion of membrane proteins

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    Proteases have been used as a tool to investigate the role of surface molecules in fibronectin-mediated cell adhesion. Proteolytic digestion of membrane-proteins by pronase (1 mg/ml for 20 min at 37 degrees C) completely inhibited adhesion of baby hamster kidney (BHK) fibroblasts on fibronectin-coated plastic dishes. Various degrees of inhibition were also obtained after treatment with proteinase K, chymotrypsin, papain, subtilopeptidase A, and thermolysin. Protein synthesis was required to r...

  5. An adhesion-dependent switch between mechanisms that determine motile cell shape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin L Barnhart

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Keratocytes are fast-moving cells in which adhesion dynamics are tightly coupled to the actin polymerization motor that drives migration, resulting in highly coordinated cell movement. We have found that modifying the adhesive properties of the underlying substrate has a dramatic effect on keratocyte morphology. Cells crawling at intermediate adhesion strengths resembled stereotypical keratocytes, characterized by a broad, fan-shaped lamellipodium, clearly defined leading and trailing edges, and persistent rates of protrusion and retraction. Cells at low adhesion strength were small and round with highly variable protrusion and retraction rates, and cells at high adhesion strength were large and asymmetrical and, strikingly, exhibited traveling waves of protrusion. To elucidate the mechanisms by which adhesion strength determines cell behavior, we examined the organization of adhesions, myosin II, and the actin network in keratocytes migrating on substrates with different adhesion strengths. On the whole, our results are consistent with a quantitative physical model in which keratocyte shape and migratory behavior emerge from the self-organization of actin, adhesions, and myosin, and quantitative changes in either adhesion strength or myosin contraction can switch keratocytes among qualitatively distinct migration regimes.

  6. Rapid Reversible Photoswitching of Integrin-Mediated Adhesion at the Single-Cell Level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadem, Laith F; Holz, Michelle; Suana, Kristine Grace; Li, Qian; Lamprecht, Constanze; Herges, Rainer; Selhuber-Unkel, Christine

    2016-03-01

    Rapid and reversible photoswitching of cell adhesion is achieved by c(RGDfK)-azobenzenes embedded in a poly(ethylene glycol) background on surfaces. The light-induced cis-trans-isomerization of the azobenzene enables switching of cell adhesion on the surface. Reversibility of switching over several consecutive switching cycles is demonstrated by single-cell force spectroscopy. PMID:26685922

  7. Exenatide Alters Gene Expression of Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule (NCAM), Intercellular Cell Adhesion Molecule (ICAM), and Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule (VCAM) in the Hippocampus of Type 2 Diabetic Model Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumuslu, Esen; Cine, Naci; Ertan Gökbayrak, Merve; Mutlu, Oguz; Komsuoglu Celikyurt, Ipek; Ulak, Guner

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), a potent and selective agonist for the GLP-1 receptor, ameliorates the symptoms of diabetes through stimulation of insulin secretion. Exenatide is a potent and selective agonist for the GLP-1 receptor. Cell adhesion molecules are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily and are involved in synaptic rearrangements in the mature brain. MATERIAL AND METHODS The present study demonstrated the effects of exenatide treatment (0.1 µg/kg, subcutaneously, twice daily for 2 weeks) on the gene expression levels of cell adhesion molecules, neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), intercellular cell adhesion molecule (ICAM), and vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM) in the brain tissue of diabetic BALB/c male mice by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Diabetes was induced by streptozotocin/nicotinamide (STZ-NA) injection to male mice. RESULTS The results of this study revealed that hippocampal gene expression of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM were found to be up-regulated in STZ-NA-induced diabetic mice compared to those of controls. A significant decrease in the gene expression levels of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM were determined after 2 weeks of exenatide administration. CONCLUSIONS Cell adhesion molecules may be involved in the molecular mechanism of diabetes. Exenatide has a strong beneficial action in managing diabetes induced by STZ/NA by altering gene expression of NCAM, ICAM, and VCAM. PMID:27465247

  8. Loss of Cell Adhesion Increases Tumorigenic Potential of Polarity Deficient Scribble Mutant Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Indrayani Waghmare

    Full Text Available Epithelial polarity genes are important for maintaining tissue architecture, and regulating growth. The Drosophila neoplastic tumor suppressor gene scribble (scrib belongs to the basolateral polarity complex. Loss of scrib results in disruption of its growth regulatory functions, and downregulation or mislocalization of Scrib is correlated to tumor growth. Somatic scribble mutant cells (scrib- surrounded by wild-type cells undergo apoptosis, which can be prevented by introduction of secondary mutations that provide a growth advantage. Using genetic tools in Drosophila, we analyzed the phenotypic effects of loss of scrib in different growth promoting backgrounds. We investigated if a central mechanism that regulates cell adhesion governs the growth and invasive potential of scrib mutant cells. Here we show that increased proliferation, and survival abilities of scrib- cells in different genetic backgrounds affect their differentiation, and intercellular adhesion. Further, loss of scrib is sufficient to cause reduced cell survival, activation of the JNK pathway and a mild reduction of cell adhesion. Our data show that for scrib cells to induce aggressive tumor growth characterized by loss of differentiation, cell adhesion, increased proliferation and invasion, cooperative interactions that derail signaling pathways play an essential role in the mechanisms leading to tumorigenesis. Thus, our study provides new insights on the effects of loss of scrib and the modification of these effects via cooperative interactions that enhance the overall tumorigenic potential of scrib deficient cells.

  9. Cells adhesion and growth on gold nanoparticle grafted glass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Novotna, Zdenka, E-mail: zdenka1.novotna@vscht.cz [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Reznickova, Alena; Kvitek, Ondrej; Kasalkova, Nikola Slepickova [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic); Kolska, Zdenka [Faculty of Science, J. E. Purkyně University, Ústí nad Labem (Czech Republic); Svorcik, Vaclav [Department of Solid State Engineering, Institute of Chemical Technology Prague, 166 28 Prague (Czech Republic)

    2014-07-01

    The surface of glass substrate was plasma treated, coated by gold nano-structures and subsequently grafted with nanoparticles. The samples were plasma treated, sputtered with Au nanostructures which was followed by grafting with biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol (BPD) and then gold nanoparticles. The wettability, optical and chemical properties and surface morphology were studied. The adhesion and proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) on the samples were investigated in-vitro as well. Grafting of gold nanoparticles with the dithiol increases the UV–vis absorbance, the surface becomes more hydrophobic, rougher and more rugged compared to pristine, sputtered and only dithiol treated surface. Gold nano-particles bound over dithiol and Au nanostructures cause better cell proliferation than purely BPD treated or pristine glass.

  10. Podoplanin-mediated cell adhesion through extracellular matrix in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuneki, Masayuki; Yamazaki, Manabu; Maruyama, Satoshi; Cheng, Jun; Saku, Takashi

    2013-08-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN), one of the representative mucin-like type-I transmembrane glycoproteins specific to lymphatic endothelial cells, is expressed in various cancers including squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). On the basis of our previous studies, we have developed the hypothesis that PDPN functions in association with the extracellular matrix (ECM) from the cell surface side. The aim of this study was to elucidate the molecular role of PDPN in terms of cell adhesion, proliferation, and migration in oral SCC cells. Forty-four surgical specimens of oral SCC were used for immunohistochemistry for PDPN, and the expression profiles were correlated with their clinicopathological properties. Using ZK-1, a human oral SCC cell system, and five other cell systems, we examined PDPN expression levels by immunofluorescence, western blotting, and real-time PCR. The effects of transient PDPN knockdown by siRNA in ZK-1 were determined for cellular functions in terms of cell proliferation, adhesion, migration, and invasion in association with CD44 and hyaluronan. Cases without PDPN-positive cells were histopathologically classified as less-differentiated SCC, and SCC cells without PDPN more frequently invaded lymphatics. Adhesive properties of ZK-1 were significantly inhibited by siRNA, and PDPN was shown to collaborate with CD44 in cell adhesion to tether SCC cells with hyaluronan-rich ECM of the narrow intercellular space as well as with the stromal ECM. There was no siRNA effect in migration. We have demonstrated the primary function of PDPN in cell adhesion to ECM, which is to secondarily promote oral SCC cell proliferation.

  11. Glycosylation inhibitors efficiently inhibit P-selectin-mediated cell adhesion to endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Pushpankur; Rajendran, Mythilypriya; Odo, Nadine; Ikuta, Tohru

    2014-01-01

    Adhesion molecules play a critical role in the adhesive interactions of multiple cell types in sickle cell disease (SCD). We previously showed that anti-P-selectin aptamer efficiently inhibits cell adhesion to endothelial cells (ECs) and permits SCD mice to survive hypoxic stress. In an effort to discover new mechanisms with which to inhibit P-selectin, we examined the role of glycosylation. P-selectin is a 90 kDa protein but was found to migrate as 90 and 140 kDa bands on gel electrophoresis. When P-selectin isolated from ECs was digested with peptide N-glycosidase F, but not O-glycosidase, the 140 kDa band was lost and the 90 kDa band was enhanced. Treatment of ECs with tunicamycin, an N-glycosylation inhibitor, suppressed CD62P (P-selectin) expression on the cell surface as well as the 140 kDa form in the cytoplasm. These results indicate that the 140 kDa band is N-glycosylated and glycosylation is critical for cell surface expression of P-selectin in ECs. Thrombin, which stimulates P-selectin expression on ECs, induced AKT phosphorylation, whereas tunicamycin inhibited AKT phosphorylation, suggesting that AKT signaling is involved in the tunicamycin-mediated inhibition of P-selectin expression. Importantly, the adhesion of sickle red blood cells (sRBCs) and leukocytes to ECs induced by thrombin or hypoxia was markedly inhibited by two structurally distinct glycosylation inhibitors; the levels of which were comparable to that of a P-selectin monoclonal antibody which most strongly inhibited cell adhesion in vivo. Knockdown studies of P-selectin using short-hairpin RNAs in ECs suppressed sRBC adhesion, indicating a legitimate role for P-selectin in sRBC adhesion. Together, these results demonstrate that P-selectin expression on ECs is regulated in part by glycosylation mechanisms and that glycosylation inhibitors efficiently reduce the adhesion of sRBCs and leukocytes to ECs. Glycosylation inhibitors may lead to a novel therapy which inhibits cell adhesion in SCD.

  12. A simplified model for dynamics of cell rolling and cell-surface adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cimrák, Ivan, E-mail: ivan.cimrak@fri.uniza.sk [Cell-in-fluid Research Group, http://cell-in-fluid.fri.uniza.sk Faculty of Management Science and Informatics, University of Žilina Univerzitná 8215/1, 010 26 Žilina (Slovakia)

    2015-03-10

    We propose a three dimensional model for the adhesion and rolling of biological cells on surfaces. We study cells moving in shear flow above a wall to which they can adhere via specific receptor-ligand bonds based on receptors from selectin as well as integrin family. The computational fluid dynamics are governed by the lattice-Boltzmann method. The movement and the deformation of the cells is described by the immersed boundary method. Both methods are fully coupled by implementing a two-way fluid-structure interaction. The adhesion mechanism is modelled by adhesive bonds including stochastic rules for their creation and rupture. We explore a simplified model with dissociation rate independent of the length of the bonds. We demonstrate that this model is able to resemble the mesoscopic properties, such as velocity of rolling cells.

  13. Exendin-4 induces cell adhesion and differentiation and counteracts the invasive potential of human neuroblastoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Luciani

    Full Text Available Exendin-4 is a molecule currently used, in its synthetic form exenatide, for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Exendin-4 binds and activates the Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor (GLP-1R, thus inducing insulin release. More recently, additional biological properties have been associated to molecules that belong to the GLP-1 family. For instance, Peptide YY and Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide have been found to affect cell adhesion and migration and our previous data have shown a considerable actin cytoskeleton rearrangement after exendin-4 treatment. However, no data are currently available on the effects of exendin-4 on tumor cell motility. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of this molecule on cell adhesion, differentiation and migration in two neuroblastoma cell lines, SH-SY5Y and SK-N-AS. We first demonstrated, by Extra Cellular Matrix cell adhesion arrays, that exendin-4 increased cell adhesion, in particular on a vitronectin substrate. Subsequently, we found that this molecule induced a more differentiated phenotype, as assessed by i the evaluation of neurite-like protrusions in 3D cell cultures, ii the analysis of the expression of neuronal markers and iii electrophysiological studies. Furthermore, we demonstrated that exendin-4 reduced cell migration and counteracted anchorage-independent growth in neuroblastoma cells. Overall, these data indicate for the first time that exendin-4 may have anti-tumoral properties.

  14. N-glycosylation at Asn residues 554 and 566 of E-cadherin affects cell cycle progression through extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase signaling pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongbo Zhao; Xiliang Zha; Lidong Sun; Liying Wang; Zhibin Xu; Feng Zhou; Jianmin Su; Jiawei Jin; Yong Yang; Yali Hu

    2008-01-01

    E-cadherin, which has a widely acknowledged role in mediating calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion between epithelial cells, also functions as a tumor suppressor. The ectodomain of human E-cadherin contains four potential N-glycosylation sites at Asn residues 554, 566, 618, and 633.We investigated the role of E-cadherin N-glycosylation in cell cycle progression by site-directed mutagenesis. We showed previously that all four potential N-glycosylation sites of E-cadherin were N-glycosylated in human breast carcinoma MDA-MB-435 cells. Removal of N-glycan at Asn633 dramatically affected E-cadherin stability. In this study we showed that E-cadherin mutant missing N-glycans at Asn554, Asn566 and Asn618 failed to induce cell cycle arrest in G1 phase and to suppress cell proliferation in comparison with wild-type E-cadherin. Moreover, N-glycans at Asn554 and Asn566, but not at Asn618, seemed to be indispensable for E-cadherin-mediated suppression of cell cycle progression.Removal of N-glycans at either Asn554 or Asn566 of E-cadherin was accompanied with the activation of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase signaling pathway. After treatment with PD98059, an inhibitor of the extraceilular signal-regulated protein kinase signaling pathway, wild-type E-cadherin transfected MDA-MB-435 and E-cadherin N-glycosylation-deficient mutant transfected MDA-MB-435 cells had equivalent numbers of cells in G1 phase. These findings implied that N-glycosylation might be crucial for E-cadherin-mediated suppression of cell cycle progression.

  15. The effects of caveolin - 1/eNOS pathway in monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells induced by oxidative stress

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiaoDuan-fang

    2005-01-01

    Leukocyte adhesion to endothelial cells is the initiate event of atherosclerosis, which includes injury of endothelial cells, leukocyte rolling, adhesion and extravasation. Many adhesion molecules such as E-selectin, P-selectin,the adhesion process.ICAM-1, VCAM, L-selectin, CD18, PECAM, VLA and ECM participate in Many factors such as infection of pathogenic organism,

  16. Direct observation of catch bonds involving cell-adhesion molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Bryan T.; Long, Mian; Piper, James W.; Yago, Tadayuki; McEver, Rodger P.; Zhu, Cheng

    2003-05-01

    Bonds between adhesion molecules are often mechanically stressed. A striking example is the tensile force applied to selectin-ligand bonds, which mediate the tethering and rolling of flowing leukocytes on vascular surfaces. It has been suggested that force could either shorten bond lifetimes, because work done by the force could lower the energy barrier between the bound and free states (`slip'), or prolong bond lifetimes by deforming the molecules such that they lock more tightly (`catch'). Whereas slip bonds have been widely observed, catch bonds have not been demonstrated experimentally. Here, using atomic force microscopy and flow-chamber experiments, we show that increasing force first prolonged and then shortened the lifetimes of P-selectin complexes with P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1, revealing both catch and slip bond behaviour. Transitions between catch and slip bonds might explain why leukocyte rolling on selectins first increases and then decreases as wall shear stress increases. This dual response to force provides a mechanism for regulating cell adhesion under conditions of variable mechanical stress.

  17. Modulation of lens cell adhesion molecules by particle beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, M. P.; Bjornstad, K. A.; Chang, P. Y.; Chou, W.; Lockett, S. J.; Blakely, E. A.

    2001-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are proteins which anchor cells to each other and to the extracellular matrix (ECM), but whose functions also include signal transduction, differentiation, and apoptosis. We are testing a hypothesis that particle radiations modulate CAM expression and this contributes to radiation-induced lens opacification. We observed dose-dependent changes in the expression of beta 1-integrin and ICAM-1 in exponentially-growing and confluent cells of a differentiating human lens epithelial cell model after exposure to particle beams. Human lens epithelial (HLE) cells, less than 10 passages after their initial culture from fetal tissue, were grown on bovine corneal endothelial cell-derived ECM in medium containing 15% fetal bovine serum and supplemented with 5 ng/ml basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-2). Multiple cell populations at three different stages of differentiation were prepared for experiment: cells in exponential growth, and cells at 5 and 10 days post-confluence. The differentiation status of cells was characterized morphologically by digital image analysis, and biochemically by Western blotting using lens epithelial and fiber cell-specific markers. Cultures were irradiated with single doses (4, 8 or 12 Gy) of 55 MeV protons and, along with unirradiated control samples, were fixed using -20 degrees C methanol at 6 hours after exposure. Replicate experiments and similar experiments with helium ions are in progress. The intracellular localization of beta 1-integrin and ICAM-1 was detected by immunofluorescence using monoclonal antibodies specific for each CAM. Cells known to express each CAM were also processed as positive controls. Both exponentially-growing and confluent, differentiating cells demonstrated a dramatic proton-dose-dependent modulation (upregulation for exponential cells, downregulation for confluent cells) and a change in the intracellular distribution of the beta 1-integrin, compared to unirradiated controls. In contrast

  18. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase attenuates hepatocellular carcinoma cell adhesion stimulated by adipokine resistin

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Chen-Chieh; Chang, Shun-Fu; Chao, Jian-Kang; Lai, Yi-Liang; Chang, Wei-En; Hsu, Wen-Hsiu; Kuo, Wu-Hsien

    2014-01-01

    Background Resistin, adipocyte-secreting adipokine, may play critical role in modulating cancer pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resistin on HCC adhesion to the endothelium, and the mechanism underlying these resistin effects. Methods Human SK-Hep1 cells were used to study the effect of resistin on intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expressions as well as NF-κB activation, and hence cell adhesion to hu...

  19. N-cadherin mediated distribution of beta-catenin alters MAP kinase and BMP-2 signaling on chondrogenesis-related gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modarresi, Rozbeh; Lafond, Toulouse; Roman-Blas, Jorge A; Danielson, Keith G; Tuan, Rocky S; Seghatoleslami, M Reza

    2005-05-01

    We have examined the effect of calcium-dependent adhesion, mediated by N-cadherin, on cell signaling during chondrogenesis of multipotential embryonic mouse C3H10T1/2 cells. The activity of chondrogenic genes, type II collagen, aggrecan, and Sox9 were examined in monolayer (non-chondrogenic), and micromass (chondrogenic) cultures of parental C3H10T1/2 cells and altered C3H10T1/2 cell lines that express a dominant negative form of N-cadherin (delta390-T1/2) or overexpress normal N-cadherin (MNCD2-T1/2). Our findings show that missexpression or inhibition of N-cadherin in C3H10T1/2 cells results in temporal and spatial changes in expression of the chondrogenic genes Sox9, aggrecan, and collagen type II. We have also analyzed activity of the serum response factor (SRF), a nuclear target of MAP kinase signaling implicated in chondrogenesis. In semi-confluent monolayer cultures (minimum cell-cell contact) of C3H10T1/2, MNCD2-T1/2, or delta390-T1/2 cells, there was no significant change in the pattern of MAP kinase or bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) regulation of SRF. However, in micromass cultures, the effect of MAP kinase and BMP-2 on SRF activity was proportional to the nuclear localization of beta-catenin, a Wnt stabilized cytoplasmic factor that can associate with lymphoid enhancer-binding factor (LEF) to serve as a transcription factor. Our findings suggest that the extent of adherens junction formation mediated by N-cadherin can modulate the potential Wnt-induced nuclear activity of beta-catenin. PMID:15723280

  20. Flavonoids inhibit cytokine-induced endothelial cell adhesion protein gene expression.

    OpenAIRE

    Gerritsen, M. E.; Carley, W. W.; Ranges, G. E.; Shen, C. P.; Phan, S. A.; Ligon, G. F.; Perry, C. A.

    1995-01-01

    Treatment of human endothelial cells with cytokines such as interleukin-1, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or interferon-gamma induces the expression of specific leukocyte adhesion molecules on the endothelial cell surface. Interfering with either leukocyte adhesion or adhesion protein upregulation is an important therapeutic target as evidenced by the potent anti-inflammatory actions of neutralizing antibodies to these ligands in various animal models and in patients. In the present ...

  1. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule expression predicts lymph node metastasis in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brand, M. van den; Takes, R.P.; Blokpoel-deRuyter, M.; Slootweg, P.J.; Kempen, L.C.L.T. van

    2010-01-01

    Lymphatic metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is important for prognosis and clinical decision making concerning the treatment of the neck but may be difficult to detect. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM), has been shown to correlate with prognosis or tumor grade in dif

  2. Adhesion of different cell cycle human hepatoma cells to endothelial cells and roles of integrin β1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guan-Bin Song; Jian Qin; Qing Luo; Xiao-Dong Shen; Run-Bin Yan; Shao-Xi Cai

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the adhesive mechanical properties of different cell cycle human hepatoma cells (SMMC-7721)to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (ECV-304),expression of adhesive molecule integrinβ1 in SMMC-7721cells and its contribution to this adhesive course.METHODS: Adhesive force of SMMC-7721 cells to endothelialcells was measured using micropipette aspiration technique.Synchronous G1 and S phase SMMC-7721 cells wereachieved by thymine-2-deoxyriboside and colchicinessequential blockage method and double thymine-2-deoxyriboside blockage method, respectively. Synchronousrates of SMMC-7721 cells and expression of integrinβ1 inSMMC-7721 cells were detected by flow cytometer.RESULTS: The percentage of cell cycle phases of generalSMMC-7721 cells was 11.01% in G2/M phases, 53.51% inG0/G1 phase, and 35.48% in S phase. The synchronous ratesof G1 and S phase SMMC-7721 cells amounted to 74.09%and 98.29%, respectively. The adhesive force of SMMC-7721cells to endothelial cells changed with the variations ofadhesive time and presented behavior characteristics ofadhesion and de-adhesion. S phase SMMC-7721 cells had higheradhesive forces than G1 phase cells [(307.65±92.10)× 10-10Nvs (195.42±60.72)×10-10N, P<0.01]. The expressivefluorescent intensity of integrinβ1 in G1 phase SMMC-7721cells was depressed more significantly than the values ofS phase and general SMMC-7721cells. The contribution ofadhesive integrinβ1 was about 53% in this adhesive course.CONCLUSION: SMMC-7721 cells can be synchronizedpreferably in G1 and S phases with thymine-2-deoxyribosideand colchicines. The adhesive molecule integrinβ1 expressesa high level in SMMC-7721 cells and shows differences invarious cell cycles, suggesting integrin β1 plays an importantrole in adhesion to endothelial cells. The change of adhesiveforces in different cell cycle SMMC-7721 cells indicatesthat S phase cells play predominant roles possibly whilethey interact with endothelial cells.

  3. PRL-3 promotes cell adhesion by interacting with JAM2 in colon cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Shenyi; Meng, Lin; Xing, Xiaofang; Yang, Yongyong; Qu, Like; Shou, Chengchao

    2016-01-01

    Phosphatase of regenerating liver-3 (PRL-3), also termed PTP4A3, is a metastasis-related protein tyrosine phosphatase. Its expression levels are significantly correlated with the progression and survival of a wide range of malignant tumors. However, the mechanism by which PRL-3 promotes tumor invasion and metastasis is not clear. In the present study, the functions of PRL-3 were systemically analyzed in the key events of metastasis including, motility and adhesion. A cell wounding assay, cell spread assay and cell-matrix adhesion assay were carried out to analyze the cell movement and cell adhesion ability of colon cancer, immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence assay was confirmed the interaction of PRL-3 and JAM2. It was demonstrated that PRL-3 promoted the motility of Flp-In-293 and LoVo colon cancer cells and increased the distribution of cell skeleton proteins on the cell protrusions. In addition, stably expressing PRL-3 reduced the spreading speed of colon cancer cells and cell adhesion on uncoated, fibronectin-coated and collagen I-coated plates. Mechanistically, junction adhesion molecular 2 (JAM2) was identified as a novel interacting protein of PRL-3. The findings of the present study revealed the roles of PRL-3 in cancer cell motility and adhesion process, and provided information on the possibility of PRL-3 increase cell-cell adhesion by associating with JAM2. PMID:27588115

  4. Heterogeneity of cell adhesion molecules in the developing nervous system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, R.K.

    1985-01-01

    Cell-surface molecules, especially glycoproteins, are believed to mediate interactions between developing neurons and their environment. These interactions include pathfinding by growing processes, recognition of appropriate targets, and formation of synaptic structures. In order to identify neuronal cell-surface molecules, monoclonal antibodies (Mab's) were prepared against synaptic fractions from adult rat brain. From this group three monoclonal antibodies, designated 3C5.59, 3G5.34, and 3G6.41, that react with cell-surface antigens of embryonic neurons were selected for further study. In immunofluoresence experiments each of these antibodies strongly reacted with the processes of cultured granule cell neurons, the major class of small cerebellar neurons, cultured from developing rat cerebellum. Mab's 3C5.59 and 3G5.34 reacted only with neurons in the cerebellar cultures. Mab 3G6.41, however, also reacted with cultured brain astrocytes. On frozen sections Mab's 3G5.34 and 3G6.41 also strongly stained the molecular layer, the site of active granule cell axon growth, in the developing cerebellum. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies specific for the neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) were used to compare the two glycoproteins recognized by Mab 3G6.41 with N-CAM. Band 1, another large neuronal cell-surface glycoprotein was originally identified in mouse N18 neuroblastoma cells. In this study /sup 125/I-labeled N18-derived band 1 was tested for binding to 9 plant lectins and Limulus polyphemus agglutinin coupled to agarose beads. Band 1 solubilized from brain also specifically bound to LCA-agarose, indicating that mannose containing sugar moieties are present on band 1 from brain.

  5. Pharmacology of cell adhesion molecules of the nervous system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kiryushko, Darya; Bock, Elisabeth; Berezin, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    development. The majority of CAMs are signal transducing receptors. CAM-induced intracellular signalling is triggered via homophilic (CAM-CAM) and heterophilic (CAM - other counter-receptors) interactions, which both can be targeted pharmacologically. We here describe the progress in the CAM pharmacology...... focusing on cadherins and CAMs of the immunoglobulin (Ig) superfamily, such as NCAM and L1. Structural basis of CAM-mediated cell adhesion and CAM-induced signalling are outlined. Different pharmacological approaches to study functions of CAMs are presented including the use of specific antibodies......, recombinant proteins, and synthetic peptides. We also discuss how unravelling of the 3D structure of CAMs provides novel pharmacological tools for dissection of CAM-induced signalling pathways and offers therapeutic opportunities for a range of neurological disorders....

  6. Cell adhesion property affected by cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase: Opto-electric approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Chang Kyoung; Sukhthankar, Mugdha; Kim, Chul-Ho; Lee, Seong-Ho; English, Anthony; Kihm, Kenneth D; Baek, Seung Joon

    2010-01-15

    Expression of cyclooxygenases (COX) and lipoxygenases (LOX) has been linked to many pathophysiological phenotypes, including cell adhesion. However, many current approaches to measure cellular changes are performed only in a fixed-time point. Since cells dynamically move in conjunction with the cell matrix, there is a pressing need for dynamic or time-dependent methods for the investigation of cell properties. In the presented study, we used stable human colorectal cancer cell lines ectopically expressing COX-1, COX-2, and 15LOX-1, to investigate whether expression of COX-1, COX-2, or 15LOX-1 would affect cell adhesion using our opto-electric methodology. In a fixed-time point experiment, only COX-1- and COX-2-expressing cells enhanced phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase, but all the transfected cells showed invasion activity. However, in a real-time experiment using opto-electric approaches, transmitted cellular morphology was much different with tight adhesion being shown in COX-2 expressing cells, as imaged by differential interference contrast microscopy (DICM) and interference reflection contrast microscopy (IRCM). Furthermore, micro-impedance measurements showed a continued increase in both resistance and reactance of COX- and LOX-transfected cells, consistent with the imaging data. Our data indicate that both COX- and LOX-expressing cells have strong cell-to-cell and cell-to-substrate adhesions, and that cell imaging analysis with cell impedance data generates fully reliable results on cell adhesion measurement. PMID:20026301

  7. Reinforcing endothelial junctions prevents microvessel permeability increase and tumor cell adhesion in microvessels in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Bingmei M.; Yang, Jinlin; Cai, Bin; Fan, Jie; Zhang, Lin; Zeng, Min

    2015-10-01

    Tumor cell adhesion to the microvessel wall is a critical step during tumor metastasis. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a secretion of tumor cells, can increase microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion in the microvessel. To test the hypothesis that inhibiting permeability increase can reduce tumor cell adhesion, we used in vivo fluorescence microscopy to measure both microvessel permeability and adhesion rates of human mammary carcinoma MDA-MB-231 cells in post-capillary venules of rat mesentery under the treatment of VEGF and a cAMP analog, 8-bromo-cAMP, which can decrease microvessel permeability. By immunostaining adherens junction proteins between endothelial cells forming the microvessel wall, we further investigated the structural mechanism by which cAMP abolishes VEGF-induced increase in microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion. Our results demonstrate that 1) Pretreatment of microvessels with cAMP can abolish VEGF-enhanced microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion; 2) Tumor cells prefer to adhere to the endothelial cell junctions instead of cell bodies; 3) VEGF increases microvessel permeability and tumor cell adhesion by compromising endothelial junctions while cAMP abolishes these effects of VEGF by reinforcing the junctions. These results suggest that strengthening the microvessel wall integrity can be a potential approach to inhibiting hematogenous tumor metastasis.

  8. Troglitazone, a PPAR-γ activator prevents endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression and lymphocyte adhesion mediated by TNF-α

    OpenAIRE

    Itoh Makoto; Joh Takashi; Minagar Alireza; Welbourne Tomas; Jordan Paul; Sasaki Makoto; Elrod John W; Alexander J Steven

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Cytokine mediated induction of the mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1(MAdCAM-1) expression is associated with the onset and progression of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Results Using western blotting and cell-based ELISA, we show in this study that troglitazone, an activator of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ), widely used in the treatment of diabetes, has as well recently been highlighted as protective in models of inflammation and can...

  9. Simple and Biocompatible Ion Beam Micropatterning of a Cell-Repellent Polymer on Cell-Adhesive Surfaces to Manipulate Cell Adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, In-Tae; Jung, Chan-Hee; Jung, Chang-Hee; Choi, Jae-Hak; Shin, Kwanwoo; Yoo, Young-Do

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the simple and biocompatible micropatterning of cell-repellent poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAAm) on a cell-adhesive substrate by ion beam micropatterning to control cell adhesion is described. Cell-repellent PNIPAAm films spin-coated on cell-adhesive tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS) substrates were selectively irradiated by energetic proton ions at various fluences through a pattern mask, and subsequently developed to create the micropatterns of PNIPAAm. Well-defined negative-type PNIPAAm micropatterns were successfully created on the TCPS substrates at fluences higher than 5 x 10¹⁴ ions/cm², and their chemical properties were dependent on the fluence. Moreover, based on the results of the protein adsorption and in-vitro cell culture tests, 200 µm well-defined micropatterns of mammalian cells were clearly formed on the PNIPAAm-micropatterned TCPS substrates though the preferential adsorption and growth of cells on the TCPS regions due to the strong cell-repellency of PNIPAAm. PMID:27305772

  10. The Cell Adhesion-associated Protein Git2 Regulates Morphogenetic Movements during Zebrafish Embryonic Development

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Jianxin A.; Foley, Fiona C.; Amack, Jeffrey D.; Christopher E Turner

    2010-01-01

    Signaling through cell adhesion complexes plays a critical role in coordinating cytoskeletal remodeling necessary for efficient cell migration. During embryonic development, normal morphogenesis depends on a series of concerted cell movements; but the roles of cell adhesion signaling during these movements are poorly understood. The transparent zebrafish embryo provides an excellent system to study cell migration during development. Here, we have identified zebrafish git2a and git2b, two new ...

  11. Cell adhesion to agrin presented as a nanopatterned substrate is consistent with an interaction with the extracellular matrix and not transmembrane adhesion molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Wolfram Tobias; Spatz Joachim P; Burgess Robert W

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Molecular spacing is important for cell adhesion in a number of ways, ranging from the ordered arrangement of matrix polymers extracellularly, to steric hindrance of adhesion/signaling complexes intracellularly. This has been demonstrated using nanopatterned RGD peptides, a canonical extracellular matrix ligand for integrin interactions. Cell adhesion was greatly reduced when the RGD-coated nanoparticles were separated by more than 60 nm, indicating a sharp spacing-depende...

  12. Red cell adhesion molecules, foetal haemoglobin and endothelial factors in sickle cell disorders

    OpenAIRE

    Mundee, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Sickle cell anaemia (SS) is a haemoglobinopathy involving production of sickle haemoglobin (HbS, β⁶Glu-->Val), which is able to polymerise leading to vaso-occlusion. Hydroxyurea (HU) treatment increases foetal haemoglobin (HbF) levels but decreases vaso-occlusion and red cell adhesion molecule (AM) expression, and therefore improves clinical symptoms. In this thesis, the contribution of AMs, HbF and endothelial factors to the severity of sickle cell disease has been studied....

  13. Cell adhesion molecules involved in the leukocyte recruitment induced by venom of the snake Bothrops jararaca

    OpenAIRE

    Catarina F. P. Teixeira; Stella R. Zamuner

    2002-01-01

    It has been shown that Bothrops jararaca venom (BjV) induces a significant leukocyte accumulation, mainly neutrophils, at the local of tissue damage. Therefore, the role of the adhesion molecules intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), LECAM-1, CD18, leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) on the BjV-induced neutrophil accumulation and the correlation with release of LTB4, TXA2, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin (I...

  14. Maspin Regulates Endothelial Cell Adhesion and Migration through an Integrin Signaling Pathway*

    OpenAIRE

    Qin, Li; Zhang, Ming

    2010-01-01

    Maspin has been identified as a potent angiogenesis inhibitor. However, the molecular mechanism responsible for its anti-angiogenic property is unclear. In this study, we examined the effect of maspin on endothelial cell (EC) adhesion and migration in a cell culture system. We found that maspin was expressed in blood vessels ECs and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Maspin significantly enhanced HUVEC cell adhesion to various matrix proteins. This effect was dependent on the ac...

  15. Naxos disease: Cardiocutaneous syndrome due to cell adhesion defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Protonotarios Nikos

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Naxos disease is a recessively inherited condition with arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia/cardiomyopathy (ARVD/C and a cutaneous phenotype, characterised by peculiar woolly hair and palmoplantar keratoderma. The disease was first described in families originating from the Greek island of Naxos. Moreover, affected families have been identified in other Aegean islands, Turkey, Israel and Saudi Arabia. A syndrome with the same cutaneous phenotype and predominantly left ventricular involvement has been described in families from India and Ecuador (Carvajal syndrome. Woolly hair appears from birth, palmoplantar keratoderma develop during the first year of life and cardiomyopathy is clinically manifested by adolescence with 100% penetrance. Patients present with syncope, sustained ventricular tachycardia or sudden death. Symptoms of right heart failure appear during the end stages of the disease. In the Carvajal variant the cardiomyopathy is clinically manifested during childhood leading more frequently to heart failure. Mutations in the genes encoding the desmosomal proteins plakoglobin and desmoplakin have been identified as the cause of Naxos disease. Defects in the linking sites of these proteins can interrupt the contiguous chain of cell adhesion, particularly under conditions of increased mechanical stress or stretch, leading to cell death, progressive loss of myocardium and fibro-fatty replacement. Implantation of an automatic cardioverter defibrillator is indicated for prevention of sudden cardiac death. Antiarrhythmic drugs are used for preventing recurrences of episodes of sustained ventricular tachycardia and classical pharmacological treatment for congestive heart failure, while heart transplantation is considered at the end stages.

  16. SU-8 hollow cantilevers for AFM cell adhesion studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel fabrication method was established to produce flexible, transparent, and robust tipless hollow atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilevers made entirely from SU-8. Channels of 3 μm thickness and several millimeters length were integrated into 12 μm thick and 40 μm wide cantilevers. Connected to a pressure controller, the devices showed high sealing performance with no leakage up to 6 bars. Changing the cantilever lengths from 100 μm to 500 μm among the same wafer allowed the targeting of various spring constants ranging from 0.5 to 80 N m−1 within a single fabrication run. These hollow polymeric AFM cantilevers were operated in the optical beam deflection configuration. To demonstrate the performance of the device, single-cell force spectroscopy experiments were performed with a single probe detaching in a serial protocol more than 100 Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells from plain glass and glass coated with polydopamine while measuring adhesion forces in the sub-nanoNewton range. SU-8 now offers a new alternative to conventional silicon-based hollow cantilevers with more flexibility in terms of complex geometric design and surface chemistry modification. (paper)

  17. Cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans control adhesion and invasion of breast carcinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lim, Hooi Ching; Multhaupt, Hinke A. B.; Couchman, John R.

    2015-01-01

    -tailed paired t-test and one-way ANOVA with Tukey¿s post-hoc test were used in the analysis of data. Results: MDA-MB231 cells were shown to be highly sensitive to exogenous heparan sulfate or heparin, promoting increased spreading, focal adhesion and adherens junction formation with concomitantly reduced...

  18. Th17 Cell Induction by Adhesion of Microbes to Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atarashi, Koji; Tanoue, Takeshi; Ando, Minoru; Kamada, Nobuhiko; Nagano, Yuji; Narushima, Seiko; Suda, Wataru; Imaoka, Akemi; Setoyama, Hiromi; Nagamori, Takashi; Ishikawa, Eiji; Shima, Tatsuichiro; Hara, Taeko; Kado, Shoichi; Jinnohara, Toshi; Ohno, Hiroshi; Kondo, Takashi; Toyooka, Kiminori; Watanabe, Eiichiro; Yokoyama, Shin-Ichiro; Tokoro, Shunji; Mori, Hiroshi; Noguchi, Yurika; Morita, Hidetoshi; Ivanov, Ivaylo I; Sugiyama, Tsuyoshi; Nuñez, Gabriel; Camp, J Gray; Hattori, Masahira; Umesaki, Yoshinori; Honda, Kenya

    2015-10-01

    Intestinal Th17 cells are induced and accumulate in response to colonization with a subgroup of intestinal microbes such as segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) and certain extracellular pathogens. Here, we show that adhesion of microbes to intestinal epithelial cells (ECs) is a critical cue for Th17 induction. Upon monocolonization of germ-free mice or rats with SFB indigenous to mice (M-SFB) or rats (R-SFB), M-SFB and R-SFB showed host-specific adhesion to small intestinal ECs, accompanied by host-specific induction of Th17 cells. Citrobacter rodentium and Escherichia coli O157 triggered similar Th17 responses, whereas adhesion-defective mutants of these microbes failed to do so. Moreover, a mixture of 20 bacterial strains, which were selected and isolated from fecal samples of a patient with ulcerative colitis on the basis of their ability to cause a robust induction of Th17 cells in the mouse colon, also exhibited EC-adhesive characteristics.

  19. Reversed cell imprinting, AFM imaging and adhesion analyses of cells on patterned surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xiongtu; Shi, Jian; Zhang, Fan; Hu, Jie; Li, Xin; Wang, Li; Ma, Xueming; Chen, Yong

    2010-05-01

    Cell adhesion and motility depend strongly on the interactions between cells and cell culture substratum. To observe the cell morphology at the interface between cells and artificial substratum or patterned surfaces, we have developed a technique named reversed cell imprinting. After culture and chemical fixation of the cells on a patterned hole array, a liquid polymer was poured on and UV cured, allowing taking off the cell-polymer assembly for a direct observation of the underside cell surface using atomic force microscopy. As expected, we observed local deformation of the cell membrane in the hole area with a penetration depth strongly dependent on the size and depth of the hole as well as the culture time. Quantitative analyses of Hela cells on patterned surfaces of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) revealed that the penetration was also position dependent over the cell attachment area due to the non-homogeneous distribution of the membrane stress. With the increase of the culture time, the penetration depth was reduced, in a close correlation with the increase of the cell spreading area. Nevertheless, both cell seeding and adhesion efficiency on high density hole arrays could be significantly increased comparing to that on a smooth surface. Patterned substrates are increasingly required to produce and interrogate new biomaterials for therapeutic benefit. Overall, this work suggests a strategy to endow conventional imaging methods with added functionality to enable easy observation of the underside cell morphology on topographic patterns. PMID:20390138

  20. A role for cell adhesion in beryllium-mediated lung disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong-geller, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease (CBD) is a debilitating lung disorder in which exposure to the lightweight metal beryllium (Be) causes the accumulation of beryllium-specific CD4+ T cells in the lung and formation of noncaseating pulmonary granulomas. Treatment for CBD patients who exhibit progressive pulmonary decline is limited to systemic corticosteroids, which suppress the severe host inflammatory response. Studies in the past several years have begun to highlight cell-cell adhesion interactions in the development of Be hypersensitivity and CBD. In particular, the high binding affinity between intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (I-CAM1) on lung epithelial cells and the {beta}{sub 2} integrin LFA-1 on migrating lymphocytes and macrophages regulates the concerted rolling of immune cells to sites of inflammation in the lung. In this review, we discuss the evidence that implicates cell adhesion processes in onset of Be disease and the potential of cell adhesion as an intervention point for development of novel therapies.

  1. Cell-matrix adhesion characterization using multiple shear stress zones in single stepwise microchannel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Ji; Doh, Il; Bae, Gab-Yong; Cha, Hyuk-Jin; Cho, Young-Ho

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents a cell chip capable to characterize cell-matrix adhesion by monitoring cell detachment rate. The proposed cell chip can supply multiple levels of shear stress in single stepwise microchannel. As epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), one of hallmarks of cancer metastasis is closely associated to the interaction with extracelluar matrix (ECM), we took advantage of two lung cancer cell models with different adhesion properties to ECM depending their epithelial or mesenchymal properties, including the pair of lung cancer cells with (A549sh) or without E-cadherin expression (A549sh-Ecad), which would be optimal model to examine the alteration of adhesion properties after EMT induction. The cell-matrix adhesion resisting to shear stress appeared to be remarkably differed between lung cancer cells. The detachment rate of epithelial-like H358 and mesenchymal-like H460 cells was 53%-80% and 25%-66% in the shear stress range of 34-60 dyn/cm2, respectively. A549sh-Ecad cells exhibits lower detachment rate (5%-9%) compared to A549sh cells (14%-40%). By direct comparison of adhesion between A549sh and A549sh-Ecad, we demonstrated that A549shE-cad to mimic EMT were more favorable to the ECM attachment under the various levels of shear stress. The present method can be applied to quantitative analysis of tumor cell-ECM adhesion.

  2. Constitutive activation of BMP signalling abrogates experimental metastasis of OVCA429 cells via reduced cell adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shepherd Trevor G

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activation of bone morphogenetic protein (BMP4 signalling in human ovarian cancer cells induces a number of phenotypic changes in vitro, including altered cell morphology, adhesion, motility and invasion, relative to normal human ovarian surface epithelial cells. From these in vitro analyses, we had hypothesized that active BMP signalling promotes the metastatic potential of ovarian cancer. Methods To test this directly, we engineered OVCA429 human ovarian cancer cells possessing doxycycline-inducible expression of a constitutively-active mutant BMP receptor, ALK3QD, and administered these cells to immunocompromised mice. Further characterization was performed in vitro to address the role of activated BMP signalling on the EOC phenotype, with particular emphasis on epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT and cell adhesion. Results Unexpectedly, doxycycline-induced ALK3QD expression in OVCA429 cells reduced tumour implantation on peritoneal surfaces and ascites formation when xenografted into immunocompromised mice by intraperitoneal injection. To determine the potential mechanisms controlling this in vivo observation, we followed with several cell culture experiments. Doxycycline-induced ALK3QD expression enhanced the refractile, spindle-shaped morphology of cultured OVCA429 cells eliciting an EMT-like response. Using in vitro wound healing assays, we observed that ALK3QD-expressing cells migrated with long, cytoplasmic projections extending into the wound space. The phenotypic alterations of ALK3QD-expressing cells correlated with changes in specific gene expression patterns of EMT, including increased Snail and Slug and reduced E-cadherin mRNA expression. In addition, ALK3QD signalling reduced β1- and β3-integrin expression, critical molecules involved in ovarian cancer cell adhesion. The combination of reduced E-cadherin and β-integrin expression correlates directly with the reduced EOC cell cohesion in spheroids and

  3. Galectin-1-mediated cell adhesion, invasion and cell death in human anaplastic large cell lymphoma: Regulatory roles of cell surface glycans

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Osamu; Abe, Masafumi

    2014-01-01

    Galectin-1 is known to be one of the extracellular matrix proteins. To elucidate the biological roles of galectin-1 in cell adhesion and invasion of human anaplastic large cell lymphoma, we performed cell adhesion and invasion assays using the anaplastic large cell lymphoma cell line H-ALCL, which was previously established in our laboratory. From the cell surface lectin array, treatment with neuraminidase from Arthrobacter ureafaciens which cleaves all linkage types of cell surface sialic ac...

  4. Reciprocal interactions between cell adhesion molecules of the immunoglobulin superfamily and the cytoskeleton in neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir eSytnyk

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion molecules of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF including the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM and members of the L1 family of neuronal cell adhesion molecules play important functions in the developing nervous system by regulating formation, growth and branching of neurites and establishment of the synaptic contacts between neurons. In the mature brain, members of IgSF regulate synapse composition, function and plasticity required for learning and memory. The intracellular domains of IgSF cell adhesion molecules interact with the components of the cytoskeleton including the submembrane actin-spectrin meshwork, actin microfilaments, and microtubules. In this review, we summarize current data indicating that interactions between IgSF cell adhesion molecules and the cytoskeleton are reciprocal, and that while IgSF cell adhesion molecules regulate the assembly of the cytoskeleton, the cytoskeleton plays an important role in regulation of the functions of IgSF cell adhesion molecules. Reciprocal interactions between NCAM and L1 family members and the cytoskeleton and their role in neuronal differentiation and synapse formation are discussed in detail.

  5. Reciprocal Interactions between Cell Adhesion Molecules of the Immunoglobulin Superfamily and the Cytoskeleton in Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshchyns'ka, Iryna; Sytnyk, Vladimir

    2016-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules of the immunoglobulin superfamily (IgSF) including the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and members of the L1 family of neuronal cell adhesion molecules play important functions in the developing nervous system by regulating formation, growth and branching of neurites, and establishment of the synaptic contacts between neurons. In the mature brain, members of IgSF regulate synapse composition, function, and plasticity required for learning and memory. The intracellular domains of IgSF cell adhesion molecules interact with the components of the cytoskeleton including the submembrane actin-spectrin meshwork, actin microfilaments, and microtubules. In this review, we summarize current data indicating that interactions between IgSF cell adhesion molecules and the cytoskeleton are reciprocal, and that while IgSF cell adhesion molecules regulate the assembly of the cytoskeleton, the cytoskeleton plays an important role in regulation of the functions of IgSF cell adhesion molecules. Reciprocal interactions between NCAM and L1 family members and the cytoskeleton and their role in neuronal differentiation and synapse formation are discussed in detail. PMID:26909348

  6. Protein kinase C, focal adhesions and the regulation of cell migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fogh, Betina S; Multhaupt, Hinke A B; Couchman, John Robert

    2014-01-01

    and adhesion turnover. Focal adhesions, or focal contacts, are widespread organelles at the cell-matrix interface. They arise as a result of receptor interactions with matrix ligands, together with clustering. Recent analysis shows that focal adhesions contain a very large number of protein components......Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix is a complex process involving protrusive activity driven by the actin cytoskeleton, engagement of specific receptors, followed by signaling and cytoskeletal organization. Thereafter, contractile and endocytic/recycling activities may facilitate migration...... in their intracellular compartment. Among these are tyrosine kinases, which have received a great deal of attention, whereas the serine/threonine kinase protein kinase C has received much less. Here the status of protein kinase C in focal adhesions and cell migration is reviewed, together with discussion of its roles...

  7. Complementarity of PALM and SOFI for super-resolution live cell imaging of focal adhesions

    CERN Document Server

    Deschout, Hendrik; Sharipov, Azat; Szlag, Daniel; Feletti, Lely; Vandenberg, Wim; Dedecker, Peter; Hofkens, Johan; Leutenegger, Marcel; Lasser, Theo; Radenovic, Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Live cell imaging of focal adhesions requires a sufficiently high temporal resolution, which remains a challenging task for super-resolution microscopy. We have addressed this important issue by combining photo-activated localization microscopy (PALM) with super-resolution optical fluctuation imaging (SOFI). Using simulations and fixed cell focal adhesion images, we investigated the complementarity between PALM and SOFI in terms of spatial and temporal resolution. This PALM-SOFI framework was used to image focal adhesions in living cells, while obtaining a temporal resolution below 10 s. We visualized the dynamics of focal adhesions, and revealed local mean velocities around 190 nm per minute. The complementarity of PALM and SOFI was assessed in detail with a methodology that integrates a quantitative resolution and signal-to-noise metric. This PALM and SOFI concept provides an enlarged quantitative imaging framework, allowing unprecedented functional exploration of focal adhesions through the estimation of m...

  8. Measurement of single-cell adhesion strength using a microfluidic assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Kevin V; Williamson, Kyle B; Masters, Kristyn S; Turner, Kevin T

    2010-06-01

    Despite the importance of cell adhesion in numerous physiological, pathological, and biomaterial-related responses, our understanding of adhesion strength at the cell-substrate interface and its relationship to cell function remains incomplete. One reason for this deficit is a lack of accessible experimental approaches that quantify adhesion strength at the single-cell level and facilitate large numbers of tests. The current work describes the design, fabrication, and use of a microfluidic-based method for single-cell adhesion strength measurements. By applying a monotonically increasing flow rate in a microfluidic channel in combination with video microscopy, the adhesion strength of individual NIH3T3 fibroblasts cultured for 24 h on various surfaces was measured. The small height of the channel allows high shear stresses to be generated under laminar conditions, allowing strength measurements on well-spread, strongly adhered cells that cannot be characterized in most conventional assays. This assay was used to quantify the relationship between morphological characteristics and adhesion strength for individual well-spread cells. Cell adhesion strength was found to be positively correlated with both cell area and circularity. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed to examine the role of cell geometry in determining the actual stress applied to the cell. Use of this method to examine adhesion at the single-cell level allows the detachment of strongly-adhered cells under a highly-controllable, uniform loading to be directly observed and will enable the characterization of biological events and relationships that cannot currently be achieved using existing methods.

  9. Adhesion and morphology of fibroblastic cells cultured on different polymeric biomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombello, C B; Santos, A R; Malmonge, S M; Barbanti, S H; Wada, M L F; Duek, E A R

    2002-09-01

    Cell adhesion is influenced by the physical and chemical characteristics of the materials used as substrate for cell culturing. In this work, we evaluated the influence of the morphological and chemical characteristics of different polymeric substrates on the adhesion and morphology of fibroblastic cells. Cell growth on poly (L-lactic acid) [PLLA] membranes and poly(2-hydroxy ethyl methacrylate) [polyHEMA], poly(2-hydroxy ethyl methacrylate)-cellulose acetate [polyHEMA-CA] and poly(2-hydroxy ethyl methacrylate)-poly(methyl methacrylate-co-acrylic acid) [polyHEMA-poly(MMA-co-AA)] hydrogels of different densities and pore diameters was examined. Cells adhered preferentially to more negatively charged substrates, with polyHEMA hydrogels being more adhesive than the other substractes. The pores present in PLLA membranes did not interfere with adhesion, but the cells showed a distinctive morphology on each membrane.

  10. Cellular Adhesion Tripeptide RGD Inhibits Growth of Human Ileocecal Adenocarcinoma Cells HCT-8 and Induces Apoptosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hua; ZENG Hong-bin; YANG Shao-juan; GAO Shen; HUANG Yi-bing; HOU Rui-zhen; ZHAO Mi-feng; XU Li; ZHANG Xue-zhong

    2007-01-01

    The tripeptide, Arg-Gly-Asp(RGD) motif is an integrin-recognition site found in adhesive proteins present in extracellular matrices(ECM) and in the blood. HCT-8 cells were treated with cellular adhesion tripeptide RGD at various concentrations. MTT assay was performed to examine the growth and proliferation of HCT-8 cells after treatment with RGD for 48 h. Haematoxylin and Eosin(HE) staining and electromicroscope were used to observe the morphology of apoptotic cells. Survivin and flow cytometry were also used to analyze the HCT-8 apoptosis. Cellular adhesion tripeptide RGD significantly inhibits the growth and proliferation of HCT-8 cells in a dose-dependent manner and induces apoptosis of HCT-8. These results indicate that cellular adhesion tripeptide RGD inhibits the growth and proliferation of tumor HCT-8 cell, probably by the aid of inducing apoptosis of HCT-8 cell.

  11. N-Terminal Truncation of TACO Inhibits PMA-Induced U937 Cell Adhesion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Changzhen; SUI Senfang

    2005-01-01

    The effect of TACO1-299, the N-terminal truncation of TACO, on phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-induced U937 cell adhesion was investigated. Full-length TACO and several truncations were overexpressed in U937 cells. The effects of the expressed proteins on U937 cell adhesion mediated by PMA-induced differentiation were observed by fluorescence microscopy. The results show that the overexpression of TACO1-299 inhibits cell adhesion while overexpressions of the other proteins do not have this effect. The actin-binding capability of TACO1-299 was investigated and the results show that TACO1-299 lacks the ability of TACO to bind F-actin. The inhibitive effect of TACO1-299, the functional domain of TACO, suggests that TACO may play a role in cell differentiation mediating adhesion of monoblastic leukemia cells.

  12. Interlayer adhesion in roll-to-roll processed flexible inverted polymer solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dupont, Stephanie R.; Oliver, Mark; Krebs, Frederik C;

    2012-01-01

    The interlayer adhesion of roll-to-roll processed flexible inverted P3HT:PCBM bulk heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar cells is reported. Poor adhesion between adjacent layers may result in loss of device performance from delamination driven by the thermomechanical stresses in the device. We...

  13. Effect of Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 Expression on Intracellular Granule Movement in Pancreatic α Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokawa, Satoru; Furuno, Tadahide; Suzuki, Takahiro; Inoh, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Ryo; Hirashima, Naohide

    2016-09-01

    Although glucagon secreted from pancreatic α cells plays a role in increasing glucose concentrations in serum, the mechanism regulating glucagon secretion from α cells remains unclear. Cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1), identified as an adhesion molecule in α cells, has been reported not only to communicate among α cells and between nerve fibers, but also to prevent excessive glucagon secretion from α cells. Here, we investigated the effect of CADM1 expression on the movement of intracellular secretory granules in α cells because the granule transport is an important step in secretion. Spinning disk microscopic analysis showed that granules moved at a mean velocity of 0.236 ± 0.010 μm/s in the mouse α cell line αTC6 that expressed CADM1 endogenously. The mean velocity was significantly decreased in CADM1-knockdown (KD) cells (mean velocity: 0.190 ± 0.016 μm/s). The velocity of granule movement decreased greatly in αTC6 cells treated with the microtubule-depolymerizing reagent nocodazole, but not in αTC6 cells treated with the actin-depolymerizing reagent cytochalasin D. No difference in the mean velocity was observed between αTC6 and CADM1-KD cells treated with nocodazole. These results suggest that intracellular granules in pancreatic α cells move along the microtubule network, and that CADM1 influences their velocity. PMID:27262873

  14. Short Peptides Enhance Single Cell Adhesion and Viability onMicroarrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veiseh, Mandana; Veiseh, Omid; Martin, Michael C.; Asphahani,Fareid; Zhang, Miqin

    2007-01-19

    Single cell patterning holds important implications forbiology, biochemistry, biotechnology, medicine, and bioinformatics. Thechallenge for single cell patterning is to produce small islands hostingonly single cells and retaining their viability for a prolonged period oftime. This study demonstrated a surface engineering approach that uses acovalently bound short peptide as a mediator to pattern cells withimproved single cell adhesion and prolonged cellular viabilityon goldpatterned SiO2 substrates. The underlying hypothesis is that celladhesion is regulated bythe type, availability, and stability ofeffective cell adhesion peptides, and thus covalently bound shortpeptides would promote cell spreading and, thus, single cell adhesion andviability. The effectiveness of this approach and the underlyingmechanism for the increased probability of single cell adhesion andprolonged cell viability by short peptides were studied by comparingcellular behavior of human umbilical cord vein endothelial cells on threemodelsurfaces whose gold electrodes were immobilized with fibronectin,physically adsorbed Arg-Glu-Asp-Val-Tyr, and covalently boundLys-Arg-Glu-Asp-Val-Tyr, respectively. The surface chemistry and bindingproperties were characterized by reflectance Fourier transform infraredspectroscopy. Both short peptides were superior to fibronectin inproducing adhesion of only single cells, whereas the covalently boundpeptide also reduced apoptosis and necrosisof adhered cells. Controllingcell spreading by peptide binding domains to regulate apoptosis andviability represents a fundamental mechanism in cell-materialsinteraction and provides an effective strategy in engineering arrays ofsingle cells.

  15. The evaluation of p,p′-DDT exposure on cell adhesion of hepatocellular carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Low doses p,p′-DDT exposure disrupts cell–cell adhesion and cell–matrix adhesion in HepG2 cells. • Both oxidative stress and JAK/STAT3 pathway are activated in p,p′-DDT-treated HepG2 cells. • The stimulation of JAK/STAT3 pathway is mediated by oxidative stress. • p,p′-DDT regulates adhesion molecules via the JAK/STAT3 pathway. • p,p′-DDT stimulates JAK/STAT3 signal pathway and disrupts the expressions of cell adhesion molecules in nude mice models. - Abstract: Many studies have found a positive association between the progression of hepatocellular carcinoma and DDT exposure. These studies mainly focus on the effect of DDT exposure on cell proliferation and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) promotion. However, the influence of DDT on cell adhesion of hepatocellular carcinoma remains to be unclear. The aim of our study was to determine the effect of p,p′-DDT on cell adhesion of hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro and in vivo. The data showed that p,p′-DDT, exposing HepG2 cells for 6 days, decreased cell–cell adhesion and elevated cell–matrix adhesion. Strikingly, p,p′-DDT increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) content, and this was accompanied by the activation of JAK/STAT3 pathway. Moreover, ROS inhibitor supplement reversed these effects significantly. However, the addition of ER inhibitor, ICI, had no effect on the p,p′-DDT-induced effects. p,p′-DDT altered the mRNA levels of related adhesion molecules, including inhibition of E-cadherin and promotion of N-cadherin along with CD29. Interestingly, the p,p′-DDT-altered adhesion molecules could be reversed with JAK inhibitor or STAT3 inhibitor. Likewise, p,p′-DDT stimulated the JAK/STAT3 pathway in nude mice, as well as altered the mRNA levels of E-cadherin, N-cadherin, and CD29. Taken together, these results indicate that p,p′-DDT profoundly promotes the adhesion process by decreasing cell–cell adhesion and inducing cell

  16. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase attenuates hepatocellular carcinoma cell adhesion stimulated by adipokine resistin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resistin, adipocyte-secreting adipokine, may play critical role in modulating cancer pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of resistin on HCC adhesion to the endothelium, and the mechanism underlying these resistin effects. Human SK-Hep1 cells were used to study the effect of resistin on intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) expressions as well as NF-κB activation, and hence cell adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR), an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator, was used to determine the regulatory role of AMPK on HCC adhesion to the endothelium in regard to the resistin effects. Treatment with resistin increased the adhesion of SK-Hep1 cells to HUVECs and concomitantly induced NF-κB activation, as well as ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expressions in SK-Hep1 cells. Using specific blocking antibodies and siRNAs, we found that resistin-induced SK-Hep1 cell adhesion to HUVECs was through NF-κB-regulated ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 expressions. Moreover, treatment with AICAR demonstrated that AMPK activation in SK-Hep1 cells significantly attenuates the resistin effect on SK-Hep1 cell adhesion to HUVECs. These results clarify the role of resistin in inducing HCC adhesion to the endothelium and demonstrate the inhibitory effect of AMPK activation under the resistin stimulation. Our findings provide a notion that resistin play an important role to promote HCC metastasis and implicate AMPK may be a therapeutic target to against HCC metastasis

  17. Modulation of cell adhesion, proliferation and differentiation on materials designed for body implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacakova, Lucie; Filova, Elena; Parizek, Martin; Ruml, Tomas; Svorcik, Vaclav

    2011-01-01

    The interaction of cells and tissues with artificial materials designed for applications in biotechnologies and in medicine is governed by the physical and chemical properties of the material surface. There is optimal cell adhesion to moderately hydrophilic and positively charged substrates, due to the adsorption of cell adhesion-mediating molecules (e.g. vitronectin, fibronectin) in an advantageous geometrical conformation, which makes specific sites on these molecules (e.g. specific amino acid sequences) accessible to cell adhesion receptors (e.g. integrins). Highly hydrophilic surfaces prevent the adsorption of proteins, or these molecules are bound very weakly. On highly hydrophobic materials, however, proteins are adsorbed in rigid and denatured forms, hampering cell adhesion. The wettability of the material surface, particularly in synthetic polymers, can be effectively regulated by physical treatments, e.g. by irradiation with ions, plasma or UV light. The irradiation-activated material surface can be functionalized by various biomolecules and nanoparticles, and this further enhances its attractiveness for cells and its effectiveness in regulating cell functions. Another important factor for cell-material interaction is surface roughness and surface topography. Nanostructured substrates (i.e. substrates with irregularities smaller than 100nm), are generally considered to be beneficial for cell adhesion and growth, while microstructured substrates behave more controversially (e.g. they can hamper cell spreading and proliferation but they enhance cell differentiation, particularly in osteogenic cells). A factor which has been relatively less investigated, but which is essential for cell-material interaction, is material deformability. Highly soft and deformable substrates cannot resist the tractional forces generated by cells during cell adhesion, and cells are not able to attach, spread and survive on such materials. Local variation in the physical and

  18. Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell adhesion on E- and P-selectin under physiological flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Hematogenous metastasis is still a poorly understood phenomenon. The rate-limiting step within the metastatic cascade is not yet clear although it may be estimated that the extravasation of circulating tumor cells is a step of crucial importance, as most tumor cells that are shed into circulation undergo apoptosis. The process of extravasation includes a cascade of consecutive steps, starting with adhesion of tumor cells circulating in the bloodstream to endothelial cells, mimicking leukocyte adhesion and transmigration. Endothelial cell selectin-leukocyte glycan interaction occurs when leukocytes adhere to endothelial cells under conditions of shear stress. As there are parallels between cancer cell endothelial interactions with leukocyte endothelial cell systems an experimental setup has been developed in which adhesion of small cell lung carcinoma adhesive properties can be analyzed under physiological shear stress conditions during their attachment to E- and P-selection.

  19. Expression and function of neural cell adhesion molecule during limb regeneration.

    OpenAIRE

    Maier, C E; Watanabe, M.(Niigata University, 950-2181, Niigata, Japan); Singer, M.; McQuarrie, I G; Sunshine, J.; Rutishauser, U.

    1986-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) has been detected in regenerating limb bud of adult newts in addition to brain and peripheral nerves. In the regenerating tissue, NCAM was found primarily on mesenchymal cells and also in wound epidermis. Infusion of Fab fragments of antibodies to NCAM into limb buds at the early blastema stage delayed the regenerative process. Previous studies have indicated that NCAM serves as a homophilic ligand for adhesion among cells that express this molecule an...

  20. Mass spectrometry assisted lithography for the patterning of cell adhesion ligands on self-assembled monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Kwan; Ryoo, Soo-Ryoon; Kwack, Sul-Jin; Min, Dal-Hee

    2009-01-01

    Pattern of events: A simple and flexible method has been developed for patterning cell adhesion ligands. Locally erasing self-assembled monolayers with tri(ethyleneglycol) groups on a gold substrate by using a MALDI-TOF MS nitrogen laser and filling the exposed gold surface with an alkanethiol presenting carboxylic acid groups enables subsequent immobilization of maleimide and a cell adhesion peptide, which can then recognize cells (see scheme). PMID:19347909

  1. Snail1 controls epithelial–mesenchymal lineage commitment in focal adhesion kinase–null embryonic cells

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xiao-Yan; Zhou, Xiaoming; Rowe, R. Grant; Hu, Yuexian; Schlaepfer, David D.; Ilić, Dusko; Dressler, Gregory; Park, Ann; Guan, Jun-Lin; Weiss, Stephen J.

    2011-01-01

    Mouse embryonic cells isolated from focal adhesion kinase (FAK)–null animals at embryonic day 7.5 display multiple defects in focal adhesion remodeling, microtubule dynamics, mechanotransduction, proliferation, directional motility, and invasion. To date, the ability of FAK to modulate cell function has been ascribed largely to its control of posttranscriptional signaling cascades in this embryonic cell population. In this paper, we demonstrate that FAK unexpectedly exerts control over an epi...

  2. Laser Phototherapy Enhances Mesenchymal Stem Cells Survival in Response to the Dental Adhesives

    OpenAIRE

    Ivana Márcia Alves Diniz; Adriana Bona Matos; Márcia Martins Marques

    2015-01-01

    Background. We investigated the influence of laser phototherapy (LPT) on the survival of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) submitted to substances leached from dental adhesives. Method. MSCs were isolated and characterized. Oral mucosa fibroblasts and osteoblast-like cells were used as comparative controls. Cultured medium conditioned with two adhesive systems was applied to the cultures. Cell monolayers were exposed or not to LPT. Laser irradiations were performed using a red laser (GaAlAs...

  3. Label-free continuous cell sorter with specifically adhesive oblique micro-grooves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report the development of a label-free continuous cell sorting method based on specific adhesivity between cells and surface-immobilized adhesion molecules. The separation of cells is induced by cross-flow adhesive force on micron-sized stripes with adhesion molecules immobilized on the surface. In order to accurately form the adhesive stripes on a microchannel wall, 1 µm wide micro-grooves are fabricated at a certain angle with respect to the flow direction using direct electron-beam lithography. Amino-functionalized parylene is used as the groove surface material, and streptavidin is immobilized on the entire surface, resulting in a surface with periodic adhesive patterns. The effectiveness of the proposed cell sorting principle is verified by flow-through experiments using functionalized particles as model cells. Measurements of the motion of biotin-coated microparticles show that the particles decelerated by specific adhesivity are displaced in the cross-flow direction. The observed cross-flow displacement is around 0.8% of the streamwise travelling distance. It is also shown that the rate of cross-flow displacement is independent of the flow rate or the stripe angle. Finally, it is demonstrated that a mixture of streptavidin- and biotin-coated microparticles can be completely separated after flowing over a 20 mm long patterned surface. The proposed label-free continuous lateral separation scheme has a wide range of potential applications for separation of cells which could not be distinguished by size or separated using dielectric forces

  4. Heparanase facilitates cell adhesion and spreading by clustering of cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flonia Levy-Adam

    Full Text Available Heparanase is a heparan sulfate (HS degrading endoglycosidase participating in extracellular matrix degradation and remodeling. Apart of its well characterized enzymatic activity, heparanase was noted to exert also enzymatic-independent functions. Non-enzymatic activities of heparanase include enhanced adhesion of tumor-derived cells and primary T-cells. Attempting to identify functional domains of heparanase that would serve as targets for drug development, we have identified heparin binding domains of heparanase. A corresponding peptide (residues Lys(158-Asp(171, termed KKDC was demonstrated to physically associate with heparin and HS, and to inhibit heparanase enzymatic activity. We hypothesized that the pro-adhesive properties of heparanase are mediated by its interaction with cell surface HS proteoglycans, and utilized the KKDC peptide to examine this possibility. We provide evidence that the KKDC peptide interacts with cell membrane HS, resulting in clustering of syndecan-1 and syndecan-4. We applied classical analysis of cell morphology, fluorescent and time-lapse microscopy and demonstrated that the KKDC peptide efficiently stimulates the adhesion and spreading of various cell types, mediated by PKC, Src, and the small GTPase Rac1. These results support, and further substantiate the notion that heparanase function is not limited to its enzymatic activity.

  5. Cell Adhesion Molecules of the Immunoglobulin Superfamily in the Nervous System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walmod, Peter Schledermann; Pedersen, Martin Volmer; Berezin, Vladimir;

    2007-01-01

    CAMs belonging to IgSF, that exclusively or in part, are expressed in the nervous system. The chapter includes descriptions of myelin protein zero (P0), integrin-associated protein (CD47), neuroplastin, activated leukocyte-cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM), melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM...... to be more than simple regulators of adhesion. Many CAMs are important mediators of intracellular signal transduction, and CAMs are involved in many biological phenomena including migration, proliferation, and differentiation of cells, as well as axonal guidance, neurite outgrowth,and synaptic plasticity...

  6. A hot water extract of Curcuma longa inhibits adhesion molecule protein expression and monocyte adhesion to TNF-α-stimulated human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Kengo; Muroyama, Koutarou; Yamamoto, Norio; Murosaki, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    The recruitment of arterial leukocytes to endothelial cells is an important step in the progression of various inflammatory diseases. Therefore, its modulation is thought to be a prospective target for the prevention or treatment of such diseases. Adhesion molecules on endothelial cells are induced by proinflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and contribute to the recruitment of leukocytes. In the present study, we investigated the effect of hot water extract of Curcuma longa (WEC) on the protein expression of adhesion molecules, monocyte adhesion induced by TNF-α in human umbilical vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs). Treatment of HUVECs with WEC significantly suppressed both TNF-α-induced protein expression of adhesion molecules and monocyte adhesion. WEC also suppressed phosphorylation and degradation of nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor, alpha (IκBα) induced by TNF-α in HUVECs, suggesting that WEC inhibits the NF-κB signaling pathway.

  7. Biosynthesis of the neural cell adhesion molecule: characterization of polypeptide C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nybroe, O; Albrechtsen, M; Dahlin, J;

    1985-01-01

    The biosynthesis of the neural cell adhesion molecule (N-CAM) was studied in primary cultures of rat cerebral glial cells, cerebellar granule neurons, and skeletal muscle cells. The three cell types produced different N-CAM polypeptide patterns. Glial cells synthesized a 135,000 Mr polypeptide B...

  8. Redundant control of migration and adhesion by ERM proteins in vascular smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baeyens, Nicolas; Latrache, Iman; Yerna, Xavier [Laboratory of Cell Physiology, IoNS, Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); Noppe, Gauthier; Horman, Sandrine [Pôle de Recherche Cardiovasculaire, IREC, Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium); Morel, Nicole, E-mail: nicole.morel@uclouvain.be [Laboratory of Cell Physiology, IoNS, Université Catholique de Louvain (Belgium)

    2013-11-22

    Highlights: •The three ERM proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cell. •ERM depletion inhibited PDGF-evoked migration redundantly. •ERM depletion increased cell adhesion redundantly. •ERM depletion did not affect PDGF-evoked Ca signal, Rac1 activation, proliferation. •ERM proteins control PDGF-induced migration by regulating adhesion. -- Abstract: Ezrin, radixin, and moesin possess a very similar structure with a C-terminal actin-binding domain and a N-terminal FERM interacting domain. They are known to be involved in cytoskeleton organization in several cell types but their function in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is still unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of ERM proteins in cell migration induced by PDGF, a growth factor involved in pathophysiological processes like angiogenesis or atherosclerosis. We used primary cultured VSMC obtained from rat aorta, which express the three ERM proteins. Simultaneous depletion of the three ERM proteins with specific siRNAs abolished the effects of PDGF on cell architecture and migration and markedly increased cell adhesion and focal adhesion size, while these parameters were only slightly affected by depletion of ezrin, radixin or moesin alone. Rac1 activation, cell proliferation, and Ca{sup 2+} signal in response to PDGF were unaffected by ERM depletion. These results indicate that ERM proteins exert a redundant control on PDGF-induced VSMC migration by regulating focal adhesion turn-over and cell adhesion to substrate.

  9. The Role of Lipid Rafts in Cancer Cell Adhesion and Migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiyuki Murai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid rafts are cholesterol-enriched microdomains of the cell membrane and possess a highly dynamic nature. They have been involved in various cellular functions including the regulation of cell adhesion and membrane signaling through proteins within lipid rafts. The dynamic features of the cancer cell surface may modulate the malignant phenotype of cancer, including adhesion disorders and aggressive phenotypes of migration and invasion. Recently, it was demonstrated that lipid rafts play critical roles in cancer cell adhesion and migration. This article summarizes the important roles of lipid rafts in cancer cell adhesion and migration, with a focus on the current state of knowledge. This article will improve the understanding of cancer progression and lead to the development of novel targets for cancer therapy.

  10. Regulation of promyogenic signal transduction by cell-cell contact and adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krauss, Robert S., E-mail: Robert.Krauss@mssm.edu [Department of Developmental and Regenerative Biology, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY 10029 (United States)

    2010-11-01

    Skeletal myoblast differentiation involves acquisition of the muscle-specific transcriptional program and morphological changes, including fusion into multinucleated myofibers. Differentiation is regulated by extracellular signaling cues, including cell-cell contact and adhesion. Cadherin and Ig adhesion receptors have been implicated in distinct but overlapping stages of myogenesis. N-cadherin signals through the Ig receptor Cdo to activate p38 MAP kinase, while the Ig receptor neogenin signals to activate FAK; both processes promote muscle-specific gene expression and myoblast fusion. M-cadherin activates Rac1 to enhance fusion. Specific Ig receptors (Kirre and Sns) are essential for myoblast fusion in Drosophila, also signaling through Rac, and vertebrate orthologs of Kirre and Sns have partially conserved function. Mice lacking specific cytoplasmic signaling factors activated by multiple receptors (e.g., Rac1) have strong muscle phenotypes in vivo. In contrast, mice lacking individual adhesion receptors that lie upstream of these factors have modest phenotypes. Redundancy among receptors may account for this. Many of the mammalian Ig receptors and cadherins associate with each other, and multivalent interactions within these complexes may require removal of multiple components to reveal dramatic defects in vivo. Nevertheless, it is possible that the murine adhesion receptors rate-limiting in vivo have not yet been identified or fully assessed.

  11. Interlayer adhesion in roll-to-roll processed flexible inverted polymer solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Dupont, Stephanie R.

    2012-02-01

    The interlayer adhesion of roll-to-roll processed flexible inverted P3HT:PCBM bulk heterojunction (BHJ) polymer solar cells is reported. Poor adhesion between adjacent layers may result in loss of device performance from delamination driven by the thermomechanical stresses in the device. We demonstrate how a thin-film adhesion technique can be applied to flexible organic solar cells to obtain quantitative adhesion values. For the P3HT:PCBM-based BHJ polymer solar cells, the interface of the BHJ with the conductive polymer layer PEDOT:PSS was found to be the weakest. The adhesion fracture energy varied from 1.6 J/m2 to 0.1 J/m2 depending on the composition of the P3HT:PCBM layer. Post-deposition annealing time and temperature were shown to increase the adhesion at this interface. Additionally the PEDOT:PSS cells are compared with V2O5 cells whereby adhesive failure marked by high fracture energies was observed. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  12. Characterization of bifidobacterial adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gleinser, Marita

    2012-01-01

    Adhesion of probiotics is discussed as a prerequisite for the persistence and the colonization of the gut. Based on previous studies of our group, the strain B. bifidum S17 could be identified as promising candidate to investigate adhesion properties (Riedel et al., 2006a; Preising et al., 2010). Several E. coli-Bifidobacterium shuttle vectors with different antibiotic resistances were generated. Using a gusA reporter assay the promoter Pgap was shown to have detectable transcriptional activi...

  13. Transfection of glioma cells with the neural-cell adhesion molecule NCAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edvardsen, K; Pedersen, P H; Bjerkvig, R;

    1994-01-01

    The tumor growth and the invasive capacity of a rat glioma cell line (BT4Cn) were studied after transfection with the human transmembrane 140-kDa isoform of the neural-cell adhesion molecule, NCAM. After s.c. injection, the NCAM-transfected cells showed a slower growth rate than the parent cell...... line (BT4Cn). Upon intracerebral implantation with BT4Cn cells and different clones of NCAM-transfected cells, all animals developed neurological symptoms within 13-16 days. However, the tumors showed different growth characteristics. The NCAM-transfected BT4Cn cells were localized in the region...... showed a lower cytotoxic response than the spleen cells from rats transplanted with the transfected variants of BT4Cn cells, indicating that the transfection procedure in itself mediated an activation of the immune system. The present data suggest that NCAM may influence the malignant behavior of rat...

  14. Cell adhesion molecules regulate contractile ring-independent cytokinesis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Akira Nagasaki; Masamitsu Kanada; Taro QP Uyeda

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the roles of substrate adhesion in cytokinesis, we established cell lines lacking paxiUin (PAXB) or vinculin (VINA), and those expressing the respective GFP fusion proteins in Dictyostelium discoideum. As in mammalian cells, GFP-PAXB and GFP-VINA formed focal adhesion-like complexes on the cell bottom, paxB cells in suspension grew normally, but on substrates, often failed to divide after regression of the furrow. The efficient cytokinesis of paxB cells in suspension is not because of shear forces to assist abscission, as they divided normally in static suspension culture as well. Double knockout strains lacking mhcA, which codes for myosin I1, and paxB or vinA displayed more severe cytokinetic defects than each single knockout strain. In mitotic wild-type cells, GFP-PAXB was diffusely distributed on the basal membrane, but was strikingly condensed along the polar edges in mitotic mhcA cells. These results are consistent with our idea that Dictyostelium displays two forms of cytokinesis, one that is contractile ringdependent and adhesion-independent, and the other that is contractile ring-independent and adhesion-dependent, and that the latter requires PAXB and VINA. Furthermore, that paxB cells fail to divide normally in the presence of substrate adhesion suggests that this adhesion molecule may play additional signaling roles.

  15. Integrin Activation by Regulated Dimerization and Oligomerization of Platelet Endothelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (Pecam)-1 from within the Cell

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Tieming; Newman, Peter J.

    2001-01-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM)-1 is a 130-kD transmembrane glycoprotein having six Ig homology domains within its extracellular domain and an immunoreceptor tyrosine–based inhibitory motif within its cytoplasmic domain. Previous studies have shown that addition of bivalent anti–PECAM-1 mAbs to the surface of T cells, natural killer cells, neutrophils, or platelets result in increased cell adhesion to immobilized integrin ligands. However, the mechanism by which this occur...

  16. Silencing GFAP isoforms in astrocytoma cells disturbs laminin-dependent motility and cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeton, Martina; Kanski, Regina; Stassen, Oscar M J A; Sluijs, Jacqueline A; Geerts, Dirk; van Tijn, Paula; Wiche, Gerhard; van Strien, Miriam E; Hol, Elly M

    2014-07-01

    Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) is an intermediate filament protein expressed in astrocytes and neural stem cells. The GFAP gene is alternatively spliced, and expression of GFAP is highly regulated during development, on brain damage, and in neurodegenerative diseases. GFAPα is the canonical splice variant and is expressed in all GFAP-positive cells. In the human brain, the alternatively spliced transcript GFAPδ marks specialized astrocyte populations, such as subpial astrocytes and the neurogenic astrocytes in the human subventricular zone. We here show that shifting the GFAP isoform ratio in favor of GFAPδ in astrocytoma cells, by selectively silencing the canonical isoform GFAPα with short hairpin RNAs, induced a change in integrins, a decrease in plectin, and an increase in expression of the extracellular matrix component laminin. Together, this did not affect cell proliferation but resulted in a significantly decreased motility of astrocytoma cells. In contrast, a down-regulation of all GFAP isoforms led to less cell spreading, increased integrin expression, and a >100-fold difference in the adhesion of astrocytoma cells to laminin. In summary, isoform-specific silencing of GFAP revealed distinct roles of a specialized GFAP network in regulating the interaction of astrocytoma cells with the extracellular matrix through laminin.-Moeton, M., Kanski, R., Stassen, O. M. J. A., Sluijs, J. A., Geerts, D., van Tijn, P., Wiche, G., van Strien, M. E., Hol, E. M. Silencing GFAP isoforms in astrocytoma cells disturbs laminin dependent motility and cell adhesion.

  17. Bottom-up engineering of the surface roughness of nanostructured cubic zirconia to control cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A V; Ferri, M; Tamplenizza, M; Borghi, F; Divitini, G; Ducati, C; Lenardi, C; Piazzoni, C; Merlini, M; Podestà, A; Milani, P

    2012-11-30

    Nanostructured cubic zirconia is a strategic material for biomedical applications since it combines superior structural and optical properties with a nanoscale morphology able to control cell adhesion and proliferation. We produced nanostructured cubic zirconia thin films at room temperature by supersonic cluster beam deposition of nanoparticles produced in the gas phase. Precise control of film roughness at the nanoscale is obtained by operating in a ballistic deposition regime. This allows one to study the influence of nanoroughness on cell adhesion, while keeping the surface chemistry constant. We evaluated cell adhesion on nanostructured zirconia with an osteoblast-like cell line using confocal laser scanning microscopy for detailed morphological and cytoskeleton studies. We demonstrated that the organization of cytoskeleton and focal adhesion formation can be controlled by varying the evolution of surface nanoroughness.

  18. Inflammatory mediators and cell adhesion molecules as indicators of severity of atherosclerosis: the Rotterdam Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.P.M. de Maat (Moniek); M.L. Bots (Michiel); M.M.B. Breteler (Monique); J. Meijer (John); A.J. Kiliaan (Amanda); J.C.M. Witteman (Jacqueline); A. Hofman (Albert)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractInflammatory mediators and soluble cell adhesion molecules predict cardiovascular events. It is not clear whether they reflect the severity of underlying atherosclerotic disease. Within the Rotterdam Study, we investigated the associations of C-reactive protein (CRP), i

  19. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule and prognosis in acute ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedbakken, Linda; Jensen, Jesper K; Hallén, Jonas;

    2011-01-01

    Biomarkers predicting mortality and functional outcome in stroke may be clinically helpful in identification of patients likely to benefit from intervention. Activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule (ALCAM) is upregulated during neuroinflammation; we investigated whether ALCAM concentrations ar...

  20. Displacement of p130Cas from focal adhesions links actomyosin contraction to cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machiyama, Hiroaki; Hirata, Hiroaki; Loh, Xia Kun; Kanchi, Madhu Mathi; Fujita, Hideaki; Tan, Song Hui; Kawauchi, Keiko; Sawada, Yasuhiro

    2014-08-15

    Cell adhesion complexes provide platforms where cell-generated forces are transmitted to the extracellular matrix (ECM). Tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion proteins is crucial for cells to communicate with the extracellular environment. However, the mechanisms that transmit actin cytoskeletal motion to the extracellular environment to drive cell migration are poorly understood. We find that the movement of p130Cas (Cas, also known as BCAR1), a mechanosensor at focal adhesions, correlates with actin retrograde flow and depends upon actomyosin contraction and phosphorylation of the Cas substrate domain (CasSD). This indicates that CasSD phosphorylation underpins the physical link between Cas and the actin cytoskeleton. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments reveal that CasSD phosphorylation, as opposed to the association of Cas with Src, facilitates Cas displacement from adhesion complexes in migrating cells. Furthermore, the stabilization of Src-Cas binding and inhibition of myosin II, both of which sustain CasSD phosphorylation but mitigate Cas displacement from adhesion sites, retard cell migration. These results indicate that Cas promotes cell migration by linking actomyosin contractions to the adhesion complexes through a dynamic interaction with Src as well as through the phosphorylation-dependent association with the actin cytoskeleton. PMID:24928898

  1. Clustering of adhesion receptors following exposure of insect blood cells to foreign surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, James B; Zhuang, Shufei; Pilas, Barbara; Bee, Charles Mark; Kanost, Michael R

    2005-05-01

    Cell-mediated immune responses of insects involve interactions of two main classes of blood cells (hemocytes) known as granular cells and plasmatocytes. In response to a foreign surface, these hemocytes suddenly transform from circulating, non-adherent cells to cells that interact and adhere to each other and the foreign surface. This report presents evidence that during this adhesive transformation the extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins lacunin and a ligand for peanut agglutinin (PNA) lectin are released by granular cells and bind to surfaces of both granular cells and plasmatocytes. ECM protein co-localizes on cell surfaces with the adhesive receptors integrin and neuroglian, a member of the immunoglobulin superfamily. The ECM protein(s) secreted by granular cells are hypothesized to interact with adhesion receptors such as neuroglian and integrin by cross linking and clustering them on hemocyte surfaces. This clustering of receptors is known to enhance the adhesiveness (avidity) of interacting mammalian immune cells. The formation of ring-shaped clusters of these adhesion receptors on surfaces of insect immune cells represents an evolutionary antecedent of the mammalian immunological synapse. PMID:15894002

  2. Epigenetic Silencing of CXCR4 Promotes Loss of Cell Adhesion in Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh Singh Yadav

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the network of chemokine signaling pathways, recent reports have described the SDF-1α/CXCR4 axis and its role in cancer progression and metastasis. Interestingly, we found downregulation of CXCR4 at both transcript and protein level in cervical cancer cell lines and primary tumors. We also found CXCR4 promoter hypermethylation in cervical cancer cell lines and primary biopsy samples. DNA hypomethylating drug 5-AZA-2′-deoxycytidine and histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A treatments in cell lines reactivate both CXCR4 transcription and protein expression. Cell adhesion assay demonstrated that autocrine SDF-1α promotes the loss of cell adhesion while paracrine SDF-1α predominantly protects the normal cervical cells from loss of cell adhesion. Cervical cancer cell line C-33A having increased expression of CXCR4 after TSA treatment showed increased cell adhesion by paracrine source of SDF-1α in comparison to untreated C-33A. These findings demonstrate the first evidence that epigenetic silencing of CXCR4 makes the cells inefficient to respond to the paracrine source of SDF-1α leading to loss of cell adhesion, one of the key events in metastases and progression of the disease. Our results provide novel insight of SDF-1α/CXCR4 signaling in tumor microenvironment which may be promising to further delineate molecular mechanism of cervical carcinogenesis.

  3. Effects of adhesion dynamics and substrate compliance on the shape and motility of crawling cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falko Ziebert

    Full Text Available Computational modeling of eukaryotic cells moving on substrates is an extraordinarily complex task: many physical processes, such as actin polymerization, action of motors, formation of adhesive contacts concomitant with both substrate deformation and recruitment of actin etc., as well as regulatory pathways are intertwined. Moreover, highly nontrivial cell responses emerge when the substrate becomes deformable and/or heterogeneous. Here we extended a computational model for motile cell fragments, based on an earlier developed phase field approach, to account for explicit dynamics of adhesion site formation, as well as for substrate compliance via an effective elastic spring. Our model displays steady motion vs. stick-slip transitions with concomitant shape oscillations as a function of the actin protrusion rate, the substrate stiffness, and the rates of adhesion. Implementing a step in the substrate's elastic modulus, as well as periodic patterned surfaces exemplified by alternating stripes of high and low adhesiveness, we were able to reproduce the correct motility modes and shape phenomenology found experimentally. We also predict the following nontrivial behavior: the direction of motion of cells can switch from parallel to perpendicular to the stripes as a function of both the adhesion strength and the width ratio of adhesive to non-adhesive stripes.

  4. Effect of oligosaccharides on the adhesion of gut bacteria to human HT-29 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altamimi, M; Abdelhay, O; Rastall, R A

    2016-06-01

    The influence of five oligosaccharides (cellobiose, stachyose, raffinose, lactulose and chito-oligosaccharides) on the adhesion of eight gut bacteria (Bifidobacterium bifidum ATCC 29521, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron ATCC 29148D-5, Clostridium leptum ATCC 29065, Blautia coccoides ATCC 29236, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii ATCC 27766, Bacteroides fragilis ATCC 23745, Clostridium difficile ATCC 43255 and Lactobacillus casei ATCC 393) to mucous secreting and non-mucous secreting HT-29 human epithelial cells, was investigated. In pure culture, the bacteria showed variations in their ability to adhere to epithelial cells. The effect of oligosaccharides diminished adhesion and the presence of mucus played a major factor in adhesion, likely due to high adhesiveness to mucins present in the native human mucus layer covering the whole cell surface. However, clostridia displayed almost the same level of adhesion either with or without mucus being present. Bl. coccoides adhesion was decreased by stachyose and cellobiose in non-mucus-secreting cells in pure culture, while in mixed faecal culture cellobiose displayed the highest antiadhesive activity with an overall average of 65% inhibition amongst tested oligomers and lactulose displayed the lowest with an average of 47.4%. Bifidobacteria, Bacteroides, lactobacilli and clostridia were inhibited within the following ranges 47-78%, 32-65%, 11.7-58% and 64-85% respectively. This means that clostridia were the most strongly influenced members of the microflora amongst the bacterial groups tested in mixed culture. In conclusion, introducing oligosaccharides which are candidate prebiotics into pure or mixed cultures has affected bacterial adhesion. PMID:27018325

  5. Quantitative multicolor compositional imaging resolves molecular domains in cell-matrix adhesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eli Zamir

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cellular processes occur within dynamic and multi-molecular compartments whose characterization requires analysis at high spatio-temporal resolution. Notable examples for such complexes are cell-matrix adhesion sites, consisting of numerous cytoskeletal and signaling proteins. These adhesions are highly variable in their morphology, dynamics, and apparent function, yet their molecular diversity is poorly defined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We present here a compositional imaging approach for the analysis and display of multi-component compositions. This methodology is based on microscopy-acquired multicolor data, multi-dimensional clustering of pixels according to their composition similarity and display of the cellular distribution of these composition clusters. We apply this approach for resolving the molecular complexes associated with focal-adhesions, and the time-dependent effects of Rho-kinase inhibition. We show here compositional variations between adhesion sites, as well as ordered variations along the axis of individual focal-adhesions. The multicolor clustering approach also reveals distinct sensitivities of different focal-adhesion-associated complexes to Rho-kinase inhibition. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Multicolor compositional imaging resolves "molecular signatures" characteristic to focal-adhesions and related structures, as well as sub-domains within these adhesion sites. This analysis enhances the spatial information with additional "contents-resolved" dimensions. We propose that compositional imaging can serve as a powerful tool for studying complex multi-molecular assemblies in cells and for mapping their distribution at sub-micron resolution.

  6. Nanofibers and nanoparticles from the insect-capturing adhesive of the Sundew (Drosera for cell attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Mingjun

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The search for naturally occurring nanocomposites with diverse properties for tissue engineering has been a major interest for biomaterial research. In this study, we investigated a nanofiber and nanoparticle based nanocomposite secreted from an insect-capturing plant, the Sundew, for cell attachment. The adhesive nanocomposite has demonstrated high biocompatibility and is ready to be used with minimal preparation. Results Atomic force microscopy (AFM conducted on the adhesive from three species of Sundew found that a network of nanofibers and nanoparticles with various sizes existed independent of the coated surface. AFM and light microscopy confirmed that the pattern of nanofibers corresponded to Alcian Blue staining for polysaccharide. Transmission electron microscopy identified a low abundance of nanoparticles in different pattern form AFM observations. In addition, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy revealed the presence of Ca, Mg, and Cl, common components of biological salts. Study of the material properties of the adhesive yielded high viscoelasticity from the liquid adhesive, with reduced elasticity observed in the dried adhesive. The ability of PC12 neuron-like cells to attach and grow on the network of nanofibers created from the dried adhesive demonstrated the potential of this network to be used in tissue engineering, and other biomedical applications. Conclusions This discovery demonstrates how a naturally occurring nanofiber and nanoparticle based nanocomposite from the adhesive of Sundew can be used for tissue engineering, and opens the possibility for further examination of natural plant adhesives for biomedical applications.

  7. Local 3D matrix microenvironment regulates cell migration through spatiotemporal dynamics of contractility-dependent adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Andrew D.; Carvajal, Nicole; Jin, Albert; Matsumoto, Kazue; Yamada, Kenneth M.

    2015-11-01

    The physical properties of two-dimensional (2D) extracellular matrices (ECMs) modulate cell adhesion dynamics and motility, but little is known about the roles of local microenvironmental differences in three-dimensional (3D) ECMs. Here we generate 3D collagen gels of varying matrix microarchitectures to characterize their regulation of 3D adhesion dynamics and cell migration. ECMs containing bundled fibrils demonstrate enhanced local adhesion-scale stiffness and increased adhesion stability through balanced ECM/adhesion coupling, whereas highly pliable reticular matrices promote adhesion retraction. 3D adhesion dynamics are locally regulated by ECM rigidity together with integrin/ECM association and myosin II contractility. Unlike 2D migration, abrogating contractility stalls 3D migration regardless of ECM pore size. We find force is not required for clustering of activated integrins on 3D native collagen fibrils. We propose that efficient 3D migration requires local balancing of contractility with ECM stiffness to stabilize adhesions, which facilitates the detachment of activated integrins from ECM fibrils.

  8. Pervanadate-induced adhesion of CD4+ T cell to fibronectin is associated with tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miron, S; Kachalsky, S G; Hershkoviz, R; Lider, O

    1997-09-01

    The initial stages of T cell activation involve tyrosine protein kinase-mediated intracellular signaling events. Integrin-mediated adhesion of CD4+ T lymphocytes to extracellular matrix glycoproteins, such as fibronectin, is an activation-dependent process. The involvement of tyrosine protein kinases in the adhesion of CD4+ T cells to fibronectin was examined using pervanadate, a protein-tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor. Pervanadate induced the adhesion of human CD4+ T cells to immobilized fibronectin in a beta1 integrin-mediated fashion, and adhesion was associated with an increase of protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Tyrosine protein kinase inhibitors abrogated both T cell adhesion and intracellular protein tyrosine phosphorylation. Participation of cytoskeletal proteins in the pervanadate-induced T cell adhesion was indicated because cytoskeleton disruption by cytochalasin B inhibited cell adhesion to fibronectin. We demonstrate that the cytoskeletal protein paxillin underwent time-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation simultaneously with pervanadate-induced T cell adhesion to fibronectin. Tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin was related to cell adhesion, since pretreatment of T cells with cytochalasin B abrogated both adhesion and phosphorylation. This study demonstrates a correlation between activation of protein tyrosine kinases, tyrosine phosphorylation of paxillin, and integrin-mediated T cell adhesion to extracellular matrix glycoproteins. PMID:9307082

  9. Cell adhesion on Ti surface with controlled roughness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burgos-Asperilla, Laura

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this report, the in situ interaction between Saos-2 osteoblast cells and a smooth Ti surface was examined over time. The adhesion kinetics and mechanisms of cellular proliferation were monitored by quartz crystal microbalance (QCM and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. The rate of Saos-2 attachment on Ti surfaces, obtained from the measurements performed with the QCM, is a first-order reaction, with k=2.10−3 min−1. The impedance measurements indicate that in the absence of cells, the Ti resistance diminishes over time (7 days, due to the presence of amino acids and proteins from the culture medium that have been a dsorbed, while in the presence of osteoblasts, this decrease is much greater because of the compounds generated by the cells that accelerate the dissolution of Ti.En este trabajo, se ha estudiado la interacción in situ entre células osteoblásticas Saos-2 y una superficie de Ti de rugosidad controlada a lo largo del tiempo. El estudio de la cinética y los mecanismos de proliferación celular de adhesión se ha realizado a través de la microbalanza de cristal de cuarzo (QCM y espectroscopía de impedancia electroquímica (EIS. La velocidad de adhesión de los osteoblastos sobre la superficie de Ti obtenida a través de medidas con la QCM, sigue una reacción de primer orden, con k=2×10−3 min−1. Los ensayos de impedancia indican que, en ausencia de las células, la resistencia del Ti disminuye con el tiempo (7 días, debido a la presencia de aminoácidos y proteínas del medio de cultivo que se han adsorbido, mientras que en presencia de células, esta disminución es mucho mayor debido a los productos metabólicos generados por las células que aceleran la disolución del Ti.

  10. Material- and feature-dependent effects on cell adhesion to micro injection moulded medical polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Seong Ying; Habimana, Olivier; Flood, Peter; Reynaud, Emmanuel G; Rodriguez, Brian J; Zhang, Nan; Casey, Eoin; Gilchrist, Michael D

    2016-09-01

    Two polymers, polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) and cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), containing a range of nano- to micron- roughness surfaces (Ra 0.01, 0.1, 0.4, 1.0, 2.0, 3.2 and 5.0μm) were fabricated using electrical discharge machining (EDM) and replicated using micro injection moulding (μIM). Polymer samples were characterized using optical profilometry, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and water surface contact angle. Cell adhesion tests were carried out using bacterial Pseudomonas fluorescens and mammalian Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells to determine the effect of surface hydrophobicity, surface roughness and stiffness. It is found that there are features which gave insignificant differences (feature-dependent effect) in cell adhesion, albeit a significant difference in the physicochemical properties (material-dependent effect) of substrata. In bacterial cell adhesion, the strongest feature-dependence is found at Ra 0.4μm surfaces, with material-dependent effects strongest at Ra 0.01μm. Ra 0.1μm surfaces exhibited strongest feature-dependent effects and Ra 5.0μm has strongest material-dependent effects on mammalian cell adhesion. Bacterial cell adhesion is found to be favourable to hydrophobic surfaces (COC), with the lowest adhesion at Ra 0.4μm for both materials. Mammalian cell adhesion is lowest in Ra 0.1μm and highest in Ra 1.0μm, and generally favours hydrophilic surfaces (PMMA). These findings can be used as a basis for developing medical implants or microfluidic devices using micro injection moulding for diagnostic purposes, by tuning the cell adhesion on different areas containing different surface roughnesses on the diagnostic microfluidic devices or medical implants. PMID:27137802

  11. Monocytes mediate metastatic breast tumor cell adhesion to endothelium under flow

    OpenAIRE

    Evani, Shankar J.; Prabhu, Rajesh G.; Gnanaruban, V.; Finol, Ender A.; Anand K. Ramasubramanian

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial adhesion is necessary for the hematogenous dissemination of tumor cells. However, the metastatic breast tumor cell MDA-MB-231 does not bind to the endothelium under physiological flow conditions, suggesting alternate mechanisms of adhesion. Since monocytes are highly represented in the tumor microenvironment, and also bind to endothelium during inflammation, we hypothesized that the monocytes assist in the arrest of MDA-MB-231 on the endothelium. Using in vitro models of the dynam...

  12. Expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in rat heart with ischemia/reperfusion and limitation of infarct size by treatment with antibodies against cell adhesion molecules.

    OpenAIRE

    Yamazaki, T; Seko, Y; Tamatani, T; Miyasaka, M.; Yagita, H; Okumura, K.; R. Nagai; Yazaki, Y

    1993-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanism(s) of myocardial reperfusion injury, we investigated the roles of cell adhesion molecules on both leukocytes and vascular endothelial cells in the reperfused myocardia. We found that within 2 hours after reperfusion leukocytes began to infiltrate into the rat myocardia subjected to 30 minutes of ischemia and clarified, for the first time, that the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 was enhanced on the capillary and venous endothelial cells from 8 to 96 ...

  13. Isolation and characterization of Chinese hamster ovary cell variants defective in adhesion to fibronectin-coated collagen

    OpenAIRE

    1980-01-01

    Variant clones of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells were selected for reduced adhesion to serum-coated tissue culture plates. These clones also displayed reduced adhesion to substrata composed of collagen layers coated with bovine serum or with fibronectin (cold-insoluble globulin). Wild-type (WT) and adhesion variant (ADv) cells grew at comparable rates in suspension culture, but the adhesion variants could not be grown in monolayer culture because of their inability to attach to the substra...

  14. Laser Phototherapy Enhances Mesenchymal Stem Cells Survival in Response to the Dental Adhesives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Márcia Alves Diniz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We investigated the influence of laser phototherapy (LPT on the survival of human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs submitted to substances leached from dental adhesives. Method. MSCs were isolated and characterized. Oral mucosa fibroblasts and osteoblast-like cells were used as comparative controls. Cultured medium conditioned with two adhesive systems was applied to the cultures. Cell monolayers were exposed or not to LPT. Laser irradiations were performed using a red laser (GaAlAs, 780 nm, 0.04 cm2, 40 mW, 1 W/cm2, 0.4 J, 10 seconds, 1 point, 10 J/cm2. After 24 h, cell viability was assessed by the 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide reduction assay. Data were statistically compared by ANOVA followed by Tukey’s test (P<0.05. Results. Different cell types showed different viabilities in response to the same materials. Substances leached from adhesives were less cytotoxic to MSCs than to other cell types. Substances leached from Clearfil SE Bond were highly cytotoxic to all cell types tested, except to the MSCs when applied polymerized and in association with LPT. LPT was unable to significantly increase the cell viability of fibroblasts and osteoblast-like cells submitted to the dental adhesives. Conclusion. LPT enhances mesenchymal stem cells survival in response to substances leached from dental adhesives.

  15. Rapid and serial quantification of adhesion forces of yeast and Mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Potthoff

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion to surfaces represents the basis for niche colonization and survival. Here we establish serial quantification of adhesion forces of different cell types using a single probe. The pace of single-cell force-spectroscopy was accelerated to up to 200 yeast and 20 mammalian cells per probe when replacing the conventional cell trapping cantilever chemistry of atomic force microscopy by underpressure immobilization with fluidic force microscopy (FluidFM. In consequence, statistically relevant data could be recorded in a rapid manner, the spectrum of examinable cells was enlarged, and the cell physiology preserved until approached for force spectroscopy. Adhesion forces of Candida albicans increased from below 4 up to 16 nN at 37°C on hydrophobic surfaces, whereas a Δhgc1-mutant showed forces consistently below 4 nN. Monitoring adhesion of mammalian cells revealed mean adhesion forces of 600 nN of HeLa cells on fibronectin and were one order of magnitude higher than those observed for HEK cells.

  16. Extracellular matrix-anchored serum amyloid A preferentially induces mast cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershkoviz, R; Preciado-Patt, L; Lider, O; Fridkin, M; Dastych, J; Metcalfe, D D; Mekori, Y A

    1997-07-01

    Mast cells are known to accumulate in various inflammatory processes, some of which are known to be associated with increased local and systemic levels of acute-phase reactants such as serum amyloid A (SAA) or with amyloid deposition. The mechanism(s) by which mast cells are recruited to these sites, however, has not been fully elucidated. It has recently been shown that SAA interacts with extracellular matrix (ECM) components and thereby acts as a chemoattractant and regulator of immune cell migration. On the basis of these observations, we examined the effect of SAA on mast cell adhesion to ECM, an essential step in cellular transmigration. We could first demonstrate strong specific binding of recombinant human SAA (rSAA) to murine mast cells using flow cytometry. Moreover, radiolabeled rSAA was found to bind, in a saturable manner, to mast cells, reaching a binding affinity of 10(-8) M. When immobilized by preincubation with ECM, SAA or its proteolytically degraded amyloid A fragment (amino acid residues 2-82), which contains RGD-related adhesion motif but not the COOH-terminal portion of SAA (amino acid residues 77-104), induced the adhesion of resting mast cells to ECM or laminin. SAA and AA, in soluble or immobilized forms, did not activate mast cells to release mediators. Mast cell adhesion to the immobilized ECM-SAA complex appeared to occur through an integrin recognition, inasmuch as adhesion was calcium dependent and could be blocked by an RGD-containing peptide or by anti-CD29 monoclonal antibody. Genistein also inhibited adhesion, indicating that tyrosine kinase activity was involved. These data suggest that SAA bound to ECM may serve as an important inducer of mast cell adhesion, thus regulating mast cell recruitment and accumulation at these sites, which in turn could potentiate further pathology. PMID:9252455

  17. The adhesion receptor CD44 promotes atherosclerosis by mediating inflammatory cell recruitment and vascular cell activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuff, Carolyn A.; Kothapalli, Devashish; Azonobi, Ijeoma; Chun, Sam; Zhang, Yuanming; Belkin, Richard; Yeh, Christine; Secreto, Anthony; Assoian, Richard K.; Rader, Daniel J.; Puré, Ellen

    2001-01-01

    Atherosclerosis causes most acute coronary syndromes and strokes. The pathogenesis of atherosclerosis includes recruitment of inflammatory cells to the vessel wall and activation of vascular cells. CD44 is an adhesion protein expressed on inflammatory and vascular cells. CD44 supports the adhesion of activated lymphocytes to endothelium and smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, ligation of CD44 induces activation of both inflammatory and vascular cells. To assess the potential contribution of CD44 to atherosclerosis, we bred CD44-null mice to atherosclerosis-prone apoE-deficient mice. We found a 50–70% reduction in aortic lesions in CD44-null mice compared with CD44 heterozygote and wild-type littermates. We demonstrate that CD44 promotes the recruitment of macrophages to atherosclerotic lesions. Furthermore, we show that CD44 is required for phenotypic dedifferentiation of medial smooth muscle cells to the “synthetic” state as measured by expression of VCAM-1. Finally, we demonstrate that hyaluronan, the principal ligand for CD44, is upregulated in atherosclerotic lesions of apoE-deficient mice and that the low-molecular-weight proinflammatory forms of hyaluronan stimulate VCAM-1 expression and proliferation of cultured primary aortic smooth muscle cells, whereas high-molecular-weight forms of hyaluronan inhibit smooth muscle cell proliferation. We conclude that CD44 plays a critical role in the progression of atherosclerosis through multiple mechanisms. PMID:11581304

  18. RNA and DNA aptamers as potential tools to prevent cell adhesion in disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich H.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has shown that receptor-ligand interactions between surfaces of communicating cells are necessary prerequisites for cell proliferation, cell differentiation and immune defense. Cell-adhesion events have also been proposed for pathological conditions such as cancer growth, metastasis, and host-cell invasion by parasites such as Trypanosoma cruzi. RNA and DNA aptamers (aptus = Latin, fit that have been selected from combinatorial nucleic acid libraries are capable of binding to cell-adhesion receptors leading to a halt in cellular processes induced by outside signals as a consequence of blockage of receptor-ligand interactions. We outline here a novel approach using RNA aptamers that bind to T. cruzi receptors and interrupt host-cell invasion in analogy to existing procedures of blocking selectin adhesion and function in vitro and in vivo.

  19. Influence of cell surface characteristics on adhesion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the biomaterial hydroxylapatite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Jane S; Walker, Graeme M

    2011-02-01

    The influence of the physicochemical properties of biomaterials on microbial cell adhesion is well known, with the extent of adhesion depending on hydrophobicity, surface charge, specific functional groups and acid-base properties. Regarding yeasts, the effect of cell surfaces is often overlooked, despite the fact that generalisations may not be made between closely related strains. The current investigation compared adhesion of three industrially relevant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (M-type, NCYC 1681 and ALY, strains used in production of Scotch whisky, ale and lager, respectively) to the biomaterial hydroxylapatite (HAP). Adhesion of the whisky yeast was greatest, followed by the ale strain, while adhesion of the lager strain was approximately 10-times less. According to microbial adhesion to solvents (MATS) analysis, the ale strain was hydrophobic while the whisky and lager strains were moderately hydrophilic. This contrasted with analyses of water contact angles where all strains were characterised as hydrophilic. All yeast strains were electron donating, with low electron accepting potential, as indicated by both surface energy and MATS analysis. Overall, there was a linear correlation between adhesion to HAP and the overall surface free energy of the yeasts. This is the first time that the relationship between yeast cell surface energy and adherence to a biomaterial has been described.

  20. Bacillus cereus Certhrax ADP-ribosylates vinculin to disrupt focal adhesion complexes and cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Nathan C; Barbieri, Joseph T

    2014-04-11

    Bacillus cereus is often associated with mild to moderate gastroenteritis; however, some recent isolates cause inhalational anthrax-like diseases and death. These potential emerging human pathogens express multiple virulence factors. B. cereus strain G9241 expresses anthrax toxin, several polysaccharide capsules, and the novel ADP-ribosyltransferase, Certhrax. In this study, we show that Certhrax ADP-ribosylates Arg-433 of vinculin, a protein that coordinates actin cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix interactions. ADP-ribosylation of vinculin disrupted focal adhesion complexes and redistributed vinculin to the cytoplasm. Exogenous vinculin rescued these phenotypes. This provides a mechanism for strain G9241 to breach host barrier defenses and promote bacterial growth and spread. Certhrax is the first bacterial toxin to add a post-translational modification to vinculin to disrupt the actin cytoskeleton.

  1. Adhesion forces between cells of Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans or Leptospirillum ferrooxidans and chalcopyrite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jianyu; Li, Qian; Jiao, Weifeng; Jiang, Hao; Sand, Wolfgang; Xia, Jinlan; Liu, Xueduan; Qin, Wenqing; Qiu, Guanzhou; Hu, Yuehua; Chai, Liyuan

    2012-06-01

    The efficiency of copper leaching is improved by bacteria attached to chalcopyrite. Therefore, the study of the attachment mechanism to control leaching is important. The adhesion of three species of leaching microorganisms including Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans, Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans and Leptospirillum ferrooxidans to chalcopyrite was investigated by using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The forces were measured with tip-immobilized cells approached to and retracted from the mineral. The results show that both the surface charge and the hydrophobicity of bacteria cells influence the adhesion force. Furthermore, the adhesion force decreased in case the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) had been removed. In addition, the data indicate that the amount of attached cells increased with increasing adhesion force.

  2. ADHESION INDUCES MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE-9 GENE EXPRESSION IN OVARIAN CANCER CELLS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田方; 颜春洪; 薛红; 肖凤君

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) gene in cancer cells induced by adhesion with fibronectin and the underlying mechanism of cell invasion. Methods: Following adhesion of ovarian cancer cells A2780 to fibronectin, MMP mRNA expression was assayed by using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). MMP-9 promoter was cloned from genomic DNA of HT1080 cells with PCR. The MMP-9-pGL2 reporter gene vector was constructed and then transiently transfected into A2780 cells. Results: Adhesion could induce the expression of MMP-9 gene in A2780 cells, but did not affect longer theexpression of MMP-2 or TIMP-1 gene. The induction was enhanced with longer adhesion time. When the transfected cells were allowed to adhere and spread on FN-coated surface, the promoter activity of MMP-9 gene was also enhanced dramatically. Conclusion: adhesion of cells with ECM may stimulate the expression of MMP-9 gene through stimulating the promoter activity, thereby enhancing cancer cell invasion and metastasis.

  3. Molecular basis of sidekick-mediated cell-cell adhesion and specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, Kerry M.; Yamagata, Masahito; Jin, Xiangshu; Mannepalli, Seetha; Katsamba, Phinikoula S.; Ahlsén, Göran; Sergeeva, Alina P.; Honig, Barry; Sanes, Joshua R.; Shapiro, Lawrence

    2016-09-19

    Sidekick (Sdk) 1 and 2 are related immunoglobulin superfamily cell adhesion proteins required for appropriate synaptic connections between specific subtypes of retinal neurons. Sdks mediate cell-cell adhesion with homophilic specificity that underlies their neuronal targeting function. Here we report crystal structures of Sdk1 and Sdk2 ectodomain regions, revealing similar homodimers mediated by the four N-terminal immunoglobulin domains (Ig1–4), arranged in a horseshoe conformation. These Ig1–4 horseshoes interact in a novel back-to-back orientation in both homodimers through Ig1:Ig2, Ig1:Ig1 and Ig3:Ig4 interactions. Structure-guided mutagenesis results show that this canonical dimer is required for both Sdk-mediated cell aggregation (viatransinteractions) and Sdk clustering in isolated cells (viacisinteractions). Sdk1/Sdk2 recognition specificity is encoded across Ig1–4, with Ig1–2 conferring the majority of binding affinity and differential specificity. We suggest that competition betweencisandtransinteractions provides a novel mechanism to sharpen the specificity of cell-cell interactions.

  4. Troglitazone, a PPAR-γ activator prevents endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression and lymphocyte adhesion mediated by TNF-α

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itoh Makoto

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytokine mediated induction of the mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule-1(MAdCAM-1 expression is associated with the onset and progression of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. Results Using western blotting and cell-based ELISA, we show in this study that troglitazone, an activator of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ, widely used in the treatment of diabetes, has as well recently been highlighted as protective in models of inflammation and cancer. We found that troglitazone (10–40 μM, significantly reduced the TNF-α (1 ng/ml mediated induction of endothelial MAdCAM-1 in a dose-dependent manner, achieving a 34.7% to 98.4% reduction in induced MAdCAM-1. Trogliazone (20μM reduced TNF-α induced VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and E-selectin expression. Moreover, troglitazone significantly reduced α4β7-integrin dependent lymphocyte adhesion to TNF-α cultured endothelial cells. Conclusions These results suggest that PPAR-γ agonists like troglitazone may be useful in the clinical treatment of IBD.

  5. Surfactant functionalization induces robust, differential adhesion of tumor cells and blood cells to charged nanotube-coated biomaterials under flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Michael J; Castellanos, Carlos A; King, Michael R

    2015-07-01

    The metastatic spread of cancer cells from the primary tumor to distant sites leads to a poor prognosis in cancers originating from multiple organs. Increasing evidence has linked selectin-based adhesion between circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and endothelial cells of the microvasculature to metastatic dissemination, in a manner similar to leukocyte adhesion during inflammation. Functionalized biomaterial surfaces hold promise as a diagnostic tool to separate CTCs and potentially treat metastasis, utilizing antibody and selectin-mediated interactions for cell capture under flow. However, capture at high purity levels is challenged by the fact that CTCs and leukocytes both possess selectin ligands. Here, a straightforward technique to functionalize and alter the charge of naturally occurring halloysite nanotubes using surfactants is reported to induce robust, differential adhesion of tumor cells and blood cells to nanotube-coated surfaces under flow. Negatively charged sodium dodecanoate-functionalized nanotubes simultaneously enhanced tumor cell capture while negating leukocyte adhesion, both in the presence and absence of adhesion proteins, and can be utilized to isolate circulating tumor cells regardless of biomarker expression. Conversely, diminishing nanotube charge via functionalization with decyltrimethylammonium bromide both abolished tumor cell capture while promoting leukocyte adhesion.

  6. The cell adhesion molecules Echinoid and Friend of Echinoid coordinate cell adhesion and cell signaling to regulate the fidelity of ommatidial rotation in the Drosophila eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fetting, Jennifer L; Spencer, Susan A; Wolff, Tanya

    2009-10-01

    Directed cellular movements are a universal feature of morphogenesis in multicellular organisms. Differential adhesion between the stationary and motile cells promotes these cellular movements to effect spatial patterning of cells. A prominent feature of Drosophila eye development is the 90 degrees rotational movement of the multicellular ommatidial precursors within a matrix of stationary cells. We demonstrate that the cell adhesion molecules Echinoid (Ed) and Friend of Echinoid (Fred) act throughout ommatidial rotation to modulate the degree of ommatidial precursor movement. We propose that differential levels of Ed and Fred between stationary and rotating cells at the initiation of rotation create a permissive environment for cell movement, and that uniform levels in these two populations later contribute to stopping the movement. Based on genetic data, we propose that ed and fred impart a second, independent, ;brake-like' contribution to this process via Egfr signaling. Ed and Fred are localized in largely distinct and dynamic patterns throughout rotation. However, ed and fred are required in only a subset of cells - photoreceptors R1, R7 and R6 - for normal rotation, cells that have only recently been linked to a role in planar cell polarity (PCP). This work also provides the first demonstration of a requirement for cone cells in the ommatidial rotation aspect of PCP. ed and fred also genetically interact with the PCP genes, but affect only the degree-of-rotation aspect of the PCP phenotype. Significantly, we demonstrate that at least one PCP protein, Stbm, is required in R7 to control the degree of ommatidial rotation. PMID:19736327

  7. The pro-adhesive and pro-survival effects of glucocorticoid in human ovarian cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lijuan; Fang, Fang; Song, Xinglei; Wang, Yan; Huang, Gaoxiang; Su, Jie; Hui, Ning; Lu, Jian

    2016-07-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) is controlled by multiple signaling molecules and intracellular pathways, and is pivotal for survival and growth of cells from most solid tumors. Our previous works demonstrated that dexamethasone (DEX) significantly enhances cell adhesion and cell resistance to chemotherapeutics by increasing the levels of integrin β1, α4, and α5 in human ovarian cancer cells. However, it is unclear whether the components of ECM or other membrane molecules are also involved in the pro-adhesive effect of DEX in ovarian cancer cells. In this study, we demonstrated that the treatment of cells with DEX did not change the expression of collagens (I, III, and IV), laminin, CD44, and its principal ligand hyaluronan (HA), but significantly increased the levels of intracellular and secreted fibronectin (FN). Inhibiting the expression of FN with FN1 siRNA or blocking CD44, another FN receptor, with CD44 blocking antibody significantly attenuated the pro-adhesion of DEX, indicating that upregulation of FN mediates the pro-adhesive effect of DEX by its interaction with CD44 besides integrin β1. Moreover, DEX significantly enhanced cell resistance to the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel (PTX) by activating PI-3K-Akt pathway. Finally, we found that DEX also significantly upregulated the expression of MUC1, a transmembrane glycoprotein. Inhibiting the expression of MUC1 with MUC1 siRNA significantly attenuated the DEX-induced effects of pro-adhesion, Akt-activation, and pro-survival. In conclusion, these results provide new data that upregulation of FN and MUC1 by DEX contributes to DEX-induced pro-adhesion and protects ovarian cancer cells from chemotherapy. PMID:27151574

  8. Hyaluronan-based pericellular matrix: substrate electrostatic charges and early cell adhesion events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C Fotia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cells are surrounded by a hyaluronan-rich coat called ‘pericellular matrix’ (PCM, mainly constituted by hyaluronan, a long-chain linear polysaccharide which is secreted and resorbed by the cell, depending on its activity. Cell attachment to a surface is mediated by PCM before integrins and focal adhesions are involved. As hyaluronan is known to bear a negative charge at physiological pH, the relevance of its electrical properties in driving the early cell adhesion steps has been studied, exploring how PCM mediates cell adhesion to charged surfaces, such as polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM films. Poly(ethylene imine (PEI and poly(sodium 4-styrene sulphonate (PSS, assembled as PEI/PSS and PEI/PSS/PEI layers, were used. The nanoscale morphology of such layers was analysed by atomic force microscopy, and the detailed surface structure was analysed by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. PCM-coated and PCM-depleted MG63 osteoblast-like cells were used, and cell density, morphology and adhesive structures were analysed during early steps of cell attachment to the PEM surfaces (1-6 h. The present study demonstrates that the pericellular matrix is involved in cell adhesion to material surfaces, and its arrangement depends on the cell interaction with the surface. Moreover, the PCM/surface interaction is not simply driven by electrostatic effects, as the cell response may be affected by specific chemical groups at the material surface. In the development of biomimetic surfaces promoting cell adhesion and function, the role of this unrecognised outer cell structure has to be taken into account

  9. RP1 is a phosphorylation target of CK2 and is involved in cell adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank Stenner

    Full Text Available RP1 (synonym: MAPRE2, EB2 is a member of the microtubule binding EB1 protein family, which interacts with APC, a key regulatory molecule in the Wnt signalling pathway. While the other EB1 proteins are well characterized the cellular function and regulation of RP1 remain speculative to date. However, recently RP1 has been implicated in pancreatic cancerogenesis. CK2 is a pleiotropic kinase involved in adhesion, proliferation and anti-apoptosis. Overexpression of protein kinase CK2 is a hallmark of many cancers and supports the malignant phenotype of tumor cells. In this study we investigate the interaction of protein kinase CK2 with RP1 and demonstrate that CK2 phosphorylates RP1 at Ser(236 in vitro. Stable RP1 expression in cell lines leads to a significant cleavage and down-regulation of N-cadherin and impaired adhesion. Cells expressing a Phospho-mimicking point mutant RP1-ASP(236 show a marked decrease of adhesion to endothelial cells under shear stress. Inversely, we found that the cells under shear stress downregulate endogenous RP1, most likely to improve cellular adhesion. Accordingly, when RP1 expression is suppressed by shRNA, cells lacking RP1 display significantly increased cell adherence to surfaces. In summary, RP1 phosphorylation at Ser(236 by CK2 seems to play a significant role in cell adhesion and might initiate new insights in the CK2 and EB1 family protein association.

  10. Controlling cell adhesion via replication of laser micro/nano-textured surfaces on polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to investigate cell adhesion and viability on highly rough polymeric surfaces with gradient roughness ratios and wettabilities prepared by microreplication of laser micro/nano-textured Si surfaces. Negative replicas on polydimethylsiloxane as well as positive ones on a photocurable (organically modified ceramic) and a biodegradable (poly(lactide-co-glycolide)) polymer have been successfully reproduced. The final culture substrates comprised from forests of micron-sized conical spikes exhibiting a range of roughness ratios and wettabilities, was achieved by changing the laser fluence used to fabricate the original template surfaces. Cell culture experiments were performed with the fibroblast NIH/3T3 and PC12 neuronal cell lines in order to investigate how these surfaces are capable of modulating different types of cellular responses including, viability, adhesion and morphology. The results showed a preferential adhesion of both cell types on the microstructured surfaces compared to the unstructured ones. In particular, the fibroblast NIH/3T3 cells show optimal adhesion for small roughness ratios, independent of the surface wettability and polymer type, indicating a non-monotonic dependence of cell adhesion on surface energy. In contrast, the PC12 cells were observed to adhere well to the patterned surfaces independent of the roughness ratio and wettability. These experimental findings are correlated with micromechanical measurements performed on the unstructured and replicated surfaces and discussed on the basis of previous observations describing the relation of cell response to surface energy and rigidity.

  11. Adhesion of MRC-5 and A549 cells on poly(dimethylsiloxane) surface modified by proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuchowska, Agnieszka; Kwiatkowski, Piotr; Jastrzebska, Elzbieta; Chudy, Michal; Dybko, Artur; Brzozka, Zbigniew

    2016-02-01

    PDMS is a very popular material used for fabrication of Lab-on-a-Chip systems for biological applications. Although PDMS has numerous advantages, it is a highly hydrophobic material, which inhibits adhesion and proliferation of the cells. PDMS surface modifications are used to enrich growth of the cells. However, due to the fact that each cell type has specific adhesion, it is necessary to optimize the parameters of these modifications. In this paper, we present an investigation of normal (MRC-5) and carcinoma (A549) human lung cell adhesion and proliferation on modified PDMS surfaces. We have chosen these cell types because often they are used as models for basic cancer research. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first presentation of this type of investigation. The combination of a gas-phase processing (oxygen plasma or ultraviolet irradiation) and wet chemical methods based on proteins' adsorption was used in our experiments. Different proteins such as poly-l-lysine, fibronectin, laminin, gelatin, and collagen were incubated with the activated PDMS samples. To compare with other works, here, we also examined how ratio of prepolymer to curing agent (5:1, 10:1, and 20:1) influences PDMS hydrophilicity during further modifications. The highest adhesion of the tested cells was observed for the usage of collagen, regardless of PDMS ratio. However, the MRC-5 cell line demonstrated better adhesion than A549 cells. This is probably due to the difference in their morphology and type (normal/cancer). PMID:26311334

  12. Controlling cell adhesion via replication of laser micro/nano-textured surfaces on polymers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koufaki, Niki; Ranella, Anthi; Barberoglou, Marios; Psycharakis, Stylianos; Fotakis, Costas; Stratakis, Emmanuel [Institute of Electronic Structure and Laser (IESL), Foundation for Research and Technology-Hellas (FORTH), 711 10, Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Aifantis, Katerina E, E-mail: stratak@iesl.forth.gr [Lab of Mechanics and Materials, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki (Greece)

    2011-12-15

    The aim of this study is to investigate cell adhesion and viability on highly rough polymeric surfaces with gradient roughness ratios and wettabilities prepared by microreplication of laser micro/nano-textured Si surfaces. Negative replicas on polydimethylsiloxane as well as positive ones on a photocurable (organically modified ceramic) and a biodegradable (poly(lactide-co-glycolide)) polymer have been successfully reproduced. The final culture substrates comprised from forests of micron-sized conical spikes exhibiting a range of roughness ratios and wettabilities, was achieved by changing the laser fluence used to fabricate the original template surfaces. Cell culture experiments were performed with the fibroblast NIH/3T3 and PC12 neuronal cell lines in order to investigate how these surfaces are capable of modulating different types of cellular responses including, viability, adhesion and morphology. The results showed a preferential adhesion of both cell types on the microstructured surfaces compared to the unstructured ones. In particular, the fibroblast NIH/3T3 cells show optimal adhesion for small roughness ratios, independent of the surface wettability and polymer type, indicating a non-monotonic dependence of cell adhesion on surface energy. In contrast, the PC12 cells were observed to adhere well to the patterned surfaces independent of the roughness ratio and wettability. These experimental findings are correlated with micromechanical measurements performed on the unstructured and replicated surfaces and discussed on the basis of previous observations describing the relation of cell response to surface energy and rigidity.

  13. Cancer Cell Invasion in Three-dimensional Collagen Is Regulated Differentially by Gα13 Protein and Discoidin Domain Receptor 1-Par3 Protein Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Christina R; Ebine, Kazumi; Knab, Lawrence M; Bentrem, David J; Kumar, Krishan; Munshi, Hidayatullah G

    2016-01-22

    Cancer cells can invade in three-dimensional collagen as single cells or as a cohesive group of cells that require coordination of cell-cell junctions and the actin cytoskeleton. To examine the role of Gα13, a G12 family heterotrimeric G protein, in regulating cellular invasion in three-dimensional collagen, we established a novel method to track cell invasion by membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase-expressing cancer cells. We show that knockdown of Gα13 decreased membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase-driven proteolytic invasion in three-dimensional collagen and enhanced E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion. E-cadherin knockdown reversed Gα13 siRNA-induced cell-cell adhesion but failed to reverse the effect of Gα13 siRNA on proteolytic invasion. Instead, concurrent knockdown of E-cadherin and Gα13 led to an increased number of single cells rather than groups of cells. Significantly, knockdown of discoidin domain receptor 1 (DDR1), a collagen-binding protein that also co-localizes to cell-cell junctions, reversed the effects of Gα13 knockdown on cell-cell adhesion and proteolytic invasion in three-dimensional collagen. Knockdown of the polarity protein Par3, which can function downstream of DDR1, also reversed the effects of Gα13 knockdown on cell-cell adhesion and proteolytic invasion in three-dimensional collagen. Overall, we show that Gα13 and DDR1-Par3 differentially regulate cell-cell junctions and the actin cytoskeleton to mediate invasion in three-dimensional collagen. PMID:26589794

  14. Upregulation of cell adhesion through delta Np63 silencing in human 5637 bladder cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yun-Feng He; Dai-Yin Tian; Zheng-Jin Yi; Zhi-Kang Yin; Chun-Li Luo; Wei Tang; Xiao-Hou Wu

    2012-01-01

    Some researchs have demonstrated that the loss of delta Np63 is associated with aggressive phenotypes and poor prognosis.However,other research indicates that delta Np63 is considered to have oncogenic properties,Delta Np63 overexpression is often observed in association with the oncogenic growth of squamous cell carcinomas and bladder cancer.In this study,we investigated the oocogenic role of delta Np63 in regulating cell adhesion in transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder (TCCB).The Cells were stably transfected with the delta Np63 short hairpin RNA (shRNA) plasmid.Immunocytochemistry was performed to determine the knockdown efficiency.Tumour cells were studied for their ability to adhere to vascular endothelial cells.Confocal microscopy was used to analyse the changes in cytoskeletal F-actin.F-actin expression was measured by flow cytometry.Cell invasion ability was assessed using transwell chambers.fhe delta Np63-silenced tumour cells were shown to adhere more tightly than controls to vascular endothelial cells (P<0.05).The content of F-actin in the delta Np63-silenced cells was enhanced (P<0.05),The Matrigel invasion assays showed that human 5637 bladder cancer cells had a lower degree of motility when transfected with pdetta Np63-shRNA ( P< 0.05).In conclusion,silencing of the delta Np63 expression can enhance the adhesiveness of 5637 cells by inducing F-actin cytoskeleton production,and it will possibly inhibit the TCCB invasion and metastasis.

  15. Receptor FGFRL1 does not promote cell proliferation but induces cell adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaochen; Steinberg, Florian; Zhuang, Lei; Bessey, Ralph; Trueb, Beat

    2016-07-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR)-like protein 1 (FGFRL1) is the most recently discovered member of the FGFR family. Owing to the fact that it interacts with FGF ligands, but lacks the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain, several researchers have speculated that it may function as a decoy receptor and exert a negative effect on cell proliferation. In this study, we performed overexpression experiments with TetOn‑inducible cell clones and downregulation experiments with siRNA oligonucleotides, and found that FGFRL1 had absolutely no effect on cell growth and proliferation. Likewise, we did not observe any influence of FGFRL1 on ERK1/2 activation and on the phosphorylation of 250 other signaling proteins analyzed by the Kinexus antibody microarray. On the other hand, with bacterial petri dishes, we observed a clear effect of FGFRL1 on cell adhesion during the initial hours after cell seeding. Our results suggest that FGFRL1 is a cell adhesion protein similar to the nectins rather than a signaling receptor similar to FGFR1-FGFR4. PMID:27220341

  16. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and gelatinase expression in human peritoneal mesothelial cells during propagation in culture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sikkink, C.J.J.M.; Reijnen, M.M.P.J.; Duffhues, B.A.; Man, B.M. de; Lomme, R.M.L.M.; Goor, H. van

    2009-01-01

    Mesothelial cells are involved in a variety of biological processes, which include the formation of peritoneal adhesions. The cultures of human peritoneal mesothelial cells comprise an important tool to investigate the behavior and functions of mesothelial cells. Very little is known about the diffe

  17. Persistent downregulation of the pancarcinoma-associated epithelial cell adhesion molecule via active intranuclear methylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Gun, Bernardina T. F.; Wasserkort, Reinhold; Monami, Amelie; Jeltsch, Albert; Rasko, Tamits; Slaska-Kiss, Krystyna; Cortese, Rene; Rots, Marianne G.; de Leij, Lou F. M. H.; Ruiters, Marcel H. J.; Kiss, Antal; Weinhold, Elmar; McLaughlin, Pamela M. J.

    2008-01-01

    The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is expressed at high levels on the surface of most carcinoma cells. SiRNA silencing of EpCAM expression leads to reduced metastatic potential of tumor cells demonstrating its importance in oncogenesis and tumor progression. However, siRNA therapy require

  18. Lipid Raft is required for PSGL-1 ligation induced HL-60 cell adhesion on ICAM-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingshuang Xu

    Full Text Available P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1 and integrins are adhesion molecules that play critical roles in host defense and innate immunity. PSGL-1 mediates leukocyte rolling and primes leukocytes for integrin-mediated adhesion. However, the mechanism that PSGL-1 as a rolling receptor in regulating integrin activation has not been well characterized. Here, we investigate the function of lipid raft in regulating PSGL-1 induced β2 integrin-mediated HL-60 cells adhesion. PSGL-1 ligation with antibody enhances the β2 integrin activation and β2 integrin-dependent adhesion to ICAM-1. Importantly, with the treatment of methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD, we confirm the role of lipid raft in regulating the activation of β2 integrin. Furthermore, we find that the protein level of PSGL-1 decreased in raft fractions in MβCD treated cells. PSGL-1 ligation induces the recruitment of spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk, a tyrosine kinase and Vav1 (the pivotal downstream effector of Syk signaling pathway involved in cytoskeleton regulation to lipid raft. Inhibition of Syk activity with pharmacologic inhibitor strongly reduces HL-60 cells adhesion, implicating Syk is crucial for PSGL-1 mediated β2 integrin activation. Taken together, we report that ligation of PSGL-1 on HL-60 cells activates β2 integrin, for which lipid raft integrity and Syk activation are responsible. These findings have shed new light on the mechanisms that connect leukocyte initial rolling with subsequent adhesion.

  19. Motion of an Adhesive Gel in a Swelling Gradient a Mechanism for Cell Locomotion

    CERN Document Server

    Joanny, J F; Prost, J; Joanny, Jean-Francois; Julicher, Frank; Prost, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    Motivated by the motion of nematode sperm cells, we present a model for the motion of an adhesive gel on a solid substrate. The gel polymerizes at the leading edge and depolymerizes at the rear. The motion results from a competition between a self-generated swelling gradient and the adhesion on the substrate. The resulting stress provokes the rupture of the adhesion points and allows for the motion. The model predicts an unusual force-velocity relation which depends in significant ways on the point of application of the force.

  20. Sialylation by β-galactoside α-2,6-sialyltransferase and N-glycans regulate cell adhesion and invasion in human anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    OpenAIRE

    Suzuki, Osamu; ABE, MASAFUMI; Hashimoto, Yuko

    2015-01-01

    The interaction between cell surface glycans and extracellular matrix (ECM) including galectins is known to be closely associated with tumor cell adhesion, invasion and metastasis. We analyzed the roles of cell surface sialylation or glycosylation in galectin or ECM-mediated cell adhesion and invasion of human malignant lymphoma cells. Neuraminidase from Arthrobacter ureafaciens (AU) treatment resulted in reduction of cell adhesion to galectin-8 in human anaplastic large cell lymphoma (H-ALCL...

  1. Cell Adhesion Selectivity of Stent Material to improve Bio-functionality by Ion Beam Modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jaesang; Park, JUngchan; Jung, Myunghwan; Kim, Yongki [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Junkyu [Bio alpha., Co. Ltd., Gimhae (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In this study, ion implantation into collagen coated Co-Cr alloy, which is a cheaper material of the artificial stent product comparing with Ti alloy, has been studied to develop small diameter artificial stent by the cell adhesion control. The size of stent was 1.6mm of the diameter and 18mm of the length. The life-time of artificial stent depends on adhesion property of endothelial-cells. We successfully controlled cell adhesion selectivity between endothelial cell and muscle cell by using collagen coated and He{sup +} ion beam irradiated Co-Cr-alloy to apply to artificial stent. But, we did not achieve the inhibition of platelet adhesion, yet by using collagen coating and He{sup +} ion beam irradiation. Based on this study, we have plan to research about separation between collagen coating effect and ion beam effect. Also, we will have more detail analysis of the mechanism of cell attachment. In recent years, ion implantation has been applied to the surface modification of prosthesis to improve blood compatibility and tissue compatibility in field of biomedical application. As well known, bio compatibility was concerned with the cell adhesion selectivity for bio-functionality. The biomedical application of ion beam technology would be used more widely in the future such as catheter and artificial graft.

  2. The Role of Immunoglobulin Superfamily Cell Adhesion Molecules in Cancer Metastasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee Wai Wong

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is a major clinical problem and results in a poor prognosis for most cancers. The metastatic pathway describes the process by which cancer cells give rise to a metastatic lesion in a new tissue or organ. It consists of interconnecting steps all of which must be successfully completed to result in a metastasis. Cell-cell adhesion is a key aspect of many of these steps. Adhesion molecules belonging to the immunoglobulin superfamily (Ig-SF commonly play a central role in cell-cell adhesion, and a number of these molecules have been associated with cancer progression and a metastatic phenotype. Surprisingly, the contribution of Ig-SF members to metastasis has not received the attention afforded other cell adhesion molecules (CAMs such as the integrins. Here we examine the steps in the metastatic pathway focusing on how the Ig-SF members, melanoma cell adhesion molecule (MCAM, L1CAM, neural CAM (NCAM, leukocyte CAM (ALCAM, intercellular CAM-1 (ICAM-1 and platelet endothelial CAM-1 (PECAM-1 could play a role. Although much remains to be understood, this review aims to raise the profile of Ig-SF members in metastasis formation and prompt further research that could lead to useful clinical outcomes.

  3. Monitoring cell adhesion on tantalum and oxidised polystyrene using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lord, Megan Susan; Modin, Charlotte; Foss, Morten; Duch, Mogens; Simmons, Anne; Pedersen, Finn S; Milthorpe, Bruce K; Besenbacher, Flemming

    2006-09-01

    The quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) (Q-Sense AB, Sweden) has been established as a useful tool for evaluating interactions between various biological and non-biological systems, and there has been increasing interest in using the QCM-D technique for cell monitoring applications. This study investigated the potential of the QCM-D to characterise the initial adhesion and spreading of cells in contact with protein precoated biocompatible surfaces. The QCM-D technique is attractive for monitoring cell adhesion and spreading as it allows in situ real-time measurements. The adhesion of NIH3T3 (EGFP) fibroblasts to tantalum (Ta) and oxidised polystyrene (PS(ox)) surfaces precoated with serum proteins was examined using the QCM-D for a period of either 2 or 4 h. Time-lapse photography was performed at 30 min intervals to visually examine cell adhesion and spreading in order to relate cell morphology to the QCM-D response. Following adsorption of albumin, fibronectin or newborn calf serum onto the surfaces, QCM-D measurements showed that cells adhered and spread on the fibronectin and serum coated surfaces, while few cells adhered to the albumin coated surfaces. Cells adhered to albumin coated surfaces had a rounded morphology. The responses to fibronectin and serum precoated surfaces were quite different for each of the underlying substrates indicating that the process of cell adhesion and spreading elicits different responses depending on both the protein coating composition and the influence of the underlying substrate. The different response may be due to extracellular matrix remodelling as well as cytoskeletal changes. Frequency (f) and dissipation (D) changes associated with cell adhesion were less than would be expected from the Sauerbrey relation due to the viscoelastic properties of the cells. PMID:16716396

  4. Aging effects of plasma polymerized ethylenediamine (PPEDA) thin films on cell-adhesive implant coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Testrich, H., E-mail: holger.testrich@uni-greifswald.de [University of Greifswald, Institute of Physics, Felix-Hausdorff Str. 6, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Rebl, H. [University of Rostock, Biomedical Research Center, Department of Cell Biology, Schillingallee 69, 18057 Rostock (Germany); Finke, B.; Hempel, F. [Leibniz Institute for Plasma Science and Technology, Felix-Hausdorff Str. 2, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Nebe, B. [University of Rostock, Biomedical Research Center, Department of Cell Biology, Schillingallee 69, 18057 Rostock (Germany); Meichsner, J. [University of Greifswald, Institute of Physics, Felix-Hausdorff Str. 6, 17489 Greifswald (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Thin plasma polymer films from ethylenediamine were deposited on planar substrates placed on the powered electrode of a low pressure capacitively coupled 13.56 MHz discharge. The chemical composition of the plasma polymer films was analyzed by Fourier Transform Infrared Reflection Absorption Spectroscopy (FT-IRRAS) as well as by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) after derivatization of the primary amino groups. The PPEDA films undergo an alteration during the storage in ambient air, particularly, due to reactions with oxygen. The molecular changes in PPEDA films were studied over a long-time period of 360 days. Simultaneously, the adhesion of human osteoblast-like cells MG-63 (ATCC) was investigated on PPEDA coated corundum blasted titanium alloy (Ti-6Al-4V), which is applied as implant material in orthopedic surgery. The cell adhesion was determined by flow cytometry and the cell shape was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy. Compared to uncoated reference samples a significantly enhanced cell adhesion and proliferation were measured for PPEDA coated samples, which have been maintained after long-time storage in ambient air and additional sterilization by γ−irradiation. - Highlights: • Development of cell-adhesive nitrogen-rich coatings for biomedical applications. • Plasma polymer films from low pressure 13.56 MHz discharge in argon-ethylenediamine. • Enhanced osteoblast adhesion/proliferation on coated implant material (Ti-6Al-4V). • Despite film aging over 360 days the enhanced cell adhesion of the coating remains. • No influence of additional y-sterilization on the enhanced cell adhesion.

  5. Inhibitors of 5-lipoxygenase inhibit expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in human melanoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin WANG; Bin ZHOU; Ji LI; Yong-bing CAO; Xin-sheng CHEN; Ming-he CHENG; Ming YIN

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of 5-lipoxygenase inhibitors on the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in melanoma cells. METHODS: ICAM-1 protein of human melanoma cell a375 was detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent, flow cytometry and Western blot analysis. Level of ICAM-1 mRNA in a375 was evaluated by Northern blot analysis. Adhesion of a375 to endothelial cell EC304 was analyzed by isotopic tracing. RESULTS:5-Lipoxygenase inhibitors nordihydroguaiaretic acid, AA861 and MK886, could suppress the expression of ICAM-1 protein as well as of its mRNA in a375 cells and reduce the adhesion of a375 to EC304. CONCLUSION:5-Lipoxygenase inhibitors can inhibit the expression of ICAM-1 in human melanoma cells and may be valuable for treatment of melanoma metastasis.

  6. Three-dimensional matrix stiffness and adhesive ligands affect cancer cell response to toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zustiak, Silviya Petrova; Dadhwal, Smritee; Medina, Carlos; Steczina, Sonette; Chehreghanianzabi, Yasaman; Ashraf, Anisa; Asuri, Prashanth

    2016-02-01

    There is an immediate need to develop highly predictive in vitro cell-based assays that provide reliable information on cancer drug efficacy and toxicity. Development of biomaterial-based three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models as drug screening platforms has recently gained much scientific interest as 3D cultures of cancer cells have been shown to more adequately mimic the in vivo tumor conditions. Moreover, it has been recognized that the biophysical and biochemical properties of the 3D microenvironment can play key roles in regulating various cancer cell fates, including their response to chemicals. In this study, we employed alginate-based scaffolds of varying mechanical stiffness and adhesive ligand presentation to further explore the role of 3D microenvironmental cues on glioblastoma cell response to cytotoxic compounds. Our experiments suggested the ability of both matrix stiffness and cell-matrix adhesions to strongly influence cell responses to toxins. Cells were found to be more susceptible to the toxins when cultured in softer matrices that emulated the stiffness of brain tissue. Furthermore, the effect of matrix stiffness on differential cell responses to toxins was negated by the presence of the adhesive ligand RGD, but regained when integrin-based cell-matrix interactions were inhibited. This study therefore indicates that both 3D matrix stiffness and cell-matrix adhesions are important parameters in the design of more predictive in vitro platforms for drug development and toxicity screening.

  7. The calcium-dependent myoblast adhesion that precedes cell fusion is mediated by glycoproteins

    OpenAIRE

    1985-01-01

    Presumptive myoblasts from explants of chick embryo pectoral muscle proliferate, differentiate, and fuse to form multinucleate myotubes. One event critical to multinucleate cell formation is the specific adhesion of myoblasts before union of their membranes. In the studies reported here five known inhibitors of myotube formation-- trifluoperazine, sodium butyrate, chloroquine, 1,10 phenanthroline, and tunicamycin--were tested for their effect on the Ca++-dependent myoblast adhesion step. The ...

  8. Vascular smooth muscle cell stiffness and adhesion to collagen I modified by vasoactive agonists.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongkui Hong

    Full Text Available In vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs integrin-mediated adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM proteins play important roles in sustaining vascular tone and resistance. The main goal of this study was to determine whether VSMCs adhesion to type I collagen (COL-I was altered in parallel with the changes in the VSMCs contractile state induced by vasoconstrictors and vasodilators. VSMCs were isolated from rat cremaster skeletal muscle arterioles and maintained in primary culture without passage. Cell adhesion and cell E-modulus were assessed using atomic force microscopy (AFM by repetitive nano-indentation of the AFM probe on the cell surface at 0.1 Hz sampling frequency and 3200 nm Z-piezo travelling distance (approach and retraction. AFM probes were tipped with a 5 μm diameter microbead functionalized with COL-I (1 mg\\ml. Results showed that the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II (ANG-II; 10-6 significantly increased (p<0.05 VSMC E-modulus and adhesion probability to COL-I by approximately 35% and 33%, respectively. In contrast, the vasodilator adenosine (ADO; 10-4 significantly decreased (p<0.05 VSMC E-modulus and adhesion probability by approximately -33% and -17%, respectively. Similarly, the NO donor (PANOate, 10-6 M, a potent vasodilator, also significantly decreased (p<0.05 the VSMC E-modulus and COL-I adhesion probability by -38% and -35%, respectively. These observations support the hypothesis that integrin-mediated VSMC adhesion to the ECM protein COL-I is dynamically regulated in parallel with VSMC contractile activation. These data suggest that the signal transduction pathways modulating VSMC contractile activation and relaxation, in addition to ECM adhesion, interact during regulation of contractile state.

  9. Novel pharmacologic targeting of tight junctions and focal adhesions in prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick J Hensley

    Full Text Available Cancer cell resistance to anoikis driven by aberrant signaling sustained by the tumor microenvironment confers high invasive potential and therapeutic resistance. We recently generated a novel lead quinazoline-based Doxazosin® derivative, DZ-50, which impairs tumor growth and metastasis via anoikis. Genome-wide analysis in the human prostate cancer cell line DU-145 identified primary downregulated targets of DZ-50, including genes involved in focal adhesion integrity (fibronectin, integrin-α6 and talin, tight junction formation (claudin-11 as well as insulin growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3 and the angiogenesis modulator thrombospondin 1 (TSP-1. Confocal microscopy demonstrated structural disruption of both focal adhesions and tight junctions by the downregulation of these gene targets, resulting in decreased cell survival, migration and adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM components in two androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell lines, PC-3 and DU-145. Stabilization of cell-ECM interactions by overexpression of talin-1 and/or exposing cells to a fibronectin-rich environment mitigated the effect of DZ-50. Loss of expression of the intracellular focal adhesion signaling effectors talin-1 and integrin linked kinase (ILK sensitized human prostate cancer to anoikis. Our findings suggest that DZ-50 exerts its antitumor effect by targeting the key functional intercellular interactions, focal adhesions and tight junctions, supporting the therapeutic significance of this agent for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer.

  10. Corneal cell adhesion to contact lens hydrogel materials enhanced via tear film protein deposition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire M Elkins

    Full Text Available Tear film protein deposition on contact lens hydrogels has been well characterized from the perspective of bacterial adhesion and viability. However, the effect of protein deposition on lens interactions with the corneal epithelium remains largely unexplored. The current study employs a live cell rheometer to quantify human corneal epithelial cell adhesion to soft contact lenses fouled with the tear film protein lysozyme. PureVision balafilcon A and AirOptix lotrafilcon B lenses were soaked for five days in either phosphate buffered saline (PBS, borate buffered saline (BBS, or Sensitive Eyes Plus Saline Solution (Sensitive Eyes, either pure or in the presence of lysozyme. Treated contact lenses were then contacted to a live monolayer of corneal epithelial cells for two hours, after which the contact lens was sheared laterally. The apparent cell monolayer relaxation modulus was then used to quantify the extent of cell adhesion to the contact lens surface. For both lens types, lysozyme increased corneal cell adhesion to the contact lens, with the apparent cell monolayer relaxation modulus increasing up to an order of magnitude in the presence of protein. The magnitude of this increase depended on the identity of the soaking solution: lenses soaked in borate-buffered solutions (BBS, Sensitive Eyes exhibited a much greater increase in cell attachment upon protein addition than those soaked in PBS. Significantly, all measurements were conducted while subjecting the cells to moderate surface pressures and shear rates, similar to those experienced by corneal cells in vivo.

  11. Mesenchymal stem cell adhesion but not plasticity is affected by high substrate stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janice Kal Van Tam, Koichiro Uto, Mitsuhiro Ebara, Stefania Pagliari, Giancarlo Forte and Takao Aoyagi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The acknowledged ability of synthetic materials to induce cell-specific responses regardless of biological supplies provides tissue engineers with the opportunity to find the appropriate materials and conditions to prepare tissue-targeted scaffolds. Stem and mature cells have been shown to acquire distinct morphologies in vitro and to modify their phenotype when grown on synthetic materials with tunable mechanical properties. The stiffness of the substrate used for cell culture is likely to provide cells with mechanical cues mimicking given physiological or pathological conditions, thus affecting the biological properties of cells. The sensitivity of cells to substrate composition and mechanical properties resides in multiprotein complexes called focal adhesions, whose dynamic modification leads to cytoskeleton remodeling and changes in gene expression. In this study, the remodeling of focal adhesions in human mesenchymal stem cells in response to substrate stiffness was followed in the first phases of cell–matrix interaction, using poly-ε-caprolactone planar films with similar chemical composition and different elasticity. As compared to mature dermal fibroblasts, mesenchymal stem cells showed a specific response to substrate stiffness, in terms of adhesion, as a result of differential focal adhesion assembly, while their multipotency as a bulk was not significantly affected by matrix compliance. Given the sensitivity of stem cells to matrix mechanics, the mechanobiology of such cells requires further investigations before preparing tissue-specific scaffolds.

  12. Degranulation of human mast cells induces an endothelial antigen central to leukocyte adhesion.

    OpenAIRE

    Klein, L M; Lavker, R M; Matis, W L; Murphy, G F

    1989-01-01

    To understand better the role of mast cell secretory products in the genesis of inflammation, a system was developed for in vitro degranulation of human mast cells in skin organ cultures. Within 2 hr after morphine sulfate-induced degranulation, endothelial cells lining microvessels adjacent to affected mast cells expressed an activation antigen important for endothelial-leukocyte adhesion. Identical results were obtained when other mast cell secretagogues (anti-IgE, compound 48/80, and calci...

  13. Cell adhesion property affected by cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase: Opto-electric approach

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Chang Kyoung; Sukhthankar, Mugdha; Kim, Chul-Ho; Lee, Seong-Ho; English, Anthony; Kenneth D. Kihm; Baek, Seung Joon

    2009-01-01

    Expression of cyclooxygenases (COX) and lipoxygenases (LOX) has been linked to many pathophysiological phenotypes, including cell adhesion. However, many current approaches to measure cellular changes are performed only in a fixed time point. Since cells dynamically move in conjunction with the cell matrix, there is a pressing need for dynamic or time-dependent methods for the investigation of cell properties. In the presented study, we used stable human colorectal cancer cell lines ectopical...

  14. Integrin engagement mediates tyrosine dephosphorylation on platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1.

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, T T; Yan, L G; Madri, J. A.

    1996-01-01

    Platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1, CD31) is a 130-kDa member of the immunoglobulin gene superfamily expressed on endothelial cells, platelets, neutrophils, and monocytes and plays a role during endothelial cell migration. Phosphoamino acid analysis and Western blot analysis with anti-phosphotyrosine antibody show that endothelial PECAM-1 is tyrosine-phosphorylated. Phosphorylation is decreased with endothelial cell migration on fibronectin and collagen and with cell sprea...

  15. Quantal concept of T-cell activation: adhesion domains as immunological synapses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sackmann, Erich

    2011-06-01

    Adhesion micro-domains (ADs) formed during encounters of lymphocytes with antigen-presenting cells (APC) mediate the genetic expression of quanta of cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2). The IL-2-induced activation of IL-2 receptors promotes the stepwise progression of the T-cells through the cell cycle, hence their name, immunological synapses. The ADs form short-lived reaction centres controlling the recruitment of activators of the biochemical pathway (the kinases Lck and ZAP) while preventing the access of inhibitors (phosphatase CD45) through steric repulsion forces. CD45 acts as the generator of adhesion domains and, through its role as a spacer protein, also as the promoter of the reaction. In a second phase of T-cell-APC encounters, long-lived global reaction spaces (called supramolecular activation complexes (SMAC)) form by talin-mediated binding of the T-cell integrin (LFA-1) to the counter-receptor ICAM-1, resulting in the formation of ring-like tight adhesion zones (peripheral SMAC). The ADs move to the centre of the intercellular adhesion zone forming the central SMAC, which serve in the recycling of the AD. We propose that cell stimulation is triggered by integrating the effect evoked by the short-lived adhesion domains. Similar global reaction platforms are formed by killer cells to destruct APC. We present a testable mechanical model showing that global reaction spaces (SMAC or dome-like contacts between cytotoxic cells and APC) form by self-organization through delayed activation of the integrin-binding affinity and stabilization of the adhesion zones by F-actin recruitment. The mechanical stability and the polarization of the adhering T-cells are mediated by microtubule-actin cross-talk.

  16. Spring constants and adhesive properties of native bacterial biofilm cells measured by atomic force microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volle, C B; Ferguson, M A; Aidala, K E; Spain, E M; Núñez, M E

    2008-11-15

    Bacterial biofilms were imaged by atomic force microscopy (AFM), and their elasticity and adhesion to the AFM tip were determined from a series of tip extension and retraction cycles. Though the five bacterial strains studied included both Gram-negative and -positive bacteria and both environmental and laboratory strains, all formed simple biofilms on glass surfaces. Cellular spring constants, determined from the extension portion of the force cycle, varied between 0.16+/-0.01 and 0.41+/-0.01 N/m, where larger spring constants were measured for Gram-positive cells than for Gram-negative cells. The nonlinear regime in the extension curve depended upon the biomolecules on the cell surface: the extension curves for the smooth Gram-negative bacterial strains with the longest lipopolysaccharides on their surface had a larger nonlinear region than the rough bacterial strain with shorter lipopolysaccharides on the surface. Adhesive forces between the retracting silicon nitride tip and the cells varied between cell types in terms of the force components, the distance components, and the number of adhesion events. The Gram-negative cells' adhesion to the tip showed the longest distance components, sometimes more than 1 microm, whereas the shortest distance adhesion events were measured between the two Gram-positive cell types and the tip. Fixation of free-swimming planktonic cells by NHS and EDC perturbed both the elasticity and the adhesive properties of the cells. Here we consider the biochemical meaning of the measured physical properties of simple biofilms and implications to the colonization of surfaces in the first stages of biofilm formation. PMID:18815013

  17. Quantal concept of T-cell activation: adhesion domains as immunological synapses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sackmann, Erich, E-mail: sackmann@ph.tum.de [Physics Department E22, Technical University Munich, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2011-06-15

    Adhesion micro-domains (ADs) formed during encounters of lymphocytes with antigen-presenting cells (APC) mediate the genetic expression of quanta of cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2). The IL-2-induced activation of IL-2 receptors promotes the stepwise progression of the T-cells through the cell cycle, hence their name, immunological synapses. The ADs form short-lived reaction centres controlling the recruitment of activators of the biochemical pathway (the kinases Lck and ZAP) while preventing the access of inhibitors (phosphatase CD45) through steric repulsion forces. CD45 acts as the generator of adhesion domains and, through its role as a spacer protein, also as the promoter of the reaction. In a second phase of T-cell-APC encounters, long-lived global reaction spaces (called supramolecular activation complexes (SMAC)) form by talin-mediated binding of the T-cell integrin (LFA-1) to the counter-receptor ICAM-1, resulting in the formation of ring-like tight adhesion zones (peripheral SMAC). The ADs move to the centre of the intercellular adhesion zone forming the central SMAC, which serve in the recycling of the AD. We propose that cell stimulation is triggered by integrating the effect evoked by the short-lived adhesion domains. Similar global reaction platforms are formed by killer cells to destruct APC. We present a testable mechanical model showing that global reaction spaces (SMAC or dome-like contacts between cytotoxic cells and APC) form by self-organization through delayed activation of the integrin-binding affinity and stabilization of the adhesion zones by F-actin recruitment. The mechanical stability and the polarization of the adhering T-cells are mediated by microtubule-actin cross-talk.

  18. Comparative detection of bacterial adhesion to Caco-2 cells with ELISA, radioactivity and plate count methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Blay, Gwenaëlle; Fliss, Ismaïl; Lacroix, Christophe

    2004-11-01

    Different methods are used to study bacterial adhesion to intestinal epithelial cells, which is an important step in pathogenic infection as well as in probiotic colonization of the intestinal tract. The aim of this study was to compare the ELISA-based method with more conventional plate count and radiolabeling methods for bacterial adhesion detection. An ELISA-based assay was optimized for the detection of Bifidobacterium longum and Escherichia coli O157:H7, which are low and highly adherent bacteria, respectively. In agreement with previous investigations, a percentage of adhesion below 1% was obtained for B. longum with ELISA. However, high nonspecific background and low positive signals were measured due to the use of polyclonal antibodies and the low adhesion capacity with this strain. In contrast, the ELISA-based method developed for E. coli adhesion detected a high adhesion percentage (15%). For this bacterium the three methods tested gave similar results for the highest bacterial concentrations (6.8 Log CFU added bacteria/well). However, differences among methods increased with the addition of decreased bacterial concentration due to different detection thresholds (5.9, 5.6 and 2.9 Log CFU adherent bacteria/well for radioactivity, ELISA and plate count methods, respectively). The ELISA-based method was shown to be a good predictor for bacterial adhesion compared to the radiolabeling method when good quality specific antibodies were used. This technique is convenient and allows handling of numerous samples.

  19. Cell adhesion of F{sup +} ion implantation of intraocular lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D.J. E-mail: dejunli@hotmail.com; Cui, F.Z.; Gu, H.Q

    1999-04-01

    The cell adhesion of ion implanted polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) intraocular lens was studied using cultured cells in vitro. F{sup +} ion implantation was performed at the energies of 40, 60, 80, 100 keV with the fluences ranging from 5x10{sup 13} to 1x10{sup 15} ions/cm{sup 2} at room temperature. The cell adhesion tests gave interesting results that the number of the neutral granulocytes and the macrophages adhering on surface were reduced significantly after ion implantation. The optimal fluence was about 4x10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2}. The hydrophobicity imparted to the lens surface was also enhanced. The results of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicated that ion implantation resulted in the cleavage of some pendant groups, the oxidation of the surface, and the formation of some new chemical bonds, which was probably the main reason for the cell adhesion change.

  20. Cell adhesion, inflammation and therapy: Old ideas and a significant step forward

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Roberto GONZ(A)LEZ-AMARO

    2011-01-01

    Cell-to-cell adhesion as well as the interaction of cells with the extracellular matrix are key phenomena in different physiological and pathological conditions,including embryogenesis,blood coagulation,lymphocyte homing,immune response,angiogenesis,metastasis,thrombosis and inflammation[1,2].Thus,it has been widely proposed that cell adhesion molecules are an important therapeutic target in a wide array of diseases with high impact on public health,including atherosclerosis,thromboembolic disorders,cancer,graft rejection and autoimmune inflammatory conditions[1,2].However,anti-adhesion therapy with either biological agents (mainly blocking monoclonal antibodies,mAb's) or chemical inhibitors (mainly synthetic peptides) has not yet fulfilled these expectations and has not been devoid of undesirable effects[3,4

  1. Adhesion molecule expression stimulated by Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron cell-surface antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rokosz, A; Meisel-Mikołajczyk, F; Malchar, C; Nowaczyk, M; Górski, A

    1999-01-01

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a Gram-negative anaerobic rod belonging to the Bacteroides fragilis group (BFG), is involved in many systemic and local, most frequently suppurative infections in man. The cell envelope of these rods is composed of two carbohydrate-containing antigens: lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and capsular polysaccharide (CPS). Adhesion molecules ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin (ELAM-1) are induced on the endothelial cells by mediators of inflammation. The aim of this study was to assay the ability of B. thetaiotaomicron surface antigens to induce adhesion molecule expression on the endothelial cells. The influence of LPS and CPS on the expression of adhesion molecules on HMEC-1 cell line was examined in an ELISA test. ELISA was performed with monoclonal mouse anti-human: ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin antibodies of the IgG class. B. thetaiotaomicron lipopolysaccharides revealed the ability to induce ICAM-1, VCAM-1 and E-selectin expression on the endothelial cells. Their activities were similar, but lower than the activity of Eschericha coli LPS. ICAM-1 was the most stimulated adhesion molecule. The strongest activation by LPS was achieved at the concentrations of 10.0 and 1.0 micrograms/ml. The ability of capsular polysaccharide to induce the expression of adhesion molecules was considerably weaker.

  2. The first EGF domain of coagulation factor IX attenuates cell adhesion and induces apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Tomomi; Kitano, Hisataka; Mamiya, Atsushi; Kokubun, Shinichiro; Hidai, Chiaki

    2016-07-01

    Coagulation factor IX (FIX) is an essential plasma protein for blood coagulation. The first epidermal growth factor (EGF) motif of FIX (EGF-F9) has been reported to attenuate cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM). The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of this motif on cell adhesion and apoptosis. Treatment with a recombinant EGF-F9 attenuated cell adhesion to the ECM within 10 min. De-adhesion assays with native FIX recombinant FIX deletion mutant proteins suggested that the de-adhesion activity of EGF-F9 requires the same process of FIX activation as that which occurs for coagulation activity. The recombinant EGF-F9 increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity release into the medium and increased the number of cells stained with annexin V and activated caspase-3, by 8.8- and 2.7-fold respectively, indicating that EGF-F9 induced apoptosis. Activated caspase-3 increased very rapidly after only 5 min of administration of recombinant EGF-F9. Treatment with EGF-F9 increased the level of phosphorylated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), but not that of phosphorylated MAPK 44/42 or c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). Inhibitors of caspase-3 suppressed the release of LDH. Caspase-3 inhibitors also suppressed the attenuation of cell adhesion and phosphorylation of p38 MAPK by EGF-F9. Our data indicated that EGF-F9 activated signals for apoptosis and induced de-adhesion in a caspase-3 dependent manner. PMID:27129300

  3. Crosslinking of the T cell-specific accessory molecules CD7 and CD28 modulates T cell adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    1992-01-01

    Regulated adhesion enables T cells to migrate through tissue and transiently interact with an endless succession of cells. Monoclonal antibody (mAb) engagement of the CD3/T cell receptor (TCR) complex results in a rapid and transient augmentation of the adhesion function of LFA-1 and VLA integrin molecules on human T cells. We show in this study that mAb crosslinking of the T cell-specific accessory molecules CD7 and CD28, or treatment with the Ca2+ ionophore A23187, results in the rapid indu...

  4. Hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) overexpression downregulates MV3 melanoma cell proliferation, migration and adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malignant skin melanoma is one of the most deadly human cancers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) influences the growth of malignant tumors by modulating tumor cells adhesion and migration. Hyaluronan is an essential component of the ECM, and its amount is altered in many tumors, suggesting an important role for hyaluronan in tumorigenesis. Nonetheless its role in melanomagenesis is not understood. In this study we produced a MV3 melanoma cell line with inducible expression of the hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) and studied its effect on the behavior of the melanoma cells. HAS3 overexpression expanded the cell surface hyaluronan coat and decreased melanoma cell adhesion, migration and proliferation by cell cycle arrest at G1/G0. Melanoma cell migration was restored by removal of cell surface hyaluronan by Streptomyces hyaluronidase and by receptor blocking with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, while the effect on cell proliferation was receptor independent. Overexpression of HAS3 decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that inhibition of MAP-kinase signaling was responsible for these suppressive effects on the malignant phenotype of MV3 melanoma cells. - Highlights: • Inducible HAS3-MV3 melanoma cell line was generated using Lentiviral transduction. • HAS3 overexpression inhibits MV3 cell migration via hyaluronan–receptor interaction. • HAS3 overexpression decreases MV3 melanoma cell proliferation and adhesion. • ERK1/2 phosphorylation is downregulated by 50% in HAS3 overexpressing cells. • The results suggest that hyaluronan has anti-cancer like effects in melanoma

  5. Hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) overexpression downregulates MV3 melanoma cell proliferation, migration and adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takabe, Piia, E-mail: piia.takabe@uef.fi [University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Biomedicine, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Bart, Geneviève [University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Biomedicine, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Ropponen, Antti [University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Clinical Medicine, 70211 Kuopio (Finland); Rilla, Kirsi; Tammi, Markku; Tammi, Raija; Pasonen-Seppänen, Sanna [University of Eastern Finland, Institute of Biomedicine, 70211 Kuopio (Finland)

    2015-09-10

    Malignant skin melanoma is one of the most deadly human cancers. Extracellular matrix (ECM) influences the growth of malignant tumors by modulating tumor cells adhesion and migration. Hyaluronan is an essential component of the ECM, and its amount is altered in many tumors, suggesting an important role for hyaluronan in tumorigenesis. Nonetheless its role in melanomagenesis is not understood. In this study we produced a MV3 melanoma cell line with inducible expression of the hyaluronan synthase 3 (HAS3) and studied its effect on the behavior of the melanoma cells. HAS3 overexpression expanded the cell surface hyaluronan coat and decreased melanoma cell adhesion, migration and proliferation by cell cycle arrest at G1/G0. Melanoma cell migration was restored by removal of cell surface hyaluronan by Streptomyces hyaluronidase and by receptor blocking with hyaluronan oligosaccharides, while the effect on cell proliferation was receptor independent. Overexpression of HAS3 decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation suggesting that inhibition of MAP-kinase signaling was responsible for these suppressive effects on the malignant phenotype of MV3 melanoma cells. - Highlights: • Inducible HAS3-MV3 melanoma cell line was generated using Lentiviral transduction. • HAS3 overexpression inhibits MV3 cell migration via hyaluronan–receptor interaction. • HAS3 overexpression decreases MV3 melanoma cell proliferation and adhesion. • ERK1/2 phosphorylation is downregulated by 50% in HAS3 overexpressing cells. • The results suggest that hyaluronan has anti-cancer like effects in melanoma.

  6. An open source based high content screening method for cell biology laboratories investigating cell spreading and adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre Schmandke

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Adhesion dependent mechanisms are increasingly recognized to be important for a wide range of biological processes, diseases and therapeutics. This has led to a rising demand of pharmaceutical modulators. However, most currently available adhesion assays are time consuming and/or lack sensitivity and reproducibility or depend on specialized and expensive equipment often only available at screening facilities. Thus, rapid and economical high-content screening approaches are urgently needed. RESULTS: We established a fully open source high-content screening method for identifying modulators of adhesion. We successfully used this method to detect small molecules that are able to influence cell adhesion and cell spreading of Swiss-3T3 fibroblasts in general and/or specifically counteract Nogo-A-Δ20-induced inhibition of adhesion and cell spreading. The tricyclic anti-depressant clomipramine hydrochloride was shown to not only inhibit Nogo-A-Δ20-induced cell spreading inhibition in 3T3 fibroblasts but also to promote growth and counteract neurite outgrowth inhibition in highly purified primary neurons isolated from rat cerebellum. CONCLUSIONS: We have developed and validated a high content screening approach that can be used in any ordinarily equipped cell biology laboratory employing exclusively freely available open-source software in order to find novel modulators of adhesion and cell spreading. The versatility and adjustability of the whole screening method will enable not only centers specialized in high-throughput screens but most importantly also labs not routinely employing screens in their daily work routine to investigate the effects of a wide range of different compounds or siRNAs on adhesion and adhesion-modulating molecules.

  7. Sundew-Inspired Adhesive Hydrogels Combined with Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Leming; Huang, Yujian; Bian, Zehua; Petrosino, Jennifer; Fan, Zhen; Wang, Yongzhong; Park, Ki Ho; Yue, Tao; Schmidt, Michael; Galster, Scott; Ma, Jianjie; Zhu, Hua; Zhang, Mingjun

    2016-01-27

    The potential to harness the unique physical, chemical, and biological properties of the sundew (Drosera) plant's adhesive hydrogels has long intrigued researchers searching for novel wound-healing applications. However, the ability to collect sufficient quantities of the sundew plant's adhesive hydrogels is problematic and has eclipsed their therapeutic promise. Inspired by these natural hydrogels, we asked if sundew-inspired adhesive hydrogels could overcome the drawbacks associated with natural sundew hydrogels and be used in combination with stem-cell-based therapy to enhance wound-healing therapeutics. Using a bioinspired approach, we synthesized adhesive hydrogels comprised of sodium alginate, gum arabic, and calcium ions to mimic the properties of the natural sundew-derived adhesive hydrogels. We then characterized and showed that these sundew-inspired hydrogels promote wound healing through their superior adhesive strength, nanostructure, and resistance to shearing when compared to other hydrogels in vitro. In vivo, sundew-inspired hydrogels promoted a "suturing" effect to wound sites, which was demonstrated by enhanced wound closure following topical application of the hydrogels. In combination with mouse adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and compared to other therapeutic biomaterials, the sundew-inspired hydrogels demonstrated superior wound-healing capabilities. Collectively, our studies show that sundew-inspired hydrogels contain ideal properties that promote wound healing and suggest that sundew-inspired-ADSCs combination therapy is an efficacious approach for treating wounds without eliciting noticeable toxicity or inflammation. PMID:26731614

  8. Vascular Endothelial-Cadherin Regulates Cytoskeletal Tension, Cell Spreading, and Focal Adhesions by Stimulating RhoAD⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Celeste M.; Pirone, Dana M.; Tan, John L.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2004-01-01

    Changes in vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin–mediated cell-cell adhesion and integrin-mediated cell-matrix adhesion coordinate to affect the physical and mechanical rearrangements of the endothelium, although the mechanisms for such cross talk remain undefined. Herein, we describe the regulation of focal adhesion formation and cytoskeletal tension by intercellular VE-cadherin engagement, and the molecular mechanism by which this occurs. Increasing the density of endothelial cells to increase cell-cell contact decreased focal adhesions by decreasing cell spreading. This contact inhibition of cell spreading was blocked by disrupting VE-cadherin engagement with an adenovirus encoding dominant negative VE-cadherin. When changes in cell spreading were prevented by culturing cells on a micropatterned substrate, VE-cadherin–mediated cell-cell contact paradoxically increased focal adhesion formation. We show that VE-cadherin engagement mediates each of these effects by inducing both a transient and sustained activation of RhoA. Both the increase and decrease in cell-matrix adhesion were blocked by disrupting intracellular tension and signaling through the Rho-ROCK pathway. In all, these findings demonstrate that VE-cadherin signals through RhoA and the actin cytoskeleton to cross talk with cell-matrix adhesion and thereby define a novel pathway by which cell-cell contact alters the global mechanical and functional state of cells. PMID:15075376

  9. Impact of electrospun nanofibres orientation on mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and morphology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrospun nanofibrous materials mimicking the architecture of native extracellular matrix (ECM) hold great promise as scaffolds in tissue engineering. In order to optimize the properties of nanofibrous scaffolds it is important to understand the impact of fibres’ organization on cell behaviour. Herein, we investigated the effect of nanofibres (NFs) alignment on human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hAD-MSCs) adhesion and morphology. Electrospun composite fibrinogen/poly-lactic acid (FNG/PLA) NF scaffolds with same composition and comparable fibre size were fabricated into randomly oriented and aligned configuration and stem cells adhesion was characterized by the meaning of overall cell morphology, actin cytoskeleton organization and expression of molecules, involved in the development of focal adhesion complexes. We found that hAD-MSCs altered their morphology, actin cytoskeleton and cell attachment in accordance with nanofibre orientation while cell spreading, focal adhesions and expression of β1 and αN integrin receptors were not influenced significantly by fibre orientation. These results confirmed that fibre alignment of scaffold guide cellular arrangement and could be beneficial for stem differentiation and therefore for the successful scaffolds development if its contact guidance coincided with the cell shape and cytoskeletal tension. Key words: electrospinning, human adipose-derived stem cells, fibrinogen/polylactic acid hybrid nanofibres

  10. Cancer Cell Adhesion and Metastasis: Selectins, Integrins, and the Inhibitory Potential of Heparins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerd Bendas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion molecules play a significant role in cancer progression and metastasis. Cell-cell interactions of cancer cells with endothelium determine the metastatic spread. In addition, direct tumor cell interactions with platelets, leukocytes, and soluble components significantly contribute to cancer cell adhesion, extravasation, and the establishment of metastatic lesions. Clinical evidence indicates that heparin, commonly used for treatment of thromboembolic events in cancer patients, is beneficial for their survival. Preclinical studies confirm that heparin possesses antimetastatic activities that lead to attenuation of metastasis in various animal models. Heparin contains several biological activities that may affect several steps in metastatic cascade. Here we focus on the role of cellular adhesion receptors in the metastatic cascade and discuss evidence for heparin as an inhibitor of cell adhesion. While P- and L-selectin facilitation of cellular contacts during hematogenous metastasis is being accepted as a potential target of heparin, here we propose that heparin may also interfere with integrin activity and thereby affect cancer progression. This review summarizes recent findings about potential mechanisms of tumor cell interactions in the vasculature and antimetastatic activities of heparin.

  11. Extracellular matrix heparin induces alteration of the cell adhesion during brain development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ushakova, GA; Nikonenko, IR; Nikonenko, AG; Skibo, GG

    2002-01-01

    The studies of neuronal cell-glycosaminoglycan interactions indicate an increasing interest in the question of how heparin can mediate adhesion properties of the cell. We have found that high levels of both N-CAM concentration and heparin-binding activity were noticed in the early stages of brain fo

  12. QUANTIFICATION OF GLOMERULAR EPITHELIAL-CELL ADHESION BY USING ANTI-DNA ANTIBODIES IN ELISA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    COERS, W; SMEENK, RJT; SALANT, DJ; WEENING, JJ

    1992-01-01

    A sensitive and reproducible microassay is described for quantification of adhesion of cells to matrix-coated 96-wells plates under different experimental conditions. For this purpose glomerular visceral epithelial cells (GVEC) were used. Attached GVEC were fixed with methanol and incubated with a m

  13. Micro patterning of cell and protein non-adhesive plasma polymerized coatings for biochip applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bouaidat, Salim; Berendsen, C.; Thomsen, P.;

    2004-01-01

    conventional cleanroom photolithography and lift-off. Single cell arrays showed sharp contrast in cell adhesion between the untreated glass surface and the ppCrown layer. Similarly, proteins adsorbed selectively to untreated glass but not to ppCrown. The simplicity of the liftoff technique and the sturdiness...

  14. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition-The roles of cell morphology, labile adhesion and junctional coupling.

    OpenAIRE

    Abdulla, Tariq; Schleich, Jean-Marc; Summers, Ron

    2013-01-01

    International audience Epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a fundamental process during development and disease, including development of the heart valves and tumour metastases. An extended cellular Potts model was implemented to represent the behaviour emerging from autonomous cell morphology, labile adhesion, junctional coupling and cell motility. Computer simulations normally focus on these functional changes independently whereas this model facilitates exploration of the inte...

  15. Spatiotemporal distribution and function of N-cadherin in postnatal Schwann cells: A matter of adhesion?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Corell, Mikael; Wicher, Grzegorz; Limbach, Christoph;

    2010-01-01

    During embryonic development of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), the adhesion molecule neuronal cadherin (N-cadherin) is expressed by Schwann cell precursors and associated with axonal growth cones. N-cadherin expression levels decrease as precursors differentiate into Schwann cells. In this ...

  16. An evidence for adhesion-mediated acquisition of acute myeloid leukemic stem cell-like immaturities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funayama, Keiji; Shimane, Miyuki; Nomura, Hitoshi [Department of Integrative Bioscience and Biomedical Engineering, Waseda University, 4-3-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Asano, Shigetaka, E-mail: asgtkmd@waseda.jp [Department of Integrative Bioscience and Biomedical Engineering, Waseda University, 4-3-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2010-02-12

    For long-term survival in vitro and in vivo of acute myeloid leukemia cells, their adhesion to bone marrow stromal cells is indispensable. However, it is still unknown if these events are uniquely induced by the leukemic stem cells. Here we show that TF-1 human leukemia cells, once they have formed a cobblestone area by adhering to mouse bone marrow-derived MS-5 cells, can acquire some leukemic stem cell like properties in association with a change in the CD44 isoform-expression pattern and with an increase in a set of related microRNAs. These findings strongly suggest that at least some leukemia cells can acquire leukemic stem cell like properties in an adhesion-mediated stochastic fashion.

  17. Induction of T cell adhesion to extracellular matrix or endothelial cell ligands by soluble or matrix-bound interleukin-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, A; Hershkoviz, R; Cahalon, L; Williams, D E; Akiyama, S K; Yamada, K M; Chen, C; Alon, R; Lapidot, T; Lider, O

    1997-10-01

    The putative effects of interleukin (IL)-7, operating in the context of extracellular matrix (ECM), on the adhesion of human T cells were examined. Recombinant human, IL-7 was found to bind ECM or fibronectin (FN) with IC50 values of 10-100 nM. Nanogram amounts of both soluble and, especially, FN- or ECM-bound IL-7, which differentially affected the morphologies of FN-adherent T cells, induced the adhesion of resting CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in dose-dependent and beta 1 integrin-dependent manners. Under static and flow conditions, soluble IL-7 also induced the binding of unstimulated T cells to vascular cell adhesion molecule-1, suggesting that this cytokine can also modulate integrin binding to endothelial cell ligands. The effects of affinity modulation by IL-7 of FN-specific beta 1 integrins depend on the presence of soluble FN, which inhibited T cell adhesion to FN induced by FN-bound IL-7 or by an integrin-specific affinity-modulating monoclonal antibody, but not by soluble IL-7 or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. These findings provide an example of a major ECM integrin ligand, FN, which is capable of modulating its adhesive interactions with specific immune cells by associating with and presenting a cytokine in a bio-active state. PMID:9368611

  18. p62/IMP2 stimulates cell migration and reduces cell adhesion in breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yang; Francia, Giulio; Zhang, Jian-Ying

    2015-01-01

    p62/IMP2 is an oncofetal protein that is overexpressed in several types of cancer, and is a member of the family of insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA binding proteins. We previously reported that high levels of p62/IMP2 autoantibody are present in sera from cancer patients, compared to healthy individuals. Here, we report the overexpression of p62/IMP2 in tumor tissues of 72 out of 104 cases of human breast cancer, and high levels of p62/IMP2 autoantibody in patients’ sera (in 63 out of 216 cases). To explore the role of p62/IMP2 in breast cancer progression, we generated p62/IMP2 transfected variants of two human breast cancer cell lines: MDA-MB-231 and LM2-4. Using in vitro assays we found that overexpression of p62/IMP2 can increase cell migration, and reduce cell adhesion to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. A Human Extracellular Matrix and Adhesion Molecules qPCR array was performed with our generated variants, and it identified a group of mRNAs whose expression was altered with p62/IMP2 overexpression, including connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) mRNA – which we show to be a p62/IMP2 binding partner. Overall, our results provide new insights into the molecular mechanism by which p62/IMP2 can contribute to breast cancer progression. PMID:26416451

  19. Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression by skeletal muscle cells augments myogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goh, Qingnian; Dearth, Christopher L.; Corbett, Jacob T. [Department of Kinesiology, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Pierre, Philippe [Centre d’Immunologie de Marseille-Luminy U2M, Aix-Marseille Université, Marseille (France); INSERM U631, Institut National de la Santé et Recherche Médicale, Marseille (France); CNRS UMR6102, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Marseille (France); Chadee, Deborah N. [Department of Biological Sciences, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Pizza, Francis X., E-mail: Francis.Pizza@utoledo.edu [Department of Kinesiology, The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States)

    2015-02-15

    We previously demonstrated that the expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) by skeletal muscle cells after muscle overload contributes to ensuing regenerative and hypertrophic processes in skeletal muscle. The objective of the present study is to reveal mechanisms through which skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 augments regenerative and hypertrophic processes of myogenesis. This was accomplished by genetically engineering C2C12 myoblasts to stably express ICAM-1, and by inhibiting the adhesive and signaling functions of ICAM-1 through the use of a neutralizing antibody or cell penetrating peptide, respectively. Expression of ICAM-1 by cultured skeletal muscle cells augmented myoblast–myoblast adhesion, myotube formation, myonuclear number, myotube alignment, myotube–myotube fusion, and myotube size without influencing the ability of myoblasts to proliferate or differentiate. ICAM-1 augmented myotube formation, myonuclear accretion, and myotube alignment through a mechanism involving adhesion-induced activation of ICAM-1 signaling, as these dependent measures were reduced via antibody and peptide inhibition of ICAM-1. The adhesive and signaling functions of ICAM-1 also facilitated myotube hypertrophy through a mechanism involving myotube–myotube fusion, protein synthesis, and Akt/p70s6k signaling. Our findings demonstrate that ICAM-1 expression by skeletal muscle cells augments myogenesis, and establish a novel mechanism through which the inflammatory response facilitates growth processes in skeletal muscle. - Highlights: • We examined mechanisms through which skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 facilitates events of in vitro myogenesis. • Expression of ICAM-1 by cultured myoblasts did not influence their ability to proliferate or differentiate. • Skeletal muscle cell expression of ICAM-1 augmented myoblast fusion, myotube alignment, myotube–myotube fusion, and myotube size. • ICAM-1 augmented myogenic processes through

  20. High expression of carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) 6 and 8 in primary myelofibrosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Hans Carl; Skov, Vibe; Larsen, Thomas Stauffer;

    2011-01-01

    for the egress of CD34+ cells from the bone marrow. Carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule (CEACAM) 6 has been implicated in cell adhesion, cellular invasiveness, angiogenesis, and inflammation, which are all key processes in the pathophysiology of PMF. Accordingly, CEACAMs may play an important...

  1. PDE8 regulates rapid Teff cell adhesion and proliferation independent of ICER.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda G Vang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Abolishing the inhibitory signal of intracellular cAMP by phosphodiesterases (PDEs is a prerequisite for effector T (Teff cell function. While PDE4 plays a prominent role, its control of cAMP levels in Teff cells is not exclusive. T cell activation has been shown to induce PDE8, a PDE isoform with 40- to 100-fold greater affinity for cAMP than PDE4. Thus, we postulated that PDE8 is an important regulator of Teff cell functions. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that Teff cells express PDE8 in vivo. Inhibition of PDE8 by the PDE inhibitor dipyridamole (DP activates cAMP signaling and suppresses two major integrins involved in Teff cell adhesion. Accordingly, DP as well as the novel PDE8-selective inhibitor PF-4957325-00 suppress firm attachment of Teff cells to endothelial cells. Analysis of downstream signaling shows that DP suppresses proliferation and cytokine expression of Teff cells from Crem-/- mice lacking the inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER. Importantly, endothelial cells also express PDE8. DP treatment decreases vascular adhesion molecule and chemokine expression, while upregulating the tight junction molecule claudin-5. In vivo, DP reduces CXCL12 gene expression as determined by in situ probing of the mouse microvasculature by cell-selective laser-capture microdissection. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Collectively, our data identify PDE8 as a novel target for suppression of Teff cell functions, including adhesion to endothelial cells.

  2. Sliced Magnetic Polyacrylamide Hydrogel with Cell-Adhesive Microarray Interface: A Novel Multicellular Spheroid Culturing Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ke; Zhou, Naizhen; Li, Yang; Ma, Siyu; Guo, Zhaobin; Cao, Meng; Zhang, Qiying; Sun, Jianfei; Zhang, Tianzhu; Gu, Ning

    2016-06-22

    Cell-adhesive properties are of great significance to materials serving as extracellular matrix mimics. Appropriate cell-adhesive property of material interface can balance the cell-matrix interaction and cell-cell interaction and can promote cells to form 3D structures. Herein, a novel magnetic polyacrylamide (PAM) hydrogel fabricated via combining magnetostatic field induced magnetic nanoparticles assembly and hydrogel gelation was applied as a multicellular spheroids culturing platform. When cultured on the cell-adhesive microarray interface of sliced magnetic hydrogel, normal and tumor cells from different cell lines could rapidly form multicellular spheroids spontaneously. Furthermore, cells which could only form loose cell aggregates in a classic 3D cell culture model (such as hanging drop system) were able to be promoted to form multicellular spheroids on this platform. In the light of its simplicity in fabricating as well as its effectiveness in promoting formation of multicellular spheroids which was considered as a prevailing tool in the study of the microenvironmental regulation of tumor cell physiology and therapeutic problems, this composite material holds promise in anticancer drugs or hyperthermia therapy evaluation in vitro in the future. PMID:27258682

  3. Controlling Interdiffusion, Interfacial Composition, and Adhesion in Polymer Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Dupont, Stephanie R.

    2014-07-10

    © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim. NEXAFS spectroscopy is used to precisely quantify the interfacial composition and P3HT chain orientation at the weak P3HT:PCBM/PEDOT:PSS interface. An increase of P3HT:PCBM and PEDOT:PSS interdiffusion with post electrode deposition annealing time and temperature is found to be the underlying mechanism for effectively improving the interlayer adhesion, which is essential for the commercial realization of organic photovoltaic devices.

  4. Correlation of Serum Concentrations of Soluble Thrombomodulin, Soluble Vascular Cell Adhesion Molecule-1,Intracellular Adhesion Molecule -1 And E-Selectin In Patients WithSystemic Lupus Erythematosus

    OpenAIRE

    Malak., A. Mohsen*, Magda.A.Gamil*,Maha. I.Shehata

    2003-01-01

    To date no specific serological parameters are available to assess disease activity in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The objective of this study was to correlate serum levels of thrombomodulin (TM), intracellular adhesion molecule-1 sICAM-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 sVCAM-1, and E-selectin with standard laboratory tests and clinical indices of disease activity in 40 patients with SLE and 20 apparently healthy persons as controls. According to British Isles Lupus Assessment Grou...

  5. Chemically modified heparins inhibit fibrinogen-bridged indirect adhesion between tumor cells and platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Sheng; Liu, Yan; Jiao, Yang; Min WEI; ZENG, XIANLU

    2011-01-01

    The interaction between platelets and tumor cells is critical for the hematogenous metastasis of tumor cells. We recently reported that fibrinogen was capable of bridging and enhancing the interaction of platelets and tumor cells under conditions of physical shear force. In the present study, we aimed to detect the effects of 8 chemically modified heparins on the binding of fibrinogen to platelets or tumor cells using flow cytometry assays, as well as the fibrinogen-bridged adhesion of platel...

  6. Doxycycline inhibits leukemic cell migration via inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases and phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, CHUNHUAI; Xiang, Ru; ZHANG, XIANGZHONG; CHEN, YUNXIAN

    2015-01-01

    Doxycycline, a tetracycline-based antibiotic, has been reported to attenuate melanoma cell migration through inhibiting the focal adhesion kinase (FAK) signaling pathway. However, it remains to be elucidated whether doxycycline exerts this effect on leukemia cell migration. The present study aimed to examine the role of doxycycline in leukemia cell migration. The invasion capacities of the human leukemia cell lines KG1a (acute myelogenous leukemia) and K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia) were...

  7. Phorbol ester modulation of integrin-mediated cell adhesion: a postreceptor event

    OpenAIRE

    1989-01-01

    Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) suspension culture cells adhere readily to substrata coated with extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin, vitronectin, or laminin. In the case of fibronectin, it is known that adhesion is mediated by an integrin-type, cell surface fibronectin receptor (FnR). We demonstrate here that treatment of CHO cells with submicromolar concentrations of phorbol ester produces a remarkable increase in the ability of these cells to adhere to fibronectin. Both the rate ...

  8. A role for collagen XXIII in cancer cell adhesion, anchorage-independence, and metastasis

    OpenAIRE

    Spivey, Kristin A.; Chung, Ivy; Banyard, Jacqueline; Adini, Irit; Feldman, Henry A.; Bruce R Zetter

    2011-01-01

    Collagen XXIII is a transmembrane collagen previously shown to be upregulated in metastatic prostate cancer that has been used as a tissue and fluid biomarker for non-small cell lung cancer and prostate cancer. To determine whether collagen XXIII facilitates cancer cell metastasis in vivo and to establish a function for collagen XXIII in cancer progression, collagen XXIII knockdown cells were examined for alterations in in vivo metastasis as well as in vitro cell adhesion. In experimental and...

  9. Adhesion in flexible organic and hybrid organic/inorganic light emitting device and solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of the adhesion between bi-material pairs that are relevant to organic light emitting devices, hybrid organic/inorganic light emitting devices, organic bulk heterojunction solar cells, and hybrid organic/inorganic solar cells on flexible substrates. Adhesion between the possible bi-material pairs is measured using force microscopy (AFM) techniques. These include: interfaces that are relevant to organic light emitting devices, hybrid organic/inorganic light emitting devices, bulk heterojunction solar cells, and hybrid combinations of titanium dioxide (TiO2) and poly(3-hexylthiophene). The results of AFM measurements are incorporated into the Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov model for the determination of adhesion energies. The implications of the results are then discussed for the design of robust organic and hybrid organic/inorganic electronic devices

  10. p38 signaling and receptor recycling events in a microfluidic endothelial cell adhesion assay.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dwayne A L Vickers

    Full Text Available Adhesion-based microfluidic cell separation has proven to be very useful in applications ranging from cancer diagnostics to tissue engineering. This process involves functionalizing microchannel surfaces with a capture molecule. High specificity and purity capture can be achieved using this method. Despite these advances, little is known about the mechanisms that govern cell capture within these devices and their relationships to basic process parameters such as fluid shear stress and the presence of soluble factors. This work examines how the adhesion of human endothelial cells (ECs is influenced by a soluble tetrapeptide, Arg-Glu-Asp-Val (REDV and fluidic shear stress. The ability of these ECs to bind within microchannels coated with REDV is shown to be governed by shear- and soluble-factor mediated changes in p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase expression together with recycling of adhesion receptors from the endosome.

  11. Altered cell wall disassembly during ripening of Cnr tomato fruit : implications for cell wall adhesion and fruit softening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orfila, C.; Huisman, M.M.H.; Willats, W.G.T.; Alebeek, van G.J.W.M.; Schols, H.A.; Seymour, G.B.; Knox, J.P.

    2002-01-01

    The Cnr (Colourless non-ripening) tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) mutant has an aberrant fruit-ripening phenotype in which fruit do not soften and have reduced cell adhesion between pericarp cells. Cell walls from Cnr fruit were analysed in order to assess the possible contribution of pectic

  12. Conformational Dynamics of the Focal Adhesion Targeting Domain Control Specific Functions of Focal Adhesion Kinase in Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Kadaré, Gress

    2015-01-02

    Focal adhesion (FA) kinase (FAK) regulates cell survival and motility by transducing signals from membrane receptors. The C-terminal FA targeting (FAT) domain of FAK fulfils multiple functions, including recruitment to FAs through paxillin binding. Phosphorylation of FAT on Tyr925 facilitates FA disassembly and connects to the MAPK pathway through Grb2 association, but requires dissociation of the first helix (H1) of the four-helix bundle of FAT. We investigated the importance of H1 opening in cells by comparing the properties of FAK molecules containing wild-type or mutated FAT with impaired or facilitated H1 openings. These mutations did not alter the activation of FAK, but selectively affected its cellular functions, including self-association, Tyr925 phosphorylation, paxillin binding, and FA targeting and turnover. Phosphorylation of Tyr861, located between the kinase and FAT domains, was also enhanced by the mutation that opened the FAT bundle. Similarly phosphorylation of Ser910 by ERK in response to bombesin was increased by FAT opening. Although FAK molecules with the mutation favoring FAT opening were poorly recruited at FAs, they efficiently restored FA turnover and cell shape in FAK-deficient cells. In contrast, the mutation preventing H1 opening markedly impaired FAK function. Our data support the biological importance of conformational dynamics of the FAT domain and its functional interactions with other parts of the molecule.

  13. In vitro evaluation of osteoblastic cell adhesion on machined osseointegrated implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Fabiano Alves

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available At present the major consideration in planning an implant design is to seek biocompatible surfaces that promote a favorable response from both cells and host tissues. Different treatments of implant surfaces may modulate the adhesion, proliferation and phenotypic expression of osteoblastic cells. For this reason, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the biocompatibility of an implant surface, observing adhesion, cell morphology and proliferation of osteoblast-like cells cultivated on a commercially available titanium dental implant (Titamax Liso®, Neodent, Curitiba, PR, Brazil. The implant samples were immersed into an osteoblast-like cell (Osteo-1 suspension for a period of 24, 48 and 72 hours. After seeding the cells, the samples were prepared for analyses through scanning electron microscopy. Based on the surface analysis, the osteoblastic cells adhered to the machined surface after 24 hours in culture. In 48 hours, the cells spread over the implant surface, and after 72 hours a proliferation of cells with large and flat bodies was observed over the machined implant surface. These results demonstrate that the machined titanium surface studied is biocompatible since it allowed adhesion and proliferation of the osteoblast-like cells, in addition to preserving cell integrity and the morphologic characteristics of cells during the studied period.

  14. Cell adhesion and cortex contractility determine cell patterning in the Drosophila retina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Käfer, Jos; Hayashi, Takashi; Marée, Athanasius F M; Carthew, Richard W; Graner, François

    2007-11-20

    Because of the resemblance of many epithelial tissues to densely packed soap bubbles, it has been suggested that surface minimization, which drives soap bubble packing, could be governing cell packing as well. We test this by modeling the shape of the cells in a Drosophila retina ommatidium. We use the observed configurations and shapes in wild-type flies, as well as in flies with different numbers of cells per ommatidia, and mutants with cells where E- or N-cadherin is either deleted or misexpressed. We find that surface minimization is insufficient to model the experimentally observed shapes and packing of the cells based on their cadherin expression. We then consider a model in which adhesion leads to a surface increase, balanced by cell cortex contraction. Using the experimentally observed distributions of E- and N-cadherin, we simulate the packing and cell shapes in the wild-type eye. Furthermore, by changing only the corresponding parameters, this model can describe the mutants with different numbers of cells or changes in cadherin expression. PMID:18003929

  15. Biomechanics of P-selectin PSGL-1 bonds: Shear threshold and integrin-independent cell adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Zhihua; Goldsmith, Harry L.; MacIntosh, Fiona A.; Shankaran, Harish; Neelamegham, Sriram

    2006-03-01

    Platelet-leukocyte adhesion may contribute to thrombosis and inflammation. We examined the heterotypic interaction between unactivated neutrophils and either thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) stimulated platelets or P-selectin bearing beads (Ps-beads) in suspension. Cone-plate viscometers were used to apply controlled shear rates from 14-3000/s. Platelet-neutrophil and bead-neutrophil adhesion analysis was performed using both flow cytometry and high-speed videomicroscopy. We observed that while blocking antibodies against either P-selectin or P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) alone inhibited platelet-neutrophil adhesion by ~60% at 140/s, these reagents completely blocked adhesion at 3000/s. Anti-Mac-1 alone did not alter platelet-neutrophil adhesion rates at any shear rate, though in synergy with selectin antagonists it abrogated cell binding. Unstimulated neutrophils avidly bound Ps-beads and activated platelets in an integrin-independent manner, suggesting that purely selectin-dependent cell adhesion is possible. In support of this, antagonists against P-selectin or PSGL-1 dissociated previously formed platelet-neutrophil and Ps-bead neutrophil aggregates under shear in a variety of experimental systems, including in assays performed with whole blood. In studies where medium viscosity and shear rate were varied, a subtle shear threshold for P-selectin PSGL-1 binding was also noted at shear rates<100/s and at force loading rates of ~300pN/sec. Results are discussed in light of biophysical computations that characterize the collision between unequal size particles in linear shear flow. Overall, our studies reveal an integrin-independent regime for cell adhesion that may be physiologically relevant.

  16. Intraepithelial p63-dependent expression of distinct components of cell adhesion complexes in normal esophageal mucosa and squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thépot, Amélie; Hautefeuille, Agnès; Cros, Marie-Pierre; Abedi-Ardekani, Behnoush; Pétré, Aurélia; Damour, Odile; Krutovskikh, Vladimir; Hainaut, Pierre

    2010-11-01

    TP63 gene is a member of TP53 tumor suppressor gene family that encodes several protein isoforms involved in the process of epithelial stratification and in epithelial-mesenchyme interactions. TP63 is amplified in a significant proportion of squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus (ESCC), resulting in the hyper-expression of DeltaNp63 as the major p63 isoform. To better understand the contribution of this high expression to tumorigenesis, we have analyzed the impact of intraepithelial p63 expression on the expression of cell adhesion complexes in normal esophagus and in ESCC cell lines. Cells expressing p63 showed an adhesion pattern characterized by lack of tight junctions and presence of adherens junctions. Cell differentiation was accompanied by a decrease in p63 and by a shift to adhesion patterns involving tight junctions. Silencing of p63 mRNA in ESCC cell lines resulted in a similar shift, characterized by increased expression of component of tight junctions, decreased cell-to-cell communication and downregulation of cell proliferation. These results indicate that DeltaNp63 may contribute to esophageal squamous carcinogenesis by maintaining cell adhesion patterns compatible with cell proliferation. PMID:20127860

  17. P-Selectin-Mediated Platelet Adhesion Promotes the Metastasis of Murine Melanoma Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Cui-Ling Qi; Bo Wei; Jie Ye; Yang Yang; Bin Li; Qian-Qian Zhang; Jiang-Chao Li; Xiao-Dong He; Tian Lan; Li-Jing Wang

    2014-01-01

    Studies have indicated that the aggregation of activated platelets with cancer cells facilitates tumor metastasis; the adhesion molecule P-selectin may be an important mediator of this process, but the detailed mechanism is unclear. In the current study, we established a B16F10 (B16) cell metastatic model in P-selectin knockout (P-sel-/-) mice to determine the effect of P-selectin-mediated platelet adhesion on metastasis. Compared with C57 mice, P-sel-/- mice developed fewer metastatic foci, ...

  18. The Human Laminin Receptor is a Member of the Integrin Family of Cell Adhesion Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehlsen, Kurt R.; Dillner, Lena; Engvall, Eva; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    1988-09-01

    A receptor for the adhesive basement membrane protein, laminin, was isolated from human glioblastoma cells by affinity chromatography on laminin. This receptor has a heterodimeric structure similar to that of receptors for other extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin and vitronectin. Incorporation of the laminin receptor into liposomal membranes makes it possible for liposomes to attach to surfaces coated with laminin. The receptor liposomes also attached to some extent to surfaces coated with fibronectin, but not with other matrix proteins. These properties identify the laminin receptor as a member of the integrin family of cell adhesion receptors.

  19. Relevance of MUC1 mucin variable number of tandem repeats polymorphism in H pylori adhesion to gastric epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Natália R Costa; Nuno Mendes; Nuno T Marcos; Celso A Reis; Thomas Caffrey; Michael A Hollingsworth; Filipe Santos-Silva

    2008-01-01

    AIM:To evaluate the influence of MUC1 mucin variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) variability on H pylori adhesion to gastric cells.METHODS:Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based adhesion assays were performed to measure the adhesion of different H pylori strains (HP26695 and HPTx30a) to gastric carcinoma cell lines (GP202 and MKN45) and GP202 clones expressing recombinant MUC1 with different VNTR lengths.RESULTS:Evaluation of adhesion results shows that H pylori pathogenic strain HP26695 has a significantly higher (P<0.05) adhesion to all the cell lines and clones tested,when compared to the non-pathogenic strain HPTx30a.Bacteria showed a significantly higher (P<0.05)adhesion to the GP202 cell line,when compared to the MKN45 cell line.Furthermore,both strains showed a significantly higher (P<0.05) adhesion to GP202 clones with larger MUC1 VNTR domains.CONCLUSION:This work shows that MUC1 mucin variability conditions H pylori binding to gastric cells.The extent of bacterial adhesion depends on the size of the MUC1 VNTR domain.The adhesion is further dependent on bacterial pathogenicity and the gastric cell line.MUC1 mucin variability may contribute to determine H pylori colonization of the gastric mucosa.

  20. E. coli Nissle 1917 Affects Salmonella adhesion to porcine intestinal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schierack

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The probiotic Escherichia coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN has been shown to interfere in a human in vitro model with the invasion of several bacterial pathogens into epithelial cells, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not known. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of EcN on Salmonella Typhimurium invasion of porcine intestinal epithelial cells, focusing on EcN effects on the various stages of Salmonella infection including intracellular and extracellular Salmonella growth rates, virulence gene regulation, and adhesion. We show that EcN affects the initial Salmonella invasion steps by modulating Salmonella virulence gene regulation and Salmonella SiiE-mediated adhesion, but not extra- and intracellular Salmonella growth. However, the inhibitory activity of EcN against Salmonella invasion always correlated with EcN adhesion capacities. EcN mutants defective in the expression of F1C fimbriae and flagellae were less adherent and less inhibitory toward Salmonella invasion. Another E. coli strain expressing F1C fimbriae was also adherent to IPEC-J2 cells, and was similarly inhibitory against Salmonella invasion like EcN. CONCLUSIONS: We propose that EcN affects Salmonella adhesion through secretory components. This mechanism appears to be common to many E. coli strains, with strong adherence being a prerequisite for an effective reduction of SiiE-mediated Salmonella adhesion.

  1. Matrine inhibits the expression of adhesion molecules in activated vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Zhang, Lihua; Ren, Yingang; Gao, Yanli; Kang, Li; Lu, Shaoping

    2016-03-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease associated with increased expression of adhesion molecules in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Matrine is a main active ingredient of Sophora flavescens roots, which are used to treat inflammatory diseases. However, the effects of matrine on the expression of adhesion molecules in VSMCs have largely remained elusive. Therefore, the present study investigated the effects of matrine on the expression of adhesion molecules in tumor necrosis factor (TNF)‑α‑stimulated human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). The results showed that matrine inhibited the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule‑1 (VCAM‑1) and intercellular adhesion molecule‑1 (ICAM‑1) in TNF‑α‑stimulated HASMCs. Matrine markedly inhibited the TNF‑α‑induced expression of nuclear factor (NF)‑κB p65 and prevented the TNF‑α‑caused degradation of inhibitor of NF‑κB; it also inhibited TNF‑α‑induced activation of mitogen‑activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Furthermore, matrine inhibited the production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in TNF‑α‑stimulated HASMCs. In conclusion, the results of the present study demonstrated that matrine inhibited the expression of VCAM‑1 and ICAM‑1 in TNF‑α‑stimulated HASMCs via the suppression of ROS production as well as NF‑κB and MAPK pathway activation. Therefore, matrine may have a potential therapeutic use for preventing the advancement of atherosclerotic lesions.

  2. Migratory and adhesive properties of Xenopus laevis primordial germ cells in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliaksandr Dzementsei

    2013-11-01

    The directional migration of primordial germ cells (PGCs to the site of gonad formation is an advantageous model system to study cell motility. The embryonic development of PGCs has been investigated in different animal species, including mice, zebrafish, Xenopus and Drosophila. In this study we focus on the physical properties of Xenopus laevis PGCs during their transition from the passive to the active migratory state. Pre-migratory PGCs from Xenopus laevis embryos at developmental stages 17–19 to be compared with migratory PGCs from stages 28–30 were isolated and characterized in respect to motility and adhesive properties. Using single-cell force spectroscopy, we observed a decline in adhesiveness of PGCs upon reaching the migratory state, as defined by decreased attachment to extracellular matrix components like fibronectin, and a reduced adhesion to somatic endodermal cells. Data obtained from qPCR analysis with isolated PGCs reveal that down-regulation of E-cadherin might contribute to this weakening of cell-cell adhesion. Interestingly, however, using an in vitro migration assay, we found that movement of X. laevis PGCs can also occur independently of specific interactions with their neighboring cells. The reduction of cellular adhesion during PGC development is accompanied by enhanced cellular motility, as reflected in increased formation of bleb-like protrusions and inferred from electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS as well as time-lapse image analysis. Temporal alterations in cell shape, including contraction and expansion of the cellular body, reveal a higher degree of cellular dynamics for the migratory PGCs in vitro.

  3. Competition of Lactobacillus paracasei with Salmonella enterica for Adhesion to Caco-2 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alicja Jankowska

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Competition of commensal and probiotic bacteria with pathogens for adhesion and colonization is one of the important protective mechanisms of gastrointestinal tract. In this study, we examined the ability of Lactobacillus paracasei to inhibit the adhesion of pathogenic Salmonella enterica to human colon adenocarcinoma Caco-2 cells. Caco-2 cells were grown for 6 or 21 days to obtain nondifferentiated or well-differentiated cells, respectively. In adhesion experiments, bacteria were added to the cells for 2 or 4 hours. The number of attached bacteria was expressed as colony-forming units (CFUs, Caco-2 cells were counted in hematocytometer. Both bacterial strains used adhered better to well-differentiated than to nondifferentiated Caco-2 cells, however, the amount of Salmonella adhered to Caco-2 after 2 hours of contact was 12-fold higher in comparison to . paracasei and almost 27-fold higher after 4 hours of contact. Two types of experiments were done: coincubation (both bacteria were added to Caco-2 cells simultaneously, and preincubation (. paracasei was incubated with Caco-2 cells first, and then . enterica was added. In coincubation experiment, the presence of . paracasei decreased . enterica adhesion by 4-fold and in preincubation experiment even 7-fold. Generally, Lactobacillus spent culture supernatants (SCSs acted weaker as inhibitors of Salmonella adhesion in comparison to the whole . paracasei culture in coincubation experiment. In conclusion, the displacement of pathogens by lactic acid bacteria and its secretions showed here depends on the time of bacteria-epithelial cell contact, and also on the stage of Caco-2 differentiation.

  4. Greater osteoblast and endothelial cell adhesion on nanostructured polyethylene and titanium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theresa Raimondo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Theresa Raimondo, Sabrina Puckett, Thomas J WebsterSchool of Engineering and Department of Orthopedics, Brown University, Providence, RI, USAAbstract: Mostly due to desirable mechanical properties (such as high durability and low wear, certain synthetic polymers (such as polyethylene and metals (such as titanium have found numerous applications in the medical device arena from orthopedics to the vasculature, yet frequently, they do not proactively encourage desirable cell responses. In an effort to improve the efficacy of such traditional materials for various implant applications, this study used electron beam evaporation to create nanostructured surface features that mimic those of natural tissue on polyethylene and titanium. For other materials, it has been shown that the creation of nanorough surfaces increases surface energy leading to greater select protein (such as vitronectin and fibronectin interactions to increase specific cell adhesion. Here, osteoblast (bone forming cells and endothelial cell (cells that line the vasculature adhesion was determined on nanostructured compared to conventional, nano-smooth polyethylene and titanium. Results demonstrated that nanorough surfaces created by electron beam evaporation increased the adhesion of both cells markedly better than conventional smooth surfaces. In summary, this study provided evidence that electron beam evaporation can modify implant surfaces (specifically, polyethylene and titanium to have nanostructured surface features to improve osteoblast and endothelial cell adhesion. Since the adhesion of anchorage dependent cells (such as osteoblasts and endothelial cells is a prerequisite for their long-term functions, this study suggests that electron beam evaporation should be further studied for improving materials for various biomedical applications. Keywords: nanotechnology, polyethylene, osteoblasts, orthopedics, vascular, titanium

  5. Ethanol exposure disrupts extraembryonic microtubule cytoskeleton and embryonic blastomere cell adhesion, producing epiboly and gastrulation defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnalee Sarmah

    2013-08-01

    Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD occurs when pregnant mothers consume alcohol, causing embryonic ethanol exposure and characteristic birth defects that include craniofacial, neural and cardiac defects. Gastrulation is a particularly sensitive developmental stage for teratogen exposure, and zebrafish is an outstanding model to study gastrulation and FASD. Epiboly (spreading blastomere cells over the yolk cell, prechordal plate migration and convergence/extension cell movements are sensitive to early ethanol exposure. Here, experiments are presented that characterize mechanisms of ethanol toxicity on epiboly and gastrulation. Epiboly mechanisms include blastomere radial intercalation cell movements and yolk cell microtubule cytoskeleton pulling the embryo to the vegetal pole. Both of these processes were disrupted by ethanol exposure. Ethanol effects on cell migration also indicated that cell adhesion was affected, which was confirmed by cell aggregation assays. E-cadherin cell adhesion molecule expression was not affected by ethanol exposure, but E-cadherin distribution, which controls epiboly and gastrulation, was changed. E-cadherin was redistributed into cytoplasmic aggregates in blastomeres and dramatically redistributed in the extraembryonic yolk cell. Gene expression microarray analysis was used to identify potential causative factors for early development defects, and expression of the cell adhesion molecule protocadherin-18a (pcdh18a, which controls epiboly, was significantly reduced in ethanol exposed embryos. Injecting pcdh18a synthetic mRNA in ethanol treated embryos partially rescued epiboly cell movements, including enveloping layer cell shape changes. Together, data show that epiboly and gastrulation defects induced by ethanol are multifactorial, and include yolk cell (extraembryonic tissue microtubule cytoskeleton disruption and blastomere adhesion defects, in part caused by reduced pcdh18a expression.

  6. Micrometer scale spacings between fibronectin nanodots regulate cell morphology and focal adhesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horzum, Utku; Ozdil, Berrin; Pesen-Okvur, Devrim

    2014-04-01

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix is an important process for both health and disease states. Surface protein patterns that are topographically flat, and do not introduce other chemical, topographical or rigidity related functionality and, more importantly, that mimic the organization of the in vivo extracellular matrix are desired. Previous work showed that vinculin and cytoskeletal organization are modulated by size and shape of surface nanopatterns. However, quantitative analysis on cell morphology and focal adhesions as a function of micrometer scale spacings of FN nanopatterns was absent. Here, electron beam lithography was used to pattern fibronectin nanodots with micrometer scale spacings on a K-casein background on indium tin oxide coated glass which, unlike silicon, is transparent and thus suitable for many light microscopy techniques. Exposure times were significantly reduced using the line exposure mode with micrometer scale step sizes. Micrometer scale spacings of 2, 4 and 8 μm between fibronectin nanodots proved to modulate cell adhesion through modification of cell area, focal adhesion number, size and circularity. Overall, cell behavior was shown to shift at the apparent threshold of 4 μm spacing. The findings presented here offer exciting new opportunities for cell biology research.

  7. The viability and intestinal epithelial cell adhesion of probiotic strain combination--in vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piątek, Jacek; Gibas-Dorna, Magdalena; Olejnik, Anna; Krauss, Hanna; Wierzbicki, Krzysztof; Żukiewicz-Sobczak, Wioletta; Głowacki, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    To be effective, probiotic bacteria must exhibit a number of functional characteristics, including the resistance to gastric acidity and the ability to adhere to the intestinal epithelium. In this study, we examined in vitro the viability of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) combination after exposure to low pH, and the adhesion of LAB to Caco-2 cells during coincubation of 9 bacterial strains. To test bacterial viability, 6 commercially available products were incubated in 0.1 N HCl at pH 1.2 for 60 min. The greatest growth inhibition was noted for the non-capsulated product containing the Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain (log reduction of CFU = 6.4), and the best survival observed for the product containing 9 bacterial strains, equipped with a modern capsule made according to the Multi-Resistant Encapsulation technology (log reduction of CFU = 0.1). In the adhesion experiment, the combination of 9 bacterial strains was added to 17-day-old Caco-2 cell culture for 90 min. The greatest efficiency of adhesion was observed for the inoculum containing 5.5x10(8) CFU/mL/9.6 cm(2) of Caco-2 and the dose of probiotic bacteria of 190 cells per one Caco-2 cell. As a result, approximately 157 bacterial cells adhered to one Caco-2 cell. The results indicate that the combination of 9 bacterial strains in the examined product is characterized as highly adhesive. PMID:22462453

  8. CXCR4 Chemokine Receptor Mediates Prostate Tumor Cell Adhesion through α5 and β3 Integrins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Engl

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms leading to prostate cancer metastasis are not understood completely. Although there is evidence that the CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR 4 and its ligand CXCL12 may regulate tumor dissemination, their role in prostate cancer is controversial. We examined CXCR4 expression and functionality, and explored CXCL12-triggered adhesion of prostate tumor cells to human endothelium or to extracellular matrix proteins laminin, collagen, and fibronectin. Although little CXCR4 was expressed on LNCaP and DU-145 prostate tumor cells, CXCR4 was still active, enabling the cells to migrate toward a CXCL12 gradient. CXCL12 induced elevated adhesion to the endothelial cell monolayer and to immobilized fibronectin, laminin, and collagen. Anti-CXCR4 antibodies or CXCR4 knock out significantly impaired CXCL 12-triggered tumor cell binding. The effects observed did not depend on CXCR4 surface expression level. Rather, CXCR4-mediated adhesion was established by α5 and β3 integrin subunits and took place in the presence of reduced p38 and p38 phosphorylation. These data show that chemoattractive mechanisms are involved in adhesion processes of prostate cancer cells, and that binding of CXCL12 to its receptor leads to enhanced expression of α5 and β3. The findings provide a link between chemokine receptor expression and integrin-triggered tumor dissemination.

  9. Micrometer scale spacings between fibronectin nanodots regulate cell morphology and focal adhesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell adhesion to extracellular matrix is an important process for both health and disease states. Surface protein patterns that are topographically flat, and do not introduce other chemical, topographical or rigidity related functionality and, more importantly, that mimic the organization of the in vivo extracellular matrix are desired. Previous work showed that vinculin and cytoskeletal organization are modulated by size and shape of surface nanopatterns. However, quantitative analysis on cell morphology and focal adhesions as a function of micrometer scale spacings of FN nanopatterns was absent. Here, electron beam lithography was used to pattern fibronectin nanodots with micrometer scale spacings on a K-casein background on indium tin oxide coated glass which, unlike silicon, is transparent and thus suitable for many light microscopy techniques. Exposure times were significantly reduced using the line exposure mode with micrometer scale step sizes. Micrometer scale spacings of 2, 4 and 8 μm between fibronectin nanodots proved to modulate cell adhesion through modification of cell area, focal adhesion number, size and circularity. Overall, cell behavior was shown to shift at the apparent threshold of 4 μm spacing. The findings presented here offer exciting new opportunities for cell biology research. (papers)

  10. Tumor cell adhesion to endothelial cells is increased by endotoxin via an upregulation of beta-1 integrin expression.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Andrews, E J

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies have demonstrated that metastatic disease develops from tumor cells that adhere to endothelial cells and proliferate intravascularly. The beta-1 integrin family and its ligand laminin have been shown to be important in tumor-to-endothelial cell adhesion. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) has been implicated in the increased metastatic tumor growth that is seen postoperatively. We postulated that LPS increases tumor cell expression of beta-1 integrins and that this leads to increased adhesion. METHODS: The human metastatic colon cancer cell line LS174T was labeled with an enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) using retroviral transfection. Cell cultures were treated with LPS for 1, 2, and 4 h (n = 6 each) and were subsequently cocultured for 30 or 120 min with confluent human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs), to allow adherence. Adherent tumor cells were counted using fluorescence microscopy. These experiments were carried out in the presence or absence of a functional blocking beta-1 integrin monoclonal antibody (4B4). Expression of beta-1 integrin and laminin on tumor and HUVECs was assessed using flow cytometric analysis. Tumor cell NF-kappaB activation after incubation with LPS was measured. RESULTS: Tumor cell and HUVEC beta-1 integrin expression and HUVEC expression of laminin were significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced after incubation with LPS. Tumor cell adhesion to HUVECs was significantly increased. Addition of the beta-1 integrin blocking antibody reduced tumor cell adhesion to control levels. LPS increased tumor cell NF-kappaB activation. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to LPS increases tumor cell adhesion to the endothelium through a beta-1 integrin-mediated pathway that is NF-kappaB dependent. This may provide a target for immunotherapy directed at reducing postoperative metastatic tumor growth.

  11. Differential expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule in salivary gland neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phattarataratip, Ekarat; Masorn, Marisa; Jarupoonphol, Werapong; Supatthanayut, Sirinpaporn; Saeoweiang, Pichanee

    2016-10-01

    Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) is the epithelial-specific molecule expressed on various epithelial cell types. The function of EpCAM involves cellular adhesion, proliferation, and signaling in both normal tissues and cancers. The purposes of this study were to investigate the EpCAM expression in salivary gland neoplasms and examine its relationship with pathologic characteristics. Forty-two cases of salivary gland neoplasms, including 20 mucoepidermoid carcinomas (MECs), 11 adenoid cystic carcinomas (ACCs), 9 pleomorphic adenomas (PAs), and 2 polymorphous low-grade adenocarcinomas (PLGAs) were enrolled. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule expression was analyzed immunohistochemically using MOC-31 and BerEP4 antibodies. Results showed that the majority of MECs and all PLGAs showed EpCAM expression in more than 50% of neoplastic cells, whereas most PAs and ACCs did not express this protein. In MECs, most EpCAM-positive neoplastic cells were clear cells, glandular epithelial cells, and intermediate cells, whereas squamous cells and mucous cells were largely negative. The expression was limited to ductal epithelium in EpCAM-positive PAs and ACCs. The decreased EpCAM expression in MECs was significantly associated with microscopically diminished cystic components, the presence of small nest invasion at invasive front, cellular anaplasia, vascular invasion, and high pathologic grade. These data suggested that EpCAM showed different expression pattern among salivary gland neoplasms and in different grades of MECs. PMID:27649957

  12. Tailored Poly(2-oxazoline) Polymer Brushes to Control Protein Adsorption and Cell Adhesion

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Ning

    2012-05-18

    POx bottle-brush brushes (BBBs) are synthesized by SIPGP of 2-isopropenyl-2-oxazoline and consecutive LCROP of 2-oxazolines on 3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane-modified silicon substrates. The side chain hydrophilicity and polarity are varied. The impact of the chemical composition and architecture of the BBB upon protein (fibronectin) adsorption and endothelial cell adhesion are investigated and prove extremely low protein adsorption and cell adhesion on BBBs with hydrophilic side chains such as poly(2-methyl-2-oxazoline) and poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline). The influence of the POx side chain terminal function upon adsorption and adhesion is minor but the side chain length has a significant effect on bioadsorption. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Siah regulation of Pard3A controls neuronal cell adhesion during germinal zone exit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Famulski, Jakub K; Trivedi, Niraj; Howell, Danielle; Yang, Yuan; Tong, Yiai; Gilbertson, Richard; Solecki, David J

    2010-12-24

    The brain's circuitry is established by directed migration and synaptogenesis of neurons during development. Although neurons mature and migrate in specific patterns, little is known about how neurons exit their germinal zone niche. We found that cerebellar granule neuron germinal zone exit is regulated by proteasomal degradation of Pard3A by the Seven in Absentia homolog (Siah) E3 ubiquitin ligase. Pard3A gain of function and Siah loss of function induce precocious radial migration. Time-lapse imaging using a probe to measure neuronal cell contact reveals that Pard3A promotes adhesive interactions needed for germinal zone exit by recruiting the epithelial tight junction adhesion molecule C to the neuronal cell surface. Our findings define a Siah-Pard3A signaling pathway that controls adhesion-dependent exit of neuronal progenitors or immature neurons from a germinal zone niche.

  14. Signaling through intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) in a B cell lymphoma line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holland, J; Owens, T

    1997-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) (CD54) is an adhesion molecule of the immunoglobulin superfamily. The interaction between ICAM-1 on B lymphocytes and leukocyte function-associated antigen 1 on T cells plays a major role in several aspects of the immune response, including T-dependent B...... cell activation. While it was originally believed that ICAM-1 played a purely adhesive role, recent evidence suggests that it can itself transduce biochemical signals. We demonstrate that cross-linking of ICAM-1 results in the up-regulation of class II major histocompatibility complex, and we...... investigate the biochemical mechanism for the signaling role of ICAM-1. We show that cross-linking of ICAM-1 on the B lymphoma line A20 induces an increase in tyrosine phosphorylation of several cellular proteins, including the Src family kinase p53/p56(lyn). In vitro kinase assays showed that Lyn kinase...

  15. Flocculation protein structure and cell-cell adhesion mechanism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Katty; Willaert, Ronnie

    2010-11-01

    Cell-cell adhesion occurs in a broad spectrum of biological processes, of which yeast flocculation is an area of interest for evolutionary scientists to brewers and winemakers. The flocculation mechanism is based on a lectin-carbohydrate interaction but is not yet fully understood, although the first model dates back to the 1950s. This review will update the current understanding of the complex mechanism behind yeast flocculation. Moreover, modern technologies to measure the forces involved in single carbohydrate-lectin interactions, are discussed. The Flo1 protein has been extensively described as the protein responsible for strong flocculation. Recently, more research has been directed to the detailed analysis of this flocculin. Due to the advances in the field of bioinformatics, more information about Flo1p could be obtained via structurally or functionally related proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge of the Flo1 protein, with a strong emphasis towards its structure.

  16. New serum markers for small-cell lung cancer. II. The neural cell adhesion molecule, NCAM

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vangsted, A; Drivsholm, L; Andersen, E;

    1994-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) was recently suggested as a marker for small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated the presence of the NCAM in 78% of SCLC patients and in 25% of patients with other cancer forms. NCAM was proposed to be the most sensitive marker...... for SCLC, and it may also be an important prognostic marker for SCLC. We used a competitive ELISA to analyze the concentrations of NCAM in sera from 96 SCLC patients, 16 patients with non-SCLC, 4 patients with other cancer forms, and 16 healthy controls. All sera were collected at the time of diagnosis...... between SCLC patients with localized and extensive disease. Serum from one patient with cancer of the thyroid, but no sera from non-SCLC patients or normal healthy controls, was positive. The expression of NCAM did not correlate to any of the clinical parameters, and no correlation was found to the other...

  17. Dynamic Switch Between Two Adhesion Phenotypes in Colorectal Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Geng, Yue; Chandrasekaran, Siddarth; Agastin, Sivaprakash; Li, Jiahe; King, Michael R.

    2013-01-01

    The hematogenous metastatic cascade is mediated by the interaction of cancer cells and the endothelial cell lining of blood vessels. In this work, we examine the colon cancer cell line COLO 205, which grows simultaneously in both adherent and suspended states in culture and can serve as a good model for studying tumor heterogeneity. The two subpopulations of cells have different molecular characteristics despite being from the same parent cell line. We found that the ratio of adherent to susp...

  18. Disaccharides generated from heparan sulphate or heparin modulate chemokine-induced T-cell adhesion to extracellular matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershkoviz, R; Schor, H; Ariel, A; Hecht, I; Cohen, I R; Lider, O; Cahalon, L

    2000-01-01

    We have found previously that disaccharides (DS) enzymatically generated from heparin or heparan sulphate can modulate tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) secretion from immune cells in vitro and cell-mediated immune reactions in vivo. Here, we show that such DS can modulate the adhesion and migration of human T cells. We found that certain heparin- and heparan sulphate-derived DS induced, in a dose-dependent manner, the adhesion of human T cells to both extracellular matrix (ECM) and immobilized fibronectin (FN); maximal T-cell adhesion occurred with 1 ng/ml of DS. The levels of T-cell adhesion to ECM that were induced by the tested DS molecules resembled those induced by the prototypic chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein 1beta (MIP-1beta). However, the kinetics of DS-induced T-cell adhesion to FN resembled that induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), but not that induced by MIP-1beta. This adhesion appeared to involve beta1 integrin recognition and activation, and was associated with specific intracellular activation pathways. Although a first exposure of T cells to certain DS molecules appeared to result in cell adhesion, a subsequent exposure of T cells to pro-adhesive chemokines, such as MIP-1beta or RANTES, but not to other pro-adhesive stimuli, for example interleukin-2 or CD3 cross-linking, resulted in inhibition of T-cell adhesion to and chemotactic migration through FN. Hence, we propose that the breakdown products of tissues generated by inflammatory enzymes are part of an intrinsic functional programme, and not necessarily molecular waste. Moreover, because the DS molecules exert their modulatory functions within a limited time, it appears that the historical encounters of the tissue-invading cells with the constituents of inflamed loci may dictate the cells' behaviour upon subsequent exposure to proinflammatory mediators. PMID:10651945

  19. PEGylated human plasma fibronectin is proteolytically stable, supports cell adhesion, cell migration, focal adhesion assembly, and fibronectin fibrillogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen; Hekmatfar, Sogol; Ramanathan, Anand; Karuri, Nancy W

    2013-01-01

    Delayed wound healing in many chronic wounds has been linked to the degradation of fibronectin (FN) by abnormally high protease levels. We sought to develop a proteolytically stable and functionally active form of FN. For this purpose, we conjugated 3.35 kDa polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) to human plasma fibronectin (HPFN). Conjugation of PEGDA to HPFN or HPFN PEGylation was characterized by an increase of approximately 16 kDa in the average molecular weight of PEGylated HPFN compared to native HPFN in SDS-PAGE gels. PEGylated HPFN was more resistant to α chymotrypsin or neutrophil elastase digestion than native HPFN: after 30 min incubation with α chymotrypsin, 56 and 90% of native and PEGylated HPFN respectively remained intact. PEGylated HPFN and native HPFN supported NIH 3T3 mouse fibroblast adhesion and spreading, migration and focal adhesion formation in a similar manner. Fluorescence microscopy showed that both native and PEGylated HPFN in the culture media were assembled into extracellular matrix (ECM) fibrils. Interestingly, when coated on surfaces, native but not PEGylated HPFN was assembled into the ECM of fibroblasts. The proteolytically stable PEGylated HPFN developed herein could be used to replenish FN levels in the chronic wound bed and promote tissue repair.

  20. Stimulation of human red blood cells leads to Ca2+-mediated intercellular adhesion

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, Patrick; Nguyen, Duc Bach; Müller, Torsten; Bernhardt, Ingolf; Kaestner, Lars; Wagner, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) are a major component of blood clots, which form physiologically as a response to injury or pathologically in thrombosis. The active participation of RBCs in thrombus solidification has been previously proposed but not yet experimentally proven. Holographic optical tweezers and single-cell force spectroscopy were used to study potential cell-cell adhesion between RBCs. Irreversible intercellular adhesion of RBCs could be induced by stimulation with lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), a compound known to be released by activated platelets. We identified Ca2+ as an essential player in the signaling cascade by directly inducing Ca2+ influx using A23187. Elevation of the internal Ca2+ concentration leads to an intercellular adhesion of RBCs similar to that induced by LPA stimulation. Using single-cell force spectroscopy, the adhesion of the RBCs was identified to be approximately 100 pN, a value large enough to be of significance inside a blood clot or in pathological situations like the vasco-occ...

  1. Modeling of cell adhesion and deformation mediated by receptor-ligand interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golestaneh, Amirreza F; Nadler, Ben

    2016-04-01

    The current work is devoted to studying adhesion and deformation of biological cells mediated by receptors and ligands in order to enhance the existing models. Due to the sufficient in-plane continuity and fluidity of the phospholipid molecules, an isotropic continuum fluid membrane is proposed for modeling the cell membrane. The developed constitutive model accounts for the influence of the presence of receptors on the deformation and adhesion of the cell membrane through the introduction of spontaneous area dilation. Motivated by physics, a nonlinear receptor-ligand binding force is introduced based on charge-induced dipole interaction. Diffusion of the receptors on the membrane is governed by the receptor-ligand interaction via Fick's Law and receptor-ligand interaction. The developed model is then applied to study the deformation and adhesion of a biological cell. The proposed model is used to study the role of the material, binding, spontaneous area dilation and environmental properties on the deformation and adhesion of the cell. PMID:26093646

  2. Phosphoinositide lipid phosphatase SHIP1 and PTEN coordinate to regulate cell migration and adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Subhanjan; Subramanian, Kulandayan K.; Sakai, Jiro; Bajrami, Besnik; Luo, Hongbo R.

    2012-01-01

    The second messenger phosphatidylinositol(3,4,5)P3 (PtdIns(3,4,5)P3) is formed by stimulation of various receptors, including G protein–coupled receptors and integrins. The lipid phosphatases PTEN and SHIP1 are critical in regulating the level of PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 during chemotaxis. Observations that loss of PTEN had minor and loss of SHIP1 resulted in a severe chemotaxis defect in neutrophils led to the belief that SHIP1 rather than PTEN acts as a predominant phospholipid phosphatase in establishing a PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 compass. In this study, we show that SHIP1 regulates PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 production in response to cell adhesion and plays a limited role when cells are in suspension. SHIP1−/− neutrophils lose their polarity upon cell adhesion and are extremely adherent, which impairs chemotaxis. However, chemo­taxis can be restored by reducing adhesion. Loss of SHIP1 elevates Akt activation following cell adhesion due to increased PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 production. From our observations, we conclude that SHIP1 prevents formation of top-down PtdIns(3,4,5)P3 polarity to facilitate proper cell attachment and detachment during chemotaxis. PMID:22323291

  3. A High-Adhesive Lysine-Cyclic RGD Peptide Designed for Selective Cell Retention Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Keyu; Mei, Tieniu; Li, Zhiqiang; Deng, Moyuan; Zhang, Zehua; Hou, Tianyong; Dong, Shiwu; Xie, Zhao; Xu, Jianzhong; Luo, Fei

    2016-06-01

    Cell adhesion is an important property of biomaterials used in selective cell retention (SCR) technology, which fabricates bone grafts rapidly in clinical settings. This could be improved by physical and biologic manipulations. To facilitate retention of the cells on the scaffold, especially osteoprogenitors from bone marrow in the convenient SCR procedure, a lysine-cyclic RGD (LcRGD) peptide was here designed to coordinate positively charged amino acids and the RGD sequence to enhance the adhesion performance of the scaffold. Demineralized bone matrix (DBM) is an important therapeutic resource, but its cell adhesion ability and osteoinductive capacity are low because of its processing. These capabilities can be increased to enhance the performance of DBM when used in SCR technology. Here, LcRGD peptide was used to modify DBM and produce a DBM/LcRGD composite. This composite exhibited enhanced adhesion performance on cultured human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and retained more osteoprogenitors from bone marrow than other materials did. The DBM/LcRGD composite displayed a preferable osteoinduction in vitro and osteogenic capacity in vivo. Thus, LcRGD peptide as a commendable modifier of DBM applied in SCR technology can improve bone transplantation. PMID:27154386

  4. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 signaling inhibits the activation of human platelets

    OpenAIRE

    Cicmil, Milenko; Stevens, Jo; Leduc, Mireille; Bon, Cassian; Gibbins, Jonathan M.

    2002-01-01

    Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1/CD31) is a 130-kd transmembrane glycoprotein and a member of the growing family of receptors with immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs). PECAM-1 is expressed on platelets, certain T cells, monocytes, neutrophils, and vascular endothelial cells and is involved in a range of cellular processes, though the role of PECAM-1 in platelets is unclear. Cross-linking of PECAM-1 results in phosphorylation of the ITIM allowing the r...

  5. Distribution and surfactant association of carcinoembryonic cell adhesion molecule 6 in human lung

    OpenAIRE

    Chapin, Cheryl; Bailey, Nicole A.; Gonzales, Linda W.; Lee, Jae-Woo; Gonzalez, Robert F.; Ballard, Philip L.

    2011-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic cell adhesion molecule 6 (CEACAM6) is a glycosylated, glycophosphatidylinositol-anchored protein expressed in epithelial cells of various primate tissues. It binds gram-negative bacteria and is overexpressed in human cancers. CEACAM6 is associated with lamellar bodies of cultured type II cells of human fetal lung and protects surfactant function in vitro. In this study, we characterized CEACAM6 expression in vivo in human lung. CEACAM6 was present in lung lavage of premature ...

  6. A Novel Nectin-mediated Cell Adhesion Apparatus That Is Implicated in Prolactin Receptor Signaling for Mammary Gland Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitayama, Midori; Mizutani, Kiyohito; Maruoka, Masahiro; Mandai, Kenji; Sakakibara, Shotaro; Ueda, Yuki; Komori, Takahide; Shimono, Yohei; Takai, Yoshimi

    2016-03-11

    Mammary gland development is induced by the actions of various hormones to form a structure consisting of collecting ducts and milk-secreting alveoli, which comprise two types of epithelial cells known as luminal and basal cells. These cells adhere to each other by cell adhesion apparatuses whose roles in hormone-dependent mammary gland development remain largely unknown. Here we identified a novel cell adhesion apparatus at the boundary between the luminal and basal cells in addition to desmosomes. This apparatus was formed by the trans-interaction between the cell adhesion molecules nectin-4 and nectin-1, which were expressed in the luminal and basal cells, respectively. Nectin-4 of this apparatus further cis-interacted with the prolactin receptor in the luminal cells to enhance the prolactin-induced prolactin receptor signaling for alveolar development with lactogenic differentiation. Thus, a novel nectin-mediated cell adhesion apparatus regulates the prolactin receptor signaling for mammary gland development. PMID:26757815

  7. A Novel Nectin-mediated Cell Adhesion Apparatus That Is Implicated in Prolactin Receptor Signaling for Mammary Gland Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitayama, Midori; Mizutani, Kiyohito; Maruoka, Masahiro; Mandai, Kenji; Sakakibara, Shotaro; Ueda, Yuki; Komori, Takahide; Shimono, Yohei; Takai, Yoshimi

    2016-03-11

    Mammary gland development is induced by the actions of various hormones to form a structure consisting of collecting ducts and milk-secreting alveoli, which comprise two types of epithelial cells known as luminal and basal cells. These cells adhere to each other by cell adhesion apparatuses whose roles in hormone-dependent mammary gland development remain largely unknown. Here we identified a novel cell adhesion apparatus at the boundary between the luminal and basal cells in addition to desmosomes. This apparatus was formed by the trans-interaction between the cell adhesion molecules nectin-4 and nectin-1, which were expressed in the luminal and basal cells, respectively. Nectin-4 of this apparatus further cis-interacted with the prolactin receptor in the luminal cells to enhance the prolactin-induced prolactin receptor signaling for alveolar development with lactogenic differentiation. Thus, a novel nectin-mediated cell adhesion apparatus regulates the prolactin receptor signaling for mammary gland development.

  8. Hyaluronan suppresses prostate tumor cell proliferation through diminished expression of N-cadherin and aberrant growth factor receptor signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bharadwaj, Alamelu G.; Goodrich, Nathaniel P.; McAtee, Caitlin O.; Haferbier, Katie [Department of Biochemistry, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Oakley, Gregory G.; Wahl, James K. [Department of Oral Biology, University of Nebraska College of Dentistry, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Simpson, Melanie A., E-mail: msimpson2@unl.edu [Department of Biochemistry, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE 68588 (United States); Eppley Cancer Center, University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, NE 68198 (United States)

    2011-05-01

    Hyaluronan (HA) production has been functionally implicated in prostate tumorigenesis and metastasis. We previously used prostate tumor cells overexpressing the HA synthesizing enzyme HAS3 or the clinically relevant hyaluronidase Hyal1 to show that excess HA production suppresses tumor growth, while HA turnover accelerates spontaneous metastasis from the prostate. Here, we examined pathways responsible for effects of HAS3 and Hyal1 on tumor cell phenotype. Detailed characterization of cell cycle progression revealed that expression of Hyal1 accelerated cell cycle re-entry following synchronization, whereas HAS3 alone delayed entry. Hyal1 expressing cells exhibited a significant reduction in their ability to sustain ERK phosphorylation upon stimulation by growth factors, and in their expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21. In contrast, HAS3 expressing cells showed prolonged ERK phosphorylation and increased expression of both p21 and p27, in asynchronous and synchronized cultures. Changes in cell cycle regulatory proteins were accompanied by HA-induced suppression of N-cadherin, while E-cadherin expression and {beta}-catenin expression and distribution remained unchanged. Our results are consistent with a model in which excess HA synthesis suppresses cell proliferation by promoting homotypic E-cadherin mediated cell-cell adhesion, consequently signaling to elevate cell cycle inhibitor expression and suppress G1- to S-phase transition.

  9. Progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma accompanied with reduced E-cadherin expression but not cadherin switch.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Hashimoto

    Full Text Available The cadherin switch from E-cadherin to N-cadherin is considered as a hallmark of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition and progression of carcinomas. Although it enhances aggressive behaviors of adenocarcinoma cells, the significance and role of cadherin switch in squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs are largely controversial. In the present study, we immunohistochemically examined expression of E-cadherin and N-cadherin in oral SCCs (n = 63 and its implications for the disease progression. The E-cadherin-positive carcinoma cells were rapidly decreased at the invasive front. The percentage of carcinoma cells stained E-cadherin at the cell membrane was reduced in parallel with tumor dedifferentiation (P<0.01 and enhanced invasion (P<0.01. In contrast, N-cadherin-positive cells were very limited and did not correlate with the clinicopathological parameters. Mouse tongue tumors xenotransplantated oral SCC cell lines expressing both cadherins in vitro reproduced the reduction of E-cadherin-positive carcinoma cells at the invasive front and the negligible expression of N-cadherin. These results demonstrate that the reduction of E-cadherin-mediated carcinoma cell-cell adhesion at the invasive front, but not the cadherin switch, is an important determinant for oral SCC progression, and suggest that the environments surrounding carcinoma cells largely affect the cadherin expression.

  10. Lateral shear forces applied to cells with single elastic micropillars to influence focal adhesion dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heil, Patrick; Spatz, Joachim P, E-mail: spatz@mf.mpg.d [Department of New Materials and Biosystems, Max Planck Institute for Metals Research, Heisenbergstrasse 3, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Department of Biophysical Chemistry, University of Heidelberg, Heisenbergstrasse 3, D-70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2010-05-19

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are important adhesion sites between eukaryotic cells and the extracellular matrix, their size depending on the locally applied force. To quantitatively study the mechanosensitivity of FAs, we induce their growth and disassembly by varying the distribution of intracellular stress. We present a novel method for micromanipulation of living cells to explore the dynamics of focal adhesion (FA) assembly under force. Fibroblasts are sheared laterally to their adhesion surface with single PDMS micropillars in order to apply laterally stretch or compression to focal adhesions. This allows for measuring the shear force exerted by the micropillar and correlates it with FA length and growth velocity. Furthermore, we analyze the resulting dynamics of FA molecules (paxillin) and compare intensity profiles along FAs before and after the application of external force. The responses of stretched and relaxed FAs differ fundamentally: relaxed and compressed FAs disassemble isotropically and show no length variation while stretched FAs grow unisotropically in the direction of the applied force and show protein influx only at their front.

  11. Angiogenin enhances cell migration by regulating stress fiber assembly and focal adhesion dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saisai Wei

    Full Text Available Angiogenin (ANG acts on both vascular endothelial cells and cancer cells, but the underlying mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we carried out a co-immunoprecipitation assay in HeLa cells and identified 14 potential ANG-interacting proteins. Among these proteins, β-actin, α-actinin 4, and non-muscle myosin heavy chain 9 are stress fiber components and involved in cytoskeleton organization and movement, which prompted us to investigate the mechanism of action of ANG in cell migration. Upon confirmation of the interactions between ANG and the three proteins, further studies revealed that ANG co-localized with β-actin and α-actinin 4 at the leading edge of migrating cells. Down-regulation of ANG resulted in fewer but thicker stress fibers with less dynamics, which was associated with the enlargements of focal adhesions. The focal adhesion kinase activity and cell migration capacity were significantly decreased in ANG-deficient cells. Taken together, our data demonstrated that the existence of ANG in the cytoplasm optimizes stress fiber assembly and focal adhesion formation to accommodate cell migration. The finding that ANG promoted cancer cell migration might provide new clues for tumor metastasis research.

  12. Abrogation of junctional adhesion molecule-A expression induces cell apoptosis and reduces breast cancer progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Murakami

    Full Text Available Intercellular junctions promote homotypic cell to cell adhesion and transfer intracellular signals which control cell growth and apoptosis. Junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM-A is a transmembrane immunoglobulin located at tight junctions of normal epithelial cells of mammary ducts and glands. In the present paper we show that JAM-A acts as a survival factor for mammary carcinoma cells. JAM-A null mice expressing Polyoma Middle T under MMTV promoter develop significantly smaller mammary tumors than JAM-A positive mice. Angiogenesis and inflammatory or immune infiltrate were not statistically modified in absence of JAM-A but tumor cell apoptosis was significantly increased. Tumor cells isolated from JAM-A null mice or 4T1 cells incubated with JAM-A blocking antibodies showed reduced growth and increased apoptosis which paralleled altered junctional architecture and adhesive function. In a breast cancer clinical data set, tissue microarray data show that JAM-A expression correlates with poor prognosis. Gene expression analysis of mouse tumor samples showed a correlation between genes enriched in human G3 tumors and genes over expressed in JAM-A +/+ mammary tumors. Conversely, genes enriched in G1 human tumors correlate with genes overexpressed in JAM-A-/- tumors. We conclude that down regulation of JAM-A reduces tumor aggressive behavior by increasing cell susceptibility to apoptosis. JAM-A may be considered a negative prognostic factor and a potential therapeutic target.

  13. Alveolar Type II Cells Escape Stress Failure Caused by Tonic Stretch through Transient Focal Adhesion Disassembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Yang Liu, Xiao-Fei Chen, Yan-Hong Ren, Qing-Yuan Zhan, Chen Wang, Chun Yang

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical ventilation-induced excessive stretch of alveoli is reported to induce cellular stress failure and subsequent lung injury, and is therefore an injurious factor to the lung. Avoiding cellular stress failure is crucial to ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI treatment. In the present study, primary rat alveolar type II (ATII cells were isolated to evaluate their viability and the mechanism of their survival under tonic stretch. By the annexin V/ PI staining and flow cytometry assay, we demonstrated that tonic stretch-induced cell death is an immediate injury of mechanical stress. In addition, immunofluorescence and immunoblots assay showed that the cells experienced an expansion-contraction-reexpansion process, accompanied by partial focal adhesion (FA disassembly during contraction. Manipulation of integrin adherent affinity by altering bivalent cation levels in the culture medium and applying an integrin neutralizing antibody showed that facilitated adhesion affinity promoted cell death under tonic stretch, while lower level of adhesion protected the cells from stretch-induced stress failure. Finally, a simplified numerical model was established to reveal that adequate disassembly of FAs reduced the forces transmitting throughout the cell. Taken together, these results indicate that ATII cells escape stress failure caused by tonic stretch via active cell morphological remodeling, during which cells transiently disassemble FAs to unload mechanical forces.

  14. Cell adhesion geometry regulates non-random DNA segregation and asymmetric cell fates in mouse skeletal muscle stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yennek, Siham; Burute, Mithila; Théry, Manuel; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim

    2014-05-22

    Cells of several metazoan species have been shown to non-randomly segregate their DNA such that older template DNA strands segregate to one daughter cell. The mechanisms that regulate this asymmetry remain undefined. Determinants of cell fate are polarized during mitosis and partitioned asymmetrically as the spindle pole orients during cell division. Chromatids align along the pole axis; therefore, it is unclear whether extrinsic cues that determine spindle pole position also promote non-random DNA segregation. To mimic the asymmetric divisions seen in the mouse skeletal stem cell niche, we used micropatterns coated with extracellular matrix in asymmetric and symmetric motifs. We show that the frequency of non-random DNA segregation and transcription factor asymmetry correlates with the shape of the motif and that these events can be uncoupled. Furthermore, regulation of DNA segregation by cell adhesion occurs within a defined time interval. Thus, cell adhesion cues have a major impact on determining both DNA segregation patterns and cell fates. PMID:24836002

  15. Cell Adhesion Geometry Regulates Non-Random DNA Segregation and Asymmetric Cell Fates in Mouse Skeletal Muscle Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siham Yennek

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cells of several metazoan species have been shown to non-randomly segregate their DNA such that older template DNA strands segregate to one daughter cell. The mechanisms that regulate this asymmetry remain undefined. Determinants of cell fate are polarized during mitosis and partitioned asymmetrically as the spindle pole orients during cell division. Chromatids align along the pole axis; therefore, it is unclear whether extrinsic cues that determine spindle pole position also promote non-random DNA segregation. To mimic the asymmetric divisions seen in the mouse skeletal stem cell niche, we used micropatterns coated with extracellular matrix in asymmetric and symmetric motifs. We show that the frequency of non-random DNA segregation and transcription factor asymmetry correlates with the shape of the motif and that these events can be uncoupled. Furthermore, regulation of DNA segregation by cell adhesion occurs within a defined time interval. Thus, cell adhesion cues have a major impact on determining both DNA segregation patterns and cell fates.

  16. Molecular mechanisms underlying adhesion and migration of hematopoietic stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sahin, Aysegul Ocal; Buitenhuis, Miranda

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the most powerful treatment modality for a large number of hematopoietic malignancies, including leukemia. Successful hematopoietic recovery after transplantation depends on homing of hematopoietic stem cells to the bone marrow and subsequent lodging of those cells in specific niches in the bone marrow. Migration of hematopoietic stem cells to the bone marrow is a highly regulated process that requires correct regulation of the expression and activit...

  17. P-selectin-mediated platelet adhesion promotes the metastasis of murine melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Cui-Ling; Wei, Bo; Ye, Jie; Yang, Yang; Li, Bin; Zhang, Qian-Qian; Li, Jiang-Chao; He, Xiao-Dong; Lan, Tian; Wang, Li-Jing

    2014-01-01

    Studies have indicated that the aggregation of activated platelets with cancer cells facilitates tumor metastasis; the adhesion molecule P-selectin may be an important mediator of this process, but the detailed mechanism is unclear. In the current study, we established a B16F10 (B16) cell metastatic model in P-selectin knockout (P-sel-/-) mice to determine the effect of P-selectin-mediated platelet adhesion on metastasis. Compared with C57 mice, P-sel-/- mice developed fewer metastatic foci, and cell proliferation within the metastatic tumors was inhibited by P-selectin deficiency. The platelet refusion assay demonstrated that mice with P-sel-/- platelets developed fewer lung metastatic foci (PP-selectin deficiency inhibited the metastasis of B16 cells and that wild-type platelet refusion reversed this inhibition. The P-selectin-mediated interaction between platelets and B16 cells promoted angiogenesis by up-regulating VEGF.

  18. Enhanced adhesion of osteoblastic cells on polystyrene films by independent control of surface topography and wettability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Seung Yun [National Creative Research Center for Block Copolymer Self-Assembly, Departments of Environmental Science and Engineering and Chemical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eung-Sam [School of Interdisciplinary Bioscience and Bioengineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Gumhye [National Creative Research Center for Block Copolymer Self-Assembly, Departments of Environmental Science and Engineering and Chemical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Kwan Yong, E-mail: kchoi@postech.ac.kr [School of Interdisciplinary Bioscience and Bioengineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Life Science, Division of Molecular and Life Science, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Kon, E-mail: jkkim@postech.ac.kr [National Creative Research Center for Block Copolymer Self-Assembly, Departments of Environmental Science and Engineering and Chemical Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-04-01

    We independently controlled surface topography and wettability of polystyrene (PS) films by CF{sub 4} and oxygen plasma treatments, respectively, to evaluate the adhesion and proliferation of human fetal osteoblastic (hFOB) cells on the films. Among the CF{sub 4} plasma-treated PS films with the average surface roughness ranging from 0.9 to 70 nm, the highest adhesion of hFOB cells was observed on a PS film with roughness of ∼ 11 nm. When this film was additionally treated by oxygen plasma to provide a hydrophilic surface with a contact angle less than 10°, the proliferation of bone-forming cell was further enhanced. Thus, the plasma-based independent modification of PS film into an optimum nanotexture for human osteoblast cells could be appplied to materials used in bone tissue engineering. Highlights: ► New approach based on plasma treatment to independently control the surface topography and wettability ► The adhesion of human fetal osteoblast (hFOB) was enhanced on a surface with an average roughness of ∼ 11 nm. ► The adhesion and proliferation of hFOB was maximized when nanotextured surface became highly hydrophilic.

  19. Age-related changes in expression of neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) in heart

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    1993-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) has been implicated in cellular interactions involved in cardiac morphogenesis and innervation. In this study, expression of NCAM mRNA and protein was characterized in rat heart during postnatal development and aging (postnatal days 1, 10, 40, 270, and 730...... WORDS)...

  20. A new candidate substrate for cell-matrix adhesion study: the acellular human amniotic matrix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Qianchen; Lu, Xuya; Xue, Yuan; Zheng, Hong; Zhao, Xiaotao; Zhao, Huajian

    2012-01-01

    In vivo adhesions between cells and the extracellular matrix play a crucial role in cell differentiation, proliferation, and migration as well as tissue remodeling. Natural three-dimensional (3D) matrices, such as self-assembling matrices and Matrigel, have limitations in terms of their biomechanical properties. Here, we present a simple method to produce an acellular human amniotic matrix (AHAM) with preserved biomechanical properties and a favorable adhesion potential. On the stromal side of the AHAM, human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) attached and extended with bipolar spindle-shaped morphology proliferated to multilayer networks, invaded into the AHAM, and migrated in a straight line. Moreover, αV integrin, paxillin, and fibronectin were observed to colocalize after 24 h of HFF culture on the stromal side of the AHAM. Our results indicate that the AHAM may be an ideal candidate as a cell-matrix adhesion substrate to study cell adhesion and invasion as well as other functions in vitro under a tensile force that mimics the in vivo environment.

  1. A New Candidate Substrate for Cell-Matrix Adhesion Study: The Acellular Human Amniotic Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qianchen Guo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In vivo adhesions between cells and the extracellular matrix play a crucial role in cell differentiation, proliferation, and migration as well as tissue remodeling. Natural three-dimensional (3D matrices, such as self-assembling matrices and Matrigel, have limitations in terms of their biomechanical properties. Here, we present a simple method to produce an acellular human amniotic matrix (AHAM with preserved biomechanical properties and a favorable adhesion potential. On the stromal side of the AHAM, human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs attached and extended with bipolar spindle-shaped morphology proliferated to multilayer networks, invaded into the AHAM, and migrated in a straight line. Moreover, αV integrin, paxillin, and fibronectin were observed to colocalize after 24 h of HFF culture on the stromal side of the AHAM. Our results indicate that the AHAM may be an ideal candidate as a cell-matrix adhesion substrate to study cell adhesion and invasion as well as other functions in vitro under a tensile force that mimics the in vivo environment.

  2. Cell resistant zwitterionic polyelectrolyte coating promotes bacterial attachment: an adhesion contradiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Jessica S; Kelly, Kristopher D; Ghoussoub, Yara E; Delgado, Jose D; Keller Iii, Thomas C S; Schlenoff, Joseph B

    2016-04-22

    Polymers of various architectures with zwitterionic functionality have recently been shown to effectively suppress nonspecific fouling of surfaces by proteins and prokaryotic (bacteria) or eukaryotic (mammalian) cells as well as other microorganisms and environmental contaminants. In this work, zwitterionic copolymers were used to make thin coatings on substrates with the layer-by-layer method. Polyelectrolyte multilayers, PEMUs, were built with [poly(allylamine hydrochloride)], PAH, and copolymers of acrylic acid and either the AEDAPS zwitterionic group 3-[2-(acrylamido)-ethyldimethyl ammonio] propane sulfonate (PAA-co-AEDAPS), or benzophenone (PAABp). Benzophenone allowed the PEMU to be toughened by photocrosslinking post-deposition. The attachment of two mammalian cell lines, rat aortic smooth muscle (A7r5) and mouse fibroblasts (3T3), and the biofilm-forming Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli was studied on PEMUs terminated with PAA-co-AEDAPS. Consistent with earlier studies, it is shown that PAH/PAA-co-AEDAPS PEMUs resist the adhesion of mammalian cells, but, contrary to our initial hypothesis, are bacterial adhesive and significantly so after maximizing the surface presentation of PAA-co-AEDAPS. This unexpected contrast in the adhesive behavior of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells is explained by differences in adhesion mechanisms as well as different responses to the topology and morphology of the multilayer surface. PMID:26872345

  3. Cell Adhesion and in Vivo Osseointegration of Sandblasted/Acid Etched/Anodized Dental Implants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mu-Hyon Kim

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The authors describe a new type of titanium (Ti implant as a Modi-anodized (ANO Ti implant, the surface of which was treated by sandblasting, acid etching (SLA, and anodized techniques. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the adhesion of MG-63 cells to Modi-ANO surface treated Ti in vitro and to investigate its osseointegration characteristics in vivo. Four different types of Ti implants were examined, that is, machined Ti (control, SLA, anodized, and Modi-ANO Ti. In the cell adhesion study, Modi-ANO Ti showed higher initial MG-63 cell adhesion and induced greater filopodia growth than other groups. In vivo study in a beagle model revealed the bone-to-implant contact (BIC of Modi-ANO Ti (74.20% ± 10.89% was much greater than those of machined (33.58% ± 8.63%, SLA (58.47% ± 12.89, or ANO Ti (59.62% ± 18.30%. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that Modi-ANO Ti implants produced by sandblasting, acid etching, and anodizing improve cell adhesion and bone ongrowth as compared with machined, SLA, or ANO Ti implants. These findings suggest that the application of Modi-ANO surface treatment could improve the osseointegration of dental implant.

  4. Hydrophobic interaction governs unspecific adhesion of staphylococci: a single cell force spectroscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thewes, Nicolas; Loskill, Peter; Jung, Philipp; Peisker, Henrik; Bischoff, Markus; Herrmann, Mathias; Jacobs, Karin

    2014-01-01

    Unspecific adhesion of bacteria is usually the first step in the formation of biofilms on abiotic surfaces, yet it is unclear up to now which forces are governing this process. Alongside long-ranged van der Waals and electrostatic forces, short-ranged hydrophobic interaction plays an important role. To characterize the forces involved during approach and retraction of an individual bacterium to and from a surface, single cell force spectroscopy is applied: A single cell of the apathogenic species Staphylococcus carnosus isolate TM300 is used as bacterial probe. With the exact same bacterium, hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces can be probed and compared. We find that as far as 50 nm from the surface, attractive forces can already be recorded, an indication of the involvement of long-ranged forces. Yet, comparing the surfaces of different surface energy, our results corroborate the model that large, bacterial cell wall proteins are responsible for adhesion, and that their interplay with the short-ranged hydrophobic interaction of the involved surfaces is mainly responsible for adhesion. The ostensibly long range of the attraction is a result of the large size of the cell wall proteins, searching for contact via hydrophobic interaction. The model also explains the strong (weak) adhesion of S. carnosus to hydrophobic (hydrophilic) surfaces. PMID:25247133

  5. Hydrophobic interaction governs unspecific adhesion of staphylococci: a single cell force spectroscopy study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Thewes

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Unspecific adhesion of bacteria is usually the first step in the formation of biofilms on abiotic surfaces, yet it is unclear up to now which forces are governing this process. Alongside long-ranged van der Waals and electrostatic forces, short-ranged hydrophobic interaction plays an important role. To characterize the forces involved during approach and retraction of an individual bacterium to and from a surface, single cell force spectroscopy is applied: A single cell of the apathogenic species Staphylococcus carnosus isolate TM300 is used as bacterial probe. With the exact same bacterium, hydrophobic and hydrophilic surfaces can be probed and compared. We find that as far as 50 nm from the surface, attractive forces can already be recorded, an indication of the involvement of long-ranged forces. Yet, comparing the surfaces of different surface energy, our results corroborate the model that large, bacterial cell wall proteins are responsible for adhesion, and that their interplay with the short-ranged hydrophobic interaction of the involved surfaces is mainly responsible for adhesion. The ostensibly long range of the attraction is a result of the large size of the cell wall proteins, searching for contact via hydrophobic interaction. The model also explains the strong (weak adhesion of S. carnosus to hydrophobic (hydrophilic surfaces.

  6. Effect of Antioxidants on Endothelial Cell Reactive Oxygen Species (ROI) Generation and Adhesion of Leukocytes to Endothelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Qian; Michael Grafe; Kristoph Graf; Hans Lehmkuhl; Eckart Fleck

    2000-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether antioxidants inhibit adhesion of leukocytes to endothelium and furthermore, whether all antioxidants regulate NF-κB activation through a redox sensitive mechanism. Methods The effect of the antioxidative substances pyrrolidin dithiocarbamat (PDTC),dichloroisocumarin (DCI), chrysin and probucol on the endothelial leukocyte adhesion were examined under near physiological flow conditions. The antioxidative activity of antioxidants was measured in a DCF fluorescence assay with flow cytometry. The activation of NF-κB in endothelial cells was investigated in a gel shift assay. Results PDTC and probucol did not show an inhibitory effect to the formation of intracellular H2O2 in TNFct activated human vascular endothelial cells (HUVEC) . Chrysin showed a moderate effect.DCI showed a strong antioxidative effect. In contrast,PDTC and chrysin inhibited the adhesion of HL 60 cells to TNFa-stimulated HUVEC. DCI and probucol did not have influence on the adhesion within the area of the examined shear stresses. Only PDTC inhibited the TNFα-induced activation of NF-kB in endothelial cells.Conclusion The inhibition of the endothelial leukocyte adhesion by antioxidative substances is not to be explained by its antioxidative characteristics only. The inhibitory effect of PDTC on NF-kB activation was probably not related to its antioxidative properties.

  7. Genistein inhibits human TNF-α-induced porcine endothelial cell adhesiveness for human monocytes and natural killer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    Cellular immune response is a major barrier to xenotransplantation. Human tumor necrosis factor-α (hTNF-α) possesses cross-species activity and directly amplifies the immune rejection via the upregulation of adhesion molecules on porcine endothelium. We investigated the role of protein tyrosine phosphorylation in the induction of expression of E-sclectin and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1), and the augmentation of adhesion of human peripheral blood monocytes (PBMo) and natural killer cells (PBNK), after rhTNF-α-stimulation of porcine aortic endothelial cells (PAEC) in vitro, rhTNF-α-increased adhesiveness of PAEC for both PBMo and PBNK was dose-dependently reduced by pretreatment of PAEC with the selective protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitor genistein. The inhibitory effect occurred at the early time of PAEC activation triggered by rhTNF-α, and was completely reversible. PTK activity assay indicated that genistein also suppressed rhTNF-α stimulated activation of protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) in PAEC in a dose-dependent manner. Flow cytometric analysis showed that genistein inhibited the upregulation of E-selectin and VCAM-1 by rhTNF-α. These results suggest that PTKs may regulate the expression of E-selectin and VCAM-1 on PAEC and the adherence of PBMo and PBNK induced by rhTNF-α. Moreover, dietary genistein, used as an adhesion antagonist, may contribute to managing the cell-mediated rejection in the clinical application.

  8. Activation of GPR4 by acidosis increases endothelial cell adhesion through the cAMP/Epac pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aishe Chen

    Full Text Available Endothelium-leukocyte interaction is critical for inflammatory responses. Whereas the tissue microenvironments are often acidic at inflammatory sites, the mechanisms by which cells respond to acidosis are not well understood. Using molecular, cellular and biochemical approaches, we demonstrate that activation of GPR4, a proton-sensing G protein-coupled receptor, by isocapnic acidosis increases the adhesiveness of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs that express GPR4 endogenously. Acidosis in combination with GPR4 overexpression further augments HUVEC adhesion with U937 monocytes. In contrast, overexpression of a G protein signaling-defective DRY motif mutant (R115A of GPR4 does not elicit any increase of HUVEC adhesion, indicating the requirement of G protein signaling. Downregulation of GPR4 expression by RNA interference reduces the acidosis-induced HUVEC adhesion. To delineate downstream pathways, we show that inhibition of adenylate cyclase by inhibitors, 2',5'-dideoxyadenosine (DDA or SQ 22536, attenuates acidosis/GPR4-induced HUVEC adhesion. Consistently, treatment with a cAMP analog or a G(i signaling inhibitor increases HUVEC adhesiveness, suggesting a role of the G(s/cAMP signaling in this process. We further show that the cAMP downstream effector Epac is important for acidosis/GPR4-induced cell adhesion. Moreover, activation of GPR4 by acidosis increases the expression of vascular adhesion molecules E-selectin, VCAM-1 and ICAM-1, which are functionally involved in acidosis/GPR4-mediated HUVEC adhesion. Similarly, hypercapnic acidosis can also activate GPR4 to stimulate HUVEC adhesion molecule expression and adhesiveness. These results suggest that acidosis/GPR4 signaling regulates endothelial cell adhesion mainly through the G(s/cAMP/Epac pathway and may play a role in the inflammatory response of vascular endothelial cells.

  9. A statistical approach to estimating the strength of cell-cell interactions under the differential adhesion hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Mathieu

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Differential Adhesion Hypothesis (DAH is a theory of the organization of cells within a tissue which has been validated by several biological experiments and tested against several alternative computational models. Results In this study, a statistical approach was developed for the estimation of the strength of adhesion, incorporating earlier discrete lattice models into a continuous marked point process framework. This framework allows to describe an ergodic Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm that can simulate the model and reproduce empirical biological patterns. The estimation procedure, based on a pseudo-likelihood approximation, is validated with simulations, and a brief application to medulloblastoma stained by beta-catenin markers is given. Conclusion Our model includes the strength of cell-cell adhesion as a statistical parameter. The estimation procedure for this parameter is consistent with experimental data and would be useful for high-throughput cancer studies.

  10. The Spermicidal Compound Nonoxynol-9 Increases Adhesion of Candida Species to Human Epithelial Cells In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    All 25 strains of Candida spp. tested were able to grow in medium supplemented with 25% nonoxynol-9 in vitro. Adhesion of Candida spp. to HeLa cells was found to increase in the presence of 5% nonoxynol-9 (2.2- to 6.6-fold; P less than 0.001) and, to a lesser extent, in 12.5% nonoxynol-9. Adhesion of Candida strains cultured in medium supplemented with nonoxynol-9 varied, with five of six strains of Candida albicans and the single strain of Candida tropicalis demonstrating increases of 1.4 to...

  11. DDRs: receptors that mediate adhesion, migration and invasion in breast cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Reyes-Uribe

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Discoidin domain receptors (DDRs are receptor tyrosine kinases that are activated by native collagens and have an important role during cell adhesion, development, differentiation, proliferation, and migration. DDR deregulation is associated with progression of several different cancers. However, there is limited information about the role of DDRs in the progression of breast cancer. In this review we attempt to collect the most relevant information about DDR signaling and their role in various cancer-related processes such as adhesion, epithelial to mesenchymal transition, migration, invasion, and survival, with a focus on breast cancer.

  12. Identification of a novel agrin-dependent pathway in cell signaling and adhesion within the erythroid niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anselmo, A; Lauranzano, E; Soldani, C; Ploia, C; Angioni, R; D'amico, G; Sarukhan, A; Mazzon, C; Viola, A

    2016-08-01

    Establishment of cell-cell adhesion is crucial in embryonic development as well as within the stem cell niches of an adult. Adhesion between macrophages and erythroblasts is required for the formation of erythroblastic islands, specialized niches where erythroblasts proliferate and differentiate to produce red blood cells throughout life. The Eph family is the largest known family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and controls cell adhesion, migration, invasion and morphology by modulating integrin and adhesion molecule activity and by modifying the actin cytoskeleton. Here, we identify the proteoglycan agrin as a novel regulator of Eph receptor signaling and characterize a novel mechanism controlling cell-cell adhesion and red cell development within the erythroid niche. We demonstrate that agrin induces clustering and activation of EphB1 receptors on developing erythroblasts, leading to the activation of α5β1 integrins. In agreement, agrin knockout mice display severe anemia owing to defective adhesion to macrophages and impaired maturation of erythroid cells. These results position agrin-EphB1 as a novel key signaling couple regulating cell adhesion and erythropoiesis. PMID:26990660

  13. Localized Modeling of Biochemical and Flow Interactions during Cancer Cell Adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Behr

    Full Text Available This work focuses on one component of a larger research effort to develop a simulation tool to model populations of flowing cells. Specifically, in this study a local model of the biochemical interactions between circulating melanoma tumor cells (TC and substrate adherent polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN is developed. This model provides realistic three-dimensional distributions of bond formation and attendant attraction and repulsion forces that are consistent with the time dependent Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD framework of the full system model which accounts local pressure, shear and repulsion forces. The resulting full dynamics model enables exploration of TC adhesion to adherent PMNs, which is a known participating mechanism in melanoma cell metastasis. The model defines the adhesion molecules present on the TC and PMN cell surfaces, and calculates their interactions as the melanoma cell flows past the PMN. Biochemical rates of reactions between individual molecules are determined based on their local properties. The melanoma cell in the model expresses ICAM-1 molecules on its surface, and the PMN expresses the β-2 integrins LFA-1 and Mac-1. In this work the PMN is fixed to the substrate and is assumed fully rigid and of a prescribed shear-rate dependent shape obtained from micro-PIV experiments. The melanoma cell is transported with full six-degrees-of-freedom dynamics. Adhesion models, which represent the ability of molecules to bond and adhere the cells to each other, and repulsion models, which represent the various physical mechanisms of cellular repulsion, are incorporated with the CFD solver. All models are general enough to allow for future extensions, including arbitrary adhesion molecule types, and the ability to redefine the values of parameters to represent various cell types. The model presented in this study will be part of a clinical tool for development of personalized medical treatment programs.

  14. Extracts from Flammulina velutipes Inhibit the Adhesion of Pathogenic Fungi to Epithelial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashina, Svetlana; Villavicencio, Lérida Liss Flores; Balleza, Marco; Sabanero, Gloria Barbosa; Tsutsumi, Víctor; López, Myrna Sabanero

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recently, extracts from natural sources have been tested for their antifungal properties. In this aspect, Flammulina velutipes extracts possess a significant amount of branch-chained carbohydrates with mannose moieties that, hypothetically, can reduce the adhesion. Objective: In this study, we assessed the capacity of extracts from F. velutipes (wild-type AQF-1 and ATCC 34574 as the reference strain) to inhibit the adhesion of S. schenkii and C. albicans to epithelial cells. Materials and Methods: The aqueous extracts from F. velutipes strains were obtained by sonication, total carbohydrate and protein was analyzed by Dubois and Lowry methods respectively. Effect of the extracts (50, 100 and 150 μg/mL) on the fungi adhesion to host cells was evaluated after 1 h interaction, and the percentage of inhibition of adhesion was measured. After of interaction the cytoskeleton from cell was analyzed with phalloidin-FITC. Results: The extract from strain AQF-1 (50, 100 and 150 μg/mL) inhibited the adhesion of: S. schenkii in a dose-dependent manner (4.9, 7.5 and 12.7%, respectively) and C. albicans in a dose-independent manner (5.2%). The percentage of inhibition by extracts from the strain ATCC34574 at the same concentrations, shown that are dose independent for both fungi: 3.9% for S. schenkii and 2.6% for C. albicans. Conclusion: The extracts from F. velutipes inhibit the adhesion of pathogenic fungi to host cells. The mechanism molecular is unknown; however, is probably an interaction between the polysaccharides from extracts with the fungi receptors. This aspect is currently analyzed. SUMMARY The yields of mycelium from two strains of F. velutipes and the extract from it were similar.Extracts from both strains have inhibited adhesion of S. schenkii and C. albicans to epithelial cells in vitro, but the extract from strain AQF-1 was more effective.The extracts have not prevented damage to epithelial cells caused by pathogenic fungi. Abbreviation Used: YPG

  15. Functional polyaniline nanofibre mats for human adipose-derived stem cell proliferation and adhesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conductive polymer poly(aniline-co-m-aminobenzoic acid) (P(ANI-co-m-ABA)) and polyaniline (PANI) were blended with a biodegradable, biocompatible polymer, poly(L-lactic acid) and were electrospun into nanofibres to investigate their potential application as a scaffold for human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs). These polymers, in both conductive and non-conductive form, were electrospun with average fibre diameters of less than 400 nm. Novel nanoindentation results obtained on the individual nanofibres revealed that the elastic moduli of the nanofibres are much higher at the surface (4–10 GPa, hmax max >75 nm). The composite nanofibres showed great promise as a scaffold for hASCs as they supported the cell adhesion and proliferation. After 1 week of cell culture hASCs were well spread on the substrates with abundant focal adhesions. The electrospun mats provide the cells with comparably stiff, sub-micron sized fibres as anchoring points on a substrate of high porosity. The conductive nature of these composite nanofibres offers exciting opportunities for electrical stimulation of the cells. - Highlights: ► Polyaniline and its copolymer's nanofibres were prepared by electrospinning. ► The elastic modulus of a single polyaniline composite nanofibres were determined. ► Elastic moduli of the nanofibres are much higher at the surface than the inner core. ► The electrospun mats supported the cell adhesion and proliferation. ► The nanofibres show great promise as a scaffold for adipose derived stem cells

  16. Wet Chemistry and Peptide Immobilization on Polytetrafluoroethylene for Improved Cell-adhesion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Matthias; Niederer, Kerstin; Frey, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Endowing materials surface with cell-adhesive properties is a common strategy in biomaterial research and tissue engineering. This is particularly interesting for already approved polymers that have a long standing use in medicine because these materials are well characterized and legal issues associated with the introduction of newly synthesized polymers may be avoided. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) is one of the most frequently employed materials for the manufacturing of vascular grafts but the polymer lacks cell adhesion promoting features. Endothelialization, i.e., complete coverage of the grafts inner surface with a confluent layer of endothelial cells is regarded key to optimal performance, mainly by reducing thrombogenicity of the artificial interface. This study investigates the growth of endothelial cells on peptide-modified PTFE and compares these results to those obtained on unmodified substrate. Coupling with the endothelial cell adhesive peptide Arg-Glu-Asp-Val (REDV) is performed via activation of the fluorin-containing polymer using the reagent sodium naphthalenide, followed by subsequent conjugation steps. Cell culture is accomplished using Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs) and excellent cellular growth on peptide-immobilized material is demonstrated over a two-week period. PMID:27584937

  17. Nanoscale topographic changes on sterilized glass surfaces affect cell adhesion and spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittenburg, Gretel; Lauer, Günter; Oswald, Steffen; Labudde, Dirk; Franz, Clemens M

    2014-08-01

    Producing sterile glass surfaces is of great importance for a wide range of laboratory and medical applications, including in vitro cell culture and tissue engineering. However, sterilization may change the surface properties of glass and thereby affect its use for medical applications, for instance as a substrate for culturing cells. To investigate potential effects of sterilization on glass surface topography, borosilicate glass coverslips were left untreated or subjected to several common sterilization procedures, including low-temperature plasma gas, gamma irradiation and steam. Imaging by atomic force microscopy demonstrated that the surface of untreated borosilicate coverslips features a complex landscape of microislands ranging from 1000 to 3000 nm in diameter and 1 to 3 nm in height. Steam treatment completely removes these microislands, producing a nanosmooth glass surface. In contrast, plasma treatment partially degrades the microisland structure, while gamma irradiation has no effect on microisland topography. To test for possible effects of the nanotopographic structures on cell adhesion, human gingival fibroblasts were seeded on untreated or sterilized glass surfaces. Analyzing fibroblast adhesion 3, 6, and 24 h after cell seeding revealed significant differences in cell attachment and spreading depending on the sterilization method applied. Furthermore, single-cell force spectroscopy revealed a connection between the nanotopographic landscape of glass and the formation of cellular adhesion forces, indicating that fibroblasts generally adhere weakly to nanosmooth but strongly to nanorough glass surfaces. Nanotopographic changes induced by different sterilization methods may therefore need to be considered when preparing sterile glass surfaces for cell culture or biomedical applications.

  18. Adhesion modification of neural stem cells induced by nanoscale ripple patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedraz, P.; Casado, S.; Rodriguez, V.; Giordano, M. C.; Buatier de Mongeot, F.; Ayuso-Sacido, A.; Gnecco, E.

    2016-03-01

    We have studied the influence of anisotropic nanopatterns (ripples) on the adhesion and morphology of mouse neural stem cells (C17.2) on glass substrates using cell viability assay, optical microscopy and atomic force microscopy. The ripples were produced by defocused ion beam sputtering with inert Ar ions, which physically remove atoms from the surface at the energy of 800 eV. The ripple periodicity (∼200 nm) is comparable to the thickness of the cytoplasmatic microspikes (filopodia) which link the stem cells to the substrate. All methods show that the cell adhesion is significantly lowered compared to the same type of cells on flat glass surfaces. Furthermore, the AFM analysis reveals that the filopodia tend to be trapped parallel or perpendicular to the ripples, which limits the spreading of the stem cell on the rippled substrate. This opens the perspective of controlling the micro-adhesion of stem cells and the orientation of their filopodia by tuning the anisotropic substrate morphology without chemical reactions occurring at the surface.

  19. Early adhesive behavior of bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells on collagen electrospun fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, Casey K; Liao, Susan; Lareu, Ricky R; Raghunath, Michael [Division of Bioengineering, National University of Singapore, 7 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117574 (Singapore); Li, Bojun; Ramakrishna, S [Nanoscience and Nanotechnology Initiative, National University of Singapore, 2 Engineering Drive 3, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Larrick, James W, E-mail: doschanc@nus.edu.s [Panorama Research Institute, 2462 Wyandotte Street, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States)

    2009-06-15

    A bioabsorbable nanofibrous scaffold was developed for early adhesion of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Collagen nanofibers with diameters of 430 +- 170 nm were fabricated by electrospinning. Over 45% of the MSC population adhered to this collagen nanofiber after 30 min at room temperature. Remarkably, collagen-coated P(LLA-CL) electrospun nanofibers were almost as efficient as collagen nanofibers whereas collagen cast film did not enhance early capture when it was applied on cover slips. The adhesive efficiency could be further increased to over 20% at 20 min and over 55% at 30 min when collagen nanofibers were grafted with monoclonal antibodies recognizing CD29 or CD49a. These data demonstrate that the early adhesive behavior is highly dependent on both the surface texture and the surface chemistry of the substrate. These findings have potential applications for early capture of MSCs in an ex vivo setting under time constraints such as in a surgical setting.

  20. Morin, a Flavonoid from Moraceae, Inhibits Cancer Cell Adhesion to Endothelial Cells and EMT by Downregulating VCAM1 and Ncadherin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, JeongHee; Jin, Hana; Lee, Won Sup; Nagappan, Arulkumar; Choi, Yung Hyun; Kim, Gon Sup; Jung, JinMyung; Ryu, Chung Ho; Shin, Sung Chul; Hong, Soon Chan; Kim, Hye Jung

    2016-01-01

    Morin, a flavonoid found in figs and other Moraceae species, displays a variety of biological actions, exerting antioxidant, antiinflammatory and anticarcinogenic effects. Here, we investigated the anticancer activity of morin focusing on antiadhesive influence. We performed experiments with MDAMB231 human breast cancer cells. Morin inhibited TNFinduced cancer cell adhesion to human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) without showing any toxicity. It further inhibited the expression of VCAM1 on MDAMB231 cells as well as HUVECs. Morin also decreased the expression of Ncadherin on MDAMB231 cells. In addition, there was apparent antimetastatic activity in vivo. In conclusion, this study suggested that morin inhibits cancer cell adhesion to HUVECs by reducing VCAM1, and EMT by targeting Ncadherin, and that it features antimetastatic activity in vivo. Further investigation of possible antimetastatic activity of morin against human breast cancer cells is warranted.

  1. Dynamic Switch Between Two Adhesion Phenotypes in Colorectal Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Yue; Chandrasekaran, Siddarth; Agastin, Sivaprakash; Li, Jiahe; King, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    The hematogenous metastatic cascade is mediated by the interaction of cancer cells and the endothelial cell lining of blood vessels. In this work, we examine the colon cancer cell line COLO 205, which grows simultaneously in both adherent and suspended states in culture and can serve as a good model for studying tumor heterogeneity. The two subpopulations of cells have different molecular characteristics despite being from the same parent cell line. We found that the ratio of adherent to suspended cells in culture is maintained at 7:3 (equilibrium ratio). The ratio was maintained even when we separate the two populations and culture them separately. After 8 h in culture the equilibrium was achieved only from either adherent or suspended population. The adherent cells were found to express less E-selectin binding glycans and demonstrated significantly weaker interaction with E-selectin under flow than the suspended cells. Manipulation of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers β-catenin and E-cadherin expression, either by siRNA knockdown of β-catenin or incubation with E-cadherin antibody-coated microbeads, shifted the ratio of adherent to suspended cells to 9:1. Interestingly, human plasma supplemented media shifted the ratio of adherent to suspended cells in the opposite direction to 1:9, favoring the suspended state. The dynamic COLO 205 population switch presents unique differential phenotypes of their subpopulations and could serve as a good model for studying cell heterogeneity and the EMT process in vitro. PMID:24575161

  2. Increasing mouse embryonic fibroblast cells adhesion on superhydrophilic vertically aligned carbon nanotube films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobo, A.O., E-mail: loboao@yahoo.com [Laboratory of Biomedical Nanotechnology (NanoBio), Instituto de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento (IP and D), Universidade do Vale do Paraiba UniVap, Avenida Shishima Hifumi 2911, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12244-000, SP (Brazil) and Laboratory of Biomedical Vibrational Spectroscopy (LEVB), Instituto de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento (IP and D), Universidade do Vale do Paraiba UniVap, Avenida Shishima Hifumi 2911, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12244-000, SP (Brazil); Marciano, F.R. [Laboratory of Biomedical Nanotechnology (NanoBio), Instituto de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento (IP and D), Universidade do Vale do Paraiba UniVap, Avenida Shishima Hifumi 2911, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12244-000, SP (Brazil); Laboratory of Biomedical Vibrational Spectroscopy LEVB, Instituto de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento (IP and D), Universidade do Vale do Paraiba (UniVap), Avenida Shishima Hifumi 2911, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12244-000, SP (Brazil); Ramos, S.C. [Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais (LAS), Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Avenida dos Astronautas 1758, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12.245-970, SP (Brazil); Machado, M.M. [Centro Multidisciplinar para Investigacao Biologica na Area da Ciencia em Animais de Laboratorio (CEMIB), Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Rua 05 de Junho s/no, Cidade Universitaria ' Zeferino Vaz' , 13083-877, Campinas (Brazil); Corat, E.J. [Laboratorio Associado de Sensores e Materiais (LAS), Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), Avenida dos Astronautas 1758, Sao Jose dos Campos, 12.245-970, SP (Brazil); Corat, M.A.F. [Centro Multidisciplinar para Investigacao Biologica na Area da Ciencia em Animais de Laboratorio (CEMIB), Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Rua 05 de Junho s/no, Cidade Universitaria ' Zeferino Vaz' , 13083-877, Campinas (Brazil)

    2011-10-10

    We have analyzed the adhesion of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) genetically modified by green fluorescence protein (GFP) gene cultured on vertically-aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) after 6 days. The VACNTs films grown on Ti were obtained by microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition process using Fe catalyst and submitted to an oxygen plasma treatment, for 2 min, at 400 V and 80 mTorr, to convert them to superhydrophilic. Cellular adhesion and morphology were analyzed by scanning electron, fluorescence microscopy, and thermodynamics analysis. Characterizations of superhydrophilic VACNTs films were evaluated by contact angle and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. Differences of crowd adhered cells, as well as their spreading on superhydrophilic VACNTs scaffolds, were evaluated using focal adhesion analysis. This study was the first to demonstrate, in real time, that the wettability of VACNTs scaffolds might have enhanced and differential adherence patterns to the MEF-GFP on VACNTs substrates. Highlights: {yields} A simple oxygen plasma treatment was used to obtain superhydrophilic CNT films. {yields} Superhydrophilic CNTs films were successfully produced by incorporation of carboxylic groups. {yields} Cellular adhesion on superhydrophilic VACNT films was analyzed in real time. {yields} Wettability of CNT films directly affects the cellular migration, proliferation and adhesion.

  3. Protein micro patterned lattices to probe a fundamental lengthscale involved in cell adhesion

    CERN Document Server

    Guillou, Herve; Chaussy, Jacques; Block, Marc R

    2009-01-01

    Cell adhesion, a fundamental process of cell biology is involved in the embryo development and in numerous pathologies especially those related to cancers. We constrained cells to adhere on extracellular matrix proteins patterned in a micro lattices. The actin cytoskeleton is particularly sensitive to this constraint and reproducibly self organizes in simple geometrical patterns. Such highly organized cells are functional and proliferate. We performed statistical analysis of spread cells morphologies and discuss the existence of a fundamental lengthscale associated with active processes required for spreading.

  4. Electrospun silk fibroin nanofibers promote Schwann cell adhesion, growth and proliferation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Aijun Hu; Baoqi Zuo; Feng Zhang; Qing Lan; Huanxiang Zhang

    2012-01-01

    In this study, Schwann cells, at a density of 1 × 105 cells/well, were cultured on regenerated silk fibroin nanofibers (305 ± 84 nm) prepared using the electrospinning method. Schwann cells cultured on the silk fibroin nanofibers appeared more ordered, their processes extended further, and they formed more extensive and complex interconnections. In addition, the silk fibroin nanofibers had no impact on the proliferation of Schwann cells or on the secretion of ciliary neurotrophic factor, brain-derived neurotrophic factor or nerve growth factor. These findings indicate that regenerated electrospun silk fibroin nanofibers can promote Schwann cell adhesion, growth and proliferation, and have excellent biocompatibility.

  5. The Promotion of Human Neural Stem Cells Adhesion Using Bioinspired Poly(norepinephrine Nanoscale Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minah Park

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of versatile biomaterial interfaces that can facilitate cellular adhesion is crucial for elucidating the cellular processes that occur on biomaterial surfaces. Furthermore, biomaterial interfaces can provide physical or chemical cues that are capable of stimulating cellular behaviors by regulating intracellular signaling cascades. Herein, a method of creating a biomimetic functional biointerface was introduced to enhance human neural stem cell (hNSC adhesion. The hNSC-compatible biointerface was prepared by the oxidative polymerization of the neurotransmitter norepinephrine, which generates a nanoscale organic thin layer, termed poly(norepinephrine (pNE. Due to its adhesive property, pNE resulted in an adherent layer on various substrates, and pNE-coated biointerfaces provided a highly favorable microenvironment for hNSCs, with no observed cytotoxicity. Only a 2-hour incubation of hNSCs was required to firmly attach the stem cells, regardless of the type of substrate. Importantly, the adhesive properties of pNE interfaces led to micropatterns of cellular attachment, thereby demonstrating the ability of the interface to organize the stem cells. This highly facile surface-modification method using a biomimetic pNE thin layer can be applied to a number of suitable materials that were previously not compatible with hNSC technology.

  6. The Protrusive Phase and Full Development of Integrin-Dependent Adhesions in Colon Epithelial Cells Require FAK- and ERKMediated Actin Spike Formation: Deregulation in Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie G. Brunton

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Integrins play an important role in tumour progression by influencing cellular responses and matrix-dependent adhesion. However, the regulation of matrix-dependent adhesion assembly in epithelial cells is poorly understood. We have investigated the integrin and signalling requirements of cell-matrix adhesion assembly in colon carcinoma cells after plating on fibronectin. Adhesion assembly in these, and in the adenoma cells from which they were derived, was largely dependent on αvβ6 integrin and required phosphorylation of FAK on tyrosine-397. The rate of fibronectin-induced adhesion assembly and the expression of both αvβ6 integrin and FAK were increased during the adenoma-to-carcinoma transition. The matrix-dependent adhesion assembly process, particularly the final stages of complex protrusion that is required for optimal cell spreading, required the activity of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK. Furthermore, phosphorylated ERK was targeted to newly forming cell-matrix adhesions in the carcinoma cells but not the adenoma cells, and inhibition of FAK-tyrosine-397 phosphorylation or MEK suppressed the appearance of phosphorylated ERK at peripheral sites. In addition, inhibition of MEK-ERK activation blocked the formation of peripheral actin microspikes that were necessary for the protrusive phase of cell-matrix adhesion assembly. Thus, MEK-ERK-dependent peripheral actin re-organization is required for the full development of integrin-induced adhesions and this pathway is stimulated in an in vitro model of colon cancer progression.

  7. Photoinitiator-free synthesis of endothelial cell-adhesive and enzymatically degradable hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Derek R; Marchant, Roger E; von Recum, Horst; Sen Gupta, Anirban; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice

    2015-02-01

    We report on a photoinitiator-free synthetic method of incorporating bioactivity into poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels in order to control physical properties, enzymatic biodegradability and cell-specific adhesiveness of the polymer network, while eliminating the need for UV-mediated photopolymerization. To accomplish this, hydrogel networks were polymerized using Michael addition with four-arm PEG acrylate (10 kDa), using a collagenase-sensitive peptide (CSP) as a crosslinker, and introducing an endothelial cell-adhesive peptide either terminally (RGD) or attached to the crosslinking peptide sequence (CSP-RGD). The efficiency of the Michael addition reactions were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance and Ellman's assay. Successful decoupling of cell adhesivity and physical properties was demonstrated by quantifying and comparing the swelling ratios and Young's moduli of various hydrogel formulations. Degradation profiles were established by incubating functionalized hydrogels in collagenase solutions (0.0-1.0 μg ml(-1)), demonstrating that functionalized hydrogels degraded at a rate dependent upon collagenase concentration. Moreover, it was shown that the degradation rate was independent of CSP-RGD concentration. Cell attachment and proliferation on functionalized hydrogels were compared for various RGD concentrations, providing evidence that cell attachment and proliferation were directly related to relative amounts of the CSP-RGD combination peptide. An increase in cell viability was achieved using Michael addition techniques when compared to UV polymerization, and was assessed by a LIVE/DEAD fluorescence assay. This photoinitiator-free method shows promise in creating hydrogel-based tissue engineering scaffolds allow for decoupled cell adhesivity and physical properties and that render greater cell viability. PMID:25462848

  8. Hydrophobic interaction governs unspecific adhesion of staphylococci: a single cell force spectroscopy study

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolas Thewes; Peter Loskill; Philipp Jung; Henrik Peisker; Markus Bischoff; Mathias Herrmann; Karin Jacobs

    2014-01-01

    Unspecific adhesion of bacteria is usually the first step in the formation of biofilms on abiotic surfaces, yet it is unclear up to now which forces are governing this process. Alongside long-ranged van der Waals and electrostatic forces, short-ranged hydrophobic interaction plays an important role. To characterize the forces involved during approach and retraction of an individual bacterium to and from a surface, single cell force spectroscopy is applied: A single cell of the apathogenic spe...

  9. Characterization of a synthetic peptide from type IV collagen that promotes melanoma cell adhesion, spreading, and motility

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    The adhesion and motility of tumor cells on basement membranes is a central consideration in tumor cell invasion and metastasis. Basement membrane type IV collagen directly promotes the adhesion and migration of various tumor cell types in vitro. Our previous studies demonstrated that tumor cells adhered and spread on surfaces coated with intact type IV collagen or either of the two major enzymatically purified domains of this protein. Only one of these major domains, the pepsin-generated maj...

  10. Overexpression of Cell Surface Cytokeratin 8 in Multidrug-Resistant MCF-7/MX Cells Enhances Cell Adhesion to the Extracellular Matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Liu

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that multiple complex mechanisms may be involved, simultaneously or complementarily, in the emergence and development of multidrug resistance (MDR in various cancers. Cell adhesion-mediated MDR is one such mechanism. In the present study, we initially observed increased cell adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins by the MDR human breast tumor cell line MCF-7/MX compared to its parental cells. We then used a strategy that combined antibody-based screening technique and mass spectrometry-based proteomics to identify membrane proteins that contribute to the enhanced adhesion of MCF-7/MX cells. Using MCF-7/MX cells as immunogen, we isolated a mouse monoclonal antibody, 9C6, that preferentially reacts with MCF-7/MX cells over the parental MCF-7 cells. The molecular target of 9C6 was identified as cytokeratin 8 (CK8, which was found to be overexpressed on the cell surface of MCF-7/MX cells. We further observed that down-regulation of cell surface levels of CK8 through siRNA transfection significantly inhibited MCF-7/MX cell adhesion to fibronectin and vitronectin. In addition, anti-CK8 siRNA partially reversed the MDR phenotype of MCF-7/MX cells. Taken together, our results suggest that alterations in the expression level and cellular localization of CK8 may play a significant role in enhancing the cellular adhesion of MDR MCF-7/MX cells.

  11. Hydrophilic PCU scaffolds prepared by grafting PEGMA and immobilizing gelatin to enhance cell adhesion and proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelatin contains many functional motifs which can modulate cell specific adhesion, so we modified polycarbonate urethane (PCU) scaffold surface by immobilization of gelatin. PCU-g-gelatin scaffolds were prepared by direct immobilizing gelatins onto the surface of aminated PCU scaffolds. To increase the immobilization amount of gelatin, poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA) was grafted onto PCU scaffolds by surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. Then, following amination and immobilization, PCU-g-PEGMA-g-gelatin scaffolds were obtained. Both modified scaffolds were characterized by chemical and biological methods. After immobilization of gelatin, the microfiber surface became rough, but the original morphology of scaffolds was maintained successfully. PCU-g-PEGMA-g-gelatin scaffolds were more hydrophilic than PCU-g-gelatin scaffolds. Because hydrophilic PEGMA and gelatin were grafted and immobilized onto the surface, the PCU-g-PEGMA-g-gelatin scaffolds showed low platelet adhesion, perfect anti-hemolytic activity and excellent cell growth and proliferation capacity. It could be envisioned that PCU-g-PEGMA-g-gelatin scaffolds might have potential applications in tissue engineering artificial scaffolds. - Graphical abstract: PCU-g-gelatin scaffolds were prepared by direct immobilizing gelatin onto the surface of aminated PCU scaffolds (method a). To increase the immobilization amount of gelatin, PEGMAs were grafted onto the scaffold surface by SI-ATRP. PCU-g-PEGMA-g-gelatin scaffolds were prepared by method b. The gelatin modified scaffolds exhibited high hydrophilicity, low platelet adhesion, perfect anti-hemolytic activity, and excellent cell adhesion and proliferation capacity. They might have potential applications as tissue engineering scaffolds for artificial blood vessels. - Highlights: • Hydrophilic scaffolds were prepared by grafting PEGMA and immobilization of gelatins. • Grafting PEGMA enhanced the immobilization amount of gelatin

  12. Hydrophilic PCU scaffolds prepared by grafting PEGMA and immobilizing gelatin to enhance cell adhesion and proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shi, Changcan; Yuan, Wenjie; Khan, Musammir; Li, Qian [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Feng, Yakai, E-mail: yakaifeng@tju.edu.cn [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Key Laboratory of Systems Bioengineering of Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin University-Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Joint Laboratory for Biomaterials and Regenerative Medicine, Tianjin 300072 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemical Science and Chemical Engineering (Tianjin) Tianjin 300072 (China); Yao, Fanglian [School of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Key Laboratory of Systems Bioengineering of Ministry of Education, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072 (China); Tianjin University-Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Joint Laboratory for Biomaterials and Regenerative Medicine, Tianjin 300072 (China); Zhang, Wencheng, E-mail: wenchengzhang@yahoo.com [Department of Physiology and Pathophysiology, Logistics University of Chinese People' s Armed Police Force, Tianjin 300162 (China)

    2015-05-01

    Gelatin contains many functional motifs which can modulate cell specific adhesion, so we modified polycarbonate urethane (PCU) scaffold surface by immobilization of gelatin. PCU-g-gelatin scaffolds were prepared by direct immobilizing gelatins onto the surface of aminated PCU scaffolds. To increase the immobilization amount of gelatin, poly(ethylene glycol) methacrylate (PEGMA) was grafted onto PCU scaffolds by surface initiated atom transfer radical polymerization. Then, following amination and immobilization, PCU-g-PEGMA-g-gelatin scaffolds were obtained. Both modified scaffolds were characterized by chemical and biological methods. After immobilization of gelatin, the microfiber surface became rough, but the original morphology of scaffolds was maintained successfully. PCU-g-PEGMA-g-gelatin scaffolds were more hydrophilic than PCU-g-gelatin scaffolds. Because hydrophilic PEGMA and gelatin were grafted and immobilized onto the surface, the PCU-g-PEGMA-g-gelatin scaffolds showed low platelet adhesion, perfect anti-hemolytic activity and excellent cell growth and proliferation capacity. It could be envisioned that PCU-g-PEGMA-g-gelatin scaffolds might have potential applications in tissue engineering artificial scaffolds. - Graphical abstract: PCU-g-gelatin scaffolds were prepared by direct immobilizing gelatin onto the surface of aminated PCU scaffolds (method a). To increase the immobilization amount of gelatin, PEGMAs were grafted onto the scaffold surface by SI-ATRP. PCU-g-PEGMA-g-gelatin scaffolds were prepared by method b. The gelatin modified scaffolds exhibited high hydrophilicity, low platelet adhesion, perfect anti-hemolytic activity, and excellent cell adhesion and proliferation capacity. They might have potential applications as tissue engineering scaffolds for artificial blood vessels. - Highlights: • Hydrophilic scaffolds were prepared by grafting PEGMA and immobilization of gelatins. • Grafting PEGMA enhanced the immobilization amount of gelatin

  13. The adhesion G protein-coupled receptor G2 (ADGRG2/GPR64) constitutively activates SRE and NFκB and is involved in cell adhesion and migration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cornelia Peeters, Miriam; Fokkelman, Michiel; Boogaard, Bob;

    2015-01-01

    Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (ADGRs) are believed to be activated by auto-proteolytic cleavage of their very large extracellular N-terminal domains normally acting as a negative regulator of the intrinsically constitutively active seven transmembrane domain. ADGRG2 (or GPR64) which origin...... that the adhesion GPCR ADGRG2 is critically involved in the adhesion and migration of certain breast cancer cells through mechanisms including a non-canonical NFkB pathway and that ADGRG2 could be a target for treatment of certain types of cancer.......Adhesion G protein-coupled receptors (ADGRs) are believed to be activated by auto-proteolytic cleavage of their very large extracellular N-terminal domains normally acting as a negative regulator of the intrinsically constitutively active seven transmembrane domain. ADGRG2 (or GPR64) which...... activity through the adhesion- and migration-related transcription factors serum response element (SRE) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB) presumably via coupling to Gα12/13 and Gαq. However, activation of these two pathways appears to occur through distinct molecular...

  14. Extracellular galectin-3 counteracts adhesion and exhibits chemoattraction in Helicobacter pylori-infected gastric cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subhash, Vinod Vijay; Ling, Samantha Shi Min; Ho, Bow

    2016-08-01

    Galectin-3 (Gal-3) is a β-galactoside lectin that is upregulated and rapidly secreted by gastric epithelial cells in response to Helicobacter pylori infection. An earlier study reported the involvement of H. pylori cytotoxin-associated gene A (cagA) in the expression of intracellular Gal-3. However, the role of extracellular Gal-3 and its functional significance in H. pylori-infected cells remains uncharacterized. Data presented here demonstrate secretion of Gal-3 is an initial host response event in gastric epithelial cells during H. pylori infection and is independent of CagA. Previously, Gal-3 was shown to bind to H. pylori LPS. The present study elaborates the significance of this binding, as extracellular recombinant Gal-3 (rGal-3) was shown to inhibit the adhesion of H. pylori to the gastric epithelial cells. Interestingly, a decrease in H. pylori adhesion to host cells also resulted in a decrease in apoptosis. Furthermore, the study also demonstrated a chemoattractant role of extracellular rGal-3 in the recruitment of THP-1 monocytes. This study outlines the previously unidentified roles of extracellular Gal-3 where it acts as a negative regulator of H. pylori adhesion and apoptosis in gastric epithelial cells, and as a chemoattractant to THP-1 monocytes. Our findings could contribute to the better understanding of how Gal-3 acts as a modulator under H. pylori-induced pathological conditions. PMID:27283429

  15. Adhesion-mediated self-renewal abilities of Ph+ blastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funayama, Keiji; Saito-Kurimoto, Yumi [Department of Integrative Bioscience and Biomedical Engineering, Waseda University, 4-3-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-555 (Japan); Ebihara, Yasuhiro [Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokenedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Shimane, Miyuki; Nomura, Hitoshi [Department of Integrative Bioscience and Biomedical Engineering, Waseda University, 4-3-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-555 (Japan); Tsuji, Ko-ichiro [Institute of Medical Science, University of Tokyo, 4-6-1 Shirokenedai, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Asano, Shigetaka, E-mail: asgtkmd@waseda.jp [Department of Integrative Bioscience and Biomedical Engineering, Waseda University, 4-3-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-555 (Japan)

    2010-05-28

    The Philadelphia chromosome-positive blastoma, maintained by serial subcutaneous transplantation in nude mice, is a highly proliferating biological mass consisting of homogenous CD34{sup +}CD38{sup -} myeloblastoid cells. These cells newly evolved from pluripotent leukemia stem cells of chronic myeloid leukemia in the chronic phase. Therefore, this mass may provide a unique tool for better understanding cellular and molecular mechanisms of self-renewal of leukemia stem cells. In this paper, we demonstrated that intravenously injected blastoma cells can cause Ph+ blastic leukemia with multiple invasive foci in NOD/SCID mice but not in nude mice. In addition, using an in vitro culture system, we clearly showed that blastoma cell adhesion to OP9 stromal cells accelerates blastoma cell proliferation that is associated with up-regulation of BMI1 gene expression; increased levels of {beta}-catenin and the Notch1 intra-cellular domain; and changed the expression pattern of variant CD44 forms, which are constitutively expressed in these blastoma cells. These findings strongly suggest that adhesion of leukemic stem cells to stromal cells via CD44 might be indispensable for their cellular defense against attack by immune cells and for maintenance of their self-renewal ability.

  16. Monitoring of TGF-β 1-Induced Human Lung Adenocarcinoma A549 Cells Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transformation Process by Measuring Cell Adhesion Force with a Microfluidic Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Gao, AnXiu; Yu, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process in which epithelial cells lose their cell polarity and cell-cell adhesion, and gain migratory and invasive properties. It is believed that EMT is associated with initiation and completion of the invasion-metastasis cascade. In this study, an economic approach was developed to fabricate a microfluidic device with less instrumentation requirement for the investigation of EMT by quantifying cell adhesion force. Fluid shear force was precisely controlled by a homemade microfluidic perfusion apparatus and interface. The adhesion capability of the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 on different types of extracellular matrix protein was studied. In addition, effects of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) on EMT in A549 cells were investigated by characterizing the adhesion force changes and on-chip fluorescent staining. The results demonstrate that the microfluidic device is a potential tool to characterize the epithelial-mesenchymal transition process by measuring cell adhesion force.

  17. 9-cis-Retinoic Acid Promotes Cell Adhesion Through Integrin Dependent and Independent Mechanisms Across Immune Lineages

    OpenAIRE

    Whelan, Jarrett T.; Chen, Jianming; Miller, Jabin; Morrow, Rebekah L.; Lingo, Joshuah D.; Merrell, Kaitlin; Shaikh, Saame Raza; Bridges, Lance C.

    2012-01-01

    Retinoids are essential in the proper establishment and maintenance of immunity. Although retinoids are implicated in immune related processes, their role in immune cell adhesion has not been well established. In this study, the effect of 9-cis-retinoic acid (9-cis-RA) on human hematopoietic cell adhesion was investigated. 9-cis-RA treatment specifically induced cell adhesion of the human immune cell lines HuT-78, NB4, RPMI 8866, and U937. Due to the prominent role of integrin receptors in me...

  18. Cellular adhesome screen identifies critical modulators of focal adhesion dynamics, cellular traction forces and cell migration behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fokkelman, Michiel; Balcıoğlu, Hayri E; Klip, Janna E; Yan, Kuan; Verbeek, Fons J; Danen, Erik H J; van de Water, Bob

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells migrate from the primary tumour into surrounding tissue in order to form metastasis. Cell migration is a highly complex process, which requires continuous remodelling and re-organization of the cytoskeleton and cell-matrix adhesions. Here, we aimed to identify genes controlling aspects of tumour cell migration, including the dynamic organization of cell-matrix adhesions and cellular traction forces. In a siRNA screen targeting most cell adhesion-related genes we identified 200+ genes that regulate size and/or dynamics of cell-matrix adhesions in MCF7 breast cancer cells. In a subsequent secondary screen, the 64 most effective genes were evaluated for growth factor-induced cell migration and validated by tertiary RNAi pool deconvolution experiments. Four validated hits showed significantly enlarged adhesions accompanied by reduced cell migration upon siRNA-mediated knockdown. Furthermore, loss of PPP1R12B, HIPK3 or RAC2 caused cells to exert higher traction forces, as determined by traction force microscopy with elastomeric micropillar post arrays, and led to considerably reduced force turnover. Altogether, we identified genes that co-regulate cell-matrix adhesion dynamics and traction force turnover, thereby modulating overall motility behaviour. PMID:27531518

  19. Adhesive properties of Enterobacter sakazakii to human epithelial and brain microvascular endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pospischil Andreas

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Enterobacter sakazakii is an opportunistic pathogen that has been associated with sporadic cases and outbreaks causing meningitis, necrotizing enterocolitis and sepsis especially in neonates. However, up to now little is known about the mechanisms of pathogenicity in E. sakazakii. A necessary state in the successful colonization, establishment and ultimately production of disease by microbial pathogens is the ability to adhere to host surfaces such as mucous membranes, gastric and intestinal epithelial or endothelial tissue. This study examined for the first time the adherence ability of 50 E. sakazakii strains to the two epithelial cell lines HEp-2 and Caco-2, as well as the brain microvascular endothelial cell line HBMEC. Furthermore, the effects of bacterial culture conditions on the adherence behaviour were investigated. An attempt was made to characterize the factors involved in adherence. Results Two distinctive adherence patterns, a diffuse adhesion and the formation of localized clusters of bacteria on the cell surface could be distinguished on all three cell lines. In some strains, a mixture of both patterns was observed. Adherence was maximal during late exponential phase, and increased with higher MOI. The adhesion capacity of E. sakazakii to HBMEC cells was affected by the addition of blood to the bacteria growth medium. Mannose, hemagglutination, trypsin digestion experiments and transmission electron microscopy suggested that the adhesion of E. sakazakii to the epithelial and endothelial cells is mainly non-fimbrial based. Conclusion Adherence experiments show heterogeneity within different E. sakazakii strains. In agreement with studies on E. cloacae, we found no relationship between the adhesive capacities in E. sakazakii and the eventual production of specific fimbriae. Further studies will have to be carried out in order to determine the adhesin(s involved in the interaction of E. sakazakii with cells and to

  20. Differential role of eDNA, proteins, and polysaccharides in cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesion by three Staphylococcus species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Rikke Louise; Okshevsky, Mira Ursula; Zeng, Guanghong

    on abiotic surfaces. We quantified initial adhesion, cell aggregation, and single-cell adhesion forces of Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, and Staphylococcus xylosus in the presence and absence of DNase, dispersin, or subtilisin, which cleave extracellular DNA, polysaccharides and proteins...... eDNA and proteins are the most important adhesins for initiating S. aureus biofilms. S. epidermidis was strongly affected by all enzyme treatments, which in addition to impairing adhesion to glass, also prevented the formation of aggregates and streamers observed abundantly in control samples. One...... strategies to a specific species, or to combine several strategies to target a broader spectrum of microorganisms. Among the three enzymatic treatments used in this study, we found that removal of eDNA had the most general impact, as it weakened adhesion forces and lowered the adhesion rate of S. epidermidis...

  1. Cell adhesion-mediated radioresistance (CAM-RR). Extracellular matrix-dependent improvement of cell survival in human tumor and normal cells in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cordes, N.; Meineke, V. [Inst. of Radiobiology, Medical Academy of the German Armed Forces, Munich (Germany)

    2003-05-01

    Background: Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) contact is thought to have great impact on cellular mechanisms resulting in increased cell survival upon exposure to ionizing radiation. Several human tumor cell lines and normal human fibroblastic cell strains of different origin, all of them expressing the wide-spread and important integrin subunit {beta}1, were irradiated, and clonogenic cell survival, {beta}1-integrin cell surface expression, and adhesive functionality were investigated. Material and Methods: Human tumor cell lines A172 (glioblastoma), PATU8902 (pancreas carcinoma), SKMES1 (lung carcinoma), A549 (lung carcinoma), and IPC298 (melanoma) as well as normal human skin (HSF1) and lung fibroblasts (CCD32) and human keratinocytes (HaCaT) were irradiated with 0-8 Gy. Besides colony formation assays, {beta}1-integrin cell surface expression by flow cytometry and adhesive functionality by adhesion assays were analyzed. Results: All cell lines showed improved clonogenic survival after irradiation in the presence of fibronectin as compared to plastic. Irradiated cells exhibited a significant, dose-dependent increase in {beta}1-integrin cell surface expression following irradiation. As a parameter of the adhesive functionality of the {beta}1-integrin, a radiation-dependent elevation of cell adhesion to fibronectin in comparison with adhesion to plastic was demonstrated. Conclusion: The in vitro cellular radiosensitivity is highly influenced by fibronectin according to the phenomenon of cell adhesion-mediated radioresistance. Additionally, our emerging data question the results of former and current in vitro cytotoxicity studies performed in the absence of an ECM. These findings might also be important for the understanding of malignant transformation, anchorage-independent cell growth, optimization of radiotherapeutic regimes and the prevention of normal tissue side effects on the basis of experimental radiobiological data. (orig.)

  2. The disintegrin tzabcanin inhibits adhesion and migration in melanoma and lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saviola, Anthony J; Burns, Patrick D; Mukherjee, Ashis K; Mackessy, Stephen P

    2016-07-01

    Integrins play an essential role in cancer survival and invasion, and they have been major targets in drug development and design. Disintegrins are small (4-16kDa) viperid snake venom proteins that exhibit a canonical integrin-binding site (often RGD). These non-enzymatic proteins inhibit integrin-mediated cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions, making them potential candidates as therapeutics in cancer and numerous other human disorders. The present study examined the cytotoxic, anti-adhesion, and anti-migration effects of a recently characterized disintegrin, tzabcanin, towards melanoma (A-375) and lung (A-549) cancer cell lines. Tzabcanin inhibits adhesion of both cells lines to vitronectin and exhibited very weak cytotoxicity towards A-375 cells; however, it had no effect on cell viability of A-549 cells. Further, tzabcanin significantly inhibited migration of both cell lines in cell scratch/wound healing assays. Flow cytometric analysis indicates that both A-375 and A-549 cell lines express integrin αvβ3, a critical integrin in tumor motility and invasion, and a major receptor of the extracellular matrix protein vitronectin. Flow cytometric analysis also identified αvβ3 as a binding site of tzabcanin. These results suggest that tzabcanin may have utility in the development of anticancer therapies, or may be used as a biomarker to detect neoplasms that over-express integrin αvβ3. PMID:27060015

  3. DNA-coated AFM cantilevers for the investigation of cell adhesion and the patterning of live cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Sonny C.; Crow, Ailey K.; Lam, Wilbur A.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.; Fletcher, Daniel A.; Francis, Matthew B.

    2008-08-01

    Measurement of receptor adhesion strength requires the precise manipulation of single cells on a contact surface. To attach live cells to a moveable probe, DNA sequences complementary to strands displayed on the plasma membrane are introduced onto AFM cantilevers (see picture, bp=base pairs). The strength of the resulting linkages can be tuned by varying the length of DNA strands, allowing for controlled transport of the cells.

  4. Role of Cbl-associated protein/ponsin in receptor tyrosine kinase signaling and cell adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritva Tikkanen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The Cbl-associated protein/ponsin (CAP is an adaptor protein that contains a so-called Sorbin homology (SoHo domain and three Src homology 3 (SH3 domains which are engaged in diverse protein-protein interactions. CAP has been shown to function in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and cell adhesion and to be involved in the differentiation of muscle cells and adipocytes. In addition, it participates in signaling pathways through several receptor tyrosine kinases such as insulin and neurotrophin receptors. In the last couple of years, several studies have shed light on the details of these processes and identified novel interaction partners of CAP. In this review, we summarize these recent findings and provide an overview on the function of CAP especially in cell adhesion and membrane receptor signaling.

  5. Triple Effect of Mimetic Peptides Interfering with Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule Homophilic Cis Interactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, S. Z.; Kolkova, Kateryna; Rudenko, Olga;

    2005-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is pivotal in neural development, regeneration, and learning. Here we characterize two peptides, termed P1-B and P2, derived from the homophilic binding sites in the first two N-terminal immunoglobulin (Ig) modules of NCAM, with regard to their effects...... on neurite extension and adhesion. To evaluate how interference of these mimetic peptides with NCAM homophilic interactions in cis influences NCAM binding in trans, we employed a coculture system in which PC12-E2 cells were grown on monolayers of fibroblasts with or without NCAM expression and the rate...... of neurite outgrowth subsequently was analyzed. P2, but not P1-B, induced neurite outgrowth in the absence of NCAM binding in trans. When PC12-E2 cells were grown on monolayers of NCAM-expressing fibroblasts, the effect of both P1-B and P2 on neurite outgrowth was dependent on peptide concentrations. P1-B...

  6. Chitosan hydrogels enriched with polyphenols: Antibacterial activity, cell adhesion and growth and mineralization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lišková, Jana; Douglas, Timothy E L; Beranová, Jana; Skwarczyńska, Agata; Božič, Mojca; Samal, Sangram Keshari; Modrzejewska, Zofia; Gorgieva, Selestina; Kokol, Vanja; Bačáková, Lucie

    2015-09-20

    Injectable hydrogels for bone regeneration consisting of chitosan, sodium beta-glycerophosphate (Na-β-GP) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) were enriched with the polyphenols phloroglucinol (PG) and gallic acid (GA) and characterized physicochemically and biologically with respect to properties relevant for applications in bone regeneration, namely gelation kinetics, mineralizability, antioxidant properties, antibacterial activity, cytocompatibility and ability to support adhesion and growth of human osteoblast-like MG63 cells. Enrichment with PG and GA had no negative effect on gelation kinetics and mineralizability. PG and GA both enhanced antioxidant activity of unmineralized hydrogels. Mineralization reduced antioxidant activity of hydrogels containing GA. Hydrogels containing GA, PG and without polyphenols reduced colony forming ability of Escherichia coli after 1h, 3h and 6h incubation and slowed E. coli growth in liquid culture for 150min. Hydrogels containing GA were cytotoxic and supported cell growth more poorly than polyphenol-free hydrogels. PG had no negative effect on cell adhesion and growth.

  7. Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 Promotes HIV-1 Attachment but Not Fusion to Target Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Naoyuki Kondo; Melikyan, Gregory B.

    2012-01-01

    Incorporation of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) into HIV-1 particles is known to markedly enhance the virus binding and infection of cells expressing lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1). At the same time, ICAM-1 has been reported to exert a less pronounced effect on HIV-1 fusion with lymphoid cells. Here we examined the role of ICAM-1/LFA-1 interactions in productive HIV-1 entry into lymphoid cells using a direct virus-cell fusion assay. ICAM-1 promoted HIV-1 attachme...

  8. Transchromosomic cell model of Down syndrome shows aberrant migration, adhesion and proteome response to extracellular matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cotter Finbarr E

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Down syndrome (DS, caused by trisomy of human chromosome 21 (HSA21, is the most common genetic birth defect. Congenital heart defects (CHD are seen in 40% of DS children, and >50% of all atrioventricular canal defects in infancy are caused by trisomy 21, but the causative genes remain unknown. Results Here we show that aberrant adhesion and proliferation of DS cells can be reproduced using a transchromosomic model of DS (mouse fibroblasts bearing supernumerary HSA21. We also demonstrate a deacrease of cell migration in transchromosomic cells independently of their adhesion properties. We show that cell-autonomous proteome response to the presence of Collagen VI in extracellular matrix is strongly affected by trisomy 21. Conclusion This set of experiments establishes a new model system for genetic dissection of the specific HSA21 gene-overdose contributions to aberrant cell migration, adhesion, proliferation and specific proteome response to collagen VI, cellular phenotypes linked to the pathogenesis of CHD.

  9. Effects of fibulin-5 on attachment, adhesion, and proliferation of primary human endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Fibulin-5 is a novel extracellular protein that is thought to act as a bridging peptide between elastin fibers and cell surface integrins in blood vessel wall. Fibulin-5 binding to endothelial cell (EC) surface integrins may effect cell proliferation and cell attachment to extracellular matrix (ECM) or to artificial surfaces. In this paper, we describe the effects of fibulin-5 on attachment, adhesion, and proliferation of primary human EC. After demonstrating that fibulin-5 over-expression inhibited EC proliferation, we tested the hypothesis that co-expression of fibulin-5 and VEGF165 will lead to unique EC phenotype that will exhibit increased adherence properties and retain its proliferation capacity. Methods and results: Fibulin-5 and VEGF165 gene transfer to primary human saphenous vein endothelial cells was accomplished using retroviral vectors encoding the two genes. Transgene expression was verified using immunohistochemistry, Western blotting, and ELISA. Fibulin 5 over-expression tended to improve immediate EC attachment (30 min after seeding) and improved significantly adhesion (>40%) under shear stress tested 24 h after EC seeding. The effects of fibulin-5 and VEGF165 on EC proliferation in the presence or absence of basic FGF were also tested. EC expressing fibulin-5 had reduced proliferation while VEGF165 co-expression ameliorated this effect. Conclusion: Fibulin-5 improved EC attachment to artificial surfaces. Dual transfer of fibulin-5 and VEGF165 resulted in EC phenotype with increased adhesion and improved proliferation. This unique EC phenotype can be useful for tissue engineering on endovascular prostheses

  10. Selective adhesion of intestinal epithelial cells on patterned films with amine functionalities formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Control of cell adhesion to surfaces is important to develop analytical tools in the areas of biomedical engineering. To control cell adhesiveness of the surface, we constructed a variety of plasma polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane (PPHMDSO) thin films deposited at the plasma power range of 10-100 W by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The PPHMDSO film that was formed at 10 W was revealed to be resistant to cell adhesion. The resistance to cell adhesion is closely related to physicochemical properties of the film. Atomic force microscopic data show an increase in surface roughness from 0.52 nm to 0.74 nm with increasing plasma power. From Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption spectroscopy data, it was also determined that the methyl (-CH3) peak intensity increases with increasing plasma power, whereas the hydroxyl (-OH) peak decreases. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data reveal an increase in C-O bonding with increasing plasma power. These results suggest that C-O bonding and hydroxyl (-OH) and methyl (-CH3) functional groups play a critical part in cell adhesion. Furthermore, to enhance a diversity of film surface, we accumulated the patterned plasma polymerized ethylenediamine (PPEDA) thin film on the top of the PPHMDSO thin film. The PPEDA film is established to be strongly cell-adherent. This patterned two-layer film stacking method can be used to form the selectively limited cell-adhesive PPEDA spots over the adhesion-resistant surface.

  11. Length-scale mediated adhesion and directed growth of neural cells by surface-patterned poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krsko, Peter; McCann, Thomas E; Thach, Thu-Trang; Laabs, Tracy L; Geller, Herbert M; Libera, Matthew R

    2009-02-01

    We engineered surfaces that permit the adhesion and directed growth of neuronal cell processes but that prevent the adhesion of astrocytes. This effect was achieved based on the spatial distribution of sub-micron-sized cell-repulsive poly(ethylene glycol) [PEG] hydrogels patterned on an otherwise cell-adhesive substrate. Patterns were identified that promoted cellular responses ranging from complete non-attachment, selective attachment, and directed growth at both cellular and subcellular length scales. At the highest patterning density where the individual hydrogels almost overlapped, there was no cellular adhesion. As the spacing between individual hydrogels was increased, patterns were identified where neurites could grow on the adhesive surface between hydrogels while astrocytes were unable to adhere. Patterns such as lines or arrays were identified that could direct the growth of these subcellular neuronal processes. At higher hydrogel spacings, both neurons and astrocytes adhered and grew in a manner approaching that of unpatterned control surfaces. Patterned lines could once again direct growth at cellular length scales. Significantly, we have demonstrated that the patterning of sub-micron/nano scale cell-repulsive features at microscale lengths on an otherwise cell-adhesive surface can differently control the adhesion and growth of cells and cell processes based on the difference in their characteristic sizes. This concept could potentially be applied to an implantable nerve-guidance device that would selectively enable regrowing axons to bridge a spinal-cord injury without interference from the glial scar.

  12. Selective adhesion of intestinal epithelial cells on patterned films with amine functionalities formed by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kyung Seop; Choi, Changrok; Kim, Soo Heon; Choi, Kun oh [Department of Physics, Brain Korea 21 Physics Research Division and Institute of Basic Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jeong Min [Department of Molecular Biology and Institute of Nanosensor and Biotechnology, BK21 Graduate Program for RNA Biology, Dankook University, Yongin 448-701 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hong Ja [Department of Internal Medicine, Dankook University College of Medicine, Cheonan 330-715 (Korea, Republic of); Yeo, Sanghak [R and D Center, ELBIO Incorporation, 426-5 Gasan-dong Geumchun-gu, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Heonyong [Department of Molecular Biology and Institute of Nanosensor and Biotechnology, BK21 Graduate Program for RNA Biology, Dankook University, Yongin 448-701 (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Donggeun, E-mail: djung@skku.ac.kr [Department of Physics, Brain Korea 21 Physics Research Division and Institute of Basic Science, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-11-01

    Control of cell adhesion to surfaces is important to develop analytical tools in the areas of biomedical engineering. To control cell adhesiveness of the surface, we constructed a variety of plasma polymerized hexamethyldisiloxane (PPHMDSO) thin films deposited at the plasma power range of 10-100 W by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). The PPHMDSO film that was formed at 10 W was revealed to be resistant to cell adhesion. The resistance to cell adhesion is closely related to physicochemical properties of the film. Atomic force microscopic data show an increase in surface roughness from 0.52 nm to 0.74 nm with increasing plasma power. From Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption spectroscopy data, it was also determined that the methyl (-CH{sub 3}) peak intensity increases with increasing plasma power, whereas the hydroxyl (-OH) peak decreases. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy data reveal an increase in C-O bonding with increasing plasma power. These results suggest that C-O bonding and hydroxyl (-OH) and methyl (-CH{sub 3}) functional groups play a critical part in cell adhesion. Furthermore, to enhance a diversity of film surface, we accumulated the patterned plasma polymerized ethylenediamine (PPEDA) thin film on the top of the PPHMDSO thin film. The PPEDA film is established to be strongly cell-adherent. This patterned two-layer film stacking method can be used to form the selectively limited cell-adhesive PPEDA spots over the adhesion-resistant surface.

  13. Gene expression of adhesion molecules in pulmonary and hepatic microvascular endothelial cells during sepsis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴荣谦; 徐迎新; 宋旭华; 孟宪钧

    2002-01-01

    To study the gene expression of adhesion molecules in pulmonary and hepatic microvascular endothelial cells during sepsis in mice. Methods: Male mice were subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) and microvascular endothelial cells in pulmonary and hepatic tissues were harvested at 3 hours (early sepsis) and 12 hours (late sepsis) after CLP, respectively. Gene expression of the adhesion molecules was assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Simultaneously, the alterations of myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in pulmonary and hepatic tissues were also examined. Results: E-selectin mRNA levels markedly increased at 3 hours after CLP in both pulmonary and hepatic microvascular endothelial cells, then they returned to the normal level at 12 hours after CLP. Increases in intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) mRNA levels were found at 3 hours after CLP in both pulmonary and hepatic microvascular endothelial cells, and these levels became higher at 12 hours after CLP. Adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) mRNA expression of vascular cells also increased significantly at 3 hours and 12 hours after CLP in both pulmonary and hepatic microvascular endothelial cells. The level of VCAM-1 mRNA in hepatic microvascular endothelial cells was higher at 3 hours than that at 12 hours after CLP, while the level of VCAM-1 mRNA in pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells was higher at 12 hours than that at 3 hours after CLP. The MPO activity in pulmonary and hepatic tissues increased at 3 hours after CLP, compared with that of the sham group. They both declined significantly at 12 hours after CLP, but they were still higher than that of the sham group. Conclusions: The up-regulation of the gene expression of adhesion molecules in pulmonary and hepatic microvascular endothelial cells is an important step for the migration and accumulation of leukocytes at the site of inflammation, which plays a critical role in organ damage during sepsis. And the contribution

  14. Mechanisms of eosinophil adhesion to endothelial cells under flow conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ulfman, L.H.

    2002-01-01

    Eosinophils play an important role in allergic inflammatory diseases such as allergic asthma. Infiltrates of these cells are present in the interstitium and the lumen of the bronchi of asthmatic patients. Eosinophils must pass the endothelium to enter this site of inflammation. A widely accepted par

  15. Spatial distribution of cell–cell and cell–ECM adhesions regulates force balance while main­taining E-cadherin molecular tension in cell pairs

    OpenAIRE

    Sim, Joo Yong; Moeller, Jens; Hart, Kevin C.; Ramallo, Diego; Vogel, Viola; Dunn, Alex R.; Nelson, W. James; Pruitt, Beth L.

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical linkage between cell–cell and cell–extracellular matrix (ECM) adhesions regulates cell shape changes during embryonic development and tissue homoeostasis. We examined how the force balance between cell–cell and cell–ECM adhesions changes with cell spread area and aspect ratio in pairs of MDCK cells. We used ECM micropatterning to drive different cytoskeleton strain energy states and cell-generated traction forces and used a Förster resonance energy transfer tension biosensor to ask...

  16. PRL-3 engages the focal adhesion pathway in triple-negative breast cancer cells to alter actin structure and substrate adhesion properties critical for cell migration and invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gari, Hamid H; DeGala, Gregory D; Ray, Rahul; Lucia, M Scott; Lambert, James R

    2016-10-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs) are among the most aggressive cancers characterized by a high propensity to invade, metastasize and relapse. We previously reported that the TNBC-specific inhibitor, AMPI-109, significantly impairs the ability of TNBC cells to migrate and invade by reducing levels of the metastasis-promoting phosphatase, PRL-3. Here, we examined the mechanisms by which AMPI-109 and loss of PRL-3 impede cell migration and invasion. AMPI-109 treatment or knock down of PRL-3 expression were associated with deactivation of Src and ERK signaling and concomitant downregulation of RhoA and Rac1/2/3 GTPase protein levels. These cellular changes led to rearranged filamentous actin networks necessary for cell migration and invasion. Conversely, overexpression of PRL-3 promoted TNBC cell invasion by upregulating matrix metalloproteinase 10, which resulted in increased TNBC cell adherence to, and degradation of, the major basement membrane component laminin. Our data demonstrate that PRL-3 engages the focal adhesion pathway in TNBC cells as a key mechanism for promoting TNBC cell migration and invasion. Collectively, these data suggest that blocking PRL-3 activity may be an effective method for reducing the metastatic potential of TNBC cells. PMID:27452906

  17. Altered cell wall disassembly during ripening of Cnr tomato fruit: implications for cell adhesion and fruit softening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orfila, C.; Huisman, M.M.H.; Willats, William George Tycho;

    2002-01-01

    The Cnr (Colourless non-ripening) tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) mutant has an aberrant fruit-ripening phenotype in which fruit do not soften and have reduced cell adhesion between pericarp cells. Cell walls from Cnr fruit were analysed in order to assess the possible contribution of pectic...... polysaccharides to the non-softening and altered cell adhesion phenotype. Cell wall material (CWM) and solubilised fractions of mature green and red ripe fruit were analysed by chemical, enzymatic and immunochemical techniques. No major differences in CWM sugar composition were detected although differences were...... found in the solubility and composition of the pectic polysaccharides extracted from the CWM at both stages of development. In comparison with the wild type, the ripening-associated solubilisation of homogalacturonan-rich pectic polysaccharides was reduced in Cnr. The proportion of carbohydrate...

  18. The effect of an external magnetic force on cell adhesion and proliferation of magnetically labeled mesenchymal stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nakamae Toshio

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As the strategy for tissue regeneration using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs for transplantation, it is necessary that MSCs be accumulated and kept in the target area. To accumulate MSCs effectively, we developed a novel technique for a magnetic targeting system with magnetically labeled MSCs and an external magnetic force. In this study, we examined the effect of an external magnetic force on magnetically labeled MSCs in terms of cell adhesion and proliferation. Methods Magnetically labeled MSCs were plated at the bottom of an insert under the influence of an external magnetic force for 1 hour. Then the inserts were turned upside down for between 1 and 24 hours, and the number of MSCs which had fallen from the membrane was counted. The gene expression of MSCs affected magnetic force was analyzed with microarray. In the control group, the same procedure was done without the external magnetic force. Results At 1 hour after the inserts were turned upside down, the average number of fallen MSCs in the magnetic group was significantly smaller than that in the control group, indicating enhanced cell adhesion. At 24 hours, the average number of fallen MSCs in the magnetic group was also significantly smaller than that in control group. In the magnetic group, integrin alpha2, alpha6, beta3 BP, intercellular adhesion molecule-2 (ICAM-2, platelet/endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1 were upregulated. At 1, 2 and 3 weeks after incubation, there was no statistical significant difference in the numbers of MSCs in the magnetic group and control group. Conclusions The results indicate that an external magnetic force for 1 hour enhances cell adhesion of MSCs. Moreover, there is no difference in cell proliferation after using an external magnetic force on magnetically labeled MSCs.

  19. Surface strategies for control of neuronal cell adhesion: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roach, P.; Parker, T.; Gadegaard, N.; Alexander, M. R.

    2010-06-01

    Material engineering methods have been used for many years to develop biomedical devices for use within the body to augment, repair or replace damaged tissues ranging from contact lenses to heart valves. Here we review the findings gathered from the wide and varied surface analytical approaches applied to study the interaction between biology and man-made materials. The key material characteristics identified to be important for biological recognition are surface chemistry, topography and compliance. Model surfaces with controlled chemistry and topography have provided insight into biological response to various types of topographical features over a wide range of length scales from nano to micrometres, along with 3D matrices that have been used as scaffolds to support cells for tissue formation. The cellular response to surfaces with localised areas of patterned chemistry and to those presenting gradually changing chemistry are discussed. Where previous reviews have been structured around specific classes of surface modification, e.g. self-assembly, or have broadly examined the response of various cells to numerous surfaces, we aim in this article to focus in particular on the tissues involved in the nervous system whilst providing a broad overview of key issues from the field of cell and protein surface interactions with surfaces. The goal of repair and treatment of diseases related to the central and peripheral nervous systems rely on understanding the local interfacial environment and controlling responses at the cellular level. The role of the protein layer deposited from serum containing media onto man-made surfaces is discussed. We highlight the particular problems associated with the repair of the nervous system, and review how neuronal attachment and axon guidance can be accomplished using various surface cues when cultured with single and multiple cell types. We include a brief glossary of techniques discussed in the body of this article aimed at the

  20. Oxidative stress and cell adhesion in skin cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Hintsala, H.-R. (Hanna-Riikka)

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Skin is the largest organ in our body protecting us from ultraviolet radiation and xenobiotics. UV-radiation is a common cause of squamocellular carcinoma and melanoma of the skin that cause morbidity and mortality world wide. Reactive oxygen species are constantly formed by, for example, cellular respiration and UV-radiation, and they can readily react with virtually any macromolecule within cell structures causing damage to DNA, proteins and lipids. Oxidative stress (OS) is a h...

  1. Mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway regulates branching by remodeling epithelial cell adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anneliis Ihermann-Hella

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Although the growth factor (GF signaling guiding renal branching is well characterized, the intracellular cascades mediating GF functions are poorly understood. We studied mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathway specifically in the branching epithelia of developing kidney by genetically abrogating the pathway activity in mice lacking simultaneously dual-specificity protein kinases Mek1 and Mek2. Our data show that MAPK pathway is heterogeneously activated in the subset of G1- and S-phase epithelial cells, and its tissue-specific deletion results in severe renal hypodysplasia. Consequently to the deletion of Mek1/2, the activation of ERK1/2 in the epithelium is lost and normal branching pattern in mutant kidneys is substituted with elongation-only phenotype, in which the epithelium is largely unable to form novel branches and complex three-dimensional patterns, but able to grow without primary defects in mitosis. Cellular characterization of double mutant epithelium showed increased E-cadherin at the cell surfaces with its particular accumulation at baso-lateral locations. This indicates changes in cellular adhesion, which were revealed by electron microscopic analysis demonstrating intercellular gaps and increased extracellular space in double mutant epithelium. When challenged to form monolayer cultures, the mutant epithelial cells were impaired in spreading and displayed strong focal adhesions in addition to spiky E-cadherin. Inhibition of MAPK activity reduced paxillin phosphorylation on serine 83 while remnants of phospho-paxillin, together with another focal adhesion (FA protein vinculin, were augmented at cell surface contacts. We show that MAPK activity is required for branching morphogenesis, and propose that it promotes cell cycle progression and higher cellular motility through remodeling of cellular adhesions.

  2. Biodegradable electrospun nanofibers coated with platelet-rich plasma for cell adhesion and proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz-Gomez, Luis [Departamento de Farmacia y Tecnología Farmacéutica, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15872 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Instituto de Ortopedia y Banco de Tejidos Musculoesqueléticos, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15872 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Alvarez-Lorenzo, Carmen, E-mail: carmen.alvarez.lorenzo@usc.es [Departamento de Farmacia y Tecnología Farmacéutica, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15872 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Concheiro, Angel [Departamento de Farmacia y Tecnología Farmacéutica, Facultad de Farmacia, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15872 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Silva, Maite [Instituto de Ortopedia y Banco de Tejidos Musculoesqueléticos, Universidad de Santiago de Compostela, 15872 Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Dominguez, Fernando [Fundación Publica Galega de Medicina Xenómica, Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Sheikh, Faheem A.; Cantu, Travis; Desai, Raj; Garcia, Vanessa L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Texas Pan American, Edinburg, TX 78541 (United States); Macossay, Javier, E-mail: jmacossay@utpa.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Texas Pan American, Edinburg, TX 78541 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Biodegradable electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds were coated with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to improve cell adhesion and proliferation. PRP was obtained from human buffy coat, and tested on human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to confirm cell proliferation and cytocompatibility. Then, PRP was adsorbed on the PCL scaffolds via lyophilization, which resulted in a uniform sponge-like coating of 2.85 (S.D. 0.14) mg/mg. The scaffolds were evaluated regarding mechanical properties (Young's modulus, tensile stress and tensile strain), sustained release of total protein and growth factors (PDGF-BB, TGF-β1 and VEGF), and hemocompatibility. MSC seeded on the PRP–PCL nanofibers showed an increased adhesion and proliferation compared to pristine PCL fibers. Moreover, the adsorbed PRP enabled angiogenesis features observed as neovascularization in a chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model. Overall, these results suggest that PRP–PCL scaffolds hold promise for tissue regeneration applications. - Highlights: • Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) can be adsorbed on electrospun fibers via lyophilization. • PRP coating enhanced mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and proliferation on scaffolds. • PRP-coated scaffolds showed sustained release of growth factors. • Adsorbed PRP provided angiogenic features. • PRP-poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds hold promise for tissue regeneration applications.

  3. Cell Adhesion Modification of Streptococcus viridians in the Presence of Xylitol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmacher, Jason; Vidakovich, Blair; Giangrande, Michael; Hoffmann, Peter

    2012-10-01

    There is scientific documentation that those who chew gum sweetened by the sugar alcohol xylitol report a dramatically lower incident of both dental caries and otitis media compared to those who chew conventional gum sweetened by sucrose. An explanation contends that xylitol interferes with the ability of Streptococcus viridian (SV) to form biofilms which is a necessary precursor to the bacteria's ability to damage human tissues. We have used atomic force microscopy to study the cell wall/fimbria properties at the nanonewton level in both the presence and absence of xylitol. The first set of measurements used varying concentrations of xylitol incorporated within the incubation medium. The second used non-xylitol grown bacteria, the xylitol was added externally at various concentrations. Our study suggests that growing SV with xylitol reduces their ability to adhere together. Additionally, externally added xylitol showed grouping of cell adhesion to a relatively narrow nanonewton spread that is concentration dependent. Measurement of the adhesion properties of the bacterial cell wall have found that there is a dramatic increase in the cell wall's firmness which simultaneously accompanied a decrease in its ability to support adhesion, even at very low concentrations of xylitol.

  4. Surface modifications of photocrosslinked biodegradable elastomers and their influence on smooth muscle cell adhesion and proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilagan, Bernadette G; Amsden, Brian G

    2009-09-01

    Photocrosslinked, biodegradable elastomers based on aliphatic polyesters have many desirable features as scaffolds for smooth muscle tissue engineering. However, they lack cell adhesion motifs. To address this shortcoming, two different modification procedures were studied utilizing a high and a low crosslink density elastomer: base etching and the incorporation of acryloyl-poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-Gly-Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser (GRGDS) into the elastomer network during photocrosslinking. Base etching improved surface hydrophilicity without altering surface topography, but did not improve bovine aortic smooth muscle cell adhesion. Incorporation of PEG-GRGDS into the elastomer network significantly improved cell adhesion for both high and low crosslink density elastomers, with a greater effect with the higher crosslink density elastomer. Incorporation of GRGDS into the high crosslink density elastomer also enhanced smooth muscle cell proliferation, while proliferation on the low crosslink density unmodified, base etched, and PEG-GRGDS incorporated elastomers was significantly greater than on the high crosslink density unmodified and base etched elastomer. PMID:19375999

  5. Biodegradable electrospun nanofibers coated with platelet-rich plasma for cell adhesion and proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biodegradable electrospun poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) scaffolds were coated with platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to improve cell adhesion and proliferation. PRP was obtained from human buffy coat, and tested on human adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) to confirm cell proliferation and cytocompatibility. Then, PRP was adsorbed on the PCL scaffolds via lyophilization, which resulted in a uniform sponge-like coating of 2.85 (S.D. 0.14) mg/mg. The scaffolds were evaluated regarding mechanical properties (Young's modulus, tensile stress and tensile strain), sustained release of total protein and growth factors (PDGF-BB, TGF-β1 and VEGF), and hemocompatibility. MSC seeded on the PRP–PCL nanofibers showed an increased adhesion and proliferation compared to pristine PCL fibers. Moreover, the adsorbed PRP enabled angiogenesis features observed as neovascularization in a chicken chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model. Overall, these results suggest that PRP–PCL scaffolds hold promise for tissue regeneration applications. - Highlights: • Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) can be adsorbed on electrospun fibers via lyophilization. • PRP coating enhanced mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and proliferation on scaffolds. • PRP-coated scaffolds showed sustained release of growth factors. • Adsorbed PRP provided angiogenic features. • PRP-poly(ε-caprolactone) scaffolds hold promise for tissue regeneration applications

  6. NMU signaling promotes endometrial cancer cell progression by modulating adhesion signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ting-Yu; Wu, Fang-Ju; Chang, Chia-Lin; Li, Zhongyou; Luo, Ching-Wei

    2016-03-01

    Neuromedin U (NMU) was originally named based on its strong uterine contractile activity, but little is known regarding its signaling/functions in utero. We identified that NMU and one of its receptors, NMUR2, are not only present in normal uterine endometrium but also co-expressed in endometrial cancer tissues, where the NMU level is correlated with the malignant grades and survival of patients. Cell-based assays further confirmed that NMU signaling can promote cell motility and proliferation of endometrial cancer cells derived from grade II tumors. Activation of NMU pathway in these endometrial cancer cells is required in order to sustain expression of various adhesion molecules, such as CD44 and integrin alpha1, as well as production of their corresponding extracellular matrix ligands, hyaluronan and collagen IV; it also increased the activity of SRC and its downstream proteins RHOA and RAC1. Thus, it is concluded that NMU pathway positively controls the adhesion signaling-SRC-Rho GTPase axis in the tested endometrial cancer cells and that changes in cell motility and proliferation can occur when there is manipulation of NMU signaling in these cells either in vitro or in vivo. Intriguingly, this novel mechanism also explains how NMU signaling promotes the EGFR-driven and TGFβ receptor-driven mesenchymal transitions. Through the above axis, NMU signaling not only can promote malignancy of the tested endometrial cancer cells directly, but also helps these cells to become more sensitive to niche growth factors in their microenvironment. PMID:26849234

  7. The epithelial cell adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM) as a morphoregulatory molecule is a tool in surgical pathology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winter, M.J.; Nagtegaal, I.D.; Krieken, J.H.J.M. van; Litvinov, S.V.

    2003-01-01

    Cell adhesion receptors (CAMs) are actively involved in regulating various cell processes, including growth, differentiation, and cell death. Therefore, CAMs represent a large group of morphoregulating molecules, mediating cross-talk between cells and of cells with their environment. From this persp

  8. Cell adhesion molecules involved in the leukocyte recruitment induced by venom of the snake Bothrops jararaca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella R. Zamuner

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been shown that Bothrops jararaca venom (BjV induces a significant leukocyte accumulation, mainly neutrophils, at the local of tissue damage. Therefore, the role of the adhesion molecules intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, LECAM-1, CD18, leukocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1 and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1 on the BjV-induced neutrophil accumulation and the correlation with release of LTB4, TXA2, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL-1 and IL-6 have been investigated. Anti-mouse LECAM-1, LFA-1, ICAM-1 and PECAM-1 monoclonal antibody injection resulted in a reduction of 42%, 80%, 66% and 67%, respectively, of neutrophil accumulation induced by BjV (250 μg/kg, intraperitoneal injection in male mice compared with isotype-matched control injected animals. The anti-mouse CD18 monoclonal antibody had no significant effect on venom-induced neutrophil accumulation. Concentrations of LTB4, TXA2, IL-6 and TNF-α were significant increased in the peritoneal exudates of animals injected with venom, whereas no increment in IL-1 was detected. This results suggest that ICAM-1, LECAM-1, LFA-1 and PECAM-1, but not CD18, adhesion molecules are involved in the recruitment of neutrophils into the inflammatory site induced by BjV. This is the first in vivo evidence that snake venom is able to up-regulate the expression of adhesion molecules by both leukocytes and endothelial cells. This venom effect may be indirect, probably through the release of the inflammatory mediators evidenced in the present study.

  9. Mast cells facilitate local VEGF release as an early event in the pathogenesis of postoperative peritoneal adhesions.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cahill, Ronan A

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Peritoneal injury sustained at laparotomy may evoke local inflammatory responses that result in adhesion formation. Peritoneal mast cells are likely to initiate this process, whereas vascular permeability\\/endothelial growth factor (VEGF) may facilitate the degree to which subsequent adhesion formation occurs. METHODS: Mast cell deficient mice (WBB6F1-\\/-), along with their mast cell sufficient counterparts (WBB6F1+\\/+), underwent a standardized adhesion-inducing operation (AIS) with subsequent sacrifice and adhesion assessment 14 days later in a blinded fashion. Additional CD-1 and WBB6F1+\\/+, and WBB6F1-\\/- mice were killed 2, 6, 12, and 24 hours after operation for measurement of VEGF by ELISA in systemic serum and peritoneal lavage fluid. Two further groups of CD-1 mice underwent AIS and received either a single perioperative dose of anti-VEGF monoclonal antibody (10 mug\\/mouse) or a similar volume of IgG isotypic antibody and adhesion formation 2 weeks later was evaluated. RESULTS: WBB6F1-\\/- mice had less adhesions then did their WBB6F1+\\/+ counterparts (median [interquartile range] adhesion score 3[3-3] vs 1.5[1-2] respectively; P < .003). Local VEGF release peaked 6 hours after AIS in both WBB6F1+\\/+ and CD-1 mice whereas levels remained at baseline in WBB6F1-\\/- mice. CD-1 mice treated with a single dose of anti-VEGF therapy during operation had less adhesions than controls (2[1.25-2] vs 3[2.25-3], P = .0002). CONCLUSIONS: Mast cells and VEGF are central to the formation of postoperative intra-abdominal adhesions with mast cells being responsible, either directly or indirectly, for VEGF release into the peritoneal cavity after operation. In tandem with the recent clinical success of anti-VEGF monoclonal antibodies in oncologic practice, our observations suggest an intriguing avenue for research and development of anti-adhesion strategy.

  10. MEK inhibitors, novel anti-adhesive molecules, reduce sickle red blood cell adhesion in vitro and in vivo, and vasoocclusion in vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahima Zennadi

    Full Text Available In sickle cell disease, sickle erythrocyte (SSRBC interacts with endothelial cells, leukocytes, and platelets, and activates coagulation and inflammation, promoting vessel obstruction, which leads to serious life-threatening complications, including acute painful crises and irreversible damage to multiple organs. The mitogen-activated protein kinase, ERK1/2, is abnormally activated in SSRBCs. However, the therapeutic potential of SSRBC ERK1/2 inactivation has never been investigated. I tested four different inhibitors of MEK1/2 (MEK, the kinase that activates ERK1/2, in a model of human SSRBC adhesion to TNFα-activated endothelial cells (ECs. SSRBC MEK inhibition abrogated adhesion to non-activated and TNFα-activated ECs to levels below baseline SSRBC adhesion to non-activated ECs in vitro. SSRBC MEK inhibition also prevented SSRBCs from activating naïve neutrophils to adhere to endothelium. To determine the effect of MEK inhibitors on SSRBC adherence in vivo, sham-treated or MEK inhibitor-treated SSRBCs were infused to nude mice previously treated with TNFα. Sham-treated SSRBCs displayed marked adhesion and occlusion of enflamed vessels, both small and large. However, SSRBC treatment with MEK inhibitors ex vivo showed poor SSRBC adhesion to enflamed vessels with no visible vasoocclusion in vivo. In addition, MEK inhibitor treatment of SSRBCs reduced SSRBC organ trapping and increased the number of SSRBCs circulating in bloodstream. Thus, these data suggest that SSRBC ERK1/2 plays potentially a critical role in sickle pathogenesis, and that MEK inhibitors may represent a valuable intervention for acute sickle cell crises.

  11. [Comparison of adhesion of different endothelial cells under shear stress load in the flow field in vitro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhenghua; Zhang, Bengui; Zhang, Eryong; Xu, Weilin; Shi, Yingkang; Guo, Yingqiang

    2011-02-01

    This study was aimed to compare the differences of adhesion properties of endothelial cells (EC) from arteries (AEC), veins (VEC) and capillaries (MVEC) under shear stress condition, and to explore whether they can get the same adhesive ability as graft in similar shear stress conditions. With mended parallel plate flow apparatus and peristalsis pump providing fluid shear stress used, endothelial culture models were established in vitro with the same environmental factors as steady culture. To compare the adhesion among three kinds of endothelial cells under dynamic condition and static condition, the dynamic change of cytoskeletal actin filaments and the effects of different adhesive proteins coated on the adhesion of EC to the glass were studied. The cultured endothelial cells under flow conditions were extended and arranged along the direction of flow. The adhesive ability from high to low under static condition were AEC, MVEC and VEC (VEC compared with AEC or MVEC, P different between AEC and MVEC. But VEC was significantly different (P stress fibers were formed, which even interconnected to form a whole in the MVEC. The adhesion of AEC, VEC and MVEC under shear stress conditions are more significantly increased than those under the static culture conditions, and the MVEC can achieve the same adhesion as AEC.

  12. Keynote Paper: Cell-Surface Adhesive Interactions in Microchannels and Microvessels

    CERN Document Server

    King, M R

    2003-01-01

    Adhesive interactions between white blood cells and the interior surface of the blood vessels they contact is important in inflammation and in the progression of heart disease. Parallel-plate microchannels have been useful in characterizing the strength of these interactions, in conditions that are much simplified over the complex environment these cells experience in the body. Recent computational and experimental work by several laboratories have attempted to bridge this gap between behavior observed in flow chamber experiments, and cell-surface interactions observed in the microvessels of anesthetized animals.

  13. Targeting the Metastasis Suppressor, N-Myc Downstream Regulated Gene-1, with Novel Di-2-Pyridylketone Thiosemicarbazones: Suppression of Tumor Cell Migration and Cell-Collagen Adhesion by Inhibiting Focal Adhesion Kinase/Paxillin Signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangpu, Xiongzhi; Lu, Jiaoyang; Xi, Ruxing; Yue, Fei; Sahni, Sumit; Park, Kyung Chan; Menezes, Sharleen; Huang, Michael L H; Zheng, Minhua; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Richardson, Des R

    2016-05-01

    Metastasis is a complex process that is regulated by multiple signaling pathways, with the focal adhesion kinase (FAK)/paxillin pathway playing a major role in the formation of focal adhesions and cell motility. N-myc downstream regulated gene-1 (NDRG1) is a potent metastasis suppressor in many solid tumor types, including prostate and colon cancer. Considering the antimetastatic effect of NDRG1 and the crucial involvement of the FAK/paxillin pathway in cellular migration and cell-matrix adhesion, we assessed the effects of NDRG1 on this important oncogenic pathway. In the present study, NDRG1 overexpression and silencing models of HT29 colon cancer and DU145 prostate cancer cells were used to examine the activation of FAK/paxillin signaling and the formation of focal adhesions. The expression of NDRG1 resulted in a marked and significant decrease in the activating phosphorylation of FAK and paxillin, whereas silencing of NDRG1 resulted in an opposite effect. The expression of NDRG1 also inhibited the formation of focal adhesions as well as cell migration and cell-collagen adhesion. Incubation of cells with novel thiosemicarbazones, namely di-2-pyridylketone 4,4-dimethyl-3-thiosemicarbazone and di-2-pyridylketone 4-cyclohexyl-4-methyl-3-thiosemicarbazone, that upregulate NDRG1 also resulted in decreased phosphorylation of FAK and paxillin. The ability of these thiosemicarbazones to inhibit cell migration and metastasis could be mediated, at least in part, through the FAK/paxillin pathway. PMID:26895766

  14. Impacts of Hematite Nanoparticle Exposure on Biomechanical, Adhesive, and Surface Electrical Properties of Escherichia coli Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Wen; Hughes, Joseph; Chen, Yongsheng

    2012-01-01

    Despite a wealth of studies examining the toxicity of engineered nanomaterials, current knowledge on their cytotoxic mechanisms (particularly from a physical perspective) remains limited. In this work, we imaged and quantitatively characterized the biomechanical (hardness and elasticity), adhesive, and surface electrical properties of Escherichia coli cells with and without exposure to hematite nanoparticles (NPs) in an effort to advance our understanding of the cytotoxic impacts of nanomater...

  15. Inhibition of adhesion of Neisseria meningitidis to human epithelial cells by berry juice polyphenolic fractions

    OpenAIRE

    Toivanen, Marko; Huttunen, Sanna; Lapinjoki, Seppo; Tikkanen-Kaukanen, Carina

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Adhesion of pathogens to host tissues is the requirement for the initiation of the majority of infectious diseases. We recently showed that the binding of Neisseria meningitidis pili to immobilised human epithelial cells is inhibited by molecular size fractions (10?100 kDa) of berry juices. Additionally, the isolated meningococcal pili bound to polyphenolic fractions of berry juices. In the present study we investigated the antiadhesive effects of berry juice polyphenolics...

  16. Nanofibers and nanoparticles from the insect-capturing adhesive of the Sundew (Drosera) for cell attachment

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang Mingjun; Lenaghan Scott C; Xia Lijin; Dong Lixin; He Wei; Henson William R; Fan Xudong

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The search for naturally occurring nanocomposites with diverse properties for tissue engineering has been a major interest for biomaterial research. In this study, we investigated a nanofiber and nanoparticle based nanocomposite secreted from an insect-capturing plant, the Sundew, for cell attachment. The adhesive nanocomposite has demonstrated high biocompatibility and is ready to be used with minimal preparation. Results Atomic force microscopy (AFM) conducted on the adh...

  17. Photoinitiator-Free Synthesis of Endothelial Cell Adhesive and Enzymatically Degradable Hydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Jones, Derek R.; Marchant, Roger E.; von Recum, Horst; Gupta, Anirban Sen; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice

    2014-01-01

    We report on a photoinitiator-free synthetic method of incorporating bioactivity into poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels in order to control physical properties, enzymatic biodegradability and cell-specific adhesiveness of the polymer network, while eliminating the need for UV-mediated photopolymerization. To accomplish this, hydrogel networks were polymerized using Michael addition with four-arm PEG acrylate (10 kDa), using a collagenase sensitive peptide (CSP) as a crosslinker, and intro...

  18. Synthesis and Cell Adhesive Properties of Linear and Cyclic RGD Functionalized Polynorbornene Thin Films

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, Paresma R.; Kiser, Rosemary Conrad; Lu, Ying Y.; Fong, Eileen; Ho, Wilson C.; Tirrell, David A.; Grubbs, Robert H.

    2012-01-01

    Described herein is the efficient synthesis and evaluation of bioactive arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) functionalized polynorbornene-based materials for cell adhesion and spreading. Polynorbornenes containing either linear or cyclic RGD peptides were synthesized by ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) using the well-defined ruthenium initiator [(H_(2)IMes)(pyr)_(2)(Cl)_(2)Ru═CHPh]. The random copolymerization of three separate norbornene monomers allowed for the incorporation o...

  19. Tuning the mechanical properties of bioreducible multilayer films for improved cell adhesion and transfection activity

    OpenAIRE

    Blacklock, Jenifer; Vetter, Andreas; Lankenau, Andreas; Oupický, David; Möhwald, Helmuth

    2010-01-01

    A simple approach to the mechanical modulation of layer-by-layer (LbL) films is through manipulation of the film assembly. Here, we report results based on altering the salt concentration during film assembly and its effect on film rigidity. Based on changes in film rigidity, cell adhesion characteristics and transfection activity were investigated in vitro. LbL films consisting of reducible hyperbranched poly(amide amine) (RHB) have been implemented along with DNA for investigating fibroblas...

  20. Structural and cell adhesion properties of zebrafish syndecan-4 are shared with higher vertebrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whiteford, James; Ko, Sunggeon; Lee, Weontae;

    2008-01-01

    The syndecan proteoglycans are an ancient class of receptor, bearing heparan sulfate chains that interact with numerous potential ligands including growth factors, morphogens, and extracellular matrix molecules. The single syndecan of invertebrates appears not to have cell adhesion roles, but the......-4 are consistent across the vertebrate spectrum and reflect an early acquisition of specialization after syndecan gene duplication events at the invertebrate/early chordate boundary....

  1. Bisphosphonates inhibit the adhesion of breast cancer cells to bone matrices in vitro.

    OpenAIRE

    van der Pluijm, G.; Vloedgraven, H; van Beek, E; van der Wee-Pals, L; Löwik, C; Papapoulos, S

    1996-01-01

    Bisphosphonates are used with increasing frequency in the management of skeletal complications in patients with breast cancer. In this paper, we have investigated whether bisphosphonates, besides their known beneficial effects on tumor-associated osteoclastic resorption, are capable of inhibiting breast cancer cell adhesion to bone matrix. For that we used two in vitro models for bone matrix (cortical bone slices and cryostat sections of trabecular bone from neonatal mouse tails). Four bone m...

  2. Stiffness and Adhesivity Control Aortic Valve Interstitial Cell Behavior within Hyaluronic Acid Based Hydrogels

    OpenAIRE

    Duan, Bin; Hockaday, Laura A.; Kapetanovic, Edi; Kang, Kevin H.; Butcher, Jonathan T.

    2013-01-01

    Bioactive and biodegradable hydrogels that mimic the extracellular matrix and regulate valve interstitial cells (VIC) behavior are of great interest as three dimensional (3D) model systems for understanding mechanisms of valvular heart disease pathogenesis in vitro and the basis for regenerative templates for tissue engineering. However, the role of stiffness and adhesivity of hydrogels in VIC behavior remains poorly understood. This study reports synthesis of oxidized and methacrylated hyalu...

  3. Radioresistance of mice cells immobilized by adhesion in glass layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phagocytic leukocytes are involved in bio compatibility and biodegradation processes at which materials utilized in different at which materials utilized in different types of implants are submitted. In this work round shape glass cover slips were implanted subcutaneously in 45-day-old C57B1J 6 mice and later irradiated with a 60 Co sublethal whole-body dose of 4.0 Gy. Cover slips were removed 1,3,7 and 14 days post-implant and dyed by the hematoxylin-eosin technique. Macrophage and giant cell estimations were done in a microscope by means of an integrator eyepiece. The modifications found permit to conclude that they to exist significant differences in macrophages as a function of time after implant but not as a consequence of irradiation. (author)

  4. Enhanced osteoblast-like cell adhesion and proliferation using sulfonate-bearing polymeric scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaterji, Somali; Gemeinhart, Richard A

    2007-12-15

    Orthopedic malfunction, degeneration, or damage remains a serious healthcare issue despite advances in medical technology. Proactive extracellular matrix (ECM)-mimetic scaffolds are being researched to orchestrate the activation of diverse osteogenic signaling cascades, facilitating osteointegration. We hypothesized that sulfonated functionalities incorporated into synthetic hydrogels would simulate anionic, sulfate-bearing proteoglycans, abundant in the ECM. Using this rationale, we successfully developed differentially sulfonated hydrogels, polymerizing a range of sulfopropyl acrylate potassium-acrylamide (SPAK-AM) mole ratios as monomer feeds under room temperature conditions. For anchorage-dependent cells, such as osteoblasts, adhesion is a critical prerequisite for subsequent osteointegration and cell specialization. The introduction of the sulfonated monomer, SPAK, resulted in favorable uptake of serum proteins with proportional increase in adhesion and proliferation rates of model cell lines, which included NIH/3T3 fibroblasts, MG-63 osteoblasts, and MC3T3-E1 subclone 4 preosteoblasts. In fact, higher proportions of sulfonate content (pSPAK75, pSPAK100) exhibited comparable or even higher degrees of adhesion and proliferation, relative to commercial grade tissue culture polystyrene in vitro. These results indicate promising potentials of sulfonated ECM-mimetic hydrogels as potential osteogenic tissue engineering scaffolds. PMID:17584889

  5. Nanometer polymer surface features: the influence on surface energy, protein adsorption and endothelial cell adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Joseph; Khang, Dongwoo; Webster, Thomas J.

    2008-12-01

    Current small diameter (vascular graft materials exhibit poor long-term patency due to thrombosis and intimal hyperplasia. Tissue engineered solutions have yielded functional vascular tissue, but some require an eight-week in vitro culture period prior to implantation—too long for immediate clinical bedside applications. Previous in vitro studies have shown that nanostructured poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) surfaces elevated endothelial cell adhesion, proliferation, and extracellular matrix synthesis when compared to nanosmooth surfaces. Nonetheless, these studies failed to address the importance of lateral and vertical surface feature dimensionality coupled with surface free energy; nor did such studies elicit an optimum specific surface feature size for promoting endothelial cell adhesion. In this study, a series of highly ordered nanometer to submicron structured PLGA surfaces of identical chemistry were created using a technique employing polystyrene nanobeads and poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) molds. Results demonstrated increased endothelial cell adhesion on PLGA surfaces with vertical surface features of size less than 18.87 nm but greater than 0 nm due to increased surface energy and subsequently protein (fibronectin and collagen type IV) adsorption. Furthermore, this study provided evidence that the vertical dimension of nanometer surface features, rather than the lateral dimension, is largely responsible for these increases. In this manner, this study provides key design parameters that may promote vascular graft efficacy.

  6. Endothelial adhesion of synchronized gastric tumor cells changes during cell cycle transit and correlates with the expression level of CD44 splice variants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Anton Oertl; Jens Castein; Tobias Engl; Wolf-Dietrich Beecken; Dietger Jonas; Richard Melamed; Roman A. Blaheta

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To study adhesion capacity and CD44 expression of human gastric adenocarcinoma MKN45 cells at different stages of a first cell cycle.METHODS: MKN45 cells were synchronized by aphidicolin and assayed for adhesion to an endothelial cell (HUVEC)monolayer. Surface expression of CD44 and CD44 splice variants on MKN45 cells was evaluated by flow cytometry.Functional relevance of CD44 adhesion receptors was investigated by blocking studies using anti CD44 monoclonal antibodies or by hyaluronan digestion.RESULTS: Adhesion of MKN45 to HUVEC was increased during G2/M transit, after which adhesion returned to baseline levels with cell cycle completion. In parallel, CD44splice variants CD44v4, CD44v5, and CD44v7 were all upregulated on MKN45 during cell cycle progression with a maximum effect in G2/M. The function of CD44 surface receptors was assessed with specific receptor blocking monodonal antibodies or removal of hyaluronan by digestion with hyaluronidase. Both strategies inhibited tumor cell adhesion to HUVEC by nearly 50%, which indicates that MKN45-HUVEC-interaction is CD44 dependent.CONCLUSION: CD44 expression level is linked to the cell cycle in gastrointestinal tumor cells, which in turn leads to cell cyde dependent alterations of their adhesion behaviour to endothelium.

  7. Cell adhesion molecules and hyaluronic acid as markers of inflammation, fibrosis and response to antiviral therapy in chronic hepatitis C patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Granot

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Cell adhesion molecules (intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1 and hyaluronic acid, markers of inflammation and fibrosis were monitored in hepatitis C patients to determine whether changes in plasma levels, during antiviral treatment, can predict long-term response to therapy.

  8. Focal adhesion kinase regulation in stem cell alignment and spreading on nanofibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andalib, Mohammad Nahid; Lee, Jeong Soon; Ha, Ligyeom; Dzenis, Yuris; Lim, Jung Yul

    2016-05-13

    While electrospun nanofibers have demonstrated the potential for novel tissue engineering scaffolds, very little is known about the molecular mechanism of how cells sense and adapt to nanofibers. Here, we revealed the role of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), one of the key molecular sensors in the focal adhesion complex, in regulating mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) shaping on nanofibers. We produced uniaxially aligned and randomly distributed nanofibers from poly(l-lactic acid) to have the same diameters (about 130 nm) and evaluated MSC behavior on these nanofibers comparing with that on flat PLLA control. C3H10T1/2 murine MSCs exhibited upregulations in FAK expression and phosphorylation (pY397) on nanofibrous cultures as assessed by immunoblotting, and this trend was even greater on aligned nanofibers. MSCs showed significantly elongated and well-spread morphologies on aligned and random nanofibers, respectively. In the presence of FAK silencing via small hairpin RNA (shRNA), cell elongation length in the aligned nanofiber direction (cell major axis length) was significantly decreased, while cells still showed preferred orientation along the aligned nanofibers. On random nanofibers, MSCs with FAK-shRNA showed impaired cell spreading resulting in smaller cell area and higher circularity. Our study provides new data on how MSCs shape their morphologies on aligned and random nanofibrous cultures potentially via FAK-mediated mechanism. PMID:27040763

  9. Decipher the dynamic coordination between enzymatic activity and structural modulation at focal adhesions in living cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Shaoying; Seong, Jihye; Wang, Yi; Chang, Shiou-Chi; Eichorst, John Paul; Ouyang, Mingxing; Li, Julie Y.-S.; Chien, Shu; Wang, Yingxiao

    2014-07-01

    Focal adhesions (FAs) are dynamic subcellular structures crucial for cell adhesion, migration and differentiation. It remains an enigma how enzymatic activities in these local complexes regulate their structural remodeling in live cells. Utilizing biosensors based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET), we developed a correlative FRET imaging microscopy (CFIM) approach to quantitatively analyze the subcellular coordination between the enzymatic Src activation and the structural FA disassembly. CFIM reveals that the Src kinase activity only within the microdomain of lipid rafts at the plasma membrane is coupled with FA dynamics. FA disassembly at cell periphery was linearly dependent on this raft-localized Src activity, although cells displayed heterogeneous levels of response to stimulation. Within lipid rafts, the time delay between Src activation and FA disassembly was 1.2 min in cells seeded on low fibronectin concentration ([FN]) and 4.3 min in cells on high [FN]. CFIM further showed that the level of Src-FA coupling, as well as the time delay, was regulated by cell-matrix interactions, as a tight enzyme-structure coupling occurred in FA populations mediated by integrin αvβ3, but not in those by integrin α5β1. Therefore, different FA subpopulations have distinctive regulation mechanisms between their local kinase activity and structural FA dynamics.

  10. Computer simulation of wound closure in epithelial tissues: Cell-basal-lamina adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Tatsuzo; Honda, Hisao

    2009-12-01

    The mechanism of wound closure in epithelial tissues, i.e., cell monolayer sheets, is investigated through computer simulations. A wound means an area in which some cells have been removed from the normal tissue. The vertex dynamics cell model [T. Nagai and H. Honda, Philos. Mag. B 81, 699 (2001)], which describes morphogenesis of epithelial tissues using the concepts of statistical physics, is modified and applied to the closure of small wounds without mitosis. It is shown that cell-basal-lamina adhesion governs the wound closure competing with cell-cell adhesion and cell elasticity. The simulation results reproduce the actual wound closure process qualitatively and partly quantitatively. The closing proceeds with the translation of the edges of wound polygons toward the wound center and the intermittent reduction in the number of polygon edges. Over time, the process leads to an exponential decrease in the wound area. A shape factor is introduced to describe the wound shape quantitatively and is used to examine the time variation thereof. A method for determining model parameters by comparison with the experiments is given.

  11. Epigenetic mechanisms of cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Yusuke; Kikuchi, Jiro

    2016-09-01

    Multiple myeloma cells acquire the resistance to anti-cancer drugs through physical and functional interactions with the bone marrow microenvironment via two overlapping mechanisms. First, bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) produce soluble factors, such as interleukin-6 and insulin-like growth factor-1, to activate signal transduction pathways leading to drug resistance (soluble factor-mediated drug resistance). Second, BMSCs up-regulate the expression of cell cycle inhibitors, anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family and ABC drug transporters in myeloma cells upon direct adhesion [cell adhesion-mediated drug resistance (CAM-DR)]. Elucidation of the mechanisms underlying drug resistance may greatly contribute to the advancement of cancer therapies. Recent investigations, including ours, have revealed the involvement of epigenetic alterations in drug resistance especially CAM-DR. For example, we found that class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) determine the sensitivity of proteasome inhibitors and the histone methyltransferase EZH2 regulates the transcription of anti-apoptotic genes during the acquisition of CAM-DR by myeloma cells. In addition, another histone methyltransferase MMSET was shown to confer drug resistance to myeloma cells by facilitating DNA repair. These findings provide a rationale for the inclusion of epigenetic drugs, such as HDAC inhibitors and histone methylation modifiers, in combination chemotherapy for MM patients to increase the therapeutic index. PMID:27411688

  12. Effects of ovarian cancer G protein coupled receptor 1 on the proliferation, migration, and adhesion of human ovarian cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Juan; ZHANG Long

    2011-01-01

    Background OGR1 was found as a G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and proton sensor. Our previous studies have found that OGR1 has inhibitory effect on the metastasis of prostate cancer. In order to investigate the roles of OGR1 gene in the biological activities of ovarian cancer, we studied the OGR1 effects on ovarian cancer cells, HEY cells.Methods OGR1 gene was transfected into HEY cell, in which endogenous expression is low. OGR1-overxepressed cells and vector-transfected cells were compared in different assays. Western blotting was employed to confirm the high expression level of OGR1. Cell proliferation was determined by MTT assay and cell doubling time assay. Cell migration assay (transwell assay) and cell adhesion assay were performed to determine the migration and adhesion potential of cells. Student's t test was employed for statistical analysis.Results Proliferation of OGR1-overexpressed cells was significantly reduced (P <0.01); cell migration was significantly inhibited in the OGR1-transfected cells (P <0.01); cell adhesion to extracellular matrix including fibronectin, vitronectin,collagen Ⅰ/Ⅳ was significantly increased (P <0.01).Conclusions OGR1 expression in human ovarian cancer cells significantly inhibited the cell proliferation and migration,but significantly enhanced cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix. It indicated that OGR1 may be a tumor suppressor gene for ovarian cancer.

  13. Functional polyaniline nanofibre mats for human adipose-derived stem cell proliferation and adhesion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdul Rahman, Norizah, E-mail: norizah@science.putra.edu.my [Polymer Electronics Research Centre, School of Chemical Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Department of Chemistry, University of Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia); Feisst, Vaughan [School of Biological Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Dickinson, Michelle E. [Department of Chemical and Materials Engineering, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Malmström, Jenny [Polymer Electronics Research Centre, School of Chemical Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Dunbar, P. Rod [School of Biological Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Maurice Wilkins Centre, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); Travas-Sejdic, Jadranka, E-mail: j.travas-sejdic@auckland.ac.nz [Polymer Electronics Research Centre, School of Chemical Sciences, The University of Auckland, Private Bag 92019, Auckland (New Zealand); MacDiarmid Institute for Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology, P.O. Box 600, Wellington 6140 (New Zealand)

    2013-02-15

    Conductive polymer poly(aniline-co-m-aminobenzoic acid) (P(ANI-co-m-ABA)) and polyaniline (PANI) were blended with a biodegradable, biocompatible polymer, poly(L-lactic acid) and were electrospun into nanofibres to investigate their potential application as a scaffold for human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs). These polymers, in both conductive and non-conductive form, were electrospun with average fibre diameters of less than 400 nm. Novel nanoindentation results obtained on the individual nanofibres revealed that the elastic moduli of the nanofibres are much higher at the surface (4–10 GPa, h{sub max} <75 nm) than in the inner fibre core (2–4 GPa, h{sub max} >75 nm). The composite nanofibres showed great promise as a scaffold for hASCs as they supported the cell adhesion and proliferation. After 1 week of cell culture hASCs were well spread on the substrates with abundant focal adhesions. The electrospun mats provide the cells with comparably stiff, sub-micron sized fibres as anchoring points on a substrate of high porosity. The conductive nature of these composite nanofibres offers exciting opportunities for electrical stimulation of the cells. - Highlights: ► Polyaniline and its copolymer's nanofibres were prepared by electrospinning. ► The elastic modulus of a single polyaniline composite nanofibres were determined. ► Elastic moduli of the nanofibres are much higher at the surface than the inner core. ► The electrospun mats supported the cell adhesion and proliferation. ► The nanofibres show great promise as a scaffold for adipose derived stem cells.

  14. Resveratrol and Estradiol Exert Disparate Effects on Cell Migration, Cell Surface Actin Structures, and Focal Adhesion Assembly in MDA-MB-231 Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas G. Azios

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Resveratrol, a grape polyphenol, is thought to be a cancer preventive, yet its effects on metastatic breast cancer are relatively unknown. Since cancer cell invasion is dependent on cell migration, the chemotactic response of MDA-MB-231 metastatic human breast cancer cells to resveratrol, estradiol (E2, or epidermal growth factor (EGF was investigated. Resveratrol decreased while E2 and EGF increased directed cell migration. Resveratrol may inhibit cell migration by altering the cytoskeleton. Resveratrol induced a rapid global array of filopodia and decreased focal adhesions and focal adhesion kinase (FAK activity. E2 or EGF treatment did not affect filopodia extension but increased lamellipodia and associated focal adhesions that are integral for cell migration. Combined resveratrol and E2 treatment resulted in a filopodia and focal adhesion response similar to resveratrol alone. Combined resveratrol and EGF resulted in a lamellipodia and focal adhesion response similar to EGF alone. E2 and to a lesser extent resveratrol increased EGFR activity. The cytoskeletal changes and EGFR activity in response to E2 were blocked by EGFR1 inhibitor indicating that E2 may increase cell migration via crosstalk with EGFR signaling. These data suggest a promotional role for E2 in breast cancer cell migration but an antiestrogenic, preventative role for resveratrol.

  15. IL-12 and IL-18 induce MAP kinase-dependent adhesion of T cells to extracellular matrix components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariel, Amiram; Novick, Daniela; Rubinstein, Menachem; Dinarello, Charles A; Lider, Ofer; Hershkoviz, Rami

    2002-07-01

    Cytokines and chemokines play an essential role in recruiting leukocytes from the circulation to the peripheral sites of inflammation by modulating cellular interactions with endothelial cell ligands and extracellular matrix (ECM). Herein, we examined regulation of T cell adhesion to ECM ligands by two major proinflammatory cytokines, interleukin (IL)-12 and IL-18. IL-12 and IL-18 induced T cell adhesion to fibronectin (FN) and hyaluronic acid at low (pM) concentrations that were mediated by specific adhesion molecules expressed on the T cell surface, namely, beta(1) integrins and CD44, respectively. The induction of adhesion by IL-12 and IL-18 was inhibited by extracellular signal-regulated kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitors (PD098059 and SB203580, respectively). In contrast, IL-12- and IL-18-induced interferon-gamma (INF-gamma) secretion from T cells was inhibited by SB203580, but not by PD098059. It is interesting that low concentrations of IL-12 and IL-18 induced T cell adhesion to FN in a synergistic manner. Thus, in addition to the regulation of late inflammatory functions such as INF-gamma production, IL-12 and IL-18, alone or in combination, regulate early inflammatory events such as T cell adhesion to inflamed sites. PMID:12101280

  16. Role of HLA-G1 in trophoblast cell proliferation, adhesion and invasion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Feng, E-mail: jiangfeng1161@163.com [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, 569 Xinsi Road, Baqiao District, Xi' an 710038 (China); Zhao, Hongxi [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, 569 Xinsi Road, Baqiao District, Xi' an 710038 (China); Wang, Li [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100853 (China); Guo, Xinyu [Assisted Reproductive Center, General Hospital of Guangzhou Military Command, Guangzhou 510010 (China); Wang, Xiaohong; Yin, Guowu [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, 569 Xinsi Road, Baqiao District, Xi' an 710038 (China); Hu, Yunsheng [Department of Orthopedics, Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Li, Yi [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Tangdu Hospital, The Fourth Military Medical University, 569 Xinsi Road, Baqiao District, Xi' an 710038 (China); Yao, Yuanqing, E-mail: yuanqingyaoxa@163.com [Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics, The Chinese PLA General Hospital, 28 Fuxing Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100853 (China)

    2015-02-27

    Trophoblast cells are important in embryo implantation and fetomaternal tolerance. HLA-G is specifically expressed at the maternal–fetal interface and is a regulator in pregnancy. The aim of the present study was to detect the effect of HLA-G1 on trophoblast cell proliferation, adhesion, and invasion. Human trophoblast cell lines (JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells) were infected with HLA-G1-expressing lentivirus. After infection, HLA-G1 expression of the cells was detected by western blotting. Cell proliferation was detected by the BrdU assay. The cell cycle and apoptosis of JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells was measured by flow cytometry (FCM). The invasion of the cells under different conditions was detected by the transwell invasion chamber assay. HLA-G1 didn't show any significant influence on the proliferation, apoptosis, adhesion, and invasion of trophocytes in normal culture conditions. However, HLA-G1 inhibited JAR and HTR-8/SVneo cells invasion induced by hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) under normal oxygen conditions. In conditions of hypoxia, HLA-G1 couldn't inhibit the induction of cell invasion by HGF. HLA-G1 is not an independent factor for regulating the trophocytes. It may play an indirect role in embryo implantation and formation of the placenta. - Highlights: • HLA-G1 could not influence trophocytes under normal conditions. • HLA-G1 inhibited cell invasion induced by HGF under normal oxygen condition. • HLA-G1 could not influence cell invasion under hypoxia conditions.

  17. Epinephrine-induced activation of LW-mediated sickle cell adhesion and vaso-occlusion in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Zennadi, Rahima; Moeller, Benjamin J; Whalen, Erin J.; Batchvarova, Milena; Xu, Ke; Shan, Siqing; Delahunty, Martha; Dewhirst, Mark W.; Telen, Marilyn J.

    2007-01-01

    Sickle red cell (SS RBC) adhesion is believed to contribute to the process of vaso-occlusion in sickle cell disease (SCD). We previously found that the LW RBC adhesion receptor can be activated by epinephrine to mediate SS RBC adhesion to endothelial αvβ3 integrin. To determine the contribution of LW activation to vaso-occlusive events in vivo, we investigated whether in vitro treatment of SS RBCs by epinephrine resulted in vaso-occlusion in intact microvasculature after RBC infusion into nud...

  18. A model for cell motility on soft bio-adhesive substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarvestani, Alireza S

    2011-02-24

    Mechanical stiffness of bio-adhesive substrates has been recognized as a major regulator of cell motility. We present a simple physical model to study the crawling locomotion of a contractile cell on a soft elastic substrate. The mechanism of rigidity sensing is accounted for using Schwarz's two-spring model Schwarz et al. (2006). The predicted dependency between the speed of motility and substrate stiffness is qualitatively consistent with experimental observations. The model demonstrates that the rigidity dependent motility of cells is rooted in the regulation of actomyosin contractile forces by substrate deformation at each anchorage point. On stiffer substrates, the traction forces required for cell translocation acquire larger magnitude but show weaker asymmetry which leads to slower cell motility. On very soft substrates, the model predicts a biphasic relationship between the substrate rigidity and the speed of locomotion, over a narrow stiffness range, which has been observed experimentally for some cell types. PMID:21106198

  19. Cellular adhesion molecules on endothelial cells participate in radiation-mediated inflammation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The acute and subacute clinical manifestations of ionizing radiation mimic the inflammatory response to a number of stimuli. During the early stages of the inflammatory response, endothelial cells rapidly and transiently express a number of glycoproteins such as E-selectin, P-selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1 which influence leucocyte adhesion. We quantified the expression of these cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) in irradiated endothelial cells in order to determine whether these glycoproteins participate in radiation-mediated inflammation. Methods: Primary cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and HMEC cells were grown to 90% confluence and irradiated with a GE Maxitron x-ray generator. The cells were incubated with primary IgG1 antibody (mouse anti-human ICAM-1, VCAM-1, P-selectin and E-selectin and incubated with FITC-conjugated secondary antibody (goat anti-mouse IgG1). Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) analysis was utilized for quantitation of receptor expression of each CAM on irradiated endothelial cells. Electrophoretic mobility gel shift assays of nuclear protein extracts from irradiated HUVEC cells were performed using the E-selectin NFkB binding sequence (5'AGCTTAGAGGGGATTTCCGAGAGGA-3'). The E-selectin promoter was ligated to the growth hormone reporter. Plasmids pE-sel(-587 +35)GH or pE-sel(-587 +35)GH Δ NFκB (5 μg) was transfected into HMEC or HUVEC cells by use of lipofection. Transfectants were incubated for 16 h after transfection followed by treatment with 10 Gy (1 Gy/min, GE Maxitron) of ionizing radiation, and or with TNF or IL-1. Leukocyte adhesion to irradiated endothelial cells was quantified by HL-60 binding. Results: The log fluorescence of cells incubated with the antibody to E-selectin shifted by 32% at 4 h after irradiation. In comparison, a shift of 35% occurred 20 h after irradiation for cells incubated with the antibody to ICAM. However, there was no significant increase in P-selectin or VCAM

  20. Tauopathy Differentially Affects Cell Adhesion Molecules in Mouse Brain: Early Down-Regulation of Nectin-3 in Stratum Lacunosum Moleculare

    OpenAIRE

    Hervé Maurin; Claire Marie Seymour; Benoit Lechat; Peter Borghgraef; Herman Devijver; Tomasz Jaworski; Schmidt, Mathias V.; Sebastian Kuegler; Fred Van Leuven

    2013-01-01

    Cell adhesion molecules are important structural substrates, required for synaptic plasticity and synaptogenesis. CAMs differ widely in their expression throughout different brain regions and their specific structural and functional roles in the brain remain to be elucidated. Here, we investigated selected cell adhesion molecules for alterations in expression levels and neuronal localization in validated mouse models for Alzheimer's disease that mimic the age-related progression of amyloid ac...

  1. The adhesion modulation protein, AmpA localizes to an endocytic compartment and influences substrate adhesion, actin polymerization and endocytosis in vegetative Dictyostelium cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noratel Elizabeth F

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background AmpA is a secreted 24Kd protein that has pleiotropic effects on Dictyostelium development. Null mutants delay development at the mound stage with cells adhering too tightly to the substrate. Prestalk cells initially specify as prespore cells and are delayed in their migration to the mound apex. Extracellular AmpA can rescue these defects, but AmpA is also necessary in a cell autonomous manner for anterior like cells (ALCs to migrate to the upper cup. The ALCs are only 10% of the developing cell population making it difficult to study the cell autonomous effect of AmpA on the migration of these cells. AmpA is also expressed in growing cells, but, while it contains a hydrophobic leader sequence that is cleaved, it is not secreted from growing cells. This makes growing cells an attractive system for studying the cell autonomous function of AmpA. Results In growing cells AmpA plays an environment dependent role in cell migration. Excess AmpA facilitates migration on soft, adhesive surfaces but hinders migration on less adhesive surfaces. AmpA also effects the level of actin polymerization. Knockout cells polymerize less actin while over expressing cells polymerize more actin than wild type. Overexpression of AmpA also causes an increase in endocytosis that is traced to repeated formation of multiple endocytic cups at the same site on the membrane. Immunofluorescence analysis shows that AmpA is found in the Golgi and colocalizes with calnexin and the slow endosomal recycling compartment marker, p25, in a perinuclear compartment. AmpA is found on the cell periphery and is endocytically recycled to the perinuclear compartment. Conclusion AmpA is processed through the secretory pathway and traffics to the cell periphery where it is endocytosed and localizes to what has been defined as a slow endosomal recycling compartment. AmpA plays a role in actin polymerization and cell substrate adhesion. Additionally AmpA influences cell

  2. ShcA regulates neurite outgrowth stimulated by neural cell adhesion molecule but not by fibroblast growth factor 2: evidence for a distinct fibroblast growth factor receptor response to neural cell adhesion molecule activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hinsby, Anders M; Lundfald, Line; Ditlevsen, Dorte K;

    2004-01-01

    Homophilic binding in trans of the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) mediates adhesion between cells and leads, via activation of intracellular signaling cascades, to neurite outgrowth in primary neurons as well as in the neuronal cell line PC12. NCAM mediates neurite extension in PC12 cells...... ShcA was pivotal to neurite outgrowth induced by NCAM, but not by FGF2, in PC12 cells. Moreover, in rat cerebellar granule neurons, phosphorylation of ShcA was stimulated by an NCAM mimicking peptide, but not by FGF2. This activation was blocked by inhibitors of both FGFR and Fyn, indicating that NCAM...

  3. ICAM-1-independent, CD18-dependent adhesion between neutrophils and human epithelial cells exposed in vitro to ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tosi, M.F.; Hamedani, A.; Brosovich, J.; Alpert, S.E. (Case Western Reserve Univ. School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States))

    1994-02-15

    Inhalant exposure to ozone can cause diffuse airway epithelial injury that is associated with an inflammatory response, including the influx of neutrophils into lung and airway tissue. The authors have previously documented enhanced adhesiveness by neutrophils for human airway epithelial cells in in vitro models of diseases associated with airway inflammation and have suggested that this enhanced adhesion may contribute to neutrophil-mediated airway injury. When primary human tracheal epithelial cell (TEC) monolayers were exposed to ozone at 2.0 ppm for 30 min or 0.5 ppm for 2 h, the percentage of PMN adhering to these cells increased from <5% to a maximum of approximately 75% by 18 to 24 h after the ozone exposure. No change was observed within the first 2 h after ozone exposure, but there was a statistically significant increase in PMN adhesion by 8 h after exposure. In contrast to previous studies with cytokine exposure or respiratory virus infection of TEC, the increased adhesion after ozone exposure was not associated with an increase in epithelial expression of ICAM-1. Consistent with the lack of induction of ICAM-1 by ozone exposure was the observation that anti-ICAM-1 mAbs previously shown to block PMN adhesion to TEC with increased ICAM-1 expression had no effect on PMN adhesion to ozone-exposed TEC. However, mAbs against CD11b or CD18 on PMN blocked PMN adhesion to ozone-exposed TEC by approximately 55 and 80%, respectively. Chemoattractant preactivation of PMN was necessary to achieve the highest levels of adhesion to ozone-treated TEC, in marked contrast to earlier studies with PMN adhesion to cytokine-treated or virus-infected TEC in which resting and prestimulated PMN exhibited the same high levels of adhesion.

  4. Plakophilin3 downregulation leads to a decrease in cell adhesion and promotes metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Samrat T; Gosavi, Prajakta; Khapare, Nileema; Patel, Rachana; Hosing, Amol S; Maru, Girish B; Ingle, Arvind; Decaprio, James A; Dalal, Sorab N

    2008-11-15

    Plakophilin3 is a desmosomal plaque protein whose levels are reduced in poorly differentiated tumors of the oropharyngeal cavity and in invasive colon carcinomas. To test the hypothesis that plakophilin3 loss stimulates neoplastic progression, plakophilin3 expression was inhibited by DNA vector driven RNA interference in 3 epithelial cell lines, HCT116, HaCaT and fetal buccal mucosa. The plakophilin3-knockdown clones showed a decrease in cell-cell adhesion as assessed in a hanging drop assay, which was accompanied by an increase in cell migration. The HCT116 plakophilin3-knockdown clones showed a decrease in desmosome size as revealed by electron microscopy. These altered desmosomal properties were accompanied by colony formation in soft agar and growth to high density in culture. The HCT116-derived clones showed accelerated tumor formation in nude mice and increased metastasis to the lung, a phenotype consistent with the increased migration observed in vitro and is consistent with data from human tumors that suggests that plakophililn3 is lost in invasive and metastatic tumors. These data indicate that plakophilin3 loss leads to a decrease in cell-cell adhesion leading to the stimulation of neoplastic progression and metastasis. PMID:18729189

  5. Human cell adhesion molecules: annotated functional subtypes and overrepresentation of addiction-associated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Xiaoming; Drgonova, Jana; Li, Chuan-Yun; Uhl, George R

    2015-09-01

    Human cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) are essential for proper development, modulation, and maintenance of interactions between cells and cell-to-cell (and matrix-to-cell) communication about these interactions. Despite the differential functional significance of these roles, there have been surprisingly few systematic studies to enumerate the universe of CAMs and identify specific CAMs in distinct functions. In this paper, we update and review the set of human genes likely to encode CAMs with searches of databases, literature reviews, and annotations. We describe likely CAMs and functional subclasses, including CAMs that have a primary function in information exchange (iCAMs), CAMs involved in focal adhesions, CAM gene products that are preferentially involved with stereotyped and morphologically identifiable connections between cells (e.g., adherens junctions, gap junctions), and smaller numbers of CAM genes in other classes. We discuss a novel proposed mechanism involving selective anchoring of the constituents of iCAM-containing lipid rafts in zones of close neuronal apposition to membranes expressing iCAM binding partners. We also discuss data from genetic and genomic studies of addiction in humans and mouse models to highlight the ways in which CAM variation may contribute to a specific brain-based disorder such as addiction. Specific examples include changes in CAM mRNA splicing mediated by differences in the addiction-associated splicing regulator RBFOX1/A2BP1 and CAM expression in dopamine neurons. PMID:25988664

  6. Polycarbonate surface cell's adhesion examination after Nd:YAG laser irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramazani, S.A. Ahmad, E-mail: Ramazani@sharif.ir [Polymer Group, Department of Chemical and Petroleum Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mousavi, Seyyed Abbas, E-mail: Musavi@che.sharif.ir [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Seyedjafari, Ehsan [Department of Biotechnology, University College of Science, University of Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Poursalehi, Reza [Department of Physics, University of Shahed, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sareh, Shohreh [Research Center of Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Silakhori, Kaveh [Laser Research Center, Atomic Energy Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Poorfatollah, Ali Akbar [Research Center of Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamkhali, Amir Nasser [Department of Chemistry, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-05-05

    Nd:YAG laser treatment was used in order to increase surface cell adhesion aspects of polycarbonate (PC) films prepared via melt process. The treatment was carried out under different wavelengths and beam diameters. ATR-FTIR and UV spectra obtained from different samples before and after laser treatment in air showed that laser irradiation has induced some chemical and physical changes in surface properties. The irradiated films were also characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and contact angle measurements. Effect of pulse numbers on the surface properties was also investigated. Cell culture test was used to evaluate cell adhesion property on the PC films before and after treatment. The results obtained from this test showed that after laser treatment, the cells were attached and proliferated extensively on the Nd:YAG laser treated films in comparison with the unmodified PC. Moreover, it was revealed that a decrease in the laser beam diameter and an increase in the irradiated pulse numbers increased surface wettability and caused a better cell attachment on the polymer surface. The obtained results also showed that a decrease in the laser beam diameter and an increase in the irradiated pulse numbers increased surface wettability and caused a better cell attachment on the polymer surface.

  7. Persistent cell migration and adhesion rely on retrograde transport of β(1) integrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shafaq-Zadah, Massiullah; Gomes-Santos, Carina S; Bardin, Sabine; Maiuri, Paolo; Maurin, Mathieu; Iranzo, Julian; Gautreau, Alexis; Lamaze, Christophe; Caswell, Patrick; Goud, Bruno; Johannes, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    Integrins have key functions in cell adhesion and migration. How integrins are dynamically relocalized to the leading edge in highly polarized migratory cells has remained unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that β1 integrin (known as PAT-3 in Caenorhabditis elegans), but not β3, is transported from the plasma membrane to the trans-Golgi network, to be resecreted in a polarized manner. This retrograde trafficking is restricted to the non-ligand-bound conformation of β1 integrin. Retrograde trafficking inhibition abrogates several β1-integrin-specific functions such as cell adhesion in early embryonic development of mice, and persistent cell migration in the developing posterior gonad arm of C. elegans. Our results establish a paradigm according to which retrograde trafficking, and not endosomal recycling, is the key driver for β1 integrin function in highly polarized cells. These data more generally suggest that the retrograde route is used to relocalize plasma membrane machinery from previous sites of function to the leading edge of migratory cells.

  8. P-selectin-mediated platelet adhesion promotes the metastasis of murine melanoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui-Ling Qi

    Full Text Available Studies have indicated that the aggregation of activated platelets with cancer cells facilitates tumor metastasis; the adhesion molecule P-selectin may be an important mediator of this process, but the detailed mechanism is unclear. In the current study, we established a B16F10 (B16 cell metastatic model in P-selectin knockout (P-sel-/- mice to determine the effect of P-selectin-mediated platelet adhesion on metastasis. Compared with C57 mice, P-sel-/- mice developed fewer metastatic foci, and cell proliferation within the metastatic tumors was inhibited by P-selectin deficiency. The platelet refusion assay demonstrated that mice with P-sel-/- platelets developed fewer lung metastatic foci (P<0.01 with a lower microvascular density (MVD than mice with wild-type platelets. A co-culture model of platelets and B16 cells was utilized to determine the difference in VEGF concentration in the supernatants. The results demonstrated that the supernatan